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Sample records for asymptomatic hiv-1 infection

  1. Oligoclonal CD8 lymphocytes from persons with asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 infection inhibit HIV-1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toso, J F; Chen, C H; Mohr, J R; Piglia, L; Oei, C; Ferrari, G; Greenberg, M L; Weinhold, K J

    1995-10-01

    CD8 lymphocytes from asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1-infected patients can suppress virus production from infected CD4 cells. Suppressive activity is separate and distinct from cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) reactivities and is likely mediated by a soluble factor(s). The majority of HIV-1 suppression studies have been done in the context of bulk CD8 cell cultures. In this study, viral suppression was characterized by clonal populations of CD8 cells derived from HIV-1-infected patients. Most of the suppressive clones were devoid of detectable CTL reactivity against env-, gag-, pol-, and nef-expressing targets. Among the suppressive clones derived from an individual patient, a marked heterogeneity was evident with respect to phenotypic markers, cytokine production, and T cell receptor V beta expression. These results suggest that noncytolytic virus suppression is oligoclonal in nature. Clones provide tools for future studies aimed at understanding the mechanism of suppression and identifying the suppressive factor.

  2. Identifying HIV-1 dual infections

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    Cornelissen Marion

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is no exception to the phenomenon that a second, productive infection with another strain of the same virus is feasible. Experiments with RNA viruses have suggested that both coinfections (simultaneous infection with two strains of a virus and superinfections (second infection after a specific immune response to the first infecting strain has developed can result in increased fitness of the viral population. Concerns about dual infections with HIV are increasing. First, the frequent detection of superinfections seems to indicate that it will be difficult to develop a prophylactic vaccine. Second, HIV-1 superinfections have been associated with accelerated disease progression, although this is not true for all persons. In fact, superinfections have even been detected in persons controlling their HIV infections without antiretroviral therapy. Third, dual infections can give rise to recombinant viruses, which are increasingly found in the HIV-1 epidemic. Recombinants could have increased fitness over the parental strains, as in vitro models suggest, and could exhibit increased pathogenicity. Multiple drug resistant (MDR strains could recombine to produce a pan-resistant, transmittable virus. We will describe in this review what is presently known about super- and re-infection among ambient viral infections, as well as the first cases of HIV-1 superinfection, including HIV-1 triple infections. The clinical implications, the impact of the immune system, and the effect of anti-retroviral therapy will be covered, as will as the timing of HIV superinfection. The methods used to detect HIV-1 dual infections will be discussed in detail. To increase the likelihood of detecting a dual HIV-1 infection, pre-selection of patients can be done by serotyping, heteroduplex mobility assays (HMA, counting the degenerate base codes in the HIV-1 genotyping sequence, or surveying unexpected increases in the

  3. A Case of Seronegative HIV-1 Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Spivak, Adam M; Brennan, Tim; O'Connell, Karen; Sydnor, Emily; Thomas M Williams; Robert F. Siliciano; Gallant, Joel E.; Blankson, Joel N.

    2010-01-01

    Patients infected with HIV-1 typically seroconvert within weeks of primary infection. In rare cases, patients do not develop antibodies against HIV-1 despite demonstrable infection. We describe an HLA-B*5802 positive individual who presented with AIDS despite repeatedly negative HIV-1 antibody screening tests. Phylogenetic analysis of env clones revealed little sequence diversity, and weak HIV-1 specific CD8+ T cell responses were present to Gag epitopes. The patient seroconverted after immun...

  4. Male reproduction and HIV-1 infection

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    E. van Leeuwen

    2009-01-01

    From its initial presentation in the early nineteen eighties until 1996, HIV-1 infection almost inevitably led to AIDS, which was a death sentence. Because of the short life expectancy, patients were advised against pregnancy. The improved prognosis of patients with HIV-1 infection following the int

  5. Asymptomatic Borrelia burgdorferi infection.

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    Wormser, G P; Nadelman, R B; Nowakowski, J; Schwartz, I

    2001-10-01

    Little is known about the natural history of asymptomatic Borrelia burgdorferi infection. Our analysis of the asymptomatic infections diagnosed serologically in a recent OspA vaccine trial conducted in the United States (N Engl J Med 1998;339: 209-215), suggests that the natural history of this event is more benign than that reported for untreated patients with erythema migrans (Ann Intern Med 1987;107: 725-731). We hypothesize that this is due either to incorrect diagnosis since the specificity of the serologic criteria used to diagnose asymptomatic infection in the vaccine study is unknown, or to infection with non-pathogenic strains of B. burgdorferi. Increasing evidence indicates that the invasive potential of strains of B. burgdorferi varies according to the specific subtype. Theoretically, a serologic testing method could be devised which would distinguish infection with invasive versus non-invasive strains of B. burgdorferi, and allow testing of the second hypothesis.

  6. Asymptomatic infection with Borrelia burgdorferi.

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    Steere, Allen C; Sikand, Vijay K; Schoen, Robert T; Nowakowski, John

    2003-08-15

    The natural history of asymptomatic seroconversion to Borrelia burgdorferi has been unclear. We report here, on the basis of a post hoc assessment, the frequency and outcome of asymptomatic seroconversion to B. burgdorferi in participants of a large Lyme disease vaccine trial. We show that infection with B. burgdorferi may be asymptomatic but that asymptomatic infection is unusual in the United States.

  7. Intestinal microbiota and HIV-1 infection

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    E. B. S. M. Trindade

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal microbiota consists of a qualitatively and quantitatively diverse range of microorganisms dynamically interacting with the host. It is remarkably stable with regard to the presence of microorganisms and their roles which, however, can be altered due to pathological conditions, diet composition, gastrointestinal disturbances and/or drug ingestion. The present review aimed at contributing to the discussion about changes in the intestinal microbiota due to HIV-1 infection, focusing on the triad infection-microbiota-nutrition as factors that promote intestinal bacterial imbalance. Intestinal microbiota alterations can be due to the HIV-1 infection as a primary factor or the pharmacotherapy employed, or they can be one of the consequences of the disease.

  8. NKT cells in HIV-1 infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a unique T cell population that have important immunoregulatory functions and have been shown to be involved in host immunity against a range of microorganisms. It also emerges that they might play a role in HIV-1 infection, and therefore be selectively depleted during the early stages of infection. Recent studies are reviewed regarding the dynamics of NKT depletion during HIV-I infection and their recovery under highly active antiretrovirai treatment (HAART). Possible mechanisms for these changes are proposed based on the recent developments in HIV pathogenesis. Further discussions are focused on HIV's disruption of NKT activation by downregulating CDId expression on antigen presentation cells (APC). HIV-1 protein Nefis found to play the major role by interrupting the intraceilular trafficking of nascent and recycling CDId molecules.

  9. Cyclophilin B enhances HIV-1 infection

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    DeBoer, Jason; Madson, Christian J. [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Creighton University, Omaha, NE (United States); Belshan, Michael, E-mail: michaelbelshan@creighton.edu [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Creighton University, Omaha, NE (United States); The Nebraska Center for Virology, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Cyclophilin B (CypB) is a member of the immunophilin family and intracellular chaperone. It predominantly localizes to the ER, but also contains a nuclear localization signal and is secreted from cells. CypB has been shown to interact with the Gag protein of human immunodeficiency type 1 (HIV-1). Several proteomic and genetic studies identified it as a potential factor involved in HIV replication. Herein, we show that over-expression of CypB enhances HIV infection by increasing nuclear import of viral DNA. This enhancement was unaffected by cyclosporine treatment and requires the N-terminus of the protein. The N-terminus contains an ER leader sequence, putative nuclear localization signal, and is required for secretion. Deletion of the N-terminus resulted in mislocalization from the ER and suppression of HIV infection. Passive transfer experiments showed that secreted CypB did not impact HIV infection. Combined, these experiments show that intracellular CypB modulates a pathway of HIV nuclear import. - Highlights: • CypB has been identified in several proteomic studies of HIV-1 infection. • CypB expression is upregulated in activated and infected T-cells. • Over-expression of CypB enhances HIV nuclear import and infection. • The N-terminus of CypB is necessary for these effects.

  10. Suppression of HIV-1 Infectivity by Human Glioma Cells.

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    Hoque, Sheikh Ariful; Tanaka, Atsushi; Islam, Salequl; Ahsan, Gias Uddin; Jinno-Oue, Atsushi; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2016-05-01

    HIV-1 infection to the central nervous system (CNS) is very common in AIDS patients. The predominant cell types infected in the brain are monocytes and macrophages, which are surrounded by several HIV-1-resistant cell types, such as astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, neurons, and microvascular cells. The effect of these HIV-1-resistant cells on HIV-1 infection is largely unknown. In this study, we examined the stability of HIV-1 cultured with several human glioblastoma cell lines, for example, NP-2, U87MG, T98G, and A172, to determine whether these HIV-1-resistant brain cells could enhance or suppress HIV-1 infection and thus modulate HIV-1 infection in the CNS. The HIV-1 titer was determined using the MAGIC-5A indicator cell line as well as naturally occurring CD4(+) T cells. We found that the stability of HIV-1 incubated with NP-2 or U87MG cells at 37°C was significantly shorter (half-life, 2.5-4 h) compared to that of HIV-1 incubated with T98G or A172 cells or in culture medium without cells (half-life, 8-18 h). The spent culture media (SCM) of NP-2 and U87MG cells had the ability to suppress both R5- and X4-HIV-1 infection by inhibiting HIV-1 attachment to target cells. This inhibitory effect was eliminated by the treatment of the SCM with chondroitinase ABC but not heparinase, suggesting that the inhibitory factor(s) secreted by NP-2 and U87MG cells was chiefly mediated by chondroitin sulfate (CS) or CS-like moiety. Thus, this study reveals that some but not all glioma cells secrete inhibitory molecules to HIV-1 infection that may contribute in lowering HIV-1 infection in the CNS in vivo.

  11. Enhanced clearance of HIV-1-infected cells by broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 in vivo.

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    Lu, Ching-Lan; Murakowski, Dariusz K; Bournazos, Stylianos; Schoofs, Till; Sarkar, Debolina; Halper-Stromberg, Ariel; Horwitz, Joshua A; Nogueira, Lilian; Golijanin, Jovana; Gazumyan, Anna; Ravetch, Jeffrey V; Caskey, Marina; Chakraborty, Arup K; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2016-05-20

    Antiretroviral drugs and antibodies limit HIV-1 infection by interfering with the viral life cycle. In addition, antibodies also have the potential to guide host immune effector cells to kill HIV-1-infected cells. Examination of the kinetics of HIV-1 suppression in infected individuals by passively administered 3BNC117, a broadly neutralizing antibody, suggested that the effects of the antibody are not limited to free viral clearance and blocking new infection but also include acceleration of infected cell clearance. Consistent with these observations, we find that broadly neutralizing antibodies can target CD4(+) T cells infected with patient viruses and can decrease their in vivo half-lives by a mechanism that requires Fcγ receptor engagement in a humanized mouse model. The results indicate that passive immunotherapy can accelerate elimination of HIV-1-infected cells.

  12. Can HIV-1 infection be cured?%HIV-1感染能治愈吗?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张兴权

    2013-01-01

    A functional HIV-1 cure has been possible now.The ideal functional HIV-1 cure should get HIV-1 infected patients to the point where drugs are not needed after combination therapy and HIV-1 RNA cannot be detected in some patients.However,a functional HIV-1 cure is not equal to a cure for HIV-1,because HIV-1 RNA can still be detected in patients' latent infected cells and related symptoms have not been resolved completely.An era of eradication cure for HIV infection will be coming with further basic and clinical studies,especially when cleaning virus reservoirs by gene modifications successfully.%目前,HIV-1感染治疗已发展到“功能性治愈”阶段,即采用联合化疗一段时间后停止用药几年内,可以使部分患者体内的病毒达到检测不出的水平.然而,这还不是治愈,因为患者的静止淋巴细胞内仍可查到病毒痕迹,患者临床症状也并未完全消失.真正的治愈还须进行更深入的基础和临床研究,特别是通过基因修饰清除病毒的藏身之地.

  13. Methamphetamine Enhances HIV-1 Infectivity in Monocyte Derived Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The US is currently experiencing an epidemic of methamphetamine (Meth) use as a recreational drug. Recent studies also show a high prevalence of HIV-1 infection among Meth users. We report that Meth enhances HIV-1 infectivity of dendritic cells as measured by multinuclear activation of a galactosidase indicator (MAGI) cell assay, p24 assay, and LTR-RU5 amplification. Meth induces increased HIV-1 infection in association with an increase in the HIV-1 coreceptors, CXCR4 and CCR5, and infection ...

  14. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules.

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    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S Y

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This "shock" approach is then followed by "kill" of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells.

  15. Wound infection rates after invasive procedures in HIV-1 seropositive versus HIV-1 seronegative hemophiliacs.

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    Buehrer, J L; Weber, D J; Meyer, A A; Becherer, P R; Rutala, W A; Wilson, B; Smiley, M L; White, G C

    1990-01-01

    One-hundred and two patients with hemophilia A, hemophilia B, or acquired antibody to factor VIII who had undergone invasive procedures were cross referenced with patients participating in an ongoing prospective natural history study of HIV-1 infection in hemophiliacs. Matching revealed that HIV-1 status was known for 83 patients (83%) who had undergone 169 procedures between July 1979 and April 1988. Invasive procedures were classified as clean in 108 patients (63.9%), clean-contaminated in 45 (26.6%), contaminated in 2 (1.2%), and infected in 14 (8.3%). Wound infection rates by HIV-1 status were as follows (95% confidence intervals): HIV+ 1.4% (0% to 5%), HIV- 0% (0% to 9%), and procedure before testing HIV+ 1.5% (0% to 6%). There were no significant differences between the wound infection rates of HIV-positive and HIV-negative hemophiliacs nor in the wound infection rate among all three subgroups of patients (p greater than 0.5, Fisher's Exact Test). We conclude that surgery in HIV-1-infected patients who have not progressed to AIDS does not entail an increased risk of postoperative wound infections. PMID:2322041

  16. Endometrial Histopathology in Patients with Laparoscopic Proven Salpingitis and HIV-1 Infection

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    Nelly R. Mugo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Objective. To identify sensitive and specific histological criteria for endometritis in women with laparoscopically-confirmed acute salpingitis. Methods. Women, age 18–40 years of age presenting with complaints of lower abdominal pain ≤2 weeks and no antibiotics use in past two weeks, were enrolled. They underwent clinical examination, screening for HIV; other sexually transmitted infections plus endometrial biopsy sampling for histopathology. Diagnostic laparoscopy confirmed the diagnosis of acute salpingitis. Controls were women undergoing tubal ligation and HIV-1 infected women asymptomatic for genital tract infection. Results. Of 125 women with laparoscopically-confirmed salpingitis, 38% were HIV-1 seropositive. Nineteen HIV-1 negative controls were recruited. For the diagnosis of endometritis, ≥1 plasma cells (PC and ≥3 polymorphonuclear lymphocytes (PMN per HPF in the endometrium had a sensitivity of 74% for HIV-1-seropositive, 63% for HIV-1-seronegative women with a specificity of 75% and positive predictive value of 85% regardless of HIV-1-infection for predicting moderate to severe salpingitis. For HIV-1-seronegative women with mild salpingitis, ≥1 PC and ≥3 PMN had a sensitivity of 16% and a PPV of 57%. Conclusion. Endometrial histology, did not perform well as a surrogate marker for moderate to severe salpingitis, and failed as a surrogate marker for mild salpingitis.

  17. Platelets and HIV-1 infection: old and new aspects.

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    Torre, Donato; Pugliese, Agostino

    2008-09-01

    In this review we summarize the data on interaction of platelets with HIV-1 infection. Thrombocytopenia is a common finding among HIV-1 infected patients; several combined factors contribute to low peripheral platelet counts, which are present during all the stages of the disease. In addition, a relationship between platelet count, plasma viral load and disease progression has been reported, and this shows the potential influence platelets may have on the natural history of HIV-1 disease. Several lines of evidence have shown that platelets are an integral part of inflammation, and can be also potent effector cells of innate immune response as well as of adaptive immunity. Thus, we rewieved the role of inflammatory cytokines, and chemokines as activators of platelets during HIV-1 infection. Moreover, platelets show a direct interaction with HIV-1 itself, through different pathogenic mechanisms as binding, engulfment, internalisation of HIV-1, playing a role in host defence during HIV-1 infection, by limiting viral spread and probably by inactivating viral particles. Platelets may also play an intriguing role on endothelial dysfunction present in HIV-1 infection, and this topic begins to receive systematic study, inasmuch as interaction between platelets and endothelial cells is important in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in HIV-1 infected patients, especially in those patients treated with antiretroviral drugs. Finally, this review attempts to better define the state of this emerging issue, to focus areas of potential clinical relevance, and to suggest several directions for future research.

  18. Broadly neutralizing antibodies: An approach to control HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaseen, Mahmoud Mohammad; Yaseen, Mohammad Mahmoud; Alqudah, Mohammad Ali

    2017-01-02

    Although available antiretroviral therapy (ART) has changed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection to a non-fatal chronic disease, the economic burden of lifelong therapy, severe adverse ART effects, daily ART adherence, and emergence of ART-resistant HIV-1 mutants require prospecting for alternative therapeutic modalities. Indeed, a growing body of evidence suggests that broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 antibodies (BNAbs) may offer one such feasible alternative. To evaluate their therapeutic potential in established HIV-1 infection, we sought to address recent advances in pre-clinical and clinical investigations in this area of HIV-1 research. In addition, we addressed the obstacles that may impede the success of such immunotherapeutic approach, suggested strategic solutions, and briefly compared this approach with the currently used ART to open new insights for potential future passive immunotherapy for HIV-1 infection.

  19. Varicella vaccination in HIV-1-infected children after immune reconstitution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Bekker; G.H.A. Westerlaken; H. Scherpbier; S. Alders; H. Zaaijer; D. van Baarle; T. Kuijper

    2006-01-01

    Background: HIV-1-infected children have an increased risk of severe chickenpox. However, vaccination is not recommended in severely immunocompromised children. Objective: Can the live-attenuated varicella zoster virus (VZV) Oka strain be safely and effectively given to HIV-1-infected children despi

  20. Global human genetics of HIV-1 infection and China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tuo Fu ZHU; Tie Jian FENG; Xin XIAO; Hui WANG; Bo Ping ZHOU

    2005-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in human genes can influence the risk for HIV-1 infection and disease progression, although the reported effects of these alleles have been inconsistent. This review highlights the recent discoveries on global and Chinese genetic polymorphisms and their association with HIV-1 transmission and disease progression.

  1. Sexually transmitted infections among HIV-1-discordant couples.

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    Brandon L Guthrie

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: More new HIV-1 infections occur within stable HIV-1-discordant couples than in any other group in Africa, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs may increase transmission risk among discordant couples, accounting for a large proportion of new HIV-1 infections. Understanding correlates of STIs among discordant couples will aid in optimizing interventions to prevent HIV-1 transmission in these couples. METHODS: HIV-1-discordant couples in which HIV-1-infected partners were HSV-2-seropositive were tested for syphilis, chlamydia, gonorrhea, and trichomoniasis, and HIV-1-uninfected partners were tested for HSV-2. We assessed sociodemographic, behavioral, and biological correlates of a current STI. RESULTS: Of 416 couples enrolled, 16% were affected by a treatable STI, and among these both partners were infected in 17% of couples. A treatable STI was found in 46 (11% females and 30 (7% males. The most prevalent infections were trichomoniasis (5.9% and syphilis (2.6%. Participants were 5.9-fold more likely to have an STI if their partner had an STI (P<0.01, and STIs were more common among those reporting any unprotected sex (OR = 2.43; P<0.01 and those with low education (OR = 3.00; P<0.01. Among HIV-1-uninfected participants with an HSV-2-seropositive partner, females were significantly more likely to be HSV-2-seropositive than males (78% versus 50%, P<0.01. CONCLUSIONS: Treatable STIs were common among HIV-1-discordant couples and the majority of couples affected by an STI were discordant for the STI, with relatively high HSV-2 discordance. Awareness of STI correlates and treatment of both partners may reduce HIV-1 transmission. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00194519.

  2. Purinergic Receptors: Key Mediators of HIV-1 infection and inflammation

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    Talia H Swartz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 causes a chronic infection that afflicts more than 38 million individuals worldwide. While the infection can be suppressed with potent anti-retroviral therapies, individuals infected with HIV have elevated levels of inflammation as indicated by increased T cell activation, soluble biomarkers, and associated morbidity and mortality. A single mechanism linking HIV pathogenesis to this inflammation has yet to be identified. Purinergic receptors are known to mediate inflammation and have been shown to be required for HIV-1 infection at the level of HIV-1 membrane fusion. Here we review the literature on the role of purinergic receptors in HIV-1 infection and associated inflammation and describe a role for these receptors as potential therapeutic targets.

  3. HIV-1/HSV-2 co-infected adults in early HIV-1 infection have elevated CD4+ T cell counts.

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    Jason D Barbour

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: HIV-1 is often acquired in the presence of pre-existing co-infections, such as Herpes Simplex Virus 2 (HSV-2. We examined the impact of HSV-2 status at the time of HIV-1 acquisition for its impact on subsequent clinical course, and total CD4+ T cell phenotypes. METHODS: We assessed the relationship of HSV-1/HSV-2 co-infection status on CD4+ T cell counts and HIV-1 RNA levels over time prior in a cohort of 186 treatment naïve adults identified during early HIV-1 infection. We assessed the activation and differentiation state of total CD4+ T cells at study entry by HSV-2 status. RESULTS: Of 186 recently HIV-1 infected persons, 101 (54% were sero-positive for HSV-2. There was no difference in initial CD8+ T cell count, or differences between the groups for age, gender, or race based on HSV-2 status. Persons with HIV-1/HSV-2 co-infection sustained higher CD4+ T cell counts over time (+69 cells/ul greater (SD = 33.7, p = 0.04 than those with HIV-1 infection alone (Figure 1, after adjustment for HIV-1 RNA levels (-57 cells per 1 log(10 higher HIV-1 RNA, p<0.0001. We did not observe a relationship between HSV-2 infection status with plasma HIV-1 RNA levels over time. HSV-2 acquisition after HIV-1 acquisition had no impact on CD4+ count or viral load. We did not detect differences in CD4+ T cell activation or differentiation state by HSV-2+ status. DISCUSSION: We observed no effect of HSV-2 status on viral load. However, we did observe that treatment naïve, recently HIV-1 infected adults co-infected with HSV-2+ at the time of HIV-1 acquisition had higher CD4+ T cell counts over time. If verified in other cohorts, this result poses a striking paradox, and its public health implications are not immediately clear.

  4. HIV-1 infection of in vitro cultured human monocytes: early events and influence of anti HIV-1 antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Olofsson, S; Nielsen, Jens Ole;

    1994-01-01

    To characterize the role of the humoral immune response on HIV-1 infection of monocytes and macrophages (M phi s) we examined the susceptibility of in vitro cultured monocyte/M phi s to various HIV-1 isolates and the influence of heterologous and particularly autologous anti HIV-1 sera on this in...

  5. Innate Immune Activation in Primary HIV-1 Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, J. Judy; Altfeld, Marcus

    2010-01-01

    There is growing evidence highlighting the role of the immune response during acute HIV-1 infection on the control or development of disease. The adaptive immune responses do not appear until after the HIV-1 infection is already well established and as such the role of the earlier and faster responding innate immunity needs to be more closely scrutinized. In particular, two aspects of the innate immunity with growing developments will be examined in this review; type I IFNs and NK cells. Both...

  6. Impairment of B-cell functions during HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amu, Sylvie; Ruffin, Nicolas; Rethi, Bence; Chiodi, Francesca

    2013-09-24

    A variety of B-cell dysfunctions are manifested during HIV-1 infection, as reported early during the HIV-1 epidemic. It is not unusual that the pathogenic mechanisms presented to elucidate impairment of B-cell responses during HIV-1 infection focus on the impact of reduced T-cell numbers and functions, and lack of germinal center formation in lymphoid tissues. To our understanding, however, perturbation of B-cell phenotype and function during HIV-1 infection may begin at several different B-cell developmental stages. These impairments can be mediated by intrinsic B-cell defects as well as by the lack of proper T-cell help. In this review, we will highlight some of the pathways and molecular interactions leading to B-cell impairment prior to germinal center formation and B-cell activation mediated through the B-cell receptor in response to HIV-1 antigens. Recent studies indicate a regulatory role for B cells on T-cell biology and immune responses. We will discuss some of these novel findings and how these regulatory mechanisms could potentially be affected by the intrinsic defects of B cells taking place during HIV-1 infection.

  7. Impaired production of cytokines is an independent predictor of mortality in HIV-1-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, Sisse R; Gerstoft, Jan; Pedersen, Bente K;

    2003-01-01

    With regard to the natural history of HIV-1 infection this study investigated whether whole-blood culture cytokine production was associated with mortality in HIV-1-infected patients.......With regard to the natural history of HIV-1 infection this study investigated whether whole-blood culture cytokine production was associated with mortality in HIV-1-infected patients....

  8. New insights into complications and treatment of HIV-1 infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lelyveld, S.F.L.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis the complications and treatment of HIV-1 infection in the current era was studied. Life expectancy of HIV-infected patients has increased enormously with the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). In line with this observation, we found that the outcome of HIV-infe

  9. Raltegravir cerebrospinal fluid concentrations in HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aylin Yilmaz

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Raltegravir is an HIV-1 integrase inhibitor currently used in treatment-experienced HIV-1-infected patients resistant to other drug classes. In order to assess its central nervous system penetration, we measured raltegravir concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and plasma in subjects receiving antiretroviral treatment regimens containing this drug. METHODS: Raltegravir concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry in 25 paired CSF and plasma samples from 16 HIV-1-infected individuals. The lower limit of quantitation was 2.0 ng/ml for CSF and 10 ng/ml for plasma. RESULTS: Twenty-four of the 25 CSF samples had detectable raltegravir concentrations with a median raltegravir concentration of 18.4 ng/ml (range, <2.0-126.0. The median plasma raltegravir concentration was 448 ng/ml (range, 37-5180. CSF raltegravir concentrations correlated with CSF:plasma albumin ratios and CSF albumin concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: Approximately 50% of the CSF specimens exceeded the IC(95 levels reported to inhibit HIV-1 strains without resistance to integrase inhibitors. In addition to contributing to control of systemic HIV-1 infection, raltegravir achieves local inhibitory concentrations in CSF in most, but not all, patients. Blood-brain and blood-CSF barriers likely restrict drug entry, while enhanced permeability of these barriers enhances drug entry.

  10. Flail arm-like syndrome associated with HIV-1 infection

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    Nalini A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last 20 years at least 23 cases of motor neuron disease have been reported in HIV-1 seropositive patients. In this report we describe the clinical picture of a young man with HIV-1 clade C infection and flail arm-like syndrome, who we were able to follow-up for a long period. We investigated and prospectively monitored a 34-year-old man with features of flail arm syndrome, who developed the weakness and wasting 1 year after being diagnosed with HIV-1 infection after a routine blood test. He presented in 2003 with progressive, symmetrical wasting and weakness of the proximal muscles of the upper limb of 2 years′ duration. He had severe wasting and weakness of the shoulder and arm muscles. There were no pyramidal signs. He has been on HAART for the last 4 years and the weakness or wasting has not worsened. At the last follow-up in July 2007, the patient had the same neurological deficit and no other symptoms or signs of HIV-1 infection. MRI of the spinal cord in 2007 showed characteristic T2 hyperintense signals in the central part of the spinal cord, corresponding to the central gray matter. Thus, our patient had HIV-1 clade C infection associated with a ′flail arm-like syndrome.′ The causal relationship between HIV-1 infection and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS-like syndrome is still uncertain. The syndrome usually manifests as a lower motor neuron syndrome, as was seen in our young patient. It is known that treatment with antiretroviral therapy (ART stabilizes/improves the condition. In our patient the weakness and atrophy remained stable over a period of 3.5 years after commencing HAART regimen.

  11. Raltegravir with optimized background therapy for resistant HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steigbigel, Roy T; Cooper, David A; Kumar, Princy N;

    2008-01-01

    for the length of follow-up, cancers were detected in 3.5% of raltegravir recipients and in 1.7% of placebo recipients. The overall frequencies of drug-related adverse events were similar in the raltegravir and placebo groups. CONCLUSIONS: In HIV-infected patients with limited treatment options, raltegravir plus......BACKGROUND: Raltegravir (MK-0518) is an inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase active against HIV-1 susceptible or resistant to older antiretroviral drugs. METHODS: We conducted two identical trials in different geographic regions to evaluate the safety and efficacy...... of raltegravir, as compared with placebo, in combination with optimized background therapy, in patients infected with HIV-1 that has triple-class drug resistance in whom antiretroviral therapy had failed. Patients were randomly assigned to raltegravir or placebo in a 2:1 ratio. RESULTS: In the combined studies...

  12. Positron emission tomography in patients suffering from HIV-1 infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathekge, Mike [University Hospital of Pretoria, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); Goethals, Ingeborg; Wiele, Christophe van de [University Hospital Ghent, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium); Maes, Alex [AZ Groening, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium)

    2009-07-15

    This paper reviews currently available PET studies performed either to improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection or to assess the value of PET imaging in the clinical decision making of patients infected with HIV-1 presenting with AIDS-related opportunistic infections and malignancies. FDG PET has shown that HIV-1 infection progresses by distinct anatomical steps, with involvement of the upper torso preceding involvement of the lower part of the torso, and that the degree of FDG uptake relates to viral load. The former finding suggests that lymphoid tissues are engaged in a predictable sequence and that diffusible mediators of activation might be important targets for vaccine or therapeutic intervention strategies. In lipodystrophic HIV-infected patients, limited available data support the hypothesis that stavudine-related lipodystrophy is associated with increased glucose uptake by adipose tissue as a result of the metabolic stress of adipose tissue in response to highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART). Finally, in early AIDS-related dementia complex (ADC), striatal hypermetabolism is observed, whereas progressive ADC is characterized by a decrease in subcortical and cortical metabolism. In the clinical setting, PET has been shown to allow the differentiation of AIDS-related opportunistic infections and malignancies, and to allow monitoring of side effects of HAART. However, in patients suffering from HIV infection and presenting with extracerebral lymphoma or other human malignancies, knowledge of viraemia is essential when interpreting FDG PET imaging. (orig.)

  13. Episodes of Guillain-Barré syndrome associated with the acute phase of HIV-1 infection and with recurrence of viremia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castro Gleusa de

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a severe case of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS characterized by flaccid areflexive tetraplegia and signs of autonomic instability related to acute HIV-1 infection, and the occurrence of relapse episodes coinciding with the detection of HIV-1 RNA in blood during the phase of irregular treatment with antiretroviral agents. The patient has been asymptomatic for 3 years and has an HIV-1 load below the limit of detection. The recurrence of GBS in this case may be related to alterations of the immunologic response caused by disequilibrium in the host-HIV relationship due to the increase in HIV-1 viremia.

  14. Anti-HIV-1 activity of flavonoid myricetin on HIV-1 infection in a dual-chamber in vitro model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Pasetto

    Full Text Available HIV infection by sexual transmission remains an enormous global health concern. More than 1 million new infections among women occur annually. Microbicides represent a promising prevention strategy that women can easily control. Among emerging therapies, natural small molecules such as flavonoids are an important source of new active substances. In this study we report the in vitro cytotoxicity and anti-HIV-1 and microbicide activity of the following flavonoids: Myricetin, Quercetin and Pinocembrin. Cytotoxicity tests were conducted on TZM-bl, HeLa, PBMC, and H9 cell cultures using 0.01-100 µM concentrations. Myricetin presented the lowest toxic effect, with Quercetin and Pinocembrin relatively more toxic. The anti-HIV-1 activity was tested with TZM-bl cell plus HIV-1 BaL (R5 tropic, H9 and PBMC cells plus HIV-1 MN (X4 tropic, and the dual tropic (X4R5 HIV-1 89.6. All flavonoids showed anti-HIV activity, although Myricetin was more effective than Quercetin or Pinocembrin. In TZM-bl cells, Myricetin inhibited ≥90% of HIV-1 BaL infection. The results were confirmed by quantification of HIV-1 p24 antigen in supernatant from H9 and PBMC cells following flavonoid treatment. In H9 and PBMC cells infected by HIV-1 MN and HIV-1 89.6, Myricetin showed more than 80% anti-HIV activity. Quercetin and Pinocembrin presented modest anti-HIV activity in all experiments. Myricetin activity was tested against HIV-RT and inhibited the enzyme by 49%. Microbicide activities were evaluated using a dual-chamber female genital tract model. In the in vitro microbicide activity model, Myricetin showed promising results against different strains of HIV-1 while also showing insignificant cytotoxic effects. Further studies of Myricetin should be performed to identify its molecular targets in order to provide a solid biological foundation for translational research.

  15. Innate immune activation in primary HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, J Judy; Altfeld, Marcus

    2010-10-15

    There is growing evidence that highlights the role of the immune response during acute human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in the control or development of disease. The adaptive immune responses do not appear until after HIV-1 infection is already well established, so the role of earlier and faster-responding innate immunity needs to be more closely scrutinized. In particular, 2 aspects of innate immunity for which there are growing research developments will be examined in this review: the actions of type I interferons and natural killer cells. These two components of the innate immune response contribute to viral control both by killing infected cells and by modulating other immune cells that develop. However, the role of interferon α in immune activation is a double-edged sword, causing recruitment of adaptive immune cells that can assist in viral control but concurrently contributing to immune activation-dependent disease progression. Understanding the complexity of how innate responses affect the outcome of HIV-1 infection will help in the development of vaccines that can use innate immunity to enhance viral control with minimal pathogenesis.

  16. Phenotypic Knockout of HIV-1 Chemokine Coreceptor CXCR4 and CCR5 by Intrakines for Blocking HIV-1 Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张颖; 张岩; 王平忠; 王九平; 黄长形; 孙永涛; 白雪帆

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the phenotypic knockout of HIV-1 chemokine coreceptor CXCR4 and CCR5 by intrakines and its inhibitory effect on HIV-1 infection. Primary human PBLs were transduced with the recombinant vector pLNCX-R-K-S-K(△NGFR), followed by anti-NGFR/anti-IgG-magnetic bead method selection and FCM detection. The transduced PBLs were infected with DP1 HIV-1 virus thereafter envelope-mediated syncytium formation and p24 detection were carried out to study the blockage of HIV-1 infection by co-inactivation of CCR5 and CXCR4. pLNCX-R-K-S-K (△NGFR)-transduced PBILs were isolated with an anti-NGFR/anti-IgG-magnetic bead method. After isolation, about 70% of the PBLs were positive for the NGFR marker. When the transduced PBLs were infected with DP1 HIV-1 virus, envelop-mediated syncytium formation was almost completely inhibited by pLNCX-R-K-S-K(△NGFR) transfection. Also, p24 antigen was very low in the cultures of pLNCX-R-K-S-K (△NGFR) transduced PBLs. pLNCX-R-K-S-K(△NGFR) transduction inhibited the production of DP1 p24 antigen by 15%, 43% and 19% on days 4, 7 and 10 respectively. The lymphocytes with the phenotypic knockout of CCR5 and CXCR4 could protect primary human PBLs from DP1 HIV-1 virus infection.

  17. HIV-1 infection of in vitro cultured human monocytes: early events and influence of anti HIV-1 antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Olofsson, S; Nielsen, Jens Ole;

    1994-01-01

    on this infection. Depending on the period of in vitro cultivation and the virus isolate used different patterns of susceptibility were detected. One week old monocyte/M phi s were highly susceptible to HIV-1 infection, in contrast to monocyte/M phi s cultured 4 weeks. The infection by virus isolated immediately...... to CD4 and that post binding events may be common to the infection of lymphocytes. Anti HIV-1 sera showed neutralizing activity against heterologous and even autologous escape virus. This finding, together with the observation that monocytes and M phi s are infected in vivo, suggests that protection...

  18. Altered sialylation of alveolar macrophages in HIV-1-infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, C; Giordanengo, V; Bannwarth, S; Blaive, B; Lefebvre, J C

    1997-10-01

    In previous studies, we have demonstrated that O-glycans at the surface of HIV-1-infected cell lines were hyposialylated. Moreover, we and others have shown that HIV+ individuals produced autoantibodies that react with hyposialylated CD43, on T cell lines. Since the autoantigen responsible for this abnormal immune response was not easily found in the peripheral blood cells of corresponding patients, we searched for its possible presence in other sites. Using fluorescence staining of alveolar macrophages with various lectins, we show that the binding of the PNA lectin specific for asialo O-glycans is much more efficient on cells from HIV-1-infected individuals. Moreover, the degree of reactivity of PNA is correlated with the clinical stage of the illness.

  19. HIV-1 clade B pol evolution following primary infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George K Hightower

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Characterize intra-individual HIV-1 subtype B pol evolution in antiretroviral naive individuals. DESIGN: Longitudinal cohort study of individuals enrolled during primary infection. METHODS: Eligible individuals were antiretroviral naïve participants enrolled in the cohort from December 1997-December 2005 and having at least two blood samples available with the first one collected within a year of their estimated date of infection. Population-based pol sequences were generated from collected blood samples and analyzed for genetic divergence over time in respect to dual infection status, HLA, CD4 count and viral load. RESULTS: 93 participants were observed for a median of 1.8 years (Mean = 2.2 years, SD =1.9 years. All participants classified as mono-infected had less than 0.7% divergence between any two of their pol sequences using the Tamura-Nei model (TN93, while individuals with dual infection had up to 7.0% divergence. The global substitution rates (substitutions/nucleotide/year for mono and dually infected individuals were significantly different (p<0.001; however, substitution rates were not associated with HLA haplotype, CD4 or viral load. CONCLUSIONS: Even after a maximum of almost 9 years of follow-up, all mono-infected participants had less than 1% divergence between baseline and longitudinal sequences, while participants with dual infection had 10 times greater divergence. These data support the use of HIV-1 pol sequence data to evaluate transmission events, networks and HIV-1 dual infection.

  20. Detection of Acute HIV-1 Infection by RT-LAMP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna L Rudolph

    Full Text Available A rapid, cost-effective diagnostic test for the detection of acute HIV-1 infection is highly desired. Isothermal amplification techniques, such as reverse-transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP, exhibit characteristics that are ideal for the development of a rapid nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT because they are quick, easy to perform and do not require complex, dedicated equipment and laboratory space. In this study, we assessed the ability of the HIV-1 RT-LAMP assay to detect acute HIV infection as compared to a representative rapid antibody test and several FDA-approved laboratory-based assays. The HIV-1 RT-LAMP assay detected seroconverting individuals one to three weeks earlier than a rapid HIV antibody test and up to two weeks earlier than a lab-based antigen/antibody (Ag/Ab combo enzyme immunoassay (EIA. RT-LAMP was not as sensitive as a lab-based qualitative RNA assay, which could be attributed to the significantly smaller nucleic acid input volume. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of detecting acute HIV infection using the RT-LAMP assay. The availability of a rapid NAAT, such as the HIV-1 RT-LAMP assay, at the point of care (POC or in laboratories that do not have access to large platform NAAT could increase the percentage of individuals who receive an acute HIV infection status or confirmation of their HIV status, while immediately linking them to counseling and medical care. In addition, early knowledge of HIV status could lead to reduced high-risk behavior at a time when individuals are at a higher risk for transmitting the virus.

  1. Exercise and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, DeSales; Jackson, Catherine G. R.; Greenleaf, John E.

    1995-01-01

    The human immune system is highly efficient and remarkably protective when functioning properly. Similar to other physiological systems, it functions best when the body is maintained with a balanced diet, sufficient rest and a moderately stress-free lifestyle. It can be disrupted by inappropriate drug use and extreme emotion or exertion. The functioning of normal or compromised immune systems can be enhanced by properly prescribed moderate exercise conditioning regimens in healthy people, and in some human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1)-infected patients but not in others who unable to complete an interval training program. Regular exercise conditioning in healthy people reduces cardiovascular risk factors, increases stamina, facilitates bodyweight control, and reduces stress by engendering positive feelings of well-being. Certain types of cancer may also be suppressed by appropriate exercise conditioning. Various exercise regimens are being evaluated as adjunct treatments for medicated patients with the HIV-1 syndrome. Limited anecdotal evidence from patients suggests that moderate exercise conditioning is per se responsible for their survival well beyond expectancy. HIV-1-infected patients respond positively, both physiologically and psychologically, to moderate exercise conditioning. However, the effectiveness of any exercise treatment programme depends on its mode, frequency, intensity and duration when prescribed o complement the pathological condition of the patient. The effectiveness of exercise conditioning regimens in patients with HIV-1 infection is reviewed in this article. In addition, we discuss mechanisms and pathways, involving the interplay of psychological and physiological factors, through which the suppressed immune system can be enhanced. The immune modulators discussed are endogenous opioids, cytokines, neurotransmitters and other hormones. Exercise conditioning treatment appears to be more effective when combined with other stress management

  2. Cell-specific RNA aptamer against human CCR5 specifically targets HIV-1 susceptible cells and inhibits HIV-1 infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiehua; Satheesan, Sangeetha; Li, Haitang; Weinberg, Marc S; Morris, Kevin V; Burnett, John C; Rossi, John J

    2015-03-19

    The C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is a receptor expressed by T cells and macrophages that serves as a coreceptor for macrophage-tropic HIV-1. Loss of CCR5 is associated with resistance to HIV-1. Here, we combine the live-cell-based SELEX with high-throughput sequencing technology to generate CCR5 RNA aptamers capable of specifically targeting HIV-1 susceptible cells (as small interfering RNA [siRNA] delivery agent) and inhibiting HIV-1 infectivity (as antiviral agent) via block of the CCR5 required for HIV-1 to enter cells. One of the best candidates, G-3, efficiently bound and was internalized into human CCR5-expressing cells. The G-3 specifically neutralized R5 virus infection in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and in vivo generated human CD4(+) T cells with a nanomolar inhibitory concentration 50%. G-3 was also capable of transferring functional siRNAs to CCR5-expressing cells. Collectively, the cell-specific, internalizing, CCR5-targeted aptamers and aptamer-siRNA conjugates offer promise for overcoming some of the current challenges of drug resistance in HIV-1 by providing cell-type- or tissue-specific delivery of various therapeutic moieties.

  3. Prognostic value of a CCR5 defective allele in pediatric HIV-1 infection.

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A deletion of 32 base pairs in the CCR5 gene (delta32 CCR5) has been linked to resistance to HIV-1 infection in exposed adults and to the delay of disease progression in infected adults. MATERIALS AND METHODS: To determine the role of delta32 CCR5 in disease progression of HIV-1 infected children born to seropositive mothers, we studied a polymerase chain reaction in 301 HIV-1 infected, 262 HIV-1 exposed-uninfected and 47 HIV-1 unexposed-uninfected children of Spanish and Italian ...

  4. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iordanskiy, Sergey [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Van Duyne, Rachel [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Romerio, Fabio [Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Kashanchi, Fatah, E-mail: fkashanc@gmu.edu [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    The highly active antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV-1 RNA in plasma to undetectable levels. However, the virus continues to persist in the long-lived resting CD4{sup +} T cells, macrophages and astrocytes which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals. Reactivation of viral transcription is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus. Using the chronically HIV-1 infected T lymphoblastoid and monocytic cell lines, primary quiescent CD4{sup +} T cells and humanized mice infected with dual-tropic HIV-1 89.6, we examined the effect of various X-ray irradiation (IR) doses (used for HIV-related lymphoma treatment and lower doses) on HIV-1 transcription and viability of infected cells. Treatment of both T cells and monocytes with IR, a well-defined stress signal, led to increase of HIV-1 transcription, as evidenced by the presence of RNA polymerase II and reduction of HDAC1 and methyl transferase SUV39H1 on the HIV-1 promoter. This correlated with the increased GFP signal and elevated level of intracellular HIV-1 RNA in the IR-treated quiescent CD4{sup +} T cells infected with GFP-encoding HIV-1. Exposition of latently HIV-1infected monocytes treated with PKC agonist bryostatin 1 to IR enhanced transcription activation effect of this latency-reversing agent. Increased HIV-1 replication after IR correlated with higher cell death: the level of phosphorylated Ser46 in p53, responsible for apoptosis induction, was markedly higher in the HIV-1 infected cells following IR treatment. Exposure of HIV-1 infected humanized mice with undetectable viral RNA level to IR resulted in a significant increase of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain tissues. Collectively, these data point to the use of low to moderate dose of IR alone or in combination with HIV-1 transcription activators as a potential application for the “Shock and Kill” strategy for latently HIV-1 infected cells. - Highlights: • X-ray irradiation

  5. Iron status in HIV-1 infection: implications in disease pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banjoko S Olatunbosun

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There had been conflicting reports with levels of markers of iron metabolism in HIV infection. This study was therefore aimed at investigating iron status and its possible mediation of severity of HIV- 1 infection and pathogenesis. Method Eighty (80 anti-retroviral naive HIV-1 positive and 50 sero-negative controls were recruited for the study. Concentrations of serum total iron, transferrin, total iron binding capacity (TIBC, CD4+ T -lymphocytes, vitamin C, zinc, selenium and transferrin saturation were estimated. Results The mean CD4+ T-lymphocyte cell counts, serum iron, TIBC, transferrin saturation for the tests and controls were 319 ± 22, 952 ± 57 cells/μl (P 4+ T-lymphocyte cell count had a positive correlation with levels of vitamin C (r = 0.497, P Conclusion It could be inferred that derangement in iron metabolism, in addition to oxidative stress, might have contributed to the depletion of CD4+ T cell population in our subjects and this may result in poor prognosis of the disease.

  6. Genomic architecture of HIV-1 infection: current status & challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurvinder; Sharma, Gaurav; Kumar, Neeraj; Kaul, Mrinali H; Bansal, Rhea A; Vajpayee, Madhu; Wig, Naveet; Sharma, Surender K; Mehra, Narinder K

    2013-11-01

    Studies on host genomics have revealed the existence of identifiable HIV-1 specific protective factors among infected individuals who remain naturally resistant viraemia controllers with little or no evidence of virus replication. These factors are broadly grouped into those that are immune associated (MHC, chemokines, cytokines, CTLs and others), linked to viral entry (chemokine co-receptors and ligands), act as post-entry restriction elements (TRIM5a, APOBEC3) and those associated with viral replication (cytokines and others). These features have been identified through multiple experimental approaches ranging from candidate gene approaches, genome wide association studies (GWAS), expression analysis in conjunction with functional assays in humans to primate based models. Several studies have highlighted the individual and population level gross differences both in the viral clade sequences as well as host determined genetic associations. This review collates current information on studies involving major histocompatibility complex (MHC) as well as non MHC genes in the context of HIV-1 infection and AIDS involving varied ethnic groups. Special focus of the review is on the genetic studies carried out on the Indian population. Further challenges with regard to therapeutic interventions based on current knowledge have been discussed along with discussion on documented cases of stem cell therapy and very early highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) interventions.

  7. Dynamics of a stochastic HIV-1 infection model with logistic growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Daqing; Liu, Qun; Shi, Ningzhong; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Xia, Peiyan

    2017-03-01

    This paper is concerned with a stochastic HIV-1 infection model with logistic growth. Firstly, by constructing suitable stochastic Lyapunov functions, we establish sufficient conditions for the existence of ergodic stationary distribution of the solution to the HIV-1 infection model. Then we obtain sufficient conditions for extinction of the infection. The stationary distribution shows that the infection can become persistent in vivo.

  8. An inhibition enzyme immunoassay, using a human monoclonal antibody (K14) reactive with gp41 of HIV-1, for the serology of HIV-1 infections.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.J.P. Teeuwsen; J.J. Schalken; G. van der Groen (Guido); R. van den Akker (Ruud); J. Goudsmit (Jaap); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractAn inhibition enzyme immunoassay (IEIA), using a human monoclonal antibody (K14) reactive with gp41 of HIV-1, was evaluated for its applicability to the serology of HIV-1 infections. Using panels of serum samples from seronegative and confirmed HIV-1-seropositive individuals, it was show

  9. Thiolated pyrimidine nucleotides may interfere thiol groups concentrated at lipid rafts of HIV-1 infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanizsai, Szilvia; Ongrádi, Joseph; Aradi, János; Nagy, Károly

    2014-12-01

    Upon HIV infection, cells become activated and cell surface thiols are present in increased number. Earlier we demonstrated in vitro anti-HIV effect of thiolated pyrimidine nucleotide UD29, which interferes thiol function. To further analyse the redox processes required for HIV-1 entry and infection, toxicity assays were performed using HIV-1 infected monolayer HeLaCD4-LTR/ β-gal cells and suspension H9 T cells treated with several thiolated nucleotide derivatives of UD29. Selective cytotoxicity of thiolated pyrimidines on HIV-1 infected cells were observed. Results indicate that thiolated pyrimidine derivates may interfere with -SH (thiol) groups concentrated in lipid rafts of cell membrane and interacts HIV-1 infected (activated) cells resulting in a selective cytotoxicity of HIV-1 infected cells, and reducing HIV-1 entry.

  10. KI and WU polyomaviruses and CD4+ cell counts in HIV-1-infected patients, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babakir-Mina, Muhammed; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Farchi, Francesca; Bergallo, Massimiliano; Cavallo, Rossana; Adorno, Gaspare; Perno, Carlo Federico; Ciotti, Marco

    2010-09-01

    To investigate an association between KI and WU polyomavirus (KIPyV and WUPyV) infections and CD4+ cell counts, we tested HIV-1-positive patients and blood donors. No association was found between cell counts and virus infections in HIV-1-positive patients. Frequency of KIPyV infection was similar for both groups. WUPyV was more frequent in HIV-1-positive patients.

  11. Thymic plasmacytoid dendritic cells are susceptible to productive HIV-1 infection and efficiently transfer R5 HIV-1 to thymocytes in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wright Edwina

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 infection of the thymus contributes to the defective regeneration and loss of CD4+ T cells in HIV-1-infected individuals. As thymic dendritic cells (DC are permissive to infection by HIV-1, we examined the ability of thymic DC to enhance infection of thymocytes which may contribute to the overall depletion of CD4+ T cells. We compared productive infection in isolated human thymic and blood CD11c+ myeloid DC (mDC and CD123+ plasmacytoid DC (pDC using enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP CCR5 (R5-tropic NL(AD8 and CXCR4 (X4-tropic NL4-3 HIV-1 reporter viruses. Transfer of productive HIV-1 infection from thymic mDC and pDC was determined by culturing these DC subsets either alone or with sorted thymocytes. Results Productive infection was observed in both thymic pDC and mDC following exposure to R5 HIV-1 and X4 HIV-1. Thymic pDC were more frequently productively infected by both R5 and X4 HIV-1 than thymic mDC (p = 0.03; n = 6. Thymic pDC efficiently transferred productive R5 HIV-1 infection to both CD3hi (p = 0.01; mean fold increase of 6.5; n = 6 and CD3lo thymocytes (mean fold increase of 1.6; n = 2. In comparison, transfer of productive infection by thymic mDC was not observed for either X4 or R5 HIV-1. Conclusions The capacity of thymic pDC to efficiently transfer R5 HIV-1 to both mature and immature thymocytes that are otherwise refractory to R5 virus may represent a pathway to early infection and impaired production of thymocytes and CD4+ T cells in HIV-1-infected individuals.

  12. Changes in plasma cytokines after treatment of ascaris lumbricoides infection in individuals with HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blish, Catherine A; Sangaré, Laura; Herrin, Bradley R; Richardson, Barbra A; John-Stewart, Grace; Walson, Judd L

    2010-06-15

    Albendazole treatment of individuals with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and Ascaris lumbricoides co-infection has led to significantly improved CD4(+) cell counts and a trend for lower plasma HIV-1 RNA levels in a previous randomized placebo-controlled trial. To define mechanisms by which deworming contributed to changes in markers of HIV-1 disease progression, plasma cytokine levels were evaluated. Albendazole treatment, compared with placebo, was associated with significantly decreased plasma interleukin (IL) 10 levels (P = .01)ot associated with significant changes in levels of IL-1beta, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-12p70, IL-13, interferon gamma, tumor necrosis factor alpha, or thymic stromal lymphopoietin. Treatment of A. lumbricoides co-infection may delay HIV-1 disease progression by reducing helminth-induced, IL-10-mediated immunosuppression.

  13. High levels of divergent HIV-1 quasispecies in patients with neurological opportunistic infections in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yulin; Wei, Feili; Liang, Qi; Ding, Wei; Qiao, Luxin; Song, Fengli; Liu, Lifeng; Yang, Sufang; Jin, Ronghua; Gu, Jianhua; Li, Ning; Chen, Dexi

    2013-08-01

    Despite the fact that the survival of people infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has improved worldwide because of the increasingly powerful and highly active antiretroviral therapy, opportunistic infections (OIs) of the central nervous system (CNS) remain a serious burden. HIV-1 is capable of entering the CNS through infected peripheral monocytes, but its effect on OIs of CNS remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the characteristics of HIV-1 in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients with CNS OIs. A total of 24 patients with CNS OIs and 16 non-CNS OIs (control) cases were selected. These AIDS patients were infected with HIV-1 by paid blood donors in China. HIV-1 loads in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were detected using RT-PCR, and the C2-V5 region of HIV-1 envelope gene was amplified from viral quasispecies isolated from CSF using nested PCR. The CSF HIV-1 load of CNS OIs was higher than that of non-CNS OIs, but plasma HIV-1 load of CNS OIs was not higher than that of non-CNS OIs. The nucleotide sequence of C2-V5 region of the HIV-1 quasispecies isolated from the CSF of CNS OIs had a high diversity, and the HIV-1 quasispecies isolated from the CSF of CNS OIs revealed R5 tropism as 11/25 charge rule. These results suggest that high levels of divergent HIV-1 quasispecies in the CNS probably contribute to opportunistic infections.

  14. Prevention of HIV-1 infection 2013: glimmers of hope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of transmission of HIV depends on the infectiousness of the index case and the susceptibility of those exposed. Infectiousness is dictated by the concentration of HIV-1 in relevant fluids (regardless of route of transmission and the viral genotype and phenotype. People newly infected with HIV-1 (i.e. acute infection and those with STI co-infections excrete such a large concentration of virus as to be “hyperinfectious.” The actual transmission of HIV likely occurs in the first few hours after exposure. The probability of transmission may be as low as 1/10,000 episodes of intercourse or 1/10 sexual exposures when anal intercourse is practiced. The transmission of HIV is generally limited to one or a small number of founder variants which themselves may be “hyperinfectious.” Synergistic behavioural and biologic HIV prevention strategies have been developed and implemented. Safer sex includes limiting the number of sexual partners, use of male latex condoms, and structural interventions to reduce exposure. These strategies appear to have contributed to reduced HIV incidence in many countries. Biological interventions have proved catalytic: these include treatment of inflammatory cofactors, voluntary male circumcision and use of antiviral agents either for infected people (who can be rendered remarkably less contagious or as pre- and post-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP and PEP. Ecologic evidence suggests that broader, earlier antiviral treatment of HIV may be reducing incidence in some (but not all populations. However, maximal benefit of HIV “treatment for prevention” and application of PrEP will likely require a program of universal “test and treat,” where many more infected patients are identified, linked to care, and treated very early in disease and for life. Community randomized trials designed to support this approach are under way in Africa. The “test and treat” prevention strategy is resource-intensive and

  15. Coronary artery calcification is associated with atherogenic lipid changes, cardiac dysfunction and morphologic abnormalities in HIV-1 infected black adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Qing-yi; DU Jie-fu; LAI Hong; LAI Sheng-han

    2005-01-01

    @@ The heart is an organ frequently affected in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.1 But there is little information as to whether the coronary artery calcification can identify asymptomatic individuals at high risk for having cardiac morphological and functional abnormalities and cardiac risk factors in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to determine whether coronary artery calcification was associated with cardiac morphological and functional abnormalities, atherogenic lipid and C-reactive protein (CRP) changes in a black adult population with HIV-1 infection.

  16. Increased iron export by ferroportin induces restriction of HIV-1 infection in sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Namita; Ammosova, Tatiana; Diaz, Sharmin; Lin, Xionghao; Niu, Xiaomei; Ivanov, Andrey; Jerebtsova, Marina; Dhawan, Subhash; Oneal, Patricia; Nekhai, Sergei

    2017-01-01

    The low incidence of HIV-1 infection in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) and inhibition of HIV-1 replication in vitro under the conditions of low intracellular iron or heme treatment suggests a potential restriction of HIV-1 infection in SCD. We investigated HIV-1 ex vivo infection of SCD peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and found that HIV-1 replication was inhibited at the level of reverse transcription (RT) and transcription. We observed increased expression of heme and iron-regulated genes, previously shown to inhibit HIV-1, including ferroportin, IKBα, HO-1, p21, and SAM domain and HD domain-containing protein 1 (SAMHD1). HIV-1 inhibition was less pronounced in hepcidin-treated SCD PBMCs and more pronounced in the iron or iron chelators treated, suggesting a key role of iron metabolism. In SCD PBMCs, labile iron levels were reduced and protein levels of ferroportin, HIF-1α, IKBα, and HO-1 were increased. Hemin treatment induced ferroportin expression and inhibited HIV-1 in THP-1 cells, mimicking the HIV-1 inhibition in SCD PBMCs, especially as hepcidin similarly prevented HIV-1 inhibition. In THP-1 cells with knocked down ferroportin, IKBα, or HO-1 genes but not HIF-1α or p21, HIV-1 was not inhibited by hemin. Activity of SAMHD1-regulatory CDK2 was decreased, and SAMHD1 phosphorylation was reduced in SCD PBMCs and hemin-treated THP-1 cells, suggesting SAMHD1-mediated HIV-1 restriction in SCD. Our findings point to ferroportin as a trigger of HIV-1 restriction in SCD settings, linking reduced intracellular iron levels to the inhibition of CDK2 activity, reduction of SAMHD1 phosphorylation, increased IKBα expression, and inhibition of HIV-1 RT and transcription.

  17. Rapid Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation for Women in an HIV-1 Prevention Clinical Trial Experiencing Primary HIV-1 Infection during Pregnancy or Breastfeeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Morrison

    Full Text Available During an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial in East Africa, we observed 16 cases of primary HIV-1 infection in women coincident with pregnancy or breastfeeding. Nine of eleven pregnant women initiated rapid combination antiretroviral therapy (ART, despite having CD4 counts exceeding national criteria for ART initiation; breastfeeding women initiated ART or replacement feeding. Rapid ART initiation during primary HIV-1 infection during pregnancy and breastfeeding is feasible in this setting.

  18. Escherichia coli surface display of single-chain antibody VRC01 against HIV-1 infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lin-Xu [Nebraska Center for Virology, Lincoln, NE (United States); School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska—Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583 (United States); Mellon, Michael [Nebraska Center for Virology, Lincoln, NE (United States); School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Lincoln, NE (United States); Bowder, Dane [Nebraska Center for Virology, Lincoln, NE (United States); School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska—Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583 (United States); Quinn, Meghan [Nebraska Center for Virology, Lincoln, NE (United States); School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Lincoln, NE (United States); Shea, Danielle; Wood, Charles [Nebraska Center for Virology, Lincoln, NE (United States); School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska—Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583 (United States); Xiang, Shi-Hua, E-mail: sxiang2@unl.edu [Nebraska Center for Virology, Lincoln, NE (United States); School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Lincoln, NE (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission and infection occur mainly via the mucosal surfaces. The commensal bacteria residing in these surfaces can potentially be employed as a vehicle for delivering inhibitors to prevent HIV-1 infection. In this study, we have employed a bacteria-based strategy to display a broadly neutralizing antibody VRC01, which could potentially be used to prevent HIV-1 infection. The VRC01 antibody mimics CD4-binding to gp120 and has broadly neutralization activities against HIV-1. We have designed a construct that can express the fusion peptide of the scFv-VRC01 antibody together with the autotransporter β-barrel domain of IgAP gene from Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which enabled surface display of the antibody molecule. Our results indicate that the scFv-VRC01 antibody molecule was displayed on the surface of the bacteria as demonstrated by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. The engineered bacteria can capture HIV-1 particles via surface-binding and inhibit HIV-1 infection in cell culture. - Highlights: • Designed single-chain VRC01 antibody was demonstrated to bind HIV-1 envelope gp120. • Single-chain VRC01 antibody was successfully displayed on the surface of E. coli. • Engineered bacteria can absorb HIV-1 particles and prevent HIV-1 infection in cell culture.

  19. Mesenchymal stem cell derived hematopoietic cells are permissive to HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mondal Debasis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tissue resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent, self-renewing cells known for their differentiation potential into cells of mesenchymal lineage. The ability of single cell clones isolated from adipose tissue resident MSCs (ASCs to differentiate into cells of hematopoietic lineage has been previously demonstrated. In the present study, we investigated if the hematopoietic differentiated (HD cells derived from ASCs could productively be infected with HIV-1. Results HD cells were generated by differentiating clonally expanded cultures of adherent subsets of ASCs (CD90+, CD105+, CD45-, and CD34-. Transcriptome analysis revealed that HD cells acquire a number of elements that increase their susceptibility for HIV-1 infection, including HIV-1 receptor/co-receptor and other key cellular cofactors. HIV-1 infected HD cells (HD-HIV showed elevated p24 protein and gag and tat gene expression, implying a high and productive infection. HD-HIV cells showed decreased CD4, but significant increase in the expression of CCR5, CXCR4, Nef-associated factor HCK, and Vpu-associated factor BTRC. HIV-1 restricting factors like APOBEC3F and TRIM5 also showed up regulation. HIV-1 infection increased apoptosis and cell cycle regulatory genes in HD cells. Although undifferentiated ASCs failed to show productive infection, HIV-1 exposure increased the expression of several hematopoietic lineage associated genes such as c-Kit, MMD2, and IL-10. Conclusions Considering the presence of profuse amounts of ASCs in different tissues, these findings suggest the possible role that could be played by HD cells derived from ASCs in HIV-1 infection. The undifferentiated ASCs were non-permissive to HIV-1 infection; however, HIV-1 exposure increased the expression of some hematopoietic lineage related genes. The findings relate the importance of ASCs in HIV-1 research and facilitate the understanding of the disease process and management strategies.

  20. Down-regulation of HIV-1 Infection by Inhibition of the MAPK Signaling Pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Gong; Xi-hui Shen; Chao Chen; Hui Qiu; Rong-ge Yang

    2011-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1(HIV-1)can interact with and exploit the host cellular machinery to replicate and propagate itself.Numerous studies have shown that the Mitogen-activated protein kinase(MAPK)signal pathway can positively regulate the replication of HIV-1,but exactly how each MAPK pathway affects HIV-1 infection and replication is not understood.In this study,we used the Extracellular signal-regulated kinase(ERK)pathway inhibitor,PD98059,the Jun N-terminal kinase(JNK)pathway inhibitor,SP600125,and the p38 pathway inhibitor,SB203580,to investigate the roles of these pathways in HIV-1replication.We found that application of PD98059 results in a strong VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1NL4-3 luciferase reporter virus and HIV-1NL4-3 virus inhibition activity.In addition,SB203580 and SP600125 also elicited marked VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1NL4-3 luciferase reporter virus inhibition activity but no HIV-1NL4-3 virus inhibition activity.We also found that SB203580 and SP600125 can enhance the HIV-1 inhibition activity of PD98059when cells were treated with all three MAPK pathway inhibitors in combination.Finally,we show that HIV-1virus inhibition activity of the MAPK pathway inhibitors was the result of the negative regulation of HIV-1 LTR promoter activity.

  1. Innate immunity and chronic immune activation in HCV/HIV-1 co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Veronica D; Landay, Alan L; Sandberg, Johan K

    2010-04-01

    Innate immune responses are critical in the defense against viral infections. NK cells, myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and invariant CD1d-restricted NKT cells mediate both effector and regulatory functions in this early immune response. In chronic uncontrolled viral infections such as HCV and HIV-1, these essential immune functions are compromised and can become a double edged sword contributing to the immunopathogenesis of viral disease. In particular, recent findings indicate that innate immune responses play a central role in the chronic immune activation which is a primary driver of HIV-1 disease progression. HCV/HIV-1 co-infection is affecting millions of people and is associated with faster viral disease progression. Here, we review the role of innate immunity and chronic immune activation in HCV and HIV-1 infection, and discuss how mechanisms of innate immunity may influence protection as well as immunopathogenesis in the HCV/HIV-1 co-infected human host.

  2. Oxidative Imbalance in HIV-1 Infected Patients Treated with Antiretroviral Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Mandas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that oxidative stress is involved in HIV infection. However, the role in oxidative balance of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART is still debated. In our study we assessed serum oxidant and antioxidant levels in an HIV-1-infected population treated with HAART, and compared them with those of untreated HIV-1 patients and HIV-1-negative subjects. The study included 116 HIV-1-infected patients (86 HAART-treated and 30 untreated, and 46 HIV-negative controls. Serum oxidant levels were significantly higher in the HIV-1 treated group as compared to untreated and control groups. In addition, a decrease of serum total antioxidant status was observed in the HIV-1 treated group. To be noted is that patients who rigorously follow antiretroviral therapy (optimal HAART adherence have significantly higher oxidative status than those who do not closely follow the therapy (poor HAART adherence. Analysis of variance revealed no significant further increase in oxidative status in HIV-1-infected patients taking antiretroviral and other drugs with the exception of psychiatric drugs (e.g. anxiolytics or antidepressants. Taken together, our results indicate that HAART may affect oxidative stress in HIV-1-infected patients and suggest that antiretroviral therapy plays an important role in the synergy of HIV infection and oxidative stress.

  3. Underestimated Amoebic Appendicitis among HIV-1-Infected Individuals in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Taiichiro; Yano, Hideaki; Murata, Yukinori; Igari, Toru; Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Yagita, Kenji; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Kaku, Mitsuo; Tsukada, Kunihisa; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Yoshimi; Oka, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Entamoeba histolytica is not a common causative agent of acute appendicitis. However, amoebic appendicitis can sometimes be severe and life threatening, mainly due to a lack of awareness. Also, its frequency, clinical features, and pathogenesis remain unclear. The study subjects were HIV-1-infected individuals who presented with acute appendicitis and later underwent appendectomy at our hospital between 1996 and 2014. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded preserved appendix specimens were reexamined by periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining and PCR to identify undiagnosed amoebic appendicitis. Appendectomies were performed in 57 patients with acute appendicitis. The seroprevalence of E. histolytica was 33% (14/43) from the available stored sera. Based on the medical records, only 3 cases were clinically diagnosed as amoebic appendicitis, including 2 diagnosed at the time of appendectomy and 1 case diagnosed by rereview of the appendix after the development of postoperative complications. Retrospective analyses using PAS staining and PCR identified 3 and 3 more cases, respectively. Thus, E. histolytica infection was confirmed in 9 cases (15.8%) in the present study. Apart from a significantly higher leukocyte count in E. histolytica-positive patients than in negative patients (median, 13,760 versus 10,385 cells/μl, respectively, P = 0.02), there were no other differences in the clinical features of the PCR-positive and -negative groups. In conclusion, E. histolytica infection was confirmed in 9 (15.8%) of the appendicitis cases. However, only 3, including one diagnosed after intestinal perforation, were diagnosed before the present analyses. These results strongly suggest there is frequently a failure to detect trophozoites in routine examination, resulting in an underestimation of the incidence of amoebic appendicitis. PMID:27847377

  4. Host genetic factors in susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and progression to AIDS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Koushik Chatterjee

    2010-04-01

    HIV-1 infection has rapidly spread worldwide and has become the leading cause of mortality in infectious diseases. The duration for development of AIDS (AIDS progression) is highly variable among HIV–1 infected individuals, ranging from 2–3 years to no signs of AIDS development in the entire lifetime. Several factors regulate the rate at which HIV-1 infection progresses to AIDS. Host genetic factors play an important role in the outcome of such complex or multifactor diseases as AIDS and are also known to regulate the rate of disease progression. This review focuses on the major host genes reported to affect the progression to AIDS in HIV-1 infected individuals.

  5. Identification of host proteins associated with HIV-1 preintegration complexes isolated from infected CD4+ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavendra, Nidhanapati K; Shkriabai, Nikolozi; Graham, Robert Lj; Hess, Sonja; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Wu, Li

    2010-08-11

    An integrated HIV-1 genomic DNA leads to an infected cell becoming either an active or a latent virus-producing cell. Upon appropriate activation, a latently infected cell can result in production of progeny viruses that spread the infection to uninfected cells. The host proteins influence several steps of HIV-1 infection including formation of the preintegration complex (PIC), a key nucleoprotein intermediate essential for integration of reverse transcribed viral DNA into the chromosome. Much effort has gone into the identification of host proteins contributing to the assembly of functional PICs. Experimental approaches included the use of yeast two-hybrid system, co-immunoprecipitation, affinity tagged HIV-1 viral proteins and in vitro reconstitution of salt-stripped PIC activity. Several host proteins identified using these approaches have been shown to affect HIV-1 replication in cells and influence catalytic activities of recombinant IN in vitro. However, the comprehensive identification and characterization of host proteins associated with HIV-1 PICs of infected cells have been hindered in part by the technical limitation in acquiring sufficient amount of catalytically active PICs. To efficiently identify additional host factors associated with PICs in infected cells, we have developed the following novel approach. The catalytically active PICs from HIV-1-infected CD4+ cells were isolated using biotinylated target DNA, and the proteins selectively co-purifying with PICs have been analyzed by mass spectrometry. This technology enabled us to reveal at least 19 host proteins that are associated with HIV-1 PICs, of which 18 proteins have not been described previously with respect to HIV-1 integration. Physiological functions of the identified proteins range from chromatin organization to protein transport. A detailed characterization of these host proteins could provide new insights into the mechanism of HIV-1 integration and uncover new antiviral targets to

  6. Interaction between Tat and Drugs of Abuse during HIV-1 Infection and Central Nervous System Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique E Maubert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In many individuals, drug abuse is intimately linked with HIV-1 infection. In addition to being associated with one-third of all HIV-1 infections in the United States, drug abuse also plays a role in disease progression and severity in HIV-1-infected patients, including adverse effects on the central nervous system (CNS. Specific systems within the brain are known to be damaged in HIV-1-infected individuals and this damage is similar to that observed in drug abuse. Even in the era of anti-retroviral therapy (ART, CNS pathogenesis occurs with HIV-1 infection, with a broad range of cognitive impairment observed, collectively referred to as HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND. A number of HIV-1 proteins (Tat, gp120, Nef, Vpr have been implicated in the etiology of pathogenesis and disease as a result of the biologic activity of the extracellular form of each of the proteins in a number of tissues, including the CNS, even in ART-suppressed patients. In this review, we have made Tat the center of attention for a number of reasons. First, it has been shown to be synthesized and secreted by HIV-1-infected cells in the CNS, despite the most effective suppression therapies available to date. Second, Tat has been shown to alter the functions of several host factors, disrupting the molecular and biochemical balance of numerous pathways contributing to cellular toxicity, dysfunction, and death. In addition, the advantages and disadvantages of ART suppression with regard to controlling the genesis and progression of neurocognitive impairment are currently under debate in the field and are yet to be fully determined. In this review, we discuss the individual and concerted contributions of HIV-1 Tat, drug abuse, and ART with respect to damage in the CNS, and how these factors contribute to the development of HAND in HIV-1-infected patients.

  7. IFITM Proteins Restrict HIV-1 Infection by Antagonizing the Envelope Glycoprotein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyou Yu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM proteins have been recently shown to restrict HIV-1 and other viruses. Here, we provide evidence that IFITM proteins, particularly IFITM2 and IFITM3, specifically antagonize the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env, thereby inhibiting viral infection. IFITM proteins interact with HIV-1 Env in viral producer cells, leading to impaired Env processing and virion incorporation. Notably, the level of IFITM incorporation into HIV-1 virions does not strictly correlate with the extent of inhibition. Prolonged passage of HIV-1 in IFITM-expressing T lymphocytes leads to emergence of Env mutants that overcome IFITM restriction. The ability of IFITMs to inhibit cell-to-cell infection can be extended to HIV-1 primary isolates, HIV-2 and SIVs; however, the extent of inhibition appears to be virus-strain dependent. Overall, our study uncovers a mechanism by which IFITM proteins specifically antagonize HIV-1 Env to restrict HIV-1 infection and provides insight into the specialized role of IFITMs in HIV infection.

  8. Assisted reproductive technologies to establish pregnancies in couples with an HIV-1-infected man

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van Leeuwen; S. Repping; J.M. Prins; P. Reiss; F. van der Veen

    2009-01-01

    For HIV -1-infected men and women the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HART) in 1996 led to a spectacular increase in life expectancy and quality of life. In Western society where HART is readily available, HIV -1 is now considered to be a chronic disease and as a consequence qu

  9. Oral keratinocytes support non-replicative infection and transfer of harbored HIV-1 to permissive cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacaman Rodrigo A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral keratinocytes on the mucosal surface are frequently exposed to HIV-1 through contact with infected sexual partners or nursing mothers. To determine the plausibility that oral keratinocytes are primary targets of HIV-1, we tested the hypothesis that HIV-1 infects oral keratinocytes in a restricted manner. Results To study the fate of HIV-1, immortalized oral keratinocytes (OKF6/TERT-2; TERT-2 cells were characterized for the fate of HIV-specific RNA and DNA. At 6 h post inoculation with X4 or R5-tropic HIV-1, HIV-1gag RNA was detected maximally within TERT-2 cells. Reverse transcriptase activity in TERT-2 cells was confirmed by VSV-G-mediated infection with HIV-NL4-3Δenv-EGFP. AZT inhibited EGFP expression in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that viral replication can be supported if receptors are bypassed. Within 3 h post inoculation, integrated HIV-1 DNA was detected in TERT-2 cell nuclei and persisted after subculture. Multiply spliced and unspliced HIV-1 mRNAs were not detectable up to 72 h post inoculation, suggesting that HIV replication may abort and that infection is non-productive. Within 48 h post inoculation, however, virus harbored by CD4 negative TERT-2 cells trans infected co-cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs or MOLT4 cells (CD4+ CCR5+ by direct cell-to-cell transfer or by releasing low levels of infectious virions. Primary tonsil epithelial cells also trans infected HIV-1 to permissive cells in a donor-specific manner. Conclusion Oral keratinocytes appear, therefore, to support stable non-replicative integration, while harboring and transmitting infectious X4- or R5-tropic HIV-1 to permissive cells for up to 48 h.

  10. Clinical presentation and opportunistic infections in HIV-1, HIV-2 and HIV-1/2 dual seropositive patients in Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Allan; Jespersen, Sanne; Katzenstein, Terese L;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Better understanding of HIV-2 infection is likely to affect the patient care in areas where HIV-2 is prevalent. In this study, we aimed to characterize the clinical presentations among HIV-1, HIV-2 and HIV-1/2 dual seropositive patients. METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, newly...... diagnosed HIV patients attending the HIV outpatient clinic at Hospital Nacional Simão Mendes in Guinea-Bissau were enrolled. Demographical and clinical data were collected and compared between HIV-1, HIV-2 and HIV-1/2 dual seropositive patients. RESULTS: A total of 169 patients (76% HIV-1, 17% HIV-2 and 6......% HIV 1/2) were included in the study between 21 March 2012 and 14 December 2012. HIV-1 seropositive patients were younger than HIV-2 and HIV-1/2 seropositive patients, but no difference in sex was observed. Patients with HIV-1 and HIV-1/2 had a lower baseline CD4 cell count than HIV-2 seropositive...

  11. Dysregulation of beta-chemokines in the lungs of HIV-1-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, H; McKenna, S M; Ketoff, N R; Jones, L; Wu, M; Hejal, R; Rich, E A; Toossi, Z

    2001-04-01

    The beta-chemokines, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1 alpha, MIP-1 beta, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 and regulated-on-activation normal T cell, expressed and secreted (RANTES) are not only chemotactic for mononuclear cells but may be important in suppression of HIV-1 replication through competitive binding to the chemokine receptor, CCR5, which is critical to viral entry. In this study, bronchoalveolar cells (BACs) and autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained from HIV-1-infected participants who did not manifest clinical signs of lung disease with peripheral CD4 T-cell count >200/mm(3) (n = 7, group with high CD4 count), or CD4 T-cell count CCR5 was assessed. Induction of MIP-1 alpha by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in BAC of HIV-1-infected study subjects from the low CD4 group was less than BAC from healthy study subjects (p HIV-1-infected patients was significantly less than that from healthy study subjects (p CCR5 and MIP-1 alpha in BAC was significantly lower in HIV-1-infected patients compared with in healthy study subjects (p HIV-1-infected patients with high CD4 count was significantly higher than healthy study subjects (p HIV-1 infection in the lung.

  12. Mother-to-Child HIV-1 Transmission Events Are Differentially Impacted by Breast Milk and Its Components from HIV-1-Infected Women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruizhong Shen

    Full Text Available Breast milk is a vehicle of infection and source of protection in post-natal mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission (MTCT. Understanding the mechanism by which breast milk limits vertical transmission will provide critical insight into the design of preventive and therapeutic approaches to interrupt HIV-1 mucosal transmission. However, characterization of the inhibitory activity of breast milk in human intestinal mucosa, the portal of entry in postnatal MTCT, has been constrained by the limited availability of primary mucosal target cells and tissues to recapitulate mucosal transmission ex vivo. Here, we characterized the impact of skimmed breast milk, breast milk antibodies (Igs and non-Ig components from HIV-1-infected Ugandan women on the major events of HIV-1 mucosal transmission using primary human intestinal cells and tissues. HIV-1-specific IgG antibodies and non-Ig components in breast milk inhibited the uptake of Ugandan HIV-1 isolates by primary human intestinal epithelial cells, viral replication in and transport of HIV-1- bearing dendritic cells through the human intestinal mucosa. Breast milk HIV-1-specific IgG and IgA, as well as innate factors, blocked the uptake and transport of HIV-1 through intestinal mucosa. Thus, breast milk components have distinct and complementary effects in reducing HIV-1 uptake, transport through and replication in the intestinal mucosa and, therefore, likely contribute to preventing postnatal HIV-1 transmission. Our data suggests that a successful preventive or therapeutic approach would require multiple immune factors acting at multiple steps in the HIV-1 mucosal transmission process.

  13. HIV-1 Entry and Trans-Infection of Astrocytes Involves CD81 Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Lachlan R.; Turville, Stuart G.; HItchen, Tina L.; Cheng, Wan-Jung; Ellett, Anne M.; Salimi, Hamid; Roche, Michael J.; Wesselingh, Steve L.; Gorry, Paul R.; Churchill, Melissa J.

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes are extensively infected with HIV-1 in vivo and play a significant role in the development of HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders. Despite their extensive infection, little is known about how astrocytes become infected, since they lack cell surface CD4 expression. In the present study, we investigated the fate of HIV-1 upon infection of astrocytes. Astrocytes were found to bind and harbor virus followed by biphasic decay, with HIV-1 detectable out to 72 hours. HIV-1 was observed to associate with CD81-lined vesicle structures. shRNA silencing of CD81 resulted in less cell-associated virus but no loss of co-localization between HIV-1 and CD81. Astrocytes supported trans-infection of HIV-1 to T-cells without de novo virus production, and the virus-containing compartment required 37°C to form, and was trypsin-resistant. The CD81 compartment observed herein, has been shown in other cell types to be a relatively protective compartment. Within astrocytes, this compartment may be actively involved in virus entry and/or spread. The ability of astrocytes to transfer virus, without de novo viral synthesis suggests they are capable of sequestering and protecting virus and thus, they could potentially facilitate viral dissemination in the CNS. PMID:24587404

  14. Asymptomatic brucellosis infection in humans: implications for diagnosis and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Q; Lu, Y; Yuan, X; Qiu, Y; Xu, J; Li, W; Ke, Y; Yu, Y; Huang, L; Wang, Y; Chen, Z

    2013-09-01

    Human brucellosis is mainly caused by contact with Brucella-infected animals and their secretions and carcasses. Individuals who are continuously in contact with animals are considered to be at a high risk but only some show symptoms and are diagnosed as cases of brucellosis. Here, we showed that asymptomatic brucellosis infections occur among humans. Asymptomatic infections mainly result from less frequent contact with Brucella and/or contact with low-virulence Brucella. In our study, patients with asymptomatic infection had low antibody titres and different contact patterns. Awareness of asymptomatic infection is important for early diagnosis of brucellosis and prevention of chronic infection.

  15. Platelets and erythrocyte-bound platelets bind infectious HIV-1 in plasma of chronically infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Zoltan; Jagodzinski, Linda L; Eller, Michael A; Thelian, Doris; Matyas, Gary R; Kunz, Anjali N; Alving, Carl R

    2013-01-01

    Chronic HIV-1 infection is associated with persistent viremia in most patients, but it remains unclear how free virus may survive the potential hostile effects of plasma. We investigated whether sites might exist on the surfaces of circulating blood cells for protection of infectious HIV-1 particles. Red blood cells (RBC) either from blood of uninfected normal individuals, or from blood obtained without EDTA from chronically infected HIV-1 patients, invariably contained a small number of RBC having attached platelets as determined by flow cytometry, light microscopy, and immunofluorescence microscopy. After mixing normal RBC with platelet-rich plasma, discrete populations of RBC, platelets, and complexes of platelets attached to RBC were purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Upon incubation of purified cells or platelets with HIV-1 followed by washing and co-incubation with CD4-positive peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), platelets, and platelet-RBC complexes, but not platelet-free RBC, caused infection of PBMC. Infection was prevented by pre-treating the platelet-RBC complexes with EDTA. Plasma and RBC (comprising a RBC/platelet-RBC mixture) from chronically infected patients with low viral loads were also co-incubated with PBMC ex vivo to determine the presence of infectious HIV-1. All freshly isolated plasmas from the HIV-1-infected donors, obtained in the absence of anticoagulant, were noninfectious. Interestingly, the RBC from most of the patients caused cell-cell infection of PBMC that was prevented by stripping the RBC with EDTA. A monoclonal antibody to DC-SIGN partially inhibited cell-cell HIV-1 infection of PBMC by normal RBC pre-incubated with platelets and HIV-1. We conclude: (a) platelet-free EDTA-free plasma from chronically infected HIV-1 patients, although containing viral RNA, is an environment that lacks detectable infectious HIV-1; (b) platelets and platelet-RBC complexes, but not purified RBC, bind infectious HIV-1; (c) DC

  16. Platelets and erythrocyte-bound platelets bind infectious HIV-1 in plasma of chronically infected patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltan Beck

    Full Text Available Chronic HIV-1 infection is associated with persistent viremia in most patients, but it remains unclear how free virus may survive the potential hostile effects of plasma. We investigated whether sites might exist on the surfaces of circulating blood cells for protection of infectious HIV-1 particles. Red blood cells (RBC either from blood of uninfected normal individuals, or from blood obtained without EDTA from chronically infected HIV-1 patients, invariably contained a small number of RBC having attached platelets as determined by flow cytometry, light microscopy, and immunofluorescence microscopy. After mixing normal RBC with platelet-rich plasma, discrete populations of RBC, platelets, and complexes of platelets attached to RBC were purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Upon incubation of purified cells or platelets with HIV-1 followed by washing and co-incubation with CD4-positive peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, platelets, and platelet-RBC complexes, but not platelet-free RBC, caused infection of PBMC. Infection was prevented by pre-treating the platelet-RBC complexes with EDTA. Plasma and RBC (comprising a RBC/platelet-RBC mixture from chronically infected patients with low viral loads were also co-incubated with PBMC ex vivo to determine the presence of infectious HIV-1. All freshly isolated plasmas from the HIV-1-infected donors, obtained in the absence of anticoagulant, were noninfectious. Interestingly, the RBC from most of the patients caused cell-cell infection of PBMC that was prevented by stripping the RBC with EDTA. A monoclonal antibody to DC-SIGN partially inhibited cell-cell HIV-1 infection of PBMC by normal RBC pre-incubated with platelets and HIV-1. We conclude: (a platelet-free EDTA-free plasma from chronically infected HIV-1 patients, although containing viral RNA, is an environment that lacks detectable infectious HIV-1; (b platelets and platelet-RBC complexes, but not purified RBC, bind infectious HIV

  17. Sialoadhesin expressed on IFN-induced monocytes binds HIV-1 and enhances infectivity.

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    Hans Rempel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV-1 infection dysregulates the immune system and alters gene expression in circulating monocytes. Differential gene expression analysis of CD14(+ monocytes from subjects infected with HIV-1 revealed increased expression of sialoadhesin (Sn, CD169, Siglec 1, a cell adhesion molecule first described in a subset of macrophages activated in chronic inflammatory diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed sialoadhesin expression on CD14(+ monocytes by flow cytometry and found significantly higher expression in subjects with elevated viral loads compared to subjects with undetectable viral loads. In cultured CD14(+ monocytes isolated from healthy individuals, sialoadhesin expression was induced by interferon-alpha and interferon-gamma but not tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Using a stringent binding assay, sialoadhesin-expressing monocytes adsorbed HIV-1 through interaction with the sialic acid residues on the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120. Furthermore, monocytes expressing sialoadhesin facilitated HIV-1 trans infection of permissive cells, which occurred in the absence of monocyte self-infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Increased sialoadhesin expression on CD14(+ monocytes occurred in response to HIV-1 infection with maximum expression associated with high viral load. We show that interferons induce sialoadhesin in primary CD14(+ monocytes, which is consistent with an antiviral response during viremia. Our findings suggest that circulating sialoadhesin-expressing monocytes are capable of binding HIV-1 and effectively delivering virus to target cells thereby enhancing the distribution of HIV-1. Sialoadhesin could disseminate HIV-1 to viral reservoirs during monocyte immunosurveillance or migration to sites of inflammation and then facilitate HIV-1 infection of permissive cells.

  18. Association of Neutralization Sensitivity of HIV- 1 Primary Isolates With Biological Properties of Isolates From HIV-1 Infected Chinese Individuals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FA-XIN HEI; HAI-LI TANG; KUN-XUE HONG; JIAN-PING CHEN; HONG PENG; LIN YUAN; JIANG-QING XU; YI-MING SHAO

    2005-01-01

    Objective Although HIV-1 infection is prevalent in many regions in China, it remains largely unknown on the biological characteristics of dominant circulating isolates. This study was designed to isolate the circulating viral strains from different prevalent regions and to characterize their biological properties and neutralization sensitivity. Methods Primary viruses were isolated from fresh PBMCs using the traditional co-culture method and their capacity of inducing syncytium was tested in MT-2 cells. Meanwhile, their coreceptor usage was determined with two cell lines: Magi and GHOST (3) stably expressing CD4 and the chemokine receptor CCR5 or CXCR4. Furthermore, the sensitivity of these viruses to neutralization by HIV-1-infected patients' plasma which were highly active to neutralize SF33 strain, was quantified in GHOST cell-based neutralization assay. Results Six primary viral strains were isolated from 4 separated regions. Isolates LTG0213,LTG0214 and XVS032691 induced syncytia in MT-2 cells, and used CXCR4 as coreceptor. Isolates XJN0021, XJN0091, or SHXDC0041 did not induce syncytia, and used CCR5 as coreceptor. Overall neutralization sensitivity differed among four representative strains: HIV-1 XVS032691>LTG0214>XJN0091≈SHXDC0041. Conclusion The neutralization sensitivity of HIV isolates is linked with the phenotype of isolates, in which syncytium-inducing (SI) or CXCR4-tropic (X4) viruses are more easily neutralized than non-syncytium-inducing (NSI) or CCR5-tropic (R5) viruses. The genetic subtypes based on the phylogeny of env sequences are not classical neutralization serotypes.

  19. Uridine metabolism in HIV-1-infected patients: effect of infection, of antiretroviral therapy and of HIV-1/ART-associated lipodystrophy syndrome.

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    Pere Domingo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Uridine has been advocated for the treatment of HIV-1/HAART-associated lipodystrophy (HALS, although its metabolism in HIV-1-infected patients is poorly understood. METHODS: Plasma uridine concentrations were measured in 35 controls and 221 HIV-1-infected patients and fat uridine in 15 controls and 19 patients. The diagnosis of HALS was performed following the criteria of the Lipodystrophy Severity Grading Scale. Uridine was measured by a binary gradient-elution HPLC method. Analysis of genes encoding uridine metabolizing enzymes in fat was performed with TaqMan RT-PCR. RESULTS: Median plasma uridine concentrations for HIV-1-infected patients were 3.80 µmol/l (interquartile range: 1.60, and for controls 4.60 µmol/l (IQR: 1.8 (P = 0.0009. In fat, they were of 6.0 (3.67, and 2.8 (4.65 nmol/mg of protein, respectively (P = 0.0118. Patients with a mixed HALS form had a median plasma uridine level of 4.0 (IC95%: 3.40-4.80 whereas in those with isolated lipoatrophy it was 3.25 (2.55-4.15 µmol/l/l (P = 0.0066. The expression of uridine cytidine kinase and uridine phosphorylase genes was significantly decreased in all groups of patients with respect to controls. A higher expression of the mRNAs for concentrative nucleoside transporters was found in HIV-1-infected patients with respect to healthy controls. CONCLUSIONS: HIV-1 infection is associated with a decrease in plasma uridine and a shift of uridine to the adipose tissue compartment. Antiretroviral therapy was not associated with plasma uridine concentrations, but pure lipoatrophic HALS was associated with significantly lower plasma uridine concentrations.

  20. The Role of Cationic Polypeptides in Modulating HIV-1 Infection of the Cervicovaginal Mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Amy Liese; Cole, Alexander M.

    2014-01-01

    The mucosa and overlying fluid of the female reproductive tract (FRT) are portals for the heterosexual transmission of HIV-1. Toward the ongoing development of topically applied microbicides and mucosal vaccines against HIV-1, it is evermore important to understand how the dynamic FRT mucosa is involved in controlling transmission and infection of HIV-1. Cationic peptides and proteins are the principal innate immune effector molecules of mucosal surfaces, and interact in a combinatorial fashion to modulate HIV-1 infection of the cervix and vagina. While cationic peptides and proteins have historically been categorized as antimicrobial or have other host-benefitting roles, an increasing number of these molecules have been found to augment HIV-1 infection and potentially antagonize host defense. Complex environmental factors such as hormonal fluctuations and/or bacterial and viral co-infections provide additional challenges to both experimentation and interpretation of results. In the context of heterosexual transmission of HIV-1, this review explores how various cationic peptides and proteins participate in modulating host defense against HIV-1 of the cervicovaginal mucosa. PMID:27025760

  1. The Role of Cationic Polypeptides in Modulating HIV-1 Infection of the Cervicovaginal Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Liese Cole

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The mucosa and overlying fluid of the female reproductive tract (FRT are portals for the heterosexual transmission of HIV-1. Toward the ongoing development of topically applied microbicides and mucosal vaccines against HIV-1, it is evermore important to understand how the dynamic FRT mucosa is involved in controlling transmission and infection of HIV-1. Cationic peptides and proteins are the principal innate immune effector molecules of mucosal surfaces, and interact in a combinatorial fashion to modulate HIV-1 infection of the cervix and vagina. While cationic peptides and proteins have historically been categorized as antimicrobial or have other host-benefitting roles, an increasing number of these molecules have been found to augment HIV-1 infection and potentially antagonize host defense. Complex environmental factors such as hormonal fluctuations and/or bacterial and viral co-infections provide additional challenges to both experimentation and interpretation of results. In the context of heterosexual transmission of HIV-1, this review explores how various cationic peptides and proteins participate in modulating host defense against HIV-1 of the cervicovaginal mucosa.

  2. Elevated Levels of Microbial Translocation Markers and CCL2 Among Older HIV-1-Infected Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Eileen; Lockhart, Ainsley; Huang, Lisa; Robles, Yvonne; Becerril, Carlos; Romero-Tejeda, Marisol; Albrecht, Mary A; Palmer, Christine D; Bosch, Ronald J; Altfeld, Marcus; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Lin, Nina H

    2016-03-01

    The aging of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected population obligates a focus on the interaction between aging, comorbid conditions, and HIV-1. We recruited a cohort of HIV-1-infected men aged ≤ 35 years or ≥ 50 years who were receiving fully suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). We analyzed plasma markers of inflammation; T-cell activation, exhaustion, proliferation; and innate cellular subsets and functional capacity. Levels of lipopolysaccharide and the plasma marker of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 were significantly elevated in older HIV-infected men despite comparable cellular phenotypes. Compared with similarly age-stratified uninfected subjects, older HIV-1-infected adults were also more frequently in the upper quartile of soluble CD14 expression.

  3. HIV-1-infection of T lymphocytes and macrophages affects their migration via Nef

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    Christel eVérollet

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 disseminates in the body and is found in several organs and tissues. While HIV-1 mainly targets both CD4+ T lymphocytes and macrophages, it has contrasting effects between these cell populations. HIV-1 infection namely reduces the viability of CD4+ T cells, whereas infected macrophages are long-lived. In addition, the migration of T cells is reduced by the infection, while HIV-1 differentially modulates the migration modes of macrophages. In 2-dimensions (2D assays, infected macrophages are less motile compared to the control counterparts. In 3D environments, macrophages use two migration modes that are dependent on the matrix architecture: amoeboid and mesenchymal migration. HIV-1 infected macrophages exhibit a reduced amoeboid migration but an enhanced mesenchymal migration, via the viral protein Nef. Indeed, the mesenchymal migration involves podosomes, and Nef stabilizes these cell structures through the activation of the tyrosine kinase Hck, which in turn phosphorylates the Wiskott Aldrich Syndrome Protein (WASP. WASP is a key player in actin remodeling and cell migration. The reprogramed motility of infected macrophages observed in vitro correlates in vivo with enhanced macrophage infiltration in experimental tumors in Nef-transgenic mice compared to control mice.In conclusion, HIV infection of host target cells modifies their migration capacity; we infer that HIV-1 enhances virus spreading in confined environments by reducing T cells migration, and facilitates virus dissemination into different organs and tissues of the human body by enhancing macrophage mesenchymal migration.

  4. Diminished representation of HIV-1 variants containing select drug resistance-conferring mutations in primary HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Dan; Brenner, Bluma; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Moisi, Daniela; Rosberger, Zeev; Roger, Michel; Wainberg, Mark A

    2004-12-15

    This study compared the incidence of HIV-1 variants harboring mutations conferring resistance to thymidine analogues, ie, thymidine analogue mutations (TAMs), nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NNMs), lamivudine (3TC) (ie, M184V), and protease inhibitors (PIs) acquired in primary HIV infection (PHI) (n = 59) to their observed prevalence in a corresponding potential transmitter (PT) population of persons harboring resistant infections (n = 380). Both of these populations in the context of this cohort analysis possessed similar demographics. Whereas the frequencies of observed TAMs, NNMs, M184V, and protease-associated mutations (PRAMs) were similar in the PT groups, the prevalence of M184V and major PI mutations were significantly lower in the PHI group (PHI/PT ratios of 0.14 and 0.39, respectively). There was a decreased prevalence in the PHI population of resistant viruses co-expressing NNMs or TAMs with M184V compared with viruses that harbored NNMs or TAMs in the absence of M184V (P < 0.0001). It was also observed that individuals in the PT subgroups who harbored RT mutations or PRAMs with M184V had lower levels of plasma viremia than individuals who lacked M184V (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that both decreased viremia and viral fitness in the case of M184V-containing HIV-1 variants may impact on viral transmissibility.

  5. The Immune Interaction between HIV-1 Infection and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Bruyn, Elsa; Wilkinson, Robert John

    2016-12-01

    The modulation of tuberculosis (TB)-induced immunopathology caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 coinfection remains incompletely understood but underlies the change seen in the natural history, presentation, and prognosis of TB in such patients. The deleterious combination of these two pathogens has been dubbed a "deadly syndemic," with each favoring the replication of the other and thereby contributing to accelerated disease morbidity and mortality. HIV-1 is the best-recognized risk factor for the development of active TB and accounts for 13% of cases globally. The advent of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) has considerably mitigated this risk. Rapid roll-out of ART globally and the recent recommendation by the World Health Organization (WHO) to initiate ART for everyone living with HIV at any CD4 cell count should lead to further reductions in HIV-1-associated TB incidence because susceptibility to TB is inversely proportional to CD4 count. However, it is important to note that even after successful ART, patients with HIV-1 are still at increased risk for TB. Indeed, in settings of high TB incidence, the occurrence of TB often remains the first presentation of, and thereby the entry into, HIV care. As advantageous as ART-induced immune recovery is, it may also give rise to immunopathology, especially in the lower-CD4-count strata in the form of the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. TB-immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome will continue to impact the HIV-TB syndemic.

  6. Pharmacokinetics of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1-infected children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.L.A. Fraaij (Pieter); J.J.A. van Kampen (Jeroen); D.M. Burger (David); R. de Groot (Ronald)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThe initiation of antiretroviral therapy has resulted in an impressive reduction in the rate of disease progression in AIDS and HIV-1-related deaths in children; however, there are still several major challenges to be faced in order to improve therapy. A major topic that needs to be deal

  7. The SCID-hu mouse as a model for HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrovandi, G M; Feuer, G; Gao, L; Jamieson, B; Kristeva, M; Chen, I S; Zack, J A

    1993-06-24

    During normal fetal ontogeny, one of the first organs to harbour CD4-positive cells is the thymus. This organ could therefore be one of the earliest targets infected by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in utero. HIV-1-infected cells and pathological abnormalities of the thymus have been seen in HIV-1-infected adults and children, and in some fetuses aborted from infected women. Studies of HIV-1 pathogenesis have been hampered by lack of a suitable animal model system. Here we use the SCID-hu mouse as a model to investigate the effect of virus infection on human tissue. The mouse is homozygous for the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) defect. The model is constructed by implanting human fetal liver and thymus under the mouse kidney capsule. A conjoint human organ develops, which allows normal maturation of human thymocytes. After direct inoculation of HIV-1 into these implants, we observed severe depletion of human CD4-bearing cells within a few weeks of infection. This correlated with increasing virus load in the implants. Thus the SCID-hu mouse may be a useful in vivo system for the study of HIV-1-induced pathology.

  8. IL-15 promotes activation and expansion of CD8+ T cells in HIV-1 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, Souheil-Antoine; Freeman, Michael L.; Mudd, Joseph C.; Shive, Carey L.; Reynaldi, Arnold; Estes, Jacob D.; Deleage, Claire; Lucero, Carissa; Anderson, Jodi; Schacker, Timothy W.; Davenport, Miles P.; McCune, Joseph M.; Hunt, Peter W.; Lee, Sulggi A.; Debernardo, Robert L.; Jacobson, Jeffrey M.; Canaday, David H.; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Sieg, Scott F.; Lederman, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    In HIV-1infected patients, increased numbers of circulating CD8+ T cells are linked to increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Here, we identified a bystander mechanism that promotes CD8 T cell activation and expansion in untreated HIV-1infected patients. Compared with healthy controls, untreated HIV-1infected patients have an increased population of proliferating, granzyme B+, CD8+ T cells in circulation. Vβ expression and deep sequencing of CDR3 revealed that in untreated HIV-1 infection, cycling memory CD8 T cells possess a broad T cell repertoire that reflects the repertoire of the resting population. This suggests that cycling is driven by bystander activation, rather than specific antigen exposure. Treatment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with IL-15 induced a cycling, granzyme B+ phenotype in CD8+ T cells. Moreover, elevated IL-15 expression in the lymph nodes of untreated HIV-1infected patients correlated with circulating CD8+ T cell counts and was normalized in these patients following antiretroviral therapy. Together, these results suggest that IL-15 drives bystander activation of CD8+ T cells, which predicts disease progression in untreated HIV-1infected patients and suggests that elevated IL-15 may also drive CD8+ T cell expansion that is linked to increased morbidity and mortality in treated patients. PMID:27322062

  9. Viraemia suppressed in HIV-1-infected humans by broadly neutralizing antibody 3BNC117.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caskey, Marina; Klein, Florian; Lorenzi, Julio C C; Seaman, Michael S; West, Anthony P; Buckley, Noreen; Kremer, Gisela; Nogueira, Lilian; Braunschweig, Malte; Scheid, Johannes F; Horwitz, Joshua A; Shimeliovich, Irina; Ben-Avraham, Sivan; Witmer-Pack, Maggi; Platten, Martin; Lehmann, Clara; Burke, Leah A; Hawthorne, Thomas; Gorelick, Robert J; Walker, Bruce D; Keler, Tibor; Gulick, Roy M; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Schlesinger, Sarah J; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2015-06-25

    HIV-1 immunotherapy with a combination of first generation monoclonal antibodies was largely ineffective in pre-clinical and clinical settings and was therefore abandoned. However, recently developed single-cell-based antibody cloning methods have uncovered a new generation of far more potent broadly neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1 (refs 4, 5). These antibodies can prevent infection and suppress viraemia in humanized mice and nonhuman primates, but their potential for human HIV-1 immunotherapy has not been evaluated. Here we report the results of a first-in-man dose escalation phase 1 clinical trial of 3BNC117, a potent human CD4 binding site antibody, in uninfected and HIV-1-infected individuals. 3BNC117 infusion was well tolerated and demonstrated favourable pharmacokinetics. A single 30 mg kg(-1) infusion of 3BNC117 reduced the viral load in HIV-1-infected individuals by 0.8-2.5 log10 and viraemia remained significantly reduced for 28 days. Emergence of resistant viral strains was variable, with some individuals remaining sensitive to 3BNC117 for a period of 28 days. We conclude that, as a single agent, 3BNC117 is safe and effective in reducing HIV-1 viraemia, and that immunotherapy should be explored as a new modality for HIV-1 prevention, therapy and cure.

  10. The Role of Sexually Transmitted Infections in HIV-1 Progression: A Comprehensive Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen M. Chun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to shared routes of infection, HIV-infected persons are frequently coinfected with other sexually transmitted infections (STIs. Studies have demonstrated the bidirectional relationships between HIV and several STIs, including herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2, hepatitis B and C viruses, human papilloma virus, syphilis, gonorrhea, chlamydia, and trichomonas. HIV-1 may affect the clinical presentation, treatment outcome, and progression of STIs, such as syphilis, HSV-2, and hepatitis B and C viruses. Likewise, the presence of an STI may increase both genital and plasma HIV-1 RNA levels, enhancing the transmissibility of HIV-1, with important public health implications. Regarding the effect of STIs on HIV-1 progression, the most studied interrelationship has been with HIV-1/HSV-2 coinfection, with recent studies showing that antiherpetic medications slow the time to CD4 <200 cells/µL and antiretroviral therapy among coinfected patients. The impact of other chronic STIs (hepatitis B and C on HIV-1 progression requires further study, but some studies have shown increased mortality rates. Treatable, nonchronic STIs (i.e., syphilis, gonorrhea, chlamydia, and trichomonas typically have no or transient impacts on plasma HIV RNA levels that resolve with antimicrobial therapy; no long-term effects on outcomes have been shown. Future studies are advocated to continue investigating the complex interplay between HIV-1 and other STIs.

  11. Schistosomiasis and HIV-1 infection in rural Zimbabwe: effect of treatment of schistosomiasis on CD4 cell count and plasma HIV-1 RNA load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallestrup, Per; Zinyama, Rutendo; Gomo, Exnevia;

    2005-01-01

    To determine whether treatment of schistosomiasis has an effect on the course of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, individuals with schistosomiasis and with or without HIV-1 infection were randomized to receive praziquantel treatment at inclusion or after a delay of 3 months......; 287 participants were included in the study, and 227 (79%) were followed up. Among the 130 participants who were coinfected, those who received early treatment (n=64) had a significantly lower increase in plasma HIV-1 RNA load than did those who received delayed treatment (n=66) (P...

  12. Humans with chimpanzee-like major histocompatibility complex-specificities control HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoof, Ilka; Kesmir, Can; Lund, Ole;

    2008-01-01

    Background: Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules allow immune surveillance by presenting a snapshot of the intracellular state of a cell to circulating cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The MHC class I alleles of an HIV-1 infected individual strongly influence the level of viremia...... and the progression rate to AIDS. Chimpanzees control HIV-1 viral replication and develop a chronic infection without progressing to AIDS. A similar course of disease is observed in human long-term non-progressors. Objective: To investigate if long-term non-progressors and chimpanzees have functional similarities...... in their MHC class I repertoire. Methods: We compared the specificity of groups of human MHC molecules associated with different levels of viremia in HIV-1 infected individuals with those of chimpanzee. Results and conclusion: We demonstrate that human MHC with control of HIV-1 viral load share binding motifs...

  13. Prevalence of asymptomatic urinary tract infections in morbidly obese dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Wynn, Susan G.; Angela L. Witzel; Joseph W. Bartges; Tamberlyn S. Moyers; Claudia A. Kirk

    2016-01-01

    Background. Obesity has reached epidemic proportions in dogs and, as in humans, cost of care has increased due to associated comorbidities. In humans, asymptomatic urinary tract infections (UTI) may be more prevalent in the obese. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) is the term used when UTI are asymptomatic. We hypothesized that morbidly obese dogs are similarly more likely to have asymptomatic bacteriuria than lean, overweight, and moderately obese dogs. Methods. A retrospective study was underta...

  14. HIV-1 infection initiates an inflammatory cascade in human renal tubular epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Michael J; Fan, Cheng; Ross, Michael D; Chu, Te-Huatearina; Shi, Yueyue; Kaufman, Lewis; Zhang, Weijia; Klotman, Mary E; Klotman, Paul E

    2006-05-01

    HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) is the most common cause of chronic renal failure in HIV-infected patients. Tubulointerstitial inflammation is a prominent component of the histopathology of HIVAN. The pathogenesis of HIVAN is a result of infection of renal epithelial cells, but the cellular response to this infection remains poorly defined. In these studies, we used oligonucleotide microarrays to identify differentially expressed genes in renal tubular epithelial cells from a patient with HIVAN at three time points after infection with vesicular stomatitis virus-pseudotyped gag/pol-deleted HIV-1. Very few genes were differentially expressed 12 and 24 hours after infection. Three days after infection, however, 47 genes were upregulated by at least 1.8-fold. The most prominent response of these cells to HIV-1 expression was production of proinflammatory mediators, including chemokines, cytokines, and adhesion molecules. Many of the upregulated genes are targets of interleukin 6 and nuclear factor kappa B regulation, suggesting a central role for these proteins in the response of tubular epithelial cells to HIV-1 infection. Analysis of kidneys from HIV-1 transgenic mice revealed upregulation of many of the proinflammatory genes identified in the microarray studies. These studies provide novel insights into the mechanisms by which HIV-1 infection of tubular epithelial cells leads to tubulointerstitial inflammation and progressive renal injury.

  15. TRIM5 and the Regulation of HIV-1 Infectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Luban

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The past ten years have seen an explosion of information concerning host restriction factors that inhibit the replication of HIV-1 and other retroviruses. Among these factors is TRIM5, an innate immune signaling molecule that recognizes the capsid lattice as soon as the retrovirion core is released into the cytoplasm of otherwise susceptible target cells. Recognition of the capsid lattice has several consequences that include multimerization of TRIM5 into a complementary lattice, premature uncoating of the virion core, and activation of TRIM5 E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Unattached, K63-linked ubiquitin chains are generated that activate the TAK1 kinase complex and downstream inflammatory mediators. Polymorphisms in the capsid recognition domain of TRIM5 explain the observed species-specific differences among orthologues and the relatively weak anti-HIV-1 activity of human TRIM5. Better understanding of the complex interaction between TRIM5 and the retrovirus capsid lattice may someday lead to exploitation of this interaction for the development of potent HIV-1 inhibitors.

  16. Diphtheria Antibodies and T lymphocyte Counts in Patients Infected with HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco A. B. Speranza

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We assessed the IgG levels anti-diphtheria (D-Ab and T cell counts (CD4+ and CD8+ in HIV-1 infected subjects undergoing or not highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. Approximately 70% of all HIV-1 patients were unprotected against diphtheria. There were no differences in D-Ab according to CD4 counts. Untreated patients had higher D-Ab (geometric mean of 0.62 IU/ml than HAART-patients (geometric mean of 0.39 IU/ml. The data indicated the necessity of keeping all HIV-1 patients up-to-date with their vaccination.

  17. LINE-1 retrotransposable element DNA accumulates in HIV-1-infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R Brad; Song, Haihan; Xu, Yang; Garrison, Keith E; Buzdin, Anton A; Anwar, Naveed; Hunter, Diana V; Mujib, Shariq; Mihajlovic, Vesna; Martin, Eric; Lee, Erika; Kuciak, Monika; Raposo, Rui André Saraiva; Bozorgzad, Ardalan; Meiklejohn, Duncan A; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C; Nixon, Douglas F; Ostrowski, Mario A

    2013-12-01

    Type 1 long-interspersed nuclear elements (L1s) are autonomous retrotransposable elements that retain the potential for activity in the human genome but are suppressed by host factors. Retrotransposition of L1s into chromosomal DNA can lead to genomic instability, whereas reverse transcription of L1 in the cytosol has the potential to activate innate immune sensors. We hypothesized that HIV-1 infection would compromise cellular control of L1 elements, resulting in the induction of retrotransposition events. Here, we show that HIV-1 infection enhances L1 retrotransposition in Jurkat cells in a Vif- and Vpr-dependent manner. In primary CD4(+) cells, HIV-1 infection results in the accumulation of L1 DNA, at least the majority of which is extrachromosomal. These data expose an unrecognized interaction between HIV-1 and endogenous retrotransposable elements, which may have implications for the innate immune response to HIV-1 infection, as well as for HIV-1-induced genomic instability and cytopathicity.

  18. Improved quantification of HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells using an optimised method of intracellular HIV-1 gag p24 antigen detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongbing; Yorke, Elisabeth; Hancock, Gemma; Clutton, Genevieve; Sande, Nellia; Angus, Brian; Smyth, Redmond; Mak, Johnson; Dorrell, Lucy

    2013-05-31

    The capacity of CD8+ T cells to inhibit HIV-1 replication in vitro strongly correlates with virus control in vivo. Post-hoc evaluations of HIV-1 vaccine candidates suggest that this immunological parameter is a promising benchmark of vaccine efficacy. Large-scale analysis of CD8+ T cell antiviral activity requires a rapid, robust and economical assay for accurate quantification of HIV-1 infection in primary CD4+ T cells. Detection of intracellular HIV-1 p24 antigen (p24 Ag) by flow cytometry is one such method but it is thought to be less sensitive and quantitative than p24 Ag ELISA. We report that fixation and permeabilisation of HIV-infected cells using paraformaldehyde/50% methanol/Nonidet P-40 instead of a conventional paraformaldehyde/saponin-based protocol improved their detection across multiplicities of infection (MOI) ranging from 10(-2) to 8×10(-5), and by nearly two-fold (pp24 Ag release during culture, thus validating its use as a measure of productive infection. We were also able to quantify infection with a panel of HIV-1 isolates representing the major clades. The protocol described here is rapid and cost-effective compared with ELISA and thus could be a useful component of immune monitoring of HIV-1 vaccines and interventions to reduce viral reservoirs.

  19. Apoptotic killing of HIV-1-infected macrophages is subverted by the viral envelope glycoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Swingler

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Viruses have evolved strategies to protect infected cells from apoptotic clearance. We present evidence that HIV-1 possesses a mechanism to protect infected macrophages from the apoptotic effects of the death ligand TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand. In HIV-1-infected macrophages, the viral envelope protein induced macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF. This pro-survival cytokine downregulated the TRAIL receptor TRAIL-R1/DR4 and upregulated the anti-apoptotic genes Bfl-1 and Mcl-1. Inhibition of M-CSF activity or silencing of Bfl-1 and Mcl-1 rendered infected macrophages highly susceptible to TRAIL. The anti-cancer agent Imatinib inhibited M-CSF receptor activation and restored the apoptotic sensitivity of HIV-1-infected macrophages, suggesting a novel strategy to curtail viral persistence in the macrophage reservoir.

  20. Epigenetic modulations in activated cells early after HIV-1 infection and their possible functional consequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana T Maricato

    Full Text Available Epigenetic modifications refer to a number of biological processes which alter the structure of chromatin and its transcriptional activity such as DNA methylation and histone post-translational processing. Studies have tried to elucidate how the viral genome and its products are affected by epigenetic modifications imposed by cell machinery and how it affects the ability of the virus to either, replicate and produce a viable progeny or be driven to latency. The purpose of this study was to evaluate epigenetic modifications in PBMCs and CD4+ cells after HIV-1 infection analyzing three approaches: (i global DNA- methylation; (ii qPCR array and (iii western blot. HIV-1 infection led to methylation increases in the cellular DNA regardless the activation status of PBMCs. The analysis of H3K9me3 and H3K27me3 suggested a trend towards transcriptional repression in activated cells after HIV-1 infection. Using a qPCR array, we detected genes related to epigenetic processes highly modulated in activated HIV-1 infected cells. SETDB2 and RSK2 transcripts showed highest up-regulation levels. SETDB2 signaling is related to transcriptional silencing while RSK2 is related to either silencing or activation of gene expression depending on the signaling pathway triggered down-stream. In addition, activated cells infected by HIV-1 showed lower CD69 expression and a decrease of IL-2, IFN-γ and metabolism-related factors transcripts indicating a possible functional consequence towards global transcriptional repression found in HIV-1 infected cells. Conversely, based on epigenetic markers studied here, non-stimulated cells infected by HIV-1, showed signs of global transcriptional activation. Our results suggest that HIV-1 infection exerts epigenetic modulations in activated cells that may lead these cells to transcriptional repression with important functional consequences. Moreover, non-stimulated cells seem to increase gene transcription after HIV-1 infection

  1. Use of silver nanoparticles increased inhibition of cell-associated HIV-1 infection by neutralizing antibodies developed against HIV-1 envelope proteins

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    Garza Treviño Elsa N

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV/AIDS pandemic is a worldwide public health issue. There is a need for new approaches to develop new antiviral compounds or other therapeutic strategies to limit viral transmission. The envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp41 of HIV are the main targets for both silver nanoparticles (AgNPs and neutralizing antibodies. There is an urgency to optimize the efficiency of the neutralizing antibodies (NABs. In this study, we demonstrated that there is an additive effect between the four NABs and AgNPs when combined against cell-associated HIV-1 infection in vitro Results Four NABs (Monoclonal antibody to HIV-1 gp41 126-7, HIV-1 gp120 Antiserum PB1 Sub 2, HIV-1 gp120 Antiserum PB1, HIV-1 gp120 Monoclonal Antibody F425 B4e8 with or without AgNPs of 30-50 nm in size were tested against cell free and cell-associated HIVIIIB virus. All NABs inhibited HIV-1 cell free infection at a dose response manner, but with AgNPs an antiviral additive effect was not achieved Although there was no inhibition of infection with cell-associated virus by the NABs itself, AgNPs alone were able to inhibit cell associated virus infection and more importantly, when mixed together with NABs they inhibited the HIV-1 cell associated infection in an additive manner. Discussion The most attractive strategies to deal with the HIV problem are the development of a prophylactic vaccine and the development of effective topical vaginal microbicide. For two decades a potent vaccine that inhibits transmission of infection of HIV has been searched. There are vaccines that elicit NABs but none of them has the efficacy to stop transmission of HIV-1 infection. We propose that with the addition of AgNPs, NABs will have an additive effect and become more potent to inhibit cell-associated HIV-1 transmission/infection. Conclusions The addition of AgNPs to NABs has significantly increased the neutralizing potency of NABs in prevention of cell-associated HIV-1 transmission/infection

  2. The impact of inflammation and immune activation on B cell differentiation during HIV-1 infection

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    Nicolas eRuffin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 infection is characterized by continuous antigenic stimulation, chronic immune activation and impaired survival of T and B cells. A decline of resting memory B cells has previously been reported to occur in both children and adults infected with HIV-1; these cells are responsible for mounting and maintaining an adequate serological response to antigens previously encountered in life through natural infection or vaccination. Further understanding of the mechanisms leading to impaired B cell differentiation and germinal center reaction might be essential to design new HIV vaccines and therapies that could improve humoral immune responses in HIV-1 infected individuals. In the present article we summarize the literature and present our view on critical mechanisms of B cell development which are impaired during HIV-1 infection. We also discuss the impact of microbial translocation, a driving force for persistent inflammation during HIV-1 infection, on survival of terminally differentiated B cells and how the altered expression of cytokines/chemokines pivotal for communication between T and B cells in lymphoid tissues may impair formation of memory B cells.

  3. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection by synthetic peptides derived CCR5 fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Masaki; Baranyi, Lajos; Okada, Noriko; Okada, Hidechika

    2007-02-23

    HIV-1 infection requires interaction of viral envelope protein gp160 with CD4 and a chemokine receptor, CCR5 or CXCR4 as entry coreceptor. We designed HIV-inhibitory peptides targeted to CCR5 using a novel computer program (ANTIS), which searched all possible sense-antisense amino acid pairs between proteins. Seven AHBs were found in CCR5 receptor. All AHB peptides were synthesized and tested for their ability to prevent HIV-1 infection to human T cells. A peptide fragment (LC5) which is a part of the CCR5 receptor corresponding to the loop between the fifth and sixth transmembrane regions (amino acids 222-240) proved to inhibit HIV-1IIIB infection of MT-4 cells. Interaction of these antisense peptides could be involved in sustaining HIV-1 infectivity. LC5 effectively indicated dose-dependent manner, and the suppression was enhanced additively by T20 peptide, which inhibits infection in vitro by disrupting the gp41 conformational changes necessary for membrane fusion. Thus, these results indicate that CCR5-derived AHB peptides could provide a useful tool to define the mechanism(s) of HIV infection, and may provide insight which will contribute to the development of an anti-HIV-1 reagent.

  4. Treatment of primary HIV-1 infection with cyclosporin A coupled with highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzardi, G. Paolo; Harari, Alexandre; Capiluppi, Brunella; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Ellefsen, Kim; Ciuffreda, Donatella; Champagne, Patrick; Bart, Pierre-Alexandre; Chave, Jean-Philippe; Lazzarin, Adriano; Pantaleo, Giuseppe

    2002-01-01

    Primary HIV-1 infection causes extensive immune activation, during which CD4+ T cell activation supports massive HIV-1 production. We tested the safety and the immune-modulating effects of combining cyclosporin A (CsA) treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) during primary HIV-1 infection. Nine adults with primary HIV-1 infection were treated with CsA along with HAART. At week 8, all patients discontinued CsA but maintained HAART. Viral replication was suppressed to a comparable extent in the CsA + HAART cohort and in 29 control patients whose primary infection was treated with HAART alone. CsA restored normal CD4+ T cell levels, both in terms of percentage and absolute numbers. The increase in CD4+ T cells was apparent within a week and persisted throughout the study period. CsA was not detrimental to virus-specific CD8+ or CD4+ T cell responses. At week 48, the proportion of IFN-γ–secreting CD4+ and CD4+CCR7– T cells was significantly higher in the CsA + HAART cohort than in the HAART-alone cohort. In conclusion, rapid shutdown of T cell activation in the early phases of primary HIV-1 infection can have long-term beneficial effects and establish a more favorable immunologic set-point. Appropriate, immune-based therapeutic interventions may represent a valuable complement to HAART for treating HIV infection. PMID:11877476

  5. The impact of inflammation and immune activation on B cell differentiation during HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffin, Nicolas; Thang, Pham Hong; Rethi, Bence; Nilsson, Anna; Chiodi, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    One important pathogenic feature of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection is chronic immune activation and impaired survival of T and B cells. A decline of resting memory B cells was reported to occur in both children and adults infected with HIV-1; these cells are responsible for maintaining an adequate serological response to antigens previously encountered in life through natural infection or vaccination. Further understanding of the mechanisms leading to impaired B cell differentiation and germinal center reaction might be essential to design new HIV vaccines and therapies that could improve humoral immune responses in HIV-1 infected individuals. In the present article we summarize the literature and present our view on critical mechanisms of B cell development impaired during HIV-1 infection. We also discuss the impact of microbial translocation, a driving force for persistent inflammation during HIV-1 infection, on survival of terminally differentiated B cells and how the altered expression of cytokines/chemokines pivotal for communication between T and B cells in lymphoid tissues may impair formation of memory B cells.

  6. Sentinel surveillance of HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance, acute infection and recent infection.

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    Hong-Ha M Truong

    Full Text Available HIV-1 acute infection, recent infection and transmitted drug resistance screening was integrated into voluntary HIV counseling and testing (VCT services to enhance the existing surveillance program in San Francisco. This study describes newly-diagnosed HIV cases and characterizes correlates associated with infection.A consecutive sample of persons presenting for HIV VCT at the municipal sexually transmitted infections (STI clinic from 2004 to 2006 (N = 9,868 were evaluated by standard enzyme-linked immunoassays (EIA. HIV antibody-positive specimens were characterized as recent infections using a less-sensitive EIA. HIV-RNA pooled testing was performed on HIV antibody-negative specimens to identify acute infections. HIV antibody-positive and acute infection specimens were evaluated for drug resistance by sequence analysis. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to evaluate associations. The 380 newly-diagnosed HIV cases included 29 acute infections, 128 recent infections, and 47 drug-resistant cases, with no significant increases or decreases in prevalence over the three years studied. HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance prevalence was 11.0% in 2004, 13.4% in 2005 and 14.9% in 2006 (p = 0.36. Resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI was the most common pattern detected, present in 28 cases of resistance (59.6%. Among MSM, recent infection was associated with amphetamine use (AOR = 2.67; p<0.001, unprotected anal intercourse (AOR = 2.27; p<0.001, sex with a known HIV-infected partner (AOR = 1.64; p = 0.02, and history of gonorrhea (AOR = 1.62; p = 0.03.New HIV diagnoses, recent infections, acute infections and transmitted drug resistance prevalence remained stable between 2004 and 2006. Resistance to NNRTI comprised more than half of the drug-resistant cases, a worrisome finding given its role as the backbone of first-line antiretroviral therapy in San Francisco as well as worldwide. The integration of HIV-1 drug

  7. Sentinel Surveillance of HIV-1 Transmitted Drug Resistance, Acute Infection and Recent Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Hong-Ha M.; Kellogg, Timothy A.; McFarland, Willi; Louie, Brian; Klausner, Jeffrey D.; Philip, Susan S.; Grant, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Background HIV-1 acute infection, recent infection and transmitted drug resistance screening was integrated into voluntary HIV counseling and testing (VCT) services to enhance the existing surveillance program in San Francisco. This study describes newly-diagnosed HIV cases and characterizes correlates associated with infection. Methodology/Principal Findings A consecutive sample of persons presenting for HIV VCT at the municipal sexually transmitted infections (STI) clinic from 2004 to 2006 (N = 9,868) were evaluated by standard enzyme-linked immunoassays (EIA). HIV antibody-positive specimens were characterized as recent infections using a less-sensitive EIA. HIV-RNA pooled testing was performed on HIV antibody-negative specimens to identify acute infections. HIV antibody-positive and acute infection specimens were evaluated for drug resistance by sequence analysis. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to evaluate associations. The 380 newly-diagnosed HIV cases included 29 acute infections, 128 recent infections, and 47 drug-resistant cases, with no significant increases or decreases in prevalence over the three years studied. HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance prevalence was 11.0% in 2004, 13.4% in 2005 and 14.9% in 2006 (p = 0.36). Resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) was the most common pattern detected, present in 28 cases of resistance (59.6%). Among MSM, recent infection was associated with amphetamine use (AOR = 2.67; p<0.001), unprotected anal intercourse (AOR = 2.27; p<0.001), sex with a known HIV-infected partner (AOR = 1.64; p = 0.02), and history of gonorrhea (AOR = 1.62; p = 0.03). Conclusions New HIV diagnoses, recent infections, acute infections and transmitted drug resistance prevalence remained stable between 2004 and 2006. Resistance to NNRTI comprised more than half of the drug-resistant cases, a worrisome finding given its role as the backbone of first

  8. The impact of pregnancy on the HIV-1-specific T cell function in infected pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hygino, Joana; Vieira, Morgana M; Kasahara, Taissa M; Xavier, Luciana F; Blanco, Bernardo; Guillermo, Landi V C; Filho, Renato G S; Saramago, Carmen S M; Lima-Silva, Agostinho A; Oliveira, Ariane L; Guimarães, Vander; Andrade, Arnaldo F B; Bento, Cleonice A M

    2012-12-01

    Evidences indicate that pregnancy can alter the Ag-specific T-cell responses. This work aims to evaluate the impact of pregnancy on the in vitro HIV-1-specific immune response. As compared with non-pregnant patients, lower T-cell proliferation and higher IL-10 production were observed in T-cell cultures from pregnant patients following addition of either mitogens or HIV-1 antigens. In our system, the main T lymphocyte subset involved in producing IL-10 was CD4(+)FoxP3(-). Depletion of CD4(+) cells elevated TNF-α and IFN-γ production. Interestingly, the in vitro HIV-1 replication was lower in cell cultures from pregnant patients, and it was inversely related to IL-10 production. In these cultures, the neutralization of IL-10 by anti-IL-10 mAb elevated TNF-α release and HIV-1 replication. In conclusion, our results reveal that pregnancy-related events should favor the expansion of HIV-1-specific IL-10-secreting CD4(+) T-cells in HIV-1-infected women, which should, in the scenario of pregnancy, help to reduce the risk of vertical HIV-1 transmission.

  9. HIV-1 infected and immune competent mononuclear phagocytes induce quantitative alterations in neuronal dendritic arbor: relevance for HIV-1-associated dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J; Thylin, M R; Cotter, R L; Lopez, A L; Ghorpade, A; Persidsky, Y; Xiong, H; Leisman, G B; Che, M H; Gendelman, H E

    2001-10-01

    Neuronal loss, alterations in dendritic arbor, and decreased synaptic density, in infected brain tissue, are neuropathological signatures of HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD). Brain mononuclear phagocyte (MP) (macrophage and microglia) secretory products can effect neuronal compromise, although the underlying mechanism(s) remain incompletely defined. To these ends, we quantitatively assessed the effects of virus-infected and/or immune activated MP secretory products on multiple aspects of neuronal morphology. Rat cortical and hippocampal neurons were exposed to secretory products from HIV-1-infected and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated human monocyte-derived macrophage (MDM). Our assays for alterations in neuronal dendritic arbor and cell loss included the quantification of neurofilament (NF), neuron-specific enolase (NSE), and MAP-2 by ELISA and cellular morphology. MDM conditioned media (MCM) enhanced neuronal survival. HIV-1 infection or activation by LPS had modest neurotoxic effects. In contrast, the combination of HIV-1 infection and activation of MDM produced significant neurotoxicity. Such MDM products altered dendritic arbor, decreased synaptic density, and increased LDH release. Comparable neurotrophic/toxic responses were observed when neurons were exposed to MCM collected from 12 separate human donors. Similar responses were observed with MCM from human fetal microglia, further supporting the role of HIV-1-infected and immune-activated brain MP in the overall neurotoxic responses. This work provides quantitative measures of neuronal damage by which virus infected and activated MP can elicit neuronal injury in HAD.

  10. Regulatory T cells expanded from HIV-1-infected individuals maintain phenotype, TCR repertoire and suppressive capacity.

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    Mathieu Angin

    Full Text Available While modulation of regulatory T cell (Treg function and adoptive Treg transfer are being explored as therapeutic modalities in the context of autoimmune diseases, transplantation and cancer, their role in HIV-1 pathogenesis remains less well defined. Controversy persists regarding their beneficial or detrimental effects in HIV-1 disease, which warrants further detailed exploration. Our objectives were to investigate if functional CD4(+ Tregs can be isolated and expanded from HIV-1-infected individuals for experimental or potential future therapeutic use and to determine phenotype and suppressive capacity of expanded Tregs from HIV-1 positive blood and tissue. Tregs and conventional T cell controls were isolated from blood and gut-associated lymphoid tissue of individuals with HIV-1 infection and healthy donors using flow-based cell-sorting. The phenotype of expanded Tregs was assessed by flow-cytometry and quantitative PCR. T-cell receptor ß-chain (TCR-β repertoire diversity was investigated by deep sequencing. Flow-based T-cell proliferation and chromium release cytotoxicity assays were used to determine Treg suppressive function. Tregs from HIV-1 positive individuals, including infants, were successfully expanded from PBMC and GALT. Expanded Tregs expressed high levels of FOXP3, CTLA4, CD39 and HELIOS and exhibited a highly demethylated TSDR (Treg-specific demethylated region, characteristic of Treg lineage. The TCRß repertoire was maintained following Treg expansion and expanded Tregs remained highly suppressive in vitro. Our data demonstrate that Tregs can be expanded from blood and tissue compartments of HIV-1+ donors with preservation of Treg phenotype, function and TCR repertoire. These results are highly relevant for the investigation of potential future therapeutic use, as currently investigated for other disease states and hold great promise for detailed studies on the role of Tregs in HIV-1 infection.

  11. Cell-type specific requirements for thiol/disulfide exchange during HIV-1 entry and infection

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    Stantchev Tzanko S

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of disulfide bond remodeling in HIV-1 infection is well described, but the process still remains incompletely characterized. At present, the data have been predominantly obtained using established cell lines and/or CXCR4-tropic laboratory-adapted virus strains. There is also ambiguity about which disulfide isomerases/ reductases play a major role in HIV-1 entry, as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI and/or thioredoxin (Trx have emerged as the two enzymes most often implicated in this process. Results We have extended our previous findings and those of others by focusing on CCR5-using HIV-1 strains and their natural targets - primary human macrophages and CD4+ T lymphocytes. We found that the nonspecific thiol/disulfide exchange inhibitor, 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid (DTNB, significantly reduced HIV-1 entry and infection in cell lines, human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM, and also phytohemagglutinin (PHA-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. Subsequent studies were performed using specific anti-PDI or Trx monoclonal antibodies (mAb in HIV-1 envelope pseudotyped and wild type (wt virus infection systems. Although human donor-to-donor variability was observed as expected, Trx appeared to play a greater role than PDI in HIV-1 infection of MDM. In contrast, PDI, but not Trx, was predominantly involved in HIV-1 entry and infection of the CD4+/CCR5+ T cell line, PM-1, and PHA-stimulated primary human T lymphocytes. Intriguingly, both PDI and Trx were present on the surface of MDM, PM-1 and PHA-stimulated CD4+ T cells. However, considerably lower levels of Trx were detected on freshly isolated CD4+ lymphocytes, compared to PHA-stimulated cells. Conclusions Our findings clearly demonstrate the role of thiol/disulfide exchange in HIV-1 entry in primary T lymphocytes and MDM. They also establish a cell-type specificity regarding the involvement of particular disulfide isomerases/reductases in this

  12. Comparative efficiency of HIV-1-infected T cell killing by NK cells, monocytes and neutrophils.

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    Smalls-Mantey, Adjoa; Connors, Mark; Sattentau, Quentin J

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 infected cells are eliminated in infected individuals by a variety of cellular mechanisms, the best characterized of which are cytotoxic T cell and NK cell-mediated killing. An additional antiviral mechanism is antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Here we use primary CD4(+) T cells infected with the BaL clone of HIV-1 as target cells and autologous NK cells, monocytes, and neutrophils as effector cells, to quantify the cytotoxicity mediated by the different effectors. This was carried out in the presence or absence of HIV-1-specific antiserum to assess antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. We show that at the same effector to target ratio, NK cells and monocytes mediate similar levels of both antibody-dependent and antibody-independent killing of HIV-1-infected T cells. Neutrophils mediated significant antibody-dependent killing of targets, but were less effective than monocytes or NK cells. These data have implications for acquisition and control of HIV-1 in natural infection and in the context of vaccination.

  13. Acute risk for hepatitis E virus infection among HIV-1-positive pregnant women in central Africa

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    Caron Mélanie

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis E virus (HEV, an enterically transmitted pathogen, is highly endemic in several African countries. Pregnant women are at particularly high risk for acute or severe hepatitis E. In Gabon, a central African country, the prevalence of antibodies to HEV among pregnant women is 14.1%. Recent studies have demonstrated unusual patterns of hepatitis E (chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis among immunodeficient patients. Findings We investigated the prevalence of antibodies to HEV among pregnant women infected with HIV-1 or HTLV-1 in Gabon. Of 243 samples collected, 183 were positive for HIV-1 and 60 for HTLV-1; 16 women (6.6% had IgG antibodies to HEV. The seroprevalence was higher among HIV-1-infected women (7.1% than HTLV-1-infected women (5.0%. Moreover, the HIV-1 viral load was significantly increased (p ≤ 0.02 among women with past-HEV exposure (1.3E+05 vs 5.7E+04 copies per ml, whereas no difference was found in HTLV-1 proviral load (9.0E+01 vs 1.1E+03 copies per ml. Conclusions These data provide evidence that HIV-1-infected women are at risk for acute or severe infection if they are exposed to HEV during pregnancy, with an increased viral load.

  14. Psoralen/UV inactivation of HIV-1-infected cells for use in cytologic and immunologic procedures

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    Watson, A.J.; Klaniecki, J.; Hanson, C.V. (Oncogen Corporation, Seattle, WA (USA))

    1990-04-01

    A rapid procedure for the inactivation of HIV-1-infected cells using psoralen and ultraviolet (UV) light is described. Exposure of HIV-1-infected cells to 5 micrograms/ml psoralen followed by UV irradiation (320-380 nm) for 5 minutes yields cells that are noninfectious as assessed by extended infectivity assays. The psoralen/UV inactivation procedure described is effective with cells chronically or acutely infected with HIV-1 and is unaffected by cell densities up to 12 x 10(6)/ml. At 5 micrograms/ml psoralen does little damage to cellular permeability as shown by the ability of treated cells to exclude trypan blue and propidium iodide. Psoralen/UV treatment of HIV-1-infected cells does not cause a significant decrease in the reactivity of HIV-1 core and envelope antigens or cellular antigens to monoclonal antibodies. Experiments are presented demonstrating the use of these cells for flow cytometry studies and for cell surface labeling using the lactoperoxidase {sup 125}I iodination procedure.

  15. Extracellular ATP acts on P2Y2 purinergic receptors to facilitate HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séror, Claire; Melki, Marie-Thérèse; Subra, Frédéric; Raza, Syed Qasim; Bras, Marlène; Saïdi, Héla; Nardacci, Roberta; Voisin, Laurent; Paoletti, Audrey; Law, Frédéric; Martins, Isabelle; Amendola, Alessandra; Abdul-Sater, Ali A; Ciccosanti, Fabiola; Delelis, Olivier; Niedergang, Florence; Thierry, Sylvain; Said-Sadier, Najwane; Lamaze, Christophe; Métivier, Didier; Estaquier, Jérome; Fimia, Gian Maria; Falasca, Laura; Casetti, Rita; Modjtahedi, Nazanine; Kanellopoulos, Jean; Mouscadet, Jean-François; Ojcius, David M; Piacentini, Mauro; Gougeon, Marie-Lise; Kroemer, Guido; Perfettini, Jean-Luc

    2011-08-29

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) can activate purinergic receptors of the plasma membrane and modulate multiple cellular functions. We report that ATP is released from HIV-1 target cells through pannexin-1 channels upon interaction between the HIV-1 envelope protein and specific target cell receptors. Extracellular ATP then acts on purinergic receptors, including P2Y2, to activate proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2) kinase and transient plasma membrane depolarization, which in turn stimulate fusion between Env-expressing membranes and membranes containing CD4 plus appropriate chemokine co-receptors. Inhibition of any of the constituents of this cascade (pannexin-1, ATP, P2Y2, and Pyk2) impairs the replication of HIV-1 mutant viruses that are resistant to conventional antiretroviral agents. Altogether, our results reveal a novel signaling pathway involved in the early steps of HIV-1 infection that may be targeted with new therapeutic approaches.

  16. Subgroup and resistance analyses of raltegravir for resistant HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, David A; Steigbigel, Roy T; Gatell, Jose M;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We evaluated the efficacy of raltegravir and the development of viral resistance in two identical trials involving patients who were infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) with triple-class drug resistance and in whom antiretroviral therapy had failed. METHODS: We......, regardless of the baseline values of HIV-1 RNA level; CD4 cell count; genotypic or phenotypic sensitivity score; use or nonuse of darunavir, enfuvirtide, or both in optimized background therapy; or demographic characteristics. Among patients in the two studies combined who were using both enfuvirtide...... and darunavir for the first time, HIV-1 RNA levels of less than 50 copies per milliliter were achieved in 89% of raltegravir recipients and 68% of placebo recipients. HIV-1 RNA levels of less than 50 copies per milliliter were achieved in 69% and 80% of the raltegravir recipients and in 47% and 57...

  17. HIV-1 diversity and drug-resistant mutations in infected individuals in Changchun, China.

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    Ming Yan

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection has been detected in all provinces of China. Although epidemiological and phylogenetic studies have been conducted in many regions, such analyses are lacking from Jilin province in northeastern China. METHOD: Epidemiological and phylogenetic analyses, as well as detection of drug-resistant mutations, were conducted on 57 HIV-1 infected patients from Changchun city identified and confirmed through annual surveillance by local Centers for Disease Control in Jilin province of northeastern China in 2012. RESULTS: Sexual contact was determined to be the major pathway for HIV-1 transmission in Jilin, where hetero- and homosexual activities contributed almost equally. Phylogenetic analyses detected multiple subtypes of HIV-1 including subtype G circulating in Jilin, with multiple origins for each of them. Both subtype B and CRF01_AE were dominant, and evidence of subtype B transmitting between different high-risk groups was observed. Mutations in the viral protease at position 71 indicated the presence of a selective pressure. Several drug-resistant mutations were detected, although they were predicted with low-level resistance to antiviral treatments. CONCLUSIONS: Information from this study fills the gap in knowledge of HIV-1 transmission in Changchun city, Jilin province, China. By revealing the origin and evolutionary status of local HIV-1 strains, this work contributes to ongoing efforts in the control and prevention of AIDS.

  18. Ampelopsin, a Small Molecule Inhibitor of HIV-1 Infection Targeting HIV Entry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DE-YU LIU; JIAN-TAO YE; WEN-HUI YANG; JIN YAN; CHANG-HONG ZENG; SA ZENG

    2004-01-01

    Objective To investigate the anti-HIV effects of ampelopsin and its interaction with HIV-1 coreceptor CXCR4. Methods Through anti-virus experiments in vitro, the inhibitory effect of ampelopsin on HIV-1 infection was verified. Chemotaxis assay was performed to show the ability to induce PBMCs migration by ampelopsin, RANTES and SDF-1(. Fluorescence labelling monoclonal antibody was utilized to observe the interaction of ampelopsin and CXCR4. Mice immunosuppressant model was also established to detail the role ampelopsin played in regulating cellular immunological functions. Results Ampelopsin could protect sensitive cells against HIV-1 infection and dramatically reduce HIV-1 antigen P24 expression. HIV-1SF33 attaching to MT-4 cells was interfered by ampelopsin, and the EC50 was 0.175 mg/mL for cellular protection and 0.024 mg/mL for P24 inhibition. At co-cultivating phase, EC50 was 0.229 mg/mL and 0.197 mg/mL respectively. Furthermore, the EC50 was 0.179 mg/mL and 0.348 mg/mL in acute infection. Human PBMCs migration was induced after being challenged with ampelopsin or chemokines, and synergistic action was observed during co-treatment. Ampelopsin alone resulted in maximal chemotaxis at 1 mg/mL. HIV-1 co-receptor CXCR4 on the surface of PBMCs was decreased by internalization, which indicated the effect of ampelopsin on CXCR4. About 70% CXCR4 was reduced by ampelopsin at 1 mg/mL. Ampelopsin also augmented cellular immunological functions in immunosuppressive mice. Conclusion Ampelopsin displays a strong inhibitive role during HIV-1 absorption, incubation and acute infection. These results are coincident with its immune enhancement.

  19. KI and WU Polyomaviruses and CD4+ Cell Counts in HIV-1infected Patients, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babakir-Mina, Muhammed; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Farchi, Francesca; Bergallo, Massimiliano; Cavallo, Rossana; Adorno, Gaspare; Perno, Carlo Federico

    2010-01-01

    To investigate an association between KI and WU polyomavirus (KIPyV and WUPyV) infections and CD4+ cell counts, we tested HIV-1–positive patients and blood donors. No association was found between cell counts and virus infections in HIV-1–positive patients. Frequency of KIPyV infection was similar for both groups. WUPyV was more frequent in HIV-1–positive patients. PMID:20735940

  20. Mutagen-mediated enhancement of HIV-1 replication in persistently infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Jiménez, Carmen; Olivares, Isabel; de Ávila Lucas, Ana Isabel; Toledano, Víctor; Gutiérrez-Rivas, Mónica; Lorenzo-Redondo, Ramón; Grande-Pérez, Ana; Domingo, Esteban; López-Galíndez, Cecilio

    2012-03-15

    Lethal mutagenesis, a new antiviral strategy to extinguish virus through elevated mutation rates, was explored in H61-D cells an HIV-1 persistently infected lymphoid cell line. Three mutagenic agents: 5-hydroxy-2(')-deoxycytidine (5-OHdC), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and 2,2(')-difluoro-2(')-deoxycytidine (gemcitabine) were used. After 54 passages, treatments with 5-FU and gemcitabine reduced virus infectivity, p24 and RT activity. Treatment with the pyrimidine analog 5-OHdC resulted in increases of p24 production, RT activity and infectivity. Rise in viral replication by 5-OHdC during HIV-1 persistence is in contrast with its inhibitory effect in acute infections. Viral replication enhancement by 5-OHdC was associated with an increase in intracellular HIV-1 RNA mutations. Mechanisms of HIV-1 replication enhancement by 5-OHdC are unknown but some potential factors are discussed. Increase of HIV-1 replication by 5-OHdC cautions against the use, without previous analyses, of mutagenic nucleoside analogs for AIDS treatment.

  1. Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol treatment during human monocyte differentiation reduces macrophage susceptibility to HIV-1 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Julie C.; Appelberg, Sofia; Goldberger, Bruce A.; Klein, Thomas W.; Sleasman, John W.; Goodenow, Maureen M.

    2014-01-01

    The major psychoactive component of marijuana, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), also acts to suppress inflammatory responses. Receptors for THC, CB1, CB2, and GPR55, are differentially expressed on multiple cell types including monocytes and macrophages, which are important modulators of inflammation in vivo and target cells for HIV-1 infection. Use of recreational and medicinal marijuana is increasing, but the consequences of marijuana exposure on HIV-1 infection are unclear. Ex vivo studies were designed to investigate effects on HIV-1 infection in macrophages exposed to THC during or following differentiation. THC treatment of primary human monocytes during differentiation reduced HIV-1 infection of subsequent macrophages by replication competent or single cycle CCR5 using viruses. In contrast, treatment of macrophages with THC immediately prior to or continuously following HIV-1 exposure failed to alter infection. Specific receptor agonists indicated that the THC effect during monocyte differentiation was mediated primarily through CB2. THC reduced the number of p24 positive cells with little to no effect on virus production per infected cell, while quantitation of intracellular viral gag pinpointed the THC effect to an early event in the viral life cycle. Cells treated during differentiation with THC displayed reduced expression of CD14, CD16, and CD163 and donor dependent increases in mRNA expression of selected viral restriction factors, suggesting a fundamental alteration in phenotype. Ultimately, the mechanism of THC suppression of HIV-1 infection was traced to a reduction in cell surface HIV receptor (CD4, CCR5 and CXCR4) expression that diminished entry efficiency. PMID:24562630

  2. Leukotrienes inhibit early stages of HIV-1 infection in monocyte-derived microglia-like cells

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    Bertin Jonathan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microglia are one of the main cell types to be productively infected by HIV-1 in the central nervous system (CNS. Leukotriene B4 (LTB4 and cysteinyl-leukotrienes such as LTC4 are some of the proinflammatory molecules produced in infected individuals that contribute to neuroinflammation. We therefore sought to investigate the role of leukotrienes (LTs in HIV-1 infection of microglial cells. Methods To evaluate the role of LTs on HIV-1 infection in the CNS, monocyte-derived microglial-like cells (MDMis were utilized in this study. Leukotriene-treated MDMis were infected with either fully replicative brain-derived HIV-1 isolates (YU2 or R5-tropic luciferase-encoding particles in order to assess viral production and expression. The efficacy of various steps of the replication cycle was evaluated by means of p24 quantification by ELISA, luciferase activity determination and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Results We report in this study that virus replication is reduced upon treatment of MDMis with LTB4 and LTC4. Additional experiments indicate that these proinflammatory molecules alter the pH-independent entry and early post-fusion events of the viral life cycle. Indeed, LT treatment induced a diminution in integrated proviral DNA while reverse-transcribed viral products remained unaffected. Furthermore, decreased C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5 surface expression was observed in LT-treated MDMis. Finally, the effect of LTs on HIV-1 infection in MDMis appears to be mediated partly via a signal transduction pathway involving protein kinase C. Conclusions These data show for the first time that LTs influence microglial cell infection by HIV-1, and may be a factor in the control of viral load in the CNS.

  3. Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol treatment during human monocyte differentiation reduces macrophage susceptibility to HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Julie C; Appelberg, Sofia; Goldberger, Bruce A; Klein, Thomas W; Sleasman, John W; Goodenow, Maureen M

    2014-06-01

    The major psychoactive component of marijuana, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), also acts to suppress inflammatory responses. Receptors for THC, CB1, CB2, and GPR55, are differentially expressed on multiple cell types including monocytes and macrophages, which are important modulators of inflammation in vivo and target cells for HIV-1 infection. Use of recreational and medicinal marijuana is increasing, but the consequences of marijuana exposure on HIV-1 infection are unclear. Ex vivo studies were designed to investigate effects on HIV-1 infection in macrophages exposed to THC during or following differentiation. THC treatment of primary human monocytes during differentiation reduced HIV-1 infection of subsequent macrophages by replication competent or single cycle CCR5 using viruses. In contrast, treatment of macrophages with THC immediately prior to or continuously following HIV-1 exposure failed to alter infection. Specific receptor agonists indicated that the THC effect during monocyte differentiation was mediated primarily through CB2. THC reduced the number of p24 positive cells with little to no effect on virus production per infected cell, while quantitation of intracellular viral gag pinpointed the THC effect to an early event in the viral life cycle. Cells treated during differentiation with THC displayed reduced expression of CD14, CD16, and CD163 and donor dependent increases in mRNA expression of selected viral restriction factors, suggesting a fundamental alteration in phenotype. Ultimately, the mechanism of THC suppression of HIV-1 infection was traced to a reduction in cell surface HIV receptor (CD4, CCR5 and CXCR4) expression that diminished entry efficiency.

  4. Acceleration of age-associated methylation patterns in HIV-1-infected adults.

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    Tammy M Rickabaugh

    Full Text Available Patients with treated HIV-1-infection experience earlier occurrence of aging-associated diseases, raising speculation that HIV-1-infection, or antiretroviral treatment, may accelerate aging. We recently described an age-related co-methylation module comprised of hundreds of CpGs; however, it is unknown whether aging and HIV-1-infection exert negative health effects through similar, or disparate, mechanisms. We investigated whether HIV-1-infection would induce age-associated methylation changes. We evaluated DNA methylation levels at >450,000 CpG sites in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC of young (20-35 and older (36-56 adults in two separate groups of participants. Each age group for each data set consisted of 12 HIV-1-infected and 12 age-matched HIV-1-uninfected samples for a total of 96 samples. The effects of age and HIV-1 infection on methylation at each CpG revealed a strong correlation of 0.49, p<1 x 10(-200 and 0.47, p<1 x 10(-200. Weighted gene correlation network analysis (WGCNA identified 17 co-methylation modules; module 3 (ME3 was significantly correlated with age (cor=0.70 and HIV-1 status (cor=0.31. Older HIV-1+ individuals had a greater number of hypermethylated CpGs across ME3 (p=0.015. In a multivariate model, ME3 was significantly associated with age and HIV status (Data set 1: βage=0.007088, p=2.08 x 10(-9; βHIV=0.099574, p=0.0011; Data set 2: βage=0.008762, p=1.27 x 10(-5; βHIV=0.128649, p=0.0001. Using this model, we estimate that HIV-1 infection accelerates age-related methylation by approximately 13.7 years in data set 1 and 14.7 years in data set 2. The genes related to CpGs in ME3 are enriched for polycomb group target genes known to be involved in cell renewal and aging. The overlap between ME3 and an aging methylation module found in solid tissues is also highly significant (Fisher-exact p=5.6 x 10(-6, odds ratio=1.91. These data demonstrate that HIV-1 infection is associated with methylation patterns that

  5. Alterations in the nuclear proteome of HIV-1 infected T-cells

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    DeBoer, Jason [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Creighton University, 2500 California Plaza, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Jagadish, Teena; Haverland, Nicole A. [Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Neuroscience, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198 (United States); Madson, Christian J. [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Creighton University, 2500 California Plaza, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Ciborowski, Pawel [Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Neuroscience, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198 (United States); The Nebraska Center for Virology, University of Nebraska, Lincoln 68583 (United States); Belshan, Michael, E-mail: michaelbelshan@creighton.edu [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Creighton University, 2500 California Plaza, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); The Nebraska Center for Virology, University of Nebraska, Lincoln 68583 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Virus infection of a cell involves the appropriation of host factors and the innate defensive response of the cell. The identification of proteins critical for virus replication may lead to the development of novel, cell-based inhibitors. In this study we mapped the changes in T-cell nuclei during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) at 20 hpi. Using a stringent data threshold, a total of 13 and 38 unique proteins were identified in infected and uninfected cells, respectively, across all biological replicates. An additional 15 proteins were found to be differentially regulated between infected and control nuclei. STRING analysis identified four clusters of protein–protein interactions in the data set related to nuclear architecture, RNA regulation, cell division, and cell homeostasis. Immunoblot analysis confirmed the differential expression of several proteins in both C8166-45 and Jurkat E6-1 T-cells. These data provide a map of the response in host cell nuclei upon HIV-1 infection. - Highlights: • We identify changes in the expression of nuclear proteins during HIV-1 infection. • 163 nuclear proteins were found differentially regulated during HIV-1 infection. • Bioinformatic analysis identified several nuclear pathways altered by HIV infection. • Candidate factors were validated in two independent cell lines.

  6. Impaired Phenotype and Function of T Follicular Helper Cells in HIV-1-Infected Children Receiving ART.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekele, Yonas; Amu, Sylvie; Bobosha, Kidist; Lantto, Rebecka; Nilsson, Anna; Endale, Birtukan; Gebre, Meseret; Aseffa, Abraham; Rethi, Bence; Howe, Rawleigh; Chiodi, Francesca

    2015-07-01

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are important components in development of specific humoral immune responses; whether the number and biology of Tfh cells is impaired in HIV-1-infected children is not yet studied.The frequency, phenotype, and function of Tfh cells and B cells were determined in blood of HIV-1-infected children receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) and age-matched controls. Flow cytometry was used to characterize the frequency of Tfh cells and B cell subsets. Cytokine expression was measured after in vitro activation of Tfh cells.A reduced frequency of memory Tfh cells (P < 0.001) was identified in HIV-1-infected children and, on these cells, a reduced expression of programmed death-1 (PD-1) and inducible T cell costimulator (ICOS) (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01). Upon activation, the capacity of Tfh cells to express IL-4, an important cytokine for B cell function, was impaired in HIV-1-infected children.B cell subpopulations in HIV-1-infected children displayed significant differences from the control group: the frequency of resting memory (RM) B cells was reduced (P < 0.01) whereas the frequency of exhausted memory B cells increased (P < 0.001). Interestingly, the decline of RM cells correlated with the reduction of memory Tfh cells (P = 0.02).Our study shows that function and phenotype of Tfh cells, pivotal cells for establishment of adaptive B cell responses, are impaired during HIV-1 infection in children. A consistent reduction of memory Tfh cells is associated with declined frequencies of RM B cells, creating a novel link between dysfunctional features of these cell types, major players in establishment of humoral immunity.

  7. Characterization of HIV-1 Gag-specific T cell responses in chronically infected Indian population

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    Kaushik, S; Vajpayee, M; Wig, N; Seth, P

    2005-01-01

    India is at the epicentre of the global HIV/AIDS epidemic in South-east Asia, predominated by subtype C infections. It is important to characterize HIV-1-specific T cell responses in this particular population with the aim of identifying protective correlates of immunity to control HIV-1 infection. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the breadth and magnitude of T cell responses directed at HIV-1 subtype C Gag, one of the most conserved HIV-1 proteins. The study population consisted of antiretroviral naive, chronic HIV-1 subtype C-infected individuals at various stages of infection. We used recent advanced techniques such as enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay and intracellular cytokine staining to quantify the total CD4+ and CD8+ T cell response to HIV-1 gag at single peptide level, regardless of HLA haplotype of the infected individual. The p24-Gag was identified as the most frequently recognized subunit protein with the greatest magnitude of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. Stronger and broader CD8 T cell responses were recognized, contrasting with the weaker and narrower CD4 T cell responses with regard to Gag protein subunits. The magnitude of the HIV-specific interferon (IFN)-γ responses was observed to be higher than the corresponding interleukin (IL)-2 response, indicating the persistence of antigenic load in chronically infected Indian population due to the probable dysfunction of HIV-specific, IFN-γ-secreting CD8 T cells in absence of IL-2 help. PMID:16232229

  8. Different pattern of immunoglobulin gene usage by HIV-1 compared to non-HIV-1 antibodies derived from the same infected subject.

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    Liuzhe Li

    Full Text Available A biased usage of immunoglobulin (Ig genes is observed in human anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs resulting probably from compensation to reduced usage of the VH3 family genes, while the other alternative suggests that this bias usage is due to antigen requirements. If the antigen structure is responsible for the preferential usage of particular Ig genes, it may have certain implications for HIV vaccine development by the targeting of particular Ig gene-encoded B cell receptors to induce neutralizing anti-HIV-1 antibodies. To address this issue, we have produced HIV-1 specific and non-HIV-1 mAbs from an infected individual and analyzed the Ig gene usage. Green-fluorescence labeled virus-like particles (VLP expressing HIV-1 envelope (Env proteins of JRFL and BaL and control VLPs (without Env were used to select single B cells for the production of 68 recombinant mAbs. Ten of these mAbs were HIV-1 Env specific with neutralizing activity against V3 and the CD4 binding site, as well as non-neutralizing mAbs to gp41. The remaining 58 mAbs were non-HIV-1 Env mAbs with undefined specificities. Analysis revealed that biased usage of Ig genes was restricted only to anti-HIV-1 but not to non-HIV-1 mAbs. The VH1 family genes were dominantly used, followed by VH3, VH4, and VH5 among anti-HIV-1 mAbs, while non-HIV-1 specific mAbs preferentially used VH3 family genes, followed by VH4, VH1 and VH5 families in a pattern identical to Abs derived from healthy individuals. This observation suggests that the biased usage of Ig genes by anti-HIV-1 mAbs is driven by structural requirements of the virus antigens rather than by compensation to any depletion of VH3 B cells due to autoreactive mechanisms, according to the gp120 superantigen hypothesis.

  9. Antibody 10-1074 suppresses viremia in HIV-1-infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caskey, Marina; Schoofs, Till; Gruell, Henning; Settler, Allison; Karagounis, Theodora; Kreider, Edward F; Murrell, Ben; Pfeifer, Nico; Nogueira, Lilian; Oliveira, Thiago Y; Learn, Gerald H; Cohen, Yehuda Z; Lehmann, Clara; Gillor, Daniel; Shimeliovich, Irina; Unson-O'Brien, Cecilia; Weiland, Daniela; Robles, Alexander; Kümmerle, Tim; Wyen, Christoph; Levin, Rebeka; Witmer-Pack, Maggi; Eren, Kemal; Ignacio, Caroline; Kiss, Szilard; West, Anthony P; Mouquet, Hugo; Zingman, Barry S; Gulick, Roy M; Keler, Tibor; Bjorkman, Pamela J; Seaman, Michael S; Hahn, Beatrice H; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Schlesinger, Sarah J; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Klein, Florian

    2017-02-01

    Monoclonal antibody 10-1074 targets the V3 glycan supersite on the HIV-1 envelope (Env) protein. It is among the most potent anti-HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies isolated so far. Here we report on its safety and activity in 33 individuals who received a single intravenous infusion of the antibody. 10-1074 was well tolerated and had a half-life of 24.0 d in participants without HIV-1 infection and 12.8 d in individuals with HIV-1 infection. Thirteen individuals with viremia received the highest dose of 30 mg/kg 10-1074. Eleven of these participants were 10-1074-sensitive and showed a rapid decline in viremia by a mean of 1.52 log10 copies/ml. Virologic analysis revealed the emergence of multiple independent 10-1074-resistant viruses in the first weeks after infusion. Emerging escape variants were generally resistant to the related V3-specific antibody PGT121, but remained sensitive to antibodies targeting nonoverlapping epitopes, such as the anti-CD4-binding-site antibodies 3BNC117 and VRC01. The results demonstrate the safety and activity of 10-1074 in humans and support the idea that antibodies targeting the V3 glycan supersite might be useful for the treatment and prevention of HIV-1 infection.

  10. Inhibition of ecto-ATPase activities impairs HIV-1 infection of macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachter, Julieta; Delgado, Kelly Valcárcel; Barreto-de-Souza, Victor; Bou-Habib, Dumith Chequer; Persechini, Pedro Muanis; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2015-05-01

    Nucleotides and nucleosides are secreted into extracellular media at different concentrations as a consequence of different physiologic and pathological conditions. Ecto-nucleotidases, enzymes present on the surface of most cells, hydrolyze these extracellular nucleotides and reduce the concentration of them, thus affecting the activation of different nucleotide and nucleoside receptors. Also, ecto-nucleotidases are present in a number of microorganisms and play important roles in host-pathogen interactions. Here, we characterized the ecto-ATPase activities present on the surface of HIV-1 particle and human macrophages as well. We found that the kinetic properties of HIV-1 and macrophage ecto-ATPases are similar, suggesting that the enzyme is the same. This ecto-ATPase activity was increased in macrophages infected in vitro with HIV-1. Using three different non-related ecto-ATPase inhibitors-POM-1, ARL67156 and BG0-we showed that the inhibition of these macrophage and viral ecto-ATPase activities impairs HIV-1 infection. In addition, we also found that elevated extracellular concentrations of ATP inhibit HIV-1 production by infected macrophages.

  11. SAMHD1 controls cell cycle status, apoptosis and HIV-1 infection in monocytic THP-1 cells

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    Bonifati, Serena [Center for Retrovirus Research, Department of Veterinary Biosciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Daly, Michele B. [Center for Drug Discovery, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); St Gelais, Corine; Kim, Sun Hee [Center for Retrovirus Research, Department of Veterinary Biosciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Hollenbaugh, Joseph A.; Shepard, Caitlin [Center for Drug Discovery, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kennedy, Edward M. [Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Kim, Dong-Hyun [Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, Kyung-Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Schinazi, Raymond F. [Center for Drug Discovery, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kim, Baek, E-mail: baek.kim@emory.edu [Center for Drug Discovery, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, Kyung-Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Wu, Li, E-mail: wu.840@osu.edu [Center for Retrovirus Research, Department of Veterinary Biosciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2016-08-15

    SAMHD1 limits HIV-1 infection in non-dividing myeloid cells by decreasing intracellular dNTP pools. HIV-1 restriction by SAMHD1 in these cells likely prevents activation of antiviral immune responses and modulates viral pathogenesis, thus highlighting a critical role of SAMHD1 in HIV-1 physiopathology. Here, we explored the function of SAMHD1 in regulating cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis in monocytic THP-1 cells. Using the CRISPR/Cas9 technology, we generated THP-1 cells with stable SAMHD1 knockout. We found that silencing of SAMHD1 in cycling cells stimulates cell proliferation, redistributes cell cycle population in the G{sub 1}/G{sub 0} phase and reduces apoptosis. These alterations correlated with increased dNTP levels and more efficient HIV-1 infection in dividing SAMHD1 knockout cells relative to control. Our results suggest that SAMHD1, through its dNTPase activity, affects cell proliferation, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis, and emphasize a key role of SAMHD1 in the interplay between cell cycle regulation and HIV-1 infection.

  12. High prevalence of CXCR4-using viruses in vertically HIV-1-infected infants in Thailand

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    T Samleerat

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the study: Previous studies evaluating the frequency of CXCR4-using strains in HIV-1 vertically infected children restricted mainly to patients infected with subtype B or C strains. However, the coreceptor use by non-B or non-C subtypes remains little known, especially in infants. In this study, we determined the HIV-1 coreceptor usage in infants with vertically-acquired HIV-1 infection in Thailand, where the predominant circulating HIV-1 strains are CRF01_AE and the minority are subtype B. Methods: C2-V3-C3 gp120 was amplified in a triplicate nested-PCR and sequenced. Coreceptor usage was predicted using the geno2pheno [coreceptor] algorithm and analyzed with a false positive rate (FRP of 10%. Summary of results: A total of 255 sequences were obtained from viral isolates of 85 HIV-1-infected infants (34 male and 51 female participating in the National AIDS Program (NAP of the National Health Security Office (NHSO of Thailand. All children were received ARV prophylaxis according to the Thai national guidelines. The median age was 84 days (range: 33–308. Seventy-four children (87.1% were infected with CRF01_AE strain and 11 (12.9% were infected with subtype B strain. Concordance in tropism prediction for the triplicates was observed in all samples. CXCR4 coreceptor-using strains were found in 44.7% (38 of 85 and CCR5 coreceptor-using strains were found in 55.3% (47 of 85. No significant difference in age (p=0.34 and clinical signs of AIDS (p=0.47 were observed between these populations. CCR5Delta32 and CCR5m303 mutation genotypes that may contribute to a selective pressure of viruses to alternatively use CXCR4 as a coreceptor were not found. Conclusions: A high prevalence of HIV-1 CXCR4-using variants was found among HIV-1 vertically infected infants in Thailand, indicating that a direct vertical transmission of CXCR4-using variants or a rapid switch from CCR5-using to CXCR4-using viruses shortly after transmission. These

  13. Efficient human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection of cells lacking PDZD8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shijian; Sodroski, Joseph

    2015-07-01

    PDZD8 can bind the capsid proteins of different retroviruses, and transient knockdown of PDZD8 results in a decrease in the efficiency of an early, post-entry event in the retrovirus life cycle. Here we used the CRISPR-CAS9 system to create cell lines in which PDZD8 expression is stably eliminated. The PDZD8-knockout cell lines were infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) and murine leukemia virus as efficiently as the parental PDZD8-expressing cells. These results indicate that PDZD8 is not absolutely necessary for HIV-1 infection and diminishes its attractiveness as a potential target for intervention.

  14. 急性期/早期HIV-1感染的临床研究进展%Clinical research progress of acute and early HIV-1 infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴焱; 徐克沂; 王玉光; 李兴旺

    2011-01-01

    Primary HIV-1 infection (PHI) includes acute HIV-1 infection (AHI)and early HIV-1 infection (EHI). AHI is often associated with an acute "retroviral syndrome" that usually includes fever with a variety of nonspecific clinical and laboratory abnormalities. Critical point of AHI and EHI is HIV-1 antibody seroconversion. Cut-off point of PHI and following chronic phage is whether HIV-1 RNA decrease to the set point. Early diagnosis depends on HIV RNA and P24 antigen tests. About 50% of new sexual transmission happens while a person is in this primary phase of infection. HIV pandemic could be slowed down by early diagnosis and immediate antiretroviral therapy intervention. Several studies have suggested that treatment of AHI allows long-term viral suppression and might lead to preservation and even increase of HIV-1 specific T helper cell responses. However, there are no sufficient data available to support the clinical benefit of early initiation of antiretroviral therapy and to address the risks of antiretroviral therapy and treatment interruptions.%原发Ⅰ型艾滋病病毒(HIV-1)感染(PHI)包括急性期感染(AHI)和早期感染(EHI).AHI通常与急性的"反转录病毒综合征"有关,包括一系列非特异的症状和实验室检测异常.AHI和EHI的分界点在于HIV抗体的阳转,而PHI和其后的慢性感染阶段的临界点在于体内何时达到HIV-1的调定点.早期诊断有赖于检测HIV-1RNA和P24抗原.大约50%经性传染HIV发生在急性期阶段,对急性期/早期感染者尽早诊断并给予抗病毒治疗,能明显减少HIV的传播.一些研究显示,早期抗病毒治疗能够使病毒得以长期抑制,并能保持甚至增加HIV-1特异性T细胞免疫应答,但早期治疗和治疗中断的临床益处还没有足够数据支持.

  15. Peptide Inhibitors of HIV-1 Virus Infection Based on Cullin-5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ke-tong; ZHANG Xi-zhen; LOU Chao-ping; GUO Bo; DU Juan; WANG Xiao-dan; WU Yong-ge; KONG Wei; YU Xiang-hui

    2008-01-01

    Virion infectivity factor(Vif) is one of the six accessory proteins of HIV-1 and is necessary for viral infectivity. Human Apolipoprotein B editing complex protein 3G(h-APOBEC3G) is a cytidine deaminase only expressed in "nonpermissive" cells and exhibits virus suppressive activity. With the aid of a Cullin-5 E3 ligase, Vif induces h-APOBEC3G degradation and with the destruction of this ligase, Vif is functionally inactive. Therefore, it is expected that blocking this E3 pathway would be a new therapeutic strategy against HIV-1 infection. In this article, the authors' took sequence alignment of the N-termini of Cullin-5 and three other members of the Cullin protein family,respectively. A set of small peptides has been synthesized based on the sequence comparison results and possible Vif-Cullin-5 interaction domains. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that several peptides can reduce virus infectivity in "nonpermissive" cells with a dose-responsive manner, but not in "permissive" cells. The results also indicate that the loss of viral infectivity may be because of the increase of APOBEC3G amount in the peptide-treated cells. It is concluded that peptides derived from Cullin-5 can block the APOBEC3G degradation induced by Vif and suppress HIV-1 infectivity. Therefore this study starts a novel strategy for the development of a new HIV-1 inhibitor.

  16. Phenotype and envelope gene diversity of nef-deleted HIV-1 isolated from long-term survivors infected from a single source

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    Sullivan John S

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Sydney blood bank cohort (SBBC of long-term survivors consists of multiple individuals infected with attenuated, nef-deleted variants of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 acquired from a single source. Long-term prospective studies have demonstrated that the SBBC now comprises slow progressors (SP as well as long-term nonprogressors (LTNP. Convergent evolution of nef sequences in SBBC SP and LTNP indicates the in vivo pathogenicity of HIV-1 in SBBC members is dictated by factors other than nef. To better understand mechanisms underlying the pathogenicity of nef-deleted HIV-1, we examined the phenotype and env sequence diversity of sequentially isolated viruses (n = 2 from 3 SBBC members. Results The viruses characterized here were isolated from two SP spanning a three or six year period during progressive HIV-1 infection (subjects D36 and C98, respectively and from a LTNP spanning a two year period during asymptomatic, nonprogressive infection (subject C18. Both isolates from D36 were R5X4 phenotype and, compared to control HIV-1 strains, replicated to low levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. In contrast, both isolates from C98 and C18 were CCR5-restricted. Both viruses isolated from C98 replicated to barely detectable levels in PBMC, whereas both viruses isolated from C18 replicated to low levels, similar to those isolated from D36. Analysis of env by V1V2 and V3 heteroduplex tracking assay, V1V2 length polymorphisms, sequencing and phylogenetic analysis showed distinct intra- and inter-patient env evolution. Conclusion Independent evolution of env despite convergent evolution of nef may contribute to the in vivo pathogenicity of nef-deleted HIV-1 in SBBC members, which may not necessarily be associated with changes in replication capacity or viral coreceptor specificity.

  17. Human rhinovirus infections in symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects

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    C.N. Camargo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of rhinovirus asymptomatic infections in the transmission among close contacts subjects is unknown. We tested health care workers, a pair of one child and a family member and immunocompromised patients (n =191. HRV were detected on 22.9% symptomatic and 3.6% asymptomatic cases suggesting lower transmission among contacts.

  18. Blocking of HIV-1 Infectivity by a Soluble, Secreted Form of the CD4 Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Douglas H.; Byrn, Randal A.; Marsters, Scot A.; Gregory, Timothy; Groopman, Jerome E.; Capon, Daniel J.

    1987-12-01

    The initial event in the infection of human T lymphocytes, macrophages, and other cells by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) is the attachment of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 to its cellular receptor, CD4. As a step toward designing antagonists of this binding event, soluble, secreted forms of CD4 were produced by transfection of mammalian cells with vectors encoding versions of CD4 lacking its transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. The soluble CD4 so produced binds gp120 with an affinity and specificity comparable to intact CD4 and is capable of neutralizing the infectivity of HIV-1. These studies reveal that the high-affinity CD4-gp120 interaction does not require other cell or viral components and may establish a novel basis for therapeutic intervention in the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

  19. Origin and dynamics of HIV-1 subtype C infection in India.

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    Chengli Shen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the geographical origin and evolution dynamics of HIV-1 subtype C infection in India. DESIGN: Ninety HIV-1 subtype C env gp120 subtype C sequences from India were compared with 312 env gp120 reference subtype C sequences from 27 different countries obtained from Los Alamos HIV database. All the HIV-1 subtype C env gp120 sequences from India were used for the geographical origin analysis and 61 subtype C env gp120 sequences with known sampling year (from 1991 to 2008 were employed to determine the origin of HIV infection in India. METHODS: Phylogenetic analysis of HIV-1 env sequences was used to investigate the geographical origin and tMRCA of Indian HIV-1 subtype C. Evolutionary parameters including origin date and demographic growth patterns of Indian subtype C were estimated using a Bayesian coalescent-based approach under relaxed molecular clock models. FINDINGS: The majority of the analyzed Indian and South African HIV-1 subtype C sequences formed a single monophyletic cluster. The most recent common ancestor date was calculated to be 1975.56 (95% HPD, 1968.78-1981.52. Reconstruction of the effective population size revealed three phases of epidemic growth: an initial slow growth, followed by exponential growth, and then a plateau phase approaching present time. Stabilization of the epidemic growth phase correlated with the foundation of National AIDS Control Organization in India. INTERPRETATION: Indian subtype C originated from a single South African lineage in the middle of 1970s. The current study emphasizes not only the utility of HIV-1 sequence data for epidemiological studies but more notably highlights the effectiveness of community or government intervention strategies in controlling the trend of the epidemic.

  20. Prevalence of XMRV Nucleic Acid and Antibody in HIV-1-Infected Men and in Men at Risk for HIV-1 Infection

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    J. Spindler

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Xenotropic MLV-Related Virus (XMRV was recently reported to be associated with prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS. Infection was also reported in 3.7% of healthy individuals. These highly reported frequencies of infection prompted concerns about the possibility of a new, widespread retroviral epidemic. The Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS provides an opportunity to assess the prevalence of XMRV infection and its association with HIV-1 infection among men who have sex with men. Reliable detection of XMRV infection requires the application of multiple diagnostic methods, including detection of human antibodies to XMRV and detection of XMRV nucleic acid. We, therefore, tested 332 patient plasma and PBMC samples obtained from recent visits in a subset of patients in the MACS cohort for XMRV antibodies using Abbott prototype ARCHITECT chemiluminescent immunoassays (CMIAs and for XMRV RNA and proviral DNA using a XMRV single-copy qPCR assay (X-SCA. Although 9 of 332 (2.7% samples showed low positive reactivity against a single antigen in the CMIA, none of these samples or matched controls were positive for plasma XMRV RNA or PBMC XMRV DNA by X-SCA. Thus, we found no evidence of XMRV infection among men in the MACS regardless of HIV-1 serostatus.

  1. Silibinin inhibits HIV-1 infection by reducing cellular activation and proliferation.

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    Janela McClure

    Full Text Available Purified silymarin-derived natural products from the milk thistle plant (Silybum marianum block hepatitis C virus (HCV infection and inhibit T cell proliferation in vitro. An intravenous formulation of silibinin (SIL, a major component of silymarin, displays anti-HCV effects in humans and also inhibits T-cell proliferation in vitro. We show that SIL inhibited replication of HIV-1 in TZM-bl cells, PBMCs, and CEM cells in vitro. SIL suppression of HIV-1 coincided with dose-dependent reductions in actively proliferating CD19+, CD4+, and CD8+ cells, resulting in fewer CD4+ T cells expressing the HIV-1 co-receptors CXCR4 and CCR5. SIL inhibition of T-cell growth was not due to cytotoxicity measured by cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or necrosis. SIL also blocked induction of the activation markers CD38, HLA-DR, Ki67, and CCR5 on CD4+ T cells. The data suggest that SIL attenuated cellular functions involved in T-cell activation, proliferation, and HIV-1 infection. Silymarin-derived compounds provide cytoprotection by suppressing virus infection, immune activation, and inflammation, and as such may be relevant for both HIV mono-infected and HIV/HCV co-infected subjects.

  2. Silibinin inhibits HIV-1 infection by reducing cellular activation and proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Janela; Lovelace, Erica S; Elahi, Shokrollah; Maurice, Nicholas J; Wagoner, Jessica; Dragavon, Joan; Mittler, John E; Kraft, Zane; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Stamatatos, Leonidis; Horton, Helen; De Rosa, Stephen C; Coombs, Robert W; Polyak, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    Purified silymarin-derived natural products from the milk thistle plant (Silybum marianum) block hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and inhibit T cell proliferation in vitro. An intravenous formulation of silibinin (SIL), a major component of silymarin, displays anti-HCV effects in humans and also inhibits T-cell proliferation in vitro. We show that SIL inhibited replication of HIV-1 in TZM-bl cells, PBMCs, and CEM cells in vitro. SIL suppression of HIV-1 coincided with dose-dependent reductions in actively proliferating CD19+, CD4+, and CD8+ cells, resulting in fewer CD4+ T cells expressing the HIV-1 co-receptors CXCR4 and CCR5. SIL inhibition of T-cell growth was not due to cytotoxicity measured by cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or necrosis. SIL also blocked induction of the activation markers CD38, HLA-DR, Ki67, and CCR5 on CD4+ T cells. The data suggest that SIL attenuated cellular functions involved in T-cell activation, proliferation, and HIV-1 infection. Silymarin-derived compounds provide cytoprotection by suppressing virus infection, immune activation, and inflammation, and as such may be relevant for both HIV mono-infected and HIV/HCV co-infected subjects.

  3. SEROPREVALENCE OF HTLV IN A POPULATION OF HIV1-INFECTED PATIENTS IN MIDWESTERN BRAZIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    KOZLOWSKI, Aline Garcia; de MATOS, Márcia Alves Dias; CARNEIRO, Megmar Aparecida dos Santos; LOPES, Carmen Luci Rodrigues; TELES, Sheila Araújo; VICENTE, Carolina Paulo; MARTINS, Regina Maria Bringel

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV) may affect the clinical course of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV1). Both infections are common in endemic areas because these viruses share similar routes of transmission. The aim of this study was to estimate the seroprevalence of HTLV1/2 in a population of HIV1-infected patients in the state of Goiás, Midwestern Brazil. Of the 505 studied patients, four (0.79%) were positive for anti-HTLV1/2 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), with HTLV1 infection confirmed by line immunoassay (LIA) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in all of the ELISA-positive samples. No cases of HTLV2 infection were observed. The prevalence of HTLV1/HIV1 coinfection was 0.79% (4/505; 95% CI: 0.25-2.16). All the coinfected patients reported sexual risk behaviors and only one reported intravenous drug use. Sequencing of the viral long terminal repeat (LTR) region and phylogenetic analysis revealed that the four HTLV1 isolates belonged to the Transcontinental a subgroup of the Cosmopolitan (1a) subtype, the most frequent subgroup detected in Brazil. This study shows a low prevalence of HTLV1/2 in HIV1-infected patients in Midwestern Brazil. PMID:27828621

  4. Residual viraemia in HIV-1-infected patients with plasma viral load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, S.R.; Katzenstein, T.L.; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund;

    2008-01-01

    Despite undetectable viral load in conventional assays, probably all human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infected patients have residual viraemia (RV) detectable by ultra-sensitive assays. To study this issue, this study investigated virologic and immunologic consequences of RV in highly active...... antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-treated HIV-1-infected patients with plasma HIV-1 RNA or=1 episode with TMA-RV whereas 9 patients had undetectable TMA-RV throughout the study-period. Time-points with TMA-RV and PCR-RV were associated with higher circulating sTNFrII (+0.234 ng/ml, P = 0.030) and beta(2......)-microglobulin (+22 nmol/l, P = 0.016) and time-points with PCR-RV were also associated with higher IgA (+0.82 micromol/l, P = 0.035) and CD8-count (+1.18-fold, P = 0.001). Patients with TMA-RV in the study-period had higher HIV-1 RNA pre-HAART (P = 0.032). RV was not associated with proviral-HIV-1-DNA, CD4...

  5. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of HIV-1 virus found early in infection

    OpenAIRE

    Freitas, Inês Trindade de, 1986-

    2010-01-01

    Tese de mestrado. Biologia (Biologia Molecular e Humana). Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, 2010 In this study we raised full-length envelope sequences from HIV-1 infected patients in early phases of infection, up to three month of viral acquisition, and from their transmitting partners, who were in later stages of infection, to assess any genotypic signature(s) that would distinguish the envelope sequences that were being transmitted and correlate those signatures with viral ...

  6. Safeguard against DNA sensing: The role of TREX1 in HIV-1 infection and autoimmune diseases

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    Nan eYan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Innate immune recognition is crucial for host responses against viral infections, including infection by human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1. Human cells detect such invading pathogens with a collection of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs that activate the production of antiviral proteins, such as the cytokine interferon-type I, to initiate antiviral responses immediately as well as the adaptive immune response for long-term protection. To establish infection in the host, many viruses have thus evolved strategies for subversion of these mechanisms of innate immunity. For example, acute infection by HIV-1 and other retroviruses have long been thought to be non-immunogenic, signifying suppression of host defenses by these pathogens. Studies in the past few years have begun to uncover a multifaceted scheme of how HIV-1 evades innate immune detection, especially of its DNA, by exploiting host proteins. This review will discuss the host mechanisms of HIV-1 DNA sensing and viral immune evasion, with a particular focus on TREX1, a host 3’ to 5’ exodeoxyribonuclease (also known as DNase III.

  7. The effect of fluconazole on ritonavir and saquinavir pharmacokinetics in HIV-1-infected individuals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koks, C.H.W.; Crommentuyn, K.M.; Hoetelmans, R.M.; Burger, D.M.; Koopmans † , P.P.; Mathô t, R.A.A.; Mulder, J.W.; Meenhorst, P.L.; Beijnen, J.H.

    2001-01-01

    AIMS: To study the effect of fluconazole on the steady-state pharmacokinetics of the protease inhibitors ritonavir and saquinavir in HIV-1-infected patients. METHODS: Five subjects treated with saquinavir and three with ritonavir received the protease inhibitor alone (saquinavir 1200 mg three times

  8. New therapy to revert dysfunctional antibody responses during HIV-1 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodi, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    Individuals infected with HIV-1 progress to AIDS at different rates. Rapid progressors develop AIDS within 2–5 years of initial infection, compared with approximately 10 years in typical progressors. Progression to AIDS is associated with impaired humoral and cellular immunity. In this issue of the JCI, Titanji and colleagues report that activated memory B (mBAct) cells are depleted in SIV-infected macaques defined as rapid progressors. Depletion was mediated by programmed death-1 (PD-1) and resulted in reduction of antibody titers specific for SIV and bacterial antigens. Interestingly, blockade of PD-1 in infected animals protected B cells from apoptosis and increased levels of SIV-specific antibodies in blood. These findings pave the way for a new therapeutic strategy aimed at improving humoral immunity in HIV-1 infection. PMID:20972328

  9. Asymptomatic infection with American cutaneous leishmaniasis: epidemiological and immunological studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Narvaez, Fernando J; Loría-Cervera, Elsy Nalleli; Sosa-Bibiano, Erika I; Van Wynsberghe, Nicole R

    2016-01-01

    American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL) is a major public health problem caused by vector-borne protozoan intracellular parasites from the genus Leishmania, subgenera Viannia and Leishmania. Asymptomatic infection is the most common outcome after Leishmania inoculation. There is incomplete knowledge of the biological processes explaining the absence of signs or symptoms in most cases while other cases present a variety of clinical findings. Most studies of asymptomatic infection have been conducted in areas of endemic visceral leishmaniasis. In contrast, asymptomatic ACL infection has been neglected. This review is focused on the following: (1) epidemiological studies supporting the existence of asymptomatic ACL infection and (2) immunological studies conducted to understand the mechanisms responsible for controlling the parasite and avoiding tissue damage. PMID:27759762

  10. Transcriptional Regulation of CXCL5 in HIV-1-Infected Macrophages and Its Functional Consequences on CNS Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Debjani; Klamar, Cynthia R; Reinhart, Todd; Ayyavoo, Velpandi

    2015-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1)-infected monocytes/macrophages and microglia release increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including ELR+ (containing glutamic acid-leucine-arginine motif) chemokines. To investigate the role of HIV-1 infection on chemokine regulation, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) from normal donors were infected with HIV-1 and the expression of chemokines and their downstream biological functions were evaluated. Among the tested chemokines, CXCL5 was upregulated significantly both at the mRNA and protein level in the HIV-1-infected MDMs compared with mock-infected cultures. Upregulation of CXCL5 in the HIV-1-infected MDMs is, in part, regulated by increased interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production and phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Functional analyses indicate that HIV-1-induced overexpression of CXCL5 has enhanced the ability to attract neutrophils, as observed by chemotaxis assay. However, exposure of NT2, SH-SY5Y cells, and primary neurons to HIV-1-infected MDM supernatants resulted in cell death that was not rescued by anti-CXCL5 antibody suggesting that CXCL5 does not have direct effect on neuronal death. Together, these results suggest that the increased level of CXCL5 in tissue compartments, including the central nervous system of HIV-1-infected individuals might alter the inflammatory response through the infiltration of neutrophils into tissue compartment, thus causing secondary effects on resident cells.

  11. Induction of cyclooxygenase-2 expression during HIV-1-infected monocyte-derived macrophage and human brain microvascular endothelial cell interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereira, CF; Boven, LA; Middel, J; Verhoef, J; Nottet, HSLM

    2000-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1)-associated dementia (HAD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by HIV infection and replication in brain tissue. HIV-1-infected monocytes overexpress inflammatory molecules that facilitate their entry into the brain. Prostanoids are lipid mediators

  12. Changes in biomarkers of cardiovascular risk after a switch to abacavir in HIV-1-infected individuals receiving combination antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, U S; Kofoed, K; Kronborg, G;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate, using a longitudinal design, whether biomarkers of cardiovascular risk change after a switch to an abacavir (ABC)-containing regimen in HIV-1-infected individuals already receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (ART). METHODS: Thirty-five HIV-1-infected individuals...

  13. High prevalence and genetic diversity of HCV among HIV-1 infected people from various high-risk groups in China.

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    Hong Shang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Co-infection with HIV-1 and HCV is a significant global public health problem and a major consideration for anti-HIV-1 treatment. HCV infection among HIV-1 positive people who are eligible for the newly launched nationwide anti-HIV-1 treatment program in China has not been well characterized. METHODOLOGY: A nationwide survey of HIV-1 positive injection drug uses (IDU, former paid blood donors (FBD, and sexually transmitted cases from multiple provinces including the four most affected provinces in China was conducted. HCV prevalence and genetic diversity were determined. We found that IDU and FBD have extremely high rates of HCV infection (97% and 93%, respectively. Surprisingly, people who acquired HIV-1 through sexual contact also had a higher rate of HCV infection (20% than the general population. HIV-1 subtype and HCV genotypes were amazingly similar among FBD from multiple provinces stretching from Central to Northeast China. However, although patterns of overland trafficking of heroin and distinct HIV-1 subtypes could be detected among IDU, HCV genotypes of IDU were more diverse and exhibited significant regional differences. CONCLUSION: Emerging HIV-1 and HCV co-infection and possible sexual transmission of HCV in China require urgent prevention measures and should be taken into consideration in the nationwide antiretroviral treatment program.

  14. Differential expression of CD163 on monocyte subsets in healthy and HIV-1 infected individuals.

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    Emma Tippett

    Full Text Available CD163, a haptoglobin-hemoglobin (Hp-Hb scavenger receptor, expressed by monocytes and macrophages, is important in resolution of inflammation. Age-related non-AIDS co-morbidities in HIV-infected individuals, particularly dementia and cardiovascular disease, result in part from effects of HIV-1 infection on monocyte and macrophage biology. CD163 co-expression on CD14+CD16++ monocytes has been proposed as a useful biomarker for HIV-1 disease progression and the presence of HIV associated dementia. Here we investigated CD163 expression on monocyte subsets ex vivo, on cultured macrophages, and soluble in plasma, in the setting of HIV-1 infection. Whole blood immunophenotyping revealed CD163 expression on CD14++CD16- monocytes but not on CD14+CD16++ monocytes (P = 0.004, supported by CD163 mRNA levels. Incubation with M-CSF induced CD163 protein expression on CD14+CD16++ monocytes to the same extent as CD14++CD16- monocytes. CD163 expression on CD14++CD16+ monocytes from HIV-infected subjects was significantly higher than from uninfected individuals, with a trend towards increased expression on CD14++CD16- monocytes (P = 0.019 and 0.069 respectively, which is accounted for by HIV-1 therapy including protease inhibitors. Shedding of CD163 was shown to predominantly occur from the CD14++CD16- subset after Ficoll isolation and LPS stimulation. Soluble CD163 concentration in plasma from HIV-1 infected donors was similar to HIV-1 uninfected donors. Monocyte CD163 expression in HIV-1 infected patients showed a complicated relationship with classical measures of disease progression. Our findings clarify technical issues regarding CD163 expression on monocyte subsets and further elucidates its role in HIV-associated inflammation by demonstrating that CD163 is readily lost from CD14++CD16- monocytes and induced in pro-inflammatory CD14+CD16++ monocytes by M-CSF. Our data show that all monocyte subsets are potentially capable of differentiating into CD

  15. Noninvasive micromanipulation of live HIV-1 infected cells via laser light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mthunzi, Patience

    2015-12-01

    Live mammalian cells from various tissues of origin can be aseptically and noninvasively micromanipulated via lasers of different regimes. Laser-driven techniques are therefore paving a path toward the advancement of human immuno-deficiency virus (HIV-1) investigations. Studies aimed at the interaction of laser light, nanomaterials, and biological materials can also lead to an understanding of a wealth of disease conditions and result in photonics-based therapies and diagnostic tools. Thus, in our research, both continuous wave and pulsed lasers operated at varying wavelengths are employed, as they possess special properties that allow classical biomedical applications. This paper discusses photo-translocation of antiretroviral drugs into HIV-1 permissive cells and preliminary results of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in HIV-1 infected cells.

  16. Central and peripheral nervous system functions are independently disturbed in HIV-1 infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Giesen, Hans-Jürgen; Köller, Hubertus; Hefter, Harald; Arendt, Gabriele

    2002-06-01

    We examined the peripheral nervous system (PNS) (nerve conduction velocity (NCV)) and the central nervous system (CNS) (basal ganglia-mediated psychomotor speed) in 93 males seropositive for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) with no prior history of opportunistic brain disease, antiretroviral treatment or intravenous drug use. Patients with different degrees of slowing of peroneal and sural NCV showed no significant differences in psychomotor speed as assessed by tremor peak frequency, most rapid alternating movements, reaction times and contraction times. There was no significant correlation between psychomotor measures and NCV. Psychomotor slowing test findings were independent from peripheral nervous system damage indicating uncorrelated disturbances of CNS and PNS function in HIV-1 infection. Differences in HIV-1 viral quasispecies or host responses may determine the predominance of CNS or PNS injury.

  17. Noninvasive micromanipulation of live HIV-1 infected cells via laser light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mthunzi, Patience [National Laser Centre, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Pretoria (South Africa)

    2015-12-31

    Live mammalian cells from various tissues of origin can be aseptically and noninvasively micromanipulated via lasers of different regimes. Laser-driven techniques are therefore paving a path toward the advancement of human immuno-deficiency virus (HIV-1) investigations. Studies aimed at the interaction of laser light, nanomaterials, and biological materials can also lead to an understanding of a wealth of disease conditions and result in photonics-based therapies and diagnostic tools. Thus, in our research, both continuous wave and pulsed lasers operated at varying wavelengths are employed, as they possess special properties that allow classical biomedical applications. This paper discusses photo-translocation of antiretroviral drugs into HIV-1 permissive cells and preliminary results of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in HIV-1 infected cells.

  18. Tyrosine-sulfated V2 peptides inhibit HIV-1 infection via coreceptor mimicry

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    Raffaello Cimbro

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Tyrosine sulfation is a post-translational modification that facilitates protein-protein interaction. Two sulfated tyrosines (Tys173 and Tys177 were recently identified within the second variable (V2 loop of the major HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, and shown to contribute to stabilizing the intramolecular interaction between V2 and the third variable (V3 loop. Here, we report that tyrosine-sulfated peptides derived from V2 act as structural and functional mimics of the CCR5 N-terminus and potently block HIV-1 infection. Nuclear magnetic and surface plasmon resonance analyses indicate that a tyrosine-sulfated V2 peptide (pV2α-Tys adopts a CCR5-like helical conformation and directly interacts with gp120 in a CD4-dependent fashion, competing with a CCR5 N-terminal peptide. Sulfated V2 mimics, but not their non-sulfated counterparts, inhibit HIV-1 entry and fusion by preventing coreceptor utilization, with the highly conserved C-terminal sulfotyrosine, Tys177, playing a dominant role. Unlike CCR5 N-terminal peptides, V2 mimics inhibit a broad range of HIV-1 strains irrespective of their coreceptor tropism, highlighting the overall structural conservation of the coreceptor-binding site in gp120. These results document the use of receptor mimicry by a retrovirus to occlude a key neutralization target site and provide leads for the design of therapeutic strategies against HIV-1.

  19. Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 in seronegative infants born to HIV-1-infected mothers

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    G Reyes-Terán

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some individuals repeatedly exposed to Human Immunodeficiency Virus do not seroconvert and are resistant to HIV infection. Here, in a pediatric cohort of HIV seronegative infants born of HIV-infected mothers, we have studied eight non-breastfed children in whom viral DNA was detected in their PBMC. Our objective was to assess whether silent infection in these children can be explained by the presence of integrated viral DNA. Methods The presence of viral DNA was corroborated by nested PCR with primers for gag and the nef/LTR regions of HIV-1. Integration of HIV DNA into the host genome was assessed by an Alu-LTR PCR. Amplicons were sequenced and phylogenetic analyzes were done. Results HIV-1 DNA was detected in the earliest available PBMC sample from all eight infants, and two of them tested positive for HIV DNA at 2 years of age. Nested PCR resulted in the amplification of gag, nef/LTR and Alu-LTR fragments, which demostrated that HIV-1 DNA was integrated in the host cell genome. Each individual has a characteristic sequence pattern and is different from the LTR sequence of HXB2 prototype virus and other Mexican isolates. Conclusion HIV-1 DNA was observed in PBMC from HIV exposed seronegative children in this pediatric cohort.

  20. Do tests devised to detect recent HIV-1 infection provide reliable estimates of incidence in Africa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakarovitch, Charlotte; Rouet, Francois; Murphy, Gary; Minga, Albert K; Alioum, Ahmadou; Dabis, Francois; Costagliola, Dominique; Salamon, Roger; Parry, John V; Barin, Francis

    2007-05-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the performance of 4 biologic tests designed to detect recent HIV-1 infections in estimating incidence in West Africa (BED, Vironostika, Avidity, and IDE-V3). These tests were assessed on a panel of 135 samples from 79 HIV-1-positive regular blood donors from Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire, whose date of seroconversion was known (Agence Nationale de Recherches sur le SIDA et les Hépatites Virales 1220 cohort). The 135 samples included 26 from recently infected patients (180 days), and 15 from patients with clinical AIDS. The performance of each assay in estimating HIV incidence was assessed through simulations. The modified commercial assays gave the best results for sensitivity (100% for both), and the IDE-V3 technique gave the best result for specificity (96.3%). In a context like Abidjan, with a 10% HIV-1 prevalence associated with a 1% annual incidence, the estimated test-specific annual incidence rates would be 1.2% (IDE-V3), 5.5% (Vironostika), 6.2% (BED), and 11.2% (Avidity). Most of the specimens falsely classified as incident cases were from patients infected for >180 days but <1 year. The authors conclude that none of the 4 methods could currently be used to estimate HIV-1 incidence routinely in Côte d'Ivoire but that further adaptations might enhance their accuracy.

  1. The Effects of the Recombinant CCR5 T4 Lysozyme Fusion Protein on HIV-1 Infection.

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    Qingwen Jin

    Full Text Available Insertion of T4 lysozyme (T4L into the GPCR successfully enhanced GPCR protein stability and solubilization. However, the biological functions of the recombinant GPCR protein have not been analyzed.We engineered the CCR5-T4L mutant and expressed and purified the soluble recombinant protein using an E.coli expression system. The antiviral effects of this recombinant protein in THP-1 cell lines, primary human macrophages, and PBMCs from different donors were investigated. We also explored the possible mechanisms underlying the observed antiviral effects.Our data showed the biphasic inhibitory and promotion effects of different concentrations of soluble recombinant CCR5-T4L protein on R5 tropic human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 infection in THP-1 cell lines, human macrophages, and PBMCs from clinical isolates. We demonstrated that soluble recombinant CCR5-T4L acts as a HIV-1 co-receptor, interacts with wild type CCR5, down-regulates the surface CCR5 expression in human macrophages, and interacts with CCL5 to inhibit macrophage migration. Using binding assays, we further determined that recombinant CCR5-T4L and [125I]-CCL5 compete for the same binding site on wild type CCR5.Our results suggest that recombinant CCR5-T4L protein marginally promotes HIV-1 infection at low concentrations and markedly inhibits infection at higher concentrations. This recombinant protein may be helpful in the future development of anti-HIV-1 therapeutic agents.

  2. HLA-C increases HIV-1 infectivity and is associated with gp120

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beretta Alberto

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recently identified genetic polymorphism located in the 5' region of the HLA-C gene is associated with individual variations in HIV-1 viral load and with differences in HLA-C expression levels. HLA-C has the potential to restrict HIV-1 by presenting epitopes to cytotoxic T cells but it is also a potent inhibitor of NK cells. In addition, HLA-C molecules incorporated within the HIV-1 envelope have been shown to bind to the envelope glycoprotein gp120 and enhance viral infectivity. We investigated this last property in cell fusion assays where the expression of HLA-C was silenced by small interfering RNA sequences. Syncytia formation was analyzed by co-cultivating cell lines expressing HIV-1 gp120/gp41 from different laboratory and primary isolates with target cells expressing different HIV-1 co-receptors. Virus infectivity was analyzed using pseudoviruses. Molecular complexes generated during cell fusion (fusion complexes were purified and analyzed for their HLA-C content. Results HLA-C positive cells co-expressing HIV-1 gp120/gp41 fused more rapidly and produced larger syncytia than HLA-C negative cells. Transient transfection of gp120/gp41 from different primary isolates in HLA-C positive cells resulted in a significant cell fusion increase. Fusion efficiency was reduced in HLA-C silenced cells compared to non-silenced cells when co-cultivated with different target cell lines expressing HIV-1 co-receptors. Similarly, pseudoviruses produced from HLA-C silenced cells were significantly less infectious. HLA-C was co-purified with gp120 from cells before and after fusion and was associated with the fusion complex. Conclusion Virionic HLA-C molecules associate to Env and increase the infectivity of both R5 and X4 viruses. Genetic polymorphisms associated to variations in HLA-C expression levels may therefore influence the individual viral set point not only by means of a regulation of the virus-specific immune response but also

  3. Relationships between humoral factors in HIV-1-infected mothers and the occurrence of HIV infection in their infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabondzo, A; Rouvier, P; Raoul, H; Le Naour, R; Courpotin, C; Hervé, F; Parnet-Mathieu, F; Lasfargues, G; Dormont, D

    1995-12-01

    Based on what is known about the biology of HIV-1 vertical transmission, the HIV burden of the mother, maternal immune factors and the integrity of the placental barrier are likely to play major roles. We therefore sought to determine whether the presence of antibodies in sera from 47 HIV-1-infected mothers, including 30 non-transmitting and 17 transmitting mothers, affected the risk of HIV-1 transmission to infants. Our findings showed no significant correlation between the capacity of antibodies to mediate antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and their capacity to induce protection of the child from HIV-1 infection (P = 0.14). Furthermore, no correlation was found between the capacity of maternal antibodies to neutralize in vitro lymphocyte or macrophage heterologous viral infection and the occurrence of in vivo HIV-1 infection in the infant. Sera recovered from five of 12 transmitting mothers and from five of 11 non-transmitting mothers were compared in their capacity to neutralize the viruses drawn from the same individuals. Four out of five maternal isolates from transmitting mothers and all maternal isolates from non-transmitting mothers were sensitive to enhancement of infection mediated by the maternal serum.

  4. Bone marrow plasma cells are a primary source of serum HIV-1-specific antibodies in chronically infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montezuma-Rusca, Jairo M; Moir, Susan; Kardava, Lela; Buckner, Clarisa M; Louie, Aaron; Kim, Leo J Y; Santich, Brian H; Wang, Wei; Fankuchen, Olivia R; Diaz, Gabriella; Daub, Janine R; Rosenzweig, Sergio D; Chun, Tae-Wook; Li, Yuxing; Braylan, Raul C; Calvo, Katherine R; Fauci, Anthony S

    2015-03-15

    Several potent and broadly neutralizing Abs to HIV-1 have been isolated recently from peripheral blood B cells of infected individuals, based on prescreening of Ab activity in the serum. However, little is known regarding the cells that make the Abs that circulate in the blood. Accordingly, we investigated the most likely source, the bone marrow, of chronically HIV-1-infected individuals who were not receiving antiretroviral therapy. Increased frequencies of plasma cells, as well as B cell precursors, namely preB-I and preB-II, and decreased frequencies of mature B cells were observed in bone marrow aspirates of these individuals compared with HIV-negative counterparts. Increased frequencies of bone marrow plasma cells are consistent with known hallmarks of HIV-1 infection, namely hypergammaglobulinemia and increased frequencies of peripheral blood plasmablasts. Levels of HIV-1 envelope (Env)-binding and HIV-1-neutralizing Abs were measured in serum, and corresponding frequencies of Ab-secreting or Env-binding cells were measured in the blood (plasmablasts and memory B cells) and in the bone marrow (plasma cells). A strong correlation was observed between serum HIV-1-specific Abs and Env-specific bone marrow-derived plasma cells, but not circulating plasmablasts or memory B cells. These findings demonstrate that, despite HIV-1-induced phenotypic and functional B cell dysregulation in the peripheral blood and secondary lymphoid tissues, bone marrow plasma cells remain a primary source for circulating HIV-1-specific Abs in HIV-1-infected individuals.

  5. Antigen-presenting cells represent targets for R5 HIV-1 infection in the first trimester pregnancy uterine mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Marlin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During the first trimester of pregnancy, HIV-1 mother-to-child transmission is relatively rare despite the permissivity of placental cells to cell-to-cell HIV-1 infection. The placenta interacts directly with maternal uterine cells (decidual cells but the physiological role of the decidua in the control of HIV-1 transmission and whether decidua could be a source of infected cells is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To answer to this question, decidual mononuclear cells were exposed to HIV-1 in vitro. Decidual cells were shown to be more susceptible to infection by an R5 HIV-1, as compared to an X4 HIV-1. Infected cells were identified by flow cytometry analysis. The results showed that CD14(+ cells were the main targets of HIV-1 infection in the decidua. These infected CD14(+ cells expressed DC-SIGN, CD11b, CD11c, the Fc gamma receptor CD16, CD32 and CD64, classical MHC class-I and class-II and maturation and activation molecules CD83, CD80 and CD86. The permissivity of decidual tissue was also evaluated by histoculture. Decidual tissue was not infected by X4 HIV-1 but was permissive to R5 HIV-1. Different profiles of infection were observed depending on tissue localization. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The presence of HIV-1 target cells in the decidua in vitro and the low rate of in utero mother-to-child transmission during the first trimester of pregnancy suggest that a natural control occurs in vivo limiting cell-to-cell infection of the placenta and consequently infection of the fetus.

  6. Unique and differential protein signatures within the mononuclear cells of HIV-1 and HCV mono-infected and co-infected patients

    OpenAIRE

    Boukli Nawal M; Shetty Vivekananda; Cubano Luis; Ricaurte Martha; Coelho-dos-Reis Jordana; Nickens Zacharie; Shah Punit; Talal Andrew H; Philip Ramila; Jain Pooja

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Pathogenesis of liver damage in patients with HIV and HCV co-infection is complex and multifactorial. Although global awareness regarding HIV-1/HCV co-infection is increasing little is known about the pathophysiology that mediates the rapid progression to hepatic disease in the co-infected individuals. Results In this study, we investigated the proteome profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV-1 mono-, HCV mono-, and HIV-1/HCV co-infected patients. The resul...

  7. IL-23 in Infections, Inflammation, Autoimmunity and Cancer: Possible Role in HIV-1 and AIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Yannam, Govardhana Rao; Gutti, Tanuja; Poluektova, Larisa Y.

    2011-01-01

    The growing family of interleukin (IL)-12-like cytokines produced by activated macrophages and dendritic cells became the important players in the control of infections, development of inflammation, autoimmunity and cancer. However, the role of one of them—heterodimer IL-23, which consists of IL12p40 and the unique p19 subunit in HIV-1 infection pathogenesis and progression to AIDS, represent special interest. We overviewed findings of IL-23 involvement in control of peripheral bacterial path...

  8. KIF5B and Nup358 Cooperatively Mediate the Nuclear Import of HIV-1 during Infection.

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    Adarsh Dharan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Following envelope mediated fusion, the HIV-1 core is released into the cytoplasm of the target cell and undergoes a series of trafficking and replicative steps that result in the nuclear import of the viral genome, which ultimately leads to the integration of the proviral DNA into the host cell genome. Previous studies have found that disruption of microtubules, or depletion of dynein or kinesin motors, perturb the normal uncoating and trafficking of the viral genome. Here, we show that the Kinesin-1 motor, KIF5B, induces a relocalization of the nuclear pore component Nup358 into the cytoplasm during HIV-1 infection. This relocalization of NUP358 is dependent on HIV-1 capsid, and NUP358 directly associates with viral cores following cytoplasmic translocation. This interaction between NUP358 and the HIV-1 core is dependent on multiple capsid binding surfaces, as this association is not observed following infection with capsid mutants in which a conserved hydrophobic binding pocket (N74D or the cyclophilin A binding loop (P90A is disrupted. KIF5B knockdown also prevents the nuclear entry and infection by HIV-1, but does not exert a similar effect on the N74D or P90A capsid mutants which do not rely on Nup358 for nuclear import. Finally, we observe that the relocalization of Nup358 in response to CA is dependent on cleavage protein and polyadenylation factor 6 (CPSF6, but independent of cyclophilin A. Collectively, these observations identify a previously unappreciated role for KIF5B in mediating the Nup358 dependent nuclear import of the viral genome during infection.

  9. HIV-1 Trans Infection of CD4+ T Cells by Professional Antigen Presenting Cells

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    Charles R. Rinaldo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1990s we have known of the fascinating ability of a complex set of professional antigen presenting cells (APCs; dendritic cells, monocytes/macrophages, and B lymphocytes to mediate HIV-1 trans infection of CD4+ T cells. This results in a burst of virus replication in the T cells that is much greater than that resulting from direct, cis infection of either APC or T cells, or trans infection between T cells. Such APC-to-T cell trans infection first involves a complex set of virus subtype, attachment, entry, and replication patterns that have many similarities among APC, as well as distinct differences related to virus receptors, intracellular trafficking, and productive and nonproductive replication pathways. The end result is that HIV-1 can sequester within the APC for several days and be transmitted via membrane extensions intracellularly and extracellularly to T cells across the virologic synapse. Virus replication requires activated T cells that can develop concurrently with the events of virus transmission. Further research is essential to fill the many gaps in our understanding of these trans infection processes and their role in natural HIV-1 infection.

  10. Quantification of infectious HIV-1 plasma viral load using a boosted in vitro infection protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusert, Peter; Fischer, Marek; Joos, Beda; Leemann, Christine; Kuster, Herbert; Flepp, Markus; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian; Günthard, Huldrych F; Trkola, Alexandra

    2004-08-15

    Methods currently used for HIV-1 viral load measurements are very sensitive, but cannot distinguish between infectious and noninfectious particles. Here we describe the development of a novel, sensitive, and highly reproducible method that allows rapid isolation and quantification of infectious particles from patient plasma. By immobilizing HIV-1 particles in human plasma to platelets using polybrene, we observed a 10- to 1000-fold increase in infectivity over infection protocols using free virus particles. Using this method, we evaluated infectivity in plasma from 52 patients at various disease stages. At plasma viral loads of 1000-10000 HIV-1 RNA copies/ml 18%, at 10,000-50,000 copies/ml 73%, at 50,000-100,000 copies/ml 90%, and above 100,000 copies 96% of cultures were positive. We found that infectious titers among patients vary distinctively but are characteristic for a patient over extended time periods. Furthermore, we demonstrate that by evaluating infectious titers in conjunction with total HIV RNA loads, subtle effects of treatment intervention on viremia levels can be detected. The immobilization procedure does not interfere with viral entry and does not restore the infectivity of neutralized virus. Therefore, this assay system can be utilized to investigate the influence of substances that specifically affect virion infectivity such as neutralizing antibodies, soluble CD4, or protease inhibitors. Measuring viral infectivity may thereby function as an additional, useful marker in monitoring disease progression and evaluating efficacy of antivirals in vivo.

  11. Chemokine control of HIV-1 infection: Beyond a binding competition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Yuntao

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent paper by Cameron et al. demonstrated that certain chemokines such as CCL19 activate cofilin and actin dynamics, promoting HIV nuclear localization and integration into resting CD4 T cells. Apparently, these chomokines synergize with the viral envelope protein, triggering cofilin and actin dynamics necessary for the establishment of viral latency. This study opens a new avenue for understanding chemokine interaction with HIV. Traditionally, chemokine control of HIV infection focuses on competitive binding and down-modulation of the corecptors, particularly CCR5. This new study suggests that a diverse group of chemokines may also affect HIV infection through synergistic or antagonistic interaction with the viral coreceptor signaling pathways.

  12. Urinary tract infections and asymptomatic bacteriuria in renal transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabi Yacoub

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Asymptomatic bacteriuria and urinary tract infection are common complications after kidney transplantation. In this population, if urinary tract infection occurred in the first six months post procedure, it carries a grave impact on both graft and patient survival. Renal transplant recipients with urinary tract infection are often clinically asymptomatic as a consequence of immunosuppression. Urinary tract infection, however, may progress to acute pyelonephritis, bacteremia and the full blown picture of urosepsis. PubMed and Cochrane databases were searched. The purpose of this review is to discuss the screening and treatment of urinary tract infection and asymptomatic bacteriuria in renal transplant recipients and to evaluate the guidelines on the basis of a review of published evidence.

  13. High IP-10 levels decrease T cell function in HIV-1-infected individuals on ART

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, L. A.; Arango, T. A.; Thompson, E.; Naji, M.; Tebas, P.; Boyer, J. D.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1-infected subjects, despite control of viral replication with ART, have an altered immune cytokine/chemokine milieu. Changes in systemic cytokines and chemokines can alter immune responses. IP-10, in particular, has been associated with pathogenesis in a number of conditions, and we found that IP-10 is increased in serum in subjects who are HIV-1 infected and on stable ART compared with HIV-1-uninfected individuals. In a series of in vitro studies, we found that PBMCs exposed to IP-10 showed a significant decrease in the number of cells capable of secreting IFN-γ, as well as other cytokines, when stimulated with recall antigens. Furthermore, treatment with IP-10 led to decreased antigen-specific calcium signaling and MAPK38 phosphorylation. Importantly, the cytokines, as well as proliferative responses, could be enhanced with an IP-10 Nab. Our findings suggest that IP-10-modulating drugs may potentially enhance T cell responses to vaccination and HIV-1 in HIV+ subjects on ART. PMID:25157027

  14. Variable patterns of neuropsychological performance in HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, S; Suarez, P; Casey, C Y; Cherner, M; Marcotte, T D; Letendre, S; Grant, I; Heaton, R K

    2008-08-01

    Based upon prior findings with group means, a "prototypical pattern" of neuropsychological results with HIV infection has emerged: impaired executive functioning, motor skills, speed of information processing, and learning, with intact memory retention, most language skills, and visuospatial functioning. We examined neuropsychological results from 553 HIV+ adults to determine the number of patterns seen among individuals with HIV infection. Factor analysis of a relatively comprehensive neuropsychological battery identified 6 component factors: verbal memory (VeM), visual memory (ViM), processing speed (PS), attention/working memory (A/WM), executive function (EF), and motor (M). These factor scores were submitted to hierarchical cluster analysis, to determine the appropriate number of clusters or patterns in the cohort. Final cluster membership was then determined by K-means analysis, based on the Lange, Iverson, Senior, and Chelune (2002) method. A 6-cluster solution was found to be most appropriate. The definitions of the clusters were based upon ipsative scoring of factor scores to indicate relative strengths and weaknesses (independent of overall level of performance): Cluster 1: strong EF; Cluster 2: strong M, weak VeM and EF; Cluster 3: strong PS, weak ViM and EF; Cluster 4: strong VeM, weak M; Cluster 5: strong A/WM; Cluster 6: strong VeM, weak EF. Neuropsychological-impairment rates differed across clusters, but all 6 clusters contained substantial numbers of impaired and unimpaired individuals. Cluster membership was not explained by demographic variables or psychiatric or neuromedical confounds. Thus, there does not appear to be a single, prototypical pattern of neuropsychological impairment associated with HIV infection for this battery of representative neuropsychological tests.

  15. Prevalence of maternal HIV-1 infection in Thames regions: results from anonymous unlinked neonatal testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ades, A E; Parker, S; Berry, T; Holland, F J; Davison, C F; Cubitt, D; Hjelm, M; Wilcox, A H; Hudson, C N; Briggs, M

    1991-06-29

    To monitor the spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the heterosexual population, residues of blood samples collected routinely on absorbent paper for neonatal screening (Guthrie cards) in NE, NW, and SW Thames Regions in England have been tested for antibodies to HIV-1 since June, 1988. 323,369 dried blood spots were analysed to end March, 1991. Prevalence of anti-HIV-1 in newborn babies has remained stable in outer London and non-metropolitan districts whereas prevalence in inner London has increased from 1 in 2000 in the 12 months beginning June, 1988, to 1 in 500 in the first 3 months of 1991. Either exponential or linear growth in the numbers of new seropositives could account for the results. That obstetricians were aware of maternal HIV infection in only 20% of infected pregnancies, indicates the extent to which HIV infection goes unrecognised in the heterosexual community.

  16. Plasma proteomic profiling in HIV-1 infected methamphetamine abusers.

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    Gwenael Pottiez

    Full Text Available We wanted to determine whether methamphetamine use affects a subset of plasma proteins in HIV-infected persons. Plasma samples from two visits were identified for subjects from four groups: HIV+, ongoing, persistent METH use; HIV+, short-term METH abstinent; HIV+, long term METH abstinence; HIV negative, no history of METH use. Among 390 proteins identified, 28 showed significant changes in expression in the HIV+/persistent METH+ group over the two visits, which were not attributable to HIV itself. These proteins were involved in complement, coagulation pathways and oxidative stress. Continuous METH use is an unstable condition, altering levels of a number of plasma proteins.

  17. Quantifying Susceptibility of CD4+ Stem Memory T-Cells to Infection by Laboratory Adapted and Clinical HIV-1 Strains

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    Jacqueline K. Flynn

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available CD4+ T cells are principal targets for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection. CD4+ T cell subsets are heterogeneous cell populations, divided by functional and phenotypic differences into naïve and memory T cells. The memory CD4+ T cells are further segregated into central, effector and transitional memory cell subsets by functional, phenotypic and homeostatic characteristics. Defining the distribution of HIV-1 infection in different T cell subsets is important, as this can play a role in determining the size and composition of the viral reservoir. Both central memory and transitional memory CD4+ T cells have been described as long-lived viral reservoirs for HIV. Recently, the newly described stem memory T cell subset has also been implicated as a long-lived HIV reservoir. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP reporter strains of HIV-1 and multi parameter flow cytometry, we developed an assay to simultaneously quantify the susceptibility of stem memory (TSCM, central memory, effector memory, transitional memory and naïve CD4+ T cell subsets, to HIV-1 infection in vitro. We show that TSCM are susceptible to infection with laboratory adapted and clinical HIV-1 strains. Our system facilitates the quantitation of HIV-1 infection in alternative T cell subsets by CCR5- and CXCR4-using viruses across different HIV-1 subtypes, and will be useful for studies of HIV-1 pathogenesis and viral reservoirs.

  18. Quantifying susceptibility of CD4+ stem memory T-cells to infection by laboratory adapted and clinical HIV-1 strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Jacqueline K; Paukovics, Geza; Cashin, Kieran; Borm, Katharina; Ellett, Anne; Roche, Michael; Jakobsen, Martin R; Churchill, Melissa J; Gorry, Paul R

    2014-02-10

    CD4+ T cells are principal targets for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. CD4+ T cell subsets are heterogeneous cell populations, divided by functional and phenotypic differences into naïve and memory T cells. The memory CD4+ T cells are further segregated into central, effector and transitional memory cell subsets by functional, phenotypic and homeostatic characteristics. Defining the distribution of HIV-1 infection in different T cell subsets is important, as this can play a role in determining the size and composition of the viral reservoir. Both central memory and transitional memory CD4+ T cells have been described as long-lived viral reservoirs for HIV. Recently, the newly described stem memory T cell subset has also been implicated as a long-lived HIV reservoir. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter strains of HIV-1 and multi parameter flow cytometry, we developed an assay to simultaneously quantify the susceptibility of stem memory (TSCM), central memory, effector memory, transitional memory and naïve CD4+ T cell subsets, to HIV-1 infection in vitro. We show that TSCM are susceptible to infection with laboratory adapted and clinical HIV-1 strains. Our system facilitates the quantitation of HIV-1 infection in alternative T cell subsets by CCR5- and CXCR4-using viruses across different HIV-1 subtypes, and will be useful for studies of HIV-1 pathogenesis and viral reservoirs.

  19. Low level of regulatory T cells and maintenance of balance between regulatory T cells and TH17 cells in HIV-1-infected elite controllers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Lea; Benfield, Thomas Lars; Mens, Helene

    2011-01-01

    A subgroup of HIV-1-infected individuals, elite controllers, have spontaneous viral control and offer an exceptional opportunity to study virological and immunolocigal factors of possible involvement in control of HIV-1 infection....

  20. Vpr Promotes Macrophage-Dependent HIV-1 Infection of CD4+ T Lymphocytes.

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    David R Collins

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Vpr is a conserved primate lentiviral protein that promotes infection of T lymphocytes in vivo by an unknown mechanism. Here we demonstrate that Vpr and its cellular co-factor, DCAF1, are necessary for efficient cell-to-cell spread of HIV-1 from macrophages to CD4+ T lymphocytes when there is inadequate cell-free virus to support direct T lymphocyte infection. Remarkably, Vpr functioned to counteract a macrophage-specific intrinsic antiviral pathway that targeted Env-containing virions to LAMP1+ lysosomal compartments. This restriction of Env also impaired virological synapses formed through interactions between HIV-1 Env on infected macrophages and CD4 on T lymphocytes. Treatment of infected macrophages with exogenous interferon-alpha induced virion degradation and blocked synapse formation, overcoming the effects of Vpr. These results provide a mechanism that helps explain the in vivo requirement for Vpr and suggests that a macrophage-dependent stage of HIV-1 infection drives the evolutionary conservation of Vpr.

  1. Human Papillomavirus Infection in HIV-1 Infected Women in Catalonia (Spain): Implications for Prevention of Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuardo, Valeria; Agustí, Cristina; Godinez, José Manuel; Montoliu, Alexandra; Torné, Aureli; Tarrats, Antoni; Alcalde, Carmen; Martín, Dolores; Fernández-Montoli, Eulalia; Vanrell, Cristina; Solé, Josefa; Canet, Yolanda; Marqueta, José Manuel; Mohamed, Jadiyettu; Cuenca, Isabel; Lonca, Montserrat; Sirera, Guillem; Ferrer, Elena; Domingo, Pere; Lloveras, Belen; Miro, Josep María; De Sanjosé, Silvia; Casabona, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Background High-risk human Papillomavirus infection is a necessary factor for cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions and invasive cervical cancer. In HIV-1-infected women, HPV infection is more prevalent and a higher risk of cervical cancer has been identified. We aimed to calculate the prevalence of infection by HR-HPV, determine the factors associated with this infection and abnormal cytology findings and to describe the history of cervical cancer screening in HIV-1-infected women. Methods We enrolled 479 HIV-1infected women from the PISCIS cohort. Each patient underwent a gynecological check-up, PAP smear, HPV AND Hybrid capture, HPV genotyping, and colposcopy and biopsy, if necessary. We applied questionnaires to obtain information on sociodemographic, behavioral, clinical, and cervical screening variables. We present a cross-sectional analysis. Results Median age was 42 years. The prevalence of HR-HPV infection was 33.2% and that of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) was 3.8%. The most common genotypes were 16(23%), 53(20.3%), and 52(16.2%). The factor associated with HR-HPV infection was age 500cells/mm3 (OR,8.4; 95%CI,3.7–19.2), HIV-1 viral load >10,000copies/mL versus <400copies/mL (OR,2.1; 95%CI,1.0–4.4), and use of oral contraceptives (OR,2.0; 95%CI,1.0–3.9). Sixty percent of HIV-1infected women had had one Pap smear within the last 2 years. Conclusions The high prevalence of HPV infection and cervical lesions in the HIV-1infected population in Catalonia, as well as the low coverage and frequency of screening in this group, means that better preventive efforts are necessary and should include vaccination against HPV, better accessibility to screening programs, training of health care professionals, and specific health education for HIV-1infected women. PMID:23118894

  2. Prevalence of asymptomatic urinary tract infections in morbidly obese dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzel, Angela L.; Bartges, Joseph W.; Moyers, Tamberlyn S.; Kirk, Claudia A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Obesity has reached epidemic proportions in dogs and, as in humans, cost of care has increased due to associated comorbidities. In humans, asymptomatic urinary tract infections (UTI) may be more prevalent in the obese. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) is the term used when UTI are asymptomatic. We hypothesized that morbidly obese dogs are similarly more likely to have asymptomatic bacteriuria than lean, overweight, and moderately obese dogs. Methods. A retrospective study was undertaken to explore a possible association between obesity and asymptomatic bacteriuria. Records from lean, overweight, and obese dogs receiving both a dual energy absorptiometry (DXA) scan and urine culture were included. Results. Six positive urine cultures were identified among 46 dogs fulfilling search criteria. All six positive cultures were found in dogs with body fat percentage of >45%. In dogs with body fat percentage of <45%, there were no positive urine cultures. Discussion. There was an increased prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria in the morbidly obese dogs in this study compared to those that were lean, overweight, or moderately obese. Whether antibiotic therapy is necessary in such cases is still being debated, but because asymptomatic bacteriuria may be associated with ascending infections, uroliths, or other complications, the data reported herein support the screening of obese patients for bacteriuria. PMID:26989606

  3. Prevalence of asymptomatic urinary tract infections in morbidly obese dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan G. Wynn

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Obesity has reached epidemic proportions in dogs and, as in humans, cost of care has increased due to associated comorbidities. In humans, asymptomatic urinary tract infections (UTI may be more prevalent in the obese. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB is the term used when UTI are asymptomatic. We hypothesized that morbidly obese dogs are similarly more likely to have asymptomatic bacteriuria than lean, overweight, and moderately obese dogs. Methods. A retrospective study was undertaken to explore a possible association between obesity and asymptomatic bacteriuria. Records from lean, overweight, and obese dogs receiving both a dual energy absorptiometry (DXA scan and urine culture were included. Results. Six positive urine cultures were identified among 46 dogs fulfilling search criteria. All six positive cultures were found in dogs with body fat percentage of >45%. In dogs with body fat percentage of <45%, there were no positive urine cultures. Discussion. There was an increased prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria in the morbidly obese dogs in this study compared to those that were lean, overweight, or moderately obese. Whether antibiotic therapy is necessary in such cases is still being debated, but because asymptomatic bacteriuria may be associated with ascending infections, uroliths, or other complications, the data reported herein support the screening of obese patients for bacteriuria.

  4. HIV-1 DNA vaccine with adjuvant cytokines induces specific immune responses against HIV-1 infection in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Fu-xiang; SUN Yong-tao; WANG Lin-xu; LIU Juan

    2006-01-01

    @@ There is mounting evidence that the induction of strong mucosal and cell-mediated immune responses is key element to consider in constructing efficacious HIV-1 vaccine. Therapeutic vaccines that induce high levels of CTL specific to HIV are currently being developed worldwide.

  5. HLA-associated susceptibility to HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabio, G; Scorza, R; Lazzarin, A; Marchini, M; Zarantonello, M; D'Arminio, A; Marchisio, P; Plebani, A; Luzzati, R; Costigliola, P

    1992-01-01

    We studied HLA antigen distribution of 50 heterosexual partners of HIV+ drug abusers with more than 1 year of sexual exposure to HIV, 36 children born to seropositive mothers and 61 haemophiliac patients exposed to presumably infectious clotting factor concentrates. B52 and B44 antigens were associated with HIV resistance while B51 was associated with HIV susceptibility. Forty-nine HIV+ drug abusers, spouses of heterosexual partners studied and 25 HIV+ mothers of the children were also typed. DR11 phenotype was associated with infectiousness of HIV+ subjects. Our data suggest that the HLA region controls susceptibility to infection with HIV and infectiousness of HIV+ subjects in different risk groups. PMID:1733633

  6. Large Isoform of Mammalian Relative of DnaJ is a Major Determinant of Human Susceptibility to HIV-1 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ping Chiang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Individual differences in susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection have been of interest for decades. We aimed to determine the contribution of large isoform of Mammalian DnaJ (MRJ-L, a HIV-1 Vpr-interacting cellular protein, to this natural variation. Expression of MRJ-L in monocyte-derived macrophages was significantly higher in HIV-infected individuals (n = 31 than their uninfected counterparts (n = 27 (p = 0.009. Fifty male homosexual subjects (20 of them are HIV-1 positive were further recruited to examine the association between MRJ-L levels and occurrence of HIV infection. Bayesian multiple logistic regression revealed that playing a receptive role and increased levels of MRJ-L in macrophages were two risk factors for HIV-1 infection. A 1% rise in MRJ-L expression was associated with a 1.13 fold (95% CrI 1.06–1.29 increase in odds of contracting HIV-1 infection. Ex vivo experiments revealed that MRJ-L facilitated Vpr-dependent nuclear localization of virus. Infection of macrophage-tropic strain is a critical step in HIV-1 transmission. MRJ-L is a critical factor in this process; hence, subjects with higher macrophage MRJ-L levels are more vulnerable to HIV-1 infection.

  7. Spatial working memory in asymptomatic HIV-infected subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, B; Garghentini, G; Campana, A; Grassi, E; Bertelli, S; Cinque, P; Epifani, M; Lazzarin, A; Scarone, S

    1999-01-01

    Many clinical and research findings converge to indicate that frontal lobe, basal ganglia, and related neuronal connections are primarily involved in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection; frontal lobe, mainly the prefrontal cortex, has a specialized role in working memory processes. This study focused on neuropsychological evaluation of the spatial component of working memory in a sample of 34 asymptomatic HIV-infected subjects as compared with 34 age- and sex-matched seronegative control subjects. A computer-administered test assessing spatial working memory was used for the neuropsychological evaluation. The findings did not show any spatial working memory impairment during the asymptomatic phase of HIV infection.

  8. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection by aqueous extracts of Prunella vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCoy Joe-Ann

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mint family (Lamiaceae produces a wide variety of constituents with medicinal properties. Several family members have been reported to have antiviral activity, including lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L., sage (Salvia spp., peppermint (Mentha × piperita L., hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis L., basil (Ocimum spp. and self-heal (Prunella vulgaris L.. To further characterize the anti-lentiviral activities of Prunella vulgaris, water and ethanol extracts were tested for their ability to inhibit HIV-1 infection. Results Aqueous extracts contained more anti-viral activity than did ethanol extracts, displaying potent antiviral activity against HIV-1 at sub μg/mL concentrations with little to no cellular cytotoxicity at concentrations more than 100-fold higher. Time-of-addition studies demonstrated that aqueous extracts were effective when added during the first five hours following initiation of infection, suggesting that the botanical constituents were targeting entry events. Further analysis revealed that extracts inhibited both virus/cell interactions and post-binding events. While only 40% inhibition was maximally achieved in our virus/cell interaction studies, extract effectively blocked post-binding events at concentrations similar to those that blocked infection, suggesting that it was targeting of these latter steps that was most important for mediating inhibition of virus infectivity. Conclusions We demonstrate that aqueous P. vulgaris extracts inhibited HIV-1 infectivity. Our studies suggest that inhibition occurs primarily by interference of early, post-virion binding events. The ability of aqueous extracts to inhibit early events within the HIV life cycle suggests that these extracts, or purified constituents responsible for the antiviral activity, are promising microbicides and/or antivirals against HIV-1.

  9. Optimal Combinations of Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies for Prevention and Treatment of HIV-1 Clade C Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagh, Kshitij; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Williamson, Carolyn; Robles, Alex; Bayne, Madeleine; Garrity, Jetta; Rist, Michael; Rademeyer, Cecilia; Yoon, Hyejin; Lapedes, Alan; Gao, Hongmei; Greene, Kelli; Louder, Mark K; Kong, Rui; Karim, Salim Abdool; Burton, Dennis R; Barouch, Dan H; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Mascola, John R; Morris, Lynn; Montefiori, David C; Korber, Bette; Seaman, Michael S

    2016-03-01

    The identification of a new generation of potent broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies (bnAbs) has generated substantial interest in their potential use for the prevention and/or treatment of HIV-1 infection. While combinations of bnAbs targeting distinct epitopes on the viral envelope (Env) will likely be required to overcome the extraordinary diversity of HIV-1, a key outstanding question is which bnAbs, and how many, will be needed to achieve optimal clinical benefit. We assessed the neutralizing activity of 15 bnAbs targeting four distinct epitopes of Env, including the CD4-binding site (CD4bs), the V1/V2-glycan region, the V3-glycan region, and the gp41 membrane proximal external region (MPER), against a panel of 200 acute/early clade C HIV-1 Env pseudoviruses. A mathematical model was developed that predicted neutralization by a subset of experimentally evaluated bnAb combinations with high accuracy. Using this model, we performed a comprehensive and systematic comparison of the predicted neutralizing activity of over 1,600 possible double, triple, and quadruple bnAb combinations. The most promising bnAb combinations were identified based not only on breadth and potency of neutralization, but also other relevant measures, such as the extent of complete neutralization and instantaneous inhibitory potential (IIP). By this set of criteria, triple and quadruple combinations of bnAbs were identified that were significantly more effective than the best double combinations, and further improved the probability of having multiple bnAbs simultaneously active against a given virus, a requirement that may be critical for countering escape in vivo. These results provide a rationale for advancing bnAb combinations with the best in vitro predictors of success into clinical trials for both the prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  10. Ectopic expression of anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD8{sup +} T cells modified with CD4ζ CAR from HIV-1 infection and alleviates impairment of cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamata, Masakazu, E-mail: masa3k@ucla.edu [Division of Hematology-Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Kim, Patrick Y. [Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ng, Hwee L. [Division of Infectious Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ringpis, Gene-Errol E.; Kranz, Emiko; Chan, Joshua; O' Connor, Sean [Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Yang, Otto O. [Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Division of Infectious Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); UCLA AIDS Institute, Los Angeles, CA (United States); AIDS Healthcare Foundation, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Chen, Irvin S.Y. [Division of Hematology-Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); UCLA AIDS Institute, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-07-31

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are artificially engineered receptors that confer a desired specificity to immune effector T cells. As an HIV-1-specific CAR, CD4ζ CAR has been extensively tested in vitro as well as in clinical trials. T cells modified with this CAR mediated highly potent anti-HIV-1 activities in vitro and were well-tolerated in vivo, but exerted limited effects on viral load and reservoir size due to poor survival and/or functionality of the transduced cells in patients. We hypothesize that ectopic expression of CD4ζ on CD8{sup +} T cells renders them susceptible to HIV-1 infection, resulting in poor survival of those cells. To test this possibility, highly purified CD8{sup +} T cells were genetically modified with a CD4ζ-encoding lentiviral vector and infected with HIV-1. CD8{sup +} T cells were vulnerable to HIV-1 infection upon expression of CD4ζ as evidenced by elevated levels of p24{sup Gag} in cells and culture supernatants. Concurrently, the number of CD4ζ-modified CD8{sup +} T cells was reduced relative to control cells upon HIV-1 infection. To protect these cells from HIV-1 infection, we co-expressed two anti-HIV-1 shRNAs previously developed by our group together with CD4ζ. This combination vector was able to suppress HIV-1 infection without impairing HIV-1-dependent effector activities of CD4ζ. In addition, the number of CD4ζ-modified CD8{sup +} T cells maintained similar levels to that of the control even under HIV-1 infection. These results suggest that protecting CD4ζ-modified CD8{sup +} T cells from HIV-1 infection is required for prolonged HIV-1-specific immune surveillance. - Highlights: • Ectopic expression of CD4ζ CAR in CD8{sup +} T cells renders them susceptible to HIV-1 infection. • Co-expression of two anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD4ζ CAR-modified CD8{sup +} T cells from HIV-1 infection. • Protecting CD4ζ CAR-modified CD8{sup +} T cells from HIV-1 infection suppresses its cytopathic effect.

  11. HIV-1 inhibits phagocytosis and inflammatory cytokine responses of human monocyte-derived macrophages to P. falciparum infected erythrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise E Ludlow

    Full Text Available HIV-1 infection increases the risk and severity of malaria by poorly defined mechanisms. We investigated the effect of HIV-1(Ba-L infection of monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM on phagocytosis of opsonised P. falciparum infected erythrocytes (IE and subsequent proinflammatory cytokine secretion. Compared to mock-infected MDM, HIV-1 infection significantly inhibited phagocytosis of IE (median (IQR (10 (0-28 versus (34 (27-108; IE internalised/100 MDM; p = 0.001 and decreased secretion of IL-6 (1,116 (352-3,387 versus 1,552 (889-6,331; pg/mL; p = 0.0078 and IL-1β (16 (7-21 versus 33 (27-65; pg/mL; p = 0.0078. Thus inadequate phagocytosis and cytokine production may contribute to impaired control of malaria in HIV-1 infected individuals.

  12. Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections due to Asymptomatic Colonic Diverticulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos Falidas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Colovesical fistula is a common complication of diverticulitis. Pneumaturia, fecaluria, urinary tract infections, abdominal pain, and dysuria are commonly reported. The authors report a case of colovesical fistula due to asymptomatic diverticulitis, and they emphasize the importance of deeply investigate recurrent urinary tract infection without any bowel symptoms. They also briefly review the literature.

  13. Asymptomatic carriers contribute to nosocomial Clostridium difficile infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blixt, Thomas; Gradel, Kim Oren; Homann, Christian;

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Nosocomial infection with Clostridium difficile pose a considerable problem despite numerous attempts by health care workers to reduce risk of transmission. Asymptomatic carriers of C difficile might spread their infection to other patients. We investigated the effects of of as...

  14. Ibalizumab: an anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Christopher J; Jacobson, Jeffrey M

    2010-09-01

    The majority of currently available agents for the treatment of HIV-1 infection act by targeting one of several intracellular steps in the viral life cycle. Despite improvements in efficacy and tolerability, the development of viral resistance to these agents is common and significant toxicity and adherence issues still occur. For this reason the development of safe, well tolerated antiviral agents that target a novel step in the viral life cycle remains important. Viral entry into host cells affords several potential extracellular targets for antiretroviral therapy. Ibalizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody to CD4, the primary host cellular receptor for HIV-1 entry, has been shown to block HIV-1 entry in vitro. Early clinical trials have demonstrated significant antiviral efficacy with a >1 log(10) reduction in viral load when given as monotherapy. Its long half-life, which allows weekly dosing, and its administration as an intravenous infusion differentiate it from other currently available antiretroviral agents. These properties may prove useful in allowing improved drug delivery to patients who have had difficulty adhering to daily oral regimens. Its unique mode of action reduces the risk of cross-resistance with currently available antiretroviral agents, with the potential to expand the choices available to treat drug-resistant HIV-1.

  15. Outcome of protease inhibitor substitution with nevirapine in HIV-1 infected children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomez M Luisa

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protease inhibitors (PIs have been associated with metabolic complications. There is a trend to switch to simpler therapy to improve these disturbances. We report a case-series describing the effects in metabolic abnormalities in seven HIV-infected children, previously treated with protease inhibitor (PI after switching to nevirapine. Methods Seven children with stable PI-containing regimen and a long lasting HIV-1 RNA Results Seven HIV-infected children were enrolled. Median age: 130 months (99,177. Median baseline CD4%: 32%. All had HIV-1 RNA Conclusion PI substitution with nevirapine improved lipid profile in our patients, although this strategy did not show significant changes in body fat or lipodystrophy.

  16. Tetanus and diphtheria antibodies and response to a booster dose in Brazilian HIV-1-infected women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, Tatiana C S; Succi, Regina C M; Weckx, Lily Y; Tavares-Lopes, L; de Moraes-Pinto, M Isabel

    2004-09-09

    Tetanus and diphtheria (Td) antibodies were studied in HIV-1-infected women during puerperium. HIV group (n=61) was compared with Control group (n=101). Twenty-one women from HIV and 13 from Control group who had antibody levels lower than 0.1 IU/mL received a booster with Td vaccine. Antibodies were assessed by double antigen ELISA. Mean tetanus and diphtheria antibody levels from HIV group were lower than those from Control group. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that tetanus and diphtheria antibody levels were decreased by HIV-1-infection, and that was independent of the reduction due to the time interval between last booster and antibody assessment. After a booster dose, both groups had an increase in mean tetanus and diphtheria antibody levels, but in Control group the levels were higher than in HIV group.

  17. Frequency of class I anti-HLA alloantibodies in patients infected by HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Regina Manzolli Leite

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of class I anti-HLA alloantibodies in patients infected by HIV-1 and relate it with the different clinical courses of the disease. Blood samples were collected in EDTA tubes from 145 individuals. HIV-1 infection was confirmed by ELISA test. The presence of class I anti-HLA alloantibodies and HLA allele's were determined. Clinical evolution was set as fast (3 years. Class I anti-HLA alloantibodies presence was lower in healthy individuals than in those infected by HIV-1 (4.2% against 32.4%. However, an equal distribution of these alloantibodies was found among the individuals infected, independent on the clinical evolution. Thus, class I anti-HLA alloantibodies was not a determinant factor for patient worsening.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a presença de aloanticorpos anti-HLA classe I em pacientes infectados pelo HIV-1 e relacioná-la aos diferentes cursos clínicos da doença. Amostras de sangue de 145 indivíduos HIV positivo foram coletadas em tubos com EDTA. A infecção pelo HIV-1 foi confirmada por teste ELISA e a presença de aloanticorpos anti-HLA classe I determinada em seguida. A evolução clínica foi definida como rápida (3 anos. A presença de aloanticorpos anti-HLA classe I foi menor em indivíduos saudáveis em relação aos infectados pelo HIV-1 (4,2% contra 32,4%. Porém, a distribuição destes aloanticorpos entre os indivíduos infectados foi igual, independente da evolução clínica. Deste modo, a presença de aloanticorpos anti-HLA classe I não é um fator determinante na piora clínica do paciente.

  18. Polymorphisms in the IFNγ, IL-10, and TGFβ Genes May Be Associated with HIV-1 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Bonfim Freitas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study investigated possible associations between the TNFα-308G/A, IFN+874A/T, IL-6-174C/G, IL-10-1082A/G, and TGFβ-509C/T polymorphisms with HIV-1 infection, in addition to correlation of the polymorphisms with clinical markers of AIDS progression, such as levels of CD4+/CD8+ T lymphocytes and plasma viral load. Methods. A total of 216 individuals who were infected with HIV-1 and on antiretroviral therapy (ART and 294 individuals from the uninfected control group were analyzed. Results. All individuals evaluated were negative for total anti-HBc, anti-HCV, anti-T. pallidum, and anti-HTLV-1/2. The polymorphisms were identified by PCR-RFLP. Individuals presenting the IFN+874A allele as well as the AA genotype were more frequent in the HIV-1 infected group compared to the control group (P<0.05, in addition to having lower levels of CD4+ T lymphocytes. The CD8+ T lymphocytes count was significantly lower in individuals with the IL-10-1082 GG genotype. The TGFβ-509TT genotype was associated with higher plasma viral load. Conclusions. The results suggest that the presence of the IFN+874A allele confers susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and a decrease in the number of CD4+ T lymphocytes. In addition, the genotype associated with high serum levels of TGFβ may be associated with an increase in plasma viral load.

  19. PPARgamma Pro12Ala polymorphism in HIV-1-infected patients with HAART-related lipodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saumoy, Maria; Veloso, Sergi; Alonso-Villaverde, Carlos; Domingo, Pere; Chacón, Matilde R; Miranda, Merce; Aragonès, Gerard; Gutiérrez, Maria Mar; Viladés, Consuelo; Peraire, Joaquim; Sirvent, Joan-Josep; López-Dupla, Miguel; Aguilar, Carmen; Richart, Cristóbal; Vidal, Francesc

    2009-09-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) is involved in obesity and in some components of the metabolic syndrome in unselected population. To determine whether PPARgamma genetic variants are associated with the risk of developing lipodystrophy and its associated metabolic disturbances in HIV-1-infected patients treated with HAART and to assess PPARgamma mRNA expression in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT). The study group comprised 278 patients infected with HIV-1 and treated with antiretroviral drugs (139 with lipodystrophy and 139 without) and 105 uninfected controls (UC). The PPARgamma Pro12Ala (C%>G) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was assessed using PCR-RFLPs on white cell DNA. PPARgamma mRNA expression in SAT was assessed in 38 patients (25 with lipodystrophy and 13 without) and in 21 UC by real-time PCR. Statistical analysis was based on Student's T tests, Chi(2) tests, Spearman's correlations tests and logistic regression tests. PPARgamma Pro12Ala genotype distribution and allele frequencies were non-significantly different between both HIV-1-infected categories, lipodystrophy vs non-lipodystrophy (p=0.9 and p=0.87, respectively). Lipodystrophic patients harbouring the rare X/Ala genotype (Ala/Ala plus Pro/Ala) had significantly greater plasma total and LDL cholesterol levels compared with carriers of the common Pro/Pro genotype (p=0.029 and p=0.016, respectively) at univariate analyses. At multivariate analyses these associations were no longer significant. There was a near-significant decreased SAT PPARgamma mRNA expression in patients with lipodystrophy compared to UC (p=0.054). PPARgamma Pro12Ala SNP has no effect on the risk of developing lipodystrophy in HIV-1-infected patients treated with HAART. PPARgamma mRNA SAT expression appears decreased in lipodystrophy.

  20. Macrophages and lymphocytes differentially modulate the ability of RANTES to inhibit HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Eleanore; Amella, Carol A; Pompucci, Lorena; Franchin, Giovanni; Sherry, Barbara; Schmidtmayerova, Helena

    2003-11-01

    The beta-chemokines MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta, and RANTES inhibit HIV-1 infection of CD4+ T cells by inhibiting interactions between the virus and CCR5 receptors. However, while beta-chemokine-mediated inhibition of HIV-1 infection of primary lymphocytes is well documented, conflicting results have been obtained using primary macrophages as the virus target. Here, we show that the beta-chemokine RANTES inhibits virus entry into both cellular targets of the virus, lymphocytes and macrophages. However, while virus entry is inhibited at the moment of infection in both cell types, the amount of virus progeny is lowered only in lymphocytes. In macrophages, early-entry restriction is lost during long-term cultivation, and the amount of virus produced by RANTES-treated macrophages is similar to the untreated cultures, suggesting an enhanced virus replication. We further show that at least two distinct cellular responses to RANTES treatment in primary lymphocytes and macrophages contribute to this phenomenon. In lymphocytes, exposure to RANTES significantly increases the pool of inhibitory beta-chemokines through intracellular signals that result in increased production of MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta, thereby amplifying the antiviral effects of RANTES. In macrophages this amplification step does not occur. In fact, RANTES added to the macrophages is efficiently cleared from the culture, without inducing synthesis of beta-chemokines. Our results demonstrate dichotomous effects of RANTES on HIV-1 entry at the moment of infection, and on production and spread of virus progeny in primary macrophages. Since macrophages serve as a reservoir of HIV-1, this may contribute to the failure of endogenous chemokines to successfully eradicate the virus.

  1. Transmission of single and multiple viral variants in primary HIV-1 subtype C infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Novitsky

    Full Text Available To address whether sequences of viral gag and env quasispecies collected during the early post-acute period can be utilized to determine multiplicity of transmitted HIV's, recently developed approaches for analysis of viral evolution in acute HIV-1 infection [1,2] were applied. Specifically, phylogenetic reconstruction, inter- and intra-patient distribution of maximum and mean genetic distances, analysis of Poisson fitness, shape of highlighter plots, recombination analysis, and estimation of time to the most recent common ancestor (tMRCA were utilized for resolving multiplicity of HIV-1 transmission in a set of viral quasispecies collected within 50 days post-seroconversion (p/s in 25 HIV-infected individuals with estimated time of seroconversion. The decision on multiplicity of HIV infection was made based on the model's fit with, or failure to explain, the observed extent of viral sequence heterogeneity. The initial analysis was based on phylogeny, inter-patient distribution of maximum and mean distances, and Poisson fitness, and was able to resolve multiplicity of HIV transmission in 20 of 25 (80% cases. Additional analysis involved distribution of individual viral distances, highlighter plots, recombination analysis, and estimation of tMRCA, and resolved 4 of the 5 remaining cases. Overall, transmission of a single viral variant was identified in 16 of 25 (64% cases, and transmission of multiple variants was evident in 8 of 25 (32% cases. In one case multiplicity of HIV-1 transmission could not be determined. In primary HIV-1 subtype C infection, samples collected within 50 days p/s and analyzed by a single-genome amplification/sequencing technique can provide reliable identification of transmission multiplicity in 24 of 25 (96% cases. Observed transmission frequency of a single viral variant and multiple viral variants were within the ranges of 64% to 68%, and 32% to 36%, respectively.

  2. Comprehensive longitudinal analysis of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific T cell responses during acute HCV infection in the presence of existing HIV-1 infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H.S.B. van den Berg; T.A. Ruys; N.M. Nanlohy; S.E. Geerlings; J.T. van der Meer; J.W. Mulder; J.A. Lange; D. van Baarle

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to study the development of HCV-specific T cell immunity during acute HCV infection in the presence of an existing HIV-1 infection in four HIV-1 infected men having sex with men. A comprehensive analysis of HCV-specific T cell responses was performed at two time points duri

  3. The amino-terminal domain of the CCR2 chemokine receptor acts as coreceptor for HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frade, J M; Llorente, M; Mellado, M; Alcamí, J; Gutiérrez-Ramos, J C; Zaballos, A; Real, G; Martínez-A, C

    1997-08-01

    The chemokines are a homologous serum protein family characterized by their ability to induce activation of integrin adhesion molecules and leukocyte migration. Chemokines interact with their receptors, which are composed of a single-chain, seven-helix, membrane-spanning protein coupled to G proteins. Two CC chemokine receptors, CCR3 and CCR5, as well as the CXCR4 chemokine receptor, have been shown necessary for infection by several HIV-1 virus isolates. We studied the effect of the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and of a panel of MCP-1 receptor (CCR2)-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb) on the suppression of HIV-1 replication in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We have compelling evidence that MCP-1 has potent HIV-1 suppressive activity when HIV-1-infected peripheral blood lymphocytes are used as target cells. Furthermore, mAb specific for the MCP-1R CCR2 which recognize the third extracellular CCR2 domain inhibit all MCP-1 activity and also block MCP-1 suppressive activity. Finally, a set of mAb specific for the CCR2 amino-terminal domain, one of which mimics MCP-1 activity, has a potent suppressive effect on HIV-1 replication in M- and T-tropic HIV-1 viral isolates. We conjecture a role for CCR2 as a coreceptor for HIV-1 infection and map the HIV-1 binding site to the amino-terminal part of this receptor. This concurs with results showing that the CCR5 amino terminus is relevant in HIV-1 infection, although chimeric fusion of various extracellular domains shows that other domains are also implicated. We discuss the importance of CCR2 structure relative to its coreceptor role and the role of anti-CCR2 receptor antibodies in the prevention of HIV-1 infection.

  4. HIV-1自然感染中的中和抗体反应%Neutralizing antibodies responses during natural HIV-1 infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任彩云; 李妍; 凌虹

    2012-01-01

    中和抗体(Nab)可以防止I型人类免疫缺陷病毒(HIV-1)侵入靶细胞.HIV-1感染数周后即可诱导产生Nab,这些早期抗体只能特异性地中和自体病毒但不能中和异源性病毒.在一些慢性感染者体内则可以检测到可同时中和同源性和异源性病毒的广谱中和抗体(BNab).BNab的靶点通常位于包膜蛋白的保守区域.HIV-1 BNab的产生还受到病毒变异及结构遮盖等因素的限制,同时Nab的中和广度与病毒载量具有相关性.%Neutralizing antibodies can protect a host against the infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1).Neutralizing antibodies can be induced several weeks after infection.However,the antibodies induced in the early stage can neutralize only the autologous but not heterologous viruses.Nevertheless,broad neutralizing antibodies,which can neutralize both autologous and heterologous viruses,have been found in some chronic patients.Inaddition,broad neutralizing antibodies usually target the conserved regions of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein.However,the envelope glycoprotein mutation and its structure shielding limit the induction of these antibodies.

  5. Mitochondrial Haplogroup Influences Motor Function in Long-Term HIV-1-Infected Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azar, Ashley; Giovannetti, Tania; Pirrone, Vanessa; Nonnemacher, Michael R.; Passic, Shendra; Kercher, Katherine; Williams, Jean W.; Wigdahl, Brian; Dampier, William; Libon, David J.; Sell, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary divergence of the mitochondrial genome has given rise to distinct haplogroups. These haplogroups have arisen in specific geographical locations and are responsible for subtle functional changes in the mitochondria that may provide an evolutionary advantage in a given environment. Based on these functional differences, haplogroups could define disease susceptibility in chronic settings. In this study, we undertook a detailed neuropsychological analysis of a cohort of long-term HIV-1-infected individuals in conjunction with sequencing of their mitochondrial genomes. Stepwise regression analysis showed that the best model for predicting both working memory and declarative memory were age and years since diagnosis. In contrast, years since diagnosis and sub-haplogroup were significantly predictive of psychomotor speed. Consistent with this, patients with haplogroup L3e obtained better scores on psychomotor speed and dexterity tasks when compared to the remainder of the cohort, suggesting that this haplogroup provides a protective advantage when faced with the combined stress of HIV-1 infection and long-term antiretroviral therapies. Differential performance on declarative memory tasks was noted for individuals with other sub-L haplogroups, but these differences were not as robust as the association between L3e and psychomotor speed and dexterity tasks. This work provides evidence that mitochondrial haplogroup is related to neuropsychological test performance among patients in chronic disease settings such as HIV-1 infection. PMID:27711166

  6. Evaluation of dried blood spots with a multiplex assay for measuring recent HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly A Curtis

    Full Text Available Laboratory-based HIV tests for recent infection (TRIs, which primarily measure a specific serological biomarker(s that distinguishes recent from long-term HIV infection, have facilitated the estimation of population-based incidence. Dried blood spots (DBS on filter paper are an attractive sample source for HIV surveillance, given the simplified and cost-effective methods of specimen collection, storage, and shipment. Here, we evaluated the use of DBS in conjunction with an in-house multiplex TRI, the HIV-1-specific Bio-Plex assay, which measures direct antibody binding and avidity to multiple HIV-1 analytes. The assay performance was comparable between matched plasma and DBS samples from HIV-1 infected individuals obtained from diverse sources. The coefficients of variation, comparing the median antibody reactivity for each analyte between plasma and DBS, ranged from 2.78% to 9.40% and the correlation coefficients between the two sample types ranged from 0.89 to 0.97, depending on the analyte. The correlation in antibody reactivity between laboratory and site-prepared DBS for each analyte ranged from 0.87 to 0.98 and from 0.90 to 0.97 between site-prepared DBS and plasma. The correlation in assay measures between plasma and DBS indicate that the sample types can be used interchangeably with the Bio-Plex format, without negatively impacting the misclassification rate of the assay.

  7. Prevalence of asymptomatic urinary tract infections in morbidly obese dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Susan G; Witzel, Angela L; Bartges, Joseph W; Moyers, Tamberlyn S; Kirk, Claudia A

    2016-01-01

    Background. Obesity has reached epidemic proportions in dogs and, as in humans, cost of care has increased due to associated comorbidities. In humans, asymptomatic urinary tract infections (UTI) may be more prevalent in the obese. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) is the term used when UTI are asymptomatic. We hypothesized that morbidly obese dogs are similarly more likely to have asymptomatic bacteriuria than lean, overweight, and moderately obese dogs. Methods. A retrospective study was undertaken to explore a possible association between obesity and asymptomatic bacteriuria. Records from lean, overweight, and obese dogs receiving both a dual energy absorptiometry (DXA) scan and urine culture were included. Results. Six positive urine cultures were identified among 46 dogs fulfilling search criteria. All six positive cultures were found in dogs with body fat percentage of >45%. In dogs with body fat percentage of obese dogs in this study compared to those that were lean, overweight, or moderately obese. Whether antibiotic therapy is necessary in such cases is still being debated, but because asymptomatic bacteriuria may be associated with ascending infections, uroliths, or other complications, the data reported herein support the screening of obese patients for bacteriuria.

  8. Viremic Control and Viral Coreceptor Usage in Two HIV-1-Infected Persons Homozygous for CCR5 Δ32

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Timothy J.; Hanhauser, Emily; Hu, Zixin; Stellbrink, Hans-Jürgen; Noah, Christian; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Deeks, Steven G.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Pereyra, Florencia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine viral and immune factors involved in transmission and control of HIV-1 infection in persons without functional CCR5 Design Understanding transmission and control of HIV-1 in persons homozygous for CCR5Δ32 is important given efforts to develop HIV-1 curative therapies aimed at modifying or disrupting CCR5 expression. Methods We identified two HIV-infected CCR5Δ32/Δ32 individuals among a cohort of patients with spontaneous control of HIV-1 infection without antiretroviral therapy and determined co-receptor usage of the infecting viruses. We assessed genetic evolution of full-length HIV-1 envelope sequences by single-genome analysis from one participant and his sexual partner, and explored HIV-1 immune responses and HIV-1 mutations following virologic escape and disease progression. Results Both participants experienced viremia of less than 4,000 RNA copies/ml with preserved CD4+ T cell counts off ART for at least 3.3 and 4.6 years after diagnosis, respectively. One participant had phenotypic evidence of X4 virus, had no known favorable HLA alleles, and appeared to be infected by minority X4 virus from a pool that predominately used CCR5 for entry. The second participant had virus that was unable to use CXCR4 for entry in phenotypic assay but was able to engage alternative viral coreceptors (e.g. CXCR6) in vitro. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that individuals may be infected by minority X4 viruses from a population that predominately uses CCR5 for entry, and that viruses may bypass traditional HIV-1 coreceptors (CCR5 and CXCR4) completely by engaging alternative coreceptors to establish and propagate HIV-1 infection. PMID:25730507

  9. Analysis of HIV-1- and CMV-specific memory CD4 T-cell responses during primary and chronic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harari, Alexandre; Rizzardi, G Paolo; Ellefsen, Kim; Ciuffreda, Donatella; Champagne, Patrick; Bart, Pierre-Alexandre; Kaufmann, Daniel; Telenti, Amalio; Sahli, Roland; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Kaiser, Laurent; Lazzarin, Adriano; Perrin, Luc; Pantaleo, Giuseppe

    2002-08-15

    CD4 T-cell-specific memory antiviral responses to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) were investigated in 16 patients with documented primary HIV-1 infection (4 of the 16 subjects also had primary CMV infection) and compared with those observed in patients with chronic HIV-1 and CMV coinfection. Virus-specific memory CD4 T cells were characterized on the basis of the expression of the chemokine receptor CCR7. HIV-1- and CMV-specific interferon-gamma-secreting CD4 T cells were detected in patients with primary and chronic HIV-1 and CMV coinfection and were mostly contained in the cell population lacking expression of CCR7. The magnitude of the primary CMV-specific CD4 T-cell response was significantly greater than that of chronic CMV infection, whereas there were no differences between primary and chronic HIV-1-specific CD4 T-cell responses. A substantial proportion of CD4(+)CCR7(-) T cells were infected with HIV-1. These results advance the characterization of antiviral memory CD4 T-cell response and the delineation of the potential mechanisms that likely prevent the generation of a robust CD4 T-cell immune response during primary infection.

  10. Syphilis and HIV-1 co-infection: influence on CD4 T cell count, HIV-1 viral load and treatment response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Kristian; Gerstoft, Jan; Mathiesen, Lars Reinhardt;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the effect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 and syphilis coinfection on HIV-ribonucleic acid (RNA) viral load, CD4 cell count, and the response in rapid plasmin reagin (RPR) to treatment of the syphilis infection. STUDY DESIGN: Cases of syphilis diagnosed during 1 yea...... treated with doxycycline were the same. CONCLUSION: Syphilis was associated with a decrease in CD4 cell counts and an increase in HIV-RNA levels that both improved after treatment of syphilis....

  11. Two double-blinded, randomized, comparative trials of 4 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope vaccines in HIV-1-infected individuals across a spectrum of disease severity: AIDS Clinical Trials Groups 209 and 214.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schooley, R T; Spino, C; Kuritzkes, D; Walker, B D; Valentine, F A; Hirsch, M S; Cooney, E; Friedland, G; Kundu, S; Merigan, T C; McElrath, M J; Collier, A; Plaeger, S; Mitsuyasu, R; Kahn, J; Haslett, P; Uherova, P; deGruttola, V; Chiu, S; Zhang, B; Jones, G; Bell, D; Ketter, N; Twadell, T; Chernoff, D; Rosandich, M

    2000-11-01

    The potential role of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-specific immune responses in controlling viral replication in vivo has stimulated interest in enhancing virus-specific immunity by vaccinating infected individuals with HIV-1 or its components. These studies were undertaken to define patient populations most likely to respond to vaccination, with the induction of novel HIV-1-specific cellular immune responses, and to compare the safety and immunogenicity of several candidate recombinant HIV-1 envelope vaccines and adjuvants. New lymphoproliferative responses (LPRs) developed in 350 cells/mm(3) and were usually strain restricted. Responders tended to be more likely than nonresponders to have an undetectable level of HIV-1 RNA at baseline (P=.067). Induction of new cellular immune responses by HIV-1 envelope vaccines is a function of the immunologic stage of disease and baseline plasma HIV-1 RNA level and exhibits considerable vaccine strain specificity.

  12. Longitudinal anthropometric assessment of infants born to HIV-1-infected mothers, Belo Horizonte, Southeastern Brazil

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    Maria Arlene Fausto

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the growth parameters in infants who were born to HIV-1-infected mothers. METHODS: The study was a longitudinal evaluation of the z-scores for the weight-for-age (WAZ, weight-for-length (WLZ and length-for-age (LAZ data collected from a cohort. A total of 97 non-infected and 33 HIV-infected infants born to HIV-1-infected mothers in Belo Horizonte, Southeastern Brazil, between 1995 and 2003 was studied. The average follow-up period for the infected and non-infected children was 15.8 months (variation: 6.8 to 18.0 months and 14.3 months (variation: 6.3 to 18.6 months, respectively. A mixed-effects linear regression model was used and was fitted using a restricted maximum likelihood. RESULTS: There was an observed decrease over time in the WAZ, LAZ and WLZ among the infected infants. At six months of age, the mean differences in the WAZ, LAZ and WLZ between the HIV-infected and non-infected infants were 1.02, 0.59, and 0.63 standard deviations, respectively. At 12 months, the mean differences in the WAZ, LAZ and WLZ between the HIV-infected and non-infected infants were 1.15, 1.01, and 0.87 standard deviations, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The precocious and increasing deterioration of the HIV-infected infants' anthropometric indicators demonstrates the importance of the early identification of HIV-infected infants who are at nutritional risk and the importance of the continuous assessment of nutritional interventions for these infants.

  13. Enhanced Th17 phenotype in uninfected neonates born from viremic HIV-1-infected pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hygino, Joana; Vieira, Morgana M; Guillermo, Landi V; Silva-Filho, Renato G; Saramago, Carmen; Lima-Silva, Agostinho A; Andrade, Regis M; Andrade, Arnaldao F B; Brindeiro, Rodrigo M; Tanuri, Amilcar; Guimarães, Vander; de Melo Bento, Cleonice Alves

    2011-04-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the in vitro functional profile of T cells from uninfected neonates born from HIV-1-infected pregnant women who controlled (G1) or not (G2) the virus replication. We demonstrated that the lymphoproliferation of T cell to polyclonal activators was higher in the G2 as compared with G1. Nevertheless, no detectable proliferative response was observed in response to HIV-1 antigens in both neonate groups. Cytokine dosage in the supernatants of these polyclonally activated T cell cultures demonstrated that, while IL-10 was the dominant cytokine produced in G1, Th17-related cytokines were significantly higher in G2 neonates. The higher Th17 phenotype tendency in G2 was related to high production of IL-23 by lipopolysaccharide-activated monocyte-derived dendritic cells from these neonates. Our results demonstrated immunological disorders in uninfected neonates born from viremic HIV-1-infected mothers that can help to explain why some of these children have elevated risk of clinical morbidity and mortality due to pathological hypersensitivity.

  14. [Application progress of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology in the treatment of HIV-1 infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yinglun; Li, Qingwei

    2016-01-01

    The goal of gene therapy is to introduce foreign genes into human target cells in a certain way to correct or compensate diseases caused by defective or abnormal genes. Therefore, gene therapy has great practical significance in studying the treatment of persistent or latent HIV-1 infection. At present, the existing methods of gene therapy have some major defects such as limited target site recognition and high frequency of off-targets. The latest research showed that the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) /CRISPR-associated nuclease 9 (Cas9) system from bacteria and archaea has been successfully reformed to a targeted genome editing tool. Thus, how to achieve the goal of treating HIV-1 infection by modifying targeted HIV-1 virus genome effectively using the CRISPR/Cas9 system has become a current research focus. Here we review the latest achievements worldwide and briefly introduce applications of the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology in the treatment of HIV-1 infection, including CCR5 gene editing, removal of HIV-1 virus and activation of HIV-1 virus, in order to provide reference for the prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  15. Elevated Levels of Microbial Translocation Markers and CCL2 Among Older HIV-1Infected Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Eileen; Lockhart, Ainsley; Huang, Lisa; Robles, Yvonne; Becerril, Carlos; Romero-Tejeda, Marisol; Albrecht, Mary A.; Palmer, Christine D.; Bosch, Ronald J; Altfeld, Marcus; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Lin, Nina H.

    2016-01-01

    The aging of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)–infected population obligates a focus on the interaction between aging, comorbid conditions, and HIV-1. We recruited a cohort of HIV-1infected men aged ≤35 years or ≥50 years who were receiving fully suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). We analyzed plasma markers of inflammation; T-cell activation, exhaustion, proliferation; and innate cellular subsets and functional capacity. Levels of lipopolysaccharide and the plasma marker of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 were significantly elevated in older HIV-infected men despite comparable cellular phenotypes. Compared with similarly age-stratified uninfected subjects, older HIV-1infected adults were also more frequently in the upper quartile of soluble CD14 expression. PMID:26494772

  16. APOBEC3G与Vif在HIV-1感染中的作用%The Roles of APOBEC3G and Vif in HIV-1 Infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马寅佳; 杨怡姝; 曾毅

    2012-01-01

    Apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing catalytic polypeptide-like (APOBEC) proteins are cytidine deaminases that exert antiviral activity to inhibit the infection of many viruses, especially retrovintses. The antiviral activity of AP0BEC-3G( A3G) and APOBEC-3F are stronger than other family members. A3G inhibits human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection through cytidine deamination and non-cytidine deamination. However, the degradation of A3G by the ubiquitin- proteasome system can be antagonized by HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif). The study of the interaction of A3G and Vif will be informative for its connection with HIV-1 treatments.%载脂蛋白B mRNA编辑催化多肽样(apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing catalytic polypeptide-like,APOBEC)蛋白是一组胞嘧啶脱氨基酶,具有天然的抗病毒活性,对多种病毒具有抑制作用,特别是逆转录病毒.APOBEC3蛋白能够抑制人类免疫缺陷病毒(HIV-1)的感染,其中APOBEC3G和APOBEC3F的作用最强.APOBEC3G能够通过胞嘧啶脱氨基作用和非胞嘧啶脱氨基作用抑制病毒感染.HIV-1病毒感染因子(Vif)蛋白主要经泛素-蛋白酶体途径介导APOBEC3G降解,从而拮抗其抗病毒作用.APOBEC3G和Vif之间相互作用的研究对于寻求新的抗HIV治疗靶点具有重要意义.

  17. Molecular characterisation of newly identified HIV-1 infections in Curitiba, Brazil: preponderance of clade C among males with recent infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Leandro de Paula Ferreira

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available As in many areas of Brazil, the AIDS epidemic in Curitiba is relatively stable, but surveillance is important to support public policy. The molecular characteristics of HIV may be instrumental for monitoring epidemic trends. We evaluated plasma HIV-1 RNA (n = 37 from 38 cases presenting with positive serology, who were among 820 consenting volunteers visiting the downtown counselling and serology testing centre. Seroprevalence was 4.6% (CI 95% 3.2-6.3 and the estimated HIV incidence, as defined by the BED assay, was 2.86 persons/years (CI 95% 1.04-4.68. An additional set of contemporaneous, anonymous samples from a local laboratory was also analysed (n = 20. Regions of the HIV-1 polymerase (n = 57 and envelope (n = 34 were evaluated for subtyping, determination of mosaic structure, primary drug resistance mutations (pDRM, envelope V3 loop motifs and amino acid signatures related to viral tropism. HIV-1 clade B was observed in 53% of cases; HIV-1C in 30% and BC mosaics in 14%, with one F genome and one CF mosaic. Clade C infection was associated with recent infections among males (p < 0.03. Stanford surveillance pDRM was observed in 8.8% of sequences, with 7% showing high level resistance to at least one antiretroviral drug. Tropism for CXCR4 co-receptor was predicted in 18% of envelope sequences, which were exclusively among clade B genomes and cases with serological reactivity to chronic infection.

  18. Exhaustion of Activated CD8 T Cells Predicts Disease Progression in Primary HIV-1 Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Hoffmann

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The rate at which HIV-1 infected individuals progress to AIDS is highly variable and impacted by T cell immunity. CD8 T cell inhibitory molecules are up-regulated in HIV-1 infection and associate with immune dysfunction. We evaluated participants (n = 122 recruited to the SPARTAC randomised clinical trial to determine whether CD8 T cell exhaustion markers PD-1, Lag-3 and Tim-3 were associated with immune activation and disease progression. Expression of PD-1, Tim-3, Lag-3 and CD38 on CD8 T cells from the closest pre-therapy time-point to seroconversion was measured by flow cytometry, and correlated with surrogate markers of HIV-1 disease (HIV-1 plasma viral load (pVL and CD4 T cell count and the trial endpoint (time to CD4 count <350 cells/μl or initiation of antiretroviral therapy. To explore the functional significance of these markers, co-expression of Eomes, T-bet and CD39 was assessed. Expression of PD-1 on CD8 and CD38 CD8 T cells correlated with pVL and CD4 count at baseline, and predicted time to the trial endpoint. Lag-3 expression was associated with pVL but not CD4 count. For all exhaustion markers, expression of CD38 on CD8 T cells increased the strength of associations. In Cox models, progression to the trial endpoint was most marked for PD-1/CD38 co-expressing cells, with evidence for a stronger effect within 12 weeks from confirmed diagnosis of PHI. The effect of PD-1 and Lag-3 expression on CD8 T cells retained statistical significance in Cox proportional hazards models including antiretroviral therapy and CD4 count, but not pVL as co-variants. Expression of 'exhaustion' or 'immune checkpoint' markers in early HIV-1 infection is associated with clinical progression and is impacted by immune activation and the duration of infection. New markers to identify exhausted T cells and novel interventions to reverse exhaustion may inform the development of novel immunotherapeutic approaches.

  19. Inter-laboratory assessment of a prototype multiplex kit for determination of recent HIV-1 infection.

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    Kelly A Curtis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Accurate and reliable laboratory-based assays are needed for estimating HIV-1 incidence from cross-sectional samples. We recently described the development of a customized, HIV-1-specific Bio-Plex assay that allows for the measurement of HIV-specific antibody levels and avidity to multiple analytes for improved HIV-1 incidence estimates. METHODS: To assess intra- and inter-laboratory assay performance, prototype multiplex kits were developed and evaluated by three distinct laboratories. Longitudinal seroconversion specimens were tested in parallel by each laboratory and kit performance was compared to that of an in-house assay. Additionally, the ability of the kit to distinguish recent from long-term HIV-1 infection, as compared to the in-house assay, was determined by comparing the reactivity of known recent (infected 12 months drug naïve specimens. RESULTS: Although the range of reactivity for each analyte varied between the prototype kit and in-house assay, a measurable distinction in reactivity between recent and long-term specimens was observed with both assays in all three laboratories. Additionally, kit performance was consistent between all three laboratories. The intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV, between sample replicates for all laboratories, ranged from 0.5% to 6.1%. The inter-laboratory CVs ranged from 8.5% to 21.3% for gp160-avidity index (a and gp120-normalized mean fluorescent intensity (MFI value (n, respectively. CONCLUSION: We demonstrate the feasibility of producing a multiplex kit for measuring HIV antibody levels and avidity, with the potential for improved incidence estimates based on multi-analyte algorithms. The availability of a commercial kit will facilitate the transfer of technology among diverse laboratories for widespread assay use.

  20. Interferon-α Subtypes in an Ex Vivo Model of Acute HIV-1 Infection: Expression, Potency and Effector Mechanisms.

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    Michael S Harper

    Full Text Available HIV-1 is transmitted primarily across mucosal surfaces and rapidly spreads within the intestinal mucosa during acute infection. The type I interferons (IFNs likely serve as a first line of defense, but the relative expression and antiviral properties of the 12 IFNα subtypes against HIV-1 infection of mucosal tissues remain unknown. Here, we evaluated the expression of all IFNα subtypes in HIV-1-exposed plasmacytoid dendritic cells by next-generation sequencing. We then determined the relative antiviral potency of each IFNα subtype ex vivo using the human intestinal Lamina Propria Aggregate Culture model. IFNα subtype transcripts from the centromeric half of the IFNA gene complex were highly expressed in pDCs following HIV-1 exposure. There was an inverse relationship between IFNA subtype expression and potency. IFNα8, IFNα6 and IFNα14 were the most potent in restricting HIV-1 infection. IFNα2, the clinically-approved subtype, and IFNα1 were both highly expressed but exhibited relatively weak antiviral activity. The relative potencies correlated with binding affinity to the type I IFN receptor and the induction levels of HIV-1 restriction factors Mx2 and Tetherin/BST-2 but not APOBEC3G, F and D. However, despite the lack of APOBEC3 transcriptional induction, the higher relative potency of IFNα8 and IFNα14 correlated with stronger inhibition of virion infectivity, which is linked to deaminase-independent APOBEC3 restriction activity. By contrast, both potent (IFNα8 and weak (IFNα1 subtypes significantly induced HIV-1 GG-to-AG hypermutation. The results unravel non-redundant functions of the IFNα subtypes against HIV-1 infection, with strong implications for HIV-1 mucosal immunity, viral evolution and IFNα-based functional cure strategies.

  1. Prevalence of and risk factors for pulmonary tuberculosis among newly diagnosed HIV-1 infected Nigerian children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebonyi, Augustine O.; Oguche, Stephen; Ejeliogu, Emeka U.; Agbaji, Oche O.; Shehu, Nathan Y.; Abah, Isaac O.; Sagay, Atiene S.; Ugoagwu, Placid O.; Okonkwo, Prosper I.; Idoko, John A.; Kanki, Phyllis J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Studies on the prevalence of and risk factors for tuberculosis (TB) among newly diagnosed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children in sub-Saharan Africa are scarce and in Nigeria there is paucity of reported data. We determined the prevalence of and risk factors for pulmonary TB (PTB) in newly diagnosed (treatment-naïve) HIV-1 infected children at the pediatric HIV clinic of the Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH) in Nigeria. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of 876 children, aged 2 months – 13 years, diagnosed with HIV-1 infection between July 2005 and December 2012, of which 286 were diagnosed with PTB at presentation after TB screening. The study site was the AIDS Prevention Initiative in Nigeria (APIN)-supported Pediatric HIV clinic at JUTH, Jos. A multivariate forward logistic regression modelling was used to identify risk factors for PTB-HIV co-infection. Results The prevalence of PTB-HIV co-infection was 32% (286/876). Severe immunosuppression (SI) and World Health Organization (WHO) HIV clinical stage 3/4 were identified as independent risk factors for PTB-HIV co-infection in HIV infected children. The odds of PTB-HIV co-infection was increased two-fold in HIV-infected children with WHO clinical stage 3/4 compared to those with stage 1/2 (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 1.76 [1.31-2.37], p<0.001) and 1.5-fold in children with SI compared to those without SI (AOR 1.52 [1.12-2.06], p=0.007). Conclusion In our setting, the burden of PTB was high among newly diagnosed HIV-infected children, and late WHO HIV clinical stage and severe immunosuppression were associated with PTB-HIV co-infection. Therefore there is a clear need to improve strategies for early diagnosis of both HIV and PTB to optimize clinical outcomes. PMID:27019829

  2. Binding of HIV-1 virions to α4β7 expressing cells and impact of antagonizing α4β7 on HIV-1 infection of primary CD4+ T cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang; Li; Wei; Jin; Tao; Du; Biao; Wu; Yalan; Liu; Robin; J; Shattock; Qinxue; Hu

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein is reported to interact with α4β7, an integrin mediating the homing of lymphocytes to gut-associated lymphoid tissue, but the significance of α4β7 in HIV-1 infection remains controversial. Here, using HIV-1 strain Ba L, the gp120 of which was previously shown to be capable of interacting with α4β7, we demonstrated that α4β7 can mediate the binding of whole HIV-1 virions to α4β7-expressing transfectants. We further constructed a cell line stably expressing α4β7 and confirmed the α4β7-mediated HIV-1 binding. In primary lymphocytes with activated α4β7 expression, we also observed significant virus binding which can be inhibited by an anti-α4β7 antibody. Moreover, we investigated the impact of antagonizing α4β7 on HIV-1 infection of primary CD4+ T cells. In α4β7-activated CD4+ T cells, both anti-α4β7 antibodies and introduction of shorthairpin RNAs specifically targeting α4β7 resulted in a decreased HIV-1 infection. Our findings indicate that α4β7 may serve as an attachment factor at least for some HIV-1 strains. The established approach provides a promising means for the investigation of other viral strains to understand the potential roles of α4β7 in HIV-1 infection.

  3. Extensive Genetic Diversity of HIV-1 in Incident and Prevalent Infections among Malaysian Blood Donors: Multiple Introductions of HIV-1 Genotypes from Highly Prevalent Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Wei Zhen; Bon, Abdul Hamid; Keating, Sheila; Anderios, Fread; Halim, Hazwan Abdul; Takebe, Yutaka; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Busch, Michael P.; Tee, Kok Keng

    2016-01-01

    Transfusion-transmissible infections including HIV-1 continue to pose major risks for unsafe blood transfusions due to both window phase infections and divergent viruses that may not be detected by donor screening assays. Given the recent emergence of several HIV-1 circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) in high-risk populations in the Southeast Asia region, we investigated the genetic diversity of HIV-1 among the blood donors in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. A total of 211 HIV-positive plasma samples detected among 730,188 donations to the National Blood Centre between 2013 and 2014 were provided (90.5% male, median age: 27.0 years old). Recent or long-term infection status at the time of donation was determined using a limiting antigen avidity enzyme immunoassay (LAg-Avidity EIA). HIV-1 gag-pol genes were amplified and sequenced from residual plasma for 149 cases followed by genotype determination using phylogenetic and recombination analyses. Transmitted antiretroviral resistance mutations were not observed among the blood donors, among which 22.7% were classified as recent or incident infections. Major circulating HIV-1 genotypes determined by neighbour-joining phylogenetic inference included CRF01_AE at 40.9% (61/149), CRF33_01B at 21.5% (32/149), and subtype B at 10.1% (15/149). Newly-described CRFs including CRF54_01B circulated at 4.0%, CRF74_01B at 2.0%, and CRF53_01B and CRF48_01B at 0.7% each. Interestingly, unique HIV-1 genotypes including African subtype G (8.7%), CRF45_cpx (1.3%), CRF02_AG (0.7%) and CRF07_BC (0.7%) from China were detected for the first time in the country. A cluster of subtype G sequences formed a distinct founder sub-lineage within the African strains. In addition, 8.7% (13/149) of HIV-infected donors had unique recombinant forms (URFs) including CRF01_AE/B' (4.7%), B'/C (2.7%) and B'/G (1.3%) recombinants. Detailed analysis identified similar recombinant structures with shared parental strains among the B'/C and B'/G URFs, some of which

  4. Asymptomatic malaria infections: detectability, transmissibility and public health relevance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousema, T.; Okell, L.; Felger, I.; Drakeley, C.

    2014-01-01

    Most Plasmodium falciparum infections that are detected in community surveys are characterized by low-density parasitaemia and the absence of clinical symptoms. Molecular diagnostics have shown that this asymptomatic parasitic reservoir is more widespread than previously thought, even in low-endemic

  5. Microfluidic Chip-based Nucleic Acid Testing using Gingival Crevicular Fluid as a New Technique for Detecting HIV-1 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Willyandre

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Transmission of HIV-1 infection by individuals in window period who are tested negative in conventional HIV-1 detection would pose the community with serious problems. Several diagnostic tools require specific labora-tory equipment, perfect timing of diagnosis, antibody to HIV-1, and invasive technique to get sample for examination, until high amount of time to process the sample as well as accessibility of remote areas. Many attempts have been made to solve those problems to come to a new detection technique. This review aims to give information about the current development technique for detection of HIV infection. Microfluidic Chip-based Nucleic Acid Testing is currently introduced for detection of HIV-1 infection. This review also cover the possible usage of gingival crevicular fluid as sample specimen that could be taken noninvasively from the individual.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v18i2.63

  6. Socio-demographic and epidemiological characteristics associated with human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1 infection in HIV-1-explosed but uninfected individuals, and in HIV-1-infected patients from a southern brasilian population Características sociodemográficas e epidemiológicas associadas com a infecção pelo vírus da imunodeficiência humana tipo 1 (HIV-1 em indivíduos expostos ao HIV-1 mas não infectados e em pacientes infectados pelo HIV-1, provenientes da população da região Sul do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna Maria Vissoci Reiche

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The ability to control human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection and progression of the disease is regulated by host and viral factors. This cross-sectional study describes the socio-demographic and epidemiological characteristics associated with HIV-1 infection in 1,061 subjects attended in Londrina and region, south of Brazil: 136 healthy individuals (Group 1, 147 HIV-1-exposed but uninfected individuals (Group 2, 161 HIV-1-infected asymptomatic patients (Group 3, and 617 patients with AIDS (Group 4. Data were obtained by a standardized questionnaire and serological tests. The age of the individuals ranged from 15.1 to 79.5 years, 54.0% and 56.1% of the Groups 3 and 4 patients, respectively, were men. The major features of groups 2, 3, and 4 were a predominance of education level up to secondary school (55.8%, 60.2% and 62.4%, respectively, sexual route of exposure (88.4%, 87.0% and 82.0%, respectively, heterosexual behavior (91.8%, 75.2% and 83.7%, respectively, and previous sexually transmitted diseases (20.4%, 32.5%, and 38.1%, respectively. The patients with AIDS showed the highest rates of seropositivity for syphilis (25.6%, of anti-HCV (22.3%, and anti-HTLV I/II obtained by two serological screening tests (6.2% and 6.8%, respectively. The results documenting the predominant characteristics for HIV-1 infection among residents of Londrina and region, could be useful for the improvement of current HIV-1 prevention, monitoring and therapeutic programs targeted at this population.Este estudo transversal descreve as principais características sociodemográficas e epidemiológicas associadas com a infecção pelo HIV-1 em 1.061 indivíduos atendidos em Londrina e região, Sul do Brasil: 136 indivíduos saudáveis (Grupo 1, 147 indivíduos expostos ao HIV-1 mas não infectados (Grupo 2, 161 pacientes infectados pelo HIV-1 assintomáticos (Grupo 3 e 617 pacientes com aids (Grupo 4. Os dados foram obtidos pela aplicação de um

  7. The prevalence of HSV-2 infection in HIV-1 discordant couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, S; Ding, Y; Wu, Z; Rou, K; Yang, Y; Wang, J; Gao, M; Ye, R; Xiang, L; He, N

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the prevalence and associated factors of HSV-2 discordance and concordance in HIV-1-discordant couples. This study used the baseline data from a cohort study of HIV-1-discordant couples in Dehong prefecture of Yunnan province, China. Of 954 participating couples, 42·4% were affected by HSV-2, of which 20·4% were HSV-2-concordant positive, 7·6% were HSV-2-discordant where the male was HSV-2 positive, and 14·4% were HSV-2 discordant where the female was HSV-2 positive. Compared to HSV-2-negative concordance, HSV-2 discordance with an HSV-2-positive male spouse was significantly associated with characteristics of the male spouse, including Han ethnicity and being in a second marriage. HSV-2 discordance with an HSV-2-positive female spouse was significantly associated with characteristics of the female spouse, including Han ethnicity, having engaged in commercial sex, having a sexual relationship of HSV-2 discordance, HSV-2-positive concordance was significantly associated with an education level of middle school or higher for both spouses, a sexual relationship of ⩾3 years, more frequent sex and having an HIV-1-infected male spouse. The findings highlight the need for HSV-2 prevention and treatment efforts to reduce HSV-2 transmission in this population, and emphasize the importance of implementing prevention interventions early in couples' relationships.

  8. Impact of gender on response to highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1 infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Kristina; Ladelund, Steen; Jensen-Fangel, Søren;

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Impact of gender on time to initiation, response to and risk of modification of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in HIV-1 infected individuals is still controversial. METHODS: From a nationwide cohort of Danish HIV infected individuals we identified all heterosex......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Impact of gender on time to initiation, response to and risk of modification of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in HIV-1 infected individuals is still controversial. METHODS: From a nationwide cohort of Danish HIV infected individuals we identified all...... counts (adjusted p=0.21). We observed no delay in time to initiation of HAART in women compared to men (HR 0.91, 95% CI 0.79-1.06). There were no gender differences in risk of treatment modification of the original HAART regimen during the first year of therapy for either toxicity (IRR 0.97 95% CI 0.......66-1.44) or other/unknown reasons (IRR 1.18 95% CI 0.76-1.82). Finally, CD4 counts and the risk of having a detectable viral load at 1, 3 and 6 years did not differ between genders. CONCLUSIONS: In a setting with free access to healthcare and HAART, gender does neither affect time from eligibility to HAART...

  9. Antiviral activity of derivatized dextrans on HIV-1 infection of primary macrophages and blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddiki, N; Mbemba, E; Letourneur, D; Ylisastigui, L; Benjouad, A; Saffar, L; Gluckman, J C; Jozefonvicz, J; Gattegno, L

    1997-11-28

    The present study demonstrates at the molecular level that dextran derivatives carboxymethyl dextran benzylamine (CMDB) and carboxymethyl dextran benzylamine sulfonate (CMDBS), characterized by a statistical distribution of anionic carboxylic groups, hydrophobic benzylamide units, and/or sulfonate moieties, interact with HIV-1 LAI gp120 and V3 consensus clades B domain. Only limited interaction was observed with carboxy-methyl dextran (CMD) or dextran (D) under the same conditions. CMDBS and CMDB (1 microM) strongly inhibited HIV-1 infection of primary macrophages and primary CD4+ lymphocytes by macrophage-tropic and T lymphocyte-tropic strains, respectively, while D or CMD had more limited effects on M-tropic infection of primary macrophages and exert no inhibitory effect on M- or T-tropic infection of primary lymphocytes. CMDBS and CMDB (1 microM) had limited but significant effect on oligomerized soluble recombinant gp120 binding to primary macrophages while they clearly inhibit (> 50%) such binding to primary lymphocytes. In conclusion, the inhibitory effect of CMDB and the CMDBS, is observed for HIV M- and T-tropic strain infections of primary lymphocytes and macrophages which indicates that these compounds interfere with steps of HIV replicative cycle which neither depend on the virus nor on the cell.

  10. Apoptotic cell death, detected ex vivo in peripheral blood lymphocytes of HIV-1 infected persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. F. te Velde

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available In HIV-1 infection the ongoing depletion of CD4+ T-lymphocytes is believed, to a large extent, to be due to apoptosis. Until now quantitative information about in vivo apoptosis of lymphocytes in HIV-patients is scarce because of the very nature of the apoptotic process. Successful detection of apoptosis ex vivo requires the recognition of the initial phase of this process, because at a later stage the cells may not remain any longer in the circulation. We measured quantitatively the amount of early apoptotic peripheral blood lymphocytes directly ex vivo in HIV-1 infected patients using a recently described flow cytometric assay. With this method we observed in an unselected heterogenous group of twelve HIV-infected individuals a median percentage of apoptotic lymphocytes to be significantly higher than in ten healthy controls. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of ex vivo observed increased apoptosis of peripheral blood lymphocytes in HIV-infected persons.

  11. Systemic Immune Activation Profiles of HIV-1 Subtype C-Infected Children and Their Mothers

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    Tinyiko G. Makhubele

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about immune activation profiles of children infected with HIV-1 subtype C. The current study compared levels of selected circulating biomarkers of immune activation in HIV-1 subtype C-infected untreated mothers and their children with those of healthy controls. Multiplex bead array, ELISA, and immunonephelometric procedures were used to measure soluble CD14 (sCD14, beta-2 microglobulin (β2M, CRP, MIG, IP-10, and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1. Levels of all 6 biomarkers were significantly elevated in the HIV-infected mothers and, with the exception of MIG, in their children (P<0.01–P<0.0001. The effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART and maternal smoking on these biomarkers were also assessed. With the exception of TGF-β1, which was unchanged in the children 12 months after therapy, initiation of ART was accompanied by decreases in the other biomarkers. Regression analysis revealed that although most biomarkers were apparently unaffected by smoking, exposure of children to maternal smoking was associated with a significant increase in IP-10. These findings demonstrate that biomarkers of immune activation are elevated in HIV-infected children pre-ART and decline, with the exception of TGF-β1, after therapy. Although preliminary, elevation of IP-10 in smoke-exposed infants is consistent with a higher level of immune activation in this group.

  12. Randomized pilot trial of a synbiotic dietary supplement in chronic HIV-1 infection

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    Schunter Marco

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with HIV-1 results in marked immunologic insults and structural damage to the intestinal mucosa, including compromised barrier function. While the development of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has been a major advancement in the treatment of HIV-1 infection, the need for novel complementary interventions to help restore intestinal structural and functional integrity remains unmet. Known properties of pre-, pro-, and synbiotics suggest that they may be useful tools in achieving this goal. Methods This was a 4-week parallel, placebo-controlled, randomized pilot trial in HIV-infected women on antiretroviral therapy. A synbiotic formulation (Synbiotic 2000® containing 4 strains of probiotic bacteria (1010 each plus 4 nondigestible, fermentable dietary fibers (2.5 g each was provided each day, versus a fiber-only placebo formulation. The primary outcome was bacterial translocation. Secondary outcomes included the levels of supplemented bacteria in stool, the activation phenotype of peripheral T-cells and monocytes, and plasma levels of C-reactive protein and soluble CD14. Results Microbial translocation, as measured by plasma bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA concentration, was not altered by synbiotic treatment. In contrast, the synbiotic formulation resulted in significantly elevated levels of supplemented probiotic bacterial strains in stool, including L. plantarum and P. pentosaceus, with the colonization of these two species being positively correlated with each other. T-cell activation phenotype of peripheral blood lymphocytes showed modest changes in response to synbiotic exposure, with HLA-DR expression slightly elevated on a minor population of CD4+ T-cells which lack expression of HLA-DR or PD-1. In addition, CD38 expression on CD8+ T-cells was slightly lower in the fiber-only group. Plasma levels of soluble CD14 and C-reactive protein were unaffected by synbiotic treatment in this study. Conclusions

  13. Activation of HIV-1 from latent infection via synergy of RUNX1 inhibitor Ro5-3335 and SAHA.

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    Zachary Klase

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A major barrier to the elimination of HIV-1 infection is the presence of a pool of long-lived, latently infected CD4+ memory T-cells. The search for treatments to re-activate latent HIV to aid in clearance is hindered by the incomplete understanding of the mechanisms that lead to transcriptional silencing of viral gene expression in host cells. Here we identify a previously unknown role for RUNX1 in HIV-1 transcriptional latency. The RUNX proteins, in combination with the co-factor CBF-β, are critical transcriptional regulators in T-cells. RUNX1 strongly modulates CD4 expression and contributes to CD4+ T-cell function. We show that RUNX1 can bind DNA sequences within the HIV-1 LTR and that this binding represses transcription. Using patient samples we show a negative correlation between RUNX1 expression and viral load. Furthermore, we find that pharmacologic inhibition of RUNX1 by a small molecule inhibitor, Ro5-3335, synergizes with the histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor SAHA (Vorinostat to enhance the activation of latent HIV-1 in both cell lines and PBMCs from patients. Our findings indicate that RUNX1 and CBF-β cooperate in cells to modulate HIV-1 replication, identifying for the first time RUNX1 as a cellular factor involved in HIV-1 latency. This work highlights the therapeutic potential of inhibitors of RUNX1 to re-activate virus and aid in clearance of HIV-1.

  14. Defective HIV-1 proviruses produce novel protein-coding RNA species in HIV-infected patients on combination antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamichi, Hiromi; Dewar, Robin L; Adelsberger, Joseph W; Rehm, Catherine A; O'Doherty, Una; Paxinos, Ellen E; Fauci, Anthony S; Lane, H Clifford

    2016-08-02

    Despite years of plasma HIV-RNA levels <40 copies per milliliter during combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), the majority of HIV-infected patients exhibit persistent seropositivity to HIV-1 and evidence of immune activation. These patients also show persistence of proviruses of HIV-1 in circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Many of these proviruses have been characterized as defective and thus thought to contribute little to HIV-1 pathogenesis. By combining 5'LTR-to-3'LTR single-genome amplification and direct amplicon sequencing, we have identified the presence of "defective" proviruses capable of transcribing novel unspliced HIV-RNA (usHIV-RNA) species in patients at all stages of HIV-1 infection. Although these novel usHIV-RNA transcripts had exon structures that were different from those of the known spliced HIV-RNA variants, they maintained translationally competent ORFs, involving elements of gag, pol, env, rev, and nef to encode a series of novel HIV-1 chimeric proteins. These novel usHIV-RNAs were detected in five of five patients, including four of four patients with prolonged viral suppression of HIV-RNA levels <40 copies per milliliter for more than 6 y. Our findings suggest that the persistent defective proviruses of HIV-1 are not "silent," but rather may contribute to HIV-1 pathogenesis by stimulating host-defense pathways that target foreign nucleic acids and proteins.

  15. Activation of HIV-1 from latent infection via synergy of RUNX1 inhibitor Ro5-3335 and SAHA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klase, Zachary; Yedavalli, Venkat S R K; Houzet, Laurent; Perkins, Molly; Maldarelli, Frank; Brenchley, Jason; Strebel, Klaus; Liu, Paul; Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2014-03-01

    A major barrier to the elimination of HIV-1 infection is the presence of a pool of long-lived, latently infected CD4+ memory T-cells. The search for treatments to re-activate latent HIV to aid in clearance is hindered by the incomplete understanding of the mechanisms that lead to transcriptional silencing of viral gene expression in host cells. Here we identify a previously unknown role for RUNX1 in HIV-1 transcriptional latency. The RUNX proteins, in combination with the co-factor CBF-β, are critical transcriptional regulators in T-cells. RUNX1 strongly modulates CD4 expression and contributes to CD4+ T-cell function. We show that RUNX1 can bind DNA sequences within the HIV-1 LTR and that this binding represses transcription. Using patient samples we show a negative correlation between RUNX1 expression and viral load. Furthermore, we find that pharmacologic inhibition of RUNX1 by a small molecule inhibitor, Ro5-3335, synergizes with the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor SAHA (Vorinostat) to enhance the activation of latent HIV-1 in both cell lines and PBMCs from patients. Our findings indicate that RUNX1 and CBF-β cooperate in cells to modulate HIV-1 replication, identifying for the first time RUNX1 as a cellular factor involved in HIV-1 latency. This work highlights the therapeutic potential of inhibitors of RUNX1 to re-activate virus and aid in clearance of HIV-1.

  16. Contribution of intestinal barrier damage, microbial translocation and HIV-1 infection status to an inflammaging signature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda K Steele

    Full Text Available Systemic inflammation is a characteristic of both HIV-1 infection and aging ("inflammaging". Intestinal epithelial barrier damage (IEBD and microbial translocation (MT contribute to HIV-associated inflammation, but their impact on inflammaging remains unclear.Plasma biomarkers for IEBD (iFABP, MT (LPS, sCD14, T-cell activation (sCD27, and inflammation (hsCRP, IL-6 were measured in 88 HIV-1 uninfected (HIV(neg and 83 treated, HIV-1-infected (HIV(pos adults from 20-100 years old.Age positively correlated with iFABP (r = 0.284, p = 0.008, sCD14 (r = 0.646, p = <0.0001 and LPS (r = 0.421, p = 0.0002 levels in HIV(neg but not HIV(pos subjects. Age also correlated with sCD27, hsCRP, and IL-6 levels regardless of HIV status. Middle-aged HIV(pos subjects had elevated plasma biomarker levels similar to or greater than those of elderly HIV(neg subjects with the exception of sCD14. Clustering analysis described an inflammaging phenotype (IP based on iFABP, sCD14, sCD27, and hsCRP levels in HIV(neg subjects over 60 years of age. The IP in HIV(neg subjects was used to develop a classification model that was applied to HIV(pos subjects to determine whether HIV(pos subjects under 60 years of age were IP+. HIV(pos IP+ subjects were similar in age to IP- subjects but had a greater risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD based on Framingham risk score (p =  0.01.We describe a novel IP that incorporates biomarkers of IEBD, MT, immune activation as well as inflammation. Application of this novel IP in HIV-infected subjects identified a group at higher risk of CVD.

  17. New insights into the mechanisms whereby low molecular weight CCR5 ligands inhibit HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Perez, Javier; Rueda, Patricia; Staropoli, Isabelle; Kellenberger, Esther; Alcami, Jose; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Lagane, Bernard

    2011-02-18

    CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a G-protein-coupled receptor for the chemokines CCL3, -4, and -5 and a coreceptor for entry of R5-tropic strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) into CD4(+) T-cells. We investigated the mechanisms whereby nonpeptidic, low molecular weight CCR5 ligands block HIV-1 entry and infection. Displacement binding assays and dissociation kinetics demonstrated that two of these molecules, i.e. TAK779 and maraviroc (MVC), inhibit CCL3 and the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 binding to CCR5 by a noncompetitive and allosteric mechanism, supporting the view that they bind to regions of CCR5 distinct from the gp120- and CCL3-binding sites. We observed that TAK779 and MVC are full and weak inverse agonists for CCR5, respectively, indicating that they stabilize distinct CCR5 conformations with impaired abilities to activate G-proteins. Dissociation of [(125)I]CCL3 from CCR5 was accelerated by TAK779, to a lesser extent by MVC, and by GTP analogs, suggesting that inverse agonism contributes to allosteric inhibition of the chemokine binding to CCR5. TAK779 and MVC also promote dissociation of [(35)S]gp120 from CCR5 with an efficiency that correlates with their ability to act as inverse agonists. Displacement experiments revealed that affinities of MVC and TAK779 for the [(35)S]gp120-binding receptors are in the same range (IC(50) ∼6.4 versus 22 nm), although we found that MVC is 100-fold more potent than TAK779 for inhibiting HIV infection. This suggests that allosteric CCR5 inhibitors not only act by blocking gp120 binding but also alter distinct steps of CCR5 usage in the course of HIV infection.

  18. The CD16+ monocyte subset is more permissive to infection and preferentially harbors HIV-1 in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellery, Philip J; Tippett, Emma; Chiu, Ya-Lin; Paukovics, Geza; Cameron, Paul U; Solomon, Ajantha; Lewin, Sharon R; Gorry, Paul R; Jaworowski, Anthony; Greene, Warner C; Sonza, Secondo; Crowe, Suzanne M

    2007-05-15

    HIV-1 persists in peripheral blood monocytes in individuals receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) with viral suppression, despite these cells being poorly susceptible to infection in vitro. Because very few monocytes harbor HIV-1 in vivo, we considered whether a subset of monocytes might be more permissive to infection. We show that a minor CD16+ monocyte subset preferentially harbors HIV-1 in infected individuals on HAART when compared with the majority of monocytes (CD14highCD16-). We confirmed this by in vitro experiments showing that CD16+ monocytes were more susceptible to CCR5-using strains of HIV-1, a finding that is associated with higher CCR5 expression on these cells. CD16+ monocytes were also more permissive to infection with a vesicular stomatitis virus G protein-pseudotyped reporter strain of HIV-1 than the majority of monocytes, suggesting that they are better able to support HIV-1 replication after entry. Consistent with this observation, high molecular mass complexes of apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like 3G (APOBEC3G) were observed in CD16+ monocytes that were similar to those observed in highly permissive T cells. In contrast, CD14highCD16- monocytes contained low molecular mass active APOBEC3G, suggesting this is a mechanism of resistance to HIV-1 infection in these cells. Collectively, these data show that CD16+ monocytes are preferentially susceptible to HIV-1 entry, more permissive for replication, and constitute a continuing source of viral persistence during HAART.

  19. Sugar-binding proteins potently inhibit dendritic cell human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and dendritic-cell-directed HIV-1 transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turville, Stuart G; Vermeire, Kurt; Balzarini, Jan; Schols, Dominique

    2005-11-01

    Both endocytic uptake and viral fusion can lead to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transfer to CD4+ lymphocytes, either through directional regurgitation (infectious transfer in trans [I-IT]) or through de novo viral production in dendritic cells (DCs) resulting in a second-phase transfer to CD4+ lymphocytes (infectious second-phase transfer [I-SPT]). We have evaluated in immature monocyte-derived DCs both pathways of transfer with regard to their susceptibilities to being blocked by potential microbicidal compounds, including cyanovirin (CNV); the plant lectins Hippeastrum hybrid agglutinin, Galanthus nivalis agglutinin, Urtica dioica agglutinin, and Cymbidium hybrid agglutinin; and the glycan mannan. I-IT was a relatively inefficient means of viral transfer compared to I-SPT at both high and low levels of the viral inoculum. CNV was able to completely block I-IT at 15 microg/ml. All other compounds except mannan could inhibit I-IT by at least 90% when used at doses of 15 microg/ml. In contrast, efficient inhibition of I-SPT was remarkably harder to achieve, as 50% effective concentration levels for plant lectins and CNV to suppress this mode of HIV-1 transfer increased significantly. Thus, our findings indicate that I-SPT may be more elusive to targeting by antiviral drugs and stress the need for drugs affecting the pronounced inhibition of the infection of DCs by HIV-1.

  20. Leptin and adiponectin, but not IL18, are related with insulin resistance in treated HIV-1-infected patients with lipodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veloso, Sergi; Escoté, Xavier; Ceperuelo-Mallafré, Victòria; López-Dupla, Miguel; Peraire, Joaquim; Viladés, Consuelo; Domingo, Pere; Castro, Antoni; Olona, Montserrat; Sirvent, Joan-Josep; Leal, Manuel; Vendrell, Joan; Richart, Cristóbal; Vidal, Francesc

    2012-05-01

    Leptin, adiponectin and IL18 are adipokines related with obesity, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia in the general population. Treated HIV-1-infected patients with lipodystrophy may develop insulin resistance and proatherogenic dyslipidemia. We assessed the relationship between plasma adipokine levels, adipokine genetics, lipodystrophy and metabolic disturbances. Plasma leptin, adiponectin and IL18 levels were assessed in 446 individuals: 282 HIV-1-infected patients treated with antiretroviral drugs (132 with lipodystrophy and 150 without) and 164 uninfected controls (UC). The LEP2410A>G, LEPRQ223R, ADIPQ276G>T, ADIPOR2-Intron5A>G and IL18-607C>A polymorphisms were validated by sequencing. Leptin levels were higher in UC than in HIV-1-infected, either with or without lipodystrophy (plipodystrophy compared with those without lipodystrophy (p=0.006). In patients with lipodystrophy, leptin had a positive correlation with insulin and with HOMA-IR. Adiponectin levels were non-significantly different in UC and HIV-1-infected patients. Patients with lipodystrophy had lower adiponectin levels than non-lipodystrophy subjects (plipodystrophy, adiponectin was negatively correlated with insulin, HOMA-IR and triglycerides. Plasma IL18 levels were higher in HIV-1-infected patients compared with UC (plipodystrophy. In patients with lipodystrophy there was a negative correlation between IL18 levels and LDLc. Genetic analyses indicated no significant associations with lipodystrophy nor with insulin resistance or with lipid abnormalities. In conclusion, HIV-1-infected patients have reduced plasma leptin levels. This reduction is magnified in patients with lipodystrophy whose adiponectin levels were lower than that of non-lipodystrophy subjects. Plasma IL18 levels are increased in infected patients irrespective of the presence of lipodystrophy. The polymorphisms assessed are not associated with lipodystrophy or metabolic disturbances in treated HIV-1-infected patients.

  1. Restricted isotype, distinct variable gene usage, and high rate of gp120 specificity of HIV-1 envelope-specific B cells in colostrum compared with those in blood of HIV-1-infected, lactating African women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacha, C R; Vandergrift, N; Jeffries, T L; McGuire, E; Fouda, G G; Liebl, B; Marshall, D J; Gurley, T C; Stiegel, L; Whitesides, J F; Friedman, J; Badiabo, A; Foulger, A; Yates, N L; Tomaras, G D; Kepler, T B; Liao, H X; Haynes, B F; Moody, M A; Permar, S R

    2015-03-01

    A successful HIV-1 vaccine must elicit immune responses that impede mucosal virus transmission, though functional roles of protective HIV-1 Envelope (Env)-specific mucosal antibodies remain unclear. Colostrum is a rich source of readily accessible mucosal B cells that may help define the mucosal antibody response contributing to prevention of postnatal HIV-1 transmission. To examine the HIV-1 Env-specific colostrum B-cell repertoire, single B cells were isolated from 17 chronically HIV-infected, lactating women, producing 51 blood and 39 colostrum HIV-1 Env-specific B-cell antibodies. All HIV-1 Env-specific colostrum-derived antibodies were immunoglobulin (Ig)G1 isotype and had mean heavy chain complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) lengths and mutation frequencies similar to those isolated from blood. However, variable heavy chain (VH) gene subfamily 1(∼)69 usage was higher among colostrum than blood HIV-1 Env-reactive antibodies (49% vs. 20%, P=0.006, Fisher's exact test). Additionally, more HIV-1 Env-specific colostrum antibodies were gp120 specific than those isolated from blood (44% vs. 16%, P=0.005, Fisher's exact test). One cross-compartment HIV-1 Env-specific clonal B-cell lineage was identified. These unique characteristics of colostrum B-cell antibodies suggest selective homing of HIV-1-specific IgG1-secreting memory B cells to the mammary gland and have implications for targeting mucosal B-cell populations by vaccination.

  2. Rapid selection of escape mutants by the first CD8 T cell responses in acute HIV-1 infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korber, Bette Tina Marie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The recent failure of a vaccine that primes T cell responses to control primary HIV-1 infection has raised doubts about the role of CD8+ T cells in early HIV-1 infection. We studied four patients who were identified shortly after HIV-1 infection and before seroconversion. In each patient there was very rapid selection of multiple HIV-1 escape mutants in the transmitted virus by CD8 T cells, including examples of complete fixation of non-synonymous substitutions within 2 weeks. Sequencing by single genome amplification suggested that the high rate of virus replication in acute infection gave a selective advantage to virus molecules that contained simultaneous and gained sequential T cell escape mutations. These observations show that whilst early HIV-1 specific CD8 T cells can act against virus, rapid escape means that these T cell responses are unlikely to benefit the patient and may in part explain why current HIV-1 T cell vaccines may not be protective.

  3. Lack of mucosal immune reconstitution during prolonged treatment of acute and early HIV-1 infection.

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    Saurabh Mehandru

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During acute and early HIV-1 infection (AEI, up to 60% of CD4(+ T cells in the lamina propria of the lower gastrointestinal (GI tract are lost as early as 2-4 wk after infection. Reconstitution in the peripheral blood during therapy with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART is well established. However, the extent of immune reconstitution in the GI tract is unknown. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Fifty-four AEI patients and 18 uninfected control participants underwent colonic biopsy. Forty of the 54 AEI patients were followed after initiation of antiretroviral therapy (18 were studied longitudinally with sequential biopsies over a 3-y period after beginning HAART, and 22 were studied cross sectionally after 1-7 y of uninterrupted therapy. Lymphocyte subsets, markers of immune activation and memory in the peripheral blood and GI tract were determined by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. In situ hybridization was performed in order to identify persistent HIV-1 RNA expression. Of the patients studied, 70% maintained, on average, a 50%-60% depletion of lamina propria lymphocytes despite 1-7 y of HAART. Lymphocytes expressing CCR5 and both CCR5 and CXCR4 were persistently and preferentially depleted. Levels of immune activation in the memory cell population, CD45RO+ HLA-DR+, returned to levels seen in the uninfected control participants in the peripheral blood, but were elevated in the GI tract of patients with persistent CD4+ T cell depletion despite therapy. Rare HIV-1 RNA-expressing cells were detected by in situ hybridization. CONCLUSIONS: Apparently suppressive treatment with HAART during acute and early infection does not lead to complete immune reconstitution in the GI mucosa in the majority of patients studied, despite immune reconstitution in the peripheral blood. Though the mechanism remains obscure, the data suggest that there is either viral or immune-mediated accelerated T cell destruction or, possibly, alterations in T

  4. Efficient Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) Infection of Cells Lacking PDZD8

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shijian; Sodroski, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    PDZD8 can bind the capsid proteins of different retroviruses, and transient knockdown of PDZD8 results in a decrease in the efficiency of an early, post-entry event in the retrovirus life cycle. Here we used the CRISPR-CAS9 system to create cell lines in which PDZD8 expression is stably eliminated. The PDZD8-knockout cell lines were infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) and murine leukemia virus as efficiently as the parental PDZD8-expressing cells. These results indicate that PDZD...

  5. Asymptotic behaviors of a cell-to-cell HIV-1 infection model perturbed by white noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qun

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we analyze a mathematical model of cell-to-cell HIV-1 infection to CD4+ T cells perturbed by stochastic perturbations. First of all, we investigate that there exists a unique global positive solution of the system for any positive initial value. Then by using Lyapunov analysis methods, we study the asymptotic property of this solution. Moreover, we discuss whether there is a stationary distribution for this system and if it owns the ergodic property. Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the theoretical results.

  6. Fluconazole for ketoconazole-resistant oropharyngeal candidiasis in HIV-1 infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, S; Mathiesen, Lars Reinhardt

    1990-01-01

    The efficacy of fluconazole in doses ranging from 50 to 200 mg/day in controlling oropharyngeal candidiasis was retrospectively evaluated in 16 consecutive HIV-1-infected patients. 13 patients received fluconazole due to failure of treatment with ketoconazole, and among these 11 (84%) initially...... showed complete or partial remission of oropharyngeal candidiasis. 3 (27%) of these subsequently developed failure of treatment within a median observation period of 38 days. No major toxicities were observed. Fluconazole appears promising in the therapy of ketoconazole-resistant candidiasis....

  7. Resilience and Life Expectations of Perinatally HIV-1 Infected Adolescents in France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funck-Brentano, Isabelle; Assoumou, Lambert; Veber, Florence; Moshous, Despina; Frange, Pierre; Blanche, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Background: Resilience of perinatally HIV-infected youth in European countries is poorly studied. Life satisfaction and expectations for adulthood are rarely examined. Objective: This cross-sectional, descriptive study of a French cohort of 54 perinatally HIV-infected adolescents raised in France (age 14-20 years) aimed to (1) evaluate their psychosocial adjustment, (2) identify their expectations for adulthood and (3) delineate risk and protective factors associated with mental health, life satisfaction, and HIV-1 viral load level. Method: Medical evaluation, psychological semi-structured interview, and self-report questionnaires were used. Results: All the adolescents had been receiving Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy (HAART) for 9 to 11 years and 2/3 were healthy with controlled viral load (adolescent relationships and high life satisfaction were significant protective factors for controlled viral load. Conclusion: These data indicate psychosocial resilience among perinatally HIV-1 infected adolescents with 10 years of HAART treatment. These findings demonstrate the influence of life satisfaction, parent’s life status and quality of caregiver-adolescent relationships on resilience and health outcomes in these patients. We conclude that healthcare providers should attend to these factors. PMID:27990195

  8. Diverse fates of uracilated HIV-1 DNA during infection of myeloid lineage cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Erik C; Ransom, Monica; Hesselberth, Jay R; Hosmane, Nina N; Capoferri, Adam A; Bruner, Katherine M; Pollack, Ross A; Zhang, Hao; Drummond, Michael Bradley; Siliciano, Janet M; Siliciano, Robert; Stivers, James T

    2016-01-01

    We report that a major subpopulation of monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) contains high levels of dUTP, which is incorporated into HIV-1 DNA during reverse transcription (U/A pairs), resulting in pre-integration restriction and post-integration mutagenesis. After entering the nucleus, uracilated viral DNA products are degraded by the uracil base excision repair (UBER) machinery with less than 1% of the uracilated DNA successfully integrating. Although uracilated proviral DNA showed few mutations, the viral genomic RNA was highly mutated, suggesting that errors occur during transcription. Viral DNA isolated from blood monocytes and alveolar macrophages (but not T cells) of drug-suppressed HIV-infected individuals also contained abundant uracils. The presence of viral uracils in short-lived monocytes suggests their recent infection through contact with virus producing cells in a tissue reservoir. These findings reveal new elements of a viral defense mechanism involving host UBER that may be relevant to the establishment and persistence of HIV-1 infection. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18447.001 PMID:27644592

  9. CD27− B-Cells Produce Class Switched and Somatically Hyper-Mutated Antibodies during Chronic HIV-1 Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagigi, Alberto; Du, Likun; Dang, Linh Vu Phuong; Grutzmeier, Sven; Atlas, Ann; Chiodi, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    Class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation occur in mature B-cells in response to antigen stimulation. These processes are crucial for the generation of functional antibodies. During HIV-1 infection, loss of memory B-cells, together with an altered differentiation of naïve B-cells result in production of low quality antibodies, which may be due to impaired immunoglobulin affinity maturation. In the current study, we evaluated the effect of HIV-1 infection on class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation by studying the expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) in peripheral B-cells from a cohort of chronically HIV-1 infected patients as compared to a group of healthy controls. In parallel, we also characterized the phenotype of B-cells and their ability to produce immunoglobulins in vitro. Cells from HIV-1 infected patients showed higher baseline levels of AID expression and increased IgA production measured ex-vivo and upon CD40 and TLR9 stimulation in vitro. Moreover, the percentage of CD27−IgA+ and CD27−IgG+ B-cells in blood was significantly increased in HIV-1 infected patients as compared to controls. Interestingly, our results showed a significantly increased number of somatic hypermutations in the VH genes in CD27− cells from patients. Taken together, these results show that during HIV-1 infection, CD27− B-cells can also produce class switched and somatically hypermutated antibodies. Our data add important information for the understanding of the mechanisms underlying the loss of specific antibody production observed during HIV-1 infection. PMID:19412542

  10. CD27(- B-cells produce class switched and somatically hyper-mutated antibodies during chronic HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Cagigi

    Full Text Available Class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation occur in mature B-cells in response to antigen stimulation. These processes are crucial for the generation of functional antibodies. During HIV-1 infection, loss of memory B-cells, together with an altered differentiation of naïve B-cells result in production of low quality antibodies, which may be due to impaired immunoglobulin affinity maturation. In the current study, we evaluated the effect of HIV-1 infection on class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation by studying the expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID in peripheral B-cells from a cohort of chronically HIV-1 infected patients as compared to a group of healthy controls. In parallel, we also characterized the phenotype of B-cells and their ability to produce immunoglobulins in vitro. Cells from HIV-1 infected patients showed higher baseline levels of AID expression and increased IgA production measured ex-vivo and upon CD40 and TLR9 stimulation in vitro. Moreover, the percentage of CD27(-IgA+ and CD27(-IgG+ B-cells in blood was significantly increased in HIV-1 infected patients as compared to controls. Interestingly, our results showed a significantly increased number of somatic hypermutations in the VH genes in CD27(- cells from patients. Taken together, these results show that during HIV-1 infection, CD27(- B-cells can also produce class switched and somatically hypermutated antibodies. Our data add important information for the understanding of the mechanisms underlying the loss of specific antibody production observed during HIV-1 infection.

  11. Antiretroviral salvage therapy for multiclass drug-resistant HIV-1-infected patients: from clinical trials to daily clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaz, Arkaitz; Falcó, Vicenç; Ribera, Esteban

    2011-01-01

    Drug resistance is one of the key problems in the management of long-term HIV-1-infected patients. Due to cross-resistance patterns within classes, broad resistance to the three original antiretroviral classes can develop in some patients, mainly those with extensive antiretroviral treatment experience and multiple treatment failures. Triple-class-resistant HIV-1 infection has been associated with a higher risk of clinical progression and death. Additionally, it increases the probability of transmission of multidrug-resistant HIV-1 strains. Over the last years, the availability of new antiretroviral agents against novel targets (integrase inhibitors and CCR5 antagonists), and new drugs within old classes (nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors) has opened a range of new therapeutic options for patients with multiclass drug-resistant HIV-1 infection and scarce therapeutic options with previous drugs. In randomized clinical trials, each of these new drugs has shown exceptional efficacy results, especially in patients who received other fully active drugs in the regimen. Indeed, in nonrandomized trials and observational studies, unprecedented rates of virologic suppression similar to those obtained in naive patients have been achieved when three of the currently available new drugs were combined, even in heavily experienced patients who had no viable salvage options with the previous classes. Thus, the goal of suppression and maintenance (plasma HIV-1 RNA infection. Treatment failure can still occur, however, and the management of patients with multidrug-resistant HIV-1 infection remains a challenge. Clinicians are encouraged to optimize use of the new drugs to obtain better control of HIV infection while avoiding emergence of new resistance-associated mutations. The aim of this article is to summarize current knowledge on the management of salvage therapy for patients with multidrug-resistant HIV-1 infection by analyzing the evidence

  12. Effect of humoral immunity on HIV-1 dynamics with virus-to-target and infected-to-target infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elaiw, A. M.; Raezah, A. A.; Alofi, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    We consider an HIV-1 dynamics model by incorporating (i) two routes of infection via, respectively, binding of a virus to a receptor on the surface of a target cell to start genetic reactions (virus-to-target infection), and the direct transmission from infected cells to uninfected cells through the concept of virological synapse in vivo (infected-to-target infection); (ii) two types of distributed-time delays to describe the time between the virus or infected cell contacts an uninfected CD4+ T cell and the emission of new active viruses; (iii) humoral immune response, where the HIV-1 particles are attacked by the antibodies that are produced from the B lymphocytes. The existence and stability of all steady states are completely established by two bifurcation parameters, R 0 (the basic reproduction number) and R 1 (the viral reproduction number at the chronic-infection steady state without humoral immune response). By constructing Lyapunov functionals and using LaSalle's invariance principle, we have proven that, if R 0 ≤ 1 , then the infection-free steady state is globally asymptotically stable, if R 1 ≤ 1 1 , then the chronic-infection steady state with humoral immune response is globally asymptotically stable. We have performed numerical simulations to confirm our theoretical results.

  13. Outcome and reinfection after Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in individuals with and without HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stammler Jaliff, Bianca; Dahl-Knudsen, Jenny; Petersen, Andreas;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Individuals infected with HIV-1 are at an increased risk of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB). The aim of this study was to investigate mortality rate and risk of reinfection associated with SAB in HIV-1-infected individuals compared to individuals without HIV-1 infection. SETTI...... and Pitt score predicted outcome. For patients infected with HIV, neither CD4 T-lymphocyte counts nor plasma HIV RNA levels were associated with 30-day outcome. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: The study was approved by the Danish Data Protection Agency (record no. 2007-41-1196)....... not associate to mortality. During follow-up, there were 43 episodes of reinfection; in individuals with HIV infection at an incidence rate of 7.8 (95% CI 4.7 to 10.9)/100 person-years compared with 2.2 (95% CI 1.2 to 3.2)/100 person-years for individuals without HIV. In multivariate analysis, HIV status (OR 2...

  14. HIV-1Infected Individuals in Antiretroviral Therapy React Specifically With Polyfunctional T-Cell Responses to Gag p24

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Lea; Benfield, Thomas; Kronborg, Gitte;

    2013-01-01

    Still no effective HIV-1 prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines are available. However, as the proportion of HIV-1-infected individuals on antiretroviral treatment is increasing, knowledge about the residual immune response is important for the possible development of an HIV-1 vaccine....

  15. HIV-1 Pathogenesis and Therapeutic Intervention in the SCID-hu Thy/Liv Mouse: A Model for Primary HIV-1 Infection in the Human Thymus

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Lishan

    1997-01-01

    The SCID-hu Thy/Liv mouse is a model for the analysis of human thymopoiesis. It has been constructed by engrafting fragments of human fetal liver and thymus into the immunodeficient C.B-17 scid/scid (SCID) mouse. The resulting ‘Thy/Liv’ organ promotes long-term differentiation of human T cells. Given the apparently normal physiology of the SCID-hu Thy/Liv organ, it has been used to explore the pathophysiologic mechanisms of HIV-1 infection in vivo, and to test therapeutic modalities such as a...

  16. Gp120 V3-dependent impairment of R5 HIV-1 infectivity due to virion-incorporated CCR5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monde, Kazuaki; Maeda, Yosuke; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Harada, Shinji; Yusa, Keisuke

    2007-12-21

    Entry of R5 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) into target cells requires sequential interactions of the envelope glycoprotein gp120 with the receptor CD4 and the coreceptor CCR5. We investigated replication of 45 R5 viral clones derived from the HIV-1JR-FLan library carrying 0-10 random amino acid substitutions in the gp120 V3 loop. It was found that 6.7% (3/45) of the viruses revealed >or=10-fold replication suppression in PM1/CCR5 cells expressing high levels of CCR5 compared with PM1 cells expressing low levels of CCR5. In HIV-1V3L#08, suppression of replication was not associated with entry events and viral production but with a marked decrease in infectivity of nascent progeny virus. HIV-1V3L#08, generated from infected PM1/CCR5 cells, was 98% immunoprecipitated by anti-CCR5 monoclonal antibody T21/8, whereas the other infectious viruses were only partially precipitated, suggesting that incorporation of larger amounts of CCR5 into the virions caused impairment of viral infectivity in HIV-1V3L#08. The results demonstrate the implications of an alternative influence of CCR5 on HIV-1 replication.

  17. Prevalence and risk factors for HIV-1 infection in rural Kilimanjaro region of Tanzania: Implications for prevention and treatment

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    Leyna Germana H

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variability in stages of the HIV-1 epidemic and hence HIV-1 prevalence exists in different areas in sub-Saharan Africa. The purpose of this study was to investigate the magnitude of HIV-1 infection and identify HIV-1 risk factors that may help to develop preventive strategies in rural Kilimanjaro, Tanzania. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted between March and May of 2005 involving all individuals aged between 15–44 years having an address in Oria Village. All eligible individuals were registered and invited to participate. Participants were interviewed regarding their demographic characteristics, sexual behaviors, and medical history. Following a pre-test counseling, participants were offered an HIV test. Results Of the 2 093 eligible individuals, 1 528 (73.0% participated. The overall age and sex adjusted HIV-1 prevalence was 5.6%. Women had 2.5 times higher prevalence (8.0% vs. 3.2% as compared to men. The age group 25–44 years, marriage, separation and low education were associated with higher risk of HIV-1 infection for both sexes. HIV-1 infection was significantly associated with >2 sexual partners in the past 12 months (women: Adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.5 (95%CI: 1.3–4.7, and past 5 years, [(men: AOR, 2.2 (95%CI:1.2–5.6; women: AOR, 2.5 (95%CI: 1.4–4.0], unprotected casual sex (men: AOR,1.8 95%CI: 1.2–5.8, bottled alcohol (Men: AOR, 5.9 (95%CI:1.7–20.1 and local brew (men: AOR, 3.7 (95%CI: 1.5–9.2. Other factors included treatment for genital ulcers and genital discharge in the past 1 month. Health-related complaints were more common among HIV-1 seropositive as compared to seronegative participants and predicted the presence of HIV-1 infection. Conclusion HIV-1 infection was highly prevalent in this population. As compared to our previous findings, a shift of the epidemic from a younger to an older age group and from educated to uneducated individuals was observed. Women and married or

  18. Kidney disease in children and adolescents with perinatal HIV-1 infection

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    Rajendra Bhimma

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Involvement of the kidney in children and adolescents with perinatal (HIV-1 infection can occur at any stage during the child's life with diverse diagnoses, ranging from acute kidney injury, childhood urinary tract infections (UTIs, electrolyte imbalances and drug-induced nephrotoxicity, to diseases of the glomerulus. The latter include various immune-mediated chronic kidney diseases (CKD and HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN. Discussion: The introduction of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART has dramatically reduced the incidence of HIVAN, once the commonest form of CKD in children of African descent living with HIV, and also altered its prognosis from eventual progression to end-stage kidney disease to one that is compatible with long-term survival. The impact of HAART on the outcome of other forms of kidney diseases seen in this population has not been as impressive. Increasingly important is nephrotoxicity secondary to the prolonged use of anti-retroviral agents, and the occurrence of co-morbid kidney disease unrelated to HIV infection or its treatment. Improved understanding of the molecular pathogenesis and genetics of kidney diseases associated with HIV will result in better screening, prevention and treatment efforts, as HIV specialists and nephrologists coordinate clinical care of these patients. Both haemodialysis (HD and peritoneal dialysis (PD are effective as renal replacement therapy in HIV-infected patients with end-stage kidney disease, with PD being preferred in resource-limited settings. Kidney transplantation, once contraindicated in this population, has now become the most effective renal replacement therapy, provided rigorous criteria are met. Given the attendant morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected children and adolescents with kidney disease, routine screening for kidney disease is recommended where resources permit. Conclusions: This review focuses on the pathogenesis and genetics, clinical

  19. Extensive complement-dependent enhancement of HIV-1 by autologous non-neutralising antibodies at early stages of infection

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    Williams Ian

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-neutralising antibodies to the envelope glycoprotein are elicited during acute HIV-1 infection and are abundant throughout the course of disease progression. Although these antibodies appear to have negligible effects on HIV-1 infection when assayed in standard neutralisation assays, they have the potential to exert either inhibitory or enhancing effects through interactions with complement and/or Fc receptors. Here we report that non-neutralising antibodies produced early in response to HIV-1 infection can enhance viral infectivity. Results We investigated this complement-mediated antibody-dependent enhancement (C'-ADE of early HIV infection by carrying out longitudinal studies with primary viruses and autologous sera derived sequentially from recently infected individuals, using a T cell line naturally expressing the complement receptor 2 (CR2; CD21. The C'-ADE was consistently observed and in some cases achieved infection-enhancing levels of greater than 350-fold, converting a low-level infection to a highly destructive one. C'-ADE activity declined as a neutralising response to the early virus emerged, but later virus isolates that had escaped the neutralising response demonstrated an increased capacity for enhanced infection by autologous antibodies. Moreover, sera with autologous enhancing activity were capable of C'ADE of heterologous viral isolates, suggesting the targeting of conserved epitopes on the envelope glycoprotein. Ectopic expression of CR2 on cell lines expressing HIV-1 receptors was sufficient to render them sensitive to C'ADE. Conclusions Taken together, these results suggest that non-neutralising antibodies to the HIV-1 envelope that arise during acute infection are not 'passive', but in concert with complement and complement receptors may have consequences for HIV-1 dissemination and pathogenesis.

  20. Identification of Host Micro RNAs That Differentiate HIV-1 and HIV-2 Infection Using Genome Expression Profiling Techniques

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    Krishnakumar Devadas

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available While human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2 share many similar traits, major differences in pathogenesis and clinical outcomes exist between the two viruses. The differential expression of host factors like microRNAs (miRNAs in response to HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections are thought to influence the clinical outcomes presented by the two viruses. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNA molecules which function in transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. MiRNAs play a critical role in many key biological processes and could serve as putative biomarker(s for infection. Identification of miRNAs that modulate viral life cycle, disease progression, and cellular responses to infection with HIV-1 and HIV-2 could reveal important insights into viral pathogenesis and provide new tools that could serve as prognostic markers and targets for therapeutic intervention. The aim of this study was to elucidate the differential expression profiles of host miRNAs in cells infected with HIV-1 and HIV-2 in order to identify potential differences in virus-host interactions between HIV-1 and HIV-2. Differential expression of host miRNA expression profiles was analyzed using the miRNA profiling polymerase chain reaction (PCR arrays. Differentially expressed miRNAs were identified and their putative functional targets identified. The results indicate that hsa-miR 541-3p, hsa-miR 518f-3p, and hsa-miR 195-3p were consistently up-regulated only in HIV-1 infected cells. The expression of hsa-miR 1225-5p, hsa-miR 18a* and hsa-miR 335 were down modulated in HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected cells. Putative functional targets of these miRNAs include genes involved in signal transduction, metabolism, development and cell death.

  1. Characteristics of HIV-1-specific CD8 T-cell responses and their role in loss of viremia in children chronically infected with HIV-1 undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zheng; ZHAO Qing-xia; FU Jun-liang; YAO Jin-xia; HE Yun; JIN Lei; WANG Fu-sheng

    2006-01-01

    Background Few studies have examined the properties of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) epitope-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses in children. To address this issue, we characterized epitope-specific CTL responses and analyzed the determinants that may affect CTL responses before and after highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in children with HIV-1 infection.Methods A total of 22 HIV-1-infected children and 23 uninfected healthy children as control were enrolled in the study. Circulating CD4 T cells and HIV-1 RNA load in plasma were routinely measured. Peripheral HIV-1-specific CTL frequency and HIV-1 epitope-specific, interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-producing T lymphocytes were measured using tetramer staining and enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay, respectively.Circulating dendritic cell (DC) subsets were monitored with FACS analysis.Results More than 80% of the children with HIV-1 infection exhibited a positive HIV-1-epitope-specific CTL response at baseline, but HIV-specific CTLs and IFN-γ-producing lymphocytes decreased in patients who responded to HAART in comparison with non-responders and HAART-naive children. The duration of virus suppression resulted from HAART was inversely correlated with CTL frequency. While in HAART-naive children, HIV-1-specific CTL frequency was positively correlated with myeloid DC (mDC) frequency,although the cause and effect relationship between the DCs and CTLs remains unknown.Conclusions HIV-1-epitope-specific CTL responses are dependent on antigenic stimulation. The impaired DC subsets in blood might result in a defect in DC-mediated T cell responses. These findings may provide insight into understanding the factors and related mechanisms that influence the outcome of HIV-1 carriers to HAART or future antiviral therapies.

  2. Immune control of HIV-1 infection after therapy interruption: immediate versus deferred antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernaschi Massimo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The optimal stage for initiating antiretroviral therapies in HIV-1 bearing patients is still a matter of debate. Methods We present computer simulations of HIV-1 infection aimed at identifying the pro et contra of immediate as compared to deferred Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART. Results Our simulations highlight that a prompt specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes response is detected when therapy is delayed. Compared to very early initiation of HAART, in deferred treated patients CD8+ T cells manage to mediate the decline of viremia in a shorter time and, at interruption of therapy, the virus experiences a stronger immune pressure. We also observe, however, that the immunological effects of the therapy fade with time in both therapeutic regimens. Thus, within one year from discontinuation, viral burden recovers to the value at which it would level off in the absence of therapy. In summary, simulations show that immediate therapy does not prolong the disease-free period and does not confer a survival benefit when compared to treatment started during the chronic infection phase. Conclusion Our conclusion is that, since there is no therapy to date that guarantees life-long protection, deferral of therapy should be preferred in order to minimize the risk of adverse effects, the occurrence of drug resistances and the costs of treatment.

  3. [COGNITIVE SCREENING IN HIV-1 INFECTED YOUNG ADULTS AT BUENOS AIRES. PRELIMINARY DATA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauas, Romina; Espiño, Analía; Marenco, Victoria; López, Pablo; Cassetti, Isabel; Richly, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is highly prevalent in HIV-1 infected patients, even in younger individuals. These symptoms usually are not recognized by health professionals or even patients themselves. However, they can represent a major cause of functional impairment and failure in treatment compliance. In our country we lack both sufficient epidemiological information on the true impact of these symptoms and screening tests with local validation needed to be used by health professionals during the medical assessment. Therefore we designed a prospective study to compare the performance of four brief cognitive tests and a new screening tool with the neuropsychological assessment (gold standard) in a population of young adults infected with HIV-1 in Argentina, in order to assess their sensitivity and specificity in our culture and language. Different confounding conditions were taken into account. Preliminary data were analyzed after the enrollment of 19 subjects. NEURA screening correlated significantly with the neuropsychological assessment (rho = 0.496, p = .031). In terms of sensitivity and specificity, NEURA performance was superior to other screening tests routinely used in our country: IHDS (S 27%/E 5%), MMSE (S/E 0%), ACE (S 9%/E 100%) and IFS (S 36%/E 80%).

  4. Dried blood spots for the diagnosis and quantitation of HIV-1: stability studies and evaluation of sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of infant HIV-1 infection in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leelawiwat, W; Young, N L; Chaowanachan, T; Ou, C Y; Culnane, M; Vanprapa, N; Waranawat, N; Wasinrapee, P; Mock, P A; Tappero, J; McNicholl, J M

    2009-02-01

    Molecular methods for HIV-1 infection using dried blood-spot (DBS) for HIV-1 CRF01_AE subtypes have not been fully optimized. In this study assays for HIV-1 diagnosis or quantitation were evaluated using infant DBS from Thailand. Paired DBS and whole blood samples from 56 HIV-1 CRF01_AE or B'-infected infants were tested for infant diagnosis using modified Amplicor DNA PCR and NucliSens RNA NASBA and an in-house real-time PCR assay. The Amplicor Monitor viral load (VL) assay, with modifications for DBS, was also evaluated. DBS VL were hematocrit corrected. Stability studies were done on DBS stored at -70 degrees C to 37 degrees C for up to 1 year. The DBS diagnostic assays were 96-100% sensitive and 100% specific for HIV-1 diagnosis. DBS HIV-1 VL were highly correlated with plasma VL when corrected using the actual or an assumed hematocrit factor (r(c)=0.88 or 0.93, respectively). HIV-1 DNA in DBS appeared to be more stable than RNA and could be detected after up to 9 months at most temperatures. DBS VL could be consistently determined when stored frozen. These results show that DBS can be used accurately instead of whole blood for the diagnosis of HIV-1 infection and VL quantitation, particularly if samples are appropriately stored.

  5. Altered T cell surface glycosylation in HIV-1 infection results in increased susceptibility to galectin-1-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantéri, Marion; Giordanengo, Valérie; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Fuzibet, Jean-Gabriel; Auberger, Patrick; Fukuda, Minoru; Baum, Linda G; Lefebvre, Jean-Claude

    2003-12-01

    The massive T cell death that occurs in HIV type 1 (HIV-1) infection contributes profoundly to the pathophysiology associated with AIDS. The mechanisms controlling cell death of both infected and uninfected T cells ("bystander" death) are not completely understood. We have shown that HIV-1 infection of T cells results in altered glycosylation of cell surface glycoproteins; specifically, it decreased sialylation and increased expression of core 2 O-glycans. Galectin-1 is an endogenous human lectin that recognizes these types of glycosylation changes and induces cell death of activated lymphocytes. Therefore we studied the possible contribution of galectin-1 in the pathophysiology of AIDS. O-glycan modifications were investigated on peripheral lymphocytes from AIDS patients. Oligosaccharides from CD43 and CD45 of CEM cells latently infected with HIV-1 were chemically analyzed. Consistent with our previous results, we show that HIV-1 infection results in accumulation of exposed lactosamine residues, oligosaccharides recognized by galectin-1 on cell surface glycoproteins. Both latently HIV-1-infected T cell lines and peripheral CD4 and CD8 T cells from AIDS patients exhibited exposed lactosamine residues and demonstrated marked susceptibility to galectin-1-induced cell death, in contrast to control cultures or cells from uninfected donors. The fraction of cells that died in response to galectin-1 exceeded the fraction of infected cells, indicating that death of uninfected cells occurred. Altered cell surface glycosylation of T cells during HIV-1 infection increases the susceptibility to galectin-1-induced cell death, and this death pathway can contribute to loss of both infected and uninfected T cells in AIDS.

  6. An initial screening for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders of HIV-1 infected patients in China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yulin; Qiao, Luxin; Ding, Wei; Wei, Feili; Zhao, Qingxia; WANG, XICHENG; Shi, Ying; Li, Ning; Smith, Davey; Chen, Dexi

    2012-01-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), characterized by cognitive, motor, and behavioral abnormalities, are common among people living with HIV and AIDS. In combined antiretroviral therapy era in Western countries, nearly 40% of HIV-infected patients continue to suffer from HAND, mainly with mild or asymptomatic cognitive impairment. However, the prevalence and the clinical features of HAND in China are still not well known. In this study, a multi-center cross-sectional study was per...

  7. Lipidomic dataset of plasma from patients infected with wild type and nef-deficient HIV-1 strain

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    Peter Meikle

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that HIV protein nef plays a key role in impairing cellular and systemic cholesterol metabolism in HIV disease, but clinical support for these findings is lacking. Here we present the data of comparative lipidomic analysis (330 lipid species of plasma samples from HIV-negative subjects, patients infected with WT HIV-1 strain and patients infected with nef-deficient strain of HIV-1. We determine which effects of HIV on plasma lipidome are explained by the presence of nef. The data can be used to evaluate cardiovascular risk in HIV disease and to assess the role of nef in HIV-induced disturbances in systemic lipid metabolism. The full impact of nef deficiency on lipid and lipoprotein metabolism in HIV-infected patients is presented in the accompanying study “Lipid Metabolism in Patients Infected with Nef-deficient HIV-1 Strain” [1].

  8. Brugia malayi Antigen (BmA Inhibits HIV-1 Trans-Infection but Neither BmA nor ES-62 Alter HIV-1 Infectivity of DC Induced CD4+ Th-Cells.

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    Emily E I M Mouser

    Full Text Available One of the hallmarks of HIV-1 disease is the association of heightened CD4+ T-cell activation with HIV-1 replication. Parasitic helminths including filarial nematodes have evolved numerous and complex mechanisms to skew, dampen and evade human immune responses suggesting that HIV-1 infection may be modulated in co-infected individuals. Here we studied the effects of two filarial nematode products, adult worm antigen from Brugia malayi (BmA and excretory-secretory product 62 (ES-62 from Acanthocheilonema viteae on HIV-1 infection in vitro. Neither BmA nor ES-62 influenced HIV-1 replication in CD4+ enriched T-cells, with either a CCR5- or CXCR4-using virus. BmA, but not ES-62, had the capacity to bind the C-type lectin dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN thereby inhibiting HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4+ enriched T-cells. As for their effect on DCs, neither BmA nor ES-62 could enhance or inhibit DC maturation as determined by CD83, CD86 and HLA-DR expression, or the production of IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-α. As expected, due to the unaltered DC phenotype, no differences were found in CD4+ T helper (Th cell phenotypes induced by DCs treated with either BmA or ES-62. Moreover, the HIV-1 susceptibility of the Th-cell populations induced by BmA or ES-62 exposed DCs was unaffected for both CCR5- and CXCR4-using HIV-1 viruses. In conclusion, although BmA has the potential capacity to interfere with HIV-1 transmission or initial viral dissemination through preventing the virus from interacting with DCs, no differences in the Th-cell polarizing capacity of DCs exposed to BmA or ES-62 were observed. Neither antigenic source demonstrated beneficial or detrimental effects on the HIV-1 susceptibility of CD4+ Th-cells induced by exposed DCs.

  9. CTL Responses to Regulatory Proteins Tat and Rev in HIV-1 B'/C Virus-Infected Individuals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MING-MING JIA; KUN-XUE HONG; JIAN-PING CHEN; HONG-WEI LIU; SHA LIU; XIAO-QING ZHANG; HONG-JING ZHAO; YI-MING SHAO

    2008-01-01

    To characterize HIV-1 specific CTL responses to regulatory proteins Tat and Rev in HIV-B'/C vires-infected ART-naive individuals. Methods HIV-1-specific CTL responses were analyzed by IFN-γ ELISPOT assay using overlapping peptides spanning the consensus sequences of HIV-1 clade C Tat and Rev proteins. Statistical analysis and graphical presentation were performed using SIGMAPLOT 10.0 and SIGMASTAT 3.5. For samples with a positive response, the magnitude of CTL responses was compared between HIV-1 C proteins by Wilcoxon rank sum test, and the significance threshold was P<0.05. Results Tat and Rev were frequently recognized, with 23% and 52% of the tested individuals having detectable responses to these proteins, respectively. Several immunodominant regions were detected in Rev. No significant correlation was observed between the magnitude and breadth of CTL responses to regulatory proteins and the control of virus replication in this study. Conclusion Tat and Rev can serve as targets for HIV-1-specific CTL, and several immunodominant regions are detectable in Rev. Further characterization of epitopes and their role in virus control may shed light on pathogenesis of HIV-1 natural infection and also be useful for the design and testing of candidate vaccines.

  10. Timing constraints of in vivo gag mutations during primary HIV-1 subtype C infection.

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    Vladimir Novitsky

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aiming to answer the broad question "When does mutation occur?" this study examined the time of appearance, dominance, and completeness of in vivo Gag mutations in primary HIV-1 subtype C infection. METHODS: A primary HIV-1C infection cohort comprised of 8 acutely and 34 recently infected subjects were followed frequently up to 500 days post-seroconversion (p/s. Gag mutations were analyzed by employing single-genome amplification and direct sequencing. Gag mutations were determined in relation to the estimated time of seroconversion. Time of appearance, dominance, and completeness was compared for different types of in vivo Gag mutations. RESULTS: Reverse mutations to the wild type appeared at a median (IQR of 62 (44;139 days p/s, while escape mutations from the wild type appeared at 234 (169;326 days p/s (p<0.001. Within the subset of mutations that became dominant, reverse and escape mutations appeared at 54 (30;78 days p/s and 104 (47;198 days p/s, respectively (p<0.001. Among the mutations that reached completeness, reverse and escape mutations appeared at 54 (30;78 days p/s and 90 (44;196 days p/s, respectively (p=0.006. Time of dominance for reverse mutations to and escape mutations from the wild type was 58 (44;105 days p/s and 219 (90;326 days p/s, respectively (p<0.001. Time of completeness for reverse and escape mutations was 152 (100;176 days p/s and 243 (101;370 days p/s, respectively (p=0.001. Fitting a Cox proportional hazards model with frailties confirmed a significantly earlier time of appearance (hazard ratio (HR: 2.6; 95% CI: 2.3-3.0, dominance (4.8 (3.4-6.8, and completeness (3.6 (2.3-5.5 of reverse mutations to the wild type Gag than escape mutations from the wild type. Some complex mutational pathways in Gag included sequential series of reversions and escapes. CONCLUSIONS: The study identified the timing of different types of in vivo Gag mutations in primary HIV-1 subtype C infection in relation to the

  11. Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) genital shedding in HSV-2-/HIV-1-co-infected women receiving effective combination antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péré, Héléne; Rascanu, Aida; LeGoff, Jérome; Matta, Mathieu; Bois, Frédéric; Lortholary, Olivier; Leroy, Valériane; Launay, Odile; Bélec, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of genital shedding of HSV-2 DNA was assessed in HIV-1-infected women taking combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). HIV-1 RNA, HIV-1 DNA and HSV DNA loads were measured during 12-18 months using frozen plasma, PBMC and cervicovaginal lavage samples from 22 HIV-1-infected women, including 17 women naive for antiretroviral therapy initiating cART and 5 women with virological failure switching to a new regimen. Nineteen (86%) women were HSV-2-seropositive. Among HSV-2-/HIV-1-co-infected women, HIV-1 RNA loads showed a rapid fall from baseline after one month of cART, in parallel in paired plasma and cervicovaginal secretions. In contrast, HIV-1 DNA loads did not show significant variations from baseline up to 18 months of treatment in both systemic and genital compartments. HSV DNA was detected at least once in 12 (63%) of 19 women during follow up: HSV-2 shedding in the genital compartment was observed in 11% of cervicovaginal samples at baseline and in 16% after initiating or switching cART. Cervicovaginal HIV-1 RNA loads were strongly associated with plasma HIV-1 RNA loads over time, but not with cervicovaginal HSV DNA loads. Reactivation of genital HSV-2 replication frequently occurred despite effective cART in HSV-2-/HIV-1-co-infected women. Genital HSV-2 replication under cART does not influence cervicovaginal HIV-1 RNA or DNA shedding.

  12. Inflammatory genital infections mitigate a severe genetic bottleneck in heterosexual transmission of subtype A and C HIV-1.

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    Richard E Haaland

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The HIV-1 epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa is driven largely by heterosexual transmission of non-subtype B viruses, of which subtypes C and A are predominant. Previous studies of subtype B and subtype C transmission pairs have suggested that a single variant from the chronically infected partner can establish infection in their newly infected partner. However, in subtype A infected individuals from a sex worker cohort and subtype B individuals from STD clinics, infection was frequently established by multiple variants. This study examined over 1750 single-genome amplified viral sequences derived from epidemiologically linked subtype C and subtype A transmission pairs very early after infection. In 90% (18/20 of the pairs, HIV-1 infection is initiated by a single viral variant that is derived from the quasispecies of the transmitting partner. In addition, the virus initiating infection in individuals who were infected by someone other than their spouse was characterized to determine if genital infections mitigated the severe genetic bottleneck observed in a majority of epidemiologically linked heterosexual HIV-1 transmission events. In nearly 50% (3/7 of individuals infected by someone other than their spouse, multiple genetic variants from a single individual established infection. A statistically significant association was observed between infection by multiple genetic variants and an inflammatory genital infection in the newly infected individual. Thus, in the vast majority of HIV-1 transmission events in cohabiting heterosexual couples, a single genetic variant establishes infection. Nevertheless, this severe genetic bottleneck can be mitigated by the presence of inflammatory genital infections in the at risk partner, suggesting that this restriction on genetic diversity is imposed in large part by the mucosal barrier.

  13. Similar Neutralizing Activity in the HIV-1 Infected Long Term Non-progressors(LTNPs) and Typical Progressors(TPs)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Wang; Si-yang Liu; Lin Li; Tian-yi Li; Jing-yun Li; Li-li Chen; Yong-jian Liu; Han-ping Li; Zuo-yi Bao; Xiao-lin Wang; Dao-min Zhuang

    2012-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies are considered to be an important protective parameter used in HIV-l vaccine evaluation.However,the exact role that neutralizing antibodies plays in controlling the disease progression of HIV-1 infected peoples is still undetermined.In this paper,we compared the protective function of the neutralizing antibody response in the plasma from LTNP and TP against clade B and clade C pseudoviruses.No difference in the neutralizing activities between the plasma from LTNP and TP was found,which was consistent with the most recent reports.In addition,no correlations between the titer or breadth and CD4+ or viral load in HIV-1 infected individuals were found.The protective roles played by neutralizing antibodies in controlling disease progression of HIV-1 infected people need to be considered in a new viewpoint.

  14. Soluble urokinase receptor levels in plasma during 5 years of highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, Sisse R; Katzenstein, Terese L; Piironen, Timo;

    2004-01-01

    High blood levels of the soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) strongly predict increased mortality in human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1)-infected patients. This study investigated the plasma concentration of suPAR in 29 treatment-naive HIV-1-infected patients during 5 years treatment with highly...... active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Plasma suPAR decreased after introducing HAART, most pronounced during the first treatment year. The change in plasma suPAR was independent of changes in viral replication and CD4+ cells but it was strongly correlated with plasma levels of the soluble TNF receptor...... is linked to inflammation in untreated as well as HAART-treated HIV-1-infected patients....

  15. APOBEC3G-depleted resting CD4+ T cells remain refractory to HIV1 infection.

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    Francesca R Santoni de Sio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CD4+ T lymphocytes are the primary targets of HIV1 but cannot be infected when fully quiescent, due to a post-entry block preventing the completion of reverse transcription. Chiu et al. recently proposed that this restriction reflects the action of APOBEC3G (A3G. They further suggested that T cell activation abrogates the A3G-mediated block by directing this protein to a high molecular mass complex. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present work, we sought to explore further this model. However, we found that effective suppression of A3G by combined RNA interference and expression of HIV1 Vif does not relieve the restrictive phenotype of post-activation resting T cells. We also failed to find a correlation between HIV resistance and the presence of A3G in a low molecular complex in primary T cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that A3G is unlikely to play a role in the HIV restrictive phenotype of quiescent T lymphocytes.

  16. An expanded behavioral paradigm for prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Thomas J

    2013-07-01

    This article addresses behavioral and social research priorities for prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection. The approach used to define these priorities is based on 3 premises: (1) Behavioral interventions for prevention and treatment are necessary but not sufficient for producing reductions in transmission or advances in treatment; the same is true of biomedical interventions, and by themselves, they cannot maximally impact the health of communities. (2) Combination prevention and treatment strategies should include optimal combinations of behavioral and biomedical strategies but also must include the varieties of the behaviors of individuals, communities, and systems needed to ensure effective treatment and prevention. (3) And it is no longer useful, given scientific advances in understanding how treatment contributes to prevention, to discuss prevention without incorporating treatment and vice versa. This redefinition of behavioral approaches in combination prevention and treatment provides a new paradigm for defining behavioral research in HIV-1 disease. No longer is it sufficient to focus on single behavior (eg, high-risk sexual behavior, adherence to antiretroviral medications) of individuals in a vertical way. Rather, the behavioral agenda not only need to expand to encompass traditional investigations of single behaviors but also need to include the behavior of many actors and systems that are essential in facilitating reductions in transmission and improvements in treatment outcomes. In addition, there is the need for expanded implementation research agenda to encompass the study of methods to achieve high coverage, acceptability, and effectiveness of available menu of interventions.

  17. HIV-1 with multiple CCR5/CXCR4 chimeric receptor use is predictive of immunological failure in infected children.

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    Mariangela Cavarelli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV-1 R5 viruses are characterized by a large phenotypic variation, that is reflected by the mode of coreceptor use. The ability of R5 HIV-1 to infect target cells expressing chimeric receptors between CCR5 and CXCR4 (R5(broad viruses, was shown to correlate with disease stage in HIV-1 infected adults. Here, we ask the question whether phenotypic variation of R5 viruses could play a role also in mother-to-child transmission (MTCT of HIV-1 and pediatric disease progression. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Viral isolates obtained from a total of 59 HIV-1 seropositive women (24 transmitting and 35 non transmitting and 28 infected newborn children, were used to infect U87.CD4 cells expressing wild type or six different CCR5/CXCR4 chimeric receptors. HIV-1 isolates obtained from newborn infants had predominantly R5(narrow phenotype (n = 20, but R5(broad and R5X4 viruses were also found in seven and one case, respectively. The presence of R5(broad and R5X4 phenotypes correlated significantly with a severe decline of the CD4+ T cells (CDC stage 3 or death within 2 years of age. Forty-three percent of the maternal R5 isolates displayed an R5(broad phenotype, however, the presence of the R5(broad virus was not predictive for MTCT of HIV-1. Of interest, while only 1 of 5 mothers with an R5X4 virus transmitted the dualtropic virus, 5 of 6 mothers carrying R5(broad viruses transmitted viruses with a similar broad chimeric coreceptor usage. Thus, the maternal R5(broad phenotype was largely preserved during transmission and could be predictive of the phenotype of the newborn's viral variant. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results show that R5(broad viruses are not hampered in transmission. When transmitted, immunological failure occurs earlier than in children infected with HIV-1 of R5(narrow phenotype. We believe that this finding is of utmost relevance for therapeutic interventions in pediatric HIV-1 infection.

  18. Endotoxemia is associated with altered innate and adaptive immune responses in untreated HIV-1 infected individuals.

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    Anne Roslev Bukh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microbial translocation may contribute to the immunopathogenesis in HIV infection. We investigated if microbial translocation and inflammation were associated with innate and adaptive immune responses in adults with HIV. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This was an observational cohort study. Sera from HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected individuals were analyzed for microbial translocation (soluble CD14, lipopolysaccharides [LPS], endotoxin core antibody, and anti-α-galactosyl antibodies and inflammatory markers (high sensitivity C-reactive protein, IL-6, IL-1 receptor antagonist, soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor II, and IL-10 with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from HIV-infected persons and healthy controls (primed with single-stranded HIV-1-derived RNA were stimulated with LPS, and cytokine production was measured. Finally, HIV-infected patients were immunized with Prevnar 7vPnC±CpG 7909 followed by Pneumo Novum PPV-23. Effects of microbial translocation and inflammation on immunization were analyzed in a predictive regression model. We included 96 HIV-infected individuals, 76 on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, 20 HAART-naive, and 50 healthy controls. Microbial translocation and inflammatory markers were higher among HIV-infected persons than controls. Cytokine levels following LPS stimulation were increased in PBMCs from HAART-naive compared to HAART-treated HIV-infected persons. Further, RNA-priming of PBMCs from controls acted synergistically with LPS to augment cytokine responses. Finally, high serum LPS levels predicted poor vaccine responses among HAART-naive, but not among HAART-treated HIV-infected individuals. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: LPS acts synergistically with HIV RNA to stimulate innate immune responses in vitro and increasing serum LPS levels seem to predict poor antibody responses after vaccination among HAART-naive HIV-infected persons. Thus, our

  19. Exosomes from HIV-1-infected Cells Stimulate Production of Pro-inflammatory Cytokines through Trans-activating Response (TAR) RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampey, Gavin C; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Schwab, Angela; Barclay, Robert; Punya, Shreya; Chung, Myung-Chul; Hakami, Ramin M; Zadeh, Mohammad Asad; Lepene, Benjamin; Klase, Zachary A; El-Hage, Nazira; Young, Mary; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2016-01-15

    HIV-1 infection results in a chronic illness because long-term highly active antiretroviral therapy can lower viral titers to an undetectable level. However, discontinuation of therapy rapidly increases virus burden. Moreover, patients under highly active antiretroviral therapy frequently develop various metabolic disorders, neurocognitive abnormalities, and cardiovascular diseases. We have previously shown that exosomes containing trans-activating response (TAR) element RNA enhance susceptibility of undifferentiated naive cells to HIV-1 infection. This study indicates that exosomes from HIV-1-infected primary cells are highly abundant with TAR RNA as detected by RT-real time PCR. Interestingly, up to a million copies of TAR RNA/μl were also detected in the serum from HIV-1-infected humanized mice suggesting that TAR RNA may be stable in vivo. Incubation of exosomes from HIV-1-infected cells with primary macrophages resulted in a dramatic increase of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNF-β, indicating that exosomes containing TAR RNA could play a direct role in control of cytokine gene expression. The intact TAR molecule was able to bind to PKR and TLR3 effectively, whereas the 5' and 3' stems (TAR microRNAs) bound best to TLR7 and -8 and none to PKR. Binding of TAR to PKR did not result in its phosphorylation, and therefore, TAR may be a dominant negative decoy molecule in cells. The TLR binding through either TAR RNA or TAR microRNA potentially can activate the NF-κB pathway and regulate cytokine expression. Collectively, these results imply that exosomes containing TAR RNA could directly affect the proinflammatory cytokine gene expression and may explain a possible mechanism of inflammation observed in HIV-1-infected patients under cART.

  20. Hepatitis C virus quasispecies and pseudotype analysis from acute infection to chronicity in HIV-1 co-infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferns, R Bridget; Tarr, Alexander W; Hue, Stephane; Urbanowicz, Richard A; McClure, C Patrick; Gilson, Richard; Ball, Jonathan K; Nastouli, Eleni; Garson, Jeremy A; Pillay, Deenan

    2016-05-01

    HIV-1 infected patients who acquire HCV infection have higher rates of chronicity and liver disease progression than patients with HCV mono-infection. Understanding early events in this pathogenic process is important. We applied single genome sequencing of the E1 to NS3 regions and viral pseudotype neutralization assays to explore the consequences of viral quasispecies evolution from pre-seroconversion to chronicity in four co-infected individuals (mean follow up 566 days). We observed that one to three founder viruses were transmitted. Relatively low viral sequence diversity, possibly related to an impaired immune response, due to HIV infection was observed in three patients. However, the fourth patient, after an early purifying selection displayed increasing E2 sequence evolution, possibly related to being on suppressive antiretroviral therapy. Viral pseudotypes generated from HCV variants showed relative resistance to neutralization by autologous plasma but not to plasma collected from later time points, confirming ongoing virus escape from antibody neutralization.

  1. Factors Associated With the Control of Viral Replication and Virologic Breakthrough in a Recently Infected HIV-1 Controller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker-Sperling, Victoria E; Pohlmeyer, Christopher W; Veenhuis, Rebecca T; May, Megan; Luna, Krystle A; Kirkpatrick, Allison R; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Cox, Andrea L; Carrington, Mary; Bailey, Justin R; Arduino, Roberto C; Blankson, Joel N

    2017-02-01

    HIV-1 controllers are patients who control HIV-1 viral replication without antiretroviral therapy. Control is achieved very early in the course of infection, but the mechanisms through which viral replication is restricted are not fully understood. We describe a patient who presented with acute HIV-1 infection and was found to have an HIV-1 RNA level of <100copies/mL. She did not have any known protective HLA alleles, but significant immune activation of CD8+ T cells and natural killer (NK) cells was present, and both cell types inhibited viral replication. Virus cultured from this patient replicated as well in vitro as virus isolated from her partner, a patient with AIDS who was the source of transmission. Virologic breakthrough occurred 9months after her initial presentation and was associated with an increase in CD4+ T cell activation levels and a significant decrease in NK cell inhibitory capacity. Remarkably, CD8+ T cell inhibitory capacity was preserved and there were no new escape mutations in targeted Gag epitopes. These findings suggest that fully replication-competent virus can be controlled in acute HIV-1 infection in some patients without protective HLA alleles and that NK cell responses may contribute to this early control of viral replication.

  2. Factors Associated With the Control of Viral Replication and Virologic Breakthrough in a Recently Infected HIV-1 Controller

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    Victoria E. Walker-Sperling

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 controllers are patients who control HIV-1 viral replication without antiretroviral therapy. Control is achieved very early in the course of infection, but the mechanisms through which viral replication is restricted are not fully understood. We describe a patient who presented with acute HIV-1 infection and was found to have an HIV-1 RNA level of <100 copies/mL. She did not have any known protective HLA alleles, but significant immune activation of CD8+ T cells and natural killer (NK cells was present, and both cell types inhibited viral replication. Virus cultured from this patient replicated as well in vitro as virus isolated from her partner, a patient with AIDS who was the source of transmission. Virologic breakthrough occurred 9 months after her initial presentation and was associated with an increase in CD4+ T cell activation levels and a significant decrease in NK cell inhibitory capacity. Remarkably, CD8+ T cell inhibitory capacity was preserved and there were no new escape mutations in targeted Gag epitopes. These findings suggest that fully replication-competent virus can be controlled in acute HIV-1 infection in some patients without protective HLA alleles and that NK cell responses may contribute to this early control of viral replication.

  3. Serum neutralizing activities from a Beijing homosexual male cohort infected with different subtypes of HIV-1 in China.

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    Mingshun Zhang

    Full Text Available Protective antibodies play a critical role in an effective HIV vaccine; however, eliciting antibodies to block infection by viruses from diverse genetic subtypes remains a major challenge. As the world's most populous country, China has been under the threat of at least three major subtypes of circulating HIV-1 viruses. Understanding the cross reactivity and specificities of serum antibody responses that mediate broad neutralization of the virus in HIV-1 infected Chinese patients will provide valuable information for the design of vaccines to prevent HIV-1 transmission in China. Sera from a cohort of homosexual men, who have been managed by a major HIV clinical center in Beijing, China, were analyzed for cross-sectional neutralizing activities against pseudotyped viruses expressing Env antigens of the major subtype viruses (AE, BC and B subtypes circulating in China. Neutralizing activities in infected patients' blood were most capable of neutralizing viruses in the homologous subtype; however, a subset of blood samples was able to achieve broad neutralizing activities across different subtypes. Such cross neutralizing activity took 1-2 years to develop and CD4 binding site antibodies were critical components in these blood samples. Our study confirmed the presence of broadly neutralizing sera in China's HIV-1 patient population. Understanding the specificity and breadth of these neutralizing activities can guide efforts for the development of HIV vaccines against major HIV-1 viruses in China.

  4. What do mathematical models tell us about killing rates during HIV-1 infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadhamsetty, Saikrishna; Beltman, Joost B; de Boer, Rob J

    2015-11-01

    Over the past few decades the extent to which cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) control human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication has been studied extensively, yet their role and mode of action remain controversial. In some studies, CTLs were found to kill a large fraction of the productively infected cells relative to the viral cytopathicity, whereas in others CTLs were suggested to kill only a small fraction of infected cells. In this review, we compile published estimates of CTL-mediated death rates, and examine whether these studies permit determining the rate at which CTLs kill HIV-1 infected cells. We highlight potential misinterpretations of the CTL-killing rates from the escape rates of mutants, and from perturbations of the steady state viral load during chronic infection. Our major conclusion is that CTL-mediated killing rates remain unknown. But contrary to current consensus, we argue that killing rates higher than one per day are perfectly consistent with the experimental data, which would imply that the majority of the productively infected cells could still die from CTL-mediated killing rather than from viral cytopathicity.

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid neopterin: an informative biomarker of central nervous system immune activation in HIV-1 infection

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    Bestetti Arabella

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract HIV-1 invades the central nervous system (CNS in the context of acute infection, persists thereafter in the absence of treatment, and leads to chronic intrathecal immunoactivation that can be measured by the macrophage activation marker, neopterin, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. In this review we describe our experience with CSF neopterin measurements in 382 untreated HIV-infected patients across the spectrum of immunosuppression and HIV-related neurological diseases, in 73 untreated AIDS patients with opportunistic CNS infections, and in 233 treated patients. In untreated patients, CSF neopterin concentrations are almost always elevated and increase progressively as immunosuppression worsens and blood CD4 cell counts fall. However, patients with HIV dementia exhibit particularly high CSF neopterin concentrations, above those of patients without neurological disease, though patients with CNS opportunistic infections, including CMV encephalitis and cryptococcal meningitis, also exhibit high levels of CSF neopterin. Combination antiretroviral therapy, with its potent effect on CNS HIV infection and CSF HIV RNA, mitigates both intrathecal immunoactivation and lowers CSF neopterin. However, despite suppression of plasma and CSF HIV RNA to below the detection limits of clinical assays ( Although nonspecific, CSF neopterin can serve as a useful biomarker in the diagnosis of HIV dementia in the setting of confounding conditions, in monitoring the CNS inflammatory effects of antiretroviral treatment, and give valuable information to the cause of ongoing brain injury.

  6. Molecular Epidemiology of HIV-1 Infection among Men who Have Sex with Men in Taiwan in 2012.

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    Szu-Wei Huang

    Full Text Available The number of men who have sex with men (MSM infected with HIV-1 in Taiwan has increased rapidly in the past few years. The goal of this study was to conduct a molecular epidemiological study of HIV-1 infection among MSM in Taiwan to identify risk factors for intervention. Voluntary counseling program and anonymous testing were provided to patrons at 1 gay bar, 7 night clubs and 3 gay saunas in Taipei and New Taipei Cities in 2012. HIV-1 subtypes were determined using gag subtype-specific PCR and phylogenetic analysis by env sequences. Recent HIV-1 infection was determined using LAg-Avidity EIA. In-depth interviews and questionnaires were used to identify risk factors. The prevalence and incidence of HIV-1 among MSM in Taiwan were 4.38% (53/1,208 and 3.29 per 100 person-years, respectively. Of 49 cases genotyped, 48 (97.9% were infected with subtype B and 1 with CRF01_AE (2%. Phylogenetic analysis of 46 HIV-1 strains showed that 25 (54.4% subtype B strains formed 9 clusters with each other or with other local strains. The CRF01_AE case clustered with a reference strain from a Thai blood donor with bootstrap value of 99. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that risk factors associated with HIV-1 infection included use of oil-based solution as lubricant (vs. saliva or water-based lubricants, OR= 4.23; p <0.001; exclusively receptive role (vs. insertive role, OR= 9.69; p <0.001; versatile role (vs. insertive role, OR= 6.45; p= 0.003; oral sex (vs. insertive role, OR= 11.93; p= 0.044; times of sexual contact per week (2-3 vs. zero per week, OR= 3.41; p= 0.021; illegal drug use (OR= 4.12; p <0.001; and history of sexually transmitted diseases (OR= 3.65; p= 0.002. In conclusion, there was no new HIV-1 subtype or circulating recombinant form responsible for the increase of HIV-1 among MSM in Taiwan in 2012. Misuse of oil-based solution as lubricant is a new risk factor identified among MSM in Taiwan. The Taiwan's Centers for Disease

  7. BRAIN ABSCESS DUE TO Staphylococcus aureus OF CRYPTOGENIC SOURCE IN AN HIV-1 INFECTED PATIENT IN USE OF ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    de OLIVEIRA, Anna Paula Romero; PAPPALARDO, Mara Cristina; DANTAS, Daniel; LINS, Diogo; VIDAL, José Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    The spectrum of neurological complications associated with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is broad. The most frequent etiologies include primary diseases (caused by HIV itself) or secondary diseases (opportunistic infections or neoplasms). Despite these conditions, HIV-infected patients are susceptible to other infections observed in patients without HIV infection. Here we report a rare case of a brain abscess caused by Staphylococcus aureus in an HIV-infected patient. After drainage of the abscess and treatment with oxacilin, the patient had a favorable outcome. This case reinforces the importance of a timely neurosurgical procedure that supported adequate management of an unusual cause of expansive brain lesions in HIV-1 infected patients. PMID:27074328

  8. Acute plasma biomarkers of T cell activation set-point levels and of disease progression in HIV-1 infection.

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    Anne-Sophie Liovat

    Full Text Available T cell activation levels, viral load and CD4(+ T cell counts at early stages of HIV-1 infection are predictive of the rate of progression towards AIDS. We evaluated whether the inflammatory profile during primary HIV-1 infection is predictive of the virological and immunological set-points and of disease progression. We quantified 28 plasma proteins during acute and post-acute HIV-1 infection in individuals with known disease progression profiles. Forty-six untreated patients, enrolled during primary HIV-1 infection, were categorized into rapid progressors, progressors and slow progressors according to their spontaneous progression profile over 42 months of follow-up. Already during primary infection, rapid progressors showed a higher number of increased plasma proteins than progressors or slow progressors. The plasma levels of TGF-β1 and IL-18 in primary HIV-1 infection were both positively associated with T cell activation level at set-point (6 months after acute infection and together able to predict 74% of the T cell activation variation at set-point. Plasma IP-10 was positively and negatively associated with, respectively, T cell activation and CD4(+ T cell counts at set-point and capable to predict 30% of the CD4(+ T cell count variation at set-point. Moreover, plasma IP-10 levels during primary infection were predictive of rapid progression. In primary infection, IP-10 was an even better predictor of rapid disease progression than viremia or CD4(+ T cell levels at this time point. The superior predictive capacity of IP-10 was confirmed in an independent group of 88 HIV-1 infected individuals. Altogether, this study shows that the inflammatory profile in primary HIV-1 infection is associated with T cell activation levels and CD4(+ T cell counts at set-point. Plasma IP-10 levels were of strong predictive value for rapid disease progression. The data suggest IP-10 being an earlier marker of disease progression than CD4(+ T cell counts or

  9. Total and unbound darunavir (DRV pharmacokinetics (PK in HIV-1-infected pregnant women

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    C Zorrilla

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral (ARV therapy during pregnancy is recommended to reduce the risk of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT. Physiologic changes during pregnancy can affect PK. We present the PK of total and unbound (pharmacologically active DRV in HIV-1-infected pregnant women receiving twice-daily (bid DRV/ritonavir (rtv. This Phase IIIb study enrolled HIV-1-infected pregnant women≥18 years old in the 2nd trimester of pregnancy receiving DRV/rtv 600/100 mg bid and other ARVs. DRV (total and unbound and rtv (total plasma concentrations were obtained predose and 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 9 and 12 hours postdose during the 2nd and 3rd trimesters and postpartum. Total DRV and rtv plasma concentrations were determined using a previously validated HPLC-MS/MS assay (lower limit of quantification 5.00 ng/mL. Unbound DRV was determined by fortifying plasma samples with 14-C DRV and separating total and unbound DRV using ultrafiltration. Total and unbound 14-C DRV were measured using liquid scintillation counting. Total and unbound PK parameters were derived using a noncompartmental analysis. Safety and efficacy were investigated at each visit and summarized using descriptive statistics. Sixteen women (10 black, 4 Hispanic, 2 white were enrolled; 11 had evaluable PK data. Total DRV AUC12h was 24% and 17% lower during 2nd and 3rd trimesters, respectively, vs postpartum (Table. Unbound DRV AUC12h was unchanged during 2nd and 3rd trimesters vs postpartum. Total and unbound DRV Cmin increased by 43% and 10%, respectively, during 2nd trimester and by 86% and 14%, respectively, during 3rd trimester vs postpartum. Unbound DRV was above the EC50 (27.5 ng/mL for PI-resistant HIV in all patients. Albumin and α1-acid glycoprotein (AAG concentrations were 22%–29% lower during pregnancy vs postpartum. Viral load decreased and CD4+ count increased over time. One serious adverse event was reported (increased transaminase. Three of 12 infants were born prior to 37 weeks (30, 36 and

  10. IgM repertoire biodiversity is reduced in HIV-1 infection and systemic lupus erythematosus

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    Li eYin

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: HIV-1 infection or systemic lupus erythematosus [SLE] disrupt B cell homeostasis, reduce memory B cells, and impair function of IgG and IgM antibodies. Objective: To determine how disturbances in B cell populations producing polyclonal antibodies relate to the IgM repertoire, the IgM transcriptome in health and disease was explored at the complementarity determining region 3 [CDRH3] sequence population level. Methods: 454-deep pyrosequencing in combination with a novel analysis pipeline was applied to define populations of IGHM CDRH3 sequences based on absence or presence of somatic hypermutations [SHM] in peripheral blood B cells. Results: HIV or SLE subjects have reduced biodiversity within their IGHM transcriptome compared to healthy subjects, mainly due to a significant decrease in the number of unique combinations of alleles, although recombination machinery was intact. While major differences between sequences without or with SHM occurred among all groups, IGHD and IGHJ allele use, CDRH3 length distribution, or generation of SHM were similar among study cohorts. Antiretroviral therapy failed to normalize IGHM biodiversity in HIV-infected individuals. All subjects had a low frequency of allelic combinations within the IGHM repertoire similar to known broadly-neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies. Conclusions: Polyclonal expansion would decrease overall IgM biodiversity independent of other mechanisms for development of the B cell repertoire. Applying deep sequencing as a strategy to follow development of the IgM repertoire in health and disease provides a novel molecular assessment of multiple points along the B cell differentiation pathway that is highly sensitive for detecting perturbations within the repertoire at the population level.

  11. Gallic Acid Is an Antagonist of Semen Amyloid Fibrils That Enhance HIV-1 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoRicco, Josephine G; Xu, Changmingzi Sherry; Neidleman, Jason; Bergkvist, Magnus; Greene, Warner C; Roan, Nadia R; Makhatadze, George I

    2016-07-01

    Recent in vitro studies have demonstrated that amyloid fibrils found in semen from healthy and HIV-infected men, as well as semen itself, can markedly enhance HIV infection rates. Semen fibrils are made up of multiple naturally occurring peptide fragments derived from semen. The best characterized of these fibrils are SEVI (semen-derived enhancer of viral infection), made up of residues 248-286 of prostatic acidic phosphatase, and the SEM1 fibrils, made up of residues 86-107 of semenogelin 1. A small molecule screen for antagonists of semen fibrils identified four compounds that lowered semen-mediated enhancement of HIV-1 infectivity. One of the four, gallic acid, was previously reported to antagonize other amyloids and to exert anti-inflammatory effects. To better understand the mechanism by which gallic acid modifies the properties of semen amyloids, we performed biophysical measurements (atomic force microscopy, electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, thioflavin T and Congo Red fluorescence assays, zeta potential measurements) and quantitative assays on the effects of gallic acid on semen-mediated enhancement of HIV infection and inflammation. Our results demonstrate that gallic acid binds to both SEVI and SEM1 fibrils and modifies their surface electrostatics to render them less cationic. In addition, gallic acid decreased semen-mediated enhancement of HIV infection but did not decrease the inflammatory response induced by semen. Together, these observations identify gallic acid as a non-polyanionic compound that inhibits semen-mediated enhancement of HIV infection and suggest the potential utility of incorporating gallic acid into a multicomponent microbicide targeting both the HIV virus and host components that promote viral infection.

  12. Cellular Composition of Cerebrospinal Fluid in HIV-1 Infected and Uninfected Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Emily L; Ronquillo, Rollie; Altmeppen, Hermann; Spudich, Serena S; Price, Richard W; Sinclair, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    In order to characterize the cellular composition of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in a healthy state and in the setting of chronic pleocytosis associated with HIV-1 (HIV) infection, multi-parameter flow cytometry was used to identify and quantitate cellular phenotypes in CSF derived from HIV-uninfected healthy controls and HIV-infected subjects across a spectrum of disease and treatment. CD4+ T cells were the most frequent CSF population and the CD4:CD8 ratio was significantly increased in the CSF compared to blood (p = 0.0232), suggesting preferential trafficking of CD4+ over CD8+ T cells to this compartment. In contrast, in HIV-infection, CD8+ T cells were the major cellular component of the CSF and were markedly increased compared to HIV-uninfected subjects (p<0.001). As with peripheral blood, the CSF CD4:CD8 ratio was reversed in HIV-infected subjects compared to HIV-uninfected subjects. Monocytes, B cells and NK cells were rare in the CSF in both groups, although absolute counts of CSF NK cells and B cells were significantly increased in HIV-infected subjects (p<0.05). Our studies show that T cells are the major cellular component of the CSF in HIV-infected and uninfected subjects. The CSF pleocytosis characteristic of HIV infection involves all lymphocyte subsets we measured, except for CD4+ T cells, but is comprised primarily of CD8+ T cells. The reduced proportion of CD4+ T cells in the CSF may reflect both HIV-related peripheral loss and changes in trafficking patterns in response to HIV infection in the central nervous system.

  13. Cellular Composition of Cerebrospinal Fluid in HIV-1 Infected and Uninfected Subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily L Ho

    Full Text Available In order to characterize the cellular composition of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF in a healthy state and in the setting of chronic pleocytosis associated with HIV-1 (HIV infection, multi-parameter flow cytometry was used to identify and quantitate cellular phenotypes in CSF derived from HIV-uninfected healthy controls and HIV-infected subjects across a spectrum of disease and treatment. CD4+ T cells were the most frequent CSF population and the CD4:CD8 ratio was significantly increased in the CSF compared to blood (p = 0.0232, suggesting preferential trafficking of CD4+ over CD8+ T cells to this compartment. In contrast, in HIV-infection, CD8+ T cells were the major cellular component of the CSF and were markedly increased compared to HIV-uninfected subjects (p<0.001. As with peripheral blood, the CSF CD4:CD8 ratio was reversed in HIV-infected subjects compared to HIV-uninfected subjects. Monocytes, B cells and NK cells were rare in the CSF in both groups, although absolute counts of CSF NK cells and B cells were significantly increased in HIV-infected subjects (p<0.05. Our studies show that T cells are the major cellular component of the CSF in HIV-infected and uninfected subjects. The CSF pleocytosis characteristic of HIV infection involves all lymphocyte subsets we measured, except for CD4+ T cells, but is comprised primarily of CD8+ T cells. The reduced proportion of CD4+ T cells in the CSF may reflect both HIV-related peripheral loss and changes in trafficking patterns in response to HIV infection in the central nervous system.

  14. Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies Display Potential for Prevention of HIV-1 Infection of Mucosal Tissue Superior to That of Nonneutralizing Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheeseman, Hannah M; Olejniczak, Natalia J; Rogers, Paul M; Evans, Abbey B; King, Deborah F L; Ziprin, Paul; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F; Shattock, Robin J

    2017-01-01

    Definition of the key parameters mediating effective antibody blocking of HIV-1 acquisition within mucosal tissue may prove critical to effective vaccine development and the prophylactic use of monoclonal antibodies. Although direct antibody-mediated neutralization is highly effective against cell-free virus, antibodies targeting different sites of envelope vulnerability may display differential activity against mucosal infection. Nonneutralizing antibodies (nnAbs) may also impact mucosal transmission events through Fc-gamma receptor (FcγR)-mediated inhibition. In this study, a panel of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) and nnAbs, including those associated with protection in the RV144 vaccine trial, were screened for the ability to block HIV-1 acquisition and replication across a range of cellular and mucosal tissue models. Neutralization potency, as determined by the TZM-bl infection assay, did not fully predict activity in mucosal tissue. CD4-binding site (CD4bs)-specific bnAbs, in particular VRC01, were consistent in blocking HIV-1 infection across all cellular and tissue models. Membrane-proximal external region (MPER) (2F5) and outer domain glycan (2G12) bnAbs were also efficient in preventing infection of mucosal tissues, while the protective efficacy of bnAbs targeting V1-V2 glycans (PG9 and PG16) was more variable. In contrast, nnAbs alone and in combinations, while active in a range of cellular assays, were poorly protective against HIV-1 infection of mucosal tissues. These data suggest that tissue resident effector cell numbers and low FcγR expression may limit the potential of nnAbs to prevent establishment of the initial foci of infection. The solid protection provided by specific bnAbs clearly demonstrates their superior potential over that of nonneutralizing antibodies for preventing HIV-1 infection at the mucosal portals of infection.

  15. High levels of anti-Nef antibodies may prevent AIDS disease progression in vertically HIV-1-infected infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Corró

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: HIV-1-associated CD4+ T-cell depletion is a consequence of uninfected cell death. Nef is one of the viral factors that trigger apoptosis on bystander cells, though the plasma Nef levels do not correlate with Th lymphocytes counts. The aim of our study was to evaluate whether anti-Nef antibodies were involved in paediatric AIDS development and whether they can prevent the CD4+ T-cell depletion in vertically infected children. Methods: Two hundred and seventy three HIV-1 vertically infected children seen at Garrahan Paediatric Hospital were randomly included in the study, adding 13 selected cases: seven LTNP (long-term non-progressors and six RP (rapid progressors children (ntotal=286. Specific anti-HIV-1-Nef antibodies were titrated by indirect ELISA and compared between groups. The plasma blocking effect on Nef-dependent cytotoxicity was evaluated in Jurkat cells using recombinant Nef as apoptotic stimulus and patient plasmas as blockers, measuring the apoptotic levels using Annexin-V stain and flow cytometry. Results: Only 63.4% of the patients had specific anti-Nef antibodies, and the levels of anti-Nef antibodies found in the selected LTNPs plasmas were always significantly higher (p=1.55×10−4 than those in RPs or general HIV-1+ paediatric populations. The LTNPs’ plasma had a strong inhibitory effect on Nef-dependent cytotoxicity even at high dilutions, while RP plasmas had little or no effect on Nef-induced apoptosis. Discussion and conclusions: High anti-Nef antibody levels are associated and predict slow or non-progression to AIDS in vertically HIV-1-infected children. They could be an efficient tool in preventing Nef-associated bystander effect, preserving CD4+ T-cells and the immune function in the context of paediatric HIV-1 infection.

  16. Host Immune Responses in HIV-1 Infection: The Emerging Pathogenic Role of Siglecs and Their Clinical Correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulak, Joanna; Di Vito, Clara; Zaghi, Elisa; Mavilio, Domenico

    2017-01-01

    A better understanding of the mechanisms employed by HIV-1 to escape immune responses still represents one of the major tasks required for the development of novel therapeutic approaches targeting a disease still lacking a definitive cure. Host innate immune responses against HIV-1 are key in the early phases of the infection as they could prevent the development and the establishment of two hallmarks of the infection: chronic inflammation and viral reservoirs. Sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglecs) belong to a family of transmembrane proteins able to dampen host immune responses and set appropriate immune activation thresholds upon ligation with their natural ligands, the sialylated carbohydrates. This immune-modulatory function is also targeted by many pathogens that have evolved to express sialic acids on their surface in order to escape host immune responses. HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein 120 (gp120) is extensively covered by carbohydrates playing active roles in life cycle of the virus. Indeed, besides forming a protecting shield from antibody recognition, this coat of N-linked glycans interferes with the folding of viral glycoproteins and enhances virus infectivity. In particular, the sialic acid residues present on gp120 can bind Siglec-7 on natural killer and monocytes/macrophages and Siglec-1 on monocytes/macrophages and dendritic cells. The interactions between these two members of the Siglec family and the sialylated glycans present on HIV-1 envelope either induce or increase HIV-1 entry in conventional and unconventional target cells, thus contributing to viral dissemination and disease progression. In this review, we address the impact of Siglecs in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection and discuss how they could be employed as clinic and therapeutic targets.

  17. Estimating the fraction of progeny virions that must incorporate APOBEC3G for suppression of productive HIV-1 infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thangavelu, Pulari U.; Gupta, Vipul; Dixit, Narendra M., E-mail: narendra@chemeng.iisc.ernet.in

    2014-01-20

    The contest between the host factor APOBEC3G (A3G) and the HIV-1 protein Vif presents an attractive target of intervention. The extent to which the A3G–Vif interaction must be suppressed to tilt the balance in favor of A3G remains unknown. We employed stochastic simulations and mathematical modeling of the within-host dynamics and evolution of HIV-1 to estimate the fraction of progeny virions that must incorporate A3G to render productive infection unsustainable. Using three different approaches, we found consistently that a transition from sustained infection to suppression of productive infection occurred when the latter fraction exceeded ∼0.8. The transition was triggered by A3G-induced hypermutations that led to premature stop codons compromising viral production and was consistent with driving the basic reproductive number, R{sub 0}, below unity. The fraction identified may serve as a quantitative guideline for strategies targeting the A3G–Vif axis. - Highlights: • We perform simulations and mathematical modeling of the role of APOBEC3G in suppressing HIV-1 infection. • In three distinct ways, we estimate that when over 80% of progeny virions carry APOBEC3G, productive HIV-1 infection would be suppressed. • Our estimate of this critical fraction presents quantitative guidelines for strategies targeting the APOBEC3G–Vif axis.

  18. [Correlativity of subtype B viral transmission among elderly HIV-1 infected individuals in Yongding district, Zhangjiajie city, Hunan province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y Q; Zou, X B; Qin, R; He, J M; Zhang, P F; Jiang, Y; Chen, G M; Yang, Y J; Chen, X

    2016-12-10

    Objective: To investigate the characteristics of transmission correlativity regarding subtype B among elderly HIV-1 infected individuals in Yongding district, Zhangjiajie city, Hunan province and to explore a method on its traceability. Methods: A total of 43 newly diagnosed elderly HIV-1 Infected individuals in Yongding district were enrolled in this study. Pol area genes were amplified and sequenced by 'In house' method. Methods used to analyze the relationship related to HIV individuals transmission would include Bayesian phylogenetic tree and other epidemiological ones. Results: A total of 42 valid sequences were successfully obtained, with predominant strain as subtype B (80.95%, 34/42). All the 42 sequences were gathered into eight clusters. In each cluster, the genetic distance was significantly shorter than the average from the 34 subtype B strains (0.058 3). The HIV-1 infected individuals in one cluster had the same high-risk behaviors and the significantly patchy distributions were identified at the sites where the high-risk behaviors existed. Our results indicated that the local elderly HIV-infected individuals had high level of homology between geographical position and related behaviors. Conclusions: The patchy distribution between geographical position and behavior was associated among the elderly HIV-1 infected individuals. Guidance related to epidemic precise positioning and effective interventions was provided through the findings of this study.

  19. Humanized mice dually challenged with R5 and X4 HIV-1 show preferential R5 viremia and restricted X4 infection of CCR5(+)CD4(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terahara, Kazutaka; Ishige, Masayuki; Ikeno, Shota; Okada, Seiji; Kobayashi-Ishihara, Mie; Ato, Manabu; Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko

    2015-05-01

    CCR5-tropic (R5) immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains are highly transmissible during the early stage of infection in humans, whereas CXCR4-tropic (X4) strains are less transmissible. This study aimed to explore the basis for early phase R5 and X4 HIV-1 infection in vivo by using humanized mice dually challenged with R5 HIV-1NLAD8-D harboring DsRed and X4 HIV-1(NL-E) harboring EGFP. Whereas R5 HIV-1 replicated well, X4 HIV-1 caused only transient viremia with variable kinetics; however, this was distinct from the low level but persistent viremia observed in mice challenged with X4 HIV-1 alone. Flow cytometric analysis of HIV-1-infected cells revealed that X4 HIV-1 infection of CCR5(+)CD4(+) T cells was significantly suppressed in the presence of R5 HIV-1. X4 HIV-1 was more cytopathic than R5 HIV-1; however, this was not the cause of restricted X4 HIV-1 infection because there were no significant differences in the mortality rates of CCR5(+) and CCR5(-) cells within the X4 HIV-1-infected cell populations. Taken together, these results suggest that restricted infection of CCR5(+)CD4(+) T cells by X4 HIV-1 (occurring via a still-to-be-identified mechanism) might contribute to the preferential transmission of R5 HIV-1 during the early phase of infection.

  20. ART therapy affect CD4+FoxP3+regulatory T cells in disease progression of HIV-1 infection%ART治疗对HIV感染者CD4+FoxP3+T细胞水平的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊竑冶; 董冠军; 傅更锋; 还锡萍; 羊海涛; 王建军; 侯亚义

    2012-01-01

    目的:探索抗逆转录病毒疗法(ART)治疗在HIV-1疾病进程中对调节性T细胞(Treg细胞)的影响,并探讨Treg细胞频率在HIV-1疾病进程中的作用.方法:抽取114例(男96例、女18例)HIV-1阳性患者及17例健康对照者外周血,应用流式细胞术检测Treg细胞,并分析其表达水平(频率和绝对数)在 HIV-1疾病进程中的变化趋势及其与CD4+细胞绝对数之间的相关性.结果:随着HIV-1感染者病情进展,患者外周血中Treg细胞绝对数趋向下降并且与CD4+T细胞绝对数呈正相关,而Treg细胞频率趋向升高并且与CD4+T细胞绝对数呈负相关.Treg细胞频率及绝对数在ART治疗无症状HIV-1阳性感染者中显著降低,而在AIDS患者中却显著升高.结论:Treg细胞参与艾滋病免疫发病过程,并且在HIV-1感染的不同阶段,ART治疗对Treg细胞水平具有一定的影响,提示通过控制Treg细胞的水平可能有助于HIV-1感染疾病的临床控制.%Objective: To understand the changes of CD4 + FoxP3 + regulatory T cells during disease progression of HIV-1 infection with anti-retroviral therapy (ART). Methods: 114 patients HIV-1 positively infected and 17 healthy controls were randomly enrolled. The percentages and absolute counts of Treg cells were detected by using flow cytometry and the correlation of Treg cells with the absolute CD4 + T cells was analyzed in the process of disease progression of HIV-1 infection with ART. Results: With HIV-1 disease progression, the absolute counts of Treg cells in HIV-1 positive peripheral blood tended to decrease and positively correlated with the absolute counts of CD4 + T cells, while the frequency of Treg cells increased and negatively correlated with the absolute counts of CD4 + T cells. Both the frequency and absolute number of Treg cells in HIV-1 positive infected asymptomatic patients with ART treatment were significantly reduced, on the contrary they were significantly higher in patients with AIDS

  1. Diagnostic performance of line-immunoassay based algorithms for incident HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schüpbach Jörg

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serologic testing algorithms for recent HIV seroconversion (STARHS provide important information for HIV surveillance. We have previously demonstrated that a patient's antibody reaction pattern in a confirmatory line immunoassay (INNO-LIA™ HIV I/II Score provides information on the duration of infection, which is unaffected by clinical, immunological and viral variables. In this report we have set out to determine the diagnostic performance of Inno-Lia algorithms for identifying incident infections in patients with known duration of infection and evaluated the algorithms in annual cohorts of HIV notifications. Methods Diagnostic sensitivity was determined in 527 treatment-naive patients infected for up to 12 months. Specificity was determined in 740 patients infected for longer than 12 months. Plasma was tested by Inno-Lia and classified as either incident ( Results The 10 best algorithms had a mean raw sensitivity of 59.4% and a mean specificity of 95.1%. Adjustment for overrepresentation of patients in the first quarter year of infection further reduced the sensitivity. In the preferred model, the mean adjusted sensitivity was 37.4%. Application of the 10 best algorithms to four annual cohorts of HIV-1 notifications totalling 2'595 patients yielded a mean IIR of 0.35 in 2005/6 (baseline and of 0.45, 0.42 and 0.35 in 2008, 2009 and 2010, respectively. The increase between baseline and 2008 and the ensuing decreases were highly significant. Other adjustment models yielded different absolute IIR, although the relative changes between the cohorts were identical for all models. Conclusions The method can be used for comparing IIR in annual cohorts of HIV notifications. The use of several different algorithms in combination, each with its own sensitivity and specificity to detect incident infection, is advisable as this reduces the impact of individual imperfections stemming primarily from relatively low sensitivities and

  2. An anti-CD45RO immunotoxin eliminates T cells latently infected with HIV-1 in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    McCoig, Cynthia; Dyke, Gregory; Chou, Chin-Sheng; Picker, Louis J.; Ramilo,Octavio; Vitetta, Ellen S.

    1999-01-01

    Despite the success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in lowering circulating HIV-1 to undetectable levels in most infected individuals, several studies have documented the presence of a small reservoir of latently infected cells in HAART patients, the majority of which are CD45RO+ memory T cells. We previously have demonstrated that latently infected, replication-competent cells can be generated in vitro after eliminating CD25+ cells with an immunotoxin (IT). The present study ...

  3. Detection of recent HIV-1 infections among men who have sex with men in Beijing during 2005-2006

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shen-wei; ZHANG Xiao-yan; LI Xin-xu; WANG Min-jie; LI Dong-liang; RUAN Yu-hua; ZHANG Xiao-xi; SHAO Yi-ming

    2008-01-01

    Background Men who have sex with men (MSM) have become one of the most risky populations for HIV infection in China.Though several cross-sectional sero-prevalence studies have been conducted.the annual HIV incidence remains unknown in this population.Methods We applied IgG-capture BED-enzyme immunoassay (BED-CEIA) to define the recent HIV-1 infections among MSM in Beijing in the years 2005 and 2006 and the annual HIV incidence was estimated.Results Overall,1067 MSM samples were collected,including 526 samples in the year 2005 and 541 in 2006.In 2005,0f 17 HIV seropositive samples.7 were identified as recent HIV-1 infections and the estimated HIV infection incidence was 2.9% per year (95%CI,0.8%-5.0%).In 2006,of 26 HIV seropositive samples,9 were identified as recent HIV-1 infections and the estimated annual incidence was 3.6% (95%CI,1.3%-5.9%),which was 0.7% higher than that in 2005.Individuals engaging in male group sexual intercourse (5.17% vs 0.87%,P=0.019) and having receptive anal sexual intercourse more than five times (2.79% vs 0.33%,P=0.047) in the past 6 months significantly increase the risk of being infected by HIV-1.Conclusions A high level of annual HIV-1 infection incidence was observed among MSM in Beijing for the consecutive years 2005 and 2006 with a continuous increasing trend.The rising incidence and related high risk behavior among MSM alarmed the health authorities and calls for more effective intervention strategies among this population.

  4. Identification of CD4-Binding Site Dependent Plasma Neutralizing Antibodies in an HIV-1 Infected Indian Individual.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubina Khan

    Full Text Available Dissecting antibody specificities in the plasma of HIV-1 infected individuals that develop broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs is likely to provide useful information for refining target epitopes for vaccine design. Several studies have reported CD4-binding site (CD4bs antibodies as neutralization determinants in the plasma of subtype B-infected individuals; however there is little information on the prevalence of CD4bs specificities in HIV-infected individuals in India. Here, we report on the presence of CD4bs antibodies and their contribution to virus neutralization in the plasma from a cohort of HIV-1 infected Indian individuals. Plasma from 11 of the 140 HIV-1 infected individuals (7.9% studied here exhibited cross-neutralization activity against a panel of subtype B and C viruses. Analyses of these 11 plasma samples for the presence of CD4bs antibodies using two CD4bs-selective probes (antigenically resurfaced HXB2gp120 core protein RSC3 and hyperglycosylated JRFLgp120 mutant ΔN2mCHO revealed that five (AIIMS 617, 619, 627, 642, 660 contained RSC3-reactive plasma antibodies and only one (AIIMS 660 contained ΔN2mCHO-reactive antibodies. Plasma antibody depletion and competition experiments confirmed that the neutralizing activity in the AIIMS 660 plasma was dependent on CD4bs antibodies. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report specifically on the presence of CD4bs antibodies in the plasma of a cohort of HIV-1 infected Indian donors. The identification of CD4bs dependent neutralizing antibodies in an HIV-1 infected Indian donor is a salient finding of this study and is supportive of ongoing efforts to induce similar antibodies by immunization.

  5. Identification of CD4-Binding Site Dependent Plasma Neutralizing Antibodies in an HIV-1 Infected Indian Individual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Lubina; Makhdoomi, Muzamil Ashraf; Kumar, Sanjeev; Nair, Ambili; Andrabi, Raiees; Clark, Brenda E; Auyeung, Kate; Bhattacharya, Jayanta; Vajpayee, Madhu; Wig, Naveet; Pantophlet, Ralph; Luthra, Kalpana

    2015-01-01

    Dissecting antibody specificities in the plasma of HIV-1 infected individuals that develop broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) is likely to provide useful information for refining target epitopes for vaccine design. Several studies have reported CD4-binding site (CD4bs) antibodies as neutralization determinants in the plasma of subtype B-infected individuals; however there is little information on the prevalence of CD4bs specificities in HIV-infected individuals in India. Here, we report on the presence of CD4bs antibodies and their contribution to virus neutralization in the plasma from a cohort of HIV-1 infected Indian individuals. Plasma from 11 of the 140 HIV-1 infected individuals (7.9%) studied here exhibited cross-neutralization activity against a panel of subtype B and C viruses. Analyses of these 11 plasma samples for the presence of CD4bs antibodies using two CD4bs-selective probes (antigenically resurfaced HXB2gp120 core protein RSC3 and hyperglycosylated JRFLgp120 mutant ΔN2mCHO) revealed that five (AIIMS 617, 619, 627, 642, 660) contained RSC3-reactive plasma antibodies and only one (AIIMS 660) contained ΔN2mCHO-reactive antibodies. Plasma antibody depletion and competition experiments confirmed that the neutralizing activity in the AIIMS 660 plasma was dependent on CD4bs antibodies. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report specifically on the presence of CD4bs antibodies in the plasma of a cohort of HIV-1 infected Indian donors. The identification of CD4bs dependent neutralizing antibodies in an HIV-1 infected Indian donor is a salient finding of this study and is supportive of ongoing efforts to induce similar antibodies by immunization.

  6. 天津市不同感染途径HIV-1感染者流行毒株亚型分析%The genetic subtype of HIV-1 in different groups of HIV-1 infected person in Tianjin City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王欣; 郑敏娜; 郭燕; 柏建芸; 程绍辉

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the molecular epidemiology of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection in different groups of HIV-1 infected person in Tianjin, and compare the genetic subtype of HIV-1 in this region. Methods Whole blood samples were collected from 100 HIV-1 infected individuals whose routes of infection were confirmed. Nested PCR method was used to amplify gag genes sequences of HIV-1 after DNA extracted. The nucleotide sequence of amplification products was determined, and the genetic subtype was identified by comparative analysis. Results Gag gene fragments of HIV-1 were successfully amplified for 87 samples and 4 kinds of HIV-1 subtypes and recombinant gene were found. CRP01-AE was major subtype, accounted for 59.77% ( 52/87) of all positives, which were mainly distributed in the homosexuals and heterosexuals. CRP07_BC was mainly distributed among the intravenous drug users. Conclusions There are at least 4 kinds of HIV-1 gene subtypes in Tianjin, and the distribution of genetic subtype of HIV-1 was a little different among different routes of HIV-1 infection. Therefore, the surveillance in the subtype variation of HIV-1 strains should be strengthened for the better prevention and control of the HIV-1 infection in this area.%目的 了解天津市HIV-1毒株的流行情况,比较不同感染途径HIV-1感染者中流行毒株的亚型分布.方法 采集100例感染途径已知的HIV-1感染者抗凝全血标本,提取DNA,用巢式聚合酶链式反应扩增病毒gag基因,并进行序列测定和亚型分析.结果 100份样品中,有87份样品被成功扩增出HIV-1的gag基因片段,通过系统进化分析,确定天津市HIV-1流行毒株分属4个亚型和重组型,其中CRF01 _AE比例最大,达59.77%(52/87),主要分布在通过同性和异性性传播的HIV-1感染者中,而在通过静注吸毒感染的HIV-1感染者中以CRF07_BC亚型为主.结论 天津市HIV-1流行株至少有4种基因亚型,且不同感染途径HIV-1感染

  7. Gp120/CD4 blocking antibodies are frequently elicited in ART-naive chronically HIV-1 infected individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Carrillo

    Full Text Available Antibodies with the ability to block the interaction of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env gp120 with CD4, including those overlapping the CD4 binding site (CD4bs antibodies, can protect from infection by HIV-1, and their elicitation may be an interesting goal for any vaccination strategy. To identify gp120/CD4 blocking antibodies in plasma samples from HIV-1 infected individuals we have developed a competitive flow cytometry-based functional assay. In a cohort of treatment-naïve chronically infected patients, we showed that gp120/CD4 blocking antibodies were frequently elicited (detected in 97% plasma samples and correlated with binding to trimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins. However, no correlation was observed between functional CD4 binding blockade data and titer of CD4bs antibodies determined by ELISA using resurfaced gp120 proteins. Consistently, plasma samples lacking CD4bs antibodies were able to block the interaction between gp120 and its receptor, indicating that antibodies recognizing other epitopes, such as PGT126 and PG16, can also play the same role. Antibodies blocking CD4 binding increased over time and correlated positively with the capacity of plasma samples to neutralize the laboratory-adapted NL4.3 and BaL virus isolates, suggesting their potential contribution to the neutralizing workforce of plasma in vivo. Determining whether this response can be boosted to achieve broadly neutralizing antibodies may provide valuable information for the design of new strategies aimed to improve the anti-HIV-1 humoral response and to develop a successful HIV-1 vaccine.

  8. Quantitative analysis of differentially expressed saliva proteins in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infected individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Nawei; Zhang, Zhenyu [Beijing Chaoyang Hospital Affiliated Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Feng, Shan [MOE Key Laboratory of Bioinformatics, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Wang, Qingtao [Beijing Chaoyang Hospital Affiliated Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Malamud, Daniel [NYU College of Dentistry, 345 East 24th Street, New York, NY 10010 (United States); Deng, Haiteng, E-mail: dht@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Bioinformatics, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2013-04-24

    Highlights: ► A high-throughput method for profiling and quantification of the differentially expressed proteins in saliva samples was developed. ► Identified that DMBT1, S100A7, S100A8, S100A9 and alpha defensin were up-regulated in saliva from HIV-1 seropositive patients. ► Established analytical strategies are translatable to the clinical setting. -- Abstract: In the present study, we have established a new methodology to analyze saliva proteins from HIV-1-seropositive patients before highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and seronegative controls. A total of 593 and 601 proteins were identified in the pooled saliva samples from 5 HIV-1 subjects and 5 controls, respectively. Forty-one proteins were found to be differentially expressed. Bioinformatic analysis of differentially expressed salivary proteins showed an increase of antimicrobial proteins and decrease of protease inhibitors upon HIV-1 infection. To validate some of these differentially expressed proteins, a high-throughput quantitation method was established to determine concentrations of 10 salivary proteins in 40 individual saliva samples from 20 seropositive patients before HAART and 20 seronegative subjects. This method was based on limited protein separation within the zone of the stacking gel of the 1D SDS PAGE and using isotope-coded synthetic peptides as internal standards. The results demonstrated that a combination of protein profiling and targeted quantitation is an efficient method to identify and validate differentially expressed salivary proteins. Expression levels of members of the calcium-binding S100 protein family and deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 protein (DMBT1) were up-regulated while that of Mucin 5B was down-regulated in HIV-1 seropositive saliva samples, which may provide new perspectives for monitoring HIV-infection and understanding the mechanism of HIV-1 infectivity.

  9. Role of Mannose-Binding Lectin Deficiency in HIV-1 and Schistosoma Infections in a Rural Adult Population in Zimbabwe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinyama-Gutsire, Rutendo B L; Chasela, Charles; Madsen, Hans O

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Polymorphism in the MBL2 gene lead to MBL deficiency, which has been shown to increase susceptibility to various bacterial, viral and parasitic infections. We assessed role of MBL deficiency in HIV-1 and schistosoma infections in Zimbabwean adults enrolled in the Mupfure Schistosomiasis...... and HIV Cohort (MUSH Cohort). METHODS: HIV-1, S. haematobium and S. mansoni infections were determined at baseline. Plasma MBL concentration was measured by ELISA and MBL2 genotypes determined by PCR. We calculated and compared the proportions of plasma MBL deficiency, MBL2 structural variant alleles B...... (codon 54A>G), C (codon 57A>G), and D (codon 52T>C) as well as MBL2 promoter variants -550(H/L), -221(X/Y) and +4(P/Q) between HIV-1 and schistosoma co-infection and control groups using Chi Square test. RESULTS: We assessed 379 adults, 80% females, median age (IQR) 30 (17-41) years. HIV-1, S...

  10. Ritonavir-boosted darunavir combined with raltegravir or tenofovir-emtricitabine in antiretroviral-naive adults infected with HIV-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffi, François; Babiker, Abdel G; Richert, Laura;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Standard first-line antiretroviral therapy for HIV-1 infection includes two nucleoside or nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NtRTIs), but these drugs have limitations. We assessed the 96 week efficacy and safety of an NtRTI-sparing regimen. METHODS: Between August, 2010, and...

  11. Prognosis of HIV-1-infected patients up to 5 years after initiation of HAART: collaborative analysis of prospective studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, M; Sterne, JAC; Sabin, C

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prognosis over 5 years of HIV-1-infected, treatment-naive patients starting HAART, taking into account the immunological and virological response to therapy. DESIGN: A collaborative analysis of data from 12 cohorts in Europe and North America on 20,379 adults who starte...

  12. The brain-specific factor FEZ1 is a determinant of neuronal susceptibility to HIV-1 infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haedicke, Juliane

    2009-08-18

    Neurons are one of the few cell types in the human body that do not support HIV type-1 (HIV-1) replication. Although the lack of key receptors is a major obstacle to infection, studies suggest that additional functions inhibit virus replication to explain the exquisite resistance of neurons to HIV-1. However, specific neuronal factors that may explain this resistance remain to be discovered. In a screen for antiviral factors using a fibroblast line chemically mutagenized and selected for resistance to retroviral infection, we recently identified induction of rat FEZ1 (fasciculation and elongation protein zeta-1), a brain-specific protein, as the cause of this resistance. When exogenously expressed in nonneuronal cell lines rat FEZ1 blocked nuclear entry of retroviral DNA. Here, we demonstrate that among human brain cells, neurons naturally express high levels of FEZ1 compared to astrocytes or microglia cells and are correspondingly less susceptible to infection with pseudotyped HIV-1 that bypasses receptor-mediated viral entry. Demonstrating that endogenous FEZ1 was functionally important in the resistance of neurons to HIV-1 infection, siRNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous FEZ1 increased the infectivity of neurons while sensitive brain cell types like microglia became more resistant upon FEZ1 overexpression. In addition, FEZ1 expression was not induced in response to IFN treatment. As such, in contrast to other widely expressed, IFN-inducible antiviral factors, FEZ1 appears to represent a unique neuron-specific determinant of cellular susceptibility to infection in a cell type that is naturally resistant to HIV-1.

  13. Polymorphisms of CUL5 are associated with CD4+ T cell loss in HIV-1 infected individuals.

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    Ping An

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Human apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like 3 (Apobec3 antiretroviral factors cause hypermutation of proviral DNA leading to degradation or replication-incompetent HIV-1. However, HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif suppresses Apobec3 activity through the Cullin 5-Elongin B-Elongin C E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. We examined the effect of genetic polymorphisms in the CUL5 gene (encoding Cullin 5 protein on AIDS disease progression in five HIV-1 longitudinal cohorts. A total of 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs spanning 93 kb in the CUL5 locus were genotyped and their haplotypes inferred. A phylogenetic network analysis revealed that CUL5 haplotypes were grouped into two clusters of evolutionarily related haplotypes. Cox survival analysis and mixed effects models were used to assess time to AIDS outcomes and CD4(+ T cell trajectories, respectively. Relative to cluster I haplotypes, the collective cluster II haplotypes were associated with more rapid CD4(+ T cell loss (relative hazards [RH] = 1.47 and p = 0.009, in a dose-dependent fashion. This effect was mainly attributable to a single cluster II haplotype (Hap10 (RH = 2.49 and p = 0.00001, possibly due to differential nuclear protein-binding efficiencies of a Hap10-specifying SNP as indicated by a gel shift assay. Consistent effects were observed for CD4(+ T cell counts and HIV-1 viral load trajectories over time. The findings of both functional and genetic epidemiologic consequences of CUL5 polymorphism on CD4(+ T cell and HIV-1 levels point to a role for Cullin 5 in HIV-1 pathogenesis and suggest interference with the Vif-Cullin 5 pathway as a possible anti-HIV-1 therapeutic strategy.

  14. Psychoneuroimmunology and HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Michael H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presents evidence describing benefits of behavioral interventions such as aerobic exercise training on both psychological and immunological functioning among high risk human immunodeficiency virus-Type 1 (HIV-1) seronegative and very early stage seropositive homosexual men. HIV-1 infection is cast as chronic disease for which early…

  15. The effect of cholecalciferol supplementation on vitamin D levels and insulin sensitivity is dose related in vitamin D-deficient HIV-1-infected patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukel, CJ van den Bout-va; Bos, M.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Hermus, A.R.M.M.; Sweep, F.C.; Tack, C.J.J.; Bosch, M.E.; Burger, D.M.; Koopmans, P.P.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to explore the effects of cholecalciferol supplementation on vitamin D levels, bone mineral density (BMD), body fat distribution and insulin sensitivity in vitamin D-deficient HIV-1-infected patients. METHODS: Twenty vitamin D-deficient HIV-1-infected patients we

  16. The prognostic value of the suPARnosticTM ELISA assay in HIV-1 infected individuals is not affected by uPAR promoter polymorphisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Uffe Vest; Nielsen, Rikke Lyngaa; Pedersen, Court;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High blood levels of soluble urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor (suPAR) are associated with poor outcomes in human immunodeficiency-1 (HIV-1) infected individuals. Research on the clinical value of suPAR in HIV-1 infection led to the development of the suPARnosticTM assay...

  17. Development of TIMP1 magnetic nanoformulation for regulation of synaptic plasticity in HIV-1 infection

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    Atluri VSR

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Venkata Subba Rao Atluri* Rahul Dev Jayant* Sudheesh Pilakka-Kanthikeel, Gabriella Garcia, Thangavel Samikkannu, Adriana Yndart, Ajeet Kaushik, Madhavan Nair Center for Personalized Nanomedicine, Department of Immunology, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Although the introduction of antiretroviral therapy has reduced the prevalence of severe forms of neurocognitive disorders, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders were observed in 50% of HIV-infected patients globally. The blood–brain barrier is known to be impermeable to most of antiretroviral drugs. Successful delivery of antiretroviral drugs into the brain may induce an inflammatory response, which may further induce neurotoxicity. Therefore, alternate options to antiretroviral drugs for decreasing the HIV infection and neurotoxicity may help in reducing neurocognitive impairments observed in HIV-infected patients. In this study, we explored the role of magnetic nanoparticle (MNP-bound tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP1 protein in reducing HIV infection levels, oxidative stress, and recovering spine density in HIV-infected SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells. We did not observe any neuronal cytotoxicity with either the free TIMP1 or MNP-bound TIMP1 used in our study. We observed significantly reduced HIV infection in both solution phase and in MNP-bound TIMP1-exposed neuronal cells. Furthermore, we also observed significantly reduced reactive oxygen species production in both the test groups compared to the neuronal cells infected with HIV alone. To observe the effect of both soluble-phase TIMP1 and MNP-bound TIMP1 on spine density in HIV-infected neuronal cells, confocal microscopy was used. We observed significant recovery of spine density in both the test groups when compared to the cells infected with HIV alone, indicting the

  18. Monitoring CD27 expression to evaluate Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity in HIV-1 infected individuals in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Alexandra; Haule, Antelmo; Reither, Klaus; Ngwenyama, Njabulo; Rachow, Andrea; Meyerhans, Andreas; Maboko, Leonard; Koup, Richard A; Hoelscher, Michael; Geldmacher, Christof

    2011-01-01

    The level of bacterial activity is only poorly defined during asymptomatic Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infection. The objective was to study the capacity of a new biomarker, the expression of the T cell maturation marker CD27 on MTB-specific CD4 T cells, to identify active tuberculosis (TB) disease in subjects from a MTB and HIV endemic region. The frequency and CD27 expression of circulating MTB-specific CD4 T cells was determined in 96 study participants after stimulation with purified protein derivative (PPD) using intracellular cytokine staining for IFNgamma (IFNγ). Subjects were then stratified by their TB and HIV status. Within PPD responders, a CD27(-) phenotype was associated with active TB in HIV(-) (p = 0.0003) and HIV(+) (p = 0.057) subjects, respectively. In addition, loss of CD27 expression preceded development of active TB in one HIV seroconverter. Interestingly, in contrast to HIV(-) subjects, MTB-specific CD4 T cell populations from HIV(+) TB-asymptomatic subjects were often dominated by CD27(-) cells. These data indicate that down-regulation of CD27 on MTB-specific CD4 T cell could be used as a biomarker of active TB, potentially preceding clinical TB disease. Furthermore, these data are consistent with the hypothesis that late, chronic HIV infection is frequently associated with increased mycobacterial activity in vivo. The analysis of T cell maturation and activation markers might thus be a useful tool to monitor TB disease progression.

  19. Monitoring CD27 expression to evaluate Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity in HIV-1 infected individuals in vivo.

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    Alexandra Schuetz

    Full Text Available The level of bacterial activity is only poorly defined during asymptomatic Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB infection. The objective was to study the capacity of a new biomarker, the expression of the T cell maturation marker CD27 on MTB-specific CD4 T cells, to identify active tuberculosis (TB disease in subjects from a MTB and HIV endemic region. The frequency and CD27 expression of circulating MTB-specific CD4 T cells was determined in 96 study participants after stimulation with purified protein derivative (PPD using intracellular cytokine staining for IFNgamma (IFNγ. Subjects were then stratified by their TB and HIV status. Within PPD responders, a CD27(- phenotype was associated with active TB in HIV(- (p = 0.0003 and HIV(+ (p = 0.057 subjects, respectively. In addition, loss of CD27 expression preceded development of active TB in one HIV seroconverter. Interestingly, in contrast to HIV(- subjects, MTB-specific CD4 T cell populations from HIV(+ TB-asymptomatic subjects were often dominated by CD27(- cells. These data indicate that down-regulation of CD27 on MTB-specific CD4 T cell could be used as a biomarker of active TB, potentially preceding clinical TB disease. Furthermore, these data are consistent with the hypothesis that late, chronic HIV infection is frequently associated with increased mycobacterial activity in vivo. The analysis of T cell maturation and activation markers might thus be a useful tool to monitor TB disease progression.

  20. Levels of procalcitonin, C-reactive protein and neopterin in patients with advanced HIV-1 infection

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    P Bipath

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To compare the value of procalcitonin, C-reactive protein (CRP and neopterin as indicators of immune deficiency, co-infection, efficacy of treatment, and disease progression, in patients with advanced HIV-1 infection. Design. Cross-sectional, investigating baseline blood measurements and clinical observations in 82 HIV-positive patients divided into an antiretroviral treatment (ART group and an ART-naïve group. Setting. Secondary general hospital in Pretoria. Results. Procalcitonin and CRP levels showed no significant differences between the ART and ART-naïve groups, and no correlations with CD4 counts or viral loads. CRP levels were significantly higher with TB co-infection (p<0.05. Neopterin levels were raised above normal in 92% of the ART-naïve group and in 75% of the ART group. The levels were significantly higher (p<0.05 in the ART- naïve group. Negative correlations were found between neopterin and CD4 counts for the total patient group (r=-0.482; p<0.001. Neopterin was significantly (p<0.05 higher in the HIV/TB co-infection group than in those without TB. Higher neopterin levels at baseline were associated with a decline in CD4 counts over the ensuing 6-month period, and patients with higher baseline neopterin levels developed more complications over the 6-month period. Conclusions. Compared with procalcitonin and CRP, neopterin appears to be associated with the degree of immunodeficiency and of co-infection with TB. Neopterin levels may be investigated further as a measure of disease progression or treatment response. S Afr J HIV Med 2012;13(2:78-82.

  1. Neurocognitive impairment in HIV-1 clade C- versus B-infected individuals in Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Sergio Monteiro; Ribeiro, Clea Elisa; de Pereira, Ana Paula; Badiee, Jayraan; Cherner, Mariana; Smith, Davey; Maich, Ingrid; Raboni, Sonia Mara; Rotta, Indianara; Barbosa, Francisco Jaime; Heaton, Robert K; Umlauf, Anya; Ellis, Ronald J

    2013-12-01

    HIV-1 clade C isolates show reduced Tat protein chemoattractant activity compared with clade B. This might influence neuropathogenesis by altering trafficking of monocytes into the CNS. A previous study suggested low rates of HIV-associated dementia in clade C-infected individuals. The present study evaluated neurocognitive impairment rates in clade B- and C-infected individuals from the same local population. HIV+ and HIV- participants were recruited from the same geographic region in Southern Brazil. We evaluated neuropsychological (NP) impairment using a screening instrument (the International HIV Dementia Scale (IHDS)), as well as a Brazilian Portuguese adaptation of a comprehensive battery that has demonstrated sensitivity to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) internationally. NP performance in controls was used to generate T scores and impairment ratings by the global deficit score (GDS) method. Clade assignments were ascertained by sequencing pol and env. Blood and cerebrospinal fluid were collected from all HIV+ participants. HIV+ and HIV- participants were comparable on demographic characteristics. HIV+ participants overall were more likely to be impaired than HIV- by the IHDS and the GDS. Clade B- and C-infected individuals were demographically similar and did not differ significantly in rates of impairment. The prevalence of pleocytosis, a marker of intrathecal cellular chemotaxis, also did not differ between clade B and C infections. Clade B and C HIV-infected individuals from the same geographic region, when ascertained using comparable methods, did not differ in their rates of neurocognitive impairment, and there was no evidence of differences in CNS chemotaxis.

  2. Neurocognitive Impairment in HIV-1 Clade C versus B Infected Individuals in Southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Sergio Monteiro; Ribeiro, Clea Elisa; de Pereira, Ana Paula; Badiee, Jayraan; Cherner, Mariana; Smith, Davey; Maich, Ingrid; Raboni, Sonia Mara; Rotta, Indianara; Barbosa, Francisco Jaime; Heaton, Robert K.; Umlauf, Anya; Ellis, Ronald J.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 clade C isolates show reduced Tat protein chemoattractant activity compared with clade B. This might influence neuropathogenesis by altering trafficking of monocytes into the CNS. A previous study suggested low rates of HIV-associated dementia in clade C infected individuals. The present study evaluated neurocognitive impairment rates in clade B- and C-infected individuals from the same local population. HIV+ and HIV- participants were recruited from the same geographic region in southern Brazil. We evaluated neuropsychological (NP) impairment using a screening instrument (the International HIV Dementia Scale; IHDS), as well as a Brazilian Portuguese adaptation of a comprehensive battery that has demonstrated sensitivity to HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) internationally. NP performance in controls was used to generate T-scores and impairment ratings by the global deficit score (GDS) method. Clade assignments were ascertained by sequencing pol and env. Blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were collected from all HIV+ participants. HIV+ and HIV- participants were comparable on demographic characteristics. HIV+ participants overall were more likely to be impaired than HIV- by the IHDS and the GDS. Clade B and C infected individuals were demographically similar and did not differ significantly in rates of impairment. The prevalence of pleocytosis, a marker of intrathecal cellular chemotaxis, also did not differ between clade B and C infections. Clade B and C HIV-infected individuals from the same geographic region, when ascertained using comparable methods, did not differ in their rates of neurocognitive impairment, and there was no evidence of differences in CNS chemotaxis. PMID:24277437

  3. Influences of HCV Infection on Incidence of Occult HBV Infection in Patients Infected with HIV-1%HIV-1感染者中HCV感染对于隐匿性HBV感染的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁红霞; 余祖江; 张倩; 李志勤; 潘延凤; 李娟; 江河清; 李建生; 何云

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the influences of HCV infection on occult HBV infection in patients infected with HIV-1.Methods The study enrolled 178 HBsAg-negative treatment-naive HIV-1 patients who transmitted by commercial blood donation in an HIV/AIDS CARE site in Henan province. Many parameters were detected, including liver function, HBV serologic markers (HBsAg,Anti-HBs, HBeAg, anti-HBe and anti-HBc), HCV antibody, HBV DNA and HCV RNA. Analyses were performed to compare the differences of HBV etiological markers in anti-HCV + group, anti-HCV- group and different HCV RNA groups. Results Among the 178 HBsAg-negative HIV-infected patients, 35 were HBV-M negative, 25 anti-HBs positive only, 25 anti-HBc positive only, 34 with both anti-HBs and anti-HBo positive. There were no significant differences in ages and gender between anti-HCV + group and anti-HCV- group (P >0.05). There were significant differences in ALT and AST(P < 0.05 ) but not total bilirubin between anti-HCV + group and antiHCV- group. There were no significant differences in HBV-M negative, isolated HBsAb positive only, isolated anti-HBc positive only,anti-HBs and anti-HBc double positive, HBV DNA positive between anti-HCV + group and anti-HCV- group. There were no significant differences in HBV DNA positive rate between different HCV RNA groups ( P > 0.05 ). Conclusion In the HIV-infected patients who transmitted by commercial blood donation, HCV infection and viral loads of HCV RNA had no correlation with incidence of occult HBV infection, but HCV co-infection could aggravate the liver damage.%目的 探讨在人免疫缺陷病毒-1(human immunodeficiency virus-1,HIV-1)感染者中丙型肝炎病毒(hepatitis C virus,HCV)感染对于隐匿性乙型肝炎病毒(hepatitis B virus,HBV)感染的影响.方法 研究对象为河南某艾滋病治疗示范区中178例乙型肝炎表面抗原(hepatitis B surface antigen,HBsAg)阴性的经有偿献血感染HIV-1未经抗病毒治疗的患者,检测项

  4. A Spirulina maxima-derived peptide inhibits HIV-1 infection in a human T cell line MT4

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    In-Seung Jang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is the causative agent of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS. Anti-HIV agents targeting various steps in HIV life cycle have been developed; however, so far, no effective drugs have been found. We show here that a peptide isolated from Spirulina maxima (SM-peptide inhibits HIV-1 infection in a human T cell line MT4. SM-peptide inhibited HIV-1IIIB-induced cell lysis with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 of 0.691 mM, while its 50 % cytotoxic concentration (CC50 was greater than 1.457 mM. Furthermore, the SM-peptide inhibited the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity and p24 antigen production. This suggests that SM-peptide is a novel candidate peptide, which may be developed as a therapeutic agent for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients.

  5. Limited penetration of lopinavir and ritonavir in the genital tract of men infected with HIV-1 in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Tania R C; Estrela, Rita C E; Suarez-Kurtz, Guilherme; Schechter, Mauro; Cerbino-Neto, José; Barroso, Paulo F

    2006-04-01

    The concentrations of lopinavir and ritonavir in seminal and blood plasma and the seminal human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viral load were quantified by HPLC and the Nuclisens assay, respectively, in a cross-sectional study of 16 HIV-1-infected Brazilian men under stable treatment with a lopinavir/ritonavir containing antiretroviral regimen. Semen and blood samples were collected on 2 occasions: at 6 to 60 minutes before ("trough"), and 5 to 6 hours after ("peak") ingestion of regular doses of lopinavir/ritonavir. Median seminal lopinavir levels were 120.6 ng/mL (range, semen were, respectively, 1.9% to 3% and 3.7% to 4.4% of those measured in blood plasma samples collected within 30 minutes. HIV-1 viral load was detectable in the semen of 2 and in the blood of 6 of 16 patients. These results may have implications for drug-resistant HIV-1 evolution and transmission.

  6. Perturbations of Monocyte Subsets and Their Association with T Helper Cell Differentiation in Acute and Chronic HIV-1-Infected Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng; Su, Bin; Zhang, Tong; Zhu, Xiaojing; Xia, Wei; Fu, Yan; Zhao, Guoxian; Xia, Huan; Dai, Lili; Sun, Lijun; Liu, Lifeng; Wu, Hao

    2017-01-01

    Monocytes have been recently subdivided into three subsets: classical (CD14++CD16−), intermediate (CD14++CD16+), and non-classical (CD14+CD16++) subsets, but phenotypic and functional abnormalities of the three monocyte subsets in HIV-1 infection have not been fully characterized, especially in acute HIV-1 infection (AHI). In the study, we explored the dynamic changes of monocyte subsets and their surface markers, and the association between monocyte subsets and the IFN-γ, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-17, and TNF-α producing CD4+ T cells in acute and chronic HIV-1-infected patients. We found that, in the acute HIV-1-infected individuals, the frequency of the intermediate CD14++CD16+ monocyte subsets, the CD163 density and HLA-DR density on intermediate CD14++CD16+ monocytes, and plasma soluble form of CD163 (sCD163) were significantly higher than that in healthy controls. Intermediate CD14++CD16+ monocyte subsets and their HLA-DR expression levels were inversely correlated with the CD4+ T cell counts, and the intermediate CD14++CD16+ monocytes were positively correlated with plasma sCD163. In contrast to the non-classical CD14+CD16++ and classical CD14++CD16− monocyte subsets, the frequency of the intermediate CD14++CD16+ monocytes was positively associated with the frequency of IFN-γ and IL-4 producing CD4+ T cells in HIV-1-infected patients. Taken together, our observations provide new insight into the roles of the monocyte subsets in HIV pathogenesis, particularly during AHI, and our findings may be helpful for the treatment of HIV-related immune activation.

  7. Interleukin-8-mediated heterologous receptor internalization provides resistance to HIV-1 infectivity. Role of signal strength and receptor desensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Ricardo M; Tokunaga, Kenzo; Marjoram, Robin; Sata, Tetsutaro; Snyderman, Ralph

    2003-05-02

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) entry into CD4(+) cells requires the chemokine receptors CCR5 or CXCR4 as co-fusion receptors. We have previously demonstrated that chemokine receptors are capable of cross-regulating the functions of each other and, thus, affecting cellular responsiveness at the site of infection. To investigate the effects of chemokine receptor cross-regulation in HIV-1 infection, monocytes and MAGIC5 and rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cell lines co-expressing the interleukin-8 (IL-8 or CXCL8) receptor CXCR1 and either CCR5 (ACCR5) or CXCR4 (ACXCR4) were generated. IL-8 activation of CXCR1, but not the IL-8 receptor CXCR2, cross-phosphorylated CCR5 and CXCR4 and cross-desensitized their responsiveness to RANTES (regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted) (CCL5) and stromal derived factor (SDF-1 or CXCL12), respectively. CXCR1 activation internalized CCR5 but not CXCR4 despite cross-phosphorylation of both. IL-8 pretreatment also inhibited CCR5- but not CXCR4-mediated virus entry into MAGIC5 cells. A tail-deleted mutant of CXCR1, DeltaCXCR1, produced greater signals upon activation (Ca(2+) mobilization and phosphoinositide hydrolysis) and cross-internalized CXCR4, inhibiting HIV-1 entry. The protein kinase C inhibitor staurosporine prevented phosphorylation and internalization of the receptors by CXCR1 activation. Taken together, these results indicate that chemokine receptor-mediated HIV-1 cell infection is blocked by receptor internalization but not desensitization alone. Thus, activation of chemokine receptors unrelated to CCR5 and CXCR4 may play a cross-regulatory role in the infection and propagation of HIV-1. Since DeltaCXCR1, but not CXCR1, cross-internalized and cross-inhibited HIV-1 infection to CXCR4, the data indicate the importance of the signal strength of a receptor and, as a consequence, protein kinase C activation in the suppression of HIV-1 infection by cross-receptor-mediated internalization.

  8. First-line antiretroviral treatment outcome in a patient presenting an HIV-1/2 multiclass drug resistant infection

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    E Castro

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: With the expansion of HIV-2 epidemic beyond African countries, co-infection with HIV-1 becomes a global challenge. We have recently identified an HIV-1/2 dual infection with both viruses bearing multiclass drug resistance in an untreated patient [1]. We now present the patient's combined antiretroviral treatment (cART outcome after 6 months follow-up. Patient and Methods: Clinical samples were obtained upon informed consent from a 23-year-old man living in Guinea-Bissau until March 2011 when he moved to Switzerland. As previously reported [1], HIV-1/2 co-infection was confirmed by HIV-1 PCR (21.000 copies/ml and total HIV-1/2 viremia (4.351 nU/ml by product-enhanced reverse transcriptase (PERT assay. The patient denied previous HIV testing or exposure to antiretroviral drugs. Dual infection consisted of HIV-1 CRF02_AG bearing resistance mutations M184V/V90I and HIV-2 clade A, harboring K65R/D67N mutations as amplified from proviral-DNA. Baseline CD4 + T-cell count was 408 cell/mm3. We initiated cART in accordance to drug resistance mutations (see below. Treatment compliance was assessed with an electronic pillbox device and drug-plasma concentrations. Clinical and laboratory follow up were done at weeks 2, 4, 9, 12 and 24. Results: cART was initiated with tenofovir/emtricitabine (TDF/FTC, boosted-darunavir (DRV/r and raltegravir(RAL. Treatment compliance was fluctuant during the first 3 months after which it remained stable with an average monthly intake of 92%. Antiretroviral drug-plasma concentrations were traced at percentile 25th. HIV-1 viremia became undetectable at week 12. Additionally, HIV-2 viremia was retrospectively assessed by real-time RT-PCR at two independent laboratories showing undetectable values across the study period including baseline. Thus, baseline viremia, as assessed by the PERT test for particle-associated reverse transcriptase activity was due to HIV-1 alone. CD4 + T-cell count was 559 cell/mm3 at

  9. Immune-correlates analysis of an HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial reveals an association of nonspecific interferon-γ secretion with increased HIV-1 infection risk: a cohort-based modeling study.

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    Yunda Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Elevated risk of HIV-1 infection among recipients of an adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5-vectored HIV-1 vaccine was previously reported in the Step HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial. We assessed pre-infection cellular immune responses measured at 4 weeks after the second vaccination to determine their roles in HIV-1 infection susceptibility among Step study male participants. METHODS: We examined ex vivo interferon-γ (IFN-γ secretion from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC using an ELISpot assay in 112 HIV-infected and 962 uninfected participants. In addition, we performed flow cytometric assays to examine T-cell activation, and ex vivo IFN-γ and interleukin-2 secretion from CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells. We accounted for the sub-sampling design in Cox proportional hazards models to estimate hazard ratios (HRs of HIV-1 infection per 1-log(e increase of the immune responses. FINDINGS: We found that HIV-specific immune responses were not associated with risk of HIV-1 infection. However, each 1-log(e increase of mock responses measured by the ELISpot assay (i.e., IFN-γ secretion in the absence of antigen-specific stimulation was associated with a 62% increase of HIV-1 infection risk among vaccine recipients (HR = 1.62, 95% CI: (1.28, 2.04, p<0.001. This association remains after accounting for CD4(+ or CD8(+ T-cell activation. We observed a moderate correlation between ELISpot mock responses and CD4(+ T-cells secreting IFN-γ (ρ = 0.33, p = 0.007. In addition, the effect of the Step vaccine on infection risk appeared to vary with ELISpot mock response levels, especially among participants who had pre-existing anti-Ad5 antibodies (interaction p = 0.04. CONCLUSIONS: The proportion of cells, likely CD4(+ T-cells, producing IFN-γ without stimulation by exogenous antigen appears to carry information beyond T-cell activation and baseline characteristics that predict risk of HIV-1 infection. These results motivate additional investigation to

  10. Longitudinal changes of peripheral blood DC subsets and regulatory T cells in Chinese chronic HIV-1-infected patients during antiretroviral therapy.

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    Mei Zhang

    Full Text Available It has been emphasized that chronic generalized immune dysfunction is the leading event in the pathogenesis of HIV infection, in which the contribution of dendritic cells (DCs and regulatory T cells (Tregs should not be underestimated. In current study, we assessed the longitudinal changes of peripheral blood DC subsets and Tregs in chronically asymptomatic treatment-naive HIV-1-infected patients during 60 weeks of antiretroviral therapy (ART, and compared with those in healthy controls and long term non-progressors (LTNPs. Blood samples were collected at week 0, 4, 12, 24, 48 and 60 of treatment to measure the counts of DC subsets and Tregs by flow cytometry and IFN-a plasma levels by ELISA. The counts of myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs increased during ART, reaching similar levels to healthy controls at week 60 post ART but still lower than those of LTNPs. In HIV-1-infected patients, the mDCs counts were directly correlated with CD4 counts during ART. Changes in mDCs at week 8 were positively correlated with the changes in CD4 counts at week 60 post ART. However, the counts and function of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs remained relatively stable during ART, and similar to those in healthy controls and LTNPs. The percentage of Tregs increased before ART and normalized after ART. Importantly, we found pDCs counts were associated with percentage of Tregs during ART, which may help in understanding of the role of these cells in HIV infection.

  11. Oral and vaginal epithelial cell lines bind and transfer cell-free infectious HIV-1 to permissive cells but are not productively infected.

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    Arinder Kohli

    Full Text Available The majority of HIV-1 infections worldwide are acquired via mucosal surfaces. However, unlike the vaginal mucosa, the issue of whether the oral mucosa can act as a portal of entry for HIV-1 infection remains controversial. To address potential differences with regard to the fate of HIV-1 after exposure to oral and vaginal epithelium, we utilized two epithelial cell lines representative of buccal (TR146 and pharyngeal (FaDu sites of the oral cavity and compared them with a cell line derived from vaginal epithelium (A431 in order to determine (i HIV-1 receptor gene and protein expression, (ii whether HIV-1 genome integration into epithelial cells occurs, (iii whether productive viral infection ensues, and (iv whether infectious virus can be transferred to permissive cells. Using flow cytometry to measure captured virus by HIV-1 gp120 protein detection and western blot to detect HIV-1 p24 gag protein, we demonstrate that buccal, pharyngeal and vaginal epithelial cells capture CXCR4- and CCR5-utilising virus, probably via non-canonical receptors. Both oral and vaginal epithelial cells are able to transfer infectious virus to permissive cells either directly through cell-cell attachment or via transcytosis of HIV-1 across epithelial cells. However, HIV-1 integration, as measured by real-time PCR and presence of early gene mRNA transcripts and de novo protein production were not detected in either epithelial cell type. Importantly, both oral and vaginal epithelial cells were able to support integration and productive infection if HIV-1 entered via the endocytic pathway driven by VSV-G. Our data demonstrate that under normal conditions productive HIV-1 infection of epithelial cells leading to progeny virion production is unlikely, but that epithelial cells can act as mediators of systemic viral dissemination through attachment and transfer of HIV-1 to permissive cells.

  12. Analysis of memory B cell responses and isolation of novel monoclonal antibodies with neutralizing breadth from HIV-1-infected individuals.

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    Davide Corti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The isolation of human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs that neutralize a broad spectrum of primary HIV-1 isolates and the characterization of the human neutralizing antibody B cell response to HIV-1 infection are important goals that are central to the design of an effective antibody-based vaccine. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We immortalized IgG(+ memory B cells from individuals infected with diverse clades of HIV-1 and selected on the basis of plasma neutralization profiles that were cross-clade and relatively potent. Culture supernatants were screened using various recombinant forms of the envelope glycoproteins (Env in multiple parallel assays. We isolated 58 mAbs that were mapped to different Env surfaces, most of which showed neutralizing activity. One mAb in particular (HJ16 specific for a novel epitope proximal to the CD4 binding site on gp120 selectively neutralized a multi-clade panel of Tier-2 HIV-1 pseudoviruses, and demonstrated reactivity that was comparable in breadth, but distinct in neutralization specificity, to that of the other CD4 binding site-specific neutralizing mAb b12. A second mAb (HGN194 bound a conserved epitope in the V3 crown and neutralized all Tier-1 and a proportion of Tier-2 pseudoviruses tested, irrespective of clade. A third mAb (HK20 with broad neutralizing activity, particularly as a Fab fragment, recognized a highly conserved epitope in the HR-1 region of gp41, but showed striking assay-dependent selectivity in its activity. CONCLUSIONS: This study reveals that by using appropriate screening methods, a large proportion of memory B cells can be isolated that produce mAbs with HIV-1 neutralizing activity. Three of these mAbs show unusual breadth of neutralization and therefore add to the current panel of HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies with potential for passive protection and template-based vaccine design.

  13. Molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 among the HIV infected people of Manipur, Northeastern India: Emergence of unique recombinant forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Adhikarimayum Lakhikumar; Singh, Thiyam Ramsing; Devi, Khuraijam Ranjana; Singh, Lisam Shanjukumar

    2016-11-21

    According to the Joint National Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), the northeastern region of India has the highest HIV prevalence in the country. This study was conducted to determine the current HIV-1 molecular epidemiology of Manipur, a state in northeast India. Blood samples from HIV-1 seropositive subjects were collected between June 2011 and February 2014. The partial regions of HIV-1 genes; pol and tat-vpu-env were independently amplified, sequenced, analyzed, and genotyped. Based on all sequences generated from 110 samples using pol and/or tat-vpu-env gene, the overall HIV-1 genotypes distribution of Manipur was as follows: 65.45% (72/110) subtype C, 32.73% (36/110) unique recombinant forms (URFs), and 1.82% (2/110) subtype B. The distribution of HIV-1 genotypes among the risk groups was: heterosexual: 58.33% (35/60) subtype C, 38.33% (23/60) URFs, and 3.34% (2/60) subtype B; intravenous drug users (IDUs): 85.36% (35/41) subtype C, 9.76% (4/41) URFs, and 4.88% (2/41) subtype B; mother to child (MTC): 50% (3/6) URFs and 50% (3/6) subtype C and blood transfusion: 100% (3/3) subtype C. The findings for the first time revealed the emergence of URFs of HIV-1 in Manipur which is predominant among the sexual and MTC risk groups as compared to IDUs. Taking together, this study illustrated that Manipur is the "recombinant hotspot of HIV" of India. The results will provide the clinical importance for continuous monitoring of HIV-infections in order to design appropriate prevention measures to limit the spread of new HIV infections.

  14. Lopinavir/ritonavir in the treatment of HIV-1 infection: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Chandwani

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Ashish Chandwani1, Jonathan Shuter21Division of Infectious Diseases, Montefiore Medical Center and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA; 2AIDS Center and Division of Infectious Diseases, Montefiore Medical Center and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USAAbstract: Lopinavir/ritonavir is the first and only coformulated HIV-1 protease inhibitor (PI. Large clinical trials have demonstrated lopinavir/ritonavir’s clinical efficacy in both antiretroviral-naïve and -experienced patients. The immunologic and virologic benefits of treatment with this agent have been proven in HIV-infected adults, adolescents, and children. Smaller studies support the use of lopinavir/ritonavir monotherapy as a therapeutic option in certain patients. The drug is characterized by a high genetic barrier to resistance, and appears to be more forgiving of non-adherence than earlier, unboosted PIs. The most frequent side effects observed are diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting. These gastrointestinal adverse effects are generally mild to moderate. Metabolic derangements, including hyperlipidemia and glucose intolerance, have also been observed in lopinavir/ritonavir recipients. As the menu of available antiretroviral agents continues to expand, lopinavir/ritonavir remains a proven and effective drug for the treatment of HIV infection.Keywords: lopinavir/ritonavir, protease inhibitor, HIV, antiretroviral, Kaletra®

  15. Type I interferons and interferon regulatory factors regulate TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL in HIV-1-infected macrophages.

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    Yunlong Huang

    Full Text Available TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL is a member of the TNF family that participates in HIV-1 pathogenesis through the depletion of CD4+ T cells. TRAIL is expressed on the cell membrane of peripheral immune cells and can be cleaved into a soluble, secreted form. The regulation of TRAIL in macrophages during HIV-1 infection is not completely understood. In this study, we investigated the mechanism(s of TRAIL expression in HIV-1-infected macrophages, an important cell type in HIV-1 pathogenesis. A human monocyte-derived macrophage (MDM culture system was infected with macrophage-tropic HIV-1(ADA, HIV-1(JR-FL, or HIV-1(BAL strains. TRAIL, predominantly the membrane-bound form, increased following HIV-1 infection. We found that HIV-1 infection also induced interferon regulatory factor (IRF-1, IRF-7 gene expression and signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1 activation. Small interfering RNA knockdown of IRF-1 or IRF-7, but not IRF-3, reduced STAT1 activation and TRAIL expression. Furthermore, the upregulation of IRF-1, IRF-7, TRAIL, and the activation of STAT1 by HIV-1 infection was reduced by the treatment of type I interferon (IFN-neutralizing antibodies. In addition, inhibition of STAT1 by fludarabine abolished IRF-1, IRF-7, and TRAIL upregulation. We conclude that IRF-1, IRF-7, type I IFNs, and STAT1 form a signaling feedback loop that is critical in regulating TRAIL expression in HIV-1-infected macrophages.

  16. Preferential S phase entry and apoptosis of CD4(+) T lymphocytes of HIV-1-infected patients after in vitro cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patki, A H; Zielske, S P; Sieg, S F; Lederman, M M

    2000-12-01

    We have studied the relationship between spontaneous apoptosis and cell cycle perturbations in circulating peripheral blood lymphocytes of HIV-1-infected patients and healthy controls. PBMC obtained from HIV-1-infected patients and healthy controls were incubated in culture medium for 48 h. Cells were separated into CD4(+) and CD8(+) populations using immunomagnetic beads. Apoptosis and cell cycle phases were measured by propidium iodide staining and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation followed by flow cytometric analyses. In experiments using cells obtained from HIV-1-infected patients, spontaneous apoptosis was more frequent in CD4(+) T lymphocytes than in CD8(+) T lymphocytes (17.6% vs 9.5%, P lymphocytes was comparable (4.5% vs 5.1%). Lymphocytes obtained from patients were more frequently in S phase than healthy controls' cells (2.2 +/- 0.9% vs 0.5 +/- 0.2%, P 0.4). Kinetic analyses using BrdU and PI staining revealed that S phase cells were more likely to become apoptotic than resting (G(0)-G(1)) cells (28.4% +/- 10.3% vs 11.3% +/- 9.9% in patients, P Lymphocytes obtained from HIV-1-infected persons are activated in vivo to enter S phase and to undergo spontaneous apoptosis after brief in vitro cultivation. The present studies indicate that most apoptotic cells in this system are CD4(+) and kinetic analyses reveal that S phase cells are more likely to undergo spontaneous apoptosis than G(0)-G(1) cells. Accelerated cell death in HIV-1 disease may contribute to the failure of lymphocyte responsiveness to appropriate T cell receptor stimulation.

  17. CCL3L1 copy number variation and susceptibility to HIV-1 infection: a meta-analysis.

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    SiJie Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although several studies have investigated whether CCL3L1 copy number variation (CNV influences the risk of HIV-1 infection, there are still no clear conclusions. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis using two models to generate a more robust estimate of the association between CCL3L1 CNV and susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. METHODS: We divided the cases and controls into two parts as individuals with CCL3L1 gene copy number (GCN above the population specific median copy number (PMN and individuals with CCL3L1 GCN below PMN, respectively. Odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs were given for the main analysis. We also conducted stratified analyses by ethnicity, age group and sample size. Relevant literatures were searched through PubMed and ISI Web of Knowledge up to March 2010. RESULTS: In total, 9 studies with 2434 cases and 4029 controls were included. ORs for the main analysis were 1.35 (95% CI, 1.02-1.78, model: GCN ≤ PMN Vs. GCN > PMN and 1.70 (95% CI, 1.30-2.23, model: GCN < PMN Vs. GCN ≥ PMN, respectively. Either in stratified analysis, statistically significant results can be detected in some subgroups. CONCLUSIONS: Our analyses indicate that CCL3L1 CNV is associated with susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. A lower copy number is associated with an increased risk of HIV-1 infection, while a higher copy number is associated with reduced risk for acquiring HIV-1.

  18. A profile of cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies against various subtypes of HIV-1 strains in people with HIV-1 infection in Chongqing city%重庆市 HIV-1慢性感染者亚型交叉反应中和抗体的分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林怡; 周全华; 张敏; 王韬; 沈方伟; 薛以乐; 王盈; 钟平

    2015-01-01

    Objective To measure the levels of cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies responding to various subtypes of HIV-1 strains in people with HIV-1 infection in Chongqing and to analyze their character-istics.Methods Two hundred and thirty-six plasma samples were collected from patients with chronic HIV-1 infection in Chongqing city.The single-round-infection assay in TZM-bl cells were performed to screen the plasma samples with cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies against various subtypes of HIV-1 strains by using HIV-1 pseudovirus strains and to measure the 50%inhibitory dose ( ID50 ) .Results Eight-een out of 236 (7.63%) plasma samples were able to neutralize various B subtypes and/or C subtypes of HIV-1 pseudovirus strains, among which 15 plasma samples showed the great ability to neutralize pseudovir-us strains of different subtypes.Conclusion The cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies against various sub-types of HIV-1 strains existed in plasma samples collected from people with chronic HIV-1 infection in Chongqing city.%目的:了解重庆市HIV-1感染者体内亚型交叉中和抗体的水平,并分析其特点,为后续表位研究和HIV-1疫苗研制提供科学数据。方法选取重庆市236份HIV-1慢性感染者为研究对象,采用国际通用的假病毒单复制TZM-bl细胞荧光检测系统,使用多个不同亚型的HIV-1假病毒株交叉筛选,对这些血浆样本进行了中和谱筛查和抗体中和能力(ID50)的检测。结果236份血浆样本中,有18份能交叉中和B和C亚型假病毒,占总样本量的7.63%;其中15份样本对多亚型假病毒表现出不同程度的型交叉中和作用。结论重庆市HIV-1慢性感染者血浆样本中存在HIV-1亚型交叉的广谱中和抗体。

  19. Epitope Mapping of Ibalizumab, a Humanized Anti-CD4 Monoclonal Antibody with Anti-HIV-1 Activity in Infected Patients▿

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Ruijiang; Franco, David; Kao, Chia-Ying; Yu, Faye; Huang, Yaoxing; Ho, David D.

    2010-01-01

    Ibalizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds human CD4, the primary receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). With its unique specificity for domain 2 of CD4, this antibody potently and broadly blocks HIV-1 infection in vitro by inhibiting a postbinding step required for viral entry but without interfering with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-mediated immune function. In clinical trials, ibalizumab has demonstrated anti-HIV-1 activity in patients...

  20. Productive infection of human neural progenitor cells by R5 tropic HIV-1: opiate co-exposure heightens infectivity and functional vulnerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balinang, Joyce M.; Masvekar, Ruturaj R.; Hauser, Kurt F.; Knapp, Pamela E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective HIV type-1 (HIV-1) causes a spectrum of central nervous system (CNS) complications; many are worsened by opiate co-exposure. Human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) give rise to all CNS neurons and macroglia. We tested the hypothesis that hNPC maturation and fate are altered by HIV and opiates, contributing to HIV-1-related neuropathology. Reports of hNPC infection remain controversial. We rigorously examined this question, testing whether hNPC propagated infection and whether HIV affected hNPCs absent their infection. Design and methods Primary hNPCs were characterized over multiple passages. Following R5 HIV-1BaL exposure, p24, Nef, and tat assays monitored infection; a serial dilution approach tested infection transfer to naive hNPCs. Bromodeoxyuridine uptake, population doubling time, and immunostaining assessed proliferation and differentiation. Morphine co-exposure assessed opiate interactions. Supernatant from HIV-1BaL-infected PBMCs (HIVsup), HIV-1BaL, and ultraviolet light-inactivated HIVsup were compared to test effects of inflammatory milieu versus virus or infection per se. Results The hNPCs (CD4_/CD8_/Iba_/CXC3CL1_/CD11b_) were infectable and could transfer infection to naive hNPCs. Infection was partly blocked by maraviroc, implicating CCR5. HIVsup reduced hNPC proliferation and caused premature differentiation into neurons/astroglia. Effects on proliferation were due to soluble factors/viral proteins, not infection per se. Morphine co-exposure exacerbated certain functional consequences of HIVsup, and sustained the infection of hNPCs. Conclusion hNPCs can be infected and propagate virus in vitro. hNPCs or their progeny may represent an underappreciated viral reservoir. Factors from infected cells alter hNPC proliferation and neural cell maturation which likely compromises CNS structure and function. Morphine–HIV interactions may worsen dysfunction and sustain infection. PMID:28099189

  1. HIV-1 infection ex vivo accelerates measles virus infection by upregulating signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) in CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuki, Yu-ya; Terahara, Kazutaka; Shibusawa, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Takuya; Tsuchiya, Takatsugu; Mizukoshi, Fuminori; Ishige, Masayuki; Okada, Seiji; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Morikawa, Yuko; Nakayama, Tetsuo; Takeda, Makoto; Yanagi, Yusuke; Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko

    2012-07-01

    Measles virus (MV) infection in children harboring human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is often fatal, even in the presence of neutralizing antibodies; however, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine the interaction between HIV-1 and wild-type MV (MVwt) or an MV vaccine strain (MVvac) during dual infection. The results showed that the frequencies of MVwt- and MVvac-infected CD4(+) T cells within the resting peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were increased 3- to 4-fold after HIV-1 infection, and this was associated with a marked upregulation of signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) expression on CD4(+) T cells but not on CD8(+) T cells. SLAM upregulation was induced by infection with a replication-competent HIV-1 isolate comprising both the X4 and R5 types and to a lesser extent by a pseudotyped HIV-1 infection. Notably, SLAM upregulation was observed in HIV-infected as well as -uninfected CD4(+) T cells and was abrogated by the removal of HLA-DR(+) cells from the PBMC culture. Furthermore, SLAM upregulation did not occur in uninfected PBMCs cultured together with HIV-infected PBMCs in compartments separated by a permeable membrane, indicating that no soluble factors were involved. Rather, CD4(+) T cell activation mediated through direct contact with dendritic cells via leukocyte function-associated molecule 1 (LFA-1)/intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and LFA-3/CD2 was critical. Thus, HIV-1 infection induces a high level of SLAM expression on CD4(+) T cells, which may enhance their susceptibility to MV and exacerbate measles in coinfected individuals.

  2. Modeling of HIV-1 infection: insights to the role of monocytes/macrophages, latently infected T4 cells, and HAART regimes.

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    Qiang Li

    Full Text Available A novel dynamic model covering five types of cells and three connected compartments, peripheral blood (PB, lymph nodes (LNs, and the central nervous system (CNS, is here proposed. It is based on assessment of the biological principles underlying the interactions between the human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1 and the human immune system. The simulated results of this model matched the three well-documented phases of HIV-1 infection very closely and successfully described the three stages of LN destruction that occur during HIV-1 infection. The model also showed that LNs are the major location of viral replication, creating a pool of latently infected T4 cells during the latency period. A detailed discussion of the role of monocytes/macrophages is made, and the results indicated that infected monocytes/macrophages could determine the progression of HIV-1 infection. The effects of typical highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART drugs on HIV-1 infection were analyzed and the results showed that efficiency of each drug but not the time of the treatment start contributed to the change of the turnover of the disease greatly. An incremental count of latently infected T4 cells was made under therapeutic simulation, and patients were found to fail to respond to HAART therapy in the presence of certain stimuli, such as opportunistic infections. In general, the dynamics of the model qualitatively matched clinical observations very closely, indicating that the model may have benefits in evaluating the efficacy of different drug therapy regimens and in the discovery of new monitoring markers and therapeutic schemes for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  3. HIV-1 vaccine-induced T-cell responses cluster in epitope hotspots that differ from those induced in natural infection with HIV-1.

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    Tomer Hertz

    Full Text Available Several recent large clinical trials evaluated HIV vaccine candidates that were based on recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd-5 vectors expressing HIV-derived antigens. These vaccines primarily elicited T-cell responses, which are known to be critical for controlling HIV infection. In the current study, we present a meta-analysis of epitope mapping data from 177 participants in three clinical trials that tested two different HIV vaccines: MRKAd-5 HIV and VRC-HIVAD014-00VP. We characterized the population-level epitope responses in these trials by generating population-based epitope maps, and also designed such maps using a large cohort of 372 naturally infected individuals. We used these maps to address several questions: (1 Are vaccine-induced responses randomly distributed across vaccine inserts, or do they cluster into immunodominant epitope hotspots? (2 Are the immunodominance patterns observed for these two vaccines in three vaccine trials different from one another? (3 Do vaccine-induced hotspots overlap with epitope hotspots induced by chronic natural infection with HIV-1? (4 Do immunodominant hotspots target evolutionarily conserved regions of the HIV genome? (5 Can epitope prediction methods be used to identify these hotspots? We found that vaccine responses clustered into epitope hotspots in all three vaccine trials and some of these hotspots were not observed in chronic natural infection. We also found significant differences between the immunodominance patterns generated in each trial, even comparing two trials that tested the same vaccine in different populations. Some of the vaccine-induced immunodominant hotspots were located in highly variable regions of the HIV genome, and this was more evident for the MRKAd-5 HIV vaccine. Finally, we found that epitope prediction methods can partially predict the location of vaccine-induced epitope hotspots. Our findings have implications for vaccine design and suggest a framework by which

  4. Impacts of Humanized Mouse Models on the Investigation of HIV-1 Infection: Illuminating the Roles of Viral Accessory Proteins in Vivo

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    Eri Yamada

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 encodes four accessory genes: vif, vpu, vpr, and nef. Recent investigations using in vitro cell culture systems have shed light on the roles of these HIV-1 accessory proteins, Vif, Vpr, Vpu, and Nef, in counteracting, modulating, and evading various cellular factors that are responsible for anti-HIV-1 intrinsic immunity. However, since humans are the exclusive target for HIV-1 infection, conventional animal models are incapable of mimicking the dynamics of HIV-1 infection in vivo. Moreover, the effects of HIV-1 accessory proteins on viral infection in vivo remain unclear. To elucidate the roles of HIV-1 accessory proteins in the dynamics of viral infection in vivo, humanized mouse models, in which the mice are xenotransplanted with human hematopoietic stem cells, has been utilized. This review describes the current knowledge of the roles of HIV-1 accessory proteins in viral infection, replication, and pathogenicity in vivo, which are revealed by the studies using humanized mouse models.

  5. Cytokine profile and clinical metabolic alterations in HIV-1 infected individuals with and without lipodistrophy

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    L. C. R. Pontes-Cardoso

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The extensive use of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART has transformed HIV infection into a chronic condition. Thus, metabolic alterations including lipodystrophy and dyslipidemia have been associated with the use of such medications. The objective of the present study was to analyze clinical metabolic alterations and the profile of TNF-alpha, IFN-Y, IL-2, IL-10, and TNF-alpha type II soluble receptor in serum of HIV-1 individuals with and without lipodystrophy. Eighty-four adults were evaluated, 42 males and 42 females, mean age 37 years, and HAART time of at least 15 months. Two groups were formed, G1: 42 individuals with lipodystrophy, and G2: 42 without lipodistropy. From the HAART used, stavudine was more associated with the lipodystrophy group and zidovudine with the non-lipodystrophy group. CD4 and CD8 values, viral load, glucose, albumin, and lipids were not different between groups, except for triglycerides, which were high in the lipodystrophy group, and HDL, whose concentration was reduced in G1. TNF-alpha, TNF-RII, and IL-10 profiles were high and had positive correlation; IL-2 and IFN-gamma had reduced levels in the lipodystrophy group. High TNF-alpha and its receptor levels seem to be associated with lipodystrophy development in individuals under HAART therapy.

  6. Potential for new antiretrovirals to address unmet needs in the management of HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyle, Graeme; Gatell, Jose; Perno, Carlo-Federico; Ratanasuwan, Winai; Schechter, Mauro; Tsoukas, Christos

    2008-06-01

    Despite the myriad advances in antiretroviral therapy since the original highly active antiretroviral therapy regimens were developed, there remain numerous important and pressing unmet needs that, if addressed, would substantially improve the quality of life and longevity of HIV-infected patients. The most achievable goals of antiretroviral (ARV) therapy in the near future are likely to be continued reduction in HIV-related morbidity and mortality; improved quality of life; and restoration and preservation of immune function: all of which are most effectively achieved through sustained suppression of HIV-1 RNA. The ability to achieve long-term viral load reduction will require new ARVs with few, manageable toxicities, and medications that are convenient to adhere to, with few drug interactions. This is particularly true for the large number of highly treatment-experienced patients in whom HIV has developed resistance to one or more ARVs. Development of therapies that allow convenient dosing schedules, that do not necessitate strict adherence to meal-related timing restrictions, and that remain active in the face of resistance mutations is paramount, and remains a significant unmet need. Of the large number of ARVs currently in development, this article focuses on three agents recently approved that have shown particular promise in addressing some of these unmet needs: the novel non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor etravirine; the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc; and the integrase inhibitor raltegravir.

  7. Comparison of antibody repertoires produced by HIV-1 infection, other chronic and acute infections, and systemic autoimmune disease.

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    Felix Breden

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antibodies (Abs produced during HIV-1 infection rarely neutralize a broad range of viral isolates; only eight broadly-neutralizing (bNt monoclonal (MAbs have been isolated. Yet, to be effective, an HIV-1 vaccine may have to elicit the essential features of these MAbs. The V genes of all of these bNt MAbs are highly somatically mutated, and the V(H genes of five of them encode a long (≥ 20 aa third complementarity-determining region (CDR-H3. This led us to question whether long CDR-H3s and high levels of somatic mutation (SM are a preferred feature of anti-HIV bNt MAbs, or if other adaptive immune responses elicit them in general. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We assembled a V(H-gene sequence database from over 700 human MAbs of known antigen specificity isolated from chronic (viral infections (ChI, acute (bacterial and viral infections (AcI, and systemic autoimmune diseases (SAD, and compared their CDR-H3 length, number of SMs and germline V(H-gene usage. We found that anti-HIV Abs, regardless of their neutralization breadth, tended to have long CDR-H3s and high numbers of SMs. However, these features were also common among Abs associated with other chronic viral infections. In contrast, Abs from acute viral infections (but not bacterial infections tended to have relatively short CDR-H3s and a low number of SMs, whereas SAD Abs were generally intermediate in CDR-H3 length and number of SMs. Analysis of V(H gene usage showed that ChI Abs also tended to favor distal germline V(H-genes (particularly V(H1-69, especially in Abs bearing long CDR-H3s. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The striking difference between the Abs produced during chronic vs. acute viral infection suggests that Abs bearing long CDR-H3s, high levels of SM and V(H1-69 gene usage may be preferentially selected during persistent infection.

  8. Unique and differential protein signatures within the mononuclear cells of HIV-1 and HCV mono-infected and co-infected patients

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    Boukli Nawal M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pathogenesis of liver damage in patients with HIV and HCV co-infection is complex and multifactorial. Although global awareness regarding HIV-1/HCV co-infection is increasing little is known about the pathophysiology that mediates the rapid progression to hepatic disease in the co-infected individuals. Results In this study, we investigated the proteome profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV-1 mono-, HCV mono-, and HIV-1/HCV co-infected patients. The results of high-resolution 2D gel electrophoresis and PD quest software quantitative analysis revealed that several proteins were differentially expressed in HIV-1, HCV, and HIV-1/HCV co-infection. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and Mascot database matching (LC-MS/MS analysis successfully identified 29 unique and differentially expressed proteins. These included cytoskeletal proteins (tropomyosin, gelsolin, DYPLSL3, DYPLSL4 and profilin-1, chaperones and co-chaperones (HSP90-beta and stress-induced phosphoprotein, metabolic and pre-apoptotic proteins (guanosine triphosphate [GTP]-binding nuclear protein Ran, the detoxifying enzyme glutathione S-transferase (GST and Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor (Rho-GDI, proteins involved in cell prosurvival mechanism, and those involved in matrix synthesis (collagen binding protein 2 [CBP2]. The six most significant and relevant proteins were further validated in a group of mono- and co-infected patients (n = 20 at the transcriptional levels. Conclusions The specific pro- and anti- apoptotic protein signatures revealed in this study could facilitate the understanding of apoptotic and protective immune-mediated mechanisms underlying HIV-1 and HCV co-infection and their implications on liver disease progression in co-infected patients.

  9. Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy in Early Asymptomatic HIV Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens D; Babiker, Abdel G; Gordin, Fred

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data from randomized trials are lacking on the benefits and risks of initiating antiretroviral therapy in patients with asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection who have a CD4+ count of more than 350 cells per cubic millimeter. METHODS: We randomly assigned HIV...... entry, the median HIV viral load was 12,759 copies per milliliter, and the median CD4+ count was 651 cells per cubic millimeter. On May 15, 2015, on the basis of an interim analysis, the data and safety monitoring board determined that the study question had been answered and recommended that patients...... per cubic millimeter provided net benefits over starting such therapy in patients after the CD4+ count had declined to 350 cells per cubic millimeter. (Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and others; START ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00867048.)....

  10. Breast milk from Tanzanian women has divergent effects on cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1 infection in vitro.

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    Magdalena A Lyimo

    Full Text Available Transmission of HIV-1 during breastfeeding is a significant source of new pediatric infections in sub-Saharan Africa. Breast milk from HIV-positive mothers contains both cell-free and cell-associated virus; however, the impact of breast milk on HIV-1 infectivity remains poorly understood. In the present study, breast milk was collected from HIV-positive and HIV-negative Tanzanian women attending antenatal clinics in Dar es Salaam. Milk was analyzed for activity in vitro against both cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1. Potent inhibition of cell-free R5 and X4 HIV-1 occurred in the presence of milk from all donors regardless of HIV-1 serostatus. Inhibition of cell-free HIV-1 infection positively correlated with milk levels of sialyl-Lewis(X from HIV-positive donors. In contrast, milk from 8 of 16 subjects enhanced infection with cell-associated HIV-1 regardless of donor serostatus. Milk from two of these subjects contained high levels of multiple pro-inflammatory cytokines including TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, MCP-1 and IP-10, and enhanced cell-associated HIV-1 infection at dilutions as high as 1∶500. These findings indicate that breast milk contains innate factors with divergent activity against cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1 in vitro. Enhancement of cell-associated HIV-1 infection by breast milk may be associated with inflammatory conditions in the mother and may contribute to infant infection during breastfeeding.

  11. HIV-1 antiretroviral drug resistance in recently infected patients in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire: A 4-year survey, 2002-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toni, Thomas d'Aquin; Masquelier, Bernard; Minga, Albert; Anglaret, Xavier; Danel, Christine; Coulibaly, Ali; Chenal, Henri; Dabis, François; Salamon, Roger; Fleury, Hervé J

    2007-09-01

    We performed HIV-1 drug resistance genotypic analysis of viral isolates from 100 antiretroviral (ARV)-naive, recently HIV-1-infected (between 2002 and 2006) individuals from Abidjan (Côte d'Ivoire). The overall prevalence of HIV-1 variants with resistance mutations to reverse transcriptase, protease, or fusion inhibitors was 6%. The majority of isolates were CRF02_AG. Compared with a previous study carried out by our group in 2001-2002 in a similar population in Abidjan, our findings confirm the circulation and transmission of HIV-1 carrying key ARV drug resistance mutation.

  12. Contribution of intrinsic reactivity of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins to CD4-independent infection and global inhibitor sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hillel Haim

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 enters cells following sequential activation of the high-potential-energy viral envelope glycoprotein trimer by target cell CD4 and coreceptor. HIV-1 variants differ in their requirements for CD4; viruses that can infect coreceptor-expressing cells that lack CD4 have been generated in the laboratory. These CD4-independent HIV-1 variants are sensitive to neutralization by multiple antibodies that recognize different envelope glycoprotein epitopes. The mechanisms underlying CD4 independence, global sensitivity to neutralization and the association between them are still unclear. By studying HIV-1 variants that differ in requirements for CD4, we investigated the contribution of CD4 binding to virus entry. CD4 engagement exposes the coreceptor-binding site and increases the "intrinsic reactivity" of the envelope glycoproteins; intrinsic reactivity describes the propensity of the envelope glycoproteins to negotiate transitions to lower-energy states upon stimulation. Coreceptor-binding site exposure and increased intrinsic reactivity promote formation/exposure of the HR1 coiled coil on the gp41 transmembrane glycoprotein and allow virus entry upon coreceptor binding. Intrinsic reactivity also dictates the global sensitivity of HIV-1 to perturbations such as exposure to cold and the binding of antibodies and small molecules. Accordingly, CD4 independence of HIV-1 was accompanied by increased susceptibility to inactivation by these factors. We investigated the role of intrinsic reactivity in determining the sensitivity of primary HIV-1 isolates to inhibition. Relative to the more common neutralization-resistant ("Tier 2-like" viruses, globally sensitive ("Tier 1" viruses exhibited increased intrinsic reactivity, i.e., were inactivated more efficiently by cold exposure or by a given level of antibody binding to the envelope glycoprotein trimer. Virus sensitivity to neutralization was dictated both by the efficiency of

  13. 基于趋化因子受体CCR5阻断HIV-1感染的方法%Methods for blocking HIV-1 infection based on chemokine receptor 5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    季海艳; 夏海滨

    2013-01-01

    获得性免疫缺陷综合征(acquired immunodeficiency syndrome,AIDS)主要是由HIV-1感染人体免疫细胞所造成,而介导HIV-1病毒进入机体细胞的主要辅助受体为趋化因子受体CCR5 [chemokine (C-Cmotif) receptor 5],目前以CCR5为研究靶点阻断HIV-l感染的方法在医学和生物学领域备受关注,主要包括CCR5拮抗剂、RNA干扰(RNA interference,RNAi)、锌指核酸酶(zinc-finger nuclease,ZFN)和转录激活因子样效应物核酸酶(transcription activator-like effectors nuclease,TALEN)技术.趋化因子受体CCR5阻断HIV-1感染方法的相关研究进展有必要进行综述.%Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome is mainly caused by HIV-1 infection of the human immune cell. The entry of HIV-1 into target cells is mediated by a major coreceptor, CCR5. Currently, a lot of interest has been focused on the methods for blocking HIV-1 infection using CCR5 as a target in medical and biological research. These methods include CCR5 antagonists, small interfering RNA, and ZFNs (zinc finger nucleases) and TALENs (transcription activator-like effectors nucleases) techniques. It is necessary to review the progress on the methods for blocking HIV-1 infection based on chemokine receptor 5.

  14. HUMAN-IMMUNODEFICIENCY-VIRUS (HIV) TYPE-1 INFECTION STATUS AND IN-VITRO SUSCEPTIBILITY TO HIV-INFECTION AMONG HIGH-RISK HIV-1 SERONEGATIVE HEMOPHILIACS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LEDERMAN, MM; JACKSON, JB; KRONER, BL; WHITE, GC; EYSTER, ME; ALEDORT, LM; HILGARTNER, MW; KESSLER, CM; COHEN, AR; KIGER, KP; GOEDERT, JJ

    1995-01-01

    Blood samples were obtained from 16 hemophiliacs who had a 50%-94% defined risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV type 1 infection on the basis of treatment history and from 14 controls not at risk for HIV infection. HIV-1 was not detected in any of 12 patient samples by cocultivation nor in 14 p

  15. HIV-1-infected monocyte-derived dendritic cells do not undergo maturation but can elicit IL-10 production and T cell regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granelli-Piperno, Angela; Golebiowska, Angelika; Trumpfheller, Christine; Siegal, Frederick P.; Steinman, Ralph M.

    2004-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) undergo maturation during virus infection and thereby become potent stimulators of cell-mediated immunity. HIV-1 replicates in immature DCs, but we now find that infection is not accompanied by many components of maturation in either infected cells or uninfected bystanders. The infected cultures do not develop potent stimulating activity for the mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR), and the DCs producing HIV-1 gag p24 do not express CD83 and DC-lysosome-associated membrane protein maturation markers. If different maturation stimuli are applied to DCs infected with HIV-1, the infected cells selectively fail to mature. When DCs from HIV-1-infected patients are infected and cultured with autologous T cells, IL-10 was produced in 6 of 10 patients. These DC-T cell cocultures could suppress another immune response, the MLR. The regulation was partially IL-10-dependent and correlated in extent with the level of IL-10 produced. Suppressor cells only developed from infected patients, rather than healthy controls, and the DCs had to be exposed to live virus rather than HIV-1 gag peptides or protein. These results indicate that HIV-1-infected DCs have two previously unrecognized means to evade immune responses: maturation can be blocked reducing the efficacy of antigen presentation from infected cells, and T cell-dependent suppression can be induced.

  16. Epigenetic alterations in the brain associated with HIV-1 infection and methamphetamine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desplats, Paula; Dumaop, Wilmar; Cronin, Peter; Gianella, Sara; Woods, Steven; Letendre, Scott; Smith, David; Masliah, Eliezer; Grant, Igor

    2014-01-01

    HIV involvement of the CNS continues to be a significant problem despite successful use of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Drugs of abuse can act in concert with HIV proteins to damage glia and neurons, worsening the neurotoxicity caused by HIV alone. Methamphetamine (METH) is a highly addictive psychostimulant drug, abuse of which has reached epidemic proportions and is associated with high-risk sexual behavior, increased HIV transmission, and development of drug resistance. HIV infection and METH dependence can have synergistic pathological effects, with preferential involvement of frontostriatal circuits. At the molecular level, epigenetic alterations have been reported for both HIV-1 infection and drug abuse, but the neuropathological pathways triggered by their combined effects are less known. We investigated epigenetic changes in the brain associated with HIV and METH. We analyzed postmortem frontal cortex tissue from 27 HIV seropositive individuals, 13 of which had a history of METH dependence, in comparison to 14 cases who never used METH. We detected changes in the expression of DNMT1, at mRNA and protein levels, that resulted in the increase of global DNA methylation. Genome-wide profiling of DNA methylation in a subset of cases, showed differential methylation on genes related to neurodegeneration; dopamine metabolism and transport; and oxidative phosphorylation. We provide evidence for the synergy of HIV and METH dependence on the patterns of DNA methylation on the host brain, which results in a distinctive landscape for the comorbid condition. Importantly, we identified new epigenetic targets that might aid in understanding the aggravated neurodegenerative, cognitive, motor and behavioral symptoms observed in persons living with HIV and addictions.

  17. Epigenetic alterations in the brain associated with HIV-1 infection and methamphetamine dependence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Desplats

    Full Text Available HIV involvement of the CNS continues to be a significant problem despite successful use of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART. Drugs of abuse can act in concert with HIV proteins to damage glia and neurons, worsening the neurotoxicity caused by HIV alone. Methamphetamine (METH is a highly addictive psychostimulant drug, abuse of which has reached epidemic proportions and is associated with high-risk sexual behavior, increased HIV transmission, and development of drug resistance. HIV infection and METH dependence can have synergistic pathological effects, with preferential involvement of frontostriatal circuits. At the molecular level, epigenetic alterations have been reported for both HIV-1 infection and drug abuse, but the neuropathological pathways triggered by their combined effects are less known. We investigated epigenetic changes in the brain associated with HIV and METH. We analyzed postmortem frontal cortex tissue from 27 HIV seropositive individuals, 13 of which had a history of METH dependence, in comparison to 14 cases who never used METH. We detected changes in the expression of DNMT1, at mRNA and protein levels, that resulted in the increase of global DNA methylation. Genome-wide profiling of DNA methylation in a subset of cases, showed differential methylation on genes related to neurodegeneration; dopamine metabolism and transport; and oxidative phosphorylation. We provide evidence for the synergy of HIV and METH dependence on the patterns of DNA methylation on the host brain, which results in a distinctive landscape for the comorbid condition. Importantly, we identified new epigenetic targets that might aid in understanding the aggravated neurodegenerative, cognitive, motor and behavioral symptoms observed in persons living with HIV and addictions.

  18. Association of single nucleotide polymorphisms of APOBEC3G with susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and disease progression among men engaging in homosexual activity in northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiuyan; Qiao, Yuandong; Zhang, Guangfa; He, Ning; Zhang, Xuelong; Jia, Xueyuan; Sun, Haiming; Wang, Chuntao; Xu, Lidan

    2017-01-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) are at high risk of HIV infection. The APOBEC3G (apolipoprotein B mRNA editing catalytic polypeptide 3G) protein is a component of innate antiviral immunity that inhibits HIV-1 replication. In the present study, a total of 483 HIV-1 seropositive men and 493 HIV-1 seronegative men were selected to investigate the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the APOBEC3G gene and susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and AIDS progression among MSM residing in northern China. Genotyping of four SNPs (rs5757465, rs3736685, rs8177832, and rs2899313) of the APOBEC3G was performed using the SNPscan™ Kit, while the rs2294367 polymorphism was genotyped using the SNaPshot multiplex system. Our results disclosed no association between the SNPs of APOBEC3G and susceptibility to HIV-1, or effects of these polymorphisms on the CD4(+) T cell count or clinical phase of disease. A meta-analysis of 1624 men with HIV-1 infection and 1523 controls suggested that the association between rs8177832 and susceptibility was not significant. However, we observed a trend towards association with HIV-1 infection for haplotype TTACA (p = 0.082). The potential role of variants of APOBEC3G in HIV-1/AIDS warrants further investigation.

  19. Differences in APOBEC3G expression in CD4+ T helper lymphocyte subtypes modulate HIV-1 infectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L Vetter

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The cytidine deaminases APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F exert anti-HIV-1 activity that is countered by the HIV-1 vif protein. Based on potential transcription factor binding sites in their putative promoters, we hypothesized that expression of APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F would vary with T helper lymphocyte differentiation. Naive CD4+ T lymphocytes were differentiated to T helper type 1 (Th1 and 2 (Th2 effector cells by expression of transcription factors Tbet and GATA3, respectively, as well as by cytokine polarization. APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F RNA levels, and APOBEC3G protein levels, were higher in Th1 than in Th2 cells. T cell receptor stimulation further increased APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F expression in Tbet- and control-transduced, but not in GATA3-transduced, cells. Neutralizing anti-interferon-gamma antibodies reduced both basal and T cell receptor-stimulated APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F expression in Tbet- and control-transduced cells. HIV-1 produced from Th1 cells had more virion APOBEC3G, and decreased infectivity, compared to virions produced from Th2 cells. These differences between Th1- and Th2-produced virions were greater for viruses lacking functional vif, but also seen with vif-positive viruses. Over-expression of APOBEC3G in Th2 cells decreased the infectivity of virions produced from Th2 cells, and reduction of APOBEC3G in Th1 cells increased infectivity of virions produced from Th1 cells, consistent with a causal role for APOBEC3G in the infectivity difference. These results indicate that APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F levels vary physiologically during CD4+ T lymphocyte differentiation, that interferon-gamma contributes to this modulation, and that this physiological regulation can cause changes in infectivity of progeny virions, even in the presence of HIV-1 vif.

  20. Association between Nef-specific CD8 T-cell responses and disease progression in HIV-1 subtype B infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAO Yang; LI Tai-sheng; XIE Jing; HAN Yang; QIU Zhi-feng; ZUO Ling-yan; Thomas Mourez; WANG Ai-xia

    2006-01-01

    Background The correlation between HIV-1 Nef-specific CD8 T-cell responses and markers of HIV-1 disease progression still remains unclear. This study analysed and compared the role of HIV-1 Nef-specific CD8 T-cell responses in patients with different disease status.Methods Two groups of patients with HIV-1 subtype B infection were selected according to CD4 count and clinical manifestations: long-term nonprogresssors (LTNPs, n = 20) and advanced progressors (Aps, CD4 count <500 cells/μ1, n = 34). Nef-specific CD8 T-cell responses were studied by interferon- γ ELISpot assay against 3 pools of HIV-Nef peptides.Results Nef-specific CD8 T-cell responses did not correlate with viral load or CD4 count in all patients and no significant differences were found in the magnitude of Nef-specific CD8 T-cell responses between groups LTNPs and Aps (670 SFC/106 peripheral blood mononuclear cells vs 1107 SFC/106 peripheral blood mononuclear cells,P = 0.255). Further comparisons showed that there were also no significant correlations observed in group LTNPs,but Nef-specific CD8 T cells correlated negatively with viral load (r = -0.397, P = 0.020) and positively with CD4 count (r = 0.364, P = 0.034) in group Aps.Conclusion These data suggest that different correlation patterns between Nef-specific CD8 T-cell responses and disease progression exist in LTNPs and Aps. Although a negative association was observed with concurrent plasma HIV RNA in Aps, Nef-specific CD8 T-cell responses might fail to play a protective role in different stages of HIV- 1 infection.

  1. Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies Display Potential for Prevention of HIV-1 Infection of Mucosal Tissue Superior to That of Nonneutralizing Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheeseman, Hannah M.; Olejniczak, Natalia J.; Rogers, Paul M.; Evans, Abbey B.; King, Deborah F. L.; Ziprin, Paul; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Definition of the key parameters mediating effective antibody blocking of HIV-1 acquisition within mucosal tissue may prove critical to effective vaccine development and the prophylactic use of monoclonal antibodies. Although direct antibody-mediated neutralization is highly effective against cell-free virus, antibodies targeting different sites of envelope vulnerability may display differential activity against mucosal infection. Nonneutralizing antibodies (nnAbs) may also impact mucosal transmission events through Fc-gamma receptor (FcγR)-mediated inhibition. In this study, a panel of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) and nnAbs, including those associated with protection in the RV144 vaccine trial, were screened for the ability to block HIV-1 acquisition and replication across a range of cellular and mucosal tissue models. Neutralization potency, as determined by the TZM-bl infection assay, did not fully predict activity in mucosal tissue. CD4-binding site (CD4bs)-specific bnAbs, in particular VRC01, were consistent in blocking HIV-1 infection across all cellular and tissue models. Membrane-proximal external region (MPER) (2F5) and outer domain glycan (2G12) bnAbs were also efficient in preventing infection of mucosal tissues, while the protective efficacy of bnAbs targeting V1-V2 glycans (PG9 and PG16) was more variable. In contrast, nnAbs alone and in combinations, while active in a range of cellular assays, were poorly protective against HIV-1 infection of mucosal tissues. These data suggest that tissue resident effector cell numbers and low FcγR expression may limit the potential of nnAbs to prevent establishment of the initial foci of infection. The solid protection provided by specific bnAbs clearly demonstrates their superior potential over that of nonneutralizing antibodies for preventing HIV-1 infection at the mucosal portals of infection. IMPORTANCE Key parameters mediating effective antibody blocking of HIV-1 acquisition within mucosal

  2. High level of soluble HLA-G in the female genital tract of Beninese commercial sex workers is associated with HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Thibodeau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most HIV infections are transmitted across mucosal epithelium. Understanding the role of innate and specific mucosal immunity in susceptibility or protection against HIV infection, as well as the effect of HIV infection on mucosal immunity, are of fundamental importance. HLA-G is a powerful modulator of the immune response. The aim of this study was to investigate whether soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G expression in the female genital tract is associated with HIV-1 infection. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Genital levels of sHLA-G were determined in 52 HIV-1-uninfected and 44 antiretroviral naïve HIV-1-infected female commercial sex workers (CSWs, as well as 71 HIV-1-uninfected non-CSW women at low risk of exposure, recruited in Cotonou, Benin. HIV-1-infected CSWs had higher genital levels of sHLA-G compared with those in both the HIV-1-uninfected CSW (P = 0.009 and non-CSW groups (P = 0.0006. The presence of bacterial vaginosis (P = 0.008, and HLA-G*01:01:02 genotype (P = 0.002 were associated with higher genital levels of sHLA-G in the HIV-1-infected CSWs, whereas the HLA-G*01:04:04 genotype was also associated with higher genital level of sHLA-G in the overall population (P = 0.038. When adjustment was made for all significant variables, the increased expression of sHLA-G in the genital mucosa remained significantly associated with both HIV-1 infection (P = 0.02 and bacterial vaginosis (P = 0.03. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that high level of sHLA-G in the genital mucosa is independently associated with both HIV-1 infection and bacterial vaginosis.

  3. Immune Activation at Sites of HIV/TB Co-Infection Contributes to the Pathogenesis of HIV-1 Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qinglai; Sayin, Ismail; Canaday, David H.; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Baseke, Joy; Toossi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Systemic immune activation is critical to the pathogenesis of HIV-1 disease, and is accentuated in HIV/TB co-infected patients. The contribution of immune activation at sites of HIV/TB co-infection to viral activity, CD4 T cell count, and productive HIV-1 infection remain unclear. In this study, we measured markers of immune activation both in pleural fluid and plasma, and in T cells in pleural fluid mononuclear cell (PFMC) and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) in HIV/TB co-infected subjects. The relationship between soluble and T cell activation markers with viral load in pleural fluid and blood CD4 T cell count were assessed. The T cell phenotype and activation status of HIV-1 p24 + T cells in PFMC and PBMC from HIV/TB patients were determined. We found that T cell and macrophage-specific and non-specific soluble markers of immune activation, sCD27, sCD163, IL1Ra, and sCD14, were higher in pleural fluid as compared to plasma from HIV/TB co-infected subjects, and higher as compared to pleural fluid from TB mono-infected subjects. Intestinal fatty acid-binding protein, a marker of intestinal tract damage, in plasma from HIV/TB co-infected patients was not different than that in HIV+ subjects. Expression of HLADR and CD38 double positive (HLADR/CD38) on CD4 T cells, and CD69+ on CD8 T cells correlated with pleural fluid viral load, and inversely with blood CD4 T cell count. Higher expression of HLADR/CD38 and CCR5 on CD4 T cells, and HLADR/CD38 and CD69 on CD8 T cells in PFMC were limited to effector memory populations. HIV-1 p24+ CD8 negative (includes CD4 + and double negative T cells) effector memory T cells in PFMC had higher expression of HLADR/CD38, Ki67, and CCR5 compared to HIV-1 p24- CD8 negative PFMC. Cumulatively, these data indicate that sites of HIV/TB co-infection are the source of intense immune activation. PMID:27870882

  4. HIV-1 structural proteins serve as PAMPs for TLR2 heterodimers significantly increasing infection and innate immune activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Lee Rosenthal

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Immune activation is critical to HIV infection and pathogenesis; however, our understanding of HIV innate immune activation remains incomplete. Recently we demonstrated that soluble TLR2 (sTLR2 physically inhibited HIV-induced, NFκB activation and inflammation, as well as HIV-1 infection. In light of these findings, we hypothesized that HIV-1 structural proteins may serve as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs for cellular TLR2 heterodimers. These studies made use of primary human T cells and TZMbl cells stably transformed to express TLR2 (TZMbl-2. Our results demonstrated that cells expressing TLR2 showed significantly increased proviral DNA compared to cells lacking TLR2, and mechanistically this may be due to a TLR2-mediated increased CCR5 expression. Importantly, we show that HIV-1 structural proteins, p17, p24, and gp41 act as viral PAMPs signalling through TLR2 and its heterodimers leading to significantly increased immune activation via the NFκB signaling pathway. Using co-immunoprecipitation and a dot blot method, we demonstrated direct protein interactions between these viral PAMPs and TLR2, while only p17 and gp41 bound to TLR1. Specifically, TLR2/1 heterodimer recognized p17 and gp41, while p24 lead to immune activation through TLR2/6. These results were confirmed using TLR2/1 siRNA knock down assays which ablated p17 and gp41-induced cellular activation and through studies of HEK293 cells expressing selected TLRs. Interestingly, our results show in the absence of TLR6, p24 bound to TLR2 and blocked p17 and gp41-induced activation, thus providing a novel mechanism by which HIV-1 can manipulate innate sensing. Taken together, our results identified, for the first time, novel HIV-1 PAMPs that play a role in TLR2-mediated cellular activation and increased proviral DNA. These findings have important implications for our fundamental understanding of HIV-1 immune activation and pathogenesis, as well as HIV-1 vaccine development.

  5. Preferential infection and depletion of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific CD4 T cells after HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geldmacher, Christof; Ngwenyama, Njabulo; Schuetz, Alexandra; Petrovas, Constantinos; Reither, Klaus; Heeregrave, Edwin J; Casazza, Joseph P; Ambrozak, David R; Louder, Mark; Ampofo, William; Pollakis, Georgios; Hill, Brenna; Sanga, Erica; Saathoff, Elmar; Maboko, Leonard; Roederer, Mario; Paxton, William A; Hoelscher, Michael; Koup, Richard A

    2010-12-20

    HIV-1 infection results in the progressive loss of CD4 T cells. In this study, we address how different pathogen-specific CD4 T cells are affected by HIV infection and the cellular parameters involved. We found striking differences in the depletion rates between CD4 T cells to two common opportunistic pathogens, cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). CMV-specific CD4 T cells persisted after HIV infection, whereas MTB-specific CD4 T cells were depleted rapidly. CMV-specific CD4 T cells expressed a mature phenotype and produced very little IL-2, but large amounts of MIP-1β. In contrast, MTB-specific CD4 T cells were less mature, and most produced IL-2 but not MIP-1β. Staphylococcal enterotoxin B-stimulated IL-2-producing cells were more susceptible to HIV infection in vitro than MIP-1β-producing cells. Moreover, IL-2 production was associated with expression of CD25, and neutralization of IL-2 completely abrogated productive HIV infection in vitro. HIV DNA was found to be most abundant in IL-2-producing cells, and least abundant in MIP-1β-producing MTB-specific CD4 T cells from HIV-infected subjects with active tuberculosis. These data support the hypothesis that differences in function affect the susceptibility of pathogen-specific CD4 T cells to HIV infection and depletion in vivo, providing a potential mechanism to explain the rapid loss of MTB-specific CD4 T cells after HIV infection.

  6. Asymptomatic bacteriuria and urinary tract infections in women : focus on diabetes mellitus and pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneeberger, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    There is a shortage of evidence for clinical guidelines on diagnosis and management of both asymptomatic bacteriuria (the presence of bacteria in urine without symptoms of an infection) and urinary tract infections in women with diabetes and pregnant women. Asymptomatic bacteriuria and urinary tract

  7. A Cross-sectional Serological Study of Cysticercosis, Schistosomiasis, Toxocariasis and Echinococcosis in HIV-1 Infected People in Beira, Mozambique

    OpenAIRE

    Emilia Virginia Noormahomed; Noémia Nhacupe; Carmen Mascaró-Lazcano; Manuel Natane Mauaie; Titos Buene; Carlos Abel Funzamo; Constance Ann Benson

    2014-01-01

    Background: Helminthic infections are highly endemic in Mozambique, due to limited access to healthcare and resources for disease prevention. Data on the subclinical prevalence of these diseases are scarce due to the fact that an immunological and imaging diagnosis is not often available in endemic areas. We conducted a cross-sectional study on HIV1+ patients from Beira city in order to determine the seroprevalence of cysticercosis, schistosomiasis, toxocariasis and echinoccocosis and its...

  8. The amino-terminal domain of the CCR2 chemokine receptor acts as coreceptor for HIV-1 infection

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    The chemokines are a homologous serum protein family characterized by their ability to induce activation of integrin adhesion molecules and leukocyte migration. Chemokines interact with their receptors, which are composed of a single-chain, seven-helix, membrane-spanning protein coupled to G proteins. Two CC chemokine receptors, CCR3 and CCR5, as well as the CXCR4 chemokine receptor, have been shown necessary for infection by several HIV-1 virus isolates. We studied the effect of the chemokin...

  9. A model of HIV-1 infection with two time delays: mathematical analysis and comparison with patient data

    OpenAIRE

    Pawelek, Kasia A.; Liu, Shengqiang; Pahlevani, Faranak; Rong, Libin

    2011-01-01

    Mathematical models have made considerable contributions to our understanding of HIV dynamics. Introducing time delays to HIV models usually brings challenges to both mathematical analysis of the models and comparison of model predictions with patient data. In this paper, we incorporate two delays, one the time needed for infected cells to produce virions after viral entry and the other the time needed for the adaptive immune response to emerge to control viral replication, into an HIV-1 mode...

  10. Identification of full-length transmitted/founder viruses and their progeny in primary HIV-1 infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korber, Bette [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hraber, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Giorgi, Elena [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bhattacharya, T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Identification of transmitted/founder virus genomes and their progeny by is a novel strategy for probing the molecular basis of HIV-1 transmission and for evaluating the genetic imprint of viral and host factors that act to constrain or facilitate virus replication. Here, we show in a cohort of twelve acutely infected subjects (9 clade B; 3 clade C), that complete genomic sequences of transmitted/founder viruses could be inferred using single genome amplification of plasma viral RNA, direct amplicon sequencing, and a model of random virus evolution. This allowed for the precise identification, chemical synthesis, molecular cloning, and biological analysis of those viruses actually responsible for productive clinical infection and for a comprehensive mapping of sequential viral genomes and proteomes for mutations that are necessary or incidental to the establishment of HIV-1 persistence. Transmitted/founder viruses were CD4 and CCR5 tropic, replicated preferentially in activated primary T-Iymphocytes but not monocyte-derived macrophages, and were effectively shielded from most heterologous or broadly neutralizing antibodies. By 3 months of infection, the evolving viral quasispecies in three subjects showed mutational fixation at only 2-5 discreet genomic loci. By 6-12 months, mutational fixation was evident at 18-27 genomic loci. Some, but not all, of these mutations were attributable to virus escape from cytotoxic Tlymphocytes or neutralizing antibodies, suggesting that other viral or host factors may influence early HIV -1 fitness.

  11. Vpr14-88-Apobec3G fusion protein is efficiently incorporated into Vif-positive HIV-1 particles and inhibits viral infection.

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    Zhujun Ao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: APOBEC3G (A3G, a deoxycytidine deaminase, is a potent host antiviral factor that can restrict HIV-1 infection. During Vif-negative HIV-1 replication, A3G is incorporated into HIV-1 particles, induces mutations in reverse transcribed viral DNA and inhibits reverse transcription. However, HIV-1 Vif counteracts A3G's activities by inducing its degradation and by blocking its incorporation into HIV-1 particles. Thus, it is interesting to elucidate a mechanism that would allow A3G to escape the effects of Vif in order to rescue its potent antiviral activity and to provide a possible novel therapeutic strategy for treating HIV-1 infection. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In this study, we generated an R88-A3G fusion protein by fusing A3G to a virion-targeting polypeptide (R14-88 derived from HIV-1 Vpr protein and compared its antiviral effects relative to those of HA-tagged native A3G (HA-A3G. Our study showed that transient expression of the R88-A3G fusion protein in both Vif(- and Vif(+ HIV-1 producing cells drastically inhibited viral infection in HeLa-CD4-CCR5-cells, CD4(+ C8166 T cells and human primary PBMCs. Moreover, we established CD4(+ C8166 T cell lines that stably express either R88-A3G or HA-A3G by transduction with VSV-G-pseudotyped lentiviral vector that harbor expression cassettes for R88-A3G or HA-A3G, respectively, and tested their susceptibility to Vif(+ HIV-1 infection. Our results clearly reveal that expression of R88-A3G in transduced CD4(+ C8166 cells significantly blocked Vif(+ HIV-1 infection. In an attempt to understand the mechanism underlying the antiviral activity of R88-A3G, we demonstrated that R88-A3G was efficiently incorporated into viral particles in the presence of Vif. Moreover, PCR analysis revealed that R88-A3G significantly inhibited viral cDNA synthesis during the early stage of Vif(+ virus infection. CONCLUSIONS: Our results clearly indicate that R88 delivers A3G into Vif(+ HIV-1 particles and inhibits

  12. Randomized, controlled trial of therapy interruption in chronic HIV-1 infection.

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    Emmanouil Papasavvas

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Approaches to limiting exposure to antiretroviral therapy (ART drugs are an active area of HIV therapy research. Here we present longitudinal follow-up of a randomized, open-label, single-center study of the immune, viral, and safety outcomes of structured therapy interruptions (TIs in patients with chronically suppressed HIV-1 infection as compared to equal follow-up of patients on continuous therapy and including a final therapy interruption in both arms. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Forty-two chronically HIV-infected patients on suppressive ART with CD4 counts higher than 400 were randomized 1:1 to either (1 three successive fixed TIs of 2, 4, and 6 wk, with intervening resumption of therapy with resuppression for 4 wk before subsequent interruption, or (2 40 wk of continuous therapy, with a final open-ended TI in both treatment groups. Main outcome was analysis of the time to viral rebound (>5,000 copies/ml during the open-ended TI. Secondary outcomes included study-defined safety criteria, viral resistance, therapy failure, and retention of immune reconstitution. There was no difference between the groups in time to viral rebound during the open-ended TI (continuous therapy/single TI, median [interquartile range] = 4 [1-8] wk, n = 21; repeated TI, median [interquartile range] = 5 [4-8] wk, n = 21; p = 0.36. No differences in study-related adverse events, viral set point at 12 or 20 wk of open-ended interruption, viral resistance or therapy failure, retention of CD4 T cell numbers on ART, or retention of lymphoproliferative recall antigen responses were noted between groups. Importantly, resistance detected shortly after initial viremia following the open-ended TI did not result in a lack of resuppression to less than 50 copies/ml after reinitiation of the same drug regimen. CONCLUSION: Cycles of 2- to 6-wk time-fixed TIs in patients with suppressed HIV infection failed to confer a clinically significant benefit with regard to viral

  13. HIV-1/2 indeterminate Western blot results: follow-up of asymptomatic blood donors in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil

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    CARNEIRO-PROIETTI A.B.F.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical and public health importance of indeterminate results in HIV-1/2 testing is still difficult to evaluate in volunteer blood donors. At Fundação Hemominas, HIV-1/2 ELISA is used as the screening test and, if reactive, is followed by Western blot (WB. We have evaluated 84 blood donors who had repeatedly reactive ELISA tests for HIV-1/2, but indeterminate WB results. Sixteen of the 84 donors (19.0% had history of sexually transmitted diseases; 18/84 (21.4% informed receiving or paying for sex; 3/84 (3.6% had homosexual contact; 2/26 women (7.6% had past history of multiple illegal abortions and 3/84 (3.6% had been previously transfused. Four out of 62 donors (6.5% had positive anti-nuclear factor (Hep2, with titles up to 1:640. Parasitological examination of the stool revealed eggs of S. mansoni in 4/62 (6.4% donors and other parasites in 8/62 (12.9%. Five (5.9% of the subjects presented overt seroconversion for HIV-1/2, 43/84 (51.2% had negative results on the last visit, while 36/84 (42.9% remained WB indeterminate. Although some conditions could be found associated with the HIV-1/2 indeterminate WB results and many donors had past of risky behavior, the significance of the majority of the results remains to be determined.

  14. Impact of first-line protease inhibitors on predicted resistance to tipranavir in HIV-1-infected patients with virological failure

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    Chen Mao-Yuan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tipranavir (TPV is a recently approved nonpeptidic protease inhibitor (PI of HIV-1 and has been indicated for those infected with PIs-resistant HIV-1. However, in clinical practice, whether the HIV-1 from the patients with virological failure to the regimens containing first-line PIs remains susceptible to TPV/r may be questionable. Methods To assess the resistance levels to TPV of HIV-1 from patients with treatment failure to first-line PIs, patients who experienced virological failure were tested for genotypic resistance of HIV-1 since August 2006 in National Taiwan University Hospital. Patients were enrolled for this analysis if their failed regimens contained > 12 weeks of atazanavir or lopinavir/ritonavir (defined as ATV group and LPV/r group, respectively, but were excluded if they experienced both or other PIs. The levels of genotypic resistance to TPV/r were determined by TPV mutation score. Results Till May 2008, 21 subjects in ATV group and 20 subjects in LPV/r group were enrolled. The TPV mutation scores in subjects in LPV/r group were significantly higher than these in ATV group (median, 3 vs 1, P = 0.007. 95.2% subjects in ATV group and only 45% subjects in LPV/r group had an estimated maximal virological response to TPV/r (P Conclusion Cross-resistance from first-line PIs may impede the effectiveness of TPV/r-containing salvage therapy. TPV/r should be used cautiously for patients with virological failure to LPV/r especially long duration of exposure.

  15. Recalibration of the limiting antigen avidity EIA to determine mean duration of recent infection in divergent HIV-1 subtypes.

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    Yen T Duong

    Full Text Available Mean duration of recent infection (MDRI and misclassification of long-term HIV-1 infections, as proportion false recent (PFR, are critical parameters for laboratory-based assays for estimating HIV-1 incidence. Recent review of the data by us and others indicated that MDRI of LAg-Avidity EIA estimated previously required recalibration. We present here results of recalibration efforts using >250 seroconversion panels and multiple statistical methods to ensure accuracy and consensus.A total of 2737 longitudinal specimens collected from 259 seroconverting individuals infected with diverse HIV-1 subtypes were tested with the LAg-Avidity EIA as previously described. Data were analyzed for determination of MDRI at ODn cutoffs of 1.0 to 2.0 using 7 statistical approaches and sub-analyzed by HIV-1 subtypes. In addition, 3740 specimens from individuals with infection >1 year, including 488 from patients with AIDS, were tested for PFR at varying cutoffs.Using different statistical methods, MDRI values ranged from 88-94 days at cutoff ODn = 1.0 to 177-183 days at ODn = 2.0. The MDRI values were similar by different methods suggesting coherence of different approaches. Testing for misclassification among long-term infections indicated that overall PFRs were 0.6% to 2.5% at increasing cutoffs of 1.0 to 2.0, respectively. Balancing the need for a longer MDRI and smaller PFR (<2.0% suggests that a cutoff ODn = 1.5, corresponding to an MDRI of 130 days should be used for cross-sectional application. The MDRI varied among subtypes from 109 days (subtype A&D to 152 days (subtype C.Based on the new data and revised analysis, we recommend an ODn cutoff = 1.5 to classify recent and long-term infections, corresponding to an MDRI of 130 days (118-142. Determination of revised parameters for estimation of HIV-1 incidence should facilitate application of the LAg-Avidity EIA for worldwide use.

  16. Primary HIV-1 infection is associated with preferential depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes from effector sites in the gastrointestinal tract.

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    Mehandru, Saurabh; Poles, Michael A; Tenner-Racz, Klara; Horowitz, Amir; Hurley, Arlene; Hogan, Christine; Boden, Daniel; Racz, Paul; Markowitz, Martin

    2004-09-20

    Given its population of CCR5-expressing, immunologically activated CD4(+) T cells, the gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa is uniquely susceptible to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection. We undertook this study to assess whether a preferential depletion of mucosal CD4(+) T cells would be observed in HIV-1-infected subjects during the primary infection period, to examine the anatomic subcompartment from which these cells are depleted, and to examine whether suppressive highly active antiretroviral therapy could result in complete immune reconstitution in the mucosal compartment. Our results demonstrate that a significant and preferential depletion of mucosal CD4(+) T cells compared with peripheral blood CD4(+) T cells is seen during primary HIV-1 infection. CD4(+) T cell loss predominated in the effector subcompartment of the GI mucosa, in distinction to the inductive compartment, where HIV-1 RNA was present. Cross-sectional analysis of a cohort of primary HIV-1 infection subjects showed that although chronic suppression of HIV-1 permits near-complete immune recovery of the peripheral blood CD4(+) T cell population, a significantly greater CD4(+) T cell loss remains in the GI mucosa, despite up to 5 yr of fully suppressive therapy. Given the importance of the mucosal compartment in HIV-1 pathogenesis, further study to elucidate the significance of the changes observed here is critical.

  17. The microvesicle component of HIV-1 inocula modulates dendritic cell infection and maturation and enhances adhesion to and activation of T lymphocytes.

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    Sarah K Mercier

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 is taken up by immature monocyte derived dendritic cells (iMDDCs into tetraspanin rich caves from which the virus can either be transferred to T lymphocytes or enter into endosomes resulting in degradation. HIV-1 binding and fusion with the DC membrane results in low level de novo infection that can also be transferred to T lymphocytes at a later stage. We have previously reported that HIV-1 can induce partial maturation of iMDDCs at both stages of trafficking. Here we show that CD45⁺ microvesicles (MV which contaminate purified HIV-1 inocula due to similar size and density, affect DC maturation, de novo HIV-1 infection and transfer to T lymphocytes. Comparing iMDDCs infected with CD45-depleted HIV-1BaL or matched non-depleted preparations, the presence of CD45⁺ MVs was shown to enhance DC maturation and ICAM-1 (CD54 expression, which is involved in DC∶T lymphocyte interactions, while restricting HIV-1 infection of MDDCs. Furthermore, in the DC culture HIV-1 infected (p24⁺ MDDCs were more mature than bystander cells. Depletion of MVs from the HIV-1 inoculum markedly inhibited DC∶T lymphocyte clustering and the induction of alloproliferation as well as limiting HIV-1 transfer from DCs to T lymphocytes. The effects of MV depletion on these functions were reversed by the re-addition of purified MVs from activated but not non-activated SUPT1.CCR5-CL.30 or primary T cells. Analysis of the protein complement of these MVs and of these HIV-1 inocula before and after MV depletion showed that Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs and nef were the likely DC maturation candidates. Recombinant HSP90α and β and nef all induced DC maturation and ICAM-1 expression, greater when combined. These results suggest that MVs contaminating HIV-1 released from infected T lymphocytes may be biologically important, especially in enhancing T cell activation, during uptake by DCs in vitro and in vivo, particularly as MVs have been detected in the circulation of HIV-1

  18. Associations among race/ethnicity, ApoC-III genotypes, and lipids in HIV-1-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy.

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    Andrea S Foulkes

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protease inhibitors (PIs are associated with hypertriglyceridemia and atherogenic dyslipidemia. Identifying HIV-1-infected individuals who are at increased risk of PI-related dyslipidemia will facilitate therapeutic choices that maintain viral suppression while reducing risk of atherosclerotic diseases. Apolipoprotein C-III (apoC-III gene variants, which vary by race/ethnicity, have been associated with a lipid profile that resembles PI-induced dyslipidemia. However, the association of race/ethnicity, or candidate gene effects across race/ethnicity, with plasma lipid levels in HIV-1-infected individuals, has not been reported. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A cross-sectional analysis of race/ethnicity, apoC-III/apoA-I genotypes, and PI exposure on plasma lipids was performed in AIDS Clinical Trial Group studies (n = 626. Race/ethnicity was a highly significant predictor of plasma lipids in fully adjusted models. Furthermore, in stratified analyses, the effect of PI exposure appeared to differ across race/ethnicity. Black/non-Hispanic, compared with White/non-Hispanics and Hispanics, had lower plasma triglyceride (TG levels overall, but the greatest increase in TG levels when exposed to PIs. In Hispanics, current PI antiretroviral therapy (ART exposure was associated with a significantly smaller increase in TGs among patients with variant alleles at apoC-III-482, -455, and Intron 1, or at a composite apoC-III genotype, compared with patients with the wild-type genotypes. CONCLUSIONS: In the first pharmacogenetic study of its kind in HIV-1 disease, we found race/ethnic-specific differences in plasma lipid levels on ART, as well as differences in the influence of the apoC-III gene on the development of PI-related hypertriglyceridemia. Given the multi-ethnic distribution of HIV-1 infection, our findings underscore the need for future studies of metabolic and cardiovascular complications of ART that specifically account for racial

  19. Prevalence and risk factors for Hepatitis C and HIV-1 infections among pregnant women in Central Brazil

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    Stefani Mariane MA

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C (HCV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infections are a major burden to public health worldwide. Routine antenatal HIV-1 screening to prevent maternal-infant transmission is universally recommended. Our objectives were to evaluate the prevalence of and potential risk factors for HCV and HIV infection among pregnant women who attended prenatal care under the coverage of public health in Central Brazil. Methods Screening and counselling for HIV and HCV infections was offered free of charge to all pregnant women attending antenatal clinic (ANC in the public health system, in Goiania city (~1.1 million inhabitants during 2004–2005. Initial screening was performed on a dried blood spot collected onto standard filter paper; positive or indeterminate results were confirmed by a second blood sample. HCV infection was defined as a positive or indeterminate sample (EIA test and confirmed HCV-RNA technique. HIV infection was defined according to standard criteria. Factors associated with HIV and HCV infections were identified with logistic regression. The number needed to screen (NNS to prevent one case of infant HIV infection was calculated using the Monte Carlo simulation method. Results A total of 28,561 pregnant women were screened for HCV and HIV-1 in ANC. Mean maternal age was 23.9 years (SD = 5.6, with 45% of the women experiencing their first pregnancy. Prevalence of HCV infection was 0.15% (95% CI 0.11%–0.20%, and the risk increased with age (p Conclusion The prevalence of HIV and HCV infections were low among pregnant women, with high acceptability rates in the opt-in strategy in primary care. Older maternal age was a risk factor for HCV and antenatal HCV testing does not fulfill the requirements for screening recommendation. The finding of higher risk of HIV-1 infection among black women despite being in consonance with the HIV-1 ethnic pattern in some American regions cannot be ruled out to be a surrogate

  20. Modulation of HIV-1 infectivity and cyclophilin A-dependence by Gag sequence and target cell type

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    Dam Elisabeth

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 Gag proteins are essential for virion assembly and viral replication in newly infected cells. Gag proteins are also strong determinants of viral infectivity; immune escape mutations in the Gag capsid (CA protein can markedly reduce viral fitness, and interactions of CA with host proteins such as cyclophilin A (CypA and TRIM5α can have important effects on viral infectivity. Little information, however, is available concerning the extent that different primary Gag proteins affect HIV-1 replication in different cell types, or the impact on viral replication of differences in the expression by target cells of proteins that interact with CA. To address these questions, we compared the infectivity of recombinant HIV-1 viruses expressing Gag-protease sequences from primary isolates in different target cells in the presence or absence of agents that disrupt cyclophilin A – CA interactions and correlated these results with the viral genotype and the expression of cyclophilin A and TRIM5α by the target cells. Results Viral infectivity was governed by the nature of the Gag proteins in a target cell-specific fashion. The treatment of target cells with agents that disrupt CypA-CA interactions often produced biphasic dose-response curves in which viral infectivity first increased and subsequently decreased as a function of the dose used. The extent that treatment of target cells with high-dose CypA inhibitors impaired viral infectivity was dependent on several factors, including the viral genotype, the nature of the target cell, and the extent that treatment with low-dose CypA inhibitors increased viral infectivity. Neither the presence of polymorphisms in the CA CypA-binding loop, the level of expression of CypA, or the level of TRIM5α expression could, alone, explain the differences in the shape of the dose-response curves observed or the extent that high-dose CypA inhibitors reduced viral infectivity. Conclusion Multiple

  1. HIV-1 prevalence and factors associated with infection in the conflict-affected region of North Uganda

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    Musinguzi Joshua

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since 1986, northern Uganda has been severely affected by civil strife with most of its population currently living internally displaced in protected camps. This study aims at estimating the HIV-1 prevalence among this population and the factors associated with infection. Methods In June-December 2005, a total of 3051 antenatal clinics attendees in Gulu, Kitgum and Pader districts were anonymously tested for HIV-1 infection as part of routine sentinel surveillance. Factors associated with the infection were evaluated using logistic regression models. Results The age-standardised HIV-1 prevalence was 10.3%, 9.1% and 4.3% in the Gulu, Kitgum and Pader district, respectively. The overall prevalence in the area comprised of these districts was 8.2% when data was weighted according to the districts' population size. Data from all sites combined show that, besides older women [20–24 years: adjusted odds ratio (AOR = 1.96, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.29–2.97; 25–29 years: AOR = 2.01, 95% CI: 1.30–3.11; ≥ 30 years: AOR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.23–2.97], unmarried women (AOR = 1.47, 95% CI: 1.06–2.04, and those with a partner with a non-traditional occupation (AOR = 1.62, 95% CI: 1.18–2.21, women living outside of protected camps for internally displaced persons have a higher risk of being HIV-1 infected than internally displaced women (AOR = 1.55, 95% CI: 1.15–2.08. Conclusion Although published data from Gulu district show a declining HIV-1 prevalence trend that is consistent with that observed at the national level since 1993, the prevalence in North Uganda is still high. Internally displaced women have a lower risk of being infected probably because of their reduced mobility and accessibility, and increased access to health prevention services.

  2. 输血后感染的HIV-1流行株分子流行病学调查%Molecular epidemiological investigation of HIV-1 circulating strain infected after blood receiving

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    赵翠英; 李保军; 陈素良; 邢辉; 路新利; 李巧敏; 白广义; 赵宏儒

    2011-01-01

    目的 了解河北省沙河市受血感染者及其夫妻传播者中HIV-1亚型特点和来源.方法 采集HIV-1感染者的全血样品,分离外周血单核细胞(PBMC),提取前病毒DNA,使用套式聚合酶链反应(nested-PCR),扩增HIV-1的env基因的C2~V3区,并进行序列测定和亚型分析.结果 对7例HIV-1感染者的血标本进行nested-PCR扩增,得到6份HIV-1 env C2~V3基因片段,经序列测定分析,6份样品均为B'亚型.组内基因离散率6.22%±1.38%,基因序列与云南瑞丽株RL42(泰国B亚型)相近.受血者Heb0224及其配偶Heb0223与云南瑞丽株RL42 env的基因离散率分别为3.93%和7.71%.结论 在河北省沙河市受血感染者及其夫妻传播者中流行的为HIV-1 B'亚型.%Objective To understand the characteristics and origin of subtypes of HIV-1 strains infected blood receivers and their couples in Shahe, Hebei Province. Methods The whole blood from HIV-1 infected individuals were collected and the peripheral blood mononuclear cell were separated. The provirus DNA was extracted and amplified by nested-PCR, after which the HIV-1 env C2~ V3 gene fragments was sequenced and its subtypes were analyzed. Results Among 7 HIV-1 antibody positive cases, 6 HIV-1 env C2~ V3 gene fragments were amplified and analyzed. 6 cases were confirmed to be infected with HIV-lsubtype B' strain. The genetic distance of HIV-1 B' intersubtype was 6.22 % ± 1.38% ( n = 6), their gene sequence were closely related to RL42 in Yunnan (Thailand B). To compare with RL42, the genetic distance of blood receiver (Heb0224) was 3.39 % and that of their spouses (Heb0223) was 7.71%. Conclusions HIV-1 subtype B' was the predominant subtype circulating among blood receivers and their spouses within families in Shahe, Hebei Province.

  3. Zidovudine/lamivudine for HIV-1 infection contributes to limb fat loss.

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    Marit G A van Vonderen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lipoatrophy is known to be associated with stavudine as part of the treatment for HIV infection, but it is less clear if this serious side effect is also related to other nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors like zidovudine. We aimed to determine whether zidovudine-sparing first-line antiretroviral therapy would lead to less lipoatrophy and other metabolic changes than zidovudine-containing therapy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Fifty antiretroviral therapy-naïve HIV-1 infected men with an indication to start antiretroviral therapy were included in a randomized single blinded clinical trial. Randomisation was between zidovudine-containing therapy (zidovudine/lamivudine+lopinavir/ritonavir and zidovudine-sparing therapy (nevirapine+lopinavir/ritonavir. Main outcome measures were body composition assessed by computed tomography and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan and lipid profile before and after 3, 12, 24 months of antiretroviral therapy. In the zidovudine/lamivudine+lopinavir/ritonavir group, from 3 months onward limb fat decreased progressively by 684+/-293 grams (estimated mean+/-standard error of the mean(p = 0.02 up to 24 months whereas abdominal fat increased, but exclusively in the visceral compartment (+21.9+/-8.1 cm(2, p = 0.008. In contrast, in the nevirapine+lopinavir/ritonavir group, a generalized increase in fat mass was observed. After 24 months no significant differences in high density lipoprotein and total/high density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio were found between both treatment groups, but total and low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were higher in the nevirapine+lopinavir/ritonavir group (6.1+/-0.2 versus 5.3+/-0.2 and 3.6+/-0.1 versus 2.8+/-0.1 mmol/l respectively, p<0.05. Virologic response and safety were comparable in both groups. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Zidovudine/lamivudine+lopinavir/ritonavir, but not nevirapine+lopinavir/ritonavir in antiretroviral therapy-naïve patients, is

  4. Memory B cell antibodies to HIV-1 gp140 cloned from individuals infected with clade A and B viruses.

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    Hugo Mouquet

    Full Text Available Understanding the antibody response to HIV-1 in humans that show broad neutralizing serologic activity is a crucial step in trying to reproduce such responses by vaccination. Investigating antibodies with cross clade reactivity is particularly important as these antibodies may target conserved epitopes on the HIV envelope gp160 protein. To this end we have used a clade B YU-2 gp140 trimeric antigen and single-cell antibody cloning methods to obtain 189 new anti-gp140 antibodies representing 51 independent B cell clones from the IgG memory B cells of 3 patients infected with HIV-1 clade A or B viruses and exhibiting broad neutralizing serologic activity. Our results support previous findings showing a diverse antibody response to HIV gp140 envelope protein, characterized by differentially expanded B-cell clones producing highly hypermutated antibodies with heterogenous gp140-specificity and neutralizing activity. In addition to their high-affinity binding to the HIV spike, the vast majority of the new anti-gp140 antibodies are also polyreactive. Although none of the new antibodies are as broad or potent as VRC01 or PG9, two clonally-related antibodies isolated from a clade A HIV-1 infected donor, directed against the gp120 variable loop 3, rank in the top 5% of the neutralizers identified in our large collection of 185 unique gp140-specific antibodies in terms of breadth and potency.

  5. Moesin is required for HIV-1-induced CD4-CXCR4 interaction, F-actin redistribution, membrane fusion and viral infection in lymphocytes.

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    Barrero-Villar, Marta; Cabrero, José Román; Gordón-Alonso, Mónica; Barroso-González, Jonathan; Alvarez-Losada, Susana; Muñoz-Fernández, M Angeles; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Valenzuela-Fernández, Agustín

    2009-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) envelope regulates the initial attachment of viral particles to target cells through its association with CD4 and either CXCR4 or CCR5. Although F-actin is required for CD4 and CXCR4 redistribution, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying this fundamental process in HIV infection. Using CD4(+) CXCR4(+) permissive human leukemic CEM T cells and primary lymphocytes, we have investigated whether HIV-1 Env might promote viral entry and infection by activating ERM (ezrin-radixin-moesin) proteins to regulate F-actin reorganization and CD4/CXCR4 co-clustering. The interaction of the X4-tropic protein HIV-1 gp120 with CD4 augments ezrin and moesin phosphorylation in human permissive T cells, thereby regulating ezrin-moesin activation. Moreover, the association and clustering of CD4-CXCR4 induced by HIV-1 gp120 requires moesin-mediated anchoring of actin in the plasma membrane. Suppression of moesin expression with dominant-negative N-moesin or specific moesin silencing impedes reorganization of F-actin and HIV-1 entry and infection mediated by the HIV-1 envelope protein complex. Therefore, we propose that activated moesin promotes F-actin redistribution and CD4-CXCR4 clustering and is also required for efficient X4-tropic HIV-1 infection in permissive lymphocytes.

  6. 桂林市经性传播的HIV-1的流行特征和亚型分析%Epidemiology and gene analysis of HIV-1 infections in Guilin who infected by sexually transmission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔衍琳; 王海泉; 李林; 孙常荣; 李敬云; 梁浩; 梁冰玉; 张奇; 张帅; 王雪雯; 李赫伟; 胡婷婷; 蒋骞; 蒋就喜; 潘定权; 张振开

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the epidemiological situation of confirmed HIV-1 infections in Guilin after 2008 who were infected by sexually transmission, and to understand the distribution of HIV-1 subtypes. Methods To make epidemiological survey on the 100 confirmed HIV-1 infections, extract HIV-1 RNA from their whole blood and amplified by RT-PCR. HIV-1 gag gene was sequenced directly from the PCR product. Results In the chosen patients, male to female ratio was 2. 125 ∶ 1. Patients aged ≥20 and ≤49 years old accounted for 54% in total, and patients aged 50 years old or older accounted for 45%. Farmers accounted for 40% and students accounted for 6%. Patients with education level of junior middle school or below accounted for 69%. The proportions which were transmitted through heterosexual and homosexual contact were 93% and 7% respectively. 61 specimens were gained in 100 specimens, then sequence analysis showed that there were 3 HIV-1 subtypes, CRF01-AE(48 samples),B (5 samples),CRF-07BC(8 samples). Conclusion The more attentions should be paid to the HIV/AIDS antibody screening in marriage and pregnancy inspection, focus on HIV/AIDS infection though sexual transmission in elderly people, and more effective ways to prevent HIV/AIDS infection for the population with poor education level should be explored. With the change of the main transmission and subtype, the more education and behavioral interven-tions should be done to prevent the spread of HIV/ AIDS.%目的:了解桂林市2008年及以后确诊的经性传播的人类免疫缺陷病毒1型( HIV-1)感染者的流行病学及亚型的分布情况。方法选取样本100例,收集流行病学资料,采集抗凝全血,提取病毒RNA,RT-PCR法行gag基因扩增,对产物进行测序和分析。结果100例样本中男女比例为2.125∶1;青壮年年龄组(20~49岁)患者为54%,>50岁年龄组患者为45%;职业为农民的患者为40%,学生为6%;初中及以下文化水平患者占69%;经异

  7. The F4/AS01B HIV-1 Vaccine Candidate Is Safe and Immunogenic, But Does Not Show Viral Efficacy in Antiretroviral Therapy-Naive, HIV-1-Infected Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinges, Warren; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Podzamczer, Daniel; Brockmeyer, Norbert H.; García, Felipe.; Harrer, Thomas; Lelievre, Jean-Daniel; Frank, Ian; Colin De Verdière, Nathalie; Yeni, Guy-Patrick; Ortega Gonzalez, Enrique; Rubio, Rafael; Clotet Sala, Bonaventura; DeJesus, Edwin; Pérez-Elias, Maria Jesus; Launay, Odile; Pialoux, Gilles; Slim, Jihad; Weiss, Laurence; Bouchaud, Olivier; Felizarta, Franco; Meurer, Anja; Raffi, François; Esser, Stefan; Katlama, Christine; Koletar, Susan L.; Mounzer, Karam; Swindells, Susan; Baxter, John D.; Schneider, Stefan; Chas, Julie; Molina, Jean-Michel; Koutsoukos, Marguerite; Collard, Alix; Bourguignon, Patricia; Roman, François

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The impact of the investigational human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) F4/AS01B vaccine on HIV-1 viral load (VL) was evaluated in antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive HIV-1 infected adults. This phase IIb, observer-blind study (NCT01218113), included ART-naive HIV-1 infected adults aged 18 to 55 years. Participants were randomized to receive 2 (F4/AS01B_2 group, N = 64) or 3 (F4/AS01B_3 group, N = 62) doses of F4/AS01B or placebo (control group, N = 64) at weeks 0, 4, and 28. Efficacy (HIV-1 VL, CD4+ T-cell count, ART initiation, and HIV-related clinical events), safety, and immunogenicity (antibody and T-cell responses) were evaluated during 48 weeks. At week 48, based on a mixed model, no statistically significant difference in HIV-1 VL change from baseline was demonstrated between F4/AS01B_2 and control group (0.073 log10 copies/mL [97.5% confidence interval (CI): −0.088; 0.235]), or F4/AS01B_3 and control group (−0.096 log10 copies/mL [97.5% CI: −0.257; 0.065]). No differences between groups were observed in HIV-1 VL change, CD4+ T-cell count, ART initiation, or HIV-related clinical events at intermediate timepoints. Among F4/AS01B recipients, the most frequent solicited symptoms were pain at injection site (252/300 doses), fatigue (137/300 doses), myalgia (105/300 doses), and headache (90/300 doses). Twelve serious adverse events were reported in 6 participants; 1 was considered vaccine-related (F4/AS01B_2 group: angioedema). F4/AS01B induced polyfunctional F4-specific CD4+ T-cells, but had no significant impact on F4-specific CD8+ T-cell and anti-F4 antibody levels. F4/AS01B had a clinically acceptable safety profile, induced F4-specific CD4+ T-cell responses, but did not reduce HIV-1 VL, impact CD4+ T-cells count, delay ART initiation, or prevent HIV-1 related clinical events. PMID:26871794

  8. Fluorescent reporter signals, EGFP and DsRed, encoded in HIV-1 facilitate the detection of productively infected cells and cell-associated viral replication levels

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    Kazutaka eTerahara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow cytometric analysis is a reliable and convenient method for investigating molecules at the single cell level. Previously, recombinant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 strains were constructed that express a fluorescent reporter, either enhanced green fluorescent protein or DsRed, which allow the monitoring of HIV-1-infected cells by flow cytometry. The present study further investigated the potential of these recombinant viruses in terms of whether the HIV-1 fluorescent reporters would be helpful in evaluating viral replication based on fluorescence intensity. When primary CD4+ T cells were infected with recombinant viruses, the fluorescent reporter intensity measured by flow cytometry was associated with the level of CD4 downmodulation and Gag p24 expression in infected cells. Interestingly, some HIV-1-infected cells, in which CD4 was only moderately downmodulated, were reporter-positive but Gag p24-negative. Furthermore, when the activation status of primary CD4+ T cells was modulated by T cell receptor-mediated stimulation, we confirmed the preferential viral production upon strong stimulation and showed that the intensity of the fluorescent reporter within a proportion of HIV-1-infected cells was correlated with the viral replication level. These findings indicate that a fluorescent reporter encoded within HIV-1 is useful for the sensitive detection of productively-infected cells at different stages of infection and for evaluating cell-associated viral replication at the single cell level.

  9. The prognostic value of the suPARnosticTM ELISA assay in HIV-1 infected individuals is not affected by uPAR promoter polymorphisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Uffe; Nielsen, Rikke; Pedersen, Court;

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: High blood levels of soluble urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor (suPAR) are associated with poor outcomes in human immunodeficiency-1 (HIV-1) infected individuals. Research on the clinical value of suPAR in HIV-1 infection led to the development of the su......PARnosticTM assay for commercial use in 2006. The aim of this study was to: 1) Evaluate the prognostic value of the new suPARnosticTM assay and 2) Determine whether polymorphisms in the active promoter of uPAR influences survival and/or suPAR values in HIV-1 patients who are antiretroviral therapy (ART) naive...

  10. Impact of gender on the risk of AIDS-defining illnesses and mortality in Danish HIV-1-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Kristina; Ladelund, Steen; Jensen-Fangel, Søren;

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background: Gender differences in the risk of AIDS-defining illness (ADI) and mortality have been reported in the HIV-1-infected (HIV-positive) population, with conflicting findings. We aimed to assess the impact of gender on the risk of ADI and death in HIV-positive patients infected...... no differences between the 3 risk groups, although we saw a trend towards a higher risk of death in older MSW. MSM had a lower risk of death compared to the background population than women and MSW. Conclusions: In the Danish HIV population, gender has no major impact on progression to AIDS or mortality...

  11. Acne vulgaris and acne rosacea as part of immune reconstitution disease in HIV-1 infected patients starting antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Christopher; Staughton, Richard C D; Bunker, Christopher J; Asboe, David

    2008-07-01

    Immune reconstitution disease (IRD) has been widely reported following the commencement of antiretrovirals. We report a case series from a cohort of HIV-1-infected patients of whom four developed acne vulgaris and one developed acne rosacea after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy. Acne vulgaris, as part of IRD, has been reported only once in the literature, whereas acne rosacea has not, to our knowledge, previously been described. This serves as a reminder not to overlook dermatological manifestations of disease in patients with HIV infection after starting antiretrovirals.

  12. Temporal expression of HIV-1 envelope proteins in baculovirus-infected insect cells: Implications for glycosylation and CD4 binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, C.I.; Lennick, M.; Lehar, S.M.; Beltz, G.A.; Young, E. (Cambridge Bioscience Corporation, Worcester, MA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Three different human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) envelope derived recombinant proteins and the full length human CD4 polypeptide were expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells. DNA constructs encoding CD4, gp120, gp160, and gp160 delta were cloned into the baculovirus expression vector pVL941 or a derivative and used to generate recombinant viruses in a cotransfection with DNA from Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV). Western blotting of cell extracts of the recombinant HIV-1 proteins showed that for each construct two major bands specifically reacted with anti-HIV-1 envelope antiserum. These bands corresponded to glycosylated and nonglycosylated versions of the HIV proteins as determined by 3H-mannose labeling and tunicamycin treatment of infected cells. A time course of HIV envelope expression revealed that at early times post-infection (24 hours) the proteins were fully glycosylated and soluble in nonionic detergents. However, at later times postinfection (48 hours), expression levels of recombinant protein reached a maximum but most of the increase was due to a rise in the level of the nonglycosylated species, which was largely insoluble in nonionic detergents. Thus, it appears that Sf9 cells cannot process large amounts of glycosylated recombinant proteins efficiently. As a measure of biological activity, the CD4 binding ability of both glycosylated and nonglycosylated recombinant HIV envelope proteins was tested in a coimmunoprecipitation assay. The results showed that CD4 and the glycosylated versions of recombinant gp120 or gp160 delta specifically associated with one another in this analysis. Nonglycosylated gp120 or gp160 delta proteins from tunicamycin-treated cultures did immunoprecipitate with anti-HIV-1 antiserum but did not interact with CD4.

  13. Hiv-1 genetic diversity in Argentina and early diagnosis of perinatal infection La diversidad genética del HIV-1 en la Argentina y el diagnóstico temprano de la infección perinatal

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    Paula C. Aulicino

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 diagnosis of perinatally exposed children is usually performed by molecular biology-based methods, allowing the direct detection of the virus. Thus, HIV-1 genomic variability within and across strains plays a major role in relation to the sensitivity of these tests, often leading to misdiagnosis. We describe the performance of an in-house multiplex nested PCR (nPCR for early detection of HIV-1 infection in perinatally exposed children born in Argentina, where the percentage of diverse BF recombinants is as high as 80%. After evaluation of 1316 HIV-1 perinatally exposed children collected over a 7-year period, the specificity and sensitivity of the diagnostic nPCR was of 100% and 99.2% respectively, with only two false negative cases indicating a good performance of the diagnostic nPCR in the Argentine pediatric cohort. In search of unusual HIV-1 subtypes among 22 HIV-1 infected cases presenting partial or complete HIV-1 gene amplification failure, we performed phylogenetic and recombination analysis of a vpu-env fragment in addition to gag and env Heteroduplex Mobility Assay screening. The most unusual findings included two subtypes A and a novel BC recombinant, while the majority of the strains were a variety of different BF recombinants. These results indicate the presence of novel and heterogeneous genotypes in our country and the need of continuous viral surveillance not only for diagnostic test optimization but also for the eventual implementation of a successful vaccine.El diagnóstico temprano de infección por HIV-1 en niños expuestos perinatalmente al virus se realiza con técnicas de biología molecular, detectando el virus en sangre. Por ello, la variabilidad genómica intra e inter subtipo del HIV-1 juega un rol importante en relación a la sensibilidad de estos tests. Describimos aquí la performance de una PCR multiplex anidada artesanal (nPCR, rutinariamente usada para el diagnóstico temprano de la infección por HIV-1 en

  14. A cyclophilin homology domain-independent role for Nup358 in HIV-1 infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meehan, A.M.; Saenz, D.T.; Guevera, R.; Morrison, J.H.; Peretz, M.; Fadel, H.J.; Hamada, M.; Deursen, J. van; Poeschla, E.M.

    2014-01-01

    The large nucleoporin Nup358/RanBP2 forms eight filaments that project from the nuclear pore into the cytoplasm where they function as docking platforms for nucleocytoplasmic transport receptors. RNAi screens have implicated Nup358 in the HIV-1 life cycle. The 164 C-terminal amino acids of this 3,22

  15. Multimicronutrient supplementation and asymptomatic urinary tract infections in the elderly

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    Paul Boekitwetan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available As human life expectancy continues to increase, developing countries are reporting higher percentages of elderly in their respective populations. The defense mechanisms of the elderly are reduced due to several factors, such as increased susceptibility to infection, specifically urinary tract infection (UTI. A randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial was conducted to assess whether multimicronutrient supplementation is effective in reducing UTIs in older people in the community. A total of 261 elderly who lived in Mampang Prapatan district, South Jakarta, were randomised to daily multimicronutrient supplementation or control groups. The primary outcomes were the incidence of asymptomatic UTI, the organisms responsible for UTIs and the results of sensitivity tests on UTI microorganisms. UTI was defined as culture-positive urine yielding a single species of organisms in numbers greater than 104 cfu/mL urine specimen. At base-line 19.5% of the elderly had UTI, namely 23.7% patients in the MMN group and 16.7% in the control group, but the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.158. Escherichia coli was the most common microorganism, isolated in 20.7% of the MMN group and 17.5% of the control group. After six months of supplementation, UTI in the MMN group decreased by 40.6% compared with only 14.4% in the control group. The numbers of E. coli also declined by 64.3% in the MMN group compared to 37.8% in the control group. This study has confirmed the beneficial effect of multimicronutrient supplementation on UTI in the elderly.

  16. Decreased NK Cell FcRgamma in HIV-1 infected individuals receiving combination antiretroviral therapy: a cross sectional study.

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    Edwin Leeansyah

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: FcRgamma is an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM-signalling protein essential for immunoreceptor signaling and monocyte, macrophage and NK cell function. Previous study from our laboratory showed that FcRgamma is down-regulated in HIV-infected macrophages in vitro. FcRgamma expression in immune cells present in HIV-infected individuals is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We compared FcRgamma expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from HIV-1-infected individuals receiving combination antiretroviral therapy and healthy, HIV-1-uninfected individuals. FcRgamma mRNA and protein levels were measured using quantitative real-time PCR and immunoblotting, respectively. CD56(+ CD94(+ lymphocytes isolated from blood of HIV-1 infected individuals had reduced FcRgamma protein expression compared to HIV-uninfected individuals (decrease = 76.8%, n = 18 and n = 12 respectively, p = 0.0036. In a second group of patients, highly purified NK cells had reduced FcRgamma protein expression compared to uninfected controls (decrease = 50.2%, n = 9 and n = 8 respectively, p = 0.021. Decreased FcRgamma expression in CD56+CD94+ lymphocytes was associated with reduced mRNA (51.7%, p = 0.021 but this was not observed for the smaller group of patients analysed for NK cell expression (p = 0.36. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest biochemical defects in ITAM-dependent signalling within NK cells in HIV-infected individuals which is present in the context of treatment with combination antiretroviral therapy.

  17. HIV Drug Resistance-Associated Mutations in Antiretroviral Naïve HIV-1-Infected Latin American Children

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    Luis E. Soto-Ramirez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Our goal was to describe the presence of HIV drug resistance among HIV-1-infected, antiretroviral (ARV naïve children and adolescents in Latin America and to examine resistance in these children in relation to drug exposure in the mother. Genotyping was performed on plasma samples obtained at baseline from HIV-1-infected participants in a prospective cohort study in Brazil, Argentina, and Mexico (NISDI Pediatric Study. Of 713 HIV-infected children enrolled, 69 were ARV naïve and eligible for the analysis. At enrollment, mean age was 7.3 years; 81.2% were infected with HIV perinatally. Drug resistance mutations (DRMs were detected in 6 (8.7%; 95% confidence interval 3.1–18.2% ARV-naïve subjects; none of the mothers of these 6 received ARVs during their pregnancies and none of the children received ARV prophylaxis. Reverse transcriptase mutations K70R and K70E were detected in 3 and 2 subjects, respectively; protease mutation I50 V was detected in 1 subject. Three of the 6 children with DRMs initiated ARV therapy during followup, with a good response in 2. The overall rate of primary drug resistance in this pediatric HIV-infected population was low, and no subjects had more than 1 DRM. Mutations associated with resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors were the most prevalent.

  18. Kaposi's-sarcoma-associated-herpesvirus-activated dendritic cells promote HIV-1 trans-infection and suppress CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wan; Qin, Yan; Bai, Lei [Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institute Pasteur of Shanghai, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Lan, Ke [Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institute Pasteur of Shanghai, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Wang, Jian-Hua, E-mail: Jh_wang@sibs.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institute Pasteur of Shanghai, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China)

    2013-06-05

    Infection of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is commonly occurred in AIDS patients. KSHV and HIV-1 act cooperatively in regulating infection with each other and in human carcinogenesis. Dendritic cells (DCs), as the pivotal cells in host immunity, may be modulated by both viruses, for immunoevasion and dissemination, therefore, the interaction between DCs and each virus has been a prior focus for pathogenesis elucidation. Here, we assessed the potential effect of KSHV on DC–HIV-1 interaction. We found that KSHV stimulation could promote maturation of monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) and impaired the ability of MDDCs to drive proliferation of resting CD4{sup +} T cells, demonstrating the immunosuppression induced by KSHV. More importantly, KSHV-stimulated MDDCs could capture more HIV-1 and efficiently transferred these infectious viruses to Hut/CCR5 T cell line. Our results reveal the novel modulation of DC-mediated HIV-1 dissemination by KSHV, and highlight the importance of studying DC–HIV-1 interaction to elucidate HIV/AIDS pathogenesis. - Highlights: ► KSHV impaired the ability of MDDCs to drive proliferation of resting CD4{sup +} T cells. ► KSHV stimulation matured MDDCs and enhanced HIV-1 endocytosis. ► KSHV stimulated MDDCs increased ICAM-1 expression and tighten contact with T cells. ► KSHV-stimulated MDDCs promoted HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4{sup +} T cells.

  19. Siglec-1 is a novel dendritic cell receptor that mediates HIV-1 trans-infection through recognition of viral membrane gangliosides.

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    Nuria Izquierdo-Useros

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are essential antigen-presenting cells for the induction of immunity against pathogens. However, HIV-1 spread is strongly enhanced in clusters of DCs and CD4(+ T cells. Uninfected DCs capture HIV-1 and mediate viral transfer to bystander CD4(+ T cells through a process termed trans-infection. Initial studies identified the C-type lectin DC-SIGN as the HIV-1 binding factor on DCs, which interacts with the viral envelope glycoproteins. Upon DC maturation, however, DC-SIGN is down-regulated, while HIV-1 capture and trans-infection is strongly enhanced via a glycoprotein-independent capture pathway that recognizes sialyllactose-containing membrane gangliosides. Here we show that the sialic acid-binding Ig-like lectin 1 (Siglec-1, CD169, which is highly expressed on mature DCs, specifically binds HIV-1 and vesicles carrying sialyllactose. Furthermore, Siglec-1 is essential for trans-infection by mature DCs. These findings identify Siglec-1 as a key factor for HIV-1 spread via infectious DC/T-cell synapses, highlighting a novel mechanism that mediates HIV-1 dissemination in activated tissues.

  20. Controle de polidrâmnio recorrente em gestante portadora do HIV-1: relato de caso Recurrent polyhydramnios management in an HIV-1 infected pregnant woman: a case report

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    Geraldo Duarte

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A redução da transmissão vertical (TV do vírus da imunodeficiência humana tipo 1 (HIV-1 utilizando a profilaxia com a zidovudina (AZT representa significativo avanço na assistência pré-natal e obstétrica destas pacientes. Condutas obstétricas invasivas são contra-indicadas em gestantes portadoras do HIV-1, em face do risco de aumento da taxa de TV deste vírus. Os autores relatam um caso de polidrâmnio recorrente em gestante portadora do HIV-1, que exigiu drenagem por amniocentese. Foram realizadas quatro punções ao longo da gestação, na 23ª, 26ª, 27ª e 29ª semanas, todas guiadas por ultra-sonografia, drenando, respectivamente, 1.800, 1.450, 1.700 e 1.960 mL de líquido amniótico claro em cada punção. Com 30 semanas e 5 dias de gestação a paciente apresentou trabalho de parto pré-termo, evoluindo para parto vaginal de recém-nato (RN pesando 1.690 g e medindo 43 cm. O RN evoluiu com diagnóstico de nefropatia perdedora de sódio, tendo três aferições de reação em cadeia de polimerase para HIV-1 negativas. Os autores ilustram uma opção no manejo de situações que envolvam gestantes portadoras do HIV-1 que necessitem de procedimentos obstétricos invasivos, utilizando AZT endovenoso (2 mg/kg previamente ao procedimento, medida que apresentou excelente resultado no caso descrito, evitando a infecção perinatal pelo HIV-1.The reduction of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT of the HIV-1 using zidovudine (ZDV represents a cornerstone in the prenatal and obstetrical care to these patients. The invasive fetal and obstetric procedures are proscribed in HIV-1 infected pregnant patients, to avoid the increased risk of MTCT of this virus. The authors present a case of an HIV-1 infected woman with recurrent polyhydramnios. Four ultrasound-guided amniotic punctures were performed in the 23rd, 26th, 27th and 29th weeks of gestation, each one draining the respective volumes of 1,800, 1,450, 1,700 and 1,960 ml of clear amniotic

  1. The Novel Cyclophilin Inhibitor CPI-431-32 Concurrently Blocks HCV and HIV-1 Infections via a Similar Mechanism of Action.

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    Philippe A Gallay

    Full Text Available HCV-related liver disease is the main cause of morbidity and mortality of HCV/HIV-1 co-infected patients. Despite the recent advent of anti-HCV direct acting antivirals (DAAs, the treatment of HCV/HIV-1 co-infected patients remains a challenge, as these patients are refractory to most therapies and develop liver fibrosis, cirrhosis and liver cancer more often than HCV mono-infected patients. Until the present study, there was no suitable in vitro assay to test the inhibitory activity of drugs on HCV/HIV-1 co-infection. Here we developed a novel in vitro "co-infection" model where HCV and HIV-1 concurrently replicate in their respective main host target cells--human hepatocytes and CD4+ T-lymphocytes. Using this co-culture model, we demonstrate that cyclophilin inhibitors (CypI, including a novel cyclosporin A (CsA analog, CPI-431-32, simultaneously inhibits replication of both HCV and HIV-1 when added pre- and post-infection. In contrast, the HIV-1 protease inhibitor nelfinavir or the HCV NS5A inhibitor daclatasvir only blocks the replication of a single virus in the "co-infection" system. CPI-431-32 efficiently inhibits HCV and HIV-1 variants, which are normally resistant to DAAs. CPI-431-32 is slightly, but consistently more efficacious than the most advanced clinically tested CypI--alisporivir (ALV--at interrupting an established HCV/HIV-1 co-infection. The superior antiviral efficacy of CPI-431-32 over ALV correlates with its higher potency inhibition of cyclophilin A (CypA isomerase activity and at preventing HCV NS5A-CypA and HIV-1 capsid-CypA interactions known to be vital for replication of the respective viruses. Moreover, we obtained evidence that CPI-431-32 prevents the cloaking of both the HIV-1 and HCV genomes from cellular sensors. Based on these results, CPI-431-32 has the potential, as a single agent or in combination with DAAs, to inhibit both HCV and HIV-1 infections.

  2. Clade A HIV-1 Gag-Specific T Cell Responses Are Frequent but Do Not Correlate with Viral Loads in a Cohort of Treatment-Naive HIV-Infected Individuals Living in Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristoffer Jarlov; Gómez Román, Victor Raúl; Skov Jensen, Sanne;

    2012-01-01

    In a phase I clinical trial in Guinea-Bissau, we have tested an immunotherapeutic 33 HIV-1 vaccine candidate in HIV-1-infected subjects (Gómez Román et al., under review).…......In a phase I clinical trial in Guinea-Bissau, we have tested an immunotherapeutic 33 HIV-1 vaccine candidate in HIV-1-infected subjects (Gómez Román et al., under review).…...

  3. Association study of common genetic variants and HIV-1 acquisition in 6,300 infected cases and 7,200 controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaren, Paul J; Coulonges, Cédric; Ripke, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    -level data sets (a list of all collaborators appears in Note S1 in Text S1). After imputation using the 1,000 Genomes Project reference panel, we tested approximately 8 million common DNA variants (SNPs and indels) for association with HIV-1 acquisition in 6,334 infected patients and 7,247 population samples......Multiple genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been performed in HIV-1 infected individuals, identifying common genetic influences on viral control and disease course. Similarly, common genetic correlates of acquisition of HIV-1 after exposure have been interrogated using GWAS, although...... in generally small samples. Under the auspices of the International Collaboration for the Genomics of HIV, we have combined the genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data collected by 25 cohorts, studies, or institutions on HIV-1 infected individuals and compared them to carefully matched population...

  4. High prevalence of illicit drug use in men who have sex with men with HIV-1 infection in Japan.

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    Takeshi Nishijima

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine the prevalence of illicit drug use among men who have sex with men (MSM with HIV-1 infection in Japan, where the life-time prevalence of illicit drug use in the general population is only 2.9%. DESIGN: A single-center cross-sectional study at a large HIV clinic in Tokyo, which treats approximately 15% of HIV-1 infected patients in Japan. METHODS: The prevalence of illicit drug use and the association of characteristics and social demographics of the patients with illicit drug use were examined. Patients who visited the clinic for the first time from 2005 to 2010 were enrolled. Relevant variables were collected using a structured interview and from the medical records. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were applied to estimate the odds of association of MSM over non-MSM HIV-infected patients with illicit drug use. RESULTS: 1,196 patients were enrolled. They were mostly Japanese men of relatively young age. Illicit drug use (including injection drugs was reported by 35% of the patients (by 40% of MSM, and 4% were IDU while 5% were on methamphetamine. 2% of the population was arrested due to illicit drugs. MSM was significantly associated with illicit drug use (adjusted OR = 4.60; 95% CI, 2.88-7.36; p40 showed that the odds of association of MSM with illicit drug use was the strongest in the youngest age group (≤ 30 years: adjusted OR = 7.56; 95% CI, 2.86-20.0; p40 years: adjusted OR = 6.15; 95% CI, 2.40-15.8; p<0.01, and the weakest in the group aged 31 to 40 (adjusted OR = 3.39; 95% CI, 1.73-6.63; p<0.01. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of illicit drug use is high among MSM patients with HIV-1 infection in Japan. Effective intervention for illicit drug use in this population is warranted.

  5. Characterization of HIV-1 Infection and Innate Sensing in Different Types of Primary Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

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    Elisabeth A. Diget

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages play an important role in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV pathogenesis and contribute to establishment of a viral reservoir responsible for continuous virus production and virus transmission to T cells. In this study, we investigated the differences between various monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs generated through different differentiation protocols and evaluated different cellular, immunological, and virological properties. We found that elevated and persistent HIV-1 pWT/BaL replication could be obtained only in MDMs grown in RPMI containing macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF. Interestingly, this MDM type was also most responsive to toll-like receptor stimulation. By contrast, all MDM types were activated to a comparable extent by intracellular DNA, and the macrophage serum-free medium-(Mac-SFM-differentiated MDMs responded strongly to membrane fusion through expression of CXCL10. Finally, we found that HIV infection of RPMI/M-CSF-differentiated MDMs induced low-grade expression of two interferon-stimulated genes in some donors. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the differentiation protocol used greatly influences the ability of MDMs to activate innate immune reactions and support HIV-1 replication. Paradoxically, the data show that the MDMs with the strongest innate immune response were also the most permissive for HIV-1 replication.

  6. Analysis of HIV-1 protease gene reveals frequent multiple infections followed by recombination among drug treated individuals living in Sao Paulo and Santos, Brazil.

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    Edsel Renata De Morais Nunes

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the prevalence of HIV-1 multiple infections in a population composed by 47 patients under HAART failure and enrolled at the National DST/AIDS, Program, Ministry of Health, Brazil.Detection of multiple infections was done using a previously published RFLP assay for the HIV-1 protease gene, which is able of distinguishing between infections caused by a single or multiple HIV-1 subtypes. Samples with multiple infections were cloned, and sequence data submitted to phylogenetic analysis. We were able to identify 17 HIV-1 multiple infections out of 47 samples. Multiple infections were mostly composed by a mixture of recombinant viruses (94%, with only one case in which protease gene pure subtypes B and F were recovered. This is the first study that reports the prevalence of multiple infections and intersubtype recombinants in a population undergoing HAART in Brazil. Based on the data there was a steep increase of multiple infections after the introduction of the combined antiretroviral therapy in Brazil. Cases of multiple infections may be associated with HIV-1 genetic diversity through recombination allowing for the generation of viruses showing a combination of resistance mutations.

  7. The thalidomide analogue CC-3052 inhibits HIV-1 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) expression in acutely and chronically infected cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Maestra, L; Zaninoni, A; Marriott, J B; Lazzarin, A; Dalgleish, A G; Barcellini, W

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the in vitro effect of the water-soluble, highly stable thalidomide analogue CC-3052 on HIV-1 expression and TNF-α production in latently infected promonocytic U1 cells, acutely infected T cells and monocyte-derived human macrophages (MDM), and in mitogen-stimulated ex vivo cultures from patients with primary acute HIV-1 infection. HIV-1 expression was assessed by Northern blot analysis of RNAs, and ELISA for p24 antigen release and reverse transcriptase (RT) activity. TNF-α expression was evaluated by RT-polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-ELISA for mRNA and ELISA for protein secretion. We demonstrated that CC-3052