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Sample records for asymptomatic aortic valve

  1. Assessing Optimal Blood Pressure in Patients With Asymptomatic Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Olav W; Sajadieh, Ahmad; Sabbah, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence for treating hypertension in patients with asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis is scarce. We used data from the SEAS trial (Simvastatin Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis) to assess what blood pressure (BP) would be optimal. METHODS: A total of 1767 patients with asymptomatic aortic...

  2. Asymptomatic papillary fibroelastoma of the Aortic valve in a young woman - a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pitsis Antonis

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Echocardiography represents an invaluable diagnostic tool for the detection of intracardiac masses while simultaneously provides information about their size, location, mobility and attachment site as well as the presence and extent of any consequent hemodynamic derangement. A 29-year-old asymptomatic young woman with incidental transthoracic echocardiographic (TTE discovery of an aortic valve mass is presented. The 2-dimensional TTE showed a mobile, pedunculated mass, attached by a thin stalk to the aortic surface of the right coronary aortic cusp at the junction of its base with the anterior aortic wall. The importance of valve sparing tumour resection even in asymptomatic patients is emphasised.

  3. Six-minute walking test and long term prognosis in patients with asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigvardsen, Per Ejlstrup; Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Carstensen, Helle Gervig

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Management of asymptomatic patients with aortic valve stenosis is challenging due to the elusive relationship between symptomatic status and hemodynamic parameters in addition to the occurrence of cardiovascular death. The 6-minute walking test (6MWT) reflects overall hemodynamic func...

  4. Left atrial volume as predictor of valve replacement and cardiovascular events in patients with asymptomatic mild to moderate aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Morten; Egstrup, Kenneth; Wachtell, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Left atrial (LA) size is known to increase with chronically increased left ventricular (LV) filling pressure. We hypothesized that LA volume was predictive of aortic valve replacement (AVR) and cardiovascular events in a large cohort of patients with asymptomatic mild to moderate aortic valve...

  5. Assessing Optimal Blood Pressure in Patients With Asymptomatic Aortic Valve Stenosis: The Simvastatin Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis Study (SEAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Olav W; Sajadieh, Ahmad; Sabbah, Muhammad; Greve, Anders M; Olsen, Michael H; Boman, Kurt; Nienaber, Christoph A; Kesäniemi, Y Antero; Pedersen, Terje R; Willenheimer, Ronnie; Wachtell, Kristian

    2016-08-09

    Evidence for treating hypertension in patients with asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis is scarce. We used data from the SEAS trial (Simvastatin Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis) to assess what blood pressure (BP) would be optimal. A total of 1767 patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis and no manifest atherosclerotic disease were analyzed. Outcomes were all-cause mortality, cardiovascular death, heart failure, stroke, myocardial infarction, and aortic valve replacement. BP was analyzed in Cox models as the cumulative average of serially measured BP and a time-varying covariate. The incidence of all-cause mortality was highest for average follow-up systolic BP ≥160 mm Hg (4.3 per 100 person-years; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.1-6.0) and lowest for average systolic BP of 120 to 139 mm Hg (2.0 per 100 person-years; 95% CI, 1.6-2.6). In multivariable analysis, all-cause mortality was associated with average systolic BP <120 mm Hg (hazard ratio [HR], 3.4; 95% CI, 1.9-6.1), diastolic BP ≥90 mm Hg (HR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.1-2.9), and pulse pressure <50 mm Hg (HR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.1-2.9), with systolic BP of 120 to 139 mm Hg, diastolic BP of 70 to 79 mm Hg, and pulse pressure of 60 to 69 mm Hg taken as reference. Low systolic and diastolic BPs increased risk in patients with moderate aortic stenosis. With a time-varying systolic BP from 130 to 139 mm Hg used as reference, mortality was increased for systolic BP ≥160 mm Hg (HR, 1.7; P=0.033) and BP of 120 to 129 mm Hg (HR, 1.6; P=0.039). Optimal BP seems to be systolic BP of 130 to 139 mm Hg and diastolic BP of 70 to 90 mm Hg in these patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis and no manifest atherosclerotic disease or diabetes mellitus. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00092677. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Exercise stress testing enhances blood coagulation and impairs fibrinolysis in asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolasa-Trela, Renata; Fil, Korneliusz; Wypasek, Ewa; Undas, Anetta

    2015-06-01

    Increased thrombin formation and fibrin deposition on the valves were observed in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis (AS). Exercise enhances blood coagulation and fibrinolysis in healthy subjects, but its haemostatic effects in AS are unknown. We sought to investigate how stress echocardiography alters blood coagulation and fibrinolysis in AS patients free of significant atherosclerotic vascular disease. We studied 32 consecutive asymptomatic moderate-to-severe AS patients and 32 age- and sex-matched controls. We measured peak thrombin generated using calibrated automated thrombogram, clot lysis time (CLT), and fibrinolytic markers at four time points, i.e. at rest, at peak exercise, and 1h and 24h after a symptom-limited exercise test. We observed that peak thrombin generated rose at peak exercise to 25% higher value in the patients than in controls (pfibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) activity (r=0.69, pfibrinolysis as compared to controls. Repeated episodes of exercise-induced prothrombotic state in AS might contribute to the progression of this disease. Copyright © 2014 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Prognostic implications of left ventricular asymmetry in patients with asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigvardsen, Per Ejlstrup; Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Carstensen, Helle Gervig

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Left ventricular (LV) regional hypertrophy in the form of LV asymmetry is a common finding in patients with aortic valve stenosis. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that LV asymmetry predicts future symptomatic status and indication for aortic valve replacement (AVR) in patie......Aims: Left ventricular (LV) regional hypertrophy in the form of LV asymmetry is a common finding in patients with aortic valve stenosis. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that LV asymmetry predicts future symptomatic status and indication for aortic valve replacement (AVR...... by multi-detector computed tomography according to previous definitions. Follow-up was conducted using electronic health records. Event-free survival was assessed using Cox proportional hazards models. Patients were followed for a median of 2.2 years (interquartile range 1.6-3.6). Indication for AVR...

  8. Aortic Valve Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rapid, fluttering heartbeat Not eating enough (mainly in children with aortic valve stenosis) Not gaining enough weight (mainly in children with aortic valve stenosis) The heart-weakening effects of aortic valve stenosis ...

  9. Aortic valve bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Jens T; Jensen, Maiken Brit; Arendrup, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    In aortic valve bypass (AVB) a valve-containing conduit is connecting the apex of the left ventricle to the descending aorta. Candidates are patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis rejected for conventional aortic valve replacement (AVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI...

  10. Tissue engineered aortic valve

    OpenAIRE

    Dohmen, P M

    2012-01-01

    Several prostheses are available to replace degenerative diseased aortic valves with unique advantages and disadvantages. Bioprotheses show excellent hemodynamic behavior and low risk of thromboembolic complications, but are limited by tissue deterioration. Mechanical heart valves have extended durability, but permanent anticoagulation is mandatory. Tissue engineering created a new generation heart valve, which overcome limitations of biological and mechanical heart valves due to remodelling,...

  11. [Asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis: a reopened debate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urso, Stefano; Sadaba, Rafael; de la Cruz, Elena

    2014-05-06

    Aortic stenosis is a complex disease. About 2-7% of the population over 65 years of age is affected by its degenerative form. In patients with severe aortic stenosis presenting with symptoms or left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF)debate. Recent published data show that about one third of these patients present with low left ventricle stroke volume, which may affect survival. For this reason, and considering that aortic valve replacement is in most cases a low risk procedure, early surgery in this subgroup is a strategy that deserves to be taken into account. In this review we report on these recent findings, which allow understanding why patients with asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis should not be considered and treated as a homogenous population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Timing of Dynamic NT-proBNP and hs-cTnT Response to Exercise Challenge in Asymptomatic Children with Moderate Aortic Valve Regurgitation or Moderate Aortic Valve Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawad, Wadi; Abadir, Sylvia; Fournier, Anne; Bigras, Jean-Luc; Curnier, Daniel; Kadem, Lyes; Dahdah, Nagib

    2015-12-01

    Patients with congenital aortic valve stenosis (AVS) can remain asymptomatic but may develop progressive and often underestimated exercise intolerance. The risk of increased left ventricular (LV) wall stress, irreversible myocardial fibrosis and sudden death in untreated patients warrants earlier intervention. The timing for curative therapy for severe AVS is clear, but optimal timing for moderate stenosis (modAS) is unknown. AVS often coexists with aortic regurgitation, which adds a volume overload to an already pressure-overloaded LV, adding an additional challenge to the estimation of disease severity. We investigated the possible value of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) upon treadmill exercise challenge in children with asymptomatic modAS versus moderate regurgitation (modAR). The aim was to determine optimal timing of peak biochemical response. Blood samples were obtained at rest, and then at 20, 40 and 60 min after peak exercise comparing modAS and modAR to healthy controls. Exercise performance was equivalent in all groups, with no difference for biomarker levels at rest. The increase in NT-proBNP was significant in modAR at 40 min (99.2 ± 48.6 ng/L; p = 0.04) and 60 min into recovery (100.0 ± 53.7 ng/L; p = 0.01), but not in modAS. The increase in hs-cTnT was significant only at 60 min into recovery for modAS and modAR. NT-proBNP and hs-cTnT following exercise challenge are possible discriminant biomarkers of modAR from modAS and controls at 60 min into recovery despite comparable exercise performance. This offers a promising avenue for future stratification of aortic valve disease and optimal timing of intervention.

  13. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in degenerative sutureless perceval aortic bioprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landes, Uri; Sagie, Alexander; Kornowski, Ran

    2016-10-03

    Sutureless aortic bioprostheses (SAB) are increasingly being used to provide shorter cross-clamp time. Valve-in-valve transcatheter aortic valve replacement (VIV-A) is shown to be effective and safe in the vast majority of patients with degenerated bioprosthetics, yet its' use in SAB failure is infrequent. We present a case of balloon-expandable VIV-A in an 80-year-old woman who suffered severe symptomatic aortic regurgitation in a failed Perceval S 21-mm valve. Computed tomography scan demonstrated a deformed valve. Our heart team favored a percutaneous VIV-A over reoperation due to the patients' high surgical risk. An Edwards-Sapien XT 23 mm was successfully deployed with excellent results. The patient remained asymptomatic following 6 months. As other bioprosthesis, some sutureless valves are condemned to structural valve degeneration. Because VIV-A is being established for managing degenerative bioprosthesis in high risk patients, it is cardinal to identify its role in novel degenerative sutureless valves. SAB were introduced to the clinical market only 5-7 years ago. The absence of sutures may theoretically impose risk for valve instability when adding a transcatheter sutureless valve inside the first one. Our successful experience was very reassuring. We report its feasibility because we believe it should provide support for further investigation on VIV-A within novel SAV. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation for bicuspid aortic valve stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Ashraf; Kornowski, Ran

    2015-08-01

    In Preprocedural CT, patients with BAV have larger aortic annulus perimeters, and more calcified valves compared with TAV. In patients with BAV, self-expandable valves were under-expand and balloon-expandable valves have a trend toward increased rates of postimplantation AR grade. Self-expandable valves have higher postprocedural gradient in BAV compared with TAV. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foghsgaard, Signe; Schmidt, Thomas Andersen; Kjaergard, Henrik K

    2009-01-01

    In this descriptive prospective study, we evaluate the outcomes of surgery in 98 patients who were scheduled to undergo minimally invasive aortic valve replacement. These patients were compared with a group of 50 patients who underwent scheduled aortic valve replacement through a full sternotomy...

  16. Aortic Annular Enlargement during Aortic Valve Replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Selman Dumani; Ermal Likaj; Laureta Dibra; Stavri Llazo; Ali Refatllari

    2016-01-01

    In the surgery of aortic valve replacement is always attempted, as much as possible, to implant the larger prosthesis with the mains goals to enhance the potential benefits, to minimise transvalvular gradient, decrease left ventricular size and avoid the phenomenon of patient-prosthesis mismatch. Implantation of an ideal prosthesis often it is not possible, due to a small aortic annulus. A variety of aortic annulus enlargement techniques is reported to avoid patient-prosthesis mismatch. We pr...

  17. Aortic Annular Enlargement during Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selman Dumani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the surgery of aortic valve replacement is always attempted, as much as possible, to implant the larger prosthesis with the mains goals to enhance the potential benefits, to minimise transvalvular gradient, decrease left ventricular size and avoid the phenomenon of patient-prosthesis mismatch. Implantation of an ideal prosthesis often it is not possible, due to a small aortic annulus. A variety of aortic annulus enlargement techniques is reported to avoid patient-prosthesis mismatch. We present the case that has submitted four three times open heart surgery. We used Manouguian technique to enlarge aortic anulus with excellent results during the fourth time of surgery.

  18. Aortic Annular Enlargement during Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumani, Selman; Likaj, Ermal; Dibra, Laureta; Llazo, Stavri; Refatllari, Ali

    2016-09-15

    In the surgery of aortic valve replacement is always attempted, as much as possible, to implant the larger prosthesis with the mains goals to enhance the potential benefits, to minimise transvalvular gradient, decrease left ventricular size and avoid the phenomenon of patient-prosthesis mismatch. Implantation of an ideal prosthesis often it is not possible, due to a small aortic annulus. A variety of aortic annulus enlargement techniques is reported to avoid patient-prosthesis mismatch. We present the case that has submitted four three times open heart surgery. We used Manouguian technique to enlarge aortic anulus with excellent results during the fourth time of surgery.

  19. Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    aortic valvular disease, endocarditis, ascending aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection.1-4 There is also an association of BAV with coarctation of...for aortic aneurysm , patients with BAV appear to have additional risks for aortic disease. Nistri et al.12 reported significant aortic root...Congenital heart disease in patients with Turner’s syndrome. Italian study group for Turner syndrome (ISGTS). J Pediatr 1998; 133:688-692. 7. Schmid

  20. Death from ascending aortic aneurysm secondary to quadricuspid aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoni, Francesco; Ricci, Serafino

    2014-12-01

    Quadricuspid aortic valve is a very rare cardiac malformation (<1.46%) that is very rarely associated with other diseases, such as ascending aortic aneurysm.The authors present a case of cardiac tamponade from a rupture of the ascending aortic aneurysm that may have been caused, as shown by a review of the literature, by the quadricuspid aortic valve.

  1. Factors influencing left ventricular structure and stress-corrected systolic function in men and women with asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis (a SEAS Substudy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramariuc, D.; Rieck, A.E.; Staal, E.M.

    2008-01-01

    To identify determinants of left ventricular (LV) structure and stress-corrected systolic function in men and women with asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS), Doppler echocardiography was performed at baseline in 1,046 men and 674 women 28 to 86 years of age (mean 67 +/- 10) recruited in the Simvast......To identify determinants of left ventricular (LV) structure and stress-corrected systolic function in men and women with asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS), Doppler echocardiography was performed at baseline in 1,046 men and 674 women 28 to 86 years of age (mean 67 +/- 10) recruited.......05). In logistic regression analyses, LV hypertrophy was independently associated with male gender, severity of AS, hypertension, higher systolic blood pressure, and lower stress-corrected midwall shortening (scMWS) or stress-corrected fractional shortening (scFS; all p values ... mass, relative wall thickness, aortic regurgitation, hypertension, and end-systolic stress (R(2) = 0.23 and 0.59, respectively, p major determinants of LV hypertrophy in patients with asymptomatic AS are male gender, severity of AS, and concomitant hypertension. Women have...

  2. [MINIMALLY INVASIVE AORTIC VALVE REPLACEMENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabata, Minoru

    2016-03-01

    Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) is defined as aortic valve replacement avoiding full sternotomy. Common approaches include a partial sternotomy right thoracotomy, and a parasternal approach. MIAVR has been shown to have advantages over conventional AVR such as shorter length of stay and smaller amount of blood transfusion and better cosmesis. However, it is also known to have disadvantages such as longer cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times and potential complications related to peripheral cannulation. Appropriate patient selection is very important. Since the procedure is more complex than conventional AVR, more intensive teamwork in the operating room is essential. Additionally, a team approach during postoperative management is critical to maximize the benefits of MIAVR.

  3. Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation due to severe aortic regurgitation in a degenerated aortic homograft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lene Kjaer; Engstrøm, Thomas; Søndergaard, Lars

    2009-01-01

    a successful valve-in-valve implantation of a CoreValve aortic valve prosthesis through the right subclavian artery in a case of severe aortic regurgitation within a degenerated aortic homograft. The case exemplifies the possibilities of expanding the indications for TAVI, as well as other vascular access...

  4. Aortic Valve Regurgitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... valves. Rheumatic fever. Rheumatic fever — a complication of strep throat and once a common childhood illness in the ... a severe sore throat, see a doctor. Untreated strep throat can lead to rheumatic fever. Fortunately, strep throat ...

  5. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement†

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolbergen, David R.; Manshanden, Johan S. J.; Bouma, Berto J.; Blom, Nico A.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.; Hazekamp, Mark G.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate our results of valve-sparing aortic root replacement and associated (multiple) valve repair. From September 2003 to September 2013, 97 patients had valve-sparing aortic root replacement procedures. Patient records and preoperative, postoperative and recent echocardiograms were reviewed.

  6. Aortic valve surgery - open

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be able to store blood in the blood bank for transfusions during and after your surgery. Ask ... Mechanical heart valves do not fail often. However, blood clots can develop on them. If a blood clot forms, you may have a stroke. Bleeding can occur, ...

  7. Aortic Calcification: An Early Sign of Heart Valve Problems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the aortic valve — a condition called aortic valve stenosis. Aortic valve calcification may be an early sign ... have any other heart disease symptoms. Calcification and stenosis generally affects people older than age 65. When ...

  8. Aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; Athanasiou, Thanos; Mestres, Carlos A

    2008-01-01

    countries. METHODS: A multi-institutional, non-randomized, retrospective analysis was conducted among 2,932 patients who underwent AVR surgery at seven tertiary cardiac surgery centers throughout Europe. Demographic and perioperative variables including valve size and type, body surface area (BSA) and early...... and southern European countries. Imbalances in the prevalence of rheumatic heart disease, health resource availability and variations in surgical practice throughout Europe might be possible etiological causes....

  9. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Degenerative Bioprosthetic Surgical Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvir, Danny; Webb, John; Brecker, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation is an emerging therapeutic alternative for patients with a failed surgical bioprosthesis and may obviate the need for reoperation. We evaluated the clinical results of this technique using a large, worldwide registry....

  10. Two-Year Outcomes in Patients With Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis Randomized to Transcatheter Versus Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lars; Steinbrüchel, Daniel Andreas; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Nordic Aortic Valve Intervention (NOTION) trial was the first to randomize all-comers with severe native aortic valve stenosis to either transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) with the CoreValve self-expanding bioprosthesis or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR), inclu...... population. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01057173....

  11. Prosthetic valve endocarditis after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Niels Thue; De Backer, Ole; Thyregod, Hans G H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an advancing mode of treatment for inoperable or high-risk patients with aortic stenosis. Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) after TAVI is a serious complication, but only limited data exist on its incidence, outcome, and procedural...

  12. Aortic Diameter Growth in Children With a Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merkx, R.; Duijnhouwer, A.L.; Vink, E. de; Roos-Hesselink, J.W.; Schokking, M.

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of aortic growth in patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is essential to identify patients at risk for dissection, but data on children remain unclear. We retrospectively evaluated the aortic diameters of all pediatric BAV patients, identified through an echocardiographic database

  13. Aortic Diameter Growth in Children With a Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merkx, R. (Remy); A.L. Duijnhouwer (Anthonie L.); Vink, E. (Evelien); J.W. Roos-Hesselink (Jolien); M. Schokking (Michiel)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractKnowledge of aortic growth in patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is essential to identify patients at risk for dissection, but data on children remain unclear. We retrospectively evaluated the aortic diameters of all pediatric BAV patients, identified through an echocardiographic

  14. Pathogenetic Basis of Aortopathy and Aortic Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-19

    Aortopathies; Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm; Aortic Valve Disease; Thoracic Aortic Disease; Thoracic Aortic Dissection; Thoracic Aortic Rupture; Ascending Aortic Disease; Descending Aortic Disease; Ascending Aortic Aneurysm; Descending Aortic Aneurysm; Marfan Syndrome; Loeys-Dietz Syndrome; Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome; Shprintzen-Goldberg Syndrome; Turner Syndrome; PHACE Syndrome; Autosomal Recessive Cutis Laxa; Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly; Arterial Tortuosity Syndrome

  15. A case of SAPIEN XT valve fallen into left ventricle during valve-in-valve transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Shigeki; Ehara, Natsuhiko; Nishiya, Kenta; Koyama, Tadaaki

    2017-06-24

    Late transcatheter heart valve embolization is a rare but life-threatening complication of transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Surgical intervention is performed for most cases, but some cases were treated by valve-in-valve transcatheter aortic valve implantation. We describe a patient in whom a 29-mm Edwards SAPIEN XT valve migrated into the left ventricular outflow tract 41 days after the initial implantation. We tried to perform valve-in-valve transcatheter aortic valve implantation using a transfemoral approach. As soon as the second transcatheter heart valve touched the first implanted valve, it fell into the left ventricle. Immediate surgical intervention was required. The first valve was removed, and surgical aortic valve replacement was successfully performed. In conclusion, we should choose surgical aortic valve replacement for late transcatheter heart valve embolization. Even if we need to treat by catheter intervention, transapical approach may be better.

  16. Full metal jacket: transfemoral aortic valve implantation for regurgitant valve after endovascular aortic repair†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanyeli, Omer; Dereli, Yuksel; Gormus, Niyazi; Duzenli, Mehmet Akif

    2017-07-25

    Transfemoral aortic valve implantation has become an almost routine interventional procedure for severe aortic stenosis in high-risk patients. Over time an increased number of experiences has led to unusual procedures. In this report, we present a successful valve-in-valve transfemoral aortic valve implantation in a patient with aortic regurgitation, who previously had debranching and thoracic endovascular aortic repair operations. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  17. Valve thrombosis following transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba-Soriano, Juan G; Puri, Rishi; Amat-Santos, Ignacio; Ribeiro, Henrique B; Abdul-Jawad Altisent, Omar; del Trigo, María; Paradis, Jean-Michel; Dumont, Eric; Urena, Marina; Rodés-Cabau, Josep

    2015-03-01

    Despite the rapid global uptake of transcatheter aortic valve implantation, valve trombosis has yet to be systematically evaluated in this field. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics, diagnostic criteria, and treatment outcomes of patients diagnosed with valve thrombosis following transcatheter aortic valve implantation through a systematic review of published data. Literature published between 2002 and 2012 on valve thrombosis as a complication of transcatheter aortic valve implantation was identified through a systematic electronic search. A total of 11 publications were identified, describing 16 patients (mean age, 80 [5] years, 65% men). All but 1 patient (94%) received a balloon-expandable valve. All patients received dual antiplatelet therapy immediately following the procedure and continued to take either mono- or dual antiplatelet therapy at the time of valve thrombosis diagnosis. Valve thrombosis was diagnosed at a median of 6 months post-procedure, with progressive dyspnea being the most common symptom. A significant increase in transvalvular gradient (from 10 [4] to 40 [12] mmHg) was the most common echocardiographic feature, in addition to leaflet thickening. Thrombus was not directly visualized with echocardiography. Three patients underwent valve explantation, and the remaining received warfarin, which effectively restored the mean transvalvular gradient to baseline within 2 months. Systemic embolism was not a feature of valve thrombosis post-transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Although a rare, yet likely under-reported complication of post-transcatheter aortic valve implantation, progressive dyspnea coupled with an increasing transvalvular gradient on echocardiography within the months following the intervention likely signifies valve thrombosis. While direct thrombus visualization appears difficult, prompt initiation of oral anticoagulation therapy effectively restores baseline valve function. Copyright © 2014

  18. Low-flow aortic stenosis in asymptomatic patients: valvular-arterial impedance and systolic function from the SEAS Substudy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramariuc, Dana; Cioffi, Giovanni; Rieck, Ashild E

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study sought to assess the impact of valvuloarterial impedance on left ventricular (LV) myocardial systolic function in asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis (AS). BACKGROUND: In atherosclerotic AS, LV global load consists of combined valvular and arterial resistance to LV ejection....... preserved. (An Investigational Drug on Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Aortic Stenosis [Narrowing of the Major Blood Vessel of the Heart]; NCT00092677)....

  19. Small aortic root in aortic valve stenosis: clinical characteristics and prognostic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahlmann, Edda; Cramariuc, Dana; Minners, Jan; Lønnebakken, Mai Tone; Ray, Simon; Gohlke-Baerwolf, Christa; Nienaber, Christoph A; Jander, Nikolaus; Seifert, Reinhard; Chambers, John B; Kuck, Karl Heinz; Gerdts, Eva

    2017-04-01

    In aortic valve stenosis (AS), having a small aortic root may influence both the assessment of AS severity and the treatment strategy. The aim was to test the prognostic implications of having a small aortic root in AS within a large prospective study. We used data from 4.3-year follow-up of 1560 patients with asymptomatic, initially mostly moderate AS enrolled in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study. A small aortic root was defined as inner aortic sinotubular junction diameter indexed for body height <1.4 cm/m in women and <1.5 cm/m in men. A small aortic root was found in 270 patients (17.3%) at baseline. Having a small aortic root was associated with larger aortic root wall thickness, higher pressure recovery, lower systemic arterial compliance, left ventricular mass index, and female sex in a multivariable logistic regression analysis (all P < 0.05). In the Cox regression analysis, having a small aortic root at baseline was associated with higher hazard rates of ischaemic cardiovascular events (n = 268; HR 1.55, 95% CI 1.16-2.06), non-haemorrhagic stroke (n = 55; HR 1.88, 95% CI 1.04-3.41), and cardiovascular death (n = 81; HR 2.08, 95% CI 1.28-3.39) (all P < 0.05) after adjusting for confounders, including randomized study treatment, sex, hypertension, AS severity, and aortic valve replacement. In AS patients without known cardiovascular disease or diabetes, having a small aortic root was associated with increased ischaemic cardiovascular events and mortality. The results suggest a relation between the presence of a small aortic root and that of subclinical atherosclerosis. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00092677.

  20. Association of ischemic heart disease to global and regional longitudinal strain in asymptomatic aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Helle Gervig; Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Hassager, Christian

    2015-01-01

    independent of aortic valve area, stroke volume index, pro-BNP, valvulo-arterial impedance, body mass index and heart rate. In linear regression models with both aortic valve area and significant coronary stenosis, apical (p ...Longitudinal deformation has been shown to deteriorate with progressive aortic stenosis as well as ischemic heart disease. Despite that both conditions share risk factors and are often coexisting, studies have not assessed the influence on longitudinal deformation for both conditions simultaneously....... Thus the purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between subclinical ischemic heart disease and global and regional longitudinal strain in asymptomatic patients with significant aortic stenosis. Prevalent patients with a diagnosis of aortic stenosis at six hospitals in the Greater...

  1. Minimally Invasive Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Watch a Broward Health surgeon perform a minimally invasive Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2017 BroadcastMed, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Minimally Invasive Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Watch a Broward Health surgeon perform a minimally invasive Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2017 BroadcastMed, Inc. ...

  3. Successful Thrombolysis of Aortic Prosthetic Valve Thrombosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arun Kumar Agnihotri

    threatening. Standard surgical treatment using cardiopulmonary bypass carries high maternal and fetal complications. Here we report a case of an antenatal female in first trimester with aortic prosthetic valve thrombosis (PVT), who was successfully ...

  4. Infective endocarditis following transcatheter aortic valve replacement-

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loh, Poay Huan; Bundgaard, Henning; S�ndergaard, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) can improve the symptoms and prognosis of patients with severe aortic stenosis who, due to a high expected operative risk, would not have otherwise been treated surgically. If these patients develop prosthetic valve endocarditis, their presentations m...... treated medically, discuss the challenges in the diagnosis and management of such patients, and review available literature on the incidence and outcome of the condition. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  5. Towards new therapies for calcific aortic valve disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riem Vis, P.W.

    2011-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is characterized by progressive calcification of the aortic valve cusps. The end-stage (stenosis), can lead to heart failure and death. Approximately 2-3% of adults over 65 years of age are thought to suffer from valve stenosis, requiring aortic valve

  6. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With Early- and New-Generation Devices in Bicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoon, Sung Han; Lefèvre, Thierry; Ahn, Jung Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Few studies have evaluated the clinical outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in patients with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis (AS). Particularly, limited data exist comparing the results of TAVR with new-generation devices versus early-generation devices.  Objective...

  7. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A Siordia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR is a novel therapeutic intervention for the replacement of severely stenotic aortic valves in high-risk patients for standard surgical procedures. Since the initial PARTNER trial results, use of TAVR has been on the rise each year. New delivery methods and different valves have been developed and modified in order to promote the minimally invasive procedure and reduce common complications, such as stroke. This review article focuses on the current data on the indications, risks, benefits, and future directions of TAVR. Recently, TAVR has been considered as a standard-of-care procedure. While this technique is used frequently in high-risk surgical candidates, studies have been focusing on the application of this method for younger patients with lower surgical risk. Moreover, several studies have proposed promising results regarding the use of valve-in-valve technique or the procedure in which the valve is placed within a previously implemented bioprosthetic valve. However, ischemic strokes and paravalvular leak remain a matter of debate in these surgeries. New methods and devices have been developed to reduce the incidence of post-procedural stroke. While the third generation of TAVR valves (i.e., Edwards Sapien 3 and Medtronic Evolut R addresses the issue of paravalvular leak structurally, results on their efficacy in reducing the risk of paravalvular leak are yet to be obtained. Furthermore, TAVR enters the field of hybrid methods in the treatment of cardiac issues via both surgical and catheter-based approaches. Finally, while TAVR is primarily performed on cases with aortic stenosis, new valves and methods have been proposed regarding the application of this technique in aortic regurgitation, as well as other aortic pathologies. TAVR is a suitable therapeutic approach for the treatment of aortic stenosis in high-risk patients. Considering the promising results in the current patient population

  8. Stentless aortic valve replacement: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Junjiro KobayashiDepartment of Cardiovascular Surgery, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, Osaka, JapanAbstract: Although porcine aortic valves or pericardial tissue mounted on a stent have made implantation techniques easier, these valves sacrifice orifice area and increase stress at the attachment of the stent, which causes primary tissue failure. Optimizing hemodynamics to prevent patient–prosthetic mismatch and improve durability, stentless bioprostheses use was revived in the early 1990s. The purpose of this review is to provide a current overview of stentless valves in the aortic position. Retrospective and prospective randomized controlled studies showed similar operative mortality and morbidity in stented and stentless aortic valve replacement (AVR, though stentless AVR required longer cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass time. Several cohort studies showed improved survival after stentless AVR, probably due to better hemodynamic performance and earlier left ventricular (LV mass regression compared with stented AVR. However, there was a bias of operation age and nonrandomization. A randomized trial supported an improved 8-year survival of patients with the Freestyle or Toronto valves compared with Carpentier–Edwards porcine valves. On the contrary, another randomized study did not show improved clinical outcomes up to 12 years. Freedom from reoperation at 12 years in Toronto stentless porcine valves ranged from 69% to 75%, which is much lower than for Carpentier–Edwards Perimount valves. Cusp tear with consequent aortic regurgitation was the most common cause of structural valve deterioration. Cryolife O'Brien valves also have shorter durability compared with stent valves. Actuarial freedom from reoperation was 44% at 10 years. Early prosthetic valve failure was also reported in patients who underwent root replacement with Shelhigh stentless composite grafts. There was no level I or IIa evidence of more effective orifice

  9. Bicuspid Aortic Valve and Aortic Root Morphology in Hispanic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Sofia A; Mihos, Christos G; Rodriguez-Escudero, Juan P; Elmahdy, Hany M; Pineda, Andres M; Rosen, Gerald P; Carlos Brenes, Juan; Santana, Orlando

    2015-11-01

    The study aim was to evaluate the aortic valve and aortic root morphology in Hispanic patients with a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV). BAV disease is one of the most common congenital anomaly of the heart, and is associated with abnormalities of the aorta. Interracial differences have been described between Caucasian and African-American patients with BAV, which may have clinical and therapeutic implications. The clinical and anatomical spectrum of BAV disease in Hispanic patients has not been well established. A retrospective review was conducted of all heart operations performed at the authors' institution between April 2008 and June 2013. Patients with BAV who underwent aortic valve replacement (AVR) were identified. All echocardiograms available were reviewed in order to compare cusp morphology, valvular function, and ascending aorta dimensions between Hispanic and non-Hispanic individuals. A total of 291 patients (159 Hispanic, 132 non-Hispanic) with a mean age of 62 ± 13 years were identified. The baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups. In both Hispanics and non-Hispanics, the most prevalent cusp morphology was fusion of the right and left coronary cusps (82% for both groups). The most common indication for surgery was aortic stenosis. Hispanic patients had a larger aortic annulus diameter (2.58 ± 0.32 cm versus 2.39 ± 0.39 cm, p = 0.04). However, this difference was not significant after adjusting for age, gender, body surface area, and the presence of moderate-to-severe aortic insufficiency. Ascending aortopathy was present in 42.7% of the total study population. Regardless of ethnicity, the most common pattern of aortopathy involved the tubular ascending aorta with mild to moderate root enlargement (type 1). Compared with other ethnic groups, Hispanics with BAVs have similar aortic valve morphology and function, as well as comparable aortopathy.

  10. Mitral valve aneurysm associated with aortic valve endocarditis and regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raval, Amish N; Menkis, Alan H; Boughner, Derek R

    2002-01-01

    Mitral valve aneurysms are rare complications occurring most commonly in association with aortic valve infective endocarditis. [Decroly 1989, Chua 1990, Northridge 1991, Karalis 1992, Roguin 1996, Mollod 1997, Vilacosta 1997, Cai 1999, Vilacosta 1999, Teskey 1999, Chan 2000, Goh 2000, Marcos- Alberca 2000] While the mechanism of the development of this lesion is unclear, complications such as perforation can occur and lead to significant mitral regurgitation. [Decroly 1989, Karalis 1992, Teskey 1999, Vilacosta 1999]; The case of a 69-year-old male with Streptococcus Sanguis aortic valve endocarditis and associated anterior mitral leaflet aneurysm is presented. Following surgery, tissue pathology of the excised lesion revealed myxomatous degeneration and no active endocarditis or inflammatory cells. This may add support to the hypothesis that physical stress due to severe aortic insufficiency and structural weakening, without infection of the anterior mitral leaflet, can lead to the development of this lesion.

  11. [Paravalvular aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buğan, Barış; Tuzcu, Emin Murat

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a rapidly evolving technology that has been accepted as a treatment option in patients with severe aortic stenosis who are not suitable for or are at high risk for conventional surgery. Randomized trials have shown that TAVR decreases mortality and improves quality of life in patients who are not suitable for conventional surgery and that TAVR is not inferior to standard surgery in operable but high- risk patients. However, TAVR has several important limitations, the most prominent of which is residual paravalvular aortic regurgitation (PAR). The purpose of this review is to present the mechanism, incidence, assessment, and treatment of PAR after TAVR.

  12. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in failed bioprosthetic surgical valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvir, Danny; Webb, John G; Bleiziffer, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Owing to a considerable shift toward bioprosthesis implantation rather than mechanical valves, it is expected that patients will increasingly present with degenerated bioprostheses in the next few years. Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation is a less invasive approach......, stroke, and New York Heart Association functional class. RESULTS: Modes of bioprosthesis failure were stenosis (n = 181 [39.4%]), regurgitation (n = 139 [30.3%]), and combined (n = 139 [30.3%]). The stenosis group had a higher percentage of small valves (37% vs 20.9% and 26.6% in the regurgitation...... and combined groups, respectively; P = .005). Within 1 month following valve-in-valve implantation, 35 (7.6%) patients died, 8 (1.7%) had major stroke, and 313 (92.6%) of surviving patients had good functional status (New York Heart Association class I/II). The overall 1-year Kaplan-Meier survival rate was 83...

  13. Pilot licensing after aortic valve surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syburra, Thomas; Schnüriger, Hans; Kwiatkowski, Barbara; Graves, Kirk; Reuthebuch, Oliver; Genoni, Michele

    2010-05-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve is the most common congenital heart malformation, and a high percentage of patients with this condition will develop complications over time. It is rare that pilots undergo aortic valve surgery, and the confirmation of flight-licensing requirements after aortic valve replacement (AVR) is a challenge for the patient's cardiac surgeon and, particularly, for the Aeromedical Examiner (AME). Only AMEs are able to determine the flight status of pilots. Furthermore, in military and in civil aviation (e.g., Red Bull Air Race), the high G-load environment experienced by pilots is an exceptional physiological parameter, which must be considered postoperatively. A review was conducted of the aeronautical, surgical and medical literature, and of European pilot-licensing regulations. Case studies are also reported for two Swiss Air Force pilots. According to European legislation, pilots can return to flight duty from the sixth postoperative month, with the following limitations: that an aortic bioprosthesis presents no restrictions in cardiac function, requires no cardioactive medications, yet requires a flight operation with co-pilot, the avoidance of accelerations over +3 Gz and, in military aviation, restricts the pilot to non-ejection-seat aircraft. The patient follow up must include both echocardiographic and rhythm assessments every six months. Mechanical prostheses cannot be certified because the required anticoagulation therapy is a disqualifying condition for pilot licensing. Pilot licensing after aortic valve surgery is possible, but with restrictions. The +Gz exposition is of concern in both military and civilian aviation (aerobatics). The choice of bioprosthesis type and size is determinant. Pericardial and stentless valves seem to show better flow characteristics under high-output conditions. Repetitive cardiological controls are mandatory for the early assessment of structural valve disease and rhythm disturbances. A pre-emptive timing is

  14. Aortic Diameter Growth in Children With a Bicuspid Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkx, Remy; Duijnhouwer, Anthonie L; Vink, Evelien; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W; Schokking, Michiel

    2017-07-01

    Knowledge of aortic growth in patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is essential to identify patients at risk for dissection, but data on children remain unclear. We retrospectively evaluated the aortic diameters of all pediatric BAV patients, identified through an echocardiographic database (2005 to 2013). Medical records were reviewed and aortic diameters re-measured on echocardiographic images at diagnosis and if available on variable mid- and endpoints follow-up. Dilatation (z-score >2) was based on 2 different z-score equation methods (Gautier/Campens). In 234 of the total 250 BAV patients, aortic diameters were analyzed; median age was 6.1 years (interquartile range 1.7 to 10), of which 63% were male. Aortic coarctation was present in 81 (36%) patients, 23% had a ventricular septal defect. BAV morphology according to Sievers was as follows: type 0 in 128 patients (55%), type 1 in 96 (41%), and type 2 in 10 (4%). Ascending aortic (AA) dilatation was present in 24% (Gautier) and 36% (Campens) at inclusion. Median follow-up was 4.7 years. The AA was the only location where mean z-scores progressed significantly with age: 0.06 (Gautier) and 0.09 (Campens) units per year between ages 5 and 15 years. Associations for higher AA z-scores at older age were an initial z-score >2 (p aortic valve stenosis (p aortic surgery occurred. In conclusion, only the AA seems at risk for complication, although no aortic complications occurred in this pediatric BAV cohort. BAV morphology seems associated with larger AA z-scores and valvular dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Multimodality Imaging of a Giant Aortic Valve Papillary Fibroelastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowell M. Fine

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Papillary fibroelastomas (PFEs are benign cardiac tumors arising from endocardium. They are commonly found on valvular surfaces and average 1.0–1.5 cm in size. Though often asymptomatic, PFEs can lead to potentially severe complications, primarily due to their embolic potential. Surgical resection is recommended for all symptomatic or large PFEs. We report the case of a patient presenting with cardiovascular symptoms who was found to have a very large aortic valve PFE, as diagnosed by histopathologic examination following surgical resection. Multimodality cardiovascular imaging demonstrates the classic morphologic findings, including a pedunculated appearance and oscillating “frond-like” surface projections.

  16. Prognostic importance of atrial fibrillation in asymptomatic aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders; Gerdts, Eva; Boman, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The frequency and prognostic importance of atrial fibrillation (AF) in asymptomatic mild-to-moderate aortic stenosis (AS) has not been well described. METHODS: Clinical examination, electrocardiography and echocardiography were obtained in asymptomatic patients with mild-to-moderate A...

  17. Pathogenic Mechanisms of Bicuspid Aortic Valve Aortopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassine, Noor M.; Shahram, Jasmine T.; Body, Simon C.

    2017-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most common congenital valvular defect and is associated with ascending aortic dilation (AAD) in a quarter of patients. AAD has been ascribed both to the hemodynamic consequences of normally functioning and abnormal BAV morphology, and to the effect of rare and common genetic variation upon function of the ascending aortic media. AAD manifests in two overall and sometimes overlapping phenotypes: that of aortic root aneurysm, similar to the AAD of Marfan syndrome; and that of tubular AAD, similar to the AAD seen with tricuspid aortic valves (TAVs). These aortic phenotypes appear to be independent of BAV phenotype, have different embryologic origins and have unique etiologic factors, notably, regarding the role of hemodynamic changes inherent to the BAV phenotype. Further, in contrast to Marfan syndrome, the AAD seen with BAV is infrequently present as a strongly inherited syndromic phenotype; rather, it appears to be a less-penetrant, milder phenotype. Both reduced levels of normally functioning transcriptional proteins and structurally abnormal proteins have been observed in aneurysmal aortic media. We provide evidence that aortic root AAD has a stronger genetic etiology, sometimes related to identified common non-coding fibrillin-1 (FBN1) variants and other aortic wall protein variants in patients with BAV. In patients with BAV having tubular AAD, we propose a stronger hemodynamic influence, but with pathology still based on a functional deficit of the aortic media, of genetic or epigenetic etiology. Although it is an attractive hypothesis to ascribe common mechanisms to BAV and AAD, thus far the genetic etiologies of AAD have not been associated to the genetic etiologies of BAV, notably, not including BAV variants in NOTCH1 and GATA4. PMID:28993736

  18. Transcatheter, valve-in-valve transapical aortic and mitral valve implantation, in a high risk patient with aortic and mitral prosthetic valve stenoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcatheter valve implantation continues to grow worldwide and has been used principally for the nonsurgical management of native aortic valvular disease-as a potentially less invasive method of valve replacement in high-risk and inoperable patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. Given the burden of valvular heart disease in the general population and the increasing numbers of patients who have had previous valve operations, we are now seeing a growing number of high-risk patients presenting with prosthetic valve stenosis, who are not potential surgical candidates. For this high-risk subset transcatheter valve delivery may be the only option. Here, we present an inoperable patient with severe, prosthetic valve aortic and mitral stenosis who was successfully treated with a trans catheter based approach, with a valve-in-valve implantation procedure of both aortic and mitral valves.

  19. Hybrid Palliation for Interrupted Aortic Arch With Small Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Yoshimasa; Masuoka, Ayumu; Hotoda, Kentarou; Katogi, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Takaaki

    2017-05-01

    Open heart surgery for interrupted aortic arch in the neonatal period is still a high-risk procedure related in part to patient factors such as low birth weight, other morphologic anomalies, and, especially, small aortic valve size. Recently, we performed hybrid palliation with bilateral pulmonary artery banding and ductal stenting as the first-stage palliation for such cases. In this study, the outcomes of this procedure were examined. Six cases of interrupted aortic arch with a small aortic valve underwent the hybrid procedure in the neonatal period in our institute from 2010 to 2015 (mean age: 6.8 days, mean body weight: 3.2 kg, mean z score of the aortic valve annulus: -8.3). Their postoperative clinical courses and results of the second-stage surgery were evaluated. No mortality or severe morbidity was seen in association with initial hybrid palliation. Five of six patients were discharged from the hospital; the one exception had a significant urinary tract anomaly. None needed an additional catheter intervention or surgical procedure postoperatively. All surviving patients underwent second-stage surgery; three had biventricular repair by the conventional method or Damus-Kaye-Stansel anastomosis with the Rastelli procedure and the other three proceeded toward staged Fontan reconstruction. Growth of the aortic valve was seen in four patients, and increased indexed left ventricle volume was recognized in one after the palliation. Hybrid palliation could be useful not only to avoid high-risk neonatal surgery but also to allow for eventual selection of the second-stage surgery based on the observations of potential interval development of left ventricular structures.

  20. Autopsy after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Kesteren, F; Wiegerinck, E M A; Rizzo, S

    2017-01-01

    Autopsy after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a new field of interest in cardiovascular pathology. To identify the cause of death, it is important to be familiar with specific findings related to the time interval between the procedure and death. We aimed to provide an overview ...

  1. Antithrombotic therapy after bioprosthetic aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafiq, Sulman; Steinbrüchel, Daniel Andreas; Lilleør, Nikolaj Bang

    2017-01-01

    Background The optimal medical strategy for prevention of thromboembolic events after surgical bioprosthetic aortic valve replacement (BAVR) is still debated. The objective of this study was to compare warfarin therapy (target INR of 2.0 to 3.0) with aspirin 150 mg daily as antithrombotic therapy...

  2. Osseous and chondromatous metaplasia in calcific aortic valve stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Matthew; Hwang, David H; Padera, Robert F; Mitchell, Richard N; VanderLaan, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement for calcific aortic valve stenosis is one of the more common cardiac surgical procedures. However, the underlying pathophysiology of calcific aortic valve stenosis is poorly understood. We therefore investigated the histologic findings of aortic valves excised for calcific aortic valve stenosis and correlated these findings with their associated clinical features. We performed a retrospective analysis on 6685 native aortic valves excised for calcific stenosis and 312 prosthetic tissue aortic valves with calcific degeneration at a single institution between 1987 and 2013. Patient demographics were correlated with valvular histologic features diagnosed on formalin-fixed, decalcified, and paraffin embedded hematoxylin and eosin stained sections. Of the analyzed aortic valves, 5200 (77.8%) were tricuspid, 1473 (22%) were bicuspid, 11 (0.2%) were unicuspid, and 1 was quadricuspid. The overall prevalence of osseous and/or chondromatous metaplasia was 15.6%. Compared to tricuspid valves, bicuspid valves had a higher prevalence of metaplasia (30.1% vs. 11.5%) and had an earlier mean age of excision (60.2 vs. 75.1 years old). In addition, the frequency of osseous metaplasia and/or chondromatous metaplasia increased with age at time of excision of bicuspid aortic valves, while tricuspid aortic valves showed the same incidence regardless of patient age. Males had a higher prevalence of metaplasia in both bicuspid (33.5% vs. 22.3%) and tricuspid (13.8% vs. 8.6%) aortic valves compared to females. Osseous metaplasia and/or chondromatous metaplasia was also more common in patients with bicuspid aortic valves and concurrent chronic kidney disease or atherosclerosis than in those without (33.6% vs. 28.3%). No osseous or chondromatous metaplasia was observed within the cusps of any of the prosthetic tissue valves. Osseous and chondromatous metaplasia are common findings in native aortic valves but do not occur in prosthetic tissue aortic valves. Bicuspid

  3. Surgery for small asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filardo, Giovanni; Powell, Janet T; Martinez, Melissa Ashley-Marie; Ballard, David J

    2015-02-08

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is an abnormal ballooning of the major abdominal artery. Some AAAs present as emergencies and require surgery; others remain asymptomatic. Treatment of asymptomatic AAAs depends on many factors, but an important one is the size of the aneurysm, as risk of rupture increases with aneurysm size. Large asymptomatic AAAs (greater than 5.5 cm in diameter) are usually repaired surgically; very small AAAs (less than 4.0 cm diameter) are monitored with ultrasonography. Debate continues over the appropriate roles of immediate repair and surveillance with repair on subsequent enlargement in people presenting with asymptomatic AAAs of 4.0 cm to 5.5 cm diameter. This is the third update of the review first published in 1999. To compare mortality, quality of life, and cost effectiveness of immediate surgical repair versus routine ultrasound surveillance in people with asymptomatic AAAs between 4.0 cm and 5.5 cm in diameter. For this update, the Cochrane Peripheral Vascular Diseases Group Trials Search Co-ordinator searched the Specialised Register (February 2014) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 1). We checked reference lists of relevant articles for additional studies. Randomised controlled trials in which men and women with asymptomatic AAAs of diameter 4.0 cm to 5.5 cm were randomly allocated to immediate repair or imaging-based surveillance at least every six months. Outcomes had to include mortality or survival. Three members of the review team independently extracted the data, which were cross-checked by other team members. Risk ratios (RR) (endovascular aneurysm repair only), hazard ratios (HR) (open repair only), and 95% confidence intervals based on Mantel-Haenszel Chi(2) statistic were estimated at one and six years (open repair only) following randomisation. We included all relevant published studies in this review. For this update, four trials with a combined total of 3314 participants

  4. THE PROGNOSIS IN TRANSCATHETER AORTIC VALVE IMPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Imaev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the effect of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI, performed by different types of prostheses and various surgical access, on the prognosis of patients with critical aortic stenosis and comorbidities.Material and methods. Patients (n=130 that had consistently performed 80 TAVI by Edwards valve transfemoral (n=50 and transapical (n=30 access, as well as 50 transcatheter aortic valve replacement by CoreValve system were included into the study. Complications including perioperative mortality, total 30-day mortality, as well as post-hospital mortality were registered during aortic valve replacement, immediately after surgery, before the expiry of 30 days. Mean follow-up was 2.2 years (range 0.2 to 5.2 years.Results. Hospital mortality was on average 6.9%. 121 patients had been discharged from the department after the surgery. The number of deaths in the post-hospital period was 14.8%. Valve type and the type of access had no effect on post-hospital mortality. Men died more than 2.5 times often than women, regardless of age. Atrioventricular block, pacemaker implantation, and history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were the most significant prognostic factors. An important role of minor stroke and renal failure should be noted. Mortality did not depend on the surgical access or valve type. All parameters characterizing the intervention were significantly associated with mortality, both during and after surgery. The proportion of survivors at the end of the first year of observation using Corvalve system was 86.9%, Edwards valve by transfemoral access - 88% and Edwards valve by transapical access – 85.4% (insignificant differences for all groups, p>0.05. Two-year survival was 77.5%, 82.5% and 82.7%, respectively (also insignificant differences for all groups, p>0.05.Conclusion. TAVI is the method of choice, reasonable alternative approach for surgical valve replacement in patients with high surgical risk, although

  5. Cardiologic aspects of aortic valve surgery--who? when? what?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, J B

    1996-10-01

    The title invites a discussion of a patient (age, lesion, physical condition, compliance, and other organ pathology) with aortic valve disease in the context of proposed surgical management. It further seeks clarification on the timing of such surgical contribution and on which operation is optimal. Without reviewing all the vast and somewhat conflicting literature, these aspects are addressed by a clinical cardiologist based principally on his own experience. Among the principal conclusions are the following: a) Surgery can safely be delayed in hemodynamically significant congenital aortic stenosis in children or young adults provided that the patients are nearly asymptomatic and that submaximal or maximal stress testing shows minimal or no ST-T changes. b) Prognosis after successful valve surgery for critically tight aortic stenosis in middle-aged and elderly patients differs from that for aortic regurgitation in that left ventricular myocardial dysfunction, however severe, will always improve postoperatively in the former condition. There is, therefore, never a cardiac contraindication to surgical management of symptomatic patients with tight aortic stenosis. c) Certain features in cases of chronic severe aortic regurgitation, such as diminished ejection fraction, increased end-systolic left ventricular diameter, electrocardiographic repolarization abnormalities, marked cardiomegaly on radiologic examination, and NYHA class III or IV symptoms, reflect a higher operative mortality and poorer long-term prognosis. Nevertheless, none of these features, alone or combined, can to date justify a definite contraindication to surgery in a specific patient. d) There is little uniformity or agreement among surgeons, including their cardiologists if or when that is pertinent, on the type of operation for patients of any age requiring aortic valve surgery. For example, a patient aged 40 years and depending on the "whims and fancies" of a Department or indeed those of an

  6. Inhibitory role of Notch1 in calcific aortic valve disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha Acharya

    Full Text Available Aortic valve calcification is the most common form of valvular heart disease, but the mechanisms of calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD are unknown. NOTCH1 mutations are associated with aortic valve malformations and adult-onset calcification in families with inherited disease. The Notch signaling pathway is critical for multiple cell differentiation processes, but its role in the development of CAVD is not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular changes that occur with inhibition of Notch signaling in the aortic valve. Notch signaling pathway members are expressed in adult aortic valve cusps, and examination of diseased human aortic valves revealed decreased expression of NOTCH1 in areas of calcium deposition. To identify downstream mediators of Notch1, we examined gene expression changes that occur with chemical inhibition of Notch signaling in rat aortic valve interstitial cells (AVICs. We found significant downregulation of Sox9 along with several cartilage-specific genes that were direct targets of the transcription factor, Sox9. Loss of Sox9 expression has been published to be associated with aortic valve calcification. Utilizing an in vitro porcine aortic valve calcification model system, inhibition of Notch activity resulted in accelerated calcification while stimulation of Notch signaling attenuated the calcific process. Finally, the addition of Sox9 was able to prevent the calcification of porcine AVICs that occurs with Notch inhibition. In conclusion, loss of Notch signaling contributes to aortic valve calcification via a Sox9-dependent mechanism.

  7. Should a Regurgitant Mitral Valve Be Replaced Simultaneously with a Stenotic Aortic Valve?

    OpenAIRE

    Christenson, Jan T.; Jordan, Bernard; Bloch, Antoine; Schmuziger, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Mitral valve regurgitation frequently accompanies aortic valve stenosis. It has been suggested that mitral regurgitation improves after aortic valve replacement alone and that the mitral valve need not be replaced simultaneously. Furthermore, mitral regurgitation associated with coronary artery disease, particularly in patients with poor left ventricular function, shows immediate improvement after coronary artery bypass grafting.

  8. Decellularized aortic homografts for aortic valve and aorta ascendens replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudorache, Igor; Horke, Alexander; Cebotari, Serghei; Sarikouch, Samir; Boethig, Dietmar; Breymann, Thomas; Beerbaum, Philipp; Bertram, Harald; Westhoff-Bleck, Mechthild; Theodoridis, Karolina; Bobylev, Dmitry; Cheptanaru, Eduard; Ciubotaru, Anatol; Haverich, Axel

    2016-07-01

    The choice of valve prosthesis for aortic valve replacement (AVR) in young patients is challenging. Decellularized pulmonary homografts (DPHs) have shown excellent results in pulmonary position. Here, we report our early clinical results using decellularized aortic valve homografts (DAHs) for AVR in children and mainly young adults. This prospective observational study included all 69 patients (44 males) operated from February 2008 to September 2015, with a mean age of 19.7 ± 14.6 years (range 0.2-65.3 years). In 18 patients, a long DAH was used for simultaneous replacement of a dilated ascending aorta as an extended aortic root replacement (EARR). Four patients received simultaneous pulmonary valve replacement with DPH. Thirty-nine patients (57%) had a total of 62 previous operations. The mean aortic cross-clamp time in isolated cases was 129 ± 41 min. There was 1 conduit-unrelated death. The mean DAH diameter was 22.4 ± 3.7 mm (range, 10-29 mm), the average peak gradient was 14 ± 15 mmHg and the mean aortic regurgitation grade (0.5 = trace, 1 = mild) was 0.6 ± 0.5. The mean effective orifice area (EOA) of 25 mm diameter DAH was 3.07 ± 0.7 cm(2). DAH annulus z-values were 1.1 ± 1.1 at implantation and 0.7 ± 1.3 at the last follow-up. The last mean left ventricle ejection fraction and left ventricle end diastolic volume index was 63 ± 7% and 78 ± 16 ml/m(2) body surface area, respectively. To date, no dilatation has been observed at any level of the graft during follow-up; however, the observational time is short (140.4 years in total, mean 2.0 ± 1.8 years, maximum 7.6 years). One small DAH (10 mm at implantation) had to be explanted due to subvalvular stenosis and developing regurgitation after 4.5 years and was replaced with a 17 mm DAH without complication. No calcification of the explanted graft was noticed intraoperatively and after histological analysis, which revealed extensive recellularization without inflammation. DAHs withstand systemic

  9. Aortic valve surgery - minimally invasive

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be able to store blood in the blood bank for transfusions during and after your surgery. Ask ... Mechanical heart valves do not fail often. However, blood clots can develop on them. If a blood clot forms, you may have a stroke. Bleeding can occur, ...

  10. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation and cerebrovascular accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stortecky, Stefan; Wenaweser, Peter; Windecker, Stephan

    2012-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an evidence-based treatment alternative for selected high-risk patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis as acknowledged in the most recent edition of the ESC Guidelines on Valvular Heart Disease 2012. However, periprocedural complications and in particular cerebrovascular accidents remain a matter of concern. While transcatheter heart valve technology continuously improves and the development of novel and even less invasive implantation techniques is on-going, cerebrovascular events complicating TAVI may abrogate the usual improvement in terms of prognosis and quality of life. This article describes the incidence of cerebrovascular events after cardiovascular procedures, provides an overview of the pathophysiological mechanisms as well as the impact on outcomes and provides some insights into preventive strategies as well as the acute management of these events.

  11. Early Outcomes of Sutureless Aortic Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammet Onur Hanedan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In elderly high-risk surgical patients, sutureless aortic valve replacement (AVR should be an alternative to standard AVR. The potential advantages of sutureless aortic prostheses include reducing cross-clamping and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB time and facilitating minimally invasive surgery and complex cardiac interventions, while maintaining satisfactory hemodynamic outcomes and low rates of paravalvular leakage. The current study reports our single-center experience regarding the early outcomes of sutureless aortic valve implantation. Methods: Between October 2012 and June 2015, 65 patients scheduled for surgical valve replacement with symptomatic aortic valve disease and New York Heart Association function of class II or higher were included to this study. Perceval S (Sorin Biomedica Cardio Srl, Sallugia, Italy and Edwards Intuity (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA valves were used. Results: The mean age of the patients was 71.15±8.60 years. Forty-four patients (67.7% were female. The average preoperative left ventricular ejection fraction was 56.9±9.93. The CPB time was 96.51±41.27 minutes and the cross-clamping time was 60.85±27.08 minutes. The intubation time was 8.95±4.19 hours, and the intensive care unit and hospital stays were 2.89±1.42 days and 7.86±1.42 days, respectively. The mean quantity of drainage from chest tubes was 407.69±149.28 mL. The hospital mortality rate was 3.1%. A total of five patients (7.69% died during follow-up. The mean follow-up time was 687.24±24.76 days. The one-year survival rate was over 90%. Conclusion: In the last few years, several models of valvular sutureless bioprostheses have been developed. The present study evaluating the single-center early outcomes of sutureless aortic valve implantation presents the results of an innovative surgical technique, finding that it resulted in appropriate hemodynamic conditions with acceptable ischemic time.

  12. Quantitative image analysis for planning of aortic valve replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elattar, M.A.I.M.

    2016-01-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common and frequent cause of sudden death among all valvular heart diseases. Symptomatic aortic stenosis is considered to be a fatal disease if left untreated. Aortic valve replacement is the mainstay of treatment of symptomatic aortic stenosis. Traditional treatment of

  13. Concomitant aortic valve and internal mammary artery injuries in blunt chest trauma: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chun-Chieh; Hsieh, Chi-Hsun; Wang, Yu-Chun; Chung, Ping-Kuei; Chen, Ray-Jade

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of concomitant injury to the aortic valve and internal mammary artery (IMA) from nonpenetrating chest trauma. To our knowledge, this is the first such case to be reported. Transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) following diagnostic angiography offers an effective and minimally invasive treatment for traumatic IMA injuries. Because there might be an asymptomatic interval after traumatic aortic valve injuries, serial physical examinations and repeated echocardiography should be mandatory for patients with de novo heart failure after blunt chest trauma. Transesophageal echocardiography can provide a clearer image of cardiac injuries than transthoracic echocardiography, particularly if there is extensive anterior mediastinal hematoma resulting from IMA trauma.

  14. Aortic valve insufficiency in the teenager and young adult: the role of prosthetic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Scott M

    2013-10-01

    The contents of this article were presented in the session "Aortic insufficiency in the teenager" at the congenital parallel symposium of the 2013 Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) annual meeting. The accompanying articles detail the approaches of aortic valve repair and the Ross procedure.(1,2) The current article focuses on prosthetic valve replacement. For many young patients requiring aortic valve surgery, either aortic valve repair or a Ross procedure provides a good option. The advantages include avoidance of anticoagulation and potential for growth. In other patients, a prosthetic valve is an appropriate alternative. This article discusses the current state of knowledge regarding mechanical and bioprosthetic valve prostheses and their specific advantages relative to valve repair or a Ross procedure. In current practice, young patients requiring aortic valve surgery frequently undergo valve replacement with a prosthetic valve. In STS adult cardiac database, among patients ≤30 years of age undergoing aortic valve surgery, 34% had placement of a mechanical valve, 51% had placement of a bioprosthetic valve, 9% had aortic valve repair, and 2% had a Ross procedure. In the STS congenital database, among patients 12 to 30 years of age undergoing aortic valve surgery, 21% had placement of a mechanical valve, 18% had placement of a bioprosthetic valve, 30% had aortic valve repair, and 24% had a Ross procedure. In the future, the balance among these options may be altered by design improvements in prosthetic valves, alternatives to warfarin, the development of new patch materials for valve repair, and techniques to avoid Ross autograft failure.

  15. Cellular regulation of the structure and function of aortic valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail El-Hamamsy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aortic valve was long considered a passive structure that opens and closes in response to changes in transvalvular pressure. Recent evidence suggests that the aortic valve performs highly sophisticated functions as a result of its unique microscopic structure. These functions allow it to adapt to its hemodynamic and mechanical environment. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in normal valve physiology is essential to elucidate the mechanisms behind valve disease. We here review the structure and developmental biology of aortic valves; we examine the role of its cellular parts in regulating its function and describe potential pathophysiological and clinical implications.

  16. Histopathology of aortic complications in bicuspid aortic valve versus Marfan syndrome: relevance for therapy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Grewal (Nimrat); R. Franken (Romy); B.J.M. Mulder (Barbara); M.-J. Goumans (Marie-José); J.H.N. Lindeman (Johannes); M.R.M. Jongbloed (Monique); M.C. DeRuiter (Marco); R.J.M. Klautz (Robert); A.J.J.C. Bogers (Ad); R.E. Poelmann (Robert); A.C.G.-D. Groot (Adriana C. Gittenberger-de)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPatients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) and patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) are more prone to develop aortic dilation and dissection compared to persons with a tricuspid aortic valve (TAV). To elucidate potential common and distinct pathways of clinical relevance, we compared the

  17. A retrospective analysis of mitral valve pathology in the setting of bicuspid aortic valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rensburg, Annari; Doubell, Anton

    2017-01-01

    The therapeutic implications of bicuspid aortic valve associations have come under scrutiny in the transcatheter aortic valve implantation era. We evaluate the spectrum of mitral valve disease in patients with bicuspid aortic valves to determine the need for closer echocardiographic scrutiny/follow-up of the mitral valve. A retrospective analysis of echocardiograms done at a referral hospital over five years was conducted in patients with bicuspid aortic valves with special attention to congenital abnormalities of the mitral valve. One hundred and forty patients with a bicuspid aortic valve were included. A congenital mitral valve abnormality was present in eight (5.7%, P = 0.01) with a parachute mitral valve in four (2.8%), an accessory mitral valve leaflet in one (0.7%), mitral valve prolapse in one, a cleft in one and the novel finding of a trileaflet mitral valve in one. Minor abnormalities included an elongated anterior mitral valve leaflet (P abnormal papillary muscles (P = 0.002) and an additional chord or tendon in the left ventricle cavity (P = 0.007). Mitral valve abnormalities occur more commonly in patients with bicuspid aortic valves than matched healthy individuals. The study confirms that abnormalities in these patients extend beyond the aorta. These abnormalities did not have a significant functional effect. PMID:28515127

  18. A retrospective analysis of mitral valve pathology in the setting of bicuspid aortic valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rensburg, Annari; Herbst, Philip; Doubell, Anton

    2017-06-01

    The therapeutic implications of bicuspid aortic valve associations have come under scrutiny in the transcatheter aortic valve implantation era. We evaluate the spectrum of mitral valve disease in patients with bicuspid aortic valves to determine the need for closer echocardiographic scrutiny/follow-up of the mitral valve. A retrospective analysis of echocardiograms done at a referral hospital over five years was conducted in patients with bicuspid aortic valves with special attention to congenital abnormalities of the mitral valve. One hundred and forty patients with a bicuspid aortic valve were included. A congenital mitral valve abnormality was present in eight (5.7%, P = 0.01) with a parachute mitral valve in four (2.8%), an accessory mitral valve leaflet in one (0.7%), mitral valve prolapse in one, a cleft in one and the novel finding of a trileaflet mitral valve in one. Minor abnormalities included an elongated anterior mitral valve leaflet (P mitral regurgitation (P Mitral valve abnormalities occur more commonly in patients with bicuspid aortic valves than matched healthy individuals. The study confirms that abnormalities in these patients extend beyond the aorta. These abnormalities did not have a significant functional effect. © 2017 The authors.

  19. Statins for progression of aortic valve stenosis and the best evidence for making decisions in health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Thiago

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Western world, calcified aortic valve stenosis is the most common form of valvular heart disease, affecting up to 3% of adults over the age of 75 years. It is a gradually progressive disease, characterized by a long asymptomatic phase that may last for several decades, followed by a short symptomatic phase associated with severe restriction of the valve orifice. Investigations on treatments for aortic valve stenosis are still in progress. Thus, it is believed that calcification of aortic valve stenosis is similar to the process of atherosclerosis that occurs in coronary artery disease. Recent studies have suggested that cholesterol lowering through the use of statins may have a salutary effect on the progression of aortic valve stenosis

  20. Suprasternal Aortic Valve Replacement: Key Technology and Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiser, Andy C; Caranasos, Thomas G; Peterson, Mark D; Buller, Christopher E; Borger, Michael A

    2017-10-01

    Suprasternal transcatheter aortic valve replacement offers patients, with unsuitable femoral artery anatomy, an alternative to transapical, direct aortic, and subclavian approaches. The Transit System (Aegis Surgical, Galway, Ireland) enables transcatheter aortic valve replacement directly into the ascending aorta or innominate artery through a small, suprasternal incision. The valve introducer sheath is inserted through a standard pursestring suture, which facilitates secure arterial closure. The proximity to the aortic valve promotes precise control. Proper patient selection and preoperative imaging is essential. A heart team working collaboratively in a hybrid operating room ensures procedural success. Using this approach, four different manufacturer's transcatheter valves have been used successfully. Suprasternal transcatheter aortic valve replacement is a safe and effective addition to the surgeon's armamentarium. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Preparatory balloon aortic valvuloplasty during transcatheter aortic valve implantation for improved valve sizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsalis, Polykarpos C; Al-Rashid, Fadi; Neumann, Till; Plicht, Björn; Hildebrandt, Heike A; Wendt, Daniel; Thielmann, Matthias; Jakob, Heinz G; Heusch, Gerd; Erbel, Raimund; Kahlert, Philipp

    2013-09-01

    This study sought to evaluate whether supra-aortic angiography during preparatory balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) improves valve sizing. Current recommendations for valve size selection are based on annular measurements by transesophageal echocardiography and computed tomography, but paravalvular aortic regurgitation (PAR) is a frequent problem. Data of 270 consecutive patients with either conventional sizing (group 1, n = 167) or balloon aortic valvuloplasty-based sizing (group 2, n = 103) were compared. PAR was graded angiographically and quantitatively using several hemodynamic indices. PAR was observed in 113 patients of group 1 and 41 patients of group 2 (67.7% vs. 39.8%, p < 0.001). More than mild PAR was found in 24 (14.4%) patients of group 1 and 8 (7.8%) patients of group 2. According to pre-interventional imaging, 40 (39%) patients had a borderline annulus size, raising uncertainty regarding valve size selection. Balloon sizing resulted in selection of the bigger prosthesis in 30 (29%) and the smaller prosthesis in the remaining patients, and only 1 of these 40 patients had more than mild PAR. As predicted by the hemodynamic indices of PAR, mortality at 30 days and 1 year was less in group 2 than in group 1 (5.8% vs. 9%, p = 0.2 and 10.6% vs. 20%, p = 0.01). Preparatory balloon aortic valvuloplasty during transcatheter aortic valve implantation improves valve size selection, reduces the associated PAR, and increases survival in borderline cases. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Embolic cerebral insults after transapical aortic valve implantation detected by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Martin; Schulz-Heise, Susanne; Achenbach, Stephan; Ott, Sabine; Dörfler, Arnd; Ropers, Dieter; Feyrer, Richard; Einhaus, Friedrich; Loders, Sabrina; Mahmoud, Faidi; Roerick, Olaf; Daniel, Werner G; Weyand, Michael; Ensminger, Stephan M; Ludwig, Josef

    2010-11-01

    This study assessed the rate of periprocedural embolic ischemic brain injury during transapical aortic valve replacement in 25 consecutive patients. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is rapidly being established as a new therapeutic approach for aortic valve stenosis. Although initial clinical results are promising, it is unknown whether mobilization and embolization of calcified particles may lead to cerebral ischemia. Twenty-five consecutive patients (10 men, 15 women, mean age: 81 ± 5 years, mean log EuroSCORE [European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation]: 32 ± 10%) scheduled for transapical aortic valve implantation were included. All patients received a baseline cerebral magnetic resonance imaging scan. The scan was repeated approximately 6 days after valve implantation. The magnetic resonance imaging studies included axial diffusion-weighted, T(2)-weighted, fluid attenuated inversion recovery-weighted, and T(2) gradient echo sequences. Standardized assessment of the neurologic status was performed before aortic valve replacement and post-operatively. Transapical aortic valve implantation was successfully performed in all patients. In 17 patients (68%), new cerebral lesions could be detected, whereas 8 patients showed no new cerebral insults. The pattern of distribution and morphology were typical of embolic origin. Despite the high incidence of morphologically detectable lesions, only 5 patients showed clinical neurologic alterations. Out of these patients, only 1 suffered from a permanent stroke. New embolic ischemic cerebral insults are detected in 68% of patients after transapical valve implantation. Clinical symptoms are rare and usually transitory. Larger trials will need to establish the clinical significance of asymptomatic ischemic lesions as well as the rate of ischemic events in patients undergoing transfemoral valve replacement. Copyright © 2010 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  3. Differences in cardiovascular risk profile between electrocardiographic hypertrophy versus strain in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (from SEAS data)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders M; Gerdts, Eva; Boman, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    Electrocardiograms are routinely obtained in clinical follow-up of patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS). The association with aortic valve, left ventricular (LV) response to long-term pressure load, and clinical covariates is unclear and the clinical value is thus uncertain. Data from...... clinical examination, electrocardiogram, and echocardiogram in 1,563 patients in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study were used. Electrocardiograms were Minnesota coded for arrhythmias and atrioventricular and intraventricular blocks; LV hypertrophy was assessed by Sokolow...

  4. Valve Replacement with a Sutureless Aortic Prosthesis in a Patient with Concomitant Mitral Valve Disease and Severe Aortic Root Calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lio, Antonio; Scafuri, Antonio; Nicolò, Francesca; Chiariello, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    Aortic valve replacement with concomitant mitral valve surgery in the presence of severe aortic root calcification is technically difficult, with long cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times. We performed sutureless aortic valve replacement and mitral valve annuloplasty in a 68-year-old man who had severe aortic stenosis and moderate-to-severe mitral regurgitation. Intraoperatively, we found severe calcification of the aortic root. We approached the aortic valve through a transverse aortotomy, performed in a higher position than usual, and we replaced the valve with a Sorin Perceval S sutureless prosthesis. In addition, we performed mitral annuloplasty with use of an open rigid ring. The aortic cross-clamp time was 63 minutes, and the cardiopulmonary bypass time was 83 minutes. No paravalvular leakage of the aortic prosthesis was detected 30 days postoperatively. Our case shows that the Perceval S sutureless bioprosthesis can be safely implanted in patients with aortic root calcification, even when mitral valve disease needs surgical correction.

  5. Indexing aortic valve area by body surface area increases the prevalence of severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jander, Nikolaus; Gohlke-Bärwolf, Christa; Bahlmann, Edda

    2014-01-01

    To account for differences in body size in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is divided by body surface area (BSA) to calculate indexed AVA (AVAindex). Cut-off values for severe stenosis are...

  6. Aortic valve area assessed with 320-detector computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Kofoed, Klaus Fuglsang; Carstensen, Helle Gervig

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of aortic valve area (AVA) assessment with 320-detector Computed Tomography (MDCT) compared to transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) in a population with mild to severe aortic valve stenosis. AVA was estimated in 169 patients by planimetry on MDCT images (AVA...

  7. Aortic valve dysfunction and aortic dilation in adults with coarctation of the aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clair, Mathieu; Fernandes, Susan M; Khairy, Paul; Graham, Dionne A; Krieger, Eric V; Opotowsky, Alexander R; Singh, Michael N; Colan, Steven D; Meijboom, Erik J; Landzberg, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of aortic valve dysfunction, aortic dilation, and aortic valve and ascending aortic intervention in adults with coarctation of the aorta (CoA). Aortic valve dysfunction and aortic dilation are rare among children and adolescents with CoA. With longer follow-up, adults may be more likely to have progressive disease. We retrospectively reviewed all adults with CoA, repaired or unrepaired, seen at our center between 2004 and 2010. Two hundred sixteen adults (56.0% male) with CoA were identified. Median age at last evaluation was 28.3 (range 18.0 to 75.3) years. Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) was present in 65.7%. At last follow-up, 3.2% had moderate or severe aortic stenosis, and 3.7% had moderate or severe aortic regurgitation. Dilation of the aortic root or ascending aorta was present in 28.0% and 41.6% of patients, respectively. Moderate or severe aortic root or ascending aortic dilation (z-score > 4) was present in 8.2% and 13.7%, respectively. Patients with BAV were more likely to have moderate or severe ascending aortic dilation compared with those without BAV (19.5% vs. 0%; P aortic dilation (P = 0.04). At most recent follow-up, 5.6% had undergone aortic valve intervention, and 3.2% had aortic root or ascending aortic replacement. In adults with CoA, significant aortic valve dysfunction and interventions during early adulthood were uncommon. However, aortic dilation was prevalent, especially of the ascending aorta, in patients with BAV. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Simulation for transthoracic echocardiography of aortic valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navin C Nanda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulation allows interactive transthoracic echocardiography (TTE learning using a virtual three-dimensional model of the heart and may aid in the acquisition of the cognitive and technical skills needed to perform TTE. The ability to link probe manipulation, cardiac anatomy, and echocardiographic images using a simulator has been shown to be an effective model for training anesthesiology residents in transesophageal echocardiography. A proposed alternative to real-time reality patient-based learning is simulation-based training that allows anesthesiologists to learn complex concepts and procedures, especially for specific structures such as aortic valve.

  9. Transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a patient with a severe aortic stenosis and cardiogenic shock requiring intra-aortic balloon pump support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodór, Piotr; Wilczek, Krzysztof; Przybylski, Roman; Świątkowski, Andrzej; Głowacki, Jan; Kalarus, Zbigniew; Zembala, Marian

    2015-01-01

    The following paper presents a patient with severe aortic stenosis and severely reduced left ventricular ejection fraction with intra-aortic balloon pump counterpulsation support, who underwent transfemoral aortic valve implantation of a CoreValve prosthesis.

  10. Mitral and aortic regurgitation following transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymański, Piotr; Hryniewiecki, Tomasz; Dąbrowski, Maciej; Sorysz, Danuta; Kochman, Janusz; Jastrzębski, Jan; Kukulski, Tomasz; Zembala, Marian

    2016-05-01

    To analyse the impact of postprocedural mitral regurgitation (MR), in an interaction with aortic regurgitation (AR), on mortality following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). To assess the interaction between MR and AR, we compared the survival rate of patients (i) without both significant MR and AR versus (ii) those with either significant MR or significant AR versus (iii) with significant MR and AR, all postprocedure. 381 participants of the Polish Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Registry (166 males (43.6%) and 215 females (56.4%), age 78.8±7.4 years) were analysed. Follow-up was 94.1±96.5 days. In-hospital and midterm mortality were 6.6% and 10.2%, respectively. Significant MR and AR were present in 16% and 8.1% patients, including 3.1% patients with both significant MR and AR. Patients with significant versus insignificant AR differed with respect to mortality (log rank p=0.009). This difference was not apparent in a subgroup of patients without significant MR (log rank p=0.80). In a subgroup of patients without significant AR, there were no significant differences in mortality between individuals with versus without significant MR (log rank p=0.44). Significant MR and AR had a significant impact on mortality only when associated with each other (log rank p<0.0001). At multivariate Cox regression modelling concomitant significant MR and AR were independently associated with mortality (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.54 to 5.71, p=0.002). Significant MR or AR postprocedure, when isolated, had no impact on survival. Combined MR and AR had a significant impact on a patient's prognosis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. When operable patients become inoperable: conversion of a surgical aortic valve replacement into transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lene Kjaer; Arendrup, Henrik; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a relatively new treatment option for inoperable patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS). This case describes how a planned conventional surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) on a 73-year-old woman was successfully converted to a TAVI procedure....... On extracorporal circulation it was reconized that the aortic annulus, the coronary ostiae and the proximal part of the ascending aorta were severely calcified making valve implantation impossible. Surgical closure without valve substitution was estimated to be associated with a high risk of mortality due......, and the prosthesis was sutured to the ascending aorta. With some manipulation of the prosthesis it was possible to suture the aorta circumferentially around the fully expanded upper part of the prosthesis. Post-procedurally the patient recovered successfully, with improved function capacity, aortic valve area...

  12. Osteoprotegerin inhibits aortic valve calcification and preserves valve function in hypercholesterolemic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M Weiss

    Full Text Available There are no rigorously confirmed effective medical therapies for calcific aortic stenosis. Hypercholesterolemic Ldlr (-/- Apob (100/100 mice develop calcific aortic stenosis and valvular cardiomyopathy in old age. Osteoprotegerin (OPG modulates calcification in bone and blood vessels, but its effect on valve calcification and valve function is not known.To determine the impact of pharmacologic treatment with OPG upon aortic valve calcification and valve function in aortic stenosis-prone hypercholesterolemic Ldlr (-/- Apob (100/100 mice.Young Ldlr (-/- Apob (100/100 mice (age 2 months were fed a Western diet and received exogenous OPG or vehicle (N = 12 each 3 times per week, until age 8 months. After echocardiographic evaluation of valve function, the aortic valve was evaluated histologically. Older Ldlr (-/- Apob (100/100 mice were fed a Western diet beginning at age 2 months. OPG or vehicle (N = 12 each was administered from 6 to 12 months of age, followed by echocardiographic evaluation of valve function, followed by histologic evaluation.In Young Ldlr (-/- Apob (100/100 mice, OPG significantly attenuated osteogenic transformation in the aortic valve, but did not affect lipid accumulation. In Older Ldlr (-/- Apob (100/100 mice, OPG attenuated accumulation of the osteoblast-specific matrix protein osteocalcin by ∼80%, and attenuated aortic valve calcification by ∼ 70%. OPG also attenuated impairment of aortic valve function.OPG attenuates pro-calcific processes in the aortic valve, and protects against impairment of aortic valve function in hypercholesterolemic aortic stenosis-prone Ldlr (-/- Apob (100/100 mice.

  13. Sequential transcatheter aortic valve implantation due to valve dislodgement - a Portico valve implanted over a CoreValve bioprosthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campante Teles, Rui; Costa, Cátia; Almeida, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become an important treatment in high surgical risk patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS), whose complications need to be managed promptly. The authors report the case of an 86-year-old woman presenting with severe symptomatic AS, rejected fo...

  14. Efficiency of aortic valve commissurotomy for congenital aortic valve stenosis in pediatric population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. А. Лукьянов

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study was designed to evaluate short-term and long-term outcomes after open aortic valve commissurotomy in the pediatric patients at our center over a period of 10 years. Methods. A retrospective study of 94 patients who underwent open surgical commissurotomy because of aortic valve stenosis between 2003 and 2013 is presented. Follow-up time was in the range of 1 to 7 years. Results. The open aortic valve commissurotomy combined with debridement of leaflet free edge 36.1 %, LVOT myectomy 11.7%, leaflet suture plastic 7.4%, modified Konno procedure 6.3%, Brom's aortoplasty 4.2% was performed for all patients. Average cardiopulmonary bypass time was 59.2 30.7 min. Median aortic cross-clamping time was 31.52 15.1 min. Hospital complications were observed in 38.2% of cases. ICU time was in the range of 1 to 31 (mean 3.2 5.1 day. Artificial lung ventilation time varied from 2 to 76 (mean 15.3 18.3 hours. Inotropic support was needed in 26.5% of cases. Mean hospital stay time was 17.1 7.3 days. At follow-up between 2 and 7 years, reoperations were required for 3 patients who underwent a Ross procedure. Conclusions. The results evidence that open surgical commissurotomy is an effective way of treatment for aortic valve stenosis, considering the accuracy of plasty and additional techniques of leaflet correction. The best children age group for this type of operation is from first to five years of life.

  15. Mitraclip Followed by Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement: Hybrid Techniques for Regurgitant Aortic and Mitral Valve Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eudailey, Kyle; Hamid, Nadira; Hahn, Rebecca T; Kodali, Susheel; Gray, William; George, Isaac

    2016-08-01

    With the advent of percutaneous valve interventions, the landscape for management of high-risk valve replacement and repair has changed dramatically. Transcatheter valve repair/replacement techniques can be used in conjunction with open surgery to facilitate a hybrid approach in patients with multivalve disease. We present a case of staged hybrid valve repair followed by surgical replacement for a high-risk patient with mitral regurgitation and aortic regurgitation. This case illustrates the effectiveness of the staged hybrid approach for high-risk patients with incomplete transcatheter options. We expect these techniques to play an increasingly larger role in the treatment algorithm for high-risk multivalve disease. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. First Reported Successful Femoral Valve-in-Valve Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Using the Edwards Sapien 3 Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Stephane; Monney, Pierre; Roguelov, Christan; Zuffi, Andrea; Iglesias, Juan F; Qanadli, Salah D; Courbon, Cecile; Eeckhout, Eric; Muller, Olivier

    2015-10-01

    Management of degenerated aortic valve bioprosthesis classically requires redo surgery, but transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation is becoming a valid alternative in selected cases. In the case of a degenerated Mitroflow bioprosthesis, TAVR is associated with an additional challenge due to a specific risk of coronary occlusion. We aimed to assess the safety and feasibility of transfemoral valve-in-valve implantation of the new Edwards Sapien 3 (Edwards Lifesciences) in a degenerated Mitroflow bioprosthesis (Sorin Group, Inc). We report here the safety and feasibility of transfemoral valve-in-valve implantation of a 23 mm Edwards Sapien 3 in a degenerated 25 mm Mitroflow valve and describe the specific assessment of the risk of coronary obstruction using a multi-imaging modality. The final result showed an absence of aortic regurgitation and a mean transvalvular gradient of 14 mm Hg. The patient had no major adverse cardiovascular events at 30-day follow-up. Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation of an Edwards Sapien 3 in a degenerated Mitroflow is feasible and safe, considering a careful assessment of the risk of coronary obstruction with Mitroflow bioprosthesis due to leaflets mounted externally to the stent.

  17. Global strain in severe aortic valve stenosis: relation to clinical outcome after aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbæk, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K; Rudbæk, Torsten R; Pellikka, Patricia A; Møller, Jacob E

    2012-09-01

    Global longitudinal systolic strain (GLS) is often reduced in aortic stenosis despite normal ejection fraction. The importance of reduced preoperative GLS on long-term outcome after aortic valve replacement is unknown. A total of 125 patients with severe aortic stenosis and ejection fraction >40% scheduled for aortic valve replacement were evaluated preoperatively and divided into 4 groups according to GLS quartiles. Patients were followed up for 4 years. The primary end points were major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) defined as cardiovascular mortality and cardiac hospitalization because of worsening of heart failure; the secondary end point was cardiovascular mortality. MACE and cardiac mortality were significantly increased in patients with lower GLS. Estimated 5-year MACE was increased: first quartile 19% (n=6) / second quartile 20% (n=6) / third quartile 35% (n=11) / fourth quartile 49% (n=15); P=0.04. Patients with increased age, left ventricular hypertrophy, and left atrial dilatation were at increased risk. In Cox regression analysis, after correcting for standard risk factors and ejection fraction, GLS was found to be significantly associated with cardiac morbidity and mortality. In a stepwise Cox model with forward selection, GLS was the sole independent predictor: hazard ratio=1.13 (95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.25), P=0.04. Comparing the overall log likelihood χ(2) of the predictive power of the multivariable model containing GLS was statistically superior to models based on EuroScore, history with ischemic heart disease, and ejection fraction. In patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis undergoing aortic valve replacement, reduced GLS provides important prognostic information beyond standard risk factors.

  18. Pregnancy Outcomes in Women With Aortic Valve Substitutes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvelman, Helena J.; Arabkhani, Bardia; Cornette, Jerome M. J.; Pieper, Petronella G.; Bogers, Ad J. J. C.; Takkenberg, Johanna J. M.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.

    2013-01-01

    Young women who require aortic valve replacement need information on the potential cardiac and obstetric complications of pregnancy for the different valve substitutes available. We, therefore, assessed the pregnancy outcomes in women who had received an autograft, homograft, or mechanical valve in

  19. Conduction Disorders After Sutureless Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhout, Ismail; Mazine, Amine; Rivard, Lena; Ghoneim, Aly; El-Hamamsy, Ismail; Lamarche, Yoan; Carrier, Michel; Demers, Philippe; Bouchard, Denis

    2017-04-01

    Sutureless self-expandable aortic bioprostheses rely on radial forces for stabilization, raising concern that these devices may increase the risk of postoperative conduction disease. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of conduction disorders after sutureless aortic valve replacement (AVR) with the Perceval S (Sorin Group, Saluggia, Italy) bioprosthesis. Between June 2011 and March 2013, 108 consecutive patients underwent sutureless AVR with the Perceval S prosthesis. Six patients (6%) had a permanent pacemaker (PPM) preoperatively and were excluded from the present study. Mean electrocardiographic follow-up was 14.6 ± 6.0 months. Mean age was 79.2 ± 4.8 years (52% female). During the postoperative period, 34 patients (34%) had first-degree atrioventricular block, 2 (2%) had Mobitz-II atrioventricular block, and 16 (16%) had complete atrioventricular block. New-onset left bundle branch block and right bundle branch block were observed in 33 patients (33%) and 22 patients (22%), respectively. Inhospital postoperative PPM implantation was required in 23 patients (23%). Preoperative aortic valve area, age more than 85 years, and preoperative right bundle branch block were found to be independently associated with inhospital PPM implantation or new-onset postoperative conduction disorder. At follow-up, 3 more patients (3%) underwent PPM implantation. The cumulative incidences of PPM dependency and ventricular pacing more than 25% of the time were 18% ± 11% and 21% ± 10%, respectively, at 18 months. In the present study, the postoperative PPM implantation rate (23%) after sutureless AVR with the Perceval S prosthesis was high. Surgical strategies aimed at mitigating this risk should be further investigated. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Bentall procedure 39 years after implantation of a Starr-Edwards Aortic Caged- Ball-Valve Prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of a male patient who received an implantation of a Starr-Edwards-caged-ball-valve-prosthesis in 1967. The surgery and postoperative course were without complications and the patient recovered well after the operation. For the next four decades, the patient remained asymptomatic - no restrictions on his lifestyle and without any complications. In 2006, 39 years after the initial operation, we performed a Bentall-Procedure to treat an aortic ascendens aneurysm with diameters of 6.0 × 6.5 cm: we explanted the old Starr-Edwards-aortic-caged-ball-valve-prosthesis and replaced the ascending aorta with a 29 mm St.Jude Medical aortic-valve-composite-graft and re-implanted the coronary arteries. This case represents the longest time period between Starr-Edwards-caged-ball-valve-prothesis-implantation and Bentall-reoperation, thereby confirming the excellent durability of this valve. PMID:20298579

  1. Bentall procedure 39 years after implantation of a Starr-Edwards Aortic Caged- Ball-Valve Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohns Christian

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report a case of a male patient who received an implantation of a Starr-Edwards-caged-ball-valve-prosthesis in 1967. The surgery and postoperative course were without complications and the patient recovered well after the operation. For the next four decades, the patient remained asymptomatic - no restrictions on his lifestyle and without any complications. In 2006, 39 years after the initial operation, we performed a Bentall-Procedure to treat an aortic ascendens aneurysm with diameters of 6.0 × 6.5 cm: we explanted the old Starr-Edwards-aortic-caged-ball-valve-prosthesis and replaced the ascending aorta with a 29 mm St.Jude Medical aortic-valve-composite-graft and re-implanted the coronary arteries. This case represents the longest time period between Starr-Edwards-caged-ball-valve-prothesis-implantation and Bentall-reoperation, thereby confirming the excellent durability of this valve.

  2. Direct aortic access for transcatheter aortic valve replacement with a fully repositionable and retrievable nonmetallic valve system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnaq, Hasan; Metz, Dietrich; Petrov, Asen; Frantz, Stefan; Hofmann, Ulrich; Raspé, Christoph; Treede, Hendrik

    2016-12-01

    The standard procedure of transcatheter aortic valve implantation involves transfemoral access. Nevertheless, the use of this access route is limited by the vessel diameter, calcification, and tortuosity, making a subgroup of patients ineligible for peripheral access. We report the first use of direct aortic transcatheter aortic valve implantation with the Direct Flow Medical valve (Direct Flow Medical, Inc, Santa Rosa, Calif) in 15 patients at the Halle-Wittenberg University. Between January 2014 and May 2015, 55 patients with severe aortic valve disease underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation with the Direct Flow Medical valve at the Halle-Wittenberg University. Subgroups of 15 patients were treated using direct aortic access because of small vessel diameter, excessive calcification, or extreme tortuosity of the iliofemoral vessels. The mean patient age was 79.1 ± 6.72 years, and 10 patients (66%) were male. The mean logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation was 23.4% ± 16.9%, and the mean Society of Thoracic Surgeons score was 7.8% ± 6.8%. Access related to redo-sternotomy during transcatheter aortic valve implantation was required in 4 patients (27%). Valve retrieval was performed in 2 patients (13%). There was no conversion to surgical aortic valve replacement and no incidence of major stroke. The postimplant mean gradient was 9.3 ± 2.5 mm Hg. No patient had moderate or severe paravalvular leakage. All patients survived the first 30 days. Direct aortic access seems to be a feasible and safe endovascular alternative for implantation of the Direct Flow Medical valve. This access provides direct and accurate control of the entire implantation procedure. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular evaluation of the great vessels of patients with bicuspid aortic valve disease

    OpenAIRE

    Leme, Mauro Paes; David, Tirone E.; Butany, Jagdish; Banerjee, Diponkar; Bastos,Eduardo S.; Provenzano,Sylvio C.; Leôncio A. Feitosa; Murad,Henrique; Magnanini,Monica M. Ferreira

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is associated with increased prevalence of annulo-aortic ectasia, dissection and ascending aortic aneurysm. This study was undertaken to compare the amount of fibrillin-1 and elastin in the media of great vessels of patients with bicuspid and tricuspid aortic valve disease. METHOD: Tissue samples of ascending aorta and pulmonary artery were obtained from 22 patients with bicuspid aortic valve disease (BAV) and 17 patients with tricuspid aortic valve diseas...

  4. Reoperative Aortic Root Replacement in Patients with Previous Aortic Root or Aortic Valve Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Kwon Chong

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Generalization of standardized surgical techniques to treat aortic valve (AV and aortic root diseases has benefited large numbers of patients. As a consequence of the proliferation of patients receiving aortic root surgeries, surgeons are more frequently challenged by reoperative aortic root procedures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of redo-aortic root replacement (ARR. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 66 patients (36 male; mean age, 44.5±9.5 years who underwent redo-ARR following AV or aortic root procedures between April 1995 and June 2015. Results: Emergency surgeries comprised 43.9% (n=29. Indications for the redo-ARR were aneurysm (n=12, pseudoaneurysm (n=1, or dissection (n=6 of the residual native aortic sinus in 19 patients (28.8%, native AV dysfunction in 8 patients (12.1%, structural dysfunction of an implanted bioprosthetic AV in 19 patients (28.8%, and infection of previously replaced AV or proximal aortic grafts in 30 patients (45.5%. There were 3 early deaths (4.5%. During follow- up (median, 54.65 months; quartile 1–3, 17.93 to 95.71 months, there were 14 late deaths (21.2%, and 9 valve-related complications including reoperation of the aortic root in 1 patient, infective endocarditis in 3 patients, and hemorrhagic events in 5 patients. Overall survival and event-free survival rates at 5 years were 81.5%±5.1% and 76.4%±5.4%, respectively. Conclusion: Despite technical challenges and a high rate of emergency conditions in patients requiring redo-ARR, early and late outcomes were acceptable in these patients.

  5. Pathological Investigation of Congenital Bicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis, Compared with Atherosclerotic Tricuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis and Congenital Bicuspid Aortic Valve Regurgitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamatani, Yasuhiro; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Nagai, Toshiyuki; Sugano, Yasuo; Kanzaki, Hideaki; Yasuda, Satoshi; Fujita, Tomoyuki; Kobayashi, Junjiro; Anzai, Toshihisa

    2016-01-01

    Background Congenital bicuspid aortic valve (CBAV) is the main cause of aortic stenosis (AS) in young adults. However, the histopathological features of AS in patients with CBAV have not been fully investigated. Methods and Results We examined specimens of aortic valve leaflets obtained from patients who had undergone aortic valve re/placement at our institution for severe AS with CBAV (n = 24, CBAV-AS group), severe AS with tricuspid aortic valve (n = 24, TAV-AS group), and severe aortic regurgitation (AR) with CBAV (n = 24, CBAV-AR group). We compared the histopathological features among the three groups. Pathological features were classified using semi-quantitative methods (graded on a scale 0 to 3) by experienced pathologists without knowledge of the patients’ backgrounds. The severity of inflammation, neovascularization, and calcium and cholesterol deposition did not differ between the CBAV-AS and TAV-AS groups, and these four parameters were less marked in the CBAV-AR group than in the CBAV-AS (all paortic side than on the ventricular side (both paortic and ventricular sides in CBAV-AR patients (p = 0.35). Conclusions Valvular fibrosis, especially on the aortic side, was greater in patients with CBAV-AS than in those without, suggesting a difference in the pathogenesis of AS between CBAV and TAV. PMID:27479126

  6. Bundle-branch reentry ventricular tachycardia after transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana de la Rosa Riestra

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An 83-year-old male suffering from severe symptomatic aortic valve stenosis received an implant of a biological aortic prosthesis through the femoral artery without complications. Seven days after dischargement he experienced a syncope. The patient was wearing an ECG holter monitor that day, which showed a wide QRS complex tachycardia of 300 beats per minute. The electrophysiological study revealed a bundle-branch reentry ventricular tachycardia as the cause of the syncope. Radio-frequency was applied on the right-bundle branch. Twelve months later, the patient has remained asymptomatic.

  7. Midterm Results of Aortic Valve Replacement with Cryopreserved Homografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Özker

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the midterm clinical results of aortic valve replacement with cryopreserved homografts.Materials and Methods: Aortic valve replacement was performed in 40 patients with cryopreserved homograft. The indications were aortic valve endocarditis in 20 patients (50%, truncus arteriosus in 6 patients (15%, and re-stenosis or regurtitation after aortic valve reconstruction in 14 (35% patients. The valve sizes ranged from 10 to 27mm. A full root replacement technique was used for homograft replacement in all patients.Results: The 30-day postoperative mortality rate was 12.5% (5 patients. There were four late deaths. Only one of them was related to cardiac events. Overall mortality was 22.5%. Thirty-three patients were followed up for 67±26 months. Two patients needed reoperation due to aortic aneurysm caused by endocarditis. The mean transvalvular gradient significantly decreased after valve replacement (p<0.003. The last follow up showed that the 27 (82% patients had a normal left ventricular function.Conclusion: Cryopreserved homografts are safe alternatives to mechanical valves that can be used when there are proper indications. Although it has a high perioperative mortality rate, cryopreserved homograft implantation is an alternative for valve replacement, particularly in younger patients and for complex surgical problems such as endocarditis that must be minimalized.

  8. A rare complication: an attempt of retrieval of an aortic valve wrapped with pig tail catheter during transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Bekir Serhat; Alihanoglu, Yusuf Izzettin; Alur, Ihsan; Evrengul, Harun; Kaya, Dayimi

    2015-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is preferred to treat high surgical risk patients with severe aort stenosis. Wrapping of a pig tail catheter with device struts during transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a very rare complication. In this report, we present the images and videos of an attempt of retrieval of an aortic valve wrapped with pig tail catheter during transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a 71-year-old man. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation with balloonexpandable valve: early experience from China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingsheng Lu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: The aim of the current study was to evaluate the early experience of the application of transcatheter aortic valve implantation with the balloon-expandable system in China. The transcatheter aortic valve implantation technology has been widely used for patients with inoperable severe aortic stenosis in the developed world. The application of transcatheter aortic valve implantation is still in the early stages of testing in China, particularly for the balloon-expandable valve procedure. Methods: This was a retrospective study. All patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation with balloon-expandable system in our hospital between 2011 and 2014 were included. Edwards SAPIEN XT Transcatheter Heart Valve was used. The improvement of valve and heart function was evaluated as well as 30-day mortality and major complications according to the VARC-2 definition. Results: A total of 10 transcatheter aortic valve implantation procedures with the balloon-expandable system were performed in our hospital, of which 9 were transfemoral and 1 was transapical. The median age was 76 years, and the median STS score and Logistic EuroSCORE (% were 8.9 and 16.2. The implantation was successfully conducted in all patients, only 2 patients had mild paravalvular leak. There was no second valve implantation. Moreover, no 30-day mortality or complications was reported. Following the transcatheter aortic valve implantation procedure, the heart and valve functions had improved significantly. During the follow-up period of 3-34 months, one patient died of lung cancer 13 months after the operation. Conclusion: This early experience has provided preliminary evidence for the safety and efficacy of transcatheter aortic valve implantation procedure with the balloon-expandable system in the developing world with an increasing aging population.

  10. The living aortic valve: From molecules to function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Adrian H.; El-Hamamsy, Ismail; Butcher, Jonathan T.; Latif, Najma; Bertazzo, Sergio; Yacoub, Magdi H.

    2014-01-01

    The aortic valve lies in a unique hemodynamic environment, one characterized by a range of stresses (shear stress, bending forces, loading forces and strain) that vary in intensity and direction throughout the cardiac cycle. Yet, despite its changing environment, the aortic valve opens and closes over 100,000 times a day and, in the majority of human beings, will function normally over a lifespan of 70–90 years. Until relatively recently heart valves were considered passive structures that play no active role in the functioning of a valve, or in the maintenance of its integrity and durability. However, through clinical experience and basic research the aortic valve can now be characterized as a living, dynamic organ with the capacity to adapt to its complex mechanical and biomechanical environment through active and passive communication between its constituent parts. The clinical relevance of a living valve substitute in patients requiring aortic valve replacement has been confirmed. This highlights the importance of using tissue engineering to develop heart valve substitutes containing living cells which have the ability to assume the complex functioning of the native valve. PMID:25054122

  11. Choice of Treatment for Aortic Valve Stenosis in the Era of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Eastern Denmark (2005 to 2015)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Luk, Ngai H V; Olsen, Niels T

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the choice of treatment for severe aortic valve stenosis in the era of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in Eastern Denmark. BACKGROUND: Until the early 21st century, the only therapeutic option for aortic valve stenosis was surgical...

  12. Successful treatment of annular rupture during transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unic, Daniel; Sutlic, Zeljko; Starcevic, Boris; Bradic, Nikola; Baric, Davor; Rudez, Igor

    2017-04-01

    Annular rupture presents a rare but potentially fatal complication of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Although it can be subtle and subclinical in presentation, most severe forms present with hemodynamic instability and represent true emergencies requiring a more invasive treatment, even conventional surgery. We present a case of successful treatment of annular rupture by left ventricular outflow tract patch and surgical aortic valve replacement.

  13. Percutaneous transluminal alcohol septal myocardial ablation after aortic valve replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitges, M.; Kapadia, S.; Rubin, D. N.; Thomas, J. D.; Tuzcu, M. E.; Lever, H. M.

    2001-01-01

    When left ventricular outflow tract obstruction develops after aortic valve replacement, few treatment choices have been available until now. We present a patient with prior aortic valve replacement who developed left ventricle outflow tract obstruction that was successfully treated with a percutaneous transcoronary myocardial septal alcohol ablation. This technique is a useful tool for the treatment of obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, especially in those patients with prior heart surgery. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Patient-reported outcomes after aortic and mitral valve surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borregaard, Britt; Ekholm, Ola; Riber, Lars

    2017-01-01

    , cross-sectional study (DenHeart). Patient-reported outcome measures included: Short-Form-12, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, EuroQol-5D-5L, HeartQol and Edmonton Symptom Assessment System. Demographic and clinical information was obtained from national registers. RESULTS: Of 354 patients (65% men......, mean age: 68 years), 79% underwent aortic valve surgery. Patients who had undergone aortic valve surgery had more symptoms of anxiety compared with patients who had undergone mitral valve surgery (34% vs 17%, p=0.003, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale anxiety cut-off score of eight). Being female...... Analogue Scale. Age and comorbidity were not associated with patient-reported outcomes. CONCLUSION: Patients who had undergone aortic valve and mitral valve surgery did not significantly differ in patient-reported health at discharge, except for symptoms of anxiety. Being female was the only characteristic...

  15. Subclinical leaflet thrombosis in surgical and transcatheter bioprosthetic aortic valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakravarty, Tarun; Søndergaard, Lars; Friedman, John

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Subclinical leaflet thrombosis of bioprosthetic aortic valves after transcatheter valve replacement (TAVR) and surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) has been found with CT imaging. The objective of this study was to report the prevalence of subclinical leaflet thrombosis in surgical...... and transcatheter aortic valves and the effect of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) on the subclinical leaflet thrombosis and subsequent valve haemodynamics and clinical outcomes on the basis of two registries of patients who had CT imaging done after TAVR or SAVR. METHODS: Patients enrolled between Dec 22, 2014......, and Jan 18, 2017, in the RESOLVE registry, and between June 2, 2014, and Sept 28, 2016, in the SAVORY registry, had CT imaging done with a dedicated four-dimensional volume-rendered imaging protocol at varying intervals after TAVR and SAVR. We defined subclinical leaflet thrombosis as the presence...

  16. Imaging of aortic valve dynamics in 4D OCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schnabel Christian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical components of the heart, especially the valves and leaflets, are enormous stressed during lifetime. Therefore, those structures undergo different pathophysiological tissue transformations which affect cardiac output and in consequence living comfort of affected patients. These changes may lead to calcific aortic valve stenosis (AVS, the major heart valve disease in humans. The knowledge about changes of the dynamic behaviour during the course of this disease and the possibility of early stage diagnosis is of particular interest and could lead to the development of new treatment strategies and drug based options of prevention or therapy. 4D optical coherence tomography (OCT in combination with high-speed video microscopy were applied to characterize dynamic behaviour of the murine aortic valve and to characterize dynamic properties during artificial stimulation. We present a promising tool to investigate the aortic valve dynamics in an ex vivo disease model with a high spatial and temporal resolution using a multimodal imaging setup.

  17. Outcome of pregnancy in women after pulmonary autograft valve replacement for congenital aortic valve disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yap, S.C.; Drenthen, W.; Pieper, P.G.; Moons, P.; Mulder, B.J.M.; Klieverik, L.M.; Vliegen, H.W.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Meijboom, F.J.; Roos-Hesselink, J.W.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY: The pulmonary autograft has been recommended as the valve of choice for aortic valve replacement (AVR) in young women contemplating pregnancy. However, current information on maternal and perinatal outcome of pregnancy in women with pulmonary autograft valve

  18. Outcome of pregnancy in women after pulmonary autograft valve replacement for congenital aortic valve disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yap, Sing-Chien; Drenthen, Willem; Pieper, Petronella G.; Moons, Philip; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; Klieverik, Loes M.; Vliegen, Hubert W.; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Meijboom, Folkert J.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.

    Background and aim of the study: The pulmonary autograft has been recommended as the valve of choice for aortic valve replacement (AVR) in young women contemplating pregnancy. However, current information on maternal and perinatal outcome of pregnancy in women with pulmonary autograft valve

  19. Aortic Valve Morphology Correlates With Left Ventricular Systolic Function and Outcome in Children With Congenital Aortic Stenosis Prior to Balloon Aortic Valvuloplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Kevin; Sachdeva, Ritu; Goldstein, Bryan H; Lang, Sean; Petit, Christopher J

    2016-09-01

    We sought to determine the relationship between aortic valve morphology and left ventricular (LV) systolic function in children with aortic stenosis (AS) prior to balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV). Both aortic valve morphology and LV systolic function have been linked with outcomes in children with congenital AS undergoing BAV. The relationship between aortic valve morphology and LV function is poorly defined despite their importance in regard to outcomes. We performed a retrospective multicenter cohort study of 89 AS patients who underwent BAV between 2007-2013. Pre-BAV echocardiograms were analyzed for: aortic valve opening (AVO); aortic valve type (true bicuspid, functionally bicuspid, or unicuspid); maximal raphe length; aortic valve leaflet symmetry; and valve angle of excursion. The primary endpoint was low function, defined as LV shortening fraction (LVSF) aortic valve mean gradient was 47.00 mm Hg (IQR, 36.75-56.00 mm Hg). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that low AVO (P=.03) was associated with reduced LV function, independent of age or aortic valve gradient (R² = .652). Bicuspid aortic valve (P=.07) was associated with improved LV function compared with functionally unicuspid aortic valve. Low AVO stenosis. Qualitative aspects such as valve type may also affect LV systolic function. Further study may elucidate whether aortic valve morphology or LV function is the principal predictor of response to BAV and of late outcomes after BAV.

  20. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Versus Aortic Valve Bypass: A Comparison of Outcomes and Economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, John W; Boyd, Jack H; Patel, Parth M; Baker, Mary L; Syed, Amjad; Ladowski, Joe; Corvera, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is currently offered to patients who are high-risk candidates for conventional surgical aortic valve replacement. For the past 37 years, off-pump aortic valve bypass (AVB) has been used in elderly patients at our center for this similarly high-risk group. Although TAVR and AVB were offered to similar patients at our center, comparisons of clinical outcomes and hospital economics for each strategy were not reported. We reviewed the clinical and financial records of 53 consecutive AVB procedures performed since 2008 with the records of 51 consecutive TAVR procedures performed since 2012. Data included demographics, hemodynamics, The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) risk score, extent of coronary disease, and ventricular function. Follow-up was 100% in both groups. Hospital financial information for both cohorts was obtained. Mean risk score for the TAVR group was 10.1% versus 17.6% for AVB group (p < 0.001). Kaplan-Meier hospital rates of 3- and 6-month survival and of 1-year survival were 88%, 86%, 81%, and 61% and 89%, 83%, 83%, and 70% for the TAVR and AVB groups, respectively (p = 0.781). Two patients who had undergone TAVR had a procedure-related stroke. The one stroke in an AVB recipient was late and not procedure related. At discharge, mild and moderate perivalvular and central aortic insufficiency were present in 31% and 16% of TAVR recipients, respectively; no AVB valve leaked. Transvalvular gradients were reduced to less than 10 mm Hg in both groups. The average hospital length of stay for the AVB-treated patients was 13 days, and it was 9 days for the TAVR-treated patients. Median hospital charges were $253,000 for TAVR and $158,000 for AVB. Mean payment to the hospital was $65,000 (TAVR) versus $64,000 (AVB), and the mean positive contribution margin (profit) to the hospital was $14,000 for TAVR versus $29,000 for AVB. TAVR and AVB relieve aortic stenosis and have similar and acceptable procedural mortality

  1. Neurotrophin 3 upregulates proliferation and collagen production in human aortic valve interstitial cells: a potential role in aortic valve sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qingzhou; Song, Rui; Ao, Lihua; Cleveland, Joseph C; Fullerton, David A; Meng, Xianzhong

    2017-06-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a leading cardiovascular disorder in the elderly. Diseased aortic valves are characterized by sclerosis (fibrosis) and nodular calcification. Sclerosis, an early pathological change, is caused by aortic valve interstitial cell (AVIC) proliferation and overproduction of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. However, the mechanism of aortic valve sclerosis remains unclear. Recently, we observed that diseased human aortic valves overexpress growth factor neurotrophin 3 (NT3). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that NT3 is a profibrogenic factor to human AVICs. AVICs isolated from normal human aortic valves were cultured in M199 growth medium and treated with recombinant human NT3 (0.10 µg/ml). An exposure to NT3 induced AVIC proliferation, upregulated the production of collagen and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), and augmented collagen deposition. These changes were abolished by inhibition of the Trk receptors. NT3 induced Akt phosphorylation and increased cyclin D1 protein levels in a Trk receptor-dependent fashion. Inhibition of Akt abrogated the effect of NT3 on cyclin D1 production. Furthermore, inhibition of either Akt or cyclin D1 suppressed NT3-induced cellular proliferation and MMP-9 and collagen production, as well as collagen deposition. Thus, NT3 upregulates cellular proliferation, ECM protein production, and collagen deposition in human AVICs. It exerts these effects through the Trk-Akt-cyclin D1 cascade. NT3 is a profibrogenic mediator in human aortic valve, and overproduction of NT3 by aortic valve tissue may contribute to the mechanism of valvular sclerosis. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Using the Portico System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tzikas, Apostolos; Amrane, Hafid; Bedogni, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The Portico system (St. Jude Medical, Minneapolis, MN, USA) consists of a self-expanding valve prosthesis and a delivery system designed for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). We describe this system, its 10-steps implantation procedure, and provide tips and tricks based on our person...

  3. Characterization of Aortic Valve Closure Artifact During Outflow Tract Mapping: Correlation With Hemodynamics and Mechanical Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Jorge; Ajijola, Olujimi; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Tung, Roderick

    2017-06-01

    Premature ventricular contractions originating in the left ventricle outflow tract represent a significant subgroup of patients referred for catheter ablation. Mechanical artifacts from aortic valve leaflet motion may be observed during mapping, although the incidence and characteristics have not been reported. Twenty-eight consecutive patients with left ventricle outflow tract premature ventricular contraction were included. Electric signals recorded on the ablation catheter not coincident with atrial or ventricular depolarization were analyzed on the recording system. Correlation with invasive hemodynamic aortic pressure tracings was performed. Additionally, 4 patients with mechanical aortic valves, who underwent scar-related ventricular tachycardia ablation, were analyzed to correlate the timing of the observed artifacts with native aortic valves. Aortic valve artifact was observed while mapping within the coronary cusps in 11 patients (39%; 73% men; age, 41±25 years; left ventricular ejection fraction 49±16%) with high incidence from the left coronary cusp. This artifact was consistently observed with timing coincident with the terminal portion of the T wave. The average interval between the end of the T wave and the aortic valve artifact was 19±37 ms. The duration of the aortic valve artifact was 39±8 ms with amplitude of 0.12±0.07 mV (range, 0.06-0.36 mV). In patients referred for left ventricle outflow tract premature ventricular contraction ablation, an aortic valve closure artifact is observed in up to one third of cases during mapping within the aortic cusps. The timing of this artifact correlates with invasive hemodynamics and mechanical aortic valve artifacts. Recognition of this physiological phenomenon is useful when assigning near-field activation. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Relation of Aortic Valve Morphologic Characteristics to Aortic Valve Insufficiency and Residual Stenosis in Children With Congenital Aortic Stenosis Undergoing Balloon Valvuloplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Christopher J; Gao, Kevin; Goldstein, Bryan H; Lang, Sean M; Gillespie, Scott E; Kim, Sung-In H; Sachdeva, Ritu

    2016-03-15

    Aortic valve morphology has been invoked as intrinsic to outcomes of balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) for congenital aortic valve stenosis. We sought to use aortic valve morphologic features to discriminate between valves that respond favorably or unfavorably to BAV, using aortic insufficiency (AI) as the primary outcome. All patients who underwent BAV at 2 large-volume pediatric centers from 2007 to 2014 were reviewed. Morphologic features assessed on pre-BAV echo included valve pattern (unicuspid, functional bicuspid, and true bicuspid), leaflet fusion length, leaflet excursion angle, and aortic valve opening area and on post-BAV echo included leaflet versus commissural tear. Primary end point was increase in AI (AI+) of ≥2°. Eighty-nine patients (median age 0.2 years) were included in the study (39 unicuspid, 41 functional bicuspid, and 9 true bicuspid valves). Unicuspid valves had a lower opening area (p <0.01) and greater fusion length (p = 0.01) compared with functional and true bicuspid valves. Valve gradient pre-BAV and post-BAV were not different among valve patterns. Of the 16 patients (18%) with AI+, 14 had leaflet tears (odds ratio 13.9, 3.8 to 50). True bicuspid valves had the highest rate (33%) of AI+. On multivariate analysis, leaflet tears were associated with AI+, with larger opening area pre-BAV and lower fusion length pre-BAV. AI+ was associated with larger pre-BAV opening area. Gradient relief was associated with reduced angle of excursion. Valve morphology influences outcomes after BAV. Valves with lesser fusion and larger valve openings have higher rates of leaflet tears which in turn are associated with AI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI): update on the indications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Stéphane; Monney, Pierre; Ferrari, Enrico; Iglesias, Juan F; Roguelov, Christan; Zuffi, Andrea; Eeckhout, Eric; Muller, Olivier

    2015-05-27

    Although surgical aortic valve replacement has been the standard of care for patient with severe aortic stenosis, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is now a fair standard of care for patients not eligible or high risk for surgical treatment. The decision of therapeutic choice between TAVI and surgery considers surgical risk (estimated by the Euro-SCORE and STS-PROM) as well as many parameters that go beyond the assessment of the valvular disease's severity by echocardiography: a multidisciplinary assessment in "Heart Team" is needed to assess each case in all its complexity.

  6. Safety considerations during transapical aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drews, Thorsten; Pasic, Miralem; Juran, Ralf; Unbehaun, Axel; Dreysse, Stephan; Kukucka, Marian; Mladenow, Alexander; Hetzer, Roland; Buz, Semih

    2014-05-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a new method for the treatment of very high-risk patients with aortic valve stenosis. The radiation dose to which the patient and each member of the heart team are exposed during this new fluoroscopically guided intervention is unknown. Between April 2008 and August 2013, 1177 consecutive patients underwent transapical TAVI (TA-TAVI). In 22 consecutive patients undergoing TA-TAVI, the radiation doses to the cardiothoracic surgeon, cardiologist, anaesthesiologist (performing echocardiography examination), surgical assistant and nurse were measured. The radiation dose measurements were performed during TAVI using thermoluminescence and film dosimeters positioned on seven parts of the body: (i) chest above the lead apron, (ii) pelvic area below the apron, (iii) chest below the apron, (iv) thyroid gland above the apron, (v) near eyes, (vi) hands (using rings) and (vii) the feet. The results were compared with the values given in the international literature on recommended radiation dose limits for workers. The mean radiation time was 6.1 min and the mean dose-area product for the patients was 8.661 µGy · m(2). Analysis of the dosimeters and the calculation of the effective dose showed a per intervention dose of 0.03 mSv for the surgeon, 0.05 mSv for the assistant, 0.02 mSv for the cardiologist and the anaesthesiologist and 0.001 mSv for the nurse. The maximum ionizing radiation per intervention was 0.5 mSv at the right hand of the surgeon (holding the introducer sheet) and 0.7 mSv at the left hand of the surgical assistant. Additionally, the analysis of the body dose shows a maximum dose to the lower leg of the surgeon (0.3 mSv) and the genital area of the assistant (0.06 mSv). During a TA-TAVI procedure, the patients receive a higher X-ray dose than during coronary angiography with intervention. After 100 TAVI procedures, the members of the heart team sustain a comparable dose of ionizing radiation to the annual dose

  7. [Quality in aortic valve replacement--how good have hybrid valves have to be?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aicher, D; Groesdonk, H V; Schäfers, H-J

    2009-10-01

    The current enthusiasm with the development of catheter-based aortic valve replacement suggests a critical appraisal of the quality of conventional techniques. Currently surgical treatment of diseased aortic valves includes different methods that can be employed with a low risk. Risk prediction is difficult, the Euroscore largely overestimates mortality. By comparison, there is no evidence that the risk of implantation is reduced by catheter-based implantation. Specific complications (stroke, AV-block, perivalvular leak) are more frequent compared to conventional replacement. Despite the current enthusiasm over the feasibility of catheter-based implantation of hybrid aortic valves they should still be used cautiously. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.

  8. Measurement of effective aortic valve area using three-dimensional echocardiography in children undergoing aortic balloon valvuloplasty for aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharucha, Tara; Fernandes, Fernanda; Slorach, Cameron; Mertens, Luc; Friedberg, Mark Kevin

    2012-04-01

    Pressure gradient is used for timing of balloon aortic valvuloplasty for aortic stenosis (AS) in children, but does not correlate well with outcome and is limited if ventricular function is poor. In adults, effective orifice area (EOA) is used to assess AS severity, but EOA by continuity equation or 2D echo is unreliable in children. Three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) may reliably assess EOA but has not been studied in children. We assessed measurement of aortic valve EOA by 3DE in children with AS before and after balloon aortic valvuloplasty and compared results with change in aortic valve gradient. 3DE was performed at time of catheterization before and after balloon aortic valvuloplasty. Using 3DE multiplanar review mode, valve annulus diameter, area, and EOA were measured and compared with change in aortic gradient and degree of aortic insufficiency. Twenty-four 3DE studies in 12 children (mean age 4.4 ± 5.0 years) were analyzed. EOA was measurable in all. Catheter peak gradient decreased from 45 ± 10 to 26 ± 17 mmHg (P = 0.0018). 3DE EOA increased after balloon aortic valvuloplasty (0.59 ± 0.52 cm(2) vs 0.80 ± 0.70 cm(2) ; P = 0.03), without change in valve diameter. EOA change correlated with change in peak (r = 0.77; P = 0.005) and mean (r = 0.60; P = 0.03) aortic valve gradient post balloon aortic valvuloplasty. 3DE facilitates EOA measurement in pediatric AS and correlates with change in aortic valve gradient after balloon valvuloplasty. © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Does gender affect the rates of abnormal exercise stress echocardiography in patients with asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaturi, Mordehay; Weisenberg, Daniel; Yedidya, Idit; Shapira, Yaron; Nevzorov, Roman; Monakier, Daniel; Sagie, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Patient gender can affect not only the clinical manifestations of coronary artery disease (CAD) but also the clinician's interpretation of the symptoms and results of exercise stress tests for management decisions. This may be true also for aortic stenosis (AS), given its many shared features with CAD and similar symptom-based management. The study aim was to evaluate the effect of gender on the assessment of severe asymptomatic AS by exercise stress echocardiography (ESE). A total of 160 patients (89 males, 71 females) with severe asymptomatic AS and good left ventricular function underwent ESE for assessment of their clinical status. Of these patients, 133 (83%) were followed up after echocardiography for a mean of 644 +/- 467 days. The findings and outcome were compared between males and females. No gender-related differences were identified for mean age, baseline and peak exercise heart rates and blood pressures, aortic valve area, and prevalence of CAD. Female patients had a lower exercise capacity (shorter exercise time, lower exercise load), but there were no significant between-group differences in the exercise-related parameters defining AS. In total, 38 women (24%) and 45 men (28%) were treated by aortic valve replacement (p = 0.2) within a similar time range from echocardiography (p = 0.6). Asymptomatic women with severe AS have similar rates of abnormal ESE as men, despite limitations in exercise capacity among women compared to men.

  10. Treatment of mechanical aortic valve thrombosis with heparin and eptifibatide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, Amit N; Gehrig, Thomas; Bashore, Thomas M; Kiefer, Todd L

    2014-07-01

    A 75-year old woman with a history of coronary disease status post 3-vessel coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) 8 years ago and a repeat one-vessel CABG 2 years ago in the setting of aortic valve replacement with a #19 mm St. Jude bileaflet mechanical valve for severe aortic stenosis presented with two to three weeks of progressive dyspnea and increasing substernal chest discomfort. Echocardiography revealed a gradient to 31 mmHg across her aortic valve, increased from a baseline of 13 mmHg five months previously. Fluoroscopy revealed thrombosis of her mechanical aortic valve. She was not a candidate for surgery given her multiple comorbidities, and fibrinolysis was contraindicated given a recent subdural hematoma 1 year prior to presentation. She was treated with heparin and eptifibatide and subsequently demonstrated resolution of her aortic valve thrombosis. We report the first described successful use of eptifibatide in addition to unfractionated heparin for the management of subacute valve thrombosis in a patient at high risk for repeat surgery or fibrinolysis.

  11. Aortic root reimplantation procedure: a new milestone in aortic valve-sparing operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. М. Чернявский

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Emphasis in this study was placed on clinical and functional assessment of a modified "Florida Sleeve" procedure during surgical correction of ascending aorta aneurysms with concomitant aortic insufficiency.Methods: 32 patients with an aneurysm of the ascending aorta and aortic insufficiency underwent a modified "Florida Sleeve" procedure. The average follow-up was 17 (0-60 months. The average age of patients was 57±13 (23-73 years 56±13 years.Results: The expected 4-year cumulative survival rate was 84.3%. Overall freedom from aortic insufficiency in the late period was 88.9%. Median aortic regurgitation was 1+ (1; 2. Long-term follow-up revealed no valve-associated complications.Conclusion: The aortic root reimplantation procedure enables optimal correction of the existing lesions of the aortic root without performing aortic valve replacement and demonstrates stable clinical and functional outcomes in the long-term period.Key words: aortic aneurysm; aortic valve; valve-sparing operations.FundingThe study had no sponsorship.Conflict of interestThe authors declare no conflict of interest.

  12. Combined surgical and catheter-based treatment of extensive thoracic aortic aneurysm and aortic valve stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Lönn, Lars; Søndergaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    valve stenosis (AS) who are considered at high risk for surgical aortic valve replacement. In this report, we describe the combined surgical and catheter-based treatment of an extensive TAA and AS. To our knowledge, this is the first report of hybrid TAA repair combined with TAVR.......An extensive thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is a potentially life-threatening condition and remains a technical challenge to surgeons. Over the past decade, repair of aortic arch aneurysms has been accomplished using both hybrid (open and endovascular) and totally endovascular techniques. Thoracic...... endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) has changed and extended management options in thoracic aorta disease, including in those patients deemed unfit or unsuitable for open surgery. Accordingly, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is increasingly used to treat patients with symptomatic severe aortic...

  13. Left main coronary artery obstruction by dislodged native-valve calculus after transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmaz, Tahir; Ayhan, Huseyin; Keles, Telat; Aslan, Abdullah Nabi; Erdogan, Kemal Esref; Sari, Cenk; Bilen, Emine; Akcay, Murat; Bozkurt, Engin

    2014-08-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement can be an effective, reliable treatment for severe aortic stenosis in surgically high-risk or ineligible patients. However, various sequelae like coronary artery obstruction can occur, not only in the long term, but also immediately after the procedure. We present the case of a 78-year-old woman whose left main coronary artery became obstructed with calculus 2 hours after the transfemoral implantation of an Edwards Sapien XT aortic valve. Despite percutaneous coronary intervention in that artery, the patient died. This case reminds us that early recognition of acute coronary obstruction and prompt intervention are crucial in patients with aortic stenosis who have undergone transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

  14. Aortic Valve Gradient and Clinical Outcome in Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation for Severe Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witberg, Guy; Barsheshet, Alon; Assali, Abid; Vaknin-Assa, Hana; Shaul, Aviv A; Orvin, Katia; Vaturi, Moti; Schwartzenberg, Shmuel; Shapira, Yaron; Sagie, Alexander; Kornowski, Ran

    2016-01-01

    To explore the relation between the baseline aortic valve gradient (AVG) as a continuous variable and clinical outcomes following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in general and specifically in patients with high-gradient aortic stenosis (AS). We reviewed 317 consecutive patients who underwent TAVI at our institution. We investigated the relation between AVG as a continuous/categorical variable and outcome among all patients and in patients without low-flow low-gradient AS, using the Cox proportional hazard model adjusting for multiple prognostic variables. Patients had a peak AVG of 79.9 ± 22.8 mm Hg (mean 50.5 ±15.7). During a mean follow-up of 2.7 years, AVG was inversely associated with mortality and mortality or cardiac hospitalization. Every 10-mm-Hg increase in peak AVG was associated with 18% reduction in mortality (p = 0.003) and 19% reduction in mortality/cardiac hospitalization (p 40% or peak AVG >64 mm Hg yielded similar results. Mean and peak baseline AVGs are directly associated with improved outcomes after TAVI; AVG can be used to select the patients most likely to benefit from TAVI. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Aortic Valve and Thoracic Aortic Calcification Measurements : How Low Can We Go in Radiation Dose?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hamersvelt, Robbert Willem; den Harder, Annemarie M; Willemink, Martin J; Schilham, Arnold M R|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/239678605; Lammers, Jan-Willem J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071697624; Nathoe, Hendrik M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/267961472; Budde, Ricardo P J; Leiner, Tim; de Jong, Pim A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/287955672

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine the lowest radiation dose and iterative reconstruction level(s) at which computed tomography (CT)-based quantification of aortic valve calcification (AVC) and thoracic aortic calcification (TAC) is still feasible. METHODS: Twenty-eight patients underwent a

  16. Fibrotic Aortic Valve Stenosis in Hypercholesterolemic/Hypertensive Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yi; Lund, Donald D; Doshi, Hardik; Keen, Henry L; Knudtson, Kevin L; Funk, Nathan D; Shao, Jian Q; Cheng, Justine; Hajj, Georges P; Zimmerman, Kathy A; Davis, Melissa K; Brooks, Robert M; Chapleau, Mark W; Sigmund, Curt D; Weiss, Robert M; Heistad, Donald D

    2016-03-01

    Hypercholesterolemia and hypertension are associated with aortic valve stenosis (AVS) in humans. We have examined aortic valve function, structure, and gene expression in hypercholesterolemic/hypertensive mice. Control, hypertensive, hypercholesterolemic (Apoe(-/-)), and hypercholesterolemic/hypertensive mice were studied. Severe aortic stenosis (echocardiography) occurred only in hypercholesterolemic/hypertensive mice. There was minimal calcification of the aortic valve. Several structural changes were identified at the base of the valve. The intercusp raphe (or seam between leaflets) was longer in hypercholesterolemic/hypertensive mice than in other mice, and collagen fibers at the base of the leaflets were reoriented to form a mesh. In hypercholesterolemic/hypertensive mice, the cusps were asymmetrical, which may contribute to changes that produce AVS. RNA sequencing was used to identify molecular targets during the developmental phase of stenosis. Genes related to the structure of the valve were identified, which differentially expressed before fibrotic AVS developed. Both RNA and protein of a profibrotic molecule, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, were increased greatly in hypercholesterolemic/hypertensive mice. Hypercholesterolemic/hypertensive mice are the first model of fibrotic AVS. Hypercholesterolemic/hypertensive mice develop severe AVS in the absence of significant calcification, a feature that resembles AVS in children and some adults. Structural changes at the base of the valve leaflets include lengthening of the raphe, remodeling of collagen, and asymmetry of the leaflets. Genes were identified that may contribute to the development of fibrotic AVS. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Evaluation of a porcine model of early aortic valve sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sider, Krista L; Zhu, Cuilan; Kwong, Andrea V; Mirzaei, Zahra; de Langé, Cornelius F M; Simmons, Craig A

    2014-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is associated with significant cardiovascular morbidity. While late-stage CAVD is well-described, early pathobiological processes are poorly understood due to the lack of animal models that faithfully replicate early human disease. Here we evaluated a hypercholesterolemic porcine model of early diet-induced aortic valve sclerosis. Yorkshire swine were fed either a standard or high-fat/high-cholesterol diet for 2 or 5 months. Right coronary aortic valve leaflets were excised and analyzed (immuno)histochemically. Early human-like proteoglycan-rich onlays formed between the endothelial layer and elastic lamina in the fibrosa layer of valve leaflets, with accelerated formation associated with hypercholesterolemia (Psclerosis in hypercholesterolemic swine is characterized by the formation of proteoglycan-rich onlays in the fibrosa, which can occur prior to significant lipid accumulation, inflammatory cell infiltration, or myofibroblast activation. These characteristics mimic those of early human aortic valve disease, and thus the porcine model has utility for the study of early valve sclerosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Adjusting parameters of aortic valve stenosis severity by body size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minners, Jan; Gohlke-Baerwolf, Christa; Kaufmann, Beat A

    2014-01-01

    stenosis (jet velocity ≥2.5 m/s) and related to outcomes in a second cohort of 1525 patients from the Simvastatin/Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study. RESULTS: Whereas jet velocity and MPG were independent of body size, AVA was significantly correlated with height, weight, BSA and BMI (Pearson......BACKGROUND: Adjustment of cardiac dimensions by measures of body size appears intuitively convincing and in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is commonly adjusted by body surface area (BSA). However, there is little evidence to support such an approach. OBJECTIVE: To identify...... the adequate measure of body size for the adjustment of aortic stenosis severity. METHODS: Parameters of aortic stenosis severity (jet velocity, mean pressure gradient (MPG) and AVA) and measures of body size (height, weight, BSA and body mass index (BMI)) were analysed in 2843 consecutive patients with aortic...

  19. The German Aortic Valve Registry (GARY): a nationwide registry for patients undergoing invasive therapy for severe aortic valve stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, A; Hamm, C; Figulla, H R; Cremer, J; Kuck, K H; Lange, R; Zahn, R; Sack, S; Schuler, G C; Walther, T; Beyersdorf, F; Böhm, M; Heusch, G; Funkat, A K; Meinertz, T; Neumann, T; Papoutsis, K; Schneider, S; Welz, A; Mohr, F W

    2012-07-01

    Background The increasing prevalence of severe aortic valve defects correlates with the increase of life expectancy. For decades, surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR), under the use of extracorporeal circulation, has been the gold standard for treatment of severe aortic valve diseases. In Germany ~12,000 patients receive isolated aortic valve surgery per year. For some time, percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty has been used as a palliative therapeutic option for very few patients. Currently, alternatives for the established surgical procedures such as transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) have become available, but there are only limited data from randomized studies or low-volume registries concerning long-time outcome. In Germany, the implementation of this new technology into hospital care increased rapidly in the past few years. Therefore, the German Aortic Valve Registry (GARY) was founded in July 2010 including all available therapeutic options and providing data from a large quantity of patients.Methods The GARY is assembled as a complete survey for all invasive therapies in patients with relevant aortic valve diseases. It evaluates the new therapeutic options and compares them to surgical AVR. The model for data acquisition is based on three data sources: source I, the mandatory German database for external performance measurement; source II, a specific registry dataset; and source III, a follow-up data sheet (generated by phone interview). Various procedures will be compared concerning observed complications, mortality, and quality of life up to 5 years after the initial procedure. Furthermore, the registry will enable a compilation of evidence-based indication criteria and, in addition, also a comparison of all approved operative procedures, such as Ross or David procedures, and the use of different mechanical or biological aortic valve prostheses.Results Since the launch of data acquisition in July 2010, almost all institutions performing

  20. Left Atrial Systolic Force in Asymptomatic Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cioffi, Giovanni; Cramariuc, Dana; Dalsgaard, Morten

    2011-01-01

    in aortic stenosis study evaluating the effect of placebo-controlled combined simvastatin and ezetimibe treatment in asymptomatic AS. The LASF was calculated by Manning's method. Low and high LASF were defined as 95th percentile of the distribution within the study population, respectively. Results: Mean...... LASF in the total study population was 21 ± 14 kdynes/cm(2) . The determinants of LASF were higher age, heart rate, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, left ventricular (LV) mass, mitral peak early velocity, maximal LA volume, and longer mitral deceleration time (multiple R(2) = 0.37, P ....01). High LASF (78 patients) was characterized by abnormal LV relaxation in 90% of the cases. Low LASF (82 patients) was associated with restrictive LV filling pattern, absence of abnormal relaxation pattern, smaller maximal LA volume, and lower body mass index. In 40% of the patients with low LASF...

  1. Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgery: Transapical Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive cardiac surgery is less traumatic and therefore leads to quicker recovery. With the assistance of engineering technologies on devices, imaging, and robotics, in conjunction with surgical technique, minimally invasive cardiac surgery will improve clinical outcomes and expand the cohort of patients that can be treated. We used transapical aortic valve implantation as an example to demonstrate that minimally invasive cardiac surgery can be implemented with the integration of surgical techniques and engineering technologies. Feasibility studies and long-term evaluation results prove that transapical aortic valve implantation under MRI guidance is feasible and practical. We are investigating an MRI compatible robotic surgical system to further assist the surgeon to precisely deliver aortic valve prostheses via a transapical approach. Ex vivo experimentation results indicate that a robotic system can also be employed in in vivo models.

  2. Combined aortic root replacement and mitral valve surgery: The quest to preserve both valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadikasgari, Hoda; Roselli, Eric E; Aftab, Muhammad; Suri, Rakesh M; Desai, Milind Y; Khosravi, Mitra; Cikach, Frank; Isabella, Monica; Idrees, Jay J; Raza, Sajjad; Tappuni, Bassman; Griffin, Brian P; Svensson, Lars G; Gillinov, A Marc

    2017-05-01

    Coexisting aortic root and mitral valve pathology is increasingly recognized among patients undergoing surgery. We characterized the pathology and surgical outcomes of patients with combined aortic root and mitral disease. From 1987 to 2016, 118 patients (age 52.40 ± 17.71 years) underwent concomitant aortic root and mitral procedures (excluding aortic stenosis, endocarditis, and reoperations). Aortic root pathologies included degenerative aneurysm (94%) and aortic dissection (6%). The aortic valve was bicuspid in 15% of patients and had normally functioning tricuspid leaflets in 23% of patients. Marfan syndrome was present in 34 patients (29%). Degenerative mitral disease predominated (78%). Mitral procedures were repair (86%) and replacement (14%), and root procedures were valve-preserving root reimplantation (36%), Bentall procedure (47%), and homograft root replacement (17%). In the last 10 years, the combination of valve-preserving root reimplantation and mitral repair has increased to 50%. Kaplan-Meier and competing risk analyses were used to estimate survival and reoperation. There were 2 (1.7%) operative deaths with survival of 79% and 71% at 10 and 15 years, respectively, and reoperation rates of 4.7% and 12% after 5 and 10 years, respectively. There were no operative deaths in patients with combined valve-preserving root reimplantation and mitral repair, with survival of 89% and reoperation rate of 7.8% at 10 years. Among patients with Bentall/homograft and mitral operation, survival was 73% and reoperation was 9.8% at 10 years. In patients with aortic root and mitral pathology, combined surgical risk is low and valve durability is high. When possible, valve-preserving root reimplantation and mitral repair should be considered to avoid prosthesis degeneration, anticoagulation, and lifestyle limitations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Anterior mitral valve aneurysm perforation secondary to aortic valve endocarditis detected by Doppler colour flow mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decroly, P; Vandenbossche, J L; Englert, M

    1989-02-01

    We report a case of mitral valve aneurysm formation and perforation, secondary to Streptococcus sanguis endocarditis of the aortic valve. Aneurysm formation was documented by cross-sectional echocardiography and its perforation was established by Doppler colour flow mapping, and subsequently confirmed at surgery.

  4. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation: where are we now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariathas, Mark; Rawlins, John; Curzen, Nick

    2017-11-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) was first used in clinical practice in 2002. Since 2002, there has been a rapid increase in TAVI activity in patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis. This has been supported by systematic randomized data comparing TAVI against the gold standard treatment for the last 50 years' surgical aortic valve replacement. TAVI is now currently a recommended therapeutic intervention in the treatment of severe aortic stenosis patients who are deemed either high risk or inoperable. The indications for TAVI continue to expand. Within this review we will focus on the current guidelines for TAVI, the evidence for it, the complications of TAVI, postprocedure care, the technology available to clinicians now and finally the future perspectives for TAVI.

  5. [Effect of transcatheter aortic valve replacement using Venus-A valve for treating patients with severe aortic stenosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, G Y; Wang, M Y; Wang, Y; Liu, X B; Feng, Y; Kong, X Q; Wu, Y J

    2017-10-24

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of transcatheter aortic valve replacement(TAVR) using Venus-A valve for treating patients with severe aortic stenosis. Methods: In this prospective study, 101 consecutive severe aortic stenosis patients with high surgical risk(Society of Thoracic Surgeon(STS) score ≥4%) or at prohibitive surgical risk were enrolled from 5 academic cardiovascular centers in China(Fuwai hospital, the second affiliated hospital of Zhejiang university school of medicine, West China hospital of Sichuan university, the first affiliated hospital of Nanjing medical university, Ruijin hospital of Shanghai Jiaotong university school of medicine) from September 2012 to January 2015, and Venus-A valves were used in TAVR for these patients. The primary endpoints were death from any cause and major stroke in 1 year. The secondary endpoints included efficacy and safety of TAVR in 1 year. Results: TAVR success rate was 97.9%(98/101), and 3 patients were transferred to receive surgical AVR. There were 85 patients using 1 Venus-A valve, and 13 patients underwent valve-in-valve implantation using 2 Venus-A valves. There were 1 case(1.0%) of stroke, 2 cases(2.0%)of acute myocardial infarction, 5 cases(5.0%) of pericardial effusion, 6 cases(5.9%) of severe vascular complication, and 2 cases(2.0%) of death after 7 days of TAVR. Meanwhile, aortic pressure gradient derived from echocardiography was significantly reduced when compared with pre-procedure level(11(8, 15) mmHg (1 mmHg=0.133 kPa) vs. 59(45, 71)mmHg, PVenus-A valve for treating patients with severe aortic stenosis is effective and safe in the early and medium term post procedure.

  6. Quadricuspid aortic valve defined by echocardiography and cardiac computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsberg, Daniel W; Elad, Yaron; Kass, Robert M; Karlsberg, Ronald P

    2012-01-01

    A 54 year old female presented with lower extremity edema, fatigue, and shortness of breath with physical findings indicative of advanced aortic insufficiency. Echocardiography showed severe aortic regurgitation and a probable quadricuspid aortic valve. In anticipation of aortic valve replacement, cardiac computed tomography (Cardiac CT) was performed using 100 kV, 420 mA which resulted in 6 mSv of radiation exposure. Advanced computing algorithmic software was performed with a non-linear interpolation to estimate potential physiological movement. Surgical photographs and in-vitro anatomic pathology exam reveal the accuracy and precision that preoperative Cardiac CT provided in this rare case of a quadricuspid aortic valve. While there have been isolated reports of quadricuspid diagnosis with Cardiac CT, we report the correlation between echocardiography, Cardiac CT, and similar appearance at surgery with confirmed pathology and interesting post-processed rendered images. Cardiac CT may be an alternative to invasive coronary angiography for non-coronary cardiothoracic surgery with the advantage of providing detailed morphological dynamic imaging and the ability to define the coronary arteries non-invasively. The reduced noise and striking depiction of the valve motion with advanced algorithms will require validation studies to determine its role.

  7. Perceval S aortic valve implantation in an achondroplastic Dwarf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos G Baikoussis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite cardiovascular disease in patients with dwarfism is not rare; there is a lack of reports referring to cardiac interventions in such patients. Dwarfism may be due to achondroplasia or hormonal growth disorders. We present a 58-year-old woman with episodes of dyspnea for several months. She underwent on transthoracic echocardiography, and she diagnosed with severe aortic valve stenosis. She referred to our department for surgical treatment of this finding. In accordance of her anthropometric characteristics and her very small aortic annulus, we had the dilemma of prosthesis selection. We decided to implant a stentless valve to optimize her effective orifice area. Our aim is to present the successful Perceval S valve implantation and the descriptions of the problems coming across in operating on these special patients. To our knowledge, this is the first case patient in which a Perceval S valve is implanted according to the international bibliography.

  8. A Quantitative Study of Simulated Bicuspid Aortic Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeto, Kai; Nguyen, Tran; Rodriguez, Javier; Pastuszko, Peter; Nigam, Vishal; Lasheras, Juan

    2010-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that congentially bicuspid aortic valves develop degenerative diseases earlier than the standard trileaflet, but the causes are not well understood. It has been hypothesized that the asymmetrical flow patterns and turbulence found in the bileaflet valves together with abnormally high levels of strain may result in an early thickening and eventually calcification and stenosis. Central to this hypothesis is the need for a precise quantification of the differences in the strain rate levels between bileaflets and trileaflet valves. We present here some in-vitro dynamic measurements of the spatial variation of the strain rate in pig aortic vales conducted in a left ventricular heart flow simulator device. We measure the strain rate of each leaflet during the whole cardiac cycle using phase-locked stereoscopic three-dimensional image surface reconstruction techniques. The bicuspid case is simulated by surgically stitching two of the leaflets in a normal valve.

  9. [Balloon valvuloplasty for congenital aortic valve stenosis in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lin; Qi, Chunhua; He, Lan; Liu, Fang; Lu, Ying; Huang, Guoying

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of percutaneous balloon aortic valvuloplasty (PBAV) for congenital aortic valve stenosis in children. This is a retrospective clinical study including 14 children treated with PBAV for congenital aortic valve stenosis from October 2006 to December 2012 in our institute. During clinical follow-up, aortic residual stenosis and restenosis, left ventricular function and the procedure-related complications, including the approach artery injury, and aortic regurgitation were particularly assessed. A total of 14 patients consisting of 12 boys and 2 girls underwent the procedure, with mean age (17.1 ± 10.5) months (range from 8 days to 6 years) and the mean body weight (8.9 ± 5.5) kg (range from 1.9 kg to 23.0 kg). The indication for PBAV was a Doppler-derived peak instaneous gradient of ≥ 75 mmHg(1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa) or a smaller gradient with signs of severe left ventricular dysfunction or left ventricular strain on the ECG. The mean ratio of balloon-annulus was 0.92 ± 0.09 (range from 0.75 to 1.09). The catheter-measured peak systolic valve gradient was successfully relieved in all the patients, decreasing from (69 ± 26) mmHg to (29 ± 13) mmHg immediately after balloon valvuloplasty (t = 7.628, P = 0.000). The Doppler-derived peak and mean gradient decreased from (95 ± 21) mmHg and (50 ± 7) mmHg to (49 ± 16) mmHg and (24 ± 11) mmHg, respectively (t = 7.630, 10.401; P = 0.000, 0.000) . The mean follow-up period was 1 day to 61 months. At follow-up, 2 patients (2/14, 14%) underwent the second balloon valvuloplasty for the significant restenosis, and both showed successful relief of restenosis, however 1 patient required surgical Ross procedure due to significant recurrent systolic pressure gradient and moderate aortic regurgitation 4 years after the second balloon valvuloplasty. Among the 3 young infants who presented with congestive heart failure before intervention, 1 died 1 day after the procedure, the other 2 patients had

  10. Progression of Aortic Regurgitation After Different Repair Techniques for Congenital Aortic Valve Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kari, Fabian A; Kroll, Johannes; Kiss, Jan; Hess, Carolin; Stiller, Brigitte; Siepe, Matthias; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm

    2016-01-01

    We sought to characterize the incidence of AR progression and determine risk factors for AR progression in a consecutive series of infants and children after surgical correction of congenital aortic valvular and supravalvular stenosis. N = 30 patients underwent repair of the aortic valve for isolated congenital aortic valve stenosis (n = 14, 47 %) or combined with aortic regurgitation (AR, n = 16, 53%). N = 27 (90%) had a valvular and n = 3 patients (10%) presented with supravalvular pathology of their aortic valve. In n = 16 patients (53%) a bicuspid and in n = 2 (6%) patients, a unicuspid valve was present. Comparative survival was analyzed using the Cox model and log-rank calculations. Log-rank calculations were performed for variables reaching statistical significance in order to identify differences in survival between groups. Commissurotomy was performed in n = 20 patients, patch implantation in n = 4, cusp shaving in n = 8, cusp prolapse correction in n = 3, and cusp augmentation in n = 4 patients. In patients with combined dysfunction and preoperative AR, AR was successfully reduced by the initial procedure, and postoperatively the overall median AR grade was 1+ (range 0-2.5+, p = 0.001, for AR reduction among patients with any grade of preoperative AR). By the time of follow-up echocardiography, the median AR grade had significantly progressed toward 1.5+ (p = 0.004). At the time of mid-term follow-up at 3.2 years, none of the patients had moderate or severe AR grades >2.5+. Patients with a monocuspid aortic valve and patients who had some kind of patch implantation into their cusps or commissures or shaving of thickened cusps were more likely to present with progression of aortic regurgitation. Monocuspid aortic valve and patch implantation, as well as cusp shaving, are probably linked to AR progression. The standard procedure of commissurotomy results in an absolute rate of AR progression of 40 % over a medium-term follow-up period.

  11. Ascending Aortic Wall Cohesion: Comparison of Bicuspid and Tricuspid Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Benedik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Bicuspid aortic valve (AV represents the most common form of congenital AV malformation, which is frequently associated with pathologies of the ascending aorta. We compared the mechanical properties of the aortic wall between patients with bicuspid and tricuspid AV using a new custom-made device mimicking transversal aortic wall shear stress. Methods. Between 03/2010 and 07/2011, 190 consecutive patients undergoing open aortic valve replacement at our institution were prospectively enrolled, presenting either with a bicuspid (group 1, n=44 or a tricuspid (group 2, n=146 AV. Aortic wall specimen were examined with the “dissectometer” resulting in nine specific aortic-wall parameters derived from tensile strength curves (TSC. Results. Patients with a bicuspid AV showed significantly more calcified valves (43.2% versus 15.8%, P<0.001, and a significantly thinner aortic wall (2.04±0.42 mm versus 2.24±0.41 mm, P=0.008. Transesophageal echocardiography diameters (annulus, aortic sinuses, and sinotubular junction were significantly larger in the bicuspid group (P=0.003, P=0.02, P=0.01. We found no difference in the aortic wall cohesion between both groups as revealed by shear stress testing (P=0.72, P=0.40, P=0.41. Conclusion. We observed no differences of TSC in patients presenting with tricuspid or bicuspid AVs. These results may allow us to assume that the morphology of the AV and the pathology of the ascending aorta are independent.

  12. Ochronosis: an unusual finding at aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helou, J; Masters, R G; Keon, W J; Veinot, J P

    1999-09-01

    The condition known as ochronosis refers to the accumulation of oxidized homogentisic acid in the connective tissues of alkaptonuric patients. The diagnosis is usually made from the triad of degenerative arthritis, ochronotic connective tissue pigmentation and urine that turns dark brown or black on alkalinization. Cardiovascular disease is a less well appreciated aspect of this disorder. A patient with ochronosis of his stenotic aortic valve is reported. The role of the pigment in the genesis of the valve degeneration is discussed.

  13. Prognostic importance of atrial fibrillation in asymptomatic aortic stenosis: The Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders M; Gerdts, Eva; Boman, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The frequency and prognostic importance of atrial fibrillation (AF) in asymptomatic mild-to-moderate aortic stenosis (AS) has not been well described. METHODS: Clinical examination, electrocardiography and echocardiography were obtained in asymptomatic patients with mild-to-moderate A...

  14. Case Report: Prothesis-patient mismatch after aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Ospina, Luis; Garcia-Morell, Juan; Rodriguez-Monserrate, Carla P; Valentin-Nieves, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Valve replacement is the standard surgical treatment of diseased valves that cannot be repaired. The main goal of replacement is to exchange the diseased valve with one that has the engineering and hemodynamics as close as possible to the disease free native valve. However due to mechanical and fluid dynamic constraints all prosthetic heart valves (PHVs) are smaller than normal and thus are inherently stenotic. This represents a challenge when it comes time to replace a valve. The correct valve with the correct and matching profile has to be selected before the procedure to avoid possible complications. It is well recognized that patients are also prone to patient-prosthesis mismatch at long term which could have consequences in the clinical outcomes (1). The evaluation of patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) has not been sufficiently emphasized in common practice. Failure to recognize this fact may lead to significant hemodynamic impairment and worsening of the clinical status over the time. Making efforts to identifying patients at risk may decrease the prevalence of PPM, the economic impact to our health system, the morbidity and mortality involved in these cases as well as creates efforts to standardized pre-operative protocols to minimized risk of PPM. We present a case of a 78 years old male patient who underwent aortic valve replacement due severe aortic stenosis, afterwards his clinical course got complicated with several admissions for shortness of breath and decompensated congestive heart failure (CHF).

  15. Early results of valve-sparing ascending aortic replacement in type A aortic dissection and aortic insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М. Л. Гордеев

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study was designed to investigate predictors of effective valve-sparing ascending aortic replacement in patients with Stanford type A aortic dissection combined with aortic insufficiency and to analyze efficacy and safety of this kind of surgery.Methods: From January 2010 to December 2015, 49 patients with Stanford type A aortic dissection combined with aortic insufficiency underwent ascending aortic replacement. All patients were divided into 3 groups: valve-sparing procedures (group 1, n = 11, combined aortic valve and supracoronary ascending aortic replacement (group 2, n = 12, and Bentall procedure (group 3, n = 26. We assessed the initial status of patients, incidence of complications and efficacy of valve-sparing ascending aortic replacement.Results: The hospital mortality rate was 8.2% (4/49 patients. The amount of surgical correction correlated with the initial diameter of the aorta at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva. During the hospital period, none of patients from group 1 developed aortic insufficiency exceeding Grade 2 and the vast majority of patients had trivial aortic regurgitation. The parameters of cardiopulmonary bypass, cross-clamp time and circulatory arrest time did not correlate with the initial size of the ascending aorta and aortic valve blood flow impairment, neither did they influence significantly the incidence and severity of neurological complications. The baseline size of the ascending aorta and degree of aortic regurgitation did not impact the course of the early hospital period.Conclusions: Supracoronary ascending aortic replacement combined with aortic valve repair in ascending aortic dissection and aortic regurgitation is effective and safe. The initial size of the ascending aorta and aortic arch do not influence immediate results. The diameter of the aorta at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva and the condition of aortic valve leaflets could be considered as the limiting factors. Further long

  16. The effect of the aortic valve orientation on cavitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Peter; Travis, Brandon R; Smerup, Morten; Decker Christensen, Thomas; Funder, Jonas; Nyboe, Camilla; Nygaard, Hans; Hasenkam, J Michael

    2016-08-01

    When implanting a mechanical aortic valve the annulus orientation is important with respect to turbulence. However, the effect on cavitation has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate how cavitation is influenced hereof in vivo. Three pigs were included in the study. An Omnicarbon 21mm valve equipped with a rotating mechanism enabling controlled rotation of the valve was implanted in aortic position. Under stable hemodynamic conditions, measurements were performed using a hydrophone positioned at the aortic root. The valve was rotated from 0-360° in increments of 30°. From the pressure fluctuations recorded by the hydrophone the root mean square of the 50 kHz high pass filtered signal as well as the non-deterministic signal energy was calculated as indirect measures of cavitation. Various degrees of cavitation were measured but no relationship was found between either of the two cavitation measures and the valve orientation. Hemodynamics varied during the experiments for all pigs (3.9-5.7 l/min; 5.0-7.2 l/min; 3.1-7.5 l/min). Changes in cavitation quantities seemed to be caused by changes in hemodynamics rather than valve angular position. In conclusion, these results do not favor any position over another in terms of cavitation potential.

  17. Fusion of valve cushions as a key factor in the formation of congenital bicuspid aortic valves in Syrian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sans-Coma, V; Fernández, B; Durán, A C; Thiene, G; Arqué, J M; Muñoz-Chápuli, R; Cardo, M

    1996-04-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve is the most frequent congenital cardiac malformation in humans. However, the morphogenesis of the defect is still unknown. Previous work showed that, in the Syrian hamster, congenital bicuspid aortic valves with the aortic sinuses arranged in ventrodorsal orientation are expressions of a trait the variation of which takes the form of a continuous phenotypic spectrum, ranging from a tricuspid aortic valve with no fusion of the ventral commissure to a bicuspid aortic valve devoid of any raphe. The present study was designed to elucidate the mechanism involved in the formation of bicuspid aortic valves in Syrian hamsters as a possible starting point for further investigation of this process in humans. The sample examined consisted of 80 embryos, aged between 10 days, 16 hours and 13 days, 1 hour postcoitum. Most (n = 59) of the embryos belonged to a laboratory-inbred family of Syrian hamsters with a high incidence of bicuspid aortic valves. The study was carried out using scanning electron microscopy and histological techniques for light microscopy. Twenty-three embryos showed a still undivided conotruncus. In all of these cases there were six mesenchymal semilunar valve primordia protruding into the lumen of the conotruncus. In a further 29 embryos, the conotruncus had just divided into the aortic and pulmonary channels; the embryos were at the beginning of the valvulogenesis. In 13 of these 29 embryos there were three well-defined aortic valve cushions, right, left, and dorsal, whereas in the other 16, the right and left valve cushions were more or less fused toward the lumen of the aorta; when they were completely fused, only two aortic valve cushions, a ventral and a dorsal, could be identified. In the remaining 28 embryos, the aortic valve cushions showed a marked degree of excavation. In 23 of these cases, the valve exhibited a basically tricuspid architecture, whereas it was unequivocally bicuspid in the other five. All variants of the

  18. Comparison of the size of artificial aortic valve with ring diameter by echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rangbarnegad II

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent socio-economic state it is not possible to have different sets of prosthetic cardiac valves available in the operating room before open-heart surgery for valvular replacement. In this study the diameter of the aortic valve ring measured in 2-D echocardiography was compared with the size of the aortic prosthetic valves implanted for the patients with aortic valvular disease. The purpose was to find a logical correlation to help the surgeons to order the correct size of aortic prosthetic valve in advance of surgery. 26 patients with aortic valve disease were studied from 1972 till 1974 who underwent aortic valve replacement surgery. Now, it is possible to predict the accurate size of aortic mechanical valve prosthesis before surgery

  19. Computational prediction of mechanical hemolysis in aortic valved protheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Tullio, M.D.; Nam, J.; Pascazio, G.; Balaras, E.; Verzicco, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The paper reports the prediction of mechanical hemolysis by three different models for the case of blood flow through aortic valved prostheses. Two of the adopted models are based on the action of instantaneous shear stress on the blood cells (stress-based), while the third accounts for the finite

  20. Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation of a CoreValve in a JenaValve prosthesis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Shahram; Becker, Michael; Moza, Ajay; Autschbach, Rüdiger; Marx, Nikolaus; Schröder, Jörg

    2017-09-10

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation has become an accepted treatment modality for inoperable or high-risk surgical patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis. We report the case of a 70-year-old white man who was treated for severe symptomatic aortic regurgitation using transcatheter aortic valve implantation from the apical approach. Because of recurrent cardiac decompensation 4 weeks after implantation he underwent the implantation of a left ventricular assist device system. A year later echocardiography showed a severe transvalvular central insufficiency. Our heart team decided to choose a valve-in-valve approach while reducing the flow rate of left ventricular assist device to minimum and pacing with a frequency of 140 beats/minute. There was an excellent result and our patient is doing well with no relevant insufficiency of the aortic valve at 12-month follow-up. This is the first report about a successful treatment of a stenotic JenaValve using a CoreValve Evolut R; the use of a CoreValve Evolut R prosthesis may be an optimal option for valve-in-valve procedures.

  1. Maximizing prosthetic valve size with the Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Jan; Geha, Alexander S.

    2007-01-01

    -annular mechanical prostheses (CarboMedics, Inc., Arvada, CO, USA) at two institutions. Size frequency distribution was compared to published series, and to the manufacturer's US registry. The ventriculoaortic junction (VAJ) size was available in 234 patients, and compared to the size of the Top Hat valve implanted......BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY: The CarboMedics Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve allows a one-size (and often two-size) increase over the standard intra-annular valve. This advantage should minimize the risk of patient-prosthesis mismatch, where the effective prosthetic valve orifice area...... is less than that of a normal valve. It is suggested that the ability to implant Top Hat valves having greater size, relative to standard intra-annular valves, may currently be under-utilized. Further, there has been some concern that Top Hat implantation can cause obstruction of the coronary ostia...

  2. Hemodynamics and Mechanobiology of Aortic Valve Inflammation and Calcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartik Balachandran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac valves function in a mechanically complex environment, opening and closing close to a billion times during the average human lifetime, experiencing transvalvular pressures and pulsatile and oscillatory shear stresses, as well as bending and axial stress. Although valves were originally thought to be passive pieces of tissue, recent evidence points to an intimate interplay between the hemodynamic environment and biological response of the valve. Several decades of study have been devoted to understanding these varied mechanical stimuli and how they might induce valve pathology. Here, we review efforts taken in understanding the valvular response to its mechanical milieu and key insights gained from in vitro and ex vivo whole-tissue studies in the mechanobiology of aortic valve remodeling, inflammation, and calcification.

  3. Successful Thrombolysis of Aortic Prosthetic Valve Thrombosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arun Kumar Agnihotri

    She delivered a normal baby uneventfully in follow up at full term of pregnancy with no complications. Fibrinolytic therapy for mechanical valve thrombosis is a reasonable alternative to surgery in first trimester of pregnancy. KEY WORDS: Prosthetic valve thrombosis; Echocardiography; Streptokinase;. Thrombolysis; Fetus.

  4. Immediate post-operative responses to transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Nielsen, Susanne; Lisby, Karen H.

    2015-01-01

    Background:Conventional treatment for patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis is surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR), but transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become a reliable alternative in high-risk patients.Aims:The aim of our study was to describe the post-operative....../haematoma/oozing from femoral insertion site in 23 (45%)/10 (19%)/23 (43%) patients.Conclusion:Patients older than 80 years did as well as the younger patients in our study; the main complaints were post-operative pain and disrupted sleep. Our numbers are small, but most patients experienced considerable pain......, predominantly continuous and at rest. We recommend the development of an evidence-based pathway to address the immediate post-operative issues in TAVI patients. Non-pharmacological interventions to prevent pain and promote sleep need to be explored....

  5. Acute Right Coronary Ostial Stenosis during Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarwar Umran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of acute right coronary artery stenosis developing in a patient undergoing aortic valve replacement. We present a case report with a brief overview of the literature relating to coronary artery occlusion associated with cardiac valve surgery - the theories and treatments are discussed. A 85 year-old female was admitted under the care of the cardiothoracic team with signs and symptoms of heart failure. Investigations, including cardiac echocardiography and coronary angiography, indicated a critical aortic valve stenosis. Intraoperative right ventricular failure ensued post aortic valve replacement. Subsequent investigations revealed an acute occlusion of the proximal right coronary artery with resultant absence of distal flow supplying the right ventricle. An immediate right coronary artery bypass procedure was performed with resolution of the right ventricular failure. Subsequent weaning off cardiopulmonary bypass was uneventful and the patient continued to make excellent recovery in the postoperative phase. To our knowledge this is one of the few documented cases of intraoperative acute coronary artery occlusion developing during valve surgery. However, surgeons should be aware of the potential for acute occlusion so that early recognition and rapid intervention can be instituted.

  6. Effect of lipid lowering on new-onset atrial fibrillation in patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Casper N; Greve, Anders M; Boman, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    Lipid-lowering drugs, particularly statins, have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that may prevent atrial fibrillation (AF). This effect has not been investigated on new-onset AF in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (AS)....

  7. Treatment of Aortic, Mitral and Tricuspid Structural Bioprosthetic Valve Deterioration Using the Valve-in-Valve Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codner, Pablo; Assali, Abid; Vaknin-Assa, Hana; Shapira, Yaron; Orvin, Katia; Sharony, Ram; Sagie, Alexander; Kornowski, Ran

    2015-05-01

    The percutaneous approach for a failed bioprosthetic valve is an emerging alternative to redo-valve surgery in patients at high surgical risk. The study aim was to describe the treatment of patients with structural bioprosthetic valve deterioration, using the valve-in-valve technique. A total of 33 consecutive patients with symptomatic structural bioprosthetic valve deterioration was treated at the authors' institution, using the valve-in-valve technique. The valve-in-valve procedure in the aortic position was performed in 23 patients (mean age 81.4 ± 5.9 years; mean STS score 9.6 ± 5.4). The self-expandable and balloon-expandable devices were used in 21 cases (91.3%) and two cases (8.7%), respectively. Procedures were performed via the trans-femoral, trans-axillary and trans-apical routes in 18 (78.2%), three (13%) and two (8.7%) cases, respectively. After the procedure, all patients were in NYHA class I/II. Survival rates were 95.6% at the one-year follow up. The valve-in-valve procedure in the mitral position was performed in 10 patients (mean age 73.6 ± 15 years; mean STS score 7.7 ± 4.1). All procedures were performed using the balloon-expandable device via the trans-apical route. The composite end point of device success was achieved in all patients. Survival rates were 100% and 75% at one month and two years' follow up, respectively. A single valve-in-valve implantation within a failed tricuspid bioprosthetic valve was also successfully performed. In the authors' experience, the valve-in-valve technique for the treatment of a wide range of bioprosthetic valve deterioration modes of failure in different valve positions is safe and very effective.

  8. 3D echocardiographic analysis of aortic annulus for transcatheter aortic valve replacement using novel aortic valve quantification software: Comparison with computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediratta, Anuj; Addetia, Karima; Medvedofsky, Diego; Schneider, Robert J; Kruse, Eric; Shah, Atman P; Nathan, Sandeep; Paul, Jonathan D; Blair, John E; Ota, Takeyoshi; Balkhy, Husam H; Patel, Amit R; Mor-Avi, Victor; Lang, Roberto M

    2017-05-01

    With the increasing use of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in patients with aortic stenosis (AS), computed tomography (CT) remains the standard for annulus sizing. However, 3D transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) has been an alternative in patients with contraindications to CT. We sought to (1) test the feasibility, accuracy, and reproducibility of prototype 3DTEE analysis software (Philips) for aortic annular measurements and (2) compare the new approach to the existing echocardiographic techniques. We prospectively studied 52 patients who underwent gated contrast CT, procedural 3DTEE, and TAVR. 3DTEE images were analyzed using novel semi-automated software designed for 3D measurements of the aortic root, which uses multiplanar reconstruction, similar to CT analysis. Aortic annulus measurements included area, perimeter, and diameter calculations from these measurements. The results were compared to CT-derived values. Additionally, 3D echocardiographic measurements (3D planimetry and mitral valve analysis software adapted for the aortic valve) were also compared to the CT reference values. 3DTEE image quality was sufficient in 90% of patients for aortic annulus measurements using the new software, which were in good agreement with CT (r-values: .89-.91) and small (software can accurately measure aortic annulus in patients with severe AS undergoing TAVR, in better agreement with CT than the existing methodology. Accordingly, intra-procedural TEE could potentially replace CT in patients where CT carries significant risk. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The role of balloon aortic valvuloplasty in the era of transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacławski, Jacek; Wilczek, Krzysztof; Pres, Damian; Krajewski, Adam; Poloński, Lech; Zembala, Marian; Gąsior, Mariusz

    2015-03-01

    Balloon aortic valvuloplasty is recommended in patients not suitable for transcatheter aortic valve implantation/aortic valve replacement (TAVI/AVR) or when such interventions are temporarily contraindicated. The number of performed balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) procedures has been increasing in recent years. Valvuloplasty enables the selection of individuals with severe left ventricular dysfunction or with symptoms of uncertain origin resulting from concomitant disorders (including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD]) who can benefit from destination therapy (AVR/TAVI). Thanks to improved equipment, the number of adverse effects is now lower than it was in the first years after the advent of BAV. Valvuloplasty can be safely performed even in unstable patients, but long-term results remain poor. In view of the limited availability of TAVI in Poland, it is reasonable to qualify patients for BAV more often, as it is a relatively safe procedure improving the clinical condition of patients awaiting AVR/TAVI.

  10. Significance of aortic valve calcification in patients with low-gradient low-flow aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Olcay; Cam, Akin; Agarwal, Shikhar; Ige, Mobolaji; Yousefzai, Rayan; Singh, Dhssraj; Griffin, Brian P; Schoenhagen, Paul; Kapadia, Samir R; Tuzcu, Murat E

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of patients with aortic stenosis (AS) and impaired left ventricular function remains challenging. Aortic valve calcium (AVC) scoring with computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopy has been proposed as means of diagnosing and predicting outcomes in patients with severe AS. Severity of aortic valve calcification correlates with the diagnosis of true severe AS and outcomes in patients with low-gradient low-flow AS. Echocardiography and CT database records from January 1, 2000 to September 26, 2009 were reviewed. Patients with aortic valve area (AVA)<1.0 cm2 who had ejection fraction (EF)≤25% and mean valvular gradient≤25 mmHg with concurrent noncontrast CT scans were included. AVC was evaluated using CT and fluoroscopy. Mortality and aortic valve replacement (AVR) were established using the Social Security Death Index and medical records. The role of surgery in outcomes was evaluated. Fifty-one patients who met the above criteria were included. Mean age was 75.1±9.6 years, and 15 patients were female. Mean EF was 21%±4.6% with AVA of 0.7±0.1 cm2. The peak and mean gradients were 35.5±10.6 and 19.0±5.1 mmHg, respectively. Median aortic valve calcium score was 2027 Agatston units. Mean follow-up was 908 days. Patients with calcium scores above the median value were found to have increased mortality (P=0.02). The benefit of surgery on survival was more pronounced in patients with higher valvular scores (P=0.001). Fluoroscopy scoring led to similar findings, where increased AVC predicted worse outcomes (P=0.04). In patients with low-gradient low-flow AS, higher valvular calcium score predicts worse long-term mortality. AVR is associated with improved survival in patients with higher valve scores. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Kangaroo vs. porcine aortic valves: calcification potential after glutaraldehyde fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narine, K; Chéry, Cyrille C; Goetghebeur, Els; Forsyth, R; Claeys, E; Cornelissen, Maria; Moens, L; Van Nooten, G

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the calcification potential of kangaroo and porcine aortic valves after glutaraldehyde fixation at both low (0.6%) and high (2.0%) concentrations of glutaraldehyde in the rat subcutaneous model. To our knowledge this is the first report comparing the time-related, progressive calcification of these two species in the rat subcutaneous model. Twenty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were each implanted with two aortic valve leaflets (porcine and kangaroo) after fixation in 0.6% glutaraldehyde and two aortic valve leaflets (porcine and kangaroo) after fixation in 2% glutaraldehyde respectively. Animals were sacrificed after 24 h and thereafter weekly for up to 10 weeks after implantation. Calcium content was determined using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and confirmed histologically. Mean calcium content per milligram of tissue (dry weight) treated with 0.6 and 2% glutaraldehyde was 116.2 and 110.4 microg/mg tissue for kangaroo and 95.0 and 106.8 microg/mg tissue for porcine valves. Calcium content increased significantly over time (8.8 microg/mg tissue per week) and was not significantly different between groups. Regression analysis of calcification over time showed no significant difference in calcification of valves treated with 0.6 or 2% glutaraldehyde within and between the two species. Using the subcutaneous model, we did not detect a difference in calcification potential between kangaroo and porcine aortic valves treated with either high or low concentrations of glutaraldehyde. Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Surgical treatment of aortic valve endocarditis: a 26-year experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylan Adademir

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We have retrospectively analyzed the results of the operations made for aortic valve endocarditis in a single center in 26 years. Methods: From June 1985 to January 2011, 174 patients were operated for aortic valve endocarditis. One hundred and thirty-eight (79.3% patients were male and the mean age was 39.3±14.4 (9-77 years. Twenty-seven (15.5% patients had prosthetic valve endocarditis. The mean duration of follow-up was 7.3±4.2 years (0.1-18.2 adding up to a total of 1030.8 patient/years. Results: Two hundred and eighty-two procedures were performed. The most frequently performed procedure was aortic valve replacement with mechanical prosthesis (81.6%. In-hospital mortality occurred in 27 (15.5% cases. Postoperatively, 25 (14.4% patients had low cardiac output and 17 (9.8% heart block. The actuarial survival rates for 10 and 15 years were 74.6±3.7% and 61.1±10.3%, respectively. In-hospital mortality was found to be associated with female gender, emergency operation, postoperative renal failure and low cardiac output. The long term mortality was significantly associated with mitral valve involvement. Male gender was found to be a significant risk factor for recurrence in the follow-up. Conclusion: Surgery for aortic valve endocarditis has significant mortality. Emergency operation, female gender, postoperative renal failure and low cardiac output are significant risk factors. Risk for recurrence and need for reoperation is low.

  13. TRINITY heart valve prosthesis: a novel repositionable and retrievable transapical transcatheter aortic valve system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengstenberg, Christian; Condado, Jose; Garcia, David; Martinez, Milka Marin; La Forgia, Giambattista; Ebner, Adrian; Gallo, Santiago; Silva, Enrique; Holzamer, Andreas; Husser, Oliver; Hilker, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become a viable option for selected high-risk patients with severe and symptomatic aortic stenosis. First- and second-generation TAVI devices are either self- or balloon-expandable, and are often not repositionable or not fully retrievable, leading to suboptimal positioning in some cases. This may result in paravalvular regurgitation, AV conduction delay, or compromise of coronary perfusion. A broader application of TAVI requires advances in both valve and delivery systems. Therefore, in order to facilitate accurate positioning, to minimise paravalvular leakage, possibly to reduce the risk of AV conduction delay, and possibly to be able to abort the procedure, a "next-generation" TAVI system has been developed which is repositionable and retrievable, the TRINITY heart valve system. The TRINITY heart valve system was implanted in a first-in-human study using the transapical approach to demonstrate feasibility and procedural success. All endpoints were adjudicated according to VARC definitions at seven and 30 days. The TRINITY heart valve system was implanted in a 74-year-old patient with severe symptomatic aortic valve stenosis. In this case, repositioning of the TRINITY resulted in optimal position without paravalvular leakage and with perfect function. The TRINITY heart valve is a repositionable and retrievable TAVI system. Both the implantation result and short-term clinical and haemodynamic outcome were excellent.

  14. Impact of aortic root geometry on hydrody-namic performance of transcatheter aortic valve prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaule Sebastian

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of hydrodynamic performance of transcatheter aortic valve prostheses (TAVP in vitro is es-sentially in the fields of development and approval of novel implants. For the prediction of clinical performance, in vitro testing of TAVP allows for benchmarking of different devic-es, likewise. In addition to the implant itself, also the testing environment has a crucial influence on leaflet dynamics and quantitative test results like effective orifice area (EOA or aortic regurgitation.

  15. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement - pros and cons of keyhole aortic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarczyk, Marcin; Szałański, Przemysław; Zembala, Michał; Filipiak, Krzysztof; Karolak, Wojciech; Wojarski, Jacek; Garbacz, Marcin; Kaczmarczyk, Aleksandra; Kwiecień, Anna; Zembala, Marian

    2015-06-01

    Over the last twenty years, minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) has evolved into a safe, well-tolerated and efficient surgical treatment option for aortic valve disease. It has been shown to reduce postoperative morbidity, providing faster recovery and rehabilitation, shorter hospital stay and better cosmetic results compared with conventional surgery. A variety of minimally invasive accesses have been developed and utilized to date. This concise review demonstrates and discusses surgical techniques used in contemporary approaches to MIAVR and presents the most important results of MIAVR procedures.

  16. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement – pros and cons of keyhole aortic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szałański, Przemysław; Zembala, Michał; Filipiak, Krzysztof; Karolak, Wojciech; Wojarski, Jacek; Garbacz, Marcin; Kaczmarczyk, Aleksandra; Kwiecień, Anna; Zembala, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Over the last twenty years, minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) has evolved into a safe, well-tolerated and efficient surgical treatment option for aortic valve disease. It has been shown to reduce postoperative morbidity, providing faster recovery and rehabilitation, shorter hospital stay and better cosmetic results compared with conventional surgery. A variety of minimally invasive accesses have been developed and utilized to date. This concise review demonstrates and discusses surgical techniques used in contemporary approaches to MIAVR and presents the most important results of MIAVR procedures. PMID:26336491

  17. Resting heart rate and risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in asymptomatic aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders M; Bang, Casper N; Berg, Ronan M G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An elevated resting heart rate (RHR) may be an early sign of cardiac failure, but its prognostic value during watchful waiting in asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) is largely unknown. METHODS: RHR was determined by annual ECGs in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS)...

  18. The importance of echocardiography in transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilen, Emine; Sari, Cenk; Durmaz, Tahir; Keleş, Telat; Bayram, Nihal A; Akçay, Murat; Ayhan, Hüseyin M; Bozkurt, Engin

    2014-01-01

    Valvular heart diseases cause serious health problems in Turkey as well as in Western countries. According to a study conducted in Turkey, aortic stenosis (AS) is second after mitral valve disease among all valvular heart diseases. AS is frequently observed in elderly patients who have several cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities. In symptomatic severe AS, surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) is a definitive treatment. However, in elderly patients with left ventricular dysfunction and comorbidities, the risk of operative morbidity and mortality increases and outweighs the gain obtained from AVR surgery. As a result, almost one-third of the patients with serious AS are considered ineligible for surgery. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an effective treatment in patients with symptomatic severe AS who have high risk for conventional surgery. Since being performed for the first time in 2002, with a procedure success rate reported as 95% and a mortality rate of 5%, TAVI has become a promising method. Assessment of vascular anatomy, aortic annular diameter, and left ventricular function may be useful for the appropriate selection of patients and may reduce the risk of complications. Cardiac imaging methods including 2D and 3D echocardiography and multidetector computed tomography are critical during the evaluation of suitable patients for TAVI as well as during and after the procedure. In this review, we describe the role of echocardiography methods in clinical practice for TAVI procedure in its entirety, i.e. from patient selection to guidance during the procedure, and subsequent monitoring. © 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Prognostic significance of aortic valve gradient in patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witberg, Guy; Finkelstein, Arik; Barbash, Issi; Assali, Abid; Shapira, Yaron; Segev, Amit; Halkin, Amir; Fefer, Paul; Ben-Shoshan, Jeremy; Konigstein, Maayan; Sagie, Alexander; Guetta, Victor; Kornowski, Ran; Barsheshet, Alon

    2017-05-22

    To evaluate the effect of baseline aortic valve gradient (AVG) both as a continuous and a categorical variable on mortality in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), focusing on the high-gradient severe aortic stenosis (AS) patients. Identifying new predictors of mortality in the TAVR population can help refine risk stratification and improve the patient selection process for this procedure. So far, AVG has mainly been studied as a categorical variable and there is a paucity of data on its prognostic value as a continuous variable, especially in patients with high AVG AS, who constitute the majority of patients referred for TAVR. We analyzed data on 1,224 consecutive symptomatic severe AS patients, who underwent TAVR at 3 centers. The relation between pre-TAVR AVG and mortality was evaluated among all patients and in patients with high AVGs (mean AVG ≥40 mm Hg) using the Cox proportional hazard model adjusting for multiple variables. During a mean follow-up of 1.8 years, baseline AVG was inversely associated with mortality in the entire cohort and in patients with high AVG AS. By multivariable analysis, patients with mean AVG 40-60 mm Hg and >60 mm Hg had a respective 38% (P = 0.010) and 61% (P 40 mm Hg) and very high AVG AS (mean AVG >60 mm Hg) yielded similar results (HR = 0.88, P = 0.031, and HR = 0.80, P = 0.019, per 10 mm Hg increase in AVG, respectively). Using peak AVGs and an analysis restricted to patients without reduced ejection fraction yielded consistent results. Baseline AVGs show an inverse association with mortality post-TAVR. These results were consistent also in patients with high-gradient AS, suggesting that AVG can be used to identify patients most likely to benefit from TAVR. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Impaired Collagen Biosynthesis and Cross-linking in Aorta of Patients With Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagsater, Dick; Paloschi, Valentina; Hanemaaijer, Roeland; Hultenby, Kjell; Bank, Ruud A.; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Lindeman, Jan H. N.; Eriksson, Per

    Background-Patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) have an increased risk of developing ascending aortic aneurysm. In the present study, collagen homeostasis in nondilated and dilated aorta segments from patients with BAV was studied, with normal and dilated aortas from tricuspid aortic valve

  1. Qualitative haemodynamic validation of a percutaneous temporary aortic valve: a proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, P C

    2011-02-01

    The concept of temporary aortic valves has been suggested in the clinical settings of acute aortic regurgitation and transcatheter aortic valve replacement procedure (TAVR). In TAVR, suggestions have been made to pre-treat or remove the diseased aortic valve prior to implantation of the replacement valve. A successful temporary aortic valve must demonstrate the ability to prevent life-threatening haemodynamics of massive aortic regurgitation. A novel temporary aortic valve (TAV) design, comprised of inflatable balloon elements as a check-valve, can readily be deployed and retrieved via a catheter-system. A simple flow model is set up to test the TAV's performance in severe aortic regurgitation. With induced aortic regurgitation, placement of the TAV is found to increase the distal aortic diastolic pressure, to reduce the widened pulse pressure, to protect proximal aorta-left ventricle from diastolic pressure elevation and to reduce the aortic regurgitant volume. In conclusion, continued development of the TAV system can lead to a successful temporary aortic valve to be used in various appropriate clinical settings.

  2. Transcatheter Versus Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Steinbrüchel, Daniel Andreas; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2015-01-01

    outcome was the composite rate of death from any cause, stroke, or myocardial infarction (MI) at 1 year. RESULTS: A total of 280 patients were randomized at 3 Nordic centers. Mean age was 79.1 years, and 81.8% were considered low-risk patients. In the intention-to-treat population, no significant...... difference in the primary endpoint was found (13.1% vs. 16.3%; p = 0.43 for superiority). The result did not change in the as-treated population. No difference in the rate of cardiovascular death or prosthesis reintervention was found. Compared with SAVR-treated patients, TAVR-treated patients had more...... injury (stage II or III), and new-onset or worsening atrial fibrillation at 30 days than did TAVR-treated patients. CONCLUSIONS: In the NOTION trial, no significant difference between TAVR and SAVR was found for the composite rate of death from any cause, stroke, or MI after 1 year. (Nordic Aortic Valve...

  3. Noninvasive assessment of filling pressure and left atrial pressure overload in severe aortic valve stenosis: relation to ventricular remodeling and clinical outcome after aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbæk, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K

    2011-01-01

    One of the hemodynamic consequences of aortic valve stenosis is pressure overload leading to left atrial dilatation. Left atrial size is a known risk factor providing prognostic information in several cardiac conditions. It is not known if this is also the case in patients with aortic valve...

  4. Aortic root disease in athletes: aortic root dilation, anomalous coronary artery, bicuspid aortic valve, and Marfan's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Eugene Sun

    2013-08-01

    Two professional athletes in the U.S. National Basketball Association required surgery for aortic root dilation in 2012. These cases have attracted attention in sports medicine to the importance of aortic root disease in athletes. In addition to aortic root dilation, other forms of aortic disease include anomalous coronary artery, bicuspid aortic valve, and Marfan's syndrome. In this review, electronic database literature searches were performed using the terms "aortic root" and "athletes." The literature search produced 122 manuscripts. Of these, 22 were on aortic root dilation, 21 on anomalous coronary arteries, 12 on bicuspid aortic valves, and 8 on Marfan's syndrome. Aortic root dilation is a condition involving pathologic dilation of the aortic root, which can lead to life-threatening sequelae. Prevalence of the condition among athletes and higher risk athletes in particular sports needs to be better delineated. Normative parameters for aortic root diameter in the general population are proportionate to anthropomorphic variables, but this has not been validated for athletes at the extremes of anthropomorphic indices. Although echocardiography is the favored screening modality, computed tomography (CT) and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are also used for diagnosis and surgical planning. Medical management has utilized beta-blockers, with more recent use of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), and statins. Indications for surgery are based on comorbidities, degree of dilation, and rate of progression. Management decisions for aortic root dilation in athletes are nuanced and will benefit from the development of evidence-based guidelines. Anomalous coronary artery is another form of aortic disease with relevance in athletes. Diagnosis has traditionally been through cardiac catheterization, but more recently has included evaluation with echocardiography, multislice CT, and MRI. Athletes with this

  5. Global Strain in Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbæk, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K

    2012-01-01

    Score, history with ischemic heart disease and ejection fraction. CONCLUSIONS: -In patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis undergoing AVR reduced GLS provides important prognostic information beyond standard risk factors. Clinical Trial Registration-URL: http://www.clinicaltrial.gov. Unique identifier...

  6. Aortic Valve Stenosis and Left Main Coronary Disease: Hybrid Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amodi, Hussein A; Alhabib, Hamad F; St-Amand, Marc; Iglesias, Ivan; Teefy, Patrick; Chu, Michael W A; Kiaii, Bob

    2015-01-01

    We describe a technique of combined transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), off-pump single coronary artery bypass, and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in a high-risk patient presenting with unstable angina and severe heart failure. This patient had documented moderate to severe aortic stenosis, left ventricular dysfunction, and a heavily calcified ascending aorta. A robotic-assisted left internal thoracic artery harvesting was aborted owing to inability to tolerate single-lung ventilation. A median sternotomy was done, then successful off-pump single-vessel bypass, PCI, and TAVR were achieved. The patient recovered and was discharged from hospital in stable condition.

  7. Clinical Implications of Electrocardiographic Left Ventricular Strain and Hypertrophy in Asymptomatic Patients with Aortic Stenosis: The Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders M; Boman, Kurt; Gohlke-Baerwolf, Christa

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prognostic impact of electrocardiographic left ventricular (LV) strain and hypertrophy (LVH) in asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) is not well described. METHODS AND RESULTS: Data were obtained in asymptomatic patients randomized to simvastatin/ezetimibe combination vs. placebo in ...

  8. Achromobacter xylosoxidans subsp. xylosoxidans prosthetic aortic valve infective endocarditis and aortic root abscesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hal, S; Stark, D; Marriott, D; Harkness, J

    2008-04-01

    We report a case of prosthetic valve infective endocarditis and aortic root abscesses caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans subsp. xylosoxidans. The patient was an intravenous drug user and had injected amphetamines using 'duck pond water' as a diluent. After surgical intervention and 6 weeks of intravenous meropenem therapy, the patient made an uneventful recovery.

  9. Successful balloon aortic valvuloplasty as a bridge therapy to transcatheter aortic valve implantation during the proctoring period

    OpenAIRE

    Yanagisawa, Hiromu; Saito, Naritatsu; Imai, Masao; Minakata, Kenji; Fujita, Takanari; Watanabe, Shin; Watanabe, Hirotoshi; Yamazaki, Kazuhiro; Toyota, Toshiaki; Taniguchi, Tomohiko; Tazaki, Junichi; Shizuta, Satoshi; Daijo, Hiroki; Sakata, Ryuzo; Kimura, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    In Japan, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) with Edwards-SAPIEN XT valve (Edwards Lifesciences Inc., Irvine, CA, USA) started in October 2013. All institutions should undergo a training period to perform TAVI independently. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) as a bridge to TAVI during the training period should be performed with caution to avoid severe aortic regurgitation (AR) because bailout TAVI is not possible. We present a case in which BAV was successfully performed as a br...

  10. Coronary artery disease and symptomatic severe aortic valve stenosis: clinical outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer eMancio

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The impact of coronary artery disease (CAD on outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI has not been clarified. Furthermore, less is known about the indication and strategy of revascularization in these high risk patients. Aims: This study sought to determine the prevalence and prognostic impact of CAD in patients undergoing TAVI, and to assess the safety and feasibility of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI before TAVI.Methods: Patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS undergoing TAVI were included into a prospective single centre registry from 2007 to 2012. Clinical outcomes were compared between patients with and without CAD. In some patients with CAD it was decided to perform elective PCI before TAVI after decision by the Heart Team. The primary endpoints were 30-day and 2-year all-cause mortality.Results: A total of 91 consecutive patients with mean age of 79±9 years (52% men underwent TAVI with a median follow-up duration of 16 months (interquartile range of 27.6 months. CAD was present on 46 patients (51%. At 30-day, the incidences of death were similar between CAD and non-CAD patients (9% and 5%, p=0.44, but at 2 years were 50% in CAD patients and 24% in non-CAD patients (crude hazard ratio with CAD, 2.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1 to 4.6; p=0.04. Adjusting for age, gender, left ventricular ejection fraction and glomerular filtration rate the hazard of death was 2.6-fold higher in patients with CAD (95% CI, 1.1 to 6.0; p=0.03. Elective PCI before TAVI was performed in 13 patients (28% of CAD patients. There were no more adverse events in patients who underwent TAVI+PCI when compared with those who underwent isolated TAVI. Conclusions: In severe symptomatic AS who underwent TAVI, CAD is frequent and adversely impacts long-term outcomes, but not procedure outcomes. In selected patients, PCI before TAVI appears to be feasible and safe.

  11. Aortic Valve Fibroelastoma Masquerading as Transient Ischaemic Attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope-Anne Gowland

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The following paper is on a 49-year-old man who presented to accident and emergency department having experienced five hours of left-sided chest pain, tightness in the chest, and shortness of breath. He also reported paresthesia and an ache in the left arm. Further investigations revealed an aortic valve papillary fibroelastoma. Although histologically papillary fibroelastomas are described as benign, they carry with them considerable risk of morbidity and mortality. This patient experienced recurrent transient ischemic attacks (TIAs’. He was taken to theatre on urgent basis to remove the papillary fibroelastoma. His aortic valve was preserved during the operation. The patient had an uneventful recovery following the surgery. His neurologic symptoms resolved following the operation. The operation was curative and no further symptoms were reported at followup.

  12. Outcome after transvascular transcatheter aortic valve implantation in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaede, Luise; Blumenstein, Johannes; Liebetrau, Christoph; Dörr, Oliver; Kim, Won-Keun; Nef, Holger; Husser, Oliver; Elsässer, Albrecht; Hamm, Christian W; Möllmann, Helge

    2017-12-08

    We analysed the number of procedures, complications, and in-hospital mortality rates of all patients undergoing transvascular transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TV-TAVI) in comparison to isolated surgical aortic valve replacement (iSAVR) from 2014 to 2016 in Germany. All aortic valve procedures performed in Germany are mandatorily registered in a quality control program. More than 15 000 TV-TAVI procedures were performed in 2016 in Germany. Especially the number of post-procedural complications declined within the last few years, including new pacemaker implantations (2015: 12.6% vs. 2016: 11.4%, P = 0.002) and vascular complications (2015: 8.5% vs. 2016: 7.1%; P TV-TAVI was 2.6%, which is for the first time numerically below that of iSAVR, which was 2.9% (P = 0.19). A stratified analysis according to the German aortic valve score shows a lower observed than expected in-hospital mortality rate for TV-TAVI (O/E 0.68). Additionally, the in-hospital mortality was significantly lower after TV-TAVI than after iSAVR in the very high- (11.3% vs. 23.6%; P TV-TAVI was numerically lower than after iSAVR in 2016 for the first time. In the low risk group in-hospital mortality was similar, whereas in all other risk groups in-hospital mortality after TV-TAVI was significantly lower than after SAVR. This is likely to contribute to a redefinition of the standard of care in the future.

  13. Increased risk of aortic valve stenosis in patients with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalid, Usman; Ahlehoff, Ole; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease including atherosclerosis. The pathogenesis of aortic valve stenosis (AS) also includes an inflammatory component. We therefore investigated the risk of AS in patients with psoriasis compared...... with mild and severe disease, respectively. CONCLUSION: In a nationwide cohort, psoriasis was associated with a disease severity-dependent increased risk of AS. The mechanisms underlying this novel finding require further study....

  14. Distal coronary embolisation during transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Akira; Saito, Naritatsu; Minakata, Kenji; Kimura, Takeshi

    2016-07-07

    A 92-year-old woman was admitted to a hospital with severe aortic valve stenosis for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). TAVI was performed under general anaesthesia. After balloon valvuloplasty, the patient became hypotensive and transesophageal echocardiography showed severe aortic regurgitation with severely depressed left ventricular wall motion. A 26 mm Sapien XT valve was deployed. However, the ventricular wall motion was still severely depressed. Coronary angiography showed occlusion of the mid-left anterior descending (LAD) artery. After crossing a 0.014″ guidewire, manual vacuum aspiration was conducted and multiple emboli were removed. 2 drug-eluting stents were deployed in the LAD artery. Following this, the left ventricular wall motion improved. The patient's failure symptoms improved remarkably after TAVI. Histopathological examination of the aspirated emboli was compatible with a recent thrombus containing platelets, fibrin, erythrocytes and leucocytes. This is the first report to describe a distal coronary embolisation during TAVI with histopathological confirmation of the embolus. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  15. Predictive factors for pacemaker requirement after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akin Ibrahim

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI has been established as a treatment option for inoperable patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis. However, patients suffer frequently from conduction disturbances after TAVI. Methods Baseline, procedural as well as surface and intracardiac ECG parameters were evaluated for patients treated with TAVI and a comparison between patients requiring pacemaker with those not suffering from relevant conduction disorders were done. Results TAVI was successfully in all patients (n=45. Baseline surface and intracardiac ECG recording revealed longer PQ (197.1±51.2 msec versus 154.1±32.1 msec; p120 msec and a PQ interval >200 msec immediately (within 60 minutes after implantation of the aortic valve were predictors for high-grade (type II second-degree and third-degree AV block. Other clinical parameters as well as baseline electrocardiographic parameters had no impact on critical conduction delay. Conclusion Cardiac conduction disturbances are common after TAVI. The need for pacing after TAVI is predictable by surface ECG evaluation immediately (within 60 minutes after the procedure.

  16. Predictors of permanent pacemaker implantation after transfemoral aortic valve implantation with the Lotus valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keßler, Mirjam; Gonska, Birgid; Seeger, Julia; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Wöhrle, Jochen

    2017-10-01

    Permanent pacemaker implantation (PPMI) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation is of high clinical relevance, but PPMI rates differ widely between valve types. Although the Lotus valve can be repositioned, reported rates for PPMI are high. The predictors of PPMI after Lotus valve implantation have not been defined yet. We analyzed the impact of preexisting conduction disturbances, depth of implantation, oversizing, and amount of calcification on PPMI in 216 patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis underdoing Lotus valve implantation. PPMI was required in 39.8% of patients. Patients with need for PPMI compared with patients without need for PPMI had more often the following criteria: male gender (P=.035); preprocedural right bundle-branch block (RBBB) (16.3% vs 0, P<.001); atrioventricular (AV) block first degree (26.7% vs 10.1%, P=.004); higher calcium volume of the left coronary cusp (63.1±87.5 mm(3) vs 42.8±49.3 mm(3), P=.05); and deeper valve implantation at right coronary (P=.011), noncoronary (P=.026), and left coronary (P=.012) position. Oversizing in relation to annulus and left ventricular outflow tract did not have an impact on need for PPMI. By multiple regression analysis, preprocedural AV block first degree (P=.005), RBBB (P<.001), and depth of implantation (P=.006) were independent risk factors for need of PPMI. In patients with severe aortic stenosis receiving transfemoral Lotus valve, preexisting AV block first degree, RBBB, and implantation depth are independent predictors of PPMI, highlighting the importance of careful valve positioning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Aortic valve sclerosis is associated with lower serum adiponectin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çabuk, Gizem; Guray, Umit; Kafes, Habibe; Guray, Yesim; Cabuk, Ali Kemal; Bayir, Pinar T; Asarcikli, Lale D

    2015-06-01

    The sclerotic lesions of the aortic valve share common features with atherosclerosis. An anti-inflammatory protein, adiponectin, seems to have a protective effect on the cardiovascular system. The goal of our study is to determine adiponectin levels in patients with aortic sclerosis and to compare these values with the control group with similar age and cardiovascular risk profile. Sixty-eight patients with aortic sclerosis and 40 controls were included. Serum adiponectin levels were measured by solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. There were no significant differences regarding age, sex and other cardiovascular risk factors between groups. Also, mean body mass index values were similar. The rate of mitral annular calcification and left ventricular hypertrophy were significantly higher in patients with aortic sclerosis. Among laboratory variables, high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels were significantly higher in patients with aortic sclerosis than in those without (4.0 ± 2.9 vs. 2.9 ± 2.3 mg/dl, P = 0.04). Adiponectin levels were found to be significantly lower in aortic sclerosis group than in controls (9.7 ± 4.4 vs. 11.7 ± 4.9 μg/ml, P = 0.034). In the whole group, adiponectin levels were significantly correlated with BMI (r = -0.22, P = 0.02), white blood cell count (r = -0.2, P = 0.03), hsCRP (r = -0.25, P = 0.008), total cholesterol (r = -0.18, P = 0.05), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (r = 0.31, P = 0.001) and triglyceride (r = -0.36, P sclerosis, serum adiponectin levels were significantly lower compared with those with normal aortic valves. Our findings suggested that adiponectin might play a role in the progression of degenerative aortic valve disease.

  18. Cognitive Outcomes following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ka Sing Paris Lai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease in the elderly in the Western world and contributes to a large proportion of all deaths over the age of 70. Severe aortic stenosis is conventionally treated with surgical aortic valve replacement; however, the less invasive transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI is suggested for those at high surgical risk. While TAVI has been associated with improved survival and favourable outcomes, there is a higher incidence of cerebral microembolisms in TAVI patients. This finding is of concern given mechanistic links with cognitive decline, a symptom highly prevalent in those with cardiovascular disease. This paper reviews the literature assessing the possible link between TAVI and cognitive changes. Studies to date have shown that global cognition improves or remains unchanged over 3 months following TAVI while individual cognitive domains remain preserved over time. However, the association between TAVI and cognition remains unclear due to methodological limitations. Furthermore, while these studies have largely focused on memory, cognitive impairment in this population may be predominantly of vascular origin. Therefore, cognitive assessment focusing on domains important in vascular cognitive impairment, such as executive dysfunction, may be more helpful in elucidating the association between TAVI and cognition in the long term.

  19. Valve Sparing Aortic Root Replacement in Children with Loeys-Dietz Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Tae Sim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder that is characterized by aggressive arterial and aortic disease, often involving the formation of aortic aneurysms. We describe the cases of two children with LDS who were diagnosed with aortic root aneurysms and successfully treated by valve-sparing aortic root replacement (VSRR with a Valsalva graft. VSRR is a safe and suitable operation for children that avoids prosthetic valve replacement.

  20. Symetis Acurate Transapical Aortic Valve: the initial experience with a second generation of transcatheter aortic valve replacement device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zembala, Michał Oskar; Piegza, Jacek; Wacławski, Jacek; Hawranek, Michał; Hilker, Michael; Niklewski, Tomasz; Głowacki, Jan; Parys, Monika; Nadziakiewicz, Paweł; Chodór, Piotr; Wilczek, Krzysztof; Przybylski, Roman; Gąsior, Mariusz; Zembala, Marian

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has proven to be a valuable alternative to conventional surgical aortic valve replacement in high risk and surgically in operable patients who suffer from severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. However, a significant number of complications, associated with both the learning curve and device specificity, have required attention and subsequent improvement. The Symetis transapical TAVR system is a self-positioning bioprosthesis composed of a non-coronary leaflet of surgical quality porcine tissue valve sewn into a self-expanding nitinol stent that iscovered with a PET-skirt. From June to September 2013 six patients have been operated on severe aortic stenosis using the new TAVR device. All patients have undergone critical assessment of a local Heart Team and have been disqualified from conventional AVR. Five were woman. Mean age was 82.3 ± 2.0 (mean LogEuroScore 23.9 ± 14.3). Four patients suffered from coronary artery disease - two had history of previous percutaneous coronary intervention with intracoronary stents, while the next two had history of coronary artery bypass grafting. Diabetes was frequent (n = 3) as well as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n = 4). Carotid artery disease was encountered in three patients similarly to atrial fibrillation. Mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 51.5 ± 11.8%, but one patient had suffered from low-flow-low-gradient aortic stenosis with LVEF of 29%. The procedure was carried out successfully in all six cases. Two patients have received the valve sized L, three - M and one - S. Mean procedure time was 180 ± 19 min, mean cine 7.2 ± 1.2 min. Mean X-ray dose 930 ± 439 mGy, while mean volume of contrast given was 135 ± 61 mL. In all patients but one perivalvular leak (PVL) was not present. One patient had trace of PVL. Also, good LVEF was noted in all patients. Similar findings were obtained 30 days post procedure. No strokes, transient ischaemic attack or other

  1. Quality and Safety in Health Care, Part XXX: Transcatheter Aortic Valve Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay A

    2017-12-01

    Initially, the transcatheter aortic valve replacement procedure was approved only for patients with aortic stenosis that was both severe and symptomatic who either also had too high a risk of aortic valve replacement surgery to have the surgery or who had a high risk for the surgery. Between the years 2012 and 2015, the death rate at 30 days declined from an initial rate of 7.5% to 4.6%. There has also been more use of the transfemoral approach over the years. In 2016, the transcatheter aortic valve replacement was approved for patients with aortic stenosis at intermediate risk of surgery.

  2. Comparison of 1-Year Outcome in Patients With Severe Aorta Stenosis Treated Conservatively or by Aortic Valve Replacement or by Percutaneous Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (Data from a Multicenter Spanish Registry).

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Saldivar, Hugo; Rodriguez-Pascual, Carlos; de la Morena, Gonzalo; Fernández-Golfín, Covadonga; Amorós, Carmen; Alonso, Mario Baquero; Dolz, Luis Martínez; Solé, Albert Ariza; Guzmán-Martínez, Gabriela; Gómez-Doblas, Juan José; Jiménez, Antonio Arribas; Fuentes, María Eugenia; Gay, Laura Galian; Ortiz, Martin Ruiz; Avanzas, Pablo; Abu-Assi, Emad; Ripoll-Vera, Tomás; Díaz-Castro, Oscar; Osinalde, Eduardo P; Martínez-Sellés, Manuel

    2016-07-15

    The factors that influence decision making in severe aortic stenosis (AS) are unknown. Our aim was to assess, in patients with severe AS, the determinants of management and prognosis in a multicenter registry that enrolled all consecutive adults with severe AS during a 1-month period. One-year follow-up was obtained in all patients and included vital status and aortic valve intervention (aortic valve replacement [AVR] and transcatheter aortic valve implantation [TAVI]). A total of 726 patients were included, mean age was 77.3 ± 10.6 years, and 377 were women (51.8%). The most common management was conservative therapy in 468 (64.5%) followed by AVR in 199 (27.4%) and TAVI in 59 (8.1%). The strongest association with aortic valve intervention was patient management in a tertiary hospital with cardiac surgery (odds ratio 2.7, 95% confidence interval 1.8 to 4.1, p <0.001). The 2 main reasons to choose conservative management were the absence of significant symptoms (136% to 29.1%) and the presence of co-morbidity (128% to 27.4%). During 1-year follow-up, 132 patients died (18.2%). The main causes of death were heart failure (60% to 45.5%) and noncardiac diseases (46% to 34.9%). One-year survival for patients treated conservatively, with TAVI, and with AVR was 76.3%, 94.9%, and 92.5%, respectively, p <0.001. One-year survival of patients treated conservatively in the absence of significant symptoms was 97.1%. In conclusion, most patients with severe AS are treated conservatively. The outcome in asymptomatic patients managed conservatively was acceptable. Management in tertiary hospitals is associated with valve intervention. One-year survival was similar with both interventional strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Anterior mitral valve aneurysm: a rare sequelae of aortic valve endocarditis

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    Rajesh Janardhanan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In intravenous drug abusers, infective endocarditis usually involves right-sided valves, with Staphylococcus aureus being the most common etiologic agent. We present a patient who is an intravenous drug abuser with left-sided (aortic valve endocarditis caused by Enterococcus faecalis who subsequently developed an anterior mitral valve aneurysm, which is an exceedingly rare complication. A systematic literature search was conducted which identified only five reported cases in the literature of mitral valve aneurysmal rupture in the setting of E. faecalis endocarditis. Real-time 3D-transesophageal echocardiography was critical in making an accurate diagnosis leading to timely intervention. Learning objectives: • Early recognition of a mitral valve aneurysm (MVA is important because it may rupture and produce catastrophic mitral regurgitation (MR in an already seriously ill patient requiring emergency surgery, or it may be overlooked at the time of aortic valve replacement (AVR. • Real-time 3D-transesophageal echocardiography (RT-3DTEE is much more advanced and accurate than transthoracic echocardiography for the diagnosis and management of MVA.

  4. A second-time percutaneous aortic-valve implantation for bioprosthetic failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codner, Pablo; Assali, Abid; Vaknin Assa, Hana; Kornowski, Ran

    2015-09-01

    We report a case of an 84-year-old man with a history of surgical aortic-valve replacement for chronic aortic regurgitation (AR) who later developed severe prosthetic valve AR. Subsequent treatment with a Corevalve® was unsuccessful with severe AR seen at 3 years after the valve-in-valve procedure. The patient was then successfully treated with a second catheter-based Corevalve® implantation.

  5. Cardiac energetics analysis after aortic valve replacement with 16-mm ATS mechanical valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushijima, Tomoki; Tanoue, Yoshihisa; Uchida, Takayuki; Matsuyama, Sho; Matsumoto, Takashi; Tominaga, Ryuji

    2014-09-01

    The 16-mm ATS mechanical valve is one of the smallest prosthetic valves used for aortic valve replacement (AVR) in patients with a very small aortic annulus, and its clinical outcomes are reportedly satisfactory. Here, we analyzed the left ventricular (LV) performance after AVR with the 16-mm ATS mechanical valve, based on the concept of cardiac energetics analysis. Eleven patients who underwent AVR with the 16-mm ATS mechanical valve were enrolled in this study. All underwent echocardiographic examination at three time points: before AVR, approximately 1 month after AVR, and approximately 1 year after AVR. LV contractility (end-systolic elastance [Ees]), afterload (effective arterial elastance [Ea]), and efficiency (ventriculoarterial coupling [Ea/Ees] and the stroke work to pressure-volume area ratio [SW/PVA]) were noninvasively measured by echocardiographic data and blood pressure measurement. Ees transiently decreased after AVR and then recovered to the pre-AVR level at the one-year follow-up. Ea significantly decreased in a stepwise manner. Consequently, Ea/Ees and SW/PVA were also significantly improved at the one-year follow-up compared with those before AVR. The midterm LV performance after AVR with the 16-mm ATS mechanical valve was satisfactory. AVR with the 16-mm ATS mechanical valve is validated as an effective treatment for patients with a very small aortic annulus. The cardiac energetics variables, coupling with the conventional hemodynamic variables, can contribute to a better understanding of the patients' clinical conditions, and those may serve as promising indices of the cardiac function.

  6. Bicuspid Aortic Valve: Unresolved Issues and Role of Imaging Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most common congenital heart disease with marked heterogeneity in many aspects. Fusion patterns of the aortic cusp are quite variable with different type and severity of valvular dysfunction. Moreover, non-valvular cardiovascular abnormalities are associated with BAV. Among them, aortic aneurysm/dissection is the most serious clinical condition with variable patterns of segmental aortic dilatation. Potential association between BAV phenotype and valvulopathy or aortopathy has been suggested, but needs to be tested further. A lack of long-term outcome data at this moment is responsible for unresolved debate regarding appropriate management of patients with BAV, specifically to prevent development of aortic dissection. Long-term follow-up data of a well-characterized cohort or registry based on standardized classification of BAV phenotype and aortopathy are necessary for evidence-based medical practice. Advanced imaging techniques such as computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging offer better opportunities for accurate phenotype classification and imaging specialists should play a central role to establish a collaborative multicenter cohort or registry. PMID:25883749

  7. Direct Aortic CoreValve implantation via right anterior thoracotomy in a patient with patent bilateral mammary artery grafts and aortic arch chronic dissection

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    Giuseppe Bruschi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct aortic trans-catheter aortic valve implantation is an alternative approach to treat high risk for surgery patients affected by severe aortic stenosis and concomitant peripheral vascular disease. We describe a case of direct aortic CoreValve implantation made via a right anterior thoracotomy in a 78-year-old male affected by severe aortic stenosis and severe peripheral vasculopathy, who previously underwent coronary artery bypass grafting, with patent bilateral mammary artery grafts and chronic aortic arch dissection.

  8. Aortic allografts in treatment of aortic valve and ascending aorta prosthetic endocarditis

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    S.V. Spiridonov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim – to assess short- and long-term results of aortic root replacement using aortic allografts in patients with prosthetic endocarditis. Materials and methods. Since February 2009 until June 2016 aortic valve and ascending aorta replacement using aortic allografts was performed in 26 patients with prosthetic endocarditis. In 50 % of cases at initial operation aortic valve replacement was performed, in another 50 % of cases – aortic valve and ascending aorta replacement. Echocardiography was performed 10 days, 3, 6 and 12 months, 2, 3 and 5 years after surgery. Analysis of long-term results included all cases of deaths, prosthesis-related complications and recurrence of endocarditis. Results. 30-day mortality was 23.1 %. Extracorporeal membranous oxygenation (ECMO was used only in 5 patients (19.2 %. Four patients were weaned from ECMO. We did not observe any allograft-related complications. During follow-up period there were no cases of reoperation due to structural allograft failure. Relapse of infection occurred in 1 patient (3.8 % four years after the operation and led to lethal outcome. Conclusion. Reoperations using allografts are an effective surgical treatment of prosthetic endocarditis. In majority of cases prosthetic endocarditis was caused by gram-positive cocci (Staphylococcus. In 84.6 % of cases it was associated with destruction of paravalvular structures and abscesses formation. Heart failure was a causative factor of different complications in these patients, which required ECMO in 19.2 % of patients. In 80 % of cases patients were weaned from ECMO. Allografts using for the treatment of prosthetic endocarditis is associated with high resistance to infection and with a significant rate of freedom from recurrence of endocarditis within 3 years after surgery.

  9. Extensive infective endocarditis of the aortic root and the aortic-mitral continuity: a mitral valve sparing approach†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomšic, Anton; Schneider, Adriaan W; Palmen, Meindert; van Brakel, Thomas J; Versteegh, Michel I M; Klautz, Robert J M

    2017-06-01

    Severe cases of infective endocarditis (IE) of the aortic valve can cause aortic root destruction and affect the surrounding structures, including the aortic-mitral continuity, the anterior mitral valve leaflet and the roof of the left atrium. Reconstruction after resection of all infected tissue remains challenging. We describe our surgical approach and the mid-term results. Between January 2004 and December 2015, 35 patients underwent surgery for extensive IE of the aortic valve with destruction of the aortic root, the aortic-mitral continuity and the mitral valve. Mean age was 60.4 ± 13.7; 26/35 (74%) patients had prosthetic valve endocarditis. Four patients were in critical preoperative state. Median EuroSCORE II was 18.0% [interquartile range (IQR) 11.0-26.7]. Aortic root replacement was performed in 32 (91%) patients. The remaining patients underwent aortic valve replacement. Reconstruction of the aortic-mitral continuity and the roof of the left atrium were performed using a folded pericardial patch. In 28 patients (80%), mitral valve repair was performed. Postoperative mechanical circulatory support, acute kidney failure and surgical re-exploration were seen in 5 (16%), 10 (31%) and 4 (13%) patients, respectively. Early survival rate was 77% (27 patients). During a median follow-up of 29.8 months (IQR 6.4-62.9), 7 (26%) patients required reintervention (3-42 months after surgery); 4 were due to mitral incompetence, early in our experience. Extensive IE of the aortic root with destruction of the surrounding tissues remains a complex disease with high morbidity and mortality rates. Our technique allows native mitral valve preservation but is technically challenging.

  10. Aortic and Mitral Valve Disease and Left Ventricular Dysfunction in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Kevin O; Tweddell, James S

    2016-08-01

    In this review, we will discuss aortic stenosis, aortic regurgitation, mitral regurgitation, and mitral stenosis. We will review the etiology, anatomy, pathophysiology, presentation, and treatment of aortic and mitral valve disease. Age and lesion specific treatments are outlined based on the severity of valve disease with an aim at long-term preservation of left ventricular function. MEDLINE and PubMed. Mitral and aortic valve disease leads to unique hemodynamic burdens that can impact left ventricular function, quality of life, and longevity. The primary challenge in the management of mitral and aortic valve disease is to apply appropriate medical management and identify that point in time at which the surgery is necessary. Although guidelines have been established for the management of aortic and mitral valve disease in adults, the challenges of early presentation, maintenance of growth potential, and apparent increased tolerance of hemodynamic burden in children makes decision making challenging.

  11. Circulating matrix metalloproteinase patterns in association with aortic dilatation in bicuspid aortic valve patients with isolated severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongshi; Wu, Boting; Dong, Lili; Wang, Chunsheng; Wang, Xiaolin; Shu, Xianhong

    2016-02-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) exhibits a clinical incline toward aortopathy, in which aberrant tensile and shear stress generated by BAV can induce differential expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their endogenous tissue inhibitors (TIMPs). Whether stenotic BAV, which exhibits additional eccentric high-velocity flow jet upon ascending aorta and further worsens circumferential systolic wall shear stress than BAV with echocardiographically normal aortic valve, can lead to unique plasma MMP/TIMP patterns is still unknown. According to their valvulopathy and aortic dilatation status, 93 BAV patients were included in the present study. Group A (n = 37) and B (n = 28) comprised severely stenotic patients with or without ascending aorta dilatation; Group C (n = 12) and D (n = 16) comprised echocardiographically normal BAV patients with or without ascending aorta dilatation. Plasma MMP/TIMP levels (MMP-1, -2, -3, -8, -9, -10, -13 and TIMP-1, -2, -4) were determined via a multiplex ELISA detection system in a single procedure. Among patients with isolated severe aortic stenosis, plasma levels of MMP-2 and -9 were significantly elevated when ascending aortic dilatation was present (p = 0.001 and p = 0.002, respectively). MMP-2, however, remained as the single elevated plasma component among echocardiographically normal BAV patients with dilated ascending aorta (p = 0.027). Multivariate analysis revealed that MMP-2 and MMP-9 could both serve as independent risk factor for aortic dilatation in the case of isolated severe stenosis (p = 0.003 and p = 0.001, respectively), and MMP-2 in echocardiographically normal patients (p = 0.002). In conclusion, BAV patients with isolated severe aortic stenosis demonstrated a distinct plasma MMP/TIMP pattern, which might be utilized as circulating biomarkers for early detection of aortic dilatation.

  12. Antihypertensive Treatment With β-Blockade in Patients With Asymptomatic Aortic Stenosis and Association With Cardiovascular Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Casper N; Greve, Anders M; Rossebø, Anne B; Ray, Simon; Egstrup, Kenneth; Boman, Kurt; Nienaber, Christoph; Okin, Peter M; Devereux, Richard B; Wachtell, Kristian

    2017-11-27

    Patients with aortic stenosis (AS) often have concomitant hypertension. Antihypertensive treatment with a β-blocker (Bbl) is frequently avoided because of fear of depression of left ventricular function. However, it remains unclear whether antihypertensive treatment with a Bbl is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events in patients with asymptomatic mild to moderate AS. We did a post hoc analysis of 1873 asymptomatic patients with mild to moderate AS and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction in the SEAS (Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis) study. Propensity-matched Cox regression and competing risk analyses were used to assess risk ratios for all-cause mortality, sudden cardiac death, and cardiovascular death. A total of 932 (50%) patients received Bbl at baseline. During a median follow-up of 4.3±0.9 years, 545 underwent aortic valve replacement, and 205 died; of those, 101 were cardiovascular deaths, including 40 sudden cardiovascular deaths. In adjusted analyses, Bbl use was associated with lower risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 0.5, 95% confidence interval 0.3-0.7, P0.1). In post hoc analyses Bbl therapy did not increase the risk of all-cause mortality, sudden cardiac death, or cardiovascular death in patients with asymptomatic mild to moderate AS. A prospective study may be warranted to determine if Bbl therapy is in fact beneficial. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00092677. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  13. Quadricuspid aortic valve complicated with infective endocarditis: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoguchi, Hiroki; Sakaki, Masayuki; Inoue, Kazushige; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Iwata, Takashi; Suehiro, Yasuo; Miura, Takuya

    2014-12-01

    Congenital quadricuspid aortic valve is a rare cardiac malformation with an unknown risk of infective endocarditis. We report a case of quadricuspid aortic valve complicated with infective endocarditis. A 53-year-old Japanese woman was hospitalized with leg edema and a fever of unknown origin. Corynebacterium striatum was detected in the blood culture. Echocardiography demonstrated a quadricuspid aortic valve with vegetation and severe functional regurgitation. The condition was diagnosed as a quadricuspid aortic valve with infective endocarditis, for which surgery was performed. The quadricuspid aortic valve had three equal-sized cusps and one smaller cusp (type B according to Hurwitz classification). We dissected the vegetation and infectious focus and implanted a mechanical valve. Following the case report, we review the literature.

  14. Aortic valve replacement in octogenarians with prior cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timek, Tomasz A; Turfe, Zaahir; Hooker, Robert L; Davis, Alan T; Willekes, Charles L; Murphy, Edward T; Bove, Theodore J; Heiser, John C; Patzelt, Lawrence H

    2015-02-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has been advocated for very elderly patients with aortic stenosis, and prior cardiac surgery as a less invasive treatment option. Although surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) is safe and effective in selected elderly patients, the perioperative and mid-term outcomes of AVR in very elderly with prior cardiac surgery are unknown. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) Database at our center enrolled 3,735 patients after AVR since 1997. In this time interval, we identified 61 patients 80 years and older who underwent AVR for severe AS or failed aortic bioprosthesis after having prior cardiac surgery. All clinical parameters were derived from the STS database. Follow-up mortality was assessed using the Social Security Death Index. The average age of the patients was 83 ± 2 years, 77% were male, and 75% underwent an isolated coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) as their first cardiac procedure. The mean ejection fraction was 0.53 ± 0.13. The CABG was performed concurrently in 49% of patients at the time of redo sternotomy and AVR. Stented bioprosthesis was implanted in 61% of patients and stentless in 39%. Perioperative mortality was 1.6% (1 of 61). One, 3, 5, and 7 year survival rates were 85%, 69%, 63%, and 43%, respectively. Patients with AVR only had similar survival to patients who underwent concomitant AVR and CABG. Type of aortic prosthesis did not influence postoperative survival. In selected patients over the age of 80 with history of prior cardiac surgery, AVR can be performed safely with very good mid-term outcomes. Age alone should not be exclusion criteria for surgical AVR in octogenarians with prior cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Correlation Between Aortic Valve Sclerosis and Coronary Artery Disease: A Cross - Sectional Study

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    Afsoon Fazlinezhad

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Aortic valve sclerosisis considered as a manifestation of coronary atherosclerosis. Recent studies demonstrated an association between aortic valve sclerosis and obstructive coronary artery disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluatethe correlation betweenaortic valve sclerosis andobstructive coronary artery disease and the extent of coronary artery disease in patients hospitalized for chest pain. Materials and Methods: A total of 230 consecutive patients were referred to the coronary angiography of GhaemMedical Center and were subjected to transthorasic echocardiography for screening of aortic valve sclerosis and coronary risk assessment. The diagnostic value of obstructive coronary artery disease for aortic valve sclerosis was calculated. Results: The patients with obstructive coronary artery disease had a higher prevalence of aortic valve sclerosis compared to those with no coronary artery disease (P< 0.05. Aortic valve sclerosis was an independent predictor for obstructive coronary artery disease by multivariate analysis (P< 0.05. Aortic valve sclerosis had sensitivity of 47% and specificity of 79% and positive predictor value of 92%. Conclusions: Aortic valve sclerosis was an independent predictor for obstructive coronary artery disease in patients with chest pain and was strongly interrelated with the extent of coronary artery disease in these patients.

  16. Study on decellularized porcine aortic valve/poly (3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) hybrid heart valve in sheep model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Song; Liu, Ying-Long; Cui, Bin; Qu, Xiang-Hua; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2007-09-01

    To overcome shortcomings of current heart valve prostheses, novel hybrid valves were fabricated from decellularized porcine aortic valves coated with poly (3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate [PHBHHx]). In the mechanical test in vitro, the biomechanical performance of hybrid valve was investigated. In an in vivo study, hybrid valve conduits were implanted in pulmonary position in sheep without cardiopulmonary bypass. Uncoated grafts were used as control. The valves were explanted and examined histologically and biochemically 16 weeks after surgery. The hybrid valve conduits maintained original shapes, were covered by a confluent layer of cells, and had less calcification than uncoated control. The mechanical test in vitro revealed that PHBHHx coating improved tensile strength. The results in vivo indicated that PHBHHx coating reduced calcification and promoted the repopulation of hybrid valve with the recipient's cells resembling native valve tissue. The hybrid valve may provide superior valve replacement with current techniques.

  17. Evaluation of aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve implantation: aortic root angiography in comparison to cardiac magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Michael; Meyer, Christian G; Kirschfink, Annemarie; Altiok, Ertunc; Lehrke, Michael; Brehmer, Kathrin; Lotfi, Shahram; Hoffmann, Rainer

    2016-03-01

    Aortic regurgitation (AR) is common after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Intraprocedural assessment of AR relies on aortic root angiography. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) phase-contrast mapping of the ascending aorta provides accurate AR quantification. This study evaluated the accuracy of AR grading by aortic root angiography after TAVI in comparison to CMR phase-contrast velocity mapping. In 69 patients with TAVI for severe aortic stenosis, post-procedural AR was determined by aortic root angiography with visual assessment according to the Sellers classification and by CMR using phase-contrast velocity mapping for analysis of AR volume and fraction. Spearman's correlation coefficient showed a moderate correlation between angiographic analysis of AR grade and CMR-derived AR volume (r=0.41; pangiography with cut-off Sellers grade ≥2 had a sensitivity of 71% and a specificity of 98% to detect AR graded as moderate to severe or severe as defined by CMR. There is only a moderate correlation between aortic root angiography and CMR in the classification of AR severity after TAVI. Alternative imaging including multimodality imaging as well as haemodynamic analysis should therefore be considered for intraprocedural AR assessment and guidance of TAVI procedure in cases of uncertainty in AR grading.

  18. Comparative Matched Outcome of Evolut-R vs CoreValve Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landes, Uri; Bental, Tamir; Barsheshet, Alon; Assali, Abid; Vaknin Assa, Hana; Levi, Amos; Orvin, Katia; Kornowski, Ran

    2017-02-01

    The Evolut-R (Medtronic, Inc) is a transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) system that was built on the well-established foundation of Medtronic's CoreValve device platform. Although already in extensive clinical utilization, it is unknown if the Evolut-R improves TAVI outcomes. Herein, we compared TAVI outcomes of the Evolut-R and CoreValve devices. A propensity score 1:1 matching was conducted on 358 Evolut-R patients (n = 75) and CoreValve patients (n = 283). Thirty-day outcomes were compared using Valve Academic Research Consortium (VARC)-2 criteria. A combined 30-day endpoint including all-cause death, stroke, major vascular complication, major bleeding, implantation failure, paravalvular leak (PVL) ≥ moderate, and new pacemaker implantation was also tested. The final study group included 146 patients (73 Evolut-R; 73 CoreValve). Post matching, baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups. Mean patient age was 82 ± 6 years, mean STS score was 5.2 ± 3.8, 72% were female, and 17% were deemed frail. Implantation success reached 99% with Evolut-R and 94% with CoreValve (P=.10). Both groups had low periprocedural stroke/myocardial infarction/mortality rates and there was also no difference in 30-day vascular complications (P=.18), bleeding (P=.37), PVL (P=.24), and new pacemaker (P=.14). The combined outcome rate was 24% with Evolut-R and 37% with CoreValve (P=.10). This study indicates that the efficacy and safety of the self-expandable second-generation Evolut-R transcatheter valve is at least comparable with the first-generation CoreValve. The observed improved performance in correct positioning of a single valve and the numerically lower chance to suffer a combined TAVI endpoint needs further investigation.

  19. Geometry and fusion of aortic valves from pulsatile flow ventricular assist device patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May-Newman, Karen; Mendoza, Annamarie; Abulon, Dina J K; Joshi, Mrunalini; Kunda, Anand; Dembitsky, Walter

    2011-03-01

    Aortic valve commissural fusion is a process in which fibrous tissue is deposited at the aortic valve commissures, creating adhesion between leaflets and preventing opening. Fusion has recently been associated with the implantation of left ventricular assist devices (VADs), affecting upwards of 50% of patients in recent studies. Aortic incompetence has also been associated with pulsatile VAD use, but a specific structural mechanism has not been identified. The study aim was to measure aortic valve geometry and fusion in tissue samples from explanted hearts of VAD recipients and to identify features that might explain the development of aortic valve dysfunction. The diameter, perimeter and thickness of the aortic root, as well as the height, edge length and thickness of each of the three aortic leaflets were measured in seven valves. Histological studies were performed of both fused and unfused leaflets. The aortic root geometry showed an elliptical aorta, with asymmetric leaflets. The right coronary leaflet had the greatest edge length, but was thinnest. The other two leaflets were smaller, but slightly thicker. Overall, the aorta and valve geometry was within the normal range. Fusion was found in five of the seven valves studied, and often observed in multiple leaflets. Fusion length correlated loosely with the time of VAD support. Tissue from both fused and unfused valves showed unilateral fibrosis in the leaflets, and a loss of the laminar tissue structure that was related to the duration of VAD support. These findings support previous observations that pathological changes occur in the aortic valves of VAD patients shortly after implantation. While the tissue exhibits abnormalities in the structure, the geometry does not show gross remodeling such as annular dilatation or leaflet lengthening that might precede the development of aortic valve dysfunction. These changes are associated with the development of aortic valve fusion, and may be related to the

  20. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation with the self-expandable venus A-Valve and CoreValve devices: Preliminary Experiences in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yan-Biao; Zhao, Zhen-Gang; Wei, Xin; Xu, Yuan-Ning; Zuo, Zhi-Liang; Li, Yi-Jian; Zheng, Ming-Xia; Feng, Yuan; Chen, Mao

    2017-03-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has been demonstrated to be an effective alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in patients with aortic stenosis who are deemed high risk or inoperable. Currently, TAVI procedures in China mostly make use of the domestic Venus A-Valve and the CoreValve; however, there is no data on their comparative performance. Consecutive patients undergoing TAVI with the aforementioned devices were included. The outcomes were reported according to the Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 (VARC) definitions. A total of 54 TAVI procedures were performed, 27 with the CoreValve and the other 27 with the Venus A-Valve. An additional valve was required in 4 (14.8%) and 3 (11.1%) patients, and the VARC-2 device success rates were 81.5 and 85.2%, respectively. The incidences of common complications were similar, except for the significantly less frequent pacemaker insertion in the Venus A-Valve group (7.4 vs. 37.0%, P = 0.03). Within 30 days, 2 (3.7%) patients died, 1 in each group, and both had a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV). No other serious complications, such as annular rupture, coronary obstruction and aortic dissection, occurred in the 32 BAV patients treated with the Venus A-Valve (14) or the CoreValve (18). After 2-years of follow-up, there was no significant difference between CoreValve group and Venus-A group (11.1 vs. 7.4%, P = 0.64). TAVI with the domestic Venus A-Valve is feasible, safe, and can produce favorable short-term outcomes comparable to those with the CoreValve in inoperable or high-risk patients with tricuspid and bicuspid aortic valve stenosis. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. A risk score for predicting mortality in patients with asymptomatic mild to moderate aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, Ingar; Pedersen, Terje R; Boman, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundPrognostic information for asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (AS) from prospective studies is scarce and there is no risk score available to assess mortality.ObjectivesTo develop an easily calculable score, from which clinicians could stratify patients into high and lower risk ...... of mortality, using data from the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study.MethodA search for significant prognostic factors (p...

  2. Aorta measurements are heritable and influenced by bicuspid aortic valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa J Martin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Word Count 266, 1609 charactersObjectives: To determine whether the contributions of genetics and bicuspid aortic valve (BAV independently influence aortic (Ao dimensions.Background: Ao dilation is a risk factor for aneurysm, dissection, and sudden cardiac death. Frequent association of BAV with Ao dilation implicates a common underlying defect possibly due to genetic factors. Methods: Families enriched for BAV underwent standardized transthoracic echocardiography. In addition to BAV status, echocardiographic measures of Ao (annulus to descending Ao, pulmonary artery and mitral valve annulus diameters were obtained. Using variance components analysis, heritability was estimated with and without BAV status. Additionally, bivariate genetic analyses between Ao dimensions and BAV were performed.Results: Our cohort was obtained from 209 families enriched for BAV. After adjusting for age, body surface area and sex, individuals with BAV had a statistically significant increase in all echocardiographic measurements (p < 0.006 except descending Ao and mitral valve annulus. Individuals with BAV were at greater odds of having Ao dilation (OR = 4.44, 95% CI 2.93 – 6.72 than family members without BAV. All echocardiographic measurements exhibited moderate to strong heritability (0.25 to 0.53, and these estimates were not influenced by inclusion of BAV as a covariate. Bivariate genetic analyses supported that the genetic correlation between BAV and echo measures were not significantly different from zero.Conclusions: We show for the first time that echocardiographic measurements of Ao, pulmonary artery and mitral valve annulus diameters are quantitative traits that exhibit significant heritability. In addition, our results suggest the presence of BAV independently influences the proximal Ao and pulmonary artery measures but not those in the descending Ao or mitral valve annulus.

  3. Normal aortic valves stay open much longer in systole than porcine substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhani, Maboo; Kumar, Ramarathnam Krishna; Balakrishnan, Komarakshi R

    2013-06-01

    To compare the opening mechanics of porcine valve substitutes with those of a normal human aortic valve. All commercially available porcine valves are pretreated with glutaraldehyde. This study was undertaken to evaluate the consequences of such treatment on valve mechanics. The opening mechanics of the aortic valve, especially the time taken to open fully from a closed position, and the duration for which the valve is maximally open, were compared in a normal aortic valve, a stent-mounted porcine valve, and a stentless porcine valve, using a finite element model. Despite a 4-fold higher gradient, stent-mounted porcine valves were slower in attaining the fully open position, and the time for which the valve was fully open was almost 25% less than a normal valve. In stentless valves, the compliant root made the initial opening mechanics similar to those of a normal valve. Once this effect was over, the effect of porcine leaflet properties took over, and there was a corresponding delay in the valve opening. Fixing the root with a stent and stiffening the leaflets with glutaraldehyde result in delayed valve opening and decrease the duration for which the valve is fully open, thus contributing to inferior hemodynamics.

  4. Papillary fibroelastoma of the aortic valve - a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Von Canal Friederike

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The prevalence of primary cardiac tumour ranges from 0.0017-0.28% and papillary fibroelastoma is rare but not uncommon benign cardiac neoplasm. Currently, with the advent of higher-resolution imaging technology especially transoesophageal echocardiography such cases being recognized frequently. The clinical presentation of these tumours varies from asymptomatic to severe ischaemic or embolic complications. We herein, present a 50-year-old female patient with a papillary fibroelastoma of the aortic valve arising from the endocardium of the right coronary cusp very close to the commissure between the right and non-coronary cusps. The patient presented with angina-like chest pain and was investigated using echocardiography and CT angiographic modalities in addition to the usual investigations. The differential diagnosis considered was a thrombus, myxoma, Lambl's excrescence and infective vegetation. The surgical management included a prompt resection of the tumour on cardiopulmonary bypass avoiding injury to the aortic valve. The patient recovered well. A review of the literature suggests that the cardiac papillary fibroelastoma is a rare but potentially treatable cause of embolic stroke and other fatal complications, therefore, a strong suspicion; appropriate use of imaging modality, preoperative anticoagulation and urgent surgical resection is warranted. Also, possibility of this diagnosis should be kept in mind while managing cardiac or valvular tumours.

  5. Impact of QRS duration and morphology on the risk of sudden cardiac death in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders M; Gerdts, Eva; Boman, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the predictive value of QRS duration and morphology during watchful waiting in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (AS).......The aim of the study was to examine the predictive value of QRS duration and morphology during watchful waiting in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (AS)....

  6. Association Between Left Atrial Dilatation and Invasive Hemodynamics at Rest and During Exercise in Asymptomatic Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Nicolaj Lyhne; Dahl, Jordi Sanchez; Carter-Storch, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transition from an asymptomatic to symptomatic state in severe aortic stenosis is often difficult to assess. Identification of a morphological sign of increased hemodynamic load may be important in asymptomatic aortic stenosis to identify patients at risk. METHODS AND RESULTS: Thirty-...... burden. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02395107....

  7. Coronary artery anomalies and aortic valve morphology in the Syrian hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, M C; Durán, A C; Real, R; López, D; Fernández, B; de Andrés, A V; Arqué, J M; Gallego, A; Sans-Coma, V

    2000-04-01

    In the Syrian hamster, anomalies in the origin of the left coronary artery are significantly associated with the bicuspid condition of the aortic valve. In this species, bicuspid aortic valves are expressions of a trait, the variation of which takes the form of a phenotypic continuum, ranging from a tricuspid aortic valve with no commissural fusion to a bicuspid aortic valve with the aortic sinuses located in ventrodorsal orientation and devoid of any raphe. The intermediate stages of the continuum are represented by tricuspid aortic valves with a more or less extensive fusion of the ventral commissure and bicuspid aortic valves with a more or less developed raphe located in the ventral aortic sinus. The present study was designed to decide whether there is a gap between tricuspid and bicuspid aortic valves regarding the incidence of coronary artery anomalies, or whether this incidence varies according to the different tricuspid and bicuspid morphotypes of the continuum. The study was carried out in Syrian hamsters belonging to a single inbred family with a high incidence of tricuspid aortic valves with fusion of the ventral commissure, bicuspid aortic valves, and anomalies in the origin of the left coronary artery, i.e. single right coronary artery ostium in aorta, anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery, and anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the dorsal aortic sinus. The specimens were examined by means of a stereomicroscope and, in several cases, scanning electron microscopy was also used. The relationships between anomalous coronary artery patterns and aortic valve morphologies were tested using a logistic regression model. The results obtained indicate that there is no discontinuity between tricuspid and bicuspid aortic valves regarding the incidence of coronary artery anomalies. The probability of occurrence of anomalous coronary artery patterns increases continuously according to the deviation degree of the

  8. No clinical effect of prosthesis-patient mismatch after transcatheter versus surgical aortic valve replacement in intermediate- and low-risk patients with severe aortic valve stenosis at mid-term follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav Hørsted; Steinbrüchel, Daniel Andreas; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) after surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) for severe aortic valve stenosis (AVS) is common, but less common after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in patients considered at high risk for death after surgery. The objectives of this st...

  9. Aortic cusp extension valvuloplasty with or without tricuspidization in children and adolescents: long-term results and freedom from aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polimenakos, Anastasios C; Sathanandam, Shyam; Elzein, Chawki; Barth, Mary J; Higgins, Robert S D; Ilbawi, Michel N

    2010-04-01

    Aortic cusp extension valvuloplasty is increasingly used in the management of children and adolescents with aortic stenosis or regurgitation. The durability of this approach and the freedom from valve replacement are not well defined. A study was undertaken to investigate outcomes. From July 1987 to November 2008, 142 patients aged less than 19 years underwent aortic cusp extension valvuloplasty in the form of pericardial cusp extension and tricuspidization (when needed). Three patients with truncus arteriosus and severe truncal valve insufficiency were excluded. From the available follow-up data of 139 patients, 50 had bicuspid aortic valves, 40 had congenital aortic valve stenosis, 41 had combined congenital aortic valve stenosis/insufficiency, and 8 had other diagnoses. Median follow-up was 14.4 years (0.1-21.4). Long-term mortality and freedom from aortic valve replacement were studied. There were no early, intermediate, or late deaths. Z-values of left ventricular end-diastolic dimension, aortic annulus, aortic sinus diameter, and sinotubular junction diameter before aortic valve replacement were 4.2 +/- 3.11, 2.3 +/- 1.25, 4.4 +/- 1.23, and 1.84 +/- 1.28, respectively. During the follow-up period, 64 patients underwent aortic valve reinterventions. The Ross procedure was performed in 32 of 139 patients (23%) undergoing aortic cusp extension valvuloplasty. Other aortic valve replacements were undertaken after 16 aortic cusp extension valvuloplasties (11.5%). Freedom from a second aortic cusp extension valvuloplasty or aortic valve replacement at 18 years was 82.1% +/- 4.2% and 60.0% +/- 7.2%, respectively. Aortic cusp extension valvuloplasty is a safe and effective surgical option with excellent survival and good long-term outcomes in children and adolescents. The procedure provides acceptable durability and satisfactory freedom from aortic valve replacement. Copyright 2010 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights

  10. Concomitant mitral valve surgery with aortic valve replacement: a 21-year experience with a single mechanical prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidhu Pushpinder

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long-term survival for combined aortic and mitral valve replacement appears to be determined by the mitral valve prosthesis from our previous studies. This 21-year retrospective study assess long-term outcome and durability of aortic valve replacement (AVR with either concomitant mitral valve replacement (MVR or mitral valve repair (MVrep. We consider only a single mechanical prosthesis. Methods Three hundred and sixteen patients underwent double valve replacement (DVR (n = 273 or AVR+MVrep (n = 43, in the period 1977 to 1997. Follow up of 100% was achieved via telephone questionnaire and review of patients' medical records. Actuarial analysis of long-term survival was determined by Kaplan-Meier method. The Cox regression model was used to evaluate potential predictors of mortality. Results There were seventeen cases (5.4% of early mortality and ninety-six cases of late mortality. Fifteen-year survival was similar in both groups at 44% and 57% for DVR and AVR+MVrep respectively. There were no significant differences in valve related deaths, anticoagulation related complications, or prosthetic valve endocarditis between the groups. There were 6 cases of periprosthetic leak in the DVR group. Sex, pre-operative mitral and aortic valve pathology or previous cardiac surgery did not significantly affect outcome. Conclusion The mitral valve appears to be the determinant of survival following double valve surgery and survival is not significantly influenced by mitral valve repair.

  11. Percutaneous balloon dilatation of calcific aortic valve stenosis: anatomical and haemodynamic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commeau, P; Grollier, G; Lamy, E; Foucault, J P; Durand, C; Maffei, G; Maiza, D; Khayat, A; Potier, J C

    1988-01-01

    Two groups of elderly patients with calcified aortic stenosis were treated by balloon dilatation. In group 1, the valve was dilated just before surgical replacement of the valve. The valvar and annular changes occurring during dilatation were examined visually. In 20 of the 26 patients in this group there was no change. In the six remaining patients mobilisation of friable calcific deposits (1 case), slight tearing of the commissure (4 cases), or tearing of the aortic ring (1 case) were seen. Dilatation did not appear to alter valvar rigidity. In 14 patients (group 2) the haemodynamic gradient across the aortic valve was measured before and immediately after dilatation and one week after the procedure. Dilatation produced an immediate significant decrease of the aortic mean gradient and a significant increase of the aortic valve area. Eight days later the mean gradient had increased and the aortic valve area had decreased. Nevertheless there was a significant difference between the initial gradient and the gradient eight days after dilatation. The initial aortic valve area was also significantly larger than the area eight days after dilatation. The aortic valve gradient rose significantly in the eight days after dilatation and at follow up the gradients were those of severe aortic stenosis. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 5 Fig 6 Fig 7 PMID:3342163

  12. Aortic valve prosthesis-patient mismatch and exercise capacity in adult patients with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Slooten, Ymkje J.; Melle, van Joost P.; Freling, Hendrik G.; Bouma, Berto J.; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Jongbloed, Monique R. M.; Post, Martijn C.; Sieswerda, Gertjan T.; in 't Veld, Anna Huis; Ebels, Tjark; Voors, Adriaan A.; Pieper, Petronella G.

    Objectives To report the prevalence of aortic valve prosthesis patient mismatch (PPM) in an adult population with congenital heart disease (CHD) and its impact on exercise capacity. Adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) with a history of aortic valve replacement may outgrow their prosthesis

  13. An up-to-date overview of the most recent transcatheter implantable aortic valve prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerinck, Esther M. A.; van Kesteren, Floortje; van Mourik, Martijn S.; Vis, Marije M.; Baan, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has evolved towards the routine therapy for high-risk patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. Technical refinements in TAVI are rapidly evolving with a simultaneous expansion of the number of available devices. This review will

  14. Effect of permanent pacemaker on mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engborg, Jonathan; Riechel-Sarup, Casper; Gerke, Oke

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an established treatment for high-grade aortic valve stenosis in patients found unfit for open heart surgery. The method may cause cardiac conduction disorders requiring permanent pacemaker (PPM) implantation, and the long-term effect ...

  15. The value of echocardiography in follow-up of human tissue valves in aortic position

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.P. Willems (Tineke)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractThe application of human tissue valves for aortic valve or root replacement was introduced during the 19608. The first successful clinical orthotopic implantation of an aortic allograft was performed by Ross and Barrat-Boyes independently in 19621,2, In 1967 Ross first reported the use

  16. File list: DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Aortic_valve_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: InP.CDV.20.AllAg.Aortic_valve_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. Transcatheter implantation of a new prototype of self-expanding aortic valve prosthesis: first experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е. И. Кретов

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Calcific aortic stenosis is an aortic valve disease of atherosclerotic origin occurring in 2-4 % of persons older than 65 years, for whom open surgery is contraindicated. Models of self-expanding aortic valves available today have a number of significant drawbacks. The authors have developed a prototype of a new aortic valve and present its first successful implantation in the experiment.Received 17 October 2016. Accepted 22 November 2016.Funding: The study had no sponsorship.Conflict of interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

  9. Aortic valve endocarditis complicated by ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenny, Benjamin E; Almanaseer, Yassar

    2014-12-01

    Infective endocarditis complicated by abscess formation and coronary artery compression is a rare clinical event with a high mortality rate, and diagnosis requires a heightened degree of suspicion. We present the clinical, angiographic, and echocardiographic features of a 73-year-old woman who presented with dyspnea and was found to have right coronary artery compression that was secondary to abscess formation resulting from diffuse infectious endocarditis. We discuss the patient's case and briefly review the relevant medical literature. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of abscess formation involving a native aortic valve and the right coronary artery.

  10. St Jude Epic heart valve bioprostheses versus native human and porcine aortic valves - comparison of mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalejs, Martins; Stradins, Peteris; Lacis, Romans; Ozolanta, Iveta; Pavars, Janis; Kasyanov, Vladimir

    2009-05-01

    The major problem with heart valve bioprostheses made from chemically treated porcine aortic valves is their limited longevity caused by gradual deterioration, which has a causal link with valve tissue mechanical properties. To our best knowledge, there are no published studies on the mechanical properties of modern, commercially available bioprostheses comparing them to native human valves. The objective of this study is to determine the mechanical properties of St Jude Epic bioprostheses and to compare them with native human and porcine aortic valves. Leaflets from eight porcine aortic valves and six Epic bioprostheses were analyzed using uni-axial tensile tests in radial and circumferential directions. Mechanical properties of human valves have been previously published by our group. Results are represented as mean values+/-S.D. Circumferential direction. Modulus of elasticity of Epic bioprostheses in circumferential direction at the level of stress 1.0 MPa is 101.99+/-58.24 MPa, 42.3+/-4.96 MPa for native porcine and 15.34+/-3.84 MPa for human aortic valves. Ultimate stress is highest for Epic bioprostheses 5.77+/-1.94 MPa, human valves have ultimate stress of 1.74+/-0.29 MPa and porcine 1.58+/-0.26 MPa. Ultimate strain in circumferential direction is highest for human valves 18.35+/-7.61% followed by 7.26+/-0.69% for porcine valves and 5.95+/-1.54% for Epic bioprostheses. Radial direction. Modulus of elasticity in radial direction is 9.18+/-1.81 MPa for Epic bioprostheses, 5.33+/-0.61 MPa for native porcine, and 1.98+/-0.15 MPa for human aortic valve leaflets. In the radial direction ultimate stress is highest for Epic bioprostheses 0.7+/-0.21 MPa followed by native porcine valves 0.55+/-0.11 MPa and 0.32+/-0.04 MPa for human valves. For human valves ultimate strain is 23.92+/-4.87%, for native porcine valves 8.57+/-0.8% and 7.92+/-1.74% for Epic bioprostheses. Epic bioprostheses have non-linear stress-strain behavior similar to native valve tissue, but they

  11. Effect of transcatheter aortic valve size and position on valve-in-valve hemodynamics: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azadani, Ali N; Reardon, Michael; Simonato, Matheus; Aldea, Gabriel; Nickenig, Georg; Kornowski, Ran; Dvir, Danny

    2017-06-01

    Transcatheter heart valve implantation in failed aortic bioprostheses (valve-in-valve [ViV]) is an increasingly used therapeutic option for high-risk patients. However, high postprocedural gradients are a significant limitation of aortic ViV. Our objective was to evaluate Medtronic CoreValve Evolut R ViV hemodynamics in relation to the degree of device oversizing and depth of implantation. Evolut R devices of 23 and 26 mm were implanted within 21-, 23-, and 25-mm Hancock II bioprostheses. Small and gradual changes in implantation depth were attempted. Hemodynamic testing was performed in a pulse duplicator under ISO-5840 standard. A total of 47 bench-testing experiments were performed. The mean gradient of the 26-mm Evolut R in 23- and 25-mm Hancock II was lower than 23-mm Evolut R (P  17.5 mm. The current comprehensive bench-testing assessment demonstrates the importance of both transcatheter heart valve size and device position for the attainment of optimal hemodynamics during ViV procedures. Additional in vitro testing may be required to develop hemodynamics-based guidelines for device sizing in ViV procedures in degenerated surgical bioprostheses. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dynamic heart phantom with functional mitral and aortic valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannelli, Claire; Moore, John; McLeod, Jonathan; Ceh, Dennis; Peters, Terry

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac valvular stenosis, prolapse and regurgitation are increasingly common conditions, particularly in an elderly population with limited potential for on-pump cardiac surgery. NeoChord©, MitraClipand numerous stent-based transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) devices provide an alternative to intrusive cardiac operations; performed while the heart is beating, these procedures require surgeons and cardiologists to learn new image-guidance based techniques. Developing these visual aids and protocols is a challenging task that benefits from sophisticated simulators. Existing models lack features needed to simulate off-pump valvular procedures: functional, dynamic valves, apical and vascular access, and user flexibility for different activation patterns such as variable heart rates and rapid pacing. We present a left ventricle phantom with these characteristics. The phantom can be used to simulate valvular repair and replacement procedures with magnetic tracking, augmented reality, fluoroscopy and ultrasound guidance. This tool serves as a platform to develop image-guidance and image processing techniques required for a range of minimally invasive cardiac interventions. The phantom mimics in vivo mitral and aortic valve motion, permitting realistic ultrasound images of these components to be acquired. It also has a physiological realistic left ventricular ejection fraction of 50%. Given its realistic imaging properties and non-biodegradable composition—silicone for tissue, water for blood—the system promises to reduce the number of animal trials required to develop image guidance applications for valvular repair and replacement. The phantom has been used in validation studies for both TAVI image-guidance techniques1, and image-based mitral valve tracking algorithms2.

  13. Outcomes in patients with contained ruptures of the aortic annulus after transcatheter aortic valve implantation with balloon-expandable devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breitbart, Philipp; Minners, Jan; Pache, Gregor

    2017-01-01

    ) at three centers in Germany and Denmark. CR were identified in 12 patients (1.2%, 80.7+5.0 years, STS-Score 4.1+1.4%). All 12 patients had received a balloon-expandable valve. In 3 patients periprocedural transesophageal echocardiography revealed findings suggestive of aortic dissection, an aortic...

  14. Aortic valve replacement in a patient with ostegenesis imperfecta A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concistrè, Giovanni; Casali, Giovanni; Della Monica, Paola Lilla; Montalto, Andrea; Ranocchi, Federeico; Fiorani, Brenno; Musumeci, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an inherited connective tissue disorder in which fragile bones readily cause fractures. Aortic root dilatation, aortic valve regurgitation and mitral valve prolapse are uncommon cardiovascular manifestations of OI. Cardiac surgery in these patients carries a high risk of complications due to increased tissue and capillary fragility. We describe an open heart surgery in a woman with isolated aortic valve regurgitation secondary to OI. A 58-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for surgical correction of aortic valve regurgitation. She had a past history of recurrent long bone fractures, and OI was diagnosed in the childhood. A standard median sternotomy was performed; the sternum was found to be thin and brittle. The native aortic valve was replaced with a size 23 mm stented aortic bioprosthesis. The sternum was closed with stainless steel wires. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged home on the eighth postoperative day. We used thoracic band to avoid sternal diastasis. One year postoperatively, the echocardiogram showed a normal aortic bioprosthesis function without paravalvular leakage. The sternum was stable without dehiscence. The mortality rate in cardiac surgery patients with heritable generalized connective tissue disorders, such as osteogenesis imperfecta, is high. Although tissue friability had no impact on surgical outcome, it should be kept in mind when operating on patients with OI. We highlight the importance of a meticulous surgical technique, together with a strategy for management of anticipated perioperative complications to ensure a successful outcome. Aortic valve, Endocardirtis, Mitral valve, Replacement.

  15. Apixaban Versus Warfarin for Mechanical Heart Valve Thromboprophylaxis in a Swine Aortic Heterotopic Valve Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Patrick A; Coleman, Dawn M; Diaz, Jose A; Jackson, Tatum O; Hawley, Angela E; Mathues, Angela R; Grant, Brandon T; Knabb, Robert M; Ramacciotti, Eduardo; Frost, Charles E; Song, Yan; Wakefield, Thomas W; Myers, Daniel D

    2017-05-01

    Warfarin is the current standard for oral anticoagulation therapy in patients with mechanical heart valves, yet optimal therapy to maximize anticoagulation and minimize bleeding complications requires routine coagulation monitoring, possible dietary restrictions, and drug interaction monitoring. As alternatives to warfarin, oral direct acting factor Xa inhibitors are currently approved for the prophylaxis and treatment of venous thromboembolism and reduction of stroke and systemic embolization. However, no in vivo preclinical or clinical studies have been performed directly comparing oral factor Xa inhibitors such as apixaban to warfarin, the current standard of therapy. A well-documented heterotopic aortic valve porcine model was used to test the hypothesis that apixaban has comparable efficacy to warfarin for thromboprophylaxis of mechanical heart valves. Sixteen swine were implanted with a bileaflet mechanical aortic valve that bypassed the ligated descending thoracic aorta. Animals were randomized to 4 groups: control (no anticoagulation; n=4), apixaban oral 1 mg/kg twice a day (n=5), warfarin oral 0.04 to 0.08 mg/kg daily (international normalized ratio 2-3; n=3), and apixaban infusion (n=4). Postmortem valve thrombus was measured 30 days post-surgery for control-oral groups and 14 days post-surgery for the apixaban infusion group. Control thrombus weight (mean) was significantly different (1422.9 mg) compared with apixaban oral (357.5 mg), warfarin (247.1 mg), and apixiban 14-day infusion (61.1 mg; Pheart valves. Unlike warfarin, no adverse bleeding events were observed in any apixaban groups. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Design of Bioprosthetic Aortic Valves using biaxial test data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabiri, Y; Paulson, K; Tyberg, J; Ronsky, J; Ali, I; Di Martino, E; Narine, K

    2015-01-01

    Bioprosthetic Aortic Valves (BAVs) do not have the serious limitations of mechanical aortic valves in terms of thrombosis. However, the lifetime of BAVs is too short, often requiring repeated surgeries. The lifetime of BAVs might be improved by using computer simulations of the structural behavior of the leaflets. The goal of this study was to develop a numerical model applicable to the optimization of durability of BAVs. The constitutive equations were derived using biaxial tensile tests. Using a Fung model, stress and strain data were computed from biaxial test data. SolidWorks was used to develop the geometry of the leaflets, and ABAQUS finite element software package was used for finite element calculations. Results showed the model is consistent with experimental observations. Reaction forces computed by the model corresponded with experimental measurements when the biaxial test was simulated. As well, the location of maximum stresses corresponded to the locations of frequent tearing of BAV leaflets. Results suggest that BAV design can be optimized with respect to durability.

  17. The power of disruptive technological innovation: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, David B; Davidson, Michael J; Schoen, Frederick J

    2015-11-01

    We sought to evaluate the principles of disruptive innovation, defined as technology innovation that fundamentally shifts performance and utility metrics, as applied to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). In particular, we considered implantation procedure, device design, cost, and patient population. Generally cheaper and lower performing, classical disruptive innovations are first commercialized in insignificant markets, promise lower margins, and often parasitize existing usage, representing unattractive investments for established market participants. However, despite presently high unit cost, TAVI is less invasive, treats a "new," generally high risk, patient population, and is generally done by a multidisciplinary integrated heart team. Moreover, at least in the short-term TAVI has not been lower-performing than open surgical aortic valve replacement in high-risk patients. We conclude that TAVI extends the paradigm of disruptive innovation and represents an attractive commercial opportunity space. Moreover, should the long-term performance and durability of TAVI approach that of conventional prostheses, TAVI will be an increasingly attractive commercial opportunity. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Measurement of the aortic diameter in the asymptomatic Korean population: Assessment with multidetector CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Hwan; Lee, Whal; Choi, Hyuck Jae; Kim, Dae Jin; Park, Eun Ah; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    To determine normal reference values for aortic diameters in asymptomatic Korean adults. Three hundred adults without signs or symptoms of cardiovascular diseases were enrolled in this study. Aortic diameters were measured at nine predetermined levels on CT images. Aortic diameter measurements were adjusted for body surface area. Analysis of data was performed with regard to age, sex, weight, height and hypertension. Aortic diameters were 2.99 ± 0.57 cm at the ascending aorta, 2.54 ± 0.35 cm at the transverse aortic arch, 2.36 ± 0.35 cm at the proximal descending thoracic aorta (DTA), 2.23 ± 0.37 cm at the mid DTA, 2.17 ± 0.38 cm at the distal DTA, 2.16 ± 0.37 cm at the thoracoabdominal junction, 2.10, 00B1, 0.35 cm at the level of the celiac axis, 1.94, 00B1, 0.36 cm at the suprarenal aorta, 1.58 ± 0.24 cm at the aortic bifurcation. Men had slightly larger diameters than women (p < 0.05). All diameters increased with age and hypertension, with statistical significance (p < 0.01). And all aortic diameters increased with height (p < 0.05) except at the level of the aortic arch (p = 0.056), and increased with weight (p < 0.05) except at the level of the suprarenal aorta (p = 0.067). Male sex, higher weight and height, age and hypertension are associated with larger aortic diameters in asymptomatic Korean adults.

  19. Comparative performance of transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation versus conventional surgical redo aortic valve replacement in patients with degenerated aortic valve bioprostheses: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozdek, Miroslaw; Raffa, Giuseppe Maria; Suwalski, Piotr; Kolodziejczak, Michalina; Anisimowicz, Lech; Kubica, Jacek; Navarese, Eliano Pio; Kowalewski, Mariusz

    2017-09-08

    The objective of this report was to directly compare, by means of a systematic review and meta-analysis, redo surgical aortic valve replacement (re-sAVR) with valve-in-valve transcatheter aortic valve implantation (ViV TAVI) for patients with failed degenerated aortic bioprostheses. Multiple databases were screened for all available reports comparing ViV TAVI with re-sAVR in patients with failing degenerated aortic bioprostheses. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality determined from the longest available survival data. Five observational studies (n = 342) were included in the meta-analysis; patients in the ViV TAVI group were older and had a higher baseline risk compared to those in the re-sAVR group. Although there was no statistical difference in procedural mortality [risk ratio (RR) 0.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.18-2.97; P = 0.67], 30-day mortality (RR 1.29, 95% CI 0.44-3.78; P = 0.64) and cardiovascular mortality (RR 0.91, 95% CI 0.30-2.70; P = 0.86) at a mean follow-up period of 18 months, cumulative survival analysis favoured surgery with borderline statistical significance (ViV TAVI versus re-sAVR: hazard ratio 1.91, 95% CI 1.03-3.57; P = 0.039). ViV TAVI was associated with a significantly lower rate of permanent pacemaker implantations (RR 0.37, 95% CI 0.20-0.68; P = 0.002) and shorter intensive care unit (P superior echocardiographic outcomes: lower incidence of patient-prosthesis mismatch (P = 0.008), fewer paravalvular leaks (P = 0.023) and lower mean postoperative aortic valve gradients in the prespecified analysis (P = 0.017). The ViV TAVI approach is a safe and feasible alternative to re-sAVR that may offer an effective, less invasive treatment for patients with failed surgical aortic valve bioprostheses who are inoperable or at high risk. Re-sAVR should remain the standard of care, particularly in the low-risk population, because it offers superior haemodynamic outcomes with low mortality rates.

  20. Initial Surgical Experience with Aortic Valve Repair: Clinical and Echocardiographic Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Francisco Diniz Affonso; Colatusso, Daniele de Fátima Fornazari; da Costa, Ana Claudia Brenner Affonso; Balbi Filho, Eduardo Mendel; Cavicchioli, Vinicius Nesi; Lopes, Sergio Augusto Veiga; Ferreira, Andrea Dumsch de Aragon; Collatusso, Claudinei

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Due to late complications associated with the use of conventional prosthetic heart valves, several centers have advocated aortic valve repair and/or valve sparing aortic root replacement for patients with aortic valve insufficiency, in order to enhance late survival and minimize adverse postoperative events. Methods From March/2012 thru March 2015, 37 patients consecutively underwent conservative operations of the aortic valve and/or aortic root. Mean age was 48±16 years and 81% were males. The aortic valve was bicuspid in 54% and tricuspid in the remaining. All were operated with the aid of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography. Surgical techniques consisted of replacing the aortic root with a Dacron graft whenever it was dilated or aneurysmatic, using either the remodeling or the reimplantation technique, besides correcting leaflet prolapse when present. Patients were sequentially evaluated with clinical and echocardiographic studies and mean follow-up time was 16±5 months. Results Thirty-day mortality was 2.7%. In addition there were two late deaths, with late survival being 85% (CI 95% - 68%-95%) at two years. Two patients were reoperated due to primary structural valve failure. Freedom from reoperation or from primary structural valve failure was 90% (CI 95% - 66%-97%) and 91% (CI 95% - 69%-97%) at 2 years, respectively. During clinical follow-up up to 3 years, there were no cases of thromboembolism, hemorrhage or endocarditis. Conclusions Although this represents an initial series, these data demonstrates that aortic valve repair and/or valve sparing aortic root surgery can be performed with satisfactory immediate and short-term results. PMID:27556321

  1. Sinus of Valsalva aneurysms with concomitant aortic insufficiency: how should the aortic valve be managed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi; Yin, Kanhua; Wang, Yulin; Guo, Changfa; Tian, Ziwei; Xie, Qiuchen; Zhang, Zhiqi; Wang, Chunsheng

    2017-09-14

    Sinus of Valsalva aneurysms (SVAs) are rare and are often complicated by aortic insufficiency (AI). Treating AI is important for achieving good long-term results in patients with SVA. Here, we have summarized our experience with the surgical management of patients with SVA with concomitant AI. Patients who were diagnosed with SVA and underwent surgical treatment between January 2008 and May 2016 were included. Clinical characteristics, including age, gender, SVA anatomy and concurrent anomalies, were analysed. The surgical strategies, intraoperative results and early and late outcomes were evaluated. A total of 178 patients (age 37.4 ± 13.1 years, 114 men) were identified. Eighty-seven (48.9%) patients had at least 2+ AI preoperatively. Patients with AI had a significant higher incidence of right coronary SVA with concomitant ventricular septal defects (80.5% vs 54.9%, P  SVA repair only. The mean follow-up time was 44.4 ± 33.8 months. During the follow-up, no patients who underwent valve replacement experienced perivalvular leakage, whereas 7 patients who underwent aortic valve repair had trivial-to-mild AI and 3 of the 17 patients who underwent SVA repair only presented with moderate AI. Various surgical techniques can be utilized to manage concomitant AI without compromising short-term outcomes. Valve replacement yields good long-term results. According to our experience, valve repair, especially valve-sparing procedures performed by experienced surgeons, could be an acceptable option when managing concomitant AI in young patients.

  2. A systematic review of reported cases of combined transcatheter aortic and mitral valve interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Tomo; Takagi, Hisato; Briasoulis, Alexandros; Telila, Tesfaye; Slovut, David P; Afonso, Luis; Grines, Cindy L; Schreiber, Theodore

    2018-01-01

    To summarize the published data of combined transcatheter aortic and mitral valve intervention (CTAMVI). CTAMVI, a combination of either transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) or transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve (TAViV) and transcatheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR), transcatheter mitral valve-in-valve/valve-in-ring (TMViV/ViR), or percutaneous mitral valve repair (PMVR) is an attractive alternative in high-surgical risk patients with combined aortic and mitral valve disease. However, its procedural details and clinical outcomes have not been well described. We performed a systematic review of all the published articles from PUBMED and EMBASE. A total of 37 studies with 60 patients were included. The indication for CTAMVI was high or inoperable surgical risk and symptomatic severe aortic stenosis (92%) or severe aortic regurgitation (8%) combined with moderate to severe/severe mitral stenosis (30%) or moderate/severe mitral regurgitation (65%) or both (5%). In majority of the cases, aortic valve intervention was performed prior to the mitral valve. Mortality rate were 25% for TAVR + TMVR (range 42 days to 10 months), 17% for TAVR + TMViV/ViR (range 13 days to 6 months), 0% for TAViV + TMViV/ViR (range 6-365 days), and 15% for TAVR/ViV + PMVR (range 17 days to 419 days). Significant (more than moderate) paravalvular regurgitation post-procedure was rare. CTAMVI appears to confer reasonable clinical outcome. Further large study is warranted to clarify the optimal strategy, procedural details and clinical outcomes in the future. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Successful implantation of a second-generation aortic valve in severe aortic regurgitation secondary to a traumatic cusp lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangieri, Antonio [Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, San Raffaele Institute, Milan (Italy); Latib, Azeem, E-mail: info@emocolumbus.it [Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, San Raffaele Institute, Milan (Italy); EMO-GVM Centro Cuore Columbus, Milan (Italy); Aurelio, Andrea [Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, San Raffaele Institute, Milan (Italy); Figini, Filippo [Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, San Raffaele Institute, Milan (Italy); EMO-GVM Centro Cuore Columbus, Milan (Italy); Agricola, Eustachio; Rosa, Isabella; Stella, Stefano; Spagnolo, Pietro; Castiglioni, Alessandro [Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, San Raffaele Institute, Milan (Italy); Colombo, Antonio [Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, San Raffaele Institute, Milan (Italy); EMO-GVM Centro Cuore Columbus, Milan (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    A 67-year-old man with a dilated cardiomyopathy and severe aortic regurgitation (AR) secondary to a traumatic cusp lesion was referred to our institution because of progressive worsening of dyspnea. After formal discussion in the heart team, the patient was scheduled for TAVI (transcatheter aortic valve implantation). The pre procedural computed tomography scan revealed a minimum amount of calcium on the aortic valve and low position of coronary ostia. The TAVI procedure was performed with the implantation of a fully retrievable and repositionable aortic valve prosthesis (Direct Flow 29 mm, Direct Flow Medical, Santa Rosa, California) with an excellent result and no paravalvular leak. The TAVI devices designed for the treatment of calcific aortic stenosis have numerous limitations for the treatment of pure AR such as the risk of residual AR, the lack of repositionability and retrievability, and the need for valve- in-valve implantation. We believe that treatment of selected cases of pure AR with the Direct Flow valve is feasible and takes advantage of the retrievability of the prosthesis.

  4. Distortion of aortic valve from mechanical traction imposed by the mitral valve prosthesis: The three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiographic perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Saravana; Koniparambil, Unnikrishnan P; Kumar, Muthu; Radhakrishnan, Bineesh K; Aggarwal, Neelam; Nanda, Saurabh

    2017-01-01

    Iatrogenic injury to the aortic valve is a rare but frequently reported complication during mitral valve surgeries. Intraoperative 2-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (2D TEE) has a major impact in diagnosing these injuries, so that timely intervention is possible. However, 2D TEE has lot of limitations during the perioperative period, which can be overcome by the three dimensional echocardiography (3D-TEE). We report a case where 3D TEE has undoubtedly delineated the cause for distortion of aortic sinus after mitral valve replacement and helped in the successful outcome.

  5. Quality of life after aortic valve repair is similar to Ross patients and superior to mechanical valve replacement: A cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Zacek (Pavel); T. Holubec; M. Vobornik; J. Dominik; J.J.M. Takkenberg (Hanneke); J. Harrer; J. Vojacek

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In patients after aortic valve surgery, the quality of life is hypothesized to be influenced by the type of the valve procedure. A cross-sectional study on the postoperative quality of life was carried out in patients after aortic valve-sparing surgery (with regards to the

  6. Effect of candesartan treatment on left ventricular remodeling after aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbaek, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K

    2010-01-01

    In hypertension, angiotensin receptor blockers can augment regression of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy. It is not known whether this also is the case after aortic valve replacement (AVR) for severe aortic stenosis (AS). To test the hypothesis that treatment with candesartan in addition...... to conventional treatment is able to augment LV and left atrial (LA) reverse remodeling in patients with AS undergoing AVR, we studied 114 patients scheduled for AVR. Patients were randomized to treatment with candesartan 32 mg 1 time/day or conventional therapy immediately after AVR. Patients were followed...... group had greater improvement in longitudinal LV systolic function assessed by tissue Doppler S' wave (0.6 +/- 0.1-cm/s increase in control group vs 1.4 +/- 0.1 cm/s in candesartan group, p = 0.01, p for trend = 0.02) and a decrease in LA volume (p for trend = 0.01). Treatment had no effect on diastolic...

  7. Sutureless, rapid deployment valves and stented bioprosthesis in aortic valve replacement: recommendations of an International Expert Consensus Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersak, Borut; Fischlein, Theodor; Folliguet, Thierry A; Meuris, Bart; Teoh, Kevin H T; Moten, Simon C; Solinas, Marco; Miceli, Antonio; Oberwalder, Peter J; Rambaldini, Manfredo; Bhatnagar, Gopal; Borger, Michael A; Bouchard, Denis; Bouchot, Olivier; Clark, Stephen C; Dapunt, Otto E; Ferrarini, Matteo; Laufer, Guenther; Mignosa, Carmelo; Millner, Russell; Noirhomme, Philippe; Pfeiffer, Steffen; Ruyra-Baliarda, Xavier; Shrestha, Malakh; Suri, Rakesh M; Troise, Giovanni; Diegeler, Anno; Laborde, Francois; Laskar, Marc; Najm, Hani K; Glauber, Mattia

    2016-03-01

    After a panel process, recommendations on the use of sutureless and rapid deployment valves in aortic valve replacement were given with special respect as an alternative to stented valves. Thirty-one international experts in both sutureless, rapid deployment valves and stented bioprostheses constituted the panel. After a thorough literature review, evidence-based recommendations were rated in a three-step modified Delphi approach by the experts. Literature research could identify 67 clinical trials, 4 guidelines and 10 systematic reviews for detailed text analysis to obtain a total of 28 recommendations. After rating by the experts, 12 recommendations were identified and degree of consensus for each was determined. Proctoring and education are necessary for the introduction of sutureless valves on an institutional basis as well as for the individual training of surgeons. Sutureless and rapid deployment should be considered as the valve prosthesis of first choice for isolated procedures in patients with comorbidities, old age, delicate aortic wall conditions such as calcified root, porcelain aorta or prior implantation of aortic homograft and stentless valves as well as for concomitant procedures and small aortic roots to reduce cross-clamp time. Intraoperative transoesophageal echocardiography is highly recommended, and in case of right anterior thoracotomy, preoperative computer tomography is strongly recommended. Suitable annular sizes are 19-27 mm. There is a contraindication for bicuspid valves only for Type 0 and for annular abscess or destruction due to infective endocarditis. Careful but complete decalcification of the aortic root is recommended to avoid paravalvular leakage; extensive decalcification should be avoided not to create annular defects. Proximal anastomoses of concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting should be placed during a single aortic cross-clamp period or alternatively with careful side clamping. Available evidence suggests that the use

  8. Rapidly Progrediating Aortic Valve Infective Endocarditis in an Intravenous Drug User Treated by Antibiotics and Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malkia S. Swedi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 22-year old male, a self-confessed recreational drug user who developed cardiogenic shock because of severe destruction of the aortic valve by rapidly progressive aortic valve endocarditis. The disease progression was acute; in a matter of days, the clinical manifestations were life-threatening necessitating urgent aortic valve replacement surgery. Cultivation revealed Streptococcus viridans as the microbial agent. Subsequent recovery with antibiotic treatment was without complication. This case report shows that immediately performed transoesophageal echocardiography and early consultation with a cardiac surgeon has fundamental importance in diagnosis and management of acute infective endocarditis in haemodynamically instable patients.

  9. Complete Resolution of a Large Bicuspid Aortic Valve Thrombus with Anticoagulation in Primary Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayan Jo Rachwan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Native aortic valve thrombosis in primary antiphospholipid syndrome (APLS is a rare entity. We describe a 38-year-old man who presented with neurological symptoms and a cardiac murmur. Transthoracic echocardiography detected a large bicuspid aortic valve thrombus. Laboratory evaluation showed the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. Anticoagulation was started, and serial echocardiographic studies showed complete resolution of the aortic valve vegetation after 4 months. The patient improved clinically and had no residual symptoms. This report and review of the literature suggests that vegetations in APLS can be treated successfully with conservative treatment, regardless of their size.

  10. [Aorto-right ventricular fistula associated with aortic valve endocarditis: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszuk-Kazberuk, Anna; Sobkowicz, Bozena; Hirnle, Tomasz; Adamczuk, Anna; Sawicki, Robert; Krynicki, Romuald; Knapp, Małgorzata; Musiał, Włodzimierz J

    2006-06-01

    A case of a 42-year old man with aortic valve endocarditis with peri-anular multi-chamber abscess formation and fistulous communication between right sinus of Valsalva and right ventricle, is presented. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed abnormal flow through the fistula confirmed at surgery. Intraoperatively the aortic valve was severely damaged with massive calcifications on the leaflets, anulus, right sinus of Valsalva and interventricular septum surrounded by fresh vegetations. Surgical procedure consisted of removal of calcification and infected tissues, followed by reconstruction of interventricular septum and aorta with pericardial patch and aortic valve replacement. Postoperative course was uneventful.

  11. Is the ross procedure a suitable choice for aortic valve replacement in children with rheumatic aortic valve disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsoufi, Bahaaldin; Manlhiot, Cedric; Fadel, Bahaa; Al-Fayyadh, Majid; McCrindle, Brian W; Alwadai, Abdullah; Al-Halees, Zohair

    2012-01-01

    Ross procedure is the aortic valve replacement of choice in children. Nonetheless, late autograft reoperation for dilatation and/or regurgitation is concerning. We examine whether Ross procedure is suitable in children with rheumatic fever. Medical records of 104 children with rheumatic fever who underwent Ross procedure were reviewed (1991-2004). Competing risks methodology determined time-related prevalence and associated factors for two mutually exclusive end states: autograft reoperation and death prior to subsequent reoperation. Mean age was 13.8 ± 2.7, 83 (80%) were males. Hemodynamic dysfunction was primarily regurgitation (n = 92, 88%) and stenosis/mixed (n = 12, 12%). Competing risks analysis showed that in ten years after the Ross procedure, 1% of patients died, 32% underwent autograft reoperation, and 67% were alive and free from reoperation. Ten-year freedom from aortic regurgitation greater than or equal to moderate was 63%. Ten-year freedom from autograft reoperation was 65% for regurgitation versus 90% for stenosis/mixed disease. Risk factors for autograft reoperation were earlier surgery year (PE: 0.26 ± 0.06 per year; P freedom from homograft replacement was 83%. Risk factors were fresh homografts (PE: 1.36 ± 0.71; P = .06) and aortic homografts (PE: 1.15 ± 0.59; P = .05). Ten-year freedom from any cardiac reoperation was 53%. Concomitant cardiac surgery was risk factor (PE: 1.37 ± 0.47; P = .004). Ross procedure in children with rheumatic fever is associated with excellent survival but results are plagued by aortic regurgitation and frequent autograft reoperation. Risk factors include preoperative regurgitation, concomitant surgery, dilated annulus, and earlier surgery era. Better patient selection in later era has mitigated autograft reoperation risk. Continued, improved candidate selection, along with modifications in autograft implantation and root/sinotubular stabilization techniques, may further decrease late autograft failure.

  12. The JUPITER registry: 1-year results of transapical aortic valve implantation using a second-generation transcatheter heart valve in patients with aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silaschi, Miriam; Treede, Hendrik; Rastan, Ardawan J; Baumbach, Hardy; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Kappert, Utz; Eichinger, Walter; Rüter, Florian; de Kroon, Thomas L; Lange, Rüdiger; Ensminger, Stephan; Wendler, Olaf

    2016-11-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is an established therapy for patients with aortic stenosis (AS) at high surgical risk. The JenaValve™ is a second-generation, self-expanding transcatheter heart valve (THV), implanted through transapical access (TA). During stent deployment, a specific 'clipping-mechanism' engages native aortic valve cusps for fixation. We present 1-year outcomes of the JUPITER registry, a post-market registry of the JenaValve for TA-TAVR. The JUPITER registry is a prospective, multicentre, uncontrolled and observational European study to evaluate the long-term safety and effectiveness of the Conformité Européenne-marked JenaValve THV. A total of 180 patients with AS were enrolled between 2012 and 2014. End-points were adjudicated in accordance with the valve academic research consortium document no. 1 definitions. The mean age was 80.4 ± 5.9 years and the mean logistic European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation I 21.2 ± 14.7%. The procedure was successful in 95.0% (171/180), implantation of a second THV (valve-in-valve) was performed in 2.2% (4/180) and conversion to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) was necessary in 2.8% (5/180). No annular rupture or coronary ostia obstruction occurred. Two patients required SAVR after the day of index procedure (1.1%). All-cause mortality at 30 days was 11.1% (20/180), being cardiovascular in 7.2% (13/180). A major stroke occurred in 1.1% (2/180) at 30 days, no additional major strokes were observed during 1 year. All-cause mortality after 30 days was 13.1% (21/160) and combined efficacy at 1 year was 80.8% (122/151). At 1-year follow-up, no patient presented with more than moderate paravalvular leakage, while 2 patients (3.2%) showed moderate, 12 (19.0%) mild and 49 (82.4%) trace/none paravalvular regurgitation. In a high-risk cohort of patients undergoing TA-TAVR for AS, the use of the JenaValve THV is safe and effective. In patients at higher risk for coronary ostia

  13. MDCT evaluation of aortic root and aortic valve prior to TAVI. What is the optimal imaging time point in the cardiac cycle?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurencak, T.; Turek, J.; Kietselaer, B.L.; Mihl, C.; Kok, M. de; Ommen, V.G. van; Garsse, L.A. van; Nijssen, E.C.; Wildberger, J.E.; Das, M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the optimal imaging time point for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) therapy planning by comprehensive evaluation of the aortic root. METHODS: Multidetector-row CT (MDCT) examination with retrospective ECG gating was retrospectively performed in 64 consecutive

  14. The development of transcatheter aortic valve replacement in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvir, Danny; Barbash, Israel M; Ben-Dor, Itsik; Okubagzi, Petros; Satler, Lowell F; Waksman, Ron; Pichard, Augusto D

    2012-03-01

    The penetration rate of devices in general, and in transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) specifically, is significantly delayed in the United States of America (USA) compared with in Europe. This is mostly due to the mission statement of the regulatory agencies in the USA, which requires very rigorous clinical testing of a device prior to its approval. The USA had a major role in the development and evaluation of this technology and USA research has enabled clinicians inside and outside of the USA to conduct a concise scientifically based assessment of the performance of TAVR devices in terms of safety and efficacy. In the following review, we provide data on the development of TAVR in the USA, revealing the critical role the USA has played in this extraordinary process. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Oxidized Phospholipids and Risk of Calcific Aortic Valve Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, Pia R; Hung, Ming-Yow; Witztum, Joseph L

    2017-01-01

    -control study was performed within the Copenhagen General Population Study (n=87 980), including 725 CAVD cases (1977-2013) and 1413 controls free of cardiovascular disease. OxPL carried by apoB (apolipoprotein B-100; OxPL-apoB) or apolipoprotein(a) (OxPL-apo(a)) containing lipoproteins, lipoprotein(a) levels......OBJECTIVE: Lipoprotein(a) is causally associated with calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD). Lipoprotein(a) carries proinflammatory and procalcific oxidized phospholipids (OxPL). We tested whether the CAVD risk is mediated by the content of OxPL on lipoprotein(a). APPROACH AND RESULTS: A case......, LPA kringle IV type 2 repeat, and rs10455872 genetic variants were measured. OxPL-apoB and OxPL-apo(a) levels correlated with lipoprotein(a) levels among cases (r=0.75 and r=0.95; both P

  16. Gallium-SPECT in the detection of prosthetic valve endocarditis and aortic ring abscess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, K.; Barnes, D.; Martin, R.H.; Rae, J.R. (Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Victoria General Hospital Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada))

    1991-09-01

    A 52-yr-old man who had a bioprosthetic aortic valve developed Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Despite antibiotic therapy he had persistent pyrexia and developed new conduction system disturbances. Echocardiography did not demonstrate vegetations on the valve or an abscess, but gallium scintigraphy using SPECT clearly identified a focus of intense activity in the region of the aortic valve. The presence of valvular vegetations and a septal abscess was confirmed at autopsy. Gallium scintigraphy, using SPECT, provided a useful noninvasive method for the demonstration of endocarditis and the associated valve ring abscess.

  17. Association of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis and aortic valve sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto O. Orden

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The principal objective of this investigation was to analyze the association between diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH and the presence of aortic valve sclerosis (AVS. For this study we used results from 1000 consecutive outpatients (473 males, older than 50 years of age (average 67.6 years, that had been examined with Doppler echocardiogram and anterior and lateral chest radiographs. Overall, 195 patients (19.5% were diagnosed with DISH and 283 (28.3% with AVS. DISH was more prevalent than AVS in males (66.7% vs. 42.6%, p< 0.0001 and in older patients (73.6 ± 9 years vs. 66.1 ± 9 years, p < 0.0001. Furthermore, 55.4% of patients with dorsal DISH presented aortic sclerosis calcification vs. 21.7% of patients free of DISH (OR = 4.47; 95% CI = 3.22-6.21. The adjusted odds ratio (OR was calculated by sex and age resulting in 3.04 (95% CI = 2.12-4.36; p < .0001. A statistically significant association was found between DISH and AVS in accordance to age and sex. The biological plausibility of this association is based on similar risk factors, pathogenic mechanisms and vascular complications.

  18. Clinical Relevance of Baseline TCP in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sannino, Anna; Stoler, Robert C; Hebeler, Robert F; Szerlip, Molly; Mack, Michael J; Grayburn, Paul A

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the influence of baseline thrombocytopenia (TCP) on short-term and long-term outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). A total of 732 consecutive patients with severe, symptomatic aortic stenosis undergoing TAVR from January 2012 to December 2015 were included. Primary outcomes of interest were the relationship of baseline TCP with 30-day and 1-year all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes of interest were procedural complications and in-hospital mortality in the same subgroups. The prevalence of TCP (defined as platelet count TCP (defined as platelet count TCP, moderate/severe TCP at baseline was associated with a significantly higher 30-day mortality (23.3% vs 2.3% and 3.1%, respectively; PTCP was an independent predictor of 30-day and 1-year mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 13.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.49-38.64; PTCP is a strong predictor of mortality in TAVR patients, possibly identifying a specific subgroup of frail patients; therefore, it should be taken into account when addressing TAVR risk.

  19. Time to Explore Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Younger, Low-Risk Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergaard, Lars

    2016-01-01

    During the last decade transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has been established as a treatment for patients with severe aortic stenosis, who are at particularly high surgical risk. As compared with surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR), TAVR has been associated with lower early risk ...

  20. Association Between Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement and Subsequent Infective Endocarditis and In-Hospital Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regueiro, Ander; Linke, Axel; Latib, Azeem

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Limited data exist on clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients who had infective endocarditis after undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). OBJECTIVE: To determine the associated factors, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of patients who had infective e...

  1. Aortic bypass surgery for asymptomatic patients awaiting a kidney transplant: a word of caution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franquet, Q; Terrier, N; Pirvu, A; Rambeaud, J-J; Long, J-A; Janbon, B; Tetaz, R; Malvezzi, P; Jouve, T; Descotes, J-L; Fiard, G

    2018-02-02

    In the presence of severe aorto-iliac calcification, aortic bypass surgery can be mandatory to allow kidney transplantation. The aim of our study was to evaluate the safety and outcomes of this strategy among asymptomatic patients. We retrospectively reviewed the files of all patients that had undergone vascular bypass surgery prior to kidney transplantation between November 2004 and March 2016. All patients undergoing aortic bypass surgery prior to kidney transplantation without any vascular-related symptoms were included. Twenty-one asymptomatic patients were included. Ten patients (48%) have not received a kidney transplant. Four patients died before kidney transplantation, including two deaths related to the bypass surgery (9.5%). Early post-operative morbidity involved 11 cases. Eleven patients (52%) were transplanted. Transplanted patients were significantly younger (median age 60 (56-61) versus 67 (60-72) years, p=0 .04) at the time of bypass and were less frequently treated for coronary heart disease (9% versus 50%, p=0.06). Aortic bypass surgery performed prior to kidney transplantation among asymptomatic patients has significant mortality and morbidity rates. When transplantation is possible, the results are satisfying. Larger studies are required to define the selection criteria, such as age and coronary heart disease. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Form Follows Function: Advances in Trilayered Structure Replication for Aortic Heart Valve Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan T. Simionescu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering the aortic heart valve is a challenging endeavor because of the particular hemodynamic and biologic conditions present in the native aortic heart valve. The backbone of an ideal valve substitute should be a scaffold that is strong enough to withstand billions of repetitive bending, flexing and stretching cycles, while also being slowly degradable to allow for remodeling. In this review, we highlight three overlooked aspects that might influence the long term durability of tissue engineered valves: (i replication of the native valve trilayered histoarchitecture, (ii duplication of the three-dimensional shape of the valve, (iii and cell integration efforts focused on getting the right number and type of cells to the right place within the valve structure and driving them towards homeostatic maintenance of the valve matrix. We propose that the trilayered structure in the native aortic valve that includes a middle spongiosa layer cushioning the motions of the two external fibrous layers should be our template for creation of novel scaffolds with improved mechanical durability. Furthermore, since cells adapt to micro-loads within the valve structure, we believe that interstitial cell remodeling of the valvular matrix will depend on the accurate replication of the structures and loads, resulting in successful regeneration of the valve tissue and extended durability.

  3. Novel hemodynamic index for assessment of aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugan, Baris; Kapadia, Samir; Svensson, Lars; Krishnaswamy, Amar; Tuzcu, Emin Murat

    2015-09-01

    Paravalvular aortic regurgitation (AR) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has been associated with increased mortality. Precise assessment of the degree of AR within the catheterization laboratory is crucial to take counter measures, but it remains challenging. The aim of this study was to determine whether any modification to AR index can improve its performance. The study included 64 patients treated with the Sapien valve (Edwards Life Sciences, Inc., Irvine, CA). The severity of AR was evaluated using echocardiography, angiography, and invasive hemodynamic parameters. We evaluated the time-integrated aortic regurgitation (TIAR) index as follows: (LV - Ao diastolic pressure time integral)/(LV systolic pressure time integral) × 100. We analyzed the AR index and TIAR index with the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. AR was observed in 58 patients (90.7%) and graded as mild in 33 (51.6%), moderate in 20 (31.3%), or moderate to severe in 5 (7.8%) patients. No severe AR was detected. The AR index and TIAR index decreased proportionately to the increased severity of AR (P = 0.002 and P < 0.001, respectively). TIAR index < 80 was associated with a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 83% for ≥mild AR. The area under the curve was greater for the TIAR index compared to the AR index (0.93 vs. 0.74). The TIAR index provides a better hemodynamic measure for assessing severity of AR compared to the AR index. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Use of intraventricular ribbon gauze to reduce particulate emboli during aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loubani Mahmoud

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of cerebrovascular accidents following aortic valve surgery remains a devastating complication. The aim of this study was to determine the number of potential embolic material arising during aortic valve replacement and to examine the efficacy of using ribbon gauze in the left ventricle during removal of the native valve and decalcification of the aortic annulus. Methods Ribbon gauze was inserted into the left ventricular cavity prior to aortic valve excision in an unselected, prospectively studied series of 30 patients undergoing aortic valve replacement. A further 30 lengths of ribbon gauze were soaked in the pericardiotomy blood of the same patients and all were subjected to histological analysis. Results The median number of tissue fragments from the aortic valve replacement group was significantly higher than in the control group 5 (0–18 versus 0 (0–1 (p = 3.6 × 10-5. The size of tissue fragments varied between 0.1 and 9.0 mm with a mean of 0.61 ± 1.12 mm and a median of 0.2 mm. There was a significantly higher number of tissue fragments associated with patients having surgery for aortic stenosis when compared with patients who had aortic regurgitation with median of 5 (0–18 versus 0 (0–3 (p = 0.8 × 10-3. Conclusion Significant capture of particulate debris by the intraventricular ribbon gauze suggests that the technique of left ventricular ribbon gauze insertion during aortic valve excision has merit.

  5. [Transcatheter aortic valve implantation versus aortic valve replacement: cost analysis from the regional health service and hospital perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, Elena; Fortuna, Daniela; Bartoli, Simona; Ciuca, Cristina; Orlando, Anna; Scondotto, Salvatore; Agabiti, Nera; Salizzoni, Stefano; Aranzulla, Tiziana Claudia; Gandolfo, Caterina; De Palma, Rossana; Saia, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the cost of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) procedures, together with the cost of the first-year hospitalizations following the index ones, in 4 Italian regions where diffusion level of TAVI and coverage decisions are different. The cost analysis was performed evaluating 372 patients enrolled consecutively from December 1, 2012 to September 30, 2015. The index hospitalization cost was calculated both from the hospital perspective through a full-costing approach and from the regional healthcare service perspective by applying the regional reimbursement tariffs. The follow-up costs were calculated for one year after the index hospitalization, from the regional healthcare sservice perspective, through the identification of hospital admissions for cardiovascular pathologies after the index hospitalization and computation of the relative regional tariffs. The mean hospitalization cost was € 32 120 for transfemoral TAVI (232 procedures), € 35 958 for transapical TAVI (31 procedures) and € 17 441 for AVR (109 procedures). From the regional healthcare service perspective, the mean transfemoral TAVI cost was € 29 989, with relevant regional variability (range from € 19 987 to € 36 979); the mean transapical TAVI cost was € 39 148; the mean AVR cost was € 32 020. The mean follow-up costs were € 2294 for transfemoral TAVI, € 2335 for transapical TAVI, and € 2601 for AVR. In our study, transapical TAVI resulted more expensive than transfemoral TAVI, while surgical AVR was cheaper than both (less than 40%). Costs of the transfemoral approach showed great variability between participating regions, probably due to different hospital costs, logistics, patients' selection and reimbursement policy. A central level of control would be appropriate to avoid unjustified differences in access to innovative procedures between different Italian regions.

  6. [Successful preoperative respiratory rehabilitation in patients with aortic valve stenosis associated with severe respiratory dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Mitsuru; Motoyoshi, Naotaka; Akiyama, Masatoshi; Kumagai, Kiichirou; Kawamoto, Shunsuke; Kurosawa, Hajime; Kohzuki, Masahiro; Saiki, Yoshikatsu

    2011-08-01

    We describe 2 cases of aortic valve stenosis with severe pulmonary dysfunction. Preoperative respiratory rehabilitation programmed by the rehabilitation doctors was cautiously undertaken to improve their exercise tolerance and respiratory reserve. These 2 patients underwent aortic valve replacement eventually. Postoperative course in each patient was uneventful without respiratory complication. Preoperative respiratory rehabilitation can be performed in the high risk patient with severe pulmonary dysfunction as long as careful risk management is guaranteed.

  7. Incidence and prognosis of congenital aortic valve stenosis in Liverpool (1960-1990).

    OpenAIRE

    Kitchiner, D J; Jackson, M; Walsh, K; Peart, I; Arnold, R

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the incidence and prognosis of congenital aortic valve stenosis in the five Health Districts of Liverpool that make up the Merseyside area. DESIGN--The records of the Liverpool Congenital Malformations Registry and the Royal Liverpool Children's Hospital identified 239 patients (155 male, 84 female) born with aortic valve stenosis between 1960 and 1990. Patients were traced to assess the severity of stenosis at follow up. Information on the severity at presentation and...

  8. Outcomes of a hybrid approach of percutaneous coronary intervention followed by minimally invasive aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Orlando; Xydas, Steve; Williams, Roy F; LaPietra, Angelo; Mawad, Maurice; Rosen, Gerald P; Beohar, Nirat; Mihos, Christos G

    2017-06-01

    In patients requiring coronary revascularization and aortic valve replacement, a combined approach of percutaneous coronary intervention followed by minimally invasive aortic valve replacement may be a viable treatment strategy. The outcomes of 123 consecutive patients with significant coronary artery and aortic valve disease, who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention followed by elective minimally invasive aortic valve replacement between February 2009 and April 2014, were retrospectively evaluated. The cohort consisted of 80 males and 43 females, with a mean age of 75.7±8.1 years. Drug-eluting stents were used in 69.9% of the patients, and 64.2% were on dual anti-platelet therapy at the time of aortic valve replacement. Within a median of 39 days (IQR 21-64), 83.7% of the patients underwent primary and 16.3% underwent re-operative minimally invasive aortic valve replacement. Post-operatively, there was 1 (0.8%) cerebrovascular accident, 1 patient (0.8%) required a re-operation due to bleeding, and 2 (1.6%) developed acute kidney injury. Thirty-day mortality occurred in 2 (1.6%) patients. Follow-up was available for all of the patients, and at a mean follow-up period of 14.3±12.5 months, 4 (3.3%) had an acute coronary syndrome, and 1 (0.8%) required a repeat target vessel revascularization. The actuarial survival rate at 1- and 3-year was 92.7% and 89.4%, respectively. In a select group of patients with coronary artery and aortic valve disease, a combined approach of percutaneous coronary intervention followed by minimally invasive aortic valve replacement can be safely performed with excellent short-term and midterm outcomes.

  9. Perioperative Anaesthesia Management During Minimally Invasive Surgery in Patients with Aortic Valve Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Lafci A; Gunaydin S; Gokcinar D; Gunertem E; Gogus N

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement is a common procedures in practice. Our aim is to present our experiences on our anaesthesia applications during these operations. Methods: Upon the approval of the Hospital Ethics Committee, data of the patients that underwent minimal invasive aortic valve surgery between 1 January 2017 and 31 August 2017 were analysed retrospectively. Recorded details were age, gender, Body Mass Index (BMI), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) c...

  10. Quantification of calcified particles in human valve tissue reveals asymmetry of calcific aortic valve disease development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsumi Yabusaki

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicated that small calcified particles observable by scanning electron microcopy (SEM may initiate calcification in cardiovascular tissues. We hypothesized that if the calcified particles precede gross calcification observed in calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD, they would exhibit a regional asymmetric distribution associated with CAVD development, which always initiates at the base of aortic valve leaflets adjacent to the aortic outflow in a region known as the fibrosa. Testing this hypothesis required counting the calcified particles in histological sections of aortic valve leaflets. SEM images, however, do not provide high contrast between components within images, making the identification and quantification of particles buried within tissue extracellular matrix difficult. We designed a new unique pattern matching-based technique to allow for flexibility in recognizing particles by creating a gap zone in the detection criteria that decreased the influence of non-particle image clutter in determining whether a particle was identified. We developed this flexible pattern particle labeling (FpPL technique using synthetic test images and human carotid artery tissue sections. A conventional image particle counting method (pre-installed in ImageJ did not properly recognize small calcified particles located in noisy images that include complex extracellular matrix structures, and other commonly used pattern matching methods failed to detect the wide variation in size, shape and brightness exhibited by the particles. Comparative experiments with the ImageJ particle counting method demonstrated that our method detected significantly more p<2*10-7 particles than the conventional method with significantly fewer p<0.0003 false positives and false negatives p<0.0003. We then applied the FpPL technique to CAVD leaflets and showed a significant increase in detected particles in the fibrosa at the base of the leaflets (p<0.0001, supporting

  11. ACE inhibition attenuates uremia-induced aortic valve thickening in a novel mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simolin, Mikko A; Pedersen, Tanja X; Bro, Susanne

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We examined whether impaired renal function causes thickening of the aortic valve leaflets in hyperlipidemic apoE-knockout (apoE-/-) mice, and whether the putative effect on the aortic valves could be prevented by inhibiting the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) with enalapril. METH...... for investigating the mechanisms of uremia-induced aortic valve disease, and also provides an opportunity to study its pharmacologic prevention.......BACKGROUND: We examined whether impaired renal function causes thickening of the aortic valve leaflets in hyperlipidemic apoE-knockout (apoE-/-) mice, and whether the putative effect on the aortic valves could be prevented by inhibiting the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) with enalapril....... METHODS: Thickening of the aortic valve leaflets in apoE-/- mice was induced by producing mild or moderate chronic renal failure resulting from unilateral nephrectomy (1/2 NX, n = 18) or subtotal nephrectomy (5/6 NX, n = 22), respectively. Additionally, the 5/6 NX mice were randomized to no treatment (n...

  12. Timing of Onset and Outcome of New Conduction Abnormalities Following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation: Role of Balloon Aortic Valvuloplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campelo-Parada, Francisco; Nombela-Franco, Luis; Urena, Marina; Regueiro, Ander; Jiménez-Quevedo, Pilar; Del Trigo, María; Chamandi, Chekrallah; Rodríguez-Gabella, Tania; Auffret, Vincent; Abdul-Jawad Altisent, Omar; DeLarochellière, Robert; Paradis, Jean-Michel; Dumont, Eric; Philippon, François; Pérez-Castellano, Nicasio; Puri, Rishi; Macaya, Carlos; Rodés-Cabau, Josep

    2017-05-27

    Little is known about the timing of onset and outcome of conduction abnormalities (CA) following balloon-expandable transcatheter aortic valve implantation. The aim of this study was to examine the timing of CA and determine the impact of balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) on the persistence of these abnormalities. A total of 347 patients were included. Of these, 75 had a continuous electrocardiogram recording and a 6-lead electrocardiogram at each step of the procedure. In the transcatheter aortic valve implantation population undergoing continuous electrocardiogram monitoring, new-onset left bundle branch block (LBBB) or third-degree atrioventricular block occurred in 48 (64%) and 16 (21.3%) patients, with 51.5% of CA occurring before valve implantation. Left bundle branch block persisted more frequently at hospital discharge (53.8 vs 22.7%; P=.028) and at 1-month follow-up (38.5 vs 13.6%; P=.054) when occurring before valve implantation. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty prior to valve implantation was used in 264 (76.1%) patients, and 78 (22.5%) had persistent LBBB or complete atrioventricular block requiring pacemaker implantation. Persistent LBBB or unresolved atrioventricular block at 1 month occurred more frequently in the BAV group (76.1 vs 47.6%; P=.021), and the use of BAV was associated with a lack of CA resolution (OR, 3.5; 95%CI, 1.17-10.43; P=.021). In patients undergoing a balloon-expandable transcatheter aortic valve implantation, more than half of CA occurred before valve implantation. Early occurrence of CA was associated with a higher rate of persistence at 1-month follow-up. The use of BAV was associated with an increased risk of CA persistence. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Rationale and design of the edwards SAPIEN-3 periprosthetic leakage evaluation versus medtronic corevalve in transfemoral aortic valve implantation (ELECT) trial : A randomised comparison of balloon-expandable versus self-expanding transcatheter aortic valve prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abawi, M; Agostoni, Pierfrancesco; Kooistra, N H M; Samim, M; Nijhoff, F; Voskuil, M; Nathoe, H; Doevendans, P A; Chamuleau, S A; Urgel, K; Hendrikse, J; Leiner, T; Abrahams, A C; van der Worp, B; Stella, P R

    2017-01-01

    Background and objectives Periprosthetic aortic regurgitation (PPR) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) remains an important issue associated with impaired long-term outcomes. The current randomised study aims to evaluate potential differences between the balloon-expandable Edwards

  14. Electrocardiographic imaging-based recognition of possible induced bundle branch blocks during transcatheter aortic valve implantations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, P.M. van; Proniewska, K.; Maugenest, A.M.; Mieghem, N.M. van; Maan, A.C.; Jaegere, P.P. de; Bruining, N.

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Conventional electrocardiogram (ECG)-based diagnosis of left bundle branch block (LBBB) in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is ambiguous. Left ventricular hypertrophy is often seen in patients with severe aortic stenosis in which a transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI)

  15. 3D bioprinting of heterogeneous aortic valve conduits with alginate/gelatin hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Bin; Hockaday, Laura A; Kang, Kevin H; Butcher, Jonathan T

    2013-05-01

    Heart valve disease is a serious and growing public health problem for which prosthetic replacement is most commonly indicated. Current prosthetic devices are inadequate for younger adults and growing children. Tissue engineered living aortic valve conduits have potential for remodeling, regeneration, and growth, but fabricating natural anatomical complexity with cellular heterogeneity remain challenging. In the current study, we implement 3D bioprinting to fabricate living alginate/gelatin hydrogel valve conduits with anatomical architecture and direct incorporation of dual cell types in a regionally constrained manner. Encapsulated aortic root sinus smooth muscle cells (SMC) and aortic valve leaflet interstitial cells (VIC) were viable within alginate/gelatin hydrogel discs over 7 days in culture. Acellular 3D printed hydrogels exhibited reduced modulus, ultimate strength, and peak strain reducing slightly over 7-day culture, while the tensile biomechanics of cell-laden hydrogels were maintained. Aortic valve conduits were successfully bioprinted with direct encapsulation of SMC in the valve root and VIC in the leaflets. Both cell types were viable (81.4 ± 3.4% for SMC and 83.2 ± 4.0% for VIC) within 3D printed tissues. Encapsulated SMC expressed elevated alpha-smooth muscle actin, while VIC expressed elevated vimentin. These results demonstrate that anatomically complex, heterogeneously encapsulated aortic valve hydrogel conduits can be fabricated with 3D bioprinting. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Matched Comparison of Self-Expanding Transcatheter Heart Valves for the Treatment of Failed Aortic Surgical Bioprosthesis: Insights From the Valve-in-Valve International Data Registry (VIVID).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnasser, Sami; Cheema, Asim N; Simonato, Matheus; Barbanti, Marco; Edwards, Jeremy; Kornowski, Ran; Horlick, Eric; Wijeysundera, Harindra C; Testa, Luca; Bedogni, Francesco; Amrane, Hafid; Walther, Thomas; Pelletier, Marc; Latib, Azeem; Laborde, Jean-Claude; Hildick-Smith, David; Kim, Won-Keun; Tchetche, Didier; Agrifoglio, Marco; Sinning, Jan-Malte; van Boven, Ad J; Kefer, Joëlle; Frerker, Christian; van Mieghem, Nicolas M; Linke, Axel; Worthley, Stephen; Asgar, Anita; Sgroi, Carmelo; Aziz, Mina; Danenberg, Haim D; Labinaz, Marino; Manoharan, Ganesh; Cheung, Anson; Webb, John G; Dvir, Danny

    2017-04-01

    Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation is an established therapy for high-risk patients with failed surgical aortic bioprosthesis. There are limited data comparing outcomes of valve-in-valve implantation using different transcatheter heart valves (THV). Patients included in the Valve-in-Valve International Data registry (VIVID) and treated with self-expanding THV devices were analyzed using centralized core laboratory blinded to clinical events. St. Jude Medical Portico versus Medtronic CoreValve were compared in a 1:2 fashion after propensity score matching. A total of 162 patients, Portico- (n=54) and CoreValve- (n=108) based valve-in-valve procedures comprised the study population with no significant difference in baseline characteristics (age, 79±8.2 years; 60% women; mean STS [Society of Thoracic Surgery] score 8.1±5.5%). Postimplantation, CoreValve was associated with a larger effective orifice area (1.67 versus 1.31 cm2; P=0.001), lower mean gradient (14±7.5 versus 17±7.5 mm Hg; P=0.02), and lower core laboratory-adjudicated moderate-to-severe aortic insufficiency (4.2% versus 13.7%; P=0.04), compared with Portico. Procedural complications including THV malpositioning, second THV requirement, or coronary obstruction were not significantly different between the 2 groups. Survival and stroke rates at 30 days were similar, but overall mortality at 1 year was higher among patients treated with Portico compared with CoreValve (22.6% versus 9.1%; P=0.03). In this first matched comparison of THVs for valve-in-valve implantations, Portico and CoreValve demonstrated differences in postprocedural hemodynamics and long-term clinical outcomes. Although this could be related to THV design characteristics, the impact of other procedural factors cannot be excluded and require further evaluation. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Myocardial perforation by a guidewire crossing a stenotic aortic valve during cardiac catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinkels, Ben M; ten Cate, Tim J F; Haenen, Nico A; Rensing, Benno J W M; Defauw, Jo J A M; Jaarsma, Wybren

    2010-03-04

    Myocardial perforation by a guidewire after retrograde crossing of a stenotic aortic valve during cardiac catheterization is rare. We present a patient with calcific aortic stenosis who suffered this potentially life-threatening complication and in whom conservative treatment was successful. Early recognition of this complication is important for the operator performing cardiac catheterizations in patients with calcific aortic stenosis. Copyright 2008 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Augmented Reality System for Ultrasound Guidance of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Maria E; McLeod, A Jonathan; Moore, John T; Chu, Michael W A; Patel, Rajni; Kiaii, Bob; Peters, Terry M

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) relies on fluoroscopy and nephrotoxic contrast medium for valve deployment. We propose an alternative guidance system using augmented reality (AR) and transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) to guide TAVI deployment. The goals of this study were to determine how consistently the aortic valve annulus is defined from TEE using different aortic valve landmarks and to compare AR guidance with fluoroscopic guidance of TAVI deployment in an aortic root model. Magnetic tracking sensors were integrated into the TAVI catheter and TEE probe, allowing these tools to be displayed in an AR environment. Variability in identifying aortic valve commissures and cuspal nadirs was assessed using TEE aortic root images. To compare AR guidance of TAVI deployment with fluoroscopic guidance, a TAVI stent was deployed 10 times in the aortic root model using each of the two guidance systems. Commissures and nadirs were both investigated as features for defining the valve annulus in the AR guidance system. The commissures were identified more consistently than the nadirs, with intraobserver variability of 2.2 and 3.8 mm, respectively, and interobserver variability of 3.3 and 4.7 mm, respectively. The precision of TAVI deployment using fluoroscopic guidance was 3.4 mm, whereas the precision of AR guidance was 2.9 mm, and its overall accuracy was 3.4 mm. This indicates that both have similar performance. Aortic valve commissures can be identified more reliably than cuspal nadirs from TEE. The AR guidance system achieved similar deployment accuracy to that of fluoroscopy while eliminating the use and consequences of nephrotoxic contrast and radiation.

  19. Our new tornado-compatible aortic valve prosthesis: notable results of hydrodynamic testing and experimental trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo A. Bockeria

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aims A shortcoming common to all existing designs of mechanical cardiac valve prostheses is an increased trombogenicity caused, among other factors, by the lack of hydrodynamic compatibility between the luminal part of the prosthesis and the patterned blood flow. The aim of the study is to design and test our new mechanical aortic valve prosthesis to exclude life-long anticoagulation treatment. Materials and methods Standard hydrodynamic tests of the new prosthetic valve have been carried out for comparing with the other existing valve designs. A new method for the heart valve prosthesis testing in a tornado-like flow has been developed. The valve function has been verified in a swine excluding the anticoagulation treatment during the period of time exceeding six months. Results The significant advantage of the new prosthesis in the standard hydrodynamic tests has been demonstrated. The tests in the tornado-like flow have shown that only this prosthesis allows maintaining the pattern, the head and flow rate characteristics of the tornado-like jet. Upon implanting the new prosthesis in the aortic position in a swine, the good performance of the valve without anticoagulation therapy has been confirmed in the course of more than six months. Conclusion Obtained has been the evidence of the merits of the new mechanical aortic valve owing to the due consideration of the hydrodynamic peculiarities of the aortic blood flow and the creation of the design providing the proper hydrodynamic compatibility.

  20. Intraleaflet hemorrhages are a common finding in symptomatic aortic and mitral valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, Olga C. G.; Daemen, Mat J. A. P.; van Rijswijk, Jan Willem; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.; van der Wal, Allard C.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Intraleaflet hemorrhage (ILH) has been reported to occur in calcified degenerated aortic valves. At present, no such information is available for mitral valves or for other types of valvular disease. We examined the prevalence, age, and potential source of ILH in a consecutive series

  1. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a patient with circulatory collapse, using the lucas® chest compression system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Blom; Andersen, Claus; Nissen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    We describe a case of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) using the LUCAS® Chest Compression System in an elderly high risk patient with severe aortic stenosis and heart failure. In this case, the patient developed severe aortic regurgitation following predilatation of the native aortic...

  2. Immediate results of aortic valve reconstruction by using autologous pericardium (Ozaki procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е. В. Россейкин

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study was designed to compare the immediate echocardiographic characteristics of aortic valve reconstruction by using autologous pericardium and the method proposed in 2007 by Shigeyuki Ozaki, as well as aortic valve replacement by means of frame-mounted biological prostheses Medtronic HANCOCK®II T505 CINCH® II and the Carpentier-Edwards PERIMOUNT.Methods: Over a period from January 2014 to February 2016, 76 patients underwent aortic valve replacement by means of frame-mounted biological prostheses Medtronic HANCOCK®II T505 CINCH® II (n=41 and Carpentier-Edwards PERIMOUNT (n=35 at our hospital. 20 patients underwent the Ozaki procedure. These three groups of patients were assigned to the study. Demographic and preoperative indicators of patients from all three groups were homogeneous (р>0.05. The evaluation of the aortic valves replaced was carried out by echocardiography.Results: Echocardiography was performed before the procedure and in the early postoperative period. Statistical analysis using ANOVA showed significantly lower values of the aortic valve pressure gradient (p<0.001 and larger effective orifice area and indexed effective orifice area of the valve (p<0.001 in the group of the Ozaki procedure.Conclusion: According to echocardiography data, in the immediate postoperative period the Ozaki procedure is associated with lower mean and peak gradients of pressure on the aortic valve and larger effective orifice area and indexed effective orifice area of the valve, as compared with the frame-mounted biological aortic prostheses Medtronic HANCOCK®II T505 CINCH® II and the Carpentier-Edwards PERIMOUNT.FundingThe study had no sponsorship.Conflict of interestThe authors declare no conflict of interest.

  3. Immediate results of aortic valve reconstruction by using autologous pericardium (Ozaki procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е. В. Россейкин

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The study was designed to compare the immediate echocardiographic characteristics of aortic valve reconstruction by using autologous pericardium and the method proposed in 2007 by Shigeyuki Ozaki, as well as aortic valve replacement by means of frame-mounted biological prostheses Medtronic HANCOCK®II T505 CINCH® II and the Carpentier-Edwards PERIMOUNT.Methods. Over a period from January 2014 to February 2016, 76 patients underwent aortic valve replacement by means of frame-mounted biological prostheses Medtronic HANCOCK®II T505 CINCH® II (n=41 and Carpentier-Edwards PERIMOUNT (n=35 at our hospital. 20 patients underwent the Ozaki procedure. These three groups of patients were assigned to the study. Demographic and preoperative indicators of patients from all three groups were homogeneous (р>0.05. The evaluation of the aortic valves replaced was carried out by echocardiography.Results. Echocardiography was performed before the procedure and in the early postoperative period. Statistical analysis using ANOVA showed significantly lower values of the aortic valve pressure gradient (p<0.001 and larger effective orifice area and indexed effective orifice area of the valve (p<0.001 in the group of the Ozaki procedure.Conclusion. According to echocardiography data, in the immediate postoperative period the Ozaki procedure is associated with lower mean and peak gradients of pressure on the aortic valve and larger effective orifice area and indexed effective orifice area of the valve, as compared with the frame-mounted biological aortic prostheses Medtronic HANCOCK®II T505 CINCH® II and the Carpentier-Edwards PERIMOUNT.Received 27 May 2016. Accepted 24 June 2016.Funding: The study had no sponsorship. Conflict of interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

  4. Evaluation of NT-proBNP concentrations during exercise in asymptomatic patients with severe high-gradient aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowolski, Piotr; Lech, Agnieszka; Klisiewicz, Anna; Hoffman, Piotr

    2016-08-11

    INTRODUCTION The effect of asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis (ASAS) on N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels ar rest and during exercise, as well as their relevance for clinical practice remain controversial.  OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis of whether the evaluation of NT-proBNP concentrations during exercise provides additional information about the severity of aortic stenosis and left ventricular remodeling in patients with ASAS. PATIENTS AND METHODS A total of 50 patients with ASAS (mean age, 38.4 ±18.1 years) and 21 healthy subjects (mean age, 43.4 ±10.6 years) were enrolled. Rest and exercise echocardiography was performed to evaluate maximum velocity (Vmax), mean aortic gradient (AG), and aortic valve area (AVA). The left ventricular mass index (LVMI) was calculated. NT-proBNP concentrations at rest and during exercise were assessed, and the difference between the 2 values was calculated (ΔNT-proBNP). RESULTS NT-proBNP and ΔNT-proBNP levels at rest and during exercise were significantly higher in the ASAS group compared with the control group. In the ASAS group, NT-proBNP levels at rest significantly correlated with LVMI (r = 0.432; P <0.0001), AVA (r = -0.408; P <0.0001), Vmax (r = 0.375; P = 0.002), and mean AG (r = 0.257; P = 0.03). NT-proBNP levels during exercise significantly correlated with LVMI (r = 0.432; P <0.0001), mean AG (r = 0.401; P = 0.001), and AVA (r = -0.375; P = 0.001). In the multivariate logistic regression model, the factors independently associated with NT-proBNP both at rest and during exercise were age, AVA, and LVMI. CONCLUSIONS NT-proBNP levels at rest provide valuable information for identifying patients with more advanced left ventricular hypertrophy secondary to severe aortic stenosis. NT-proBNP levels during exercise do not provide new information on the severity of AS.

  5. Transcarotid Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement as Preferred Alternative Access in a Patient With Bilateral Carotid Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Puja B; Loh, Shang; Gruberg, Luis; Patel, Neal; Weinstein, Jonathan; Tannous, Henry; Bilfinger, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    A 78-year-old man presented with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis and a heavily calcified, stenotic aortic valve. Given multiple comorbidities, the heart team agreed on a transcatheter approach via the left common carotid artery.

  6. Outcome With the Repositionable and Retrievable Boston Scientific Lotus Valve Compared With the Balloon-Expandable Edwards Sapien 3 Valve in Patients Undergoing Transfemoral Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Julia; Gonska, Birgid; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Wöhrle, Jochen

    2017-06-01

    New generation devices for transfemoral aortic valve replacement were optimized on valve positioning and reduction of residual aortic regurgitation. We compared 30-day, 12-month, and 24-month outcomes of the Boston Scientific Lotus valve (Lotus) and the balloon-expandable Edwards Sapien 3 (ES3) valve. Primary end point was all-cause mortality or disabling stroke within 12 months. Between 2014 and 2016, 537 patients were enrolled at our center, and 202 patients received Lotus and 335 ES3. There was no residual moderate or severe aortic regurgitation. Rate of mild aortic regurgitation was lower with the repositionable and retrievable Lotus valve compared with the ES3. Rate of pacemaker implantation was significantly higher with the Lotus valve compared with the ES3 valve (36.1% versus 14.9%, P<0.01). Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 early safety end point at 30 days was 7.4% with both devices with no difference in all-cause mortality (Lotus, 1.9%; ES3, 1.8%; P=0.87), rate of disabling stroke (Lotus, 1.5%; ES3, 2.1%; P=0.62), or major vascular complications (Lotus, 2.9%; ES3, 2.4%; P=0.69). The primary end point at 12 months was similar between groups. In a propensity score-matched comparison, there was no difference in the primary end point within 12 months (Lotus, 15.5%; ES3, 18.6%; P=0.69) and 24 months (Lotus, 21.9%; ES3, 26.4%; P=0.49). Transfemoral aortic valve replacement with the ES3 and the Lotus were associated with similar 30-day, 12-month, and 24-month clinical outcomes. Need for permanent pacemaker implantation was significantly higher with the repositionable Lotus device. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02162069. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation with either CoreValve or SAPIEN XT devices in patients with a single coronary artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbets, Emmanuel; Choby, Michael; Tchetche, Didier

    2012-07-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is associated with a risk of coronary obstruction. This complication is potentially lethal when the origin of the coronary arteries is anomalous. We describe two cases of TAVI with the SAPIEN XT (Edwards Lifesciences) and CoreValve devices (Medtronic) in patients with a single coronary artery. The tools and techniques used to anticipate the risk of acute coronary occlusion are discussed.

  8. Hybrid approach combining off-pump CABG with transapical aortic valve implantation via median sternotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotte, J M; Rupp, W; Schild, A; Horke, A; Bedda, W; Doll, N

    2012-09-01

    We report the case of a 75-year-old patient diagnosed with severe aortic stenosis and two-vessel coronary artery disease. Due to multiple comorbidities including chronic renal insufficiency, stroke and pulmonary hypertension (EuroSCORE: 34%; STS mortality risk: 14.9%), he was not a candidate for conventional aortic valve surgery. He underwent a novel hybrid treatment approach combining off-pump CABG and transapical aortic valve implantation via a median sternotomy. Extracorporeal circulation could be entirely avoided. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  9. Endovascular iliac rescue technique for complete arterial avulsion after transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obon-Dent, Mauricio; Reul, Ross M; Mortazavi, Ali

    2014-08-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has emerged as an alternative therapy to open aortic valve repair for high-risk patients with aortic stenosis, but larger delivery sheath size is associated with vascular complications. We report 2 cases in which a minimally invasive technique was used for the hybrid repair of confirmed or suspected large-bore sheath traumatic avulsion (i.e., "iliac on a stick") after TAVR. We believe our hybrid approach to rescuing the iliac artery in suspected or confirmed complete artery avulsion could improve outcomes for patients who require TAVR. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Left side approach for aortic valve replacement in patient with dextrocardia and situs inversus totalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah E. Altarabsheh

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aortic valve replacement in patients with dextrocardia and situs inversus totalis is technically challenging due to anatomical considerations. Modifications of the cannulation strategy and operative tool sets are helpful. We report a 47-year-old man who had dextrocardia with situs inversus totalis with severe aortic regurgitation. Our approach was precisely planned depending on the clear anatomy outlined by preoperative contrast-enhanced computed tomography of the chest. We used a surgical approach in which the main surgeon was standing on the left side of the patient. Left sided approach provided excellent exposure for aortic valve replacement in this case scenario.

  11. Local Versus General Anesthesia in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar, Avais; Khurana, Ayush; Mohammed, Ashfaq; Das, Rajiv; Zaman, Azfar; Edwards, Richard

    2016-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is conventionally performed under general anesthesia (GA) allowing intraoperative transoesophageal echocardiogram imaging. We present our experience in patients having the procedure under local anesthesia (LA), who were subsequently transferred to a low dependency unit postprocedure, to assess safety and length of hospital stay. We retrospectively assessed all the transfemoral TAVR procedures conducted at our center from January 03, 2011. Of 216 patients, 145 had the procedure under GA and 71 under LA. Both groups were similar with respect to age, co-morbidities, Euro Score, and the severity of the aortic stenosis. The procedure time was significantly shorter in the LA group measured from time in room to skin closure (108 vs 143 minutes, p mild (2.1% in GA and 2.8% in LA, p = 0.67), need for permanent pacing (3.4% in GA and 1.4% in LA, p = 0.32), and disabling cerebrovascular accidents (1.4% and 1.4%, p = 1.0). The 30-day survival was not significantly different (95.9% in GA and 100% in LA, p = 0.17), whereas the median number of days in hospital was shorter in the LA group (4 in GA and 2 in LA, p hospital stay. LA is a safe and cost-effective alternative to GA and patients can be safely transferred to a low dependency unit. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Platelet reactivity in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orvin, Katia; Eisen, Alon; Perl, Leor; Zemer-Wassercug, Noa; Codner, Pablo; Assali, Abid; Vaknin-Assa, Hana; Lev, Eli I; Kornowski, Ran

    2016-07-01

    Thromboembolic events, primarily stroke, might complicate transcatheter aortic-valve implantation (TAVI) procedures in 3-5 % of cases. Thus, it is common to administer aspirin and clopidogrel pharmacotherapy for 3-6 months following TAVI in order to prevent those events. The biologic response to the dual anti platelet treatment (DAPT) is heterogeneous, e.g. low response, known as high on treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR) may be associated with adverse thromboembolic events. Little is known about the prevalence of HTPR among patients undergoing TAVI. To assess the variability in response and rates of residual platelet reactivity in patients undergoing TAVI. We examined platelet reactivity in response to clopidogrel and aspirin in 40 consecutive patients (mean age 81.7 ± 6.5 years, 66.7 % women) who underwent successful TAVI using the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay and the multiple electrode aggregometry assay (Multiplate analyzer) in response to adenosine diphosphate and arachidonic acid respectively, at different time points before and following TAVI. Before TAVI, the majority of patients were on antiplatelet therapy (68.5 % aspirin, 12.5 % clopidogrel, 12.5 % DAPT). Following the procedure all patients were on DAPT or clopidogrel and warfarin. Among analyzed patients, 41 % had HTPR for clopidogrel and 12.5 % for aspirin at baseline, which did not significantly change 1-month following the procedure (p = 0.81 and p  = 0.33, respectively). In conclusion, patients undergoing TAVI for severe aortic stenosis and treated with DAPT have high rates of residual platelet reactivity during the peri-procedural period and up to 1-month thereafter. These findings may have clinical implications for the anti-platelet management of TAVI patients.

  13. Reliability and Identification of Aortic Valve Prolapse in the Horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hallowell Gayle D

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objectives were to determine and assess the reliability of criteria for identification of aortic valve prolapse (AVP using echocardiography in the horse. Results Opinion of equine cardiologists indicated that a long-axis view of the aortic valve (AoV was most commonly used for identification of AVP (46%; n=13. There was consensus that AVP could be mimicked by ultrasound probe malignment. This was confirmed in 7 healthy horses, where the appearance of AVP could be induced by malalignment. In a study of a further 8 healthy horses (5 with AVP examined daily for 5 days, by two echocardiographers standardized imaging guidelines gave good to excellent agreement for the assessment of AVP (kappa>0.80 and good agreement between days and observers (kappa >0.6. The technique allowed for assessment of the degree of prolapse and measurement of the prolapse distance that provided excellent agreement between echocardiographers, days and observers (kappa/ICC>0.8. Assessments made using real-time zoomed images provided similar measurements to the standard views (ICC=0.9, with agreement for the identification of AVP (kappa>0.8. Short axis views of the AoV were used for identification of AVP by fewer respondents (23%, however provided less agreement for the identification of AVP (kappa>0.6 and only adequate agreement with observations made in long axis (kappa>0.5, with AVP being identified more often in short axis (92% compared to long axis (76%. Orthogonal views were used by 31% of respondents to identify the presence of AVP, and 85% to identify cusp. Its identification on both views on 4 days was used to categorise horses as having AVP, providing a positive predictive value of 79% and negative predictive value of 18%. Only the non-coronary cusp (NCC of the AoV was observed to prolapse in these studies. Prolapse of the NCC was confirmed during the optimisation study using four-dimensional echocardiography, which concurred with the findings

  14. Transapical implantation of a self-expandable aortic valve prosthesis utilizing a novel designed positioning element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaopeng; Tang, Yue; Luo, Fuliang; Tian, Yi; Li, Kai; Sun, Jiakang; Jia, Liujun; Wang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate a new transapical system which utilizes a novel designed positioning element and a two-step positioning mechanism for easy and accurate implantation of transcatheter valves. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is an important treatment option for non-surgical patients with severe aortic stenosis. However, accurate placement of the transcatheter valve remains challenging. Self-expandable aortic valve prosthesis with a flexibly connected, annulus-like positioning element was implanted through a transapical approach in 12 pigs. The positioning element was separated and can be released independent of the valve prosthesis. During valve implantation, firstly, the positioning element was unsheathed and fixed into the aortic sinus. Then, the prosthetic valve was guided to an anatomically oriented position and deployed. Six animals were followed up to 180 days. With the help of the positioning element, all 12 valves were successfully deployed at the anticipated site. The valve release procedure took an average of 7.3 ± 2.5 min. The mean transvalvular pressure gradient was 2.8 ± 1.1 mm Hg at valve deployment. Of the six chronic animals, the mean transvalvular pressure gradient was 3.0 ± 1.0 mm Hg on day 7, and 2.9 ± 1.6 mm Hg on day 180 (P = 0.91). No migration, embolization, or coronary obstruction was observed during surgery and at necropsy. Pathological examination showed anatomically correct positioning of the prosthetic valve without signs of thrombosis or calcification. In this study, we confirmed the feasibility of the J-Valve transapical system for transapical implantation through a two-step process. Satisfactory hemodynamic and pathological performance during a follow-up of 180 days was demonstrated. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Impact of new technologies and experience on procedural aspects of surgical aortic valve replacement - a process analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Langhammer, Bettina; Nucera, Maria; Englberger, Lars; Roost, Eva; Reineke, David; Schönhoff, Florian; Most, Henriette; Winkler, Bernhard; Gisler, Fabian; Carrel, Thierry; Huber, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) is the treatment of choice in severe symptomatic aortic valve disease. New techniques and prostheses have been recently developed to facilitate the procedure and reduce aortic cross-clamp time (AOx). The aim of this study was to analyse the different procedural steps in order to identify the most time-consuming part during aortic clamping time and to compare impact of experience on procedural aspects. METHODS AOx during SAVR was ...

  16. Expanding TAVI options: elective rotational atherectomy during trans-catheter aortic valve implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piccoli, Anna; Lunardi, Mattia; Ariotti, Sara; Ferrero, Valeria; Vassanelli, Corrado; Ribichini, Flavio, E-mail: flavio.ribichini@univr.it

    2015-01-15

    Summary: Aortic valve stenosis (AVS) in the elderly is frequently associated to coronary artery disease (CAD). In patients with significant coronary stenosis surgical valve replacement is associated to coronary bypass grafting, but whether coronary angioplasty is needed in patients receiving trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is unknown. Given the frequent complexity of CAD in the elderly with calcific AVS, rotational atherectomy (RA) may be needed in some cases. No data are available about feasibility and safety of RA during TAVI. The need for myocardial revascularization in TAVI candidates is discussed, and a series of RA cases performed during TAVI is described.

  17. Robotic excision of aortic valve papillary fibroelastoma and concomitant maze procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Edward T

    2012-01-01

    Cardiothoracic surgeons have utilized the surgical robot to provide a minimally invasive approach to a number of intracardiac operations, including tumor resection, valve repair, and ablation of atrial arrhythmia. We report the case of a 58 year-old woman who was found to have a mobile mass on her aortic valve during evaluation of atrial fibrillation. Both of these conditions were addressed when she underwent a combined robotic biatrial Maze procedure and excision of the mass, which proved to be a papillary fibroelastoma of the aortic valve.

  18. Robotic excision of aortic valve papillary fibroelastoma and concomitant Maze procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward T Murphy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cardiothoracic surgeons have utilized the surgical robot to provide a minimally invasive approach to a number of intracardiac operations, including tumor resection, valve repair, and ablation of atrial arrhythmia. We report the case of a 58 year-old woman who was found to have a mobile mass on her aortic valve during evaluation of atrial fibrillation. Both of these conditions were addressed when she underwent a combined robotic biatrial Maze procedure and excision of the mass, which proved to be a papillary fibroelastoma of the aortic valve.

  19. Initial Experience with Sutureless Sorin Perceval S Aortic Prosthesis for the Treatment of Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lio, Antonio; Miceli, Antonio; Solinas, Marco; Glauber, Mattia

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate results of the initial experience with sutureless Perceval S for active prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE). From October 2012 to April 2014, f: ve patients underwent surgery for aortic PVE with Perceval S bioprosthesis. There was one in-hospital death (20%). Echocardiography performed at discharge showed excellent hemodynamic performance of Perceval S bioprosthesis. Aortic valve replacement with Perceval S sutureless valve in patients with PVE is a feasible and safe procedure, associated with low in-hospital mortality and good hemodynamic performance of the prosthesis. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Repair of a Mycotic Coronary Artery Aneurysm with an Intact Prosthetic Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Mitsugu; Bell, David; Marshman, David

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a 75-year-old man with a mycotic right coronary artery aneurysm without evidence of prosthetic valve endocarditis. Eight years previously he had undergone coronary artery bypass surgery and aortic valve replacement. He presented with methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus septicaemia after a prolonged hospital admission. Further investigation revealed a large mycotic right coronary artery aneurysm prompting urgent surgical repair. This case, of a mycotic coronary artery aneurysm in an atherosclerotic native coronary artery, is an extremely rare entity, which is further complicated by the presence of a prosthetic aortic valve. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Double valve replacement for acute spontaneous left chordal rupture secondary to chronic aortic incompetence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLenachan Jim

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A 54 years old male with undiagnosed chronic calcific degenerative aortic valve incompetence presented with acute left anterior chordae tendinae rupture resulting in severe left heart failure and cardiogenic shock. He was successfully treated with emergency double valve replacement using mechanical valves. The pathogenesis of acute rupture of the anterior chordae tendinae, without any evidence of infective endocarditis or ischemic heart disease seems to have been attrition of the subvalvular mitral apparatus by the chronic regurgitant jet of aortic incompetence with chronic volume overload. We review the literature with specific focus on the occurrence of this unusual event.

  2. Transfemoral aortic valve implantation for severe aortic stenosis in a patient with dextrocardia situs inversus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Richard I S; Morgan, Kenneth P; Brydie, Alan; Beydoun, Hussein K; Nadeem, S Najaf

    2014-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVR) has grown rapidly over the past 10 years. Device and delivery catheter systems have evolved to facilitate the procedure and reduce the risk of associated complications, including those related to vascular access. It is important to understand the utility of the TAVR equipment in patients with more challenging anatomy to select the most appropriate technique for this complex procedure. We report the first case, to our knowledge, of a patient with dextrocardia situs inversus and previous coronary artery bypass grafting who underwent TAVR from the femoral route using the Edwards SAPIEN XT Novaflex+ Transfemoral System (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA). Copyright © 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of forced-air and water-circulating warming for prevention of hypothermia during transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Benjamin Rohrer; Emily Penick; Farhad Zahedi; Hocine Tighiouart; Brian Kelly; Frederick Cobey; Stefan Ianchulev

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) procedures at our institution were complicated by perioperative hypothermia despite use of the standard of care forced-air convective warming device...

  4. Computed tomography in the evaluation for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausleiter, Jörg; Achenbach, Stephan; Desai, Milind Y.; Tuzcu, E. Murat

    2011-01-01

    If left untreated, symptomatic, severe aortic stenosis (AS) is associated with a dismal prognosis. Open-heart surgical valve replacement is the treatment of choice and is associated with excellent short and long-term outcome. However, many older patients with multiple co-morbidities and anticipated increased surgical risk are excluded from surgical intervention. For these patients, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is emerging as a viable treatment alternative. Transcatheter valvular heart procedures are characterized by lack of exposure and visualization of the operative field, therefore relying on image guidance, both for patient selection and preparation and the implantation procedure itself. This article describes the role of multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) for detailed assessment of the aortic valve, aortic root, and iliac arteries in the context of TAVI. PMID:24282684

  5. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement: where will we be in 5 years?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Anson; Soon, Jia-Lin

    2011-03-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has developed in less than 2 decades to be a viable procedure, carving out a niche position in our armamentarium to treat high-risk patients with aortic valve disease. Rapid advances are occurring in prosthesis design, catheter delivery system, imaging, and the hybrid operating room. The PARTNER (Placement of AoRTic traNscathetER valve) randomized trial, cohort B confirms the superiority of the transfemoral TAVI compared with standard medical therapy with regard to overall survival and cardiac functional status. Major stroke and vascular complications, however, remain higher in the transfemoral TAVI group. Large European registries of both the transapical and transfemoral TAVI are reporting improved procedural success and early survival. The CoreValve and SAPIEN valves remain the forerunners, with accumulating evidence for use, and published 3-year prosthesis durability data for the latter. Evidence is accumulating in support of TAVI for high-risk nonoperative aortic stenosis. Even before the PARTNER cohort A results, comparing TAVI and conventional aortic valve replacement, become available, the next generation devices and technological improvements are well underway to make the procedure even more reproducible.

  6. Association of body mass index and visceral fat with aortic valve calcification and mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement: the obesity paradox in severe aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Mancio

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies showed that metabolic syndrome is associated with aortic valve calcification (AVC and poor outcomes in aortic stenosis (AS. However, if these associations change and how body fat impacts the prognosis of patients in late stage of the disease have been not yet explored. Aims To determine the association of body mass index (BMI and visceral fat with AVC and mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR. Methods This was a prospective cohort of 170 severe AS patients referred to TAVR. We quantified AVC mass score and fat depots including epicardial adipose tissue, intrathoracic fat, and abdominal visceral (VAF and subcutaneous fats by computed tomography. Fat depots were indexed to body surface area. All-cause and cardiovascular-related deaths after TAVR were recorded over a median follow-up of 1.2 years. Results Higher AVC mass was independently associated with low BMI and low VAF. All-cause mortality risk increased with the decrease of BMI and increment of VAF. A stratified analysis by obesity showed that in non-obese, VAF was inversely associated with mortality, whereas in obese, high VAF was associated with higher mortality (p value for interaction < 0.05. At long-term, hazard ratio [HR] with non-obese/low VAF was 2.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1–4.9; p = 0.021 and HR with obese/high VAF was 2.5 (95% CI 1.1–5.8; p = 0.031 compared with obese/low VAF patients. Conclusions In AS patients submitted to TAVR, BMI and VAF were inversely associated with AVC. Pre-intervention assessment of VAF by computed tomography may provide a better discrimination of mortality than BMI alone.

  7. Urgent Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in Patients With Severe Aortic Stenosis and Acute Heart Failure: Procedural and 30-Day Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landes, Uri; Orvin, Katia; Codner, Pablo; Assali, Abid; Vaknin-Assa, Hana; Schwartznberg, Shmuel; Levi, Amos; Shapira, Yaron; Sagie, Alexander; Kornowski, Ran

    2016-06-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is recommended for patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) who are at prohibitive/high risk for surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Patients with severe AS may experience acute decompensated heart failure (HF) that is resistant to medical therapy. We report our TAVI experience in treating patients with unstable AS who require urgent intervention for their aortic valve disease. Patients were restrictively included in the urgent TAVI registry if they were admitted with acute refractory and persistent HF despite medical therapy and had TAVI performed during the same hospital stay. All others were included in the elective TAVI group. Between November 2008 and April 2015, 410 consecutive patients underwent TAVI at our centre-27 (6.6%) urgently. Patients operated on urgently were more likely to be frail and carry higher SAVR mortality risk based on The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Predicted Risk of Mortality/logistic EuroSCORE (LES) measures. Pulmonary edema was the most common clinical presentation. Preprocedural assessment used fewer imaging modalities, yet implantation success remained high and reached 96.3% using an additional valve (valve-within-valve) required in 3 patients, with no difference in periprocedural complications according to the Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 definitions. Although 30-day functional capacity was reduced, patients had similar 30-day mortality and major adverse cardiovascular event rates compared with patients who underwent elective TAVI. Short-term outcome after urgent TAVI appears to be reasonable. For patients with severe AS who experience acute decompensated HF that is recalcitrant to optimal medical therapy and who are at high risk with SAVR, urgent TAVI may be a viable treatment strategy. Larger prospective studies and data on long-term outcomes are needed. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Midterm results of Ross aortic valve replacement: a single-institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, John W; Ruzmetov, Mark; Shahriari, Ali; Rodefeld, Mark D; Mahomed, Yousuf; Turrentine, Mark W

    2009-08-01

    We reviewed our institutional midterm experience to assess autograft and homograft hemodynamics and reoperative frequency after Ross aortic valve replacement. Between June 1993 and January 2009, 212 consecutive patients (mean age, 24.8 +/- 15.5 years; range, 1 month to 67 years) underwent Ross aortic valve replacement; 49% were younger than 19 years old. One hundred forty-two additional procedures were required in 101 of the 212 patients (48%) at the time of the Ross aortic valve replacement. One hundred ninety-three patients had isolated aortic valve disease, and 19 pediatric patients had more complex, multilevel left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. There were 2 early (1%) and 2 late deaths (1%), with a mean follow-up of 7.9 +/- 4.2 years (range, 1 month to 15 years). Actuarial survival at 15 years was 98%. To date 28 patients (13%) have required reoperation. At 15 years, freedom from autograft sinus or ascending aortic dilatation was 79%, autograft dysfunction, 91%, autograft reoperation, 89%, and autograft replacement, 96%. Freedom from pulmonary allograft replacement was 96% at 15 years. The Ross aortic valve replacement can be performed in children and adults with good midterm results. The late complications of autograft regurgitation, sinus or ascending aortic dilatation, can usually be corrected with a valve-sparing root replacement. These complications can often be prevented by (1) aggressive treatment of postoperative systemic hypertension, (2) replacement of a dilated ascending aorta at the initial Ross procedure, or (3) external fixation of the autograft annulus or sinotubular junction. The potential of late autograft insufficiency, ascending aortic and sinus dilatation, or homograft stenosis and insufficiency warrants annual follow-up.

  9. Assessment of coronary artery disease using coronary computed tomography angiography in patients with aortic valve stenosis referred for surgical aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Kofoed, K Fuglsang; Dalsgaard, M

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients referred for aortic valve replacement (AVR) a pre-surgical assessment of coronary artery disease is mandatory to determine the possible need for additional coronary artery bypass grafting. The diagnostic accuracy of coronary computed tomography angiography (coronary CTA) w...... with low age, no chronic obstructive lung disease, NYHA function class...

  10. Efficacy and Safety of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in Aortic Stenosis Patients With Extreme Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orvin, Katia; Assali, Abid; Vaknin-Assa, Hana; Levi, Amos; Greenberg, Gabi; Codner, Pablo; Shapira, Yaron; Sagie, Alex; Kornowski, Ran

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the in-hospital and long-term outcomes of patients at extreme age with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). A total of 276 consecutive patients with a mean age of 82.2 ± 5.0 years with severe symptomatic AS underwent TAVI at our institute. We evaluated periprocedural, in-hospital, and long-term outcomes in all patients aged ≥87 years (the highest 20th percentile of age distribution) and compared them with the less elderly patients. The extremely aged group included 58 patients (21%) ≥87 years (mean age, 89.0 ± 1.9 years; 67.2% women). Baseline EuroSCOREs and STS scores were 19.6 ± 11.2% and 9.4 ± 5.0%, respectively. Nineteen patients (34.5%) were considered frail. Following TAVI, all patients regained New York Heart Association class 1-2 functional capacity. The main periprocedural and in-hospital complications were minor vascular complications, bleeding requiring blood transfusions, and the need for permanent pacemaker. None of the patients suffered from clinical stroke. In comparison to the less elderly patients, there were no significant differences in the rates of periprocedural, in-hospital complications or long-term survival (log rank, 0.87). Meticulously selected patients at extreme age benefit from TAVI with a reasonable overall risk, which does not impact the overall survival or functional status.

  11. Microparticle-Induced Coagulation Relates to Coronary Artery Atherosclerosis in Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Horn

    Full Text Available Circulating microparticles (MPs derived from endothelial cells and blood cells bear procoagulant activity and promote thrombin generation. Thrombin exerts proinflammatory effects mediating the progression of atherosclerosis. Aortic valve stenosis may represent an atherosclerosis-like process involving both the aortic valve and the vascular system. The aim of this study was to investigate whether MP-induced thrombin generation is related to coronary atherosclerosis and aortic valve calcification.In a cross-sectional study of 55 patients with severe aortic valve stenosis, we assessed the coronary calcification score (CAC as indicator of total coronary atherosclerosis burden, and aortic valve calcification (AVC by computed tomography. Thrombin-antithrombin complex (TATc levels were measured as a marker for thrombin formation. Circulating MPs were characterized by flow cytometry according to the expression of established surface antigens and by measuring MP-induced thrombin generation.Patients with CAC score below the median were classified as patients with low CAC, patients with CAC Score above the median as high CAC. In patients with high CAC compared to patients with low CAC we detected higher levels of TATc, platelet-derived MPs (PMPs, endothelial-derived MPs (EMPs and MP-induced thrombin generation. Increased level of PMPs and MP-induced thrombin generation were independent predictors for the severity of CAC. In contrast, AVC Score did not differ between patients with high and low CAC and did neither correlate with MPs levels nor with MP-induced thrombin generation.In patients with severe aortic valve stenosis MP-induced thrombin generation was independently associated with the severity of CAC but not AVC indicating different pathomechanisms involved in coronary artery and aortic valve calcification.

  12. Direct transcatheter aortic valve implantation with self-expandable bioprosthesis: Feasibility and safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorina, Claudia, E-mail: clafiorina@yahoo.it [Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Maffeo, Diego; Curello, Salvatore [Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Lipartiti, Felicia [Division of Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Chizzola, Giuliano [Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); D' Aloia, Antonio [Division of Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Adamo, Marianna [Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Mastropierro, Rosy [Division of Cardiothoracic Anestesiology, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Gavazzi, Emanuele [Department of Radiology, University of Brescia, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Ciccarese, Camilla; Chiari, Ermanna [Division of Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Ettori, Federica [Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy)

    2014-06-15

    Background: Balloon valvuloplasty has been considered a mandatory step of the transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), although it is not without risk. The aim of this work was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of TAVI performed without pre-dilation (direct TAVI) of the stenosed aortic valve. Material and Methods: Between June 2012 and June 2013, 55 consecutive TAVI performed without pre-dilation at our institution using the self-expandable CoreValve prosthesis (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) were analyzed and compared with 45 pre-dilated TAVI performed the previous year. Inclusion criteria were a symptomatic and severe aortic stenosis. Exclusion criteria were defined as presence of pure aortic regurgitation, degenerated surgical bioprosthesis or bicuspid aortic valve and prior procedure of balloon aortic valvuloplasty performed as a bridge to TAVI. Results: High-burden calcification in the device landing zone, assessed by CT scan, was found in most of the patients. The valve size implanted was similar in both groups. Device success was higher in direct TAVI (85% vs. 64%, p = 0.014), mostly driven by a significant lower incidence of paravalvular leak (PVL ≥2; 9% vs. 33%, p = 0.02). Safety combined end point at 30 days was similar in both groups. Conclusion: Compared to TAVI with pre-dilation, direct TAVI is feasible regardless of the presence of bulky calcified aortic valve and the valve size implanted. Device success was higher in direct TAVI, mostly driven by a lower incidence of paravalvular leak. Safety at 30 days was similar in two groups.

  13. Transapical off-pump removal of the native aortic valve: a proof-of-concept animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salizzoni, Stefano; Bajona, Pietro; Zehr, Kenton J; Anderson, William D; Vandenberghe, Stijn; Speziali, Giovanni

    2009-08-01

    This study evaluates the feasibility of off-pump native aortic valve removal in preparation for transapical aortic valve replacement. Off-pump aortic valve replacement is performed by balloon predilatation of the native valve followed by insertion of a stented prosthesis. In patients with calcified annuli and cusps, particulate embolization, suboptimal prosthesis sizing, and perivalvular leaks may occur. Therefore, native valve removal may improve outcomes after transapical aortic valve replacement. The aortic cusps were sequentially removed from 10 pigs in an off-pump procedure. A temporary valve was inserted percutaneously into the ascending aorta to prevent aortic regurgitation. The electrocardiogram, coronary blood flow, and arterial, left atrial, and ventricular pressures were continuously monitored. Removal of the aortic cusps caused a drop in diastolic arterial pressure and its equalization with left ventricular diastolic pressure. Systolic pressure decreased by 13.5%. Left atrial pressure increased by 86.0%. Coronary blood flow decreased by 39.9% and its pattern changed from mostly diastolic to mostly systolic. Electrocardiographic signs of ischemia appeared almost immediately. Percutaneous insertion of a temporary valve in the ascending aorta increased diastolic pressure and caused a tendency toward echocardiographic normalization. Aortic valve removal in a healthy beating heart causes acute massive aortic regurgitation, hemodynamic instability, and the rapid onset of myocardial ischemia. Reduction of left ventricular volume overload, by placement of a temporary valve in the ascending aorta, mitigates myocardial distress, helps stabilize hemodynamic parameters, and may be a useful tool to allow surgical manipulations of the aortic valve and annulus during transapical aortic valve replacement procedures.

  14. When is the Ross operation a good option to treat aortic valve disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Tirone E; Woo, Anna; Armstrong, Susan; Maganti, Manjula

    2010-01-01

    We sought to identify suitable patients for the Ross operation. A cohort of 212 patients (mean age, 34 + or - 9 years; 66% men; 82% with congenital aortic valve disease) underwent the Ross operation and was prospectively followed with clinical evaluations and echocardiographic analysis for 3.1 to 18 years (mean, 10.1 + or - 4.2 years). In addition to longitudinal outcomes determined by means of Kaplan-Meier analysis, Cox regression analysis was used to identify predictors of valve failure. There were 1 operative and 4 late deaths, none of which were valve related. Survival at 15 years was 96.6% + or - 1.5% and similar to that seen in the general population matched for age and sex. There were 20 reoperations: 13 in the pulmonary autograft, 3 in the pulmonary homograft, and 4 others. Freedom from reoperation in the pulmonary autograft at 15 years was 92.1% + or - 2.3%. Aortic insufficiency was the only independent predictor of reoperation. Freedom from moderate or severe aortic insufficiency at 15 years was 89.7%, and greater than mild aortic insufficiency was 63.2%. Male sex, aortic/pulmonary annular mismatch, aortic annulus of 27 mm or larger, and preoperative aortic insufficiency were associated with higher risk of late aortic insufficiency by means of log-rank analysis. Cox regression analysis identified male sex as the only independent predictor of postoperative aortic insufficiency. Freedom from moderate or severe pulmonary insufficiency, peak gradient of 40 mm Hg or greater, or both at 15 years was 70.8% + or - 6.8%, and event-free survival was 81% + or - 3.7%. The Ross operation provided suboptimal results in male patients with aortic insufficiency. The best outcomes were in female patients, those with aortic stenosis, and those with an aortic annulus of less than 27 mm in diameter. Copyright 2010 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Changes in platelet indices in children with bicuspid aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayhan, Aylin Canbolat; Ayhan, Yusuf Izzet; Kalaycık, Ozlem; Timur, Cetin; Yoruk, Asım

    2015-03-01

    Mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet distribution width (PDW) can help diagnose cardiovascular pathologies. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate the changes in platelet (PLT) indices in children diagnosed with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) with mild stenosis and without stenosis to compare patients with mild stenosis with those without stenosis. A total of 73 children diagnosed with BAV (30 patients with mild stenosis and 43 without stenosis) with a mean age 9.73 ± 5.01 years and a control group were included in the study. Mean MPV value was significantly lower in the control group compared with patients with BAV with mild stenosis and patients without stenosis (p = 0.001, and p stenosis than in patients without stenosis (p = 0.049 and p stenosis had a significantly greater mean PDW value compared with patients without stenosis and the control group (p = 0.024 and p stenosis and the control group with respect to mean PDW value (p > 0.05). In conclusion, the results of this study demonsrate that children with BAV either with or without stenosis have increased MPV; the ones with mild stenosis have even greater values than the ones without stenosis. It emphasizes the risk of thrombosis in children with BAV.

  16. Dynamic Energy Loss Characteristics in the Native Aortic Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwai Yap, Choon; Dasi, Laksmi P.; Yoganathan, Ajit P.

    2009-11-01

    Aortic Valve (AV) stenosis if untreated leads to heart failure. From a mechanics standpoint, heart failure implies failure to generate sufficient mechanical power to overcome energy losses in the circulation. Thus energy efficiency-based measures are direct measures of AV disease severity, which unfortunately is not used in current clinical measures of stenosis severity. We present an analysis of the dynamic rate of energy dissipation through the AV from direct high temporal resolution measurements of flow and pressure drop across the AV in a pulsatile left heart setup. Porcine AV was used and measurements at various conditions were acquired: varying stroke volumes; heart rates; and stenosis levels. Energy dissipation waveform has a distinctive pattern of being skewed towards late systole, attributed to the explosive growth of flow instabilities from adverse pressure gradient. Increasing heart rate and stroke volume increases energy dissipation, but does not alter the normalized shape of the dissipation temporal profile. Stenosis increases energy dissipation and also alters the normalized shape of dissipation waveform with significantly more losses during late acceleration phase. Since stenosis produces a departure from the signature dissipation waveform shape, dynamic energy dissipation analysis can be extended into a clinical tool for AV evaluation.

  17. Myocardial hypertrophy and intracardial hemodynamics in children with bicuspid aortic valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. V. Kamenshchyk

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Bicuspid aortic valve is one of the most common congenital heart diseases with low manifestation in childhood and severe consequences in adults that determines the importance in early diagnostics of myocardial changes in this anomaly. According to the literature the polymorphisms in the genes of NFATC family could result both in impaired embriogenetic valves formation and development of postnatal myocardial hypertrophy. The aim of the study was to detect the early changes of intracardial hemodynamics at aortic valve in children with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV and establish their interrelations to the signs of myocardial hypertrophy in these children. Materials and methods: Dopplerograhphic study of basic intracardiac hemodynamics parameters in 38 children with BAV and in 28 children of control group was conducted. The results were processed statistically by Student’s t-test, correlation analysis and multiple regression. Results: In the result of study the moderate concentric left ventricle myocardial hypertrophy development was detected in 62 % of children with BAV which is accompanying to significant increasing of blood flow velocity and pressure gradient at aortic valve. There were not established significant correlations between the parameters of hemodynamics at valve and left ventricle’s posterior wall depth and septum depth whereas the highest inputs of these values were obtained in the left ventricle systolic dimension and volume and less in the hypertrophic signs. Conclusions: In children with BAV the moderate concentric myocardial hypertrophy with significant changes of intracardial hemodynamics at aortic valve takes place with the highest inputs in left ventricle volumetric values The obtained data serves as a substantiation for the treatment and prevention of it further development. bicuspid aortic valve; children; heart hypertrophy; dopplerechocardiography; hemodynamics; regression analysis

  18. Genetically alike Syrian hamsters display both bifoliate and trifoliate aortic valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sans-Coma, Valentín; Carmen Fernández, M; Fernández, Borja; Durán, Ana C; Anderson, Robert H; Arqué, Josep M

    2012-01-01

    The bifoliate, or bicuspid, aortic valve (BAV) is the most frequent congenital cardiac anomaly in man. It is a heritable defect, but its mode of inheritance remains unclear. Previous studies in Syrian hamsters showed that BAVs with fusion of the right and left coronary leaflets are expressions of a trait, the variation of which takes the form of a phenotypic continuum. It ranges from a trifoliate valve with no fusion of the coronary leaflets to a bifoliate root devoid of any raphe. The intermediate stages are represented by trifoliate valves with fusion of the coronary aortic leaflets, and bifoliate valves with raphes. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether the distinct morphological variants rely on a common genotype, or on different genotypes. We examined the aortic valves from 1 849 Syrian hamsters belonging to a family subjected to systematic inbreeding by full-sib mating. The incidence of the different trifoliate aortic valve (TAV) and bifoliate aortic valve (BAV) morphological variants widely varied in the successive inbred generations. TAVs with extensive fusion of the leaflets, and BAVs, accounted for five-sixths of the patterns found in Syrian hamsters considered to be genetically alike or virtually isogenic, with the probability of homozygosity being 0.999 or higher. The remaining one-sixth hamsters had aortic valves with a tricuspid design, but in most cases the right and left coronary leaflets were slightly fused. Results of crosses between genetically alike hamsters, with the probability of homozygosity being 0.989 or higher, revealed no significant association between the valvar phenotypes in the parents and their offspring. Our findings are consistent with the notion that the BAVs of the Syrian hamster are expressions of a quantitative trait subject to polygenic inheritance. They suggest that the genotype of the virtually isogenic animals produced by systematic inbreeding greatly predisposes to the development of anomalous valves, be they

  19. Updated standardized endpoint definitions for transcatheter aortic valve implantation: The Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 consensus document

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.P. Kappetein (Arie Pieter); S.J. Head (Stuart); P. Généreux (Philippe); N. Piazza (Nicolo); N.M. van Mieghem (Nicolas); E.H. Blackstone (Eugene); T.G. Brott (Thomas); D.J. Cohen (David J.); D.E. Cutlip (Donald); G.A. van Es (Gerrit Anne); R.T. Hahn (Rebecca); A.J. Kirtane (Ajay); M. Krucoff (Mitchell); S. Kodali (Susheel); M.J. Mack (Michael); R. Mehran (Roxana); J. Rodés-Cabau (Josep); P. Vranckx (Pascal); J.G. Webb (John); S.W. Windecker (Stephan); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); M.B. Leon (Martin)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: The aim of the current Valvular Academic Research Consortium (VARC)-2 initiative was to revisit the selection and definitions of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI)- clinical endpoints to make them more suitable to the present and future needs of clinical trials.

  20. Allogenic heart valve bank in the Department of Cardiovascular Surgery and Transplantology of Jagiellonian University in Cracow - 23 years experience in the treatment of aortic valve or aortic root diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoliński, J; Marek, G; Marcinkowska, Z; Jaskier, M; Barecka, D; Bartuś, K; Kapelak, B; Sadowski, J; Dziatkowiak, A

    2006-01-01

    Allogenic aortic valves are widely used in case of native aortic valve or root disease as well as failed prosthetic valves with great success. At the Department of Cardiovascular Surgery and Transplantology of the Jagiellonian University in Cracow, aortic valve or aortic root replacement with allogenic aortic valve has been performed for 23 years. Allogenic heart valve bank was founded in 1980. In the bank we prepare both aortic allografts for adult cardiac surgical procedures and pulmonary allografts that are mostly used for repair of congenital heart disease.Allogenic aortic valves implantation was usually considered in our clinic for older patients, patients with infective endocarditis of the native or prosthetic valve, young women in reproductive age and patients with Marfan syndrome. Allografts exhibit excellent clinical performance and acceptable durability with no early failure if properly inserted. Between 1980 and 1992, allografts were obtained only from cadavers during routine autopsies. More than 10% of prepared allografts were exported to other cardiac surgery centres in Poland and foreign countries. Aortic valve replacement using allogenic aortic valves can be performed with acceptable mortality and good long-term results. The procedure although surgically more challenging has the advantage of not requiring anticoagulation therapy, hemodynamic performance of the allogenic valve is excellent, it demonstrates freedom from thromboembolism and infective endocarditis. We would like to emphasize the importance and advantages of the fact that allogenic heart valve bank is placed in the department of cardiovascular surgery and it is able to supply the department in heart valve allografts 24 h a day.

  1. A giant myxoma originating from the aortic valve causing severe left ventricular tract obstruction: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prifti, Edvin; Ademaj, Fadil; Kajo, Efrosina; Baboci, Arben

    2015-04-16

    The left ventricular localization of a myxoma is very rare, usually arising from the interventricular septum close to the left ventricular outflow tract, the mitral valve, the ventricular wall and extremely rarely the aortic valve. A 13-year-old male was admitted due to dyspnea and angina. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed left ventricular outflow tract obstruction with a mean gradient of 58 mmHg, and a mobile mass measuring 65×25 mm originating from the ventricular surface of the aortic valve was identified. The patient underwent urgent surgical excision and aortic valve replacement. Histopathological examination of the mass confirmed the diagnosis of a myxoma. In conclusion, a myxoma originating from the aortic valve remains a very rare localization. Total resection associated with aortic valve replacement seems to offer an excellent outcome.

  2. Presence of B cells within aortic valves in patients with aortic stenosis: Relation to severity of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natorska, Joanna; Marek, Grzegorz; Sadowski, Jerzy; Undas, Anetta

    2016-01-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) shares several similarities with atherosclerosis. Recent reports showed that B cells are implicated in atherosclerosis progression through macrophage-B cells bidirectional interaction. We aimed to study the in loco presence of B cells within aortic valves and to determine its modulators. Thirty-seven patients with severe AS were studied. Immunohistochemistry was performed on valve leaflets using antibodies against CD20, B cell-activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family receptor (BAFF-R) and CD68. Plasma inflammatory markers were also determined. The B cells were detected within aortic leaflets from 5 to 31/mm(2) (17.9±11.6/mm(2)). Double-staining showed that 27±13.5% of B cells express BAFF-R. There were positive correlations between the number of B cells and macrophages (r=0.45, p=0.018), and between macrophages and B cell-associated BAFF-R expression (r=0.66, p=0.002). The number of B cells was associated with the valve calcification (r=0.41, p=0.039), and with the maximum transvalvular gradient (r=0.63, p=0.02). The BAFF-R expression was positively correlated with maximum transvalvular gradient (r=0.39, p=0.031) and negatively with aortic valve area (r=-0.41, p=0.048). There were no correlations between the number of B cells and plasma markers. It might be hypothesized that, like in atherosclerosis, increasing number of B cells within aortic valves may accelerate inflammation and thus potentiate the progression of AS. Copyright © 2015 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Resource utilization and procedure-related costs associated with transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Holger; Boleckova, Jana

    2017-06-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an alternative to surgical valve replacement for patients with aortic stenosis (AS). This study assessed the impact of changing from a self-expandable (SE) valve to a balloon-expandable (BE) valve on healthcare resource use and procedural costs in a population of inoperable AS patients. In this retrospective single center study, data for 195 patients who received either an SE or a BE valve between 2010-2014 were collected. Procedural and post-procedural healthcare resource use and cost parameters were determined for the two groups. The study showed that overall procedural time, including time required by medical personnel, was significantly shorter for TAVI using a BE compared with an SE valve. Post-surgery, patients in the BE valve group had significantly shorter hospital stays than the SE valve group, including significantly fewer days spent in the intensive care unit (ICU). Additionally, trends towards reduced 30-day mortality, incidence of new permanent pacemaker implantation, and incidence of blood transfusion were observed in the BE valve group compared with the SE valve group. Finally, total procedural costs were 24% higher in the SE compared with the BE valve group. The BE valve data were acquired in a single year, whereas the SE valve data were from a 5-year period. However, a year-by-year analysis of patient characteristics and study outcomes for the SE valve group showed few significant differences over this 5-year period. Overall, changing from an SE to a BE valve for TAVI in patients with severe AS reduced both healthcare resource use and procedure-related costs, while maintaining patient safety. For healthcare providers, this could increase efficiency and capacity within the healthcare system, with the added advantage of reducing costs.

  4. Transapical implantation of a novel self-expanding sutureless aortic valve prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalder, Mario; Suri, Rakesh M; Kraehenbuehl, Eva S; Hellige, Gerrit; Wenaweser, Peter; Zobrist, Claudia; Schaff, Harzell V; Carrel, Thierry P

    2010-03-01

    To date, transapical aortic valve implantation has required a balloon-expandable stented valve prosthesis. More recently, a novel self-expanding sutureless stented bovine pericardial prosthesis has been developed which allows rapid aortic valve replacement via an open transaortic approach in humans. The aim of this animal study was to develop a reliable protocol to facilitate the transapical implantation of this self-expanding valve in a porcine model. Off-pump transapical aortic valve implantation was performed through a left mini-thoracotomy using a bovine pericardial valve mounted on a self-expandable nitinol stent of size 21 mm and 23 mm in 11 pigs (average weight 60 kg). The crimped valve was introduced through the left ventricular apex using a flexible and steerable delivery sheath, using a three-step technique. Biplane fluoroscopy and transesophageal echocardiography were simultaneously used for guidance. Successful adjustment of alignment along three axes prior to deployment of the valve was accomplished in each animal. Deployments were performed during a period of rapid pacing. All valves were successfully deployed and functioned normally following transapical removal of the delivery system. Paravalvular leak was documented in one case (9.1%) due to prosthetic misalignment. There was no evidence of valve migration. Correct anatomic seating was confirmed during post-procedure necropsy. Successful transapical implantation of a novel self-expandable bovine pericardial valve was accomplished in 11 animals, without cardiopulmonary bypass. A flexible, steerable delivery system with a three-step release mechanism allowed precise positioning of the valve with a low rate of paravalvular leakage, and excellent device stability.

  5. Factors affecting left ventricular remodeling after valve replacement for aortic stenosis. An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mhagna Zen

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although a small percentage of patients with critical aortic stenosis do not develop left ventricle hypertrophy, increased ventricular mass is widely observed in conditions of increased afterload. There is growing epidemiological evidence that hypertrophy is associated with excess cardiac mortality and morbidity not only in patients with arterial hypertension, but also in those undergoing aortic valve replacement. Valve replacement surgery relieves the aortic obstruction and prolongs the life of many patients, but favorable or adverse left ventricular remodeling is affected by a large number of factors whose specific roles are still a subject of debate. Age, gender, hemodynamic factors, prosthetic valve types, myocyte alterations, interstitial structures, blood pressure control and ethnicity can all influence the process of left ventricle mass regression, and myocardial metabolism and coronary artery circulation are also involved in the changes occurring after aortic valve replacement. The aim of this overview is to analyze these factors in the light of our experience, elucidate the important question of prosthesis-patient mismatch by considering the method of effective orifice area, and discuss surgical timings and techniques that can improve the management of patients with aortic valve stenosis and maximize the probability of mass regression.

  6. Incidence and Impact of Patient-Prosthesis Mismatch in Isolated Aortic Valve Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumani, Selman; Likaj, Ermal; Kacani, Andi; Dibra, Laureta; Petrela, Elizana; Beca, Vera; Refatllari, Ali

    2015-12-15

    The mains topics of this work are the incidence of patient-prosthesis mismatch and the influence in the early results of isolated aortic valve surgery. In 193 patients isolated aortic valve surgery was performed. The study population was divided in three subgroups: 20 patients with severe, 131 patients with moderate and 42 patients without patient-prosthesis mismatch. The indexed effective orifice area was used to define the subgroups. Operative mortality and perioperative complications were considered the indicators of the early results of aortic valve surgery. The incidence of severe and moderate patient-prosthesis mismatch was respectively 10.3% and 67.8%. Hospital mortality and perioperative complications were: mortality 5% vs. 3.1% vs. 2.4% (p = 0.855), low cardiac output 5% vs. 6.9% vs. 4.8% (p = 0.861); pulmonary complications 5% vs. 3.1 vs. 0.0% (p = 0.430); exploration for bleeding 5% vs. 0.8% vs. 2.4% (p = 0.319); atrial fibrillation 30% vs. 19.8% vs. 11.9% (p = 0.225); wound infection 5% vs. 0.8% vs. 0.00% (p = 0.165), respectively for the group with severe, moderate and without patient-prosthesis mismatch. Patient-prosthesis mismatch is a common occurrence in aortic valve surgery. This phenomenon does not affect the early results of aortic valve surgery.

  7. Anesthetic management for combined mitral valve replacement and aortic valve repair in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Jiapeng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenesis imperfecta is a rare disorder of connective tissues and presents multiple challenges, including difficult airway, hyperthermia, coagulopathy and respiratory dysfunction, for anesthesiologists, especially during cardiac surgery. We present anesthetic management of a patient with osteogenesis impertecta during double valve surgery. Dexmedetomidine infusion minimized the risks of malignant hyperthermia. Glidescope and in-line stabilization facilitated endotracheal intubation and protected his oral structures and cervical spine. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE diagnosed a flail A3 segment and redundant left coronary cusp causing mitral and aortic regurgitation. The mitral valve was replaced and the aortic valve repaired. Coagulopathy was corrected according to comprehensive coagulation analysis. Glidescope, dexmedetomidine, coagulation analysis and TEE could facilitate anesthetic management in these patients.

  8. 3D printing based on cardiac CT assists anatomic visualization prior to transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripley, Beth; Kelil, Tatiana; Cheezum, Michael K; Goncalves, Alexandra; Di Carli, Marcelo F; Rybicki, Frank J; Steigner, Mike; Mitsouras, Dimitrios; Blankstein, Ron

    2016-01-01

    3D printing is a promising technique that may have applications in medicine, and there is expanding interest in the use of patient-specific 3D models to guide surgical interventions. To determine the feasibility of using cardiac CT to print individual models of the aortic root complex for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) planning as well as to determine the ability to predict paravalvular aortic regurgitation (PAR). This retrospective study included 16 patients (9 with PAR identified on blinded interpretation of post-procedure trans-thoracic echocardiography and 7 age, sex, and valve size-matched controls with no PAR). 3D printed models of the aortic root were created from pre-TAVR cardiac computed tomography data. These models were fitted with printed valves and predictions regarding post-implant PAR were made using a light transmission test. Aortic root 3D models were highly accurate, with excellent agreement between annulus measurements made on 3D models and those made on corresponding 2D data (mean difference of -0.34 mm, 95% limits of agreement: ± 1.3 mm). The 3D printed valve models were within 0.1 mm of their designed dimensions. Examination of the fit of valves within patient-specific aortic root models correctly predicted PAR in 6 of 9 patients (6 true positive, 3 false negative) and absence of PAR in 5 of 7 patients (5 true negative, 2 false positive). Pre-TAVR 3D-printing based on cardiac CT provides a unique patient-specific method to assess the physical interplay of the aortic root and implanted valves. With additional optimization, 3D models may complement traditional techniques used for predicting which patients are more likely to develop PAR. Copyright © 2016 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Simultaneous Transcatheter Intervention for Coarctation of the Aorta and Bicuspid Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Yukiko; Tada, Norio; Masuda, Takahiko; Hata, Masaki

    2017-07-01

    Coarctation of the aorta (CoA) is a relatively common congenital heart anomaly, and bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is a common congenital heart disease that coexists with CoA. In larger children and adults with CoA, transcatheter intervention has gained acceptance, but for surgical high-risk patients with aortic stenosis, the use of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has been established. Recently, although favorable data have been reported for TAVI when treating BAV, simultaneous transcatheter intervention for CoA and BAV will prove to be a challenge because of the unique anatomy involved requires multiple procedural steps and also has problems of site access. Herein is reported a successful case of simultaneous thoracic endovascular repair (TEVAR) for CoA and transfemoral TAVI for congenital BAV dysfunction. A 62-year-old male with CoA and congenital BAV with severe aortic stenosis and aortic regurgitation had NYHA class IV heart failure symptoms. Because of the patient's extremely poor left ventricular function, the authors' heart team decided to perform simultaneous TEVAR for CoA and transfemoral TAVI. After deployment of a 32 mm stent graft, a 29 mm SAPIEN 3 valve (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA) was successfully deployed through the stent graft. This resulted in no significant pressure gradient within the aorta, and no aortic regurgitation. Video 1: Cineradiography showing delivery of the Edwards Commander delivery system through the stent graft. Video 2: Final aortography showing no residual aortic regurgitation.

  10. Increased hsCRP is associated with higher risk of aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blyme, Adam; Nielsen, Olav W.; Asferg, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate relations between inflammation and aortic valve stenosis (AS) by measuring high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, at baseline (hsCRP0) and after 1 year (hsCRP1) and exploring associations with aortic valve replacement (AVR). Design We examined 1423 patients from...... the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study. Results During first year of treatment, hsCRP was reduced both in patients later receiving AVR (2.3 [0.9–4.9] to 1.8 [0.8–5.4] mg/l, p CRP1...... predicted later AVR (HR = 1.17, p CRP0 (HR = 0.96, p = 0.33), aortic valve area (AVA) and other risk factors. A higher rate of AVR was observed in the group with high hsCRP0 and an increase during the first year (AVRhighCRP0CRP1inc=47.3% versus AVRhighCRP0CRP1dec=27.5%, p

  11. Alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking and incidence of aortic valve stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, S C; Wolk, A; Bäck, M

    2017-10-01

    Alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking are modifiable lifestyle factors with important impact on public health. It is unclear whether these factors influence the risk of aortic valve stenosis (AVS). To investigate the associations of alcohol consumption and smoking, including smoking intensity and time since cessation, with AVS incidence in two prospective cohorts. This analysis was based on data from the Swedish Mammography Cohort and the Cohort of Swedish Men, comprising 69 365 adults without cardiovascular disease at baseline. Participants were followed for AVS incidence and death by linkage to the Swedish National Patient and Causes of Death Registers. Hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by Cox proportional hazards regression. Over a mean follow-up of 15.3 years, 1249 cases of AVS (494 in women and 755 in men) were recorded. Compared with never drinkers of alcohol (lifelong abstainers), the risk of AVS was significantly lower in current light drinkers (1-6 drinks per week [1 drink = 12 g alcohol]; multivariable HR 0.82; 95% CI: 0.68-0.99). The risk of AVS increased with increasing smoking intensity. Compared with never smokers, the HR was 1.46 (95% CI: 1.16-1.85) in current smokers of ≥30 pack-years. Former smokers who had quit smoking 10 or more years previously had similar risk for AVS as never smokers. This study suggests that current light alcohol consumption is associated with a lower risk of AVS, and indicates that the association between smoking and AVS risk is reversible. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Internal Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association for Publication of The Journal of Internal Medicine.

  12. CMR assessment after a transapical-transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biere, Loïc, E-mail: lobiere@chu-angers.fr [L’UNAM Université, Angers (France); Université d’Angers, Laboratoire Cardioprotection, Remodelage et Thrombose, CHU d’Angers, Service de Cardiologie, Angers (France); Pinaud, Frédéric [L’UNAM Université, Angers (France); Université d’Angers, CHU d’Angers, Service de Chirurgie Cardio-vasculaire et Thoracique, Angers (France); UMR-CNRS 6214, INSERM 1083, faculté de médecine, Angers (France); Delépine, Stéphane; Grall, Sylvain; Viot, Nathalie; Mateus, Victor; Rouleau, Frédéric [L’UNAM Université, Angers (France); Université d’Angers, Laboratoire Cardioprotection, Remodelage et Thrombose, CHU d’Angers, Service de Cardiologie, Angers (France); Corbeau, Jean-Jacques [Université d’Angers, CHU d’Angers, Département d’anesthésie-réanimation, Angers (France); Prunier, Fabrice [L’UNAM Université, Angers (France); Université d’Angers, Laboratoire Cardioprotection, Remodelage et Thrombose, CHU d’Angers, Service de Cardiologie, Angers (France); and others

    2014-02-15

    Aims: To describe the time course of myocardial scarring after transapical-transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TA-TAVI) with the Edwards SAPIEN XT™ and the Edwards SAPIEN™ prosthesis in a 3-month follow-up study using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). Methods: In 20 TA-TAVI patients, CMR was performed at discharge and 3 months (3M). Cine-MRI was used for left ventricular (LV) functional assessment, and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging was employed for detecting the presence of myocardial scarring. Special attention was given to any artifacts caused by the prosthesis, which were consequently defined using a three-grade artifact scale. Results: We systematically reported the presence of small LGE hyperintensity relating to the apical segment, with no variation found between discharge and 3 M (2.8 ± 1.6 g vs. 2.35 ± 1.1 g). LV ejection fraction, end-diastolic, and end-systolic volumes did not significantly vary. A small area of apical akinesia was observed, with no improvement at follow-up. Whereas the Edwards SAPIEN XT™ prosthesis and the Edwards SAPIEN™ prosthesis are both constituted by metallic stenting structure, the Edwards SAPIEN™ was responsible for a larger signal void, thus potentially limiting the diagnostic performance of CMR. Conclusions: CMR may be performed safely in the context of TA-TAVI. The presence of a very small apical infarction correlating with focal akinesia was observed. As expected, the Edwards SAPIEN XT™ prosthesis was shown to be particularly suitable for CMR assessment.

  13. Determination of oxidation state of iron in normal and pathologically altered human aortic valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czapla-Masztafiak, J. [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Kraków (Poland); Lis, G.J.; Gajda, M.; Jasek, E. [Department of Histology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kopernika 7, 31-034 Kraków (Poland); Czubek, U. [Department of Coronary Disease, Jagiellonian University Medical College, John Paul II Hospital, Prądnicka 80, 31-202 Kraków (Poland); Bolechała, F. [Department of Forensic Medicine, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Grzegórzecka 16, 31-531 Kraków (Poland); Borca, C. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Kwiatek, W.M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Kraków (Poland)

    2015-12-01

    In order to investigate changes in chemical state of iron in normal and pathologically altered human aortic valves X-ray absorption spectroscopy was applied. Since Fe is suspected to play detrimental role in aortic valve stenosis pathogenesis the oxidation state of this element has been determined. The experimental material consisted of 10 μm sections of valves excised during routine surgery and from autopsies. The experiment was performed at the MicroXAS beamline of the SLS synchrotron facility in Villigen (Switzerland). The Fe K-edge XANES spectra obtained from tissue samples were carefully analyzed and compared with the spectra of reference compounds containing iron in various chemical structures. The analysis of absorption edge position and shape of the spectra revealed that both chemical forms of iron are presented in valve tissue but Fe{sup 3+} is the predominant form. Small shift of the absorption edge toward higher energy in the spectra from stenotic valve samples indicates higher content of the Fe{sup 3+} form in pathological tissue. Such a phenomenon suggests the role of Fenton reaction and reactive oxygen species in the etiology of aortic valve stenosis. The comparison of pre-edge regions of XANES spectra for control and stenotic valve tissue confirmed no differences in local symmetry or spin state of iron in analyzed samples.

  14. Exercise Training in a Patient With a Left Ventricular Assist Device and Large Aortic Valve Thrombus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuliya, Mijiti; Peyrot, Sandrine; Radu, Costin; Deux, Jean-François; Ben Elhaj, Habib; Lellouche, Nicolas; Damy, Thibaud; Guendouz, Soulef; Gellen, Barnabas

    2017-11-01

    An aortic valve thrombus (AVT) is a rare complication after HeartMate II implantation. In a 44-year-old man, a large AVT was discovered 6 weeks after implantation of a HeartMate II for severe dilated cardiomyopathy. The aortic valve was permanently closed. After a followup of 3 months without embolic events, the patient started a cardiac rehabilitation (CR) program involving aerobic exercise, resistance exercises, group gymnastics, and relaxation exercise, and completed the program without any complications, resulting in a significant functional benefit. CR might not be systematically contraindicated in patients with HeartMate II and an AVT, in particular, if there is no opening of the aortic valve at rest.

  15. Mechanical valves versus the Ross procedure for aortic valve replacement in children: propensity-adjusted comparison of long-term outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsoufi, Bahaaldin; Al-Halees, Zohair; Manlhiot, Cedric; McCrindle, Brian W; Al-Ahmadi, Mamdouh; Sallehuddin, Ahmed; Canver, Charles C; Bulbul, Ziad; Joufan, Mansoor; Fadel, Bahaa

    2009-02-01

    We aimed to identify characteristics differentiating children undergoing aortic valve replacement by using mechanical prostheses versus the Ross procedure and to compare survival and the need for aortic valve reoperation after each procedure. From 1983 to 2004, 346 children underwent aortic valve replacement (215 underwent the Ross procedure and 131 underwent placement of a mechanical prosthesis). Factors associated with procedure choice were used to construct a propensity score for use as a covariate in regression models to adjust for potential confounding by indication. Patients undergoing the Ross procedure were younger, more likely to have a congenital cause, and less likely to have a rheumatic or connective tissue cause. They had a lower frequency of regurgitation, required more annular enlargement, and had less concomitant cardiac surgery. Competing-risk analysis showed that 16 years after aortic valve replacement, 20% of patients had died without subsequent aortic valve replacement, 25% underwent second aortic valve replacement, and 55% remained alive without further replacement. After propensity adjustment, factors associated with early-phase death included mechanical valves and a nonrheumatic cause. Mechanical valves were also associated with constant-phase mortality. Repeated aortic valve replacement was associated with the Ross procedure and a rheumatic cause. Both factors were also associated with all-cause cardiac reoperation. In children receiving mechanical prostheses, younger age and smaller valve size were significant risk factors for death. Freedom from homograft replacement after the Ross procedure was 82% at 16 years of follow-up. Results from this study showed good outcomes and an acceptable complication rate with both valve choices. Given the significantly increased risk of early and late death in younger children receiving smaller mechanical valves, the Ross procedure confers survival advantage in this age group at the expense of increased

  16. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Futility Risk Model Development and Validation Among Treated Patients With Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zusman, Oren; Kornowski, Ran; Witberg, Guy; Lador, Adi; Orvin, Katia; Levi, Amos; Assali, Abid; Vaknin-Assa, Hana; Sharony, Ram; Shapira, Yaron; Sagie, Alexander; Landes, Uri

    2017-12-15

    Risk-benefit assessment for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is still evolving. A sizeable group of patients do not fully benefit from intervention despite a technically successful procedure. All patients who underwent TAVI with device success and with no Valve Academic Research Consortium (VARC)-2 defined complications were included. Various demographic data, clinical details, and echocardiographic findings were examined. The outcome was defined as 1-year composite of mortality, stroke, lack of functional-class improvement (by New York Heart Association class), and readmissions (≥1 month after the procedure). Logistic regression was used to fit the prediction model. We used a 10-fold cross-validation to validate our results. Of 543 patients, 435 met the inclusion criteria. The mean age was 82 (±6.5) years, 43% were men, and the mean Society of Thoracic Surgeons score was 6.6 (±4.7). At 1 year, 66 of 435 patients (15%) experienced the study end point. The final logistic regression model included diabetes, baseline New York Heart Association functional class, diastolic dysfunction, need for diuretics, mean gradient, hemoglobin level, and creatinine level. The area under the curve was 0.73 and was reduced to 0.71 after validation, with a 97% specificity using a single cutoff. Dividing to low-, medium-, and high-risk groups for futility produced a corresponding prevalence of 6%, 19%, and 59% futility. A web application for the prediction model was developed and provided. In conclusion, this prediction score may provide an important insight and may facilitate identification of patients who, despite a technically successful and uncomplicated procedure, have risk that may outweigh the benefit of a contemplated TAVI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Fertile eunuch syndrome in association with biventricular noncompaction, bicuspid aortic valve, severe aortic stenosis, and talipes equinovarus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Kazim Serhan; Osmonov, Damirbek; Altay, Servet; Gungor, Baris; Eren, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium is a congenital cardiomyopathy characterized by prominent ventricular trabeculations and deep intertrabecular recesses. In most cases, noncompaction is an isolated disease confined to the left ventricular myocardium. Fertile eunuch syndrome is a hypogonadotropic hormonal disorder in which the levels of testosterone and follicle-stimulating hormone are low. We report a case of biventricular noncompaction in association with bicuspid aortic valve and severe aortic stenosis in a 42-year-old man who was diagnosed with talipes equinovarus and fertile eunuch syndrome during childhood.

  18. Initial non-opioid based anesthesia in a parturient having severe aortic stenosis undergoing cesarean section with aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrata Podder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy in presence of severe aortic stenosis (AS causes worsening of symptoms needing further intervention. In the advanced stages of pregnancy, some patients may even require aortic valve replacement (AVR and cesarean delivery in the same sitting. Opioid based general anesthesia for combined lower segment cesarean section (LSCS with AVR has been described. However, the use of opioid may lead to fetal morbidity and need of respiratory support for the baby. We describe successful anesthetic management for LSCS with AVR in a >33 week gravida with severe AS and congestive heart failure. We avoided opioids till delivery of the baby AVR; the delivered neonate showed a normal APGAR score.

  19. Lipoprotein(a-Associated Molecules Are Prominent Components in Plasma and Valve Leaflets in Calcific Aortic Valve Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Torzewski, MD

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The LPA gene is the only monogenetic risk factor for calcific aortic valve stenosis (CAVS. Oxidized phospholipids (OxPL and lysophosphatidic acid generated by autotaxin (ATX from OxPL are pro-inflammatory. Aortic valve leaflets categorized pathologically from both ATX–apolipoprotein B and ATX–apolipoprotein(a were measureable in plasma. Lipoprotein(a (Lp[a], ATX, OxPL, and malondialdehyde epitopes progressively increased in immunostaining (p < 0.001 for all. Six species of OxPL and lysophosphatidic acid were identified after extraction from valve leaflets. The presence of a constellation of pathologically linked, Lp(a-associated molecules in plasma and in aortic valve leaflets of patients with CAVS suggest that Lp(a is a key etiologic factor in CAVS. Key Words: aortic valve stenosis, autotaxin, inflammation, Lp(a, oxidation-specific epitopes

  20. Intermittent intravalvar regurgitation of a mechanical aortic valve ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mechanical prosthetic valve regurgitation may be either periprosthetic or intraprosthetic. The later is usually mild, occurring in the majority of normally functioning valves and is due to the 'regurgitant flow' closing the valve. An unusual case is reported of intermitent intraprosthetic regurgitation through a normally functioning ...

  1. Aortic valve replacement for a patient with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas, Serpil; Donmez, Arzu Antal; Kirali, Kaan; Alp, Mete H; Yakut, Cevat

    2005-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia and deficiency of glucose-6-phosphate deyhdrogenase (G6PD) result in severe hemolysis with different mechanisms. In patients with both pathologies, the effects of cardiopulmonary bypass on red blood cells and thrombocytes demand special care before and after open heart surgery. We evaluated the preoperative management and postoperative care of a patient with severe aortic insufficiency associated with G6PD deficiency and autoimmune hemolytic anemia who underwent aortic valve replacement.

  2. Capnocytophaga canimorsus endocarditis with root abscess in a patient with a bicuspid aortic valve

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    Michèle Hamon

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis caused by a zoonotic micro organism is a rare clinical condition. Capnocytophaga canimorsus is a commensal bacterium living in the saliva of dogs and cats which produces rarely reported endocarditis whose incidence may be underestimated, considering its failure to grow on standard media. We reported the case of a 65-year-old man with bicuspid aortic valve endocarditis and multiple abscesses of the aortic wall caused by the canine bacteria C. canimorsus.

  3. Modern Use of Echocardiography in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: an Up-Date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldararu, Cristina; Balanescu, Serban

    2016-12-01

    Echocardiography is the cornerstone in the diagnosis of any valvular heart disease. The accurate diagnosis of aortic stenosis, the left ventricle function and the other heart valves evaluation are currently done by ultrasound alone. Prosthetic valve choice and dimensions prior to implantation can be done solely by proper use of echocardiography. The emergence of new methods to cure aortic stenosis such as trans-catheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) emphasized the diagnostic value of cardiac ultrasound. The usefulness of echocardiography in TAVR can be divided in the baseline assessment (common to patients treated by conventional surgery), intra-procedural guidance of valve deployment and post-procedural follow-up. In the baseline diagnostic work-up echocardiography should allow proper assessment of low-gradient severe aortic stenosis and especially of "low-flow, low-gradient" aortic stenosis, as far the benefit of any valve intervention in these cases may be overshadowed by persistent ventricular dysfunction. "Classic" TAVR is performed with a trans-esophageal echocardiography probe in place, but recently intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) was advocated to reduce the need for general anesthesia. "Minimalist TAVR approach" recommends no echo-guidance and valve implantation by angiography alone. Post-TAVR echo assessment should allow prompt recognition of early complications and the severity of para-valvular leaks. Long term follow-up by echocardiography assesses prosthetic valve function, left ventricular functional recovery and the impact of the procedure on associated conditions (mitral regurgitation, pulmonary hypertension or tricuspid regurgitation). This article emphasizes the role of the cardiologist with ultrasound skills in the assessment of patients addressed to TAVR.

  4. Primary Mitral Valve Regurgitation Outcome in Patients With Severe Aortic Stenosis 1 Year After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation: Echocardiographic Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florentino, Thiago Marinho; Bihan, David Le; Abizaid, Alexandre Antonio Cunha; Cedro, Alexandre Vianna; Corrêa, Amably Pessoa; Santos, Alexandre Roginski Mendes Dos; Souza, Alexandre Costa; Bignoto, Tiago Costa; Sousa, José Eduardo Moraes Rego; Sousa, Amanda Guerra de Moraes Rego

    2017-07-10

    Mitral valve regurgitation (MR), present in up to 74% of the patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS), can be a negative prognostic factor when moderate or severe. The outcome of MR after percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and predictors associated with that outcome have not been well established in the literature. To assess the outcome of primary MR in patients submitted to TAVI and to identify associated factors. Observational study of patients with symptomatic severe AS submitted to TAVI from January 2009 to April 2015 at two specialized centers. Echocardiographic outcome was assessed with data collected before and 1 year after TAVI. Of the 91 patients with MR submitted to TAVI and followed up for at least 12 months, 67 (73.6%) had minimum/mild MR before the procedure and 24 (26.4%) had moderate/severe MR. Of those with minimum/mild MR, 62 (92.5%) had no change in the MR grade (p literatura. Avaliar a evolução da IM primária em pacientes submetidos ao TAVI e identificar fatores associados a essa evolução. Realizou-se um estudo observacional em pacientes com EA grave sintomática, submetidos ao TAVI no período de janeiro de 2009 a abril de 2015 em dois centros especializados. Foram avaliados desfechos ecocardiográficos com dados antes e 1 ano após a intervenção. Dos 91 pacientes com IM que realizaram TAVI e tinham acompanhamento de pelo menos 12 meses, 67 (73,6%) apresentavam IM mínima ou discreta antes da realização do procedimento e 24 (26,4%), IM moderada ou grave. Entre os com IM mínima ou discreta, 62 (92,5%) não apresentaram mudança no grau de refluxo (p < 0,001) e 5 (7,5%) tiveram piora. Entre os com IM moderada ou grave, 8 (33,3%) permaneceram na mesma classe e 16 (66,7%) tiveram melhora (p = 0,076). Pacientes com IM moderada ou grave que melhoraram o grau de insuficiência apresentavam menores valores de EuroSCORE II (p = 0,023) e STS morbidade (p = 0,027), quando comparados aos que continuaram na mesma classe

  5. Resting heart rate and risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in asymptomatic aortic stenosis: the SEAS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, Anders M; Bang, Casper N; Berg, Ronan M G; Egstrup, Kenneth; Rossebø, Anne B; Boman, Kurt; Nienaber, Christoph A; Ray, Simon; Gohlke-Baerwolf, Christa; Nielsen, Olav W; Okin, Peter M; Devereux, Richard B; Køber, Lars; Wachtell, Kristian

    2015-02-01

    An elevated resting heart rate (RHR) may be an early sign of cardiac failure, but its prognostic value during watchful waiting in asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) is largely unknown. RHR was determined by annual ECGs in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study of asymptomatic mild-to-moderate AS patients. Primary endpoint in this substudy was major cardiovascular events (MCEs) and secondary outcomes its individual components. Multivariable Cox-models using serially-measured RHR were used to examine the prognostic impact of RHR per se. 1563 patients were followed for a mean of 4.3years (6751 patient-years of follow-up), 553 (35%) MCEs occurred, 10% (n=151) died, including 75 cardiovascular deaths. In multivariable analysis, baseline RHR was independently associated with MCEs (HR 1.1 per 10min(-1) faster, 95% CI: 1.0-1.3) and cardiovascular mortality (HR 1.3 per 10min(-1) faster, 95% CI: 1.0-1.7, both p≤0.03). Updating RHR with annual in-study reexaminations, time-varying RHR was highly associated with excess MCEs (HR 1.1 per 10min(-1) faster, 95% CI: 1.1-1.3) and cardiovascular mortality (HR 1.4 per 10min(-1) faster, 95% CI: 1.2-1.7, both p≤0.006). The association of RHR with MCEs and cardiovascular mortality was not dependent on atrial fibrillation status (both p≥0.06 for interaction). RHR is independently associated with MCEs and cardiovascular death in asymptomatic AS (Clinicaltrials.gov; unique identifier NCT00092677). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Natural history of subclinical leaflet thrombosis affecting motion in bioprosthetic aortic valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergaard, Lars; De Backer, Ole; Kofoed, Klaus F

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Four-dimensional volume-rendered computed tomography (4DCT) has demonstrated instances of hypo-attenuating leaflet thickening (HALT) with or without hypo-attenuation affecting motion (HAM) after transcatheter and surgical aortic valve implantation (TAVI, SAVR). The temporal pattern of evolu......Aims: Four-dimensional volume-rendered computed tomography (4DCT) has demonstrated instances of hypo-attenuating leaflet thickening (HALT) with or without hypo-attenuation affecting motion (HAM) after transcatheter and surgical aortic valve implantation (TAVI, SAVR). The temporal pattern...

  7. Severe aortic valve stenosis in the elderly: high prevalence of sleep-related breathing disorders

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    Keymel S

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Stefanie Keymel,1 Katharina Hellhammer,1 Tobias Zeus,1 Marc Merx,2 Malte Kelm,1 Stephan Steiner3 1Department of Cardiology, Pneumology, and Vascular Diseases, Medical Faculty, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, 2Department of Cardiology, Vascular Diseases and Intensive Care Medicine, KRHKlinikum Robert Koch Gehrden, Gehrden, 3Department of Cardiology, Pneumology and Intensive Care Medicine, St Vincenz Hospital, Limburg, Germany Background: Aortic valve stenosis is common in the elderly, with a prevalence of nearly 3% in patients aged 75 years or older. Despite the fact that sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBD are thought to be associated with cardiac disease, little is known about their prevalence in this patient cohort. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of SRBD in older patients with aortic valve stenosis admitted for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.Methods: Forty-eight consecutive patients (mean age 81±6 years; 37.5% male with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis and considered for transcatheter aortic valve replacement were screened for SRBD. Sleep studies were performed by in-hospital unattended cardiorespiratory polygraphy measuring nasal air flow, chest and abdominal efforts, as well as oxygen saturation and body position. The patients were divided in subgroups dependent on the documented apnea–hypopnea index (AHI; no SRBD was defined as an AHI of <5 events/hour; mild SRBD as AHI 5–15 events/hour, and moderate to severe SRBD as AHI ≥15 events/hour.Results: Thirty-seven patients (77% had SRBD defined as an AHI of ≥5 events/hour. Eleven patients had an unremarkable investigation, with AHI <5 events/hour (mean 3.0±1.3 events/hour. Among patients with sleep apnea, 19 patients had mild SRBD, with an AHI of 5–15 events/hour (mean 9.9±3.4 events/hour and 18 patients had moderate to severe SRBD (mean 26.6±11.3 events/hour. Mainly, obstructive apneas were found. Subgroups were not

  8. Outcomes of inoperable symptomatic aortic stenosis patients not undergoing aortic valve replacement: insight into the impact of balloon aortic valvuloplasty from the PARTNER trial (Placement of AoRtic TraNscathetER Valve trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapadia, Samir; Stewart, William J; Anderson, William N; Babaliaros, Vasilis; Feldman, Ted; Cohen, David J; Douglas, Pamela S; Makkar, Raj R; Svensson, Lars G; Webb, John G; Wong, S Chiu; Brown, David L; Miller, D Craig; Moses, Jeffrey W; Smith, Craig R; Leon, Martin B; Tuzcu, E Murat

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this report is to characterize the impact of balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) in patients not undergoing aortic valve replacement in the PARTNER (Placement of AoRtic TraNscathetER Valves) trial. The PARTNER trial is the only randomized trial with independently adjudicated data of inoperable severe symptomatic aortic stenosis patients, allowing outcome analysis of unoperated-on patients. The design and initial results of the PARTNER trial (Cohort B) were reported previously. After excluding patients with pre-randomization BAV, we compared patients undergoing BAV within 30 days of randomization (BAV group) with those not having BAV within 30 days of randomization (no BAV group) to characterize the use and impact of BAV. In the PARTNER Cohort B study, 179 inoperable patients were randomized to standard treatment including 39 patients (21.8%) who had undergone a BAV before randomization (previous BAV group). Of the 140 patients who did not have BAV before enrollment in the study, 102 patients (73%) had BAV within 30 days of study randomization (BAV group). Survival at 3 months was greater in the BAV group compared with the no BAV group (88.2%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 82.0% to 94.5% vs. 73.0%; 95% CI: 58.8% to 87.4%). However, survival was similar at 6-month follow-up (74.5%; 95% CI: 66.1% to 83.0% vs. 73.1%; 58.8% to 87.4%). There was improvement in quality of life parameters when paired comparisons were made between baseline and 30 days and 6 months between the BAV and no BAV groups, but this effect was lost at 12-month follow-up. BAV improves functional status and survival in the short term, but these benefits are not sustained. BAV for aortic stenosis patients who cannot undergo aortic valve replacement is a useful palliative therapy. (THE PARTNER TRIAL: Placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER Valve Trial; NCT00530894). Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Measurement of the Aortic Diameter in the Asymptomatic Thai Population in Siriraj Hospital: Assessment with Multidetector CT

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    Krisdee Prabhasavat

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine normal reference values of intra-thoracic and abdominal aortic diameters of asymptomatic Thai adults obtained by multidetector computed tomography. Secondary end points were evaluation of relationships between aortic diameters and patients’ demographic data or potential risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Methods: Three hundred and ten Thai adults in Siriraj Hospital who had no any signs or symptoms of cardio- vascular disease that examined with computed tomography (CT of chest and whole abdomen were investigated in this study. Aortic diameters were measured at eight predefined intra-thoracic and abdominal levels on CT images, including ascending aorta, proximal transverse aortic arch, distal transverse aortic arch, aortic isthmus, thoracoabdominal junction, celiac axis, suprarenal aorta and aortic bifurcation. Analysis of data was performed with regard to patients’ demographic data (age, sex, weight, and height and three potential risk factors of cardio- vascular disease (hypertension, dyslipidemia and diabetes mellitus. Furthermore, we also recorded the co-morbid non-cardiovascular underlying diseases which were classified into seven groups, including tumors (malignant and benign tumors, infectious diseases, inflammatory diseases, autoimmune diseases, degenerative diseases, psychiatric diseases and others. Results: Aortic diameters were 3.14±0.40 cm. at the ascending aorta, 2.88 ± 0.34 cm. at proximal transverse aortic arch, 2.65±0.30 cm. at distal transverse aortic arch, 2.46 ± 0.31cm. at aortic isthmus, 2.10± 0.27 cm. at thoracoab- dominal junction, 1.99 ± 0.26 cm. at celiac axis, 1.81 ±0.25 cm. at suprarenal aorta, and 1.47±0.21 cm. at aortic bifurcation. Overall aortic diameters tend to continuously significantly decrease aortic diameters from proximal to distal direction from ascending aorta to aortic bifurcation. Men had slightly more enlarged aortic diameters in all

  10. Interaction of renal failure and dyslipidaemia in the development of calcific aortic valve disease in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, Kris; Roosens, Bram; Bala, Gezim; Remory, Isabel; Hernot, Sophie; Delvenne, Philippe; Mestrez, Fabienne; Droogmans, Steven; Cosyns, Bernard

    2017-10-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is currently the most common heart valve disease worldwide and is known to be an active process. Both renal failure and dyslipidaemia are considered to be promoting factors for the development of valvular calcifications. The aim of this study is to prospectively evaluate the respective contribution and interaction of renal failure and dyslipidaemia on CAVD in a rat model, using echocardiography and compared with histology. Sixty-eight male Wistar rats were prospectively divided in eight groups, each fed a different diet to induce renal failure alone and combined with hyperlipidaemia or hypercholesterolemia. CAVD was detected and quantified by calibrated integrated backscatter of ultrasound (cIB) and compared with the histological calcium score. The study follow-up was 20 weeks. At the end of the study, the cIB value and the calcium score of the aortic valve were significantly increased in the group with isolated renal failure but not with dyslipidaemia. The combination of renal failure with high cholesterol or high-fat diet did not significantly increase calcifications further. Renal failure alone does induce aortic valve calcifications in a rat model of CAVD, whereas dyslipidaemia alone does not. The combination of renal failure with dyslipidaemia does not increase calcification further. These findings suggest that a combination of atherosclerotic and calcifying factors is not required to induce aortic valve calcifications in this model.

  11. Feasibility of transapical aortic valve replacement through a left ventricular apical diverticulum

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    Ferrari Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transapical aortic valve replacement is an established technique performed in high-risk patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis and vascular disease contraindicating trans-vascular and trans-aortic procedures. The presence of a left ventricular apical diverticulum is a rare event and the treatment depends on dimensions and estimated risk of embolisation, rupture, or onset of ventricular arrhythmias. The diagnosis is based on standard cardiac imaging and symptoms are very rare. In this case report we illustrate our experience with a 81 years old female patient suffering from symptomatic aortic valve stenosis, respiratory disease, chronic renal failure and severe peripheral vascular disease (logistic euroscore: 42%, who successfully underwent a transapical 23 mm balloon-expandable stent-valve implantation through an apical diverticulum of the left ventricle. Intra-luminal thrombi were absent and during the same procedure were able to treat the valve disease and to successfully exclude the apical diverticulum without complications and through a mini thoracotomy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a transapical procedure is successfully performed through an apical diverticulum.

  12. Pregnancy after Prosthetic Aortic Valve Replacement: How Do We Monitor Prosthetic Valvular Function during Pregnancy?

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    Nicole Sahasrabudhe

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. With modern medicine, many women after structural heart repair are deciding to experience pregnancy. There is a need for further study to identify normal echocardiographic parameters to better assess prosthetic valvular function in pregnancy. In addition, a multidisciplinary approach is essential in managing pregnant patients with complex cardiac conditions. Case. A 22-year-old nulliparous woman with an aortic valve replacement 18 months prior to her pregnancy presented to prenatal care at 20-week gestation. During her prenatal care, serial echocardiography showed a significant increase in the mean gradient across the prosthetic aortic valve. Multidisciplinary management and a serial echocardiography played an integral role in her care that resulted in a successful spontaneous vaginal delivery without complications. Conclusion. Further characterization of the normal echocardiographic parameters in pregnant patients with prosthetic valves is critical to optimize prenatal care for this patient population. This case report is novel in that serial echocardiograms were obtained throughout prenatal care, which showed significant changes across the prosthetic aortic valve. Teaching Points. (1 Further study is needed to identify normal echocardiographic parameters to best assess prosthetic valvular function in pregnancy. (2 Multidisciplinary management is encouraged to optimize prenatal care for women with prosthetic aortic valve replacements.

  13. 4D optical coherence tomography of aortic valve dynamics in a murine mouse model ex vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, Christian; Jannasch, Anett; Faak, Saskia; Waldow, Thomas; Koch, Edmund

    2015-07-01

    The heart and its mechanical components, especially the heart valves and leaflets, are under enormous strain during lifetime. Like all highly stressed materials, also these biological components undergo fatigue and signs of wear, which impinge upon cardiac output and in the end on health and living comfort of affected patients. Thereby pathophysiological changes of the aortic valve leading to calcific aortic valve stenosis (AVS) as most frequent heart valve disease in humans are of particular interest. The knowledge about changes of the dynamic behavior during the course of this disease and the possibility of early stage diagnosis could lead to the development of new treatment strategies and drug-based options of prevention or therapy. ApoE-/- mice as established model of AVS versus wildtype mice were introduced in an ex vivo artificially stimulated heart model. 4D optical coherence tomography (OCT) in combination with high-speed video microscopy were applied to characterize dynamic behavior of the murine aortic valve and to characterize dynamic properties during artificial stimulation. OCT and high-speed video microscopy with high spatial and temporal resolution represent promising tools for the investigation of dynamic behavior and their changes in calcific aortic stenosis disease models in mice.

  14. Metastatic Calcinosis of Aortic Valve Secondary to Renal Failure Mimicking Infective Endocarditis

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    Noman Ahmed Jang Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available End stage renal disease has a list of consequences, cardiovascular being the most common. Inefficient dialysis can cause significant deposition of calcium all over the body, including heart valves making heart function impaired. We illustrate a case of 38-year-old female with end stage renal disease on peritoneal dialysis. The patient had been complaining of pain and swelling of the right hand for the last few months and had been seen by hand surgeon and was admitted electively for the biopsy of hand lesions. Before her planned surgery, she developed severe shortness of breath. Urgent echocardiogram revealed severe aortic regurgitation and large vegetation on the aortic valve. Infective endocarditis was suspected but blood cultures were negative for any microorganism and the patient did not meet the Duke criteria. Because of her hemodynamic instability immediate mechanical valve replacement surgery was performed. The pathology report showed extensive calcification and myxoid degeneration. No infectious agent was found. Later on, biopsy of her hand lesions showed extensive calcification with macrophages and giant cells. No atypia or malignancy was identified. This is a rare case of the metastatic calcinosis of aortic valve secondary to renal failure mimicking aortic valve infective endocarditis.

  15. Bicuspid aortic valve: a literature review and its impact on sport activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mozzi, Paola; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Galanti, Giorgio; Maffulli, Nicola

    2008-01-01

    The bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most common congenital cardiac malformation. A literature search was performed using the key words 'bicuspid aortic valve', 'pathophysiology', 'exercise' and 'training'. BAV is the result of a complex developmental process where several genes seem to lead to abnormal valvulogenesis. Complications associated with BAV include aortic stenosis (AS) and regurgitation, infective endocarditis and aortic dilation and dissection. Moreover, BAV may be associated with other cardiovascular anomalies, mainly aortic coarctation. There is greater awareness of BAV in the young population who practice sport, with an increasing interest on the impact of regular and competitive exercise on athletes with BAV. The early identification of BAV through pre-participation screening is of paramount importance, and the justification of the more appropriate diagnostic methods is still an area of debate. A normally functioning BAV usually does not represent a limit for practising sport. The stress of regular and intense exercise on an abnormal aortic valve may favour its early deterioration and accelerate the development of complications. Therefore, athletes with BAV warrant regular follow-up, which should include echocardiographic assessment at least every year. The eligibility for participation and ability to continue to practise competitive sports in athletes with BAV cannot be generalized, but needs to be individualized depending on age, severity of lesions and type of sport. Further studies are required to elucidate the impact of physical training and competitive sports on the natural course of the BAV.

  16. Should high risk patients with concomitant severe aortic stenosis and mitral valve disease undergo double valve surgery in the TAVR era?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Pey-Jen; Mattia, Allan; Cassiere, Hugh A; Esposito, Rick; Manetta, Frank; Kohn, Nina; Hartman, Alan R

    2017-12-29

    Significant mitral regurgitation in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is associated with increased mortality. The aim of this study is to determine if surgical correction of both aortic and mitral valves in high risk patients with concomitant valvular disease would offer patients better outcomes than TAVR alone. A retrospective analysis of 43 high-risk patients who underwent concomitant surgical aortic valve replacement and mitral valve surgery from 2008 to 2012 was performed. Immediate and long term survival were assessed. There were 43 high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing concomitant surgical aortic valve replacement and mitral valve surgery. The average age was 80 ± 6 years old. Nineteen (44%) patients had prior cardiac surgery, 15 (34.9%) patients had chronic obstructive lung disease, and 39 (91%) patients were in congestive heart failure. The mean Society of Thoracic Surgeons Predicted Risk of Mortality for isolated surgical aortic valve replacement for the cohort was 10.1% ± 6.4%. Five patients (11.6%) died during the index admission and/or within thirty days of surgery. Mortality rate was 25% at six months, 35% at 1 year and 45% at 2 years. There was no correlation between individual preoperative risk factors and mortality. High-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis and mitral valve disease undergoing concomitant surgical aortic valve replacement and mitral valve surgery may have similar long term survival as that described for such patients undergoing TAVR. Surgical correction of double valvular disease in this patient population may not confer mortality benefit compared to TAVR alone.

  17. The hereditary basis of bicuspid aortic valve disease: a role for screening?

    OpenAIRE

    Gharibeh L; Nemer M

    2014-01-01

    Lara Gharibeh, Mona Nemer Molecular Genetics and Cardiac Regeneration Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada Abstract: Over the past years, human and molecular genetic studies have provided new understanding of valve development and the molecular pathogenesis of bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) disease. BAV is an autosomal dominant disease with incomplete penetrance and is found to affect 1%–2% of the population. It ...

  18. Absence of the aortic valve associated with hypoplastic left-sided heart syndrome

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    Atik Edmar

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In this report we describe the twelveth case in the literature of absence of the aortic valve cusps, associated with hypoplastic left-sided heart syndrome in a neonate. Clinical and hemodynamic conditions in our patient resemble the classical features of this syndrome except for a greater development of the ascending aorta and the left ventricular cavity, due to aortic insufficiency. A patch was unsuccessfully inserted at the aortic annulus to exclude the left ventricle from the circulation. In addition the Norwood operation was performed.

  19. Surgical repair of a pseudoaneurysm of the ascending aorta after aortic valve replacement

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    Almeida Rui Manuel Sequeira de

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a patient with a pseudoaneurysm of the ascending aortic clinically diagnosed 5 months after surgical replacement of the aortic valve. Diagnosis was confirmed with the aid of two-dimensional echocardiography and helicoidal angiotomography. The corrective surgery, which consisted of a reinforced suture of the communication with the ascending aorta after opening and aspiration of the cavity of the pseudoaneurysm, was successfully performed through a complete sternotomy using extracorporeal circulation, femorofemoral cannulation, and moderate hypothermia, with no aortic clamping.

  20. Inclusion cylinder method for aortic valve replacement utilising the Ross operation in adults with predominant aortic stenosis – 99% freedom from re-operation on the aortic valve at 15 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillington, Peter D.; Mokhles, M. Mostafa; Wilson, William; Grigg, Leeanne; Larobina, Marco; O'Keefe, Michael; Takkenberg, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    Background: To report our experience with the Ross operation in patients with predominant aortic stenosis (AS) using an inclusion cylinder (IC) method. Methods: Out of 324 adults undergoing a Ross operation, 204 patients of mean age of 41.3 years (limits 16–62) underwent this procedure for either AS or mixed AS and regurgitation (AS/AR) between October, 1992 and February, 2012, implanting the PA with an IC method. Clinical follow up and serial echo data for this group is 97% complete with late mortality follow up 99% complete. Results: There has been zero (0%) early mortality, and late survival at 15 years is 98% (96%, 100%). Only one re-operation on the aortic valve for progressive aortic regurgitation (AR) has been required with freedom from re-operation on the aortic valve at 15 years being 99% (96%, 100%). The freedom from all re-operations on the aortic and pulmonary valves at 15 years is 97% (94%, 100%). Echo analysis at the most recent study shows that 98% have nil, trivial or mild AR. Aortic root size has remained stable, shown by long-term (15 year) echo follow up. Conclusions: In an experience spanning 19 years, the Ross operation used for predominant AS using the IC method described, results in 99% freedom from re-operation on the aortic valve at 15 years, better than any other tissue or mechanical valve. For adults under 65 years without significant co-morbidities who present with predominant AS, the pulmonary autograft inserted with this technique gives excellent results. PMID:24749112

  1. Inclusion cylinder method for aortic valve replacement utilising the Ross operation in adults with predominant aortic stenosis - 99% freedom from re-operation on the aortic valve at 15 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillington, Peter D; Mokhles, M Mostafa; Wilson, William; Grigg, Leeanne; Larobina, Marco; O'Keefe, Michael; Takkenberg, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    To report our experience with the Ross operation in patients with predominant aortic stenosis (AS) using an inclusion cylinder (IC) method. Out of 324 adults undergoing a Ross operation, 204 patients of mean age of 41.3 years (limits 16-62) underwent this procedure for either AS or mixed AS and regurgitation (AS/AR) between October, 1992 and February, 2012, implanting the PA with an IC method. Clinical follow up and serial echo data for this group is 97% complete with late mortality follow up 99% complete. There has been zero (0%) early mortality, and late survival at 15 years is 98% (96%, 100%). Only one re-operation on the aortic valve for progressive aortic regurgitation (AR) has been required with freedom from re-operation on the aortic valve at 15 years being 99% (96%, 100%). The freedom from all re-operations on the aortic and pulmonary valves at 15 years is 97% (94%, 100%). Echo analysis at the most recent study shows that 98% have nil, trivial or mild AR. Aortic root size has remained stable, shown by long-term (15 year) echo follow up. In an experience spanning 19 years, the Ross operation used for predominant AS using the IC method described, results in 99% freedom from re-operation on the aortic valve at 15 years, better than any other tissue or mechanical valve. For adults under 65 years without significant co-morbidities who present with predominant AS, the pulmonary autograft inserted with this technique gives excellent results.

  2. Sutureless aortic valve replacement versus transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a meta-analysis of comparative matched studies using propensity score matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meco, Massimo; Miceli, Antonio; Montisci, Andrea; Donatelli, Francesco; Cirri, Silvia; Ferrarini, Matteo; Lio, Antonio; Glauber, Mattia

    2017-09-11

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to compare outcomes of patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) with those undergoing surgical aortic valve replacement using sutureless valves. A systematic review and meta-analysis in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement was performed. No randomized controlled trials were identified. Six comparative studies using propensity score matching met the inclusion criteria. This meta-analysis identified 1462 patients in that 731 patients underwent surgical aortic valve replacement using sutureless valves (SU) and 731 patients underwent a TAVI. The 30-day or in-hospital mortality was lower in the SU group [odds ratio (OR) 0.54, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.36-0.80; P  = 0.003]. In the TAVI group, the incidence of postoperative stroke was higher (OR 0.36, 95% CI 0.17-0.79; P  = 0.01). The incidence of moderate or severe paravalvular regurgitation was higher in the TAVI group (OR 0.22, 95% CI 0.14-0.35; P  = 0.001). There were neither differences in the postoperative renal failure (OR 1.44, 95% CI 0.46-4.58; P  = 0.53) nor in the number of patients requiring postoperative pacemaker implantation (OR 1.06, 95% CI 0.54-2.08; P  = 0.86). Patients in the SU group required more transfusions (OR 4.47, 95% CI 2.77-7.21; P  = 0.0001), whereas those in the TAVI group had higher major vascular complications (OR 0.06, 95% CI 0.01-0.25; P  = 0.0001). Intensive care unit stay was not different (mean difference 0.99, 95% CI - 1.22 to 1.40; P  = 0.53). One-year survival was better in the SU group (Peto OR 0.35, 95% CI 0.18-0.67; P  = 0.001), as was the 2-year survival (Peto OR 0.38, 95% CI 0.17-0.86; P  = 0.001). Surgical aortic valve replacement using sutureless valves is associated with better early and mid-term outcomes compared with TAVI in high- or intermediate-risk patients.

  3. Blood flow competition after aortic valve bypass: an evaluation using computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahito, Koji; Kimura, Naoyuki; Komiya, Kenji; Nakamura, Masanori; Misawa, Yoshio

    2017-05-01

    Aortic valve bypass (AVB) (apico-aortic conduit) remains an effective surgical alternative for patients in whom surgical aortic valve replacement or transcatheter aortic valve implantation is not feasible. However, specific complications include thrombus formation, possibly caused by stagnation arising from flow competition between the antegrade and retrograde flow, but this has not been fully investigated. The aim of this study was to analyse flow characteristics after AVB and to elucidate mechanisms of intra-aortic thrombus using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Flow simulation was performed on data obtained from a 73-year-old postoperative AVB patient. Three-dimensional cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging at 3 Tesla was used to acquire flow data and to set up the simulation. The vascular geometry was reconstructed using computed tomography angiograms. Flow simulations were implemented at various ratios of the flow rate between the ascending aorta and the graft. Results were visualized by streamline and particle tracing. CFD demonstrated stagnation in the ascending aorta-arch when retrograde flow was dominant, indicating that the risk of thrombus formation exists in the ascending arch in cases with severe aortic stenosis and/or poor left ventricular function. Meanwhile, stagnation was observed in the proximal descending aorta when the antegrade and retrograde flow were equivalent, suggesting that the descending aorta is critical when aortic stenosis is not severe. Flow stagnation in the aorta which may cause thrombus was observed when retrograde flow was dominant and antegrade/retrograde flows were equivalent. Our results suggest that anticoagulants might be recommended even in patients who receive biological valves.

  4. Safety and Efficacy of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in the Treatment of Pure Aortic Regurgitation in Native Valves and Failing Surgical Bioprostheses: Results From an International Registry Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawaya, Fadi J; Deutsch, Marcus-André; Seiffert, Moritz; Yoon, Sung-Han; Codner, Pablo; Wickramarachchi, Upul; Latib, Azeem; Petronio, A Sonia; Rodés-Cabau, Josep; Taramasso, Maurizio; Spaziano, Marco; Bosmans, Johan; Biasco, Luigi; Mylotte, Darren; Savontaus, Mikko; Gheeraert, Peter; Chan, Jason; Jørgensen, Troels H; Sievert, Horst; Mocetti, Marco; Lefèvre, Thierry; Maisano, Francesco; Mangieri, Antonio; Hildick-Smith, David; Kornowski, Ran; Makkar, Raj; Bleiziffer, Sabine; Søndergaard, Lars; De Backer, Ole

    2017-05-22

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of transcatheter heart valves (THV) for the treatment of noncalcific pure native aortic valve regurgitation (NAVR) and failing bioprosthetic surgical heart valves (SHVs) with pure severe aortic regurgitation (AR). Limited data are available about the "off-label" use of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) to treat pure severe AR. The study population consisted of patients with pure severe AR treated by TAVR at 18 different centers. Study endpoints were device success, early safety, and clinical efficacy at 30 days, as defined by Valve Academic Research Consortium 2 criteria. A total of 146 patients were included, 78 patients in the NAVR group and 68 patients in the failing SHV group. In the NAVR group, device success, early safety, and clinical efficacy were 72%, 66%, and 61%, respectively. Device success and clinical efficacy were significantly better with newer generation THVs compared with old-generation THVs (85% vs. 54% and 75% vs. 46%, respectively, p 8%, major vascular or access complication, and moderate to severe AR. In the failing SHV group, device success, early safety, and clinical efficacy were 71%, 90%, and 77%, respectively. TAVR for pure NAVR remains a challenging condition, with old-generation THVs being associated with THV embolization and migration and significant paravalvular regurgitation. Newer generation THVs show more promising outcomes. For those patients with severe AR due to failing SHVs, TAVR is a valuable therapeutic option. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Numerical investigation on effect of aortic root geometry on flow induced structural stresses developed in a bileaflet mechanical heart valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, S. S.; Nasif, M. S.; Said, M. A. M.; Kadhim, S. K.

    2017-10-01

    Structural stresses developed in an artificial bileaflet mechanical heart valve (BMHV) due to pulsed blood flow may cause valve failure due to yielding. In this paper, von-Mises stresses are computed and compared for BMHV placed in two types of aortic root geometries that are aortic root with axisymmetric sinuses and with axisymmetric bulb, at different physiological blood flow rates. With BMHV placed in an aortic root with axisymmetric sinuses, the von-Mises stresses developed in the valve were found to be up to 47% higher than BMHV placed in aortic root with axisymmetric bulb under similar physiological conditions. High velocity vectors and therefore high von-Mises stresses have been observed for BMHV placed in aortic root with axisymmetric sinuses, that can lead to valve failure.

  6. [Surface modification of RGD peptides onto acellularized porcine aortic valve to promote cell adhesion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li-ming; Zeng, Xiao-fei; Ma, Rui-dong; Shang, Guan-sheng; Hao, Ming; Yi, Ding-hua

    2010-11-01

    To investigate the impact of RGD peptides on cell adhesion to acellularized procine aortic valve. The acellular porcine aorta valve (APAV) was prepared by removing the cells and cellular components from porcine aortic valve using trypsin and hyposmosis TritonX-100. With the help of epoxy chloropropane (EC), the decelluarized valve scaffolds were immobilized with YGRGDSP peptide. MFBs were seeded onto four groups [acellularized value (AV) group, EC group, glutaraldehyde+EC (GE) group and EC+ RGD group or GE+RGD group] of coupled, coated and untreated decelluarized valve scaffolds. Ninhydrin reaction, cell count and fluorescent imaging test were employed to examine the efficiency of cell adhesion. More cells were attached to the decellularized valve scaffolds when the cells were coupled with RGD peptides compared with the others. The adhesive effect was correlated with the concentration of the RGD peptide and the attaching time. With the help of EC, YGRGDSP peptides can be immobilized by covalent bonding. RGD peptides improve cell adhesion to decellularized valve scaffolds.

  7. Calcific Aortic Valve Disease Is Associated with Layer-Specific Alterations in Collagen Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Heather N.; Marohl, Taylor; Anderson, Matthew; Eliceiri, Kevin; Campagnola, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Disorganization of the valve extracellular matrix (ECM) is a hallmark of calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD). However, while microarchitectural features of the ECM can strongly influence the biological and mechanical behavior of tissues, little is known about the ECM microarchitecture in CAVD. In this work, we apply advanced imaging techniques to quantify spatially heterogeneous changes in collagen microarchitecture in CAVD. Human aortic valves were obtained from individuals between 50 and 75 years old with no evidence of valvular disease (healthy) and individuals who underwent valve replacement surgery due to severe stenosis (diseased). Second Harmonic Generation microscopy and subsequent image quantification revealed layer-specific changes in fiber characteristics in healthy and diseased valves. Specifically, the majority of collagen fiber changes in CAVD were found to occur in the spongiosa, where collagen fiber number increased by over 2-fold, and fiber width and density also significantly increased. Relatively few fibrillar changes occurred in the fibrosa in CAVD, where fibers became significantly shorter, but did not otherwise change in terms of number, width, density, or alignment. Immunohistochemical staining for lysyl oxidase showed localized increased expression in the diseased fibrosa. These findings reveal a more complex picture of valvular collagen enrichment and arrangement in CAVD than has previously been described using traditional analysis methods. Changes in fiber architecture may play a role in regulating the pathobiological events and mechanical properties of valves during CAVD. Additionally, characterization of the ECM microarchitecture can inform the design of fibrous scaffolds for heart valve tissue engineering. PMID:27685946

  8. Calcific Aortic Valve Disease Is Associated with Layer-Specific Alterations in Collagen Architecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather N Hutson

    Full Text Available Disorganization of the valve extracellular matrix (ECM is a hallmark of calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD. However, while microarchitectural features of the ECM can strongly influence the biological and mechanical behavior of tissues, little is known about the ECM microarchitecture in CAVD. In this work, we apply advanced imaging techniques to quantify spatially heterogeneous changes in collagen microarchitecture in CAVD. Human aortic valves were obtained from individuals between 50 and 75 years old with no evidence of valvular disease (healthy and individuals who underwent valve replacement surgery due to severe stenosis (diseased. Second Harmonic Generation microscopy and subsequent image quantification revealed layer-specific changes in fiber characteristics in healthy and diseased valves. Specifically, the majority of collagen fiber changes in CAVD were found to occur in the spongiosa, where collagen fiber number increased by over 2-fold, and fiber width and density also significantly increased. Relatively few fibrillar changes occurred in the fibrosa in CAVD, where fibers became significantly shorter, but did not otherwise change in terms of number, width, density, or alignment. Immunohistochemical staining for lysyl oxidase showed localized increased expression in the diseased fibrosa. These findings reveal a more complex picture of valvular collagen enrichment and arrangement in CAVD than has previously been described using traditional analysis methods. Changes in fiber architecture may play a role in regulating the pathobiological events and mechanical properties of valves during CAVD. Additionally, characterization of the ECM microarchitecture can inform the design of fibrous scaffolds for heart valve tissue engineering.

  9. Randomized comparison of exercise haemodynamics of Freestyle, Magna Ease and Trifecta bioprostheses after aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, David S; Patel, Himanshu J; Kolias, Theodore J; Deeb, G Michael

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare haemodynamics at rest and during exercise after clinically indicated aortic valve replacement (AVR) for aortic stenosis among patients randomly assigned to one of three haemodynamically excellent bioprostheses. In a single-centre, prospective trial, 60 patients undergoing clinically indicated AVR were randomly assigned to Freestyle, Magna Ease or Trifecta bioprostheses. Six months after surgery, patients underwent supine bicycle stress echocardiography for the assessment of aortic valve haemodynamics. There were 5 protocol deviations from random valve assignments, and 4 patients did not return for follow-up stress echo, yielding a study group of 56 patients {17 Freestyle, 21 Magna Ease, 18 Trifecta; median age 70 [interquartile range (IQR) 63-78 years], 37 (66%) men}. There were no statistically significant differences between groups in valve size, concomitant procedures or exercise variables. Resting haemodynamics revealed significant differences between groups in mean gradient [Freestyle 7 (IQR 5-9) mmHg, Magna Ease 9 (IQR 7-11) mmHg, Trifecta 5 (IQR 4-8) mmHg; P = 0.04], effective orifice area (EOA) [2.5 (IQR 2.2-2.7), 2.1 (IQR 1.7-2.3) and 2.6 (IQR 2.3-2.8), respectively; P = 0.02] and EOA index [1.22 (IQR 1.11-1.32), 1.02 (IQR 0.89-1.14) and 1.31 (IQR 1.00-1.42), respectively; P = 0.03]; in each case, Trifecta had better haemodynamics compared with Magna Ease. With exercise, significant differences between groups were evident in peak velocity at 50 watts and peak exercise; mean gradient at 25 watts, 50 watts and maximal exercise; and EOA at 25 watts and at peak exercise; all with haemodynamic superiority of Trifecta compared with Magna Ease. There were no statistically significant differences between Trifecta and Freestyle haemodynamics at rest or with exercise. In a prospective, randomized study comparing haemodynamics after Freestyle, Magna Ease and Trifecta, all three valves exhibited good haemodynamics at rest and

  10. A Rare Case of Diffuse Hemangiomatosis of the Spleen with Splenic Rupture following Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Capilli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a rare case of splenic rupture that occurred after an open aortic valve replacement in a male patient with hemangiomatosis of the spleen and the liver. The patient was treated with an emergency splenectomy. He showed no other sings of associated systemic disorder, such as Klippel-trénaunay syndrome or Proteus syndrome.

  11. Cross Talk between NOTCH Signaling and Biomechanics in Human Aortic Valve Disease Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Godby

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aortic valve disease is a burgeoning public health problem associated with significant mortality. Loss of function mutations in NOTCH1 cause bicuspid aortic valve (BAV and calcific aortic valve disease. Because calcific nodules manifest on the fibrosa side of the cusp in low fluidic oscillatory shear stress (OSS, elucidating pathogenesis requires approaches that consider both molecular and mechanical factors. Therefore, we examined the relationship between NOTCH loss of function (LOF and biomechanical indices in healthy and diseased human aortic valve interstitial cells (AVICs. An orbital shaker system was used to apply cyclic OSS, which mimics the cardiac cycle and hemodynamics experienced by AVICs in vivo. NOTCH LOF blocked OSS-induced cell alignment in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs, whereas AVICs did not align when subjected to OSS under any conditions. In healthy AVICs, OSS resulted in decreased elastin (ELN and α-SMA (ACTA2. NOTCH LOF was associated with similar changes, but in diseased AVICs, NOTCH LOF combined with OSS was associated with increased α-SMA expression. Interestingly, AVICs showed relatively higher expression of NOTCH2 compared to NOTCH1. Biomechanical interactions between endothelial and interstitial cells involve complex NOTCH signaling that contributes to matrix homeostasis in health and disorganization in disease.

  12. Automated CTA based measurements for planning support of minimally invasive aortic valve replacement surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elattar, Mustafa A.; van Kesteren, Floortje; Wiegerinck, Esther M.; VanBavel, Ed; Baan, Jan; Cocchieri, Riccardo; de Mol, Bas; Planken, Nils R.; Marquering, Henk A.

    2017-01-01

    Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (mini-AVR) procedures are a valuable alternative to conventional open heart surgery. Currently, planning of mini-AVR consists of selection of the intercostal space closest to the sinotubular junction on preoperative computer tomography images. We developed

  13. Clinical and echocardiographic assessment of the Medtronic Advantage aortic valve prosthesis: the Scandinavian multicentre, prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaverstad, Rune; Vitale, Nicola; Karevold, Asbjørn

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this report is the prospective, multicentre evaluation of clinical results and haemodynamic performance of the Medtronic Advantage aortic valve prosthesis. METHODS: From April 2001 to June 2003, 166 patients (male:female 125:41; mean (SD) age 61.8 (11.8) years) received an a...... echocardiography. CONCLUSIONS: Haemodynamic performance and early clinical results of Medtronic advantage in the aortic position were satisfactory and comparable with those of other bileaflet valves in current clinical use.......OBJECTIVE: The aim of this report is the prospective, multicentre evaluation of clinical results and haemodynamic performance of the Medtronic Advantage aortic valve prosthesis. METHODS: From April 2001 to June 2003, 166 patients (male:female 125:41; mean (SD) age 61.8 (11.8) years) received...... an aortic advantage valve prosthesis. Complete cumulative follow-up was 242.7 patient-years (maximum 3.2; mean 1.6 years). Postoperatively, patients underwent early (within 30 days) and 1 year transthoracic echocardiography. RESULTS: 30 day mortality was 2.4% (n = 4). Kaplan-Meier estimates of freedom from...

  14. Relation of aortic valve calcium to chronic kidney disease (from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerraty, Marie A; Chai, Boyang; Hsu, Jesse Y; Ojo, Akinlolu O; Gao, Yanlin; Yang, Wei; Keane, Martin G; Budoff, Matthew J; Mohler, Emile R

    2015-05-01

    Although subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at markedly increased risk for cardiovascular mortality, the relation between CKD and aortic valve calcification has not been fully elucidated. Also, few data are available on the relation of aortic valve calcification and earlier stages of CKD. We sought to assess the relation of aortic valve calcium (AVC) with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), traditional and novel cardiovascular risk factors, and markers of bone metabolism in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study. All patients who underwent aortic valve scanning in the CRIC study were included. The relation between AVC and eGFR, traditional and novel cardiovascular risk factors, and markers of calcium metabolism were analyzed using both unadjusted and adjusted regression models. A total of 1,964 CRIC participants underwent computed tomography for AVC quantification. Decreased renal function was independently associated with increased levels of AVC (eGFR 47.11, 44.17, and 39 ml/min/1.73 m2, respectively, p<0.001). This association persisted after adjusting for traditional, but not novel, AVC risk factors. Adjusted regression models identified several traditional and novel risk factors for AVC in patients with CKD. There was a difference in AVC risk factors between black and nonblack patients. In conclusion, our study shows that eGFR is associated in a dose-dependent manner with AVC in patients with CKD, and this association is independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Reevaluation of the indications for permanent pacemaker implantation after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre Thygesen, Julie; Loh, Poay Huan; Cholteesupachai, Jiranut

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Conduction abnormalities (CA) requiring permanent pacemaker (PPM) are a well-known complication after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). This study aimed to determine the incidence of TAVI-related PPM and reevaluate the indications for PPM after the periprocedural period. METHO...

  16. TriGuard™ HDH embolic deflection device for cerebral protection during transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samim, Mariam; van der Worp, Bart; Agostoni, Pierfrancesco; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Budde, Ricardo P. J.; Nijhoff, Freek; Ramjankhan, Faiz; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Stella, Pieter R.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: This study aims to evaluate the safety and performance of the new embolic deflection device TriGuard™HDH in patients undergoing TAVR. Background: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is associated with a high incidence of new cerebral ischemic lesions. The use of an embolic

  17. Papillary fibroelastoma of the aortic valve as a cause of transient ischemic attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akay, Mehmet H; Seiffert, Moritz; Ott, David A

    2009-01-01

    Diagnostic evaluation of embolic neurologic events requires the consideration of cardiac causes. We recently encountered a case that emphasizes the importance of cardiac tumor as a source of embolic events. We present herein the case of a 42-year-old woman who suffered a transient ischemic attack caused by a papillary fibroelastoma that originated from the aortic valve.

  18. Native aortic valve endocarditis caused by Brevibacterium epidermidis in an immunocompetent patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manetos, Christos M; Pavlidis, Antonios N; Kallistratos, Manolis S; Tsoukas, Athanasios S; Chamodraka, Eytixia S; Levantakis, Ioannis; Manolis, Athanasios J

    2011-09-01

    Although Brevibacterium species used to be considered as nonpathogenic microorganisms until recently, it seems that they can cause a wide variety of clinical diseases by acting mostly as opportunistic pathogens. The present case is the second reported case of infective endocarditis by Brevibacterium species; however, it is the first reported infected native aortic valve in an immunocompetent patient.

  19. Impact of prosthesis-patient mismatch on early and late mortality after aortic valve replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koene, Bart M.; Hamad, Mohamed A. Soliman; Bouma, Wobbe; Mariani, Massimo A.; Peels, Kathinka C.; van Dantzig, Jan-Melle; van Straten, Albert H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The influence of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) on survival after aortic valve replacement (AVR) remains controversial. In this study, we sought to determine the effect of PPM on early (30 days) after AVR or AVR combined with coronary artery bypass grafting (AVR with CABG). Methods:

  20. Can postoperative mean transprosthetic pressure gradient predict survival after aortic valve replacement?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koene, Bart M.; Hamad, Mohamed A. Soliman; Bouma, Wobbe; Mariani, Massimo A.; Peels, Kathinka C.; van Dantzig, Jan-Melle; van Straten, Albert H.

    In this study, we sought to determine the effect of the mean transprosthetic pressure gradient (TPG), measured at 6 weeks after aortic valve replacement (AVR) or AVR with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) on late all-cause mortality. Between January 1998 and March 2012, 2,276 patients (mean age

  1. Incidence and outcomes of emergent cardiac surgery during transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggebrecht, Holger; Vaquerizo, Beatriz; Moris, Cesar

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Life-threatening complications occur during transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) which can require emergent cardiac surgery (ECS). Risks and outcomes of patients needing ECS during or immediately after TAVI are still unclear. Methods and results: Incidence, risk factors, managemen...

  2. Protein-altering and regulatory genetic variants near GATA4 implicated in bicuspid aortic valve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Bo; Zhou, Wei-Wu; Jiao, Jiao

    2017-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is a heritable congenital heart defect and an important risk factor for valvulopathy and aortopathy. Here we report a genome-wide association scan of 466 BAV cases and 4,660 age, sex and ethnicity-matched controls with replication in up to 1,326 cases and 8,103 controls...

  3. Aortic valve remodelling with Urbanski's technique of separate patches - own experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bitner, Miroslaw; Jaszewski, Ryszard; Banys, Andrzej; Jander, Slawomir; Walczak, Andrzej; Ostrowski, Stanislaw; Wojtasik, Leszek

    Background: In 2005 Dr Urbanski described modification of the aortic valve remodelling technique in 20 patients. Since July 2006 we have been using his method. Aim: Evaluation of technical aspects, efficacy and usefulness of this technique based on our results. Material and Methods: 17 patients with

  4. Relation of Left Atrial Size, Cardiac Morphology, and Clinical Outcome in Asymptomatic Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Nicolaj Lyhne; Dahl, Jordi; Carter-Storch, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    characterized by higher LV mass index (73 ± 17 g/m² vs. 66 ± 16 g/m² , p=0.03), increased right ventricle (70 ± 14 ml/m² vs. 63 ± 12 ml/m², p=0.01) and LV end-diastolic volume index (84 ± 18 ml/m² vs. 77 ± 16 ml/m², p=0.05), and higher brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). No difference in late enhancement was seen......Left atrial (LA) dilatation in asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS) may be an indicator of advanced disease. The aim was to investigate the association between LA volume index (LAVi) and left ventricular (LV) morphology assessed with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI), and to assess...

  5. Aortic valve replacement with the freestyle stentless bioprosthesis with respect to spacial orientation of patient coronary ostia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalangos, A; Trigo-Trindade, P; Vala, D; Panos, A; Faidutti, B

    2000-06-01

    This study evaluates our results for safety and efficacy of aortic valve replacement using the Freestyle bioprosthesis (Medtronic, Inc, Minneapolis, Minn) with a new modified subcoronary implantation technique. This technique takes into account the spacial orientation of the stentless bioprosthesis in the aortic root with respect to the patient's coronary ostia rather than the native commissures. Fifty-two consecutive patients with predominant aortic valve stenosis underwent aortic valve replacement with a Freestyle bioprosthesis by means of the described modified subcoronary technique over a 15-month period. Fifty of them were followed up by means of echocardiography at discharge, 6 months, and 1 year. There were 19 men and 31 women, with a mean age of 76 +/- 7 years (range, 58-87 years). Valve size ranged from 21 to 27 mm. Patients with bicuspid aortic valves had a significantly larger angle between both coronary ostia than patients with tricuspid aortic valves (P =.0001). The peak and mean systolic gradients decreased significantly during the first postoperative year for each valve size (P spacial orientation of the patient's coronary ostia, has hemodynamic results similar to those of other series with different subcoronary implantation techniques. This technique is reproducible, safe at the coronary ostial level, and effective in accommodating variability in angles between human coronary ostia, ranging from 130 degrees to 170 degrees. Moreover, the great preoperative discrepancies between aortic anulus and sinotubular junction diameters are corrected immediately after operation.

  6. Ross, Hybrid Arch, and Frozen Elephant Trunk Reconstruction for Late Complications of Bicuspid Aortic Valve and Aortopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdis, Matthew; DeRose, Gaetano; Guo, Linrui; Chu, Michael W A

    2016-12-01

    Young patients with bicuspid aortic valve disease and aortopathy remain a clinical challenge, with many requiring multiple corrective operations throughout their lifetimes. Innovative surgical approaches are often required to address complex aortic pathologic conditions but leave patients at risk for reintervention, lifelong anticoagulation, and suboptimal hemodynamics. We describe an active 44-year-old female triathlete with recurrent bicuspid aortic stenosis, a small aortic root, a hypoplastic aortic arch and complex distal arch, and a descending aortic aneurysm, who underwent a single-stage reconstruction with a combined Ross procedure, hybrid arch, and frozen elephant trunk reconstruction. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. An unusual case of multiple aortic abnormalities: total occlusion of aortic arch, left external iliac artery, and bicuspid aortic valve in a 21-year-old man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanindi, Asli; Tavil, Yusuf; Mutluay, Ruya; Taktak, Hacer; Cengel, Atiye

    2007-03-01

    An unusual case of total occlusion of aorta just distal to the left subclavian artery, bicuspid aortic valve, and occluded left external iliac artery in a 21-year-old man who was admitted with headache and severe hypertension is presented. We wish to report this case because so far there have been none reported with such multiple aortic abnormalities, although several documented cases of isolated total occlusion of aorta exist. Our patient underwent a successful surgical correction, i.e., patch plasty to the coarcted segment and end to side - end to side aortal-aortal bypass with Dacron graft.

  8. Arterial hypertension and aortic valve stenosis: Shedding light on a common “liaison”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalampos I. Liakos, MD, PhD

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Arterial hypertension and aortic valve stenosis are common disorders and frequently present as concomitant diseases, especially in elderly patients. The impact of hypertension on heart haemodynamics is substantial, thus affecting the clinical presentation of any coexisting valvulopathy, especially of aortic stenosis. However, the interaction between these 2 entities is not thoroughly discussed in the European or/and American guidelines on the management of hypertension or/and valvular heart disease. The present review summarizes all available evidence on the potential interplay between hypertension and aortic valve stenosis, aiming to help physicians understand the pathophysiology and select the best diagnostic and therapeutic strategies (medical or/and interventional for better management of these high-risk patients, taking into account the impact on outcome as well as the risk-benefit-ratio.

  9. Feasibility and Optimization of Aortic Valve Planimetry with MDCT

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abbara, Suhny; Pena, Antonio J; Maurovich-Horvat, Paul; Butler, Javed; Sosnovik, David E; Lembcke, Alexander; Cury, Ricardo C; Hoffmann, Udo; Ferencik, Maros; Brady, Thomas J

    2007-01-01

    .../s. High-resolution data sets were obtained for planimetry at phase starts of 0, 50, 100, 150, and 200 milliseconds after the R wave peak and were assessed for aortic opening area and the presence of artifacts...

  10. Prospective Multicenter Evaluation of the Direct Flow Medical Transcatheter Aortic Valve System: 12-Month Outcomes of the Evaluation of the Direct Flow Medical Percutaneous Aortic Valve 18F System for the Treatment of Patients With Severe Aortic Stenosis (DISCOVER) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Thierry; Colombo, Antonio; Tchétché, Didier; Latib, Azeem; Klugmann, Silvio; Fajadet, Jean; De Marco, Federico; Maisano, Francesco; Bruschi, Giuseppe; Bijuklic, Klaudija; Nava, Stefano; Weissman, Neil; Low, Reginald; Thomas, Martyn; Young, Christopher; Redwood, Simon; Mullen, Michael; Yap, John; Grube, Eberhard; Nickenig, Georg; Sinning, Jan-Malte; Hauptmann, Karl Eugen; Friedrich, Ivar; Lauterbach, Michael; Schmoeckel, Michael; Davidson, Charles; Schofer, Joachim

    2016-01-11

    The aim of this study was to assess the 1-year outcome after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) of the Direct Flow Medical (DFM) valve in patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who were contraindicated or high risk for surgery. The DFM transcatheter heart valve is a new-generation, nonmetallic aortic valve with a pressurized support structure and conformable double-ring annular sealing delivered through an 18-F sheath. The device allows repositioning, retrieval, and assessment of valve performance before permanent implantation. A prospective multicenter European registry was set up to determine the safety and performance of the valve in 100 consecutive patients (10 centers). Echocardiographic and angiographic data were evaluated by an independent core laboratory, and adverse events were adjudicated by a clinical events committee using Valve Academic Research Consortium criteria. Patients were 83.1 ± 5.9 years of age and had a logistic EuroSCORE of 22.5 ± 11.3% and a Society of Thoracic Surgeons score of 9.7 ± 8.7%. Correct valve positioning was obtained in 99% of cases with a combined 30-day safety endpoint at 10%, including major stroke in 5.0%, major vascular complications in 2.0%, and death in 1%. At 12 months, 95% of patients were in New York Heart Association functional class I or II. Freedom from any death was 90%, and freedom from any death or major stroke was 85%. Echocardiography demonstrated none/trace to mild aortic regurgitation in 100% of patients and an unchanged mean aortic gradient of 12.2 ± 6.6 mm Hg and effective orifice area of 1.6 ± 0.4 cm(2). At 1 year, the DFM transcatheter heart valve had durable hemodynamics. This study demonstrates that the low rate of early complications and the low risk of significant aortic regurgitation translated into midterm clinical benefit. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. 2-year follow-up of patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation using a self-expanding valve prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buellesfeld, Lutz; Gerckens, Ulrich; Schuler, Gerhard; Bonan, Raoul; Kovac, Jan; Serruys, Patrick W; Labinaz, Marino; den Heijer, Peter; Mullen, Michael; Tymchak, Wayne; Windecker, Stephan; Mueller, Ralf; Grube, Eberhard

    2011-04-19

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety, device performance, and clinical outcome up to 2 years for patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The role of TAVI in the treatment of calcific aortic stenosis evolves rapidly, but mid- and long-term results are scarce. We conducted a prospective, multicenter, single-arm study with symptomatic patients undergoing TAVI for treatment of severe aortic valve stenosis using the 18-F Medtronic CoreValve (Medtronic, Minneapolis, Minnesota) prosthesis. In all, 126 patients (mean age 82 years, 42.9% male, mean logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation score 23.4%) with severe aortic valve stenosis (mean gradient 46.8 mm Hg) underwent the TAVI procedure. Access was transfemoral in all but 2 cases with subclavian access. Retrospective risk stratification classified 54 patients as moderate surgical risk, 51 patients as high-risk operable, and 21 patients as high-risk inoperable. The overall technical success rate was 83.1%. Thirty-day all-cause mortality was 15.2%, without significant differences in the subgroups. At 2 years, all-cause mortality was 38.1%, with a significant difference between the moderate-risk group and the combined high-risk groups (27.8% vs. 45.8%, p = 0.04). This difference was mainly attributable to an increased risk of noncardiac mortality among patients constituting the high-risk groups. Hemodynamic results remained unchanged during follow-up (mean gradient: 8.5 ± 2.5 mm Hg at 30 days and 9.0 ± 3.4 mm Hg at 2 years). Functional class improved in 80% of patients and remained stable over time. There was no incidence of structural valve deterioration. The TAVI procedure provides sustained clinical and hemodynamic benefits for as long as 2 years for patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis at increased risk for surgery. Copyright © 2011 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Sox9- and Scleraxis-Cre Lineage Fate Mapping in Aortic and Mitral Valve Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blair F. Austin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Heart valves are complex structures composed of a heterogeneous population of valve interstitial cells (VICs, an overlying endothelium and highly organized layers of extracellular matrix. Alterations in valve homeostasis are characteristic of dysfunction and disease, however the mechanisms that initiate and promote valve pathology are poorly understood. Advancements have been largely hindered by the limited availability of tools for gene targeting in heart valve structures during embryogenesis and after birth. We have previously shown that the transcription factors Sox9 and Scleraxis (Scx are required for heart valve formation and in this study we describe the recombination patterns of Sox9- and Scx-Cre lines at differential time points in aortic and mitral valve structures. In ScxCre; ROSA26GFP mice, recombination is undetected in valve endothelial cells (VECs and low in VICs during embryogenesis. However, recombination increases in VICs from post natal stages and by 4 weeks side-specific patterns are observed. Using the inducible Sox9CreERT2 system, we observe recombination in VECs and VICs in the embryo, and high levels are maintained through post natal and juvenile stages. These Cre-drivers provide the field with new tools for gene targeting in valve cell lineages during differential stages of embryonic and post natal maturation and maintenance.

  13. Differences in left ventricular remodelling in patients with aortic stenosis treated with transcatheter aortic valve replacement with corevalve prostheses compared to surgery with porcine or bovine biological prostheses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngo, Thuc Anh; Hassager, Christian; Thyregod, Hans Gustav Hørsted

    2018-01-01

    Aims: Patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) can be considered for treatment with either transcatheter (TAVR) or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). The purpose of this study was to compare left ventricular (LV) remodeling in patients with AS after treatment with TAVR or SAVR. Methods an...

  14. A two-stage hybrid approach for complex aortic coarctation combined with ascending-descending aorta dilatation and concomitant aortic valve regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shi-Jian; Pu, Xiao-Bo; An, Qi; Feng, Yuan; Chen, Mao

    2017-02-01

    We present a case of aortic coarctation combined with ascending-descending aorta dilatation and concomitant aortic valve regurgitation. The technique involved using endovascular stenting, a two-stage balloon dilation procedure post-stent implantation and a Bentall procedure. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. MDCT evaluation of aortic root and aortic valve prior to TAVI. What is the optimal imaging time point in the cardiac cycle?

    OpenAIRE

    Jurencak, T.; Turek, J.; Kietselaer, B.L.; Mihl, C.; Kok, M. de; Ommen, V.G. van; Garsse, L.A. van; Nijssen, E.C.; Wildberger, J.E.; Das, M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the optimal imaging time point for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) therapy planning by comprehensive evaluation of the aortic root. Methods Multidetector-row CT (MDCT) examination with retrospective ECG gating was retrospectively performed in 64 consecutive patients referred for pre-TAVI assessment. Eighteen different parameters of the aortic root were evaluated at 11 different time points in the cardiac cycle. Time points at which maximal (or minimal) s...

  16. Surgical treatment of late aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis: 19 years' experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yayla, Tuncer Eylem; Taylan, Adademir; Serpil, Tas; Bal, Polat Ebru; Antal, Dönmez Arzu; Adnan, Ak; Mustafa, Akbulut; Bulbul, Serhat; Aksut, Mehmet; Altug, Tuncer

    2014-06-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the results of operations conducted for aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis in a single center over 19 years. From February 1992 to January 2011, we performed operations on 27 patients with aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis. Seventeen patients (63.0%) were male, and the mean age was 39.1 ± 14.2 (16-67) years. Blood cultures were positive in 11 patients (40.7%), and the most commonly identified microorganism was Streptococcus (7 patients, 25.9%). The mean duration of follow-up was 8.6 ± 4.7 years (0.5-18.2), adding up to a total of 136.9 patient/years. Forty procedures were performed on these 27 patients. The most commonly performed procedure was aortic valve replacement with a prosthetic valve - 16 patients (59.3%). Fifteen patients were operated on during the active phase of infection. In-hospital mortality was observed in 11 patients (40.7%). Postoperatively, 12 patients (44.4%) had low cardiac output, 3 (11.1%) suffered from a heart block; none of them required permanent pacemaker implantation. The actuarial survival for 1 and 5 years was 55.6 ± 9.6% and 47.6 ± 9.7%, respectively. Prosthetic valve endocarditis of the aortic valve is a challenging situation for the surgeon. The surgical treatment carries a high mortality rate and long-term survival is low. Among the survivors, however, recurrence and the need for reoperation are unlikely.

  17. Surgical treatment of late aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis: 19 years’ experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yayla, Tuncer Eylem; Serpil, Tas; Bal, Polat Ebru; Antal, Dönmez Arzu; Adnan, Ak; Mustafa, Akbulut; Bulbul, Serhat; Aksut, Mehmet; Altug, Tuncer

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study We retrospectively analyzed the results of operations conducted for aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis in a single center over 19 years. Material and methods From February 1992 to January 2011, we performed operations on 27 patients with aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis. Seventeen patients (63.0%) were male, and the mean age was 39.1 ± 14.2 (16-67) years. Blood cultures were positive in 11 patients (40.7%), and the most commonly identified microorganism was Streptococcus (7 patients, 25.9%). The mean duration of follow-up was 8.6 ± 4.7 years (0.5-18.2), adding up to a total of 136.9 patient/years. Results Forty procedures were performed on these 27 patients. The most commonly performed procedure was aortic valve replacement with a prosthetic valve – 16 patients (59.3%). Fifteen patients were operated on during the active phase of infection. In-hospital mortality was observed in 11 patients (40.7%). Postoperatively, 12 patients (44.4%) had low cardiac output, 3 (11.1%) suffered from a heart block; none of them required permanent pacemaker implantation. The actuarial survival for 1 and 5 years was 55.6 ± 9.6% and 47.6 ± 9.7%, respectively. Conclusions Prosthetic valve endocarditis of the aortic valve is a challenging situation for the surgeon. The surgical treatment carries a high mortality rate and long-term survival is low. Among the survivors, however, recurrence and the need for reoperation are unlikely. PMID:26336408

  18. Percutaneous transcatheter one-step mechanical aortic disc valve prosthesis implantation: a preliminary feasibility study in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sochman, Jan; Peregrin, Jan H; Rocek, Miloslav; Timmermans, Hans A; Pavcnik, Dusan; Rösch, Josef

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of one-step implantation of a new type of stent-based mechanical aortic disc valve prosthesis (MADVP) above and across the native aortic valve and its short-term function in swine with both functional and dysfunctional native valves. The MADVP consisted of a folding disc valve made of silicone elastomer attached to either a nitinol Z-stent (Z model) or a nitinol cross-braided stent (SX model). Implantation of 10 MADVPs (6 Z and 4 SX models) was attempted in 10 swine: 4 (2 Z and 2 SX models) with a functional native valve and 6 (4 Z and 2 SX models) with aortic regurgitation induced either by intentional valve injury or by MADVP placement across the native valve. MADVP function was observed for up to 3 hr after implantation. MADVP implantation was successful in 9 swine. One animal died of induced massive regurgitation prior to implantation. Four MADVPs implanted above functioning native valves exhibited good function. In 5 swine with regurgitation, MADVP implantation corrected the induced native valve dysfunction and the device's continuous good function was observed in 4 animals. One MADVP (SX model) placed across native valve gradually migrated into the left ventricle. The tested MADVP can be implanted above and across the native valve in a one-step procedure and can replace the function of the regurgitating native valve. Further technical development and testing are warranted, preferably with a manufactured MADVP.

  19. Longitudinal Hemodynamics of Transcatheter and Surgical Aortic Valves in the PARTNER Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Pamela S; Leon, Martin B; Mack, Michael J; Svensson, Lars G; Webb, John G; Hahn, Rebecca T; Pibarot, Philippe; Weissman, Neil J; Miller, D Craig; Kapadia, Samir; Herrmann, Howard C; Kodali, Susheel K; Makkar, Raj R; Thourani, Vinod H; Lerakis, Stamatios; Lowry, Ashley M; Rajeswaran, Jeevanantham; Finn, Matthew T; Alu, Maria C; Smith, Craig R; Blackstone, Eugene H

    2017-09-27

    Use of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) for severe aortic stenosis is growing rapidly. However, to our knowledge, the durability of these prostheses is incompletely defined. To determine the midterm hemodynamic performance of balloon-expandable transcatheter heart valves. In this study, we analyzed core laboratory-generated data from echocardiograms of all patients enrolled in the Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves (PARTNER) 1 Trial with successful TAVR or surgical AVR (SAVR) obtained preimplantation and at 7 days, 1 and 6 months, and 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years postimplantation. Patients from continued access observational studies were included for comparison. Successful implantation after randomization to TAVR vs SAVR (PARTNER 1A; TAVR, n = 321; SAVR, n = 313), TAVR vs medical treatment (PARTNER 1B; TAVR, n = 165), and continued access (TAVR, n = 1996). Five-year echocardiogram data were available for 424 patients after TAVR and 49 after SAVR. Death or reintervention for aortic valve structural indications, measured using aortic valve mean gradient, effective orifice area, Doppler velocity index, and evidence of hemodynamic deterioration by reintervention, adverse hemodynamics, or transvalvular regurgitation. Of 2795 included patients, the mean (SD) age was 84.5 (7.1) years, and 1313 (47.0%) were female. Population hemodynamic trends derived from nonlinear mixed-effects models showed small early favorable changes in the first few months post-TAVR, with a decrease of -2.9 mm Hg in aortic valve mean gradient, an increase of 0.028 in Doppler velocity index, and an increase of 0.09 cm2 in effective orifice area. There was relative stability at a median follow-up of 3.1 (maximum, 5) years. Moderate/severe transvalvular regurgitation was noted in 89 patients (3.7%) after TAVR and increased over time. Patients with SAVR showed no significant changes. In TAVR, death/reintervention was associated with lower ejection fraction, stroke volume

  20. [Long-term results of surgical treatment of patients with aortic valve disease and functional mitral insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salagaev, G I; Belov, Yu V; Charchyan, E R; Katkov, A I; Vinokurov, I A

    2016-01-01

    To analyze long-term surgical results in patients with aortic valve disease and concomitant mitral regurgitation (MR) depending on volume of valve surgery. It was studied 5-year results in 71 patients with aortic valve disease and different degree of mitral regurgitation. Patients were divided into 3 groups. Control group included 40 patients after aortic valve replacement (AVR) and no mitral insufficiency. The 2nd group consisted of 16 patients after AVR and concomitant mitral regurgitation degree 2-3. The 3rd group - 15 patients after aortic and mitral valve replacement. Mortality in long-term postoperative period, quality of life, incidence of complications and echocardiography data were analyzed. There was no significant improvement of mitral regurgitation after AVR. It was showed that persistent MR decreases remote survival and quality of life as well as deteriorates echocardiography data. Herewith these data in the 3rd group did not differ from the control group. Double-valve replacement may be advisable in patients with aortic valve disease and concomitant moderate MR because persistent MR deteriorates long-term However prolonged time of cardiopulmonary bypass, aortic cross-clamping, greater blood loss require comprehensive approach to advanced cardiac surgery.

  1. Identification of Reference Genes for Quantitative Real Time PCR Assays in Aortic Tissue of Syrian Hamsters with Bicuspid Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda-Martínez, Carmen; Fernández, M Carmen; Soto-Navarrete, María Teresa; Jiménez-Navarro, Manuel; Durán, Ana Carmen; Fernández, Borja

    2016-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most frequent congenital cardiac malformation in humans, and appears frequently associated with dilatation of the ascending aorta. This association is likely the result of a common aetiology. Currently, a Syrian hamster strain with a relatively high (∼40%) incidence of BAV constitutes the only spontaneous animal model of BAV disease. The characterization of molecular alterations in the aorta of hamsters with BAV may serve to identify pathophysiological mechanisms and molecular markers of disease in humans. In this report, we evaluate the expression of ten candidate reference genes in aortic tissue of hamsters in order to identify housekeeping genes for normalization using quantitative real time PCR (RT-qPCR) assays. A total of 51 adult (180-240 days old) and 56 old (300-440 days old) animals were used. They belonged to a control strain of hamsters with normal, tricuspid aortic valve (TAV; n = 30), or to the affected strain of hamsters with TAV (n = 45) or BAV (n = 32). The expression stability of the candidate reference genes was determined by RT-qPCR using three statistical algorithms, GeNorm, NormFinder and Bestkeeper. The expression analyses showed that the most stable reference genes for the three algorithms employed were Cdkn1β, G3pdh and Polr2a. We propose the use of Cdkn1β, or both Cdkn1β and G3pdh as reference genes for mRNA expression analyses in Syrian hamster aorta.

  2. Sutureless replacement of aortic valves with St Jude Medical mechanical valve prostheses and Nitinol attachment rings: feasibility in long-term (90-day) pig experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berreklouw, Eric; Koene, Bart; De Somer, Filip; Bouchez, Stefaan; Chiers, Koen; Taeymans, Yves; Van Nooten, Guido J

    2011-05-01

    Nitinol attachment rings (devices) used to attach mechanical aortic valve prostheses suturelessly were studied in long-term (90 days) pig experiments. The aortic valve was removed and replaced by a device around a St Jude Medical mechanical valve prosthesis in 10 surviving pigs. Supravalvular angiography was done at the end of the operation. No coumarin derivates were given. No or minimal aortic regurgitation was confirmed in all surviving pigs at the end of the operation. Total follow-up was 846 days. In 4 pigs, follow-up was shorter than 90 days (28-75 days); the other 6 pigs did reach 90 days' survival or more. Repeat angiography in 4 pigs at the end of follow-up confirmed the unchanged position of the device at the aortic annulus, without aortic regurgitation. At autopsy, in all pigs the devices proved to be well grown in at the annulus, covered with endothelium, and sometimes tissue overgrowth related to not using coumarin derivates. There was no case of para-device leakage, migration, or embolization. No damage to surrounding anatomic structures or prosthetic valves was found. Nitinol attachment rings can be used to replace the aortic valve suturelessly with St Jude Medical mechanical aortic valve prostheses, without para-device leakage, migration, or damage to the surrounding tissues, in long-term pig experiments during a follow-up of 90 days or more. Refraining from anticoagulation in pigs with mechanical valve prostheses can lead to tissue overgrowth of the valve prosthesis. Further studies are needed to determine long-term feasibility of this method in human beings. Copyright © 2011 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Exercise-induced changes in left ventricular global longitudinal strain in asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Agnieszka K; Dobrowolski, Piotr P; Klisiewicz, Anna; Hoffman, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    The management of patients with asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis (ASAS) is still under discussion. Therefore, it is advisable to search for the parameters of early damage to left ventricular (LV) function. The aim of the study was to assess exercise-induced changes in LV global longitudinal strain (GLS) in ASAS. The ASAS group consisted of 50 patients (26 women and 24 men, aged 38.4 ± 18.1 years) meeting the echocardiographic criteria of severe aortic stenosis (AVA 4 m/s, mean aortic gradient > 40 mm Hg), with normal LV ejection fraction (LVEF ≥ 55%) and sinus rhythm on electrocardiogram, and without significant concomitant valvular heart diseases. The control group consisted of 21 people matched for age and sex. Echocardiographic examinations and echocardiographic stress tests with the assessment of GLS using the speckle tracking imaging were performed. The ASAS group was characterised by statistically significantly higher LV mass index (LVMI) and higher LVEF. GLS values at rest in both groups were within normal limits but were significantly higher in the control group (-18.9 ± 2.4% vs. -20.7 ± 1.7%, p = 0.006). An increase in GLS at peak exercise in both groups was observed, lower in the ASAS group (the difference was not statistically significant: -0.8 ± 3.0% vs. -2.2 ± 3.1%, p = 0.086). Changes in GLS during exercise (ΔGLS) did not correlate with the parameters of the severity of aortic stenosis. In the multivariate model, LVMI proved to be a factor associated with GLS at rest and during exercise. In patients with ASAS, GLS is a non-invasive marker of an early stage of LV myocardial damage associated with myocardial hypertrophy. An increase in GLS during exercise in the ASAS group, smaller than in the control group, indicates a preserved functional reserve of the LV myocardium but smaller than in healthy individuals. The assessment of the clinical usefulness of exercise-induced changes in GLS requires further research.

  4. Is valve choice a significant determinant of paravalular leak post-transcatheter aortic valve implantation? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, Katie E

    2013-11-01

    Paravalvular regurgitation (PVR) following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is associated with poor survival. The two main valve delivery systems used to date differ significantly in both structure and deployment technique. The primary objective of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies identifying PVR in patients post-TAVI using Medtronic CoreValve (MCV) and Edward Sapien (ES) valves in order to identify whether a significant difference exists between valve types. The secondary objective was to identify additional factors predisposing to PVR to provide an overview of the other associated considerations.

  5. Risk of stroke after transcatheter prosthetic aortic valve implant with aortic bioprosthesis: subclinical thrombosis and possible therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pasquale, Giuseppe; Coutsoumbas, Gloria V; Zagnoni, Silvia

    2017-10-16

    : Many factors could increase the risk of stroke after transcatheter prosthetic aortic valve implant, mainly related to the procedure itself, or to the type of valvular prosthesis, or to the presence of atrial fibrillation. There is a wide variability in the antithrombotic treatment utilized in clinical practice, as far as the choice of drugs (anticoagulant, single or dual antiplatelet treatment), and its optimal duration. The most popular therapeutic strategy, also recommended by the Scientific Societies, is dual antiplatelet (aspirin and clopidogrel) for the first 3-6 months then switching to single antiplatelet (usually aspirin), limiting oral anticoagulant therapy only to those patients with other primary indication to the treatment. Recently, it has been outlined that subclinical thrombosis could be responsible for bioprosthetic valve malfunction, whereas some studies suggest the efficacy of a single antiplatelet drug after transcatheter prosthetic aortic valve implant. Therefore, it is possible to personalize the therapeutic regimen balancing the ischemic and hemorrhagic risk. Several studies are ongoing to overcome these therapeutic uncertainties, including the use of new oral anticoagulants.

  6. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery. A safe and useful technique beyond the cosmetic benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Federico A; Cánovas, Sergio J; Gil, Oscar; García-Fuster, Rafael; Hornero, Fernando; Vázquez, Alejandro; Martín, Elio; Mena, Armando; Martínez-León, Juan

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the in-hospital clinical outcomes of minimally invasive, isolated aortic valve replacement vs median sternotomy. Between 2005 and 2012, 615 patients underwent aortic valve replacement at a single institution, 532 by a median sternotomy (E group) and 83 by a J-shaped ministernotomy (M group). No significant differences were found between the E and M groups in terms of age (69.27 [9.31] years vs 69.40 [10.24] years, respectively), logistic EuroSCORE (6.27 [2.91] vs 5.64 [2.17], respectively), size of implanted valve prosthesis (21.94 [2.04] mm vs 21.79 [2.01] mm, respectively), or the incidence of diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, high blood pressure, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Mean cardiopulmonary bypass time was 102.90 (41.68) min for the E group vs 81.37 (25.41) min for the M group (Psurgery for aortic valve replacement are at least comparable to those achieved with median sternotomy. The length of the hospital stay was reduced by minimally invasive surgery in our single-institution experience. The retrospective nature of this study warrants further randomized prospective trials to validate our results. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of MRI issues at 3-Tesla for a transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) bioprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeedi, Mahrad; Thomas, Asish; Shellock, Frank G

    2015-05-01

    Replacement of the aortic heart valve typically requires open-heart surgery. A new transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) bioprosthesis made from metallic material was recently developed that is an advantageous alternative insofar as it is implanted using a minimally invasive procedure. Because of the presence of metal, there are safety issues related to MRI. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to use standardized testing techniques to evaluate MRI issues for this TAVR bioprosthesis in association with a 3-Tesla MR system. The TAVR bioprosthesis (Hydra Aortic Valve, Percutaneous Heart Valve Prosthesis, Vascular Innovations Company, Ltd, Thailand) was evaluated for magnetic field interactions (translational attraction and torque), MRI-related heating at a relative high specific absorption rate level (whole body average SAR, 2.9-W/kg), and artifacts (T1-weighted, spin echo, and gradient echo pulse sequences) at 3-Tesla. The TAVR bioprosthesis demonstrated negligible magnetic field interactions (deflection angle, 3-degrees; torque, 0) and minimal heating (maximum temperature rise, 2.5°C; background temperature rise, 1.7°C). Artifacts were relatively small in relation to the size and shape of the implant. The TAVR bioprosthesis that was evaluated in this investigation is acceptable, or using current MRI terminology "MR Conditional", for a patient undergoing MRI at 3-Tesla or less. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Inconsistencies of echocardiographic criteria for the grading of aortic valve stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minners, Jan; Allgeier, Martin; Gohlke-Baerwolf, Christa; Kienzle, Rolf-Peter; Neumann, Franz-Josef; Jander, Nikolaus

    2008-04-01

    The present study tests the consistency of echocardiographic criteria for the grading of aortic valve stenosis. Current guidelines/recommendations define severe stenosis as an aortic valve area (AVA) 40 mmHg, or peak flow velocity (Vmax) >4 m/s. We tested the consistency of the three criteria for the grading of aortic valve stenosis in 3483 echocardiography studies performed in 2427 patients with normal left ventricular (LV) systolic function and a calculated AVA of equation and between AVA and Vmax based on the continuity equation for our study population. An AVA of 1.0 cm2 correlated to a DeltaPm of 21 mmHg and a Vmax of 3.3 m/s. Conversely, a DeltaPm of 40 mmHg corresponds to an AVA of 0.75 cm2 and a Vmax of 4.0 m/s to an AVA of 0.82 cm2. Consequently, severe stenosis was diagnosed in 69% of patients based on AVA, 45% on Vmax, and 40% on DeltaPm. Stroke volume was lower in inconsistently graded patients (65 +/- 11 mL vs. consistently graded: 70 +/- 14 mL, P < 0.001). The criteria for the grading of aortic stenosis are inconsistent in patients with normal systolic LV function. On the basis of AVA, a higher proportion of patients is classified as having severe aortic valve stenosis compared with mean pressure gradient and peak flow velocity. Discrepant grading in these patients may be partly due to reduced stroke volume.

  9. Aortic valve prosthesis-patient mismatch and exercise capacity in adult patients with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Slooten, Ymkje J; van Melle, Joost P; Freling, Hendrik G; Bouma, Berto J; van Dijk, Arie Pj; Jongbloed, Monique Rm; Post, Martijn C; Sieswerda, Gertjan T; Huis In 't Veld, Anna; Ebels, Tjark; Voors, Adriaan A; Pieper, Petronella G

    2016-01-01

    To report the prevalence of aortic valve prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) in an adult population with congenital heart disease (CHD) and its impact on exercise capacity. Adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) with a history of aortic valve replacement may outgrow their prosthesis later in life. However, the prevalence and clinical consequences of aortic PPM in ACHD are presently unknown. From the national Dutch Congenital Corvitia (CONCOR) registry, we identified 207 ACHD with an aortic valve prosthesis for this cross-sectional cohort study. Severe PPM was defined as an indexed effective orifice area ≤0.65 cm2/m2 and moderate PPM as an indexed orifice area ≤0.85 cm2/m2 measured using echocardiography. Exercise capacity was reported as percentage of predicted exercise capacity (PPEC). Of the 207 patients, 68% was male, 71% had a mechanical prosthesis and mean age at inclusion was 43.9 years ±11.4. The prevalence of PPM was 42%, comprising 23% severe PPM and 19% moderate PPM. Prevalence of PPM was higher in patients with mechanical prostheses (pHeart Association (NYHA) class remained stable in most patients. PPM showed no significant effect on death or hospitalisation during follow-up (p=0.218). In this study we report a high prevalence (42%) of PPM in ACHD with an aortic valve prosthesis and an independent association of PPM with diminished exercise capacity. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. Tumor necrosis factor-α accelerates the calcification of human aortic valve interstitial cells obtained from patients with calcific aortic valve stenosis via the BMP2-Dlx5 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zaiqiang; Seya, Kazuhiko; Daitoku, Kazuyuki; Motomura, Shigeru; Fukuda, Ikuo; Furukawa, Ken-Ichi

    2011-04-01

    Calcific aortic valve stenosis (CAS) is the most frequent heart valve disease in the elderly, accompanied by valve calcification. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a pleiotropic cytokine secreted mainly from macrophages, has been detected in human calcified valves. However, the role of TNF-α in valve calcification remains unclear. To clarify whether TNF-α accelerates the calcification of aortic valves, we investigated the effect of TNF-α on human aortic valve interstitial cells (HAVICs) obtained from patients with CAS (CAS group) and with aortic regurgitation or aortic dissection having a noncalcified aortic valve (control group). HAVICs (2 × 10(4)) were cultured in a 12-well dish in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium with 10% fetal bovine serum. The medium containing TNF-α (30 ng/ml) was replenished every 3 days after the cells reached confluence. TNF-α significantly accelerated the calcification and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of HAVICs from CAS but not the control group after 12 days of culture. Furthermore, gene expression of calcigenic markers, ALP, bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), and distal-less homeobox 5 (Dlx5) were significantly increased after 6 days of TNF-α treatment in the CAS group but not the control group. Dorsomorphin, an inhibitor of mothers against decapentaplegic homologs (Smads) 1/5/8 phosphorylation, significantly inhibited the enhancement of TNF-α-induced calcification, ALP activity, Smad phosphorylation, and Dlx5 gene expression of HAVICs from the CAS group. These results suggest that HAVICs from the CAS group have greater sensitivity to TNF-α, which accelerates the calcification of aortic valves via the BMP2-Dlx5 pathway.

  11. Long-term follow-up after implantation of the Shelhigh (R) No-React (R) complete biological aortic valved conduit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reineke, David C.; Kaya, Abdullah; Heinisch, Paul P.; Oezdemir, Berna; Winkler, Bernhard; Huber, Christoph; Heijmen, Robin H.; Morshuis, Wim; Carrel, Thierry P.; Englberger, Lars

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Long-term follow-up reports after implantation of the Shelhigh (R) (Shelhigh, Inc., NJ, USA) No-React (R) aortic valved conduit used for aortic root replacement do not exist. METHODS: Between November 1998 and December 2007, the Shelhigh (R) No-React (R) aortic valved conduit was

  12. Transapical sutureless aortic valve implantation under magnetic resonance imaging guidance: Acute and short-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Keith A; Mazilu, Dumitru; Cai, Junfeng; Kindzelski, Bogdan; Li, Ming

    2015-04-01

    Despite the increasing success and applicability of transcatheter aortic valve replacement, 2 critical issues remain: the durability of the valves, and the ideal imaging to aid implantation. This study was designed to investigate the transapical implantation of a device of known durability using real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance. A sutureless aortic valve was used that employs a self-expanding nitinol stent and is amenable to transapical delivery. MRI (1.5-T) was used to identify the anatomic landmarks in 60-kg Yucatan swine. Prostheses were loaded into an MRI-compatible delivery device with an active guidewire to enhance visualization. A series of acute feasibility experiments were conducted (n = 10). Additional animals (n = 6) were allowed to survive and had follow-up MRI scans and echocardiography at 90 days postoperatively. Postmortem gross examination was performed. The valve was MRI compatible and created no significant MRI artifacts. The 3 commissural struts were visible on short-axis view; therefore, coronary ostia obstruction was easily avoided. The average implantation time was 65 seconds. Final results demonstrated stability of the implants with preservation of myocardial perfusion and function over 90 days: the ejection fraction was 48% ± 15%; the peak gradient was 17.3 ± 11.3 mm Hg; the mean gradient was 9.8 ± 7.2 mm Hg. Mild aortic regurgitation was seen in 4 cases, trace in 1 case, and a severe central jet in 1 case. Prosthesis positioning was evaluated during gross examination. We demonstrated that a sutureless aortic valve can be safely and expeditiously implanted through a transapical approach under real-time MRI guidance. Postimplantation results showed a well-functioning prosthesis, with minimal regurgitation, and stability over time. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Aortic Valve Cyclic Stretch Causes Increased Remodeling Activity and Enhanced Serotonin Receptor Responsiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Kartik; Bakay, Marina A.; Connolly, Jeanne M.; Zhang, Xuemei; Yoganathan, Ajit P.; Levy, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Increased serotonin(5HT) receptor(5HTR) signaling has been associated with cardiac valvulopathy. Prior cell culture studies of 5HTR signaling in heart valve interstitial cells have provided mechanistic insights concerning only static conditions. We investigated the hypothesis that aortic valve biomechanics participate in the regulation of both 5HTR expression and inter-related extracellular matrix remodeling events. Methods The effects of cyclic-stretch on aortic valve 5HTR, expression, signaling and extracellular matrix remodeling were investigated using a tensile stretch bioreactor in studies which also compared the effects of adding 5HT and/or the 5HT-transporter inhibitor, Fluoxetine. Results Cyclic-stretch alone increased both proliferation and collagen in porcine aortic valve cusp samples. However, with cyclic-stretch, unlike static conditions, 5HT plus Fluoxetine caused the greatest increase in proliferation (p4.5 fold) for cyclic-stretch versus static (p<0.001), while expression of the 5HT transporter was not changed significantly. Extracellular matrix genes (eg. Collagen Types I,II,III, and proteoglycans) were also upregulated by cyclic-stretch. Conclusions Porcine aortic valve cusp samples subjected to cyclic stretch upregulate 5HTR2A and 2B, and also initiate remodeling activity characterized by increased proliferation and collagen production. Importantly, enhanced 5HTR responsiveness, due to increased 5HTR2A and 2B expression, results in a significantly greater response in remodeling endpoints (proliferation, collagen and GAG production) to 5HT in the presence of 5HT transporter blockade. PMID:21718840

  14. Consequence of patient substitution of nattokinase for warfarin after aortic valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahi, Maqsood M; Choi, Charles H; Konda, Subbareddy; Shake, Jay G

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a patient's self-substitution of nattokinase for the vitamin K antagonist warfarin after aortic valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis. Nattokinase is an enzyme derived from a popular fermented soybean preparation in Japan (natto), which has fibrinolytic properties and is gaining popularity in nontraditional health journals and nonmedical health websites as an over-the-counter thrombolytic. After nearly a year of use of nattokinase without warfarin, the patient developed thrombus on the mechanical valve and underwent successful repeat valve replacement. We believe this is the first documented case of nattokinase being used as a substitute for warfarin after valve replacement, and we strongly discourage its use for this purpose.

  15. Sex differences in aortic root and vascular anatomy in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation: A computed-tomographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Ashraf; Barbash, Israel; Schwammenthal, Ehud; Segev, Amit; Kornowski, Ran; Assali, Abid; Shaviv, Ella; Fefer, Paul; Goitein, Orly; Konen, Eli; Guetta, Victor

    Very little data exist on the impact of sex on aortic and arterial anatomy as relevant for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). To investigate whether patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) referred for TAVI display sex-specific differences in aortic root and ilio-femoral artery size. In 506 patients referred for pre-procedural CT evaluation before TAVI we performed a detailed assessment of aortic root anatomy: size of the annulus and the sinus of Valsalva (SoV), diameter of the sino-tubular junction (STJ), and distance of the coronary artery ostia to the aortic annulus plane; we also determined the dimensions of aorta, subclavian, and ilio-femoral arteries. Women had significantly smaller aortic root dimensions (annulus mean diameter: 22.9 ± 2.2 mm vs. 25.7 ± 2.7 mm, SoV mean diameter: 31.8 ± 4.2 mm vs. 36.3 ± 3.8 mm, STJ mean diameter: 26.3 ± 3.4 mm vs. 29.8 ± 4.2 mm) and lower left and right coronary artery ostia take-off (12.3 ± 2.4 vs. 14.1 ± 2.9 mm; 14.8 ± 2.6 vs. 17.1 ± 3.2 mm, respectively) than men (P < 0.001 for all), even after adjustment for their smaller body surface area (BSA) and height. Dimensions of the ascending aorta, subclavian and ilio-femoral arteries were also significantly smaller in women, but not when adjusted for BSA. Women with severe AS had smaller aortic root dimensions even after correcting for their smaller body size and height, reflecting a sex-specific difference. In contrast, sex-related differences in aortic, subclavian, and ilio-femoral dimensions were fully explained by the smaller BSA of women. Copyright © 2017 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Quantification of aortic valve calcification using multislice spiral computed tomography: comparison with atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koos, Ralf; Mahnken, Andreas Horst; Kühl, Harald Peter; Mühlenbruch, Georg; Mevissen, Vera; Stork, Ludwig; Dronskowski, Richard; Langebartels, Georg; Autschbach, Rüdiger; Ortlepp, Jan R

    2006-05-01

    Multislice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) allows the in vivo detection of valvular calcification. The aim of this study was to validate the quantification of aortic valve calcification (AVC) by MSCT with in vitro measurements by atomic absorption spectroscopy. In 18 patients with severe aortic stenosis, 16 detector row MSCT (SOMATOM Sensation 16, Siemens, Forchheim, Germany with scan parameters as follows: 420 milliseconds tube rotation time, 12 x 0.75 mm collimation, tube voltage 120 KV) was performed before aortic valve replacement. Images were reconstructed at 60% of the RR interval with an effective slice thickness of 3 mm and a reconstruction increment of 2 mm. AVC was assessed using Agatston AVC score, mass AVC score, and volumetric AVC score. After valve replacement, the calcium content of the excised human stenotic aortic valves was determined in vitro using atomic absorption spectroscopy. The mean Agatston AVC score was 3,842 +/- 1,790, the mean volumetric AVC score was 3,061 +/- 1,406, and mass AVC score was 888 +/- 492 as quantified by MSCT. Atomic absorption spectroscopy showed a mean true calcification mass (Ca5(PO4)3OH) of 19 +/- 8 mass%. There was a significant correlation between in vivo AVC scores determined by MSCT and in vitro mean true calcification mass (r = 0.74, P = 0.0004 for mass AVC score, r = 0.79, P = 0.0001 for volumetric AVC score and r = 0.80, P = 0.0001 for Agatston AVC score) determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Linear regression analysis showed a significant association between the degree of hydroxyapatite (given in mass%) in the aortic valve and the degree of AVC (R = 0.74, F = 19.6, P = 0.0004 for mass AVC score, R = 0.80, F = 29.3, P = 0.0001 for Agatston AVC score and R = 0.79, F = 27.3, P = 0.0001 for volumetric AVC score) assessed by MSCT. MSCT allows accurate in vivo quantification of aortic valve calcifications.

  17. Updated standardized endpoint definitions for transcatheter aortic valve implantation: the Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 consensus document (VARC-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappetein, Arie Pieter; Head, Stuart J; Généreux, Philippe; Piazza, Nicolo; van Mieghem, Nicolas M; Blackstone, Eugene H; Brott, Thomas G; Cohen, David J; Cutlip, Donald E; van Es, Gerrit-Anne; Hahn, Rebecca T; Kirtane, Ajay J; Krucoff, Mitchell W; Kodali, Susheel; Mack, Michael J; Mehran, Roxana; Rodés-Cabau, Josep; Vranckx, Pascal; Webb, John G; Windecker, Stephan; Serruys, Patrick W; Leon, Martin B

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the current Valve Academic Research Consortium (VARC)-2 initiative was to revisit the selection and definitions of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) clinical endpoints to make them more suitable to the present and future needs of clinical trials. In addition, this document is intended to expand the understanding of patient risk stratification and case selection. A recent study confirmed that VARC definitions have already been incorporated into clinical and research practice and represent a new standard for consistency in reporting clinical outcomes of patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS) undergoing TAVI. However, as the clinical experience with this technology has matured and expanded, certain definitions have become unsuitable or ambiguous. Two in-person meetings (held in September 2011 in Washington, DC, USA, and in February 2012 in Rotterdam, Netherlands) involving VARC study group members, independent experts (including surgeons, interventional and non-interventional cardiologists, imaging specialists, neurologists, geriatric specialists, and clinical trialists), the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and industry representatives, provided much of the substantive discussion from which this VARC-2 consensus manuscript was derived. This document provides an overview of risk assessment and patient stratification that need to be considered for accurate patient inclusion in studies. Working groups were assigned to define the following clinical endpoints: mortality, stroke, myocardial infarction, bleeding complications, acute kidney injury, vascular complications, conduction disturbances and arrhythmias, and a miscellaneous category including relevant complications not previously categorized. Furthermore, comprehensive echocardiographic recommendations are provided for the evaluation of prosthetic valve (dys)function. Definitions for the quality of life assessments are also reported. These endpoints formed the basis for

  18. Updated standardized endpoint definitions for transcatheter aortic valve implantation: the Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 consensus document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappetein, A Pieter; Head, Stuart J; Généreux, Philippe; Piazza, Nicolo; van Mieghem, Nicolas M; Blackstone, Eugene H; Brott, Thomas G; Cohen, David J; Cutlip, Donald E; van Es, Gerrit-Anne; Hahn, Rebecca T; Kirtane, Ajay J; Krucoff, Mitchell W; Kodali, Susheel; Mack, Michael J; Mehran, Roxana; Rodés-Cabau, Josep; Vranckx, Pascal; Webb, John G; Windecker, Stephan; Serruys, Patrick W; Leon, Martin B

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the current Valve Academic Research Consortium (VARC)-2 initiative was to revisit the selection and definitions of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) clinical endpoints to make them more suitable to the present and future needs of clinical trials. In addition, this document is intended to expand the understanding of patient risk stratification and case selection. A recent study confirmed that VARC definitions have already been incorporated into clinical and research practice and represent a new standard for consistency in reporting clinical outcomes of patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS) undergoing TAVI. However, as the clinical experience with this technology has matured and expanded, certain definitions have become unsuitable or ambiguous. Two in-person meetings (held in September 2011 in Washington, DC, and in February 2012 in Rotterdam, The Netherlands) involving VARC study group members, independent experts (including surgeons, interventional and noninterventional cardiologists, imaging specialists, neurologists, geriatric specialists, and clinical trialists), the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and industry representatives, provided much of the substantive discussion from which this VARC-2 consensus manuscript was derived. This document provides an overview of risk assessment and patient stratification that need to be considered for accurate patient inclusion in studies. Working groups were assigned to define the following clinical endpoints: mortality, stroke, myocardial infarction, bleeding complications, acute kidney injury, vascular complications, conduction disturbances and arrhythmias, and a miscellaneous category including relevant complications not previously categorized. Furthermore, comprehensive echocardiographic recommendations are provided for the evaluation of prosthetic valve (dys)function. Definitions for the quality of life assessments are also reported. These endpoints formed the basis for

  19. Recovery from anemia in patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation--prevalence, predictors and clinical outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Arnous, Samer; Lønborg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Preoperative anemia is common in patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and has been linked to a poorer outcome--including a higher 1-year mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of successful TAVI...... on baseline anemia. METHODS: A total of 253 patients who survived at least 1 year following TAVI were included in this study. The prevalence, predictors and clinical outcome of hemoglobin (Hb)-recovery were assessed. RESULTS: The prevalence of baseline anemia was 49% (n = 124)--recovery from anemia occurred......-recovery, while blood transfusion (OR 0.31, P = 0.038) and chronic kidney disease (CKD, OR 0.33, P = 0.043) were identified as negative predictors at, respectively, one and two years after TAVI. When compared to patients without baseline anemia, those anemic patients with Hb-recovery had a similar functional...

  20. Sinus of Valsalva aneurysm and bicuspid aortic valve: detection and mechanism by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen Li Looi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR demonstrated a sinus of Valsalva aneurysm (SVA with severe dilatation of the right coronary sinus in association with a congenital bicuspid aortic valve (BAV and subaortic membrane. The SVA had not been apparent on echocardiography as the dilatation was outside standard echo image planes. On both CMR and echo, blood flow was eccentrically directed into the right coronary sinus by the domed posterior leaflet of the BAV. The impact of the aortic jet on the wall of the right coronary sinus is probably important in the aetiology of the sinus dilatation. CMR proved valuable in demonstrating the SVA and understanding its aetiology.

  1. Sinus of Valsalva aneurysm and bicuspid aortic valve: detection and mechanism by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen Li Looi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR demonstrated a sinus of Valsalva aneurysm (SVA with severe dilatation of the right coronary sinus in association with a congenital bicuspid aortic valve (BAV and subaortic membrane. The SVA had not been apparent on echocardiography as the dilatation was outside standard echo image planes. On both CMR and echo, blood flow was eccentrically directed into the right coronary sinus by the domed posterior leaflet of the BAV. The impact of the aortic jet on the wall of the right coronary sinus is probably important in the aetiology of the sinus dilatation. CMR proved valuable in demonstrating the SVA and understanding its aetiology.

  2. ox-LDL induces PiT-1 expression in human aortic valve interstitial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadlonek, Nicole A; Lee, Joon H; Weyant, Michael J; Meng, Xianzhong; Fullerton, David A

    2013-09-01

    The aortic valve interstitial cell (AVIC) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of calcific aortic stenosis. When appropriately stimulated, AVICs undergo a phenotypic change from that of a myofibroblast to that of a bone-forming-like cell. An elevated blood level of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol is a clinical risk factor for aortic stenosis, and oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) cholesterol has been consistently found in calcified aortic valve leaflets. However, whether it plays a role in the pathogenesis of aortic stenosis is unknown. The process of aortic valve leaflet calcification has been associated with the deposition of calcium phosphate, mediated in part by the phosphate inorganic transporter 1 (PiT-1), a sodium-phosphate ion cotransporter. Therefore, we hypothesized that ox-LDL induces an osteogenic change in human AVICs marked by the induction of PiT-1. Using isolated human AVICs, the purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of ox-LDL on the expression of PiT-1 and the osteogenic factor bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), which is a protein necessary for bone formation. Human AVICs were isolated from nonstenotic aortic valves obtained from the explanted hearts of patients undergoing cardiac transplantation (n = 4) and grown in culture. The cells were treated with serum-free media, serum-free media with dimethyl sulfoxide (vehicle control), 40 μg/mL of ox-LDL, or 40 μg/mL of ox-LDL plus 2.5 mM phosphonoformate hexahydrate acid. Phosphonoformate hexahydrate acid is a competitive inhibitor of PiT-1 by mimicking inorganic phosphate. Cell lysis was performed at 24 h after treatment. Cell lysates were analyzed using immunoblot and densitometry for PiT-1 and BMP-2. Statistical analysis was performed using analysis of variance. P PiT-1 and BMP-2. ox-LDL induced increased production of the phosphate transporter, PiT-1, and the osteogenic factor, BMP-2. Inhibition of PiT-1 with phosphonoformate hexahydrate acid prevented ox-LDL-induced BMP-2

  3. Application of Regent mechanical valve in patients with small aortic annulus: 3-year follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Aortic valve replacement (AVR) with a small aortic annulus is always challenging for the cardiac surgeon. In this study, we sought to evaluate the midterm performance of implantation with a 17-mm or 19-mm St. Jude Medical Regent (SJM Regent) mechanical valve in retrospective consecutive cohort of patients with small aortic annulus (diameter ≤ 19 mm). Methods From January 2008 to April 2011, 40 patients (31 female, mean age = 47.2 ± 5.8 years) with small aortic annulus (≤19 mm in diameter) underwent aortic valve replacement with a 17-mm or 19-mm St. Jude Medical Regent (SJM Regent) mechanical valve. Preoperative mean body surface area, New York Heart Association class, and mean aortic annulus were 1.61 ± 0.26 m2, 3.2 ± 0.4, and 18 ± 1.4 mm respectively. Patients were divided into two groups, according to the implantation of 17 mm SJM Regent mechanical valve (group 1, n = 18) or 19 mm SJM Regent valve (group 2, n = 22). All patients underwent echocardiography examination preoperatively and at one year post-operation. Results There were no early deaths in either group. Follow-up time averaged 36 ± 17.6 months. The mean postoperative New York Heart Association class was 1.3 ± 0.6 (p < 0.001). By echocardiography, in group 1, the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), left ventricular fraction shortening (LVFS), and the indexed effective orifice area (EOAI) increased from 43.7% ± 11.6%, 27.3% ± 7.6%, and 0.70 ± 0.06 cm2/m2 to 69.8 ± 9.3%, 41.4 ± 8.3%, and 0.92 ± 0.10 cm2/m2 respectively (P < 0.05), while the left ventricular mass index (LVMI), and the aortic transvalvular pressure gradient decreased from 116.4 ± 25.4 g/m2, 46.1 ± 8.5 mmHg to 86.7 ± 18.2 g/m2 , 13.7 ± 5.2 mmHg respectively. In group 2, the LVEF, LVFS and EOAI increased from 45.9% ± 9.7%, 30.7% ± 8.0%, and 0.81 ± 0.09 cm2/m2 to 77.4%

  4. Assessment of trans-aortic pressure gradient using a coronary pressure wire in patients with mechanical aortic and mitral valve prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kherada, Nisharahmed; Brenes, Juan Carlos; Kini, Annapoorna S; Dangas, George D

    2017-03-15

    Accurate evaluation of trans-aortic valvular pressure gradients is challenging in cases where dual mechanical aortic and mitral valve prostheses are present. Non-invasive Doppler echocardiographic imaging has its limitations due to multiple geometric assumptions. Invasive measurement of trans-valvular gradients with cardiac catheterization can provide further information in patients with two mechanical valves, where simultaneous pressure measurements in the left ventricle and ascending aorta must be obtained. Obtaining access to the left ventricle via the mitral valve after a trans-septal puncture is not feasible in the case of a concomitant mechanical mitral valve, whereas left ventricular apical puncture technique is associated with high procedural risks. Retrograde crossing of a bileaflet mechanical aortic prosthesis with standard catheters is associated with the risk of catheter entrapment and acute valvular regurgitation. In these cases, the assessment of trans-valvular gradients using a 0.014˝ diameter coronary pressure wire technique has been described in a few case reports. We present the case of a 76-year-old female with rheumatic valvular heart disease who underwent mechanical aortic and mitral valve replacement in the past. She presented with decompensated heart failure and echocardiographic findings suggestive of elevated pressure gradient across the mechanical aortic valve prosthesis. The use of a high-fidelity 0.014˝ diameter coronary pressure guidewire resulted in the detection of a normal trans-valvular pressure gradient across the mechanical aortic valve. This avoided a high-risk third redo valve surgery in our patient. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Moderate Aortic Valvular Insufficiency Invalidates Vortex Formation Time as an Index of Left Ventricular Filling Efficiency in Patients With Severe Degenerative Calcific Aortic Stenosis Undergoing Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagel, Paul S; Boettcher, Brent T; De Vry, Derek J; Freed, Julie K; Iqbal, Zafar

    2016-10-01

    Transmitral blood flow produces a vortex ring (quantified using vortex formation time [VFT]) that enhances the efficiency of left ventricular (LV) filling. VFT is attenuated in LV hypertrophy resulting from aortic valve stenosis (AS) versus normal LV geometry. Many patients with AS also have aortic insufficiency (AI). The authors tested the hypothesis that moderate AI falsely elevates VFT by partially inhibiting mitral leaflet opening in patients with AS. Observational study. Veterans Affairs medical center. Patients with AS in the presence or absence of moderate AI (n = 8 per group) undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR) were studied after institutional review board approval. None. Under general anesthesia, peak early LV filling (E) and atrial systole (A) blood flow velocities and their corresponding velocity-time integrals were obtained using pulse-wave Doppler transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) to determine E/A and atrial filling fraction (beta). Mitral valve diameter (D) was calculated as the average of major and minor axis lengths obtained in the midesophageal bicommissural (transcommissural anterior-lateral-posterior medial) and LV long-axis (anterior-posterior) TEE imaging planes, respectively. VFT was calculated as 4·(1-beta)·SV/πD(3), where SV = stroke volume measured using thermodilution. Hemodynamics, diastolic function, and VFT were determined during steady-state conditions before cardiopulmonary bypass. The severity of AS (mean and peak pressure gradients, peak transvalvular jet velocity, aortic valve area) and diastolic function (E/A, beta) were similar between groups. Moderate centrally directed AI was present in 8 patients with AS (ratio of regurgitant jet width to LV outflow tract diameter of 36±6%). Pulse pressure and mean pulmonary artery pressure were elevated in patients with versus without AI, but no other differences in hemodynamics were observed. Mitral valve minor and major axis lengths, diameter, and area were reduced in the

  6. Long-Term Outcomes for Patients With Severe Symptomatic Aortic Stenosis Treated With Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codner, Pablo; Orvin, Katia; Assali, Abid; Sharony, Ram; Vaknin-Assa, Hanna; Shapira, Yaron; Schwartzenberg, Shmuel; Bental, Tamir; Sagie, Alexander; Kornowski, Ran

    2015-11-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an established technique for the treatment of severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. Data on long-term TAVI outcomes, both hemodynamic and clinical, in real-world practice settings are limited. We aim to explore the long-term clinical results in patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis using multiple catheter-based options: 360 TAVI-treated patients were followed up for ≤5 years. The Medtronic CoreValve was used in 71% and the Edwards SAPIEN in 26%. The primary end point was all-cause mortality during follow-up. Outcomes were assessed based on the Valve Academic Research Consortium 2 criteria. The mean ± SD patient age was 82.1 ± 6.9 years (56.4% women). The Society of Thoracic Surgeons score was 7.5 ± 4.7. The clinical efficacy end point and time-related valve safety at 3 years was 50% and 81.7%, respectively. The calculated 3- and 5-year survival rates were 71.6% and 56.4%, respectively. Five-year follow-up data were obtained for 54 patients alive; 96.2% of alive patients were in the New York Heart Association class I and II, 4 years after TAVI. No gender differences in all-cause mortality rates were observed (p = 0.58). In multivariate analysis, hospitalization 6 months previous to TAVI (hazard ratio [HR] 1.92, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17 to 3.15, p = 0.01), frailty (HR 1.89, 95% CI 1.11 to 3.2, p = 0.02), acute kidney injury (HR 1.93, 95% CI 1.03 to 3.61, p = 0.04), and moderate or more paravalvular aortic regurgitation after TAVI (HR 4.26, 95% CI 2.54 to 7.15, p <0.001) were independent predictors for all-cause mortality. In conclusion, long-term outcomes of TAVI are encouraging. Prevention and early identification of paravalvular leak and acute renal failure after the procedure would improve short- and long-term outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Treatment of aortic stenosis with a self-expanding transcatheter valve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linke, Axel; Wenaweser, Peter; Gerckens, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    -centre 'real-world' patient population in highly experienced centres. METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients with severe aortic stenosis at a higher surgical risk in whom implantation of the CoreValve System was decided by the Heart Team were included. Endpoints were a composite of major adverse cardiovascular...... and cerebrovascular events (MACCE; all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction, stroke, or reintervention) and mortality at 30 days and 1 year. Endpoint-related events were independently adjudicated based on Valve Academic Research Consortium definitions. A total of 1015 patients [mean logistic EuroSCORE 19.4 ± 12...

  8. Impact of Prosthesis-Patient Mismatch on Long-term Functional Capacity After Mechanical Aortic Valve Replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petit-Eisenmann, H.; Epailly, E.; Velten, M.; Radojevic, J.; Eisenmann, B.; Kremer, H.; Kindo, M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) after aortic valve replacement (AVR) for aortic stenosis on exercise capacity remains controversial. The aim of this study was to analyze the long-term impact of PPM after mechanical AVR on maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). METHODS: The study

  9. Predictors for permanent pacemaker implantation in patients undergoing transfemoral aortic valve implantation with the Edwards Sapien 3 valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonska, Birgid; Seeger, Julia; Keßler, Mirjam; von Keil, Alexander; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Wöhrle, Jochen

    2017-08-01

    Predictors for the need of permanent pacemaker implantation (PPMI) in the context of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) are not well defined yet. We evaluated the impact of conduction disturbances, calcium volume of the device landing zone, oversizing and implantation depth on PPMI after TAVI with the balloon-expandable Edwards Sapien 3 (ES3). 335 consecutive patients undergoing transfemoral TAVI with the ES3 for the treatment of symptomatic severe aortic stenosis were included (clinicaltrials NCT02162069). Rate of PPMI after TAVI was 18.4%, excluding patients with permanent pacemakers prior to TAVI or valve-in-valve implantations. Patients requiring PPMI more often had first degree atrioventricular block (AVB) at baseline (48.7 vs. 16.5%, p < 0.01), preprocedural complete right bundle branch block (RBBB; 25.0 vs. 3.9%, p < 0.01) and higher calcium volume of the aortic valve (258.5 ± 317.3 vs. 163.6 ± 178.8 mm³, p < 0.01). There was a trend towards higher rate of PPMI in patients with new-onset left bundle branch block after TAVI (32.7 vs. 20.7%, p = 0.06). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that baseline first degree AVB (odds ratio 3.9, 95% confidence interval 1.73-9.10, p < 0.01) and preprocedural complete RBBB (odds ratio 4.5, 95% confidence interval 1.50-13.21, p < 0.01) were independent predictors of PPMI. Of note, neither oversizing nor implantation depth were independent predictors for need of PPMI with the ES3. In patients treated with the ES3 for symptomatic severe aortic stenosis first degree AVB and complete RBBB at baseline were independently associated with higher rates of postprocedural PPMI, whereas implantation depth and oversizing did not have an impact on PPMI.

  10. Application of Regent mechanical valve in patients with small aortic annulus: 3-year follow-up

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    Zhao Dong

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aortic valve replacement (AVR with a small aortic annulus is always challenging for the cardiac surgeon. In this study, we sought to evaluate the midterm performance of implantation with a 17-mm or 19-mm St. Jude Medical Regent (SJM Regent mechanical valve in retrospective consecutive cohort of patients with small aortic annulus (diameter ≤ 19 mm. Methods From January 2008 to April 2011, 40 patients (31 female, mean age = 47.2 ± 5.8 years with small aortic annulus (≤19 mm in diameter underwent aortic valve replacement with a 17-mm or 19-mm St. Jude Medical Regent (SJM Regent mechanical valve. Preoperative mean body surface area, New York Heart Association class, and mean aortic annulus were 1.61 ± 0.26 m2, 3.2 ± 0.4, and 18 ± 1.4 mm respectively. Patients were divided into two groups, according to the implantation of 17 mm SJM Regent mechanical valve (group 1, n = 18 or 19 mm SJM Regent valve (group 2, n = 22. All patients underwent echocardiography examination preoperatively and at one year post-operation. Results There were no early deaths in either group. Follow-up time averaged 36 ± 17.6 months. The mean postoperative New York Heart Association class was 1.3 ± 0.6 (p 2/m2 to 69.8 ± 9.3%, 41.4 ± 8.3%, and 0.92 ± 0.10 cm2/m2 respectively (P 2, 46.1 ± 8.5 mmHg to 86.7 ± 18.2 g/m2 , 13.7 ± 5.2 mmHg respectively. In group 2, the LVEF, LVFS and EOAI increased from 45.9% ± 9.7%, 30.7% ± 8.0%, and 0.81 ± 0.09 cm2/m2 to 77.4% ± 9.7%, 44.5% ± 9.6%, and 1.27 ± 0.11 cm2/m2 respectively, while the LVMI, and the aortic transvalvular pressure gradient decreased from 118.3 ± 27.6 g/m2, 44.0 ± 6.7 mmHg to 80.1 ± 19.7 g/m2, 10.8 ± 4.1 mmHg as well. The prevalence of PPM was documented in 2 patients in Group 1. Conclusions Patients with small aortic annulus and body surface

  11. Aortic valve myxoma at the extreme age: a review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Arshad; Zalawadiya, Sandip; Kovach, Julie; Afonso, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Primary cardiac tumours are a rare finding, with cardiac myxoma and fibroelastoma representing the majority of these tumours. Cardiac myxomas are most commonly found in the left atrium but are rarely found with attachment to the cardiac valves. The authors describe a case of aortic myxoma found in an 81-year-old man presented with peripheral arterial disease. CT angiogram of the thorax was performed to find the source of emboli and it showed a mass attached to the aortic valve and protruding into the aorta. Details of the location and texture were studied on transoesophageal echocardiography. Preoperative coronary angiography showed coronary artery disease and the patient underwent successful coronary artery bypass grafting and simultaneous resection of the mass. Histopathology revealed the mass as a myxoma. PMID:24642215

  12. Cardiac Hemodynamics in the Pathogenesis of Congenital Heart Disease and Aortic Valve Calcification

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    Nigam, Vishal

    2011-11-01

    An improved understanding of the roles of hemodynamic forces play in cardiac development and the pathogenesis of cardiac disease will have significant scientific and clinical impact. I will focus on the role of fluid dynamics in congenital heart disease and aortic valve calcification. Congenital heart defects are the most common form of birth defect. Aortic valve calcification/stenosis is the third leading cause of adult heart disease and the most common form of acquired valvular disease in developed countries. Given the high incidence of these diseases and their associated morbidity and mortality, the potential translational impact of an improved understanding of cardiac hemodynamic forces is very large. Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego

  13. OPTIMIZATION OF SURGICAL TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH AORTIC VALVE DISEASES AND SEVERE LEFT VENTRICULAR SYSTOLIC DYSFUNCTION

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    E. K. Mekhtiev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of the results of surgical treatment of patients with aortic valve diseases and severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction (ejection fraction less than 35% for the period from January 2005 to April 2011. The study included 39 patients who performed the aortic valve diseases correction. In order to improve the results of sur- gery was used developed a protocol that included preventive training in the intensive care unit with cardioto- nic drug levosimendan, the use of permanent methods of perioperative renal replacement therapy, using a hybrid approach with a combination of diseases with coronary artery disease. Hospital mortality was 5,1%. Based on these results it was concluded that the developed protocol can significantly improve the results of surgical treat- ment of patients with such severe category. 

  14. Valve Calcification in Aortic Stenosis: Etiology and Diagnostic Imaging Techniques

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    María Manuela Izquierdo-Gómez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aortic stenosis is the most common valvulopathy in the Western world. Its prevalence has increased significantly in recent years due to population aging; hence, up to 8% of westerners above the age of 84 now have severe aortic stenosis (Lindroos et al., 1993. This causes increased morbidity and mortality and therein lies the importance of adequate diagnosis and stratification of the degree of severity which allows planning the best therapeutic option in each case. Long understood as a passive age-related degenerative process, it is now considered a rather more complex entity involving mechanisms and factors similar to those of atherosclerosis (Stewart et al., 1997. In this review, we summarize the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the onset and progression of the disease and analyze the current role of cardiac imaging techniques for diagnosis.

  15. Relation of coarctation of the aorta to the occurrence of ascending aortic dilation in children and young adults with bicuspid aortic valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaton, Andrea Z; Nguyen, Thieu; Lai, Wyman W; Chatterjee, Samprit; Ramaswamy, Prema; Lytrivi, Irene D; Parness, Ira A; Srivastava, Shubhika

    2009-01-15

    Children with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) have aortic dilation that is present and progressive from birth irrespective of the functional state of the valve. There are no published data comparing aortic dilation in children with BAV with and without aortic coarctation (CoA). The objectives of this study were to (1) compare differences in aortic dimensions and rates of dilation between children with isolated BAV with those of children with BAV and CoA and (2) identify risk factors for the development of aortic dilation. Patients with BAV with CoA (group A) and without CoA (group B) were identified from our echocardiographic database (1993 to 2006). Aortic measurements at 4 levels were obtained, and z scores were compared. Criteria for exclusion were severe aortic regurgitation/stenosis, previous aortic valvuloplasty, complex left-sided cardiac disease, ventricular septal defects, and Turner, Noonan, Williams, and Marfan syndromes. There were 600 echocardiograms in 247 patients. Group A had 192 echocardiograms in 53 patients (median age 11.3 years; range 0 to 30; median follow-up 7 years), and group B had 382 in 194 patients (median age 8.7 years; range 0 to 29; median follow-up 4 years). Group B had significantly greater ascending aorta dimensions (paortic dilation (paortic dimensions.

  16. An expanded polytetrafluoroethylene-autologous aortic hybrid valve for right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction in the Ross procedure.

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    Miyazaki, Takako; Yamagishi, Masaaki; Shuntoh, Keisuke; Yaku, Hitoshi

    2007-04-01

    Although the Ross procedure is a well-established approach to aortic valve disease in pediatric patients and young adults, there still is no ideal method of right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) reconstruction, especially in children. To achieve improved RVOT reconstruction with long-term valve function and growth potential, we have developed a hybrid valve which combines the autologous aortic valve and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) valves. The posterior wall of RVOT was reconstructed using the autologous aortic wall with a noncoronary cusp, and the anterior wall was reconstructed using a patch made of bovine pericardium or ePTFE with bicuspid ePTFE valves. We implanted hybrid valves in 14 patients (age 5-18 years). During the follow-up period (2.4-8.8 years), there were no mortalities or morbidities, and no patients required reoperation. Echocardiography showed no significant stenosis and regurgitation, and preserved valve motion in all patients. The z-value of the diameters of the pulmonary annulus in early and late follow-up was -1.4 and -1.8, respectively, the difference not being significant. Creation of a hybrid valve was associated with excellent mid- to long-term results. Given its theoretical growth potential, we speculate that this valve could be a good choice for RVOT reconstruction in the Ross procedure, especially for young children.

  17. Patient prosthesis mismatch after aortic valve replacement: An Indian perspective

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    Shreedhar S Joshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Perioperative period. Aims: Occurrence of PPM after AVR, factors associated with PPM, impact on mortality. Settings and Design: Teritary Care Referral Cardiac Centre. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of AVR procedures at a single centre over 4 years was conducted. Demographic, echocardiographic and outcome data were collected from institute database. Rahimtoola criteria of indexed effective orifice area (iEOA were used to stratify patients into PPM categories. Patients with and without PPM were compared for associated factors. Statistical Analysis Used: Independent t-test, chi-square test, logistic regression analysis, ROC-AUC, Youden index. Results: 606 patients with complete data were analysed for PPM. The incidence of mild, moderate and severe PPM was 6.1% (37, 2.5% (15 and 0.5% (3 respectively. There was no impact of PPM on all-cause in-hospital mortality. PPM was observed more with Aortic Stenosis (AS compared to Aortic Regurgitation (AR as etiology. Aortic annulus indexed to BSA (iAA had a very good predictive ability for PPM at <16mm/m 2 BSA. Conclusions: PPM has lower incidence after AVR in this Indian population and does not increase early mortality. Patients with AS and iAA<16mm/m2BSA should be cautiously dealt with to prevent PPM.

  18. Architectural Trends in the Human Normal and Bicuspid Aortic Valve Leaflet and Its Relevance to Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Ankush; Ferrari, Giovanni; Joyce, Erin; Daniels, Michael J.; Sainger, Rachana; Gorman, Joseph H.; Gorman, Robert; Sacks, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    The bicuspid aortic valve (AV) is the most common cardiac congenital anomaly and has been found to be a significant risk factor for developing calcific AV disease. However, the mechanisms of disease development remain unclear. In this study we quantified the structure of human normal and bicuspid leaflets in the early disease stage. From these individual leaflet maps average fiber structure maps were generated using a novel spline based technique. Interestingly, we found statistically different and consistent regional structures between the normal and bicuspid valves. The regularity in the observed microstructure was a surprising finding, especially for the pathological BAV leaflets and is an essential cornerstone of any predictive mathematical models of valve disease. In contrast, we determined that isolated valve interstitial cells from BAV leaflets show the same in vitro calcification pathways as those from the normal AV leaflets. This result suggests the VICs are not intrinsically different when isolated, and that external features, such as abnormal microstructure and altered flow may be the primary contributors in the accelerated calcification experienced by BAV patients. PMID:24488233

  19. Transcatheter or Surgical Aortic-Valve Replacement in Intermediate-Risk Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Martin B; Smith, Craig R; Mack, Michael J; Makkar, Raj R; Svensson, Lars G; Kodali, Susheel K; Thourani, Vinod H; Tuzcu, E Murat; Miller, D Craig; Herrmann, Howard C; Doshi, Darshan; Cohen, David J; Pichard, Augusto D; Kapadia, Samir; Dewey, Todd; Babaliaros, Vasilis; Szeto, Wilson Y; Williams, Mathew R; Kereiakes, Dean; Zajarias, Alan; Greason, Kevin L; Whisenant, Brian K; Hodson, Robert W; Moses, Jeffrey W; Trento, Alfredo; Brown, David L; Fearon, William F; Pibarot, Philippe; Hahn, Rebecca T; Jaber, Wael A; Anderson, William N; Alu, Maria C; Webb, John G

    2016-04-28

    Previous trials have shown that among high-risk patients with aortic stenosis, survival rates are similar with transcatheter aortic-valve replacement (TAVR) and surgical aortic-valve replacement. We evaluated the two procedures in a randomized trial involving intermediate-risk patients. We randomly assigned 2032 intermediate-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis, at 57 centers, to undergo either TAVR or surgical replacement. The primary end point was death from any cause or disabling stroke at 2 years. The primary hypothesis was that TAVR would not be inferior to surgical replacement. Before randomization, patients were entered into one of two cohorts on the basis of clinical and imaging findings; 76.3% of the patients were included in the transfemoral-access cohort and 23.7% in the transthoracic-access cohort. The rate of death from any cause or disabling stroke was similar in the TAVR group and the surgery group (P=0.001 for noninferiority). At 2 years, the Kaplan-Meier event rates were 19.3% in the TAVR group and 21.1% in the surgery group (hazard ratio in the TAVR group, 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.73 to 1.09; P=0.25). In the transfemoral-access cohort, TAVR resulted in a lower rate of death or disabling stroke than surgery (hazard ratio, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.62 to 1.00; P=0.05), whereas in the transthoracic-access cohort, outcomes were similar in the two groups. TAVR resulted in larger aortic-valve areas than did surgery and also resulted in lower rates of acute kidney injury, severe bleeding, and new-onset atrial fibrillation; surgery resulted in fewer major vascular complications and less paravalvular aortic regurgitation. In intermediate-risk patients, TAVR was similar to surgical aortic-valve replacement with respect to the primary end point of death or disabling stroke. (Funded by Edwards Lifesciences; PARTNER 2 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01314313.).

  20. Dynamic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction complicating aortic valve replacement: A hidden malefactor revisited

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    Panduranga Prashanth

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that a dynamic left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT obstruction exists in patients, following aortic valve replacement (AVR and is usually considered to be benign. We present a patient with dynamic LVOT obstruction following AVR, who developed refractory cardiogenic shock and expired inspite of various treatment strategies. This phenomenon must be diagnosed early and should be considered as a serious and potentially fatal complication following AVR. The possible mechanisms and treatment options are reviewed.

  1. Consequence of patient substitution of nattokinase for warfarin after aortic valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis

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    Elahi, Maqsood M.; Choi, Charles H.; Konda, Subbareddy; Shake, Jay G.

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a patient's self-substitution of nattokinase for the vitamin K antagonist warfarin after aortic valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis. Nattokinase is an enzyme derived from a popular fermented soybean preparation in Japan (natto), which has fibrinolytic properties and is gaining popularity in nontraditional health journals and nonmedical health websites as an over-the-counter thrombolytic. After nearly a year of use of nattokinase without warfarin, the patient d...

  2. Remote ischemic preconditioning in aortic valve surgery: Results of a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinaud, Frédéric; Corbeau, Jean-Jacques; Baufreton, Christophe; Binuani, Jean-Patrice; De Brux, Jean-Louis; Fouquet, Olivier; Angoulvant, Denis; Furber, Alain; Prunier, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Although remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) has emerged as an attractive strategy to reduce cardiac injury in patients undergoing diverse cardiac surgical procedures, it is unclear whether RIPC has protective effects in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement surgery without coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Hence, 100 adult patients undergoing elective aortic valve replacement for aortic valve stenosis, without combined surgery with CABG, were prospectively randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to either the RIPC group or the control group. The RIPC group underwent three cycles of 5-min inflation to 200mmHg and 5-min deflation of an automated upper-arm cuff inflator after induction of anesthesia. The control group had a deflated cuff placed on upper arm for 30min. The primary endpoint was 72-h area under curve (AUC) for troponin I (cTnI). Secondary endpoints were 72-h AUC for creatine kinase-MB isoenzyme (CK-MB) release, incidence of acute kidney injury, extubation time, length of stay in intensive care unit, and simplified acute physiology score (SAPS II). There were no significant differences in cTnI AUC [195±190 arbitrary units (a.u.) in RIPC group vs. 169±117 a.u. in the control group; p=0.41] and CK-MB AUC between groups. None of the other secondary endpoints differed between groups. Acute kidney injury occurred in 12 patients (24.5%) in the control group and in 13 (26.0%) in the RIPC group (p=0.86). RIPC did not exhibit significant cardiac or kidney protective effects in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement surgery without CABG. Copyright © 2015 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Predictive value of platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio in severe degenerative aortic valve stenosis

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    Efe Edem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aortic valve stenosis (AVS is the most common cause of left ventricular outflow obstruction, and its prevalence among elderly patients causes a major public health burden. Recently, platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR has been recognized as a novel prognostic biomarker that offers information about both aggregation and inflammation pathways. Since PLR indicates inflammation, we hypothesized that PLR may be associated with the severity of AVS due to chronic inflammation pathways that cause stiffness and calcification of the aortic valve. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively enrolled 117 patients with severe degenerative AVS, who underwent aortic valve replacement and 117 control patients in our clinic. PLR was defined as the absolute platelet count divided by the absolute lymphocyte count. Severe AVS was defined as calcification and sclerosis of the valve with a mean pressure gradient of >40 mmHg. Results: PLR was 197.03 ± 49.61 in the AVS group and 144.9 ± 40.35 in the control group, which indicated a statistically significant difference (P < 0.001. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis demonstrated that PLR values over 188 predicted the severity of aortic stenosis with a sensitivity of 87% and a specificity of 70% (95% confidence interval = 0.734–0.882; P < 0.001; area under ROC curve: 0.808. Conclusion: We suggest that the level of PLR elevation is related to the severity of degenerative AVS, and PLR should be used to monitor patients' inflammatory responses and the efficacy of treatment, which will lead us to more closely monitor this high-risk population to detect severe degenerative AVS at an early stage.

  4. Characteristic Morphologies of the Bicuspid Aortic Valve in Patients with Genetic Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niaz, Talha; Poterucha, Joseph T; Olson, Timothy M; Johnson, Jonathan N; Craviari, Cecilia; Nienaber, Thomas; Palfreeman, Jared; Cetta, Frank; Hagler, Donald J

    2017-11-28

    In patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV), complications including progressive aortic stenosis and aortic dilatation develop over time. The morphology of cusp fusion is one of the determinants of the type and severity of these complications. We present the association of morphology of cusp fusion in BAV patients with distinctive genetic syndromes. The Mayo Clinic echocardiography database was retrospectively reviewed to identify patients (age ≤ 22 years) diagnosed with BAV from 1990 to 2016. Cusp fusion morphology was determined from the echocardiographic studies, while coexisting cardiac defects and genetic syndromes were determined from chart review. A total of 1,037 patients with BAV were identified: 550 (53%) had an isolated BAV, 299 (29%) had BAV and a coexisting congenital heart defect, and 188 (18%) had BAV and a coexisting genetic syndrome or disorder. There were no differences in distribution of morphology across the three groups. However, right-noncoronary (RN) cusp fusion was the predominant morphology associated with Down syndrome (P = .002) and right-left (RL) cusp fusion was the predominant morphology associated with Turner syndrome (P = .02), DiGeorge syndrome (P = .02), and Shone syndrome (P = .0007), when compared with valve morphology in patients with isolated BAV. Isolated BAV patients with RN cusp fusion had larger ascending aorta diameter (P = .001) and higher number of patients with ≥ moderate aortic regurgitation (P = .02), while those with RL cusp fusion had larger sinus of Valsalva diameter (P = .0006). Morphological subtypes of BAV are associated with different genetic syndromes, suggesting distinct perturbations of developmental pathways in aortic valve malformation. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Balloon Valvuloplasty of Aortic Valve Stenosis in Childhood: Midterm Results in a Children’s Hospital, Mansoura University, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Marshafawy, Hala; Al Sawah, Gehan Attia; Hafez, Mona; Matter, Mohammed; El Gamal, Adel; Sheishaa, Abdel Gawad; El Kair, Magdy Abu

    2012-01-01

    Background: Balloon valvuloplasty was established as an alternative to surgery for treatment of aortic valve stenosis in childhood. Acute complications after balloon dilatation including aortic insufficiency or early death were described. Aim of Work: To analyze early outcome and midterm results of balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) in Children’s Hospital, Mansoura University, Egypt. Subjects and Methods: Between April 2005–June 2008, all consecutive patients of age aortic valve stenosis (AVS) with BAV were analyzed retrospectively. The study included 21 patients; 17 males, and 4 females. Their age ranged from the neonatal period to 10 years (mean age 5.6 ± 3.7 years). Patients with gradient ≥50 mmHg and aortic valve insufficiency (AI) up to grade I were included. All patients had isolated aortic valve stenosis except 3 patients (14.3%) had associated aortic coarctation. Six patients (28.6%) had bicuspid aortic valve. All patients had normal myocardial function except one (4.8%) had FS 15%. The duration of follow up was (mean ± SD: 18.5 ± 11.7 months). Results: Femoral artery approach was used in 20 patients (95.2%) and carotid artery in one neonate (4.8%). Balloon/annulus ratio was 0.83 ± 0.04. Significant reduction in pressure gradient was achieved (mean 66.7 ± 9.8 mmHg to 20.65 ± 2.99 mmHg) (P aortic valve stenosis significantly reduces gradient with low morbidity and mortality in children. PMID:22412302

  6. Percutaneous Dual-valve Intervention in a High-risk Patient with Severe Aortic and Mitral Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrevlje, Blaz; Aboukura, Mohamad; Nienaber, Christoph A

    2016-01-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most frequent and mitral stenosis is the least frequent native single-sided valve disease in Europe. Patients with the combination of severe symptomatic degenerative aortic and mitral stenosis are very rare. Guidelines for the treatment of heart valve diseases are clear for single-valve situations. However, there is no common agreement or recommendation for the best treatment strategy in patients with multiple valve disease and severe concomitant comorbidities. A 76-year-old female patient with the combination of severe degenerative symptomatic aortic and mitral stenosis and several comorbidities including severe obesity, who was found unsuitable surgical candidate by the heart team and unsuitable for two-time general anesthesia in the case of two-step single-valve percutaneous approach by anesthesiologists, underwent successful percutaneous dual-valve single-intervention (transcatheter aortic valve implantation and percutaneous mitral balloon commissurotomy). Percutaneous dual-valve single-intervention is feasible in selected symptomatic high-risk patients.

  7. Strain and strain rate echocardiography findings in children with asymptomatic congenital aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Vehbi; Öcal, Burhan; Orun, Utku Arman; Ozgur, Senem; Yılmaz, Osman; Keskin, Mahmut; Ceylan, Ozben; Karademir, Selmin; Şenocak, Filiz

    2013-06-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate myocardial functions with strain/strain rate echocardiography in asymptomatic patients having congenital aortic stenosis (CAS) with normal cardiac functions as determined by conventional echocardiographic techniques and comparing them with those of healthy controls. A total of 58 patients with various degrees of isolated CAS and 52 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. Conventional and two-dimensional speckle tracking (2DSTE) echocardiography were performed. Global longitudinal strain (LS) (-23.1 ± 3.6 and -23.8 ± 4.7), and longitudinal strain rate (LSR) (-1.49 ± 0.32 and -1.76 ± 0.39) values were lower, whereas circumferential strain (CS) (-25.9 ± 4.7 and -22.8 ± 6.4) and circumferential strain rate (CSR) (-1.82 ± 0.46 and -1.69 ± 0.49) values were greater in the patient group than in the control subjects. The difference was significant for global LSR and CS (p children with CAS. Impairment of LV long-axis function occurred earlier and was more prominent in basal parts of the interventricular septum and the free wall of the left ventricle.

  8. Imaging experimental infective endocarditis with indium-111-labeled blood cellular components. [Rabbits, aortic valve

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    Riba, A.L.; Thakur, M.L.; Gottschalk, A.; Andriole, V.T.; Zaret, B.L.

    1979-02-01

    The capability of radionuclide imaging to detect experimental aortic valve infective endocarditis was assessed with indium-111 (/sup 111/In)-labeled blood cells. Sequential cardiac imaging and tissue distribution studies were obtained in 17 rabbits with infective endocarditis after administration of /sup 111/In-platelets and in five after /sup 111/In-polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Forty-eight to 72 hours after platelet administration, in vivo imaging demonstrated abnormal /sup 111/In uptake in all animals in the region of the aortic valve in an anatomically distinct pattern. Images of the excised heart showed discrete cardiac uptake conforming to the in vivo image and gross pathological examination. /sup 111/In-platelet uptake in vegetations from the 17 animals averaged 240 +- 41 times greater than that in normal myocardium and 99 +- 15 times greater uptake in blood. In contrast, /sup 111/In-leukocyte cardiac imaging showed no abnormal aortic valve uptake 24 hours after tracer administration and the lesion myocardium activity ratio was only 5 +- 2 (3 +- 1 for lesion/blood activity). Four normal rabbits demonstrated neither positive /sup 111/In-platelet scintigraphs nor abnormal cardiac tissue uptake. Likewise, noncellular /sup 111/In was not concentrated to any significant extent in three animals with infective endocarditis. This study demonstrates that /sup 111/In-platelet, but not leukocyte cardiac imaging, is a sensitive technique for detecting experimental infective endocarditis. The imaging data conform to the cellular pathology of the infective endocarditis vegetation.

  9. Crystalline Ultrastructures, Inflammatory Elements, and Neoangiogenesis Are Present in Inconspicuous Aortic Valve Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Dorfmüller

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Morbidity from calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD is increasing. Recent studies suggest early reversible changes involving inflammation and neoangiogenesis. We hypothesized that microcalcifications, chemokines, and growth factors are present in unaffected regions of calcific aortic valves. We studied aortic valves from 4 patients with CAVD and from 1 control, using immunohistochemistry, scanning electron microscopy, and infrared spectrography. We revealed clusters of capillary neovessels in calcified (ECC, to a lesser extent in noncalcified (ECN areas. Endothelial cells proved constant expression of SDF-1 in ECC, ECN, and endothelial cells from valvular surface (ECS. Its receptor CXCR4 was expressed in ECC. IL-6 expression correlated with CXCR4 staining and presence of lymphocytes. VEGF was expressed by ECS, its receptor by ECC and ECN. Crystalline ultrastructures were found on the surface of histologically noncalcified areas (HNCAs, spectrography revealed calcium hydroxylapatite. Our results demonstrate that crystalline ultrastructures are present in HNCAs, undergoing neoangiogenesis in an inflammatory context. These alterations could be an early witness of disease and an opening to therapy.

  10. The Ross full root replacement in adults with bicuspid aortic valve disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, John W; Ruzmetov, Mark; Shahriari, Ali; Rodefeld, Mark D; Turrentine, Mark W; Mahomed, Yousuf

    2011-05-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve disease (BAVD) is the most common congenital cardiac lesion causing aortic stenosis in adults. This lesion can be associated with a histological abnormality of the aortic wall and dilated or aneurysmal ascending aorta. In younger patients, the Ross operation offers several advantages over conventional aortic valve replacement (AVR); however, the rationale of performing this procedure on adults in the face of BAVD have been questioned. Between 1994 and 2009, a total of 101 adult patients (mean age 36 years; range: 18-61 years) with BAVD underwent the Ross full root replacement at the authors' institution. Of these patients, 23 (23%) had an aneurysmal ascending aorta (4.0-5.2 cm) associated with BAVD which was resected at the time of, or subsequent to, a Ross AVR. The end point of the study was freedom from Ross autograft dilatation > 4.0 cm, dysfunction, or valve repair or replacement. The mean follow up was 6.0 +/- 3.9 years. At the latest follow up, 19 patients (19%) had a dilated ascending aorta with a mean size 45.1 mm (range: 40-64 mm). Eight patients (8%) required a redo operation on the autograft. Three of seven patients undergoing reoperation had their autograft valve preserved; the remaining four underwent a modified Bentall root replacement. One patient had a repair of a left ventricular pseudoaneurysm below the Ross valve. Only three patients with preoperative ascending aorta dilation developed late autograft dilation. Freedom from autograft dilatation > 4.0 cm, dysfunction, repair or replacement was 80% at 10 years. Mid-term results indicate that Ross AVR in adults with BAVD had good outcomes, with a low incidence of autograft-related complications. In almost half of the patients undergoing reoperation, the autograft valve was preserved. The incidence of autograft valve insufficiency and dilatation might be further reduced by: (i) aggressively treating any postoperative systemic hypertension; (ii) externally fortifying the annulus

  11. Initial Experiences of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI in Iran with Midterm Follow up

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    Ali Mohammad Haji Zeinali

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement (SAVR is the gold standard method for treatment of symptomatic severe senile Aortic Valve Stenosis (AS. For inoperable patients, due to severe co-morbidities, Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI has been suggested as a new and safe alternative with significant follow up superiority to medical treatment; recently, it was suggested for patients at intermediate risk, as well. Since its introduction in 2002, TAVI has well developed in more than 40 countries. Objectives: We made an attempt to transfer this technology to Tehran University for the first time and then evaluated the feasibility and safety of this new technique with midterm closed clinical and echocardiographic follow up. Patients and Methods: Eight patients (5 males, with a mean age of 77 ± 6.7 years old underwent transfemoral TAVI from 2010, as the first sequential patients in Tehran University, by Balloon expandable bioprosthetic Edwards SAPIEN transcatheter heart valve, under general anesthesia in hybrid operation room. Results: There were 7 tricuspid valves and one bicuspid aortic valve (AV. All the patients had symptomatic severe senile valvular AS with severe co-morbidities so that the surgeons did not agree with open SAVR. Closed preprocedural, procedural, in hospital, one and 6 months clinical and echocardiographic assessments and follow up were done. Results: Procedural success rate was 100% with good implantation of the valve. A decrease in the AV mean gradient (MG from preprocedural mean AVMG 52.2 ± 19.7 mm Hg to 9.8 ± 3.7 mm Hg was observed in the 6 month follow up. One patient had procedural papillary muscle damage and moderate mitral regurgitation (MR, which needed hemodynamic support. No in hospital mortality or major complications were seen. In the follow up period, one patient had unexplained sudden death in sleep 3 weeks after the discharge. The other 7 patients had good 6 months of follow up with improvement of

  12. Automatic 3D aortic annulus sizing by computed tomography in the planning of transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queirós, Sandro; Dubois, Christophe; Morais, Pedro; Adriaenssens, Tom; Fonseca, Jaime C; Vilaça, João L; D'hooge, Jan

    Accurate imaging assessment of aortic annulus (AoA) dimension is paramount to decide on the correct transcatheter heart valve (THV) size for patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). We evaluated the feasibility and accuracy of a novel automatic framework for multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT)-based TAVI planning. Among 122 consecutive patients undergoing TAVI and retrospectively reviewed for this study, 104 patients with preoperative MDCT of sufficient quality were enrolled and analyzed with the proposed software. Fully automatic (FA) and semi-automatic (SA) AoA measurements were compared to manual measurements, with both automated and manual-based interobserver variability (IOV) being assessed. Finally, the effect of these measures on hypothetically selected THV size was evaluated against the implanted size, as well as with respect to manually-derived sizes. FA analysis was feasible in 92.3% of the cases, increasing to 100% if using the SA approach. Automatically-extracted measurements showed excellent agreement with manually-derived ones, with small biases and narrow limits of agreement, and comparable to the interobserver agreement. The SA approach presented a statistically lower IOV than manual analysis, showing the potential to reduce interobserver sizing disagreements. Moreover, the automated approaches displayed close agreement with the implanted sizes, similar to the ones obtained by the experts. The proposed automatic framework provides an accurate and robust tool for AoA measurements and THV sizing in patients undergoing TAVI. Copyright © 2016 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Low radiation dose non-contrast cardiac CT: is it of value in the evaluation of mechanical aortic valve

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    Bazeed, Mohamed Fayez (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura Univ. (Egypt)), email: m_bazeed@yahoo.com; Moselhy, Mohamed Saleh (Cardiology Dept. Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal Univ. (Egypt)); Rezk, Ahmad Ibrahim (Dept. of Cardiac Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Aim Shams Univ. (Egypt)); Al-Murayeh, Mushabab Ayedh (Dept. of Cardiac Services, Armed Forces Hospitals Southern Region (Saudi Arabia))

    2012-05-15

    Background: Prosthetic bileaflet mechanical valve function has been tradi