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Sample records for asymptomatic aortic stenosis

  1. [Asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis: a reopened debate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urso, Stefano; Sadaba, Rafael; de la Cruz, Elena

    2014-05-06

    Aortic stenosis is a complex disease. About 2-7% of the population over 65 years of age is affected by its degenerative form. In patients with severe aortic stenosis presenting with symptoms or left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF)debate. Recent published data show that about one third of these patients present with low left ventricle stroke volume, which may affect survival. For this reason, and considering that aortic valve replacement is in most cases a low risk procedure, early surgery in this subgroup is a strategy that deserves to be taken into account. In this review we report on these recent findings, which allow understanding why patients with asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis should not be considered and treated as a homogenous population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  2. Prognostic importance of atrial fibrillation in asymptomatic aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders; Gerdts, Eva; Boman, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The frequency and prognostic importance of atrial fibrillation (AF) in asymptomatic mild-to-moderate aortic stenosis (AS) has not been well described. METHODS: Clinical examination, electrocardiography and echocardiography were obtained in asymptomatic patients with mild-to-moderate A...

  3. Assessing Optimal Blood Pressure in Patients With Asymptomatic Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Olav W; Sajadieh, Ahmad; Sabbah, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence for treating hypertension in patients with asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis is scarce. We used data from the SEAS trial (Simvastatin Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis) to assess what blood pressure (BP) would be optimal. METHODS: A total of 1767 patients with asymptomatic aortic...

  4. Prognostic importance of atrial fibrillation in asymptomatic aortic stenosis: The Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders M; Gerdts, Eva; Boman, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The frequency and prognostic importance of atrial fibrillation (AF) in asymptomatic mild-to-moderate aortic stenosis (AS) has not been well described. METHODS: Clinical examination, electrocardiography and echocardiography were obtained in asymptomatic patients with mild-to-moderate A...

  5. Left Atrial Systolic Force in Asymptomatic Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cioffi, Giovanni; Cramariuc, Dana; Dalsgaard, Morten

    2011-01-01

    in aortic stenosis study evaluating the effect of placebo-controlled combined simvastatin and ezetimibe treatment in asymptomatic AS. The LASF was calculated by Manning's method. Low and high LASF were defined as 95th percentile of the distribution within the study population, respectively. Results: Mean...... LASF in the total study population was 21 ± 14 kdynes/cm(2) . The determinants of LASF were higher age, heart rate, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, left ventricular (LV) mass, mitral peak early velocity, maximal LA volume, and longer mitral deceleration time (multiple R(2) = 0.37, P ....01). High LASF (78 patients) was characterized by abnormal LV relaxation in 90% of the cases. Low LASF (82 patients) was associated with restrictive LV filling pattern, absence of abnormal relaxation pattern, smaller maximal LA volume, and lower body mass index. In 40% of the patients with low LASF...

  6. Resting heart rate and risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in asymptomatic aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders M; Bang, Casper N; Berg, Ronan M G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An elevated resting heart rate (RHR) may be an early sign of cardiac failure, but its prognostic value during watchful waiting in asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) is largely unknown. METHODS: RHR was determined by annual ECGs in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS)...

  7. Clinical Implications of Electrocardiographic Left Ventricular Strain and Hypertrophy in Asymptomatic Patients with Aortic Stenosis: The Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders M; Boman, Kurt; Gohlke-Baerwolf, Christa

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prognostic impact of electrocardiographic left ventricular (LV) strain and hypertrophy (LVH) in asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) is not well described. METHODS AND RESULTS: Data were obtained in asymptomatic patients randomized to simvastatin/ezetimibe combination vs. placebo in ...

  8. Effect of lipid lowering on new-onset atrial fibrillation in patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Casper N; Greve, Anders M; Boman, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    Lipid-lowering drugs, particularly statins, have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that may prevent atrial fibrillation (AF). This effect has not been investigated on new-onset AF in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (AS)....

  9. A risk score for predicting mortality in patients with asymptomatic mild to moderate aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, Ingar; Pedersen, Terje R; Boman, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundPrognostic information for asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (AS) from prospective studies is scarce and there is no risk score available to assess mortality.ObjectivesTo develop an easily calculable score, from which clinicians could stratify patients into high and lower risk ...... of mortality, using data from the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study.MethodA search for significant prognostic factors (p...

  10. Assessing Optimal Blood Pressure in Patients With Asymptomatic Aortic Valve Stenosis: The Simvastatin Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis Study (SEAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Olav W; Sajadieh, Ahmad; Sabbah, Muhammad; Greve, Anders M; Olsen, Michael H; Boman, Kurt; Nienaber, Christoph A; Kesäniemi, Y Antero; Pedersen, Terje R; Willenheimer, Ronnie; Wachtell, Kristian

    2016-08-09

    Evidence for treating hypertension in patients with asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis is scarce. We used data from the SEAS trial (Simvastatin Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis) to assess what blood pressure (BP) would be optimal. A total of 1767 patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis and no manifest atherosclerotic disease were analyzed. Outcomes were all-cause mortality, cardiovascular death, heart failure, stroke, myocardial infarction, and aortic valve replacement. BP was analyzed in Cox models as the cumulative average of serially measured BP and a time-varying covariate. The incidence of all-cause mortality was highest for average follow-up systolic BP ≥160 mm Hg (4.3 per 100 person-years; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.1-6.0) and lowest for average systolic BP of 120 to 139 mm Hg (2.0 per 100 person-years; 95% CI, 1.6-2.6). In multivariable analysis, all-cause mortality was associated with average systolic BP <120 mm Hg (hazard ratio [HR], 3.4; 95% CI, 1.9-6.1), diastolic BP ≥90 mm Hg (HR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.1-2.9), and pulse pressure <50 mm Hg (HR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.1-2.9), with systolic BP of 120 to 139 mm Hg, diastolic BP of 70 to 79 mm Hg, and pulse pressure of 60 to 69 mm Hg taken as reference. Low systolic and diastolic BPs increased risk in patients with moderate aortic stenosis. With a time-varying systolic BP from 130 to 139 mm Hg used as reference, mortality was increased for systolic BP ≥160 mm Hg (HR, 1.7; P=0.033) and BP of 120 to 129 mm Hg (HR, 1.6; P=0.039). Optimal BP seems to be systolic BP of 130 to 139 mm Hg and diastolic BP of 70 to 90 mm Hg in these patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis and no manifest atherosclerotic disease or diabetes mellitus. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00092677. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Association of ischemic heart disease to global and regional longitudinal strain in asymptomatic aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Helle Gervig; Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Hassager, Christian

    2015-01-01

    independent of aortic valve area, stroke volume index, pro-BNP, valvulo-arterial impedance, body mass index and heart rate. In linear regression models with both aortic valve area and significant coronary stenosis, apical (p ...Longitudinal deformation has been shown to deteriorate with progressive aortic stenosis as well as ischemic heart disease. Despite that both conditions share risk factors and are often coexisting, studies have not assessed the influence on longitudinal deformation for both conditions simultaneously....... Thus the purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between subclinical ischemic heart disease and global and regional longitudinal strain in asymptomatic patients with significant aortic stenosis. Prevalent patients with a diagnosis of aortic stenosis at six hospitals in the Greater...

  12. Impact of QRS duration and morphology on the risk of sudden cardiac death in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders M; Gerdts, Eva; Boman, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the predictive value of QRS duration and morphology during watchful waiting in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (AS).......The aim of the study was to examine the predictive value of QRS duration and morphology during watchful waiting in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (AS)....

  13. Association Between Left Atrial Dilatation and Invasive Hemodynamics at Rest and During Exercise in Asymptomatic Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Nicolaj Lyhne; Dahl, Jordi Sanchez; Carter-Storch, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transition from an asymptomatic to symptomatic state in severe aortic stenosis is often difficult to assess. Identification of a morphological sign of increased hemodynamic load may be important in asymptomatic aortic stenosis to identify patients at risk. METHODS AND RESULTS: Thirty-...... burden. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02395107....

  14. Six-minute walking test and long term prognosis in patients with asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigvardsen, Per Ejlstrup; Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Carstensen, Helle Gervig

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Management of asymptomatic patients with aortic valve stenosis is challenging due to the elusive relationship between symptomatic status and hemodynamic parameters in addition to the occurrence of cardiovascular death. The 6-minute walking test (6MWT) reflects overall hemodynamic func...

  15. Aortic stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... but most often it develops later in life. Children with aortic stenosis may have other conditions present from birth. Aortic ... children may need aortic valve repair or replacement. Children with mild aortic stenosis may be able to take part in most ...

  16. Low-flow aortic stenosis in asymptomatic patients: valvular-arterial impedance and systolic function from the SEAS Substudy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramariuc, Dana; Cioffi, Giovanni; Rieck, Ashild E

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study sought to assess the impact of valvuloarterial impedance on left ventricular (LV) myocardial systolic function in asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis (AS). BACKGROUND: In atherosclerotic AS, LV global load consists of combined valvular and arterial resistance to LV ejection....... preserved. (An Investigational Drug on Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Aortic Stenosis [Narrowing of the Major Blood Vessel of the Heart]; NCT00092677)....

  17. Differences in cardiovascular risk profile between electrocardiographic hypertrophy versus strain in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (from SEAS data)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders M; Gerdts, Eva; Boman, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    Electrocardiograms are routinely obtained in clinical follow-up of patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS). The association with aortic valve, left ventricular (LV) response to long-term pressure load, and clinical covariates is unclear and the clinical value is thus uncertain. Data from...... clinical examination, electrocardiogram, and echocardiogram in 1,563 patients in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study were used. Electrocardiograms were Minnesota coded for arrhythmias and atrioventricular and intraventricular blocks; LV hypertrophy was assessed by Sokolow...

  18. Resting heart rate and risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in asymptomatic aortic stenosis: the SEAS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, Anders M; Bang, Casper N; Berg, Ronan M G; Egstrup, Kenneth; Rossebø, Anne B; Boman, Kurt; Nienaber, Christoph A; Ray, Simon; Gohlke-Baerwolf, Christa; Nielsen, Olav W; Okin, Peter M; Devereux, Richard B; Køber, Lars; Wachtell, Kristian

    2015-02-01

    An elevated resting heart rate (RHR) may be an early sign of cardiac failure, but its prognostic value during watchful waiting in asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) is largely unknown. RHR was determined by annual ECGs in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study of asymptomatic mild-to-moderate AS patients. Primary endpoint in this substudy was major cardiovascular events (MCEs) and secondary outcomes its individual components. Multivariable Cox-models using serially-measured RHR were used to examine the prognostic impact of RHR per se. 1563 patients were followed for a mean of 4.3years (6751 patient-years of follow-up), 553 (35%) MCEs occurred, 10% (n=151) died, including 75 cardiovascular deaths. In multivariable analysis, baseline RHR was independently associated with MCEs (HR 1.1 per 10min(-1) faster, 95% CI: 1.0-1.3) and cardiovascular mortality (HR 1.3 per 10min(-1) faster, 95% CI: 1.0-1.7, both p≤0.03). Updating RHR with annual in-study reexaminations, time-varying RHR was highly associated with excess MCEs (HR 1.1 per 10min(-1) faster, 95% CI: 1.1-1.3) and cardiovascular mortality (HR 1.4 per 10min(-1) faster, 95% CI: 1.2-1.7, both p≤0.006). The association of RHR with MCEs and cardiovascular mortality was not dependent on atrial fibrillation status (both p≥0.06 for interaction). RHR is independently associated with MCEs and cardiovascular death in asymptomatic AS (Clinicaltrials.gov; unique identifier NCT00092677). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Relation of Left Atrial Size, Cardiac Morphology, and Clinical Outcome in Asymptomatic Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Nicolaj Lyhne; Dahl, Jordi; Carter-Storch, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    characterized by higher LV mass index (73 ± 17 g/m² vs. 66 ± 16 g/m² , p=0.03), increased right ventricle (70 ± 14 ml/m² vs. 63 ± 12 ml/m², p=0.01) and LV end-diastolic volume index (84 ± 18 ml/m² vs. 77 ± 16 ml/m², p=0.05), and higher brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). No difference in late enhancement was seen......Left atrial (LA) dilatation in asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS) may be an indicator of advanced disease. The aim was to investigate the association between LA volume index (LAVi) and left ventricular (LV) morphology assessed with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI), and to assess...

  20. Usefulness of the Electrocardiogram in Predicting Cardiovascular Mortality in Asymptomatic Adults With Aortic Stenosis (from the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis Study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders M; Dalsgaard, Morten; Bang, Casper N

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension and coronary heart disease are common in aortic stenosis (AS) and may impair prognosis for similar AS severity. Different changes in the electrocardiogram may be reflective of the separate impacts of AS, hypertension, and coronary heart disease, which could lead to enhanced risk...... stratification in AS. The aim of this study was therefore to examine if combining prognostically relevant electrocardiographic (ECG) findings improves prediction of cardiovascular mortality in asymptomatic AS. All patients with baseline electrocardiograms in the SEAS study were included. The primary end point...

  1. Exercise-induced changes in left ventricular global longitudinal strain in asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Agnieszka K; Dobrowolski, Piotr P; Klisiewicz, Anna; Hoffman, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    The management of patients with asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis (ASAS) is still under discussion. Therefore, it is advisable to search for the parameters of early damage to left ventricular (LV) function. The aim of the study was to assess exercise-induced changes in LV global longitudinal strain (GLS) in ASAS. The ASAS group consisted of 50 patients (26 women and 24 men, aged 38.4 ± 18.1 years) meeting the echocardiographic criteria of severe aortic stenosis (AVA 4 m/s, mean aortic gradient > 40 mm Hg), with normal LV ejection fraction (LVEF ≥ 55%) and sinus rhythm on electrocardiogram, and without significant concomitant valvular heart diseases. The control group consisted of 21 people matched for age and sex. Echocardiographic examinations and echocardiographic stress tests with the assessment of GLS using the speckle tracking imaging were performed. The ASAS group was characterised by statistically significantly higher LV mass index (LVMI) and higher LVEF. GLS values at rest in both groups were within normal limits but were significantly higher in the control group (-18.9 ± 2.4% vs. -20.7 ± 1.7%, p = 0.006). An increase in GLS at peak exercise in both groups was observed, lower in the ASAS group (the difference was not statistically significant: -0.8 ± 3.0% vs. -2.2 ± 3.1%, p = 0.086). Changes in GLS during exercise (ΔGLS) did not correlate with the parameters of the severity of aortic stenosis. In the multivariate model, LVMI proved to be a factor associated with GLS at rest and during exercise. In patients with ASAS, GLS is a non-invasive marker of an early stage of LV myocardial damage associated with myocardial hypertrophy. An increase in GLS during exercise in the ASAS group, smaller than in the control group, indicates a preserved functional reserve of the LV myocardium but smaller than in healthy individuals. The assessment of the clinical usefulness of exercise-induced changes in GLS requires further research.

  2. Aortic Valve Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rapid, fluttering heartbeat Not eating enough (mainly in children with aortic valve stenosis) Not gaining enough weight (mainly in children with aortic valve stenosis) The heart-weakening effects of aortic valve stenosis ...

  3. Exercise stress testing enhances blood coagulation and impairs fibrinolysis in asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolasa-Trela, Renata; Fil, Korneliusz; Wypasek, Ewa; Undas, Anetta

    2015-06-01

    Increased thrombin formation and fibrin deposition on the valves were observed in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis (AS). Exercise enhances blood coagulation and fibrinolysis in healthy subjects, but its haemostatic effects in AS are unknown. We sought to investigate how stress echocardiography alters blood coagulation and fibrinolysis in AS patients free of significant atherosclerotic vascular disease. We studied 32 consecutive asymptomatic moderate-to-severe AS patients and 32 age- and sex-matched controls. We measured peak thrombin generated using calibrated automated thrombogram, clot lysis time (CLT), and fibrinolytic markers at four time points, i.e. at rest, at peak exercise, and 1h and 24h after a symptom-limited exercise test. We observed that peak thrombin generated rose at peak exercise to 25% higher value in the patients than in controls (pfibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) activity (r=0.69, pfibrinolysis as compared to controls. Repeated episodes of exercise-induced prothrombotic state in AS might contribute to the progression of this disease. Copyright © 2014 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Strain and strain rate echocardiography findings in children with asymptomatic congenital aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Vehbi; Öcal, Burhan; Orun, Utku Arman; Ozgur, Senem; Yılmaz, Osman; Keskin, Mahmut; Ceylan, Ozben; Karademir, Selmin; Şenocak, Filiz

    2013-06-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate myocardial functions with strain/strain rate echocardiography in asymptomatic patients having congenital aortic stenosis (CAS) with normal cardiac functions as determined by conventional echocardiographic techniques and comparing them with those of healthy controls. A total of 58 patients with various degrees of isolated CAS and 52 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. Conventional and two-dimensional speckle tracking (2DSTE) echocardiography were performed. Global longitudinal strain (LS) (-23.1 ± 3.6 and -23.8 ± 4.7), and longitudinal strain rate (LSR) (-1.49 ± 0.32 and -1.76 ± 0.39) values were lower, whereas circumferential strain (CS) (-25.9 ± 4.7 and -22.8 ± 6.4) and circumferential strain rate (CSR) (-1.82 ± 0.46 and -1.69 ± 0.49) values were greater in the patient group than in the control subjects. The difference was significant for global LSR and CS (p children with CAS. Impairment of LV long-axis function occurred earlier and was more prominent in basal parts of the interventricular septum and the free wall of the left ventricle.

  5. Prognostic implications of left ventricular asymmetry in patients with asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigvardsen, Per Ejlstrup; Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Carstensen, Helle Gervig

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Left ventricular (LV) regional hypertrophy in the form of LV asymmetry is a common finding in patients with aortic valve stenosis. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that LV asymmetry predicts future symptomatic status and indication for aortic valve replacement (AVR) in patie......Aims: Left ventricular (LV) regional hypertrophy in the form of LV asymmetry is a common finding in patients with aortic valve stenosis. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that LV asymmetry predicts future symptomatic status and indication for aortic valve replacement (AVR...... by multi-detector computed tomography according to previous definitions. Follow-up was conducted using electronic health records. Event-free survival was assessed using Cox proportional hazards models. Patients were followed for a median of 2.2 years (interquartile range 1.6-3.6). Indication for AVR...

  6. Does gender affect the rates of abnormal exercise stress echocardiography in patients with asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaturi, Mordehay; Weisenberg, Daniel; Yedidya, Idit; Shapira, Yaron; Nevzorov, Roman; Monakier, Daniel; Sagie, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Patient gender can affect not only the clinical manifestations of coronary artery disease (CAD) but also the clinician's interpretation of the symptoms and results of exercise stress tests for management decisions. This may be true also for aortic stenosis (AS), given its many shared features with CAD and similar symptom-based management. The study aim was to evaluate the effect of gender on the assessment of severe asymptomatic AS by exercise stress echocardiography (ESE). A total of 160 patients (89 males, 71 females) with severe asymptomatic AS and good left ventricular function underwent ESE for assessment of their clinical status. Of these patients, 133 (83%) were followed up after echocardiography for a mean of 644 +/- 467 days. The findings and outcome were compared between males and females. No gender-related differences were identified for mean age, baseline and peak exercise heart rates and blood pressures, aortic valve area, and prevalence of CAD. Female patients had a lower exercise capacity (shorter exercise time, lower exercise load), but there were no significant between-group differences in the exercise-related parameters defining AS. In total, 38 women (24%) and 45 men (28%) were treated by aortic valve replacement (p = 0.2) within a similar time range from echocardiography (p = 0.6). Asymptomatic women with severe AS have similar rates of abnormal ESE as men, despite limitations in exercise capacity among women compared to men.

  7. Antihypertensive Treatment With β-Blockade in Patients With Asymptomatic Aortic Stenosis and Association With Cardiovascular Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Casper N; Greve, Anders M; Rossebø, Anne B; Ray, Simon; Egstrup, Kenneth; Boman, Kurt; Nienaber, Christoph; Okin, Peter M; Devereux, Richard B; Wachtell, Kristian

    2017-11-27

    Patients with aortic stenosis (AS) often have concomitant hypertension. Antihypertensive treatment with a β-blocker (Bbl) is frequently avoided because of fear of depression of left ventricular function. However, it remains unclear whether antihypertensive treatment with a Bbl is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events in patients with asymptomatic mild to moderate AS. We did a post hoc analysis of 1873 asymptomatic patients with mild to moderate AS and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction in the SEAS (Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis) study. Propensity-matched Cox regression and competing risk analyses were used to assess risk ratios for all-cause mortality, sudden cardiac death, and cardiovascular death. A total of 932 (50%) patients received Bbl at baseline. During a median follow-up of 4.3±0.9 years, 545 underwent aortic valve replacement, and 205 died; of those, 101 were cardiovascular deaths, including 40 sudden cardiovascular deaths. In adjusted analyses, Bbl use was associated with lower risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 0.5, 95% confidence interval 0.3-0.7, P0.1). In post hoc analyses Bbl therapy did not increase the risk of all-cause mortality, sudden cardiac death, or cardiovascular death in patients with asymptomatic mild to moderate AS. A prospective study may be warranted to determine if Bbl therapy is in fact beneficial. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00092677. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  8. Evaluation of NT-proBNP concentrations during exercise in asymptomatic patients with severe high-gradient aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowolski, Piotr; Lech, Agnieszka; Klisiewicz, Anna; Hoffman, Piotr

    2016-08-11

    INTRODUCTION The effect of asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis (ASAS) on N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels ar rest and during exercise, as well as their relevance for clinical practice remain controversial.  OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis of whether the evaluation of NT-proBNP concentrations during exercise provides additional information about the severity of aortic stenosis and left ventricular remodeling in patients with ASAS. PATIENTS AND METHODS A total of 50 patients with ASAS (mean age, 38.4 ±18.1 years) and 21 healthy subjects (mean age, 43.4 ±10.6 years) were enrolled. Rest and exercise echocardiography was performed to evaluate maximum velocity (Vmax), mean aortic gradient (AG), and aortic valve area (AVA). The left ventricular mass index (LVMI) was calculated. NT-proBNP concentrations at rest and during exercise were assessed, and the difference between the 2 values was calculated (ΔNT-proBNP). RESULTS NT-proBNP and ΔNT-proBNP levels at rest and during exercise were significantly higher in the ASAS group compared with the control group. In the ASAS group, NT-proBNP levels at rest significantly correlated with LVMI (r = 0.432; P <0.0001), AVA (r = -0.408; P <0.0001), Vmax (r = 0.375; P = 0.002), and mean AG (r = 0.257; P = 0.03). NT-proBNP levels during exercise significantly correlated with LVMI (r = 0.432; P <0.0001), mean AG (r = 0.401; P = 0.001), and AVA (r = -0.375; P = 0.001). In the multivariate logistic regression model, the factors independently associated with NT-proBNP both at rest and during exercise were age, AVA, and LVMI. CONCLUSIONS NT-proBNP levels at rest provide valuable information for identifying patients with more advanced left ventricular hypertrophy secondary to severe aortic stenosis. NT-proBNP levels during exercise do not provide new information on the severity of AS.

  9. Attitude towards one's illness vs. attitude towards a surgical operation, displayed by patients diagnosed with asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm and asymptomatic internal carotid artery stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanisić, M; Rzepa, T

    2012-08-01

    Two most frequent asymptomatic diseases qualifying for vascular surgery are abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and internal carotid artery stenosis (ICAS). Emotions experienced by the patient activate processes of dealing with the cognitive dissonance of asymptomatic disease. The aim of this paper was to compare the reasons involved in decision making on surgery in two asymptomatic vascular pathologies. Fifty patients were divided into two groups: the ICAS group-27 (CAS or CEA) and the AAA group-23 (EVAR or open surgical operation (OSR). Specific questionnaire regarding: 1) self-image; 2) attitude to one's illness; 3) reasons for decision on surgery was applied for the study. The χ² test was used to for the analysis. The AAA patients reacted emotionally (88.2%) comparing to ICAS patients reacting "rationally" (59.3%) (α=0.05). In AAA patients attitude towards themselves had worsened (α=0.001) AAA patients were less likely to seek support in decision on surgery (α=0.01). ICAS patients are internally motivated (78.7%), whereas AAA patients are externally motivated (63.9%) (α=0.001). Reasons underlying the decision on surgery, were predominantly rational (55.8%). In the process of decision-making on surgery by asymptomatic patients, evolutionary transformation takes place - the emotional attitude to one's illness leads to rationally evaluated decision. Regardless of the causes the process of making a decision on surgical operation tended to run more smoothly in ICAS patients. The ICAS patients tended to display a rational attitude to their illness. AAA patients displayed a distinctly emotional attitude towards their illness.

  10. Left atrial volume as predictor of valve replacement and cardiovascular events in patients with asymptomatic mild to moderate aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Morten; Egstrup, Kenneth; Wachtell, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Left atrial (LA) size is known to increase with chronically increased left ventricular (LV) filling pressure. We hypothesized that LA volume was predictive of aortic valve replacement (AVR) and cardiovascular events in a large cohort of patients with asymptomatic mild to moderate aortic valve...

  11. Antihypertensive Treatment With β-Blockade in Patients With Asymptomatic Aortic Stenosis and Association With Cardiovascular Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Casper N; Greve, Anders M; Rossebø, Anne B

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with aortic stenosis (AS) often have concomitant hypertension. Antihypertensive treatment with a β-blocker (Bbl) is frequently avoided because of fear of depression of left ventricular function. However, it remains unclear whether antihypertensive treatment with a Bbl is asso...

  12. Antihypertensive treatment with β-blockade in patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis and association with cardiovascular events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Casper N.; Greve, Anders M.; Rossebø, Anne B.

    2017-01-01

    Background--Patients with aortic stenosis (AS) often have concomitant hypertension. Antihypertensive treatment with a β-blocker (Bbl) is frequently avoided because of fear of depression of left ventricular function. However, it remains unclear whether antihypertensive treatment with a Bbl...

  13. Factors influencing left ventricular structure and stress-corrected systolic function in men and women with asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis (a SEAS Substudy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramariuc, D.; Rieck, A.E.; Staal, E.M.

    2008-01-01

    To identify determinants of left ventricular (LV) structure and stress-corrected systolic function in men and women with asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS), Doppler echocardiography was performed at baseline in 1,046 men and 674 women 28 to 86 years of age (mean 67 +/- 10) recruited in the Simvast......To identify determinants of left ventricular (LV) structure and stress-corrected systolic function in men and women with asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS), Doppler echocardiography was performed at baseline in 1,046 men and 674 women 28 to 86 years of age (mean 67 +/- 10) recruited.......05). In logistic regression analyses, LV hypertrophy was independently associated with male gender, severity of AS, hypertension, higher systolic blood pressure, and lower stress-corrected midwall shortening (scMWS) or stress-corrected fractional shortening (scFS; all p values ... mass, relative wall thickness, aortic regurgitation, hypertension, and end-systolic stress (R(2) = 0.23 and 0.59, respectively, p major determinants of LV hypertrophy in patients with asymptomatic AS are male gender, severity of AS, and concomitant hypertension. Women have...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: supravalvular aortic stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Supravalvular aortic stenosis Supravalvular aortic stenosis Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) is a heart defect that develops before ...

  15. Intensive lipid lowering with simvastatin and ezetimibe in aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossebo, A.B.; Pedersen, T.R.; Boman, K.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hyperlipidemia has been suggested as a risk factor for stenosis of the aortic valve, but lipid-lowering studies have had conflicting results. METHODS: We conducted a randomized, double-blind trial involving 1873 patients with mild-to-moderate, asymptomatic aortic stenosis. The patient...

  16. Aortic stenosis: From diagnosis to optimal treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavčiovski Dragan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aortic stenosis is the most frequent valvular heart disease. Aortic sclerosis is the first characteristic lesion of the cusps, which is considered today as the process similar to atherosclerosis. Progression of the disease is an active process leading to forming of bone matrix and heavily calcified stiff cusps by inflammatory cells and osteopontin. It is a chronic, progressive disease which can remain asymptomatic for a long time even in the presence of severe aortic stenosis. Proper physical examination remains an essential diagnostic tool in aortic stenosis. Recognition of characteristic systolic murmur draws attention and guides further diagnosis in the right direction. Doppler echocardiography is an ideal tool to confirm diagnosis. It is well known that exercise tests help in stratification risk of asymptomatic aortic stenosis. Serial measurements of brain natriuretic peptide during a follow-up period may help to identify the optimal time for surgery. Heart catheterization is mostly restricted to preoperative evaluation of coronary arteries rather than to evaluation of the valve lesion itself. Currently, there is no ideal medical treatment for slowing down the disease progression. The first results about the effect of ACE inhibitors and statins in aortic sclerosis and stenosis are encouraging, but there is still not enough evidence. Onset symptoms based on current ACC/AHA/ESC recommendations are I class indication for aortic valve replacement. Aortic valve can be replaced with a biological or prosthetic valve. There is a possibility of percutaneous aortic valve implantation and transapical operation for patients that are contraindicated for standard cardiac surgery.

  17. Neonatal aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turley, K; Bove, E L; Amato, J J; Iannettoni, M; Yeh, J; Cotroneo, J V; Galdieri, R J

    1990-04-01

    Aortic stenosis in the neonate has been associated in the past with a high operative mortality. As a result, in the current era of percutaneous balloon dilatation, the optimal mode of therapy remains controversial. An approach of stabilization with cardiopulmonary bypass, followed by relief of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, was used at three institutions, and the results are presented. During the period 1983 to 1989, 40 neonates with isolated aortic stenosis and patent ductus arteriosus or coarctation of the aorta, or both, underwent operative therapy. Ages ranged from 1 to 30 days, median of 12 days, including 17 patients in the first week of life. There were 30 boys and 10 girls; weights ranged from 2.5 to 5.5 kg with a mean of 3.6 kg. Perioperative conditions included congestive heart failure in 38 and mitral regurgitation in 16; left ventricular-aortic gradients ranged from 15 to 130 mm Hg, with a mean of 67 mm Hg. There were 30 open valvotomies and 10 transventricular dilatations. The hospital survival rate was 87.5% (35/40) with no significant difference between the methods of valvotomy (9/10 in the transventricular dilatation group, 90%; 26/30 in the open valvotomy group, 87%). Although multiple methods of perfusion and valvotomy were used, the single unifying factor of cardiopulmonary bypass stabilization was present in all 40 patients. No significant difference in survival was noted between institutions, methods of cardiopulmonary bypass, cardiopulmonary bypass times, crossclamp times, or method of valvotomy. There have been five reoperations, with one late death in a patient requiring mitral valve replacement and an apical-aortic conduit. One sudden death occurred; autopsy revealed endocardial fibroelastosis. Results demonstrate that in the three institutions using the methods described, a high operative and late survival rate is possible. The results of this technique, against which percutaneous dilatation should be compared, are standard in

  18. Neonatal aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Nigel E; Veldtman, Gruschen R; Benson, Lee N

    2005-09-01

    Neonatal aortic stenosis is a complex and heterogeneous condition, defined as left ventricular outflow tract obstruction at valvular level, presenting and often requiring treatment in the first month of life. Initial presentation may be catastrophic, necessitating hemodynamic, respiratory and metabolic resuscitation. Subsequent management is focused on maintaining systemic blood flow, either via a univentricular Norwood palliation or a biventricular route, in which the effective aortic valve area is increased by balloon dilation or surgical valvotomy. In infants with aortic annular hypoplasia but adequately sized left ventricle, the Ross-Konno procedure is also an attractive option. Outcomes after biventricular management have improved in recent years as a consequence of better patient selection, perioperative management and advances in catheter technology. Exciting new developments are likely to significantly modify the natural history of this disorder, including fetal intervention for the salvage of the hypoplastic left ventricle; 3D echocardiography providing better definition of valve morphology and aiding patient selection for a surgical or catheter-based intervention; and new transcutaneous approaches, such as duel beam echo, to perforate the valve.

  19. Multimorbidity in Older Adults with Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindman, Brian R; Patel, Jay N

    2016-05-01

    Aortic stenosis is a disease of older adults; many have associated comorbidities. With the aging of the population and the emergence of transcatheter aortic valve replacement as a treatment, clinicians will increasingly be confronted with aortic stenosis and multimorbidity, making the evaluation, management, and treatment of aortic stenosis more complex. To optimize patient-centered clinical outcomes, new treatment paradigms are needed that recognize the import and influence of multimorbidity on patients with aortic stenosis. The authors review the prevalence of medical and aging-related comorbidities in patients with aortic stenosis, their impact on outcomes, and discuss how they influence management and treatment decisions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Differences in cardiovascular risk profile between electrocardiographic hypertrophy versus strain in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (from SEAS data)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders M; Gerdts, Eva; Boman, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    -Lyon voltage and Cornell voltage-duration criteria; and strain by T-wave inversion and ST-segment depression. Degree of AS severity was evaluated by echocardiography as peak aortic jet velocity and LV mass was indexed by body surface area. After adjustment for age, gender, LV mass index, heart rate, systolic...... and diastolic blood pressures, blood glucose, digoxin, antiarrhythmic drugs, drugs acting on the renin-angiotensin system, diuretics, ß blockers and calcium receptor blockers; peak aortic jet velocity was significantly greater in patients with electrocardiographic strain (mean difference 0.13 m/s, p...

  1. Myocardial T1 and extracellular volume fraction measurement in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis: reproducibility and comparison with age-matched controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anvesha; Horsfield, Mark A; Bekele, Soliana; Khan, Jamal N; Greiser, Andreas; McCann, Gerry P

    2015-07-01

    (i) To establish the test-retest reproducibility of myocardial T1 and extracellular volume (ECV) fraction measurement in asymptomatic patients with moderate-severe aortic stenosis (AS), (ii) to compare reproducibility using motion-corrected (MOCO) parametric T1 maps for analysis vs. full MOLLI series of images, and (iii) to compare T1 and ECV between patients and age-matched controls. 3 T cardiac MRI was performed twice on 10 patients (median interval 7 days) to assess reproducibility. An additional 40 patients and 22 asymptomatic controls underwent a single MRI. Native T1 and ECV were calculated by outlining the myocardium on T1 maps generated inline, and using an offline T1 fit on the MOCO multiple inversion-time raw image series, in the reproducibility cohort (n = 10). Reproducibility was excellent using the inline T1 maps (CoVs for T1: 1.77%; ECV: 6.52%) and good using the full MOLLI series (CoVs for T1: 8.52%; ECV: 12.98%). On comparing AS and controls, who were well matched for age, gender and co-morbidities, there was no significant difference in the native T1 or ECV (T1 = 1103.32 ± 33.07 vs. 1092.27 ± 34.29; ECV = 0.243 ± 0.019 vs. 0.251 ± 0.026 in patients and controls, P > 0.05), which was maintained even after splitting the patients into moderate and severe AS subgroups. The test-retest reproducibility of myocardial T1 quantification using MOLLI is excellent in patients with AS and is highest using inline generated T1 maps for analysis. There was no difference in native myocardial T1 or ECV between asymptomatic patients with moderate-severe AS and age-matched controls without valve disease. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Left atrial size and function as predictors of new-onset of atrial fibrillation in patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Casper N; Dalsgaard, Morten; Greve, Anders M

    2013-01-01

    age was 66±9.7years, aortic valve area index 0.6±0.2cm(2)/m(2), LV mass 99.2±29.7g/m(2), LA(max) volume 34.6±12.0mL/m(2), LA(min) volume 17.9±9.3mL/m(2), LA-EF 50±15% and LA(con) volume 45±21mL/m(2). Baseline LA(min) volume predicted new-onset AF in Cox multivariable analysis (HR:2.3 [95%CI:1...

  3. Asymptomatic carotid arterial stenosis - population based screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    Screening for asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis in the general population is discussed in many countries because of the benefits of carotid endarterectomy in the three trials. Many factors influence the cost-effectiveness of screening. These factors are the prevalence of carotid stenosis, the

  4. Timing of Dynamic NT-proBNP and hs-cTnT Response to Exercise Challenge in Asymptomatic Children with Moderate Aortic Valve Regurgitation or Moderate Aortic Valve Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawad, Wadi; Abadir, Sylvia; Fournier, Anne; Bigras, Jean-Luc; Curnier, Daniel; Kadem, Lyes; Dahdah, Nagib

    2015-12-01

    Patients with congenital aortic valve stenosis (AVS) can remain asymptomatic but may develop progressive and often underestimated exercise intolerance. The risk of increased left ventricular (LV) wall stress, irreversible myocardial fibrosis and sudden death in untreated patients warrants earlier intervention. The timing for curative therapy for severe AVS is clear, but optimal timing for moderate stenosis (modAS) is unknown. AVS often coexists with aortic regurgitation, which adds a volume overload to an already pressure-overloaded LV, adding an additional challenge to the estimation of disease severity. We investigated the possible value of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) upon treadmill exercise challenge in children with asymptomatic modAS versus moderate regurgitation (modAR). The aim was to determine optimal timing of peak biochemical response. Blood samples were obtained at rest, and then at 20, 40 and 60 min after peak exercise comparing modAS and modAR to healthy controls. Exercise performance was equivalent in all groups, with no difference for biomarker levels at rest. The increase in NT-proBNP was significant in modAR at 40 min (99.2 ± 48.6 ng/L; p = 0.04) and 60 min into recovery (100.0 ± 53.7 ng/L; p = 0.01), but not in modAS. The increase in hs-cTnT was significant only at 60 min into recovery for modAS and modAR. NT-proBNP and hs-cTnT following exercise challenge are possible discriminant biomarkers of modAR from modAS and controls at 60 min into recovery despite comparable exercise performance. This offers a promising avenue for future stratification of aortic valve disease and optimal timing of intervention.

  5. Asymptomatic internal carotid artery stenosis and cerebrovascular risk stratification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaides, Andrew N; Kakkos, Stavros K; Kyriacou, Efthyvoulos

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the cerebrovascular risk stratification potential of baseline degree of stenosis, clinical features, and ultrasonic plaque characteristics in patients with asymptomatic internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis.......The purpose of this study was to determine the cerebrovascular risk stratification potential of baseline degree of stenosis, clinical features, and ultrasonic plaque characteristics in patients with asymptomatic internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis....

  6. Small aortic root in aortic valve stenosis: clinical characteristics and prognostic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahlmann, Edda; Cramariuc, Dana; Minners, Jan; Lønnebakken, Mai Tone; Ray, Simon; Gohlke-Baerwolf, Christa; Nienaber, Christoph A; Jander, Nikolaus; Seifert, Reinhard; Chambers, John B; Kuck, Karl Heinz; Gerdts, Eva

    2017-04-01

    In aortic valve stenosis (AS), having a small aortic root may influence both the assessment of AS severity and the treatment strategy. The aim was to test the prognostic implications of having a small aortic root in AS within a large prospective study. We used data from 4.3-year follow-up of 1560 patients with asymptomatic, initially mostly moderate AS enrolled in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study. A small aortic root was defined as inner aortic sinotubular junction diameter indexed for body height <1.4 cm/m in women and <1.5 cm/m in men. A small aortic root was found in 270 patients (17.3%) at baseline. Having a small aortic root was associated with larger aortic root wall thickness, higher pressure recovery, lower systemic arterial compliance, left ventricular mass index, and female sex in a multivariable logistic regression analysis (all P < 0.05). In the Cox regression analysis, having a small aortic root at baseline was associated with higher hazard rates of ischaemic cardiovascular events (n = 268; HR 1.55, 95% CI 1.16-2.06), non-haemorrhagic stroke (n = 55; HR 1.88, 95% CI 1.04-3.41), and cardiovascular death (n = 81; HR 2.08, 95% CI 1.28-3.39) (all P < 0.05) after adjusting for confounders, including randomized study treatment, sex, hypertension, AS severity, and aortic valve replacement. In AS patients without known cardiovascular disease or diabetes, having a small aortic root was associated with increased ischaemic cardiovascular events and mortality. The results suggest a relation between the presence of a small aortic root and that of subclinical atherosclerosis. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00092677.

  7. Supravalvular aortic stenosis with sudden cardiac death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Vaideeswar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death (SCD most commonly results from previously undiagnosed congenital, acquired, or hereditary cardiac diseases. Congenital aortic valvular, subvalvular, and supravalvular disease with left ventricular outflow tract obstruction is an important preventable cause of sudden death. This report documents sudden death presumably due to acute myocardial ischemia in a young male with an undiagnosed supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS due to a rare association of isolation of coronary sinuses of Valsalva. Congenital supravalvular pulmonary stenosis and mitral valvular dysplasia were also present.

  8. Current management of asymptomatic carotid stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla-Guerra, L; Fernández-Moreno, M C; Serrano-Rodríguez, L

    2015-05-01

    Asymptomatic carotid stenosis (ACS) is a common problem in daily clinical practice, and its management is still the subject of controversy. In contrast to symptomatic carotid disease, the main studies on surgical treatment of patients with ACS have shown only a modest benefit in the primary prevention of stroke. In addition, current medical treatment has drastically decreased the risk of stroke in patients with ACS. Selecting patients amenable to endovascular treatment and determining how and when to conduct the ultrasound follow-up of these patients are issues that still need resolving. This article analyzes two new studies underway that provide evidence for better management of ACS in daily clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  9. Global Strain in Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbæk, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K

    2012-01-01

    Score, history with ischemic heart disease and ejection fraction. CONCLUSIONS: -In patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis undergoing AVR reduced GLS provides important prognostic information beyond standard risk factors. Clinical Trial Registration-URL: http://www.clinicaltrial.gov. Unique identifier...

  10. The left ventricle in aortic stenosis--imaging assessment and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Călin, Andreea; Roşca, Monica; Beladan, Carmen Cristiana; Enache, Roxana; Mateescu, Anca Doina; Ginghină, Carmen; Popescu, Bogdan Alexandru

    2015-04-29

    Aortic stenosis has an increasing prevalence in the context of aging population. In these patients non-invasive imaging allows not only the grading of valve stenosis severity, but also the assessment of left ventricular function. These two goals play a key role in clinical decision-making. Although left ventricular ejection fraction is currently the only left ventricular function parameter that guides intervention, current imaging techniques are able to detect early changes in LV structure and function even in asymptomatic patients with significant aortic stenosis and preserved ejection fraction. Moreover, new imaging parameters emerged as predictors of disease progression in patients with aortic stenosis. Although proper standardization and confirmatory data from large prospective studies are needed, these novel parameters have the potential of becoming useful tools in guiding intervention in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis and stratify risk in symptomatic patients undergoing aortic valve replacement.This review focuses on the mechanisms of transition from compensatory left ventricular hypertrophy to left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure in aortic stenosis and the role of non-invasive imaging assessment of the left ventricular geometry and function in these patients.

  11. [Management of aortic stenosis in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbé, Vincent; Ederhy, Stéphane; Szymkiewicz, Olga; Cohen, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    There is a significant risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with severe aortic stenosis (valve area angina, syncope, or heart failure). Before any surgery, clinical assessment should search for signs of aortic stenosis which justifies echocardiographic examination, particularly in the elderly. A systematic rest echocardiography with searching aortic stenosis should be considered in patients undergoing high risk surgery. The key points of pre-operative cardiac risk assessment are: assessment of the severity of aortic stenosis, measurement of the functional capacity, evaluation of the left ventricular systolic function, search of associated coronary artery disease, estimate of the surgical risk of cardiac events, and achievement of risk indices. In symptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis, only urgent non-cardiac surgery should be performed under careful haemodynamic monitoring. Aortic valve replacement should be considered before elective non-cardiac surgery. In asymptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis, aortic valve replacement should be considered before non-cardiac high risk surgery. Non-cardiac surgery at low/intermediate risk can be performed provided an adapted anaesthetic technique. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Subendocardial ischaemia in patients with discrete subvalvar aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, G A; Benjamin, J D; Lakier, J B

    1978-01-01

    The evidence for subendocardial ischaemia was studied in 12 patients with discrete subvalvar aortic stenosis. Symptomatology, electrocardiographic criteria, and pressure difference across the left ventricular outflow tract were compared with the subendocardial flow index (diastolic pressure time index systolic pressure time index). All symptomatic patients had a large pressure difference and abnormal index, but 4 asymptomatic patients had pressure differences greater than 60 mmHg and a low index. One of these 4 patients had a normal resting electrocardiogram. In patients with borderline accepted indications for surgery, calculation of the subendocardial flow index may be an additional useful variable in the timing of surgery. PMID:565643

  13. Indexing aortic valve area by body surface area increases the prevalence of severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jander, Nikolaus; Gohlke-Bärwolf, Christa; Bahlmann, Edda

    2014-01-01

    To account for differences in body size in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is divided by body surface area (BSA) to calculate indexed AVA (AVAindex). Cut-off values for severe stenosis are...

  14. Abnormal myocardial blood flow in children with mild/moderate aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madriago, Erin; Wells, Ronald; Sahn, David J; Diggs, Brian S; Langley, Stephen M; Woodward, Daniel J; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Silberbach, Michael

    2015-10-01

    To quantify myocardial blood flow in infants and children with mild or moderate aortic stenosis using adenosine-infusion cardiac magnetic resonance. It is unclear whether asymptomatic children with mild/moderate aortic stenosis have myocardial abnormalities. In addition, cardiac magnetic resonance-determined normative myocardial blood flow data in children have not been reported. We studied 31 infants and children with either haemodynamically normal hearts (n=20, controls) or mild/moderate aortic stenosis (n=11). The left ventricular myocardium was divided into six segments, and the change in average segmental signal intensity during contrast transit was used to quantify absolute flow (ml/g/minute) at rest and during adenosine infusion by deconvolution of the tissue curves with the arterial input of contrast. In all the cases, adenosine was well tolerated without complications. The mean pressure gradient between the left ventricle and the ascending aorta was higher in the aortic stenosis group compared with controls (24 versus 3 mmHg, paortic stenosis group compared with controls (65 versus 50 g/m², pchildren with mild/moderate aortic stenosis compared with controls. Abnormal myocardial blood flow in children with mild/moderate aortic stenosis may be an important therapeutic target.

  15. Aortic Stenosis in Adults: natural history, treatment and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Heuvelman (Helena )

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This thesis concerns aortic stenosis (AS) in contemporary clinical practice. First, an introduction will be given to provide background information on the normal aortic valve, and thereafter on the incidence, disease spectrum, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of

  16. Adjusting parameters of aortic valve stenosis severity by body size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minners, Jan; Gohlke-Baerwolf, Christa; Kaufmann, Beat A

    2014-01-01

    stenosis (jet velocity ≥2.5 m/s) and related to outcomes in a second cohort of 1525 patients from the Simvastatin/Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study. RESULTS: Whereas jet velocity and MPG were independent of body size, AVA was significantly correlated with height, weight, BSA and BMI (Pearson......BACKGROUND: Adjustment of cardiac dimensions by measures of body size appears intuitively convincing and in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is commonly adjusted by body surface area (BSA). However, there is little evidence to support such an approach. OBJECTIVE: To identify...... the adequate measure of body size for the adjustment of aortic stenosis severity. METHODS: Parameters of aortic stenosis severity (jet velocity, mean pressure gradient (MPG) and AVA) and measures of body size (height, weight, BSA and body mass index (BMI)) were analysed in 2843 consecutive patients with aortic...

  17. Stroke in Patients With Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders Møller; Dalsgaard, Morten; Bang, Casper N

    2014-01-01

    ], 1.1-6.6), CHA2DS2-VASc score (HR 1.4 per unit; 95% CI, 1.1-1.8), diastolic blood pressure (HR, 1.4 per 10 mm Hg; 95% CI, 1.1-1.8), and AVR with concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting (HR, 3.2; 95% CI, 1.4-7.2, all P≤0.026) were independently associated with stroke. Incident stroke predicted......, and poststroke survival a secondary outcome. Cox models treating AVR as a time-varying covariate were adjusted for atrial fibrillation and congestive heart failure, hypertension, age≥75 years, diabetes mellitus, stroke/transient ischemic attack, vascular disease, age 65-74 years and female sex (CHA2DS2-VASc......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: There are limited data on risk stratification of stroke in aortic stenosis. This study examined predictors of stroke in aortic stenosis, the prognostic implications of stroke, and how aortic valve replacement (AVR) with or without concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting...

  18. Neonatal Aortic Stenosis Is a Surgical Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hraška, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Neonates with critical aortic stenosis represent a challenging group of patients with severe obstruction at a valvar level and with symptoms of heart failure. If biventricular repair is chosen, open valvotomy (OV) has been firmly established as the most effective initial treatment. In comparison with blind ballooning, OV, with exact splitting of fused commissures and shaving of obstructing nodules, can produce a better valve with a maximum valve orifice, without causing regurgitation. Thus, predictable and consistent early and longer-lasting results in any type of valve morphology are provided. Clearly superior results can be achieved in a tricuspid valve arrangement. OV not only offers a high survival benefit in the long run, but also a high quality of life, by minimizing re-interventions and preserving the native aortic valve in the majority of patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Imaging markers of stroke risk in asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Prabhakaran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Carotid stenosis is a major cause of ischemic stroke. While symptomatic carotid stenosis requires prompt revascularization, there is significant debate about the management of asymptomatic carotid stenosis (ACS, especially in light of recent advances in medical therapy. As a result, there is an even greater need for reliable predictors of stroke risk in asymptomatic patients. Besides clinical factors and stenosis grade, plaque morphology and cerebral hemodynamics may be suitable prognostic tools. High-risk features, using Doppler and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI suggest that subpopulations at sufficiently high risk (10% annually can be identified and in whom revascularization would be most beneficial. In this review, imaging tools to aid in stroke risk stratification in patients with ACS are discussed.

  20. [Is there a role for asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis screening?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldenberg, Eitan; Bass, Arie

    2014-08-01

    Screening for asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis (CAS) is highly controversial Many surgeons routinely screen their patients for carotid disease prior to major operations, yet the benefit of such practice was never demonstrated. The treatment of symptomatic patients has not changed much during the last twenty years, since the publication of the North American Symptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Trial (NASCET). However, in contrast, the Asymptomatic Carotid Atherosclerosis Study (ACAS) and the Asymptomatic Carotid Surgery Trial (ACST) failed to get the same acceptance among the multidisciplinary group treating CAS.The prevalence of asymptomatic 60-99% carotid artery stenosis among the general population is about 1%. Neither ACAS nor ACST showed that stenosis severity was associated with increasing stroke risk. The 'realpolitik' is that mass interventions in asymptomatic patients will probably only ever prevent about 1% of all strokes. This is even truer regarding patients scheduLed for major operation, in which the incidence of stroke is less than 1%. Moreover the current evidence in the literature suggests that the best medicaL treatment (BMT) results in 0.5% strokes per year, better than resuLts which can be offered by surgery. According to the current evidence, it seems that asymptomatic carotid artery screening should be discontinued, since it is a major waste of resources.

  1. Sudden death in asymptomatic aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Nicolaj Lyhne; Carter-Storch, Rasmus; Bakkestrøm, Rine

    2016-01-01

    En aktiv 68-årig mand med asymptomatisk svær aortastenose og normal arbejdskapacitet ved konventionel arbejdstest fik foretaget en hæmodynamisk undersøgelse under fysisk belastning med højre hjertekaterisation og simultan ekkokardiografi. Under arbejde udviklede patienten pulmonal hypertension og...

  2. Endarterectomy or Stenting in Severe Asymptomatic Carotid Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannheim, Dallit; Falah, Batla; Karmeli, Ron

    2017-05-01

    Stroke is a major cause of death in the western world, and carotid endarterectomy has been shown to be effective in treating both symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid stenosis. Carotid stenting is a relatively new form of treatment for carotid stenosis and few studies have looked specifically at asymptomatic patients. To retrospectively examine short- and long-term results in the treatment of asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis with surgery or stenting. We retrospectively collected data of all patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis treated by carotid artery stenting or carotid endarterectomy in our department from 2006-2007. The primary endpoints were stroke, myocardial infarction, or death during the periprocedural period; or any ipsilateral stroke, restenosis, or death within 4 years after the procedure. The study comprised 409 patients who were treated by either stenting or surgery. There was a low morbidity rate in both treatment groups with no significant difference in morbidity or mortality between the treatment groups in both in the short-term as well as long-term. Both treatment methods have a low morbidity and mortality rate and should be considered for patients with few risk factors and a long life expectancy. Treatment method should be selected according to the patient's individual risk factors and imaging data.

  3. Aortic root geometry in aortic stenosis patients (a SEAS substudy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahlmann, Edda; Nienaber, Christoph A; Cramariuc, Dana

    2011-01-01

    -specified requirements for the aortic root geometry for current available prostheses, CoreValve and Edwards-Sapien. The ratio of sinus of Valsalva height to sinus width was 1:2. In multivariate linear regression analysis, larger sinus of Valsalva height was associated with older age, larger sinus of Valsalva diameter...... with asymptomatic AS (mean age 67 years, 39% women) in the Simvastatin Ezetimibe in AS study were used. The inner aortic diameter was measured at four levels: annulus, sinus of Valsalva, sinotubular junction and supracoronary, and sinus height as the annulo-junctional distance. Analyses were based on vendor......, lower ejection fraction and smaller supracoronary diameter (multiple R(2) = 0.19, P

  4. Prolonged QT dispersion in children with congenital valvular aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piorecka-Makula, Anna; Werner, Bozena

    2009-10-01

    Hypertrophied and ischemic cardiac muscle in patients with aortic valve stenosis becomes a potential source of ventricular cardiac arrhythmia that can lead to sudden death. Arrhythmia is associated with an abnormal duration of the action potential in a cardiac muscle cell. The aim of this prospective study was to analyze QT dispersion in children with different stages of aortic valve stenosis and different left ventricular mass indexes. Sixty children with aortic valve stenosis were divided into 3 subgroups according to their pressure gradients. Sixty healthy children served as controls. Doppler echocardiography, standard 12-lead electrocardiography and 24-hour Holter monitoring electrocardiography were performed. QT dispersion was significantly higher in children with aortic stenosis than in the control group. There were statistically significant positive correlation between QT dispersion and left ventricular mass index and between QT dispersion and pressure gradient. QT dispersion was significantly higher in 20 patients with aortic stenosis and ventricular arrhythmia than that in patients without arrhythmia. In children with a higher pressure gradient and a higher left ventricular mass index, more complex arrhythmia was found. Risk of ventricular arrhythmia increases with the degree of aortic valve stenosis and cardiac muscle hypertrophy. QT dispersion is prolonged in children with aortic valve stenosis, particularly in patients with arrhythmia, and increases with pressure gradient and left ventricular mass index.

  5. Stress echocardiography: a useful tool for children with aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Ronak; Kunselman, Allen; Wackerle, Elizabeth; Johnson, Gerald; Cyran, Stephen E; Chowdhury, Devyani

    2013-06-01

    The development of echocardiographic ventricular wall motion abnormalities and ST segment changes with exercise may enhance the detection of myocardial ischemia in children with aortic valve stenosis (AS). This study aimed to assess the relationship between the exercise wall motion index (WMIe), ST segment depression (STd), and overall functionality in asymptomatic children with isolated AS. A prospective interpretation of collected stress echocardiographic images was performed. The 98 children who met the inclusion criteria had a mean age of 12.8 years and a male/female ratio of 4/1. Group 1 (mild AS) was composed of 70 children, and group 2 (moderate or severe AS) was composed of 28 children. Abnormal WMIe was seen in 8 patients (5 in group 1 and 3 in group 2), and significant STd was observed in 13 children (3 in group 1 and 10 in group 2). Four (50 %) of the eight patients with abnormal WMIe also had significant STd. Severity of stenosis was associated with STd (odds ratio [OR], 12.0; 95 % CI 3.0-49.0), logistic regression). A significant association also existed between abnormal WMIe and STd (OR, 9.0; 95 % CI 1.9-42.0, logistic regression). Exercise duration was significantly shorter in group 2 (12 ± 4.52 min) than in group 1 (13 ± 5.28 min) (p = 0.02, analysis of covariance). The appearance of wall motion abnormalities and STd during exercise may be helpful in detecting inducible, functionally important myocardial ischemia in asymptomatic children with AS. Stress echocardiography may be a useful adjunct to more traditional exercise testing in risk stratifying asymptomatic children with AS.

  6. Statins for progression of aortic valve stenosis and the best evidence for making decisions in health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Thiago

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Western world, calcified aortic valve stenosis is the most common form of valvular heart disease, affecting up to 3% of adults over the age of 75 years. It is a gradually progressive disease, characterized by a long asymptomatic phase that may last for several decades, followed by a short symptomatic phase associated with severe restriction of the valve orifice. Investigations on treatments for aortic valve stenosis are still in progress. Thus, it is believed that calcification of aortic valve stenosis is similar to the process of atherosclerosis that occurs in coronary artery disease. Recent studies have suggested that cholesterol lowering through the use of statins may have a salutary effect on the progression of aortic valve stenosis

  7. Predictors of exercise capacity and symptoms in severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Morten; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Pecini, Redi

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the association between invasive and non-invasive estimates of left ventricular (LV) filling pressure and exercise capacity, in order to find new potential candidates for risk markers in severe aortic valve stenosis (AS)....

  8. Predictors of exercise capacity and symptoms in severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Morten; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Pecini, Redi

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the association between invasive and non-invasive estimates of left ventricular (LV) filling pressure and exercise capacity, in order to find new potential candidates for risk markers in severe aortic valve stenosis (AS).......This study investigated the association between invasive and non-invasive estimates of left ventricular (LV) filling pressure and exercise capacity, in order to find new potential candidates for risk markers in severe aortic valve stenosis (AS)....

  9. Left coronary artery stenosis causing left ventricular dysfunction in two children with supravalvular aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Okan; Altin, Firat H; Kaya, Mehmet; Ozyılmaz, Isa; Guzeltas, Alper; Erek, Ersin

    2015-04-01

    Congenital supravalvar aortic stenosis (SVAS) is an arteriopathy associated with Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) and other isolated elastin gene deletions. Cardiovascular manifestations associated with WBS are characterized by obstructive arterial lesions such as SVAS and pulmonary artery stenosis in addition to bicuspid aortic valve and mitral valve prolapse. However, coronary artery ostial stenosis may be associated with SVAS, and it increases the risk of sudden death and may complicate surgical management. In this report, we present our experience with two patients having SVAS and left coronary artery ostial stenosis with associated left ventricular dysfunction. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Neurological manifestations of calcific aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Egorov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite being thoroughly studied, senile aortic stenosis (AS remains a disease that is frequently underestimated by Russian clinicians. Meanwhile, its manifestations can not only deteriorate quality of life in patients, but can also be poor prognostic signs. The most common sequels of this disease include heart failure and severe arrhythmias. However, there may be also rare, but no less dangerous complications: enteric bleeding associated with common dysembriogenetic backgrounds, infarctions of various organs, the basis for which is spontaneous calcium embolism, and consciousness loss episodes. The latter are manifestations of cardiocerebral syndrome. Apart from syncope, embolic stroke may develop within this syndrome. There is evidence that after syncope occurs, life expectancy averages 3 years. Global practice is elaborating approaches to the intracardiac calcification prevention based on the rapid development of new pathogenetic ideas on this disease. In particular, it is clear that valvular calcification is extraskeletal leaflet ossification rather than commonplace impregnation with calcium salts, i.e. the case in point is the reverse of osteoporosis. This is the basis for a new concept of drug prevention of both calcification and the latter-induced heart disease. But the view of senile AS remains more than conservative in Russia. The paper describes a clinical case of a rare complication as cerebral calcium embolism and discusses the nature of neurological symptoms of the disease, such as vertigo and syncope.

  11. Osseous and chondromatous metaplasia in calcific aortic valve stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Matthew; Hwang, David H; Padera, Robert F; Mitchell, Richard N; VanderLaan, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement for calcific aortic valve stenosis is one of the more common cardiac surgical procedures. However, the underlying pathophysiology of calcific aortic valve stenosis is poorly understood. We therefore investigated the histologic findings of aortic valves excised for calcific aortic valve stenosis and correlated these findings with their associated clinical features. We performed a retrospective analysis on 6685 native aortic valves excised for calcific stenosis and 312 prosthetic tissue aortic valves with calcific degeneration at a single institution between 1987 and 2013. Patient demographics were correlated with valvular histologic features diagnosed on formalin-fixed, decalcified, and paraffin embedded hematoxylin and eosin stained sections. Of the analyzed aortic valves, 5200 (77.8%) were tricuspid, 1473 (22%) were bicuspid, 11 (0.2%) were unicuspid, and 1 was quadricuspid. The overall prevalence of osseous and/or chondromatous metaplasia was 15.6%. Compared to tricuspid valves, bicuspid valves had a higher prevalence of metaplasia (30.1% vs. 11.5%) and had an earlier mean age of excision (60.2 vs. 75.1 years old). In addition, the frequency of osseous metaplasia and/or chondromatous metaplasia increased with age at time of excision of bicuspid aortic valves, while tricuspid aortic valves showed the same incidence regardless of patient age. Males had a higher prevalence of metaplasia in both bicuspid (33.5% vs. 22.3%) and tricuspid (13.8% vs. 8.6%) aortic valves compared to females. Osseous metaplasia and/or chondromatous metaplasia was also more common in patients with bicuspid aortic valves and concurrent chronic kidney disease or atherosclerosis than in those without (33.6% vs. 28.3%). No osseous or chondromatous metaplasia was observed within the cusps of any of the prosthetic tissue valves. Osseous and chondromatous metaplasia are common findings in native aortic valves but do not occur in prosthetic tissue aortic valves. Bicuspid

  12. Surgery for small asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filardo, Giovanni; Powell, Janet T; Martinez, Melissa Ashley-Marie; Ballard, David J

    2015-02-08

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is an abnormal ballooning of the major abdominal artery. Some AAAs present as emergencies and require surgery; others remain asymptomatic. Treatment of asymptomatic AAAs depends on many factors, but an important one is the size of the aneurysm, as risk of rupture increases with aneurysm size. Large asymptomatic AAAs (greater than 5.5 cm in diameter) are usually repaired surgically; very small AAAs (less than 4.0 cm diameter) are monitored with ultrasonography. Debate continues over the appropriate roles of immediate repair and surveillance with repair on subsequent enlargement in people presenting with asymptomatic AAAs of 4.0 cm to 5.5 cm diameter. This is the third update of the review first published in 1999. To compare mortality, quality of life, and cost effectiveness of immediate surgical repair versus routine ultrasound surveillance in people with asymptomatic AAAs between 4.0 cm and 5.5 cm in diameter. For this update, the Cochrane Peripheral Vascular Diseases Group Trials Search Co-ordinator searched the Specialised Register (February 2014) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 1). We checked reference lists of relevant articles for additional studies. Randomised controlled trials in which men and women with asymptomatic AAAs of diameter 4.0 cm to 5.5 cm were randomly allocated to immediate repair or imaging-based surveillance at least every six months. Outcomes had to include mortality or survival. Three members of the review team independently extracted the data, which were cross-checked by other team members. Risk ratios (RR) (endovascular aneurysm repair only), hazard ratios (HR) (open repair only), and 95% confidence intervals based on Mantel-Haenszel Chi(2) statistic were estimated at one and six years (open repair only) following randomisation. We included all relevant published studies in this review. For this update, four trials with a combined total of 3314 participants

  13. Asymmetric septal hypertrophy - a marker of hypertension in aortic stenosis (a SEAS substudy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuseth, Nora; Cramariuc, Dana; Rieck, Ashild E

    2010-01-01

    Some patients with aortic stenosis develop asymmetric septal hypertrophy (ASH) that may influence the surgical approach and is associated with higher perioperative morbidity. The aim of this analysis was to characterize further this subtype of aortic stenosis patients.......Some patients with aortic stenosis develop asymmetric septal hypertrophy (ASH) that may influence the surgical approach and is associated with higher perioperative morbidity. The aim of this analysis was to characterize further this subtype of aortic stenosis patients....

  14. Velocity ratio predicts outcomes in patients with low gradient severe aortic stenosis and preserved EF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jander, Nikolaus; Hochholzer, Willibald; Kaufmann, Beat A; Bahlmann, Edda; Gerdts, Eva; Boman, Kurt; Chambers, John B; Nienaber, Christoph A; Ray, Simon; Rossebo, Anne; Pedersen, Terje R; Wachtell, Kristian; Gohlke-Bärwolf, Christa; Neumann, Franz-Josef; Minners, Jan

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of velocity ratio (VR) in patients with low gradient severe aortic stenosis (LGSAS) and preserved EF. LGSAS despite preserved EF represents a clinically challenging entity. Reliance on mean pressure gradient (MPG) may underestimate stenosis severity as has been reported in the context of paradoxical low flow, LGSAS. On the other hand, grading of stenosis severity by aortic valve area (AVA) may overrate stenosis severity due to erroneous underestimation of LV outflow tract (LVOT) diameter, small body size or inconsistencies in cut-off values for severe stenosis. We hypothesised that VR may have conceptual advantages over MPG and AVA, predict clinical outcomes and thereby be useful in the management of patients with LGSAS. Patients from the prospective Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study with an AVA<1.0 cm(2), MPG≤40 mm Hg and EF≥55% and asymptomatic at baseline were stratified according to VR with a cut-off value of 0.25. Outcomes were evaluated according to aortic valve-related events and cardiovascular death. Of 435 patients with LGSAS, 197 (45%) had VR<0.25 suggesting severe and 238 (55%) had VR≥0.25 suggesting non-severe stenosis. Aortic valve-related events (mean follow-up 42±14 months) were more frequent in patients with VR<0.25 (57% vs 41%; p<0.001) as was cardiovascular death within the first 24 months (p<0.05). In multivariable Cox regression analysis, MPG was the strongest independent predictor of aortic valve events (p<0.001) followed by VR (p<0.02). Adjusting AVA by VR increased predictive accuracy for aortic valve events (area under the receiver operating curve 0.62 (95% CI 0.57 to 0.67) vs 0.56 (95% CI 0.51 to 0.61) for AVA, p=0.02) with net reclassification improvement calculated at 0.36 (95% CI 0.17 to 0.54, p<0.001). VR did not improve the prediction of clinical events by MPG. In the difficult setting of LGSAS, VR shows a strong association with valve-related events and-although not

  15. Isolated aortic stenosis-development of pulmonary hypertension in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalal J

    1979-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension is uncommon in children with isolat-ed congenital aortic stenosis, and even when present is usually mild. It is primarily due to transmission of the elevated left ventricular end-diastolic pressure through the pulmonary capil-lary circulation and may be then further elevated by reflex vaso-constriction. In some cases the stretching of a patent foremen ovate secondary to elevated left atrial pressure; may lead to a significant left to right shunt which further enhances pulmonary hypertension. This report discusses two cases of isolated aortic stenosis developing pulmonary hypertension in childhood.

  16. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With Early- and New-Generation Devices in Bicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoon, Sung Han; Lefèvre, Thierry; Ahn, Jung Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Few studies have evaluated the clinical outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in patients with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis (AS). Particularly, limited data exist comparing the results of TAVR with new-generation devices versus early-generation devices.  Objective...

  17. Transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a patient with a severe aortic stenosis and cardiogenic shock requiring intra-aortic balloon pump support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodór, Piotr; Wilczek, Krzysztof; Przybylski, Roman; Świątkowski, Andrzej; Głowacki, Jan; Kalarus, Zbigniew; Zembala, Marian

    2015-01-01

    The following paper presents a patient with severe aortic stenosis and severely reduced left ventricular ejection fraction with intra-aortic balloon pump counterpulsation support, who underwent transfemoral aortic valve implantation of a CoreValve prosthesis.

  18. [Balloon valvuloplasty for congenital aortic valve stenosis in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lin; Qi, Chunhua; He, Lan; Liu, Fang; Lu, Ying; Huang, Guoying

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of percutaneous balloon aortic valvuloplasty (PBAV) for congenital aortic valve stenosis in children. This is a retrospective clinical study including 14 children treated with PBAV for congenital aortic valve stenosis from October 2006 to December 2012 in our institute. During clinical follow-up, aortic residual stenosis and restenosis, left ventricular function and the procedure-related complications, including the approach artery injury, and aortic regurgitation were particularly assessed. A total of 14 patients consisting of 12 boys and 2 girls underwent the procedure, with mean age (17.1 ± 10.5) months (range from 8 days to 6 years) and the mean body weight (8.9 ± 5.5) kg (range from 1.9 kg to 23.0 kg). The indication for PBAV was a Doppler-derived peak instaneous gradient of ≥ 75 mmHg(1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa) or a smaller gradient with signs of severe left ventricular dysfunction or left ventricular strain on the ECG. The mean ratio of balloon-annulus was 0.92 ± 0.09 (range from 0.75 to 1.09). The catheter-measured peak systolic valve gradient was successfully relieved in all the patients, decreasing from (69 ± 26) mmHg to (29 ± 13) mmHg immediately after balloon valvuloplasty (t = 7.628, P = 0.000). The Doppler-derived peak and mean gradient decreased from (95 ± 21) mmHg and (50 ± 7) mmHg to (49 ± 16) mmHg and (24 ± 11) mmHg, respectively (t = 7.630, 10.401; P = 0.000, 0.000) . The mean follow-up period was 1 day to 61 months. At follow-up, 2 patients (2/14, 14%) underwent the second balloon valvuloplasty for the significant restenosis, and both showed successful relief of restenosis, however 1 patient required surgical Ross procedure due to significant recurrent systolic pressure gradient and moderate aortic regurgitation 4 years after the second balloon valvuloplasty. Among the 3 young infants who presented with congestive heart failure before intervention, 1 died 1 day after the procedure, the other 2 patients had

  19. Congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis: defining surgical and nonsurgical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Edward J; Jung, Gordon; Williams, William G; Manlhiot, Cedric; Van Arsdell, Glen S; Caldarone, Christopher A; Coles, John; McCrindle, Brian W

    2008-12-01

    Supravalvular aortic stenosis is a rare stenotic lesion of the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT). We characterized the natural history of the disease and the effect of surgical intervention. Ninety-five children diagnosed with supravalvular aortic stenosis between 1976 and 2006 were studied. Procedural and repeated echocardiography reports were analyzed. Stenosis morphology (localized, 82%; diffuse, 18%) was independent of Williams syndrome (n = 59, 62%). The risk of open operation (n = 47) was 46% +/- 6% at 10 years. Increased risk of operation was associated with higher baseline LVOT peak gradients (p 50 mm Hg and children who required an operation. Operation resulted in persistent relief of LVOT obstruction and accelerated increases in ascending aorta dimensions. Overall survival was 94% +/- 3% and 85% +/- 7% at 10 and 15 years and was similar for surgical and nonsurgical groups. No independent risk factors for death were identified on univariate or multivariable analysis. Many children-particularly those with Williams syndrome-show regression of stenosis without intervention. Children who undergo operation have high LVOT gradients and smaller LVOT z scores that do not improve over time. Surgical intervention alters the natural history: LVOT obstruction is relieved and does not recur, and ascending aortic dimensions progressively enlarge towards normal values.

  20. Fibrotic Aortic Valve Stenosis in Hypercholesterolemic/Hypertensive Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yi; Lund, Donald D; Doshi, Hardik; Keen, Henry L; Knudtson, Kevin L; Funk, Nathan D; Shao, Jian Q; Cheng, Justine; Hajj, Georges P; Zimmerman, Kathy A; Davis, Melissa K; Brooks, Robert M; Chapleau, Mark W; Sigmund, Curt D; Weiss, Robert M; Heistad, Donald D

    2016-03-01

    Hypercholesterolemia and hypertension are associated with aortic valve stenosis (AVS) in humans. We have examined aortic valve function, structure, and gene expression in hypercholesterolemic/hypertensive mice. Control, hypertensive, hypercholesterolemic (Apoe(-/-)), and hypercholesterolemic/hypertensive mice were studied. Severe aortic stenosis (echocardiography) occurred only in hypercholesterolemic/hypertensive mice. There was minimal calcification of the aortic valve. Several structural changes were identified at the base of the valve. The intercusp raphe (or seam between leaflets) was longer in hypercholesterolemic/hypertensive mice than in other mice, and collagen fibers at the base of the leaflets were reoriented to form a mesh. In hypercholesterolemic/hypertensive mice, the cusps were asymmetrical, which may contribute to changes that produce AVS. RNA sequencing was used to identify molecular targets during the developmental phase of stenosis. Genes related to the structure of the valve were identified, which differentially expressed before fibrotic AVS developed. Both RNA and protein of a profibrotic molecule, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, were increased greatly in hypercholesterolemic/hypertensive mice. Hypercholesterolemic/hypertensive mice are the first model of fibrotic AVS. Hypercholesterolemic/hypertensive mice develop severe AVS in the absence of significant calcification, a feature that resembles AVS in children and some adults. Structural changes at the base of the valve leaflets include lengthening of the raphe, remodeling of collagen, and asymmetry of the leaflets. Genes were identified that may contribute to the development of fibrotic AVS. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Two-Year Outcomes in Patients With Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis Randomized to Transcatheter Versus Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lars; Steinbrüchel, Daniel Andreas; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Nordic Aortic Valve Intervention (NOTION) trial was the first to randomize all-comers with severe native aortic valve stenosis to either transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) with the CoreValve self-expanding bioprosthesis or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR), inclu...... population. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01057173....

  2. Aortic Valve Stenosis and Left Main Coronary Disease: Hybrid Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amodi, Hussein A; Alhabib, Hamad F; St-Amand, Marc; Iglesias, Ivan; Teefy, Patrick; Chu, Michael W A; Kiaii, Bob

    2015-01-01

    We describe a technique of combined transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), off-pump single coronary artery bypass, and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in a high-risk patient presenting with unstable angina and severe heart failure. This patient had documented moderate to severe aortic stenosis, left ventricular dysfunction, and a heavily calcified ascending aorta. A robotic-assisted left internal thoracic artery harvesting was aborted owing to inability to tolerate single-lung ventilation. A median sternotomy was done, then successful off-pump single-vessel bypass, PCI, and TAVR were achieved. The patient recovered and was discharged from hospital in stable condition.

  3. Valve Calcification in Aortic Stenosis: Etiology and Diagnostic Imaging Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Manuela Izquierdo-Gómez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aortic stenosis is the most common valvulopathy in the Western world. Its prevalence has increased significantly in recent years due to population aging; hence, up to 8% of westerners above the age of 84 now have severe aortic stenosis (Lindroos et al., 1993. This causes increased morbidity and mortality and therein lies the importance of adequate diagnosis and stratification of the degree of severity which allows planning the best therapeutic option in each case. Long understood as a passive age-related degenerative process, it is now considered a rather more complex entity involving mechanisms and factors similar to those of atherosclerosis (Stewart et al., 1997. In this review, we summarize the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the onset and progression of the disease and analyze the current role of cardiac imaging techniques for diagnosis.

  4. Increased risk of aortic valve stenosis in patients with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalid, Usman; Ahlehoff, Ole; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease including atherosclerosis. The pathogenesis of aortic valve stenosis (AS) also includes an inflammatory component. We therefore investigated the risk of AS in patients with psoriasis compared...... with mild and severe disease, respectively. CONCLUSION: In a nationwide cohort, psoriasis was associated with a disease severity-dependent increased risk of AS. The mechanisms underlying this novel finding require further study....

  5. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation for bicuspid aortic valve stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Ashraf; Kornowski, Ran

    2015-08-01

    In Preprocedural CT, patients with BAV have larger aortic annulus perimeters, and more calcified valves compared with TAV. In patients with BAV, self-expandable valves were under-expand and balloon-expandable valves have a trend toward increased rates of postimplantation AR grade. Self-expandable valves have higher postprocedural gradient in BAV compared with TAV. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Temporal trends in the incidence and prognosis of aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsson, Andreas; Li, Xinjun; Andersson, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aging of Western populations is expected to result in increasing occurrence of aortic stenosis (AS), but data are limited. Recent studies have reported declining incidence and mortality for other major heart diseases. We aimed to study temporal trends in the incidence and prognosi...... that improved risk factor control and cardiovascular therapy, combined with increased use of aortic valve replacement in the elderly and reduced perioperative mortality in aortic valve replacement, have translated into favorable effects for AS.......BACKGROUND: The aging of Western populations is expected to result in increasing occurrence of aortic stenosis (AS), but data are limited. Recent studies have reported declining incidence and mortality for other major heart diseases. We aimed to study temporal trends in the incidence and prognosis......-cause and cardiovascular-related mortality. The age-adjusted incidence of AS in Sweden declined from 15.0 to 11.4 in men and 9.8 to 7.1 in women per 100 000 between 1989 to 1991 and 2007 to 2009, and the median age at diagnosis increased by 4 years for both men and women. The age- and sex-adjusted relative risk of 1...

  7. Combined surgical and catheter-based treatment of extensive thoracic aortic aneurysm and aortic valve stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Lönn, Lars; Søndergaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    valve stenosis (AS) who are considered at high risk for surgical aortic valve replacement. In this report, we describe the combined surgical and catheter-based treatment of an extensive TAA and AS. To our knowledge, this is the first report of hybrid TAA repair combined with TAVR.......An extensive thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is a potentially life-threatening condition and remains a technical challenge to surgeons. Over the past decade, repair of aortic arch aneurysms has been accomplished using both hybrid (open and endovascular) and totally endovascular techniques. Thoracic...... endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) has changed and extended management options in thoracic aorta disease, including in those patients deemed unfit or unsuitable for open surgery. Accordingly, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is increasingly used to treat patients with symptomatic severe aortic...

  8. Acute Right Coronary Ostial Stenosis during Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarwar Umran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of acute right coronary artery stenosis developing in a patient undergoing aortic valve replacement. We present a case report with a brief overview of the literature relating to coronary artery occlusion associated with cardiac valve surgery - the theories and treatments are discussed. A 85 year-old female was admitted under the care of the cardiothoracic team with signs and symptoms of heart failure. Investigations, including cardiac echocardiography and coronary angiography, indicated a critical aortic valve stenosis. Intraoperative right ventricular failure ensued post aortic valve replacement. Subsequent investigations revealed an acute occlusion of the proximal right coronary artery with resultant absence of distal flow supplying the right ventricle. An immediate right coronary artery bypass procedure was performed with resolution of the right ventricular failure. Subsequent weaning off cardiopulmonary bypass was uneventful and the patient continued to make excellent recovery in the postoperative phase. To our knowledge this is one of the few documented cases of intraoperative acute coronary artery occlusion developing during valve surgery. However, surgeons should be aware of the potential for acute occlusion so that early recognition and rapid intervention can be instituted.

  9. Circulating matrix metalloproteinase patterns in association with aortic dilatation in bicuspid aortic valve patients with isolated severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongshi; Wu, Boting; Dong, Lili; Wang, Chunsheng; Wang, Xiaolin; Shu, Xianhong

    2016-02-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) exhibits a clinical incline toward aortopathy, in which aberrant tensile and shear stress generated by BAV can induce differential expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their endogenous tissue inhibitors (TIMPs). Whether stenotic BAV, which exhibits additional eccentric high-velocity flow jet upon ascending aorta and further worsens circumferential systolic wall shear stress than BAV with echocardiographically normal aortic valve, can lead to unique plasma MMP/TIMP patterns is still unknown. According to their valvulopathy and aortic dilatation status, 93 BAV patients were included in the present study. Group A (n = 37) and B (n = 28) comprised severely stenotic patients with or without ascending aorta dilatation; Group C (n = 12) and D (n = 16) comprised echocardiographically normal BAV patients with or without ascending aorta dilatation. Plasma MMP/TIMP levels (MMP-1, -2, -3, -8, -9, -10, -13 and TIMP-1, -2, -4) were determined via a multiplex ELISA detection system in a single procedure. Among patients with isolated severe aortic stenosis, plasma levels of MMP-2 and -9 were significantly elevated when ascending aortic dilatation was present (p = 0.001 and p = 0.002, respectively). MMP-2, however, remained as the single elevated plasma component among echocardiographically normal BAV patients with dilated ascending aorta (p = 0.027). Multivariate analysis revealed that MMP-2 and MMP-9 could both serve as independent risk factor for aortic dilatation in the case of isolated severe stenosis (p = 0.003 and p = 0.001, respectively), and MMP-2 in echocardiographically normal patients (p = 0.002). In conclusion, BAV patients with isolated severe aortic stenosis demonstrated a distinct plasma MMP/TIMP pattern, which might be utilized as circulating biomarkers for early detection of aortic dilatation.

  10. Progression of Aortic Regurgitation After Different Repair Techniques for Congenital Aortic Valve Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kari, Fabian A; Kroll, Johannes; Kiss, Jan; Hess, Carolin; Stiller, Brigitte; Siepe, Matthias; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm

    2016-01-01

    We sought to characterize the incidence of AR progression and determine risk factors for AR progression in a consecutive series of infants and children after surgical correction of congenital aortic valvular and supravalvular stenosis. N = 30 patients underwent repair of the aortic valve for isolated congenital aortic valve stenosis (n = 14, 47 %) or combined with aortic regurgitation (AR, n = 16, 53%). N = 27 (90%) had a valvular and n = 3 patients (10%) presented with supravalvular pathology of their aortic valve. In n = 16 patients (53%) a bicuspid and in n = 2 (6%) patients, a unicuspid valve was present. Comparative survival was analyzed using the Cox model and log-rank calculations. Log-rank calculations were performed for variables reaching statistical significance in order to identify differences in survival between groups. Commissurotomy was performed in n = 20 patients, patch implantation in n = 4, cusp shaving in n = 8, cusp prolapse correction in n = 3, and cusp augmentation in n = 4 patients. In patients with combined dysfunction and preoperative AR, AR was successfully reduced by the initial procedure, and postoperatively the overall median AR grade was 1+ (range 0-2.5+, p = 0.001, for AR reduction among patients with any grade of preoperative AR). By the time of follow-up echocardiography, the median AR grade had significantly progressed toward 1.5+ (p = 0.004). At the time of mid-term follow-up at 3.2 years, none of the patients had moderate or severe AR grades >2.5+. Patients with a monocuspid aortic valve and patients who had some kind of patch implantation into their cusps or commissures or shaving of thickened cusps were more likely to present with progression of aortic regurgitation. Monocuspid aortic valve and patch implantation, as well as cusp shaving, are probably linked to AR progression. The standard procedure of commissurotomy results in an absolute rate of AR progression of 40 % over a medium-term follow-up period.

  11. Discrete supravalvular aortic stenosis in children: Is it necessary to reconstruct the whole aortic root?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koçyildirim, Ergin; Ozkan, Süleyman; Karadağ, Demet; Köse, S Kenan; Ekici, Enver; Ikizler, Coşkun

    2009-08-01

    Discrete supravalvular aortic stenosis (SAS) is known to involve the whole aortic root. Some surgeons have therefore changed their approach from relief of obstruction using a single-patch to symmetric reconstruction of the whole aortic root - three-patch technique. The advantages are said to be preserved long-term aortic valve function and allowance for growth. This is unproven. We compare growth and aortic root geometry in patients who have undergone relief of discrete SAS using either single-or three-patch technique. Twenty-five patients (14 male, 11 female, mean age of 11+/-4 years, range 4-18) underwent surgery for discrete SAS. No patients with diffuse SAS were included in this retrospective analysis. Twelve patients had features of Williams syndrome. Five patients had other concomitant procedures. A single-patch was inserted into the longitudinal incision, which passed across the stenosis into the non-coronary sinus in 14. A three-patch technique was used in 11 patients. Changes in aortic root following repair were documented in patients using both echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). There were no operative deaths. The mean preoperative gradient was 66+/-17 mmHg (range 50-100 mmHg), which decreased to 14+/-7 mmHg (range 4-18 mmHg) early postoperatively. The late mean gradient was 15+/-5 mmHg. There was no significant difference in the incidence of postoperative aortic regurgitation or gradient across the repair between two techniques according to the echocardiograms and MRI findings. According to our study, we cannot demonstrate any benefit in reconstructing the whole aortic root for discrete SAS. A single-patch technique is easy, safe and appears durable.

  12. Increased platelet count and leucocyte-platelet complex formation in acute symptomatic compared with asymptomatic severe carotid stenosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCabe, D J H

    2005-09-01

    The risk of stroke in patients with recently symptomatic carotid stenosis is considerably higher than in patients with asymptomatic stenosis. In the present study it was hypothesised that excessive platelet activation might partly contribute to this difference.

  13. Global strain in severe aortic valve stenosis: relation to clinical outcome after aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbæk, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K; Rudbæk, Torsten R; Pellikka, Patricia A; Møller, Jacob E

    2012-09-01

    Global longitudinal systolic strain (GLS) is often reduced in aortic stenosis despite normal ejection fraction. The importance of reduced preoperative GLS on long-term outcome after aortic valve replacement is unknown. A total of 125 patients with severe aortic stenosis and ejection fraction >40% scheduled for aortic valve replacement were evaluated preoperatively and divided into 4 groups according to GLS quartiles. Patients were followed up for 4 years. The primary end points were major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) defined as cardiovascular mortality and cardiac hospitalization because of worsening of heart failure; the secondary end point was cardiovascular mortality. MACE and cardiac mortality were significantly increased in patients with lower GLS. Estimated 5-year MACE was increased: first quartile 19% (n=6) / second quartile 20% (n=6) / third quartile 35% (n=11) / fourth quartile 49% (n=15); P=0.04. Patients with increased age, left ventricular hypertrophy, and left atrial dilatation were at increased risk. In Cox regression analysis, after correcting for standard risk factors and ejection fraction, GLS was found to be significantly associated with cardiac morbidity and mortality. In a stepwise Cox model with forward selection, GLS was the sole independent predictor: hazard ratio=1.13 (95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.25), P=0.04. Comparing the overall log likelihood χ(2) of the predictive power of the multivariable model containing GLS was statistically superior to models based on EuroScore, history with ischemic heart disease, and ejection fraction. In patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis undergoing aortic valve replacement, reduced GLS provides important prognostic information beyond standard risk factors.

  14. Measurement of effective aortic valve area using three-dimensional echocardiography in children undergoing aortic balloon valvuloplasty for aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharucha, Tara; Fernandes, Fernanda; Slorach, Cameron; Mertens, Luc; Friedberg, Mark Kevin

    2012-04-01

    Pressure gradient is used for timing of balloon aortic valvuloplasty for aortic stenosis (AS) in children, but does not correlate well with outcome and is limited if ventricular function is poor. In adults, effective orifice area (EOA) is used to assess AS severity, but EOA by continuity equation or 2D echo is unreliable in children. Three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) may reliably assess EOA but has not been studied in children. We assessed measurement of aortic valve EOA by 3DE in children with AS before and after balloon aortic valvuloplasty and compared results with change in aortic valve gradient. 3DE was performed at time of catheterization before and after balloon aortic valvuloplasty. Using 3DE multiplanar review mode, valve annulus diameter, area, and EOA were measured and compared with change in aortic gradient and degree of aortic insufficiency. Twenty-four 3DE studies in 12 children (mean age 4.4 ± 5.0 years) were analyzed. EOA was measurable in all. Catheter peak gradient decreased from 45 ± 10 to 26 ± 17 mmHg (P = 0.0018). 3DE EOA increased after balloon aortic valvuloplasty (0.59 ± 0.52 cm(2) vs 0.80 ± 0.70 cm(2) ; P = 0.03), without change in valve diameter. EOA change correlated with change in peak (r = 0.77; P = 0.005) and mean (r = 0.60; P = 0.03) aortic valve gradient post balloon aortic valvuloplasty. 3DE facilitates EOA measurement in pediatric AS and correlates with change in aortic valve gradient after balloon valvuloplasty. © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Incidence and prognosis of congenital aortic valve stenosis in Liverpool (1960-1990).

    OpenAIRE

    Kitchiner, D J; Jackson, M; Walsh, K; Peart, I; Arnold, R

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the incidence and prognosis of congenital aortic valve stenosis in the five Health Districts of Liverpool that make up the Merseyside area. DESIGN--The records of the Liverpool Congenital Malformations Registry and the Royal Liverpool Children's Hospital identified 239 patients (155 male, 84 female) born with aortic valve stenosis between 1960 and 1990. Patients were traced to assess the severity of stenosis at follow up. Information on the severity at presentation and...

  16. [Factors facilitating development of degenerative aortic valvular stenosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andropova, O V; Polubentseva, E I; Anokhin, V N

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine factors of risk and progress of aortal valvular calcinosis (AVC) and aortic ostium stenosis (AOS). The subjects were 85 patients with AVC (42--with aortic valvular stenosis (AVS), and 43--without AOS). The study, which included analysis of the lipid and mineral metabolism, and immunological tests, shows that potential factors of AVC are: age (p dislipidemia (high serum level of total cholesterol, cholesterol of low density lipoproteins, and apoB, atherogenic shift of apoB/apoA-1 ratio, low level of cholesterol of high density lipoproteins (CHDLP)), disbalance between intecellular matrix synthesis and destruction (high concentration of alkaline phosphatase and its bone fraction, and accelerated deoxypyridinoline excretion), inflammation (high concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, and interleukin-6 (IL-6)). The factors of AOS were: age (p dislipidemia (high levels of cholesterol of low density and very low density lipoproteins, low concentrations of CHDLP, and apoA-1), degradation of extracellular matrix, and inflammation (high concentrations of CRP, fibrinogen, IL-6, and IL-8). Thus, atherogenic dislipidemia and mineral dysmetabolism disorder facilitate AVC. The revealed immune status changes imply the role of inflammation in the development and progress of AVS.

  17. Pathological Investigation of Congenital Bicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis, Compared with Atherosclerotic Tricuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis and Congenital Bicuspid Aortic Valve Regurgitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamatani, Yasuhiro; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Nagai, Toshiyuki; Sugano, Yasuo; Kanzaki, Hideaki; Yasuda, Satoshi; Fujita, Tomoyuki; Kobayashi, Junjiro; Anzai, Toshihisa

    2016-01-01

    Background Congenital bicuspid aortic valve (CBAV) is the main cause of aortic stenosis (AS) in young adults. However, the histopathological features of AS in patients with CBAV have not been fully investigated. Methods and Results We examined specimens of aortic valve leaflets obtained from patients who had undergone aortic valve re/placement at our institution for severe AS with CBAV (n = 24, CBAV-AS group), severe AS with tricuspid aortic valve (n = 24, TAV-AS group), and severe aortic regurgitation (AR) with CBAV (n = 24, CBAV-AR group). We compared the histopathological features among the three groups. Pathological features were classified using semi-quantitative methods (graded on a scale 0 to 3) by experienced pathologists without knowledge of the patients’ backgrounds. The severity of inflammation, neovascularization, and calcium and cholesterol deposition did not differ between the CBAV-AS and TAV-AS groups, and these four parameters were less marked in the CBAV-AR group than in the CBAV-AS (all paortic side than on the ventricular side (both paortic and ventricular sides in CBAV-AR patients (p = 0.35). Conclusions Valvular fibrosis, especially on the aortic side, was greater in patients with CBAV-AS than in those without, suggesting a difference in the pathogenesis of AS between CBAV and TAV. PMID:27479126

  18. Angioplasty and stenting of symptomatic and asymptomatic vertebral artery stenosis: to treat or not to treat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhutik, V; Lago, A; Tembl, J I; Aparici, F; Vazquez, V; Mainar, E

    2010-02-01

    Comprehensive indications for treatment of symptomatic vertebral stenosis remain unavailable. Even less is known about endovascular treatment of asymptomatic cases. We treated symptomatic and asymptomatic vertebral ostium stenosis with angioplasty and stenting and investigated the long term outcome. Consecutive patients with two different indications were included. Group 1 (G1) had symptomatic >50% stenosis. Group 2 (G2) had asymptomatic >50% stenosis and severe lesions of anterior circulation and were expected to benefit from additional cerebral blood supply. Twenty nine vertebral origin stenoses in 28 patients (75% men, mean age 64 +/- 9 years) were treated. There were 16 G1 and 13 G2 cases. Technical success rate was 100%. Immediate neurological complications rate was 3.4% (one G1 patient with vertebral TIA due to release of emboli). Two further strokes were seen during follow up (32 +/- 24 months): vertebrobasilar stroke in a G2 patient with permeable stent in V1 segment, new ipsilateral V3 occlusion and high-risk cardioembolic source, and carotid stroke in a G1 patient who had had ipsilateral carotid stenting. There were no deaths of any cause. Asymptomatic restenosis was observed in one out of 19 patients from both groups who underwent a follow up angiography. Angioplasty and stenting appears to be technically feasible and safe in asymptomatic and symptomatic vertebral stenosis. More studies are needed in order to clarify its role in primary and secondary prevention of vertebrobasilar stroke. High risk anterior circulation lesions should be taken into account as a possible indication in patients with asymptomatic vertebral stenosis.

  19. Congenital aortic stenosis: treatment outcomes in a nationwide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallio, Merja; Rahkonen, Otto; Mattila, Ilkka; Pihkala, Jaana

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate treatment outcomes of pediatric valvar aortic stenosis (AS) in a nationwide follow-up. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) has been the preferred treatment for congenital AS in Finland since the year 2000. All children treated due to isolated AS during 2000-2014 were included in this retrospective study. Treatment outcomes were categorized into Optimal: residual gradient  ≤35 mmHg and trivial or no aortic regurgitation (AR), Adequate: gradient ≤35 mmHg with mild AR, or Inadequate: gradient >35 mmHg and/or moderate to severe AR. Sixty-one patients underwent either BAV (n = 54) or surgical valvuloplasty (n = 7) for valvar AS at a median age of 29 days (range 6 hours to 16.9 years). The proportion of patients not requiring reintervention at 1, 5, and 10 years was 61%, 50%, and 29% in neonates and 83%, 73%, and 44% in older patients, respectively (p = .02); without difference between treatment groups. Larger proportion of patients remained free from valve surgery after optimal BAV result than after adequate or inadequate result (p = .01). The reason for the first reintervention was AS in 50%, AR in 36%, and combined aortic valve disease in 16% of cases. Early mortality (before hospital discharge) was 4.9%, and associated with critical AS in neonates. There was no late mortality during the follow-up. Although majority of congenital AS patients require more than one intervention during childhood, an optimal BAV result improves long-term outcome by increasing the proportion of patients remaining free from valve surgery. High long-term freedom from reintervention is attainable also in the neonatal population.

  20. Lipoprotein(a in patients with aortic stenosis: Insights from cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilios S Vassiliou

    Full Text Available Aortic stenosis is the most common age-related valvular pathology. Patients with aortic stenosis and myocardial fibrosis have worse outcome but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Lipoprotein(a is associated with adverse cardiovascular risk and is elevated in patients with aortic stenosis. Although mechanistic pathways could link Lipoprotein(a with myocardial fibrosis, whether the two are related has not been previously explored. In this study, we investigated whether elevated Lipoprotein(a was associated with the presence of myocardial replacement fibrosis.A total of 110 patients with mild, moderate and severe aortic stenosis were assessed by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE cardiovascular magnetic resonance to identify fibrosis. Mann Whitney U tests were used to assess for evidence of an association between Lp(a and the presence or absence of myocardial fibrosis and aortic stenosis severity and compared to controls. Univariable and multivariable linear regression analysis were undertaken to identify possible predictors of Lp(a.Thirty-six patients (32.7% had no LGE enhancement, 38 (34.6% had midwall enhancement suggestive of midwall fibrosis and 36 (32.7% patients had subendocardial myocardial fibrosis, typical of infarction. The aortic stenosis patients had higher Lp(a values than controls, however, there was no significant difference between the Lp(a level in mild, moderate or severe aortic stenosis. No association was observed between midwall or infarction pattern fibrosis and Lipoprotein(a, in the mild/moderate stenosis (p = 0.91 or severe stenosis patients (p = 0.42.There is no evidence to suggest that higher Lipoprotein(a leads to increased myocardial midwall or infarction pattern fibrosis in patients with aortic stenosis.

  1. Carotid plaque, intima-media thickness, and incident aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsson, Andreas; Östling, Gerd; Persson, Margaretha

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Aortic stenosis (AS) shares risk factors with atherosclerotic vascular disease. Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and plaque may reflect the cumulative damage from exposure to different atherosclerotic risk factors. We examined the relationship of carotid IMT and plaque with incident...... AS in a prospective population-based study. APPROACH AND RESULTS: A random sample of participants (age, 45-68 years) in the population-based Malmö Diet and Cancer Study underwent B-mode ultrasound with measurements of IMT and the presence of plaque in the common carotid artery (n=5079). Potential risk factors......-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, C-reactive protein, plaque, and IMT. In contrast, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, height, and leukocyte count were not significantly associated with AS (P>0.05). After adjustments, IMT, plaque, age, smoking, C...

  2. Efficiency of aortic valve commissurotomy for congenital aortic valve stenosis in pediatric population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. А. Лукьянов

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study was designed to evaluate short-term and long-term outcomes after open aortic valve commissurotomy in the pediatric patients at our center over a period of 10 years. Methods. A retrospective study of 94 patients who underwent open surgical commissurotomy because of aortic valve stenosis between 2003 and 2013 is presented. Follow-up time was in the range of 1 to 7 years. Results. The open aortic valve commissurotomy combined with debridement of leaflet free edge 36.1 %, LVOT myectomy 11.7%, leaflet suture plastic 7.4%, modified Konno procedure 6.3%, Brom's aortoplasty 4.2% was performed for all patients. Average cardiopulmonary bypass time was 59.2 30.7 min. Median aortic cross-clamping time was 31.52 15.1 min. Hospital complications were observed in 38.2% of cases. ICU time was in the range of 1 to 31 (mean 3.2 5.1 day. Artificial lung ventilation time varied from 2 to 76 (mean 15.3 18.3 hours. Inotropic support was needed in 26.5% of cases. Mean hospital stay time was 17.1 7.3 days. At follow-up between 2 and 7 years, reoperations were required for 3 patients who underwent a Ross procedure. Conclusions. The results evidence that open surgical commissurotomy is an effective way of treatment for aortic valve stenosis, considering the accuracy of plasty and additional techniques of leaflet correction. The best children age group for this type of operation is from first to five years of life.

  3. Choice of Treatment for Aortic Valve Stenosis in the Era of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Eastern Denmark (2005 to 2015)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Luk, Ngai H V; Olsen, Niels T

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the choice of treatment for severe aortic valve stenosis in the era of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in Eastern Denmark. BACKGROUND: Until the early 21st century, the only therapeutic option for aortic valve stenosis was surgical...

  4. A comparative analysis of static balance between patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis and asymptomatic participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truszczyńska, Aleksandra; Drzał-Grabiec, Justyna; Trzaskoma, Zbigniew; Rąpała, Kazimierz; Tarnowski, Adam; Górniak, Krystyna

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess static balance in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis who qualified for surgical decompression of associated neural structures and compare them with asymptomatic participants. This case-controlled study evaluated a sample of 50 patients with spinal canal stenosis (stenosis group) and 48 participants with no history of clinical symptoms of back pain. Static balance was assessed by conducting quantitative analysis of balance reaction parameters in quiet standing with the eyes closed. Higher values were observed in total length of center of pressure (COP) path, length of COP path in the anterior-posterior plane, mean amplitude of COP projection in the anterior-posterior plane, maximal amplitude between the 2 most distant points in the anterior-posterior plane, mean COP velocity, and sway area marked by the moving COP in the stenosis group compared with the asymptomatic group. This study showed statistically significant differences in static balance parameters between patients with spinal canal stenosis compared with the asymptomatic group. Copyright © 2014 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Prevalence of asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis according to age and sex systematic review and metaregression analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Weerd, M.; Greving, J.P.; de Jong, A.W.F.; Buskens, E.; Bots, M.L.

    Background and Purpose-In the discussion on the value of population-wide screening for asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis (ACAS), reliable prevalence estimates are crucial. We set out to provide reliable age- and sex-specific prevalence estimates of ACAS through a systematic literature review and

  6. Association of Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity with Asymptomatic Intracranial Arterial Stenosis in Hypertension Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Jin; Qain, Yuesheng; Tang, Xiaofeng; Ling, Huawei; Chen, Kemin; Li, Yan; Gao, Pingjin; Zhu, Dingliang

    2016-08-01

    Intracranial arterial stenosis is a common cause of ischemic stroke in Asians. We therefore sought to explore the relationship of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and intracranial arterial stenosis in 834 stroke-free hypertensive patients. Intracranial arterial stenosis was evaluated through computerized tomographic angiography. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity was measured by an automated cuff device. The top decile of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity was significantly associated with intracranial arterial stenosis (P = .027, odds ratio = 1.82; 95% confidence interval: 1.07-3.10). The patients with the top decile of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity showed 56% higher risk for the presence of intracranial arterial stenosis to the whole population, which was more significant in patients younger than 65 years old. We also found that brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity related to both intracranial arterial stenosis and homocysteine. Our study showed the association of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity with asymptomatic intracranial arterial stenosis in hypertension patients, especially in relative younger subjects. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity might be a relatively simple and repeatable measurement to detect hypertension patients in high risk of intracranial arterial stenosis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Congenital Aortic Stenosis in Children: Diagnosis, Clinical Presentation, Treatment and Prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye.A. Kalashnikova

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article considered the literature data on the incidence, main clinical manifestations, modern methods of early neonatal and postnatal diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of aortic stenosis — congenital cardiovascular system malformation.

  8. Aortic stenosis with abnormal eccentric left ventricular remodeling secondary to hypothyroidism in a Bourdeaux Mastiff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Augusto Minozzo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This paper describes a case of congenital aortic stenosis with eccentric left ventricular hypertrophy associated with hypothyroidism in a 1-year-old Bourdeaux Mastiff dog. The dog had ascites, apathy, alopecic and erythematous skin lesions in different parts of the body. A two-dimensional echocardiogram revealed aortic valve stenosis, with poststenotic dilation in the ascending aorta. The same exam showed eccentric hypertrophy and dilation of the left ventricle during systole and diastole. Aortic stenosis usually results in concentric left ventricular hypertrophy instead of eccentric hypertrophy; and therefore, this finding was very unusual. Hypothyroidism, which is uncommon in young dogs, may be incriminated as the cause of ventricular dilation, making this report even more interesting. Because hypothyroidism would only result in dilatation, the eccentric hypertrophy was attributed to pressure overload caused by aortic stenosis. Thus, cardiac alterations of this case represent a paradoxical association of both diseases.

  9. Velocity ratio predicts outcomes in patients with low gradient severe aortic stenosis and preserved EF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jander, Nikolaus; Hochholzer, Willibald; Kaufmann, Beat A

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the usefulness of velocity ratio (VR) in patients with low gradient severe aortic stenosis (LGSAS) and preserved EF. BACKGROUND: LGSAS despite preserved EF represents a clinically challenging entity. Reliance on mean pressure gradient (MPG) may underestimate stenosis severity...... for severe stenosis. We hypothesised that VR may have conceptual advantages over MPG and AVA, predict clinical outcomes and thereby be useful in the management of patients with LGSAS. METHODS: Patients from the prospective Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study with an AVA....25 suggesting non-severe stenosis. Aortic valve-related events (mean follow-up 42±14 months) were more frequent in patients with VRanalysis, MPG was the strongest independent predictor...

  10. Effect of candesartan treatment on left ventricular remodeling after aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbaek, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K

    2010-01-01

    In hypertension, angiotensin receptor blockers can augment regression of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy. It is not known whether this also is the case after aortic valve replacement (AVR) for severe aortic stenosis (AS). To test the hypothesis that treatment with candesartan in addition...... to conventional treatment is able to augment LV and left atrial (LA) reverse remodeling in patients with AS undergoing AVR, we studied 114 patients scheduled for AVR. Patients were randomized to treatment with candesartan 32 mg 1 time/day or conventional therapy immediately after AVR. Patients were followed...... group had greater improvement in longitudinal LV systolic function assessed by tissue Doppler S' wave (0.6 +/- 0.1-cm/s increase in control group vs 1.4 +/- 0.1 cm/s in candesartan group, p = 0.01, p for trend = 0.02) and a decrease in LA volume (p for trend = 0.01). Treatment had no effect on diastolic...

  11. Exercise-induced cardiopulmonary arrest in a child with aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Hirofumi; Sugimoto, Masaya; Senzaki, Hideaki

    2016-06-01

    The beneficial effect of exercise restriction in preventing sudden cardiac death in children with aortic stenosis remains unclear. We report the case of a 15-year-old boy with congenital aortic stenosis who was resuscitated after sudden cardiac arrest during exercise. The case led to the new concept that exercise restriction may prevent not only unpredictable ventricular ischaemic events and associated arrhythmias but also progressive ventricular hypertrophy.

  12. Significance of aortic valve calcification in patients with low-gradient low-flow aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Olcay; Cam, Akin; Agarwal, Shikhar; Ige, Mobolaji; Yousefzai, Rayan; Singh, Dhssraj; Griffin, Brian P; Schoenhagen, Paul; Kapadia, Samir R; Tuzcu, Murat E

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of patients with aortic stenosis (AS) and impaired left ventricular function remains challenging. Aortic valve calcium (AVC) scoring with computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopy has been proposed as means of diagnosing and predicting outcomes in patients with severe AS. Severity of aortic valve calcification correlates with the diagnosis of true severe AS and outcomes in patients with low-gradient low-flow AS. Echocardiography and CT database records from January 1, 2000 to September 26, 2009 were reviewed. Patients with aortic valve area (AVA)<1.0 cm2 who had ejection fraction (EF)≤25% and mean valvular gradient≤25 mmHg with concurrent noncontrast CT scans were included. AVC was evaluated using CT and fluoroscopy. Mortality and aortic valve replacement (AVR) were established using the Social Security Death Index and medical records. The role of surgery in outcomes was evaluated. Fifty-one patients who met the above criteria were included. Mean age was 75.1±9.6 years, and 15 patients were female. Mean EF was 21%±4.6% with AVA of 0.7±0.1 cm2. The peak and mean gradients were 35.5±10.6 and 19.0±5.1 mmHg, respectively. Median aortic valve calcium score was 2027 Agatston units. Mean follow-up was 908 days. Patients with calcium scores above the median value were found to have increased mortality (P=0.02). The benefit of surgery on survival was more pronounced in patients with higher valvular scores (P=0.001). Fluoroscopy scoring led to similar findings, where increased AVC predicted worse outcomes (P=0.04). In patients with low-gradient low-flow AS, higher valvular calcium score predicts worse long-term mortality. AVR is associated with improved survival in patients with higher valve scores. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Aortic Valve Morphology Correlates With Left Ventricular Systolic Function and Outcome in Children With Congenital Aortic Stenosis Prior to Balloon Aortic Valvuloplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Kevin; Sachdeva, Ritu; Goldstein, Bryan H; Lang, Sean; Petit, Christopher J

    2016-09-01

    We sought to determine the relationship between aortic valve morphology and left ventricular (LV) systolic function in children with aortic stenosis (AS) prior to balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV). Both aortic valve morphology and LV systolic function have been linked with outcomes in children with congenital AS undergoing BAV. The relationship between aortic valve morphology and LV function is poorly defined despite their importance in regard to outcomes. We performed a retrospective multicenter cohort study of 89 AS patients who underwent BAV between 2007-2013. Pre-BAV echocardiograms were analyzed for: aortic valve opening (AVO); aortic valve type (true bicuspid, functionally bicuspid, or unicuspid); maximal raphe length; aortic valve leaflet symmetry; and valve angle of excursion. The primary endpoint was low function, defined as LV shortening fraction (LVSF) aortic valve mean gradient was 47.00 mm Hg (IQR, 36.75-56.00 mm Hg). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that low AVO (P=.03) was associated with reduced LV function, independent of age or aortic valve gradient (R² = .652). Bicuspid aortic valve (P=.07) was associated with improved LV function compared with functionally unicuspid aortic valve. Low AVO stenosis. Qualitative aspects such as valve type may also affect LV systolic function. Further study may elucidate whether aortic valve morphology or LV function is the principal predictor of response to BAV and of late outcomes after BAV.

  14. Abnormal Two-Dimensional Strain Echocardiography Findings in Children with Congenital Valvar Aortic Stenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcus, K.A.; Korte, C.L. de; Feuth, T.; Thijssen, J.M.; Kapusta, L.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Congenital valvar aortic stenosis (VAS) causes a pressure overload to the left ventricle. In the clinical setting, the severity of stenosis is graded by the pressure drop over the stenotic valve (pressure gradient). This parameter is dependent on the hemodynamic status and does not provide

  15. Asymptomatic papillary fibroelastoma of the Aortic valve in a young woman - a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pitsis Antonis

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Echocardiography represents an invaluable diagnostic tool for the detection of intracardiac masses while simultaneously provides information about their size, location, mobility and attachment site as well as the presence and extent of any consequent hemodynamic derangement. A 29-year-old asymptomatic young woman with incidental transthoracic echocardiographic (TTE discovery of an aortic valve mass is presented. The 2-dimensional TTE showed a mobile, pedunculated mass, attached by a thin stalk to the aortic surface of the right coronary aortic cusp at the junction of its base with the anterior aortic wall. The importance of valve sparing tumour resection even in asymptomatic patients is emphasised.

  16. Carotid revascularization and medical management for asymptomatic carotid stenosis: Protocol of the CREST-2 clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Virginia J; Meschia, James F; Lal, Brajesh K; Turan, Tanya N; Roubin, Gary S; Brown, Robert D; Voeks, Jenifer H; Barrett, Kevin M; Demaerschalk, Bart M; Huston, John; Lazar, Ronald M; Moore, Wesley S; Wadley, Virginia G; Chaturvedi, Seemant; Moy, Claudia S; Chimowitz, Marc; Howard, George; Brott, Thomas G

    2017-10-01

    Rationale Trials conducted decades ago demonstrated that carotid endarterectomy by skilled surgeons reduced stroke risk in asymptomatic patients. Developments in carotid stenting and improvements in medical prevention of stroke caused by atherothrombotic disease challenge understanding of the benefits of revascularization. Aim Carotid Revascularization and Medical Management for Asymptomatic Carotid Stenosis Trial (CREST-2) will test whether carotid endarterectomy or carotid stenting plus contemporary intensive medical therapy is superior to intensive medical therapy alone in the primary prevention of stroke in patients with high-grade asymptomatic carotid stenosis. Methods and design CREST-2 is two multicenter randomized trials of revascularization plus intensive medical therapy versus intensive medical therapy alone. One trial randomizes patients to carotid endarterectomy plus intensive medical therapy versus intensive medical therapy alone; the other, to carotid stenting plus intensive medical therapy versus intensive medical therapy alone. The risk factor targets of centrally directed intensive medical therapy are LDL cholesterol medical therapy alone arm is 4.8% higher or 2.8% lower than an anticipated 3.6% rate in the revascularization arm. Discussion Management of asymptomatic carotid stenosis requires contemporary randomized trials to address whether carotid endarterectomy or carotid stenting plus intensive medical therapy is superior in preventing stroke beyond intensive medical therapy alone. Whether carotid endarterectomy or carotid stenting has favorable effects on cognition will also be tested. Trial registration United States National Institutes of Health Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02089217.

  17. Relation of Aortic Valve Morphologic Characteristics to Aortic Valve Insufficiency and Residual Stenosis in Children With Congenital Aortic Stenosis Undergoing Balloon Valvuloplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Christopher J; Gao, Kevin; Goldstein, Bryan H; Lang, Sean M; Gillespie, Scott E; Kim, Sung-In H; Sachdeva, Ritu

    2016-03-15

    Aortic valve morphology has been invoked as intrinsic to outcomes of balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) for congenital aortic valve stenosis. We sought to use aortic valve morphologic features to discriminate between valves that respond favorably or unfavorably to BAV, using aortic insufficiency (AI) as the primary outcome. All patients who underwent BAV at 2 large-volume pediatric centers from 2007 to 2014 were reviewed. Morphologic features assessed on pre-BAV echo included valve pattern (unicuspid, functional bicuspid, and true bicuspid), leaflet fusion length, leaflet excursion angle, and aortic valve opening area and on post-BAV echo included leaflet versus commissural tear. Primary end point was increase in AI (AI+) of ≥2°. Eighty-nine patients (median age 0.2 years) were included in the study (39 unicuspid, 41 functional bicuspid, and 9 true bicuspid valves). Unicuspid valves had a lower opening area (p <0.01) and greater fusion length (p = 0.01) compared with functional and true bicuspid valves. Valve gradient pre-BAV and post-BAV were not different among valve patterns. Of the 16 patients (18%) with AI+, 14 had leaflet tears (odds ratio 13.9, 3.8 to 50). True bicuspid valves had the highest rate (33%) of AI+. On multivariate analysis, leaflet tears were associated with AI+, with larger opening area pre-BAV and lower fusion length pre-BAV. AI+ was associated with larger pre-BAV opening area. Gradient relief was associated with reduced angle of excursion. Valve morphology influences outcomes after BAV. Valves with lesser fusion and larger valve openings have higher rates of leaflet tears which in turn are associated with AI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Relation of left ventricular free wall rupture and/or aneurysm with acute myocardial infarction in patients with aortic stenosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sheikh, Irtiza N.; Roberts, William C.

    2017-01-01

    This minireview describes 6 previously reported patients with left ventricular free wall rupture and/or aneurysm complicating acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in patients with aortic stenosis. The findings suggest that left ventricular rupture and/or aneurysm is more frequent in patients with AMI associated with aortic stenosis than in patients with AMI unassociated with aortic stenosis, presumably because of retained elevation of the left ventricular peak systolic pressure after the appeara...

  19. Sex Dimorphism in the Myocardial Response to Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treibel, Thomas A; Kozor, Rebecca; Fontana, Marianna; Torlasco, Camilla; Reant, Patricia; Badiani, Sveeta; Espinoza, Maria; Yap, John; Diez, Javier; Hughes, Alun D; Lloyd, Guy; Moon, James C

    2017-11-10

    The goal of this study was to explore sex differences in myocardial remodeling in aortic stenosis (AS) by using echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), and biomarkers. AS is a disease of both valve and left ventricle (LV). Sex differences in LV remodeling are reported in AS and may play a role in disease phenotyping. This study was a prospective assessment of patients awaiting surgical valve replacement for severe AS using echocardiography, the 6-min walking test, biomarkers (high-sensitivity troponin T and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide), and CMR with late gadolinium enhancement and extracellular volume fraction, which dichotomizes the myocardium into matrix and cell volumes. LV remodeling was categorized into normal geometry, concentric remodeling, concentric hypertrophy, and eccentric hypertrophy. In 168 patients (age 70 ± 10 years, 55% male, indexed aortic valve area 0.40 ± 0.13 cm2/m2, mean gradient 47 ± 4 mm Hg), no sex or age differences in AS severity or functional capacity (6-min walking test) were found. CMR captured sex dimorphism in LV remodeling not apparent by using 2-dimensional echocardiography. Normal geometry (82% female) and concentric remodeling (60% female) dominated in women; concentric hypertrophy (71% male) and eccentric hypertrophy (76% male) dominated in men. Men also had more evidence of LV decompensation (pleural effusions), lower left ventricular ejection fraction (67 ± 16% vs. 74 ± 13%; p < 0.001), and higher levels of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (p = 0.04) and high-sensitivity troponin T (p = 0.01). Myocardial fibrosis was higher in men, with higher focal fibrosis (late gadolinium enhancement 16.5 ± 11.2 g vs. 10.5 ± 8.9 g; p < 0.001) and extracellular expansion (matrix volume 28.5 ± 8.8 ml/m2 vs. 21.4 ± 6.3 ml/m2; p < 0.001). CMR revealed sex differences in associations between AS and myocardial remodeling not evident from echocardiography. Given equal valve severity, the myocardial

  20. Complete heart block and severe aortic stenosis in a patient with rheumatoid arthtritis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyssakis, Ioannis; Lionakis, Nikolaos; Vlahodimitris, Ioannis; Votteas, Vassilios

    2009-02-05

    A 77-year-old male patient with a history of rheumatoid arthritis was admitted to our hospital for investigation of syncope and dyspnea on exertion class II according to NYHA class association. The electrocardiogram revealed complete heart block whereas the echocardiogram showed severe aortic valve stenosis with a peak gradient = 80 mmHg. A permanent pacemaker was implanted in addition to aortic valve replacement. The coexistence of complete heart block and severe aortic stenosis with rheumatoid arthritis are presented. Further studies are necessary to assess whether a true association of the above conditions exist.

  1. Low Rate of Prenatal Diagnosis among Neonates with Critical Aortic Stenosis: Insight into the Natural History In Utero (Aortic Stenosis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freud, Lindsay R.; Moon-Grady, Anita; Escobar-Diaz, Maria C.; Gotteiner, Nina L.; Young, Luciana T.; McElhinney, Doff B.; Tworetzky, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To better understand the natural history and spectrum of fetal aortic stenosis (AS), we aimed to 1) determine the prenatal diagnosis rate of neonates with critical AS and a biventricular (BV) outcome; and 2) describe the findings at fetal echocardiography in prenatally diagnosed patients. Methods A multi-center, retrospective study was performed from 2000 to 2013. Neonates with critical AS who were discharged with a BV outcome were included. The prenatal diagnosis rate was compared to that reported for hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). Fetal echocardiographic findings in prenatally diagnosed patients were reviewed. Results Only 10 of 117 neonates (8.5%) with critical AS and a BV outcome were diagnosed prenatally, a rate significantly lower than that for HLHS in the contemporary era (82%; p<0.0001). Of the 10 patients diagnosed prenatally, all developed LV dysfunction by a median gestational age of 33 weeks (range, 28–35). When present, Doppler abnormalities such as retrograde flow in the aortic arch (n=2), monophasic mitral inflow (n=2), and left to right flow across the foramen ovale (n=8) developed late in gestation (median 33 weeks). Conclusion The prenatal diagnosis rate among neonates with critical AS and a BV outcome is very low, likely due to a relatively normal 4-chamber view in mid-gestation with development of significant obstruction in the 3rd trimester. This natural history contrasts with that of severe mid-gestation AS with evolving HLHS and suggests that the timing in gestation of significant AS has an important impact on subsequent left heart growth in utero. PMID:25251721

  2. Concomitant mitral regurgitation and aortic stenosis: one step further to low-flow preserved ejection fraction aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benfari, Giovanni; Clavel, Marie-Annick; Nistri, Stefano; Maffeis, Caterina; Vassanelli, Corrado; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice; Rossi, Andrea

    2017-07-27

    Patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) and normal ejection fraction (EF) can paradoxically present low-transaortic flow and worse prognosis. The role of co-existing mitral regurgitation (MR) in determining this haemodynamic inconsistency has never been quantitatively explored. The hypothesis is that MR influences forward stroke volume and characterizes the low-flow AS pattern. Consecutive patients with indexed aortic valve area (AVA) ≤0.6 cm2/m2 and EF > 50% formed the study population. Complete echocardiographic data were collected, and mitral effective regurgitant orifice area (ERO) and regurgitant volume were obtained with proximal isovelocity surface area method. Patients were divided into subgroups according to indexed stroke volume (SV index). Included patients were 273 [age 79 ± 10 years, 53% female, EF 65 ± 7%, indexed AVA 0.47 ± 0.09 cm2/m2, mean transaortic gradient (MG) 32 ± 17 mmHg]. Mitral regurgitation was present in 89 (32%); ERO was 0.12 ± 0.08 cm2 (range 0.02-0.49 cm2). A low-flow state (SV index ≤35 mL/m2) was diagnosed in 41 (15%) patients. The prevalence of MR was higher in with low-flow vs. normal-flow group (56 vs. 28%, P = 0.03). Effective regurgitant orifice was associated to low-flow state univariately (OR: 1.75 [1.59-2.60]; P = 0.004) and after comprehensive adjustment (OR:1.76 [1.12-2.75]; P = 0.01). When MG was forced in the model, ERO remained significant (P flow condition. Furthermore, MR quantification by ERO predicts the presence of reduced flow independently of chamber volumes, systolic function, and transaortic gradient.

  3. Early Manifestation of Supravalvular Aortic and Pulmonary Artery Stenosis in a Patient with Williams Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Uk Lee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Williams syndrome (WS is a developmental disorder characterized by vascular abnormalities such as thickening of the vascular media layer in medium- and large-sized arteries. Supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS and peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis (PPAS are common vascular abnormalities in WS. The natural course of SVAS and PPAS is variable, and the timing of surgery or intervention is determined according to the progression of vascular stenosis. In our patient, SVAS and PPAS showed rapid concurrent progression within two weeks after birth. We report the early manifestation of SVAS and PPAS in the neonatal period and describe the surgical treatment for stenosis relief.

  4. Repeat balloon aortic valvuloplasty effectively delays surgical intervention in children with recurrent aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Christopher J; Maskatia, Shiraz A; Justino, Henri; Mattamal, Raphael J; Crystal, Matthew A; Ing, Frank F

    2013-10-01

    Balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) is the primary therapy for congenital aortic stenosis (AS). Recurrent AS following initial BAV or initial surgical valvotomy (SV) may require a second BAV (BAV2). We sought to determine the longterm outcomes of BAV2. We reviewed all cases of BAV2, defined as BAV following primary BAV or SV between 1988 and 2009. Cases were reviewed for pre- and post-BAV2 echocardiographic and procedural details. Tertiary care dedicated children's hospital. Between 1985 and 2009, 43 patients underwent BAV2 (23 primary SV, 20 primary BAV) at median age 1.9 years (1 month-21 years) and median weight 15 (3.3-55) kg. BAV2 performed following primary SV or primary BAV. We evaluated the following endpoints: ≥ moderate AI post-BAV2, aortic valve replacement (AVR), additional BAV or SV post-BAV2, death and heart transplantation. The gradient decreased from 61.4 ± 16.0 mm Hg to 26.0 ± 13.6 post-BAV2 (P aortic valve and AVR were associated with higher post BAV2 gradient (P = 0.04, P = 0.01). Prior to BAV2, 7 patients (17%) had AI > mild, compared to 21 (51%) patients after BAV2. Cox regression revealed that primary BAV was associated with development of AI > mild after BAV2 (P < 0.01). BAV2 is associated with decreased valve gradient, though with an increase in AI. However, residual AS, not AI, is associated with poor outcomes following BAV2. BAV2 effectively treats recurrent AS and postpones need for surgical intervention. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Comparison of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Cardiac Catheterization in Patients with Suspected Severe Aortic Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Solař

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a novel technique used in the assessment of aortic stenosis. The aim of the study was to compare MRI and cardiac catheterization (CAT that is still considered to be a “golden standard” in this indication. Methods. Thirty-four patients referred to CAT for the evaluation of aortic stenosis were enrolled into the study. CAT was performed according to the standardized protocol. Cardiac output was measured by thermodilution and mean aortic gradient was determined using simultaneous blood pressure measurement in aorta and left ventricle. MRI was performed within the period of 3 weeks after CAT. True FISP sequence with retrospective ECG gating was used for the imaging of the aortic valve orifice. Planimetry of the aortic valve area (AVA was performed at the time of maximal opening of the valve during systole. Results. MRI enabled the measurement of AVA in all patients enrolled. Mean AVA defined by CAT and MRI were 0,97 (±0,41 cm2 and 1,38 (±0,55 cm2, respectively. The correlation between the evaluated methods was statistically significant (p=0,003, but not very strong (r=0,43. The comparison of both methods in the identification of the severe aortic stenosis was characterized by kappa value of 0,331. Conclusion. Our study shows low agreement between cardiac catheterization and magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of aortic stenosis. However, MRI might have a role in the diagnostic algorithm in patients with suspected severe aortic stenosis and moderate mean aortic gradient or concomitant valvular insufficiency.

  6. Acquired von Willebrand syndrome in children with aortic and pulmonary stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binnetoğlu, Fatih Köksal; Babaoğlu, Kadir; Filiz, Şayegan Güven; Zengin, Emine; Altun, Gürkan; Kılıç, Suar Çakı; Sarper, Nazan

    This prospective study was planned to investigate the frequency and relationship of acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS) with aortic and pulmonary stenosis in patients. A total of 84 children, ranging from two to 18 years of age, were enrolled in this study. Of these, 28 had isolated aortic stenosis, 32 had isolated pulmonary stenosis and 24 were healthy. Children with aortic and pulmonary stenosis associated with other congenital heart diseases were excluded. Children with hypothyroidism, renal or liver disease, malignancy or autoimmune disease were also excluded. Wholeblood count, blood group, factor VIII level, prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), von Willebrand factor antigen (VWF:Ag), ristocetin co-factor (VWF:RCo), and bleeding time using a platelet-function analyser (PFA-100) were performed in all patients. All of the children in the study underwent a detailed physical examination and echocardiographic evaluation. A history of bleeding was positive in 18% of the aortic stenosis group, 9% of the pulmonary stenosis group, and 4% of the control group. Seven of 60 (12%) patients had laboratory findings that implied a diagnosis of AVWS, and two of these (28%) had a history of bleeding. The frequency of AVWS was 14% in patients with aortic stenosis and 9% in those with pulmonary stenosis. AVWS is not rare in stenotic obstructive cardiac diseases. A detailed history of bleeding should be taken from patients with valvular disease. Even if the history is negative, whole blood count, PT and aPTT should be performed. If necessary, PFA-100 closure time and further tests should be planned for the diagnosis of AVWS.

  7. Internal mammary artery dilatation in a patient with aortic coarctation, aortic stenosis, and coronary disease. Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez Cereijo Jose M

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The ideal surgical approach is unclear in adult patients with coarctation of the aorta that is associated with other cardiovascular pathologies that require intervention. Standard median sternotomy allows simultaneous, coronary revascularization surgery, valve replacement and repair of aortic coarctation. However the collateral circulation and the anatomy of the mammary arteries must be determined, to avoid possible complications. We report a case of a 69 year-old man with aortic coarctation, aortic stenosis, coronary artery disease and internal mammary artery dilatation who underwent concomitant surgical procedures through a median sternotomy.

  8. Aortic Valve Gradient and Clinical Outcome in Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation for Severe Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witberg, Guy; Barsheshet, Alon; Assali, Abid; Vaknin-Assa, Hana; Shaul, Aviv A; Orvin, Katia; Vaturi, Moti; Schwartzenberg, Shmuel; Shapira, Yaron; Sagie, Alexander; Kornowski, Ran

    2016-01-01

    To explore the relation between the baseline aortic valve gradient (AVG) as a continuous variable and clinical outcomes following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in general and specifically in patients with high-gradient aortic stenosis (AS). We reviewed 317 consecutive patients who underwent TAVI at our institution. We investigated the relation between AVG as a continuous/categorical variable and outcome among all patients and in patients without low-flow low-gradient AS, using the Cox proportional hazard model adjusting for multiple prognostic variables. Patients had a peak AVG of 79.9 ± 22.8 mm Hg (mean 50.5 ±15.7). During a mean follow-up of 2.7 years, AVG was inversely associated with mortality and mortality or cardiac hospitalization. Every 10-mm-Hg increase in peak AVG was associated with 18% reduction in mortality (p = 0.003) and 19% reduction in mortality/cardiac hospitalization (p 40% or peak AVG >64 mm Hg yielded similar results. Mean and peak baseline AVGs are directly associated with improved outcomes after TAVI; AVG can be used to select the patients most likely to benefit from TAVI. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking and incidence of aortic valve stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, S C; Wolk, A; Bäck, M

    2017-10-01

    Alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking are modifiable lifestyle factors with important impact on public health. It is unclear whether these factors influence the risk of aortic valve stenosis (AVS). To investigate the associations of alcohol consumption and smoking, including smoking intensity and time since cessation, with AVS incidence in two prospective cohorts. This analysis was based on data from the Swedish Mammography Cohort and the Cohort of Swedish Men, comprising 69 365 adults without cardiovascular disease at baseline. Participants were followed for AVS incidence and death by linkage to the Swedish National Patient and Causes of Death Registers. Hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by Cox proportional hazards regression. Over a mean follow-up of 15.3 years, 1249 cases of AVS (494 in women and 755 in men) were recorded. Compared with never drinkers of alcohol (lifelong abstainers), the risk of AVS was significantly lower in current light drinkers (1-6 drinks per week [1 drink = 12 g alcohol]; multivariable HR 0.82; 95% CI: 0.68-0.99). The risk of AVS increased with increasing smoking intensity. Compared with never smokers, the HR was 1.46 (95% CI: 1.16-1.85) in current smokers of ≥30 pack-years. Former smokers who had quit smoking 10 or more years previously had similar risk for AVS as never smokers. This study suggests that current light alcohol consumption is associated with a lower risk of AVS, and indicates that the association between smoking and AVS risk is reversible. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Internal Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association for Publication of The Journal of Internal Medicine.

  10. Pressure recovery in aortic stenosis: an in vitro study in a pulsatile flow model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelker, W; Reul, H; Stelzer, T; Schmidt, A; Karsch, K R

    1992-12-01

    This study was designed to study pressure recovery in various models of aortic valve stenosis by performing hemodynamic measurements under physiologic conditions in a pulsatile aortic flow circuit. The results were used to validate calculations of pressure recovery based on theoretic considerations derived from fluid dynamics. Pressure recovery in aortic stenosis has not been systematically analyzed. Stenoses varying in size, shape (circular, Y-shaped, slitlike) and inlet configuration (sharp-edged, nozzle-shaped inlet, artificially stenosed bioprostheses) were used. Aortic pressures were measured at multiple sites distal to the stenotic orifice to determine pressure gradients and recovery. With decreasing orifice area (2, 1.5, 1 and 0.5 cm2) pressure recovery increased (5, 7, 10 and 16 mm Hg, respectively) and the index pressure recovery to maximal peak to peak gradient decreased (56%, 37%, 24% and 14%, respectively). For a given orifice size of 0.5 cm2, this index ranged between 12% for a Y-shaped orifice and 15% for a circular orifice with a nozzle (cardiac output 4 liters/min). Increasing the cardiac output increased pressure recovery, whereas the ratio of pressure recovery to maximal pressure gradient remained constant. The index pressure recovery to transvalvular pressure gradient, which expresses the hemodynamic relevance of pressure recovery, decreases with increasing severity of aortic stenosis but is independent of transvalvular flow. Thus, pressure recovery is of minor importance in severe aortic stenosis but may account for discrepancies between Doppler and manometric gradients observed in patients with mild to moderate aortic stenosis or a prosthetic valve in the aortic position.

  11. Increased platelet activation in early symptomatic versus asymptomatic carotid stenosis and relationship with microembolic status: Results from the Platelets And Carotid Stenosis (PACS) Study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kinsella, Ja

    2013-04-26

    BACKGROUND: Cerebral microembolic signals (MES) may predict increased stroke risk in carotid stenosis. However, the relationship between platelet counts or platelet activation status and MES in symptomatic versus asymptomatic carotid stenosis has not been comprehensively assessed. SETTING: University teaching hospitals. METHODS: This prospective, pilot observational study assessed platelet counts and platelet activation status, and the relationship between platelet activation and MES in asymptomatic versus early (≤4 weeks after TIA\\/stroke) and late phase (≥3 months) symptomatic moderate or severe (≥50%) carotid stenosis patients. Full blood count measurements were performed, and whole blood flow cytometry was used to quantify platelet surface activation marker expression (CD62P and CD63) and circulating leucocyte-platelet complexes. Bilateral simultaneous transcranial Doppler ultrasound monitoring of the middle cerebral arteries was performed for 1 hour to classify patients as MES-positive or MES-negative. RESULTS: Data from 31 asymptomatic patients were compared with 46 symptomatic patients in the early phase, and 35 of these patients followed up to the late phase after symptom onset. The median platelet count (211 vs. 200 x 10(9) \\/L; p=0.03) and the median% lymphocyte-platelet complexes were higher in early symptomatic than asymptomatic patients (2.8 vs. 2.4%, p=0.001). The% lymphocyte-platelet complexes was higher in early symptomatic than asymptomatic patients with ≥70% carotid stenosis (p=0.0005), and in symptomatic patients recruited within 7 days of symptom onset (p=0.028). Complete TCD data were available in 25 asymptomatic and 31 early phase symptomatic, and 27 late phase symptomatic patients. 12% of asymptomatic versus 32% of early phase symptomatic (p=0.02) and 19% of late phase symptomatic patients (p=0.2) were MES-positive. Early symptomatic MES-negative patients had a higher% lymphocyte-platelet complexes than asymptomatic MES

  12. Efficacy and Safety of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in Aortic Stenosis Patients With Extreme Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orvin, Katia; Assali, Abid; Vaknin-Assa, Hana; Levi, Amos; Greenberg, Gabi; Codner, Pablo; Shapira, Yaron; Sagie, Alex; Kornowski, Ran

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the in-hospital and long-term outcomes of patients at extreme age with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). A total of 276 consecutive patients with a mean age of 82.2 ± 5.0 years with severe symptomatic AS underwent TAVI at our institute. We evaluated periprocedural, in-hospital, and long-term outcomes in all patients aged ≥87 years (the highest 20th percentile of age distribution) and compared them with the less elderly patients. The extremely aged group included 58 patients (21%) ≥87 years (mean age, 89.0 ± 1.9 years; 67.2% women). Baseline EuroSCOREs and STS scores were 19.6 ± 11.2% and 9.4 ± 5.0%, respectively. Nineteen patients (34.5%) were considered frail. Following TAVI, all patients regained New York Heart Association class 1-2 functional capacity. The main periprocedural and in-hospital complications were minor vascular complications, bleeding requiring blood transfusions, and the need for permanent pacemaker. None of the patients suffered from clinical stroke. In comparison to the less elderly patients, there were no significant differences in the rates of periprocedural, in-hospital complications or long-term survival (log rank, 0.87). Meticulously selected patients at extreme age benefit from TAVI with a reasonable overall risk, which does not impact the overall survival or functional status.

  13. A prospective randomized trial comparing endarterectomy to stenting in severe asymptomatic carotid stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannheim, Dallit; Karmeli, Ron

    2017-12-01

    For an asymptomatic patient with severe carotid stenosis the most important question is how to prevent an ischemic stroke. Carotid artery stenosis is the estimated cause of stroke in 8-20% of the cases. Today more than 50% of procedures for carotid stenosis are done on asymptomatic patients, but few of the randomized controlled trials comparing carotid endarterectomy and stenting examined specifically these patients. All patients with severe (>70%) asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis seen in the Carmel medical center vascular clinic were prospectively screened and randomized 1:1 for carotid endarterectomy (CEA) or carotid stenting (CAS). Patients eligible for both procedures were enrolled. The primary objectives of the study were: 1) periprocedural complications - stroke (CVA), transient ischemic attack (TIA), myocardial infarction (MI), and death; 2) long-term results: mortality, prevention of ipsilateral stroke or TIA, and freedom from restenosis. One-hundred and thirty-six patients were treated with mean follow-up of 26 months. There was no difference in short and long term results between the two groups. Thirty day morbidity included: 1 CVA in each group with no MI. Long-term results included 4 deaths in each group; none from CVA. One TIA was noted after CAS, and 3 cases of restenosis were found in CEA and one in CAS. CAS is a maturing procedure and has improved significantly over the past several years. Future developments of stents and protection devices will achieve better perioperative results. This along with our excellent long term results will promote the use of stenting for suitable patients.

  14. Association of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 mass with asymptomatic cerebral artery stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youxin; Zhou, Bin; Zhou, Pingan; Yao, Yan; Cui, Qinghua; Liu, Yingping; Yang, Jichun; Wu, Shouling; Zhao, Xingquan; Zhou, Yong

    2018-02-09

    Cerebral artery stenosis (CAS) is the most important causes of ischaemic stroke. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) plays 2 diverse roles in atherosclerosis (pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory), and the association between Lp-PLA2 mass and cardiovascular or cerebrovascular events is inconsistent among previous studies. A cross-sectional study including 2012 North Chinese adults aged ≥40 years was performed in 2010-2011 to investigate whether Lp-PLA2 mass is associated with asymptomatic cerebral artery stenosis (ACAS). Serum Lp-PLA2 mass was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). All participants underwent transcranial Doppler (TCD) and bilateral carotid duplex ultrasound to evaluate intracranial artery stenosis (ICAS) and extracranial arterial stenosis (ECAS). The median serum Lp-PLA2 mass of the participants was 140.74 ng/mL (interquartile range: 131.79-158.07 ng/mL). The adjusted odds ratio (OR) when comparing the 4th quartile to the 1st quartile of Lp-PLA2 was 1.98 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.42-2.78), 1.79 (95% CI: 1.08-2.94) and 1.87 (95% CI: 1.28-2.73) for the occurrence of ACAS, asymptomatic ECAS and asymptomatic ICAS, respectively, after controlling for vascular risk factors. These independently significant associations remained statistically significant in the male or elderly subgroups, but not in females or middle-aged participants. Lp-PLA2 mass is positively correlated with subclinical atherosclerosis determined by ACAS, ICAS and ECAS in North Chinese, particularly in male and older participants, suggesting that serum Lp-PLA2 mass might be potential biomarker for the detection of ACAS in the adults. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  15. Heart rate variability and heart rate turbulence in mild-to-moderate aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Ugur; Ozdemir, Murat; Kocaman, Sinan Altan; Balcioglu, Serhat; Cemri, Mustafa; Cengel, Atiye

    2008-12-01

    To study heart rate (HR) variability and HR turbulence parameters in mild-to-moderate aortic stenosis (AS) and to disclose whether any relationship exists between these parameters and echocardiographic findings. Forty-three asymptomatic patients with mild-to-moderate AS (AS group) were studied. Echocardiographic parameters and HR variability and HR turbulence indices obtained over 24 Holter ECG recordings were compared with those of an age and sex matched control population free of cardiovascular disease. Correlation between echocardiographic findings and HR variability and HR turbulence indices was also studied in the AS group. All HR variability parameters except mean RR interval, RMSSD, and pNN50 and one HR turbulence parameter, turbulence onset, were significantly disturbed in the AS group. Echocardiographic findings of diastolic dysfunction had significant correlations with HR variability and HR turbulence parameters in AS patients. Symphatovagal imbalance as shown by disturbed HR variability and HR turbulence parameters was demonstrated for the first time in patients with mild-to-moderate AS. This imbalance, which was shown to be correlated with echocardiographic findings of diastolic dysfunction, may lead to arrhythmic complications in this seemingly low-risk patient population.

  16. Percutaneous balloon dilatation of calcific aortic valve stenosis: anatomical and haemodynamic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commeau, P; Grollier, G; Lamy, E; Foucault, J P; Durand, C; Maffei, G; Maiza, D; Khayat, A; Potier, J C

    1988-01-01

    Two groups of elderly patients with calcified aortic stenosis were treated by balloon dilatation. In group 1, the valve was dilated just before surgical replacement of the valve. The valvar and annular changes occurring during dilatation were examined visually. In 20 of the 26 patients in this group there was no change. In the six remaining patients mobilisation of friable calcific deposits (1 case), slight tearing of the commissure (4 cases), or tearing of the aortic ring (1 case) were seen. Dilatation did not appear to alter valvar rigidity. In 14 patients (group 2) the haemodynamic gradient across the aortic valve was measured before and immediately after dilatation and one week after the procedure. Dilatation produced an immediate significant decrease of the aortic mean gradient and a significant increase of the aortic valve area. Eight days later the mean gradient had increased and the aortic valve area had decreased. Nevertheless there was a significant difference between the initial gradient and the gradient eight days after dilatation. The initial aortic valve area was also significantly larger than the area eight days after dilatation. The aortic valve gradient rose significantly in the eight days after dilatation and at follow up the gradients were those of severe aortic stenosis. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 5 Fig 6 Fig 7 PMID:3342163

  17. A Case of Critical Aortic Stenosis Masquerading as Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth A. Wayangankar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Serum cardiac troponins I and T are reliable and highly specific markers of myocardial injury. Studies have shown that at least 20% of patients with severe aortic stenosis have detectable serum troponins. This case report describes a patient who presented as suspected acute coronary syndrome with markedly elevated troponin levels, who was later found to have normal coronaries and critical aortic stenosis. This case highlights the need for comprehensive and accurate physical examination in patients who present with angina. Critical aortic stenosis may cause such severe subendocardial ischemia as to cause marked elevation in cardiac markers and mimic an acute coronary syndrome. Careful physical examination will lead to an earlier use of non invasive techniques, such as echocardiography to confirm the correct diagnosis and the avoidance of inappropriate treatments such as intravenous nitroglycerin and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors.

  18. Arterial hypertension and aortic valve stenosis: Shedding light on a common “liaison”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalampos I. Liakos, MD, PhD

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Arterial hypertension and aortic valve stenosis are common disorders and frequently present as concomitant diseases, especially in elderly patients. The impact of hypertension on heart haemodynamics is substantial, thus affecting the clinical presentation of any coexisting valvulopathy, especially of aortic stenosis. However, the interaction between these 2 entities is not thoroughly discussed in the European or/and American guidelines on the management of hypertension or/and valvular heart disease. The present review summarizes all available evidence on the potential interplay between hypertension and aortic valve stenosis, aiming to help physicians understand the pathophysiology and select the best diagnostic and therapeutic strategies (medical or/and interventional for better management of these high-risk patients, taking into account the impact on outcome as well as the risk-benefit-ratio.

  19. Aortic stenosis concomitant with microscopic polyangiitis: a challenge in medical reasoning and thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Paulo Sampaio; Aiello, Vera Demarchi

    2014-01-01

    Microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) is part of the anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-related vasculitis, which usually presents as renal pulmonary syndrome. It is defined as a pauci-immune necrotizing small vessel vasculitis, which usually affects the kidneys, followed by the lungs. It also presents systemic symptoms. The etiology of MPA is still unclear, but evidence reinforces the autoimmune mechanisms as the main etiopathogenic factor. Aortic valve stenosis (AS) is not an uncommon disease whose etiology varies according to geographical differences and the patient's age. The natural history of AS begins with a prolonged asymptomatic period, but when symptomatic, respiratory failure is one of its main clinical presentations. The authors present the case of a 55-year-old woman who was admitted with the diagnosis of renal failure, anemia, and a cardiac murmur. The patient had been recently diagnosed with pneumonia. During hospitalization, diagnostic workup disclosed a normal kidney size as well as parenchymal thickness. A renal biopsy was undertaken but the specimen was exiguous, showing 4 sclerotic glomeruli and 1 glomerulus with crescentic glomerulonephritis. The search for ANCA was positive. The investigation of the cardiac murmur disclosed AS. The patient, on hemodialysis, presented episodes of respiratory failure, which was interpreted as acute pulmonary edema, but a suspicion of ANCA-related pulmonary renal syndrome was raised. However, the aortic valve replacement was prioritized. While awaiting cardiac surgery, the patient died because of respiratory insufficiency. Autopsy findings concluded that MPA with pulmonary hemorrhage due to vasculitis was the immediate cause of death. Although AS was present at autopsy and classified as moderate/severe, this lesion was a bystander in the process of this patient's end of life, demonstrating the value of autopsy for medical learning and reasoning purposes.

  20. Aortic stenosis concomitant with microscopic polyangiitis: a challenge in medical reasoning and thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Sampaio Gutierrez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Microscopic polyangiitis (MPA is part of the anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA-related vasculitis, which usually presents as renal pulmonary syndrome. It is defined as a pauci-immune necrotizing small vessel vasculitis, which usually affects the kidneys, followed by the lungs. It also presents systemic symptoms. The etiology of MPA is still unclear, but evidence reinforces the autoimmune mechanisms as the main etiopathogenic factor. Aortic valve stenosis (AS is not an uncommon disease whose etiology varies according to geographical differences and the patient’s age. The natural history of AS begins with a prolonged asymptomatic period, but when symptomatic, respiratory failure is one of its main clinical presentations. The authors present the case of a 55-year-old woman who was admitted with the diagnosis of renal failure, anemia, and a cardiac murmur. The patient had been recently diagnosed with pneumonia. During hospitalization, diagnostic workup disclosed a normal kidney size as well as parenchymal thickness. A renal biopsy was undertaken but the specimen was exiguous, showing 4 sclerotic glomeruli and 1 glomerulus with crescentic glomerulonephritis. The search for ANCA was positive. The investigation of the cardiac murmur disclosed AS. The patient, on hemodialysis, presented episodes of respiratory failure, which was interpreted as acute pulmonary edema, but a suspicion of ANCA-related pulmonary renal syndrome was raised. However, the aortic valve replacement was prioritized. While awaiting cardiac surgery, the patient died because of respiratory insufficiency. Autopsy findings concluded that MPA with pulmonary hemorrhage due to vasculitis was the immediate cause of death. Although AS was present at autopsy and classified as moderate/severe, this lesion was a bystander in the process of this patient’s end of life, demonstrating the value of autopsy for medical learning and reasoning purposes.

  1. Is there any difference in aortic wall quality between patients with aortic stenosis and those with regurgitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedik, Jaroslav; Pilarzcyk, Kevin; Wendt, Daniel; Price, Vivien; Tsagakis, Konstantinos; Perrey, Mareike; Baba, Hideo A; Jakob, Heinz

    2013-10-01

    The interaction between aortic valve (AV) and aortic wall pathology is currently unclear. No intraoperative examination or investigation is able to predict postoperative dissection or aneurysm formation in patients operated on for primary AV pathology. The aim of the present study was therefore to evaluate the mechanical and histological properties of the aortic wall in patients operated on for aortic stenosis (AS) or regurgitation (AR). The aortic walls of 229 patients (age 67.5 ± 11.0 years) operated on for AS (n = 135, Group 1) or AR (n = 94, Group 2) were subjected to mechanical stress testing and postoperative histological examination. Ascending aortic diameter was ≥50 mm in 46/229 patients and 40-49 mm in 52/229 patients. AR was associated with an increased tendency to aortic media disruption (P < 0.001) and with media degeneration (P < 0.001) compared with AS patients. The incidence of aortic aneurysm (≥50 mm) was increased in AR patients (35 in AR and 11 in AS, P < 0.01). The aortic wall cohesion was better in patients with an aortic diameter of <40 mm compared with those with moderate dilatation of 40-49 mm (P = 0.009) or an aortic aneurysm (P = 0.002). Our study proves that patients presenting for AV replacement with AR have a poorer quality of the ascending aorta despite a superior thickness compared with patients with AS. In addition, patients with a slightly dilated aorta (40-49 mm) have a poorer cohesion of the aortic wall than those with normal aortic dimensions.

  2. Left ventricular myocardial function in congenital valvar aortic stenosis assessed by ultrasound tissue-velocity and strain-rate techniques.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiraly, P.; Kapusta, L.; Thijssen, J.M.; Daniëls, O.

    2003-01-01

    A pilot study was performed to reveal the potentials of new echo Doppler techniques for the detection of myocardial changes due to congenital valvar aortic stenosis. A total of 24 patients, (age range 0.1 to 17 years), with various degrees of aortic stenosis, and 24 age- and gender-matched, healthy

  3. Impact of baseline severity of aortic valve stenosis on effect of intensive lipid lowering therapy (from the SEAS study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdts, Eva; Rossebø, Anne Bjørhovde; Pedersen, Terje Rolf

    2010-01-01

    Retrospective studies have suggested a beneficial effect of lipid-lowering treatment on the progression of aortic stenosis (AS) in milder stages of the disease. In the randomized, placebo-controlled Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study, 4.3 years of combined treatment with si...

  4. A randomized trial of decision-making in asymptomatic carotid stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, B; Zaman, I F; Ashraf, K; Majed, Y; Norwood, E M; Schuh, L A; Smith, B J; Smith, R E; Schultz, L R

    2012-01-31

    We sought to evaluate whether different presentation formats, presenter characteristics, and patient characteristics affect decision-making in asymptomatic carotid stenosis. Subjects included individuals presenting to a neurology clinic. Participants included those over age 18 without known carotid stenosis. Subjects were randomized to a 30-second video with 1 of 5 presentation formats (absolute risk, absolute event-free survival, annualized absolute risk, relative risk, and a qualitative description) delivered by 1 of 4 presenter physicians (black woman, white woman, black man, white man). Subjects then completed a one-page form regarding background demographics and their decision regarding treatment choice. A total of 409 subjects watched the video and completed the survey. Overall, 48.4% of subjects chose surgery. Presentation format strongly predicted choice of surgery (qualitative [64%], relative risk [63%], absolute risk [43%], absolute event-free survival [37%], and annualized absolute risk [35%], p framing) strongly determines patient decision-making in asymptomatic carotid stenosis. Subject age, gender, and education level may also influence the decision. Clinicians should consider the influence of these variables when counseling patients.

  5. Carotid Stenting Versus Endarterectomy for Asymptomatic Carotid Artery Stenosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moresoli, Paola; Habib, Bettina; Reynier, Pauline; Secrest, Matthew H; Eisenberg, Mark J; Filion, Kristian B

    2017-08-01

    There is no consensus on the comparative efficacy and safety of carotid artery stenting (CAS) versus carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in patients with asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis. To evaluate CAS versus CEA in asymptomatic patients, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. We systematically searched EMBASE, PubMed, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Library for randomized controlled trials comparing CAS to CEA in asymptomatic patients using a pre-specified protocol. Two independent reviewers identified randomized controlled trials meeting our inclusion/exclusion criteria, extracted relevant data, and assessed quality using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Random effects models with inverse-variance weighting were used to estimate pooled risk ratios (RRs) comparing the incidences of periprocedural and long-term outcomes between CAS and CEA. We identified 11 reports of 5 randomized controlled trials for inclusion (n=3019) asymptomatic patients. The pooled incidences of any periprocedural stroke (RR, 1.84; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.99-3.40), periprocedural nondisabling stroke (RR, 1.95; 95% CI, 0.98-3.89), and any periprocedural stroke or death (RR, 1.72; 95% CI, 0.95-3.11) trended toward an increased risk after CAS. We could not rule out clinically significant differences between treatments for long-term stroke (RR, 1.24; 95% CI, 0.76-2.03) and the composite outcome of periprocedural stroke, death or myocardial infarction, or long-term ipsilateral stroke (RR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.70-1.21). Although uncertainty surrounds the long-term outcomes of CAS versus CEA, the potential for increased risks of periprocedural stroke and periprocedural stroke or death with CAS suggests that CEA is the preferred option for the management of asymptomatic carotid stenosis. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. [Successful preoperative respiratory rehabilitation in patients with aortic valve stenosis associated with severe respiratory dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Mitsuru; Motoyoshi, Naotaka; Akiyama, Masatoshi; Kumagai, Kiichirou; Kawamoto, Shunsuke; Kurosawa, Hajime; Kohzuki, Masahiro; Saiki, Yoshikatsu

    2011-08-01

    We describe 2 cases of aortic valve stenosis with severe pulmonary dysfunction. Preoperative respiratory rehabilitation programmed by the rehabilitation doctors was cautiously undertaken to improve their exercise tolerance and respiratory reserve. These 2 patients underwent aortic valve replacement eventually. Postoperative course in each patient was uneventful without respiratory complication. Preoperative respiratory rehabilitation can be performed in the high risk patient with severe pulmonary dysfunction as long as careful risk management is guaranteed.

  7. Singleton Merten Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Early Onset Aortic Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshavardhan Ghadiam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Singleton Merten syndrome (SMS is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder with variable expression. Its characteristic features include abnormal aortic calcification, abnormal ossification of extremities, and dental anomalies. We present a young man with dyspnea who was noted to have aortic stenosis in the background of glaucoma, psoriasis, dental anomalies, hand and foot deformities, Achilles tendinitis, osteopenia, and nephrolithiasis. The conglomeration of features led to the diagnosis of SMS. His mother had a very similar phenotype.

  8. Complete heart block and severe aortic stenosis in a patient with rheumatoid arthtritis: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Moyssakis, Ioannis; Lionakis, Nikolaos; Vlahodimitris, Ioannis; Votteas, Vassilios

    2009-01-01

    Background A 77-year-old male patient with a history of rheumatoid arthritis was admitted to our hospital for investigation of syncope and dyspnea on exertion class II according to NYHA class association. Case presentation The electrocardiogram revealed complete heart block whereas the echocardiogram showed severe aortic valve stenosis with a peak gradient = 80 mmHg. A permanent pacemaker was implanted in addition to aortic valve replacement. The coexistence of complete heart block and severe...

  9. Cerebral vasomotor reactivity and apnea test in symptomatic and asymptomatic high-grade carotid stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lučić-Prokin Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cerebral vasomotor reactivity (VMR represents an autoregulatory response of the arterial trunks on the specific vasoactive stimuli, most commonly CO2. Objective. The aim of this retrospective study was to compare VMR in high-grade symptomatic (SCAS and asymptomatic carotid stenosis (ACAS, using the apnea test to evaluate the hemodynamic status. Methods. The study included 50 patients who were hospitalized at the neurology and vascular surgery departments as part of preparation for carotid endarterectomy. We evaluated VMR by calculating the breath holding index (BHI in 34 patients with SCAS and 16 patients with ACAS, with isolated high-grade carotid stenosis. We evaluated the impact of risk factors and collateral circulation on BHI, as well as the correlation between the degree of carotid stenosis and BHI. Results. A pathological BHI was more frequent in the SCAS group (p<0.01. There was no difference in the range of BHI values between the groups, both ipsilaterally and contralaterally. Only male gender was associated with pathological BHI in both groups (p<0.05. Collateral circulation did not exist in over 60% of all subjects. We confirmed a negative correlation between the degree of carotid stenosis and BHI. Conclusion. SCAS and ACAS patients present with different hemodynamics. While ACAS patients have stable hemodynamics, combination of hemodynamic and thromboembolic effects is characteristic of SCAS patients.

  10. Asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis in patients with severe peripheral vascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasoul Mirsharifi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: The prevalence of carotid artery stenosis (CAS in the  eneral population is not high enough to justify screening programs. This study was done to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis (ACAS among patients with severe peripheral vascular disease (PVD.
    • METHODS: Between March 2005 and February 2006, 54 consecutive  atients with severe PVD admitted at a vascular surgery unit and underwent carotid duplex scanning in a prospective study. A  uestionnaire was used to collect data concerning known risk factors. Significant CAS was defined as a stenosis of 70% or greater.
    • RESULTS: The mean age was 62.5 years (51-72. Out of 54 patients, 2 (3.7% had an occluded internal carotid artery. Significant CAS was found in 9 (16.7% and its presence was correlated with diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, coronary artery disease, severity of symptoms, ankle-brachial index, and carotid bruit. On multivariate analysis, only hypercholesterolemia and carotid bruit seemed to have independent influence.
    • CONCLUSION: The prevalence of significant ACAS is higher among  atients with severe PVD. This patient population may indicate a  uitable subgroup for screening of ACAS, especially when hypercholesterolemia and carotid bruit are present.
    • KEYWORDS: Carotid artery stenosis, duplex ultrasound scanning, peripheral vascular disease, carotid endarterectomy,
    • cerebrovascular accident.

  11. Inconsistencies of echocardiographic criteria for the grading of aortic valve stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minners, Jan; Allgeier, Martin; Gohlke-Baerwolf, Christa; Kienzle, Rolf-Peter; Neumann, Franz-Josef; Jander, Nikolaus

    2008-04-01

    The present study tests the consistency of echocardiographic criteria for the grading of aortic valve stenosis. Current guidelines/recommendations define severe stenosis as an aortic valve area (AVA) 40 mmHg, or peak flow velocity (Vmax) >4 m/s. We tested the consistency of the three criteria for the grading of aortic valve stenosis in 3483 echocardiography studies performed in 2427 patients with normal left ventricular (LV) systolic function and a calculated AVA of equation and between AVA and Vmax based on the continuity equation for our study population. An AVA of 1.0 cm2 correlated to a DeltaPm of 21 mmHg and a Vmax of 3.3 m/s. Conversely, a DeltaPm of 40 mmHg corresponds to an AVA of 0.75 cm2 and a Vmax of 4.0 m/s to an AVA of 0.82 cm2. Consequently, severe stenosis was diagnosed in 69% of patients based on AVA, 45% on Vmax, and 40% on DeltaPm. Stroke volume was lower in inconsistently graded patients (65 +/- 11 mL vs. consistently graded: 70 +/- 14 mL, P < 0.001). The criteria for the grading of aortic stenosis are inconsistent in patients with normal systolic LV function. On the basis of AVA, a higher proportion of patients is classified as having severe aortic valve stenosis compared with mean pressure gradient and peak flow velocity. Discrepant grading in these patients may be partly due to reduced stroke volume.

  12. Left-right ventricular interactions in pediatric aortic stenosis: right ventricular myocardial strain before and after aortic valvuloplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, Mark K; Wu, Stephen; Slorach, Cameron

    2013-04-01

    Ventricular-ventricular interactions may affect left ventricular (LV) and right ventricular (RV) function but have not been well characterized in chronic LV afterload in children. The aim of this study was to assess RV myocardial strain in children with aortic stenosis before and after aortic balloon valvuloplasty. Two-dimensional echocardiographic images from children aged > 1 month were with aortic stenosis and preserved LV ejection fractions were retrospectively studied using vector velocity imaging. LV and RV strain were compared before and after balloon valvuloplasty and in comparison with normal controls. Twenty-six children were studied. Aortic valve gradient decreased after balloon valvuloplasty. LV ejection fraction, wall thickness, circumferential strain, and basal and mid longitudinal strain were unchanged after valvuloplasty (-18.09 ± 6.97% vs -16.43 ± 6.30%, P = .40, and -14.11 ± 5.011% vs -13.12 ± 5.52%, P = .50, respectively). LV strain tended to be lower than in controls after valvuloplasty (basal, -16.43 ± 6.30% vs -19.77 ± 5.82%, P = .05). RV strain was unchanged at the basal and apical segments but increased at the mid RV segment after valvuloplasty (-21.34 ± 6.55% vs -24.97 ± 8.54%, P = .02). Change in RV strain was not correlated with change in aortic gradient or change in LV strain after valvuloplasty (P = .60). LV and RV strain at baseline and their changes after valvuloplasty were variable between patients. RV strain was normal or reduced in compensated aortic stenosis and was not correlated with LV strain. The change in RV strain was variable among patients after valvuloplasty, with improvement in RV midwall longitudinal strain. Copyright © 2013 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Does lowering cholesterol have an impact on the progression of aortic stenosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, A.M.; Wachtell, K.

    2008-01-01

    reviews the pathophysiological mechanisms of calcific AS, reviews current clinical trials of statin use in aortic stenosis and reports on on-going trials, evaluating whether cholesterol lowering therapy can slow disease progression in different populations. Finally, we review if computerized tomography...

  14. Coronary Physiology During Exercise and Vasodilation in the Healthy Heart and in Severe Aortic Stenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lumley, Matthew; Williams, Rupert; Asrress, Kaleab N.; Arri, Satpal; Briceno, Natalia; Ellis, Howard; Rajani, Ronak; Siebes, Maria; Piek, Jan J.; Clapp, Brian; Redwood, Simon R.; Marber, Michael S.; Chambers, John B.; Perera, Divaka

    2016-01-01

    Severe aortic stenosis (AS) can manifest as exertional angina even in the presence of unobstructed coronary arteries. The authors describe coronary physiological changes during exercise and hyperemia in the healthy heart and in patients with severe AS. Simultaneous intracoronary pressure and flow

  15. Relation of osteoprotegerin in severe aortic valve stenosis to postoperative outcome and left ventricular function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbæk, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K

    2013-01-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily and is known to be among the mediators of the calcification process that has been shown to increase in patients with aortic stenosis (AS). The aim of this study was to characterize the association of OPG with left...

  16. Risk of complications during pregnancy in women with congenital aortic stenosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yap, S.C.; Drenthen, W.; Pieper, P.G.; Moons, P.; Mulder, B.J.M.; Mostert, B.; Vliegen, H.W.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Meijboom, F.J.; Steegers, E.A.P.; Roos-Hesselink, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pregnancy in women with congenital aortic stenosis (AS) is associated with increased cardiac complications. Data on non-cardiac complications are limited, and this information is crucial for prenatal counselling and perinatal care. The aim of this study was to present the maternal and

  17. Risk of complications during pregnancy in women with congenital aortic stenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yap, Sing-Chien; Drenthen, Willem; Pieper, Petronella G.; Moons, Philip; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; Mostert, Bianca; Vliegen, Hubert W.; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Meijboom, Folkert J.; Steegers, Eric A. P.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Pregnancy in women with congenital aortic stenosis ( AS) is associated with increased cardiac complications. Data on non-cardiac complications are limited, and this information is crucial for prenatal counselling and perinatal care. The aim of this study was to present the maternal and

  18. Results of simultaneous intervention in patients with concomitant coronary artery disease and aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Д. Д. Зубарев

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The study was aimed at comparing the immediate and long-term results of aortic valve replacement in combination with various techniques of intervention for myocardial revascularization, namely: coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA.Methods. This randomized prospective controlled study involved 120 cardiac patients over 18 years old with combined aortic valve stenosis and arterial sclerotic disease of coronary arteries. The inclusion criteria were a combination of aortic valve stenosis and a hemodynamically significant lesion of the coronary bed. A comparative analysis of the results obtained in the nearest postoperative period and during 1-year follow-up is presented. Results. Hybrid intervention (aortic valve replacement + percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty produces the results which are comparable with those of the control (aortic valve replacement + CABG, with a significantly greater decrease in the peak gradient on the aortic valve. During long-term follow-up, the group of patients who underwent hybrid intervention demonstrated a much higher myocardial infarction rate (12.5 versus 2.5 %, however, the severity of infarctions was significantly lower.Conclusion. PTCA, as compared to CABG, with concomitant coronary artery disease significantly improves the indicators of aortic valve insufficiency and the survival after repeated myocardial infarction, with the matching frequency of acute cerebral circulation abnormalities and the lethality rate in the long-term period.Received 29 August 2016. Accepted 5 October 2016.Funding: The study had no sponsorship. Conflict of interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

  19. Fertile eunuch syndrome in association with biventricular noncompaction, bicuspid aortic valve, severe aortic stenosis, and talipes equinovarus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Kazim Serhan; Osmonov, Damirbek; Altay, Servet; Gungor, Baris; Eren, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium is a congenital cardiomyopathy characterized by prominent ventricular trabeculations and deep intertrabecular recesses. In most cases, noncompaction is an isolated disease confined to the left ventricular myocardium. Fertile eunuch syndrome is a hypogonadotropic hormonal disorder in which the levels of testosterone and follicle-stimulating hormone are low. We report a case of biventricular noncompaction in association with bicuspid aortic valve and severe aortic stenosis in a 42-year-old man who was diagnosed with talipes equinovarus and fertile eunuch syndrome during childhood.

  20. Initial non-opioid based anesthesia in a parturient having severe aortic stenosis undergoing cesarean section with aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrata Podder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy in presence of severe aortic stenosis (AS causes worsening of symptoms needing further intervention. In the advanced stages of pregnancy, some patients may even require aortic valve replacement (AVR and cesarean delivery in the same sitting. Opioid based general anesthesia for combined lower segment cesarean section (LSCS with AVR has been described. However, the use of opioid may lead to fetal morbidity and need of respiratory support for the baby. We describe successful anesthetic management for LSCS with AVR in a >33 week gravida with severe AS and congestive heart failure. We avoided opioids till delivery of the baby AVR; the delivered neonate showed a normal APGAR score.

  1. Severe Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Patient With Subvalvular Aortic Stenosis Treated With Thalidomide and Octreotide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid-Jensen, Helene S; Poulsen, Steen H; Agnholt, Jørgen S

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding (GB) due to angiodysplasias can cause severe, recurrent bleeding, especially in elderly patients. Angiodysplastic bleedings in the gastrointestinal tract have been associated with aortic stenosis and, more recently, hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, caused...... due to hypertrophic subvalvular obstructive cardiomyopathy. Endoscopic procedures with argon beaming were performed without effect on bleeding. The patient was treated with a combination of both thalidomide and octreotide. Within 3 months, the patient recovered from the anemia and was able to undergo...... to resolve bleeding, especially in patients with large numbers of angiodysplasias. In patients with aortic stenosis and GB, the main treatment is aortic valve replacement but the patients may be unfit to undergo surgery due to the complicating anemia. In this case story, we present a patient with severe, GB...

  2. Is it possible that this patient is asymptomatic? The role of multidetector ct angiography in detection of ulcerated plaques in patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanasković Slobodan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Although intervention in patients with symptomatic carotid disease is generally accepted as beneficial, the management of asymptomatic disease is still controversial. We wanted to introduce and discuss treatment options in a patient with asymptomatic carotid stenosis and high embolic potential lesions of common and internal carotid artery detected by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT. Case Outline. A 78-year-old female patient was admitted to our institution for diagnostics and surgical treatment of asymptomatic high-grade carotid stenosis. Upon admission, color duplex ultrasonography of the carotid arteries revealed the left common carotid artery (CCA stenosis of 50% and the ipsilateral internal carotid artery (ICA stenosis of 60%, while the right CCA was narrowed by 60% and the ipsilateral ICA by 80%. Because of the left subclavian artery (LSA occlusion, also described by ultrasonography, MDCT angiography was performed to assess arterial morphology for possible angioplasty. In addition to LSA occlusion, MDCT angiography surprisingly revealed significant left CCA (>80% and ICA (>70% narrowing by ulcerated plaques with high embolic potential. Surgical treatment of the left CCA and ICA was indicated and Dacron® tubular graft interposition was performed. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged from the Institute on the third postoperative day. After the six-month follow-up the patient was doing well with well-preserved graft patency. Conclusion. Although color duplex ultrasonography is reliable and safe imaging modality in carotid stenosis diagnosis, MDCT angiography plays a significant role in patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis since plaques with high embolic potential could be detected, which, if left untreated, could have severe neurological ischemic consequences. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 41002

  3. [Effect of transcatheter aortic valve replacement using Venus-A valve for treating patients with severe aortic stenosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, G Y; Wang, M Y; Wang, Y; Liu, X B; Feng, Y; Kong, X Q; Wu, Y J

    2017-10-24

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of transcatheter aortic valve replacement(TAVR) using Venus-A valve for treating patients with severe aortic stenosis. Methods: In this prospective study, 101 consecutive severe aortic stenosis patients with high surgical risk(Society of Thoracic Surgeon(STS) score ≥4%) or at prohibitive surgical risk were enrolled from 5 academic cardiovascular centers in China(Fuwai hospital, the second affiliated hospital of Zhejiang university school of medicine, West China hospital of Sichuan university, the first affiliated hospital of Nanjing medical university, Ruijin hospital of Shanghai Jiaotong university school of medicine) from September 2012 to January 2015, and Venus-A valves were used in TAVR for these patients. The primary endpoints were death from any cause and major stroke in 1 year. The secondary endpoints included efficacy and safety of TAVR in 1 year. Results: TAVR success rate was 97.9%(98/101), and 3 patients were transferred to receive surgical AVR. There were 85 patients using 1 Venus-A valve, and 13 patients underwent valve-in-valve implantation using 2 Venus-A valves. There were 1 case(1.0%) of stroke, 2 cases(2.0%)of acute myocardial infarction, 5 cases(5.0%) of pericardial effusion, 6 cases(5.9%) of severe vascular complication, and 2 cases(2.0%) of death after 7 days of TAVR. Meanwhile, aortic pressure gradient derived from echocardiography was significantly reduced when compared with pre-procedure level(11(8, 15) mmHg (1 mmHg=0.133 kPa) vs. 59(45, 71)mmHg, PVenus-A valve for treating patients with severe aortic stenosis is effective and safe in the early and medium term post procedure.

  4. Balloon valvuloplasty as a treatment of congenital aortic stenosis in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parezanović, Vojislav; Djukić, Milan; Daehnert, Ingo; Gligić, Ana; Stefanović, Igor; Jovanović, Ida; Ilisić, Tamara; Ilić, Slobodan; Vulićević, Irena; Kalanj, Jasna

    2014-01-01

    Balloon valvuloplasty (BVP) is one of the primary therapies for congenital aortic stenosis in children and adolescents. The aim of this interventional procedure is to gain time before possible surgical therapy (aortic valve replacement) until adulthood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, safety and mid-term results oftranscatheter BVP in children and adolescent in our Center. From 2004 to 2011, 50 patients, aged 18 days to 18 years (mean 6.3 years) underwent BVP. Retrospective analysis of the echocardiographic and hemodynamic parameters were performed before and after procedure, especially peak pressure gradient (PG) across the aortic valve, semiquantification of the aortic regurgitation (AR) after the BVP as well as the left ventricle dimensions and functions. The mean peak PG in the whole group decreased from 74.80 +/- 27.72 mm Hg to 27.86 +/- 3.04 mm Hg (p aortic valve replacement or Ross procedure. This retrospective study analyzes our first experience of BVP as primary therapy of the congenital aortic stenosis. The results confirmed that BVP effectively postponed the need for surgery in children and adolescents toward the adulthood.

  5. Optimization and comparison of myocardial T1 techniques at 3T in patients with aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Calvin W L; Semple, Scott; Malley, Tamir; White, Audrey C; Mirsadraee, Saeed; Weale, Peter J; Prasad, Sanjay; Newby, David E; Dweck, Marc R

    2014-05-01

    To determine the optimal T1 mapping approach to assess myocardial fibrosis at 3T. T1 mapping was performed at 3T using the modified look-locker-inversion sequence in 20 healthy volunteers and 20 patients with aortic stenosis (AS). Pre- and post-contrast myocardial T1, the partition coefficient (λ; ΔRmyocardium/ΔRblood, where ΔR = 1/post-contrast T1 - 1/pre-contrast T1), and extracellular volume fraction [ECV; λ (1 - haematocrit)] were assessed. After establishing the optimal time point and myocardial region for analysis, we compared the reproducibility of these T1 measures and their ability to differentiate asymptomatic patients with AS from healthy volunteers. There was no segmental variation across the ventricle in any of the T1 measures evaluated. λ and ECV did not vary with time, while post-contrast T1 was relatively constant between 15 and 30 min. Thus, mid-cavity myocardium at 20 min was used for subsequent analyses. ECV displayed excellent intra-, inter-observer, and scan-rescan reproducibility [intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) 1.00, 0.97, and 0.96, respectively], as did λ (ICC 0.99, 0.94, 0.93, respectively). Moreover, ECV and λ were both higher in patients with AS compared with controls (ECV 28.3 ± 1.7 vs. 26.0 ± 1.6%, P T1 were only modest (ICC 0.72 and 0.56) with no differences in values observed between cases and controls (both P> 0.05). ECV appears to be the most promising measure of diffuse myocardial fibrosis at 3T based upon its superior reproducibility and ability to differentiate disease from health.

  6. Microparticle-Induced Coagulation Relates to Coronary Artery Atherosclerosis in Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Horn

    Full Text Available Circulating microparticles (MPs derived from endothelial cells and blood cells bear procoagulant activity and promote thrombin generation. Thrombin exerts proinflammatory effects mediating the progression of atherosclerosis. Aortic valve stenosis may represent an atherosclerosis-like process involving both the aortic valve and the vascular system. The aim of this study was to investigate whether MP-induced thrombin generation is related to coronary atherosclerosis and aortic valve calcification.In a cross-sectional study of 55 patients with severe aortic valve stenosis, we assessed the coronary calcification score (CAC as indicator of total coronary atherosclerosis burden, and aortic valve calcification (AVC by computed tomography. Thrombin-antithrombin complex (TATc levels were measured as a marker for thrombin formation. Circulating MPs were characterized by flow cytometry according to the expression of established surface antigens and by measuring MP-induced thrombin generation.Patients with CAC score below the median were classified as patients with low CAC, patients with CAC Score above the median as high CAC. In patients with high CAC compared to patients with low CAC we detected higher levels of TATc, platelet-derived MPs (PMPs, endothelial-derived MPs (EMPs and MP-induced thrombin generation. Increased level of PMPs and MP-induced thrombin generation were independent predictors for the severity of CAC. In contrast, AVC Score did not differ between patients with high and low CAC and did neither correlate with MPs levels nor with MP-induced thrombin generation.In patients with severe aortic valve stenosis MP-induced thrombin generation was independently associated with the severity of CAC but not AVC indicating different pathomechanisms involved in coronary artery and aortic valve calcification.

  7. Increased hsCRP is associated with higher risk of aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blyme, Adam; Nielsen, Olav W.; Asferg, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate relations between inflammation and aortic valve stenosis (AS) by measuring high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, at baseline (hsCRP0) and after 1 year (hsCRP1) and exploring associations with aortic valve replacement (AVR). Design We examined 1423 patients from...... the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study. Results During first year of treatment, hsCRP was reduced both in patients later receiving AVR (2.3 [0.9–4.9] to 1.8 [0.8–5.4] mg/l, p CRP1...... predicted later AVR (HR = 1.17, p CRP0 (HR = 0.96, p = 0.33), aortic valve area (AVA) and other risk factors. A higher rate of AVR was observed in the group with high hsCRP0 and an increase during the first year (AVRhighCRP0CRP1inc=47.3% versus AVRhighCRP0CRP1dec=27.5%, p

  8. Coronary artery disease and symptomatic severe aortic valve stenosis: clinical outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer eMancio

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The impact of coronary artery disease (CAD on outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI has not been clarified. Furthermore, less is known about the indication and strategy of revascularization in these high risk patients. Aims: This study sought to determine the prevalence and prognostic impact of CAD in patients undergoing TAVI, and to assess the safety and feasibility of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI before TAVI.Methods: Patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS undergoing TAVI were included into a prospective single centre registry from 2007 to 2012. Clinical outcomes were compared between patients with and without CAD. In some patients with CAD it was decided to perform elective PCI before TAVI after decision by the Heart Team. The primary endpoints were 30-day and 2-year all-cause mortality.Results: A total of 91 consecutive patients with mean age of 79±9 years (52% men underwent TAVI with a median follow-up duration of 16 months (interquartile range of 27.6 months. CAD was present on 46 patients (51%. At 30-day, the incidences of death were similar between CAD and non-CAD patients (9% and 5%, p=0.44, but at 2 years were 50% in CAD patients and 24% in non-CAD patients (crude hazard ratio with CAD, 2.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1 to 4.6; p=0.04. Adjusting for age, gender, left ventricular ejection fraction and glomerular filtration rate the hazard of death was 2.6-fold higher in patients with CAD (95% CI, 1.1 to 6.0; p=0.03. Elective PCI before TAVI was performed in 13 patients (28% of CAD patients. There were no more adverse events in patients who underwent TAVI+PCI when compared with those who underwent isolated TAVI. Conclusions: In severe symptomatic AS who underwent TAVI, CAD is frequent and adversely impacts long-term outcomes, but not procedure outcomes. In selected patients, PCI before TAVI appears to be feasible and safe.

  9. Prognostic significance of aortic valve gradient in patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witberg, Guy; Finkelstein, Arik; Barbash, Issi; Assali, Abid; Shapira, Yaron; Segev, Amit; Halkin, Amir; Fefer, Paul; Ben-Shoshan, Jeremy; Konigstein, Maayan; Sagie, Alexander; Guetta, Victor; Kornowski, Ran; Barsheshet, Alon

    2017-05-22

    To evaluate the effect of baseline aortic valve gradient (AVG) both as a continuous and a categorical variable on mortality in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), focusing on the high-gradient severe aortic stenosis (AS) patients. Identifying new predictors of mortality in the TAVR population can help refine risk stratification and improve the patient selection process for this procedure. So far, AVG has mainly been studied as a categorical variable and there is a paucity of data on its prognostic value as a continuous variable, especially in patients with high AVG AS, who constitute the majority of patients referred for TAVR. We analyzed data on 1,224 consecutive symptomatic severe AS patients, who underwent TAVR at 3 centers. The relation between pre-TAVR AVG and mortality was evaluated among all patients and in patients with high AVGs (mean AVG ≥40 mm Hg) using the Cox proportional hazard model adjusting for multiple variables. During a mean follow-up of 1.8 years, baseline AVG was inversely associated with mortality in the entire cohort and in patients with high AVG AS. By multivariable analysis, patients with mean AVG 40-60 mm Hg and >60 mm Hg had a respective 38% (P = 0.010) and 61% (P 40 mm Hg) and very high AVG AS (mean AVG >60 mm Hg) yielded similar results (HR = 0.88, P = 0.031, and HR = 0.80, P = 0.019, per 10 mm Hg increase in AVG, respectively). Using peak AVGs and an analysis restricted to patients without reduced ejection fraction yielded consistent results. Baseline AVGs show an inverse association with mortality post-TAVR. These results were consistent also in patients with high-gradient AS, suggesting that AVG can be used to identify patients most likely to benefit from TAVR. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Measurement of the aortic diameter in the asymptomatic Korean population: Assessment with multidetector CT

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    Lee, Sang Hwan; Lee, Whal; Choi, Hyuck Jae; Kim, Dae Jin; Park, Eun Ah; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    To determine normal reference values for aortic diameters in asymptomatic Korean adults. Three hundred adults without signs or symptoms of cardiovascular diseases were enrolled in this study. Aortic diameters were measured at nine predetermined levels on CT images. Aortic diameter measurements were adjusted for body surface area. Analysis of data was performed with regard to age, sex, weight, height and hypertension. Aortic diameters were 2.99 ± 0.57 cm at the ascending aorta, 2.54 ± 0.35 cm at the transverse aortic arch, 2.36 ± 0.35 cm at the proximal descending thoracic aorta (DTA), 2.23 ± 0.37 cm at the mid DTA, 2.17 ± 0.38 cm at the distal DTA, 2.16 ± 0.37 cm at the thoracoabdominal junction, 2.10, 00B1, 0.35 cm at the level of the celiac axis, 1.94, 00B1, 0.36 cm at the suprarenal aorta, 1.58 ± 0.24 cm at the aortic bifurcation. Men had slightly larger diameters than women (p < 0.05). All diameters increased with age and hypertension, with statistical significance (p < 0.01). And all aortic diameters increased with height (p < 0.05) except at the level of the aortic arch (p = 0.056), and increased with weight (p < 0.05) except at the level of the suprarenal aorta (p = 0.067). Male sex, higher weight and height, age and hypertension are associated with larger aortic diameters in asymptomatic Korean adults.

  11. Severe aortic valve stenosis in the elderly: high prevalence of sleep-related breathing disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keymel S

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Stefanie Keymel,1 Katharina Hellhammer,1 Tobias Zeus,1 Marc Merx,2 Malte Kelm,1 Stephan Steiner3 1Department of Cardiology, Pneumology, and Vascular Diseases, Medical Faculty, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, 2Department of Cardiology, Vascular Diseases and Intensive Care Medicine, KRHKlinikum Robert Koch Gehrden, Gehrden, 3Department of Cardiology, Pneumology and Intensive Care Medicine, St Vincenz Hospital, Limburg, Germany Background: Aortic valve stenosis is common in the elderly, with a prevalence of nearly 3% in patients aged 75 years or older. Despite the fact that sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBD are thought to be associated with cardiac disease, little is known about their prevalence in this patient cohort. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of SRBD in older patients with aortic valve stenosis admitted for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.Methods: Forty-eight consecutive patients (mean age 81±6 years; 37.5% male with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis and considered for transcatheter aortic valve replacement were screened for SRBD. Sleep studies were performed by in-hospital unattended cardiorespiratory polygraphy measuring nasal air flow, chest and abdominal efforts, as well as oxygen saturation and body position. The patients were divided in subgroups dependent on the documented apnea–hypopnea index (AHI; no SRBD was defined as an AHI of <5 events/hour; mild SRBD as AHI 5–15 events/hour, and moderate to severe SRBD as AHI ≥15 events/hour.Results: Thirty-seven patients (77% had SRBD defined as an AHI of ≥5 events/hour. Eleven patients had an unremarkable investigation, with AHI <5 events/hour (mean 3.0±1.3 events/hour. Among patients with sleep apnea, 19 patients had mild SRBD, with an AHI of 5–15 events/hour (mean 9.9±3.4 events/hour and 18 patients had moderate to severe SRBD (mean 26.6±11.3 events/hour. Mainly, obstructive apneas were found. Subgroups were not

  12. Factors affecting left ventricular remodeling after valve replacement for aortic stenosis. An overview

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    Mhagna Zen

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although a small percentage of patients with critical aortic stenosis do not develop left ventricle hypertrophy, increased ventricular mass is widely observed in conditions of increased afterload. There is growing epidemiological evidence that hypertrophy is associated with excess cardiac mortality and morbidity not only in patients with arterial hypertension, but also in those undergoing aortic valve replacement. Valve replacement surgery relieves the aortic obstruction and prolongs the life of many patients, but favorable or adverse left ventricular remodeling is affected by a large number of factors whose specific roles are still a subject of debate. Age, gender, hemodynamic factors, prosthetic valve types, myocyte alterations, interstitial structures, blood pressure control and ethnicity can all influence the process of left ventricle mass regression, and myocardial metabolism and coronary artery circulation are also involved in the changes occurring after aortic valve replacement. The aim of this overview is to analyze these factors in the light of our experience, elucidate the important question of prosthesis-patient mismatch by considering the method of effective orifice area, and discuss surgical timings and techniques that can improve the management of patients with aortic valve stenosis and maximize the probability of mass regression.

  13. Noninvasive assessment of filling pressure and left atrial pressure overload in severe aortic valve stenosis: relation to ventricular remodeling and clinical outcome after aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbæk, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K

    2011-01-01

    One of the hemodynamic consequences of aortic valve stenosis is pressure overload leading to left atrial dilatation. Left atrial size is a known risk factor providing prognostic information in several cardiac conditions. It is not known if this is also the case in patients with aortic valve...

  14. Differences in left ventricular remodelling in patients with aortic stenosis treated with transcatheter aortic valve replacement with corevalve prostheses compared to surgery with porcine or bovine biological prostheses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngo, Thuc Anh; Hassager, Christian; Thyregod, Hans Gustav Hørsted

    2018-01-01

    Aims: Patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) can be considered for treatment with either transcatheter (TAVR) or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). The purpose of this study was to compare left ventricular (LV) remodeling in patients with AS after treatment with TAVR or SAVR. Methods an...

  15. High cardiovascular event rates in patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis: the REACH Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aichner, F T; Topakian, R; Alberts, M J

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Data on current cardiovascular event rates in patients with asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis (ACAS) are sparse. We compared the 1-year outcomes of patients with ACAS > or =70% versus patients without ACAS in an international, prospective cohort of outpatients.......26%, P = 0.04), cardiovascular death (2.29% vs. 1.52%, P = 0.002), the composite end-point cardiovascular death/myocardial infarction/stroke (6.03% vs. 4.29%, P events (1.41% vs. 0.81%, P = 0.002). In patients with ACAS, Cox regression analyses identified history of cerebrovascular...... ischaemic events as most important predictor of future stroke (HR 3.21, 95% CI 1.82-5.65, P events. Stroke was powerfully predicted by prior cerebrovascular...

  16. Severe Aortic Stenosis and Severe Coarctation of the Aorta: A Hybrid Approach to Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLennan, Daniel; Caputo, Massimo; Taliotis, Demetris

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid surgery is becoming more popular in the treatment of children with congenital heart disease, particularly small infants and neonates. We report a case of a patient with aortic stenosis (AS) and coarctation of the aorta (CoA). a 1-month-old baby presented with severe AS and CoA. The decision was made to perform a hybrid surgical procedure. The patient underwent a lateral thoracotomy for repair of the CoA and carotid cutdown for aortic balloon valvuloplasty (AoVP).

  17. Dilation of the ascending aorta after balloon valvuloplasty for aortic stenosis during infancy and childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElhinney, Doff B; Lacro, Ronald V; Gauvreau, Kimberlee; O'Brien, Cheryl M; Yaroglu Kazanci, Selcen; Vogel, Melanie; Emani, Sitaram; Brown, David W

    2012-09-01

    Dilation of the ascending aorta (AA) is common in patients with a bicuspid aortic valve. The natural history of the aortic root and AA and the risk factors for dilation have not been characterized in patients with congenital aortic stenosis (AS) treated with balloon valvuloplasty during childhood. The present study was performed to determine the prevalence of aortic dilation in patients with congenital AS before and up to 20 years after balloon valvuloplasty performed during childhood. In patients who underwent balloon valvuloplasty for AS at age ≤ 18 years from 1984 to 2005, the aortic diameter measurements before intervention and at 5-year intervals afterward were recorded and the Z scores calculated. Among 156 patients (median age 1.5 years at valvuloplasty), the AA Z scores were significantly larger than normal before intervention (median Z score 1.5) and at all follow-up points (all p aortic regurgitation early after valvuloplasty was associated with greater AA Z scores than mild or less aortic regurgitation, with a progressive difference over time. More significant residual AS after valvuloplasty was associated with lower AA Z scores over time. In conclusion, AA dilation is common in children with congenital AS and continues to progress over many years after balloon valvuloplasty. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Alterations in multidirectional myocardial functions in patients with aortic stenosis and preserved ejection fraction: a two-dimensional speckle tracking analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Arnold C T; Delgado, Victoria; Bertini, Matteo; Antoni, Marie Louisa; van Bommel, Rutger J; van Rijnsoever, Eva P M; van der Kley, Frank; Ewe, See Hooi; Witkowski, Tomasz; Auger, Dominique; Nucifora, Gaetano; Schuijf, Joanne D; Poldermans, Don; Leung, Dominic Y; Schalij, Martin J; Bax, Jeroen J

    2011-06-01

    To identify changes in multidirectional strain and strain rate (SR) in patients with aortic stenosis (AS). A total of 420 patients (age 66.1 ± 14.5 years, 60.7% men) with aortic sclerosis, mild, moderate, and severe AS with preserved left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction [(EF), ≥50%] were included. Multidirectional strain and SR imaging were performed by two-dimensional speckle tracking. Patients were more likely to be older (P multiple linear regressions. Patients with AS have evidence of subclinical myocardial dysfunction early in the disease process despite normal LVEF. The myocardial dysfunction appeared to start in the subendocardium and progressed to transmural dysfunction with increasing AS severity. Symptomatic moderate and severe AS patients had more impaired multidirectional myocardial functions compared with asymptomatic patients.

  19. A CASE OF OSTEOPOROSIS OF THE SPINE IN AN ELDERLY MALE WITH CALCIFIC AORTIC STENOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yu. Karpova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The given clinical example presents a case of concomitant diseases of the heart and axial skeleton. Calcific aortic stenosis detected by chance in an elderly male was associated with osteoporosis of the lumbar spine with moderate perturbation of the calcium–vitamin D–parathyroid hormone axis and with no classical risk factors for impaired bone mineral density. Possible approaches to pathogenetic therapy are described.

  20. Surgery for congenital aortic stenosis in children with left ventricular noncompaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Miao, Qi; Liu, Xingrong; Li, Xiaofeng

    2013-07-01

    Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) is an uncommon genetic disorder of endocardial morphogenesis, which carries a high mortality from heart failure or sudden cardiac death. This condition is often first diagnosed in adults, but it has also been described in children with other cardiac anomalies. We discuss the management of a 10-year-old female with congenital aortic stenosis associated with LVNC. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Acute pulmonary edema due to stress cardiomyopathy in a patient with aortic stenosis: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Bayer, Monika F

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Stress cardiomyopathy is a condition of chest pain, breathlessness, abnormal heart rhythms and sometimes congestive heart failure or shock precipitated by intense mental or physical stress. Case presentation A 64-year-old male with a known diagnosis of moderate-to-severe aortic stenosis and advised that valve replacement was not urgent, presented with acute pulmonary edema following extraordinary mental distress. The patient was misdiagnosed as having a "massive heart attack" and...

  2. A CASE OF OSTEOPOROSIS OF THE SPINE IN AN ELDERLY MALE WITH CALCIFIC AORTIC STENOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yu. Karpova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The given clinical example presents a case of concomitant diseases of the heart and axial skeleton. Calcific aortic stenosis detected by chance in an elderly male was associated with osteoporosis of the lumbar spine with moderate perturbation of the calcium–vitamin D–parathyroid hormone axis and with no classical risk factors for impaired bone mineral density. Possible approaches to pathogenetic therapy are described.

  3. Aortic arch atherosclerosis in patients with severe aortic stenosis can be argued by greater day-by-day blood pressure variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Shinichi; Sugioka, Kenichi; Fujita, Suwako; Ito, Asahiro; Matsumura, Yoshiki; Hanatani, Akihisa; Takagi, Masahiko; Di Tullio, Marco R; Homma, Shunichi; Yoshiyama, Minoru

    2015-07-01

    Although it is well known that the prevalence of aortic arch plaques, one of the risk factors for ischemic stroke, is high in patients with severe aortic stenosis, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Increased day-by-day blood pressure (BP) variability is also known to be associated with stroke; however, little is known on the association between day-by-bay BP variability and aortic arch atherosclerosis in patients with aortic stenosis. Our objective was to clarify the association between day-by-day BP variables (average values and variability) and aortic arch atherosclerosis in patients with severe aortic stenosis. The study population consisted of 104 consecutive patients (mean age 75 ± 8 years) with severe aortic stenosis who were scheduled for aortic valve replacement. BP was measured in the morning in at least 4 consecutive days (mean 6.8 days) prior to the day of surgery. Large (≥4 mm), ulcerated, or mobile plaques were defined as complex plaques using transesophageal echocardiography. Cigarette smoking and all systolic BP variables were associated with the presence of complex plaques (p < 0.05), whereas diastolic BP variables were not. Multiple regression analysis indicated that day-by-day mean systolic BP and day-by-day systolic BP variability remained independently associated with the presence of complex plaques (p < 0.05) after adjustment for age, male sex, cigarette smoking, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes mellitus. These findings suggest that higher day-by-day mean systolic BP and day-by-day systolic BP variability are associated with complex plaques in the aortic arch and consequently stroke risk in patients with aortic stenosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Early Diastolic Strain Rate in Relation to Systolic and Diastolic Function and Prognosis in Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Barros-Gomes, Sergio; Videbæk, Lars

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined the impact of early mitral inflow velocity-to-early diastolic strain rate (E/SRe) ratio on long-term outcome after aortic valve replacement (AVR) in aortic stenosis (AS). BACKGROUND: In AS, increased filling pressures are associated with a poor prognosis and can be...

  5. Recovery from anemia in patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation--prevalence, predictors and clinical outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Arnous, Samer; Lønborg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Preoperative anemia is common in patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and has been linked to a poorer outcome--including a higher 1-year mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of successful TAVI...... on baseline anemia. METHODS: A total of 253 patients who survived at least 1 year following TAVI were included in this study. The prevalence, predictors and clinical outcome of hemoglobin (Hb)-recovery were assessed. RESULTS: The prevalence of baseline anemia was 49% (n = 124)--recovery from anemia occurred......-recovery, while blood transfusion (OR 0.31, P = 0.038) and chronic kidney disease (CKD, OR 0.33, P = 0.043) were identified as negative predictors at, respectively, one and two years after TAVI. When compared to patients without baseline anemia, those anemic patients with Hb-recovery had a similar functional...

  6. Balloon valvuloplasty as a treatment of congenital aortic stenosis in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parezanović Vojislav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Balloon valvuloplasty (BVP is one of the primary therapies for congenital aortic stenosis in children and adolescents. The aim of this interventional procedure is to gain time before possible surgical therapy (aortic valve replacement until adulthood. Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, safety and mid-term results of transcatheter BVP in children and adolescent in our Center. Methods. From 2004 to 2011, 50 patients, aged 18 days to 18 years (mean 6.3 years underwent BVP. Retrospective analysis of the echocardiographic and hemodynamic parameters were performed before and after procedure, especially peak pressure gradient (PG across the aortic valve, semiquantification of the aortic regurgitation (AR after the BVP as well as the left ventricle dimensions and functions. Results. The mean peak PG in the whole group decreased from 74.80±27.72 mm Hg to 27.86±13.04 mm Hg (p<0.001 after BVP. In 39 patients (78%, residual PG was lower than 30 mm Hg just after dilation. At the end of follow-up period, 25 patients (50% had PG above 50 mm Hg, measured by Doppler technique, and four of them underwent re-dilation. Eight patients (16% had severe AR. During the follow-up period (12-80 months, mean 51 months, six patients (12% were referred to cardiac surgeons for aortic valve replacement or Ross procedure. Conclusions. This retrospective study analyzes our first experience of BVP as primary therapy of the congenital aortic stenosis. The results confirmed that BVP effectively postponed the need for surgery in children and adolescents toward the adulthood.

  7. Aortic bypass surgery for asymptomatic patients awaiting a kidney transplant: a word of caution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franquet, Q; Terrier, N; Pirvu, A; Rambeaud, J-J; Long, J-A; Janbon, B; Tetaz, R; Malvezzi, P; Jouve, T; Descotes, J-L; Fiard, G

    2018-02-02

    In the presence of severe aorto-iliac calcification, aortic bypass surgery can be mandatory to allow kidney transplantation. The aim of our study was to evaluate the safety and outcomes of this strategy among asymptomatic patients. We retrospectively reviewed the files of all patients that had undergone vascular bypass surgery prior to kidney transplantation between November 2004 and March 2016. All patients undergoing aortic bypass surgery prior to kidney transplantation without any vascular-related symptoms were included. Twenty-one asymptomatic patients were included. Ten patients (48%) have not received a kidney transplant. Four patients died before kidney transplantation, including two deaths related to the bypass surgery (9.5%). Early post-operative morbidity involved 11 cases. Eleven patients (52%) were transplanted. Transplanted patients were significantly younger (median age 60 (56-61) versus 67 (60-72) years, p=0 .04) at the time of bypass and were less frequently treated for coronary heart disease (9% versus 50%, p=0.06). Aortic bypass surgery performed prior to kidney transplantation among asymptomatic patients has significant mortality and morbidity rates. When transplantation is possible, the results are satisfying. Larger studies are required to define the selection criteria, such as age and coronary heart disease. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Autonomic outcome is better after endarterectomy than after stenting in patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupprecht, Sven; Finn, Sigrid; Ehrhardt, Jens; Hoyer, Dirk; Mayer, Thomas; Zanow, Juergen; Guenther, Albrecht; Schwab, Matthias

    2016-10-01

    Carotid endarterectomy and stenting have comparable efficacy in stroke prevention in asymptomatic carotid stenosis. In patients with carotid stenosis, cardiac events have a more than threefold higher incidence than cerebrovascular events. Autonomic dysfunction predicts cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and carotid stenosis interferes with baroreceptor and chemoreceptor function. We assessed the effect of elective carotid revascularization (endarterectomy vs stenting) on autonomic function as a major prognostic factor of cardiovascular health. In 42 patients with ≥70% asymptomatic extracranial carotid stenosis, autonomic function was determined by analysis of heart rate variability (total band power [TP], high frequency band power [HF], low-frequency band power [LF], very low frequency band power [VLF]), baroreflex sensitivity (αHF, αLF), respiratory chemoreflex sensitivity (central apnea-hypopnea index), and cardiac chemoreflex sensitivity (hyperoxic TP, HF, LF, and VLF ratios) before and 30 days after revascularization. Patients with endarterectomy were older than patients with stenting (69 ± 7 vs 62 ± 7 years; P ≤ .008) but did not differ in gender distribution and preintervention autonomic function. Compared with stenting, postintervention heart rate variability was higher (ln TP, 6.7 [95% confidence interval (CI), 6.3-7.0] vs 6.1 [95% CI, 5.8-6.5; P ≤ .009]; ln HF, 4.5 [95% CI, 4.1-5.0] vs 4.0 [95% CI, 3.4-4.5; P ≤ .05]; ln VLF, 6.0 [95% CI, 5.7-6.4] vs 5.5 [95% CI, 5.2-5.9; P ≤ .02]); respiratory chemoreflex sensitivity (central apnea-hypopnea index, 5.5 [95% CI, 2.8-8.2] vs 10.0 [95% CI, 6.9-13.1; P ≤. 01]) and cardiac chemoreflex sensitivity (TP ratio, 1.2 [95% CI, 1.1-1.3] vs 1.0 [95% CI, 0.9-1.0; P ≤ .0001]; HF ratio, 1.4 [95% CI, 1.2-1.5] vs 0.9 [95% CI, 0.8-1.1; P ≤ .001]; LF ratio, 1.5 [95% CI, 1.3-1.6] vs 1.0 [95% CI, 0.8-1.1; P ≤ .0001]; VLF ratio, 1.2 [95% CI, 1.1-1.3) vs 1.0 [95% CI, 0.9-1.1; P ≤ .002]) were lower

  9. Association between leukoaraiosis and cerebral blood flow territory alteration in asymptomatic internal carotid artery stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y-F; Kuo, Y-S; Wu, W-C; Tang, S-C; Jiang, S-F

    2018-01-09

    To test the hypothesis that leukoaraiosis (also known as white matter lesion) is associated with cerebral blood flow territory change as revealed by territorial arterial spin-labeling (TASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with asymptomatic internal carotid artery stenosis (aICAS). The institutional review board approved this study. Thirty-three patients with aICAS were included prospectively and divided into high-grade (ultrasonographic stenosis ≥70%, n=17) and low-grade (n=16) groups; 16 healthy subjects were also included. Cerebral flow territory was delineated for left ICA, right ICA, and vertebral arteries using TASL MRI and fuzzy clustering. Two licensed neuroradiologists independently and dichotomously rated the hemispherical asymmetry of flow territories. Flow territories were finalised by consensus, and when asymmetry was present, these were divided into normal and abnormal areas where the raters separately assessed leukoaraiosis based on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images and the Fazekas scale. The inter-rater agreement in the evaluation of flow territory asymmetry with TASL imaging in conjunction with time-of-flight angiogram is substantial (Cohen's kappa=0.82). Multinomial logistic regression (reference group=healthy subjects) indicates that global leukoaraiosis is not a predictor of aICAS after controlling for age, whereas in high-grade patients, the deep white matter lesion is more severe in the area receiving collateral circulation than in the area with normal flow territory (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p=0.03). TASL MRI is clinically feasible in aICAS and shows that more severe deep white matter lesions are associated with collateral circulation in high-grade patients. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Early neonatal death and congenital left coronary abnormalities: ostial atresia, stenosis and anomalous aortic origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, Daniela; Bessières, Bettina; Houyel, Lucile; Bonnière, Maryse; Magny, Jean-François; Bajolle, Fanny; Boudjemline, Younes; Bonnet, Damien

    2013-04-01

    Congenital left coronary artery abnormalities such as ostial stenosis or atresia are extremely rare. Diagnosis in the neonate has not been reported. To describe five neonates with left coronary artery orifice abnormalities and discuss pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment options, with a focus on the importance of autopsy in unexpected neonatal death. Retrospective assessment of medical files of neonates with left coronary abnormalities seen during a 12-year period (2000-2012). Three neonates with anatomical (n=2) and functional (n=1) left coronary stenosis and two neonates with ostial atresia were identified. The three infants with coronary stenosis died within minutes to days after birth because of cardiac failure refractory to intensive care treatment; at autopsy, left coronary ostial stenosis (n=2) and high take-off with acute angle origin and tangential vertical course (n=1) were diagnosed. The fourth neonate was in cardiac failure due to critical aortic stenosis; left coronary ostial atresia was diagnosed during an emergency catheter procedure and the infant died after aortic valve dilatation. The fifth infant had a cardiac arrest on the third day of life; she was diagnosed with left coronary ostial atresia by coronary angiography and died during attempted revascularization surgery at 2 weeks of life. Congenital coronary ostial abnormalities can lead to severe heart failure and unexpected neonatal death. Systematic examination of the coronary arteries should be part of any neonatal autopsy. Coronary angiography remains the diagnostic method of choice despite advances in non-invasive imaging. Revascularization surgery seems indicated in symptomatic children based on small patient series. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  11. Presence of B cells within aortic valves in patients with aortic stenosis: Relation to severity of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natorska, Joanna; Marek, Grzegorz; Sadowski, Jerzy; Undas, Anetta

    2016-01-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) shares several similarities with atherosclerosis. Recent reports showed that B cells are implicated in atherosclerosis progression through macrophage-B cells bidirectional interaction. We aimed to study the in loco presence of B cells within aortic valves and to determine its modulators. Thirty-seven patients with severe AS were studied. Immunohistochemistry was performed on valve leaflets using antibodies against CD20, B cell-activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family receptor (BAFF-R) and CD68. Plasma inflammatory markers were also determined. The B cells were detected within aortic leaflets from 5 to 31/mm(2) (17.9±11.6/mm(2)). Double-staining showed that 27±13.5% of B cells express BAFF-R. There were positive correlations between the number of B cells and macrophages (r=0.45, p=0.018), and between macrophages and B cell-associated BAFF-R expression (r=0.66, p=0.002). The number of B cells was associated with the valve calcification (r=0.41, p=0.039), and with the maximum transvalvular gradient (r=0.63, p=0.02). The BAFF-R expression was positively correlated with maximum transvalvular gradient (r=0.39, p=0.031) and negatively with aortic valve area (r=-0.41, p=0.048). There were no correlations between the number of B cells and plasma markers. It might be hypothesized that, like in atherosclerosis, increasing number of B cells within aortic valves may accelerate inflammation and thus potentiate the progression of AS. Copyright © 2015 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The impact of gender on cardiovascular system calcification in very elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyanage, Luckmini; Lee, Nam Ju; Cook, Tessa; Herrmann, Howard C; Jagasia, Dinesh; Litt, Harold; Han, Yuchi

    2016-01-01

    There is an established sex difference in cardiovascular disease among pre-menopausal women and age-matched men, with men having greater susceptibility to cardiovascular and coronary artery disease. Cardiovascular calcification may be linked to the atherosclerotic process and resulting disease, but the sex difference regarding coronary artery disease susceptibility and calcification is incompletely understood. We thought to measure calcium volume in different chest vascular beds in very elderly men and women with severe aortic stenosis (AS). Computed tomography scans of 94 patients with severe AS were calcium volume scored on Aquarius iNtuition Terarecon (Terarecon Inc., CA, USA) work stations. Coronary beds, aortic valve, mitral valve apparatus, and the thoracic aorta were examined. A significant sex difference in the mean total calcium volume of the coronary arteries was found in elderly (p = 0.001), with men having greater levels of calcification. There is also a significant sex difference in the amount of aortic valve calcium (p = 0.003). Furthermore, aortic and coronary calcification was independently correlated with sex. This study demonstrates a significant sex impact on calcification in the coronary beds and aortic valve in elderly patients with severe AS.

  13. Left atrial volume in patients with asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis (the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Morten; Egstrup, K.; Wachtell, K.

    2008-01-01

    = -0.1, p = 0.0002). Multivariate analysis showed that LAVI was significantly related to AVA indexed (beta = -4.1, p = 0.007) in a model that also included mitral regurgitation (beta = 2.8, p history of hypertension (beta = 2.2, p = 0.002), LV end-diastolic volume (beta = 0.05, p

  14. Short-term results of a randomized trial examining timing of carotid endarterectomy in patients with severe asymptomatic unilateral carotid stenosis undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Giulio; Ricco, Jean-Baptiste; Caliò, Francesco; Pacilè, Maria Antonietta; Miraldi, Fabio; Frati, Giacomo; Macrina, Francesco; Toscano, Michele

    2011-10-01

    This study evaluated the timing of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in the prevention of stroke in patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis >70% receiving a coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). From January 2004 to December 2009, 185 patients with unilateral asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis >70%, candidates for CABG, were randomized into two groups. In group A, 94 patients received a CABG with previous or simultaneous CEA. In group B, 91 patients underwent CABG, followed by CEA. All patients underwent preoperative helical computed tomography scans, excluding significant atheroma of the ascending aorta or aortic arch. Baseline characteristics of the patients, type of coronary artery lesion, and preoperative myocardial function were comparable in the two groups. In group A, all patients underwent CEA under general anesthesia with the systematic use of a carotid shunt, and 79 patients had a combined procedure and 15 underwent CEA a few days before CABG. In group B, all patients underwent CEA, 1 to 3 months after CABG, also under general anesthesia and with systematic carotid shunting. Two patients (one in each group) died of cardiac failure in the postoperative period. Operative mortality was 1.0% in group A and 1.1% in group B (P = .98). No strokes occurred in group A vs seven ipsilateral ischemic strokes in group B, including three immediate postoperative strokes and four late strokes, at 39, 50, 58, and 66 days, after CABG. These late strokes occurred in patients for whom CEA was further delayed due to an incomplete sternal wound healing or because of completion of a cardiac rehabilitation program. The 90-day stroke and death rate was 1.0% (one of 94) in group A and 8.8% (eight of 91) in group B (odds ratio [OR], 0.11; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.01-0.91; P = .02). Logistic regression analysis showed that only delayed CEA (OR, 14.2; 95% CI, 1.32-152.0; P = .03) and duration of cardiopulmonary bypass (OR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.02-1.11; P = .004) reliably predicted

  15. Conservative management in very elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis: Time to change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Eva; Ariza-Solé, Albert; Formiga, Francesc; Abu-Assi, Emad; Carol, Antoni; Galián, Laura; Bayés-Genís, Antoni; Saldivar, Hugo González; Díez-Villanueva, Pablo; Sellés, Manuel Martínez

    2017-06-01

    Despite current recommendations, a high percentage of patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis are managed conservatively. The aim of this study was to study symptomatic patients undergoing conservative management from the IDEAS registry, describing their baseline clinical characteristics, mortality, and the causes according to the reason for conservative management. Consecutive patients with severe aortic stenosis diagnosed at 48 centers during January 2014 were included. Baseline clinical characteristics, echocardiographic data, Charlson index, and EuroSCORE-II were registered, including vital status and performance of valve intervention during one-year follow-up. For the purpose of this substudy we assessed symptomatic patients undergoing conservative management, including them in 5 groups according to the reason for performing conservative management [I: comorbidity/frailty (128, 43.8%); II: dementia 18 (6.2%); III: advanced age 34 (11.6%); IV: patients' refusal 62 (21.2%); and V: other reasons 50 (17.1%)]. We included 292 patients aged 81.5±9 years. Patients from group I had higher Charlson index (4±2.3), higher EuroSCORE-II (7.5±6), and a higher overall (42.2%) and non-cardiac mortality (16.4%) than the other groups. In contrast, patients from group III had fewer comorbidities, lower EuroSCORE-II (4±2.5), and low overall (20.6%) and non-cardiac mortality (5.9%). Patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis managed conservatively have different baseline characteristics and clinical course according to the reason for performing conservative management. A prospective assessment of comorbidity and other geriatric syndromes might contribute to improve therapeutic strategy in this clinical setting. Copyright © 2016 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Left ventricular response to pressure afterload in children: aortic stenosis and coarctation: a systematic review of the current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jashari, Haki; Rydberg, Annika; Ibrahimi, Pranvera; Bajraktari, Gani; Henein, Michael Y

    2015-01-15

    Congenital aortic stenosis (CAS) and Coarctation of Aorta (CoA) represent two forms of pressure afterload that affect the left ventricle (LV), hence require regular echocardiographic monitoring. Subclinical dysfunction of the LV exists even in asymptomatic patients with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (EF), implying low sensitivity of EF in predicting optimum time for intervention. In this article we review patterns of LV myocardial deformation before and after correction of CAS and CoA in infants, children and adolescents, showing their important role in monitoring the course of LV dysfunction. A systematic search using PubMed was performed and suitable studies are presented on a narrative form. Normal EF and/or fractional shortening (FS), with subclinical myocardial dysfunction are reported in all studies before intervention. The short-term results, after intervention, were related to the type of procedure, with no improvement or further deterioration related to surgery but immediate improvement after balloon intervention. Long term follow-up showed further improvement but still subnormal function. Thus correction of CAS and CoA before irreversible LV dysfunction is vital, and requires longitudinal studies in order to identify the most accurate parameter for function prognostication. Until then, conventional echocardiographic parameters together with myocardial velocities and deformation parameters should continue to provide follow-up reproducible measures of ventricular function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Is there evidence for statins in the treatment of aortic valve stenosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Ibrahim; Nienaber, Christoph A

    2017-08-26

    Research revealed that the pathogenesis of aortic stenosis (AS) not merely comprises of a mechanical wear and tear process yet that active biological processes, similar to those of coronary artery disease are involved, a promising role for statins in disease-modifying therapy was suggested. However, recently, many prospective studies could not observe decreased progression nor regression of the disease. Here, we review the current knowledge on the pathomechanisms of AS and its similarities and differences with atherosclerosis. Moreover, we discuss whether there is still a place for statins in the treatment of particular AS patient subgroups.

  18. Treatment of aortic stenosis with a self-expanding transcatheter valve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linke, Axel; Wenaweser, Peter; Gerckens, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    -centre 'real-world' patient population in highly experienced centres. METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients with severe aortic stenosis at a higher surgical risk in whom implantation of the CoreValve System was decided by the Heart Team were included. Endpoints were a composite of major adverse cardiovascular...... and cerebrovascular events (MACCE; all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction, stroke, or reintervention) and mortality at 30 days and 1 year. Endpoint-related events were independently adjudicated based on Valve Academic Research Consortium definitions. A total of 1015 patients [mean logistic EuroSCORE 19.4 ± 12...

  19. Acute Myocardial Infarction in an Elderly Patient With Severe Aortic Stenosis and Angiographically Normal Coronary Arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Feng Lin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Aortic stenosis (AS is common in the elderly and is associated with an increased risk of death from cardiovascular events. Nevertheless, acute myocardial infarction (AMI in patients with severe AS and “normal” coronary arteries is very rare. We present an elderly male with severe AS and angiographically normal coronary arteries who experienced AMI. Platelet hyperaggregability, activation of blood coagulation, coronary microcirculatory dysfunction, imbalance of supply and demand in the hypertrophied myocardium, and subendocardial ischemia predisposed by AS are possible mechanisms. The relevant literature is reviewed and discussed in the report.

  20. Balloon Valvuloplasty of Aortic Valve Stenosis in Childhood: Midterm Results in a Children’s Hospital, Mansoura University, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Marshafawy, Hala; Al Sawah, Gehan Attia; Hafez, Mona; Matter, Mohammed; El Gamal, Adel; Sheishaa, Abdel Gawad; El Kair, Magdy Abu

    2012-01-01

    Background: Balloon valvuloplasty was established as an alternative to surgery for treatment of aortic valve stenosis in childhood. Acute complications after balloon dilatation including aortic insufficiency or early death were described. Aim of Work: To analyze early outcome and midterm results of balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) in Children’s Hospital, Mansoura University, Egypt. Subjects and Methods: Between April 2005–June 2008, all consecutive patients of age aortic valve stenosis (AVS) with BAV were analyzed retrospectively. The study included 21 patients; 17 males, and 4 females. Their age ranged from the neonatal period to 10 years (mean age 5.6 ± 3.7 years). Patients with gradient ≥50 mmHg and aortic valve insufficiency (AI) up to grade I were included. All patients had isolated aortic valve stenosis except 3 patients (14.3%) had associated aortic coarctation. Six patients (28.6%) had bicuspid aortic valve. All patients had normal myocardial function except one (4.8%) had FS 15%. The duration of follow up was (mean ± SD: 18.5 ± 11.7 months). Results: Femoral artery approach was used in 20 patients (95.2%) and carotid artery in one neonate (4.8%). Balloon/annulus ratio was 0.83 ± 0.04. Significant reduction in pressure gradient was achieved (mean 66.7 ± 9.8 mmHg to 20.65 ± 2.99 mmHg) (P aortic valve stenosis significantly reduces gradient with low morbidity and mortality in children. PMID:22412302

  1. Urgent Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in Patients With Severe Aortic Stenosis and Acute Heart Failure: Procedural and 30-Day Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landes, Uri; Orvin, Katia; Codner, Pablo; Assali, Abid; Vaknin-Assa, Hana; Schwartznberg, Shmuel; Levi, Amos; Shapira, Yaron; Sagie, Alexander; Kornowski, Ran

    2016-06-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is recommended for patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) who are at prohibitive/high risk for surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Patients with severe AS may experience acute decompensated heart failure (HF) that is resistant to medical therapy. We report our TAVI experience in treating patients with unstable AS who require urgent intervention for their aortic valve disease. Patients were restrictively included in the urgent TAVI registry if they were admitted with acute refractory and persistent HF despite medical therapy and had TAVI performed during the same hospital stay. All others were included in the elective TAVI group. Between November 2008 and April 2015, 410 consecutive patients underwent TAVI at our centre-27 (6.6%) urgently. Patients operated on urgently were more likely to be frail and carry higher SAVR mortality risk based on The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Predicted Risk of Mortality/logistic EuroSCORE (LES) measures. Pulmonary edema was the most common clinical presentation. Preprocedural assessment used fewer imaging modalities, yet implantation success remained high and reached 96.3% using an additional valve (valve-within-valve) required in 3 patients, with no difference in periprocedural complications according to the Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 definitions. Although 30-day functional capacity was reduced, patients had similar 30-day mortality and major adverse cardiovascular event rates compared with patients who underwent elective TAVI. Short-term outcome after urgent TAVI appears to be reasonable. For patients with severe AS who experience acute decompensated HF that is recalcitrant to optimal medical therapy and who are at high risk with SAVR, urgent TAVI may be a viable treatment strategy. Larger prospective studies and data on long-term outcomes are needed. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. High sensitivity C reactive protein as a prognostic marker in patients with mild to moderate aortic valve stenosis during lipid-lowering treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blyme, Adam; Asferg, Camilla; Nielsen, Olav W

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: To assess the prognostic importance of high-sensitive C reactive protein (hsCRP) in patients with mild to moderate aortic valve stenosis during placebo or simvastatin/ezetimibe treatment in Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS). METHODS AND RESULTS: In 1620 SEAS patients, we m...

  3. Outcomes of the infant Ross procedure for congenital aortic stenosis followed into adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Robert W; Quaegebeur, Jan M; Bacha, Emile A; Chen, Jonathan M; Bourlon, Francois; Williams, Ismee A

    2013-06-01

    The Ross procedure is used to treat aortic valve disease in children. The advantages include autograft growth, long-term durability, and avoidance of anticoagulation. Long-term follow-up of the Ross procedure in infancy is limited. We sought to characterize the long-term outcomes of infants undergoing the Ross procedure. We performed a retrospective review of all patients who underwent a Ross operation at 18 months of age or younger at New-York Presbyterian and Cardiothoracic Center of Monaco from 1991 to 2010. The clinical, catheterization, and surgical records were reviewed. The most recent follow-up information, including echocardiogram and electrocardiogram, was obtained and analyzed. A total of 34 patients underwent a Ross procedure at a median age of 6 months (range, 4 days to 18.4 months). All had congenital aortic stenosis. All but 1 patient had undergone previous surgical or catheter-based interventions. The median follow-up was 10.6 years (range, 1.4-20.4 years). There were 4 early deaths and 1 late transplant. The freedom from right ventricular outflow tract reintervention was 85% at 5 years and 64% at 10 years. The freedom from autograft reintervention was 95.5% at 10 years. In 20 subjects, late follow-up echocardiograms showed a significant difference between the mean early and late Z scores of the autograft annulus (0.8 vs 2.4, P = .03), sinus (0.8 vs 2.8, P = .002), and sinotubular junction (1.2 vs 2.7, P = .04). Mild or less aortic insufficiency occurred in 17 subjects. None had significant aortic stenosis. The long-term outcomes of the Ross procedure in infants and toddlers are favorable despite moderate dilatation of the autograft. Reintervention at the right ventricular outflow tract is common. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Predictive value of platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio in severe degenerative aortic valve stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efe Edem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aortic valve stenosis (AVS is the most common cause of left ventricular outflow obstruction, and its prevalence among elderly patients causes a major public health burden. Recently, platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR has been recognized as a novel prognostic biomarker that offers information about both aggregation and inflammation pathways. Since PLR indicates inflammation, we hypothesized that PLR may be associated with the severity of AVS due to chronic inflammation pathways that cause stiffness and calcification of the aortic valve. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively enrolled 117 patients with severe degenerative AVS, who underwent aortic valve replacement and 117 control patients in our clinic. PLR was defined as the absolute platelet count divided by the absolute lymphocyte count. Severe AVS was defined as calcification and sclerosis of the valve with a mean pressure gradient of >40 mmHg. Results: PLR was 197.03 ± 49.61 in the AVS group and 144.9 ± 40.35 in the control group, which indicated a statistically significant difference (P < 0.001. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis demonstrated that PLR values over 188 predicted the severity of aortic stenosis with a sensitivity of 87% and a specificity of 70% (95% confidence interval = 0.734–0.882; P < 0.001; area under ROC curve: 0.808. Conclusion: We suggest that the level of PLR elevation is related to the severity of degenerative AVS, and PLR should be used to monitor patients' inflammatory responses and the efficacy of treatment, which will lead us to more closely monitor this high-risk population to detect severe degenerative AVS at an early stage.

  5. Long-Term Outcomes for Patients With Severe Symptomatic Aortic Stenosis Treated With Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codner, Pablo; Orvin, Katia; Assali, Abid; Sharony, Ram; Vaknin-Assa, Hanna; Shapira, Yaron; Schwartzenberg, Shmuel; Bental, Tamir; Sagie, Alexander; Kornowski, Ran

    2015-11-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an established technique for the treatment of severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. Data on long-term TAVI outcomes, both hemodynamic and clinical, in real-world practice settings are limited. We aim to explore the long-term clinical results in patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis using multiple catheter-based options: 360 TAVI-treated patients were followed up for ≤5 years. The Medtronic CoreValve was used in 71% and the Edwards SAPIEN in 26%. The primary end point was all-cause mortality during follow-up. Outcomes were assessed based on the Valve Academic Research Consortium 2 criteria. The mean ± SD patient age was 82.1 ± 6.9 years (56.4% women). The Society of Thoracic Surgeons score was 7.5 ± 4.7. The clinical efficacy end point and time-related valve safety at 3 years was 50% and 81.7%, respectively. The calculated 3- and 5-year survival rates were 71.6% and 56.4%, respectively. Five-year follow-up data were obtained for 54 patients alive; 96.2% of alive patients were in the New York Heart Association class I and II, 4 years after TAVI. No gender differences in all-cause mortality rates were observed (p = 0.58). In multivariate analysis, hospitalization 6 months previous to TAVI (hazard ratio [HR] 1.92, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17 to 3.15, p = 0.01), frailty (HR 1.89, 95% CI 1.11 to 3.2, p = 0.02), acute kidney injury (HR 1.93, 95% CI 1.03 to 3.61, p = 0.04), and moderate or more paravalvular aortic regurgitation after TAVI (HR 4.26, 95% CI 2.54 to 7.15, p <0.001) were independent predictors for all-cause mortality. In conclusion, long-term outcomes of TAVI are encouraging. Prevention and early identification of paravalvular leak and acute renal failure after the procedure would improve short- and long-term outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Impact of Carotid Artery Stenting on Cerebral Perfusion, Functional Connectivity, and Cognition in Severe Asymptomatic Carotid Stenosis Patients

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    Tao Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and purposeAsymptomatic carotid artery stenosis can lead to not only stroke but also cognition impairment. Although it has been proven that carotid artery stenting (CAS can reduce the risk of future strokes, the effect of CAS on cognition is conflicting. In recent years, pulsed arterial spin labeling (pASL MRI and resting-state functional MRI (R-fMRI have been employed in cognitive impairment studies. For the present study, cognition is evaluated in severe asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis patients undergoing CAS, and the mechanisms underlying the cognitive change are explored by pASL MRI and R-fMRI.Materials and methodsWe prospectively enrolled 24 asymptomatic, severe (≥70%, unilateral internal carotid artery stenosis patients, who were expecting the intervention of CAS. Cognition assessment (including the Montreal Cognitive Assessment Beijing Version, the Minimum Mental State Examination, the Digit Symbol Test, the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, and the Verbal Memory Test and an integrated MRI program (pASL MRI, and R-fMRI were administered 7 days before and 3 months after CAS.Results16 subjects completed the follow-up study. After stenting, significant improvement in the scores of the MMSE, the Verbal Memory test, and the delayed recall was found. No significant difference was found in the scores of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment Beijing Version, the Digit Symbol Test, and the immediate recall. After CAS treatment, asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis patients showed increased perfusion in the left frontal gyrus, increased amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF in the right precentral gyrus, and increased connectivity to the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC in the right supra frontal gyrus. However, no significant correlations were found between these imaging changes and cognition assessments.ConclusionSuccessful CAS can partly improve cognition in asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis patients. The cognition

  7. Impact of baseline severity of aortic valve stenosis on effect of intensive lipid lowering therapy (from the SEAS study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdts, Eva; Rossebø, Anne Bjørhovde; Pedersen, Terje Rolf

    2010-01-01

    Retrospective studies have suggested a beneficial effect of lipid-lowering treatment on the progression of aortic stenosis (AS) in milder stages of the disease. In the randomized, placebo-controlled Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study, 4.3 years of combined treatment...... with simvastatin 40 mg and ezetimibe 10 mg did not reduce aortic valve events (AVEs), while ischemic cardiovascular events (ICEs) were significantly reduced in the overall study population. However, the impact of baseline AS severity on treatment effect has not been reported. Baseline and outcomes data in 1...... of AVEs and ICEs increased with increasing baseline severity of AS. In Cox regression analyses, higher baseline peak aortic jet velocity predicted higher rates of AVEs and ICEs in all tertiles (all p values Simvastatin-ezetimibe treatment...

  8. Continuous spinal anaesthesia with minimally invasive haemodynamic monitoring for surgical hip repair in two patients with severe aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Mercedes López

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Aortic stenosis increases perioperative morbidity and mortality, perioperative invasive monitoring is advised for patients with an aortic valve area 30 mm Hg and it is important to avoid hypotension and arrhythmias. We report the anaesthetic management with continuous spinal anaesthesia and minimally invasive haemodynamic monitoring of two patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing surgical hip repair. CASE REPORT: Two women with severe aortic stenosis were scheduled for hip fracture repair. Continuous spinal anaesthesia with minimally invasive haemodynamic monitoring was used for anaesthetic management of both. Surgery was performed successfully after two consecutive doses of 2 mg of isobaric bupivacaine 0.5% in one of them and four consecutive doses in the other. Haemodynamic conditions remained stable throughout the intervention. Vital signs and haemodynamic parameters remained stable throughout the two interventions. CONCLUSION: Our report illustrates the use of continuous spinal anaesthesia with minimally invasive haemodynamic monitoring as a valid alternative to general or epidural anaesthesia in two patients with severe aortic stenosis who are undergoing lower limb surgery. However, controlled clinical trials would be required to establish that this technique is safe and effective in these type or patients.

  9. Medial arterial calcification, calcific aortic stenosis and mitral annular calcification in a diabetic patient with severe autonomic neuropathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, C C

    2012-02-03

    Medial arterial calcification (Monckeberg\\'s arteriosclerosis) is well described in diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy. There is also a high prevalence of diabetes mellitus among subjects with calcific aortic stenosis and mitral annular calcification. We describe a diabetic patient with autonomic neuropathy and extensive medial arterial calcification who also had calcification of the aortic valve and of the mitral valve annulus. We propose that autonomic neuropathy may play a role in calcification of these structures at the base of the heart.

  10. The Impact of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation on Mitral Regurgitation Regression in High-Risk Patients with Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perl, Leor; Vaturi, Mordehay; Assali, Abid; Sagie, Alexander; Weissler-Snir, Adaya; Codner, Pablo; Orvin, Katia; Vaknin-Assa, Hana; Shapira, Yaron; Kornowski, Ran

    2015-07-01

    In patients with aortic stenosis, mitral regurgitation (MR) is a common finding. Little is known regarding outcomes of MR in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The study aim was to characterize the short- and mid-term impact of the TAVI procedure on MR grade. A total of 261 patients (59% females; mean age 82.1 +/- 6.9 years) undergoing TAVI was assessed for rates of significant MR and the severity of MR at baseline, and at one month and six months after the procedure. In patients with moderate MR or above at baseline (n = 26, 10% of the cohort), there was a mean reduction in grade of 1.5 +/- 1.1 and 1.8 +/- 1.4 after one and six months, respectively (p < 0.01). Reduction in MR grade (1+) at six months was identified in 54.1% (40/74) of patients with mild-moderate MR or greater, and in 88.5% (23/26) of those with moderate MR or above, and was associated with an improved NYHA functional class (correlation coefficient r = -0.294, p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis identified low pulmonary pressure and tricuspid regurgitation as independent predictors of improvements in MR. Among the present cohort of patients undergoing TAVI, those with MR at baseline showed an improvement in the severity of their MR. Patients with moderate MR regurgitation or above demonstrated the greatest improvement.

  11. Impact of Aortic Valve Replacement on Left Ventricular Remodeling in Patients with Severe Aortic Stenosis and Severe Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abderrahmane Bakkali

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of aortic valve replacement on left ventricular function and remodeling among patients with severe aortic stenosis and severe left ventricular dysfunction. Methods: In this retrospective bicentric study extended over a 15-year period, 61 consecutive patients underwent isolated AVR for severe AS associated to reduced LV function. The mean age was 58.21 ± 12.50 years and 83.60 % were men. 70.50% of patients were in class III or IV NYHA. The mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF was 32.9 ± 5.6.The mean LVEDD and LVESD were respectively 63.6 ± 9.2 and 50.2 ± 8.8 mm. The mean calculated logistic EuroScore was 12.2 ±4.5. Results: The hospital mortality was 11.5%. Morbidity was marked mainly by low output syndrome in 40.8% of cases. After a median follow-up of 38 months we have recorded 3 deaths. Almost all survivors were in class I and II of NYHA. The mean LV end-diastolic and end-systolic diameters decreased significantly at late postoperative stage. The mean LV ejection fraction increased significantly from 32.9 ± 5.6 to 38.2 ± 9.3 and to 50.3 ± 9.6 in early and late postoperative stages, respectively. Multivariate linear regression analysis found that increased early postoperative LVEF (β= 0.44, 95% CI [0.14; 0.75], p=0.006 and low mean transprosthesis gradient (β=-0.72, 95% CI [-1.42; -0.02], p= 0.04 were the independent predictors of left ventricular systolic function recovery. Conclusion: Patients with aortic valve stenosis and impaired LV systolic function benefited from AVR as regard improvement of LV function parameters and regression of the LV diameters .This improvement depends mainly on early postoperative LVEF and mean transprosthesis gradient.

  12. Long-term outcomes and risk factors for aortic regurgitation after discrete subvalvular aortic stenosis resection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickard, Sarah S; Geva, Alon; Gauvreau, Kimberlee; del Nido, Pedro J; Geva, Tal

    2015-10-01

    To characterise long-term outcomes after discrete subaortic stenosis (DSS) resection and to identify risk factors for reoperation and aortic regurgitation (AR) requiring repair or replacement. All patients who underwent DSS resection between 1984 and 2009 at our institution with at least 36 months' follow-up were included. Demographic, surgical and echocardiographic data were reviewed. Outcomes were reoperation for recurrent DSS, surgery for AR, death and morbidities, including heart transplant, endocarditis and complete heart block. Median length of postoperative follow-up was 10.9 years (3-27.2 years). Reoperation occurred in 32 patients (21%) and plateaued 10 years after initial resection. Survival at 10 years and 20 years was 98.6% and 86.3%, respectively. Aortic valve (AoV) repair or replacement for predominant AR occurred in 31 patients (20%) during or after DSS resection. By multivariable analysis, prior aortic stenosis (AS) intervention (HR 22.4, p<0.001) was strongly associated with AoV repair or replacement. Risk factors for reoperation by multivariable analysis included younger age at resection (HR 1.24, p=0.003), preoperative gradient ≥60 mm Hg (HR 2.23, p=0.04), peeling of membrane off AoV or mitral valve (HR 2.52, p=0.01), distance of membrane to AoV <7.0 mm (HR 4.03, p=0.03) and AS (HR 2.58, p=0.01). In this cohort, the incidence of reoperations after initial DSS resection plateaued after 10 years. Despite a significant rate of reoperation, overall survival was good. Concomitant congenital AS and its associated interventions significantly increased the risk of AR requiring surgical intervention. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. A hybrid approach for quantifying aortic valve stenosis using impedance cardiography and echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daralammouri, Yunis; Ayoub, Khubaib; Badrieh, Najwan; Lauer, Bernward

    2016-01-22

    Impedance cardiography (IC) is a noninvasive modality that utilizes changes in impedance across the thorax to assess hemodynamic parameters, including stroke volume (SV). This study compared aortic valve area (AVA) as assessed by a hybrid approach of transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and impedance cardiography (IC) to AVA determined at cardiac catheterization using the Gorlin equation. A total of 30 patients with moderate to severe aortic stenosis underwent AVA measurement using two different approaches: using the continuity equation (CE) in a hybrid method combining IC and TTE (AVA = stroke by volume impedance cardiography/trans-aortic-VTI) and using the Gorlin equation. Patient age ranged from 37 to 82 years (mean 48); there were 21 men and 9 women. Twenty-five patients were in sinus rhythm, and five had atrial fibrillation. There was no statistically significant difference for the mean AVA between the two methods (0.7 ± 0.24 cm(2) using the Gorlin equation versus 0.7 ± 0.23 cm(2) using the hybrid approach, p = 0.17; r = 0.76, p hybrid method using impedance cardiography and TTE is a reasonable, clinically applicable approach to evaluate AVA and has significant correlation to invasive measurement using the Gorlin equation.

  14. Discordance in Grading Methods of Aortic Stenosis by Pre-Cardiopulmonary Bypass Transesophageal Echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitener, George; McKenzie, Jeff; Akushevich, Igor; White, William D; Dhakal, Ishwori B; Nicoara, Alina; Swaminathan, Madhav

    2016-04-01

    Current guidelines define severe aortic valve stenosis (AS) as an aortic valve area (AVA) ≤1.0 cm by the continuity equation and mean gradient (ΔPm) ≥ 40 mm Hg. However, these measurements can be discordant when classifying AS severity. Approximately one-third of patients with normal ejection fraction and severe AS by AVA have nonsevere AS by ΔPm when measured by preoperative transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). Given the use of positive pressure ventilation and general anesthesia in the pre-cardiopulmonary bypass (pre-CPB) period, we hypothesized that discordance between ΔPm and AVA during pre-CPB transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) would be higher than previously reported by TTE. We retrospectively examined pre-CPB TEE data for patients who had aortic valve replacement, with or without coronary artery bypass grafting, from 2000 to 2012. Patients were excluded if they had ejection fraction versus TEE) differences, inaccuracies in AS grading cutoffs when applied to pre-CPB TEE, or selection bias of the surgical population.

  15. Percutaneous Dual-valve Intervention in a High-risk Patient with Severe Aortic and Mitral Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrevlje, Blaz; Aboukura, Mohamad; Nienaber, Christoph A

    2016-01-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most frequent and mitral stenosis is the least frequent native single-sided valve disease in Europe. Patients with the combination of severe symptomatic degenerative aortic and mitral stenosis are very rare. Guidelines for the treatment of heart valve diseases are clear for single-valve situations. However, there is no common agreement or recommendation for the best treatment strategy in patients with multiple valve disease and severe concomitant comorbidities. A 76-year-old female patient with the combination of severe degenerative symptomatic aortic and mitral stenosis and several comorbidities including severe obesity, who was found unsuitable surgical candidate by the heart team and unsuitable for two-time general anesthesia in the case of two-step single-valve percutaneous approach by anesthesiologists, underwent successful percutaneous dual-valve single-intervention (transcatheter aortic valve implantation and percutaneous mitral balloon commissurotomy). Percutaneous dual-valve single-intervention is feasible in selected symptomatic high-risk patients.

  16. A single codon insertion in PICALM is associated with development of familial subvalvular aortic stenosis in Newfoundland dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Familial subvalvular aortic stenosis (SAS) is one of the most common congenital heart defects in dogs and is an inherited defect of Newfoundlands, golden retrievers and human children. Although SAS is known to be inherited, specific genes involved in Newfoundlands with SAS have not been defined. We ...

  17. Estimating the Population Impact of Lp(a) Lowering on the Incidence of Myocardial Infarction and Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshar, Mehdi; Kamstrup, Pia R; Williams, Ken

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: High lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]) is the most common genetic dyslipidemia and is a causal factor for myocardial infarction (MI) and aortic stenosis (AS). We sought to estimate the population impact of Lp(a) lowering that could be achieved in primary prevention using the therapies in developm...

  18. Cerebral Lesions in Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting in Relation to Asymptomatic Carotid and Vertebral Artery Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiberg, Sebastian; Schoos, Mikkel; Sillesen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Carotid artery stenosis (CAS) and vertebral artery stenosis (VAS) are associated with cerebral infarction after coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). It remains unclear whether this association is causal. We investigated the associations between neurologically asymptomatic CAS...... and VAS and the occurrence of subclinical cerebral lesions after CABG verified by magnetic resonance imaging. METHODS: CABG patients were included and CAS and VAS were identified by magnetic resonance angiography. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging was performed to identify new post-operative subclinical...... cerebral lesions. The associations between CAS/VAS post-operative cerebral lesions were investigated. RESULTS: Forty-six patients were included in the study. 13% had significant CAS and 11% had significant VAS. Thirty-five percent had new cerebral infarction postoperatively. We found a significant...

  19. Second natural history study of congenital heart defects. Quality of life of patients with aortic stenosis, pulmonary stenosis, or ventricular septal defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersony, W M; Hayes, C J; Driscoll, D J; Keane, J F; Kidd, L; O'Fallon, W M; Pieroni, D R; Wolfe, R R; Weidman, W H

    1993-02-01

    Quality of life of patients with congenital heart defects is an important aspect of the assessment of outcome of medical and surgical treatment. All participants in the Second Natural History Study of Congenital Heart Defects who completed the study questionnaire were included in this analysis. The questionnaire completed by the patients included inquiries relative to medical history, marital and family life, self-perception of well-being, insurability, and employability. The following general observations were apparent. The study cohort reported a self-perception of health status that was similar to that of the general population. Second, 35-40% of patients had not had a cardiac evaluation within the previous 10 years. Third, 16% of the patients had no health insurance, and 35.7% of the patients had no life insurance. For the patients with pulmonary stenosis and ventricular septal defect, the percent who were married was less than that of the corresponding national age- and sex-specific population. For patients with aortic stenosis, the percent married was greater than that of the general population for some age groups. The proportion of divorced or separated individuals was similar to that of the general population. For all three defects, the level of educational attainment exceeded the national average. Last, unemployment rates were similar to national averages except for women with aortic stenosis, who had a significantly higher unemployment rate than did age- and sex-matched controls. Patients initially identified with aortic stenosis, pulmonary stenosis, or ventricular septal defect in 1959-1973 have a quality of life in the mid-1980s similar to that of the general US population.

  20. No clinical effect of prosthesis-patient mismatch after transcatheter versus surgical aortic valve replacement in intermediate- and low-risk patients with severe aortic valve stenosis at mid-term follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav Hørsted; Steinbrüchel, Daniel Andreas; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) after surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) for severe aortic valve stenosis (AVS) is common, but less common after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in patients considered at high risk for death after surgery. The objectives of this st...

  1. Measurement of the Aortic Diameter in the Asymptomatic Thai Population in Siriraj Hospital: Assessment with Multidetector CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisdee Prabhasavat

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine normal reference values of intra-thoracic and abdominal aortic diameters of asymptomatic Thai adults obtained by multidetector computed tomography. Secondary end points were evaluation of relationships between aortic diameters and patients’ demographic data or potential risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Methods: Three hundred and ten Thai adults in Siriraj Hospital who had no any signs or symptoms of cardio- vascular disease that examined with computed tomography (CT of chest and whole abdomen were investigated in this study. Aortic diameters were measured at eight predefined intra-thoracic and abdominal levels on CT images, including ascending aorta, proximal transverse aortic arch, distal transverse aortic arch, aortic isthmus, thoracoabdominal junction, celiac axis, suprarenal aorta and aortic bifurcation. Analysis of data was performed with regard to patients’ demographic data (age, sex, weight, and height and three potential risk factors of cardio- vascular disease (hypertension, dyslipidemia and diabetes mellitus. Furthermore, we also recorded the co-morbid non-cardiovascular underlying diseases which were classified into seven groups, including tumors (malignant and benign tumors, infectious diseases, inflammatory diseases, autoimmune diseases, degenerative diseases, psychiatric diseases and others. Results: Aortic diameters were 3.14±0.40 cm. at the ascending aorta, 2.88 ± 0.34 cm. at proximal transverse aortic arch, 2.65±0.30 cm. at distal transverse aortic arch, 2.46 ± 0.31cm. at aortic isthmus, 2.10± 0.27 cm. at thoracoab- dominal junction, 1.99 ± 0.26 cm. at celiac axis, 1.81 ±0.25 cm. at suprarenal aorta, and 1.47±0.21 cm. at aortic bifurcation. Overall aortic diameters tend to continuously significantly decrease aortic diameters from proximal to distal direction from ascending aorta to aortic bifurcation. Men had slightly more enlarged aortic diameters in all

  2. Transfemoral aortic valve implantation for severe aortic stenosis in a patient with dextrocardia situs inversus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Richard I S; Morgan, Kenneth P; Brydie, Alan; Beydoun, Hussein K; Nadeem, S Najaf

    2014-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVR) has grown rapidly over the past 10 years. Device and delivery catheter systems have evolved to facilitate the procedure and reduce the risk of associated complications, including those related to vascular access. It is important to understand the utility of the TAVR equipment in patients with more challenging anatomy to select the most appropriate technique for this complex procedure. We report the first case, to our knowledge, of a patient with dextrocardia situs inversus and previous coronary artery bypass grafting who underwent TAVR from the femoral route using the Edwards SAPIEN XT Novaflex+ Transfemoral System (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA). Copyright © 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Does valvuloarterial impedance impact prognosis after surgery for severe aortic stenosis in the elderly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Minako; Najib, Mohammad Q; Marella, Punnaiah C; Temkit, M'hamed H; Belohlavek, Marek; Chaliki, Hari P

    2015-01-01

    Valvuloarterial impedance (Zva) was introduced as a prognostic measure in patients with aortic stenosis (AS). However, it is unclear whether Zva has a prognostic impact on survival after surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) in patients with severe AS with preserved ejection fraction (EF). We retrospectively reviewed 929 consecutive patients who had AVR. We investigated 170 elderly patients (age >65 years, mean 76 years) who had AVR secondary to severe AS (mean gradient ≥40 mm Hg; aortic valve area ≤1 cm(2); peak velocity ≥4 m/s). Patients with EF <50%, greater than moderate aortic regurgitation, prior heart surgery and concomitant mitral or tricuspid valve surgery were excluded. Zva was calculated and the patients were divided into two groups; low Zva, Zva <4.3 (n=82) and high Zva, Zva ≥4.3 (n=88). The end point was all-cause of death. Survival curves were calculated according to Kaplan-Meier method. Age, prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, chronic kidney disease (CKD), atrial fibrillation, symptoms, EF, E/e' and concomitant coronary artery bypass graft were not different between the groups. Survival was not different between the groups at 5 years (70% in low Zva and 81% in high Zva; p=0.21) and for the entire follow-up period (p=0.23). Only age was a significant factor in predicting survival by multivariate analyses in Cox proportional hazards model after adjusting for Zva, CKD, atrial fibrillation and hypertension. Our results suggest that preoperative Zva does not have a prognostic impact on postoperative survival in elderly patients with severe AS with preserved EF. Further investigation is needed to elucidate the controversial results.

  4. Comparison of 1-Year Outcome in Patients With Severe Aorta Stenosis Treated Conservatively or by Aortic Valve Replacement or by Percutaneous Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (Data from a Multicenter Spanish Registry).

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Saldivar, Hugo; Rodriguez-Pascual, Carlos; de la Morena, Gonzalo; Fernández-Golfín, Covadonga; Amorós, Carmen; Alonso, Mario Baquero; Dolz, Luis Martínez; Solé, Albert Ariza; Guzmán-Martínez, Gabriela; Gómez-Doblas, Juan José; Jiménez, Antonio Arribas; Fuentes, María Eugenia; Gay, Laura Galian; Ortiz, Martin Ruiz; Avanzas, Pablo; Abu-Assi, Emad; Ripoll-Vera, Tomás; Díaz-Castro, Oscar; Osinalde, Eduardo P; Martínez-Sellés, Manuel

    2016-07-15

    The factors that influence decision making in severe aortic stenosis (AS) are unknown. Our aim was to assess, in patients with severe AS, the determinants of management and prognosis in a multicenter registry that enrolled all consecutive adults with severe AS during a 1-month period. One-year follow-up was obtained in all patients and included vital status and aortic valve intervention (aortic valve replacement [AVR] and transcatheter aortic valve implantation [TAVI]). A total of 726 patients were included, mean age was 77.3 ± 10.6 years, and 377 were women (51.8%). The most common management was conservative therapy in 468 (64.5%) followed by AVR in 199 (27.4%) and TAVI in 59 (8.1%). The strongest association with aortic valve intervention was patient management in a tertiary hospital with cardiac surgery (odds ratio 2.7, 95% confidence interval 1.8 to 4.1, p <0.001). The 2 main reasons to choose conservative management were the absence of significant symptoms (136% to 29.1%) and the presence of co-morbidity (128% to 27.4%). During 1-year follow-up, 132 patients died (18.2%). The main causes of death were heart failure (60% to 45.5%) and noncardiac diseases (46% to 34.9%). One-year survival for patients treated conservatively, with TAVI, and with AVR was 76.3%, 94.9%, and 92.5%, respectively, p <0.001. One-year survival of patients treated conservatively in the absence of significant symptoms was 97.1%. In conclusion, most patients with severe AS are treated conservatively. The outcome in asymptomatic patients managed conservatively was acceptable. Management in tertiary hospitals is associated with valve intervention. One-year survival was similar with both interventional strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Prognosis of Prolonged Intensive Care Unit Stay After Aortic Valve Replacement for Severe Aortic Stenosis in Octogenarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin, Pascal; Tanaka, Sebastien; Chhor, Vibol; Provenchère, Sophie; Arnaudovski, Darko; Ibrahim, Hassan; Dilly, Marie-Pierre; Allou, Nicolas; Montravers, Philippe; Philip, Ivan

    2016-12-01

    Octogenarians considered for cardiac surgery encounter more complications than other patients. Postoperative complications raise the question of continuation of high-cost care for patients with limited life expectancy. Duration of hospitalization in intensive care after cardiac surgery may differ between octogenarians and other patients. The objectives were evaluating the mortality rate of octogenarians experiencing prolonged hospitalization in intensive care and defining the best cut-off for prolonged intensive care unit length of stay. A single-center observational study. A postoperative surgical intensive care unit in a tertiary teaching hospital in Paris, France. All consecutive patients older than 80 years considered for aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis were included. Mortality rate was determined among patients experiencing prolonged stay in intensive care with organ failure and without organ failure. An ROC curve determined the optimal cut-off defining prolonged hospitalization in intensive care according to the occurrence of postoperative complications. Multivariate analysis determined risk factors for early death or prolonged intensive care stay. The optimal cut-off defining prolonged intensive care unit length of stay was 4 days. Low ventricular ejection fraction (odds ratio [OR] = 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.96-0.83; p = 0.0016), coronary disease (OR = 2.34; 95% CI 1.19-4.85; p = 0.014), and need for catecholamine (OR = 2.79; 95% CI 1.33-5.88; p = 0.0068) were associated with eventful postoperative course. There was not a hospitalization duration beyond which the prognosis significantly worsened. Prolonged length of stay in ICU without organ failure is not associated with increased mortality. No specific duration of hospitalization in intensive care was associated with increased mortality. Continuation of care should be discussed on an individual basis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Effects of Aortic Valve Replacement on Severe Aortic Stenosis and Preserved Systolic Function: Systematic Review and Network Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qishi; Djohan, Andie H; Lim, Enghow; Ding, Zee Pin; Ling, Lieng H; Shi, Luming; Chan, Edwin Shih-Yen; Chin, Calvin Woon Loong

    2017-07-11

    The survival benefits of aortic valve replacement (AVR) in the different flow-gradient states of severe aortic stenosis (AS) is not known. A comprehensive search in PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Library, CNKI and OpenGrey were conducted to identify studies that investigated the prognosis of severe AS (effective orifice area ≤1.0 cm(2)) and left ventricular ejection fraction ≥50%. Severe AS was stratified by mean pressure gradient [threshold of 40 mmHg; high-gradient (HG) and low-gradient (LG)] and stroke volume index [threshold of 35 ml/m(2); normal-flow (NL) and low-flow (LF)]. Network meta-analysis was conducted to assess all-cause mortality among each AS sub-type with rate ratio (RR) reported. The effects of AVR on prognosis were examined using network meta-regression. In the pooled analysis (15 studies and 9,737 patients), LF states (both HG and LG) were associated with increased mortality rate (LFLG: RR 1.88; 95% CI: 1.43-2.46; LFHG: RR: 1.77; 95% CI: 1.16-2.70) compared to moderate AS; and NF states in both HG and LG had similar prognosis as moderate AS (NFLG: RR 1.11; 95% CI: 0.81-1.53; NFHG: RR 1.16; 95% CI: 0.82-1.64). AVR conferred different survival benefits: it was most effective in NFHG (RR with AVR /RR without AVR : 0.43; 95% CI: 0.22-0.82) and least in LFLG (RR with AVR /RR without AVR : 1.19; 95% CI: 0.74-1.94).

  7. 4D spiral imaging of flows in stenotic phantoms and subjects with aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negahdar, M J; Kadbi, Mo; Kendrick, Michael; Stoddard, Marcus F; Amini, Amir A

    2016-03-01

    The utility of four-dimensional (4D) spiral flow in imaging of stenotic flows in both phantoms and human subjects with aortic stenosis is investigated. The method performs 4D flow acquisitions through a stack of interleaved spiral k-space readouts. Relative to conventional 4D flow, which performs Cartesian readout, the method has reduced echo time. Thus, reduced flow artifacts are observed when imaging high-speed stenotic flows. Four-dimensional spiral flow also provides significant savings in scan times relative to conventional 4D flow. In vitro experiments were performed under both steady and pulsatile flows in a phantom model of severe stenosis (one inch diameter at the inlet, with 87% area reduction at the throat of the stenosis) while imaging a 6-cm axial extent of the phantom, which included the Gaussian-shaped stenotic narrowing. In all cases, gradient strength and slew rate for standard clinical acquisitions, and identical field of view and resolution were used. For low steady flow rates, quantitative and qualitative results showed a similar level of accuracy between 4D spiral flow (echo time [TE] = 2 ms, scan time = 40 s) and conventional 4D flow (TE = 3.6 ms, scan time = 1:01 min). However, in the case of high steady flow rates, 4D spiral flow (TE = 1.57 ms, scan time = 38 s) showed better visualization and accuracy as compared to conventional 4D flow (TE = 3.2 ms, scan time = 51 s). At low pulsatile flow rates, a good agreement was observed between 4D spiral flow (TE = 2 ms, scan time = 10:26 min) and conventional 4D flow (TE = 3.6 ms, scan time = 14:20 min). However, in the case of high flow-rate pulsatile flows, 4D spiral flow (TE = 1.57 ms, scan time = 10:26 min) demonstrated better visualization as compared to conventional 4D flow (TE = 3.2 ms, scan time = 14:20 min). The feasibility of 4D spiral flow was also investigated in five normal volunteers and four subjects with mild-to-moderate aortic stenosis. The approach achieved TE = 1.68 ms and scan

  8. Evaluation of subvalvular aortic stenosis in children: a 16-year single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Fahrettin; Bostan, Ozlem Mehtap; Signak, Isik Senkaya; Semizel, Evren; Cil, Ergun

    2013-08-01

    Subvalvular aortic stenosis accounts for 1-2 % of all congenital heart disease and for 8-20 % of cases of left-ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction in children. Recurrence of subaortic stenosis (SAS) is not uncommon after surgical management. This study was performed to investigate the clinical and surgical outcomes and to estimate the predictability of recurrences of SAS. Seventy-nine patients age 3-21 years with SAS between 1994 and 2010 were reviewed. Fifty-one patients had discrete SAS, whereas the remaining 15 patients had fibromuscular ridge-type SAS. Mean follow-up time without surgery was 22 months (range of 1-94). Forty-one patients with a diagnosis of SAS underwent surgery. Recurrence rates were 22.7 % (15 patients), and these patients developed SAS at a mean of 4.7 years follow-up. We performed second surgical membrane resection in only 1 patient. The risk of recurrence of SAS was only linked to higher preoperative LVOT gradient. Twenty-three patients had no aortic regurgitation (AR) at preoperative echocardiography. Of these, 39.1 % had trivial, 8.7 % had mild, and 8.7 % had moderate AR after surgery; there was no significant AR. We conclude that surgical intervention was required most of the time in patients with SAS, and surgical outcomes was excellent even if there were associated cardiac defects. The risk of recurrences was higher, especially in patients with higher initial LVOT gradients, although a second surgery was rarely necessary in these patients.

  9. Transcatheter Versus Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Steinbrüchel, Daniel Andreas; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2015-01-01

    outcome was the composite rate of death from any cause, stroke, or myocardial infarction (MI) at 1 year. RESULTS: A total of 280 patients were randomized at 3 Nordic centers. Mean age was 79.1 years, and 81.8% were considered low-risk patients. In the intention-to-treat population, no significant...... difference in the primary endpoint was found (13.1% vs. 16.3%; p = 0.43 for superiority). The result did not change in the as-treated population. No difference in the rate of cardiovascular death or prosthesis reintervention was found. Compared with SAVR-treated patients, TAVR-treated patients had more...... injury (stage II or III), and new-onset or worsening atrial fibrillation at 30 days than did TAVR-treated patients. CONCLUSIONS: In the NOTION trial, no significant difference between TAVR and SAVR was found for the composite rate of death from any cause, stroke, or MI after 1 year. (Nordic Aortic Valve...

  10. Randomized comparison of exercise haemodynamics of Freestyle, Magna Ease and Trifecta bioprostheses after aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, David S; Patel, Himanshu J; Kolias, Theodore J; Deeb, G Michael

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare haemodynamics at rest and during exercise after clinically indicated aortic valve replacement (AVR) for aortic stenosis among patients randomly assigned to one of three haemodynamically excellent bioprostheses. In a single-centre, prospective trial, 60 patients undergoing clinically indicated AVR were randomly assigned to Freestyle, Magna Ease or Trifecta bioprostheses. Six months after surgery, patients underwent supine bicycle stress echocardiography for the assessment of aortic valve haemodynamics. There were 5 protocol deviations from random valve assignments, and 4 patients did not return for follow-up stress echo, yielding a study group of 56 patients {17 Freestyle, 21 Magna Ease, 18 Trifecta; median age 70 [interquartile range (IQR) 63-78 years], 37 (66%) men}. There were no statistically significant differences between groups in valve size, concomitant procedures or exercise variables. Resting haemodynamics revealed significant differences between groups in mean gradient [Freestyle 7 (IQR 5-9) mmHg, Magna Ease 9 (IQR 7-11) mmHg, Trifecta 5 (IQR 4-8) mmHg; P = 0.04], effective orifice area (EOA) [2.5 (IQR 2.2-2.7), 2.1 (IQR 1.7-2.3) and 2.6 (IQR 2.3-2.8), respectively; P = 0.02] and EOA index [1.22 (IQR 1.11-1.32), 1.02 (IQR 0.89-1.14) and 1.31 (IQR 1.00-1.42), respectively; P = 0.03]; in each case, Trifecta had better haemodynamics compared with Magna Ease. With exercise, significant differences between groups were evident in peak velocity at 50 watts and peak exercise; mean gradient at 25 watts, 50 watts and maximal exercise; and EOA at 25 watts and at peak exercise; all with haemodynamic superiority of Trifecta compared with Magna Ease. There were no statistically significant differences between Trifecta and Freestyle haemodynamics at rest or with exercise. In a prospective, randomized study comparing haemodynamics after Freestyle, Magna Ease and Trifecta, all three valves exhibited good haemodynamics at rest and

  11. Reducing the Inconsistency between Doppler and Invasive Measurements of the Severity of Aortic Stenosis Using Aortic Valve Coefficient: A Retrospective Study on Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anup K. Paul

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is not uncommon to observe inconsistencies in the diagnostic parameters derived from Doppler and catheterization measurements for assessing the severity of aortic stenosis (AS which can result in suboptimal clinical decisions. In this pilot study, we investigate the possibility of improving the concordance between Doppler and catheter assessment of AS severity using the functional diagnostic parameter called aortic valve coefficient (AVC, defined as the ratio of the transvalvular pressure drop to the proximal dynamic pressure. Method and Results. AVC was calculated using diagnostic parameters obtained from retrospective chart reviews. AVC values were calculated independently from cardiac catheterization (AVCcatheter and Doppler measurements (AVCdoppler. An improved significant correlation was observed between Doppler and catheter derived AVC (r=0.92, P<0.05 when compared to the correlation between Doppler and catheter measurements of mean pressure gradient (r=0.72, P<0.05 and aortic valve area (r=0.64, P<0.05. The correlation between Doppler and catheter derived AVC exhibited a marginal improvement over the correlation between Doppler and catheter derived aortic valve resistance (r=0.89, P<0.05. Conclusion. AVC is a refined clinical parameter that can improve the concordance between the noninvasive and invasive measures of the severity of aortic stenosis.

  12. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Futility Risk Model Development and Validation Among Treated Patients With Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zusman, Oren; Kornowski, Ran; Witberg, Guy; Lador, Adi; Orvin, Katia; Levi, Amos; Assali, Abid; Vaknin-Assa, Hana; Sharony, Ram; Shapira, Yaron; Sagie, Alexander; Landes, Uri

    2017-12-15

    Risk-benefit assessment for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is still evolving. A sizeable group of patients do not fully benefit from intervention despite a technically successful procedure. All patients who underwent TAVI with device success and with no Valve Academic Research Consortium (VARC)-2 defined complications were included. Various demographic data, clinical details, and echocardiographic findings were examined. The outcome was defined as 1-year composite of mortality, stroke, lack of functional-class improvement (by New York Heart Association class), and readmissions (≥1 month after the procedure). Logistic regression was used to fit the prediction model. We used a 10-fold cross-validation to validate our results. Of 543 patients, 435 met the inclusion criteria. The mean age was 82 (±6.5) years, 43% were men, and the mean Society of Thoracic Surgeons score was 6.6 (±4.7). At 1 year, 66 of 435 patients (15%) experienced the study end point. The final logistic regression model included diabetes, baseline New York Heart Association functional class, diastolic dysfunction, need for diuretics, mean gradient, hemoglobin level, and creatinine level. The area under the curve was 0.73 and was reduced to 0.71 after validation, with a 97% specificity using a single cutoff. Dividing to low-, medium-, and high-risk groups for futility produced a corresponding prevalence of 6%, 19%, and 59% futility. A web application for the prediction model was developed and provided. In conclusion, this prediction score may provide an important insight and may facilitate identification of patients who, despite a technically successful and uncomplicated procedure, have risk that may outweigh the benefit of a contemplated TAVI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Alterations in cholesterol homeostasis are associated with coronary heart disease in patients with aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingärtner, Oliver; Weingärtner, Nadja; Scheller, Bruno; Lütjohann, Dieter; Gräber, Stefan; Schäfers, Hans-Joachim; Böhm, Michael; Laufs, Ulrich

    2009-09-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a risk factor for aortic stenosis (AS) and for coronary artery disease (CAD). Serum cholesterol concentrations are determined by intestinal cholesterol absorption and endogenous cholesterol synthesis. Vascular effects of differences in cholesterol metabolism in patients with AS are so far unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate differences in cholesterol metabolism in relation to vascular diseases in this subset of patients. In addition to identifying conventional coronary risk factors, we determined plant sterols (indicators of cholesterol absorption) and lathosterol (indicator of cholesterol synthesis) levels in 40 consecutive men and women with AS. Coronary angiograms before the aortic valve replacement determined the extent of CAD. Patients with a positive history of cardiovascular disease exhibited an increased campesterol-to-lathosterol ratio in plasma (PCoronary vessel score strongly correlated with the campesterol-to-lathosterol ratio in plasma (r = 0.52; Pcoronary risk factors tested (Pcholesterol is related to a positive family history of cardiovascular diseases and the development of concomitant CAD in patients with AS.

  14. [Non-cardiac aspects of aortic stenosis in the elderly: A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Fernández, Baldomero; Formiga, Francesç; de Mora-Martín, Manuel; Calleja, Fernando; Gómez-Huelgas, Ricardo

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is the most frequent valve disease in the elderly population Treatment is valve replacement either by open surgery, or in the case of patients at high surgical risk, by TAVI (Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation). However, almost 40% of patients who have undergone TAVI show poor health outcomes, either due to death or because their clinical status does not improved. This review examines the non-cardiac aspects of patients with AS, which may help answer three key questions in order to evaluate this condition pre-surgically: 1) Are the symptoms presented by the patient exclusively explained by the AS, or are there other factors or comorbidities that could justify or increase them?, 2) What possibilities for improvement of health status and quality of life has the patient after the valve replacement?, and 3) How can we reduce the risk of a futile valve replacement? Copyright © 2016 SEGG. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessment of subendocardial contractile function in aortic stenosis: a study using speckle tracking echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dalen, Bas M; Tzikas, Apostolos; Soliman, Osama I I; Heuvelman, Helena J; Vletter, Wim B; Ten Cate, Folkert J; Geleijnse, Marcel L

    2013-03-01

    Angina and an electrocardiographic strain pattern are potential manifestations of subendocardial ischemia in aortic stenosis (AS). Left ventricular (LV) twist is known to increase proportionally to the severity of AS, which may be a result of loss of the inhibiting effect of the subendocardial fibers due to subendocardial dysfunction. It has also been shown that the ratio of LV twist to circumferential shortening of the endocardium (twist-to-shortening ratio [TSR]) is a reliable parameter of subendocardial dysfunction. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these markers are increased in AS patients with angina and/or electrocardiographic strain. The study comprised 60 AS patients with an aortic valve area 50%, and 30 healthy-for age and gender matched-control subjects. LV rotation parameters were determined by speckle tracking echocardiography. Comparison of patients without angina and strain (n = 22), with either angina or strain (n = 28), and with both angina and strain (n = 8), showed highest peak systolic LV apical rotation, peak systolic LV twist, and TSR, in patients with more signs of subendocardial ischemia. In a multivariate linear regression model, only severity of AS and the presence of angina and/or strain could be identified as independent predictors of peak systolic LV twist and TSR. Peak systolic LV twist and TSR are increased in AS patients and related to the severity of AS and symptoms (angina) or electrocardiographic signs (strain) compatible with subendocardial ischemia. © 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Medicolegal characteristics of aortic stenosis litigation: a review of the LexisNexis Academic database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Michael J; Vidovich, Mladen I

    2010-09-01

    Currently, few studies have been conducted to assess the outcome patterns of medicolegal cases involving patients with cardiovascular disease. Thus, the literature was reviewed for patterns of liability and medical outcomes in patients involved in aortic stenosis (AS) litigation. Legal case opinions were obtained from LexisNexis Academic; case characteristics, litigation outcomes, and medical outcomes were identified. Of the 133 cases reviewed, 27% were disability claims, 23% workers' compensation cases, 14% medical malpractice cases, and 9% military service connection cases. Of the 133 cases, only 47% were judged in the patients' favor. The patients' mean age was 48.8 years, and 77% were male. The most common etiology of AS was calcific (38%), followed by rheumatic (31%), bicuspid/congenital (27%), and subaortic (4%). The most common presentation was precordial pain (38%), shortness of breath (35%), syncope/dizziness (18%), fatigue (11%) and death (9%). Aortic valve replacement (AVR) was the most common form of treatment (67%); disability was the most common medical outcome (42%). AS in litigation follows the standard pattern of AS disease. Only a minority of AS litigation cases are due to medical malpractice, while the majority of AS litigation cases are due to those seeking workers' or disability compensation. Cardiologists treating patients with AS should be cognizant of these litigation patterns and proactively document medical findings, since resulting court decisions profoundly affect the patients' financial means and quality of life.

  17. Surgical repair of supravalvular aortic stenosis with use of Brom's technique: short-term results in 9 children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Castañeda, Brenda Fabiola; Carrillo-Llamas, Fernando; Ramos-Higuera, Saúl; López-Taylor, Jaime Gilberto; Buen, Eliseo Portilla-de

    2009-01-01

    There are few published reports of the results of supravalvular aortic stenosis correction with the use of Brom's 3-patch technique. Herein, we report our use of this procedure and the short-term results therefrom.From 2002 through 2007, 9 children underwent surgical correction of localized supravalvular aortic stenosis at our hospital. The patients ranged in age from 5 to 14 years, and 8 had Williams syndrome. All operations were performed by the same surgical team.No clinically significant associated cardiac anomalies were encountered. Each aortic repair involved the use of pericardium, Dacron, or both. One patient had an uncorrected right coronary artery obstruction and died postoperatively of refractory supraventricular tachycardia. In all 8 patients who survived, postoperative transaortic blood pressure gradients were improved (range, 0-16 mmHg), and no repeat operations were needed after 6 to 55 months' follow-up.We consider Brom's technique to be safe in the repair of supravalvular aortic stenosis. In our limited series, it produced effective anatomic restoration, with good short-term and potentially good long-term results.

  18. Endarterectomy achieves lower stroke and death rates compared with stenting in patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakkos, Stavros K; Kakisis, Ioannis; Tsolakis, Ioannis A; Geroulakos, George

    2017-08-01

    It is currently unclear if carotid artery stenting (CAS) is as safe as carotid endarterectomy (CEA) for patients with significant asymptomatic stenosis. The aim of our study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of trials comparing CAS with CEA. On March 17, 2017, a search for randomized controlled trials was performed in MEDLINE and Scopus databases with no time limits. We performed meta-analyses with Peto odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Quality of evidence was assessed with the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation method. The primary safety and efficacy outcome measures were stroke or death rate at 30 days and ipsilateral stroke at 1 year (including ipsilateral stroke and death rate at 30 days), respectively. Perioperative stroke, ipsilateral stroke, myocardial infarction (MI), and cranial nerve injury (CNI) were all secondary outcome measures. The systematic review of the literature identified nine randomized controlled trials reporting on 3709 patients allocated into CEA (n = 1479) or CAS (n = 2230). Stroke or death rate at 30 days was significantly higher for CAS (64/2176 [2.94%]) compared with CEA (27/1431 [1.89%]; OR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.01-2.44; P = .044), with low level of heterogeneity beyond chance (I2 = 0%). Also, stroke rate at 30 days was significantly higher for CAS (63/2176 [2.90%]) than for CEA (26/1431 [1.82%]; OR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.04-2.54; P = .032; I2 = 0%). MI at 30 days was nonsignificantly lower for CAS (12/1815 [0.66%]) compared with CEA (16/1070 [1.50%]; OR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.24-1.14; P = .105; I2 = 0%); however, CNI at 30 days was significantly lower for CAS (2/1794 [0.11%]) than for CEA (33/1061 [3.21%]; OR, 0.13; 95% CI, 0.07-0.26; P carotid intervention, there is moderate-quality evidence to suggest that CEA had significantly lower 30-day stroke and also stroke or death rates compared with CAS at the cost of higher CNI and nonsignificantly higher MI rates. The

  19. Hybrid Balloon Valvuloplasty for the Treatment of Severe Congenital Aortic Valve Stenosis in Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou-Yang, Wen-Bin; Li, Shou-Jun; Xie, Yong-Quan; Hu, Sheng-Shou; Wang, Shou-Zheng; Zhang, Feng-Wen; Guo, Gai-Li; Liu, Yao; Pang, Kun-Jing; Pan, Xiang-Bin

    2018-01-01

    Surgical or percutaneous interventional treatment of severe congenital aortic valve stenosis (CAS) in early infancy remains challenging. This single-center, retrospective study analyzed midterm outcomes of a hybrid balloon valvuloplasty procedure through the ascending aorta by way of median sternotomy, including cases with improved technique. Included were 45 consecutive infants (aged hybrid balloon valvuloplasty in a hybrid or ordinary operating room from October 2010 to March 2016. Patients were assessed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months and yearly thereafter. Hybrid balloon valvuloplasty was successful in all patients, with the last 8 treated in an ordinary operating room under only echocardiography guidance with a new sheath. Thirty-two patients were successfully rescued from low heart rate or left ventricular systolic dysfunction, or both, by cardiac massage under direct visualization; none required cardiopulmonary bypass. The degree of new aortic insufficiency was mild in 7 patients and changed from mild to moderate in 1 patient. Aortic valve pressure gradient decreased from 70.6 ± 17.5 mm Hg preoperatively to 15.2 ± 4.2 mm Hg immediately postoperatively (p valve pressure gradient remained low (19.1 ± 5.2 mm Hg). Left ventricular ejection fraction increased from 0.515 ± 0.134 (range, 0.21 to 0.70) preoperatively to 0.633 ± 0.035 (range, 0.58 to 0.75; p hybrid balloon valvuloplasty through the ascending aorta by way of a median sternotomy appears efficacious and safe up to midterm follow-up. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of aortic valve stenosis using a hybrid approach of Doppler echocardiography and inert gas rebreathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Karsten; Trinkmann, Frederik; Heggemann, Felix; Gruettner, Joachim; Schmid-Bindert, Gerald; Borggrefe, Martin; Haghi, Dariusch; Saur, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Doppler echocardiography is the method of choice for diagnosis and evaluation of aortic stenosis. However, there are well-known limitations to this method in difficult-to-image patients. Flow acceleration in the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) can lead to overestimation of stroke volume (SV) and poor acoustic windows may impede the exact measurement of the LVOT. The present study aimed to evaluate the use of inert gas rebreathing (IGR)-derived SV in this situation. We replaced Doppler-derived SV measurements in the continuity equation (method A) by SV determined by IGR (method B) and by thermodilution during right heart catheterization (method C) to calculate the aortic valve area (AVA) in 21 consecutive patients with moderate or severe aortic stenosis. Mean SV and AVA did not differ between methods at 72±21 ml and 0.71±0.2 cm(2) (method A) vs. 66±18 ml and 0.67±0.21 cm(2) (method B) vs. 64±15 ml and 0.67±0.21 cm(2) (method C), respectively (all p-values >0.05). The mean difference and limits of agreement for AVA were 0.04±0.23 cm(2) and -0.40 to 0.47 cm(2) between methods A and B, 0.05±0.14 cm(2) and -0.26 to 0.27 cm(2) between A and C, and -0.05±0.23 cm(2) and -0.45 to 0.35 cm(2) between B and C, respectively (all p-values >0.05). The presented approach is a reliable method for the calculation of AVA and can add a diagnostic option for the use in difficult-to-image patients. Whereas the use of thermodilution is limited due to its invasive nature, IGR allows the fast and non-invasive determination of cardiac function at low cost.

  1. Association of body mass index and visceral fat with aortic valve calcification and mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement: the obesity paradox in severe aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Mancio

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies showed that metabolic syndrome is associated with aortic valve calcification (AVC and poor outcomes in aortic stenosis (AS. However, if these associations change and how body fat impacts the prognosis of patients in late stage of the disease have been not yet explored. Aims To determine the association of body mass index (BMI and visceral fat with AVC and mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR. Methods This was a prospective cohort of 170 severe AS patients referred to TAVR. We quantified AVC mass score and fat depots including epicardial adipose tissue, intrathoracic fat, and abdominal visceral (VAF and subcutaneous fats by computed tomography. Fat depots were indexed to body surface area. All-cause and cardiovascular-related deaths after TAVR were recorded over a median follow-up of 1.2 years. Results Higher AVC mass was independently associated with low BMI and low VAF. All-cause mortality risk increased with the decrease of BMI and increment of VAF. A stratified analysis by obesity showed that in non-obese, VAF was inversely associated with mortality, whereas in obese, high VAF was associated with higher mortality (p value for interaction < 0.05. At long-term, hazard ratio [HR] with non-obese/low VAF was 2.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1–4.9; p = 0.021 and HR with obese/high VAF was 2.5 (95% CI 1.1–5.8; p = 0.031 compared with obese/low VAF patients. Conclusions In AS patients submitted to TAVR, BMI and VAF were inversely associated with AVC. Pre-intervention assessment of VAF by computed tomography may provide a better discrimination of mortality than BMI alone.

  2. Observed and predicted reduction of ischemic cardiovascular events in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, Ingar; Boman, Kurt; Brudi, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    In the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) trial, combined ezetimibe (10 mg) and simvastatin (40 mg) decreased low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels by 50% and ischemic cardiovascular event (ICE) risk by 22% compared to placebo. A larger decrease in ICE risk might have been...... with baseline aortic jet velocity (JV) data, baseline and 1-year low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B, and no ICEs during the first year were included in the analysis. Relations between on-treatment measurements of 1-year LCs and time-to-ICE occurrence...

  3. Outcomes of Patients at Estimated Low, Intermediate, and High Risk Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation for Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbash, Israel Moshe; Finkelstein, Ariel; Barsheshet, Alon; Segev, Amit; Steinvil, Arie; Assali, Abid; Ben Gal, Yanai; Vaknin Assa, Hana; Fefer, Paul; Sagie, Alex; Guetta, Victor; Kornowski, Ran

    2015-12-15

    Intermediate- or low-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis were excluded from earlier transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) clinical trials; however, they are already being treated by TAVI despite a lack of data regarding the safety and efficacy in these patients. We aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of TAVI in patients at intermediate or low risk. Patients undergoing TAVI during 2008 to 2014 were included into a shared database (n = 1,327). Procedural outcomes were adjudicated according to Valve Academic Research Consortium 2 definitions. Patients were stratified according to their Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) score into 3 groups: high (STS ≥8, n = 223, 17%), intermediate (STS 4 to 8; n = 496, 38%), or low risk (STS <4; n = 576, 45%). Low-risk patients were significantly younger and more likely to be men compared to intermediate- and high-risk patients. Baseline characteristics differed significantly between the groups with a gradual increase in the rates of previous bypass surgery, stroke, peripheral vascular disease, renal failure, lung disease, and frailty scores, from low to high risk groups. Compared with intermediate- and high-risk patients, low-risk patients were more likely to undergo TAVI through the transfemoral route (81% vs 88% vs 95%, p <0.001) and under conscious sedation (69% vs 72% vs 81%, <0.001). There were no significant differences in the rates of procedural complications apart from acute kidney injury (19% vs 17% vs 13%, p = 0.03) and stroke rates (4.5% vs 2% vs 2.3%, p = 0.1). Short- and long-term mortality rates were significantly higher for intermediate- (hazard ratio [HR] 1.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2 to 2.9) and high-risk patients (HR 4.1, 95% CI 2.7 to 6.4) than low-risk patients also after multivariate adjustment (HR 1.6, 95% CI 1 to 2.6 and HR 2.7, 95% CI 1.7 to 4.5, respectively; all p <0.05). In conclusion, TAVI for intermediate- and low-risk patients is safe and associated with improved outcome

  4. Modificação técnica na cirurgia da estenose aórtica supravalvar Technical modifications in the surgery of supravalvar aortic stenosis

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    Magaly Arrais dos Santos

    1996-12-01

    íodo pós-operatório de 3 meses a 4 anos e 5 meses, não houve óbito; todos os pacientes estão assintomáticos, evoluindo satisfatoriamente, sem gradiente entre a cavidade livre do ventrículo esquerdo e aorta ascendente, conforme ecocardiograma, Doppler, ressonância nuclear magnética e estudo hemodinâmico. Estes resultados nos permitem concluir ser esta técnica adequada para a correção cirúrgica da estenose supravalvar aórtica localizada, por não utilizar enxertos artificiais e realizar a sutura da aorta em uma linha sinusoidal, evitando, assim, reestenose.A technical modification in the surgery of supravalvar aortic stenosis has been developed since October 1991 to December 1995, without using artificial grafts, but only healthy tissue of the ascending aorta thus permitting a suitable enlargement of the aortic root. The aim of this technique is to avoid complications of re-estenosis of aortic root in the late evolution of patientes submitted to surgical treatment of localized supravalvar aortic stenosis which was provoked by calcification and hardening of prosthetic material used for the enlargement of one or more Valsalva sinuses, with or whitout transversal section of the aorta. Ten patients underwent a surgery in this meantime, with clinical and hemodynamic diagnosis of localized supravalvar aortic stenosis. Their ages varied from 11 months to 38 years (mean = 13.2 years, the weight varied from 7.500 kg to 56 kg (mean = 29.1 kg, and the height varied from 72 cm to 1.68 m (mean = 1.5 m. Six of these patients were male. Three of them were asymptomatic; 4 had dyspnea, 2 were tired at efforts, 2 had palpitations, 1 had paresthesia in the lower limbs, and 1 cyanosis at crying; 6 of them bore Williams syndrome. The systolic gradient between free cavity of left ventricle and aorta varied from 50 to 100 mmHg (mean = 73.5.The patients were operated on with extracorporeal circulation, moderate hypothermia, crystalloid cardioplegia in the 7 first cases and bloody

  5. Moderate Aortic Valvular Insufficiency Invalidates Vortex Formation Time as an Index of Left Ventricular Filling Efficiency in Patients With Severe Degenerative Calcific Aortic Stenosis Undergoing Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagel, Paul S; Boettcher, Brent T; De Vry, Derek J; Freed, Julie K; Iqbal, Zafar

    2016-10-01

    Transmitral blood flow produces a vortex ring (quantified using vortex formation time [VFT]) that enhances the efficiency of left ventricular (LV) filling. VFT is attenuated in LV hypertrophy resulting from aortic valve stenosis (AS) versus normal LV geometry. Many patients with AS also have aortic insufficiency (AI). The authors tested the hypothesis that moderate AI falsely elevates VFT by partially inhibiting mitral leaflet opening in patients with AS. Observational study. Veterans Affairs medical center. Patients with AS in the presence or absence of moderate AI (n = 8 per group) undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR) were studied after institutional review board approval. None. Under general anesthesia, peak early LV filling (E) and atrial systole (A) blood flow velocities and their corresponding velocity-time integrals were obtained using pulse-wave Doppler transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) to determine E/A and atrial filling fraction (beta). Mitral valve diameter (D) was calculated as the average of major and minor axis lengths obtained in the midesophageal bicommissural (transcommissural anterior-lateral-posterior medial) and LV long-axis (anterior-posterior) TEE imaging planes, respectively. VFT was calculated as 4·(1-beta)·SV/πD(3), where SV = stroke volume measured using thermodilution. Hemodynamics, diastolic function, and VFT were determined during steady-state conditions before cardiopulmonary bypass. The severity of AS (mean and peak pressure gradients, peak transvalvular jet velocity, aortic valve area) and diastolic function (E/A, beta) were similar between groups. Moderate centrally directed AI was present in 8 patients with AS (ratio of regurgitant jet width to LV outflow tract diameter of 36±6%). Pulse pressure and mean pulmonary artery pressure were elevated in patients with versus without AI, but no other differences in hemodynamics were observed. Mitral valve minor and major axis lengths, diameter, and area were reduced in the

  6. Surgical Treatment of 13-year-old Patient with Coronary Artery Disease and Supravalvular Aortic Stenosis with Familial Hypercholesterolemia

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    Yüksel Atay

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Familial hypercholesterolemia is a genetic disorder caused by a mutation in low density lipoprotein (LDL gene. The homozygous type of the disease is rare and causes tendon xanthomas and coronary artery disease during the early years of life. Because of that, some of these patients needs early coronary revascularization. We presented 13-year-old patient who underwent coronary artery bypass graft due to familial hypercholesterolemia and repair of supravalvular aortic stenosis at the same time.

  7. Surgical Valvotomy Versus Balloon Valvuloplasty for Congenital Aortic Valve Stenosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Garick D; Ginde, Salil; Rios, Rodrigo; Frommelt, Peter C; Hill, Kevin D

    2016-08-08

    Optimal initial treatment for congenital aortic valve stenosis in children remains unclear between balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) and surgical aortic valvotomy (SAV). We performed a contemporary systematic review and meta-analysis to compare survival in children with congenital aortic valve stenosis. Secondary outcomes included frequency of at least moderate regurgitation at hospital discharge as well as rates of aortic valve replacement and reintervention. Single- and dual-arm studies were identified by a search of PubMed (Medline), Embase, and the Cochrane database. Overall 2368 patients from 20 studies were included in the analysis, including 1835 (77%) in the BAV group and 533 (23%) in the SAV group. There was no difference between SAV and BAV in hospital mortality (OR=0.98, 95% CI 0.5-2.0, P=0.27, I(2)=22%) or frequency of at least moderate aortic regurgitation at discharge (OR=0.58, 95% CI 0.3-1.3, P=0.09, I(2)=54%). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed no difference in long-term survival or freedom from aortic valve replacement but significantly more reintervention in the BAV group (10-year freedom from reintervention of 46% [95% CI 40-52] for BAV versus 73% [95% CI 68-77] for SAV, P<0.001). Results were unchanged in a sensitivity analysis restricted to infants (<1 year of age). Although higher rates of reintervention suggest improved outcomes with SAV, indications for reintervention may vary depending on initial intervention. When considering the benefits of a less-invasive approach, and clinical equipoise with respect to more clinically relevant outcomes, these findings support the need for a randomized controlled trial. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  8. Abnormal two-dimensional strain echocardiography findings in children with congenital valvar aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, K A; de Korte, C L; Feuth, T; Thijssen, J M; Kapusta, L

    2012-12-01

    Congenital valvar aortic stenosis (VAS) causes a pressure overload to the left ventricle. In the clinical setting, the severity of stenosis is graded by the pressure drop over the stenotic valve (pressure gradient). This parameter is dependent on the hemodynamic status and does not provide information regarding myocardial performance. This study was undertaken to reveal the potential of two-dimensional strain echocardiography (2DSTE) for the detection of myocardial functional changes due to congenital VAS in children. A total of 86 patients (aged from birth to 18 years) with various degrees of isolated congenital VAS were enrolled in this study. None of the patients had undergone any form of surgical or balloon intervention. 139 healthy children served as a control group. Two-dimensional cine-loop recordings of apical 4-chamber, mid-cavity short-axis and basal short-axis views were digitally stored for off-line analysis. Longitudinal, circumferential and radial peak systolic strain and strain rate values were determined as well as the time to peak systolic strain (T2P). Two-way analysis of variance was performed to assess the relationship between VAS severity and 2DSTE parameters. In all patients conventional echocardiographic findings did not indicate systolic left ventricular dysfunction. All strain parameters of the control group were significantly different from those of VAS patients. There was a statistically significant, inverse relationship between global peak systolic strain parameters in all three directions and the degree of VAS (p children diagnosed with congenital VAS, whose conventional echocardiographic findings did not indicate ventricular systolic dysfunction. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Gender difference in ventricular response to aortic stenosis: insight from cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo Myung Lee

    Full Text Available Although left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH and remodeling is associated with cardiac mortality and morbidity, little is known about the impact of gender on the ventricular response in aortic stenosis (AS patients. This study aimed to analyze the differential effect of gender on ventricular remodeling in moderate to severe AS patients.A total of 118 consecutive patients (67±9 years; 63 males with moderate or severe AS (severe 81.4% underwent transthoracic echocardiography and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR within a 1-month period in this two-center prospective registry. The pattern of LV remodeling was assessed using the LV mass index (LVMI and LV remodeling index (LVRI; LV mass/LV end-diastolic volume by CMR. Although there were no differences in AS severity parameters nor baseline characteristics between genders, males showed a significantly higher LVMI (102.6±29.1 g/m2 vs. 86.1±29.2 g/m2, p=0.003 and LVRI (1.1±0.2 vs. 1.0±0.3, p=0.018, regardless of AS severity. The LVMI was significantly associated with aortic valve area (AVA index and valvuloarterial impedance in females, whereas it was not in males, resulting in significant interaction between genders (PInteraction=0.007/0.014 for AVA index/valvuloarterial impedance, respectively. Similarly, the LVRI also showed a significantly different association between male and female subjects with the change in AS severity parameters (PInteraction=0.033/<0.001/0.029 for AVA index/transaortic mean pressure gradient/valvuloarterial impedance, respectively.Males are associated with greater degree of LVH and higher LVRI compared to females at moderate to severe AS. However, females showed a more exaggerated LV remodeling response, with increased severity of AS and hemodynamic loads, than males.

  10. Gait Speed and Dependence in Activities of Daily Living in Older Adults With Severe Aortic Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Philip; Woglom, Abigail E.; Genereux, Philippe; Maurer, Mathew S.; Kirtane, Ajay J.; Hawkey, Marian; Schnell, Susan; Sohn, Jeanie; Moses, Jeffrey W.; Leon, Martin B.; Smith, Craig R.; Williams, Mathew; Kodali, Susheel

    2013-01-01

    Background In the transcatheter aortic valve replacement era, characterization of functional status in older adults with aortic stenosis (AS) is essential. Gait speed (GS) is emerging as a marker of frailty and predictor of outcomes in older adults undergoing cardiovascular intervention. The objective of this study was to delineate the prevalence of slow GS, evaluate the association of GS with factors used in standard cardiovascular assessments, and evaluate the association of GS with dependence in activities of daily living (ADLs) in older adults with AS. Hypothesis We hypothesized that gait speed would not be associated with clinical factors, but would be associated with ADLs. Methods We evaluated GS, ADLs dependence, and Society of Thoracic Surgery score along with clinical and functional assessments in 102 older adults with AS being evaluated for transcatheter valve. Gait speed <0.5 m/s was considered slow, and GS ≥0.5 m/s was considered preserved. We assessed the association of covariates with GS as well as with ADLs dependence. Results Median GS was 0.37 m/s (interquartile range, 0.0–0.65 m/s). Sixty-four (63%) subjects had slow GS. Of commonly employed clinical covariates, only prior coronary intervention and serum albumin were weakly associated with GS. However, GS was independently associated with ADLs dependence (Odds ratio: 1.52 [1.21–1.91] for every 0.1 m/s decrease in GS; P = 0.0003). Conclusions Although the prevalence of slow GS in a population of elderly patients with severe AS being screened for transcatheter valve was high, there were only weak associations between GS and other risk stratifying tools. The strong association between GS and dependent functional status suggests that assessment of gait speed is a useful, objectively measurable, risk stratification tool in this population. PMID:22331630

  11. [Prognostic value of aortic stenosis in patients after acute coronary syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumakova, O S; Selezneva, N D; Evdokimova, M A; Osmolovskaia, B S; Kochkina, M S; Aseĭcheva, O Iu; Minushkina, L O; Baklanova, T N; Talyzin, P A; Tereshchenko, S N; Dzhaiani, N A; Akatova, E V; Glezer, M G; Galiavich, A S; Zakirova, V B; Koziolova, N A; Polianskaia, E A; Iagoda, A V; Boeva, O I; Khorolets, E V; Shlyk, S V; Volkova, E G; Rodicheva, O A; Levashov, S Iu; Konstantinov, V O; Kalishevich, N B; Zateĭshchikov, D A

    2011-01-01

    With the aim to assess prevalence of aortic stenosis (AS) and prognostic value of its detection among survivors of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) we examined 851 patients included into multicenter prospective study of risk factors of serious vascular events and death after acute coronary syndrome. The patients were enrolled into the study in stable condition on 10th day after onset of myocardial infarction (MI) or unstable angina (UA). Examination involved medical history, laboratory tests and echocardiography. Afterwards all cases of death and serious vascular events were registered. Severity of AS was specified by maximal aortic flow rate: 1st degree > 2.5, 2nd degree 3.0-4.0, 3rd degree > 4.0 m/s. AS was detected in 16 patients (1.9%). AS severity was 1st, 2nd and 3rd degree in 9, 4 and 3 patients, respectively. Patients with AS were significantly older (77.4 vs. 61.3 years, p p = 0.021) and lowered renal function (66.7 vs. 34.0%, p 75 years (OR 1,395 [1.023-1.902], p = 0.036), history of CHF (1.319 [1.015-1.713], p = 0.038), history of MI (1.692 [1.320-2.170], p p = 0.012), left atrial diameter (1.024 [1.001-1.047], p = 0.037) and presence of AS (3.211 [1.742-.,916], p < 0.001). Prevalence of preexisting AS among patients who have had MI/UA is 1.9% what is similar to data of European Heart Survey ACS-II (1.8%). Presence of AS of any severity in a survivor of ACS worsens prognosis independently of other known risk factors.

  12. Relationship between N-terminal pro-B type natriuretic peptide and extensive echocardiographic parameters in mild to moderate aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemri M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The N-terminal pro-B type natriuretic peptide levels (NT pro-BNP are increased in cases of volume or pressure overload. Aims: To examine NT pro-BNP levels and enclose whether any relationship is present between the levels of NT pro-BNP and extensive echocardiographic parameters in asymptomatic patients with mild to moderate aortic stenosis (AS. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study about the NT pro-BNP levels was conducted in 37 asymptomatic AS patients and compared with 40 controls. Methods: Patients < 70 years old with mild to moderate AS with a peak transaortic gradient> 20 mm Hg in transthoracic echocardiogram were included in our study. Extensive echocardiographic parameters and NT pro-BNP levels were obtained from these patients and these indices were compared with the control population selected from the patients who had similar clinical characteristics with the AS patients. Statistical Analysis: NT-proBNP values were found to be distribution free. Spearman correlation coefficient was used for correlation analysis. Mean values were compared by the Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: The NT pro-BNP levels were increased in patients with AS (median; interquartiles range: 686 [449-855] pg/mL vs. 140 [116-150] pg/mL, P < 0.001. Among patients with AS, when correlation analysis was performed mean transaortic gradient, aortic valve area index, myocardial performance index, E m /A m ratio, left-ventricular mass index (LVMI and E/E m ratio had correlations (r=0.38, P = 0.026; r=-0.46, P =0.008; r=0.19, P =0,049; r=-0.22, P =0.04, r=0.49, P =0.003 and r=0.53, P < 0.001 respectively with plasma NT pro-BNP levels. The LVMI (r = 0.49, P = 0.003 and E/E m ratio (r = 0.53 P < 0.001 have the strongest correlations when compared to other parameters. Conclusion: Plasma NT pro-BNP levels are increased in even asymptomatic patients with AS and correlated with several echocardiographic parameters related to severity of AS and degree of diastolic

  13. Supravalvular aortic stenosis associated to infectious endocarditis and cerebral vascular disease in a patient with Williams-Beuren Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rubens Figueroa, Jesús; Marhx, Alfonso; López Terrazas, Javier; Palacios Macedo, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    The Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare genetic disease characterized by: (a) typical facial features; (b) psychomotor retardation with a specific neurocognitive profile; (c) cardiovascular condition and (d) likely transient hypocalcemia in infancy. The objective of this study was to describe the clinic evolution and diagnosis of patient with this syndrome that was associated with endocarditis caused by Streptococcus parasanguis in the ascending aorta and an aneurism located in the fronto-temporal area, which produced a parenchymal hematoma in the left lobe, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. He was treated with ceftriaxone and dicloxacillin. Then we proceeded to correct the aneurysm and perform vegetation resection in aortic arteries with supravalvular aortic stenosis correction. The evolution after one year has been favorable and is currently without neurologic sequelae. A 5-year-old male patient presented a diagnosis of supravalvular aortic stenosis. After cardiac catheterization was performed, he presented a fever and right side paresis. The echocardiogram showed multiple vegetations in the ascendant aortic arch and the supraortic arteries. The blood cultures reported S. parasanguis. The magnetic resonance showed a subarachnoid hemorrhage with an aneurysm and a hematoma. Copyright © 2014 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  14. An unexpected evolution of symptomatic mild middle cerebral artery (MCA stenosis: asymptomatic occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malferrari Giovanni

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intracranial localization of large artery disease is recognized as the main cause of ischemic stroke in the world, considering all countries, although its global burden is widely underestimated. Indeed it has been reported more frequently in Asians and African-American people, but the finding of intracranial stenosis as a cause of ischemic stroke is relatively common also in Caucasians. The prognosis of patients with stroke due to intracranial steno-occlusion is strictly dependent on the time of recanalization. Moreover, the course of the vessel involvement is highly dynamic in both directions, improvement or worsening, although several data are derived from the atherosclerotic subtype, compared to other causes. Case description We report the clinical, neurosonological and neuroradiological findings of a young woman, who came to our Stroke Unit because of the abrupt onset of aphasia during her work. An urgent neurosonological examination showed a left M1 MCA stenosis, congruent with the presenting symptoms; magnetic resonance imaging confirmed this finding and identified an acute ischemic lesion on the left MCA territory. The past history of the patient was significant only for a hyperinsulinemic condition, treated with metformine, and a mild overweight. At this time a selective cerebral angiography was not performed because of the patient refusal and she was discharged on antiplatelet and lipid-lowering therapy, having failed to identify autoimmune or inflammatory diseases. Within 1 month, she went back to our attention because of the recurrence of aphasia, lasting about ten minutes. Neuroimaging findings were unchanged, but the patient accepted to undergo a selective cerebral angiography, which showed a mild left distal M1 MCA stenosis. During the follow-up the patient did not experienced any recurrence, but a routine neurosonological examination found an unexpected evolution of the known MCA stenosis, i.e. left M1 MCA

  15. Percutaneous balloon aortic valvuloplasty in different age groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojnarska, Olga; Grygier, Marek; Lesiak, Maciej; Grajek, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Aortic stenosis is a congenital or acquired reduction in the area of the aortic valve, resulting in obstruction of the blood flow from the left ventricle to the aorta. Aortic stenosis accounts for 2-5% of all congenital heart defects and is a potentially life-threatening disorder. In adults aortic stenosis represents 34% of all valvular heart diseases. Degenerative etiology is present in 80% of cases. Patients with mild aortic stenosis are usually asymptomatic. Symptoms of the disease occur along with the disappearance of effective compensatory mechanisms. These are symptoms of low cardiac output syndrome manifested as fainting, dizziness, ischemic pains, exercise intolerance, arrhythmias with the risk of sudden cardiac death, and heart failure. As soon as the symptoms occur the prognosis significantly worsens, which is associated with a high risk of death. Percutaneous aortic valvuloplasty is a palliative method of treatment of aortic stenosis. The aim of the procedure is to relieve left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, thereby improving cardiac output. The etiology, course of the aortic stenosis and treatment methods, including invasive procedures, vary depending on the patients’ age. The purpose of this paper is to present the characteristics of the aortic valve disease and the strategy of aortic balloon valvuloplasty in different age groups. PMID:24570692

  16. Molecular genetic analysis of individuals with Williams syndrome and supravalvar aortic stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smoot, L.B.; Lacro, R.V.; Kunkel, L.M. [Children`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Pober, B. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Mutations at the elastin locus (chromosome 7q11.23) have been demonstrated in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) and familial supravalvar aortic stenosis (SVAS). Relationships between elastin mutations and vascular and/or neurodevelopmental pathology have yet to be defined. In determining phenotype-genotype correlations in WS/SVAS, we examined 35 individuals with sporadic WS, families with SVAS affecting multiple members, and sporadic cases of isolated obstructive vascular disease. Full length elastin cDNA was used to probe a human genomic library from which multiple elastin genomic clones have been isolated and ordered relative to the elastin gene, covering a minimum of 35 kb. (Additional genomic clones are being obtained by {open_quote}walking{close_quote} 5{prime} and 3{prime} to elastin.) Elastin genomic clones were used as probes in fluorescent in situ hybridization of metaphase chromosomes from WS/SVAS patients. Preliminary analysis confirms elastin deletions in WS patients, but have not yet been demonstrated in patients with isolated vascular disease using this technique. Results of deletional analysis in individuals representing a wide spectrum of phenotypes will be presented.

  17. Valve replacement for aortic stenosis normalizes subendocardial function in patients with normal ejection fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindqvist, Per; Bajraktari, Gani; Molle, Roberta; Palmerini, Elizabetta; Holmgren, Anders; Mondillo, Sergio; Henein, Michael Y

    2010-08-01

    Long-standing aortic stenosis (AS) causes various degrees of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, which may improve after valve replacement. The aim of this study was to assess the nature of LV subendocardial abnormalities in AS and their response to valve replacement (AVR). We studied 41 consecutive symptomatic patients (age 64 +/- 13 years) with severe AS, normal LV ejection fraction (EF), but no obstructive coronary artery disease before, a week after AVR, and 6 months after AVR. LV subendocardial function was studied from recordings of long-axis M-mode (amplitude), tissue-Doppler (myocardial velocities) and speckle tracking (myocardial strain) echocardiographic techniques. Results were compared with those from 20 age- and gender-matched controls. In patients, LV dimensions and markers of asynchrony, total isovolumic time (t-IVT), and Tei index were not different from controls before AVR and remained unchanged afterwards. LV lateral long-axis amplitude, as well as lateral and septal systolic velocities and strain, were reduced (P subendocardial function is globally abnormal showing reduced amplitude of motion, velocities, and strain. The different response of its components suggests an evidence for differential reverse remodelling, irrespective of myocardial mass regression.

  18. Outcomes of inoperable symptomatic aortic stenosis patients not undergoing aortic valve replacement: insight into the impact of balloon aortic valvuloplasty from the PARTNER trial (Placement of AoRtic TraNscathetER Valve trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapadia, Samir; Stewart, William J; Anderson, William N; Babaliaros, Vasilis; Feldman, Ted; Cohen, David J; Douglas, Pamela S; Makkar, Raj R; Svensson, Lars G; Webb, John G; Wong, S Chiu; Brown, David L; Miller, D Craig; Moses, Jeffrey W; Smith, Craig R; Leon, Martin B; Tuzcu, E Murat

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this report is to characterize the impact of balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) in patients not undergoing aortic valve replacement in the PARTNER (Placement of AoRtic TraNscathetER Valves) trial. The PARTNER trial is the only randomized trial with independently adjudicated data of inoperable severe symptomatic aortic stenosis patients, allowing outcome analysis of unoperated-on patients. The design and initial results of the PARTNER trial (Cohort B) were reported previously. After excluding patients with pre-randomization BAV, we compared patients undergoing BAV within 30 days of randomization (BAV group) with those not having BAV within 30 days of randomization (no BAV group) to characterize the use and impact of BAV. In the PARTNER Cohort B study, 179 inoperable patients were randomized to standard treatment including 39 patients (21.8%) who had undergone a BAV before randomization (previous BAV group). Of the 140 patients who did not have BAV before enrollment in the study, 102 patients (73%) had BAV within 30 days of study randomization (BAV group). Survival at 3 months was greater in the BAV group compared with the no BAV group (88.2%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 82.0% to 94.5% vs. 73.0%; 95% CI: 58.8% to 87.4%). However, survival was similar at 6-month follow-up (74.5%; 95% CI: 66.1% to 83.0% vs. 73.1%; 58.8% to 87.4%). There was improvement in quality of life parameters when paired comparisons were made between baseline and 30 days and 6 months between the BAV and no BAV groups, but this effect was lost at 12-month follow-up. BAV improves functional status and survival in the short term, but these benefits are not sustained. BAV for aortic stenosis patients who cannot undergo aortic valve replacement is a useful palliative therapy. (THE PARTNER TRIAL: Placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER Valve Trial; NCT00530894). Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Successful resuscitation from two cardiac arrests in a female patient with critical aortic stenosis, severe mitral regurgitation and coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijušković Dragan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The incidence of sudden cardiac death in patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis is up to 34% and resuscitation is described as highly unsuccessful. Case report. A 72-year-old female patient with severe aortic stenosis combined with severe mitral regurgitation and three-vessel coronary artery disease was successfully resuscitated following two in-hospital cardiac arrests. The first cardiac arrest occurred immediately after intraarterial injection of low osmolar iodinated agent during coronary angiography. Angiography revealed 90% occlusion of the proximal left main coronary artery and circumflex branch. The second arrest followed induction of anesthesia. Following successful open-chest resuscitation, aortic valve replacement, mitral valvuloplasty and three-vessel aortocoronary bypass were performed. Postoperative pericardial tamponade required surgical revision. The patient recovered completely. Conclusion. Decision to start resuscitation may be justified in selected patients with critical aortic stenosis, even though cardiopulmonary resuscitation in such cases is generally considered futile.

  20. Primary Mitral Valve Regurgitation Outcome in Patients With Severe Aortic Stenosis 1 Year After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation: Echocardiographic Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florentino, Thiago Marinho; Bihan, David Le; Abizaid, Alexandre Antonio Cunha; Cedro, Alexandre Vianna; Corrêa, Amably Pessoa; Santos, Alexandre Roginski Mendes Dos; Souza, Alexandre Costa; Bignoto, Tiago Costa; Sousa, José Eduardo Moraes Rego; Sousa, Amanda Guerra de Moraes Rego

    2017-07-10

    Mitral valve regurgitation (MR), present in up to 74% of the patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS), can be a negative prognostic factor when moderate or severe. The outcome of MR after percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and predictors associated with that outcome have not been well established in the literature. To assess the outcome of primary MR in patients submitted to TAVI and to identify associated factors. Observational study of patients with symptomatic severe AS submitted to TAVI from January 2009 to April 2015 at two specialized centers. Echocardiographic outcome was assessed with data collected before and 1 year after TAVI. Of the 91 patients with MR submitted to TAVI and followed up for at least 12 months, 67 (73.6%) had minimum/mild MR before the procedure and 24 (26.4%) had moderate/severe MR. Of those with minimum/mild MR, 62 (92.5%) had no change in the MR grade (p literatura. Avaliar a evolução da IM primária em pacientes submetidos ao TAVI e identificar fatores associados a essa evolução. Realizou-se um estudo observacional em pacientes com EA grave sintomática, submetidos ao TAVI no período de janeiro de 2009 a abril de 2015 em dois centros especializados. Foram avaliados desfechos ecocardiográficos com dados antes e 1 ano após a intervenção. Dos 91 pacientes com IM que realizaram TAVI e tinham acompanhamento de pelo menos 12 meses, 67 (73,6%) apresentavam IM mínima ou discreta antes da realização do procedimento e 24 (26,4%), IM moderada ou grave. Entre os com IM mínima ou discreta, 62 (92,5%) não apresentaram mudança no grau de refluxo (p < 0,001) e 5 (7,5%) tiveram piora. Entre os com IM moderada ou grave, 8 (33,3%) permaneceram na mesma classe e 16 (66,7%) tiveram melhora (p = 0,076). Pacientes com IM moderada ou grave que melhoraram o grau de insuficiência apresentavam menores valores de EuroSCORE II (p = 0,023) e STS morbidade (p = 0,027), quando comparados aos que continuaram na mesma classe

  1. Surgical repair of supravalvular aortic stenosis in children with williams syndrome: a 30-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Tyson A; d'Udekem, Yves; Brizard, Christian P; Wheaton, Gavin; Weintraub, Robert G; Konstantinov, Igor E

    2015-04-01

    Williams syndrome is an uncommon genetic disorder associated with supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) in childhood. We reviewed outcomes of children with Williams syndrome who underwent repair of SVAS during a 30-year period at a single institution. Between 1982 and 2012, 28 patients with Williams syndrome were operated on for SVAS. Mean age at operation was 5.2 years (range, 3 months to 13 years), and mean weight at operation was 18.6 kg (range, 4.1 to 72.4 kg). Associated cardiac lesions in 11 patients (39.3%) were repaired at the time of the SVAS repair. The most common associated cardiac lesion was main pulmonary artery stenosis (8 of 28 [28%]). A 3-patch repair was performed in 10 patients, a Doty repair in 17, and a McGoon repair in 1 (3.6%). There were no early deaths. Follow-up was 96% complete (27 of 28). Overall mean follow-up was 11.2 years (range, 1 month to 27.3 years). Mean follow-up was 5 years (range, 1 month to 14.3 years) for the 3-patch repair patients and 14.7 years (range, 6 weeks to 27 years) for the Doty repair patients. Of the 17 Doty patients, there were 4 (24%) late deaths, occurring at 6 weeks, 3.5 years, 4 years, and 16 years after the initial operation. There were no late deaths in the 3-patch repair patients. Overall survival was 86% at 5, 10, and 15 years after repair. Survival was 82% at 5, 10 and 15 years for the Doty repair patients. Overall, 6 of 27 patients (22%) patients required late reoperation at a mean of 11.2 years (range, 3.6 to 23 years). No 3-patch repair patients required reoperation. Overall freedom from reoperation was 91% at 5 years and 73% at 10 and 15 years. Freedom from reoperation for the Doty repair patients was 93% at 5 years and 71% at 10 and 15 years. Surgical repair of SVAS in children Williams syndrome has excellent early results. However, significant late mortality and morbidity warrants close follow-up. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  2. High-risk patients with inoperative aortic stenosis: use of transapical, transaortic, and transcarotid techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thourani, Vinod H; Li, Chun; Devireddy, Chandan; Jensen, Hanna A; Kilgo, Patrick; Leshnower, Bradley G; Mavromatis, Kreton; Sarin, Eric L; Nguyen, Tom C; Kanitkar, Mihir; Guyton, Robert A; Block, Peter C; Maas, Amanda L; Simone, Amy; Keegan, Patricia; Merlino, John; Stewart, James P; Lerakis, Stamatios; Babaliaros, Vasilis

    2015-03-01

    Patient characteristics and procedural outcomes from nontransfemoral (non-TF) transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in high-risk or inoperable patients with aortic stenosis have been incompletely reported. The purpose of this study was to compare outcomes with non-TF TAVR access techniques including transapical (TA), transaortic (TAo), and transcarotid (TC) TAVR with a balloon-expandable valve. A retrospective review was performed of all patients undergoing TA, TAo, and TC TAVR from 2007 to 2013 at Emory University. Preoperative risk factors and postoperative outcomes were evaluated using Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 definitions. Of 469 patients undergoing TAVR during that period at our institution, 139 underwent TA TAVR, 35 had Tao TAVR, and 11 had TC TAVR. Patients undergoing TC TAVR were younger than those undergoing TA TAVR and TAo TAVR (mean ages: TC, 68.9 ± 23.6 years; TA, 81.3 ± 7.7 years; Tao, 83.8 ± 8.3 years; p = 0.017). Most patients undergoing TAo TAVR were women (82.9%), whereas patients undergoing TA TAVR were more likely to be men (62.6%). Slightly more than half of patients undergoing TA TAVR (54.7%) and TC (54.6%) TAVR had undergone previous coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), whereas no patients underwent TAo TAVR (0%). There was no preoperative difference in ejection fraction, New York Heart Association classification, significant chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and The Society of Thoracic Surgeons predicted risk of mortality between TA TAVR, Tao TAVR, and TC TAVR, respectively. Average postoperative length of stay was 9 to 11 days and was similar among groups (p = 0.22). There were 13 (9.4%) TA TAVR operative deaths and 4 (11.4%) operative deaths in the TAo TAVR group. There were no deaths in the TC TAVR group. In high-risk and inoperable patients who are not candidates for TF TAVR, careful selection of alternative access options can lead to excellent and comparable postoperative outcomes. Copyright © 2015 The

  3. Tissue Velocities and Myocardial Deformation in Asymptomatic and Symptomatic Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Helle Gervig; Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Hassager, Christian

    2015-01-01

    = 59). RESULTS: Among all global (peak systolic s', diastolic e' and a', longitudinal displacement, and global longitudinal strain and strain rate) and regional longitudinal (basal, middle, and apical longitudinal strain and strain rate) parameters, only diastolic e', longitudinal displacement...... with the aforementioned parameters, including e', longitudinal displacement, and BLS, only BLS remained significantly associated with symptomatic status in the entire study population (BLS per one-unit decrease: odds ratio, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.04-1.46; P = .017). Furthermore, patients with BLS

  4. ANMCO/SIC/SICI-GISE/SICCH Executive Summary of Consensus Document on Risk Stratification in elderly patients with aortic stenosis before surgery or transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulignano, Giovanni; Gulizia, Michele Massimo; Baldasseroni, Samuele; Bedogni, Francesco; Cioffi, Giovanni; Indolfi, Ciro; Romeo, Francesco; Murrone, Adriano; Musumeci, Francesco; Parolari, Alessandro; Patanè, Leonardo; Pino, Paolo Giuseppe; Mongiardo, Annalisa; Spaccarotella, Carmen; Di Bartolomeo, Roberto; Musumeci, Giuseppe

    2017-05-01

    Aortic stenosis is one of the most frequent valvular diseases in developed countries, and its impact on public health resources and assistance is increasing. A substantial proportion of elderly people with severe aortic stenosis is not eligible to surgery because of the advanced age, frailty, and multiple co-morbidities. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) enables the treatment of very elderly patients at high or prohibitive surgical risk considered ineligible for surgery and with an acceptable life expectancy. However, a significant percentage of patients die or show no improvement in quality of life (QOL) in the follow-up. In the decision-making process, it is important to determine: (i) whether and how much frailty of the patient influences the risk of procedures; (ii) how the QOL and the individual patient's survival are influenced by aortic valve disease or from other associated conditions; and (iii) whether a geriatric specialist intervention to evaluate and correct frailty or other diseases with their potential or already manifest disabilities can improve the outcome of surgery or TAVI. Consequently, in addition to risk stratification with conventional tools, a number of factors including multi-morbidity, disability, frailty, and cognitive function should be considered, in order to assess the expected benefit of both surgery and TAVI. The pre-operative optimization through a multidisciplinary approach with a Heart Team can counteract the multiple damage (cardiac, neurological, muscular, respiratory, and kidney) that can potentially aggravate the reduced physiological reserves characteristic of frailty. The systematic application in clinical practice of multidimensional assessment instruments of frailty and cognitive function in the screening and the adoption of specific care pathways should facilitate this task.

  5. High- Versus Low-Gradient Severe Aortic Stenosis: Demographics, Clinical Outcomes, and Effects of the Initial Aortic Valve Replacement Strategy on Long-Term Prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Tomohiko; Morimoto, Takeshi; Shiomi, Hiroki; Ando, Kenji; Kanamori, Norio; Murata, Koichiro; Kitai, Takeshi; Kawase, Yuichi; Izumi, Chisato; Miyake, Makoto; Mitsuoka, Hirokazu; Kato, Masashi; Hirano, Yutaka; Matsuda, Shintaro; Inada, Tsukasa; Nagao, Kazuya; Murakami, Tomoyuki; Takeuchi, Yasuyo; Yamane, Keiichiro; Toyofuku, Mamoru; Ishii, Mitsuru; Minamino-Muta, Eri; Kato, Takao; Inoko, Moriaki; Ikeda, Tomoyuki; Komasa, Akihiro; Ishii, Katsuhisa; Hotta, Kozo; Higashitani, Nobuya; Kato, Yoshihiro; Inuzuka, Yasutaka; Maeda, Chiyo; Jinnai, Toshikazu; Morikami, Yuko; Saito, Naritatsu; Minatoya, Kenji; Kimura, Takeshi

    2017-05-01

    There is considerable debate on the management of patients with low-gradient severe aortic stenosis (LG-AS), defined as aortic valve area strategy: n=977, and conservative strategy: n=1120) with high-gradient severe aortic stenosis (HG-AS) and 1712 patients (initial AVR strategy: n=219, and conservative strategy: n=1493) with LG-AS. AVR was more frequently performed in HG-AS patients than in LG-AS patients (60% versus 28%) during the entire follow-up. In the comparison between the initial AVR and conservative groups, the propensity score-matched cohorts were developed in both HG-AS (n=887 for each group) and LG-AS (n=218 for each group) strata. The initial AVR strategy when compared with the conservative strategy was associated with markedly lower risk for a composite of aortic valve-related death or heart failure hospitalization in both HG-AS and LG-AS strata (hazard ratio, 0.30; 95% confidence interval, 0.25-0.37; Pstrategy was associated with a better outcome than the conservative strategy (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.23-0.59; Pstrategy was associated with better outcomes than the conservative strategy in both HG-AS and LG-AS patients, although AVR was less frequently performed in LG-AS patients than in HG-AS patients. The favorable effect of initial AVR strategy was also seen in patients with LG-AS with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. URL: http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/index.htm. Unique identifier: UMIN000012140. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Cardiovascular Structure and Function in Children With Middle Aortic Syndrome and Renal Artery Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumman, Rawan K; Slorach, Cameron; Hui, Wei; Matsuda-Abedini, Mina; Langlois, Valerie; Radhakrishnan, Seetha; Lorenzo, Armando J; Amaral, Joao; Mertens, Luc; Parekh, Rulan S

    2017-12-01

    Middle aortic syndrome (MAS) is a narrowing of the abdominal aorta, often in conjunction with renal artery stenosis (RAS). Structure and function of the cardiovascular system are not well understood. In a prospective cross-sectional study, 35 children with MAS or RAS or both (MAS/RAS) were compared with 140 age-, sex-, and body surface area-matched healthy children. Vascular assessment included carotid intima-media thickness and carotid distensibility using B-mode ultrasound and central and peripheral pulse wave velocities using applanation tonometry. Left ventricular structure and function were assessed by 2-dimensional and speckle-tracking echocardiography. Children with MAS or RAS were 12.5±3.0 years old at enrollment, and 50% were men. Carotid intima-media thickness (0.54±0.10 versus 0.44±0.05 mm; Pchildren with disease compared with healthy children; however, after adjustment for systolic blood pressure z score, only carotid intima-media thickness remained significantly higher in the MAS/RAS group compared with the controls (β=0.07 [0.03, 0.10]). Peripheral pulse wave velocities and carotid distensibility were normal. Children with disease had significantly increased left ventricular mass and changes in diastolic function (lower E/a ratio and lower e' velocities). Systolic parameters, including ejection fraction, global longitudinal and circumferential strain, were similar to controls. Our findings demonstrate that children with MAS or RAS have evidence of carotid and left ventricular remodeling, without peripheral arterial involvement, which suggests a localized disease process. Left ventricular systolic function is preserved; however, subtle changes in diastolic function are observed. Carotid vessel changes are consistent with a 5- to 10-year aging, which underscores the importance of blood pressure control. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Assessment of 'on-treatment platelet reactivity' and relationship with cerebral micro-embolic signals in asymptomatic and symptomatic carotid stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, Justin A; Tobin, Oliver; Tierney, Sean; Feeley, Timothy M; Egan, Bridget; Coughlan, Tara; Ronan Collins, D; O'Neill, Desmond; Harbison, Joseph A; Doherty, Colin P; Madhavan, Prakash; Moore, Dermot J; O'Neill, Sean M; Colgan, Mary-Paula; Saqqur, Maher; Murphy, Raymond P; Moran, Niamh; Hamilton, George; McCabe, Dominick J H

    2017-05-15

    The relationship between on-treatment platelet reactivity and cerebral micro-embolic signals (MES) is unknown, and has not been previously simultaneously assessed in asymptomatic and symptomatic carotid stenosis patients. Consecutive eligible patients with ≥50% asymptomatic or recently symptomatic carotid stenosis (≤4weeks following TIA/ischaemic stroke) were recruited to this pilot study. Symptomatic patients were followed up to the 'late' phase (≥3months) following symptom onset or carotid intervention; longitudinal data were analysed from symptomatic patients with data available at both time-points. Platelet function/reactivity was assessed with the PFA-100® to measure collagen-ADP (C-ADP) and collagen-epinephrine (C-EPI) closure times in citrate-anticoagulated whole blood. Bilateral simultaneous 1-hour transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) monitoring of the middle cerebral arteries was performed to classify patients as MES +ve or MES -ve. 31 patients with ≥50% asymptomatic and 46 with early symptomatic carotid stenosis or occlusion were included. 35 symptomatic patients were followed up to the late phase (23 following carotid intervention). Prevalence of 'high on-treatment platelet reactivity' (HTPR) on the C-EPI cartridge did not differ between asymptomatic and symptomatic patients overall, but was lower in 'symptomatic post-intervention' than asymptomatic patients on aspirin monotherapy (10% vs. 50%; p=0.03). The prevalence of HTPR on the C-EPI cartridge decreased between the early and late phases in symptomatic patients (63% vs. 34%; p=0.017), including those on aspirin monotherapy (p=0.016). There were no significant differences in HTPR status between asymptomatic vs. early or late symptomatic MES +ve or MES -ve patients. Carotid interventional treatment, presumably in combination with resolution of the acute phase response, may decrease the prevalence of HTPR in patients with recently symptomatic carotid stenosis over time. Preliminary subgroup

  8. Observed and predicted reduction of ischemic cardiovascular events in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, Ingar; Boman, Kurt; Brudi, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    expected for the degree of lipid-lowering observed. This analysis investigated relations between changes in lipoprotein components (LCs), and ICE risk decrease in the SEAS trial in all patients, by severity of aortic stenosis (AS), and compared to results of other clinical trials. A total of 1,570 patients...... were assessed in all patients and in JV tertiles (3.3 m/s). Observed and predicted ICE risk decreases were compared by Cox model. Decreases in LCs after 1 year of ezetimibe plus simvastatin were associated with decreased ICE risk in all patients and in the 2 lower JV tertiles (p...

  9. PROSPECTS FOR CYTOPROTECTORS USE IN THE ELDERLY PATIENTS THROUGH THE EXAMPLE OF CALCIFIED AORTIC STENOSIS AND ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yu. Karpova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Issues of pathogenesis of the calcified aortic stenosis and ischemic heart disease in the elderly are considered. The relevance of early detection of angina, syncope, and dyspnea in view of their non-specific and subclinical course for early detection of heart disease is specified. Current scientific views on the myocardial bioenergy and its role in the genesis of chronic heart failure are presented. Particular attention is paid to the place of cytoprotectors, especially trimetazidine, in the management of patients with cardiac N.Yu. Karpova1diseases.

  10. Evaluation of aortic valve stenosis by cardiac multislice computed tomography compared with echocardiography: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdulla, Jawdat; Sivertsen, Jacob Christian; Kofoed, Klaus Fuglsang

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY: It has not yet been established whether multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) is reliable for the quantification of aortic valve area (AVA) in patients with aortic valve stenosis (AVS) and simultaneously for assessment of the coronary anatomy. The study aim, via...... a systematic literature review and meta-analysis, was to explore whether MSCT is a reliable method for AVA quantification, and simultaneously to assess the coronary anatomy in patients with AVS. METHODS: A comprehensive systematic literature search and meta-analysis was conducted that included 14 studies...... with invasive coronary angiography. RESULTS: The AVA was measured by MSCT and TTE in all 14 studies, and by TEE in four studies. The results of the meta-analyses showed that planimetry by MSCT overestimated the AVA, with a bias of 0.08 (95% CI 0.04, 0.13) cm2) (p = 0.0001) compared to TTE. The MSCT measurement...

  11. Early and long-term results of cardiosurgical treatment of coronary artery disease and aortic stenosis in patients over 80 years old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budniak, Wiktor; Buczkowski, Piotr; Perek, Bartłomiej; Katyńska, Izabela; Jemielity, Marek

    2014-09-01

    In recent years, patients over 80 years of age have been a growing group of individuals referred to cardiac surgeons. They pose a serious challenge and usually require a multidisciplinary approach. The aim of this study was to evaluate the early and late outcomes of cardiosurgical treatment of patients over 80 years of age suffering from coronary artery disease and aortic stenosis. The study involved 96 patients aged over 80 years treated between January, 2004 and December, 2012. The mortality and morbidity in the early postoperative period, as well as throughout the follow-up period, were analyzed. The majority of patients underwent isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) (58.3%; Group I), while 29.2% of them underwent an isolated aortic valve replacement (AVR) (Group II). Combined procedures (CABG + AVR) were carried out in 12.5% of patients (Group III). The mean operational risk calculated according to the logistic EuroSCORE was 11.6%, 11.9%, and 9.5%, respectively in Group I, Group II and in Group III. In the early postoperative period, 4 patients died (all from Group I). The 30-day mortality rate was 4.2% and the morbidity rate was 56.3%. During the post-discharge follow-up period that lasted from 1 to 100 months, 4 patients died (2 from Group I and 2 from Group III). The 2-year probability of survival was 91.9 ± 3.0%. During the last follow-up clinical assessment, half of the patients were asymptomatic. The perioperative mortality of the patients is acceptably and markedly lower than that predicted by the logistic EuroSCORE calculator. However, the complication rate, particularly in the early postoperative period, is relatively high.

  12. Long-Term Results of Balloon Valvuloplasty as Primary Treatment for Congenital Aortic Valve Stenosis: a 20-Year Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulatges, Camille; Momeni, Mona; Zarrouk, Nadia; Moniotte, Stéphane; Carbonez, Karlien; Barrea, Catherine; Rubay, Jean; Poncelet, Alain; Sluysmans, Thierry

    2015-08-01

    In the presence of new surgical techniques, the treatment of congenital valvular aortic stenosis is under debate. We reviewed the results and late outcomes of all 93 patients aged 1 day to 18 years, treated with balloon valvuloplasty (BAV) as first-line therapy for congenital aortic valve stenosis in our center from January 1991 to May 2012. Mean age at procedure time was 2.4 years; 37 patients underwent BAV at age ≤30 days (neonates), 29 patients at age ≥1 month and children). The invasive BAV peak-to-peak aortic valve gradient (mean 59 ± 22 mmHg) was immediately reduced (mean 24 ± 12 mmHg). The observed diminution of gradient was similar for each age group. Four patients had significant post-BAV AI. Mean follow-up after BAV was 11.4 ± 7 years. The last echo peak aortic gradient was 37 ± 18 mmHg and mean gradient was 23 ± 10 mmHg, and two patients had significant AI. Actuarial survival for the whole cohort was 88.2 and 72.9 % for the neonates. All infants, except one, and all children survived. Sixty-six percent of patients were free from surgery, and 58 % were free from any reintervention, with no difference according to age. Freedom from surgery after BAV at 5, 10, and 20 years, respectively, was 82, 72, and 66 %. Our study confirms that BAV as primary treatment for congenital AS is an efficient and low-risk procedure in infants and children. In neonates, the prognosis is more severe and clearly related to "borderline LV."

  13. Prevalence, pattern, and functional impact of late gadolinium enhancement in left ventricular hypertrophy due to aortic valve stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nassenstein, K.; Schlosser, T. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Abt. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Bruder, O. [Elisabeth-Krankenhaus Essen (Germany). Klinik fuer Kardiologie und Angiologie; Breuckmann, F.; Erbel, R. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Westdeutsches Herzzentrum Essen; Barkhausen, J. [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin

    2009-05-15

    Purpose: To assess the prevalence and pattern of myocardial late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and its functional impact on patients with left ventricular hypertrophy caused by aortic valve stenosis. Materials and Methods: Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of 40 patients (17 female, 23 male, mean age: 76.6 {+-} 22.5 years) with known aortic valve stenosis (mean aortic valve area: 89.8 {+-} 19.2 mm{sup 2}) and without coronary artery disease was performed at 1.5 T using steady-state free precession sequences for aortic valve planimetry and for the assessment of left ventricular (LV) volumes and mass. Ten to 15 minutes after injection of 0.2 mmol Gd-DTPA per kilogram body weight, inversion-recovery prepared spoiled gradient echo images were acquired in standard long and short axis views to detect areas of LGE. Results: LGE was observed in 32.5 % (13/40) of our patients. LGE was mainly located in the basal septal and inferior LV segments, and showed a non-ischemic pattern with sparing of the subendocardial region. Patients with LGE showed lower LV ejection fractions (55.5 {+-} 13.8 % vs. 69.1 {+-} 10.7 %, p = 0.0014), higher LV end-systolic volumes (59.8 {+-} 33.3 ml vs. 36.6 {+-} 16.0 ml, p = 0.0048), and LV masses (211.0 {+-} 13.8 vs. 157.9 {+-} 37.5 g, p = 0.0002) compared to patients without LGE. (orig.)

  14. Association between Asymptomatic Unilateral Internal Carotid Artery Stenosis and Electrophysiological Function of the Retina and Optic Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Machalińska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study was designed to assess retinal and optic nerve bioelectrical function in patients with unilateral asymptomatic but hemodynamically significant internal carotid artery stenosis (ICAS. Methods. Forty-two subjects with a diagnosis of unilateral ICAS and 34 controls were analyzed. Full-field electroretinogram (ERG, pattern electroretinogram (PERG, and pattern visual-evoked potentials, as well as optical coherence tomography and ophthalmological examination, were performed. Data analysis included eyes ipsilateral to ICAS (EIS and eyes contralateral to ICAS (ECS. Results. Intraocular pressure was significantly decreased in EIS and ECS compared to that in the controls. In the macula, both the cube average thickness and cube volume values were significantly reduced both in EIS and ECS compared to those in the controls. Similarly, PERG P50 and N95 wave amplitudes were significantly smaller in EIS and ECS compared to those in the controls. The ERG rod b-wave and rod-cone a-wave amplitudes were decreased, and implicit times were significantly prolonged, whereas the OP wave index was reduced in EIS compared to that in the controls. No differences in IOP, OCT, or ERG and PERG parameters were identified between EIS and ECS. Conclusions. Our study demonstrated that retinal bioelectrical function is negatively affected by ICAS despite the absence of objective clinical signs and symptoms of ocular ischemia.

  15. Collagen mineralization in human aortic valve stenosis: a field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotta, Ida; Davoli, Mariano

    2014-08-01

    Abstract Calcific aortic stenosis is a slowly progressive disorder characterized by an important extracellular matrix remodeling with fibrosis and massive deposition of minerals (primarily calcium) in the valve leaflet. The main structural components of human aortic valve are the large, thick collagen bundles that withstand the diastolic loading. Collagen has been studied in a number of reports that aim to clarify the mechanisms underlying the structural deterioration of heart valve substitutes, however to date, little is known regarding the morphological interaction between collagen and mineral crystals in the calcifying tissue of native aortic valve. Here, we have analyzed a total of 12 calcified native aortic valves by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (EDX) to depict the morphological appearance of mineralized collagen and to determine the location of calcium phosphate minerals in the collagen matrix of the valve cusp. Our results demonstrate that crystals probably nucleate and grow in the interior of the collagen fibers in the absence of surface events.

  16. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement in patients with severe aortic stenosis who are at high risk for surgical complications: summary assessment of the California Technology Assessment Forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, Jeffrey A; Sellke, Frank W; Schaff, Hartzell V

    2014-08-01

    The California Technology Assessment Forum is dedicated to assessment and public reporting of syntheses of available data on medical technologies. In this assessment, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) was evaluated for patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) who are at high risk for complications. In this assessment, 5 criteria were used: Regulatory approval, sufficient scientific evidence to allow conclusions on effectiveness, evidence that the technology improves net health outcomes, evidence that the technology is as beneficial as established methods, and availability of the technology outside investigational settings. In this assessment, all 5 criteria were judged to have been met. The primary benefit of TAVR is the ability to treat AS in patients who would otherwise be ineligible for surgical aortic valve replacement. It may also be useful for patients at high surgical risk by potentially reducing periprocedural complications and avoiding the morbidity and recovery from undergoing heart surgery. Potential harms include the need for conversion to an open procedure, perioperative death, myocardial infarction, stroke, bleeding, valve embolization, aortic regurgitation, heart block that requires a permanent pacemaker, renal failure, pulmonary failure, and major vascular complications such as cardiac perforation or arterial dissection. Potential long-term harms include death, stroke, valve failure or clotting, and endocarditis. As highlighted at the February 2012 California Technology Assessment Forum meeting, the dispersion of this technology to new centers across the United States must proceed with careful thought given to training and proctoring multidisciplinary teams to become new centers of excellence. TAVR is a potentially lifesaving procedure that may improve quality of life for patients at high risk for surgical AVR. However, attention needs to be paid to appropriate patient selection, their preoperative evaluation, surgical techniques, and

  17. Regadenoson-Stress Dynamic Myocardial Perfusion Improves Diagnostic Performance of CT Angiography in Assessment of Intermediate Coronary Artery Stenosis in Asymptomatic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxa, Jan; Hromádka, Milan; Šedivý, Jakub; Štěpánková, Lucie; Moláček, Jiří; Schmidt, Bernhard; Flohr, Thomas; Ferda, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    The prospective study included 54 asymptomatic high-risk patients who underwent coronary CT angiography (CTA) and regadenoson-induced stress CT perfusion (rsCTP). Diagnostic accuracy of significant stenosis (≥50%) determination was evaluated for CTA alone and CTA + rsCTP in 27 patients referred to ICA due to the positive rsCTP findings. Combined evaluation of CTA + rsCTP had higher diagnostic accuracy over CTA alone (per-segment: specificity 96 versus 68%, p = 0.002; per-vessel: specificity 95 versus 75%, p = 0.012) and high overruling rate of rsCTP was proved in intermediate stenosis (40–70%). Results demonstrate a significant additional value of rsCTP in the assessment of intermediate coronary artery stenosis found with CTA. PMID:26236712

  18. Regadenoson-Stress Dynamic Myocardial Perfusion Improves Diagnostic Performance of CT Angiography in Assessment of Intermediate Coronary Artery Stenosis in Asymptomatic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Baxa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The prospective study included 54 asymptomatic high-risk patients who underwent coronary CT angiography (CTA and regadenoson-induced stress CT perfusion (rsCTP. Diagnostic accuracy of significant stenosis (≥50% determination was evaluated for CTA alone and CTA + rsCTP in 27 patients referred to ICA due to the positive rsCTP findings. Combined evaluation of CTA + rsCTP had higher diagnostic accuracy over CTA alone (per-segment: specificity 96 versus 68%, p=0.002; per-vessel: specificity 95 versus 75%, p=0.012 and high overruling rate of rsCTP was proved in intermediate stenosis (40–70%. Results demonstrate a significant additional value of rsCTP in the assessment of intermediate coronary artery stenosis found with CTA.

  19. [Screening strategies for the diagnosis of asymptomatic arterial lesions in patients with atherothrombosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varenne, O; Touzé, E; Collet, J P; Raoux, F; Boissier, C; Carpentier, P H; Alpérovitch, A; Mas, J L; Montalescot, G

    2005-10-01

    Atherosclerosis is a ubiquitous inflammatory disease. Patients presenting an acute atherothrombotic event (acute coronary syndrom, stroke, aortic aneurysm, ...) have an increased risk of events in remote arterial territories affected by atherosclerosis. These patients could benefit from systematic screening of asymptomatic atherosclerotic lesions to avoid these complications. For each atherosclerotic territory (coronary artery, carotid artery, aorta, peripheral arteries including renal arteries), we review the methods for screening asymptomatic atherothrombotic lesions which could justify specific treatments: coronary artery stenosis > or = 50%, carotid artery stenosis > or = 60%, renal artery stenosis > or = 50%, and abdominal aortic aneurysm > or = 30 mm. This review shows that non invasive methods (ie, echography, tomodensitometry) are widely available for diagnosis of asymptomatic lesions in carotid and renal arteries, and in the aorta. Despite its invasive caracteristic, coronarory angiography remains the gold-standard for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. However, cardiac multi-slices CT-scan appears a promising technique for asymptomatic patients.

  20. Ultrasound screening for asymptomatic carotid stenosis in subjects with calcifications in the area of the carotid arteries on panoramic radiographs: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karp Kjell

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Directed ultrasonic screening for carotid stenosis is cost-effective in populations with > 5% prevalence of the diagnosis. Occasionally, calcifications in the area of the carotid arteries are incidentally detected on odontological panoramic radiographs. We aimed to determine if directed screening for carotid stenosis with ultrasound is indicated in individuals with such calcifications. Methods This was a cross-sectional study. Carotid ultrasound examinations were performed on consecutive persons, with findings of calcifications in the area of the carotid arteries on panoramic radiography that were otherwise eligible for asymptomatic carotid endarterectomy. Results Calcification in the area of the carotid arteries was seen in 176 of 1182 persons undergoing panoramic radiography. Of these, 117 fulfilled the inclusion criterion and were examined with carotid ultrasound. Eight persons (6.8%; 95% CI 2.2-11.5% had a carotid stenosis - not significant over the 5% pre-specified threshold (p = 0.232, Binomial test. However, there was a significant sex difference (p = 0.008, as all stenoses were found in men. Among men, 12.5% (95%CI 4.2-20.8% had carotid stenosis - significantly over the 5% pre-specified threshold (p = 0.014, Binomial test. Conclusions The incidental finding of calcification in the area of the carotid arteries on panoramic radiographs should be followed up with carotid screening in men that are otherwise eligible for asymptomatic carotid endarterectomy. Trial Registration The study was registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov; NCT00514644

  1. Lipoprotein(a-Associated Molecules Are Prominent Components in Plasma and Valve Leaflets in Calcific Aortic Valve Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Torzewski, MD

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The LPA gene is the only monogenetic risk factor for calcific aortic valve stenosis (CAVS. Oxidized phospholipids (OxPL and lysophosphatidic acid generated by autotaxin (ATX from OxPL are pro-inflammatory. Aortic valve leaflets categorized pathologically from both ATX–apolipoprotein B and ATX–apolipoprotein(a were measureable in plasma. Lipoprotein(a (Lp[a], ATX, OxPL, and malondialdehyde epitopes progressively increased in immunostaining (p < 0.001 for all. Six species of OxPL and lysophosphatidic acid were identified after extraction from valve leaflets. The presence of a constellation of pathologically linked, Lp(a-associated molecules in plasma and in aortic valve leaflets of patients with CAVS suggest that Lp(a is a key etiologic factor in CAVS. Key Words: aortic valve stenosis, autotaxin, inflammation, Lp(a, oxidation-specific epitopes

  2. Transfemoral aortic valve implantation is more successful with the Edwards Sapien 3 compared with the Edwards XT for the treatment of symptomatic severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonska, Birgid; Seeger, Julia; Junker, Alexander; Rodewald, Christoph; Trepte, Ulrike; Scharnbeck, Dominik; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Wöhrle, Jochen

    2017-11-08

    Residual aortic regurgitation (AR) after transfemoral aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is associated with increased mortality. The new Edwards Sapien 3 valve (ES3) is designed to reduce paravalvular AR. To compare a new-generation and a late-generation balloon-expandable transcatheter heart valve. In this study, 100 consecutive patients treated with the ES3 for symptomatic native severe aortic stenosis were compared with 100 consecutive patients treated with the Edwards Sapien XT valve (EXT); all valves were implanted via transfemoral access. We compared residual AR, rate of permanent pacemaker implantation, device success according to the second Valve Academic Research Consortium (VARC-2) criteria and 30-day follow-up. With the ES3, the risk of moderate/severe AR was lower (0% vs 3%), the risk of mild AR was lower (31% vs 40%) and the final result with no AR was higher (P=0.07). The mean aortic gradient was significantly higher with the ES3 (12.2±4.6 vs 9.4±3.9mmHg; P<0.01). Device success according to the VARC-2 criteria was high with the ES3 and the EXT (97% vs 95%; P=0.48). Pacemaker implantation because of higher-grade atrioventricular block was similar: 9.3% after ES3 implantation and 6.9% after EXT implantation (P=0.56). There was significantly less major or life-threatening bleeding with the ES3: 5% vs 14% (P=0.03) and 0% vs 8% (P<0.01), respectively. After 30 days, the VARC-2 early-safety endpoint was significantly lower with the ES3 (P<0.01). In conclusion, TAVI with the ES3 in patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis was associated with no moderate/severe AR, a trend towards a lower rate of mild AR, a significantly lower rate of major or life-threatening bleeding and early safety according to VARC-2 criteria within 30 days compared with the EXT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Association of the C-Reactive Protein Gene (CRP rs1205 C>T Polymorphism with Aortic Valve Calcification in Patients with Aortic Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Wypasek

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Elevation in C-reactive protein (CRP levels have been shown in patients with aortic valve stenosis (AS. Minor allele of the CRP gene (CRP rs1205 C>T polymorphism has been associated with lower plasma CRP concentrations in cohorts of healthy and atherosclerotic patients. Considering the existing similarities between atherosclerosis and AS, we examined the effect of CRP rs1205 C>T polymorphism on the AS severity. Three hundred consecutive Caucasian patients diagnosed with AS were genotyped for the rs1205 C>T polymorphism using the TaqMan assay. Severity of the AS was assessed using transthoracic echocardiography. The degree of calcification was analyzed semi-quantitatively. Carriers of the rs1205 T allele were characterized by elevated serum CRP levels (2.53 (1.51–3.96 vs. 1.68 (0.98–2.90 mg/L, p < 0.001 and a higher proportion of the severe aortic valve calcification (70.4% vs. 55.1%, p = 0.01 compared with major homozygotes. The effect of CRP rs1205 polymorphism on CRP levels is opposite in AS-affected than in unaffected subjects, suggesting existence of a disease-specific molecular regulatory mechanism. Furthermore, rs1205 variant allele predisposes to larger aortic valve calcification, potentially being a novel genetic risk marker of disease progression.

  4. Comparison of Outcome of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation for Severe Aortic Stenosis in 3 Age Groups (≤70; 71 to 80, and ≥81 Years).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, Ehud; Finkelstein, Ariel; Assali, Abid; Barbash, Israel; Fefer, Paul; Ben-Shoshan, Jeremy; Orvin, Katia; Konigstein, Maayan; Guetta, Victor; Kornowski, Ran; Segev, Amit

    2017-11-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has been widely used for the treatment of aortic stenosis. Most pivotal studies of TAVI included patients with a mean age of over 80 years old. Many young patients may also be considered for TAVI because of severe co-morbidities. We sought to describe a group of patients undergoing TAVI at an age below 70 and to compare them with older patients undergoing the procedure. This study included 1,324 consecutive patients from a 3-center TAVI registry from 2008 to 2014. Patients were divided according to age into 3 groups: patients aged 70 years and below, patients between the ages of 71 and 80, and patients 81 years and older. Patients in the younger group had higher body mass index (p 80 years was 7.6%, 7.5%, and 12.6%, respectively, p = 0.01. In conclusion, younger patients undergoing TAVI exhibited higher prevalence of risk factors and co-morbidities that probably explain the decision to perform TAVI rather than surgical aortic valve replacement. Nevertheless, the 1-year mortality of these patients was significantly lower than in older patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Noncontrast Myocardial T1 Mapping by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Predicts Outcome in Patients With Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heesun; Park, Jun-Bean; Yoon, Yeonyee E; Park, Eun-Ah; Kim, Hyung-Kwan; Lee, Whal; Kim, Yong-Jin; Cho, Goo-Yeong; Sohn, Dae-Won; Greiser, Andreas; Lee, Seung-Pyo

    2017-11-10

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether native T1 value of the myocardium on cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) could predict clinical events in patients with significant aortic stenosis (AS). Although previous studies have demonstrated the prognostic value of focal fibrosis using late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) by CMR in AS patients, the prognostic implication of diffuse myocardial fibrosis by noninvasive imaging remains unknown. A prospective observational longitudinal study was performed in 127 consecutive patients with moderate or severe AS (68.8 ± 9.2 years of age, 49.6% male) and 33 age- and sex-matched controls who underwent 3-T CMR. The degree of diffuse myocardial fibrosis was assessed by noncontrast mapping of T1 relaxation time using modified Look-Locker inversion-recovery sequence, and the presence and extent of LGE were also evaluated. The AS patients were divided into 3 groups by the native T1 value. Primary endpoint was a composite of all-cause death and hospitalization for heart failure. Native T1 value was higher in AS patients, compared with control subjects (1,232 ± 53 ms vs. 1,185 ± 37 ms; p = 0.008). During follow-up (median 27.9 months), there were 24 clinical events including 9 deaths (6 pre-operative and 3 post-operative), the majority of which occurred in the patients in the highest T1 tertile group (2.4% vs. 11.6% vs. 42.9% for lowest, mid-, and highest tertile groups; p T1 tertile group. EuroSCORE II, the presence and/or extent of LGE, and the native T1 value were predictors of poor prognosis (adjusted hazard ratio for every 20-ms increase of native T1: 1.28; p = 0.003). In particular, the highest native T1 value provided further risk stratification regardless of the presence of LGE. High native T1 value on noncontrast T1 mapping CMR is a novel, independent predictor of adverse outcome in patients with significant AS. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation as predictors of atrial fibrillation during 11 years of follow-up

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    Widgren Veronica

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is limited information about any association between the onset of atrial fibrillation (AF and the presence of valvular disease. Methods We retrospectively examined 940 patients in sinus rhythm, examined by echocardiography in 1996. During 11 years of follow-up, we assessed the incidence of AF and outcome defined as valvular surgery or death, in relation to baseline valvular function. AS (aortic stenosis severity at baseline examination was assessed using peak transaortic valve pressure gradient. Results In univariate analysis, the risk of developing AF was related to AS (significant AS versus no significant AS; hazard ratio (HR 3.73, 95% confidence interval (CI 2.39-5.61, p Conclusions AS, but not MR, was independently predictive of development of AF and combined valvular surgery or death. In patients with combined AS and MR, the grade of AS, more than the grade of MR, determined the risk of AF and combination of valvular surgery or death. Further studies using contemporary echocardiographic quantification of aortic stenosis are warranted to confirm these retrospective data based on peak transaortic valve pressure gradient.

  7. The German Aortic Valve Registry (GARY): a nationwide registry for patients undergoing invasive therapy for severe aortic valve stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, A; Hamm, C; Figulla, H R; Cremer, J; Kuck, K H; Lange, R; Zahn, R; Sack, S; Schuler, G C; Walther, T; Beyersdorf, F; Böhm, M; Heusch, G; Funkat, A K; Meinertz, T; Neumann, T; Papoutsis, K; Schneider, S; Welz, A; Mohr, F W

    2012-07-01

    Background The increasing prevalence of severe aortic valve defects correlates with the increase of life expectancy. For decades, surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR), under the use of extracorporeal circulation, has been the gold standard for treatment of severe aortic valve diseases. In Germany ~12,000 patients receive isolated aortic valve surgery per year. For some time, percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty has been used as a palliative therapeutic option for very few patients. Currently, alternatives for the established surgical procedures such as transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) have become available, but there are only limited data from randomized studies or low-volume registries concerning long-time outcome. In Germany, the implementation of this new technology into hospital care increased rapidly in the past few years. Therefore, the German Aortic Valve Registry (GARY) was founded in July 2010 including all available therapeutic options and providing data from a large quantity of patients.Methods The GARY is assembled as a complete survey for all invasive therapies in patients with relevant aortic valve diseases. It evaluates the new therapeutic options and compares them to surgical AVR. The model for data acquisition is based on three data sources: source I, the mandatory German database for external performance measurement; source II, a specific registry dataset; and source III, a follow-up data sheet (generated by phone interview). Various procedures will be compared concerning observed complications, mortality, and quality of life up to 5 years after the initial procedure. Furthermore, the registry will enable a compilation of evidence-based indication criteria and, in addition, also a comparison of all approved operative procedures, such as Ross or David procedures, and the use of different mechanical or biological aortic valve prostheses.Results Since the launch of data acquisition in July 2010, almost all institutions performing

  8. Asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis treated with medical therapy alone: temporal trends and implications for risk assessment and the design of future studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadar, Nira; Raman, Gowri; Moorthy, Denish; O'Donnell, Thomas F; Thaler, David E; Feldmann, Edward; Lau, Joseph; Kitsios, Georgios D; Dahabreh, Issa J

    2014-01-01

    The rate of adverse clinical outcomes among patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis receiving medical therapy alone can be used to guide clinical decision-making and to inform future research. We aimed to investigate temporal changes in the incidence rate of clinical outcomes among patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis receiving medical therapy alone and to explore the implications of these changes for the design of future comparative studies. We searched MEDLINE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, US Food and Drug Administration documents, and reference lists of included studies (last search: December 31, 2012). We selected prospective cohort studies of medical therapy for asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis and we extracted information on study characteristics, risk of bias, and outcomes. We performed meta-analyses to estimate summary incidence rates, meta-regressions to assess trends over time, and simulations to explore sample size requirements for the design of future studies comparing new treatments against medical therapy. The main outcomes of interest were ipsilateral stroke, any stroke, cardiovascular death, death, and myocardial infarction. We identified 41 studies of medical therapy for patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis (last recruitment year: 1978-2009). The summary incidence rate of ipsilateral carotid territory stroke (25 studies) was 1.7 per 100 person-years. This incidence rate was significantly lower in recent studies (last recruitment year from 2000 onwards) as compared to studies that ended recruitment earlier (1.0 vs. 2.3 events per 100 person-years; p studies), cardiovascular death (6 studies), death (13 studies), and myocardial infarction (5 studies) were 2.7, 4.1, 4.6, and 1.8 per 100 person-years, respectively. Simulations showed that future studies would need to enroll large numbers of patients with a relatively high incidence rate under medical therapy, and evaluate interventions with large effect

  9. Long-term outcomes and re-interventions following balloon aortic valvuloplasty in pediatric patients with congenital aortic stenosis: A single-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Patrick M; Rubio, Agustin E; Johnston, Troy A; Jones, Thomas K

    2017-02-01

    To describe long-term risk of mortality, aortic insufficiency (AI), and re-intervention following balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) in pediatric patients and to identify risk factors for re-intervention. Few studies report long-term outcomes following BAV in infants and children. Kaplan-Meier estimates and proportional hazards regression were used in a retrospective study of 154 patients undergoing BAV from 1993 to 2013. Seventy-six (49%) patients were neonates. Aortic stenosis (AS) gradients were reduced by 38 ± 19 mm Hg. Moderate or severe AI developed acutely in 19 (12%) patients. Estimates of fifteen-year transplant-free survival were 85% (95%CI: 73-92%) in neonates, 94% (95%CI: 80-96%) in infants, and 100% in older patients. Neonates had an elevated long-term risk of AI (P aortic valve replacement (AVR). Neonatal age, additional left heart lesions, higher pre- and post-dilation gradients, and acute AI were associated with LVOT re-interventions. Post-dilation gradient ≥30 mm Hg and acute AI were associated with AVR. Patients with moderate or severe acute AI but a residual AS gradient <30 mm Hg had a greater risk of AVR compared to patients with a residual AS gradient ≥30 mm Hg but mild or less AI (HR: 2.98 [95% CI: 1.01-8.77]). While post-BAV survival is excellent, long-term risks of AI and re-intervention are significant. Acute AI is a more strongly associated with AVR than residual AS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Decreases in left atrial compliance during early-stage exercise are related to exercise intolerance in asymptomatic significant mitral stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Mi-Hyang; Jung, Hae Ok; Lee, Jung-Won; Youn, Ho-Joong

    2017-11-01

    Doppler-driven net atrioventricular compliance (C n ), which represents left atrial (LA) compliance, is an important determinant of pulmonary hypertension in mitral stenosis (MS). We hypothesized that decreases in C n during early-stage exercise underlie exercise intolerance in patients with MS. Thirty-three asymptomatic patients with significant MS (valve area 1.24 ± 0.16 cm 2 ) underwent resting and bicycle exercise echocardiography. LA compliance and conventional parameters were assessed at each workload. The patients were classified into two groups based on whether they developed dyspnea during exercise: an exercise-intolerance group (n = 22) and an exercise-tolerance group (n = 11). Moreover, "50 W" was defined as an early exercise stage. Although the groups had similar resting characteristics, there were striking differences in their echocardiographic parameters from the early stages of exercise. The relative C n decrease at 50 W (expressed as a percentage of the resting C n ) was significantly greater in the exercise-intolerance group (70.3 ± 15.4% vs 49.7 ± 9.7%, P intolerance group (P = .0005). Furthermore, differences in the trends in this parameter were observed between the two groups (P intolerance (adjusted OR 1.105, 95% CI 1.030-1.184) after adjustment for other conventional parameters. Decreases in C n during early-stage exercise are an important mechanism underlying exercise intolerance in MS. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Normalization of Diffuse ST-Depression with aVR Elevation After Rehydration in a Patient with Severe Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sachin R; Patel, Vikas J; Clark, Brittany; Rust, George

    2017-05-22

    BACKGROUND Isolated ST elevation in lead aVR in combination with global ST depression with normalization after rehydration is a unique electrocardiographic pattern that is associated with a broad range of diagnoses. Its association with left main coronary artery disease and other acute coronary syndromes suggest the need for early and aggressive cardiac evaluation. CASE REPORT A 53-year-old man presented with altered mental status and loss of consciousness. He was unresponsive, hypotensive, tachycardiac, and diaphoretic. An initial ECG showed diffuse ST depression with isolated ST elevation in lead aVR, and initial troponin levels were negative. After rehydration, a repeat ECG showed sinus rhythm without ischemic changes. An emergent echocardiogram showed severe aortic stenosis and global hypokinesis. Repeat troponin results were elevated. The patient had 2 subsequent cardiac arrests. Emergent cardiac catheterization showed an occluded right coronary artery with collaterals and complete occlusion of the LAD. Urgent intra-aortic balloon pump was placed, followed by coronary artery bypass graft, aortic valve replacement, and a placement of a left ventricular assist device. Despite maximal hemodynamic support, the patient died after cardiac arrest due to massive myocardial infarction. CONCLUSIONS Normalization of diffuse ST depression with isolated aVR ST elevation on electrocardiography with improvement in clinical and hemodynamic status through fluid resuscitation can mask a stuttering myocardial infarction given its association with left main coronary artery disease and partial right coronary artery occlusion.

  12. Monitoring of Serial Presurgical and Postsurgical Changes in the Serum Proteome in a Series of Patients with Calcific Aortic Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazumi Satoh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Comprehensive analysis of proteome differentially expressed in response to surgery or drug treatment is useful to understand biological responses to dispensed interventions. Here we investigated expression changes in sera of patients who suffered from calcific aortic stenosis (CAS, before and after surgery for aortic valve replacement. Materials and Methods. Sera obtained before and after surgery with depletion of highly abundant proteins were analyzed with iTRAQ labeling followed by nanoLC-MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS. Results. Fifty-one proteins shared in five patients were identified with differential levels in postsurgical and presurgical sera. Finally, 16 proteins that show statistically significant levels in patients’ sera compared with those in control sera (P<0.05 were identified. Most of the identified proteins were positive acute-phase proteins. Among three proteins other than acute-phase proteins, we confirmed increased levels of antithrombin-III and zinc-α-2-glycoprotein in postsurgical sera by Western blot analysis using other CAS patients’ sera. Furthermore, antithrombin-III and zinc-α-2-glycoprotein were not found among proteins with differential levels in postsurgical and presurgical sera of patients with aortic aneurysms that we identified in a previous study. Conclusions. The results indicated that antithrombin-III and zinc-α-2-glycoprotein would become unique monitoring proteins for evaluating pathophysiological and biochemical processes occurring before and after surgery for CAS.

  13. The JUPITER registry: 1-year results of transapical aortic valve implantation using a second-generation transcatheter heart valve in patients with aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silaschi, Miriam; Treede, Hendrik; Rastan, Ardawan J; Baumbach, Hardy; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Kappert, Utz; Eichinger, Walter; Rüter, Florian; de Kroon, Thomas L; Lange, Rüdiger; Ensminger, Stephan; Wendler, Olaf

    2016-11-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is an established therapy for patients with aortic stenosis (AS) at high surgical risk. The JenaValve™ is a second-generation, self-expanding transcatheter heart valve (THV), implanted through transapical access (TA). During stent deployment, a specific 'clipping-mechanism' engages native aortic valve cusps for fixation. We present 1-year outcomes of the JUPITER registry, a post-market registry of the JenaValve for TA-TAVR. The JUPITER registry is a prospective, multicentre, uncontrolled and observational European study to evaluate the long-term safety and effectiveness of the Conformité Européenne-marked JenaValve THV. A total of 180 patients with AS were enrolled between 2012 and 2014. End-points were adjudicated in accordance with the valve academic research consortium document no. 1 definitions. The mean age was 80.4 ± 5.9 years and the mean logistic European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation I 21.2 ± 14.7%. The procedure was successful in 95.0% (171/180), implantation of a second THV (valve-in-valve) was performed in 2.2% (4/180) and conversion to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) was necessary in 2.8% (5/180). No annular rupture or coronary ostia obstruction occurred. Two patients required SAVR after the day of index procedure (1.1%). All-cause mortality at 30 days was 11.1% (20/180), being cardiovascular in 7.2% (13/180). A major stroke occurred in 1.1% (2/180) at 30 days, no additional major strokes were observed during 1 year. All-cause mortality after 30 days was 13.1% (21/160) and combined efficacy at 1 year was 80.8% (122/151). At 1-year follow-up, no patient presented with more than moderate paravalvular leakage, while 2 patients (3.2%) showed moderate, 12 (19.0%) mild and 49 (82.4%) trace/none paravalvular regurgitation. In a high-risk cohort of patients undergoing TA-TAVR for AS, the use of the JenaValve THV is safe and effective. In patients at higher risk for coronary ostia

  14. Outcome of patients with low-gradient "severe" aortic stenosis and preserved ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jander, Nikolaus; Minners, Jan; Holme, Ingar

    2011-01-01

    Retrospective studies have suggested that patients with a low transvalvular gradient in the presence of an aortic valve area <1.0 cm² and normal ejection fraction may represent a subgroup with an advanced stage of aortic valve disease, reduced stroke volume, and poor prognosis requiring early sur...

  15. Effect of aorto-iliac bifurcation and iliac stenosis on flow dynamics in an abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shivam; Usmani, Abdullah Y.; Muralidhar, K.

    2017-06-01

    Physiological flows in rigid diseased arterial flow phantoms emulating an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) under rest conditions with aorto-iliac bifurcation and iliac stenosis are examined in vitro through 2D PIV measurements. Flow characteristics are first established in the model resembling a symmetric AAA with a straight outlet tube. The influence of aorto-iliac bifurcation and iliac stenosis on AAA flow dynamics is then explored through a comparison of the nature of flow patterns, vorticity evolution, vortex core trajectory and hemodynamic factors against the reference configuration. Specifically, wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index in the bulge portion of the models are of interest. The results of this investigation indicate overall phenomenological similarity in AAA flow patterns across the models. The pattern is characterized by a central jet and wall-bounded vortices whose strength increases during the deceleration phase as it moves forward. The central jet impacts the wall of AAA at its distal end. In the presence of an aorto-iliac bifurcation as well as iliac stenosis, the flow patterns show diminished strength, expanse and speed of propagation of the primary vortices. The positions of the instantaneous vortex cores, determined using the Q-function, correlate with flow separation in the bulge, flow resistance due to a bifurcation, and the break in symmetry introduced by a stenosis in one of the legs of the model. Time-averaged WSS in a healthy aorta is around 0.70 N m-2 and is lowered to the range ±0.2 N m-2 in the presence of the downstream bifurcation with a stenosed common iliac artery. The consequence of changes in the flow pattern within the aneurysm on disease progression is discussed.

  16. Improvement of heart function after balloon dilation of congenital valvar aortic stenosis: a pilot study with ultrasound tissue Doppler and strain rate imaging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kort, E.; Thijssen, J.M.; Daniels, O.; Korte, C.L. de; Kapusta, L.

    2006-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the effects of balloon dilation of congenital valvar aortic (Ao) stenosis on heart function with conventional and with new echocardiographic techniques. Nine patients, preballoon and 1 to 4 d postballoon dilation of Ao-valve, were included in the study. Assessment of heart

  17. Persistent reduction in left ventricular strain using two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography after balloon valvuloplasty in children with congenital valvular aortic stenosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcus, K.A.; Korte, C.L. de; Feuth, T.; Thijssen, J.M.; Oort, A.M. van; Tanke, R.B.; Kapusta, L.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investige serial changes of myocardial deformation using two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiographic (2DSTE) imaging in children undergoing balloon valvuloplasty for congenital valvular aortic stenosis (VAS). METHODS: Thirty-seven children with

  18. Renin–angiotensin system inhibition is not associated with increased sudden cardiac death, cardiovascular mortality or all-cause mortality in patients with aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Casper N; Greve, Anders M; Køber, Lars

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Renin-angiotensin system inhibition (RASI) is frequently avoided in aortic stenosis (AS) patients because of fear of hypotension. We evaluated if RASI with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) increased mortality in patients with mild...

  19. Inclusion cylinder method for aortic valve replacement utilising the Ross operation in adults with predominant aortic stenosis – 99% freedom from re-operation on the aortic valve at 15 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillington, Peter D.; Mokhles, M. Mostafa; Wilson, William; Grigg, Leeanne; Larobina, Marco; O'Keefe, Michael; Takkenberg, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    Background: To report our experience with the Ross operation in patients with predominant aortic stenosis (AS) using an inclusion cylinder (IC) method. Methods: Out of 324 adults undergoing a Ross operation, 204 patients of mean age of 41.3 years (limits 16–62) underwent this procedure for either AS or mixed AS and regurgitation (AS/AR) between October, 1992 and February, 2012, implanting the PA with an IC method. Clinical follow up and serial echo data for this group is 97% complete with late mortality follow up 99% complete. Results: There has been zero (0%) early mortality, and late survival at 15 years is 98% (96%, 100%). Only one re-operation on the aortic valve for progressive aortic regurgitation (AR) has been required with freedom from re-operation on the aortic valve at 15 years being 99% (96%, 100%). The freedom from all re-operations on the aortic and pulmonary valves at 15 years is 97% (94%, 100%). Echo analysis at the most recent study shows that 98% have nil, trivial or mild AR. Aortic root size has remained stable, shown by long-term (15 year) echo follow up. Conclusions: In an experience spanning 19 years, the Ross operation used for predominant AS using the IC method described, results in 99% freedom from re-operation on the aortic valve at 15 years, better than any other tissue or mechanical valve. For adults under 65 years without significant co-morbidities who present with predominant AS, the pulmonary autograft inserted with this technique gives excellent results. PMID:24749112

  20. Inclusion cylinder method for aortic valve replacement utilising the Ross operation in adults with predominant aortic stenosis - 99% freedom from re-operation on the aortic valve at 15 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillington, Peter D; Mokhles, M Mostafa; Wilson, William; Grigg, Leeanne; Larobina, Marco; O'Keefe, Michael; Takkenberg, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    To report our experience with the Ross operation in patients with predominant aortic stenosis (AS) using an inclusion cylinder (IC) method. Out of 324 adults undergoing a Ross operation, 204 patients of mean age of 41.3 years (limits 16-62) underwent this procedure for either AS or mixed AS and regurgitation (AS/AR) between October, 1992 and February, 2012, implanting the PA with an IC method. Clinical follow up and serial echo data for this group is 97% complete with late mortality follow up 99% complete. There has been zero (0%) early mortality, and late survival at 15 years is 98% (96%, 100%). Only one re-operation on the aortic valve for progressive aortic regurgitation (AR) has been required with freedom from re-operation on the aortic valve at 15 years being 99% (96%, 100%). The freedom from all re-operations on the aortic and pulmonary valves at 15 years is 97% (94%, 100%). Echo analysis at the most recent study shows that 98% have nil, trivial or mild AR. Aortic root size has remained stable, shown by long-term (15 year) echo follow up. In an experience spanning 19 years, the Ross operation used for predominant AS using the IC method described, results in 99% freedom from re-operation on the aortic valve at 15 years, better than any other tissue or mechanical valve. For adults under 65 years without significant co-morbidities who present with predominant AS, the pulmonary autograft inserted with this technique gives excellent results.

  1. Functionality and Outcome in Older Patients with Severe Aortic Stenosis (FOOPAS: an interdisciplinary study concept for a prospective trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogt F

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Ferdinand Vogt,1 Susanne Wicklein,2 Markus Gosch,2 Jürgen Jessl,3 Wolfgang Hitzl,4 Theodor Fischlein,1 Matthias Pauschinger,3 Steffen Pfeiffer,1 Dennis Eckner3 1Department of Cardiac Surgery, Paracelsus Medical University, Nuremberg, Germany; 2Department of Geriatric Medicine, Paracelsus Medical University, Nuremberg, Germany; 3Department of Cardiology, Paracelsus Medical University, Nuremberg, Germany; 4Research Office – Biostatistics, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg, Austria Background: Frailty is a geriatric syndrome that can influence mortality and functional recovery after treatment of severe aortic stenosis (AS. The integration of standardized geriatric assessment (GA in clinical practice is limited by a lack of consensus on how to measure it. Objectives: This study aims to compare the incremental predictive value of different frailty scales to predict the outcomes following surgical aortic valve replacement, transcatheter aortic valve implantation, and conservative treatment of severe AS. Methods: A prospective cohort of 300 older adults with severe AS will be assembled after standard clinical examinations and a comprehensive GA, including 18 different tests and values. Primary outcome parameters are overall mortality, cardiovascular mortality, quality of life, and functionality. Secondary parameters are overall complications, cardiovascular complications, and costs. Results: Expected results will contribute to the growing body of evidence on frailty based on parameters that influence clinical and functional outcome in elderly patients independent of the method of treatment. The pre-procedural assessment is expected to be valuable in discriminating new post-procedural complications from simple exacerbations of pre-existing conditions. Therefore, a new frailty test which is simple and feasible for application in a clinical routine by most medical professionals, may help in identifying patients for whom further GA should be

  2. Acute outcomes after introduction of a standardized clinical assessment and management plan (SCAMP) for balloon aortic valvuloplasty in congenital aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras, Diego; Brown, David W; Rathod, Rahul; Friedman, Kevin; Gauvreau, Kimberly; Lock, James E; Esch, Jesse J; Bergersen, Lisa; Marshall, Audrey C

    2014-01-01

    Standardization of care can reduce practice variation, optimize resource utilization, and improve clinical outcomes. We have created a standardized clinical assessment and management plan (SCAMP) for patients having balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) for congenital aortic stenosis (AS). This study compares acute outcomes of BAV at our institution before and after introduction of this SCAMP. In this retrospective matched cohort study, each SCAMP patient was matched to four historical controls. Outcomes were categorized based on the combination of residual AS and aortic regurgitation (AR) as: (1) Optimal: gradient ≤ 35 mm Hg and trivial or no AR; (2) Adequate: gradient ≤ 35 mm Hg and mild AR; (3) Inadequate: gradient > 35 mm Hg and/or moderate or severe AR. All 23 SCAMP patients achieved a residual AS gradient ≤ 35 mm Hg; the median residual AS gradient for the SCAMP group was lower (25 [10-35] mm Hg) than in matched controls (30 [0-65] mm Hg; P = 0.005). The two groups did not differ with regard to degree of AR grade after BAV. Compared with controls, SCAMP patients were more likely to have an optimal result and less likely to have an inadequate result (52% vs. 34% and 17% vs. 45%, respectively; P = 0.02) CONCLUSIONS: A SCAMP for BAV resulted in optimal acute results in half of the initial 23 patients enrolled, and outcomes in this group were better than those of matched historical controls. Whether these improved acute outcomes translate into better long-term outcomes for this patient population remains to be seen. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Effectiveness of same day percutaneous coronary intervention followed by minimally invasive aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis and moderate coronary disease ("hybrid approach").

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinster, Derek R; Byrne, Margaretta; Rogers, Campbell D; Baim, Donald S; Simon, Daniel I; Couper, Gregory S; Cohn, Lawrence H

    2006-12-01

    In 2005, the investigators described a "hybrid" cardiovascular interventional strategy combining percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for coronary artery disease (CAD) followed by valve surgery for patients with urgent complex CAD and valve disease to reduce morbidity and mortality. This hybrid approach has been extended prospectively in elderly, high-risk patients with aortic stenosis scheduled for elective minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MI-AVR) who, on preoperative coronary angiography, were found to have moderate CAD amenable to PCI. In this prospective, observational series, 18 patients (mean age 76 years) underwent elective hybrid MI-AVR with PCI from May 2003 to February 2006. Five patients had undergone previous coronary artery bypass grafting. Patients underwent coronary angiography the day of (n = 12) or evening before (n = 6) MI-AVR, and after identifying moderately severe CAD, all 18 underwent the implantation of drug-eluting stents to the affected coronary arteries, followed by MI-AVR. Although all patients received standard doses of antiplatelet medications, including acetylsalicylic acid (325 mg before PCI and 325 mg/day thereafter) and clopidogrel (300 mg after PCI, 75 mg/day thereafter for 90 days for the Cypher stent), there were no reoperations for bleeding; only 8 of 18 patients required postoperative blood transfusions. One patient died postoperatively from a colonic perforation, and there were no late mortalities after a mean follow-up of 19 months. In conclusion, this hybrid strategy has low morbidity and mortality and may be a new therapeutic option for older, high-risk patients with combined CAD and aortic valve disease.

  4. Effect of gender differences on 1-year mortality after transcatheter aortic valve implantation for severe aortic stenosis: results from a multicenter real-world registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherif, Mohammad A; Zahn, Ralf; Gerckens, Ulrich; Sievert, Horst; Eggebrecht, Holger; Hambrecht, Rainer; Sack, Stefan; Richardt, Gert; Schneider, Steffen; Senges, Jochen; Brachmann, Johannes

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this analysis is to examine the influence of gender differences on the outcome after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) from a multicenter real-world registry in Germany (TAVI registry). The impact of gender differences on the clinical outcome after TAVI was examined in small studies with conflicting results. Consecutive patients (n = 1,432) undergoing TAVI in the period between January 2009 and June 2010 in Germany were evaluated. Differences in all-cause mortality were examined with Kaplan-Meier estimates and proportional hazards models. Women comprised 57.8 % of the cohort. The Edwards Sapien valve (18.5 %) and CoreValve (81.5 %) were used through the transfemoral (87.7 %), subclavian (3.0 %), transapical (8.6 %), or transaortic approach (0.7 %). At baseline, women had higher aortic gradients and were older. Men had more comorbidities: prior myocardial infarction, prior revascularization, prior coronary artery bypass surgery, peripheral arterial vascular disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Women had more periprocedural vascular complications in comparison to men (25.2 vs. 17.2 %, p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in mortality at 30-day follow-up (7.6 % for women vs. 8.6 % for men, p = 0.55). The adjusted HR for 1-year all-cause mortality favored women, HR 0.75 (95 % CI 0.57-0.98, p = 0.0346) with a mortality rate of 17.3 vs. 23.6 % for men. Female gender is associated with better 1-year survival after TAVI. These results suggest that TAVI could be the best treatment modality for elderly women with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis.

  5. Effects of uncomplicated carotid endarterectomy on cognitive function and brain perfusion in patients with unilateral asymptomatic severe stenosis of the internal carotid artery by comparison with unoperated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Daigo; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Yoshida, Kenji; Kubo, Yoshitaka; Chida, Kohei; Oshida, Sotaro; Yoshida, Jun; Fujiwara, Shunro; Terasaki, Kazunori

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the present exploratory study was to evaluate the effects of uncomplicated carotid endarterectomy (CEA) on cognitive function and brain perfusion in patients with unilateral asymptomatic severe stenosis of the internal carotid artery (ICA) by comparison with unoperated patients. Patients with age ≤75 years and unilateral asymptomatic severe stenosis (≥70%) of the cervical ICA underwent CEA with antiplatelet therapy (surgically treated group: 116 patients) or antiplatelet therapy alone or neither (medically treated group: 45 patients). For the surgically treated group, neuropsychological testing and brain perfusion measurement using single-photon emission computed tomography were performed within one month before surgery and one month after surgery. For the medically treated group, the same testing and measurement were performed twice at an interval of 1 to 2 months. None of the operated patients developed new major ischemic events after surgery or intraoperative cerebral hyperperfusion. None of the patients in the medically treated group experienced neurological deficits including transient ischemic attacks during the study period. The incidence of patients with interval cognitive improvement was significantly greater in the surgically treated group (11 patients: 9%) than in the medically treated group (0%) (p = 0.0352). The incidence of patients with interval brain perfusion improvement in the ipsilateral cerebral hemisphere was significantly greater in the surgically treated group (24 patients: 21%) than in the medically treated group (0%) (p = 0.0003). Uncomplicated CEA may improve cognitive function and brain perfusion in patients with unilateral asymptomatic severe stenosis of the ICA when compared with unoperated patients.

  6. Modified simple sliding aortoplasty for preserving the sinotubular junction without using foreign material for congenital supravalvar aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hong Ju; Jhang, Won Kyoung; Park, Jeong-Jun; Goo, Hyun Woo; Seo, Dong Man

    2011-09-01

    The surgical approach for treating supravalvar aortic stenosis (SVAS) has evolved from a plain patch technique to a three-dimensional patch repair, which has some drawbacks. Here, we report on the midterm outcomes after using our modified simple sliding aortoplasty preserving sinotubular junction without foreign material for surgical correction of SVAS. Between June 2001 and February 2010, 18 children (median age, 6.2 years; range 0.5-2.2 years) with discrete SVAS underwent surgical repair. After a standard median sternotomy, cardiopulmonary bypass and cardioplegic arrest, the aorta was transected obliquely just distal to the point of stenosis. An incision was then made into the non-coronary sinus of the proximal aorta, and a counterincision was made into the lesser curvature of the ascending aorta, after which, the proximal and distal aorta were anastomosed directly with a running suture. Peak pressure gradients were estimated using echocardiography and the data were reviewed retrospectively. The median follow-up period was 39.6 months (range, 1-104.5 months). There was no early or late death. No patients required re-operation. Ten patients had Williams-Beuren syndrome. There were eight cases of concomitant pulmonary artery angioplasty. The mean pressure gradient decreased from 65.9 ± 18.4 mm Hg preoperatively to 15.2 ± 8.9 mm Hg at the final follow-up (P = 0.01). There was no significant, more than mild aortic regurgitation. Our modified simple sliding aortoplasty showed excellent surgical results, and may be a good option for discrete SVAS. Copyright © 2011 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Early results after synchronous carotid stent placement and coronary artery bypass graft in patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Juan Guillermo; Rojas, Kristin E; Balestrini, Carlos; Espinel, Camilo; Figueredo, Antonio; Saaibi, Jose Federico; Machuca, Santiago; Murcia, Adriana

    2013-02-01

    The optimal management of patients with combined carotid and coronary artery disease requiring cardiac surgery is still unknown. Staged carotid endarterectomy and carotid artery stenting (CAS), each followed by coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), are options frequently employed. However, for patients with severe carotid artery disease in urgent need of open cardiac revascularization, staged operations may not be the most appropriate alternative. The aim of this study was to describe our experience using a synchronous CAS-CABG method with minimal interprocedural time. We used this synchronous combination of procedures in patients with combined carotid and coronary artery disease admitted for urgent CABG. Patients with concomitant severe carotid and coronary artery disease scheduled for synchronous CAS and urgent CABG between December 2006 and January 2010 were included in the study. All procedures were performed at a single center: the Cardiovascular Foundation of Colombia, in Floridablanca, Santander, Colombia. The study cohort was characterized according to demographic and clinical characteristics, which included degree of carotid stenosis, presence/absence of preoperative neurological symptoms, and cardiac operative risk profile. All patients underwent CAS under embolic protection devices and then CABG within the next 2 hours. Patients received aspirin pre- and postprocedure but were started on clopidogrel only after CABG. The primary end point of the study was the composite incidence rate of myocardial infarction, stroke, and death 30 days after CAS-CABG. Fifteen patients with concomitant severe carotid and coronary artery disease underwent synchronous CAS-CABG. Most patients (60%) were men, and mean (± standard deviation) age was 65.2 (± 8.4) years. Most patients (93%) were neurologically asymptomatic. The median (interquartile range) ejection fraction and logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) for the cohort were 55% (36

  8. Evidence for and risks of endovascular treatment of asymptomatic acute type B aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Rachel E; Nienaber, Christoph A

    2017-04-01

    Acute aortic dissection is a challenging disease to manage. Type B aortic dissection has traditionally been divided temporally into acute and chronic cases but more recently this classification has been modified to include a sub-acute phase. Computed tomography is the imaging technique used most frequently in diagnosis and management. Active management of blood pressure is essential and should include beta-blockade unless contraindicated. In-hospital outcomes are generally acceptable in patients with medically managed acute uncomplicated type B aortic dissection, with up to 90% of patients surviving to hospital discharge but by 5 years up to 50% of patients are dead with a significant proportion dying from aortic rupture. The aim of endovascular repair is to treat the complications of the dissection, induce aortic remodeling and false lumen thrombosis and it has been shown to result in good long-term outcomes. Stent graft placement however is associated with an incidence of death, stroke, paraplegia and retrograde type A dissection. Some experts now advocate high intensity imaging in the first 14 days to detect development of complications early in the disease course, with planned elective treatment in the subacute phase.

  9. Changes in cardiac substrate transporters and metabolic proteins mirror the metabolic shift in patients with aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather, Lisa C; Howell, Neil J; Emmanuel, Yaso; Cole, Mark A; Frenneaux, Michael P; Pagano, Domenico; Clarke, Kieran

    2011-01-01

    In the hypertrophied human heart, fatty acid metabolism is decreased and glucose utilisation is increased. We hypothesized that the sarcolemmal and mitochondrial proteins involved in these key metabolic pathways would mirror these changes, providing a mechanism to account for the modified metabolic flux measured in the human heart. Echocardiography was performed to assess in vivo hypertrophy and aortic valve impairment in patients with aortic stenosis (n = 18). Cardiac biopsies were obtained during valve replacement surgery, and used for western blotting to measure metabolic protein levels. Protein levels of the predominant fatty acid transporter, fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) correlated negatively with levels of the glucose transporters, GLUT1 and GLUT4. The decrease in FAT/CD36 was accompanied by decreases in the fatty acid binding proteins, FABPpm and H-FABP, the β-oxidation protein medium chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase, the Krebs cycle protein α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and the oxidative phosphorylation protein ATP synthase. FAT/CD36 and complex I of the electron transport chain were downregulated, whereas the glucose transporter GLUT4 was upregulated with increasing left ventricular mass index, a measure of cardiac hypertrophy. In conclusion, coordinated downregulation of sequential steps involved in fatty acid and oxidative metabolism occur in the human heart, accompanied by upregulation of the glucose transporters. The profile of the substrate transporters and metabolic proteins mirror the metabolic shift from fatty acid to glucose utilisation that occurs in vivo in the human heart.

  10. Morphological and Chemical Study of Pathological Deposits in Human Aortic and Mitral Valve Stenosis: A Biomineralogical Contribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Cottignoli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this study was to investigate heart valve calcification process by different biomineralogical techniques to provide morphological and chemical features of the ectopic deposit extracted from patients with severe mitral and aortic valve stenosis, to better evaluate this pathological process. Polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy analyses brought to light the presence of nodular and massive mineralization forms characterized by different levels of calcification, as well as the presence of submicrometric calcified globular cluster, micrometric cavities containing disorganized tissue structures, and submillimeter pockets formed by organic fibers very similar to amyloid formations. Electron microprobe analyses showed variable concentrations of Ca and P within each deposit and the highest content of Ca and P within calcified tricuspid aortic valves, while powder X-ray diffraction analyses indicated in the nanometer range the dimension of the pathological bioapatite crystals. These findings indicated the presence of highly heterogeneous deposits within heart valve tissues and suggested a progressive maturation process with continuous changes in the composition of the valvular tissue, similar to the multistep formation process of bone tissue. Moreover the micrometric cavities represent structural stages of the valve tissue that immediately precedes the formation of heavily mineralized deposits such as bone-like nodules.

  11. Novel ELN mutation in a family with supravalvular aortic stenosis and intracranial aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsig, Anne Marie; Urban, Zsolt; Hucthagowder, Vishwanathan

    2017-01-01

    stenosis, various other arterial stenoses, sudden death, and intracranial aneurysms. A frameshift mutation in exon 12, not described before, was detected in the affected family members. This report emphasises the importance of family history, genetic counselling, and demonstrates the great variability...

  12. Long-term results of percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty of congenital aortic stenosis in adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthy, Neeraj; Garg, Ria; Radhakrishnan, S; Shrivastava, Savitri

    Balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) is a well accepted modality of treatment in congenital aortic stenosis in all age groups. Although in infants and children it is the modality of choice, in adolescents and young adults, it is of debatable efficacy. To evaluate long-term results of aortic valvuloplasty particularly in adolescent and adults (>12 years) and compare the outcome in other age groups that are 12 years) n=68. The characteristics of each subgroup were mutually compared. Percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty with mean (SD) balloon to annulus ratio of 0.93. Main outcome measures were repeat BAV, significant aortic regurgitation (AR), and aortic valve replacement/repair. The incidence of significant AR from the whole cohort was 9.9% (8% moderate, 1.9% severe); n=16. Group A=significant AR 9.5% (7.1% moderate, 2.4% severe), Group B=significant AR 11.3% (9.4% moderate, 1.9% severe), and Group C=significant AR 9% (7.5% moderate, 1.5% severe); p value=0.99 (Group C vs Group A) and 0.92 (Group C vs Group B). Repeat BAV rate was 13.3% (n=22 out of 165 patients). Group A - n=5 (11.9%), Group B - n=10 (18.2%), and Group C - n=7 (10.3%). p Value=0.78 (C vs A) and 0.19 (C vs B). Surgery in follow-up was needed in n=4 (2.4%), none in Group A, 2 patients in Group B (3.6%), and 2 patients in group C (2.9%). Patients were followed up for a period of 14 years; Group A=up to 8 years, Group B=up to 13 years, and Group C=up to 14 years. Mean survival probability after the procedure was 8 years (Group A=6.5 years, Group B=8.1 years, and Group C=9.9 years), and p value=0.49 (A vs B), 0.23 (B vs C), and 0.4 (A vs C). There is no statistical difference in the long-term outcome in the adults and adolescents as compared to the children; thus BAV remains an obvious treatment of choice with good long-term outcome. Copyright © 2016 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Usefulness of 3-Tesla cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of aortic stenosis severity in routine clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Franck; Iacuzio, Laura; Civaia, Filippo; Rusek, Stephane; Dommerc, Carine; Hugues, Nicolas; Alexandrescu, Clara; Dor, Vincent; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Dreyfus, Gilles

    2016-11-01

    Recently, 1.5-Tesla cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) was reported to provide a reliable alternative to transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) for the quantification of aortic stenosis (AS) severity. Few data are available using higher magnetic field strength MRI systems in this context. To evaluate the feasibility and reproducibility of the assessment of aortic valve area (AVA) using 3-Tesla CMR in routine clinical practice, and to assess concordance between TTE and CMR for the estimation of AS severity. Ninety-one consecutive patients (60 men; mean age 74±10years) with known AS documented by TTE were included prospectively in the study. All patients underwent comprehensive TTE and CMR examination, including AVA estimation using the TTE continuity equation (0.81±0.18cm2), direct CMR planimetry (CMRp) (0.90±0.22cm2) and CMR using Hakki's formula (CMRhk), a simplified Gorlin formula (0.70±0.19cm2). Although significant agreement with TTE was found for CMRp (r=0.72) and CMRhk (r=0.66), CMRp slightly overestimated (bias=0.11±0.18cm2) and CMRhk slightly underestimated (bias=-0.11±0.17cm2) AVA compared with TTE. Inter- and intraobserver reproducibilities of CMR measurements were excellent (r=0.72 and r=0.74 for CMRp and r=0.88 and r=0.92 for peak aortic velocity, respectively). 3-Tesla CMR is a feasible, radiation-free, reproducible imaging modality for the estimation of severity of AS in routine practice, knowing that CMRp tends to overestimate AVA and CMRhk to underestimate AVA compared with TTE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Alteration in subendocardial and subepicardial myocardial strain in patients with aortic valve stenosis: an early marker of left ventricular dysfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyodo, Eiichi; Arai, Kotaro; Koczo, Agnes; Shimada, Yuichi J; Fujimoto, Kohei; Di Tullio, Marco R; Homma, Shunichi; Gillam, Linda D; Hahn, Rebecca T

    2012-02-01

    It has been suggested that myocardial systolic impairment may not be accurately detected by the evaluation of endocardial excursion alone. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that changes in left ventricular (LV) subendocardial and subepicardial strain are sensitive markers of severity of aortic stenosis (AS) and LV function in patients with AS. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed in 73 consecutive patients with AS who had preserved systolic function and in 20 controls. Longitudinal strain, subendocardial radial strain, subepicardial radial strain, and transmural radial strain were measured using LV apical and short-axis images. The 73 patients enrolled in this study were classified according to AS severity: mild (n = 10), moderate (n = 15), or severe (n = 48). Although transmural and subepicardial radial strain showed similar values in all groups, subendocardial radial strain and longitudinal strain could differentiate mild or moderate AS from severe AS. Only the ratio of subendocardial to subepicardial radial strain (the bilayer ratio) decreased significantly as the severity of AS increased. Bilayer ratio showed weak correlations with LV ejection fraction (r = 0.37) and E/E' ratio (r = -0.33) and moderate correlations with LV mass (r = -0.55) and aortic valve area (r = 0.71). Moreover, bilayer ratio was independently associated with AS severity (P = .001). In 21 patients who underwent aortic valve replacement, subendocardial radial strain and bilayer ratio increased 7 days after surgery, whereas other echocardiographic parameters of LV function showed no improvement. Bilayer ratio can reliably differentiate patients with varying degrees of AS severity and is a sensitive marker of LV function. These findings suggest that the evaluation of subendocardial and subepicardial radial strain might be a novel method for assessing LV mechanics in patients with AS. Copyright © 2012 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Mosby, Inc. All

  15. Functionality and Outcome in Older Patients with Severe Aortic Stenosis (FOOPAS): an interdisciplinary study concept for a prospective trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicklein, Susanne; Gosch, Markus; Jessl, Jürgen; Hitzl, Wolfgang; Fischlein, Theodor; Pauschinger, Matthias; Pfeiffer, Steffen; Eckner, Dennis

    2018-01-01

    Background Frailty is a geriatric syndrome that can influence mortality and functional recovery after treatment of severe aortic stenosis (AS). The integration of standardized geriatric assessment (GA) in clinical practice is limited by a lack of consensus on how to measure it. Objectives This study aims to compare the incremental predictive value of different frailty scales to predict the outcomes following surgical aortic valve replacement, transcatheter aortic valve implantation, and conservative treatment of severe AS. Methods A prospective cohort of 300 older adults with severe AS will be assembled after standard clinical examinations and a comprehensive GA, including 18 different tests and values. Primary outcome parameters are overall mortality, cardiovascular mortality, quality of life, and functionality. Secondary parameters are overall complications, cardiovascular complications, and costs. Results Expected results will contribute to the growing body of evidence on frailty based on parameters that influence clinical and functional outcome in elderly patients independent of the method of treatment. The pre-procedural assessment is expected to be valuable in discriminating new post-procedural complications from simple exacerbations of pre-existing conditions. Therefore, a new frailty test which is simple and feasible for application in a clinical routine by most medical professionals, may help in identifying patients for whom further GA should be considered. Finally, such a frailty score could support heart teams to find the right treatment for patients suffering from AS. Conclusion Comparison of different frailty scales has not only the goal of finding a predictive value of mortality but also to bring in a meaningful improvement for each individual patient and to avoid disability or fatal outcomes. PMID:29440878

  16. Should high risk patients with concomitant severe aortic stenosis and mitral valve disease undergo double valve surgery in the TAVR era?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Pey-Jen; Mattia, Allan; Cassiere, Hugh A; Esposito, Rick; Manetta, Frank; Kohn, Nina; Hartman, Alan R

    2017-12-29

    Significant mitral regurgitation in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is associated with increased mortality. The aim of this study is to determine if surgical correction of both aortic and mitral valves in high risk patients with concomitant valvular disease would offer patients better outcomes than TAVR alone. A retrospective analysis of 43 high-risk patients who underwent concomitant surgical aortic valve replacement and mitral valve surgery from 2008 to 2012 was performed. Immediate and long term survival were assessed. There were 43 high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing concomitant surgical aortic valve replacement and mitral valve surgery. The average age was 80 ± 6 years old. Nineteen (44%) patients had prior cardiac surgery, 15 (34.9%) patients had chronic obstructive lung disease, and 39 (91%) patients were in congestive heart failure. The mean Society of Thoracic Surgeons Predicted Risk of Mortality for isolated surgical aortic valve replacement for the cohort was 10.1% ± 6.4%. Five patients (11.6%) died during the index admission and/or within thirty days of surgery. Mortality rate was 25% at six months, 35% at 1 year and 45% at 2 years. There was no correlation between individual preoperative risk factors and mortality. High-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis and mitral valve disease undergoing concomitant surgical aortic valve replacement and mitral valve surgery may have similar long term survival as that described for such patients undergoing TAVR. Surgical correction of double valvular disease in this patient population may not confer mortality benefit compared to TAVR alone.

  17. Congenital Aortic Stenosis in Adults: Update on clinical outcome, diagnostic methods and pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S-C. Yap (Sing-Chien)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground and aim of the study: The pulmonary autograft has been recommended as the valve of choice for aortic valve replacement (AVR) in young women contemplating pregnancy. However, current information on maternal and perinatal outcome of pregnancy in women with pulmonary autograft

  18. Reduced global longitudinal strain in association to increased left ventricular mass in patients with aortic valve stenosis and normal ejection fraction: a hybrid study combining echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheffold Thomas

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased muscle mass index of the left ventricle (LVMi is an independent predictor for the development of symptoms in patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS. While the onset of clinical symptoms and left ventricular systolic dysfunction determines a poor prognosis, the standard echocardiographic evaluation of LV dysfunction, only based on measurements of the LV ejection fraction (EF, may be insufficient for an early assessment of imminent heart failure. Contrary, 2-dimensional speckle tracking (2DS seems to be superior in detecting subtle changes in myocardial function. The aim of the study was to assess these LV function deteriorations with global longitudinal strain (GLS analysis and the relations to LVMi in patients with AS and normal EF. Methods 50 patients with moderate to severe AS and 31 controls were enrolled. All patients underwent echocardiography, including 2DS imaging. LVMi measures were performed with magnetic resonance imaging in 38 patients with AS and indexed for body surface area. Results The total group of patients with AST showed a GLS of -15,2 ± 3,6% while the control group reached -19,5 ± 2,7% (p Conclusions In conclusion, increased LVMi is reflected in abnormalities of GLS and the proportion of GLS impairment depends on the extent of LV hypertrophy. Therefore, simultaneous measurement of LVMi and GLS might be useful to identify patients at high risk for transition into heart failure who would benefit from aortic valve replacement irrespectively of LV EF.

  19. Left ventricular filling pressure estimation at rest and during exercise in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis: comparison of echocardiographic and invasive measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Morten; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Pecini, Redi

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Doppler index of left ventricular (LV) filling (E/e') is recognized as a noninvasive measure for LV filling pressure at rest but has also been suggested as a reliable measure of exercise-induced changes. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in LV filling pressure......, measured invasively as pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), at rest and during exercise to describe the relation with E/e' in patients with severe aortic stenosis. METHODS: Twenty-eight patients with an aortic valve areas

  20. The 'obesity paradox' does exist in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation for aortic stenosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Wenyu; Li, Shuangjiang; Liao, Yanbiao; Zhao, Zhengang; Che, Guowei; Chen, Mao; Feng, Yuan

    2017-10-01

    Most recent studies have proposed the paradoxical benefits of obesity in surgical populations. For patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) for aortic stenosis, the prognostic roles of obesity and high body mass index remain controversial. Therefore, the objective of this meta-analysis was to evaluate whether the 'obesity paradox' exists in patients undergoing TAVI. We searched in PubMed and EMBASE to identify the eligible articles. Odds ratios and hazard ratios with the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were adopted for synthesizing short-term and long-term survival outcomes, respectively. The level of heterogeneity and the publication bias between studies were also estimated. Finally, there were 16 studies with 12 330 patients who met the eligibility criteria and who were thus included in this review. When body mass index was analysed as a continuous variable, each increase of 1 kg/m2 was significantly associated with the lower 30-day mortality rate (odds ratio = 0.95; 95% CI = 0.93-0.97; P obese patients had a significantly lower risk of 30-day mortality after TAVI than did normal patients (odds ratio = 0.69; 95% CI = 0.50-0.95; P = 0.024). Further analyses indicated that the obesity could be predictive of more favourable long-term overall survival of TAVI (hazard ratio = 0.84; 95% CI = 0.72-0.97; P = 0.021). However, we found no difference in procedural complications between the obese and normal patients. In conclusion, higher body mass index and obesity seem to have protective benefits on both short-term and long-term survival of TAVI patients. Current evidence suggests that the 'obesity paradox' may really exist in TAVI. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison in Men Versus Women of Co-morbidities, Complications, and Outcomes After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation for Severe Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaglia, Michael A; Lipinski, Michael J; Torguson, Rebecca; Gai, Jiaxiang; Ben-Dor, Itsik; Bernardo, Nelson L; Satler, Lowell F; Pichard, Augusto D; Waksman, Ron

    2016-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) decreases mortality in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis, but it remains unclear if female gender is associated with more favorable outcomes after TAVI. All patients who underwent TAVI at a single institution were retrospectively analyzed and stratified by gender. Procedural, in-hospital, 30-day, and 1-year outcomes were defined according to the second Valve Academic Research Consortium. The primary end point was all-cause mortality at 1 year. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression were conducted. Overall, 755 patients underwent TAVI and were included in the study; 50.7% were women. Average age was 83.0 ± 7.7 years, with a mean Society of Thoracic Surgeons score of 8.9 ± 4.6. Women were older than men and more likely to be black. Most co-morbidities were less common among women, and they were more likely than men to suffer both in-hospital (8.4% vs 4.3%, p = 0.021) and 30-day (9.4% vs 5.4%, p = 0.035) all-cause mortality. Life-threatening bleeding, transfusion, and iliofemoral dissection or perforation were more common among women. There was no difference in mortality between women and men at 1 year (20.6% vs 21.5%, log-rank p = 0.87). After multivariable adjustment, however, female gender was independently associated with lower mortality at 1 year after TAVI. In conclusion, despite higher rates of major bleeding, vascular complications, and 30-day mortality, female gender was independently associated with improved survival at 1 year after TAVI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Predictors of Health-Related Quality of Life Decline after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Older Patients with Severe Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boureau, A S; Trochu, J N; Rouaud, A; Hureau, R; Jaafar, P; Manigold, T; Letocart, V; Guerin, P; Berrut, G; de Decker, L

    2017-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic-valve implantation (TAVI) has been shown to improve survival and quality of life in patients with severe aortic stenosis. However, one-third of patients have poor outcome as death, functional decline or quality of life (QoL) decline. The aim of this study was to determine cardiac and geriatric predictors of physical and mental QoL decline 6 months after a TAVI procedure in patients aged 75 and older. Between January 2013 and June 2014, we did a prospective and multicenter study including patients ≥ 75 years old referred for TAVI. The primary outcome was the measure of QoL, assessed by the Short Form 36 survey (SF-36), before and 6 months after the intervention. Association between QoL decline and baseline characteristics including cardiac and geriatric factors was analysed by logistic regression models. Mean age of the 150 patients studied was 83.7 years old and 56% were men. The primary end point, mean SF-36 physical summary score, significantly improved between baseline and 6-month (33.6 vs. 36.4, p=0.003) whereas mental component score significantly decreased (48.2 vs. 36.4, p-valuepatients with presence of depressive symptoms before the intervention had mental QoL improvement at six months (OR 0.04 [0.01-0.19], p-valuegeriatric predictors were associated with physical QoL decline. The mental QoL significantly decreased and patients with preoperative depressive symptoms had mental QoL improvement at six months. Researches are needed to confirm that mental QoL of patients with depressive symptoms can be improved by TAVI.

  3. Transcatheter versus Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients with Diabetes and Severe Aortic Stenosis at High Risk for Surgery: An Analysis of the PARTNER Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindman, Brian R.; Pibarot, Philippe; Arnold, Suzanne V.; Suri, Rakesh; McAndrew, Thomas C.; Maniar, Hersh S.; Zajarias, Alan; Kodali, Susheel; Kirtane, Ajay J.; Thourani, Vinod H.; Tuzcu, E. Murat; Svensson, Lars G.; Waksman, Ron; Smith, Craig R.; Leon, Martin B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether a less invasive approach to aortic valve replacement (AVR) improves clinical outcomes in diabetic patients with aortic stenosis (AS). Background Diabetes is associated with increased morbidity and mortality after surgical AVR for AS. Methods Among treated patients with severe symptomatic AS at high-risk for surgery in the PARTNER trial, we examined outcomes stratified by diabetes status of patients randomly assigned to transcatheter or surgical AVR. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality at 1 year. Results Among 657 patients enrolled in PARTNER who underwent treatment, there were 275 patients with diabetes (145 transcatheter, 130 surgical). There was a significant interaction between diabetes and treatment group for 1-year all-cause mortality (p=0.048). Among diabetic patients, all-cause mortality at 1 year was 18.0% in the transcatheter group and 27.4% in the surgical group (HR 0.60; 95% CI, 0.36–0.99; p=0.04). Results were consistent among patients treated via transfemoral or transapical routes. In contrast, among non-diabetic patients, there was no significant difference in all-cause mortality at 1 year (p=0.48). Among diabetic patients, the 1-year rates of stroke were similar between treatment groups (3.5% transcatheter vs. 3.5% surgery, p=0.88), but the rates of renal failure requiring dialysis >30 days were lower in the transcatheter group (0% vs. 6.1%, p=0.003). Conclusions Among patients with diabetes and severe symptomatic AS at high-risk for surgery, this post-hoc stratified analysis of the PARTNER trial suggests there is a survival benefit, no increase in stroke, and less renal failure from treatment with transcatheter compared to surgical AVR. PMID:24291272

  4. Development of a validated model to predict 30-day stroke and 1-year survival after carotid endarterectomy for asymptomatic stenosis using the Vascular Quality Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMartino, Randall R; Brooke, Benjamin S; Neal, Dan; Beck, Adam W; Conrad, Mark F; Arya, Shipra; Desai, Sapan; Aziz, Faisal; Ryan, Patrick; Cronenwett, Jack L; Kraiss, Larry W

    2017-08-01

    Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) has been shown to be an effective treatment for patients with asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis when perioperative stroke rates are low and patients survive long enough to benefit from the intervention. Our objective was to develop and to validate a simple risk prediction model for 30-day stroke and 1-year mortality to guide optimal selection of patients for CEA. Asymptomatic patients undergoing first-time elective CEA within the Vascular Quality Initiative (VQI) from 2010 to 2015 were selected. Outcome measures included any 30-day postoperative stroke and 1-year mortality. Patient demographics, comorbidities, carotid artery disease burden, and provider characteristics were evaluated to select a parsimonious clinical model for risk prediction using multivariable logistic regression. Internal validation was performed for stroke and split sample validation was done for 1-year survival to ensure generalizability. We identified 31,939 patients for inclusion in the stroke analysis (2010-2015) and 24,086 patients for the mortality analysis (2010-2014). Both the 30-day stroke rate (0.9%) and 1-year mortality rate (3.4%) varied substantially across 265 VQI centers (range, 0%-8.3% and 0%-20%, respectively). Eleven significant factors were selected for the 30-day stroke risk prediction model (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC], 0.67). Internal validation demonstrated good discrimination (bias corrected AUC = 0.652; calibration intercept and slope of 0.03 and 1.01, respectively). Similarly, 10 significant factors were selected for the 1-year mortality risk prediction model (AUC, 0.764). External validation demonstrated excellent discrimination and calibration (AUC, 0.764; 95% confidence interval, 0.72-0.80). Stroke and 1-year mortality rates after CEA for asymptomatic stenosis vary across VQI centers. We have developed a preoperative risk model that can be used to accurately estimate risk of perioperative stroke and 1

  5. Myocardial extracellular remodeling is associated with ventricular diastolic dysfunction in children and young adults with congenital aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusenbery, Susan M; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Rickers, Carsten; Colan, Steven D; Geva, Tal; Newburger, Jane W; Powell, Andrew J

    2014-05-06

    This study sought to analyze cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) measurements of myocardial extracellular volume fraction (ECV) and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) in children and young adults with congenital aortic stenosis (AS) to determine the extent of fibrosis and examine their association with aortic valve and ventricular function. Patients with congenital AS frequently have impaired diastolic ventricular function and exercise capacity that may be related to myocardial fibrosis. A total of 35 patients with congenital AS (median age 16 years) and 27 normal control subjects (median age 16 years) were evaluated by CMR. ECV was calculated from pre- and post-gadolinium contrast T1 measurements of blood and myocardium, and the hematocrit. ECV was significantly higher in AS patients than in normal subjects (median 0.27 [range 0.22 to 0.42] vs. 0.25 [range 0.18 to 0.27], p = 0.001). LGE was present in 8 (24%) of the AS patients. A higher ECV was correlated with echocardiographic indexes of diastolic dysfunction including a higher mitral E-wave z-score (r = 0.58, p = 0.002), E/septal E' z-score (r = 0.56, p = 0.003), E/mean E' z-score (r = 0.55, p = 0.003), and indexed left atrial volume (r = 0.56, p = 0.001). Other factors associated with an elevated ECV (>0.28) included a greater number of aortic valve interventions (p = 0.004) and a greater number of aortic valve balloon valvuloplasties (p = 0.003). ECV was not significantly associated with AS gradient, left ventricular mass, mass/volume ratio, or ejection fraction. In young patients with AS, myocardial ECV is significantly elevated compared with control subjects and is associated with echocardiographic indexes of diastolic dysfunction. ECV measured by CMR may be a useful method for risk stratification and monitoring therapies targeting fibrosis. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Echocardiography as a Predicting Method in Diagnosis, Evaluation and Assessment of Children with Subvalvar Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejiqi, Ramush; Bejiqi, Hana; Retkoceri, Ragip

    2016-03-15

    Obstruction to the left ventricular outflow of the heart may be above the aortic valve (5%), at the valve (74%), or in the subvalvar region (23%). These anomalies represent 3 to 6% of all patients with congenital heart defects (CHD), and it occurs more often in males (male-female ratio of 4:1). The purpose of this study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of transthoracic echocardiography in diagnosis of discrete subaortic membrane, to determine convenient time for surgical intervention, and for identifying involvement of the aortic valve by subaortic shelf. A retrospective review of the medical records and echocardiograms of 18 patients [14 male (77%) and 4 female (23%)] with discrete subaortic membrane, aged 11 month to 12 years, with mean age of 5 years and 3 month, diagnosed at the Pediatric Clinic in Prishtina, during the period September, 1999 and December, 2010 were done. Four patients, in neonatal age were operated from critical coarctation of the aorta and, initial signs of congestive heart failure were presented. 2 of them were operated in Belgrade, Serbia and 2 in Lausanne, Switzerland. In all presented patients bicuspid aortic valve was noted, but none of them subaortic membrane was registered.

  7. Persistent reduction in left ventricular strain using two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography after balloon valvuloplasty in children with congenital valvular aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Karen A; de Korte, Chris L; Feuth, Ton; Thijssen, Johan M; van Oort, Anton M; Tanke, Ronald B; Kapusta, Livia

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investige serial changes of myocardial deformation using two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiographic (2DSTE) imaging in children undergoing balloon valvuloplasty for congenital valvular aortic stenosis (VAS). Thirty-seven children with isolated congenital VAS were enrolled in this study prospectively. Patients underwent echocardiographic evaluation at three instances: before balloon valvuloplasty, 6 months after intervention, and 3 years after intervention. Longitudinal, circumferential, and radial peak systolic strain values were determined, as well as systolic strain rate and the time to peak global systolic strain. Linear mixed statistical models were used to assess changes in 2DSTE parameters after balloon intervention. Using one-way analysis of variance, 2DSTE results at 3-year follow-up were compared with 2DSTE measurements in 74 healthy age-matched children and 76 children with uncorrected VAS whose severity of stenosis corresponded to residual stenosis of study subjects at 3-year follow-up. Global peak strain and strain rate measurements in all three directions were decreased before intervention compared with healthy children. Global peak strain and strain rate measurements increased significantly (P stenosis or aortic regurgitation. Copyright © 2012 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Determinants of Left Ventricular Mass Regression in Patients with Severe Symptomatic Aortic Stenosis Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissler-Snir, Adaya; Shapira, Yaron; Sagie, Alexander; Kazum, Shirit; Assali, Abid; Vaknin-Assa, Hana; Bental, Tamir; Codner, Pablo; Orvin, Katia; Kornowski, Ran; Vaturi, Mordehay

    2015-05-01

    The dynamics of left ventricular mass (LVM) regression following the relief of chronic left ventricular pressure overload are prone to variation. The study aim was to identify determinants of LVM regression following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). A total of 134 patients undergoing TAVI was identified. A retrospective analysis was performed of LVM indexed to body surface area (LVMi), calculated using transthoracic echocardiography at baseline and at six to 12 months post-TAVI. At six to 12 months after TAVI, there was a significant reduction in mean LVMi (from 118.2 ± 26.67 g/m2 to 103.4 ± 27.07 g/m2; p < 0.001) driven by a decrease in left ventricular wall thickness. The relative wall thickness (RWT) was decreased (0.54 ± 0.10 cm versus 0.51 ± 0.09 cm; p = 0.006), whereas the prevalence of concentric remodeling (RWT ≥ 0.42) remained unchanged (85.1% versus 80.6%; p = 0.3). However, 47 patients (35.1%) demonstrated significant LVMi regression, but had a lower baseline LVMi than patients who demonstrated significant regression (109.8 ± 25.8 g/m2 versus 122 ± 26.1 g/m2; p = 0.008) but had otherwise similar characteristics. A greater magnitude of LVMi reduction was associated with a greater baseline LVMi (r = 0.39; p < 0.001), where patients with LVMi in the highest quartile had the most substantial reduction in LVMi (p < 0.001). Multivariable analysis identified pre-TAVI LVMi as the sole independent predictor of LVMi regression at six to 12 months post-TAVI (P = 0.45; 95% confidence interval 0.255-0.534; p < 0.001). LVM regression at six to months post-TAVI was variable, with about one-third of patients not showing a significant regression. Only baseline LVM predicted LVM regression; patients with a higher baseline LVM demonstrated a greater regression.

  9. Prospective Multicenter Evaluation of the Direct Flow Medical Transcatheter Aortic Valve System: 12-Month Outcomes of the Evaluation of the Direct Flow Medical Percutaneous Aortic Valve 18F System for the Treatment of Patients With Severe Aortic Stenosis (DISCOVER) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Thierry; Colombo, Antonio; Tchétché, Didier; Latib, Azeem; Klugmann, Silvio; Fajadet, Jean; De Marco, Federico; Maisano, Francesco; Bruschi, Giuseppe; Bijuklic, Klaudija; Nava, Stefano; Weissman, Neil; Low, Reginald; Thomas, Martyn; Young, Christopher; Redwood, Simon; Mullen, Michael; Yap, John; Grube, Eberhard; Nickenig, Georg; Sinning, Jan-Malte; Hauptmann, Karl Eugen; Friedrich, Ivar; Lauterbach, Michael; Schmoeckel, Michael; Davidson, Charles; Schofer, Joachim

    2016-01-11

    The aim of this study was to assess the 1-year outcome after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) of the Direct Flow Medical (DFM) valve in patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who were contraindicated or high risk for surgery. The DFM transcatheter heart valve is a new-generation, nonmetallic aortic valve with a pressurized support structure and conformable double-ring annular sealing delivered through an 18-F sheath. The device allows repositioning, retrieval, and assessment of valve performance before permanent implantation. A prospective multicenter European registry was set up to determine the safety and performance of the valve in 100 consecutive patients (10 centers). Echocardiographic and angiographic data were evaluated by an independent core laboratory, and adverse events were adjudicated by a clinical events committee using Valve Academic Research Consortium criteria. Patients were 83.1 ± 5.9 years of age and had a logistic EuroSCORE of 22.5 ± 11.3% and a Society of Thoracic Surgeons score of 9.7 ± 8.7%. Correct valve positioning was obtained in 99% of cases with a combined 30-day safety endpoint at 10%, including major stroke in 5.0%, major vascular complications in 2.0%, and death in 1%. At 12 months, 95% of patients were in New York Heart Association functional class I or II. Freedom from any death was 90%, and freedom from any death or major stroke was 85%. Echocardiography demonstrated none/trace to mild aortic regurgitation in 100% of patients and an unchanged mean aortic gradient of 12.2 ± 6.6 mm Hg and effective orifice area of 1.6 ± 0.4 cm(2). At 1 year, the DFM transcatheter heart valve had durable hemodynamics. This study demonstrates that the low rate of early complications and the low risk of significant aortic regurgitation translated into midterm clinical benefit. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Heart Team therapeutic decision-making and treatment in severe aortic valve stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav Hørsted; Holmberg, Fredrik; Gerds, Thomas Alexander

    2016-01-01

    .51-13.77; p obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (OR = 3.66, 1.21-10.75; p = 0.02). MT patients compared with patients referred to any intervention were older, had a higher prevalence of COPD, peripheral arterial disease, previous myocardial infarction, and cerebrovascular disease......%), and surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in 392 (81%) of patients. In patients referred to intervention, TAVI compared with SAVR patients were older (OR = 1.17 per year, 95% CI 1.09-1.26; p artery bypass surgery (OR = 385, 79-2738; p 

  11. Intraprocedural left ventricular free wall rupture diagnosed by left ventriculogram in a patient with infero-posterior myocardial infarction and severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Takao; Funayama, Naohiro; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Hotta, Daisuke; Kikuchi, Kenjiro; Yokoyama, Hideo; Ohori, Katsumi

    2016-06-06

    Left ventricular wall rupture remains a major lethal complication of acute myocardial infarction and hypertension is a well-known predisposing factor of cardiac rupture after myocardial infarction. An 87-year-old man was admitted to our hospital, diagnosed as acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The echocardiogram showed 0.67-cm(2) aortic valve, consistent with severe aortic stenosis (AS). A coronary angiography showed a chronic occlusion of the proximal left circumflex artery and a 99 % stenosis and thrombus in the mid right coronary artery. During percutaneous angioplasty of the latter, transient hypotension and bradycardia developed at the time of balloon inflation, and low doses of noradrenaline and etilefrine were intravenously administered as needed. The patient suddenly lost consciousness and developed electro-mechanical dissociation. Cardio-pulmonary resuscitation followed by insertion of an intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) and percutaneous cardiopulmonary support were initiated. The echocardiogram revealed moderate pericardial effusion, though the site of free wall rupture was not distinctly visible. A left ventriculogram clearly showed an infero-posterior apical wall rupture. Surgical treatment was withheld because of the interim development of brain death. In this patient, who presented with severe AS, the administration of catecholamine to stabilize the blood pressure probably increased the intraventricular pressures considerably despite apparently normal measurements of the central aortic pressure. IABP, temporary pacemaker, or both are recommended instead of intravenous catecholamines for patients with AMI complicated with significant AS to stabilize hemodynamic function during angioplasty.

  12. The safety and efficacy of enhanced external counterpulsation as a treatment for angina in patients with aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Debra L; Braitman, Len; Figueredo, Vincent M; Figeuredo, Vincent M

    2013-02-01

    Comorbid aortic stenosis (AS) has been considered a precaution when applying enhanced external counterpulsation (EECP) to individuals with angina due to concerns about treatment-related hemodynamic changes. The aim of this study was to determine whether EECP safely reduces symptoms of myocardial ischemia and improves hemodynamics in individuals with AS. Forty-three patients with AS (average age, 73 years; 86% male) and 43 comparison patients without AS were chosen from a database of 1327 EECP patients. Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) Functional Angina Classification, diastolic augmentation ratio, and blood pressure were measured at baseline and on completion of the course of EECP. Thirty-five of the 43 patients with AS (81%, 95% CI: 66.6% to 91.6%) and 38 of the 43 without AS (88%, 95% CI: 74.9% to 96.1%) improved in angina class (P angina class outcome was not associated with AS severity (P = 0.55). The percentage of patients with diastolic augmentation ratio ≥1.0 was 16.3% in both groups at baseline and improved to 39.5% in AS patients and 37.2% in non-AS patients after EECP (both P = 0.002). The average decreases in systolic blood pressure in subjects with AS (-15 mm Hg, 95% CI: 11 to 20, P Angina patients with AS who undergo EECP had clinically important symptomatic and hemodynamic improvements comparable to their non-AS counterparts. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. A single codon insertion in PICALM is associated with development of familial subvalvular aortic stenosis in Newfoundland dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Joshua A; White, Stephen N; Lehmkuhl, Linda B; Reina-Doreste, Yamir; Ferguson, Jordan L; Nascone-Yoder, Nanette M; Meurs, Kathryn M

    2014-09-01

    Familial subvalvular aortic stenosis (SAS) is one of the most common congenital heart defects in dogs and is an inherited defect of Newfoundlands, golden retrievers and human children. Although SAS is known to be inherited, specific genes involved in Newfoundlands with SAS have not been defined. We hypothesized that SAS in Newfoundlands is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern and caused by a single genetic variant. We studied 93 prospectively recruited Newfoundland dogs, and 180 control dogs of 30 breeds. By providing cardiac screening evaluations for Newfoundlands we conducted a pedigree evaluation, genome-wide association study and RNA sequence analysis to identify a proposed pattern of inheritance and genetic loci associated with the development of SAS. We identified a three-nucleotide exonic insertion in phosphatidylinositol-binding clathrin assembly protein (PICALM) that is associated with the development of SAS in Newfoundlands. Pedigree evaluation best supported an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance and provided evidence that equivocally affected individuals may pass on SAS in their progeny. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated the presence of PICALM in the canine myocardium and area of the subvalvular ridge. Additionally, small molecule inhibition of clathrin-mediated endocytosis resulted in developmental abnormalities within the outflow tract (OFT) of Xenopus laevis embryos. The ability to test for presence of this PICALM insertion may impact dog-breeding decisions and facilitate reduction of SAS disease prevalence in Newfoundland dogs. Understanding the role of PICALM in OFT development may aid in future molecular and genetic investigations into other congenital heart defects of various species.

  14. Three-dimensional ultrasound evaluation of small asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredahl, K; Sandholt, B; Lönn, L

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Non-invasive and reproducible size measurements that correlate well with computed tomography (CT) are desirable in the management of small abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Three dimensional ultrasound (3D-US) technology may reduce inaccuracy because of variations in orientation...... physicians. METHODS: In the period from 1 March 2013 to 27 February 2014, consecutive patients with a small AAA, AAA size measures were obtained: dual plane diameter, diameter perpendicular to the residual sac's centreline...... and a partial volume. RESULT: In all, 122 consecutive US examinations were performed. Patients were excluded because of inadequate AAA size (n = 11) and for technical reasons (n = 11). Thus, 100 patients (F/M; 20/80) with a median maximum AAA diameter of 46 (range 31-55) mm were analysed. The mean US dual plane...

  15. Discrepancy analysis between crystallized and fluid intelligence tests: a novel method to detect mild cognitive impairment in patients with asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaiwa, A; Kuwayama, N; Akioka, N; Kashiwazaki, D; Kuroda, S

    2018-02-01

    The present study was conducted to accurately determine the presence of mild cognitive impairment, which is often difficult to evaluate using only simple tests. Our approach focused on discrepancy analysis of fluid intelligence relative to crystallized intelligence using internationally recognized neuropsychological tests. One-hundred and five patients diagnosed with asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis were assessed. The neuropsychological tests included the two subtests (information and picture completion) of Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R-two-subtests): crystallized intelligence tests and the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS) (immediate memory, visuospatial/constructional, language, attention, delayed memory and total score) as fluid intelligence tests. Discrepancy analysis was used to assess cognitive impairment. The score for RBANS was subtracted from the score for WAIS-R-two-subtests, and if the score difference was greater than the 5% confidence limit for statistical significance, it was defined as a decline in cognitive function. The WAIS-R-two-subsets was within normal limits when compared with the standardized values. However, all RBANS domains showed significant declines. Frequencies of decline in each RBANS domain were as follows: 69 patients (66%) in immediate memory, 26 (25%) in visuospatial/constructional, 54 (51%) in language, 63 (60%) in attention, 54 (51%) in delayed memory and 78 (74%) in the total score. Moreover, 99 patients (94%) showed decline in at least one RBANS domain. Cognitive function is only preserved in a few patients with asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis. Mild cognitive impairment can be precisely detected by performing the discrepancy analysis between crystallized and fluid intelligence tests. © 2017 EAN.

  16. The impact of frailty status on clinical and functional outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve replacement in nonagenarians with severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoh, Alexis K; Chauhan, Dhaval; Kang, Nathan; Haik, Nicky; Merlo, Aurelie; Cohen, Mark; Haik, Bruce; Chen, Chunguang; Russo, Mark J

    2017-11-15

    The impact of frailty status on TAVR outcomes in nonagenarians is unknown. The present study aims to investigate the impact of frailty status on procedural outcomes and overall survival in nonagenarians after TAVR. A frailty score (FS) was derived by using preoperative grip strength, gait speed, serum albumin, and daily activities. Patients were divided into two groups: Frail (FS ≥ 3/4) and Non-Frail (FS frailty status on outcomes was investigated. Cox regression analyses were performed to determine predictors of overall all-cause mortality. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used to estimate survival. Seventy-five patients >90 years underwent full assessment for frailty status. There was a significant improvement in overall health status of non-frail patients (mean difference: 11.03, P = 0.032). Unadjusted 30-day and 2-year mortality rates were higher in the frail group than the non-frail group. (14% vs. 2% P = 0.059; 31% vs. 9% P = 0.018). Kaplan-Meier estimated all-cause mortality to be significantly higher in the frail group (log-rank test; P = 0.042). Frailty status was independently associated with increased mortality (hazard ratio: 1.84, 95% C.I: 1.06-3.17; P = 0.028) after TAVR. Among nonagenarians selected to undergo TAVR for severe aortic stenosis, a considerable number are frail. Nonfrail patients report a significant improvement in overall health status in the short term. Worse frailty is strongly associated with diminished long-term survival. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Increased stiffness is the major early abnormality in a pig model of severe aortic stenosis and predisposes to congestive heart failure in the absence of systolic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kiyotake; Aguero, Jaume; Oh, Jae Gyun; Hammoudi, Nadjib; Fish, Lauren A; Leonardson, Lauren; Picatoste, Belén; Santos-Gallego, Carlos G; Fish, Kenneth M; Hajjar, Roger J

    2015-05-20

    It remains unclear whether abnormal systolic function and relaxation are essential for developing heart failure in pathophysiology of severe aortic stenosis. Yorkshire pigs underwent surgical banding of the ascending aorta. The animals were followed for up to 5 months after surgery, and cardiac function was assessed comprehensively by invasive pressure-volume measurements, 3-dimensional echocardiography, echocardiographic speckle-tracking strain, and postmortem molecular and histological analyses. Pigs with aortic banding (n=6) exhibited significant left ventricular hypertrophy with increased stiffness compared with the control pigs (n=7) (end-diastolic pressure-volume relationship β: 0.053±0.017 versus 0.028±0.009 mm Hg/mL, P=0.007); however, all other parameters corresponding to systolic function, including ejection fraction, end-systolic pressure-volume relationship, preload recruitable stroke work, echocardiographic circumferential strain, and longitudinal strain, were not impaired in pigs with aortic banding. Relaxation parameters were also similar between groups. Sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium (Ca(2+)) ATPase protein levels in the left ventricle were similar. There were significant increases in 3-dimensional echocardiographic left atrial volumes, suggesting the usefulness of these indexes to detect increased stiffness. Right atrial pacing with a heart rate of 120 beats per minute induced increased end-diastolic pressure in pigs with aortic banding in contrast to decreased end-diastolic pressure in the control pigs. Histological evaluation revealed that increased stiffness was accompanied by cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and increased perimysial and perivascular fibrosis. Increased stiffness is the major early pathological process that predisposes to congestive heart failure without abnormalities in systolic function and relaxation in a clinically relevant animal model of aortic stenosis. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart

  18. [Fragility in severe aortic stenosis patient: a multidimensional assessment from nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melero-Lacasia, Amaia

    2016-01-01

    The interest in studying frailty in older adults is an emerging fact in cardiology due to the incidence of patients undergoing valve replacement procedures in conditions difficult to quantify from the purely clinical point of view. In this regard, the profile of patients has been changing and often elderly people identify with greater vulnerability shown by different aspects such as walking speed, grip strength, independence for activities of daily living or emotional issues that condition their quality of life. These patients need to be identified prior to surgery in order to offer the best therapeutic option. Therefore, in our centre we set out to identify this group of fragile population with a multidimensional assessment where the nurse, through a specific assessment test, can set the degree of fragility of those patients who have an increased vulnerability. In this article we describe the multidimensional assessment in a pilot experience with 115 patients, where patient characteristics were analyzed, providing an overview of the profile of frailty in the elderly with aortic valve heart disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Hybrid balloon valvuloplasty through the ascending aorta via median sternotomy in infants with severe congenital valvular aortic stenosis: feasibility of a new method†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiang-Bin; Zhang, Feng-Wen; Hu, Sheng-Shou; Liu, Zhen-Guo; Ma, Kai; Pang, Kun-Jing; Yan, Fu-Xia; Wang, Xu; Ou-Yang, Wen-Bin; Wang, Yang; Li, Shou-Jun

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate a novel hybrid balloon valvuloplasty procedure for severe congenital valvular aortic stenosis in low-weight infants, performed through the ascending aorta via median sternotomy. Eighteen infants (Hybrid balloon valvuloplasty procedures were performed in a hybrid operating room. Patients were followed up at 3 months, 6 months, 1 year and then annually following the procedure. The hybrid balloon valvuloplasty procedure was successful in all patients. Eight patients were successfully rescued from left ventricular systolic dysfunction by cardiac compression under direct vision. The aortic valve pressure gradient decreased from 80.3 ± 20.8 mmHg preoperatively to 16.0 ± 3.6 mmHg immediately postoperatively (P valve pressure gradient remained low (21.7 ± 5.3 mmHg). Reintervention was not required in any of the patients. Hybrid balloon valvuloplasty through the ascending aorta via median sternotomy is an effective and safe procedure for infants with severe congenital aortic stenosis. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  20. Platelet expression of stromal cell-derived factor-1 is associated with the degree of valvular aortic stenosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wurster

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Platelet surface expression of stromal-cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1 is increased during platelet activation and constitutes an important factor in hematopoetic progenitor cell trafficking at sites of vascular injury and ischemia. Enhanced platelet SDF-1 expression has been reported previously in patients suffering from acute coronary syndrome (ACS. We hypothesized that expression of platelet associated SDF-1 may also be influenced by calcified valvular aortic stenosis (AS. METHODS: We consecutively evaluated 941 patients, who were admitted to the emergency department with dyspnea and chest pain. Platelet surface expression of SDF-1 was determined by flow cytometry, AS was assessed using echocardiography and hemodynamic assessment by heart catheterization. A 1∶1 propensity score matching was implemented to match 218 cases with 109 pairs adjusting for age, sex, cardiovascular risk factors, and medication including ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, beta blockers, statins, aspirin, clopidogrel, GPIIb/IIIa antagonists, and vitamin K antagonists. RESULTS: Patients with valvular AS showed enhanced platelet SDF-1 expression compared to patients without AS (non-valvular disease, NV independent of ACS and stable coronary artery disease (SAP [mean fluorescence intensity (MFI for ACS (AS vs. NV: 75±40.4 vs. 39.5±23.3; P = 0.002; for SAP (AS vs. NV: 54.9±44.6 vs. 24.3±11.2; P = 0.008]. Moreover, the degree of AS significantly correlated with SDF-1 platelet surface expression (r = 0.462; P = 0.002. CONCLUSIONS: Valvular AS is associated with enhanced platelet-SDF-1 expression; moreover the degree of valvular AS correlates with SDF-1 platelet surface expression. These findings may have clinical implications in the future.

  1. Platelet expression of stromal cell-derived factor-1 is associated with the degree of valvular aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurster, Thomas; Tegtmeyer, Roland; Borst, Oliver; Rath, Dominik; Geisler, Tobias; Gawaz, Meinrad; Bigalke, Boris

    2014-01-01

    Platelet surface expression of stromal-cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) is increased during platelet activation and constitutes an important factor in hematopoetic progenitor cell trafficking at sites of vascular injury and ischemia. Enhanced platelet SDF-1 expression has been reported previously in patients suffering from acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We hypothesized that expression of platelet associated SDF-1 may also be influenced by calcified valvular aortic stenosis (AS). We consecutively evaluated 941 patients, who were admitted to the emergency department with dyspnea and chest pain. Platelet surface expression of SDF-1 was determined by flow cytometry, AS was assessed using echocardiography and hemodynamic assessment by heart catheterization. A 1∶1 propensity score matching was implemented to match 218 cases with 109 pairs adjusting for age, sex, cardiovascular risk factors, and medication including ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, beta blockers, statins, aspirin, clopidogrel, GPIIb/IIIa antagonists, and vitamin K antagonists. Patients with valvular AS showed enhanced platelet SDF-1 expression compared to patients without AS (non-valvular disease, NV) independent of ACS and stable coronary artery disease (SAP) [mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) for ACS (AS vs. NV): 75±40.4 vs. 39.5±23.3; P = 0.002; for SAP (AS vs. NV): 54.9±44.6 vs. 24.3±11.2; P = 0.008]. Moreover, the degree of AS significantly correlated with SDF-1 platelet surface expression (r = 0.462; P = 0.002). Valvular AS is associated with enhanced platelet-SDF-1 expression; moreover the degree of valvular AS correlates with SDF-1 platelet surface expression. These findings may have clinical implications in the future.

  2. Predicting changes in flow category in patients with severe aortic stenosis and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction on medical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngiam, Jinghao Nicholas; Kuntjoro, Ivandito; Tan, Benjamin Y Q; Sim, Hui-Wen; Kong, William K F; Yeo, Tiong-Cheng; Poh, Kian-Keong

    2017-11-01

    Controversy surrounds the prognosis and management of patients with paradoxical low-flow severe aortic stenosis (AS) with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). It was not certain if patients in a particular flow category remained in the same category as disease progressed. We investigated whether there were switches in categories and if so, their predictors. Consecutive subjects (n = 203) with isolated severe AS and paired echocardiography (>180 days apart) were studied. They were divided into 4 groups, based on their flow categories and if they progressed on subsequent echocardiography to switch or remain in the same flow category. Univariate analyses of clinical and echocardiographic parameters identified predictors of these changes in flow category. One hundred eighteen were normal flow (SVI ≥ 35 mL/m2 ), while 85 were low flow on index echocardiography. In the patients with normal flow, 33% switched to low flow. This was associated with higher valvuloarterial impedance (Zva, P 4.77 mm Hg/mL/m2 , AUC = 0.81 [95% CI:0.75-0.87, P flow, 25% switched to normal flow, which was associated with lower Zva and higher SAC and the switch was predicted by a higher initial mean transaortic pressure gradient. A significant number of patients switched flow categories in severe AS with preserved LVEF on subsequent echocardiography. Changes in flow were reflected by respective changes in Zva and SAC. Identifying echocardiographic predictors of a switch in category may guide prognostication and management of such patients. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Tumor necrosis factor-α accelerates the calcification of human aortic valve interstitial cells obtained from patients with calcific aortic valve stenosis via the BMP2-Dlx5 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zaiqiang; Seya, Kazuhiko; Daitoku, Kazuyuki; Motomura, Shigeru; Fukuda, Ikuo; Furukawa, Ken-Ichi

    2011-04-01

    Calcific aortic valve stenosis (CAS) is the most frequent heart valve disease in the elderly, accompanied by valve calcification. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a pleiotropic cytokine secreted mainly from macrophages, has been detected in human calcified valves. However, the role of TNF-α in valve calcification remains unclear. To clarify whether TNF-α accelerates the calcification of aortic valves, we investigated the effect of TNF-α on human aortic valve interstitial cells (HAVICs) obtained from patients with CAS (CAS group) and with aortic regurgitation or aortic dissection having a noncalcified aortic valve (control group). HAVICs (2 × 10(4)) were cultured in a 12-well dish in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium with 10% fetal bovine serum. The medium containing TNF-α (30 ng/ml) was replenished every 3 days after the cells reached confluence. TNF-α significantly accelerated the calcification and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of HAVICs from CAS but not the control group after 12 days of culture. Furthermore, gene expression of calcigenic markers, ALP, bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), and distal-less homeobox 5 (Dlx5) were significantly increased after 6 days of TNF-α treatment in the CAS group but not the control group. Dorsomorphin, an inhibitor of mothers against decapentaplegic homologs (Smads) 1/5/8 phosphorylation, significantly inhibited the enhancement of TNF-α-induced calcification, ALP activity, Smad phosphorylation, and Dlx5 gene expression of HAVICs from the CAS group. These results suggest that HAVICs from the CAS group have greater sensitivity to TNF-α, which accelerates the calcification of aortic valves via the BMP2-Dlx5 pathway.

  4. Reduced global longitudinal strain in association to increased left ventricular mass in patients with aortic valve stenosis and normal ejection fraction: a hybrid study combining echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Wilfried; Nickl, Werner; Smettan, Jan; Kramer, Frank; Krahn, Thomas; Scheffold, Thomas; Barroso, Michael Coll; Brinkmann, Hilmar; Koehler, Till; Lankisch, Mark; Füth, Reiner

    2010-07-26

    Increased muscle mass index of the left ventricle (LVMi) is an independent predictor for the development of symptoms in patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS). While the onset of clinical symptoms and left ventricular systolic dysfunction determines a poor prognosis, the standard echocardiographic evaluation of LV dysfunction, only based on measurements of the LV ejection fraction (EF), may be insufficient for an early assessment of imminent heart failure. Contrary, 2-dimensional speckle tracking (2DS) seems to be superior in detecting subtle changes in myocardial function. The aim of the study was to assess these LV function deteriorations with global longitudinal strain (GLS) analysis and the relations to LVMi in patients with AS and normal EF. 50 patients with moderate to severe AS and 31 controls were enrolled. All patients underwent echocardiography, including 2DS imaging. LVMi measures were performed with magnetic resonance imaging in 38 patients with AS and indexed for body surface area. The total group of patients with AST showed a GLS of -15,2 +/- 3,6% while the control group reached -19,5 +/- 2,7% (p valve replacement irrespectively of LV EF.

  5. MicroRNA-19b is a potential biomarker of increased myocardial collagen cross-linking in patients with aortic stenosis and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Javier; López, Begoña; Ravassa, Susana; Hermida, Nerea; José, Gorka San; Gallego, Idoia; Valencia, Félix; Gómez-Doblas, Juan José; de Teresa, Eduardo; Díez, Javier; González, Arantxa

    2017-01-16

    This study analyzed the potential associations of 7 myocardial fibrosis-related microRNAs with the quality of the collagen network (e.g., the degree of collagen fibril cross-linking or CCL) and the enzyme lysyl oxidase (LOX) responsible for CCL in 28 patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) of whom 46% had a diagnosis of chronic heart failure (HF). MicroRNA expression was analyzed in myocardial and blood samples. From the studied microRNAs only miR-19b presented a direct correlation (p collagen network in AS patients, particularly in patients with HF.

  6. Prosthesis-patient mismatch in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis: A randomized trial of a self-expanding prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorn, George L; Little, Stephen H; Tadros, Peter; Deeb, G Michael; Gleason, Thomas G; Heiser, John; Kleiman, Neal S; Oh, Jae K; Popma, Jeffrey J; Adams, David; Huang, Jian; Reardon, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    We compared the incidence of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) between transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) using a self-expanding bioprosthesis and surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in the CoreValve US High Risk Pivotal Trial. We sought to determine the influence of PPM on clinical outcomes. Patients with severe aortic stenosis and at increased risk for surgery were randomized 1:1 to TAVR or SAVR. Postoperative PPM was defined by the effective orifice area index (EOAi) as severe PPM (EOAi ≤ 0.65 cm(2)/m(2)) and no severe PPM (EOAi > 0.65 cm(2)/m(2)); clinical outcomes were analyzed in the TAVR arm (n = 389) and SAVR arm (n = 353). Left ventricular mass index and regression were analyzed at baseline and 1 year. The incidence of severe PPM in the SAVR group at 1 year was 25.7% versus 6.2% in the TAVR group (P < .0001). Left ventricular mass index regression at 1 year was 6.8% for TAVR and 15.1% for SAVR in patients with severe PPM. At 1 year the rate of all-cause mortality and acute kidney injury were significantly greater in all patients (TAVR + SAVR) with severe PPM compared with no severe PPM (20.6% vs 12.0% [P = .0145] for death and 19.2% vs 8.5% [P = .0008] for acute kidney injury). In patients with high surgical risk and severe aortic stenosis, severe PPM is more common in patients treated with SAVR than those treated with TAVR. Patients with severe PPM are a greater risk for death and acute kidney injury than patients without severe PPM. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Evidence of subannular and left ventricular morphological differences in patients with bicuspid versus tricuspid aortic valve stenosis: magnetic resonance imaging-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disha, Kushtrim; Dubslaff, Georg; Rouman, Mina; Fey, Beatrix; Borger, Michael A; Barker, Alex J; Kuntze, Thomas; Girdauskas, Evaldas

    2017-03-01

    Prospective analysis of left ventricular (LV) morphological/functional parameters in patients with bicuspid versus tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) stenosis undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR) surgery. A total of 190 consecutive patients with BAV ( n  = 154) and TAV stenosis ( n  = 36) (mean age 61 ± 8 years, 65% male) underwent AVR ± concomitant aortic surgery from January 2012 through May 2015. All patients underwent preoperative cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in order to evaluate: (i) left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) dimensions, (ii) length of anterior mitral leaflet (AML), (iii) end-systolic and end-diastolic LV wall thickness, (iv) LV area, (v) LV end-systolic and end-diastolic diameters (LVESD, LVEDD), (vi) LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes (LVEDV, LVESV) and (vii) maximal diameter of aortic root. These parameters were compared between the two study groups. The LVOT diameter was significantly larger in BAV patients (21.7 ± 3 mm in BAV vs 18.9 ± 3 mm in TAV, P  < 0.001). Moreover, BAV patients had significantly longer AML (24 ± 3 mm in BAV vs 22 ± 4 mm in TAV, P  = 0.009). LVEDV and LVESV were significantly larger in BAV patients (LVEDV: 164.9 ± 68.4 ml in BAV groups vs 126.5 ± 53.1 ml in TAV group, P  = 0.037; LVESV: 82.1 ± 57.9 ml in BAV group vs 52.9 ± 25.7 ml in TAV group, P  = 0.008). A strong linear correlation was found between LVOT diameter and aortic annulus diameter in BAV patients ( r  = 0.7, P  < 0.001), whereas significantly weaker correlation was observed in TAV patients ( r  = 0.5, P  = 0.006, z  = 1.65, P  = 0.04). Presence of BAV morphology was independently associated with larger LVOT diameters (OR 9.0, 95% CI 1.0-81.3, P  = 0.04). We found relevant differences in LV morphological/functional parameters between BAV and TAV stenosis patients. Further investigations are warranted in order to determine the

  8. Aortic stenosis. Gender influence on left ventricular geometry and function in patients under 70 years of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocha Antonio Sérgio Cordeiro da

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To verify if adaptive left ventricle (LV characteristics are also present in individuals under 70 years of age with severe aortic stenosis (AS. METHODS: The study comprised 40 consecutive patients under 70 years of age with AS and no associated coronary artery disease, referred for valve surgery. Out of the 40 patients, 22 were men and 18 women, and the mean age was 49.8±14.3 years. Cardiac symptoms, presence of systemic hypertension (SH, functional class according to the New York Heart Association (NYHA, and valve lesion etiology were considered. LV cavity dimensions, ejection fraction (EF, fractional shortening (FS, mass (MS, and relative diastolic thickness (RDT were examined by Doppler echocardiography. RESULTS: Fourteen (63.6% men and 11 (61.6% women were classified as NYHA class III/IV (p=0.70. There was no difference in the frequency of angina, syncope or dyspnea between genders. The incidence of SH was greater in women than in men (10 versus 2, p=0.0044. Women had a smaller LV end-diastolic diameter index (32.1±6.5 x 36.5±5.3mm/m², p=0.027, LV end-systolic diameter index (19.9±5.9 x 26.5±6.4mm/m², p=0.0022 and LV mass index (MS (211.4±71.1 x 270.9±74.9g/m², p=0.017 when compared with men. EF (66.2±13.4 x 52.0±14.6%, p=0.0032, FS (37.6±10.7 x 27.9±9.6%, p=0.0046 and RDT (0.58±0.22 x 0.44±0.09, p=0.0095 were significantly greater in women than in men. CONCLUSION: It is the patient gender rather than age that influences left ventricular adaptive response to AS.

  9. Potential role of microRNA-10b down-regulation in cardiomyocyte apoptosis in aortic stenosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Idoia; Beaumont, Javier; López, Begoña; Ravassa, Susana; Gómez-Doblas, Juan José; Moreno, María Ujué; Valencia, Félix; de Teresa, Eduardo; Díez, Javier; González, Arantxa

    2016-12-01

    MicroRNAs have been associated with cardiomyocyte apoptosis, a process involved in myocardial remodelling in aortic valve (Av) stenosis (AS). Our aim was to analyse whether the dysregulation of myocardial microRNAs was related to cardiomyocyte apoptosis in AS patients. Endomyocardial biopsies were obtained from 28 patients with severe AS (based on pressure gradients and Av area) referred for Av replacement and from necropsies of 10 cardiovascular disease-free control subjects. AS patients showed an increased (P 0.08%; n=12). Group 2 patients presented lower cardiomyocyte density (P<0.001) and ejection fraction (P<0.05), and higher troponin T levels (P<0.05), prevalence of heart failure (HF; P<0.05) and NT-proBNP levels (P<0.05) than those from group 1. miRNA expression profile analysed in 5 patients randomly selected from each group showed 64 microRNAs down-regulated and 6 up-regulated (P<0.05) in group 2 compared with group 1. Those microRNAs with the highest fold-change were validated in the full two groups corroborating that miR-10b, miR-125b-2* and miR-338-3p were down-regulated (P<0.05) in group 2 compared with group 1 and control subjects. These three microRNAs were inversely correlated (P<0.05) with the CMAI. Inhibition of miR-10b induced an increase (P<0.05) of apoptosis and increased expression (P<0.05) of apoptosis protease-activating factor-1 (Apaf-1) in HL-1 cardiomyocytes. In conclusion, myocardial down-regulation of miR-10b may be involved in increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis in AS patients, probably through Apaf-1 up-regulation, contributing to cardiomyocyte damage and to the development of HF. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  10. Text mining applied to electronic cardiovascular procedure reports to identify patients with trileaflet aortic stenosis and coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Aeron M; Kiss, Daniel H; Zlatsin, Yevgeny; Birtwell, David L; Williams, Heather; Guerraty, Marie A; Han, Yuchi; Anwaruddin, Saif; Holmes, John H; Chirinos, Julio A; Wilensky, Robert L; Giri, Jay; Rader, Daniel J

    2017-08-01

    Interrogation of the electronic health record (EHR) using billing codes as a surrogate for diagnoses of interest has been widely used for clinical research. However, the accuracy of this methodology is variable, as it reflects billing codes rather than severity of disease, and depends on the disease and the accuracy of the coding practitioner. Systematic application of text mining to the EHR has had variable success for the detection of cardiovascular phenotypes. We hypothesize that the application of text mining algorithms to cardiovascular procedure reports may be a superior method to identify patients with cardiovascular conditions of interest. We adapted the Oracle product Endeca, which utilizes text mining to identify terms of interest from a NoSQL-like database, for purposes of searching cardiovascular procedure reports and termed the tool "PennSeek". We imported 282,569 echocardiography reports representing 81,164 individuals and 27,205 cardiac catheterization reports representing 14,567 individuals from non-searchable databases into PennSeek. We then applied clinical criteria to these reports in PennSeek to identify patients with trileaflet aortic stenosis (TAS) and coronary artery disease (CAD). Accuracy of patient identification by text mining through PennSeek was compared with ICD-9 billing codes. Text mining identified 7115 patients with TAS and 9247 patients with CAD. ICD-9 codes identified 8272 patients with TAS and 6913 patients with CAD. 4346 patients with AS and 6024 patients with CAD were identified by both approaches. A randomly selected sample of 200-250 patients uniquely identified by text mining was compared with 200-250 patients uniquely identified by billing codes for both diseases. We demonstrate that text mining was superior, with a positive predictive value (PPV) of 0.95 compared to 0.53 by ICD-9 for TAS, and a PPV of 0.97 compared to 0.86 for CAD. These results highlight the superiority of text mining algorithms applied to electronic

  11. Aortic Calcification: An Early Sign of Heart Valve Problems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the aortic valve — a condition called aortic valve stenosis. Aortic valve calcification may be an early sign ... have any other heart disease symptoms. Calcification and stenosis generally affects people older than age 65. When ...

  12. Double-balloon aortic valvuloplasty at Queen Sirikit National Institute of Child Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangtawesin, Chaisit; Layangool, Thanarat; Kirawitaya, Tawatchai; Promphan, Worakan

    2014-06-01

    Balloon aortic valvuloplasty is the treatment of choice in moderate and severe valvular aortic stenosis. In order to reduce the risk of vascular complications, a double-balloon technique has been used with good results. To present the results od double-balloon aortic valvuloplasty at QSNICH. Consecutive cases of severe valvular aortic stenosis treated with double-balloon aortic valvuloplasty at QSNICH were recruited in the study. Data were obtained from the medical records starting from the day of presentations to December 2011. There were six cases of severe valvular aortic stenosis treated with double-balloon aortic valvuloplasty at QSNICH from 2004 to 2011. The age and weight ranged from 7 months to 12 years and 6 to 53.8 kilograms, respectively. The presenting symptoms were dyspnea in 3 (50%) and asymptomatic heart murmur in 3 cases (50%). Peak-to-peak pressure gradient (PG) before the procedure ranged from 48-104 mmHg (mean 70.00, SD 18.92 mmHg). Immediately after the procedure, PG significantly decreased to 15-52 mmHg (mean 34.33, SD 14.98 mmHg, p aortic regurgitation in any of the cases. Double-balloon aortic valvuloplasty can be performed safely with very good intermediate term outcome in selected patients. Long-term outcome in Thai children should be further studied.

  13. PCSK9 R46L Loss-of-Function Mutation Reduces Lipoprotein(a), LDL Cholesterol, and Risk of Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langsted, Anne; Nordestgaard, Børge; Benn, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    P = .02). The corresponding values for LDL cholesterol levels were 124 (101-147) mg/dl, 104 (85-132) mg/dl, and 97 (85-128) mg/dl, respectively (trend P = 2 × 10(-52)). PCSK9 R46L carriers vs noncarriers had an age- and sex-adjusted odds ratio of 0.64 (95% confidence interval, 0.44-0.95) for aortic......CONTEXT: Novel, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol-lowering proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type-9 (PCSK9) inhibitors also lower lipoprotein(a) levels, but the effect on aortic valve stenosis and myocardial infarction is unknown. OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that the PCSK9 R46L...... individuals of Danish descent. PARTICIPANTS: We studied 103 083 individuals from the Copenhagen General Population Study, the Copenhagen City Heart Study, and the Copenhagen Ischemic Heart Disease Study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Lipoprotein(a), LDL cholesterol, and PCSK9 R46L genotype and diagnoses of aortic...

  14. Aortic valve bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Jens T; Jensen, Maiken Brit; Arendrup, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    In aortic valve bypass (AVB) a valve-containing conduit is connecting the apex of the left ventricle to the descending aorta. Candidates are patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis rejected for conventional aortic valve replacement (AVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI...

  15. Clinical outcome of high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction undergoing medical treatment or TAVI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Pilgrim

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Reduced left ventricular function in patients with severe symptomatic valvular aortic stenosis is associated with impaired clinical outcome in patients undergoing surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI has been shown non-inferior to SAVR in high-risk patients with respect to mortality and may result in faster left ventricular recovery. METHODS: We investigated clinical outcomes of high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing medical treatment (n = 71 or TAVI (n = 256 stratified by left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF in a prospective single center registry. RESULTS: Twenty-five patients (35% among the medical cohort were found to have an LVEF≤30% (mean 26.7±4.1% and 37 patients (14% among the TAVI patients (mean 25.2±4.4%. Estimated peri-interventional risk as assessed by logistic EuroSCORE was significantly higher in patients with severely impaired LVEF as compared to patients with LVEF>30% (medical/TAVI 38.5±13.8%/40.6±16.4% versus medical/TAVI 22.5±10.8%/22.1±12.8%, p <0.001. In patients undergoing TAVI, there was no significant difference in the combined endpoint of death, myocardial infarction, major stroke, life-threatening bleeding, major access-site complications, valvular re-intervention, or renal failure at 30 days between the two groups (21.0% versus 27.0%, p = 0.40. After TAVI, patients with LVEF≤30% experienced a rapid improvement in LVEF (from 25±4% to 34±10% at discharge, p = 0.002 associated with improved NYHA functional class at 30 days (decrease ≥1 NYHA class in 95%. During long-term follow-up no difference in survival was observed in patients undergoing TAVI irrespective of baseline LVEF (p = 0.29, whereas there was a significantly higher mortality in medically treated patients with severely reduced LVEF (log rank p = 0.001. CONCLUSION: TAVI in patients with severely reduced left ventricular function may be

  16. Prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurysm and large infrarenal aorta in patients with acute coronary syndrome and proven coronary stenosis: a prospective monocenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Anne; Bui, Huu Tri; Barbe, Coralie; Henni, Amine Hadj; Journet, Julien; Metz, Damien; Nazeyrollas, Pierre

    2010-07-01

    Little is known about the prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in patients with coronary heart disease. The aims of this prospective study were to evaluate the prevalence of AAA and of large abdominal aorta in patients hospitalized for acute coronary syndrome and coronary stenosis of 50% or greater. AAA ultrasound screening was prospectively performed in 306 patients after they gave informed consent. AAA and large abdominal aorta were defined by maximum anteroposterior diameter of 30 mm or greater and of 20 to 29 mm, respectively. Patient characteristics were prospectively collected. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify risk factors for AAA and large abdominal aorta. A p value Prevalence reached 7.7% in patients older than 50 years. Using stepwise logistic regression analysis, age (odds ratio [OR] 1.04. 95% confidence [CI] 1.00-1.09 per year of age, p = 0.06) and previous coronary events (OR 2.44, 95% CI 0.96-6.25, p = 0.06) showed a borderline significant association with AAA. Large infrarenal aortic diameter was observed in 32% of patients. Age (OR 1.03, 95% CI 1.02-1.05 per year of age, p prevalence seems high in patients with acute coronary syndrome and proven coronary stenosis of 50% or greater. Previous coronary events and older age might be associated with higher risk of AAA, and age, male gender, and obesity are significantly associated with large infrarenal aorta. If these results are confirmed in larger studies, further guidelines concerning AAA screening in this well-defined population should be considered. Copyright (c) 2010 Annals of Vascular Surgery Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Assessment of coronary artery disease using coronary computed tomography angiography in patients with aortic valve stenosis referred for surgical aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Kofoed, K Fuglsang; Dalsgaard, M

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients referred for aortic valve replacement (AVR) a pre-surgical assessment of coronary artery disease is mandatory to determine the possible need for additional coronary artery bypass grafting. The diagnostic accuracy of coronary computed tomography angiography (coronary CTA) w...... with low age, no chronic obstructive lung disease, NYHA function class...

  18. Quantitative image analysis for planning of aortic valve replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elattar, M.A.I.M.

    2016-01-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common and frequent cause of sudden death among all valvular heart diseases. Symptomatic aortic stenosis is considered to be a fatal disease if left untreated. Aortic valve replacement is the mainstay of treatment of symptomatic aortic stenosis. Traditional treatment of

  19. A new method of detecting subendocardial ischemia in patients with aortic valvular stenosis without coronary artery disease using thallium-201 single photon emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umamoto, Ikuo; Sugihara, Hiroki; Harada, Yoshiaki (Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)) (and others)

    1993-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to detect myocardial ischemia in aortic valvular stenosis (AVS) without coronary artery disease by using exercise Tl-201 SPECT. The subjects were 18 AVS patients. Twenty other patients were served as controls. Transient 'left ventricular subendocardial dilation and decreased wall thickness', obtained on early SPECT images, were quantitatively determined by transient dilation index (TDI). Washout rates (WR) were calculated from overlapping early and delayed images to obtain WR map. According to TDI, 18 AVS patients were classified as having TDI[<=]1.11 (Group A, n=9) and TDI>1.11 (Group B, n=9). WR map in Group B presented the direction from the pericardial toward the endocardial side, revealing a pattern of decreased WR and a decreased coronary flow reserve on the endocardial side. Both pressure gradient between the aorta and left ventricle and left ventricular wall thickness were significantly greater in Group B than Group A. In 3 patients in Group B, TDI returned to normal and WR map became homogeneous after aortic valve replacement. In addition, fibrosis was noted in the endocardial site on biopsy. In AVS associated with great pressure gradient, endocardial ischemia may occur on exercise, resulting from a decreased coronary flow reserve, and a decreased compliance due to fibrosis and hypertrophy. Exercise Tl-201 myocardial SPECT is capable of detecting distribution patterns of subendocardial ischemia and coronary flow reserve in AVS. (N.K.).

  20. Pulmonary artery stenosis caused by a large aortic arch pseudoaneurysm detected 10 years after a minor trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalal Zamani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pseudoaneurysm of aorta is a rare condition usually seen after aortic surgeries or serious accidents. Here we report a 60 years old man without any previous medical condition who presented with non-specific symptoms and underwent different investigations for more than 1 year, until the presence of a continuous murmur raised suspicion toward his cardiovascular system. In echocardiographic and computed tomography (CT angiographic studies a large pseudoaneurysm of aortic arch with compression effect on pulmonary artery was detected. At this stage he remembered having suffered a minor trauma 10 years ago. He finally underwent operation and his aortic wall was repaired successfully with a patch. This case highlights the importance of thorough history taking and physical examination in patients irrespective of symptoms and high index of suspicion to detect this life-threatening condition.

  1. High sensitivity C reactive protein as a prognostic marker in patients with mild to moderate aortic valve stenosis during lipid-lowering treatment: an SEAS substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyme, Adam; Asferg, Camilla; Nielsen, Olav W; Sehestedt, Thomas; Kesäniemi, Y Antero; Gohlke-Bärwolf, Christa; Boman, Kurt; Willenheimer, Ronnie; Ray, Simon; Nienaber, Christoph A; Rossebø, Anne; Wachtell, Kristian; Olsen, Michael H

    2015-01-01

    To assess the prognostic importance of high-sensitive C reactive protein (hsCRP) in patients with mild to moderate aortic valve stenosis during placebo or simvastatin/ezetimibe treatment in Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS). In 1620 SEAS patients, we measured lipids and hsCRP at baseline and after 1 year of treatment and registered during 4 years of follow-up major cardiovascular events (MCE) composed of ischaemic cardiovascular events (ICE) and aortic valve-related events (AVE). Simvastatin/ezetimibe reduced low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (3.49 (2.94 to 4.15) to 1.32 (1.02 to 1.69) vs 3.46 (2.92 to 4.08) to 3.34 (2.81 to 3.92) mmol/L) and hsCRP (2.1 (0.9 to 4.1) to 1.2 (0.6 to 2.4) vs 2.2 (0.9 to 4.9) to 1.8 (0.85 to 4.35) mg/L, all p<0.05) during the first year of treatment. In multivariable Cox regression analysis adjusting for traditional risk factors and baseline hsCRP, ICE was associated with a 1-year increase of hsCRP (HR=1.19 (95% CI 1.12 to 1.25), p<0.001) but not with active treatment (HRTreatment=0.86 (0.67 to 1.13), p=0.28). Patients in the top quartile of baseline hsCRP versus the rest were associated with a higher risk of MCE (HR=1.34(1.09 to 1.64), p=0.02). The prognostic benefit of reduction in hsCRP after 1 year was significantly larger (p<0.01 for interaction) in patients with high versus low baseline hsCRP; hence, a reduction in hsCRP abolished the difference in incidence of MCE between high versus low baseline hsCRP in patients with reduced hsCRP (31.1 vs 31.9%, NS) in contrast to patients with increased hsCRP. The treatment-associated reduction in ICE was in part related to a reduction in hsCRP but not in lipids. hsCRP reduction was associated with less MCE, especially in patients with high baseline hsCRP. NCT00092677.

  2. Choosing between velocity-time-integral ratio and peak velocity ratio for calculation of the dimensionless index (or aortic valve area) in serial follow-up of aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finegold, Judith A; Manisty, Charlotte H; Cecaro, Fabrizio; Sutaria, Nilesh; Mayet, Jamil; Francis, Darrel P

    2013-08-20

    It remains unclear which echocardiographic measure is most suitable for serial measurement in real-world aortic stenosis (AS) follow-up. We determine whether the dimensionless index (DI) between aortic valve and left ventricular outflow tract velocities is measured more consistently using velocity-time-integral (VTI) or peak velocities (V(peak)) in real life. Serial echocardiograms acquired within 6 months in subjects with AS were analysed with blinding, to compare the variability over time of DI calculated using V(peak), with that of DI calculated using VTI. Paired echocardiograms, acquired on average 72 days apart, were analysed from 70 patients with a range of severities of AS (59% severe). DI, calculated using either V(peak) or VTI, did not significantly change over this short time. Coefficient of variation was significantly better when DI was calculated using V(peak) than VTI (12.6 versus 25.4%, pcalculating DI--or effective orifice area--from the ratio of V(peak) rather than VTIs would reduce 95% confidence intervals from ± 51% to a still-disappointing ± 25%. Guidelines recommend noisy surveillance measures, causing conscientious echocardiographers to 'peek' at previous values, and impairing clinicians' faith in echocardiographically-observed changes when making clinical decisions. For us in echocardiography to improve our ability to contribute to AS follow-up requires us to first acknowledge and discuss this honestly. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessment of myocardial velocities and global function of the left ventricle in asymptomatic patients with moderate-to-severe chronic aortic regurgitation: a tissue Doppler echocardiographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokmen, Gulizar; Sokmen, Abdullah; Duzenli, Akif; Soylu, Ahmet; Ozdemir, Kurtulus

    2007-07-01

    Asymptomatic patients with chronic aortic regurgitation (AR) have an excellent prognosis in the presence of preserved systolic function. It is a challenge to recognize patients with subclinical myocardial dysfunction in AR. Conventional parameters still have many drawbacks in predicting early left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. Pulsed-wave tissue Doppler imaging (PW-TDI) is a useful noninvasive technique for evaluating global and regional LV systolic function. In this study, we aimed to assess clinical usefulness of TDI in predicting early disturbance of myocardial contractility in asymptomatic patients with significant AR and preserved left ventricular systolic function. Echocardiograms were obtained in 32 AR patients and 33 healthy subjects. In addition to conventional parameters, regional myocardial velocities, isovolumetric contraction time (mICT), isovolumetric relaxation time (mIRT), and ejection time (mET) of left ventricle were obtained by TDI and modified LV myocardial performance index (MPI) was calculated. In AR, peak systolic velocity (Sm) of septal and anterior mitral annulus, and mean Sm was significantly lower, and LVMPI was significantly higher compared to control group. The data obtained by TDI show that LV MPI is lengthened, and systolic myocardial velocities are shortened in patients having chronic AR with normal LV systolic function according to conventional echocardiographic parameters. This suggests that LV long-axis contraction and global LV performance are preciously and noticeably decreased in patients with moderate-to-severe chronic AR despite normal LV ejection fraction.

  4. The balloon-expandable Edwards Sapien 3 valve is superior to the self-expanding Medtronic CoreValve in patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing transfemoral aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonska, Birgid; Seeger, Julia; Baarts, Justus; Rodewald, Christoph; Scharnbeck, Dominik; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Wöhrle, Jochen

    2017-06-01

    Residual paravalvular moderate or severe aortic regurgitation (AR) has been an independent risk factor for mortality after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The design of the third generation Edwards Sapien 3 (ES3; Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA) valve was optimized with an outer skirt to address the issue of paravalvular AR. We compared 100 consecutive patients treated with the ES3 for severe aortic stenosis with 100 patients treated with the Medtronic CoreValve (CV; Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN, USA) (Clinical Trial Registration: NCT02162069). We evaluated post-procedural AR, rate of permanent pacemaker implantation, device success, and 30-day clinical outcome according to the criteria of the Second Valve Academic Research Consortium (VARC-2). Frequency of post-procedural moderate or severe AR was significantly lower with ES3 compared to CV (0% vs. 20%, p<0.01), none or trace AR significantly higher with ES3 (69% vs. 38%, p<0.01) as well as device success (97% vs. 73%, p<0.01). There was a significantly lower need for permanent pacemaker implantation with ES3 compared with CV (14% vs. 31%, p<0.01). Cardiovascular mortality at 30 days was significantly lower with ES3 (0% vs. 6%, p=0.01), and the combined endpoint "early safety" was met significantly less with ES3 (10% vs. 21% with CV, p=0.03). Transfemoral TAVI with the ES3 compared with the CV was associated with a significantly lower rate of moderate or severe AR, significantly lower need for pacemaker implantation, and a significantly higher rate of device success according to VARC-2. Copyright © 2016 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Ex vivo assessment of valve thickness/calcification of patients with calcific aortic stenosis in relation to in vivo clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-Li; Chang, Hsiao-Huang; Huang, Pei-Jung; Wang, Wei-Chen; Lin, Shan-Yang

    2017-10-01

    Calcific aortic stenosis (AS) plays a critical role in the risk of cardiovascular disease. This preliminary study examined the relationship between the ex vivo valve thickness/calcification and in vivo clinical outcomes of Chinese patients with calcific AS. Six Chinese patients (3 patients with tricuspid aortic valves (TAV)) and 3 patients with. bicuspid aortic valves (BAV) with calcific AS undergoing heart valve replacement were initially chosen for this study. In vivo medical imaging of these calcific AS patients was evaluated using computed tomography and echocardiography. The ex vivo measurements including the actual thickness, calcified area and components of the calcified aortic values excised were performed by a digimatic caliper, X-ray equipment with a cellSens imaging analysis and portable Raman spectroscopy, respectively. Six patients were diagnosed with symptomatic moderate-to-severe AS. The thickness of noncoronary (N) leaflet in the excised TAV was significantly thicker than left-coronary (L) leaflet (p 0.05). The extent of calcification in the excised TAV was a statistically significant difference between N and L (p 0.05). The patients No. 1-3 were found to be TAV with partial commissural fusion. The patient No. 4 was classified as a type 1 NL-BAV morphotype, but both patients 5 and 6 were found to be true BAV (type 0 lateral-BAV). Each calcified valve leaflet was composed of apatites, proteins (collagen and proteoglycan), and a small amount of β-carotene and cholesterol after Raman spectral determination. The calcified nodules of each valve leaflet were predominately identified to be calcium hydroxyapatite and type-B carbonate apatite. However, octacalcium phosphate was also detected in the protein-rich part of calcified valve leaflets. A positive correlation was observed between thickness and calcification for both excised TAV and BAV after ex vivo examinations. Moreover, a negative relationship was obtained among in vivo AVA index, ex vivo

  6. Neurodevelopmental Outcome in Children after Fetal Cardiac Intervention for Aortic Stenosis with Evolving Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laraja, Kristin; Sadhwani, Anjali; Tworetzky, Wayne; Marshall, Audrey C; Gauvreau, Kimberlee; Freud, Lindsay; Hass, Cara; Dunbar-Masterson, Carolyn; Ware, Janice; Lafranchi, Terra; Wilkins-Haug, Louise; Newburger, Jane W

    2017-05-01

    To characterize neurodevelopmental outcomes after fetal aortic valvuloplasty for evolving hypoplastic left heart syndrome and determine the risk factors for adverse neurodevelopment. Questionnaires were mailed to families of children who underwent fetal aortic valvuloplasty from 2000 to 2012, and medical records were reviewed retrospectively. The primary outcome was the General Adaptive Composite score of the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System Questionnaire-Second Edition. Other questionnaires included the Behavior Assessment System for Children, Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function, Ages and Stages, and Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory. Among 69 eligible subjects, 52 (75%) completed questionnaires at median age of 5.5 (range 1.3-12) years; 30 (58%) had biventricular status circulation. The General Adaptive Composite mean score (92 ± 17) was lower than population norms (P Children, Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function, Ages and Stages, Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory), most subscale scores for patients with biventricular and single ventricular status were similar. Children who underwent fetal aortic valvuloplasty have neurodevelopmental delay, similar to patients with hypoplastic left heart syndrome without fetal intervention. Achievement of biventricular circulation was not associated with better outcomes. We infer that innate patient factors and morbidity during infancy have the greatest effect on neurodevelopmental outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Puérpera com trombose de prótese mecânica e estenose supravalvar aórtica adquirida Postpartum patient with thrombosis of mechanical prostheses and acquired supravalvular aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Adala Benfatti

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A hipercoagulabilidade sanguínea proporcionada na gravidez aumenta consideravelmente a incidência de trombose de valvas mecânicas. A estenose supravalvar aórtica adquirida é extremamente rara. Relata-se o caso de uma puérpera imediata, portadora de prótese mecânica aórtica e estenose supravalvar aórtica adquirida, submetida à cirurgia cardíaca de emergência, com instabilidade hemodinâmica grave, por meio de técnica operatória adaptada para a correção da estenose supravalvar aórtica, com evolução clínica e resultados ecocardiográficos pós-operatórios satisfatórios.The blood hypercoagulability in pregnancy increases significantly the incidence of thrombosis of mechanical valves. Acquired supravalvular aortic stenosis is extremely rare. We report the case of an immediate postpartum patient with aortic mechanical prostheses and acquired supravalvular aortic stenosis who underwent emergency heart surgery, with severe hemodynamic instability, using adapted surgical technique for correction of supravalvular stenosis with satisfactory clinical and echocardiography results.

  8. Recuperação por desbridamento manual da valva aórtica estenótica calcificada Manual debridement for repair in calcified aortic stenosis

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    Renato A. K Kalil

    1995-06-01

    and 1 late death. Surviving patients are in functional classes I or II. Maximum instantaneous gradient dropped from 90.7 ± 23.3 mmHg to 33.0 ±7.9 mmHg (p < 0.01 and mean aortic gradient from 50.3 ± 11.0 mmHg to 19.9 ± 3.5 mmHg (p < 0.05. Septal width reduced from 2.0 ± 0.5 cm to 1.2 ± 0.1 (p < 0.01. Aortic regurgitation, by echocardiography, was considered minimum in 5, mild in 9 and moderated in 2 cases. Mechanical debridement of calcified aortic valves, congenital or senile, provides good medium-term relief for aortic stenosis. This technical alternative may be considered in older patients, small aortic roots and higher risks of anticoagulation.

  9. A novel phenotypic expression associated with a new mutation in LMNA gene, characterized by partial lipodystrophy, insulin resistance, aortic stenosis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo-Vilar, David; Lado-Abeal, Joaquin; Palos-Paz, Fernando; Lattanzi, Giovanna; Bandín, Manuel A; Bellido, Diego; Domínguez-Gerpe, Lourdes; Calvo, Carlos; Pérez, Oscar; Ramazanova, Alia; Martínez-Sánchez, Noelia; Victoria, Berta; Costa-Freitas, Ana Teresa

    2008-07-01

    Lipodystrophies are a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by abnormal fat distribution. Familial partial lipodystrophy 2 (FPLD2) is due to mutations in the LMNA gene. Previous studies have suggested that LMNA mutations 5' to the nuclear localization signal (NLS) are more likely to underlie laminopathies with cardiac or skeletal muscle involvement, while mutations 3' to the NLS are more likely to underlie lipodystrophy and progeroid syndromes. To study the clinical and molecular features of a subject with FPLD. We carried out mutational analysis of LMNA gene in a woman with FPLD phenotype and in her relatives. Insulin resistance was evaluated by minimal model. Body composition was evaluated by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Echocardiography was done in affected subjects. 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were transfected with wild-type or mutant prelamin A constructs. In transfected cells, lamin A was detected using a Cy3-conjugated monoclonal anti-FLAG antibody. The patient showed atypical fat distribution, insulin resistance, severe aortic stenosis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. She has an affected 11-year-old son, not yet lipodystrophic but with an incipient aortic disease. LMNA sequencing showed that mother and son were both heterozygous for a novel c.1772G > T missense mutation in exon 11, which causes the substitution of the cysteine at residue 591 by a phenylalanine (C591F). In mouse preadipocytes transfected with the mutant human LMNA gene, the mutant lamin A isoform was mislocated in the nucleus. This patient shows a novel clinical form of FPLD2, due to a mutation affecting lamin A only, with cardiac involvement.

  10. Myocardial oxidative metabolism is increased due to haemodynamic overload in patients with aortic valve stenosis: assessment using {sup 11}C-acetate positron emission tomography

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    Naya, Masanao; Chiba, Satoru; Iwano, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Satoshi; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Katoh, Chietsugu [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Health Science, Sapporo (Japan); Manabe, Osamu; Tamaki, Nagara [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Yoshinaga, Keiichiro [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Molecular Imaging, Sapporo (Japan); Matsui, Yoshiro [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Sapporo (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    The relationship between myocardial oxidative metabolism and pressure overload in aortic valve stenosis (AS) is not fully elucidated. We identified the determinants of myocardial oxidative metabolism by measuring its changes after aortic valve replacement (AVR) in patients with AS. Myocardial {sup 11}C-acetate clearance rate constant (Kmono), an index of oxidative metabolism, was measured non-invasively by using positron emission tomography in 16 patients with moderate to severe AS and 7 healthy controls. The severity of AS was assessed by echocardiography. Of 16 patients, 5 were reexamined at 1 month after AVR. Kmono was significantly higher in patients with AS than healthy controls by 42% (0.068 {+-} 0.014 vs 0.048 {+-} 0.007/min, p < 0.01). Kmono was significantly correlated with age (r = 0.58, p < 0.01), left ventricular (LV) mass index (r = 0.61, p < 0.01) and estimated systolic LV pressure (r = 0.81, p < 0.001) measured by echocardiography. By multivariate analysis, estimated LV systolic pressure was an independent predictor of Kmono ({beta} = 0.93, p < 0.01). After AVR, Kmono (from 0.075 {+-} 0.012 to 0.061 {+-} 0.014/min, p = 0.043) and LV mass index (from 183 {+-} 49 to 124 {+-} 41 g/ml{sup 2}, p = 0.043) were significantly decreased despite no significant changes in rate-pressure product. Myocardial oxygen metabolism was increased in patients with AS, which was decreased after AVR. The increased myocardial oxidative metabolism in AS was largely attributable to the pressure overload of the LV. (orig.)

  11. FTO Is Associated with Aortic Valve Stenosis in a Gender Specific Manner of Heterozygote Advantage: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

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    Cindy Thron

    Full Text Available Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within the Fat mass and obesity associated (FTO gene have been linked with increased body weight. However, the data on an association of FTO with cardiovascular diseases remains conflicting. Therefore, we ascertained whether FTO is associated with aortic valve stenosis (AVS, one of the most frequent cardiovascular diseases in the Western world.In this population-based case-control study the FTO SNP rs9939609 was analyzed in 300 German patients with AVS and 429 German controls of the KORA survey S4, representing a random population. Blood samples were collected prior to aortic valve replacement in AVS cases and FTO rs9939609 was genotyped via ARMS-PCR. Genotype frequencies differed significantly between AVS cases and KORA controls (p = 0.004. Separate gender-analyses uncovered an association of FTO with AVS exclusively in males; homozygote carriers for the risk-allele (A had a higher risk to develop AVS (p = 0.017, odds ratio (OR 1.727; 95% confidence interval (CI 1.087-2.747, recessive model, whereas heterozygote carriers for the risk-allele showed a lower risk (p = 0.002, OR 0.565, 95% CI 0.384-0.828, overdominant model. After adjustment for multiple co-variables, the odds ratios of heterozygotes remained significant for an association with AVS (p = 0.008, OR 0.565, 95% CI 0.369-0.861.This study revealed an association of FTO rs9939609 with AVS. Furthermore, this association was restricted to men, with heterozygotes having a significantly lower chance to develop AVS. Lastly, the association between FTO and AVS was independent of BMI and other variables such as diabetes mellitus.

  12. Clinical Correlates and Prognostic Value of Plasma Galectin-3 Levels in Degenerative Aortic Stenosis: A Single-Center Prospective Study of Patients Referred for Invasive Treatment

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    Beata Bobrowska

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Galectin-3 (Gal-3, a β-galactoside-binding lectin, has been implicated in myocardial fibrosis, development of left ventricular (LV dysfunction and transition from compensated LV hypertrophy to overt heart failure (HF, being a novel prognostic marker in HF. Risk stratification is crucial for the choice of the optimal therapy in degenerative aortic stenosis (AS, affecting elderly subjects with coexistent diseases. Our aim was to assess correlates and prognostic value of circulating Gal-3 in real-world patients with degenerative AS referred for invasive treatment. Gal-3 levels were measured at admission in 80 consecutive patients with symptomatic degenerative AS (mean age: 79 ± 8 years; aortic valve area (AVA index: 0.4 ± 0.1 cm2/m2. The therapeutic strategy was chosen following a dedicated multidisciplinary team-oriented approach, including surgical valve replacement (n = 11, transcatheter valve implantation (n = 19, balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV (n = 25 and optimal medical therapy (n = 25. Besides routine echocardiographic indices, valvulo-arterial impedance (Zva, an index of global LV afterload, was computed. There were 22 deaths over a median follow-up of 523 days. Baseline Gal-3 correlated negatively with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR (r = −0.61, p < 0.001 and was unrelated to age, symptomatic status, AVA index, LV ejection fraction, LV mass index or Zva. For the study group as a whole, Gal-3 tended to predict mortality (Gal-3 >17.8 vs. Gal-3 <17.8 ng/mL; hazard ratio (HR: 2.03 (95% confidence interval, 0.88–4.69, p = 0.09, which was abolished upon adjustment for eGFR (HR: 1.70 (0.61–4.73, p = 0.3. However, in post-BAV patients multivariate-adjusted pre-procedural Gal-3 was associated with worse survival (HR: 7.41 (1.52–36.1, p = 0.01 regardless of eGFR. In conclusion, the inverse eGFR–Gal-3 relationship underlies a weak association between Gal-3 and adverse outcome in patients with degenerative AS referred for

  13. Review in Translational Cardiology: MicroRNAs and Myocardial Fibrosis in Aortic Valve Stenosis, a Deep Insight on Left Ventricular Remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacopo, Fabiani; Lorenzo, Conte; Calogero, Enrico; Matteo, Passiatore; Riccardo, Pugliese Nicola; Veronica, Santini; Valentina, Barletta; Riccardo, Liga; Cristian, Scatena; Maria, Mazzanti Chiara; Vitantonio, Di Bello

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a huge class of noncoding RNAs that regulate protein-encoding genes (degradation/inhibition of translation). miRNAs are nowadays recognized as regulators of biological processes underneath cardiovascular disorders including hypertrophy, ischemia, arrhythmias, and valvular disease. In particular, circulating miRNAs are promising biomarkers of pathology. This review gives an overview of studies in aortic valve stenosis (AS), exclusively considering myocardial remodeling processes. We searched through literature (till September 2016), all studies and reviews involving miRNAs and AS (myocardial compartment). Although at the beginning of a new era, clear evidences exist on the potential diagnostic and prognostic implementation of miRNAs in the clinical setting. In particular, for AS, miRNAs are modulators of myocardial remodeling and hypertrophy. In our experience, here presented in summary, the principal findings of our research were a confirm of the pathophysiological role in AS of miRNA-21, in particular, the interdependence between textural miRNA-21 and fibrogenic stimulus induced by an abnormal left ventricular pressure overload. Moreover, circulating miRNA-21 (biomarker) levels are able to reflect the presence of significant myocardial fibrosis (MF). Thus, the combined evaluation of miRNA-21, a marker of MF, and hypertrophy, together with advanced echocardiographic imaging (two-dimensional speckle tracking), could fulfill many existing gaps, renewing older guidelines paradigms, also allowing a better risk prognostic and diagnostic strategies.

  14. Direct relationship between cell density and FDG uptake in asymptomatic aortic aneurysm close to surgical threshold: an in vivo and in vitro study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marini, Cecilia [CNR Institute of Bioimaging and Molecular Physiology, Milan, Genoa Section, Genoa (Italy); Oftalmologia e Genetica dell' Universita di Genova, Dipartimento di Neuroscienze, Genoa (Italy); Morbelli, Silvia; Armonino, Riccardo; Riondato, Mattia; Massollo, Michela; Augeri, Carla; Fiz, Francesco; Sambuceti, Gianmario [University of Genoa, Department Internal Medicine, Chair of Nuclear Medicine, Genoa (Italy); Spinella, Giovanni; Pane, Bianca; Palmieri, Daniela; Palombo, Domenico [San Martino University Hospital, University of Genoa, Division of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Genoa (Italy); Sarocchi, Francesca; Abete, Luca; Fulcheri, Ezio [University of Genoa, Department of Surgical and Diagnostic Sciences, Pathology, Genoa (Italy); Ghigliotti, Giorgio [University of Genoa, Department of Internal Medicine, Chair of Cardiology, Genoa (Italy); Cittadini, Giuseppe [Hospital San Martino, Department of Radiology, Genoa (Italy)

    2012-01-15

    Conflicting results have been reported about the clinical value of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) imaging in predicting the risk of rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The present study tests the hypothesis that FDG uptake is low in asymptomatic noninflammatory AAA due to the low cell density in aneurysmal walls. Positron emission tomography (PET)/CT imaging was performed in 12 consecutive candidates for AAA surgical repair and in 12 age- and sex-matched controls. At intervention, aneurysmal walls were cut into three sequential blocks. Block A was frozen to cut three 5-{mu}m slices for incubation with 2-3 MBq of FDG for 5 min. Block C was first incubated with the same tracer solution for the same time and subsequently frozen to cut three 5-{mu}m slices. Autoradiographic images were coregistered with immunohistochemical pictures of cell density, type and DNA synthesis as assessed on block B. No visible uptake in abdominal aorta occurred in any patient or control subject. Immunohistochemistry documented a severe loss of wall structure, with low numbers of cells. Tracer retention directly correlated with overall cell density and with prevalence of cells synthesizing DNA. The metabolic nature of FDG uptake was confirmed by the selective effect of preliminary freezing that decreased tracer content by 90% in regions with high cell density and only by 34% in cold acellular areas. The loss of tissue structure and the marked decrease in cell density account for the low prevalence of positive findings at FDG PET imaging, at least in asymptomatic patients bearing AAAs whose diameter is close to surgical indication. (orig.)

  15. Endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm in a patient with stenosis of bilateral common iliac artery stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daab, Leo J; Aidinian, Gilbert; Weber, Michael A; Kembro, Ronald J; Cook, Patrick R

    2011-01-01

    The explosion in endovascular interventions for peripheral vascular disease has resulted in procedures being used by a multitude of specialties. Nonvascular surgeons performing these interventions can create scenarios that may make future vascular interventions difficult. In this article, we present a case report illustrating this point. A 68-year-old man with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, coronary artery disease with prior myocardial infarction, and multiple abdominal operations presented with an abdominal aortic aneurysm. In our opinion, this patient was at a prohibitive operative risk for open repair. Review of his imaging results revealed a 6.7-cm infrarenal aneurysm with bilateral common iliac artery (CIA) stents (right: 8 mm; left: 6 mm) and 6-mm self-expanding stents extending from the right external iliac artery through the common femoral artery. A Cook Zenith Renu (30 × 108 mm) graft (Cook Medical Inc., Bloomington, IN) was advanced after serial dilation and balloon angioplasty of the stenotic right CIA stent. Left brachial access was used for arteriographic imaging. The left common femoral artery was accessed and the left CIA was coil-embolized to prevent backbleeding. A femoro-femoral artery crossover bypass was then performed after segmental resection of the right common femoral artery stent. The patient tolerated the procedure well and was discharged home on postoperative day 3. Subsequent postoperative computed tomography arteriogram after 1 month showed palpable pulses and no evidence of endoleak with flow in the femoro-femoral graft on clinical exam. This case demonstrates an endovascular intervention which limited the potential options available for aneurysm repair. Similar problems may become increasingly common as more providers offer endovascular interventions, thus emphasizing the importance of a collaborative approach to the patient with complex aorto-iliac occlusive disease and abdominal aortic aneurysm. It is the duty of the

  16. Outcomes after primary transcatheter therapy in infants and young children with severe bilateral peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Jonathan W; McElhinney, Doff B; Gauvreau, Kimberlee; Bergersen, Lisa; Lacro, Ronald V; Marshall, Audrey C; Smoot, Leslie; Lock, James E

    2013-08-01

    Angioplasty and stent implantation have become accepted therapies for isolated peripheral pulmonary stenosis, and have been shown to increase vessel diameter and reduce right ventricular (RV) pressure acutely in patients with pulmonary artery (PA) stenosis. The purpose of this study was to assess long-term outcomes after primary transcatheter therapy for peripheral pulmonary stenosis. We studied 69 patients who underwent primary transcatheter intervention for severe isolated peripheral pulmonary stenosis at ≤ 5 years of age. Genetic/syndromic diagnoses included Williams syndrome (n=23), non-Williams familial arteriopathy (n=12), and Alagille syndrome (n=3). At the initial PA intervention, median RV:aortic pressure ratio decreased from 1.00 to 0.88 (median decrease, 0.18; Paortic pressure ratio had a greater reduction (Paortic stenosis. Freedom from any PA reintervention was 38 ± 6% at 1 year and 22 ± 6% at 5 years. The median RV:aortic pressure ratio decreased from 1.0 at baseline to 0.53 at the most recent catheterization (Pstenosis has become safer, regardless of genetic condition. Coupled with reintervention and surgical relief in selected cases, RV:aortic pressure ratios decrease substantially and most patients are asymptomatic at late follow-up.

  17. Bundle-branch reentry ventricular tachycardia after transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana de la Rosa Riestra

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An 83-year-old male suffering from severe symptomatic aortic valve stenosis received an implant of a biological aortic prosthesis through the femoral artery without complications. Seven days after dischargement he experienced a syncope. The patient was wearing an ECG holter monitor that day, which showed a wide QRS complex tachycardia of 300 beats per minute. The electrophysiological study revealed a bundle-branch reentry ventricular tachycardia as the cause of the syncope. Radio-frequency was applied on the right-bundle branch. Twelve months later, the patient has remained asymptomatic.

  18. Exercise training does not improve cardiac function in compensated or decompensated left ventricular hypertrophy induced by aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Deel, Elza D; de Boer, Martine; Kuster, Diederik W; Boontje, Nicky M; Holemans, Patricia; Sipido, Karin R; van der Velden, Jolanda; Duncker, Dirk J

    2011-06-01

    There is ample evidence that regular exercise exerts beneficial effects on left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, remodeling and dysfunction produced by ischemic heart disease or systemic hypertension. In contrast, the effects of exercise on pathological LV hypertrophy and dysfunction produced by LV outflow obstruction have not been studied to date. Consequently, we evaluated the effects of 8 weeks of voluntary wheel running in mice (which mitigates post-infarct LV dysfunction) on LV hypertrophy and dysfunction produced by mild (mTAC) and severe (sTAC) transverse aortic constriction. mTAC produced ~40% LV hypertrophy and increased myocardial expression of hypertrophy marker genes but did not affect LV function, SERCA2a protein levels, apoptosis or capillary density. Exercise had no effect on global LV hypertrophy and function in mTAC but increased interstitial collagen, and ANP expression. sTAC produced ~80% LV hypertrophy and further increased ANP expression and interstitial fibrosis and, in contrast with mTAC, also produced LV dilation, systolic as well as diastolic dysfunction, pulmonary congestion, apoptosis and capillary rarefaction and decreased SERCA2a and ryanodine receptor (RyR) protein levels. LV diastolic dysfunction was likely aggravated by elevated passive isometric force and Ca(2+)-sensitivity of myofilaments. Exercise training failed to mitigate the sTAC-induced LV hypertrophy and capillary rarefaction or the decreases in SERCA2a and RyR. Exercise attenuated the sTAC-induced increase in passive isometric force but did not affect myofilament Ca(2+)-sensitivity and tended to aggravate interstitial fibrosis. In conclusion, exercise had no effect on LV function in compensated and decompensated cardiac hypertrophy produced by LV outflow obstruction, suggesting that the effect of exercise on pathologic LV hypertrophy and dysfunction depends critically on the underlying cause. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Association of the Common Genetic Polymorphisms and Haplotypes of the Chymase Gene with Left Ventricular Mass in Male Patients with Symptomatic Aortic Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlowska-Baranowska, Ewa; Gora, Jaroslaw; Baranowski, Rafal; Stoklosa, Patrycjusz; Gadomska vel Betka, Lucja; Pedzich-Placha, Ewa; Milkowska, Malogrzata; Koblowska, Marta K.; Hryniewiecki, Tomasz; Gaciong, Zbigniew; Placha, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the association between polymorphisms and haplotypes of the chymase 1 gene (CMA1) and the left ventricular mass index (LVM/BSA) in a large cohort of patients with aortic stenosis (AS). Additionally, the gender differences in cardiac remodeling and hypertrophy were analyzed. The genetic background may affect the myocardial response to pressure overload. In human cardiac tissue, CMA1 is involved in angiotensin II production and TGF-β activation, which are two major players in the pathogenesis of hypertrophy and fibrosis. Preoperative echocardiographic data from 648 patients with significant symptomatic AS were used. The LVM/BSA was significantly lower (p<0.0001), but relative wall thickness (RWT) was significantly higher (p = 0.0009) in the women compared with the men. The haplotypes were reconstructed using six genotyped polymorphisms: rs5248, rs4519248, rs1956932, rs17184822, rs1956923, and rs1800875. The haplotype h1.ACAGGA was associated with higher LVM/BSA (p = 9.84×10−5), and the haplotype h2.ATAGAG was associated with lower LVM/BSA (p = 0.0061) in men, and no significant differences were found in women. Two polymorphisms within the promoter region of the CMA1 gene, namely rs1800875 (p = 0.0067) and rs1956923 (p = 0.0015), influenced the value of the LVM/BSA in males. The polymorphisms and haplotypes of the CMA1 locus are associated with cardiac hypertrophy in male patients with symptomatic AS. Appropriate methods for the indexation of heart dimensions revealed substantial sex-related differences in the myocardial response to pressure overload. PMID:24823657

  20. Meatal stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urethral meatal stenosis ... Meatal stenosis can affect both males and females. It is more common in males. In males, it is often ... in the urethra may also lead to meatal stenosis. In females, this condition is present at birth ( ...

  1. Micro-RNA-21 (biomarker) and global longitudinal strain (functional marker) in detection of myocardial fibrotic burden in severe aortic valve stenosis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiani, Iacopo; Scatena, Cristian; Mazzanti, Chiara Maria; Conte, Lorenzo; Pugliese, Nicola Riccardo; Franceschi, Sara; Lessi, Francesca; Menicagli, Michele; De Martino, Andrea; Pratali, Stefano; Bortolotti, Uberto; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; La Carrubba, Salvatore; Di Bello, Vitantonio

    2016-08-27

    Myocardial fibrosis (MF) is a deleterious consequence of aortic valve stenosis (AVS). Global longitudinal strain (GLS) is a novel left ventricular (LV) functional parameter potentially useful to non-invasively estimate MF. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding small ribonucleic acids (RNA) modulating genes function, mainly through RNA degradation. miRNA-21 is a biomarker associated with MF in pressure overload. The aim of the present study was to find an integrated algorithm for detection of MF using a combined approach with both bio- and functional markers. Thirty-six patients (75.2 ± 8 y.o.; 63 % Female) with severe AVS and preserved LV ejection fraction (EF), candidate to surgical aortic valve replacement (sAVR) were enrolled. Clinical, bio-humoral evaluation (including plasmatic miRNA-21 collected using specific tubes, PAXgene, for stabilization of peripheral RNA) and a complete echocardiographic study, including GLS and septal strain, were performed before sAVR. Twenty-eight of those patients underwent sAVR and, in 23 of them, an inter-ventricular septum biopsy was performed. Tissues were fixed in formalin and embedded in paraffin. Sections were stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin for histological evaluation and with histochemical Masson trichrome for collagen fibers. The different components were calculated and expressed as micrometers(2). To evaluate tissue miRNA components, sections 2-μm thick were cut using a microtome blade for each slide. Regression analysis was performed to test association between dependent variable and various predictors included in the model. Despite a preserved EF (66 ± 11 %), patients presented altered myocardial deformation parameters (GLS -14,02 ± 3.8 %; septal longitudinal strain, SSL -9.63 ± 2.9 %; septal longitudinal strain rate, SL-Sr -0.58 ± 0.17 1/s; Septal Longitudinal early-diastolic strain rate, SL-SrE 0.62 ± 0.32 1/s). The extent of MF showed an inverse association with both GLS and septal

  2. Edema pulmonar refractario secundario a estenosis valvular aórtica severa - valvuloplastia aórtica como terapia puente a cirugía: Presentación de un caso Refractory pulmonary edema secondary to severe aortic valvular stenosis - aortic valvuloplasty as bridge therapy to surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Salazar

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available La estenosis valvular aórtica es una entidad progresiva, que cuando es severa y produce síntomas, tiene un pronóstico sombrío que afecta de forma adversa la sobrevida. En estos casos el tratamiento de elección es la cirugía de cambio valvular, la cual, bajo determinadas circunstancias clínicas, puede ser de muy alto riesgo, y obliga así a considerar alternativas de manejo menos agresivas que permitan solucionar el problema. Se muestra el caso de un hombre de 65 años, con estenosis valvular aórtica severa, quien desarrolló edema pulmonar refractario al manejo médico, que se resolvió mediante valvuloplastia aórtica, como terapia puente a cirugía.Aortic valve stenosis is a progressive disease; when it is severe and symptomatic has a bleak prognosis that affects adversely the patient survival. In these cases, the treatment of choice is valve replacement surgery that under certain circumstances can bear a huge risk that forces the physician to consider less aggressive management alternatives to solve the problem. The case of a 65 years old male with severe aortic valve stenosis is reported. He developed pulmonary edema refractory to medical treatment that was solved by aortic valvuloplasty as bridge therapy to surgery.

  3. Age but not ABCD(2) score predicts any level of carotid stenosis in either symptomatic or asymptomatic side in transient ischaemic attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannu, G S; Kyu, M M; Bettencourt-Silva, J H; Loke, Y K; Clark, A B; Metcalf, A K; Potter, J F; Myint, P K

    2015-09-01

    The ABCD(2) score is routinely used in assessment of transient ischaemic attack (TIA) to assess the risk of developing stroke. There remains uncertainty regarding whether the ABCD(2) score could be used to help predict extent of carotid artery stenosis (CAS). We aimed to (i) collate and analyse all available published literature on this topic and (ii) compare the data from our local population to the existing evidence base. We conducted a retrospective-observational study over a 6-month period using our East of England hospital-based TIA clinic data with a catchment population of ~750,000. We also searched the literature on studies reporting the association between ABCD(2) score and CAS. We included 341 patients in our observational study. The mean age in our cohort was 72.86 years (SD 10.91) with 52% male participants. ABCD(2) score was not significantly associated with CAS (p = 0.78). Only age > 60 years was significantly associated with ipsilateral (> 50%) and contralateral CAS (> 50% and > 70%) (p ABCD(2) score and CAS was reported, confirming our findings. Our systematic review and observational study confirm that the ABCD(2) score does not predict CAS. However, our observational study has examined a larger number of possible predictors and demonstrates that age appears to be the single best predictor of CAS in patients presenting with a TIA. Selection of urgent carotid ultrasound scan thus should be based on individual patient's age and potential benefit of carotid intervention rather than ABCD(2) score. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Towards new therapies for calcific aortic valve disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riem Vis, P.W.

    2011-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is characterized by progressive calcification of the aortic valve cusps. The end-stage (stenosis), can lead to heart failure and death. Approximately 2-3% of adults over 65 years of age are thought to suffer from valve stenosis, requiring aortic valve

  5. Spinal Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and allows you to stand and bend. Spinal stenosis causes narrowing in your spine. The narrowing puts ... and spinal cord and can cause pain. Spinal stenosis occurs mostly in people older than 50. Younger ...

  6. Direct Aortic CoreValve implantation via right anterior thoracotomy in a patient with patent bilateral mammary artery grafts and aortic arch chronic dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Bruschi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct aortic trans-catheter aortic valve implantation is an alternative approach to treat high risk for surgery patients affected by severe aortic stenosis and concomitant peripheral vascular disease. We describe a case of direct aortic CoreValve implantation made via a right anterior thoracotomy in a 78-year-old male affected by severe aortic stenosis and severe peripheral vasculopathy, who previously underwent coronary artery bypass grafting, with patent bilateral mammary artery grafts and chronic aortic arch dissection.

  7. Aortic root replacement with a pulmonary autograft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.B. Hokken (Raymond)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractAortic valve disease in the pediatric age group is usually a consequence of congenital aortic stenosis, which may be isolated or may be a part of an anomaly of the left ventricular outflow tract or the aortic root. Management of these patients is difficult. Neonates and infants

  8. Cardiologic aspects of aortic valve surgery--who? when? what?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, J B

    1996-10-01

    The title invites a discussion of a patient (age, lesion, physical condition, compliance, and other organ pathology) with aortic valve disease in the context of proposed surgical management. It further seeks clarification on the timing of such surgical contribution and on which operation is optimal. Without reviewing all the vast and somewhat conflicting literature, these aspects are addressed by a clinical cardiologist based principally on his own experience. Among the principal conclusions are the following: a) Surgery can safely be delayed in hemodynamically significant congenital aortic stenosis in children or young adults provided that the patients are nearly asymptomatic and that submaximal or maximal stress testing shows minimal or no ST-T changes. b) Prognosis after successful valve surgery for critically tight aortic stenosis in middle-aged and elderly patients differs from that for aortic regurgitation in that left ventricular myocardial dysfunction, however severe, will always improve postoperatively in the former condition. There is, therefore, never a cardiac contraindication to surgical management of symptomatic patients with tight aortic stenosis. c) Certain features in cases of chronic severe aortic regurgitation, such as diminished ejection fraction, increased end-systolic left ventricular diameter, electrocardiographic repolarization abnormalities, marked cardiomegaly on radiologic examination, and NYHA class III or IV symptoms, reflect a higher operative mortality and poorer long-term prognosis. Nevertheless, none of these features, alone or combined, can to date justify a definite contraindication to surgery in a specific patient. d) There is little uniformity or agreement among surgeons, including their cardiologists if or when that is pertinent, on the type of operation for patients of any age requiring aortic valve surgery. For example, a patient aged 40 years and depending on the "whims and fancies" of a Department or indeed those of an

  9. Association of Lp-PLA2 Mass and Aysmptomatic Intracranial and Extracranial Arterial Stenosis in Hypertension Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Jin; Qian, Yuesheng; Tang, Xiaofeng; Ling, Huawei; Chen, Kemin; Gao, Pingjin; Zhu, Dingliang

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial arterial stenosis (ICAS) is a common cause of ischemic stroke in Asians, whereas whites tend to have more extracranial lesions. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) has been associated with ischemic stroke by a large amount of work. However, there are few studies focusing on the relationship of Lp-PLA2 and asymptomatic ICAS or extracranial arterial stenosis (ECAS). Wehereby sought to explore the relationship of Lp-PLA2 and ICAS, ECAS and concurrent stenosis in stroke-free hypertensive patients in Chinese population. All the subjects were evaluated for the presence and severity of ICAS and ECAS through computerized tomographic angiography (CTA) covered the whole brain down to the level of aortic arch. Lp-PLA2 mass was measured by enzyme linked immunoassay. The association of Lp-PLA2 and vascular stenosis was analyzed through multivariate logistic regression. Among 414 participants, 163 (39.4%) had no ICAS or ECAS, 63 (15.2%) had ECAS only, 111 (26.8%) had ICAS only and 77 (18.6%) had concurrent extraintracranial stenosis. Lp-PLA2 mass was significantly associated with isolated ICAS (OR: 2.3; 95% CI: 1.14-4.64), and concurrent stenosis (OR: 3.93; 95% CI: 1.62-9.51), but was not related to isolated ECAS (OR: 1.54; 95% CI: 0.68-3.48). Lp-PLA2 mass was also associated with moderate to severe ICAS no matter how was the ECAS. Moreover, patients with higher Lp-PLA2 mass showed more sever ICAS and had more intracranial arterial lesions. This study revealed the association of Lp-PLA2 mass with ICAS in stroke-free hypertensive patients in Chinese population. The further long-term cohort study was warranted to elucidate the concrete effect of Lp-PLA2 on the asymptomatic ICAS.

  10. Spinal Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vasculitis Enfermedades y Condiciones I Am A Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions Spinal Stenosis Spinal Stenosis Fast Facts Spinal ... weakness, since it greatly affects your ability to work and enjoy life. The natural course of the disease is one of slow progression over time. There ...

  11. Calculation of Mitral Valve Area in Mitral Stenosis: Comparison of Continuity Equation and Pressure Half Time With Two-Dimensional Planimetry in Patients With and Without Associated Aortic or Mitral Regurgitation or Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Sattarzadeh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurement of Mitral Valve Area (MVA is essential to determining the Mitral Stenosis (MS severity and to achieving the best management strategies for this disease. The goal of the present study is to compare mitral valve area (MVA measurement by Continuity Equation (CE and Pressure Half-Time (PHT methods with that of 2D-Planimetry (PL in patients with moderate to severe mitral stenosis (MS. This comparison also was performed in subgroups of patients with significant Aortic Insufficiency (AI, Mitral Regurgitation (MR and Atrial Fibrillation (AF. We studied 70 patients with moderate to severe MS who were referred to echocardiography clinic. MVA was determined by PL, CE and PHT methods. The agreement and correlations between MVA’s obtained from various methods were determined by kappa index, Bland-Altman analysis, and linear regression analysis. The mean values for MVA calculated by CE was 0.81 cm (±0.27 and showed good correlation with those calculated by PL (0.95 cm, ±0.26 in whole population (r=0.771, P<0.001 and MR subgroup (r=0.763, P<0.001 and normal sinus rhythm and normal valve subgroups (r=0.858, P<0.001 and r=0.867, P<0.001, respectively. But CE methods didn’t show any correlation in AF and AI subgroups. MVA measured by PHT had a good correlation with that measured by PL in whole population (r=0.770, P<0.001 and also in NSR (r=0.814, P<0.001 and normal valve subgroup (r=0.781, P<0.001. Subgroup with significant AI and those with significant MR showed moderate correlation (r=0.625, P=0.017 and r=0.595, P=0.041, respectively. Bland Altman Analysis showed that CE would estimate MVA smaller in comparison with PL in the whole population and all subgroups and PHT would estimate MVA larger in comparison with PL in the whole population and all subgroups. The mean bias for CE and PHT are 0.14 cm and -0.06 cm respectively. In patients with moderate to severe mitral stenosis, in the absence of concomitant AF, AI or MR, the accuracy

  12. Long-term outcomes of the Ross procedure in adults with severe aortic stenosis: single-centre experience with 20 years of follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfa, David; Mohammadi, Siamak; Kalavrouziotis, Dimitri; Kharroubi, Mounir; Doyle, Daniel; Marzouk, Mohamed; Metras, Jacques; Perron, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The optimal prosthesis option for aortic valve replacement in adult patientsRoss procedure in this population. Between 1990 and 2013, 276 patients aged 18 years and above (mean 40.3±10.6) underwent an elective Ross procedure. Among them, 221 patients had predominant severe AS; these patients form the study group. The Ross procedure was performed either by aortic root replacement (n=190; 86%) or the subcoronary technique (n=31; 14%). There were 169 patients with bicuspid valves and 33 redo operations including previous aortic valve repair (n=6) and replacement (n=9) for severe AS. Demographic, preoperative, postoperative and longitudinal clinical and echocardiographic data were collected prospectively. The median and mean follow-up were 11.4 years (range: 1-20.1 years) and 10.1±5.9 years, respectively. The follow-up was complete in all patients. Kaplan-Meier actuarial survival analysis was performed to assess long-term survival, freedom from reoperation for autograft and/or homograft failure and freedom from autograft valve insufficiency. Cox regression risk analysis was performed to identify factors associated with autograft or homograft reoperations. The perioperative mortality rate was 0.9% (n=2). The incidence rate of early reoperation for bleeding was 5.9%. The actuarial survival rate at 10 and 15 years following surgery was 92.1 and 90.5%, respectively. Ross-related reoperations occurred in 21 patients during follow-up: autograft dysfunction (n=9), homograft dysfunction (n=6) and both (n=6). The rate of freedom from Ross-related reoperation was 94.7 and 87.7% at 10 and 15 years, respectively. The rate of freedom from reoperation for autograft failure was 97.6 and 91.5%, the rate of freedom from reoperation for homograft failure was 95.7 and 90.8%, and the rate of freedom from moderate or severe autograft regurgitation was 94.1 and 85.6% at 10 and 15 years, respectively. Compared with available aortic bioprosthetic alternatives in young adults with severe AS

  13. Insuficiencia cardíaca congestiva por estenosis aórtica calcificada tratada con éxito en el hogar Congenital heart failure due to calcified aortic stenosis successfully treated at home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roidel Pérez Pérez

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Se describe la historia de un paciente con una insuficiencia cardíaca congestiva debido a una estenosis aórtica calcificada, con un cuadro de arritmia cardíaca relativamente complejo, que fue ingresado en el hogar y tratado por el grupo básico de trabajo de su área de salud. Se le realizaron las investigaciones imprescindibles para un adecuado manejo médico, restableciéndosele la salud al paciente, e incorporándolo a su vida laboral, sin necesidad de ingreso hospitalario. Se demostró una vez más la ventaja de este estilo de trabajo en la atención médica de salud y el gran nivel de satisfacción de la población.The history of a patient suffering from congenital heart failure due to a calcified aortic stenosis, with a relatively complex picture of heart arrhytmia, that was admitted at home and treated by the basic working group in his health area, is described. All the investigations necessary for an adequate medical management were made. The patient's health was reestablished and he was able to work again without being hospitalized. It was proved once again the advantage of this working style in health care and the high level of the patient's satisfaction.

  14. Efficacy and safety of the Lotus Valve System for treatment of patients with severe aortic valve stenosis and intermediate surgical risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Götberg, Matthias; Ihlberg, Leo

    2016-01-01

    )-defined device success was obtained in 97.4%. A Lotus Valve was successfully implanted in all patients. There was no valve migration, embolization, ectopic valve deployment, or TAV-in-TAV deployment. The VARC-defined combined safety rate at 30days was 92.2%, with a mortality rate of 1.9% and stroke rate of 3.......9% - this rate was 12.8% in case of a combined implantation depth device/annulus ratiosafety of the repositionable, retrievable Lotus Valve System in intermediate risk patients with AS. The VARC-defined device success rate was 97.......2%. The clinical efficacy rate after 30days was 91.6% - only one patient had moderate aortic regurgitation. When considering only those patients in the late experience group (N=79), the combined safety and clinical efficacy rates were 93.7% and 92.4%, respectively. The pacemaker implantation rate was 27...

  15. [Reconstruction of the aortic bifurcation: endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) and alternatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schürmann, K

    2013-06-01

    Diseases of the aortic bifurcation, whether stenotic or dilating, are mostly a manifestation of arteriosclerosis. If only stenosis is present aortic bifurcation disease is equivalent to a certain form of peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) characterized by the specific anatomical location. Aneurysmal disease and PAOD of the aortic bifurcation may occur together and men older than 60 years are particularly affected. The main symptom of aortic bifurcation PAOD is bilateral claudication whereas aneurysmal disease of the aortic bifurcation is frequently asymptomatic. Therapy of stenotic and aneurysmal disease of the aortic bifurcation depends on the degree of the disease. Simple lesions, such as isolated stenoses of the aortic bifurcation or unilateral occlusions of the common iliac artery extending to the aortic bifurcation have been treated endoluminally for many years. Current standard treatment of complex aortic bifurcation disease is open surgery with implantation of an aortobifemoral bypass graft. However, recent developments in less invasive endoluminal methods have shifted the indications more towards endoluminal therapy. This development is mirrored by the international TransAtlantic Inter-Society Consensus (TASC) II recommendations from 2007 and even more clearly by the current national S3 guidelines on PAOD (http://www.degir.de/site/leitlinien). It is stated that in complex aortic bifurcation disease, such as bilateral occlusions of the common iliac arteries (TASC C lesions) or diffuse aortobiiliac stenoses and occlusions (TASC D lesions), endoluminal therapy may be considered as an alternative to open surgery. Therapy of aneurysmal disease of the aortic bifurcation depends on the pathoanatomical conditions. Prerequisite for endoluminal therapy is a sufficient landing zone for the prostheses. If this prerequisite is fulfilled endoluminal therapy is very likely comparable to open surgery with regard to technical and clinical success. Long

  16. Extracellular Matrix Biomarker, Fibulin-1, Is Closely Related to NT-proBNP and Soluble Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor in Patients with Aortic Valve Stenosis (The SEAS Study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruger, Ruan; Rasmussen, Lars M; Argraves, William S

    2014-01-01

     = 0.16, p = 0.006, βyear4 = 0.13, p = 0.03) at the expense of the association to aortic valve area index (AVAI) (βyear0 = -0.14, p = 0.005, βyear1 = -0.08, p = 0.11, βyear4 = -0.06, p = 0.22) independently of age, gender, creatinine, and serum aspartate aminotransferase (Adj.Ryear02 = 0.19, Adj.......01), and suPAR (βyear0 = 0.09, p = 0.26, βyear1 = 0.23, βyear4 = 0.21, both pgender, AST and treatment allocation. CONCLUSIONS: Increased levels of fibulin-1 were independently associated with higher levels of suPAR and NT-proBNP especially in patients with lower AVAI, suggesting...

  17. Early detection of asymptomatic carotid disease in patients with arteriosclerotic occlusive disease of the lower extremities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rančić Zoran S.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis in patients with lower extremities atherosclerosis is relatively high. Limiting screening of specific subgroups for any demographic or medical characteristics is ineffective. Screening for asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis is indicated in all patients with lower extremities atherosclerosis except in whom prophylactic carotid endarterectomy is not recommended because of comorbid disease or extreme age.

  18. Thoracic aortic calcium, cardiovascular disease events, and all-cause mortality in asymptomatic individuals with zero coronary calcium: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joonseok; Budoff, Matthew J; Nasir, Khurram; Wong, Nathan D; Yeboah, Joseph; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H; Shea, Steve; Dardari, Zeina A; Blumenthal, Roger S; Blaha, Michael J; Cainzos-Achirica, Miguel

    2017-02-01

    TAC is associated with incident CVD and all-cause mortality. Nevertheless, the independent 10-year prognostic value of TAC in individuals with CAC = 0 beyond traditional risk factors is not well established. 3415 MESA participants with baseline CAC = 0 were followed for CHD, CVD events and all-cause mortality. TAC was measured in the ascending and descending aorta in all participants and quantified using Agatston's score. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to study the associations between TAC and incident CHD, CVD events and all-cause mortality. Likelihood ratio tests were used to compare prediction models including traditional risk factors plus TAC versus risk factors alone. 406 participants (11.9%) had TAC>0 at baseline. Over a median follow-up of 11.3 years, unadjusted event rates per 1000 person-years were higher in TAC>0 than in TAC = 0 participants: CHD 2.18 vs. 2.03; CVD 6.85 vs. 3.42; all-cause mortality 12.84 vs. 4.96. However, in multivariable Cox regression analyses adjusting for CVD risk factors, neither TAC>0, TAC>100 nor log(TAC+1) were independently associated with any of the study outcomes, nor improved their prediction compared to traditional risk factors alone (p value of likelihood ratio tests >0.05). In a multi-ethnic, modern US population of asymptomatic individuals with CAC = 0 at baseline, the prevalence of TAC>0 was low, and TAC did not improve 10-year estimation of prognosis beyond traditional risk factors. In the presence of CAC = 0, measurement of TAC is unlikely to provide sufficient additional prognostic information to further improve risk assessment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Congenital Tracheal Stenosis in a Patient with Cleft Lip

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Congenital tracheal stenosis (CTS) is a rare condition characterised by different patterns of tracheal narrowing. The pathological hallmark is the presence of complete tracheal rings, with or without associated anomalies. We present a case of asymptomatic CTS in a patient with unilateral cleft lip. Tracheal stenosis was.

  20. Efectos del ejercicio isométrico sobre la función diastólica en pacientes con estenosis aortica severa Effect of isometric exercise on diastolic function in patients with severe aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Donato

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del estudio fue determinar los efectos del ejercicio isométrico sobre la función diastólica, en pacientes con estenosis aórtica sin lesión coronaria (grupo 1, G2, n= 9 y con lesión coronaria (grupo 2, G2, n=11. Pacientes sometidos a un cateterismo cardíaco realizaron ejercicio isométrico hasta que la frecuencia cardíaca se incrementó un 32±9%, con respecto a su valor basal. Se midieron la presión sistólica ventricular izquierda (PSVI y la presión de fin de diástole (PDFVI y se calculó la constante de tiempo de caída de la presión ventricular (tau, t, y la máxima velocidad de ascenso de la presión (+dP/dt máx. La +dP/dt máx aumentó en G1 y G2, durante el ejercicio, desde un valor de 1989±190 y 2428±220 mmHg/seg, hasta un valor de 2286±214 y 2661±230 mmHg/seg, respectivamente; retornando luego a su valor basal. La PDFVI aumentó, durante el ejercicio, en G1 y G2 desde un valor de 30.1±2.7 y 26.5±2.2 mmHg hasta 38.4±1.7 y 36.1±4.0 mmHg, respectivamente (pThe objective of the study was to determine the effects of isometric exercise on the diastolic function in patients with aortic stenosis without coronary lesion (group 1, G1, n = 9 and with coronary lesion (group 2, G2, n=11. Patients subjected to a cardiac catheterization performed isometric exercise until their heart rate increased in 32±9 % compared to baseline. The left ventricular systolic pressure, the +dP/dt max, and the end diastolic pressure (LVEDP were measured, and the time constant of pressure decay (tau, t was calculated. The +dP/dt max increased in G1 and G2 during exercise, from a value of 1989±190 and 2428±220 mmHg/sec up to 2286±214 y 2661±230 mmHg/sec, respectively, returning afterwards to its baseline value. The LVEDP increased during exercise in G1 and G2 from a value of 30.1±2.7 and 26.5±2.2 mmHg up to 38.4±1.7 and 36.1±4.0 mmHg, respectively (p<0.05, returning to its baseline value only in G1. The tau (t increased during

  1. Correlation between disability and MRI findings in lumbar spinal stenosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sigmundsson, Freyr G; Kang, Xiao P; J?nsson, Bo; Str?mqvist, Bj?rn

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose MRI is the modality of choice when diagnosing spinal stenosis but it also shows that stenosis is prevalent in asymptomatic subjects over 60. The relationship between preoperative health-related quality of life, functional status, leg and back pain, and the objectively measured dural sac area in single and multilevel stenosis is unknown. We assessed this relationship in a prospective study. Patients and methods The cohort included 109 consecutive patients with central sp...

  2. A case of William's syndrome associated peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Kyung Hwa; Hwang, Mi Soo; Kim, Sun Yong; Chang, Jae Chun; Park, Bok Hwan [College of Medicine, Yeungam University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-06-15

    William's syndrome, in order to more completely delineate the total spectrum of the disorder, indicates that 'infantile hypercalcemia', 'peculiar facies' and 'supravalvular aortic stenosis.' In has other many vascular anomalies, such as peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis, coronary arterial stenosis, celiac arterial stenosis, and renal aterial stenosis. Only 32% of the patients have evidence of supravalvular aortic stenosis. And it is very rare disease entity that has been reported rarely in Korea. Recently authors experienced a case that was questioned William's syndrome with peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis, clinically and preliminary radiologically and this case was confirmed by operation. Here we report a case of William's syndrome with peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis and reviewed literatures.

  3. Tracheal resection for laryngotracheal stenosis: A retrospective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-08-03

    Aug 3, 2014 ... OTOLARYNGOLOGY. Laryngotracheal stenosis (LTS) is caused by form ation of scar tissue in the trachea and, rarely, in the larynx itself. Symptoms depend on the degree of airway obstruction and can therefore range from asymptomatic to upper airway obstruction severe enough to cause death.[15].

  4. [Paravalvular aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buğan, Barış; Tuzcu, Emin Murat

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a rapidly evolving technology that has been accepted as a treatment option in patients with severe aortic stenosis who are not suitable for or are at high risk for conventional surgery. Randomized trials have shown that TAVR decreases mortality and improves quality of life in patients who are not suitable for conventional surgery and that TAVR is not inferior to standard surgery in operable but high- risk patients. However, TAVR has several important limitations, the most prominent of which is residual paravalvular aortic regurgitation (PAR). The purpose of this review is to present the mechanism, incidence, assessment, and treatment of PAR after TAVR.

  5. Elective reconstruction of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm type IV by transabdominal approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanović Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA type IV represents an aortic dilatation from the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus to the iliac arteries branches, including visceral branches of the aorta. In the traditional procedure of TAAA type IV repair, the body is opened using thoractomy and laparotomy in order to provide adequate exposure of the descending thoracic and abdominal aorta for safe aortic reconstruction. Case report. We reported a 71-yearold man with elective reconstruction of the TAAA type IV performed by transabdominal approach. Computed tomography scans angiography revealed a TAAA type IV with diameter of 62 mm in the region of celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery branching, and the largest diameter of 75 mm in the infrarenal aortic level. The patient comorbidity included a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hypertension, therefore he was treated for a prolonged period. In preparation for the planned aortic reconstruction asymptomatic carotid disease (occlusion of the left internal carotid artery and subtotal stenosis of the right internal carotid artery was diagnosed. Within the same intervention percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with stent placement in right internal carotid artery was made. In general, under endotracheal anesthesia and epidural analgesia, with transabdominal approach performed aortic reconstruction with tubular dakron graft 24 mm were, and reimplantation of visceral aortic branches into the graft performed. Postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged on the postoperative day 17. Control computed tomography scan angiography performed three months after the operation showed vascular state of the patient to be in order. Conclusion. Complete transabdominal approach to TAAA type IV represents an appropriate substitute for thoracoabdominal approach, without compromising safety of the patient. This approach is less traumatic, especially in patients with impaired

  6. Mitral stenosis before, during and after pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JW Roos-Hesselink

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Mitral stenosis is the most common cardiac valvular problem in pregnant women with rheumatic heart disease being the most important cause. As a result of hemodynamic changes associated with pregnancy, previously asymptomatic patients develop symptoms or complications during pregnancy. Pregnancy in women with mitral stenosis is associated with a marked increase in maternal morbidity and adverse fetal outcome. Treatment of symptomatic mitral stenosis during pregnancy consists of bedrest, beta-blockers and diuretics. If symptoms persist despite optimal medical treatment, percutaneous mitral valvulotomy should be considered. If possible, surgery should be postponed until after delivery. It is recommended to treat women with symptomatic mitral stenosis in a tertiary centre with interventional possibilities.

  7. Full metal jacket: transfemoral aortic valve implantation for regurgitant valve after endovascular aortic repair†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanyeli, Omer; Dereli, Yuksel; Gormus, Niyazi; Duzenli, Mehmet Akif

    2017-07-25

    Transfemoral aortic valve implantation has become an almost routine interventional procedure for severe aortic stenosis in high-risk patients. Over time an increased number of experiences has led to unusual procedures. In this report, we present a successful valve-in-valve transfemoral aortic valve implantation in a patient with aortic regurgitation, who previously had debranching and thoracic endovascular aortic repair operations. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  8. Changes in platelet indices in children with bicuspid aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayhan, Aylin Canbolat; Ayhan, Yusuf Izzet; Kalaycık, Ozlem; Timur, Cetin; Yoruk, Asım

    2015-03-01

    Mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet distribution width (PDW) can help diagnose cardiovascular pathologies. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate the changes in platelet (PLT) indices in children diagnosed with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) with mild stenosis and without stenosis to compare patients with mild stenosis with those without stenosis. A total of 73 children diagnosed with BAV (30 patients with mild stenosis and 43 without stenosis) with a mean age 9.73 ± 5.01 years and a control group were included in the study. Mean MPV value was significantly lower in the control group compared with patients with BAV with mild stenosis and patients without stenosis (p = 0.001, and p stenosis than in patients without stenosis (p = 0.049 and p stenosis had a significantly greater mean PDW value compared with patients without stenosis and the control group (p = 0.024 and p stenosis and the control group with respect to mean PDW value (p > 0.05). In conclusion, the results of this study demonsrate that children with BAV either with or without stenosis have increased MPV; the ones with mild stenosis have even greater values than the ones without stenosis. It emphasizes the risk of thrombosis in children with BAV.

  9. Surgical Treatment of Anomalous Origin of Right Coronary Artery in a Patient with Mitral Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refatllari, Ali; Likaj, Ermal; Dumani, Selman; Hasimi, Endri; Goda, Artan

    2016-03-15

    An anomalous origin of the right coronary artery is rarely observed, with a reported incidence between 0.026% and 0.25%. This condition is often completely asymptomatic and is found incidentally during angiographic evaluation for other cardiac diseases. However some patients present with exertion angina or sudden death. Surgical treatment in patients with anomalous RCA is still controversial. Treatment can be conservative, angioplasty or surgery. A 59-year-old man was admitted with severe mitral stenosis. He complained exertion and rest dyspnea, NYHA III class. He had sequels of embolic stroke, results of left atrial thrombus. Echocardiography showed calcified severe mitral stenosis with mitral orifice area of 1.1 square centimeters with PSPAP 60 mmHg and normal LV function. Routine coronary angiography before surgery showed aberrant origin of RCA from the left sinus of Valsalva with 90% stenosis at his origin. Multi-slice computed tomography proved the diagnosis of anomalous RCA arising from the left sinus of Valsalva and taking an inter-arterial course between the aorta and pulmonary artery. The patient underwent mitral valve replacement with mechanical St. Jude prosthesis No 29 and saphenous vein graft to RCA. We chose by-pass grafting techniques because after aortotomy, RCA was too close to LMCA, intramural course was too short and stenosis of RCA was outside of aortic wall. The patient's perioperative course was without complications and patient was discharged on the seventh postoperative day. Correction of anomalous of the origin of right coronary artery is mandatory in cases where patient has to be operated for other cardiac causes.

  10. Asymptomatic dystrophinopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrone, A. [Univ. of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA (United States)]|[Univ. of Florence (Italy); Hoffman, E.P.; Hoop, R.C. [Univ. of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA (United States)] [and others

    1997-03-31

    A 4-year-old girl was referred for evaluation for a mild but persistent serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) elevation detected incidentally during routine blood screening for a skin infection. Serum creatine kinase activity was found to be increased. Immuno-histochemical study for dystrophin in her muscle biopsy showed results consistent with a carrier state for muscular dystrophy. Molecular work-up showed the proposita to be a carrier of a deletion mutation of exon 48 of the dystrophin gene. Four male relatives also had the deletion mutation, yet showed no clinical symptoms of muscular dystrophy (age range 8-58 yrs). Linkage analysis of the dystrophin gene in the family showed a spontaneous change of an STR45 allele, which could be due to either an intragenic double recombination event, or CA repeat length mutation leading to identical size alleles. To our knowledge, this is the first documentation of an asymptomatic dystrophinopathy in multiple males of advanced age. Based on molecular findings, this family would be given a diagnosis of Becker muscular dystrophy. This diagnosis implies the development of clinical symptoms, even though this family is clearly asymptomatic. This report underscores the caution which must be exercised when giving presymptomatic diagnoses based on molecular studies. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Transcarotid Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement as Preferred Alternative Access in a Patient With Bilateral Carotid Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Puja B; Loh, Shang; Gruberg, Luis; Patel, Neal; Weinstein, Jonathan; Tannous, Henry; Bilfinger, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    A 78-year-old man presented with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis and a heavily calcified, stenotic aortic valve. Given multiple comorbidities, the heart team agreed on a transcatheter approach via the left common carotid artery.

  12. Infantile Aortic Coarctation in an Adult with Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumiz, Eva; Valero, Ernesto; Vilar, Juan Vicente; Santas, Enrique; Haba, Javier

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this case report is to highlight the importance of excluding aortic coarctation in a patient with a bicuspid aortic valve. A 56-year-old woman with hypertension was admitted complaining of progressive dyspnea. Transthoracic echocardiography showed a calcified, bicuspid aortic valve with severe stenosis. Aortography revealed the presence of severe narrowing of the aorta between the carotid and subclavian arteries. The patient was referred for cardiovascular surgery in which successful aortic valve replacement and aortic correction were performed. This case report shows an uncommon finding of infantile aortic coarctation in an adult patient admitted with heart failure. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Aortic dissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... made in the chest or abdomen. Endovascular aortic repair. This surgery is done without any major surgical ... needed. If the heart arteries are involved, a coronary bypass is also performed. Outlook ... aneurysm - dissecting; Chest pain - aortic dissection; Thoracic aortic aneurysm - ...

  14. is aortic stenosis associated with congenital nephropathy?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    3Department of Biology, American University of Beirut, P.O. Box 11-0236 Beirut, Lebanon. [Gharibeh L., El-Rassy I., Soubra A., Safa R., Fahed A., Tanos R., Arabi M., Kambris Z., .... Janssen F. and Hall M. 2011 Update on congenital nephrotic syndromes and the contribution of US. Pediatr. Radiol. 41, 76–. 81. Beltcheva O.

  15. Noncardiac Surgery in Patients With Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Charlotte; Jørgensen, Mads Emil; Martinsson, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    nationwide administrative registers. AS patients (n = 2823; mean age, 75.5 years, 53% female) were matched with patients without AS (n = 2823) on propensity score for AS and surgery type. RESULTS: In elective surgery, MACE (ie, nonfatal myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, or cardiovascular death...... with high perioperative rates of MACE and mortality, but perhaps prognosis is, in practice, not much worse for patients with AS than for matched controls. Symptomatic patients and patients undergoing emergency surgery are at considerable risks of a MACE and mortality....

  16. Embolic cerebral insults after transapical aortic valve implantation detected by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Martin; Schulz-Heise, Susanne; Achenbach, Stephan; Ott, Sabine; Dörfler, Arnd; Ropers, Dieter; Feyrer, Richard; Einhaus, Friedrich; Loders, Sabrina; Mahmoud, Faidi; Roerick, Olaf; Daniel, Werner G; Weyand, Michael; Ensminger, Stephan M; Ludwig, Josef

    2010-11-01

    This study assessed the rate of periprocedural embolic ischemic brain injury during transapical aortic valve replacement in 25 consecutive patients. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is rapidly being established as a new therapeutic approach for aortic valve stenosis. Although initial clinical results are promising, it is unknown whether mobilization and embolization of calcified particles may lead to cerebral ischemia. Twenty-five consecutive patients (10 men, 15 women, mean age: 81 ± 5 years, mean log EuroSCORE [European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation]: 32 ± 10%) scheduled for transapical aortic valve implantation were included. All patients received a baseline cerebral magnetic resonance imaging scan. The scan was repeated approximately 6 days after valve implantation. The magnetic resonance imaging studies included axial diffusion-weighted, T(2)-weighted, fluid attenuated inversion recovery-weighted, and T(2) gradient echo sequences. Standardized assessment of the neurologic status was performed before aortic valve replacement and post-operatively. Transapical aortic valve implantation was successfully performed in all patients. In 17 patients (68%), new cerebral lesions could be detected, whereas 8 patients showed no new cerebral insults. The pattern of distribution and morphology were typical of embolic origin. Despite the high incidence of morphologically detectable lesions, only 5 patients showed clinical neurologic alterations. Out of these patients, only 1 suffered from a permanent stroke. New embolic ischemic cerebral insults are detected in 68% of patients after transapical valve implantation. Clinical symptoms are rare and usually transitory. Larger trials will need to establish the clinical significance of asymptomatic ischemic lesions as well as the rate of ischemic events in patients undergoing transfemoral valve replacement. Copyright © 2010 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  17. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a patient with circulatory collapse, using the lucas® chest compression system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Blom; Andersen, Claus; Nissen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    We describe a case of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) using the LUCAS® Chest Compression System in an elderly high risk patient with severe aortic stenosis and heart failure. In this case, the patient developed severe aortic regurgitation following predilatation of the native aortic...

  18. Pyloric Stenosis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Gynecologist? Blood Test: Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies Pyloric Stenosis KidsHealth > For Parents > Pyloric Stenosis Print A A ... Doctor? en español Estenosis pilórica What Is Pyloric Stenosis? Pyloric stenosis is a condition that can affect ...

  19. Aortic valve dysfunction and aortic dilation in adults with coarctation of the aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clair, Mathieu; Fernandes, Susan M; Khairy, Paul; Graham, Dionne A; Krieger, Eric V; Opotowsky, Alexander R; Singh, Michael N; Colan, Steven D; Meijboom, Erik J; Landzberg, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of aortic valve dysfunction, aortic dilation, and aortic valve and ascending aortic intervention in adults with coarctation of the aorta (CoA). Aortic valve dysfunction and aortic dilation are rare among children and adolescents with CoA. With longer follow-up, adults may be more likely to have progressive disease. We retrospectively reviewed all adults with CoA, repaired or unrepaired, seen at our center between 2004 and 2010. Two hundred sixteen adults (56.0% male) with CoA were identified. Median age at last evaluation was 28.3 (range 18.0 to 75.3) years. Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) was present in 65.7%. At last follow-up, 3.2% had moderate or severe aortic stenosis, and 3.7% had moderate or severe aortic regurgitation. Dilation of the aortic root or ascending aorta was present in 28.0% and 41.6% of patients, respectively. Moderate or severe aortic root or ascending aortic dilation (z-score > 4) was present in 8.2% and 13.7%, respectively. Patients with BAV were more likely to have moderate or severe ascending aortic dilation compared with those without BAV (19.5% vs. 0%; P aortic dilation (P = 0.04). At most recent follow-up, 5.6% had undergone aortic valve intervention, and 3.2% had aortic root or ascending aortic replacement. In adults with CoA, significant aortic valve dysfunction and interventions during early adulthood were uncommon. However, aortic dilation was prevalent, especially of the ascending aorta, in patients with BAV. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Myocardial perforation by a guidewire crossing a stenotic aortic valve during cardiac catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinkels, Ben M; ten Cate, Tim J F; Haenen, Nico A; Rensing, Benno J W M; Defauw, Jo J A M; Jaarsma, Wybren

    2010-03-04

    Myocardial perforation by a guidewire after retrograde crossing of a stenotic aortic valve during cardiac catheterization is rare. We present a patient with calcific aortic stenosis who suffered this potentially life-threatening complication and in whom conservative treatment was successful. Early recognition of this complication is important for the operator performing cardiac catheterizations in patients with calcific aortic stenosis. Copyright 2008 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. O bloqueio do sistema renina-angiotensina atenua a remodelação cardíaca de ratos submetidos a estenose aórtica Blockade of renin-angiotensin system attenuates cardiac remodeling in rats undergoing aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Gonçalves

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o papel do bloqueador dos receptores AT1 e do inibidor da enzima conversora da angiotensina na remodelação cardíaca induzida por estenose aórtica em ratos. MÉTODOS: Ratos Wistar foram divididos em 4 grupos: controle (C, n=13, estenose aórtica (EAo, n=11, EAo com lisinopril, 20 mg/kg/dia (LIS, n=11 e EAo com losartan, 40 mg/kg/dia (LOS, n=9. Os tratamentos foram iniciados 3 dias antes da cirurgia. Após 6 semanas, os animais foram submetidos ao estudo ecocardiográfico, quantificação da concentração de hidroxiprolina e da área seccional (CSA miocitária do ventrículo esquerdo (VE. RESULTADOS: A EAo induziu aumento da espessura da parede do VE. Os animais LIS e LOS não apresentaram diferença em relação aos animais controles. Os ratos EAo e LIS apresentaram maiores diâmetros do átrio esquerdo que os ratos controles, enquanto nos animais LOS não houve diferença. Os animais com EAo apresentaram maiores valores da porcentagem de encurtamento que os controle. Esse fato não foi modificado com LIS ou LOS. A CSA dos animais do grupo EAo foi maior que a dos controle. Entretanto, o tratamento com LOS e com LIS atenuou o aumento da área induzida pela EAo. A EAo resultou em aumento na concentração de HOP, enquanto o grupo LOS não apresentou diferença em relação ao grupo controle. CONCLUSÃO: O bloqueio do sistema renina-angiotensina, com bloqueador AT1 e com IECA, pode atenuar o desenvolvimento de hipertrofia cardíaca, porém só o bloqueio dos receptores AT1 atenua a fibrose intersticial do VE.OBJECTIVE: To assess the role of the AT1 receptor blocker and the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor in cardiac remodeling induced by aortic stenosis in rats. METHODS: Wistar rats were divided into the following 4 groups: 1 C - control (n=13; 2 AoS - aortic stenosis (n=11; 3 LIS - AoS treated with lisinopril, 20 mg/kg/day (n=11; and 4 LOS - AoS treated with losartan, 40 mg/kg/day (n=9. The treatments were initiated 3

  2. Quality and Safety in Health Care, Part XXX: Transcatheter Aortic Valve Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay A

    2017-12-01

    Initially, the transcatheter aortic valve replacement procedure was approved only for patients with aortic stenosis that was both severe and symptomatic who either also had too high a risk of aortic valve replacement surgery to have the surgery or who had a high risk for the surgery. Between the years 2012 and 2015, the death rate at 30 days declined from an initial rate of 7.5% to 4.6%. There has also been more use of the transfemoral approach over the years. In 2016, the transcatheter aortic valve replacement was approved for patients with aortic stenosis at intermediate risk of surgery.

  3. Aortic Diameter Growth in Children With a Bicuspid Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkx, Remy; Duijnhouwer, Anthonie L; Vink, Evelien; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W; Schokking, Michiel

    2017-07-01

    Knowledge of aortic growth in patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is essential to identify patients at risk for dissection, but data on children remain unclear. We retrospectively evaluated the aortic diameters of all pediatric BAV patients, identified through an echocardiographic database (2005 to 2013). Medical records were reviewed and aortic diameters re-measured on echocardiographic images at diagnosis and if available on variable mid- and endpoints follow-up. Dilatation (z-score >2) was based on 2 different z-score equation methods (Gautier/Campens). In 234 of the total 250 BAV patients, aortic diameters were analyzed; median age was 6.1 years (interquartile range 1.7 to 10), of which 63% were male. Aortic coarctation was present in 81 (36%) patients, 23% had a ventricular septal defect. BAV morphology according to Sievers was as follows: type 0 in 128 patients (55%), type 1 in 96 (41%), and type 2 in 10 (4%). Ascending aortic (AA) dilatation was present in 24% (Gautier) and 36% (Campens) at inclusion. Median follow-up was 4.7 years. The AA was the only location where mean z-scores progressed significantly with age: 0.06 (Gautier) and 0.09 (Campens) units per year between ages 5 and 15 years. Associations for higher AA z-scores at older age were an initial z-score >2 (p aortic valve stenosis (p aortic surgery occurred. In conclusion, only the AA seems at risk for complication, although no aortic complications occurred in this pediatric BAV cohort. BAV morphology seems associated with larger AA z-scores and valvular dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Infective endocarditis following transcatheter aortic valve replacement-

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loh, Poay Huan; Bundgaard, Henning; S�ndergaard, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) can improve the symptoms and prognosis of patients with severe aortic stenosis who, due to a high expected operative risk, would not have otherwise been treated surgically. If these patients develop prosthetic valve endocarditis, their presentations m...... treated medically, discuss the challenges in the diagnosis and management of such patients, and review available literature on the incidence and outcome of the condition. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  5. Aortic valve area assessed with 320-detector computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Kofoed, Klaus Fuglsang; Carstensen, Helle Gervig

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of aortic valve area (AVA) assessment with 320-detector Computed Tomography (MDCT) compared to transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) in a population with mild to severe aortic valve stenosis. AVA was estimated in 169 patients by planimetry on MDCT images (AVA...

  6. Prosthetic valve endocarditis after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Niels Thue; De Backer, Ole; Thyregod, Hans G H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an advancing mode of treatment for inoperable or high-risk patients with aortic stenosis. Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) after TAVI is a serious complication, but only limited data exist on its incidence, outcome, and procedural...

  7. Meatal stenosis (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meatal stenosis results from irritation of the urethral opening at the end of the penis, which leads to tissue ... also bleeding at the end of urination. Meatal stenosis can usually be treated in the physician's office ...

  8. Mitral stenosis (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitral stenosis is a heart valve disorder that narrows or obstructs the mitral valve opening. Narrowing of the mitral ... the body. The main risk factor for mitral stenosis is a history of rheumatic fever but it ...

  9. Substituição valvar aórtica percutânea para o tratamento da estenose aórtica: experiência inicial no Brasil Sustitución percutánea de la válvula aórtica para el tratamiento de la estenosis aórtica: experiencia inicial en Brasil Percutaneous aortic valve replacement for the treatment of aortic stenosis: early experience in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Perin

    2009-09-01

    la reducción del gradiente transvalvular aórtico (de 82 para 50 mmHg e de 94 para 31 mmHg inmediatamente después de la intervención. Durante la internación hospitalaria se hizo necesario implantar marcapasos definitivos en ambos pacientes, a causa de bloqueo atrioventricular. Se observó seis meses después una queda aún más grande del gradiente transvalvular aórtico (gradiente BACKGROUND: Percutaneous aortic valve replacement for the treatment of aortic stenosis is an available and efficient alternative for patients at high surgical risk, especially those with advanced age and comorbidities. OBJECTIVE: The authors report the first experience made in our midst with the use of the CoreValve endoprosthesis. METHODS: In January 2008, two patients underwent percutaneous aortic valve replacement due to symptomatic aortic stenosis. They were selected for being elderly (77 and 87 years and presenting comorbidities and a high surgical risk (EuroScore 7.7% and 12.1%. RESULTS: Percutaneous implantations of the CoreValve device were successfully performed. Enlargement of the valve area (from 0.7 to 1.5 cm² and from 0.5 to 1.3 cm² and reduction of the aortic transvalvular gradient (from 82 to 50 mmHg and from 94 to 31 mmHg were observed immediately after the intervention. During hospital stay, permanent pacemaker implantation was required in both patients due to atrioventricular block. At six months, an even greater drop in the aortic transvalvular gradient (gradient < 20 mmHg and remission of symptoms of heart failure (NYHA III to NYHA I were observed. CONCLUSION: The use of the CoreValve endoprosthesis for the treatment of aortic stenosis proved to be feasible and showed encouraging results in this early experience made in our midst.

  10. A rare complication: an attempt of retrieval of an aortic valve wrapped with pig tail catheter during transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Bekir Serhat; Alihanoglu, Yusuf Izzettin; Alur, Ihsan; Evrengul, Harun; Kaya, Dayimi

    2015-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is preferred to treat high surgical risk patients with severe aort stenosis. Wrapping of a pig tail catheter with device struts during transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a very rare complication. In this report, we present the images and videos of an attempt of retrieval of an aortic valve wrapped with pig tail catheter during transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a 71-year-old man. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Aortic cusp extension valvuloplasty with or without tricuspidization in children and adolescents: long-term results and freedom from aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polimenakos, Anastasios C; Sathanandam, Shyam; Elzein, Chawki; Barth, Mary J; Higgins, Robert S D; Ilbawi, Michel N

    2010-04-01

    Aortic cusp extension valvuloplasty is increasingly used in the management of children and adolescents with aortic stenosis or regurgitation. The durability of this approach and the freedom from valve replacement are not well defined. A study was undertaken to investigate outcomes. From July 1987 to November 2008, 142 patients aged less than 19 years underwent aortic cusp extension valvuloplasty in the form of pericardial cusp extension and tricuspidization (when needed). Three patients with truncus arteriosus and severe truncal valve insufficiency were excluded. From the available follow-up data of 139 patients, 50 had bicuspid aortic valves, 40 had congenital aortic valve stenosis, 41 had combined congenital aortic valve stenosis/insufficiency, and 8 had other diagnoses. Median follow-up was 14.4 years (0.1-21.4). Long-term mortality and freedom from aortic valve replacement were studied. There were no early, intermediate, or late deaths. Z-values of left ventricular end-diastolic dimension, aortic annulus, aortic sinus diameter, and sinotubular junction diameter before aortic valve replacement were 4.2 +/- 3.11, 2.3 +/- 1.25, 4.4 +/- 1.23, and 1.84 +/- 1.28, respectively. During the follow-up period, 64 patients underwent aortic valve reinterventions. The Ross procedure was performed in 32 of 139 patients (23%) undergoing aortic cusp extension valvuloplasty. Other aortic valve replacements were undertaken after 16 aortic cusp extension valvuloplasties (11.5%). Freedom from a second aortic cusp extension valvuloplasty or aortic valve replacement at 18 years was 82.1% +/- 4.2% and 60.0% +/- 7.2%, respectively. Aortic cusp extension valvuloplasty is a safe and effective surgical option with excellent survival and good long-term outcomes in children and adolescents. The procedure provides acceptable durability and satisfactory freedom from aortic valve replacement. Copyright 2010 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights

  12. Transcatheter valve implantation for patients with aortic stenosis: A position statement from the European Association of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC), in collaboration with the European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions (EAPCI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Vahanian (Alec); O. Alfieri (Ottavio); N. Al-Attar (Nawwar); M. Antunes (Manuel); J.J. Bax (Jeroen); B. Cormier (Bertrand); A. Cribier (Alain); P.P.T. de Jaegere (Peter); G. Fournial (Gerard); A.P. Kappetein (Arie Pieter); J. Kovac (Jan); S. Ludgate (Susanne); F. Maisano (Francesco); N. Moat (Neil); F.W. Mohr (Friedrich); P. Nataf (Patrick); L. Pié rard (Luc); J.L. Pomar (Jose); J. Schofer (Joachim); P. Tornos (Pilar); M. Tuzcu (Murat); B.A. van Hout (Ben); L.K. von Segesser (Ludwig); T. Walther (Thomas)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAims: To critically review the available transcatheter aortic valve implantation techniques and their results, as well as propose recommendations for their use and development. Methods and results: A committee of experts including European Association of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery and

  13. Modeling of the aorta artery aneurysms and renal artery stenosis using cardiovascular electronic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navidbakhsh Mahdi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aortic aneurysm is a dilatation of the aortic wall which occurs in the saccular and fusiform types. The aortic aneurysms can rupture, if left untreated. The renal stenosis occurs when the flow of blood from the arteries leading to the kidneys is constricted by atherosclerotic plaque. This narrowing may lead to the renal failure. Previous works have shown that, modelling is a useful tool for understanding of cardiovascular system functioning and pathophysiology of the system. The present study is concerned with the modelling of aortic aneurysms and renal artery stenosis using the cardiovascular electronic system. Methods The geometrical models of the aortic aneurysms and renal artery stenosis, with different rates, were constructed based on the original anatomical data. The pressure drop of each section due to the aneurysms or stenosis was computed by means of computational fluid dynamics method. The compliance of each section with the aneurysms or stenosis is also calculated using the mathematical method. An electrical system representing the cardiovascular circulation was used to study the effects of these pressure drops and the compliance variations on this system. Results The results showed the decreasing of pressure along the aorta and renal arteries lengths, due to the aneurysms and stenosis, at the peak systole. The mathematical method demonstrated that compliances of the aorta sections and renal increased with the expansion rate of the aneurysms and stenosis. The results of the modelling, such as electrical pressure graphs, exhibited the features of the pathologies such as hypertension and were compared with the relevant experimental data. Conclusion We conclude from the study that the aortic aneurysms as well as renal artery stenosis may be the most important determinant of the arteries rupture and failure. Furthermore, these pathologies play important rules in increase of the cardiovascular pulse pressure which

  14. Carotid endarterectomy: The procedure of choice for carotid stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.V. Savitr Sastri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is the commonest cause of neurological morbidity and mortality. Carotid endarterectomy has been shown to be beneficial in preventing ischemic strokes in patients with significant stenosis of the carotid artery, both in symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. Carotid artery stenting has been proposed as an alternative to CEA for this population. This paper reviews the available literature on carotid endarterectomy comparing it to the best medical therapy and carotid artery stenting in the prevention of ischemic strokes in patients with carotid stenosis. The use of newer imaging techniques and tools to redefine the existing idea of "asymptomatic" stenosis and post procedural strokes has also been reviewed. We present a concise review of existing data that shows unequivocally that endarterectomy still remains superior to stenting and best medical therapy as of now.

  15. Asymptomatic HIV infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000682.htm Asymptomatic HIV infection To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Asymptomatic HIV infection is a phase of HIV/AIDS during which ...

  16. Outcomes After Elective Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Motte, L; Jensen, L P; Vogt, K

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess outcomes after treatment for asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in Denmark in a period when both open surgery (OR) and endoluminal repair (EVAR) have been routine procedures. METHODS: We performed a retrospective nationwide cohort study of patients treated for asymp......OBJECTIVE: To assess outcomes after treatment for asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in Denmark in a period when both open surgery (OR) and endoluminal repair (EVAR) have been routine procedures. METHODS: We performed a retrospective nationwide cohort study of patients treated...... for asymptomatic AAA between 2007 and 2010. Data on demographics, procedural data, perioperative complications, length of stay (LOS), 30-day reinterventions and readmissions, late aneurysm and procedure-related complications and mortality were obtained from the Danish Vascular Registry and the Danish National...... Patient Register. RESULTS: 525 EVAR and 1176 OR for asymptomatic AAA were identified. LOS was shorter after EVAR than OR (4 vs. 7 days, p ...

  17. Bicuspid Aortic Valve and Aortic Root Morphology in Hispanic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Sofia A; Mihos, Christos G; Rodriguez-Escudero, Juan P; Elmahdy, Hany M; Pineda, Andres M; Rosen, Gerald P; Carlos Brenes, Juan; Santana, Orlando

    2015-11-01

    The study aim was to evaluate the aortic valve and aortic root morphology in Hispanic patients with a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV). BAV disease is one of the most common congenital anomaly of the heart, and is associated with abnormalities of the aorta. Interracial differences have been described between Caucasian and African-American patients with BAV, which may have clinical and therapeutic implications. The clinical and anatomical spectrum of BAV disease in Hispanic patients has not been well established. A retrospective review was conducted of all heart operations performed at the authors' institution between April 2008 and June 2013. Patients with BAV who underwent aortic valve replacement (AVR) were identified. All echocardiograms available were reviewed in order to compare cusp morphology, valvular function, and ascending aorta dimensions between Hispanic and non-Hispanic individuals. A total of 291 patients (159 Hispanic, 132 non-Hispanic) with a mean age of 62 ± 13 years were identified. The baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups. In both Hispanics and non-Hispanics, the most prevalent cusp morphology was fusion of the right and left coronary cusps (82% for both groups). The most common indication for surgery was aortic stenosis. Hispanic patients had a larger aortic annulus diameter (2.58 ± 0.32 cm versus 2.39 ± 0.39 cm, p = 0.04). However, this difference was not significant after adjusting for age, gender, body surface area, and the presence of moderate-to-severe aortic insufficiency. Ascending aortopathy was present in 42.7% of the total study population. Regardless of ethnicity, the most common pattern of aortopathy involved the tubular ascending aorta with mild to moderate root enlargement (type 1). Compared with other ethnic groups, Hispanics with BAVs have similar aortic valve morphology and function, as well as comparable aortopathy.

  18. Adventitial vasa vasorum arteriosclerosis in abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Tanaka

    Full Text Available Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is a common disease among elderly individuals. However, the precise pathophysiology of AAA remains unknown. In AAA, an intraluminal thrombus prevents luminal perfusion of oxygen, allowing only the adventitial vaso vasorum (VV to deliver oxygen and nutrients to the aortic wall. In this study, we examined changes in the adventitial VV wall in AAA to clarify the histopathological mechanisms underlying AAA. We found marked intimal hyperplasia of the adventitial VV in the AAA sac; further, immunohistological studies revealed proliferation of smooth muscle cells, which caused luminal stenosis of the VV. We also found decreased HemeB signals in the aortic wall of the sac as compared with those in the aortic wall of the neck region in AAA. The stenosis of adventitial VV in the AAA sac and the malperfusion of the aortic wall observed in the present study are new aspects of AAA pathology that are expected to enhance our understanding of this disease.

  19. Time to Explore Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Younger, Low-Risk Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergaard, Lars

    2016-01-01

    During the last decade transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has been established as a treatment for patients with severe aortic stenosis, who are at particularly high surgical risk. As compared with surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR), TAVR has been associated with lower early risk ...

  20. Platelet activation, function, and reactivity in atherosclerotic carotid artery stenosis: a systematic review of the literature.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kinsella, J A

    2012-09-27

    An important proportion of transient ischemic attack or ischemic stroke is attributable to moderate or severe (50-99%) atherosclerotic carotid stenosis or occlusion. Platelet biomarkers have the potential to improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of vascular events in this patient population. A detailed systematic review was performed to collate all available data on ex vivo platelet activation and platelet function\\/reactivity in patients with carotid stenosis. Two hundred thirteen potentially relevant articles were initially identified; 26 manuscripts met criteria for inclusion in this systematic review. There was no consistent evidence of clinically informative data from urinary or soluble blood markers of platelet activation in patients with symptomatic moderate or severe carotid stenosis who might be considered suitable for carotid intervention. Data from flow cytometry studies revealed evidence of excessive platelet activation in patients in the early, sub-acute, or late phases after transient ischemic attack or stroke in association with moderate or severe carotid stenosis and in asymptomatic moderate or severe carotid stenosis compared with controls. Furthermore, pilot data suggest that platelet activation may be increased in recently symptomatic than in asymptomatic severe carotid stenosis. Excessive platelet activation and platelet hyperreactivity may play a role in the pathogenesis of first or subsequent transient ischemic attack or stroke in patients with moderate or severe carotid stenosis. Larger longitudinal studies assessing platelet activation status with flow cytometry and platelet function\\/reactivity in symptomatic vs. asymptomatic carotid stenosis are warranted to improve our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for transient ischemic attack or stroke.

  1. Renal Branch Artery Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Zarah; Thisted, Ebbe; Andersen, Ulrik Bjørn

    2017-01-01

    Renovascular hypertension is a common cause of pediatric hypertension. In the fraction of cases that are unrelated to syndromes such as neurofibromatosis, patients with a solitary stenosis on a branch of the renal artery are common and can be diagnostically challenging. Imaging techniques...... that perform well in the diagnosis of main renal artery stenosis may fall short when it comes to branch artery stenosis. We report 2 cases that illustrate these difficulties and show that a branch artery stenosis may be overlooked even by the gold standard method, renal angiography....

  2. Follow-up study of morphology and cardiac function in rats undergoing induction of supravalvular aortic stenosis Estudo evolutivo da morfologia e função cardíaca em ratos submetidos a estenose aórtica supravalvar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Barbosa Ribeiro

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To characterize the follow-up of an experimental model of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH induced by supravalvular ascending aortic stenosis in young rats. METHODS: Wistar rats were submitted to thoracotomy and aortic stenosis was created by placing a clip on the ascending aorta (AoS group, n=12. Age-matched control animals underwent a sham operation (C group, n=12. Cardiac function was analysed by echocardiograms performed 6, 12, and 21 weeks after aortic banding. Myocardial morphological features and myocardial hydroxyproline concentration (HOP were evaluated 2, 6, 12, and 21 weeks after surgery in additional animals. RESULTS: Aortic banding promoted early concentric LVH and a progressive increase in HOP. Under light microscopy, we observed myocyte hypertrophy and wall thickening of the intramural branches of the coronary arteries due to medial hypertrophy. Cardiac function was supranormal after 6 weeks (percentage of fractional shortening - EAo6: 70.3±10.8; C6: 61.3±5.4; pOBJETIVO: Caracterizar, evolutivamente, o modelo experimental de hipertrofia ventricular esquerda (HVE por indução de estenose aórtica supravalvar em ratos jovens. MÉTODOS: Ratos Wistar foram submetidos a toracotomia para colocação de clipe ao redor da aorta torácica (grupo EAo, n=12. Animais controle foram submetidos à mesma cirurgia, porém sem a colocação do clipe (grupo C, n=12. A função cardíaca foi analisada por ecocardiogramas seriados após 6, 12 e 21 semanas. Outros grupos foram utilizados para avaliação histológica e quantificação da hidroxiprolina miocárdica (HOP: 2, 6, 12 e 21 semanas. RESULTADOS: A EAo promoveu precocemente HVE concêntrica e aumento progressivo da concentração de HOP. À microscopia óptica, observou-se hipertrofia dos miócitos e da camada média dos ramos intramurais das artérias coronárias. A função sistólica foi supranormal no período 6 semanas (porcentagem de encurtamento - EAo6:70,3±10,8; C6: 61

  3. Combined coronary artery bypass surgery and abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    OpenAIRE

    Black, J J; Desai, J B

    1995-01-01

    The proper management of patients with asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms and significant coexistent coronary artery disease is still debatable. The most common approach has been to perform the coronary artery bypass surgery some weeks before the abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in the hope of reducing the cardiac morbidity and mortality. We report our initial experience of three consecutive elective cases where the coronary artery bypass surgery and the abdominal aortic aneurysm repair ...

  4. A doença coronária aumenta a mortalidade hospitalar de portadores de estenose aórtica submetidos à substituição valvar? Does the coronary disease increase the hospital mortality in patients with aortic stenosis undergoing valve replacement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José de Lima Oliveira Júnior

    2009-12-01

    revascularização completa do miocárdio (Grupo IIA e 20,9% (nove óbitos nos com revascularização incompleta do miocárdio (Grupo IIB. CONCLUSÕES: Nos pacientes submetidos à substituição valvar aórtica isolada, a presença de doença aterosclerótica arterial coronária crítica associada, em pelo menos duas artérias, influenciou a mortalidade hospitalar. Nos pacientes submetidos ao tratamento cirúrgico combinado, o número de artérias coronárias com doença aterosclerótica crítica e a extensão da revascularização do miocárdio (RM completa ou incompleta, não influenciaram a mortalidade hospitalar, mas a realização de mais de três anastomoses distais interferiu.OBJECTIVES: With the increase in life expectancy occurred in recent decades, it has been noted the concomitant increase in the prevalence of aortic stenosis and degenerative disease of atherosclerotic coronary artery. This study aims to evaluate the influence of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease in patients with critical aortic stenosis undergoing isolated or combined implant valve prosthesis and coronary artery by pass grafting. METHODS: In the period of January 2001 to March 2006, there were analyzed 448 patients undergoing isolated implant aortic valve prosthesis (Group I and 167 patients undergoing aortic valve prosthesis implant combined with coronary artery bypass grafting (Group II. Pre- and intra-operative variables elected for analysis were: age, gender, body mass index, stroke, diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, rheumatic fever, hypertension, endocarditis, acute myocardial infarction, smoking, Fraction of the left ventricular ejection, critical atherosclerotic coronary artery disease, chronic atrial fibrillation, aortic valve operation prior (conservative, functional class of congestive heart failure, value serum creatinine, total cholesterol, size of the prosthesis used, length and number of distal anastomoses held in myocardial revascularization, duration of

  5. Cavernous carotid stenosis following stereotactic radiosurgery for Cushing's disease: A rare complication and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patibandla, Mohana Rao; Xu, Zhiyuan; Schlesinger, David; Sheehan, Jason P

    2018-01-01

    Intracranial carotid stenosis or occlusion after SRS is an extraordinarily rare event. Because of the rarity of this event, increased awareness within the neurosurgical community is required. For those with post-radiosurgical carotid stenosis who are asymptomatic, longitudinal follow up is recommended. Management depends on whether the patient is symptomatic or asymptomatic. Those who are symptomatic may require balloon angioplasty, stenting, or bypass surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Carotid stenosis: what is the high-risk population?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Hun Park

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Prevention is the best treatment for cerebrovascular disease, which is why early diagnosis and the immediate treatment of carotid stenosis contribute significantly to reducing the incidence of stroke. Given its silent nature, 80% of stroke cases occur in asymptomatic individuals, emphasizing the importance of screening individuals with carotid stenosis and identifying high-risk groups for the disease. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and the most frequent risk factors for carotid stenosis. METHODS: A transversal study was conducted in the form of a stroke prevention campaign held on three nonconsecutive Saturdays. During the sessions, carotid stenosis diagnostic procedures were performed for 500 individuals aged 60 years or older who had systemic arterial hypertension and/or diabetes mellitus and/or coronary heart disease and/or a family history of stroke. RESULTS: The prevalence of carotid stenosis in the population studied was 7.4%, and the most frequent risk factors identified were mean age of 70 years, carotid bruit, peripheral obstructive arterial disease, coronary insufficiency and smoking. Independent predictive factors of carotid stenosis include the presence of carotid bruit or peripheral obstructive heart disease and/or coronary insufficiency. CONCLUSIONS: The population with peripheral obstructive heart disease and carotid bruit should undergo routine screening for carotid stenosis.

  7. Splanchnic Artery Stenosis and Abdominal Complaints : Clinical History Is of Limited Value in Detection of Gastrointestinal Ischemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Steege, R. W. F.; Sloterdijk, H. S.; Geelkerken, R. H.; Huisman, A. B.; van der Palen, J.; Kolkman, J. J.

    Splanchnic artery stenosis is common and mostly asymptomatic and may lead to gastrointestinal ischemia (chronic splanchnic syndrome, CSS). This study was designed to assess risk factors for CSS in the medical history of patients with splanchnic artery stenosis and whether these risk factors can be

  8. Splanchnic artery stenosis and abdominal complaints: clinical history is of limited value in detection of gastrointestinal ischemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Steege, R.W.; Sloterdijk, H.S.; Geelkerken, R.H.; Huisman, A.B.; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; Kolkman, J.J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Splanchnic artery stenosis is common and mostly asymptomatic and may lead to gastrointestinal ischemia (chronic splanchnic syndrome, CSS). This study was designed to assess risk factors for CSS in the medical history of patients with splanchnic artery stenosis and whether these risk

  9. Real-world experience of treatment decision-making in carotid stenosis in a neurovascular board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmele, David Leander; Larena-Avellaneda, Axel; Alegiani, Anna C; Rosenkranz, Michael; Schmidt, Nils Ole; Regelsberger, Jan; Hummel, Friedhelm C; Magnus, Tim; Debus, Eike Sebastian; Fiehler, Jens; Gerloff, Christian; Thomalla, Götz

    2017-07-25

    To describe our experience with consensus-based decision-making for treatment of internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis by neurologists, interventional neuroradiologists, vascular surgeons, and neurosurgeons in a multidisciplinary neurovascular board and to study adherence to treatment recommendations in the context of uncertainty with respect to the best treatment option. We established a multidisciplinary neurovascular board meeting twice a week with structured documentation of consensus decisions. Over a time period of 53 months, 614 cases with ICA stenosis were discussed, with 285 (46%) symptomatic and 279 (45%) asymptomatic cases. Recommendation for symptomatic ICA stenosis was revascularization in 76%, medical management alone in 8%, and further diagnostics in 16%. For asymptomatic ICA stenosis, recommendation was randomization in a clinical trial in 29%, revascularization in 27%, medical management alone in 23%, and further diagnostics in 22%. Treatment recommendations were followed in 94% of symptomatic ICA stenosis and 69% of asymptomatic ICA stenosis. Patients in whom carotid artery stenting was recommended for revascularization were younger and showed a higher rate of severe (≥70%) ICA stenosis. Interdisciplinary board decisions are a helpful and transparent tool to assure adherence to guideline recommendations, and to provide consensus-based individualized treatment strategies in clinical practice in the absence of unequivocal evidence. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  10. [Stenosis in kidney transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gregorio, M; Giudice, C; Gueglio, G; Daels, F; Tejerizo, J C; Damia, O; Schiappapietra, J

    1999-02-01

    Evaluate the incidence of ureterovesical stenosis in the renal transplant and its outcomes in the evolution of the allograft. Seventy three renal transplants were made between August 1988 and December 1995 in Italian Hospital in Buenos Aires. The mean follow up period was 35 months. The incidence of ureterovesical stenosis and its outcomes in the renal allograft were evaluated. Seven cases of ureterovesical stenosis were found. Clinic diagnosis was made in all cases (decreased filtration, diuresis rythm diminished, pain over the implant) confirmed with ecography that showed hydronefrosis and pielography percutaneous anterograde to check the cause of obstruction. Time elapsed between transplant and diagnosis of stenosis varied from 2 to 23 months. Inicial treatment was percutaneous derivation and then in all cases where renal function was recovered ureterovesical reimplant was made out, but ureterotomy in one of them. Incidence of ureterovesical stenosis was 9.58% (seven patients). Two of the patients keep an adequate renal function, one has altered renal function, the forth lost the implant due to pyelonephritis, and the other three lost the implant due to cronic rejection between 6 and 18 months after diagnosis and treatment of stenosis. Ureterovesical stenosis is an important cause for lost of renal allograft. Imaging is outstanding for diagnosis. Definitive treatment can be made by open reconstructive operation or endoscopy.

  11. Causes and histopathology of ascending aortic disease in children and young adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Deepali; Dietz, Harry C.; Oswald, Gretchen L.; Maleszewski, Joseph J.; Halushka, Marc K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Ascending aortic diseases (aneurysms, dissections, and stenosis) and associated aortic valve disease are rare but important causes of morbidity and mortality in children and young adults. Certain genetic causes, such as Marfan syndrome and congenital bicuspid aortic valve disease, are well known. However, other rarer genetic and nongenetic causes of aortic disease exist. Methods We performed an extensive literature search to identify known causes of ascending aortic pathology in children and young adults. We catalogued both aortic pathologies and other defining systemic features of these diseases. Results We describe 17 predominantly genetic entities that have been associated with thoracic aortic disease in this age group. Conclusions While extensive literature on the common causes of ascending aortic disease exists, there is a need for better histologic documentation of aortic pathology in rarer diseases. PMID:19926309

  12. Management of a case of double aortic arch with tracheal compression complicated with postoperative tracheal restenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemang Gandhi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tracheal stenosis in association with the double aortic arch (DAA is uncommon; however, it carries a high risk of morbidity, mortality, and restenosis. Although surgery is the mainstay of managing a case of the DAA with tracheal stenosis, management of tracheal restenosis requires a multidisciplinary approach. In this case report, we present our successful experience in managing a child of DAA with tracheal stenosis who developed tracheal restenosis after sliding tracheoplasty of trachea.

  13. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation: where are we now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariathas, Mark; Rawlins, John; Curzen, Nick

    2017-11-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) was first used in clinical practice in 2002. Since 2002, there has been a rapid increase in TAVI activity in patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis. This has been supported by systematic randomized data comparing TAVI against the gold standard treatment for the last 50 years' surgical aortic valve replacement. TAVI is now currently a recommended therapeutic intervention in the treatment of severe aortic stenosis patients who are deemed either high risk or inoperable. The indications for TAVI continue to expand. Within this review we will focus on the current guidelines for TAVI, the evidence for it, the complications of TAVI, postprocedure care, the technology available to clinicians now and finally the future perspectives for TAVI.

  14. Mitral Valve Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... valve stenosis include: Rheumatic fever. A complication of strep throat, rheumatic fever can damage the mitral valve. Rheumatic ... children see your doctor for sore throats. Untreated strep throat infections can develop into rheumatic fever. Fortunately, strep ...

  15. Evaluation of aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve implantation: aortic root angiography in comparison to cardiac magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Michael; Meyer, Christian G; Kirschfink, Annemarie; Altiok, Ertunc; Lehrke, Michael; Brehmer, Kathrin; Lotfi, Shahram; Hoffmann, Rainer

    2016-03-01

    Aortic regurgitation (AR) is common after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Intraprocedural assessment of AR relies on aortic root angiography. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) phase-contrast mapping of the ascending aorta provides accurate AR quantification. This study evaluated the accuracy of AR grading by aortic root angiography after TAVI in comparison to CMR phase-contrast velocity mapping. In 69 patients with TAVI for severe aortic stenosis, post-procedural AR was determined by aortic root angiography with visual assessment according to the Sellers classification and by CMR using phase-contrast velocity mapping for analysis of AR volume and fraction. Spearman's correlation coefficient showed a moderate correlation between angiographic analysis of AR grade and CMR-derived AR volume (r=0.41; pangiography with cut-off Sellers grade ≥2 had a sensitivity of 71% and a specificity of 98% to detect AR graded as moderate to severe or severe as defined by CMR. There is only a moderate correlation between aortic root angiography and CMR in the classification of AR severity after TAVI. Alternative imaging including multimodality imaging as well as haemodynamic analysis should therefore be considered for intraprocedural AR assessment and guidance of TAVI procedure in cases of uncertainty in AR grading.

  16. Transcatheter, valve-in-valve transapical aortic and mitral valve implantation, in a high risk patient with aortic and mitral prosthetic valve stenoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcatheter valve implantation continues to grow worldwide and has been used principally for the nonsurgical management of native aortic valvular disease-as a potentially less invasive method of valve replacement in high-risk and inoperable patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. Given the burden of valvular heart disease in the general population and the increasing numbers of patients who have had previous valve operations, we are now seeing a growing number of high-risk patients presenting with prosthetic valve stenosis, who are not potential surgical candidates. For this high-risk subset transcatheter valve delivery may be the only option. Here, we present an inoperable patient with severe, prosthetic valve aortic and mitral stenosis who was successfully treated with a trans catheter based approach, with a valve-in-valve implantation procedure of both aortic and mitral valves.

  17. Flow measurement at the aortic root

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Litten; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Køber, Lars

    2016-01-01

    theoretically be equal to flow measurements, SVV and SVST were compared to SVref. RESULTS: Initially, 152 patients were included. 22 were excluded because of arrhythmias during scans and 9 were excluded for aortic stenosis. Accordingly, data from 121 patients were analysed and of these 63 had visually evident...... measurements. The mean difference between SVref-SVV (6.4 mL) and SVref-SVST (18.2 mL) showed similar variances (SD 7.4 vs. 8.1 respectively) and hence equal accuracy. CONCLUSIONS: Aortic flow measured at valve level corresponded best with volumetric measurements and on average flow measured at the sinotubular...

  18. Hybrid internal mammary to left anterior descending bypass and transaortic transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a new treatment option for patients with complex disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weich, Hellmuth S vH; van Wyk, Jacques; Pecoraro, Alfonso J; Mabin, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The case is described of a hybrid trans-aortic transcatheter aortic valve implantation and off-pump left internal mammary artery to left anterior descending artery bypass surgery in a man with a tight left main lesion and severe symptomatic aortic stenosis.

  19. An up-to-date overview of the most recent transcatheter implantable aortic valve prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerinck, Esther M. A.; van Kesteren, Floortje; van Mourik, Martijn S.; Vis, Marije M.; Baan, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has evolved towards the routine therapy for high-risk patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. Technical refinements in TAVI are rapidly evolving with a simultaneous expansion of the number of available devices. This review will

  20. Should a Regurgitant Mitral Valve Be Replaced Simultaneously with a Stenotic Aortic Valve?

    OpenAIRE

    Christenson, Jan T.; Jordan, Bernard; Bloch, Antoine; Schmuziger, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Mitral valve regurgitation frequently accompanies aortic valve stenosis. It has been suggested that mitral regurgitation improves after aortic valve replacement alone and that the mitral valve need not be replaced simultaneously. Furthermore, mitral regurgitation associated with coronary artery disease, particularly in patients with poor left ventricular function, shows immediate improvement after coronary artery bypass grafting.

  1. Effect of permanent pacemaker on mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engborg, Jonathan; Riechel-Sarup, Casper; Gerke, Oke

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an established treatment for high-grade aortic valve stenosis in patients found unfit for open heart surgery. The method may cause cardiac conduction disorders requiring permanent pacemaker (PPM) implantation, and the long-term effect ...

  2. Electrocardiographic imaging-based recognition of possible induced bundle branch blocks during transcatheter aortic valve implantations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, P.M. van; Proniewska, K.; Maugenest, A.M.; Mieghem, N.M. van; Maan, A.C.; Jaegere, P.P. de; Bruining, N.

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Conventional electrocardiogram (ECG)-based diagnosis of left bundle branch block (LBBB) in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is ambiguous. Left ventricular hypertrophy is often seen in patients with severe aortic stenosis in which a transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI)

  3. Aortic and Mitral Valve Disease and Left Ventricular Dysfunction in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Kevin O; Tweddell, James S

    2016-08-01

    In this review, we will discuss aortic stenosis, aortic regurgitation, mitral regurgitation, and mitral stenosis. We will review the etiology, anatomy, pathophysiology, presentation, and treatment of aortic and mitral valve disease. Age and lesion specific treatments are outlined based on the severity of valve disease with an aim at long-term preservation of left ventricular function. MEDLINE and PubMed. Mitral and aortic valve disease leads to unique hemodynamic burdens that can impact left ventricular function, quality of life, and longevity. The primary challenge in the management of mitral and aortic valve disease is to apply appropriate medical management and identify that point in time at which the surgery is necessary. Although guidelines have been established for the management of aortic and mitral valve disease in adults, the challenges of early presentation, maintenance of growth potential, and apparent increased tolerance of hemodynamic burden in children makes decision making challenging.

  4. State-of-the-art of transcatheter treatment of aortic valve stenosis and the overview of the InFlow project aiming at developing the first Polish TAVI system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachel, Mateusz; Milewski, Krzysztof; Buszman, Piotr; Michalak, Magdalena; Domaradzki, Wojciech; Gerber, Witold; Śliwka, Joanna; Nożyński, Jerzy; Sobota, Michał; Hirnle, Piotr; Białek-Brodocz, Marzena; Zembala, Michał; Pawlak, Mariusz; Płowiecki, Emil; Kasperczyk, Janusz; Mężyk, Arkadiusz; Bochenek, Andrzej; Buszman, Paweł

    2017-01-01

    Initial experience of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) or replacement (TAVR) has ap-peared as a promising minimally invasive technology for patients disqualified from surgical treatment (SAVR). Safety and efficacy of TAVI has been analyzed and assessed through numerous registries and trials. Furthermore, results obtained from comparative TAVI vs. SAVR trials proved that both treat¬ments can be considered equal in terms of post-procedural mortality and morbidity in high-risk, as well as lower risk patients. However, there are still some issues that have to be addressed, such as higher chance of paravalvular leakage, vascular injuries, conduction disturbances, malpositioning and the yet unmet problem of insufficient biological valves durability. Recent technological developments along with the learning curve of operators prove a great potential for improvement of TAVI and a chance of surpassing SAVR in various groups of patients in the near future. In pursuit of finding new solutions, the CardValve Consortium consisting of leading scientific and research institutions in Poland has been created. Under the name of InFlow and financial support from the National Center for Research and Development, they have started a project with the aim to design, create and implement into clinical practice the first, Polish, low-profile TAVI valve system, utilizing not only biological but also artificial, polymeric-based prosthesis. This review focuses on current developments in TAVI technologies including the InFlow project.

  5. Ross, Hybrid Arch, and Frozen Elephant Trunk Reconstruction for Late Complications of Bicuspid Aortic Valve and Aortopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdis, Matthew; DeRose, Gaetano; Guo, Linrui; Chu, Michael W A

    2016-12-01

    Young patients with bicuspid aortic valve disease and aortopathy remain a clinical challenge, with many requiring multiple corrective operations throughout their lifetimes. Innovative surgical approaches are often required to address complex aortic pathologic conditions but leave patients at risk for reintervention, lifelong anticoagulation, and suboptimal hemodynamics. We describe an active 44-year-old female triathlete with recurrent bicuspid aortic stenosis, a small aortic root, a hypoplastic aortic arch and complex distal arch, and a descending aortic aneurysm, who underwent a single-stage reconstruction with a combined Ross procedure, hybrid arch, and frozen elephant trunk reconstruction. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography in asymptomatic diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harshad, K; Sathyamurthy, I; Ashish, G; Padma, D; Shelley, S; Indirani, M; Subramanian, K

    2010-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most important cause of mortality in diabetic patients. Diabetes mellitus (DM) due to autonomic neuropathy leads to asymptomatic CAD. Hence, it is important to screen the patients with DM for CAD. To study the prevalence of asymptomatic CAD by Myocardial Perfuision SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography) (MPS) in diabetics. This prospective study included 88 asymptomatic patients (58 males and 30 females) of Type 2 DM of more than 5 years duration in the age group of 40-65 years. Risk factors like hypertension, dyslipidemia, smoking, family history of CAD and Body Mass Index > or = 25 kg/sq.m were assessed. All these patients underwent MPS study as two day standard protocol. Thirty eight patients underwent invasive Coronary Angiography (CAG) and stenosis greater than 50% was considered significant. Abnormal perfusion was detected in 38 (43%) diabetics and 4 (11%) controls. A total of 81 perfusion defects were identified (19 fired and 62 reversible). CAG showed significant coronary stenosis in 26 (68.4%), insignificant in 8 (21%) and no stenosis in 4 (10.6%) patients. A total of 114 coronaries were analysed, significant stenosis in 67 (58.8%) coronaries, 21 (18.4%) had insignificant lesions and 26(22.8%) were normal. In comparison to CAG, MPS had sensitivity of 86.6% and specificity of 51%. The Myocardial Perfusion SPECT is a sensitive diagnostic tool to identify ischemia in asymptomatic diabetics. MPS can be used as screening test for risk stratification. It has a prognostic value in predicting the outcome of CAD and can be useful for long-term follow up too.

  7. Radiographic indices for lumbar developmental spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Ng, Karen Ka Man; Cheung, Prudence Wing Hang; Samartzis, Dino; Cheung, Kenneth Man Chee

    2017-01-01

    Patients with developmental spinal stenosis (DSS) are susceptible to developing symptomatic stenosis due to pre-existing narrowed spinal canals. DSS has been previously defined by MRI via the axial anteroposterior (AP) bony spinal canal diameter. However, MRI is hardly a cost-efficient tool for screening patients. X-rays are superior due to its availability and cost, but currently, there is no definition of DSS based on plain radiographs. Thus, the aim of this study is to develop radiographic indices for diagnosing DSS. This was a prospective cohort of 148 subjects consisting of patients undergoing surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis (patient group) and asymptomatic subjects recruited openly from the general population (control group). Ethics approval was obtained from the local institutional review board. All subjects underwent MRI for diagnosing DSS and radiographs for measuring parameters used for creating the indices. All measurements were performed by two independent investigators, blinded to patient details. Intra- and interobserver reliability analyses were conducted, and only parameters with near perfect intraclass correlation underwent receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to determine the cutoff values for diagnosing DSS using radiographs. Imaging parameters from a total of 66 subjects from the patient group and 82 asymptomatic subjects in the control group were used for analysis. ROC analysis suggested sagittal vertebral body width to pedicle width ratio (SBW:PW) as having the strongest sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing DSS. Cutoff indices for SBW:PW were level-specific: L1 (2.0), L2 (2.0), L3 (2.2), L4 (2.2), L5 (2.5), and S1 (2.8). This is the first study to define DSS on plain radiographs based on comparisons between a clinically relevant patient group and a control group. Individuals with DSS can be identified by a simple radiograph using a screening tool allowing for better cost-saving means for clinical diagnosis or research

  8. Radiographic indices for lumbar developmental spinal stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Pui Yin Cheung

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with developmental spinal stenosis (DSS are susceptible to developing symptomatic stenosis due to pre-existing narrowed spinal canals. DSS has been previously defined by MRI via the axial anteroposterior (AP bony spinal canal diameter. However, MRI is hardly a cost-efficient tool for screening patients. X-rays are superior due to its availability and cost, but currently, there is no definition of DSS based on plain radiographs. Thus, the aim of this study is to develop radiographic indices for diagnosing DSS. Methods This was a prospective cohort of 148 subjects consisting of patients undergoing surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis (patient group and asymptomatic subjects recruited openly from the general population (control group. Ethics approval was obtained from the local institutional review board. All subjects underwent MRI for diagnosing DSS and radiographs for measuring parameters used for creating the indices. All measurements were performed by two independent investigators, blinded to patient details. Intra- and interobserver reliability analyses were conducted, and only parameters with near perfect intraclass correlation underwent receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis to determine the cutoff values for diagnosing DSS using radiographs. Results Imaging parameters from a total of 66 subjects from the patient group and 82 asymptomatic subjects in the control group were used for analysis. ROC analysis suggested sagittal vertebral body width to pedicle width ratio (SBW:PW as having the strongest sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing DSS. Cutoff indices for SBW:PW were level-specific: L1 (2.0, L2 (2.0, L3 (2.2, L4 (2.2, L5 (2.5, and S1 (2.8. Conclusions This is the first study to define DSS on plain radiographs based on comparisons between a clinically relevant patient group and a control group. Individuals with DSS can be identified by a simple radiograph using a screening tool allowing for better

  9. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation vs. surgical aortic valve replacement for treatment of severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siontis, George C M; Praz, Fabien; Pilgrim, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    undergoing transfemoral access [0.80 (0.69-0.93); P = 0.004], but not transthoracic access [1.17 (0.88-1.56); P = 0.293] (Pinteraction = 0.024) and in female [0.68 (0.50-0.91); P = 0.010], but not male patients [0.99 (0.77-1.28); P = 0.952] (Pinteraction = 0.050). Secondary outcomes of kidney injury, new......-onset atrial fibrillation, and major bleeding favoured TAVI, while major vascular complications, incidence of permanent pacemaker implantation, and paravalvular regurgitation favoured SAVR. CONCLUSION: Compared with SAVR, TAVI is associated with a significant survival benefit throughout 2 years of follow...

  10. Correlation between disability and MRI findings in lumbar spinal stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose MRI is the modality of choice when diagnosing spinal stenosis but it also shows that stenosis is prevalent in asymptomatic subjects over 60. The relationship between preoperative health-related quality of life, functional status, leg and back pain, and the objectively measured dural sac area in single and multilevel stenosis is unknown. We assessed this relationship in a prospective study. Patients and methods The cohort included 109 consecutive patients with central spinal stenosis operated on with decompressive laminectomy or laminotomy. Preoperatively, all patients completed the questionnaires for EQ-5D, SF-36, Oswestry disability index (ODI), estimated walking distance and leg and back pain (VAS). The cross-sectional area of the dural sac was measured at relevant disc levels in mm2, and spondylolisthesis was measured in mm. For comparison, the area of the most narrow level, the number of levels with dural sac area spondylolisthesis were studied. Results Before surgery, patients with central spinal stenosis had low HRLQoL and functional status, and high pain levels. Patients with multilevel stenosis had better general health (p = 0.04) and less leg and back pain despite having smaller dural sac area than patients with single-level stenosis. There was a poor correlation between walking distance, ODI, the SF-36, EQ-5D, and leg and back pain levels on the one hand and dural sac area on the other. Women more often had multilevel spinal stenosis (p = 0.05) and spondylolisthesis (p HRQoL, function, and pain measured preoperatively correlate with morphological changes on MRI to a limited extent. PMID:21434811

  11. Asymptomatic Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Shonni J.; Walker, Marcella D.; Bilezikian, John P.

    2014-01-01

    The clinical profile of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) as it is seen in the United States and most Western countries has evolved significantly over the past half century. The introduction of the multichannel serum autoanalyzer in the 1970s led to the recognition of a cohort of individuals with asymptomatic hypercalcemia, in whom evaluation led to the diagnosis of PHPT. The term “asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism” was introduced to describe patients who lack obvious signs and symptoms referable to either excess calcium or parathyroid hormone. Although it was expected that asymptomatic patients would eventually develop classical symptoms of PHPT, observational data suggest that most patients do not evolve over time to become overtly symptomatic. In most parts of the world, the asymptomatic phenotype of PHPT has replaced classical PHPT. This report is a selective review of data on asymptomatic PHPT: its demographic features, presentation and natural history, as well as biochemical, skeletal, neuromuscular, psychological, and cardiovascular manifestations. In addition, we will summarize available information on treatment indications and options for those with asymptomatic disease. PMID:23374736

  12. [Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI): update on the indications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Stéphane; Monney, Pierre; Ferrari, Enrico; Iglesias, Juan F; Roguelov, Christan; Zuffi, Andrea; Eeckhout, Eric; Muller, Olivier

    2015-05-27

    Although surgical aortic valve replacement has been the standard of care for patient with severe aortic stenosis, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is now a fair standard of care for patients not eligible or high risk for surgical treatment. The decision of therapeutic choice between TAVI and surgery considers surgical risk (estimated by the Euro-SCORE and STS-PROM) as well as many parameters that go beyond the assessment of the valvular disease's severity by echocardiography: a multidisciplinary assessment in "Heart Team" is needed to assess each case in all its complexity.

  13. COMPARISON OF PREOPERATIVE NONINVASIVE AND INTRAOPERATIVE MEASUREMENTS OF AORTIC ANNULUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Hinduja

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Precise preoperative assessment of aortic annulus diameter is essential for sizing of aortic valve especially in patients planned for transcatheter aortic valve replacement. Computed Tomographic (CT and echocardiographic measurements of the aortic annulus vary because of elliptical shape of aortic annulus. This study was undertaken to compare the measurement of aortic annulus intraoperatively with preoperative noninvasive methods in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement. MATERIALS AND METHODS Aortic annulus diameter was measured with cardiac CT and Transesophageal Echocardiography (TEE prior to open aortic valve replacement in 30 patients with aortic valve stenosis. In CT, aortic annulus dimensions were measured in coronal plane, sagittal oblique plane and by planimetry. Both 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional TEE were used. These were compared with intraoperative measurements done by valve sizers and Hegar dilators. Pearson analysis was applied to test for degree of correlation. RESULTS CT in coronal and sagittal oblique plane tends to overestimate the diameter of aortic annulus when compared with intraoperative measurements (coefficient of relation, r = 0.798 and 0.749, respectively. CT measurements in single oblique plane showed a weaker correlation with intraoperative measurements than 3D TEE and 2D TEE (r = 0.917 and 0.898, respectively. However, CT measurements by planimetry method were most correlating with the intraoperative measurements (r = 0.951. CONCLUSION Noninvasive investigations with 3-dimensional views (CT-based measurement employing calculated average diameter assessment by planimetry and 3-dimensional TEE showed better correlation with intraoperative measurement of aortic annulus. CT-based aortic annulus measurement by planimetry seems to provide adequate dimensions most similar to operative measurements.

  14. Valve Replacement with a Sutureless Aortic Prosthesis in a Patient with Concomitant Mitral Valve Disease and Severe Aortic Root Calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lio, Antonio; Scafuri, Antonio; Nicolò, Francesca; Chiariello, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    Aortic valve replacement with concomitant mitral valve surgery in the presence of severe aortic root calcification is technically difficult, with long cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times. We performed sutureless aortic valve replacement and mitral valve annuloplasty in a 68-year-old man who had severe aortic stenosis and moderate-to-severe mitral regurgitation. Intraoperatively, we found severe calcification of the aortic root. We approached the aortic valve through a transverse aortotomy, performed in a higher position than usual, and we replaced the valve with a Sorin Perceval S sutureless prosthesis. In addition, we performed mitral annuloplasty with use of an open rigid ring. The aortic cross-clamp time was 63 minutes, and the cardiopulmonary bypass time was 83 minutes. No paravalvular leakage of the aortic prosthesis was detected 30 days postoperatively. Our case shows that the Perceval S sutureless bioprosthesis can be safely implanted in patients with aortic root calcification, even when mitral valve disease needs surgical correction.

  15. Aortic root disease in athletes: aortic root dilation, anomalous coronary artery, bicuspid aortic valve, and Marfan's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Eugene Sun

    2013-08-01

    condition should be restricted from participation in competitive sports, but can be cleared for participation 6 months after surgical repair. Bicuspid aortic valve is another form of aortic root disease with significance in athletes. Although echocardiography has traditionally been used for diagnosis, CT and MRI have proven more sensitive and specific. Management of bicuspid aortic valve consists of surveillance through echocardiography, medical therapy with beta-blockers and ARBs, and surgery. Guidelines for sports participation are based on the presence of aortic stenosis, aortic regurgitation, and aortic root dilation. Marfan's syndrome is a genetic disorder with a number of cardiac manifestations including aortic root dilation, aneurysm, and dissection. Medical management involves beta-blockers and ARBs. Thresholds for surgical management differ from the general population. With regard to sports participation, the most important consideration is early detection. Athletes with the stigmata of Marfan's syndrome or with family history should be tested. Further research should determine whether more aggressive screening is warranted in sports with taller athletes. Athletes with Marfan's syndrome should be restricted from activities involving collision and heavy contact, avoid isometric exercise, and only participate in activities with low intensity, low dynamic, and low static components. In summary, many forms of aortic root disease afflict athletes and need to be appreciated by sports medicine practitioners because of their potential to lead to tragic but preventable deaths in an otherwise healthy population.

  16. Screening for Carotid Artery Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Carotid Artery Stenosis The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) ... final recommendation statement on Screening for Carotid Artery Stenosis. This final recommendation statement applies to adults who ...

  17. Lumbar canal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazanec, D J; Drucker, Y; Segal, A M

    1997-04-01

    Lumbar canal stenosis is an increasingly recognized condition in patients more than 65 years of age. The clinical syndrome is dominated by neurogenic claudication. The natural history of the Condition is not yet well described. Long-term results of surgical therapy are frequently disappointing, and reoperation is required in more than 10% of patients. Nonoperative treatment options include physical therapy exercise programs, calcitonin, analgesics, and epidural steroid injections. A clinical pathway for management of symptomatic stenosis, emphasizing an initial nonoperative approach, is suggested.

  18. Lumbar stenosis: clinical case

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    Pedro Sá

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar stenosis is an increasingly common pathological condition that is becoming more frequent with increasing mean life expectancy, with high costs for society. It has many causes, among which degenerative, neoplastic and traumatic causes stand out. Most of the patients respond well to conservative therapy. Surgical treatment is reserved for patients who present symptoms after implementation of conservative measures. Here, a case of severe stenosis of the lumbar spine at several levels, in a female patient with pathological and surgical antecedents in the lumbar spine, is presented. The patient underwent two different decompression techniques within the same operation.

  19. Osteoprotegerin inhibits aortic valve calcification and preserves valve function in hypercholesterolemic mice.

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    Robert M Weiss

    Full Text Available There are no rigorously confirmed effective medical therapies for calcific aortic stenosis. Hypercholesterolemic Ldlr (-/- Apob (100/100 mice develop calcific aortic stenosis and valvular cardiomyopathy in old age. Osteoprotegerin (OPG modulates calcification in bone and blood vessels, but its effect on valve calcification and valve function is not known.To determine the impact of pharmacologic treatment with OPG upon aortic valve calcification and valve function in aortic stenosis-prone hypercholesterolemic Ldlr (-/- Apob (100/100 mice.Young Ldlr (-/- Apob (100/100 mice (age 2 months were fed a Western diet and received exogenous OPG or vehicle (N = 12 each 3 times per week, until age 8 months. After echocardiographic evaluation of valve function, the aortic valve was evaluated histologically. Older Ldlr (-/- Apob (100/100 mice were fed a Western diet beginning at age 2 months. OPG or vehicle (N = 12 each was administered from 6 to 12 months of age, followed by echocardiographic evaluation of valve function, followed by histologic evaluation.In Young Ldlr (-/- Apob (100/100 mice, OPG significantly attenuated osteogenic transformation in the aortic valve, but did not affect lipid accumulation. In Older Ldlr (-/- Apob (100/100 mice, OPG attenuated accumulation of the osteoblast-specific matrix protein osteocalcin by ∼80%, and attenuated aortic valve calcification by ∼ 70%. OPG also attenuated impairment of aortic valve function.OPG attenuates pro-calcific processes in the aortic valve, and protects against impairment of aortic valve function in hypercholesterolemic aortic stenosis-prone Ldlr (-/- Apob (100/100 mice.

  20. THREE-DIMENSIONAL ULTRASOUND AND STENOSIS OF INTERNAL CAROTID ARTERY

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    Vojko Flis

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Elucidation of the ultrasound structure of the atherosclerotic plaque in stenosis of internal carotid artery may have important implications for carotid surgery. This study compares the ability of computer derived 3D ultrasound gray scale volumetric measurements to diferentiate between ultrasonic structure of symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid plaque causing more than 70% stenosis.Methods. Eightysix internal carotid artery stenoses (70–99%, 45 symptomatic, 41 asymptomatic were imaged with 3D ultrasound to obtain the whole volume of the atherosclerotic plaque. Digitalized sonograms were computerized and normalized to the gray scale median (GSM of blood (0 and vessel adventitia (200. Plaque GSM was obtained for the whole volume by computing the volume ratio between echolucent and echogenic areas. The plaque heterogeneity was obtained by computing the density of echogenic areas per volume unit. Parametric t test was used for statistic analysis.Results. Minimum volume GSM ratio (determining echolucency was higher for asymptomatic plaque (0.6 – CI 0.48– 0.91 versus 0.3 – CI 0.21–0.75: p = 0.002. Greater GSM heterogeneity was present in symptomatic plaque (6.8 – CI 2.5– 18.3 versus 0.41 – CI 0.2–3.4;.p = 0.0001.Conclusions. Volume ultrasound imaging that enables objective assessment of whole ultrasonic plaque structure is more sensitive that single longitudinal view sonography for differentiating between ultrasonic structure of symptomatic and asymptomatic plaque.

  1. Infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rikke Neess; Garne, Ester; Loane, Maria

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to present epidemiologic data on infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS) from seven well-defined European regions, and to compare incidence and changes in incidence over time between these regions. METHODS: This was a population-based study using...

  2. When operable patients become inoperable: conversion of a surgical aortic valve replacement into transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lene Kjaer; Arendrup, Henrik; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a relatively new treatment option for inoperable patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS). This case describes how a planned conventional surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) on a 73-year-old woman was successfully converted to a TAVI procedure....... On extracorporal circulation it was reconized that the aortic annulus, the coronary ostiae and the proximal part of the ascending aorta were severely calcified making valve implantation impossible. Surgical closure without valve substitution was estimated to be associated with a high risk of mortality due......, and the prosthesis was sutured to the ascending aorta. With some manipulation of the prosthesis it was possible to suture the aorta circumferentially around the fully expanded upper part of the prosthesis. Post-procedurally the patient recovered successfully, with improved function capacity, aortic valve area...

  3. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A Siordia

    2016-