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Sample records for asymptomatic african migrants

  1. Asymptomatic malaria infections among foreign migrant workers in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritsiriwuthinan, Kanyanan; Ngrenngarmlert, Warunee

    2011-07-01

    To determine the prevalence of malaria infections among foreign migrant workers in Thailand. Giemsa-stained thin and thick blood films were prepared from blood samples of 294 foreign migrant workers recruited in the study. Microscopic examination of these blood films was performed for malaria detection. Blood film examination revealed 1.36% malaria infections in these 294 subjects. All positive cases were male Myanmar workers in which their blood films only ring stage of Plasmodium spp. was found at low parasite density (mean= 144 parasites/μ L of blood). The prevalence of malaria infections was not significantly different among foreign migrant workers classified by age, gender, and resident province (P>0.05). Thin blood films of these workers also showed 78.91% hypochromic erythrocytes and 61.9% relative Eosinophilia. These findings indicate a high risk of malaria transmission. Therefore active malaria surveillance by using molecular methods with more sensitive and specific than microscopy should be considered for malaria control in foreign migrant workers. Copyright © 2011 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Malaria in asymptomatic migrant workers and symptomatic patients in Thamaka District, Kanchanaburi Province, Thailand

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    Sirima Kitvatanachai

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate malaria infections in asymptomatic legal migrant workers and symptomatic patients in Thamaka, Kanchanaburi Province. Methods: This study was conducted during April 26-29, 2008 using thick and thin blood Giemsa ’s stained. A total of 671 samples were collected in asymptomatic migrant workers and 38 samples in symptomatic patients in the same period. Results: The results showed the prevalence rate was 1.64% (11 out of 671 samples in asymptomatic migrant workers and P.vivax infections were found to be dominant (81.8%. Age group of infections showed between 16-42 years as a high risk of infection. Female: Male ratio was 1: 1.3. The infection rate was 35.7% (10 out of 38 samples in symptomatic patients with the highest infection being P. falciparum (80.0%. Age group of infections between 13-36 years. Male: Female ratio was 1: 1.4. About 43% of malarial infections came from Mohlumyai area, Myanmar. Conclusions: The high rate of malarial infections in Thamaka District still need surveillance, especially as migrant workers may spread malaria to the people living in this area if vector present.

  3. Understanding Transnational African Migrants' Perspectives of Dietary Behavior.

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    Ibe-Lamberts, Kelechi; Tshiswaka, Daudet Ilunga; Osideko, Anuolwaupo; Schwingel, Andiara

    2016-10-28

    Dietary behaviors serve as determinants for chronic diseases such as hypertension across various ethnicities worldwide and within the USA. We investigated dietary perspectives specifically for US transnational African migrants, a migrant cohort subset of individuals who maintain cross-border ties with their indigenous communities of origin. Using PEN-3 model, focus group interviews with 14 transnational African migrants (seven males and seven females) were conducted in Chicago to explore the perceptions of dietary behavior in regard to chronic disease risk factors among our target population. The findings underscore that transnational African migrants maintain strong ties with their African community of origin, impacting dietary behaviors and attitudes. Further, transnational African migrants maintain traditional dishes through their connections. Despite the ability to import African traditional foods through personal connections, African migrants face a challenge in maintaining culture yet conforming to norms of acculturation. Results from this study serve to advocate for further exploration of the interaction between African migrant dietary behaviors and risk factors to chronic diseases.

  4. Screening of imported infectious diseases among asymptomatic sub-Saharan African and Latin American immigrants: a public health challenge.

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    Monge-Maillo, Begoña; López-Vélez, Rogelio; Norman, Francesca F; Ferrere-González, Federico; Martínez-Pérez, Ángela; Pérez-Molina, José Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Migrants from developing countries are usually young and healthy but several studies report they may harbor asymptomatic infections for prolonged periods. Prevalence of infections were determined for asymptomatic immigrants from Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa who ettended to a European Tropical Medicine Referral Center from 2000 to 2009. A systematic screening protocol for selected infections was used. Data from 317 sub-Saharan Africans and 383 Latin Americans were analyzed. Patients were mostly young (mean age 29 years); there were significantly more males among sub-Saharan Africans (83% versus 31.6%) and pre-consultation period was longer for Latin Americans (5 versus 42 months). Diagnoses of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), chronic hepatitis B and C virus infection, and latent tuberculosis were significantly more frequent in sub-Saharan Africans (2.3% versus 0.3%; 14% versus 1.6%; 1.3 versus 0%; 71% versus 32.1%). There were no significant differences in prevalence for syphilis and intestinal parasites. Malaria and schistosomiasis prevalence in sub-Saharan Africans was 4.6% and 5.9%, respectively, and prevalence of Chagas disease in Latin Americans was 48.5%. Identifying and treating asymptomatic imported infectious diseases may have an impact both for the individual concerned and for public health. Based on these results, a systematic screening protocol for asymptomatic immigrants is proposed. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  5. Twice Versus Direct Migrants: East African Sikh Settlers in Britain

    OpenAIRE

    Bhachu, Parminder

    1990-01-01

    This paper has three main aims:first, it attempts to document salient features of a settler population of the twice migrant East African Sikhs,whose orientations and patterns of settlement, are different from that of the directly migrant groups who constitute the majority South Asian population in Britain. It analyses the major features of the organisation of the community, namely community values, its structure, economic organisation, the influence of a strong communications network, the con...

  6. Asymptomatic rheumatic heart disease in South African schoolchildren

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adulthood with good health and no impact on their schooling. The study team also recognised the controversies that exist around: (i) the method of screening for asymptomatic RHD; (ii) the borderline disease entity; and (iii) the prognostic impact of asymptomatic. RHD. [8] The WHF criteria, which represent the only evidence- ...

  7. Abraham and Jesus as Ancient Migrants: An African Migration Perspective

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    Dube Zorodzai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study is a response to the call for papers that focuses on African issues and, I chose to discuss the issue of migration. Though not a historical document, the Bible records various journeys that the ancient people travelled;1 it narrates people’s relocations from one geographic place to the other. However, migration has never been the main focus of several biblical interpreters who seem to perceive the Bible mostly from a theological lens. Largely, this study is informed by current challenges associated with immigration, highlighting comparative migration experiences that seem embellished under theological themes. For examples, each day we hear about stories of migrants who drown in the sea while trying to cross to Europe or of foreigners, due to xenophobic conflicts over few economic resources, die in numbers in South Africa. This study explores two biblical characters—Abraham and Jesus from a migration perspective, focusing on the pushed or pulled factors embedded under their stories.

  8. Local Villages and Global Networks: The Language and Migration Experiences of African Skilled Migrant Academics

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    Hurst, Ellen

    2017-01-01

    African skilled migrants and their circular and return migration strategies have received relatively little attention in the literature, with the previous focus of much African migration literature being on the net loss of skills to countries with developed economies in the global north. This article considers 13 interviews with African skilled…

  9. Barriers to HIV testing for migrant black Africans in Western Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fakoya, A.; Reynolds, R.; Caswell, G.; Shiripinda, I.

    2008-01-01

    Migrant black Africans are disproportionately affected by HIV in Western Europe; we discuss the barriers to HIV testing for sub-Saharan migrants, with particular emphasis on the UK and the Netherlands. Cultural, social and structural barriers to testing, such as access to testing and care, fear of

  10. High prevalence of anaemia among African migrants in Germany persists after exclusion of iron deficiency and erythrocyte polymorphisms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Müller, Sophie A; Amoah, Stephen K. B; Meese, Stefanie; Spranger, Joachim; Mockenhaupt, Frank P

    2015-01-01

    .... However, respective data of first-generation African migrants are virtually absent. We assessed these in Ghanaian migrants living in Berlin, compared them with reference data from Germany and Ghana, and estimated the role of iron deficiency (ID...

  11. Overcoming Barriers to Health Care Access: A Qualitative Study among African Migrants in Guangzhou, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lavinia; Brown, Katherine B.; Hall, Brian J.; Yu, Fan; Yang, Jingqi; Wang, Jason; Schrock, Joshua M.; Bodomo, Adams B.; Yang, Ligang; Yang, Bin; Nehl, Eric J.; Tucker, Joseph D.; Wong, Frank Y.

    2015-01-01

    Guangzhou is China's third most populous city, and the region's burgeoning manufacturing economy has attracted many young African businessmen and entrepreneurs to the city. The aims of this study were to examine strategies that African migrants in Guangzhou have adopted in response to health care barriers, and explore their perceptions of how to address their needs. Twenty-five semi-structured interviews and two focus groups were conducted among African migrants residing in Guangzhou, China. Facing multiple barriers to care, African migrants have adopted a number of suboptimal and unsustainable approaches to access health care. These included: using their Chinese friends or partners as interpreters, self-medicating, using personal connections to medical doctors, and traveling to home countries or countries that offer English-speaking doctors for health care. Health care providers and health organizations in Guangzhou have not yet acquired sufficient cultural competence to address the needs of African migrants residing in the city. Introducing linguistically and culturally competent health care services in communities concentrated with African migrants may better serve the population. With the growing international migration to China, it is essential to develop sustainable approaches to improving health care access for international migrants, particularly those who are marginalized. PMID:26400191

  12. Epidemiology and epigenetics of type 2 diabetes among African migrants in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeks, K.A.C.

    2017-01-01

    The global burden of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is high and rising and affects high income countries as well as low- and middle income countries such as countries in the sub-Saharan African region. Sub-Saharan African migrants in Europe seem disproportionally affected by T2D compared to European host

  13. Developing programs for African families, by African families: engaging African migrant families in Melbourne in health promotion interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Jennifer A; Green, Julie; Mellor, David; Mutowo, Mutsa P; de Courten, Maximilian; Renzaho, André M N

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is an emerging problem for African migrants in Australia, but few prevention programs incorporate their cultural beliefs and values. This study reports on the application of community capacity-building and empowerment principles in 4 workshops with Sudanese families in Australia. Workshop participants prioritized health behaviors, skill and knowledge gaps, and environments for change to identify culturally centered approaches to health promotion. The workshops highlighted a need for culturally and age-appropriate interventions that build whole-of-family skills and knowledge around the positive effects of physical activity and nutrition to improve health within communities while reducing intergenerational and gender role family conflicts.

  14. Turbulent trajectories: African migrants on their way to the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schapendonk, J.

    2012-01-01

    Sub-Saharan African migration towards the European Union (EU) belongs to one of the most stigmatized forms of migration of the 21st century. It is strongly characterized by EU’s restrictive migration policies. As a consequence, migrants who are aspiring to reach the EU often undertake fragmented

  15. [African refugees and migrants: "invasion of welfare-state Europe"?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohnert, D

    1993-06-01

    Migration and refugee movements from Sub-Saharan Africa to Europe are analyzed. Topics discussed include the volume of migration, countries of destination, the relationship of this migration to movements from other third world countries and Eastern Europe and to migration within Africa, causes of migration, major paths of migrants, costs and benefits of migration, and policy aspects.

  16. Breast cancer screening practices of African migrant women in Australia: a descriptive cross-sectional study.

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    Ogunsiji, Olayide Oluyemisi; Kwok, Cannas; Fan, Lee Chun

    2017-04-17

    Breast cancer is the most diagnosed cancer among women and a leading cause of mortality and morbidity, globally. Breast cancer mortality can be improved through routine cancer screening, yet migrant populations have lower participation rates. While African migrants are among the fastest growing migrant population in Australia, their breast cancer screening behaviour is under-studied. The aims of this study were to report breast cancer screening status of African migrant women and factors associated with their breast cancer screening behaviour in Australia. A descriptive, cross-sectional approach was utilised for this study. Two hundred and sixty four African migrant women aged 18-69 years and recruited from a number of organisations responded to a self-reported African version of the Breast Cancer Screening Beliefs Questionnaire (BCSBQ). Main research variables are breast cancer screening practices and demographic characteristics and total scores on each of the BCSBQ subscales. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate the impact of the demographic variables on the likelihood of women in the target age range 50-74 years having screening practices as recommended. While most of the participants heard of breast awareness (76.1%) and mammogram (85.2%), only 11.4% practised monthly breast awareness, whereas 65.9% had ever had a mammogram as frequently as recommended. Age and employment were determining factors for participating in mammogram. Significant different scores were found in the "Practical barriers" between women at the target age who had and had not performed breast awareness (80.4 versus 77.5, p-value = 0.002) and mammogram (77.1 versus 70.3, p-value = 0.009) regularly as recommended. Moreover, attitudes towards general health check-ups subscale scores were significantly higher in women who had performed clinical breast examination as frequently as recommended than those who had not. The research reveals that practical

  17. Diaspora engagement of African migrant health workers – examples from five destination countries

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    Silvia Wojczewski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Migrant health workers fill care gaps in their destination countries, but they also actively engage in improving living conditions for people of their countries of origin through expatriate professional networks. This paper aims to explore the professional links that migrant health workers from sub-Saharan African countries living in five African and European destinations (Botswana, South Africa, Belgium, Austria, and the United Kingdom have to their countries of origin. Design: Qualitative interviews were conducted with migrant doctors, nurses, and midwives from sub-Saharan Africa (N=66. A qualitative content analysis of the material was performed using the software ATLAS.ti. Results: Almost all migrant health workers have professional ties with their countries of origin supporting health, education, and social structures. They work with non-governmental organizations, universities, or hospitals and travel back and forth between their destination country and country of origin. For a few respondents, professional engagement or even maintaining private contacts in their country of origin is difficult due to the political situation at home. Conclusions: The results show that African migrant health workers are actively engaged in improving living conditions not only for their family members but also for the population in general in their countries of origin. Our respondents are mediators and active networkers in a globalized and transnationally connected world. The research suggests that the governments of these countries of origin could strategically use their migrant health workforce for improving education and population health in sub-Saharan Africa. Destination countries should be reminded of their need to comply with the WHO Global Code of Practice for the international recruitment of health professionals.

  18. Diaspora engagement of African migrant health workers - examples from five destination countries.

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    Wojczewski, Silvia; Poppe, Annelien; Hoffmann, Kathryn; Peersman, Wim; Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Pentz, Stephen; Kutalek, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Migrant health workers fill care gaps in their destination countries, but they also actively engage in improving living conditions for people of their countries of origin through expatriate professional networks. This paper aims to explore the professional links that migrant health workers from sub-Saharan African countries living in five African and European destinations (Botswana, South Africa, Belgium, Austria, and the United Kingdom) have to their countries of origin. Qualitative interviews were conducted with migrant doctors, nurses, and midwives from sub-Saharan Africa (N=66). A qualitative content analysis of the material was performed using the software ATLAS.ti. Almost all migrant health workers have professional ties with their countries of origin supporting health, education, and social structures. They work with non-governmental organizations, universities, or hospitals and travel back and forth between their destination country and country of origin. For a few respondents, professional engagement or even maintaining private contacts in their country of origin is difficult due to the political situation at home. The results show that African migrant health workers are actively engaged in improving living conditions not only for their family members but also for the population in general in their countries of origin. Our respondents are mediators and active networkers in a globalized and transnationally connected world. The research suggests that the governments of these countries of origin could strategically use their migrant health workforce for improving education and population health in sub-Saharan Africa. Destination countries should be reminded of their need to comply with the WHO Global Code of Practice for the international recruitment of health professionals.

  19. 'Migrants from over there' or 'racial minority here'? Sexual networks and prevention practices among sub-Saharan African migrants in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsicano, Elise; Lydié, Nathalie; Bajos, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    Migrants from sub-Saharan Africa bear a disproportionate burden of HIV infection in Europe, with an increasing proportion of them acquiring HIV after migration. This transformation in the epidemic pattern has raised concerns about the sexual mixing and preventive behaviours of migrants. This paper aims at exploring how racial boundaries shape sexual networks and structure prevention practices among migrants from sub-Saharan Africa. Analyses are based on a French survey carried out among 1874 individuals born in sub-Saharan Africa, aged 18-49 and living in Paris and its surroundings. Our results provide evidence of the existence of African sexual networks, over and beyond those of national origin. The intra-African segregation of these sexual networks leads to sexual contacts between migrants from low- and high-HIV prevalence countries, which probably contribute to the development of the epidemic amongst these migrants. Moreover, racially-based perceptions of HIV-related risk seem to produce a specific attitude toward prevention practices as shown by higher rates of condom use among migrant women from sub-Saharan Africa with a partner born outside sub-Saharan Africa. As a consequence, community-based approaches to HIV prevention should take into account the identification of migrants from sub-Saharan Africa as a racial minority and not only focus on national borders.

  20. Staying put in moving sands. The stepwise migration process of sub-Saharan African migrants heading north

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schapendonk, J.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the stepwise migration process of sub-Saharan African migrants heading North with a strong actor-centred approach. It aims to gain more insights into the migration processes by investigating migrant's flexibility and dependency. The chapter examines the way sub-Saharan

  1. Improving health services for African migrants in China: A health diplomacy perspective.

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    McLaughlin, Megan M; Lee, Margaret C; Hall, Brian J; Bulterys, Marc; Ling, Li; Tucker, Joseph D

    2014-01-01

    Global health has become an increasingly prominent component of foreign policy in the last decade. The term health diplomacy has been used to describe this growing interface between foreign policy and global health, and it encompasses both the concept of using health to further foreign policy objectives as well as the idea that diplomatic tools can be helpful for attaining public health goals. The Chinese presence in Africa has grown in the last 15 years, generating increased interest in Sino-African relations. While much has been written in recent years about the Chinese presence in Africa, the growing numbers of Africans in China have attracted considerably less attention. Many are small-scale traders and might be expected to face many of the health challenges common among foreign migrants, but their health needs have been largely unrecognised. In this paper, we consider how a health diplomacy approach could be applied to African migrants in China, and the potential advantages and limitations of this strategy. We identify areas of overlap between public health, trade and foreign policy goals that can be emphasised to generate support for improved services for African migrants in China and to engage partners from a diversity of sectors.

  2. AFRICAN MIGRANTS IN SPITE OF “FORTRESS” EUROPE: AN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    life – to leave their home countries” (BBC News Online). Other expressed views similar to Winter's – all furnish low perception of the African. Interdisciplinary in its outlook, this paper makes much of colonial history and literatures, sociology and philosophy. Equally, it contests the view ascribed to the prize-winning journalist, ...

  3. Asymptomatic malaria in refugees living in a non-endemic South African city.

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    Tsoka-Gwegweni, Joyce M; Okafor, Uchenna

    2014-01-01

    Asymptomatic malaria infection in refugees is both a threat to the lives of the individuals and the public in the host country. Although South Africa has been experiencing an unprecedented influx of refugees since 1994, data on malaria infection among refugees is lacking. Such information is critical since South Africa is among the countries that have planned to eliminate malaria. The objective of this study was to determine prevalence of asymptomatic malaria infection among a refugee population living in a city of KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa. A survey was conducted on adult refugee participants who attended a faith-based facility offering social services in a city of KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa. The participants were screened for the presence of malaria using rapid diagnostic tests and microscopy. Demographic data for the participants were obtained using a closed ended questionnaire. Data was obtained for 303 participants consisting of 51.5% females and 47.5% males, ranging from 19 to 64 years old. More than 95% of them originated from sub-Saharan African countries. Two hundred and ninety participants provided a blood sample for screening of malaria. Of these, 3.8% tested positive for rapid diagnostic test and 5.9% for microscopy. The majority of malaria infections were due to Plasmodium falciparum. The study confirms the presence of asymptomatic malaria infections among a refugee population residing in a city of KwaZulu-Natal province that is not endemic for malaria. The results have important implications for both public health and malaria control in South Africa, particularly since the country has decided to eliminate malaria by 2018. To achieve this goal, South Africa needs to expand research, surveillance and elimination activities to include non-endemic areas, particularly with high refugee populations. We further recommend use of powerful diagnostic tests such as PCR for these interventions.

  4. Asymptomatic malaria in refugees living in a non-endemic South African city.

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    Joyce M Tsoka-Gwegweni

    Full Text Available Asymptomatic malaria infection in refugees is both a threat to the lives of the individuals and the public in the host country. Although South Africa has been experiencing an unprecedented influx of refugees since 1994, data on malaria infection among refugees is lacking. Such information is critical since South Africa is among the countries that have planned to eliminate malaria. The objective of this study was to determine prevalence of asymptomatic malaria infection among a refugee population living in a city of KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa.A survey was conducted on adult refugee participants who attended a faith-based facility offering social services in a city of KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa. The participants were screened for the presence of malaria using rapid diagnostic tests and microscopy. Demographic data for the participants were obtained using a closed ended questionnaire. Data was obtained for 303 participants consisting of 51.5% females and 47.5% males, ranging from 19 to 64 years old. More than 95% of them originated from sub-Saharan African countries. Two hundred and ninety participants provided a blood sample for screening of malaria. Of these, 3.8% tested positive for rapid diagnostic test and 5.9% for microscopy. The majority of malaria infections were due to Plasmodium falciparum.The study confirms the presence of asymptomatic malaria infections among a refugee population residing in a city of KwaZulu-Natal province that is not endemic for malaria. The results have important implications for both public health and malaria control in South Africa, particularly since the country has decided to eliminate malaria by 2018. To achieve this goal, South Africa needs to expand research, surveillance and elimination activities to include non-endemic areas, particularly with high refugee populations. We further recommend use of powerful diagnostic tests such as PCR for these interventions.

  5. Former migrant mineworkers with respiratory disease: the South African compensation system, and implications for neighbouring countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, T W; Mabongo, N; Moeti, T; Monare, B; Trapido, A S

    2000-01-01

    In the region of Southern Africa, substantial numbers of people, primarily males, have been employed in the South African mining industry. Migrant workers from neighbouring countries have constituted a large part of the work force. Until recently, there has been little or no attention directed toward the state of health of these individuals, despite the fact that their work involves a high health risk, especially in regard to mine-related lung diseases. In addition, the South African workers' compensation programme has seldom been utilised by the migrant worker who is a victim of occupational disease. However, recent experiences from Botswana show that compensation claims can be successfully made from the neighbouring countries where the migrant workers originate. Efforts are being made to address the problem systematically, and the government of Botswana is actively involved. The major occupational lung disorders are described briefly, and differential diagnostic problems with pulmonary TB are discussed. Furthermore, a survey of the compensation system in South Africa is presented, and practical steps for medical examinations involving compensation claims are described.

  6. The EU Migration Regime and West African Clandestine Migrants

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    Hannah M. Cross

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the relationship between the EU migration regime and clandestine migration from West Africa to Europe. A review of the development of EU border and immigration policy reveals significant and sustained moves towards securitisation of migrants and the externalisation of border controls to countries of origin and transit. This emphasis on repression limits the scope of cooperation with ‘third countries’ (those outside Europe in co-development, labour mobility, sea patrols and repatriation, which are examined separately as deterrents to uncontrolled emigration. This paper then analyses the motivations and intentions of Senegalese youth around the Cap Vert peninsula. This analysis includes the role of emigration in development and more recently, the impact of human losses and repatriations resulting from the clandestine journey by pirogue (open fishing boat to the Canary Islands. This article argues that in this case, youth are excluded both from labour and asylum policies and instead are managed as a security threat, contradicting the factors driving this journey.

  7. [Health care access of Sub-Saharan African migrants living with chronic hepatitis B].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignier, Nicolas; Spira, Rosemary Dray; Lert, France; Pannetier, Julie; Ravalihasy, Andrainolo; Gosselin, Anne; Lydié, Nathalie; Bouchaud, Olivier; Desgrées du Loû, Annabel

    2017-07-10

    Objective: The objective of this study was to analyse health care access of Sub-Saharan African migrants living with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) in France. Methods: The ANRS-Parcours survey was a life-event survey conducted in 2012-2013 among Sub-Saharan African migrants recruited by health care facilities managing CHB in the Paris region. Data were collected by face-to-face interview using a biographical grid and a standardized questionnaire. Results: 96.4% of the 619 participants basic health insurance coverage with CMU universal health insurance coverage in 18.6% of cases and AME state medical assistance in 23.4% of cases. One-third of basic health insurance beneficiaries did not have any complementary health insurance and 75.7% had long-term disease status. The median time to acquisition of health insurance cover after arrival in France was one year. 22.0% of participants reported delaying health care for financial reasons since their arrival in France and 9.7% reported being refused health care usually due to refusal of CMU or AME. Health care access was effective within one year of the diagnosis. Delayed health care access was more common among people without health insurance coverage in the year of diagnosis. Patients lost to follow-up for more than 12 months were rare. Conclusion: Sub-Saharan African migrants living with chronic hepatitis B rapidly access health insurance coverage and health care. However, barriers to health care access persist for some people, essentially due to absent or incomplete health insurance cover and refusal of care for AME or CMU beneficiaries.

  8. Prevalence of Plasmodium spp. in malaria asymptomatic African migrants assessed by nucleic acid sequence based amplification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marangi, M.; Di Tullio, R.; Mens, P.F.; Martinelli, D.; Fazio, V.; Angarano, G.; Schallig, H.D.F.H.; Giangaspero, A.; Scotto, G.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Malaria is one of the most important infectious diseases in the world. Although most cases are found distributed in the tropical regions of Africa, Asia, Central and South Americas, there is in Europe a significant increase in the number of imported cases in non-endemic countries, in

  9. Genetic characterization of HIV type 1 from migrant workers in three South African gold mines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredell, H; Williamson, C; Sonnenberg, P; Martin, D J; Morris, L

    1998-05-20

    The phylogenetic relationships between 44 HIV-1 isolates from 43 infected subjects employed by three adjacent South African gold mines were investigated. The patients were migrant workers originating from rural areas of South Africa and the neighboring countries of Lesotho, Botswana, Swaziland, and Mozambique. Proviral HIV-1 DNA was subtyped using a heteroduplex mobility assay (HMA) based on the 700-bp V3-V5 region of the env gene. DNA sequence analysis was used to confirm the subtype designation and to determine phylogenetic relationships between isolates. All 44 HIV-1 isolates were identified as env subtype C using both HMA and phylogenetic analysis. These isolates did not show a distinct phylogenetic relatedness based on the geographic origins of the migrant workers or show close homology to other subtype C sequences from southern Africa or India. However, five clusters of closely related sequences were identified, mainly involving miners of disparate geographic origins, suggesting possible epidemiological linkage in these few cases. The characteristic tetrapeptide sequence, GPGQ, at the tip of the V3 loop of subtype C viruses was conserved in the predicted amino acid sequences of most isolates. The heterogeneity of HIV-1 sequences among migrant workers in a mining cohort suggests multiple introductions of HIV-1 subtype C into this population that are not apparently linked to the geographic origins of the patients.

  10. A theological perspective on migrants and migration focussing on the Southern African Development Community (SADC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botha, Nico A.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the paper is to draw some contours of a theology of migration. The specific focus in the paper is on the Southern African Development Community (SADC which constitutes a very complex situation of human migration from neighbouring countries to South Africa. The praxis cycle is called into service to construct a theology of migration informed by insertion, context analysis, theological reflection and strategic planning. The main thesis of the paper is that a theology of migration should as a bare minimum reflect the following dimensions: a theological theology, i.e. the language about God in the context of migration, a narrative theology, a liturgical-communal theology and an intercultural and interreligious theology. The proposal offered on strategic planning is aimed at the radical transformation of relationships between South Africans and migrants.

  11. Turbulent Trajectories: African Migrants on Their Way to the European Union

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    Joris Schapendonk

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Sub-Saharan African migration towards the European Union (EU belongs to one of the most stigmatized forms of migration of the 21st century. It is strongly characterized by EU’s restrictive migration policies. As a consequence, migrants who are aspiring to reach the EU often undertake fragmented and dangerous journeys to the North. This contribution attempts to gain more empirical insights into these migratory journeys. It is based on a ‘trajectory ethnography’ that combines in-depth interviews with sub-Saharan Africans, who are waiting in Morocco and Turkey to enter the EU, with a longitudinal strategy to follow some of these respondents over longer periods of time. With this longitudinal element I was in particular able to grasp expected steps and unexpected turns in individual migration trajectories. By discussing three main components (the motivation, facilitation and velocity of journeys, this contribution puts into perspective the unidirectional and often frictionless metaphors of migration—as if migrants move like ‘flows’ and ‘waves’.

  12. Guangzhou’s African Migrants: Implications for China’s Social Stability and China-Africa Relations

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    Anas Elochukwu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Until recently migration was treated like a footnote in the Africa-China discourse. Previously researchers and the media had focused attention on the “cost-benefit analysis” of China‘ s economic penetration of the continent. However, since 2008 when over a hundred African migrants blocked a major street in Guangzhou protesting the death of a Nigerian in an immigration raid, researchers and the media have been falling over themselves to unpack the phenomenon of migrant exchange in the relationship. There are now about one million Chinese migrants in Africa as against about two hundred and fifty thousand African migrants in China. Migration is a two-edged sword. On the credit side, migration can be a bridge between peoples as well as a major contributor to economic development. On the debit side, it can be a source of dispute between peoples and a threat to the hosts’ social stability. This paper discusses the implications of Guangzhou’s African migrants for China’s social stability and China’s relationship with Africa.

  13. Mental health of sub-saharan african migrants: The gendered role of migration paths and transnational ties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannetier, Julie; Lert, France; Jauffret Roustide, Marie; du Loû, Annabel Desgrées

    2017-12-01

    In Europe, migrants are at higher risk of common mental disorders or psychological distress than are natives. Little is known regarding the social determinants of migrant mental health, particularly the roles played by migration conditions and transnational practices, which may manifest themselves in different ways for men and for women. The goal of this paper was to understand the gendered roles of migration paths and transnational ties in mental health among sub-Saharan African migrants residing in the Paris, France, metropolitan area. This study used data from the Parcours study conducted in 2012-2013, which employed a life-event approach to collect data from a representative sample of migrants who visited healthcare facilities (n = 2468). We measured anxiety and depressive symptoms at the time of data collection with the Patient Health Questionnaire-4 (PHQ-4). Reasons for migration, the living conditions in the host country and transnational ties after migration were taken into account by sex and after adjustment. Our study demonstrates that among sub-Saharan African migrants, mental health is related to the migratory path and the migrant's situation in the host country but differently for women and men. Among women, anxiety and depressive symptoms were strongly related to having left one's home country because of threats to one's life. Among men, residing illegally in the host country was related to impaired mental health. For both women and men, cross-border separation from a child less than 18 years old was not independently associated with anxiety and depressive symptoms. In addition, social and emotional support from relatives and friends-both from the society of origin and of destination-were associated with lower anxiety and depressive symptoms. Migrant mental health may be impaired in the current context of anti-migrant policies and an anti-immigrant social environment in Europe.

  14. African migrant patients' trust in Chinese physicians: a social ecological approach to understanding patient-physician trust.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan M McLaughlin

    Full Text Available Patient trust in physicians is a critical determinant of health seeking behaviors, medication adherence, and health outcomes. A crisis of interpersonal trust exists in China, extending throughout multiple social spheres, including the healthcare system. At the same time, with increased migration from Africa to China in the last two decades, Chinese physicians must establish mutual trust with an increasingly diverse patient population. We undertook a qualitative study to identify factors affecting African migrants' trust in Chinese physicians and to identify potential mechanisms for promoting trust.We conducted semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 40 African migrants in Guangzhou, China. A modified version of the social ecological model was used as a theoretical framework. At the patient-physician level, interpersonal treatment, technical competence, perceived commitment and motive, and language concordance were associated with enhanced trust. At the health system level, two primary factors influenced African migrants' trust in their physicians: the fee-for-service payment system and lack of continuity with any one physician. Patients' social networks and the broader socio-cultural context of interactions between African migrants and Chinese locals also influenced patients' trust of their physicians.These findings demonstrate the importance of factors beyond the immediate patient-physician interaction and suggest opportunities to promote trust through health system interventions.

  15. African migrant patients' trust in Chinese physicians: a social ecological approach to understanding patient-physician trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Megan M; Simonson, Louis; Zou, Xia; Ling, Li; Tucker, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    Patient trust in physicians is a critical determinant of health seeking behaviors, medication adherence, and health outcomes. A crisis of interpersonal trust exists in China, extending throughout multiple social spheres, including the healthcare system. At the same time, with increased migration from Africa to China in the last two decades, Chinese physicians must establish mutual trust with an increasingly diverse patient population. We undertook a qualitative study to identify factors affecting African migrants' trust in Chinese physicians and to identify potential mechanisms for promoting trust. We conducted semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 40 African migrants in Guangzhou, China. A modified version of the social ecological model was used as a theoretical framework. At the patient-physician level, interpersonal treatment, technical competence, perceived commitment and motive, and language concordance were associated with enhanced trust. At the health system level, two primary factors influenced African migrants' trust in their physicians: the fee-for-service payment system and lack of continuity with any one physician. Patients' social networks and the broader socio-cultural context of interactions between African migrants and Chinese locals also influenced patients' trust of their physicians. These findings demonstrate the importance of factors beyond the immediate patient-physician interaction and suggest opportunities to promote trust through health system interventions.

  16. Developing a guide for community-based groups to reduce alcohol-related harm among African migrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Alison; Brown, Tony; Norman, Catherine; Hata, Kiri; Toohey, Mark; Vasiljevic, Dubravka; Rowe, Rachel

    2016-04-01

    Issue addressed Alcohol-related harm is an issue of concern for African migrant communities living in Australia. However, there has been little information available to guide workers in developing culturally sensitive health promotion strategies. Methods A three-step approach, comprising a literature review, community consultations and an external review, was undertaken to develop a guide to assist organisations and health promotion groups working with African migrant communities to address alcohol-related harms. Discussion There was a high level of agreement between the three steps. Addressing alcohol harms with African migrant communities requires approaches that are sensitive to the needs, structures and experiences of communities. The process should incorporate targeted approaches that enable communities to achieve their resettlement goals as well as strengthening mainstream health promotion efforts. Conclusions The resource produced guides alcohol harm prevention coalitions and workers from the first steps of understanding the influences of acculturation and resettlement on alcohol consumption, through to planning, developing and evaluating an intervention in partnership with communities. So what? This paper advances knowledge by providing a precise summary of Australian African migrant focused alcohol and other drug research to date. It also describes a three-step approach that aimed to incorporate a diversity of community views in the creation of a health promotion and community capacity-building resource.

  17. Prevalence rates of six selected infectious diseases among African migrants and refugees: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernet, A; Utzinger, J; Sydow, V; Probst-Hensch, N; Paris, D H; Labhardt, N D; Neumayr, A

    2017-10-28

    The objective of this paper was to systematically review the literature on the prevalence of selected infectious diseases among migrants/refugees of African origin and to provide policy makers and health care professionals with evidence-based information. We pursued a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the prevalence of six selected infectious diseases (i.e., syphilis, helminthiasis, schistosomiasis, intestinal protozoa infections, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C) among migrants/refugees of African origin. Three electronic databases (i.e., PubMed, EMBASE, and ISI Web of Science) were searched without language restrictions. Relevant data were extracted and random-effects meta-analyses conducted. Only adjusted estimates were analyzed to help account for heterogeneity and potential confounding. We assessed the quality of evidence using the GRADE approach. The results were stratified by geographical region. Ninety-six studies were included. The evidence was of low quality due to the small numbers of countries, infectious diseases, and participants included. African migrants/refugees had median (with 95% confidence interval [95% CI]) prevalence for syphilis, helminthiasis, schistosomiasis, intestinal protozoa infection, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C of 6.0% [95% CI: 2.0-7.0%], 13.0% [95% CI: 9.5-14.5%], 14.0% [95% CI: 13.0-17.0%], 15.0% [95% CI: 10.5-21.0%], 10.0% [95% CI: 6.0-14.0%], and 3.0% [95% CI: 1.0-4.0%], respectively. We found high heterogeneity regardless of the disease (I 2; minimum 97.5%, maximum 99.7%). The relatively high prevalence of some infectious diseases among African migrants/refugees warrants for systematic screening. The large heterogeneity of the available published data does not allow for stratifying such screening programs according to the geographical origin of African migrants/refugees.

  18. Mental health of sub-saharan african migrants: The gendered role of migration paths and transnational ties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Pannetier

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In Europe, migrants are at higher risk of common mental disorders or psychological distress than are natives. Little is known regarding the social determinants of migrant mental health, particularly the roles played by migration conditions and transnational practices, which may manifest themselves in different ways for men and for women. The goal of this paper was to understand the gendered roles of migration paths and transnational ties in mental health among sub-Saharan African migrants residing in the Paris, France, metropolitan area. This study used data from the Parcours study conducted in 2012–2013, which employed a life-event approach to collect data from a representative sample of migrants who visited healthcare facilities (n = 2468. We measured anxiety and depressive symptoms at the time of data collection with the Patient Health Questionnaire-4 (PHQ-4. Reasons for migration, the living conditions in the host country and transnational ties after migration were taken into account by sex and after adjustment. Our study demonstrates that among sub-Saharan African migrants, mental health is related to the migratory path and the migrant’s situation in the host country but differently for women and men. Among women, anxiety and depressive symptoms were strongly related to having left one’s home country because of threats to one’s life. Among men, residing illegally in the host country was related to impaired mental health. For both women and men, cross-border separation from a child less than 18 years old was not independently associated with anxiety and depressive symptoms. In addition, social and emotional support from relatives and friends—both from the society of origin and of destination—were associated with lower anxiety and depressive symptoms. Migrant mental health may be impaired in the current context of anti-migrant policies and an anti-immigrant social environment in Europe.

  19. Transnational ties and the health of sub-Saharan African migrants: The moderating role of gender and family separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afulani, Patience A; Torres, Jacqueline M; Sudhinaraset, May; Asunka, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    Recent scholarship has focused on the role that cross-border social and economic ties play in shaping health outcomes for migrant populations. Nevertheless, the extant empirical work on this topic has paid little attention to the health impacts of cross-border separation from close family members. In this paper we examine the association between cross-border ties-and cross-border separation-with the health of sub-Saharan African (SSA) migrant adults living in metropolitan France using data from the nationally representative "Trajectoire et Origines" survey (n = 1980 SSA migrants). In logistic regression analyses we find that remitting money and having a child abroad are each associated with poor health among women, but not men. The effect of remittances on health is also modified by the location of one's children: remittance sending is associated with poor health only for SSA-migrants separated from their children. These findings underscore the importance of examining both cross-border connection and cross-border separation in studies of immigrant health, and also underscore the heterogeneous relationships between cross-border ties and health for men and women. This is the first study to our knowledge that examines the relationship between cross-border ties and health for migrants in Europe, with a focus on SSA-migrants in France. These findings have important implications for the health of the growing immigrant and refugee populations in Europe and around the globe. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Schistosoma haematobium infection and asymptomatic bacteriuria in young South African females

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildemoes, Anna M. O.; Kjetland, Eyrun Floerecke; Zulu, Siphosenkosi Gift

    2015-01-01

    infection and asymptomatic bacteriuria can both portray haematuria, proteinuria and leukocyturia. This shared set of proxy diagnostic markers could fuel routine misdiagnosis in S. haematobium endemic areas. Furthermore, S. haematobium infected individuals might be at a higher risk of contracting bacterial...... by microscopy of urine samples. Furthermore, urine samples were tested with dipslides for asymptomatic bacteriuria and with dipsticks for haematuria, proteinuria and leukocytes. We found no association between asymptomatic bacteriuria and S. haematobium infection in a sample of 1040 female primary and high...

  1. 'Just talking about it opens your heart': meaning-making among Black African migrants and refugees living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrickson, Mark; Brown, Derek Brian; Fouché, Christa; Poindexter, Cynthia C; Scott, Kay

    2013-01-01

    Meaning-making has emerged as a core construct in addressing trauma, loss or crisis. This paper considers how diasporic Black Africans living with HIV, who come from interdependent collectivist cultures where the norm is one of implicit support, extend their meaning-making strategies when faced with a diagnosis of HIV. In this qualitative study, 13 Black African migrants and refugees living with HIV in New Zealand were interviewed and the transcripts analysed. After their diagnosis, participants began a journey of reconceptualising situational and global meaning. They extended their meaning-making strategies to include a community of like others to gain explicit support. Caregivers in host countries must understand the meaning-making processes of HIV-positive Black African migrants in order to provide competent services that lead to good social and health outcomes. All healthcare and social services workers should regularly assess Black African migrants and refugees living with HIV for positive social connectedness as well as medication adherence and more specific health concerns.

  2. Blood donation by African migrants and refugees in Australia: the role of demographic and socio-economic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuilten, Z; Waters, N; Polonsky, M; Renzaho, A

    2014-02-01

    To establish blood donation rates among African refugees and migrants and identify demographic and socio-economic factors that are associated with their blood donation. A cross-sectional survey of 425 migrants and refugees living in Victoria and South Australia was used to assess blood donation status. The association between blood donation and demographic and socio-economic factors was assessed using multiple logistic regression analysis. Overall, 73 participants (17·2%; 95% CI: 13·6-20·8) reported having donated blood previously. Of the total sample, 2·4% (95% CI: 0·9-3·8) reported having given blood in Australia; 12·9% (95% CI: 9·7-16·1) had given blood prior to migration to Australia (i.e. country of birth or transition); and 1·9% (95% CI: 0·6-3·2) indicated they had given blood in an unspecified country. In the univariate model, age, country of birth, blood donation knowledge, religion, educational attainment, migration and employment status were all associated with blood donation status. However, in the multivariate model, only age >45 years (odds ratio [OR] 5·72; 95% CI 2·11-15·46), African region of origin (OR 15·89; 95% CI 3·89-65) and blood donation knowledge (OR 4·46; 95% CI 1·57-12·7) were associated with blood donation. In order to increase the number of blood donors among African migrants, promoting knowledge and awareness of issues associated with blood donation in Australia should be emphasized. Consideration should be given to identifying these potential migrant donors to improve the availability of compatible blood for patients of African descent. © 2013 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  3. A Qualitative study of language barriers between South African health care providers and cross-border migrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter-Adams, Jo; Rother, Hanna-Andrea

    2017-01-31

    Communication with health care providers represents an essential part of access to health care for the over 230 million cross-border migrants around the world. In this article, we explore the complexity of health communication from the perspective of cross-border migrants seeking antenatal care in Cape Town, South Africa in order to highlight the importance of high quality medical interpretation. As part of a broader study of migrant maternal and infant nutrition, we conducted a secondary data analysis of semi-structured in-depth interviews (N = 23) with Congolese (n = 7), Somali (n = 8) and Zimbabwean (n = 8) women living in Cape Town, as well as nine focus group discussions (including men: n = 3 and women: n = 6) were conducted with migrant Somalis, Congolese, and Zimbabweans (N = 48). We first used content analysis to gather all data related to language and communication. We then analysed this data thematically. Zimbabwean participants described how the inability to speak the local South African language (IsiXhosa) gave rise to labelling and stereotyping by healthcare staff. Congolese and Somali participants described medical procedures, including tubal ligation, which were performed without consent. Partners often tried to play the role of interpreter, which resulted in loss of income and non-professional medical interpretation. Participants' highlighted fears over unwanted procedures or being unable to access care. Challenges of communication without a common language (and without professional medical interpretation), rather than outright denial of care by healthcare professionals, mediated these encounters. Although there are several factors impeding cross-border migrants' access to health care, effective communication is a prerequisite for quality care. Free-to-patient professional medical interpretation would not only benefit migrant populations but would benefit the broader community where language and health literacy are

  4. High prevalence of anaemia among African migrants in Germany persists after exclusion of iron deficiency and erythrocyte polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Sophie A; Amoah, Stephen K B; Meese, Stefanie; Spranger, Joachim; Mockenhaupt, Frank P

    2015-09-01

    Haematological parameters differ between individuals of African and European ancestry. However, respective data of first-generation African migrants are virtually absent. We assessed these in Ghanaian migrants living in Berlin, compared them with reference data from Germany and Ghana, and estimated the role of iron deficiency (ID) and erythrocyte polymorphisms in anaemia. A total of 576 Ghanaians (median age, 45 years) were analysed. Blood counts were performed, haemoglobinopathies and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency were genotyped, and concentrations of ferritin and C-reactive protein were measured to define ID. Most individuals had resided in Germany for more than a decade (median, 18 years). By WHO definition, anaemia was present in 30.9% of females and 9.4% of males. Median haemoglobin (Hb) levels were lower than among Germans (women, -0.8 g/dl, men, -0.7 g/dl). However, applying reference values from Ghana, only 1.9% of the migrants were considered anaemic. Alpha-thalassaemia, Hb variants and G6PD deficiency were observed in 33.9%, 28.3% and 23.6%, respectively. ID was highly prevalent in women (32.0%; men, 3.9%). The population fraction of anaemia cases attributable to ID was 29.0% (alpha-thalassaemia, 13.6%; G6PD deficiency, 13.5%). Nevertheless, excluding ID, alpha-thalassaemia, G6PD deficiency and sickle cell disease, anaemia prevalence remained high (women, 18.4%; men, 6.5%), and was also high when applying uncensored thresholds proposed for African Americans (females, 19.3%; males, 7.8%). Iron deficiency and erythrocyte polymorphisms are common among first-generation Ghanaian migrants but explain only part of the increased prevalence of anaemia. Common Hb thresholds for the definition of anaemia may not be appropriate for this group. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Examining demographic and socio-economic correlates of accurate knowledge about blood donation among African migrants in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzaho, A M N; Polonsky, M J

    2012-10-01

    To develop and test a knowledge questionnaire about blood donation in African migrant communities in Australia, which is applicable to other communities, and to assess the relationship between the demographic and socio-economic characteristics and knowledge of the African migrant community. Using a cross-sectional survey of 425 African migrants and refugees living in Victoria and South Australia, we assessed the knowledge questionnaire for readability, item difficulty, point-biserial correlation and reliability. The relationships between demographic and socio-economic factors and knowledge about blood donation were then evaluated using hierarchical multiple regression. The knowledge scale was found to have good psychometric properties and to be reliable: a Flesch reading ease score of 64.7; an average index of item difficulty of 0.42; a point-biserial correlation of 0.38 and a Kuder-Richardson-20 coefficient of 0.78 indicating strong internal consistency. A quarter of respondents (26.1%; 95% CI: 21.9, 30.3) had poor knowledge about issues related to blood donation; 51.1% (95% CI: 46.3, 55.8) had moderate knowledge and 22.8% (95% CI: 18.8, 26.8) were highly knowledgeable. Factors associated with blood donation knowledge were religion, pre-migration area of residence, country of birth, length of stay in Australia, and previous blood donation status. Age, gender, educational attainment, migration and employment status were non-significant. Knowledge and awareness of issues associated with blood donation is important in regard to blood donation decisions, and this article has developed a measure using African migrant communities in Australia that has appropriate psychographic properties. The measure can, therefore, be used by researchers when studying the role of knowledge in relation to blood donation across cultural groups in Australia and other countries. It also identifies that demographic characteristics affect knowledge, which suggests that targeted interventions

  6. Detection of African Swine Fever Virus DNA in Blood Samples Stored on FTA Cards from Asymptomatic Pigs in Mbeya Region, Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braae, U. C.; Johansen, M. V.; Ngowi, H. A.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess whether blood samples collected onto FTA® cards could be used in combination with real-time PCR for the detection of African swine fever virus (ASFV) DNA in samples from resource-poor settings under the assumption that asymptomatically (sub-clinically) infected ...

  7. The nutritional status of asymptomatic HIV-infected Africans: directions for dietary intervention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorster, Hester H; Kruger, Annamarie; Margetts, Barrie M; Venter, Christina S; Kruger, H Salomé; Veldman, Frederick J; Macintyre, Una E

    2004-12-01

    To compare the relationships between food (nutrient) intakes and biochemical markers of nutritional status of asymptomatic HIV-infected with HIV-uninfected subjects, to gain more information on the appropriate diet for HIV-infected persons at an early stage of infection. Cross-sectional population-based survey. North West Province, South Africa. Two hundred and sixteen asymptomatic HIV-infected and 1550 HIV-uninfected men and women volunteers aged 15 years and older, recruited as 'apparently healthy' subjects from 37 randomly selected sites. Food and nutrient intakes, measured with a validated food-frequency questionnaire, and nutritional status indicated by anthropometric and biochemical variables, measured by a standardised methodology. The prevalence of HIV infection in the study population was 11.9%. The anthropometric indices and nutrient intakes of HIV-infected and uninfected subjects did not differ significantly, indicating that these 216 HIV-infected subjects were at an early stage of infection. Of the biochemical nutritional status variables, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and total cholesterol, haemoglobin, albumin and triglycerides were significantly lower in infected subjects. They also had higher globulin and liver enzyme levels than uninfected subjects. In infected subjects, serum albumin correlated significantly with serum lipids, serum vitamin A, serum vitamin E, serum iron, total iron-binding capacity and haemoglobin. The significant positive correlations of the liver enzymes with serum lipids, albumin, vitamin A and iron, observed in HIV-uninfected subjects, disappeared in the infected subjects. Polyunsaturated fat intake showed significant positive correlations with the increased liver enzymes in infected subjects. A principal components analysis indicated that, in infected subjects, increased liver enzymes correlated with higher consumption of maize meal and lower consumption of meat and vegetables. This survey indicated that asymptomatic

  8. Suburban migration and the birth outcome of Chicago-born white and African-American women: the merit of the healthy migrant theory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, James W; Rankin, Kristin M; Janowiak, Christine M

    2013-11-01

    The healthy migrant theory posits that women who migrate before pregnancy are intrinsically healthier and therefore have better birth outcomes than those who don't move. Objective. To determine whether migration to the suburbs is associated with lower rates of preterm (African-American mothers. We performed stratified and multilevel logistic regression analyses on an Illinois transgenerational dataset of non-Latino White and African-American infants (1989-1991) and their mothers (1956-1976) with appended US census income information. Forty percent of Chicago-born White mothers (N = 45,135) migrated to Suburban Cook County and 30 % migrated to the more geographically distant collar counties. In contrast, 10 % of Chicago-born African-American mothers (N = 41,221) migrated to Suburban Cook and only two percent migrated to the collar counties. Chicago-born White and African-American migrant mothers to Suburban Cook County had lower preterm birth rates than their non-migrant counterparts; RR = 0.8 (0.8-0.9) and 0.8 (0.7-0.8), respectively. When neighborhood income was singularly taken into account, the protective association of suburban migration and preterm birth disappeared among Chicago-born Whites. In race-specific multilevel multivariate regression models which included neighborhood income, the adjusted odds ratio of preterm birth, low birth weight, and small for gestational-age for Chicago-born White and African-American migrant (compared to non-migrant) mothers approximated unity. Neighborhood income underlies the protective association of suburban migration and birth outcome among Chicago-born White and African-American mothers. These findings do not support the healthy migrant hypothesis of reproductive outcome.

  9. Crossing the Gulf of Aden: cutaneous infections in African migrant shipwreck survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Fabrice; Gautret, Philippe; Nicolas, Xavier; Ausset, Philippe; De Pina, Jean-Jacques; Demortière, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections were observed in migrants from Somalia who crossed the Gulf of Aden, crowded on a drifting boat for 14 days. Thirty-three percent of survivors of this hazardous journey had skin infections. Seven were hospitalized for severe Staphylococcus aureus cutaneous infections associated with intracellular dehydration. Migrants face infectious risks during their precarious travel, including severe cutaneous infections that require specific medical and surgical treatment by the emergency services. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Occult hepatitis B virus coinfection in HIV-positive African migrants to the UK: a point prevalence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, D; Doyle, T; Ellis, S; Price, D; Abbas, I; Valappil, M; Geretti, A M

    2014-03-01

    Occult (surface antigen-negative/DNA-positive) hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is common in areas of the world where HBV is endemic. The main objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of occult HBV infection in HIV-infected African migrants to the UK and to determine factors associated with occult coinfection. This anonymized point-prevalence study identified Africans attending three HIV clinics, focussing on patients naïve to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Stored blood samples were tested for HBV DNA. Prevalence was calculated in the entire cohort, as well as in subpopulations. Risk factors for occult HBV coinfection were identified using logistic regression analysis. Among 335 HIV-positive African migrants, the prevalence of occult HBV coinfection was 4.5% [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.8-7.4%] overall, and 6.5% (95% CI 3.9-10.6%) and 0.8% (95% CI 0.2-4.6%) in ART-naïve and ART-experienced patients, respectively. Among ART-naïve anti-HBV core (anti-HBc)-positive patients, the prevalence was 16.4% (95% CI 8.3-25.6%). The strongest predictor of occult coinfection was anti-HBc positivity [odds ratio (OR) 7.4; 95% CI 2.0-27.6]. Median HBV DNA and ALT levels were 54 IU/mL [interquartile range (IQR) 33-513 IU/mL] and 22 U/L (IQR 13-27 U/L), respectively. Occult HBV coinfection remains under-diagnosed in African HIV-infected patients in the UK. Given the range of HBV DNA levels observed, further studies are warranted to determine its clinical significance and to guide screening strategies and ART selection in these patients. © 2013 British HIV Association.

  11. "It's Better Not to Know": Perceived Barriers to HIV Voluntary Counseling and Testing among Sub-Saharan African Migrants in Belgium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manirankunda, Lazare; Loos, Jasna; Alou, Therese Assebide; Colebunders, Robert; Nostlinger, Christiana

    2009-01-01

    This study explored perceptions, needs, and barriers of sub-Saharan African migrants in relation to HIV voluntary counseling and testing (VCT). Using an inductive qualitative methodological approach, data were obtained from focus group discussions. Results showed that participants were in principle in favor of VCT. However, they indicated that…

  12. Rationale and cross-sectional study design of the Research on Obesity and type 2 Diabetes among African Migrants: the RODAM study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agyemang, Charles; Beune, Erik; Meeks, Karlijn; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Agyei-Baffour, Peter; Aikins, Ama de-Graft; Dodoo, Francis; Smeeth, Liam; Addo, Juliet; Mockenhaupt, Frank P.; Amoah, Stephen K.; Schulze, Matthias B.; Danquah, Ina; Spranger, Joachim; Nicolaou, Mary; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Burr, Tom; Henneman, Peter; Mannens, Marcel M.; van Straalen, Jan P.; Bahendeka, Silver; Zwinderman, A. H.; Kunst, Anton E.; Stronks, Karien

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are highly prevalent among African migrants compared with European descent populations. The underlying reasons still remain a puzzle. Gene-environmental interaction is now seen as a potential plausible factor contributing to the high prevalence of

  13. Mitochondrial chromosome as a marker of animal migratory routes: DNA barcoding revealed Asian (non-African origin of a tropical migrant butterfly Junonia orithya in south Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A. Lukhtanov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The blue pansy Junonia orithya Linnaeus, 1758 (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae is widely distributed along the tropical areas of Africa, Asia and Australia. It is also known as a migrant species in the Levant. Here we record J. orithya in south Israel and provide a DNA-barcode-based evidence for its Asian (non-African origin.

  14. Challenges in researching life with HIV/AIDS: an intersectional analysis of black African migrants in London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyal, Lesley

    2009-02-01

    Most social science research on HIV has focused on prevention. The arrival of new therapies generated more studies on life with HIV. However most have been carried out in developed world contexts. Much less is known about the vast majority of those living with HIV and dying from AIDS. If this gap is to be filled, more qualitative research will be needed on affected individuals in the developing world and also among migrants who have left developing countries to live in the diaspora. It will also be essential to explore the lives of individuals from the same communities who may experience HIV in very different ways as a result of their gender and/or sexuality. This paper presents findings from three studies of Black African migrants living with HIV in London. It uses an intersectional approach to examine the similarities and the differences between the experiences of heterosexual women, heterosexual men and gay and/or bisexual men. The article highlights the importance of research of this kind both for providing the evidence base for context-specific policy development and also for making better conceptual and theoretical sense of the impact of HIV on individuals and their lives.

  15. HIV-related risk factors among black African migrants and refugees in Christchurch, New Zealand: results from the Mayisha-NZ survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birukila, Gerida; Brunton, Cheryl; Dickson, Nigel

    2013-06-14

    To describe the demographic characteristics of, and HIV-related risk behaviours among, black African migrants and refugees in Christchurch. A cross-sectional survey of black African migrants and refugees in Christchurch was carried out. Ten trained African community researchers recruited study participants in social venues and events frequented by Africans. A short self-completed questionnaire collected data on demographic characteristics, previous HIV testing, HIV risk perception, previous STI diagnosis, utilization of health services and sexual behaviours. Valid questionnaires were obtained from 245 respondents (150 men and 95 women) with a mean age of 28 years (range 16 to 58). Participants came from 13 different African countries. Risk factors for HIV identified in this study included: low condom use, low HIV risk perception, having more than one sexual partner, previous STI diagnosis and lack of voluntary testing for HIV. Our findings justify the need for developing an HIV prevention strategy for black Africans in New Zealand that is informed by local evidence. This strategy should also address sexual health needs of Africans including barriers to condom use, the availability of HIV/STI screening services and targeting sexual behaviours that increase vulnerability to HIV infection.

  16. Comparison of equations for estimating glomerular filtration rate in screening for chronic kidney disease in asymptomatic black Africans: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omuse, Geoffrey; Maina, Daniel; Mwangi, Jane; Wambua, Caroline; Kanyua, Alice; Kagotho, Elizabeth; Amayo, Angela; Ojwang, Peter; Erasmus, Rajiv

    2017-12-20

    Several equations have been developed to estimate glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). The common equations used were derived from populations predominantly comprised of Caucasians with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Some of the equations provide a correction factor for African-Americans due to their relatively increased muscle mass and this has been extrapolated to black Africans. Studies carried out in Africa in patients with CKD suggest that using this correction factor for the black African race may not be appropriate. However, these studies were not carried out in healthy individuals and as such the extrapolation of the findings to an asymptomatic black African population is questionable. We sought to compare the proportion of asymptomatic black Africans reported as having reduced eGFR using various eGFR equations. We further compared the association between known risk factors for CKD with eGFR determined using the different equations. We used participant and laboratory data collected as part of a global reference interval study conducted by the Committee of Reference Intervals and Decision Limits (C-RIDL) under the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (IFCC). Serum creatinine values were used to calculate eGFR using the Cockcroft-Gault (CG), re-expressed 4 variable modified diet in renal disease (4v-MDRD), full age spectrum (FAS) and chronic kidney disease epidemiology collaboration equations (CKD-EPI). CKD classification based on eGFR was determined for every participant. A total of 533 participants were included comprising 273 (51.2%) females. The 4v-MDRD equation without correction for race classified the least number of participants (61.7%) as having an eGFR equivalent to CKD stage G1 compared to 93.6% for CKD-EPI with correction for race. Only age had a statistically significant linear association with eGFR across all equations after performing multiple regression analysis. The multiple correlation coefficients for CKD risk factors were higher for

  17. The effects of a culturally-tailored campaign to increase blood donation knowledge, attitudes and intentions among African migrants in two Australian States: Victoria and South Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Kate L; Polonsky, Michael J; Jones, Sandra C; Renzaho, Andre M N

    2017-01-01

    Research suggests that African migrants are often positively predisposed towards blood donation, but are under-represented in participation. A culturally-tailored intervention targeting the African migrant community in Australia was developed and implemented, to enhance knowledge about blood donation, improve attitudes towards donating, increase intentions to donate blood, and increase the number of new African donors in Australia. Four weeks after a targeted campaign, a survey evaluation process commenced, administered face-to-face by bilingual interviewers from the African community in Melbourne and Adelaide, Australia (community survey). The questionnaires covered demographics, campaign awareness, blood donation knowledge and intentions, medical mistrust and perceived discrimination, and were analysed to evaluate changes in knowledge and intention. Sixty-two percent of survey participants (n = 454) reported being aware of the campaign. With increasing campaign awareness, there was a 0.28 increase in knowledge score (p = .005); previous blood donation was also associated with an increased blood donation knowledge score. Blood donation intention scores were not associated with campaign awareness (p = 0.272), but were associated with previous blood donation behaviour and a positive blood donation attitude score. More positive scores on the blood donation attitude measure were associated with increasing blood donation intentions, self-efficacy and campaign awareness (score increases of 0.27, 0.30 and 0.04, respectively, all pcampaign was associated with improved blood donation knowledge and attitudes, but there was no short-term change in blood donation intentions or the number of African donors.

  18. Intergenerational differences in food, physical activity, and body size perceptions among African migrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzaho, André M N; McCabe, Marita; Swinburn, Boyd

    2012-06-01

    We assessed intergenerational differences in food, physical activity, and body size perceptions among refugees and migrants from the Horn of Africa living in Victoria, Australia. We used a qualitative design and obtained data from 48 participants (18 individual interviews; 3 semistructured focus groups). Three major themes emerged: (a) food and physical activity, (b) preference of body size and social expectations, and (c) perceived consequences of various body sizes. For parents, large body size was perceived to equate with being beautiful and wealthy; slimness was associated with chronic illness and poverty. Parents adopted strategies that promoted weight gain in children. These included tailored food practices and restricting children's involvement in physical activity. For young people, slimness was the ideal body size endorsed by their peers, and they adopted strategies to resist parental pressure to gain weight. Obesity-prevention programs in this subpopulation need to adopt a multigenerational approach.

  19. Migration and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Among Ghanaian Populations in Europe: The RODAM Study (Research on Obesity and Diabetes Among African Migrants).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boateng, Daniel; Agyemang, Charles; Beune, Erik; Meeks, Karlijn; Smeeth, Liam; Schulze, Matthias; Addo, Juliet; de-Graft Aikins, Ama; Galbete, Cecilia; Bahendeka, Silver; Danquah, Ina; Agyei-Baffour, Peter; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Mockenhaupt, Frank P; Spranger, Joachim; Kengne, Andre P; Grobbee, Diederick E; Stronks, Karien; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin

    2017-11-01

    For migrant populations from sub-Saharan Africa, adverse cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors have been observed to be higher than found in their home country-based counterparts or among the host populations in high-income countries. Differences in absolute overall CVD risk, however, remain largely unexplained. We, therefore, predicted the differences in 10-year CVD risk among sub-Saharan African migrants (Ghanaians) living in 3 European cities and Ghana. For 3864 subjects aged 40 to 70 years from the multicenter RODAM study (Research on Obesity and Diabetes Among African Migrants) conducted among Ghanaian adults residing in rural and urban Ghana and 3 European cities (Amsterdam, Berlin, and London), 10-year risk of CVD was estimated using the Pooled Cohort Equations with estimates ≥7.5% defining high CVD risk. Logistic regressions were used to determine the association of migration on CVD risk. The proportion with CVD risk ≥7.5% among Ghanaian men was 34.7% in rural Ghana, 45.4% in urban Ghana, 53.9% in Amsterdam, 61.0% in Berlin, and 52.2% in London. Compared with rural Ghana, CVD risk was significantly increased for Ghanaian men living in Berlin (adjusted odds ratio, 2.80; 95% confidence interval, 1.76-4.45) and Amsterdam (1.88; 1.25-2.84). Increased risk observed for men was largely not seen for women. CVD risk increased with longer stay in Europe. Knowledge about predictors of increased CVD risk among sub-Saharan African migrants in Europe and nonmigrants in urban centers will inform and support targeted health care and interventions to these populations. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Bird ringing in Slovenia in 2014 and results of the first telemetry study of an African migrant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vrezec Al

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2014, 162 bird species were recorded during the bird ringing activities in Slovenia. Of 155 species, 62,275 birds were ringed, and 107 recoveries of birds ringed in Slovenia and found abroad, 148 foreign recoveries in Slovenia and 1395 local recoveries were recorded. The most frequently ringed species were Blackcap Sylvia atricapilla and Great Tit Parus major. As far as ringed nestlings are concerned, Great Tits and Barn Swalllows Hirundo rustica predominated. Considering the recoveries ringed of found birds abroad, the commonest were Black-headed Gulls Chroicocephalus ridibundus and Mute Swans Cygnus olor. The farthest recovery was a Barn Swallow Hirundo rustica found in the Democratic Republic of Congo (5171 km away. Among the more interesting finds was also the so far southernmost recovery of a Sand Martin Riparia riparia found in Israel. Let us also mention the first recovery of a Corncrake Crex crex, which bred and was ringed in 2013 at Planinsko polje (central Slovenia and was found in the 2014 breeding season in the Czech Republic. Among rare species, two Little Buntings Emberiza pusilla were caught and ringed. After nine years, the Roller Coracias garrulus bred again in Slovenia in 2014 and its nestlings were ringed. The paper also brings the description of the migration route of the first African migrant, the Black Stork Ciconia nigra, marked with a GPS/GSM telemetric device, which migrated across the Adriatic Sea, Sicily and Sahara to Nigeria.

  1. Rationale and cross-sectional study design of the Research on Obesity and type 2 Diabetes among African Migrants: the RODAM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agyemang, Charles; Beune, Erik; Meeks, Karlijn; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Agyei-Baffour, Peter; Aikins, Ama de-Graft; Dodoo, Francis; Smeeth, Liam; Addo, Juliet; Mockenhaupt, Frank P; Amoah, Stephen K; Schulze, Matthias B; Danquah, Ina; Spranger, Joachim; Nicolaou, Mary; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Burr, Tom; Henneman, Peter; Mannens, Marcel M; van Straalen, Jan P; Bahendeka, Silver; Zwinderman, A H; Kunst, Anton E; Stronks, Karien

    2014-03-21

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are highly prevalent among African migrants compared with European descent populations. The underlying reasons still remain a puzzle. Gene-environmental interaction is now seen as a potential plausible factor contributing to the high prevalence of obesity and T2D, but has not yet been investigated. The overall aim of the Research on Obesity and Diabetes among African Migrants (RODAM) project is to understand the reasons for the high prevalence of obesity and T2D among sub-Saharan Africans in diaspora by (1) studying the complex interplay between environment (eg, lifestyle), healthcare, biochemical and (epi)genetic factors, and their relative contributions to the high prevalence of obesity and T2D; (2) to identify specific risk factors within these broad categories to guide intervention programmes and (3) to provide a basic knowledge for improving diagnosis and treatment. RODAM is a multicentre cross-sectional study among homogenous sub-Saharan African participants (ie, Ghanaians) aged >25 years living in rural and urban Ghana, the Netherlands, Germany and the UK (http://rod-am.eu/). Standardised data on the main outcomes, genetic and non-genetic factors are collected in all locations. The aim is to recruit 6250 individuals comprising five subgroups of 1250 individuals from each site. In Ghana, Kumasi and Obuasi (urban stratum) and villages in the Ashanti region (rural stratum) are served as recruitment sites. In Europe, Ghanaian migrants are selected through the municipality or Ghanaian organisations registers. Ethical approval has been obtained in all sites. This paper gives an overview of the rationale, conceptual framework and methods of the study. The differences across locations will allow us to gain insight into genetic and non-genetic factors contributing to the occurrence of obesity and T2D and will inform targeted intervention and prevention programmes, and provide the basis for improving diagnosis and treatment in these

  2. Validation of the Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire in 1st generation Black African-Caribbean and South Asian UK migrants: A sub-study to the Ethnic-Echocardiographic Heart of England Screening (E-ECHOES) study

    OpenAIRE

    Silverman Stanley; Lip Gregory YH; Bennett Philip C; Blann Andrew D; Gill Paramjit S

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background We determined the diagnostic accuracy of the Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire (ECQ) in 1st generation Black African-Caribbean UK migrants as previous diagnostic questionnaires have been found to be less accurate in this population. We also determined the diagnostic accuracy of translated versions of the ECQ in 1st generation South Asian UK migrants, as this has not been investigated before. Methods Subjects were recruited from the Ethnic-Echocardiographic Heart of Engl...

  3. Khat chewing and acculturation in East-African migrants living in Frankfurt am Main/Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongard, Stephan; Nakajima, Motohiro; al'Absi, Mustafa

    2015-04-22

    Khat (Catha edulis, Forsk) is a drug widely used in countries around the Red Sea (East-Africa and Arabian Peninsula). In Germany khat chewing is illegal but nevertheless an often observed habit in immigrants from this region. This study investigates the interrelation between immigrants acculturation processes and traditional khat chewing habits. Sixty-one khat chewers (14 female) from East-African countries were interviewed about their khat chewing habits and acculturation strategy using standardized questionnaires. Results indicate that immigrants׳ khat chewing behaviors are similar to what is common in countries with traditional khat use. But khat chewing tended to be less among immigrants who were relatively more oriented towards their cultures of origin. Chewing khat was subjectively considered to help coping with problems, to forget bad memories and to concentrate better. It was concluded that khat chewing serves a functional use of coping with stressful events in the present or in the past within this sample. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Obesity and type 2 diabetes in sub-Saharan Africans - Is the burden in today's Africa similar to African migrants in Europe? The RODAM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agyemang, Charles; Meeks, Karlijn; Beune, Erik; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Mockenhaupt, Frank P; Addo, Juliet; de Graft Aikins, Ama; Bahendeka, Silver; Danquah, Ina; Schulze, Matthias B; Spranger, Joachim; Burr, Tom; Agyei-Baffour, Peter; Amoah, Stephen K; Galbete, Cecilia; Henneman, Peter; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Nicolaou, Mary; Adeyemo, Adebowale; van Straalen, Jan; Smeeth, Liam; Stronks, Karien

    2016-10-21

    Rising rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are impending major threats to the health of African populations, but the extent to which they differ between rural and urban settings in Africa and upon migration to Europe is unknown. We assessed the burden of obesity and T2D among Ghanaians living in rural and urban Ghana and Ghanaian migrants living in different European countries. A multi-centre cross-sectional study was conducted among Ghanaian adults (n = 5659) aged 25-70 years residing in rural and urban Ghana and three European cities (Amsterdam, London and Berlin). Comparisons between groups were made using prevalence ratios (PRs) with adjustments for age and education. In rural Ghana, the prevalence of obesity was 1.3 % in men and 8.3 % in women. The prevalence was considerably higher in urban Ghana (men, 6.9 %; PR: 5.26, 95 % CI, 2.04-13.57; women, 33.9 %; PR: 4.11, 3.13-5.40) and even more so in Europe, especially in London (men, 21.4 %; PR: 15.04, 5.98-37.84; women, 54.2 %; PR: 6.63, 5.04-8.72). The prevalence of T2D was low at 3.6 % and 5.5 % in rural Ghanaian men and women, and increased in urban Ghanaians (men, 10.3 %; PR: 3.06; 1.73-5.40; women, 9.2 %; PR: 1.81, 1.25-2.64) and highest in Berlin (men, 15.3 %; PR: 4.47; 2.50-7.98; women, 10.2 %; PR: 2.21, 1.30-3.75). Impaired fasting glycaemia prevalence was comparatively higher only in Amsterdam, and in London, men compared with rural Ghana. Our study shows high risks of obesity and T2D among sub-Saharan African populations living in Europe. In Ghana, similarly high prevalence rates were seen in an urban environment, whereas in rural areas, the prevalence of obesity among women is already remarkable. Similar processes underlying the high burden of obesity and T2D following migration may also be at play in sub-Saharan Africa as a consequence of urbanisation.

  5. Migrant women’s knowledge and perceived sociocultural barriers to cervical cancer screening programme: a qualitative study of African women in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omoye Mary Akhagba

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article explores both the knowledge and perception of African women about the importance of screening as a recommended health action to counter the growing rate of cervical cancer in women. The theoretical framework is influenced by the postulations of behavioural theories, sociology of health and the health belief model (HBM on how people perceive health issues such as cervical cancer and its screening measures. In addition, this study tries to explore the acculturation challenges involved in migration, which adversely affects health knowledge and behaviour of African women. To achieve this, one focus group discussion was conducted with twelve women between the ages of 25 and 54 years old from Egypt, Eritrea, Kenya and Nigeria to share their knowledge of cervical cancer screening programmes in Poland. They constituted a mixture of women from different parts of Africa with cultural differences and different belief systems. Little or no in-depth understanding of Polish language, lack of information about the disease and its screening methods, lack of understanding of the Polish health care systems and social economic factors were issues discussed by these women as socio-cultural barriers to their non-participation in the organised cervical cancer screening programme in Poland. Based on this study, migrant women lack adequate information about cervical cancer, its causes, risk factors and its screening methods. Therefore, this study proposes that good understanding of health care systems, language translation support in the health care system, health awareness campaigns and social relationships are important motivating factors that could encourage migrant women to participate in the cancer screening programmes in Poland.

  6. Spirituality/Religiosity: A Cultural and Psychological Resource among Sub-Saharan African Migrant Women with HIV/AIDS in Belgium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Ebotabe Arrey

    Full Text Available Spirituality/religion serves important roles in coping, survival and maintaining overall wellbeing within African cultures and communities, especially when diagnosed with a chronic disease like HIV/AIDS that can have a profound effect on physical and mental health. However, spirituality/religion can be problematic to some patients and cause caregiving difficulties. The objective of this paper was to examine the role of spirituality/religion as a source of strength, resilience and wellbeing among sub-Saharan African (SSA migrant women with HIV/AIDS. A qualitative study of SSA migrant women was conducted between April 2013 and December 2014. Participants were recruited through purposive sampling and snowball techniques from AIDS Reference Centres and AIDS workshops in Belgium, if they were 18 years and older, French or English speaking, and diagnosed HIV positive more than 3 months beforehand. We conducted semi-structured interviews with patients and did observations during consultations and support groups attendances. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. 44 women were interviewed, of whom 42 were Christians and 2 Muslims. None reported religious/spiritual alienation, though at some point in time many had felt the need to question their relationship with God by asking "why me?" A majority reported being more spiritual/religious since being diagnosed HIV positive. Participants believed that prayer, meditation, regular church services and religious activities were the main spiritual/religious resources for achieving connectedness with God. They strongly believed in the power of God in their HIV/AIDS treatment and wellbeing. Spiritual/religious resources including prayer, meditation, church services, religious activities and believing in the power of God helped them cope with HIV/AIDS. These findings highlight the importance of spirituality in physical and mental health and wellbeing among SSA women with HIV/AIDS that should be taken into

  7. Spirituality/Religiosity: A Cultural and Psychological Resource among Sub-Saharan African Migrant Women with HIV/AIDS in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrey, Agnes Ebotabe; Bilsen, Johan; Lacor, Patrick; Deschepper, Reginald

    2016-01-01

    Spirituality/religion serves important roles in coping, survival and maintaining overall wellbeing within African cultures and communities, especially when diagnosed with a chronic disease like HIV/AIDS that can have a profound effect on physical and mental health. However, spirituality/religion can be problematic to some patients and cause caregiving difficulties. The objective of this paper was to examine the role of spirituality/religion as a source of strength, resilience and wellbeing among sub-Saharan African (SSA) migrant women with HIV/AIDS. A qualitative study of SSA migrant women was conducted between April 2013 and December 2014. Participants were recruited through purposive sampling and snowball techniques from AIDS Reference Centres and AIDS workshops in Belgium, if they were 18 years and older, French or English speaking, and diagnosed HIV positive more than 3 months beforehand. We conducted semi-structured interviews with patients and did observations during consultations and support groups attendances. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. 44 women were interviewed, of whom 42 were Christians and 2 Muslims. None reported religious/spiritual alienation, though at some point in time many had felt the need to question their relationship with God by asking "why me?" A majority reported being more spiritual/religious since being diagnosed HIV positive. Participants believed that prayer, meditation, regular church services and religious activities were the main spiritual/religious resources for achieving connectedness with God. They strongly believed in the power of God in their HIV/AIDS treatment and wellbeing. Spiritual/religious resources including prayer, meditation, church services, religious activities and believing in the power of God helped them cope with HIV/AIDS. These findings highlight the importance of spirituality in physical and mental health and wellbeing among SSA women with HIV/AIDS that should be taken into consideration in

  8. Chronic kidney disease burden among African migrants in three European countries and in urban and rural Ghana: the RODAM cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjei, David N; Stronks, Karien; Adu, Dwomoa; Beune, Erik; Meeks, Karlijn; Smeeth, Liam; Addo, Juliet; Owuso-Dabo, Ellis; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Mockenhaupt, Frank P; Schulze, Matthias B; Danquah, Ina; Spranger, Joachim; Bahendeka, Silver; de-Graft Aikins, Ama; Agyemang, Charles

    2018-01-12

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major burden among sub-Saharan African (SSA) populations. However, differences in CKD prevalence between rural and urban settings in Africa, and upon migration to Europe are unknown. We therefore assessed the differences in CKD prevalence among homogenous SSA population (Ghanaians) residing in rural and urban Ghana and in three European cities, and whether conventional risk factors of CKD explained the observed differences. Furthermore, we assessed whether the prevalence of CKD varied among individuals with hypertension and diabetes compared with individuals without these conditions. For this analysis, data from Research on Obesity & Diabetes among African Migrants (RODAM), a multi-centre cross-sectional study, were used. The study included a random sample of 5607 adult Ghanaians living in Europe (1465 Amsterdam, 577 Berlin, 1041 London) and Ghana (1445 urban and 1079 rural) aged 25-70 years. CKD status was defined according to severity of kidney disease using the combination of glomerular filtration rate (G1-G5) and albuminuria (A1-A3) levels as defined by the 2012 Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes severity classification. Comparisons among sites were made using logistic regression analysis. CKD prevalence was lower in Ghanaians living in Europe (10.1%) compared with their compatriots living in Ghana (13.3%) even after adjustment for age, sex and conventional risk factors of CKD [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.70, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.56-0.88, P = 0.002]. CKD prevalence was markedly lower among Ghanaian migrants with hypertension (adjusted OR = 0.54, 0.44-0.76, P = 0.001) and diabetes (adjusted OR = 0.37, 0.22-0.62, P = 0.001) compared with non-migrant Ghanaians with hypertension and diabetes. No significant differences in CKD prevalence was observed among non-migrant Ghanaians and migrant Ghanaians with no hypertension and diabetes. Among Ghanaian residents in Europe, the odds of CKD were

  9. Asymptomatic dystrophinopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrone, A. [Univ. of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA (United States)]|[Univ. of Florence (Italy); Hoffman, E.P.; Hoop, R.C. [Univ. of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA (United States)] [and others

    1997-03-31

    A 4-year-old girl was referred for evaluation for a mild but persistent serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) elevation detected incidentally during routine blood screening for a skin infection. Serum creatine kinase activity was found to be increased. Immuno-histochemical study for dystrophin in her muscle biopsy showed results consistent with a carrier state for muscular dystrophy. Molecular work-up showed the proposita to be a carrier of a deletion mutation of exon 48 of the dystrophin gene. Four male relatives also had the deletion mutation, yet showed no clinical symptoms of muscular dystrophy (age range 8-58 yrs). Linkage analysis of the dystrophin gene in the family showed a spontaneous change of an STR45 allele, which could be due to either an intragenic double recombination event, or CA repeat length mutation leading to identical size alleles. To our knowledge, this is the first documentation of an asymptomatic dystrophinopathy in multiple males of advanced age. Based on molecular findings, this family would be given a diagnosis of Becker muscular dystrophy. This diagnosis implies the development of clinical symptoms, even though this family is clearly asymptomatic. This report underscores the caution which must be exercised when giving presymptomatic diagnoses based on molecular studies. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. First HIV prevalence estimates of a representative sample of adult sub-Saharan African migrants in a European city. Results of a community-based, cross-sectional study in Antwerp, Belgium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasna Loos

    Full Text Available While sub-Saharan African migrants are the second largest group affected by HIV in Europe, sound HIV prevalence estimates based on representative samples of these heterogeneous communities are lacking. Such data are needed to inform prevention and public health policy.This community-based, cross-sectional study combined oral fluid HIV testing with an electronic behavioral survey. Adopting a two-stage time location sampling HIV prevalence estimates for a representative sample of adult sub-Saharan African migrants in Antwerp, Belgium were obtained. Sample proportions and estimated adjusted population proportions were calculated for all variables. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analysis explored factors independently associated with HIV infection.Between December 2013 and October 2014, 744 sub-Saharan African migrants were included (37% women. A substantial proportion was socially, legally and economically vulnerable: 21% were probably of undocumented status, 63% had financial problems in the last year and 9% lacked stable housing. Sexual networks were mostly African and crossed national borders, i.e. sexual encounters during travels within Europa and Africa. Concurrency is common, 34% of those in a stable relationship had a partner on the side in the last year. HIV prevalence was 5.9%(95%CI:3.4%-10.1% among women and 4.2% (95%CI:1.6%-10.6% among men. Although high lifetime HIV testing was reported at community level (73%, 65.2% (CI95%:32.4%-88.0% of sub-Saharan African migrants were possibly undiagnosed. Being 45 years or older, unprotected sex when travelling within Europe in the last year, high intentions to use condoms, being unaware of their last sexual partners' HIV status, recent HIV testing and not having encountered partner violence in the last year were independently associated with HIV infection in multivariable logical regression. In univariable analysis, HIV infection was additionally associated to unemployment

  11. Sub-Saharan African migrants living with HIV acquired after migration, France, ANRS PARCOURS study, 2012 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desgrées-du-Loû, Annabel; Pannetier, Julie; Ravalihasy, Andrainolo; Gosselin, Anne; Supervie, Virginie; Panjo, Henri; Bajos, Nathalie; Lert, France; Lydié, Nathalie; Dray-Spira, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    We estimated the proportion of migrants from sub-Saharan Africa who acquired human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) while living in France. Life-event and clinical information was collected in 2012 and 2013 from a random sample of HIV-infected outpatients born in sub-Saharan Africa and living in the Paris region. We assumed HIV infection in France if at least one of the following was fulfilled: (i) HIV diagnosis at least 11 years after arrival in France, (ii) at least one negative HIV test in France, (iii) sexual debut after arrival in France. Otherwise, time of HIV infection was based on statistical modelling of first CD4(+) T-cell count; infection in France was assumed if more than 50% (median scenario) or more than 95% (conservative scenario) of modelled infection times occurred after migration. We estimated that 49% of 898 HIV-infected adults born in sub-Saharan Africa (95% confidence interval (CI): 45-53) in the median and 35% (95% CI: 31-39) in the conservative scenario acquired HIV while living in France. This proportion was higher in men than women (44% (95% CI: 37-51) vs 30% (95% CI: 25-35); conservative scenario) and increased with length of stay in France. These high proportions highlight the need for improved HIV policies targeting migrants.

  12. Traumatic pasts and the historical imagination: Symptoms of loss, postcolonial suffering, and counter-memories among African migrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneduce, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    This work aims to rethink the relationship between anthropology and cultural psychiatry from a historical perspective, through reflections on the dynamics of forgetting and remembering in the context of migration. While migrants' symptoms often bear cultural hallmarks of suffering, they also reveal images of a traumatic history, which resurface in moments of danger, uncertainty, and crisis. I claim these symptoms are allegories of a dispossessed past, and can be interpreted as counter-memories, as "palimpsests" of an eclipsed script. Trauma symptoms keep returning to a collective past, and thus can be considered a particular form of historical consciousness. Psychiatric diagnoses may obscure these counter-memories. In particular, the diagnostic category of posttraumatic stress disorder that is commonly attached to traumatic experiences in current clinical practice recognizes the truth of individual traumatic events, but at the same time contributes to concealing the political, racial, and historical roots of suffering. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. “It’s My Secret”: Fear of Disclosure among Sub-Saharan African Migrant Women Living with HIV/AIDS in Belgium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrey, Agnes Ebotabe; Bilsen, Johan; Lacor, Patrick; Deschepper, Reginald

    2015-01-01

    Patients with HIV not only have to deal with the challenges of living with an incurable disease but also with the dilemma of whether or not to disclose their status to their partners, families and friends. This study explores the extent to which sub-Saharan African (SSA) migrant women in Belgium disclose their HIV positive status, reasons for disclosure/non-disclosure and how they deal with HIV disclosure. A qualitative study consisting of interviews with twenty-eight SSA women with HIV/AIDS was conducted. Thematic content analysis was employed to identify themes as they emerged. Our study reveals that these women usually only disclose their status to healthcare professionals because of the treatment and care they need. This selective disclosure is mainly due to the taboo of HIV disease in SSA culture. Stigma, notably self-stigma, greatly impedes HIV disclosure. Techniques to systematically incorporate HIV disclosure into post-test counseling and primary care services are highly recommended. PMID:25781906

  14. Obesity and type 2 diabetes in sub-Saharan Africans - Is the burden in today's Africa similar to African migrants in Europe? The RODAM study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agyemang, Charles; Meeks, Karlijn; Beune, Erik; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Mockenhaupt, Frank P.; Addo, Juliet; de Graft Aikins, Ama; Bahendeka, Silver; Danquah, Ina; Schulze, Matthias B.; Spranger, Joachim; Burr, Tom; Agyei-Baffour, Peter; Amoah, Stephen K.; Galbete, Cecilia; Henneman, Peter; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Nicolaou, Mary; Adeyemo, Adebowale; van Straalen, Jan; Smeeth, Liam; Stronks, Karien

    2016-01-01

    Rising rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are impending major threats to the health of African populations, but the extent to which they differ between rural and urban settings in Africa and upon migration to Europe is unknown. We assessed the burden of obesity and T2D among Ghanaians living

  15. Obesity and type 2 diabetes in sub-Saharan Africans - Is the burden in today's Africa similar to African migrants in Europe? : The RODAM study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agyemang, Charles; Meeks, Karlijn; Beune, Erik; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Mockenhaupt, Frank P; Addo, Juliet; de Graft Aikins, Ama; Bahendeka, Silver; Danquah, Ina; Schulze, Matthias B; Spranger, Joachim; Burr, Tom; Agyei-Baffour, Peter; Amoah, Stephen K; Galbete, Cecilia; Henneman, Peter; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Nicolaou, Mary; Adeyemo, Adebowale; van Straalen, Jan; Smeeth, Liam; Stronks, Karien

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rising rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are impending major threats to the health of African populations, but the extent to which they differ between rural and urban settings in Africa and upon migration to Europe is unknown. We assessed the burden of obesity and T2D among

  16. Perceived migrant threat among migrants in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwan, Roos; Bles, Per; Lubbers, M.

    2017-01-01

    This research presents a new perspective on migrant integration. It questions the extent that established migrants perceive threats from new migrants, and how that is influenced by natives’ perceived migrant threat. We hypothesized about an acculturation pattern that established migrants will be

  17. Perceived migrant threat among migrants in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwan, R. van der; Bles, P.H.; Lubbers, M.

    2017-01-01

    This research presents a new perspective on migrant integration. It questions the extent that established migrants perceive threats from new migrants, and how that is influenced by natives' perceived migrant threat. We hypothesized about an acculturation pattern that established migrants will be

  18. Migrant Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Social and Labour Bulletin, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a new German law to encourage foreign workers to return to their home countries, employment exchanges for young foreigners in Germany, and a training program for migrant workers in India. (SK)

  19. Determinants of HIV, viral hepatitis and STI prevention needs among African migrants in Germany; a cross-sectional survey on knowledge, attitudes, behaviors and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Hövener, Claudia; Marcus, Ulrich; Koschollek, Carmen; Oudini, Hapsatou; Wiebe, Mara; Ouedraogo, Omer Idrissa; Thorlie, Adama; Bremer, Viviane; Hamouda, Osamah; Dierks, Marie-Luise; An der Heiden, Matthias; Krause, Gérard

    2015-08-06

    Migrants from sub-Saharan Africa (MisSA) are a relevant sub-group for HIV-transmission in Germany. A total of 10-15 % of all newly diagnosed cases are MisSA, and approximately one third acquired HIV in Germany. There is limited information on knowledge, attitudes, behaviors and practices (KABP) regarding sexual health in African communities residing in Germany. From October-December 2013 we conducted a cross-sectional survey on KABP regarding HIV, viral hepatitis (HEP), and sexually transmitted infections (STI) among MisSA in Hamburg as a community-based participatory research project to identify knowledge gaps, sexual risk behavior regarding HIV/HEP/STI, HIV/STI-testing history and attitudes toward people living with HIV (PLWH). Trained peer researchers recruited participants through outreach. Questionnaires in German, English or French were either administered face-to-face or self-completed. Questions on knowledge about HIV/HEP/STI presented true statements; participants were asked if they knew the information before. To detect differences in sub-groups, unadjusted odds ratios (OR) were calculated, and a multivariate analysis for knowledge on HIV/HEP/STI was performed. The final sample included 569 participants of whom 57 % were men. Most participants originated from Western and Central sub-Saharan Africa. Median time living in Germany was 6 years. Overall, 28 % had a university degree and 54 % reported a good level of German language. Over 80 % knew the risks for HIV transmission. A total of 44 % of respondents wrongly assumed that an HIV-diagnosis might lead to deportation and 64 % were not aware of the free and anonymous local HIV/STI-testing service. The proportion of participants with knowledge of presented facts on HEP varied from 40-58 %. The respective proportion on STI was 28-68 % and better among women compared to men (44 % vs. 54 %; OR = 1.45; 95 % CI 1.22-1.74). Men reported more often casual sex partners than women (43 % vs. 23 %; OR = 2.6; 95 % CI 1

  20. Asymptomatic HIV infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000682.htm Asymptomatic HIV infection To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Asymptomatic HIV infection is a phase of HIV/AIDS during which ...

  1. Marathon Migrants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piersma, Theunis; van de Kam, Jan

    Marathon Migrants onderscheidt zich van alle andere vogelboeken door de combinatie van tekst van de trekvogelecoloog en waddenonderzoeker prof. dr. Theunis Piersma en de sublieme foto’s van de bekende vogelfotograaf Jan van de Kam. Door de wetenschappelijke blik van de fotograaf zijn de foto’s meer

  2. Migrant workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Starren, A.; Drupsteen, L.

    2014-01-01

    This article explores Health and Safety aspects related to migrants working in multi-cultural settings (heterogeneous teams, working together on one location). Several assumptions can be made related to cultural differences and safe and healthy behaviour, but research evidence on this matter is very

  3. A comparative gender analysis of Nigerian migrant networks in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This would be particularly useful in understanding African immigration to South Africa which is the most attractive destination point of Africans migrating within the continent. Questions that can be researched in this regard include what would a gender disaggregated analysis of the demographic profile of African migrants to ...

  4. Detection of Quiescent Infections with Multiple Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpesviruses (EEHVs), Including EEHV2, EEHV3, EEHV6, and EEHV7, within Lymphoid Lung Nodules or Lung and Spleen Tissue Samples from Five Asymptomatic Adult African Elephants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Jian-Chao; Heaggans, Sarah Y; Long, Simon Y; Latimer, Erin M; Nofs, Sally A; Bronson, Ellen; Casares, Miguel; Fouraker, Michael D; Pearson, Virginia R; Richman, Laura K; Hayward, Gary S

    2015-12-30

    of strains of EEHV1, whose natural host has been unclear. Here, we carried out genotype analyses by partial PCR sequencing of necropsy tissue from five asymptomatic African elephants and identified multiple simultaneous infections by several different EEHV types, including high concentrations in lymphoid lung nodules. Overall, the results provide strong evidence that EEHV2, EEHV3, EEHV6, and EEHV7 represent natural ubiquitous infections in African elephants, whereas Asian elephants harbor EEHV1A, EEHV1B, EEHV4, and EEHV5. Although a single case of fatal cross-species infection by EEHV3 is known, the results do not support the previous concept that highly pathogenic EEHV1A crossed from African to Asian elephants in zoos. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Violence, Resilience and Solidarity: The Right to Education for Child Migrants in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlatshwayo, Mondli; Vally, Salim

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the psychology of migrant learners' resilience, their right to education, and how migrant organizations and South African civil society are supporting and reinforcing the agency of migrant learners and their parents. It is based on a year-long study conducted by researchers at the University of Johannesburg's Centre for…

  6. Proyectos de Educacion Migrante (Migrant Education Projects).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Ramon; Garcia, Jose D.

    Written in Spanish and English for project personnel, parents, and others interested in migrant education, the booklet summarizes general concepts and requirements behind Title I-Migrant activities in Oregon, which has been allocated $4,439,341 in Title I-Migrant funds for fiscal year 1980. Following brief definitions of important terms,…

  7. African Diaspora Associations in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vammen, Ida Marie; Trans, Lars Ove

    2011-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, an increasing number of African migrants have come to Denmark, where they have formed a large number of migrant associations. This chapter presents selected findings from a comprehensive survey of African diaspora associations in Denmark and focuses specifically on their tr...... on their transnational engagement in development activities in their countries of origin....

  8. Migration and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Among Ghanaian Populations in Europe:: The RODAM Study (Research on Obesity and Diabetes Among African Migrants)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boateng, Daniel; Agyemang, Charles; Beune, Erik; Meeks, Karlijn; Smeeth, Liam; Schulze, Matthias; Addo, Juliet; de-Graft Aikins, Ama; Galbete, Cecilia; Bahendeka, Silver; Danquah, Ina; Agyei-Baffour, Peter; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Mockenhaupt, Frank P.; Spranger, Joachim; Kengne, Andre P.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Stronks, Karien; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin

    2017-01-01

    Background For migrant populations from sub-Saharan Africa, adverse cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors have been observed to be higher than found in their home country-based counterparts or among the host populations in high-income countries. Differences in absolute overall CVD risk, however,

  9. Migration and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Among Ghanaian Populations in Europe : The RODAM Study (Research on Obesity and Diabetes Among African Migrants)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boateng, Daniel; Agyemang, Charles; Beune, Erik; Meeks, Karlijn; Smeeth, Liam; Schulze, Matthias B.; Addo, Juliet; de-Graft Aikins, Ama; Galbete, Cecilia; Bahendeka, Silver; Danquah, Ina; Agyei-Baffour, Peter; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Mockenhaupt, Frank P; Spranger, Joachim; Kengne, Andre Pascal; Grobbee, Diederick E; Stronks, Karien; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For migrant populations from sub-Saharan Africa, adverse cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors have been observed to be higher than found in their home country-based counterparts or among the host populations in high-income countries. Differences in absolute overall CVD risk,

  10. Migrants' access to healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norredam, Marie

    2011-01-01

    -migrant women. Sub-study II found that some migrants (those born in Somalia, Turkey and Ex-Yugoslavia) use ER services more frequently than do non-migrants whereas others have the same or lower utilisation levels. As a consequence, substudy III was undertaken, which documented that more migrant within all...

  11. Validation of the Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire in 1st generation Black African-Caribbean and South Asian UK migrants: a sub-study to the Ethnic-Echocardiographic Heart of England Screening (E-ECHOES) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Philip C; Lip, Gregory Y H; Silverman, Stanley; Blann, Andrew D; Gill, Paramjit S

    2011-06-03

    We determined the diagnostic accuracy of the Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire (ECQ) in 1st generation Black African-Caribbean UK migrants as previous diagnostic questionnaires have been found to be less accurate in this population. We also determined the diagnostic accuracy of translated versions of the ECQ in 1st generation South Asian UK migrants, as this has not been investigated before. Subjects were recruited from the Ethnic-Echocardiographic Heart of England Screening (E-ECHOES) study, a community based screening survey for heart failure in minority ethnic groups. Translated versions of the ECQ were prepared following a recognised protocol. All participants attending screening between October 2007 and February 2009 were asked to complete the ECQ in the language of their choice (English, Punjabi, Bengali, Urdu, Hindi or Gujarati). Subjects answering positively to experiencing leg pain or discomfort on walking were asked to return to have Ankle Brachial Pressure Index (ABPI) measured. 154 out of 2831 subjects participating in E-ECHOES (5.4%) were eligible to participate in this sub-study, for which 74.3% returned for ABPI assessment. Non-responders were younger than participants (59[9] vs. 65[11] years; p=0.015). Punjabi, English and Bengali questionnaires identified participants with Intermittent Claudication, so these questionnaires were assessed. The sensitivities (SN), specificities (SP), positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values were calculated. English: SN: 50%; SP: 68%; PPV: 43%; NPV: 74%. Punjabi: SN: 50%; SP: 87%; PPV: 43%; NPV: 90%. Bengali: SN: 33%; SP: 50%; PPV: 13%; NPV: 73%. There were significant differences in diagnostic accuracy between the 3 versions (Punjabi: 83.8%; Bengali: 45%; English: 62.2%; p<0.0001). No significant differences were found in sensitivity and specificity between illiterate and literate participants in any of the questionnaires and there was no significant different difference between those under and over 60

  12. Relationship between body mass index and family functioning, family communication, family type and parenting style among African migrant parents and children in Victoria, Australia: a parent-child dyad study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Cyril

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although childhood obesity prevalence is stabilised in developed countries including Australia, it is continuing to rise among migrants and socially disadvantaged groups in these countries. African migrants and refugees in particular, are at high risk of obesity due to changes in their family dynamics. The aim of this study was to examine the difference between children and parental perception of family functioning, family communication, family type and parenting styles and their relationship with body mass index. Methods A cross-sectional parent-child dyad study was conducted among 284 African families from migrant and refugee backgrounds living in metropolitan Melbourne, Australia. Bilingual workers were trained to collect demographic, anthropometric and questionnaire data on family functioning, parenting, family type and family communication. Results Parents and children reported different levels of family dynamics. Children reported a higher prevalence of poor family functioning (61.5 %, 95 % CI: 55.6, 67.2 versus 56.8 %, 95 % CI: 49.7, 61.6 and protective family type (29 %, 95 % CI: 23.9, 34.5 vs. 13.4 %, 95 % CI: 9.9, 17.9, but a lower prevalence of authoritative parenting style (51.6 %, 95 % CI: 45.7, 57.5 vs. 63 %, 95 % CI: 57.5, 68.8 than parents. There was a positive relationship between poor family functioning and child BMI both before (β = 1.28; 95 % CI: 0.14, 2.41; p < 0.05 and after (β = 1.73; 95 % CI: 0.53, 2.94; p < 0.001 controlling for confounders, and an inverse relationship between consensual family type and child BMI after adjustment (β = −1.92; 95 % CI: −3.59, −0.24; p < 0.05. There was no significant relationship between parental BMI and family functioning, communication, family type or parenting style. Conclusion Children’s perception of poor family functioning was associated with childhood obesity. Family interventions to reduce childhood obesity need

  13. Validation of the Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire in 1st generation Black African-Caribbean and South Asian UK migrants: A sub-study to the Ethnic-Echocardiographic Heart of England Screening (E-ECHOES study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silverman Stanley

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We determined the diagnostic accuracy of the Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire (ECQ in 1st generation Black African-Caribbean UK migrants as previous diagnostic questionnaires have been found to be less accurate in this population. We also determined the diagnostic accuracy of translated versions of the ECQ in 1st generation South Asian UK migrants, as this has not been investigated before. Methods Subjects were recruited from the Ethnic-Echocardiographic Heart of England Screening (E-ECHOES study, a community based screening survey for heart failure in minority ethnic groups. Translated versions of the ECQ were prepared following a recognised protocol. All participants attending screening between October 2007 and February 2009 were asked to complete the ECQ in the language of their choice (English, Punjabi, Bengali, Urdu, Hindi or Gujarati. Subjects answering positively to experiencing leg pain or discomfort on walking were asked to return to have Ankle Brachial Pressure Index (ABPI measured. Results 154 out of 2831 subjects participating in E-ECHOES (5.4% were eligible to participate in this sub-study, for which 74.3% returned for ABPI assessment. Non-responders were younger than participants (59[9] vs. 65[11] years; p = 0.015. Punjabi, English and Bengali questionnaires identified participants with Intermittent Claudication, so these questionnaires were assessed. The sensitivities (SN, specificities (SP, positive (PPV and negative (NPV predictive values were calculated. English: SN: 50%; SP: 68%; PPV: 43%; NPV: 74%. Punjabi: SN: 50%; SP: 87%; PPV: 43%; NPV: 90%. Bengali: SN: 33%; SP: 50%; PPV: 13%; NPV: 73%. There were significant differences in diagnostic accuracy between the 3 versions (Punjabi: 83.8%; Bengali: 45%; English: 62.2%; p Conclusions Our findings suggest that the ECQ is not as sensitive or specific a diagnostic tool in 1st generation Black African-Caribbean and South Asian UK migrants than in the Edinburgh

  14. Validation of the Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire in 1st generation Black African-Caribbean and South Asian UK migrants: A sub-study to the Ethnic-Echocardiographic Heart of England Screening (E-ECHOES) study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background We determined the diagnostic accuracy of the Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire (ECQ) in 1st generation Black African-Caribbean UK migrants as previous diagnostic questionnaires have been found to be less accurate in this population. We also determined the diagnostic accuracy of translated versions of the ECQ in 1st generation South Asian UK migrants, as this has not been investigated before. Methods Subjects were recruited from the Ethnic-Echocardiographic Heart of England Screening (E-ECHOES) study, a community based screening survey for heart failure in minority ethnic groups. Translated versions of the ECQ were prepared following a recognised protocol. All participants attending screening between October 2007 and February 2009 were asked to complete the ECQ in the language of their choice (English, Punjabi, Bengali, Urdu, Hindi or Gujarati). Subjects answering positively to experiencing leg pain or discomfort on walking were asked to return to have Ankle Brachial Pressure Index (ABPI) measured. Results 154 out of 2831 subjects participating in E-ECHOES (5.4%) were eligible to participate in this sub-study, for which 74.3% returned for ABPI assessment. Non-responders were younger than participants (59[9] vs. 65[11] years; p = 0.015). Punjabi, English and Bengali questionnaires identified participants with Intermittent Claudication, so these questionnaires were assessed. The sensitivities (SN), specificities (SP), positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values were calculated. English: SN: 50%; SP: 68%; PPV: 43%; NPV: 74%. Punjabi: SN: 50%; SP: 87%; PPV: 43%; NPV: 90%. Bengali: SN: 33%; SP: 50%; PPV: 13%; NPV: 73%. There were significant differences in diagnostic accuracy between the 3 versions (Punjabi: 83.8%; Bengali: 45%; English: 62.2%; p < 0.0001). No significant differences were found in sensitivity and specificity between illiterate and literate participants in any of the questionnaires and there was no significant different difference

  15. Relationship between body mass index and family functioning, family communication, family type and parenting style among African migrant parents and children in Victoria, Australia: a parent-child dyad study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyril, S; Halliday, J; Green, J; Renzaho, A M N

    2016-08-03

    Although childhood obesity prevalence is stabilised in developed countries including Australia, it is continuing to rise among migrants and socially disadvantaged groups in these countries. African migrants and refugees in particular, are at high risk of obesity due to changes in their family dynamics. The aim of this study was to examine the difference between children and parental perception of family functioning, family communication, family type and parenting styles and their relationship with body mass index. A cross-sectional parent-child dyad study was conducted among 284 African families from migrant and refugee backgrounds living in metropolitan Melbourne, Australia. Bilingual workers were trained to collect demographic, anthropometric and questionnaire data on family functioning, parenting, family type and family communication. Parents and children reported different levels of family dynamics. Children reported a higher prevalence of poor family functioning (61.5 %, 95 % CI: 55.6, 67.2 versus 56.8 %, 95 % CI: 49.7, 61.6) and protective family type (29 %, 95 % CI: 23.9, 34.5 vs. 13.4 %, 95 % CI: 9.9, 17.9), but a lower prevalence of authoritative parenting style (51.6 %, 95 % CI: 45.7, 57.5 vs. 63 %, 95 % CI: 57.5, 68.8) than parents. There was a positive relationship between poor family functioning and child BMI both before (β = 1.28; 95 % CI: 0.14, 2.41; p parental BMI and family functioning, communication, family type or parenting style. Children's perception of poor family functioning was associated with childhood obesity. Family interventions to reduce childhood obesity need to adopt an intergenerational approach to promote a clear understanding of family dynamics between children and parents. Unless these intergenerational challenges associated with family dynamics are clearly addressed in obesity interventions, current obesity prevention initiatives will continue to widen the childhood obesity gap in Australia.

  16. Asymptomatic Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Shonni J.; Walker, Marcella D.; Bilezikian, John P.

    2014-01-01

    The clinical profile of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) as it is seen in the United States and most Western countries has evolved significantly over the past half century. The introduction of the multichannel serum autoanalyzer in the 1970s led to the recognition of a cohort of individuals with asymptomatic hypercalcemia, in whom evaluation led to the diagnosis of PHPT. The term “asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism” was introduced to describe patients who lack obvious signs and symptoms referable to either excess calcium or parathyroid hormone. Although it was expected that asymptomatic patients would eventually develop classical symptoms of PHPT, observational data suggest that most patients do not evolve over time to become overtly symptomatic. In most parts of the world, the asymptomatic phenotype of PHPT has replaced classical PHPT. This report is a selective review of data on asymptomatic PHPT: its demographic features, presentation and natural history, as well as biochemical, skeletal, neuromuscular, psychological, and cardiovascular manifestations. In addition, we will summarize available information on treatment indications and options for those with asymptomatic disease. PMID:23374736

  17. Highly Skilled Migrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidt, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In recognizing that the policies regulating the inflow of migrants have an impact on the economic contribution of migrants to the receiving economies, this paper analyzes the potential impact of the Kafala system which is the general framework regulating the inflow of migrants in the Gulf economies....... It is pointed out that while the system facilitated speedy entry to the job market, the lack of inclusion in the Gulf economies of the migrants, the lack of long-term prospects of residing in the countries and the highly asymmetric power balance between sponsor and migrant, provides few incentives...... for the highly skilled migrants to fully contribute to the Gulf economies....

  18. I, Migrant?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Walker

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available ‘I, Migrant?’ is a narrative poetry sequence that explores themes of language, culture, identity and belonging through the eyes of an Australian living in Den Haag, The Netherlands. The speaker in the poems faces challenges such as seeking work and making friends in a context where she does not speak the dominant language, Dutch. This proves far from easy, destabilising her sense of identity. She questions where and how she can belong. Reluctant to join what she considers “the white ghetto of Den Haag,” the speaker initially attempts to assimilate herself into Dutch culture, but later finds solace in a community of other expats. Within this community, national identities become exaggerated and people morph into stereotypes. The speaker increasingly defines herself as “Australian,” performing this identity both publicly and in private. Beneath the surface there bubbles, however, an awareness that she is acting out a myth. A more genuine sense of belonging emerges, unexpectedly, in an Asian food court, where she converses in Dutch with staff who also speak it as their second language. The speaker concludes that identity is located in language. It is therefore neither fixed nor singular, but multiple and forever changing.

  19. Asymptomatic inhaled foreign body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Muhammad U.; Asghar, Asif; Tareen, Irum; Azhar, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    It is very rare to have a big foreign body in the lungs without any complications or symptoms for 2 years. A 14-year-old male with episodes of minor hemoptysis for 4 weeks had a history of inhalation of a bullet 2 years earlier. He had asymptomatic for lung complications for 2 years. The bullet was removed by right thoracotomy and non-anatomical wedge stapled resection, and he followed an uneventful recovery. An aspirated foreign body although big can remain asymptomatic for a long time, especially if it has migrated to the periphery. PMID:27652366

  20. Asymptomatic ocular sarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Guilherme Azevedo de Freitas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is an idiopathic systemic granulomatous disease. It commonly affects the skin, lungs, kidneys, and central nervous system. In the eyes it primarily affects the uveal tract, conjunctiva, lacrimal glands and optic nerve. Here in we describe the case of a patient with systemic sarcoidosis and asymptomatic eye inflammation.

  1. Are Migrants More Skilled than Non-Migrants?: Repeat, Return and Same-Employer Migrants

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer Hunt

    2004-01-01

    I examine the determinants of inter-state migration of adults within western Germany, using the German Socio-Economic Panel from 1984 - 2000. I highlight the prevalence and distinctive characteristics of migrants who do not change employers. Same-employer migrants represent 25 % of all migrants, and have higher education and pre-move wages than non-migrants. Conditional on age, same-employer migrants are therefore more skilled than non-migrants. By contrast, although other migrants have highe...

  2. Sentinel surveillance data from Eritrean migrants in Italy: The theory of "Healthy Migrants".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccozzi, Massimo; Cella, Eleonora; Ceccarelli, Giancarlo; Vita, Serena; Dicuonzo, Giordano; Lopalco, Maurizio; Antonelli, Francesca; Conti, Alessia; Ottaviani, Rossella; De Cesaris, Marina; Spoto, Silvia; Angeletti, Silvia

    2017-12-02

    Eritrean migrants accounted for the majority of people who drowned in the Mediterranean this year. Recently, data deficit about international migration has been reported. One hundred and thirty-three Eritrean migrants, upon their arrival in Italy, were accommodated at the asylum seekers center of Castelnuovo di Porto, together with 25 sanitary workers, and received microbiological surveillance at the Clinical Pathology and Microbiology Unit of the University Campus Bio-Medico of Rome. Gram-negative bacteria, mostly Klebsiella pneumoniae and Klebsiella oxytoca, were frequently recovered in surveillance swabs. Gram-positive bacteria, represented by Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus dysgalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus, were also isolated in surveillance swabs. In migrants, polymicrobial swabs were recovered at high frequency, and unusual microorganisms, rarely found in our country, were isolated. The polymicrobial colonization and the high prevalence of gram-negative bacteria represent the baseline characteristics of this migrant population from Eritrea. The presence of unusual microorganisms can be potentially pathogenic to asymptomatic carriers at risk of developing clinical disease if immunosuppressed or subjected to invasive procedures. In conclusion, active microbiological surveillance can represent an advantage for the host country in terms of data collection and by tracing unusual or resistant microorganisms by monitoring migrants' health status. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Chronic kidney disease burden among African migrants in three European countries and in urban and rural Ghana: the RODAM cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adjei, David N.; Stronks, Karien; Adu, Dwomoa; Beune, Erik; Meeks, Karlijn; Smeeth, Liam; Addo, Juliet; Owuso-Dabo, Ellis; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Mockenhaupt, Frank P.; Schulze, Matthias B.; Danquah, Ina; Spranger, Joachim; Bahendeka, Silver; de-Graft Aikins, Ama; Agyemang, Charles

    2018-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major burden among sub-Saharan African (SSA) populations. However, differences in CKD prevalence between rural and urban settings in Africa, and upon migration to Europe are unknown. We therefore assessed the differences in CKD prevalence among homogenous SSA

  4. Asymptomatic intestinal protozoa in school age children in Pategi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Infectious Diseases ... The prevalence of intestinal asymptomatic protozoan infection was assessed (November, 2012 through May, 2013) among school age children in Pategi, Pategi Local Government ... The distribution of the parasites was E. histolytica/dispar (75.1), E. coli (18.8) and G. lamblia (6.1%).

  5. Migrants' access to healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norredam, Marie

    2011-10-01

    There are strong pragmatic and moral reasons for receiving societies to address access to healthcare for migrants. Receiving societies have a pragmatic interest in sustaining migrants' health to facilitate integration; they also have a moral obligation to ensure migrants' access to healthcare according to international human rights principles. The intention of this thesis is to increase the understanding of migrants' access to healthcare by exploring two study aims: 1) Are there differences in migrants' access to healthcare compared to that of non-migrants? (substudy I and II); and 2) Why are there possible differences in migrants' access to healthcare compared to that of non-migrants? (substudy III and IV). The thesis builds on different methodological approaches using both register-based retrospective cohort design, cross-sectional design and survey methods. Two different measures of access were used to explore differences: 1) cancer stage at diagnosis as a clinical outcome and 2) emergency room (ER) contacts as a utilisation measure. Both informal and formal barriers to access were studied to explore why possible differences existed including: 1) motivation for using ER; and 2) asylum seekers' healthcare entitlements. Different definitions of migration and ethnicity were investigated including: country of birth and residence status. Substudy I showed a tendency towards more advanced stage at diagnosis or unknown stage among most subgroups of migrant women with a history of cancer compared to non-migrant women. Sub-study II found that some migrants (those born in Somalia, Turkey and Ex-Yugoslavia) use ER services more frequently than do non-migrants whereas others have the same or lower utilisation levels. As a consequence, substudy III was undertaken, which documented that more migrant within all subgroups had considered contacting a primary caregiver before visiting the ER compared to non-migrants, but that migrants experienced communication problems herein

  6. Une transmission discrète et fragmentaire. De l’histoire migratoire dans les familles maghrébines A discreet and fragmentary transmission. The migrant histories of North-African families in France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Tebbakh

    2009-07-01

    , despite this inconsistency, the memories of those migrants circulate, spread and diffuse rapidly, sometimes even under conditions that may prove unfavorable, but not insurmountable. In due course, those recollected memories turn into a “referential memory”, playing a pivotal role in the shaping of North African life styles rather than being a mere abiding memory of their origins. Fragmented and incomplete as these memories may be, they enable individuals to engage in a reflective analysis of their past, to gain a better understanding of the present and to learn from their mistakes. Quite recently, France saw a public debate on the memories of colonial times, during which the discourse of North African descendants demonstrated unequivocally that, even if the history of North African immigration has come up against some difficulty in its recreation and dissemination, it nevertheless exists and its unpalatable effects are not pervasive. The recipients of the memories of that migration are appealing to the French public to acknowledge those memories so that the neglect, exclusion and racism that their forebears endured should never return.

  7. Remittances | Transferts des migrants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Major Recipients of Remittances (in Million USD, 2008Principaux pays bénéficiaires des transferts des migrants (en millions USD, 2008­Migrants’ Remittances per Capita (in USD, 2008Transferts des migrants par habitant (en USD, 2008Source: World Bank, migration and remittances data.

  8. Predictors of contraceptive use among migrant and non-migrant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Logistic regression was employed to examine predictors of contraceptive use among migrants and non-migrant couples. Majority of migrant couples live in urban areas are Christians with fewer children while most of non-migrant couples live in rural areas are Muslims and belong to poor household. Use of contraceptives is ...

  9. [An asymptomatic chronic hypokalaemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Marie-Pierre; Cheminel, Valérie; Crevon, Lionel; Dubourg, Laurence; Hadj-Aissa, Aoumeur; Mounier, Chantal; Prevosto, Jean-Michel

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of an asymptomatic patient presenting a severe chronic renal hypokalaemia. Once being sure of no diuretics use, two hypothesis can be mentioned for a normotensive patient presenting an hypokalaemia associated with a metabolic alcalosis: Bartter syndrome or Gitelman syndrome. The highlighting of low magnesaemia and hypocalciuria strongly concentrates the diagnosis on Gitelman syndrome. First, this has been strengthened by the results of renal function tests and later it has confirmed by molecular diagnosis with the identification of a known homozygous mutation on SLC12A3 gene. In the patient family, the same chromosomal abnormality has been found in the young sister. For these two patients the treatment ordered is an antikaliuretic diuretic, magnesium and potassium supplements. This case shows the difficulty to diagnose Gitelman syndrome: it is frequently mistaken for Bartter syndrome. The main differences between these two syndromes are magnesaemia and calciuria. Furthemore , patients with Gitelman syndrome are often asymptomatic, this explains why prevalence of this illness is probably underestimated.

  10. Dietary Fat and Vitamin E in Prostate Cancer Risk Among African Americans and Africans: A Case-Control Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ukoli, Flora A. M

    2007-01-01

    .... In 2002 the scope of the study was expanded to include African-Americans and African migrants in the United States so as to investigate the role of dietary nutrients associated with increased prostate cancer risk (fatty acids...

  11. Delivery of medical care for migrants in Germany: delay of diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Katja; Bauer-Dubau, Karolin; Jelinek, Tomas

    2006-01-01

    Migrants form 9% of Germany's population and 13% of its capital Berlin. Only limited data are available regarding general health status and prevalence of tropical diseases among migrants in Germany. This study was conducted to investigate the spectrum and frequency of tropical diseases among migrants in Berlin and to evaluate the quality of the medical care provided. The necessity of a routine screening for tropical diseases among migrants was assessed. Anonymized data of migrants presenting to the Berlin Institute of Tropical Medicine between 1999 and 2004 with a stay in Germany below 1 year (n= 153) were analyzed. Of all examined migrants, 48% needed immediate medical treatment and 38% carried an infectious disease, mainly nematodes and intestinal protozoa. 19% suffered from a noninfectious disease, mainly anemia, and 12% were transferred to other specialists for further investigation. These figures were similar among asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. The median duration of stay in Germany until presentation was 42 days. While 40% of the migrants were examined within the first 4 weeks of their stay, 20% had not received a medical examination after 6 months. Of this population, 50% required treatment upon presentation. The high proportion of delayed diagnosis and treatment indicates a lack of medical service for migrants. While this clearly translates into increased health risks for the individual patient, it also indicates a potential risk for transmission of communicable diseases in the community. The lack of a correlation between symptoms and detected infectious disease indicates the need for a standardized routine screening examination in all migrants.

  12. Migrants caught in crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Kelly

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A number of new initiatives point to ways in which the internationalcommunity – particularly governments – could help reduce the vulnerabilities of migrant workers during conflict and crisis situations.

  13. Between talent and migrant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosneaga, Ana

    ’ agendas for internationalisation of higher education and talent attraction to boost national competitiveness. Concurrently, convergence is happening between migration management regimes, albeit with persistent variations in actual regulations, when it comes to attracting skilled migrants, while reducing...... the in-flow of ‘unwanted’ migrants. In this context, international students’ status transition to foreign workers is influenced by their simultaneous position as talents and as migrants. This PhD project analyses how the goal of attracting skilled labour is met through international student recruitment...... of the host country stakeholders and individual migrants. Through this approach, the thesis contributes to the field of migration and mobility studies by providing more nuanced insights into the interaction between declared policy goals and their effects in practice, as well as into the central causes...

  14. 'Prohibited Migrants': Nigerian Labour Diasporas in Liberia in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article interrogates the conditions of Nigerian labour diasporas and intending migrants to Liberia in the inter-war years in the light of the global economic crunch of the late 1920s and early 1930s. While highlighting the necessity of an intra-West African labour highway during the period, the article assesses the ...

  15. [Migrant vaccinations in Poland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakowski, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    After the European Union accession in 2004, Poland has been perceived by foreigners as an attractive destination of their migration, and also as a popular transit country for people going further to the Western Europe countries. The Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine is involved in the implementation of the international project PROMOVAX (Promote Vaccinations among Migrant Populations in Europe). The objective of the project is to promote immunizations among migrant populations in Europe. This article presents the up-to-date legal regulations that are effective in Poland, taking into account their relevance to the issue of vaccinations in migrant population. The analysis of the Polish legislation concerning this problem shows that there are no specific regulations addressed to migrant population staying in our country. This issue seems to be popular in the European Union, where immunization of migrants is given high priority. From the point of view of health care professionals it is important to be aware of the fact that EU open borders favor the increased flow of people between countries. The scale of migration from outside the EU to its member states also contributes to the increase in potential contacts between health care workers and migrants working in Poland.

  16. At the Margins of the Economy? Chinese Migrants in Lesotho’s Wholesale and Retail Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Hanisch

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the relationship between the economic activities of Chinese migrants in the wholesale and retail sector in Lesotho, and the larger structural framework. More specifically, it investigates this relationship with reference to the general debate on Chinese migrants in Africa. These themes locate Chinese migrants at the margins of the economy, assume some Chinese exceptionalism, and imply a kind of neocolonialism. The article demonstrates that Chinese migrants are, in fact, not operating at the margins of the economy, but have become a vital element of Lesotho’s wholesale and retail sector. The analysis of the structural framework indicates that the economic activities of Chinese migrants are a reflection of existing structural constraints and opportunities rather than Chinese exceptionalism or neocolonialism. This in turn implies that future research would benefit from placing the interplay of Chinese migrants and the larger structural framework in respective African countries at the centre of analysis.

  17. Screening for hepatitis B and C in first-generation Egyptian migrants living in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuure, Freke R.; Bouman, Jonathan; Martens, Marjolein; Vanhommerig, Joost W.; Urbanus, Anouk T.; Davidovich, Udi; van Houdt, Robin; Speksnijder, Arjen G. C. L.; Weegink, Christine J.; van den Hoek, Anneke; Prins, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Egypt has high prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and intermediate prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection; however, infection prevalence among Egyptian migrants is unknown. Considering the asymptomatic onset and development of disease in chronically-infected patients, many may

  18. [Prevention among migrants: Participation, migrant sensitive strategies and programme characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, T; Kleer, D; Samkange-Zeeb, F; Zeeb, Hajo

    2015-06-01

    Health promotion and prevention can contribute to a long, healthy life in populations both with and without migrant background. This paper provides an overview on migrant participation in prevention programmes in Germany. Furthermore, we describe migrant sensitive prevention strategies and characteristics of prevention programmes for migrants in Germany. With regard to participation in prevention programmes, lower vaccination rates are found among children and adolescents who migrated to Germany after birth. Among adults with a migrant background, we found lower participation in general health check-ups, oral health check-ups, cancer screening programs and influenza vaccination. Migrant sensitive prevention strategies address the visual style of the material, a target group specific risk communication, language requirements, a systematic involvement of the target group, and the recognition of deeply rooted sociocultural practices and beliefs. On analyzing a large database on prevention programs in Germany, we found only a few programmes that were exclusively targeted to migrant groups (0.6%). In 16.6% of the programs migrants were addressed as the target group among others. Compared to general population programs, programs for migrants were more often exclusively directed towards girls or women. Moreover, programs for migrants used community-based approaches more often and addressed different age groups. Although information on migrant participation in prevention programs and utilization of migrant sensitive strategies is still incomplete, we can assume that there is a need for diversity-oriented, migrant sensitive prevention.

  19. Young Migrants and Discourses on Young Migrants in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerritsen, Debby; Maier, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This article compares the perspectives of young migrants in the Netherlands with the dominant discourse on "migrants" at present. The integration of young "migrants" have been studied in the European research projects TRESEGY and PROFACITY with the help of a number of ethnographic studies and a questionnaire in the Netherlands.…

  20. Asymptomatic bacteriuria among pregnant women

    OpenAIRE

    Sudha Biradar Kerure; Rajeshwari Surpur; Sheela S. Sagarad; Sneha Hegadi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common bacterial infections during pregnancy. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) is a major risk factor for the development of urinary tract infections during pregnancy and with further risk of preterm birth & pyelonephritis if untreated. Aims & Objectives: This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) in pregnant women & to isolate, identify and establish antimicrobial susceptibility of pathogens....

  1. Ocularhaemodynamics parameters of asymptomatic HAART ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Vmax of blood flow in central retinal artery (CRA) of asymptomatic HAART - experienced HIV infected children was 12.2cm/s while that of seronegative children was 13.4 cm/s. The PI and RI of blood flow in CRA of asymptomatic HAARTexperienced HIV-infected children were 0.8 and 0.5 respectively while those of ...

  2. 'We get nothing from fishing' : Fishing for boat opportunities amongst Senegalese fisher migrants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyamnjoh, Henrietta Mambo

    2010-01-01

    The world is regularly confronted in the media with dramatic images of African boat migrants. Seemingly desperate, these Africans, most of them males, are willing to risk a perilous journey at sea, hoping for a better life in Europe. And, even worse, hundreds more are believed to die each year,

  3. The converging burdens of infectious and non-communicable diseases in rural-to-urban migrant Sub-Saharan African populations: a focus on HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and cardio-metabolic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peer, Nasheeta

    2015-01-01

    Africa has the unenviable challenge of dealing with a double burden of disease: infectious diseases (IDs) such as HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis are high while non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are rapidly rising in the region. Populations with increased susceptibility to both include migrants. This review highlights the susceptibility of rural-to-urban migrants in Sub-Saharan Africa to the IDs of HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis, and to NCDs, particularly cardiovascular diseases. The disruption that occurs with migration is often accompanied by unhealthy exposures and environments. These include partaking in risky sexual practices and a subsequent greater risk for HIV infection in migrants than the general populations which contributes to the spread of the disease. Migrants frequently work and live in conditions that are poorly ventilated and overcrowded with suboptimal sanitation which increases their risk for tuberculosis. Considering that migrants have an increased risk of acquiring both HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis, and in view of the interaction between these diseases, they are likely to be at high risk for co-infection. They are also likely to facilitate the geographical spread of these infections and serve as conduits of disease dissemination to rural areas. Changes in lifestyle behaviours that accompany migration and urbanisation are exemplified primarily by shifts in physical activity and dietary patterns which promote the development of obesity, diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Urban living and employment is generally less physically exerting than rural routines; when migrants relocate from their rural residence they adapt to their new environment by significantly reducing their physical activity levels. Also, nutritional patterns among migrants in urban centres change rapidly with a shift to diets higher in fat, sugar and salt. Consequently, increases in weight, blood pressure and glucose levels have been reported within a year of migration

  4. Making Migrants Governable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenum, Helle

    2012-01-01

    This paper will investigate the production of knowledge regarding the number of illegalized migrants. Estimation of the number has been the common frame for production of this kind of knowledge, performed by social scientists, government officials, NGOs and others, but now biometric technology...... by biometric technology will produce increased objectivity and depolitization in numbers of irregular migrants which could not be obtained in the field of estimation. The level of truth reflects the level of control and surveillance fixed as a strategy of government of mobility in the biometric technology....

  5. Body reserves in intra-African migrants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nwaogu, Chima; Cresswell, Will

    Avian migration has been shown to be a life history strategy for surviving environmental resource variability, but it requires increased body reserves for long distance flight. Fat reserves make excellent energy stores for barrier crossing, whereas proteins generate less energy for the same mass of

  6. Migrant Education Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Alice, Ed.

    The handbook is directed to teachers of economically and culturally deprived, Spanish-speaking migrant pupils having a limited command or a complete lack of English. Several suggestions are given for providing a wide range of opportunities for meaningful oral communication as a means of overcoming this obstacle and promoting the use of standard…

  7. Africans in the American Labor Market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elo, Irma T; Frankenberg, Elizabeth; Gansey, Romeo; Thomas, Duncan

    2015-10-01

    The number of migrants to the United States from Africa has grown exponentially since the 1930s. For the first time in America's history, migrants born in Africa are growing at a faster rate than migrants from any other continent. The composition of African-origin migrants has also changed dramatically: in the mid-twentieth century, the majority were white and came from only three countries; but today, about one-fifth are white, and African-origin migrants hail from across the entire continent. Little is known about the implications of these changes for their labor market outcomes in the United States. Using the 2000-2011 waves of the American Community Survey, we present a picture of enormous heterogeneity in labor market participation, sectoral choice, and hourly earnings of male and female migrants by country of birth, race, age at arrival in the United States, and human capital. For example, controlling a rich set of human capital and demographic characteristics, some migrants-such as those from South Africa/Zimbabwe and Cape Verde, who typically enter on employment visas-earn substantial premiums relative to other African-origin migrants. These premiums are especially large among males who arrived after age 18. In contrast, other migrants-such as those from Sudan/Somalia, who arrived more recently, mostly as refugees-earn substantially less than migrants from other African countries. Understanding the mechanisms generating the heterogeneity in these outcomes-including levels of socioeconomic development, language, culture, and quality of education in countries of origin, as well as selectivity of those who migrate-figures prominently among important unresolved research questions.

  8. Social Engagement among Migrant Youth: Attitudes and Meanings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liudmila Kirpitchenko

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This article explores migrant young people’s engagement, participation and involvement in socially meaningful activities, events and experiences. This type of social participation is approached in the social inclusion literature using the notions of social capital and active citizenship (Bourdieu, 1986; Coleman, 1988; Putnam, 1993; Putnam, 2000. A key objective, therefore, is to explore the attitudes, values and perceptions associated with social participation for young people. They include the meanings that social engagement has for migrant young people, along with drivers and inhibitions to active participation. The article focuses on both the motives for being actively engaged as well as perceived barriers to social engagement. It is based on a large study conducted among migrant young people of African, Arabic-speaking and Pacific Islander backgrounds in Melbourne and Brisbane, and presents both quantitative and qualitative (discursive snapshots from the overall findings, based on interviews and focus groups. While many studies have centred on the management of migration and migrants, this article draws attention to the individuals’ active position in negotiating, interpreting and appropriating the conditions of social inclusion. Accounting for the multidimensional and multilayered nature of social inclusion, the paper highlights the heuristic role of social engagement in fostering the feelings of belonging and personal growth for migrant youth.

  9. Migration patterns and influence of support networks: A case study of West Africans in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chelpi-den Hamer, M.

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the influence of support networks in the migration process of West African migrants to the Netherlands. Taking a case-oriented biographic approach, the article analyzes the migration stories of several West African migrants with a focus on the networks that facilitated their

  10. Prevalence and pattern of asymptomatic bacteriuria among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most of the cultured organism (89%) were sensitive to Nitrofurantoin. Conclusion: The prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria among pregnant women at the UPTH is high. The most prevalent organism was Klebsiella. Keywords: Asymptomatic bacteriuria, Prevalence, Pattern, Klebsiella, Nitrofurantion, Morbidity ...

  11. Detection of African swine fever virus in the tissues of asymptomatic pigs in smallholder farming systems along the Kenya-Uganda border: implications for transmission in endemic areas and ASF surveillance in East Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abworo, Edward Okoth; Onzere, Cynthia; Oluoch Amimo, Joshua; Riitho, Victor; Mwangi, Waithaka; Davies, Jocelyn; Blome, Sandra; Peter Bishop, Richard

    2017-07-01

    The persistence of African swine fever virus (ASFV) in endemic areas, with small-scale but regular outbreaks in domestic pigs, is not well understood. ASFV has not been detected using conventional diagnosis in these pigs or adjacent populations of resistant African wild pigs, that could act as potential carriers during the outbreaks. However, such data are crucial for the design of evidence-based control strategies. We conducted cross-sectional (1107 pigs) and longitudinal (100 pigs) monitoring of ASFV prevalence in local pigs in Kenya and Uganda. The horizontal survey revealed no evidence of ASFV in the serum or blood using either conventional or real-time PCR. One pig consistently tested positive using ELISA, but negative using PCR assays on blood. Interestingly, the isotype of the antibodies from this animal were strongly IgA biased relative to control domestic pigs and warthogs, suggesting a role for mucosal immunity. The tissues from this pig were positive by PCR following post-mortem. Internal organ tissues of 44 healthy pigs (28 sentinel pigs and 16 pigs from slaughter slabs) were tested with four different PCR assays; 15.9 % were positive for ASFV suggesting that healthy pigs carrying ASFV exist in the swine population in the study area. P72 and p54 genotyping of ASFV revealed very limited diversity: all were classified in genotype IX at both loci, as were virtually all viruses causing recent ASF outbreaks in the region. Our study suggests that carrier pigs may play a role in ASF disease outbreaks, although the triggers for outbreaks remain unclear and require further investigation. This study significantly increases scientific knowledge of the epidemiology of ASF in the field in Africa, which will contribute to the design of effective surveillance and control strategies.

  12. Women migrants in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makinwa-adebusoye, P K

    1994-06-01

    The prevailing notion in Nigeria is that female migration is associational migration. This survey of the towns of Ibadan, Enugu, Lagos, and Kaduna examines the need for female paid employment and the reasons for migration based on marital status among 2316 migrant women with comparisons to 1363 nonmigrant women. A primary motivation for migration is dissatisfaction with living conditions. Families are support groups providing transportation and initial reinforcement for moves to urban areas. Remittances to families in the place of origin reinforce the investment. The expectation is that women will use migration as an option for advanced education, paid employment, and increased income. The survey found that only 8.2% of migrants made the decision to migrate alone. 82.7% make migration decisions jointly with family members: husbands, parents, and other relatives. Single women were more likely to make sole decisions or decisions with parents. 94% indicated family support for the decision to migrate. About 18% of single women paid the cost of transportation and the move themselves. 70% made the move in the company of parents and other relatives. Married women's costs were underwritten by husbands, except for 9.5% who paid for it themselves. 82.6% did not have a prearranged job before migrating. The average stay ranged from three months to several years. About 33% stayed less than a year. Most migrants with wage employment in the formal sector secured their positions with the help of relatives. 55.4% of migrants in the survey stayed with relatives on arrival, 8.6% were in rented units, and 2.5% stayed in employer housing. Slightly more than 50% of migrants staying with relatives and received free board. Female migration between 1971 and 1981 was influenced by modernization and greater advancement in education. Transportation and communication improvements made it easier to migrate. The economic recession and structural adjustment measures during the 1980s stimulated

  13. Asymptomatic schwannoma of the heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy Maria

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a case of an asymptomatic right atrial mass detected on a screening ECHO. Pre-operative imaging and intraoperative frozen section suggested an atrial myxoma, but the extracardiac nature of the mass and its adherence to the right superior pulmonary vein and interatrial septum were inconsistent with this. Detailed histological assessment confirmed the diagnosis of atrial schwannoma. Limited case reports have shown complete resection is curative.

  14. The politics of identity, belonging and the integration of African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of migrants' belonging and integration, the outcomes usually do not resonate with such policies or structures. Most migrants regardless of whether they are citizens, permanent residents or are on work permit, still face resistance from local South Africans who see them as a threat, and above all as strangers in the land.

  15. Breaking Through in Migrant Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Blandina

    When the "theory of incompatibilities" was first elaborated more than 30 years ago, it identified five characteristics that schools needed to address to improve migrant education, but it failed to recognize the moral and cognitive strengths elicited in many youth by the harsh migrant experience. The theory posited five interdependent…

  16. Family migration and migrant integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonjour, S.; Kraler, A.; Triandafyllidou, A.

    2016-01-01

    Family migration and integration are intimately related concepts in contemporary policy discourses in major migrant receiving countries. In these discourses, both family related migration as such and the migrant family as an institution are problematised with regard to their relation to integration.

  17. Diabetes among migrants in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Gregers Stig; Kamper-Jørgensen, Zaza; Carstensen, Bendix

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Studies of diabetes in migrant populations have shown a higher prevalence compared to their respective countries of origin and to people natively born in the host country, but there is little population-based data on diabetes incidence and mortality in migrant populations. The aim...... of the current study was (1) to describe the incidence rates and prevalence of diabetes among first generation migrants in Denmark compared to the Danish background population, and (2) to compare standardised mortality rates (SMRs) for individuals with and without diabetes according to country of origin...... to the part of the population without diabetes were calculated based on follow up of the entire Danish population. RESULTS: Compared with native born Danes, the incidence of diabetes was about 2.5 times higher among migrants from Africa, Asia, and the Middle East, and these migrant groups also showed...

  18. Migrants on the move.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karel, S

    1988-11-01

    International migration benefits both acceptor and sender countries. Skilled migrants bring economic vitality to many of the wealthy nations facing an extreme shortage of workers while their migration helps to ease their native land's overpopulation. There are currently between 20 and 22 million economically active migrants around the world; most are Asian or Latin American and migrate to the US, Canada, Australia, or new Zealand. The US takes in the largest number of legal immigrants yearly at 600,000, Australia admits 93,000, Canada 84,000, and New Zealand 35,000. Because of the rising unemployment rates, Canada allows 37,000 fewer entrants yearly today than in 1982, while New Zealand allows 11,000 fewer. 4 million legal immigrants entered the US between 1980 and 1986, and about 3.5 million illegal immigrants in 1987 alone. Asians account for about 45% of all US immigrants, while Europeans account for only 17%. 32% of all entrants claimed to be technicians or managers compared to about 2% in 1911. About 15% of Canada's population is foreign-born, while Australia's population is about 20% foreign-born. Some poor countries like Pakistan, South Korea, and Turkey send workers abroad so that they can collect remittances. Such an opening of global immigration policy can ease demographic imbalances, skills transfers, and economic development.

  19. Asymptomatic bacteriuria Escherichia coli strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Viktoria; Nielsen, E.M.; Klemm, Per

    2006-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) affect millions of people each year. Escherichia coli is the most common organism associated with asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) in humans. Persons affected by ABU may carry a particular E. coli strain for extended periods of time without any symptoms. In contrast...... to uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) that cause symptomatic UTI, very little is known about the mechanisms by which these strains colonize the urinary tract. Here, we have investigated the growth characteristics in human urine as well as adhesin repertoire of nine ABU strains; the ability of ABU strains to compete...

  20. Migration dynamics, entrepreneurship, and African development: Lessons from Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kevin J A; Inkpen, Christopher

    2013-12-01

    Using data from Malawi, this study situates the discourse on migration, entrepreneurship, and development within the context of Africa's social realities. It examines self-employment differences among three groups of migrants and corresponding group differences in agricultural and non-agricultural self-employment. International migrants are found to be more engaged in self-employment than internal-migrants. However, our results suggest that previous findings on the development-related contributions of returning migrants from the West need to be appropriately contextualized. When returnees from the West invest in self-employment, they typically shy away from Africa's largest economic sector - agriculture. In contrast, levels of self-employment, especially in agricultural self-employment, are highest among returning migrants and immigrants from other African countries, especially from those nearby. We also underscore the gendered dimensions of migrants' contribution to African development by demonstrating that female migrants are more likely to be self-employed in agriculture than male migrants. Furthermore, as human-capital increases, migrants are more likely to concentrate their self-employment activities in non-agricultural activities and not in the agricultural sector. The study concludes by using these findings to discuss key implications for policy and future research.

  1. LGBTI migrants in immigration detention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shana Tabak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available As states increasingly use detention as a means of controllingmigration flows, sexual minority migrants find themselves in detentionfacilities where they may face multiple violations of their human rights.

  2. Merchants, missionaries & migrants : an introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessel, van W.M.J.

    2002-01-01

    The contributions to this volume commemorating three hundred years of diplomatic relations between Ghana and the Netherlands are grouped under three headings - merchants and merchandise, missionaries, and voluntary and involuntary migrants - reflecting the three most important areas of contact

  3. Engendering migrant health: Canadian perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Spitzer, Denise L

    2011-01-01

    .... What contributes to this deterioration, and how can its effects be mitigated? Engendering Migrant Health brings together researchers from across Canada to address the intersections of gender, immigration, and health in the lives of new Canadians...

  4. Engendering migrant health: Canadian perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Spitzer, Denise L

    2011-01-01

    "Voluntary migrants to Canada are generally healthier than the average Canadian, but after ten years in the country they report poorer health and higher rates of chronic disease than those born here...

  5. Migrants and Small Enterprises In Post-Apartheid Pretoria/Tshwane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since South Africa's democratization in 1994, major spatial, social and economic changes have occurred in Sunnyside - a high-density inner city area of Pretoria. This period has also seen a dramatic increase in the flow of foreign, predominantly African migrants into the area. Sunnyside is becoming a vibrant, dynamic ...

  6. Yoruba Traders in Cote D'Ivoire: A Study of the Role Migrant Settlers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The bid to relocate into an alien territory is usually anchored on the migrant's hope for better fortunes or prospects. The independence government in several West African countries could not meet the high expectations of their citizens. There were also political and economic problems which made members of the ...

  7. ASFV in Tanzania: Asymptomatic pigs harbor virus of molecular similarity to Georgia 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uttenthal, Åse; Braae, Uffe Christian; Ngowi, H. A.

    2013-01-01

    In 2011 African swine fever virus (ASFV) genome was detected in asymptomatic pigs in field samples in Mbeya, Tanzania. The aim of this paper is to partly characterize the virus that was harboured in these pigs and furthermore to confirm, by a second sampling, the latest occurrence of ASFV......-month-old pigs confirms the circulation of ASFV in Mbeya several months after our detection of ASFV in asymptomatic pigs. The initial blood samples were obtained on Whatman FTA filter papers as dried blood samples. The samples were stored under field conditions and ASFV could be sequenced in DNA eluted...

  8. Epidemiological Study Of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria Among Nursery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic bateriuria in preschool children of different age and sex groups and to isolate the organisms responsible for asymptomatic bacteriuria and determine their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern. A total of 475 children from 17 nurseries in Ahvaz city, Iran ...

  9. Les migrants de Beyrouth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnès Deboulet

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Depuis la fin de la guerre (1990 l’importation d‘une main-d’œuvre peu qualifiée majoritairement féminine est devenue massive au Liban. Qu’ils soient en situation régulière ou non, des migrants non arabes dits « temporaires » ou « en transit », mais dont certains sont là depuis une dizaine d’années, ont fait leur entrée sur le marché du travail et tentent de s’inscrire, pour nombre d’entre eux, dans un « milieu » aux identités multiples et conflictuelles dans des quartiers périphériques où il est plus facile de trouver à se loger. En s’appuyant sur des enquêtes de terrain menées dans la banlieue de Bourj-Hammoud à l’est de Beyrouth et dans les quartiers sud de Jnah et de Ouzaï, les auteures décrivent des situations migratoires qui sans être généralisables n’en sont pas moins exemplaires de la place de cette main-d’œuvre immigrée.Since the end of the war, in 1990, unqualified, mostly feminine, workers have been massively entering Lebanon. Whether they have regular registration or not, non-Arab, so-called ‘temporary’, or ‘transit’ migrants have entered the labour market, but some of them have been there for about ten years. Many try to join the mixed, full of conflicts environment of peripheral districts, in which it is easier to find housing. Using fieldwork they have been conducting in the Borj-Hamoud suburb, in the east of Beirut, and Jnah and Ouzaï, in the south, the authors describe migratory situations which, although they cannot be applied generally, are nevertheless a good example of the place held by these immigrant

  10. Family Violence and Migrant Women: Implications for Practice. Migrant Clinicians Network Clinical Supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Rachel; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This newsletter supplement is devoted to the theme of domestic violence affecting migrant women. It contains four articles describing programs providing violence prevention education to migrant women and children. "Family Violence and Migrant Women: Implications for Practice" (Rachel Rodriguez) discusses the social isolation of migrant women;…

  11. The whereabouts of Migrants : A comparison of Dutch migrant registration systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Faassen, M.

    2017-01-01

    The whereabouts of migrants: a comparison of Dutch migrant registration systems. Today, one way of visualising the current refugee and migrant crisis on the outer borders of Europe is by showing a bottleneck in the processing of migrant flows: large groups of people waiting endlessly for their

  12. Are Migrants More Skilled than Non-Migrants? Repeat, Return and Same-Employer

    OpenAIRE

    Hunt, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    I examine the determinants of inter-state migration of adults within western Germany, using the German Socio-Economic Panel from 1984-2000. I highlight the prevalence and distinctive characteristics of migrants who do not change employers. Same-employer migrants represent 25% of all migrants, and have higher education and pre-move wages than non-migrants. Conditional on age, same-employer migrants are therefore more skilled than non-migrants. By contrast, although other migrants have higher e...

  13. Catch and Release. Transgender Migrants and Opposite of Deportation in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Camminga

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available South Africa has a tense relationship with migrants. It is attractive because of its status as an African financial powerhouse and the ‘Rainbow Nation’ image it has projected to the world. It is the land of opportunity where extensive constitutional protections are believed to be able to provide tangible forms of safety. Yet, migrants are regularly accused of a variety of social ills and in recent years have been on the receiving end of several mass scale xenophobic attacks. South Africa is also unique on the African continent in relation to refugee regimes in that it is the only country that recognises and constitutionally protects transgender refugees/asylum seekers. In light of this in recent years it has seen a marked rise in the emergence of transgender migrants within the country. The refugee system though is plagued with issues of corruption and many migrants choose rather to exist in a zone of illegality, outside the system. Drawing on research carried out in Johannesburg, South Africa, in 2014 this paper focuses on two such cases that of Trisha and Musa - undocumented transgender migrant sex workers. Being undocumented and practicing a trade that is illegal in South Africa - sex work - leaves Trisha and Musa particularly vulnerable to arrest and deportation. Yet, Trisha and Musa are among several transgender migrants that have been arrested and sent to South Africa’s lone deportation facility - Lindela - only to be released. This paper considers what citizenship, rights and the socio-spatial borders of belonging might mean when transgender migrants come to understand themselves as immune to deportation.

  14. Exporting by Migrants and Indigenous Entrepreneurs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashourizadeh, Shayegheh; Schøtt, Thomas; Pişkinsüt Şengüler, Ece

    2016-01-01

    Migrants may become entrepreneurs in their host countries. They may utilize their dual embeddedness in both the home country and the host country, and also use transnational links to gain a competitive advantage in exporting compared to indigenous entrepreneurs. Migrant entrepreneurs’ advantage may...... around the world was surveyed in the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor, which reports on migration and exporting. Hierarchical linear modeling shows that migrant entrepreneurs export more than indigenous entrepreneurs, especially in the first generation, and especially among educated and male migrants...

  15. Migrant entrepreneurship and new urban economic opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Nijkamp, P.; Sahin, M; Baycan, T.

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays, migrants form a significant share of the urban population, and their business is critical for urban economic growth. This paper addresses the key factors determining the position of migrant entrepreneurs in the urban economy in the Netherlands. In order to develop a solid assessment of CSFs for migrant entrepreneurs, and to understand business performance in a competitive urban environment, this study will investigate the entrepreneurial behaviour of migrants in Dutch cities from a ...

  16. Migrantes africanos en Buenos Aires: Entre estigmatización y exotización

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Régis Minvielle

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available African Migrants in Buenos Aires: between Stigma and Exoticization Abstract Since the 1990s decade, but especially since 2000, immigrants coming mostly from West Africa, have gradually weaved the contours of a transatlantic south-south migration device between Africa and Latin America. In Buenos Aires they trade on the streets. This activity was initiated mainly by the Senegalese community.This article aims to expose the stereotypes and the relationships between the Argentine society and the African migrants in order to observe the reception of an unknown population in that part of the continent. To do this research, the ethnographic method and discourse analysis were used. The recent nature of the African migration to Argentina generates clichés and prejudices but the desire for exoticism also gives rise to fascination.

  17. Human immunodeficiency virus infection among migrant fishermen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: People migrate from place to place for diverse reasons chief among which is economic. Migrant fishermen like other migrant population lead high risk sexual lifestyle and are therefore, predisposed to Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Aim: To determine the prevalence of HIV among migrant ...

  18. Charactiristies of migrant entrepreneurship in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baycan, T.; Nijkamp, P.

    2009-01-01

    The present paper aims to investigate and compare various modalities of migrant entrepreneurship in European countries in order to design a systematic classification of migrant entrepreneurship and to highlight key factors of migrant entrepreneurship in Europe. The paper is based on a comparative

  19. Definition labour migrant (updated) : Second, revised version

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Different definitions in which one can comprehend who counts as a migrant are used. Moreover, also in the regulatory frame that applies for migrants, in statistics on the stocks and flows of migrant workers, in analysis of labour mobility and cross-border recruitment, in data sources and research

  20. The transnational strategies of migrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Connie Carøe

    both these suggestions obviously have some resonance, against them goes the observation that those who take up transnational strategies are active and most capable of succeeding and managing their lives in the receiving society. In other words, the transnational engagements of migrants...... to explain. It has been suggested that transnational strategies are applied as a safety net to substitute for prospects of a secure future in the receiving society. Solidarities or obligations, sometimes in the shape of a social contract between stayers and leavers of a family, are another suggestion. While......, and on the other women’s Islamic activism, carried out by young women of Moroccan descent. What are the motivations for these migrants to engage in transnational strategies? Are transnational activities a sort of escape from defeats in the receiving society for the migrants in question or could transnational...

  1. Health differences between older migrants and non-migrants in Europe: the role of integration policies and public attitudes towards migration and migrants (2004-2013)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reus Pons, Matias; Vandenheede, Hadewijch; de Valk, Helga

    2015-01-01

    Integration policies and attitudes towards migration and migrants have so far received little attention when studying health differences between migrants and non-migrants. Our aim is to incorporate these dimensions to explain health differences between migrants and non-migrants aged 50 to 79 across

  2. [Asymptomatic kidney stones: active surveillance vs. treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neisius, A; Thomas, C; Roos, F C; Hampel, C; Fritsche, H-M; Bach, T; Thüroff, J W; Knoll, T

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of kidney stones is increasing worldwide. Asymptomatic non-obstructing kidney stones are increasingly detected as an incidental finding on radiologic imaging, which has been performed more frequently over the last decades. Beside the current interventional treatment modalities such as extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL), ureterorenoscopy (URS) and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL), active surveillance of asymptomatic kidney stones has been a focus of discussion lately, not only for attending physicians, but even more so for patients. The current German and European guidelines recommend active surveillance for patients with asymptomatic kidney stones if no interventional therapy is mandatory because of pain or medical factors. Herein we review the current literature on risks and benefits of active surveillance of asymptomatic non-obstructing kidney stones. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Asymptomatic Plasmodium spp. infection in Tierralta, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucunubá, Zulma Milena; Guerra, Angela Patricia; Rahirant, Sonia Judith; Rivera, Jorge Alonso; Cortés, Liliana Jazmín; Nicholls, Rubén Santiago

    2008-11-01

    With the aim of determining the prevalence of asymptomatic Plasmodium spp. infection by thick smear and PCR and its association with demographic and epidemiological characteristics in the village of Nuevo Tay, Tierralta, Córdoba, Colombia, a cross-sectional population study was carried out, using random probabilistic sampling. Venous blood samples were taken from 212 people on day 0 for thick smear and PCR. Clinical follow-up and thick smears were carried out on days 14 and 28. The prevalence of Plasmodium spp. infection was 17.9% (38/212; 95% CI: 12.5-23.3%) and the prevalence of asymptomatic Plasmodiumspp. infection was 14.6% (31/212; 95% CI: 9.6-19.6%). Plasmodium vivax was found more frequently (20/31; 64.5%) than Plasmodium falciparum (9/31; 29%) and mixed infections (2/31; 6.5%). A significantly higher prevalence of asymptomatic infection was found in men (19.30%) than in women (9.18%) (prevalence ratio: 2.10; 95% CI: 1.01-4.34%; p = 0.02). People who developed symptoms had a significantly higher parasitemia on day 0 than those who remained asymptomatic, of 1,881.5 +/- 3,759 versus 79 +/- 106.9 (p = 0.008). PCR detected 50% more infections than the thick smears. The presence of asymptomatic Plasmodium spp. infection highlights the importance of carrying out active searches amongst asymptomatic populations residing in endemic areas.

  4. Development of the Migrant Friendly Maternity Care Questionnaire (MFMCQ) for migrants to Western societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gagnon, Anita J; DeBruyn, Rebecca; Essén, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    with international experts in migrant reproductive health and research resulted in the MFMCQ, a questionnaire measuring key aspects of migrant-sensitive maternity care. The MFMCQ is available for further translation and use to examine and compare care and perceptions of care within and across countries, and by key......BACKGROUND: Through the World Health Assembly Resolution, 'Health of Migrants', the international community has identified migrant health as a priority. Recommendations for general hospital care for international migrants in receiving-countries have been put forward by the Migrant Friendly Hospital...... in four stages. First, questions related to migrant friendly maternity care were identified from existing questionnaires including the Migrant Friendliness Quality Questionnaire, developed in Europe to capture recommended general hospital care for migrants, and the Mothers In a New Country (MINC...

  5. Migrant entrepreneurship, economic activity and export performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rezaei, Shahamak; Baklanov, Nikita; Brambini-Pedersen, Jan Vang

    Recent studies on transnational entrepreneurship) suggest that migrant entrepreneur play an increasingly significant role as sources of economic activities and especially export revenue. The literature is, however, biased on the US experience, lacks a comparative perspective between migrants...... and non-migrants and is primarily anecdotal in nature (Saxenian, 2002; 2006, Ruzzlier et al, 2007; Honig and Drori, 2010, Drodi et al, 2010)). This paper aims at reducing this gap by mapping the recent changes in the role of migrant entrepreneurs as a source of increased economic activity and export...... in across ethic categories. Export revenue is proxied by the number of firms in the different ethnic categories that exports. The Danish context provides unique data allowing for a comparison across migrants and non-migrants, across sectors and across time. The paper reveals that migrants play a decreasing...

  6. Palaearctic-African Bird Migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwajomo, Soladoye Babatola

    Bird migration has attracted a lot of interests over past centuries and the methods used for studying this phenomenon has greatly improved in terms of availability, dimension, scale and precision. In spite of the advancements, relatively more is known about the spring migration of trans......-Saharan migrants than autumn migration. Information about the behavior and interactions of migrants during the nonbreeding season in sub-Saharan Africa is also scarce for many species. Furthermore, very little is known about intra-African migration. This thesis summarizes my research on the autumn migration...... of birds from Europe to Africa and opens up the possibility of studying intra-African migration. I have used long-term, standardized autumn ringing data from southeast Sweden to investigate patterns in biometrics, phenology and population trends as inferred from annual trapping totals. In addition, I...

  7. Engendering migrant health: Canadian perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Spitzer, Denise L

    2011-01-01

    .... Focusing on the context of Canadian policy and society, the contributors illuminate migrants' testimonies of struggle, resistance, and solidarity as they negotiate a place for themselves in a new country. Topics range from the difficulties of Francophone refugees and the changing roles of fathers, to the experiences of queer newcomers and the importance of social unity to communal and individual health."--pub. desc.

  8. Elderly Turkish Migrants in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaakilde, Anne Leonora; Petersen, Signe Sofia Gronwald; Yazici, Suzan

    Elderly Turkish migrants in Denmark: Health in a life course perspective Objective According to Statistics Denmark, Turkish immigrants constitute the largest immigrant group in Denmark with 1.1% of the population (60,390 people) in 2012. They account for a higher rate of chronic ailments and a hi......Elderly Turkish migrants in Denmark: Health in a life course perspective Objective According to Statistics Denmark, Turkish immigrants constitute the largest immigrant group in Denmark with 1.1% of the population (60,390 people) in 2012. They account for a higher rate of chronic ailments...... elderly people by studying the every day life of elderly Turkish migrants. Methods Qualitative interviews were carried out with 12 Turkish men and 18 women aged 54-80. The interviews had a focus on their health practices and health perceptions in a life history perspective. The interviews were...... histories, we learned that the interviewees had not only encountered unskilled and physical demanding work, but many of them had experienced very bad and unhealthy living conditions during their stay in Denmark. Conclusions A life course approach to the study of Elderly Turkish migrants in Denmark suggests...

  9. Cultural Integration of Migrant Citizens:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singla, Rashmi; Akora, Lydia; Panesar, Jasbir

    2006-01-01

    Artiklen handler om prakisforskning baseret på et transnationalt EU-projekt, der sigter på at forbedre "adult migrant learners" kompetencer for aktiv deltagelse i samfundet. Projektets formål var forbedring af de voksnes forståelse af socialt ansvar på forskellige niveauer ved at gøre dem bevidst...

  10. SPECIAL SCHOOL FOR MIGRANT CHILDREN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    POTTS, ALFRED M.

    MANY CHANGES HAVE OCCURRED IN MIGRANT CHILDREN OVER THE 5 YEARS THE SPECIAL SCHOOL HAS BEEN IN OPERATION. MOST NOTABLE IS THAT THE CHILDREN ARE MUCH CLEANER AND BETTER BEHAVED. THE CHILDREN ARE ISSUED COMBS, TOOTHBRUSHES, TOWELS, AND SOAP. STUDENTS SHOWER THREE TIMES EACH WEEK AND PERFORM A DAILY ROUTINE OF BRUSHING TEETH AND COMBING HAIR. MILK…

  11. Implementing health insurance for migrants, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangcharoensathien, Viroj; Thwin, Aye Aye; Patcharanarumol, Walaiporn

    2017-02-01

    Undocumented migrant workers are generally ineligible for state social security schemes, and either forego needed health services or pay out of pocket. In 2001, the Thai Ministry of Public Health introduced a policy on migrant health. Migrant health insurance is a voluntary scheme, funded by an annual premium paid by workers. It enables access to health care at public facilities and reduces catastrophic health expenditures for undocumented migrants and their dependants. A range of migrant-friendly services, including trained community health volunteers, was introduced in the community and workplace. In 2014, the government introduced a multisectoral policy on migrants, coordinated across the interior, labour, public health and immigration ministries. In 2011, around 0.3 million workers, less than 9% of the estimated migrant labour force of 3.5 million, were covered by Thailand's social security scheme. A review of the latest data showed that from April to July 2016, 1 146 979 people (33.7% of the total estimated migrant labourers of 3 400 787) applied, were screened and were enrolled in the migrant health insurance scheme. Health volunteers, recruited from migrant communities and workplaces are appreciated by local communities and are effective in promoting health and increasing uptake of health services by migrants. The capacity of the health ministry to innovate and manage migrant health insurance was a crucial factor enabling expanded health insurance coverage for undocumented migrants. Continued policy support will be needed to increase recruitment to the insurance scheme and to scale-up migrant-friendly services.

  12. New times for migrants' health in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Reyes-Uruena

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Patterns of migration can change greatly over time, with the size and composition of migrant populations reflecting both, current and historical patterns of migration flows. The recent economic crisis has caused a decrease on migration flows towards the most affected areas, as well as cut offs in health interventions addressed to migrants. The objective of this paper is to review available data about interventions on migrants' health in Europe, and to describe changes in migrant health policies across Europe after the economic crisis, that can have a negative effect in their health status. Although migrants have the right to health care under legal settlements issued by the EU, there is no a standard European approach to offer health care to migrants, since; policies in each EU Member State are developed according to specific migrant experience, political climate, and attitudes towards migration. Migrants use to face greater health problems and major health care access barriers, compared with their counterparts from the EU. Therefore, migrant health policies should focus in protects this vulnerable group, especially during economic hardship, taking into account economic and socio-demographic risk factors. There is an especial need for research in the cost-effectiveness of investing in the health care of the migrant population, demonstrating the benefit of such, even in the health of the European native population, and the need for constant intervention despite of resource constraints.

  13. New times for migrants' health in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Uruena, J M; Noori, T; Pharris, A; Jansà, J M

    2014-01-01

    Patterns of migration can change greatly over time, with the size and composition of migrant populations reflecting both, current and historical patterns of migration flows. The recent economic crisis has caused a decrease on migration flows towards the most affected areas, as well as cut offs in health interventions addressed to migrants. The objective of this paper is to review available data about interventions on migrants' health in Europe, and to describe changes in migrant health policies across Europe after the economic crisis, that can have a negative effect in their health status. Although migrants have the right to health care under legal settlements issued by the EU, there is no a standard European approach to offer health care to migrants, since; policies in each EU Member State are developed according to specific migrant experience, political climate, and attitudes towards migration. Migrants use to face greater health problems and major health care access barriers, compared with their counterparts from the EU. Therefore, migrant health policies should focus in protects this vulnerable group, especially during economic hardship, taking into account economic and socio-demographic risk factors. There is an especial need for research in the cost-effectiveness of investing in the health care of the migrant population, demonstrating the benefit of such, even in the health of the European native population, and the need for constant intervention despite of resource constraints.

  14. Dietary Fat and Vitamin E in Prostate Cancer Risk Among African Americans and Africans: A Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    ns ɘ.001 Table 5: Pattern of consumption of ice cream, yogurt , salad dressing & mayonnaise in the past three months by ethnic subgroup...Food Item African- Americans African Migrants African Nigerians Total 947 p-value Ice Cream/ Yogurt Regular Low fat Fat...phospholipids and cholesterol esters reflects medium-term (weeks to months) dietary intake (32). Because blood drawing is more acceptable to study

  15. Migrantes y refugiados: reflexiones conceptuales (Migrants and refugees: conceptual reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Espinar Ruiz, Eva

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: Al margen de las definiciones legales existentes, cada vez resulta más difícil mantener una clara distinción entre refugiados (políticos y migrantes (económicos. En concreto, las restrictivas políticas migratorias, de refugio y asilo están estrechamente relacionadas con lo que los expertos llaman the asylum-migration nexus. Así, la creación de múltiples categorías administrativas de personas protegidas, la presencia de refugiados no reconocidos como tales, la incorporación de refugiados en las redes ilegales de inmigración o la solicitud del status de refugiado por parte de población migrante colaboran en la confusión de realidades. Igualmente, los cambios sociales experimentados en las últimas décadas suponen un reto para las definiciones legales derivadas de la Convención de Ginebra de 1951 y que, desde diferentes sectores, vienen calificándose como excesivamente limitadas.Abstract: Apart from the existing legal definitions, the simple distinction between (politic refugees and (economic migrants is getting more difficult to maintain. Restrictive refugee and migration legislations are strong related with what different experts have called the asylum-migration nexus. The creation of multiple administrative categories of protected people; non recognized refugees; the incorporation of refugees to illegal networks of migration; economic migrants trying to enter a country through refugee status; etc. collaborate to the confusion of the realities. Recent social changes are also a challenge to legal definitions derived from the 1951 Geneva Convention, which are described as excessively restrictive by different actors.

  16. Sampling Migrants from their Social Networks: The Demography and Social Organization of Chinese Migrants in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merli, M Giovanna; Verdery, Ashton; Mouw, Ted; Li, Jing

    2016-07-01

    The streams of Chinese migration to Africa are growing in tandem with rising Chinese investments and trade flows in and to the African continent. In spite of the high profile of this phenomenon in the media, there are few rich and broad descriptions of Chinese communities in Africa. Reasons for this include the rarity of official statistics on foreign-born populations in African censuses, the absence of predefined sampling frames required to draw representative samples with conventional survey methods and difficulties to reach certain segments of this population. Here, we use a novel network-based approach, Network Sampling with Memory, which overcomes the challenges of sampling 'hidden' populations in the absence of a sampling frame, to recruit a sample of recent Chinese immigrants in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania and collect information on the demographic characteristics, migration histories and social ties of members of this sample. These data reveal a heterogeneous Chinese community composed of "state-led" migrants who come to Africa to work on projects undertaken by large Chinese state-owned enterprises and "independent" migrants who come on their own accord to engage in various types of business ventures. They offer a rich description of the demographic profile and social organization of this community, highlight key differences between the two categories of migrants and map the structure of the social ties linking them. We highlight needs for future research on inter-group differences in individual motivations for migration, economic activities, migration outcomes, expectations about future residence in Africa, social integration and relations with local communities.

  17. A Comparison of the Verbal Behaviors of Teachers in Interaction with Migrant and Non-Migrant Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyo, Alexina M.

    Positive, neutral, and negative verbal interaction data were collected from 2 schools in which 15 elementary summer school teachers interacted with 261 migrant and non-migrant students. These pupils were specifically identified as migrant or non-migrant. These data were then mpared with the teacher's perception of the pupil as migrant or…

  18. The traffic in voices: Contrasting experiences of migrant women in prostitution with the paradigm of "human trafficking"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alpes, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    This article is based on empirical research with West African migrant women working in prostitution in Paris. Given current migration regulations in Western Europe, as well as state policies on prostitution, the traffickers and people considered to be trafficking victims de facto form part of the

  19. "Times Are Changing": The Impact of HIV Diagnosis on Sub-Saharan Migrants' Lives in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, Anne; Lelièvre, Eva; Ravalihasy, Andrainolo; Lydié, Nathalie; Lert, France; Desgrées du Loû, Annabel

    2017-01-01

    Migrants account for 35% of HIV diagnoses in the European Union (ECDC/WHO 2014). Little is known about the impact of such a lifelong infection diagnosis on lives that are already disrupted by migration. In this paper, we assess the impact of HIV diagnosis on activity, union, well-being among African migrants living in France, the second group most affected by HIV after MSM. We compare it with the impact of the diagnosis of Hepatitis B, another lifelong infection affecting African migrants. We use the ANRS PARCOURS survey, a retrospective life-event survey led in 2012-2013 in 74 health structures in Paris greater area which collected 926 life histories of Sub-Saharan migrants living with HIV and 779 with Hepatitis B. We modelled the probability year by year since 18 years of age until data collection to lose one's activity, to experience a conjugal break up and degradation of well-being and we estimated the impact of migration and of HIV and Hepatitis B diagnoses on these probabilities, after adjustment on other factors, thanks to discrete-time logistic regressions. Migration entailed loss of activity and conjugal break up, though HIV diagnosis after migration did not statistically impact on these outcomes. Yet HIV diagnosis had a massive negative impact on well-being (aOR = 11.31 [4.64-27.56] for men and 5.75 [2.79-11.86] for women). This negative impact on well-being tended to diminish for persons diagnosed after 2004. The negative impact of HIV diagnosis on African migrants' well-being seems to be attenuated in the last decade, which hints at a normalization of the subjective experience of HIV diagnosis.

  20. Malaria burden in irregular migrants returning to Sri Lanka from human smuggling operations in West Africa and implications for a country reaching malaria elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramage, K; Galappaththy, G N L

    2013-05-01

    The number of malaria cases among irregular migrants returning to Sri Lanka has not been investigated. In the first 6 months of 2012 we screened 287 irregular migrants returning from seven West African nations to Sri Lanka for malaria to ascertain the risk of infection during migration. Four men were diagnosed as having malaria: three with Plasmodium falciparum had travelled to Togo and one with P. vivax had travelled to Guinea. The risk of contracting malaria was 14 cases per 1000. Facilitating a safe return with selective screening for at-risk inbound migrants flows is desirable as Sri Lanka advances towards its goal of malaria elimination.

  1. Ethnic density, urbanicity and psychosis risk for migrant groups - A population cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Peter; Thygesen, Malene; Das-Munshi, Jay; Becares, Laia; Cantor-Graae, Elizabeth; Pedersen, Carsten; Agerbo, Esben

    2017-12-01

    Rates of psychotic disorder are raised for many migrant groups. Understanding the role played by the social context in which they live may help explain why. This study investigates the effect of both neighbourhood ethnic density and urbanicity on the incidence of non-affective psychosis for migrant groups. Population based cohort of all those born 1965 or later followed from their 15th birthday (2,224,464 people) to 1st July 2013 (37,335,812 person years). Neighbourhood exposures were measured at age 15. For all groups incidence of non-affective psychosis was greater in lower ethnic density neighbourhoods. For migrants of African origin there was a 1.94-fold increase (95% CI, 1.17-3.23) comparing lowest and highest density quintiles; with similar effects for migrants from Europe (excluding Scandinavia): incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1.99 (95% CI, 1.56-2.54); Asia: IRR 1.63 (95% CI, 1.02-2.59); and the Middle East: IRR 1.68 (95% CI, 1.19-2.38). This initial analysis found no evidence for an urbanicity effect for migrant groups. Adjusting for ethnic density revealed a positive association between level of urbanicity and psychosis for two groups, with a statistically significant linear trend (average effect of a one quintile increase) for migrants from Europe: IRR 1.09 (95% CI, 1.02-1.16) and the Middle East: IRR 1.12 (95% CI, 1.01-1.23). In this first nationwide population-based study of ethnic density, urbanicity and psychosis we show that lower ethnic density is associated with increased incidence of non-affective psychosis for different migrant groups; masking urban/rural differences in psychosis for some groups. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Governing Education for Migrant Children : The Practice of Government-Minban Migrant School in Shanghai

    OpenAIRE

    Pasiasti, Regina Cinduringtias

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to examine the practise of governing migrant schools, and to investigate the underlying rationalities behind the governance of education for migrant children, as well as to analyze the extent to which the governance of access to education for migrant children makes it possible to accommodate their future educational needs. Drawing on two months‘ research in a government-minban migrant school in the Songjiang district of Shanghai, the data demonstrates that t...

  3. [Frequent infectious diseases in migrants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stich, A

    2016-05-01

    The current influx of refugees and the high rate of immigration increase the rate and impact of infectious diseases in Europe. Infections can be detected at the initial examination of arriving refugees as a result of systematic screening or within the framework of general medical care. Diagnosis and treatment require special expertise and in some cases special precautions. The spectrum of infections is determined by the country of origin of migrants and the conditions experienced on fleeing to Germany. In this article the diagnostics and treatment of the most important infections are presented. As far as infections are concerned refugees and migrants do not represent a threat to the general population but instead have to be perceived as a highly vulnerable group.

  4. Eastern partnership migrants in Germany: outcomes, potentials and challenges

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Biavaschi, Costanza; Zimmermann, Klaus F

    2014-01-01

    .... We find that EaP migrants experience worse labor market outcomes than other migrant groups, but current and potential migrants hold qualifications in those areas were skill shortages are expected...

  5. University experiences in students migrants

    OpenAIRE

    Torcomian, Claudia Graciela; Universidad Nacional de Córdoba. Dirección: Libertad 2173, Alto General Paz. Teléf.: 351- 4512548. Código Postal: 5000.

    2017-01-01

    In this work the field of interest focuses on the experiences of college students who migrate to study the atmosphere to the city of Cordoba and its relationship to study processes in the course of Psychology. The purpose is to analyze the experiences of migrant students and their relationship with the processes of setting, autonomy and organization and identify the vital crises linked to migration during the race. The approach is qualitative and interpretative and constructive between the re...

  6. Measuring Income Assimilation of Migrants to Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Ira N. Gang; John Landon-Lane; Myeong-Su Yun

    2009-01-01

    We measure the income assimilation of migrants to Germany employing a new measure of assimilation that uses the whole income distribution rather than selected moments. To do this we implement a discrete-state Markov chain to model the dynamics of the cross-sectional income distribution of migrants and natives in Germany. Bayesian methods allow us to fully characterize the limiting cross-sectional income distribution for migrants and natives, enabling us to compare our measures of assimilation...

  7. Learning from Migrant Education: A Case Study of the Schooling of Rural Migrant Children in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodburn, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on the educational opportunities available to rural migrant children in Beijing. On the basis of fieldwork conducted in migrant communities in 2004-2005, I conclude that administrative and financial barriers, as well as discrimination, prevent migrant children from entering state schools. I discuss the quality of education…

  8. Natural resources and rural livelihoods: Differences between migrants and non-migrants in Madagascar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Nawrotzki

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Although natural resources play a central role in rural livelihoods across the globe, little research has explored the relationship between migration and natural capital use, particularly in combination with other livelihood capitals (i.e., human, social, financial and physical. OBJECTIVE Grounded in the rural livelihood framework, this paper explores the association between the livelihood capital availability, especially natural capital, for migrants and non-migrants in rural Madagascar. METHODS Data from the 2008/2009 Demographic and Health Survey are used in combination with satellite imagery of vegetation coverage (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, NDVI to proxy natural resources. Hierarchical multilevel models allow for inclusion of cross-level interactions between migrant status and proximate natural resources as determinants of the status of livelihood assets. RESULTS Three key findings emerge. First, higher levels of proximate natural resources are associated with greater financial, human, and social capital for both migrants and non-migrants. Second, migrants have, on average, greater financial, physical, human, and social capital than non-migrants, and urban-to-rural migrants do exceptionally well on all capital asset categories. Third, migrants residing in areas with higher levels of natural capital tend to have significantly higher levels of human capital (education. CONCLUSIONS Although we cannot examine livelihood strategies per se, the results suggest variation in livelihood potential among migrants and non-migrants in rural Madagascar, with migrants tending to have greater capital assets. In addition, access to natural resources is a central livelihood strategy.

  9. Sundhedsloven og sundhedsydelser hos udokumenterede migranter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabenhus, Rune; Hallas, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Health-care workers may experience uncertainty regarding legal matters when attending to medical needs of undocumented migrants. This paper applies a pragmatic focus when addressing the legal aspects involved in providing health-care services to undocumented migrants with examples from the Danish...... Health Act and international conventions. The delivery of medical care to vulnerable groups such as pregnant women and children is described.......Health-care workers may experience uncertainty regarding legal matters when attending to medical needs of undocumented migrants. This paper applies a pragmatic focus when addressing the legal aspects involved in providing health-care services to undocumented migrants with examples from the Danish...

  10. Employers mexican migrants in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Fernández Guzmán

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available You might think that by definition the migrant labor plays in less profitable niches and meager social mobility. However, a large group of migrants in different economically developed countries have successfully launched businesses of diverse nature and volume. This is why entrepreneurship of migrants is an issue that has received increasing attention in recent years. Compared to other immigrant groups in the United States, Mexicans show low levels of entrepreneurial activity. The aim of this paper is to, through a general literature review of official statistical data, a preliminary analysis of mexican migrant entrepreneurship in the United States, that is to say in recent years has been growing in importance.

  11. Undocumented migrants have diverse health problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehmsen, Boje Kvorning; Biswas, Dan Klausholt; Jensen, Natasja Koitszch

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 2008, 1.9-3.8 million undocumented migrants lived in Europe. We aimed to strengthen the evidence base on undocumented migrants' health problems by describing characteristics of undocumented migrant patients in a Danish non-governmental organisation (NGO) health clinic. MATERIAL...... on average (16+ weeks). CONCLUSION: Undocumented migrants presented with diverse health problems. Some patients presented with critical disease, and an alarming number of pregnant women did not seek medical care until a late stage, and they did not return for infant care after giving birth. FUNDING...

  12. Tunisian Migrant Journeys: Human Rights Concerns for Tunisians Arriving by Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Maegan Hendow

    2013-01-01

    In part due to its location on the North African coast, in conjunction with its history of being a former French protectorate, Tunisia has become an important country of emigration to the European Union. In particular, maritime arrivals have become a concern for European states, for both humanitarian and security reasons. The experiences of Tunisian irregular migrants arriving to the EU by sea, who are then detained and returned, highlights the multitude of human rights issues that arise acro...

  13. Carcinoid Tumor in Accidental, Asymptomatic Meckel's Diverticulum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although Meckel's diverticulum is the most common congenital gastrointestinal disorder, it is controversial whether asymptomatic diverticula in adults should be respected. The authors report the case of a patient who was operated due to ileus caused by adhesions and a Meckel's diverticulum without any sign of ...

  14. Asymptomatic carotid arterial stenosis - population based screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    Screening for asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis in the general population is discussed in many countries because of the benefits of carotid endarterectomy in the three trials. Many factors influence the cost-effectiveness of screening. These factors are the prevalence of carotid stenosis, the

  15. Microbial aetiology and sensitivity of asymptomatic bacteriuria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Twenty nine (13.3%) of the samples had significant bacterial growth and E.coli was the commonest isolate (51.2%). There was a high level (20- 62%) of anti-bacterial resistance to the commonly used antibiotics. Conclusion: Asymptomatic bacteriuria is common among ante-natal mothers in Mulago. E. Coli that is ...

  16. Prevalence of Asymptomatic Genital Infection among Pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All the isolates except Streptococcus faecalis were resistant to ampicillin. These results show a high rate of asymptomatic genital tract infections among pregnant women in Benin City, which have implications for adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes. (Afr J Reprod Health 2002; 6[3]: 93-97) Résumé Prévalence de ...

  17. Detecting asymptomatic coronary artery disease using routine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-09-01

    Sep 1, 1990 ... ECG-monitored exercise testing has been proposed as a relatively inexpensive and effective means of screening for asymptomatic coronary artery disease in patients presenting for peripheral vascular surgery. Despite the fact that exercise thallium scintigraphy is also dependent on the patient's ability.

  18. Detecting asymptomatic coronary artery disease using routine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ECG-monitored exercise testing has been proposed as a relatively inexpensive and effective means of screening for asymptomatic coronary artery disease in patients presenting for peripheral vascular surgery. Despite the fact that exercise thallium scintigraphy is also dependent on the patient's ability to exercise, using this ...

  19. Pulmonary Performance In Asymptomatic Young Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pulmonary Performance In Asymptomatic Young Nigerian Population Following The Administration Of Ascorbic Acid And Salbutamol. ... Ascorbic acid was given orally at a dose of 1.50 mg /kg body weight; and salbutamol at a dose of 70 μg/kg body weight, orally. Measurements ... http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/njps.v19i1.32635.

  20. pulmonary performance in asymptomatic young nigerian population

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bioline

    1. PULMONARY PERFORMANCE IN ASYMPTOMATIC YOUNG NIGERIAN. POPULATION FOLLOWING THE ADMINISTRATION OF ASCORBIC. ACID AND SALBUTAMOL. S. O. ODEH1, I. E. AGABA2, A. M. SABO 1, and R. A. ODANAOGUN 1. 1 Department of Human Physiology, 2 Department of Medicine and Radiology,.

  1. Prevalence of malaria parasitaemia amongst asymptomatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Statistical analysis was done using IBM-SPSS Windows version 20. Results: The mean age of study participants was 26.7 ± 5.1 years and the age range was 17- 42 years. The prevalence of asymptomatic malaria parasitaemia was 49.6%. Nulliparity and anaemia (PCV <30%) were associated with increased prevalence of ...

  2. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in pregnant women attending antenatal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The susceptibility rate of bacterial isolate was highest for levofloxacin (83.6%), followed by nalidixic acid (64.2%) and nitrofurantoin (62.7%). The pathogens were least susceptible to co-trimoxazole (8.3%), ampilcillin (8.8%) and amoxicillin (10.4%) Conclusion: The prevalence of asymptomatic bacteria among the pregnant ...

  3. Tetanus toxoid antibody level in asymptomatic Plasmodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was designed to investigate if the presence of asymptomatic malaria parasiteamia in pregnant women will compromise their ability to respond to full dose of tetanus toxoid immunization during their antenatal clinic visits. Hence, 90 apparently healthy pregnant women who had completed the tetanus toxoid ...

  4. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria among Pregnant Women Attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The apparent decline in immunity of pregnant women appears to promote the growth of both com-mensal and non-commensal microorganisms. The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women visiting the University hospital, Ku-masi. This prospective ...

  5. Asymptomatic body packers should be treated conservatively

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glovinski, Peter V; Lauritsen, Morten L; Bay-Nielsen, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Body packing takes advantage of the human storage capacity within the alimentary tract. Body packing is used for the smuggling of drugs such as heroin, cocaine, amphetamine, hashish and ecstasy. Most body packers are asymptomatic. However, packets may rupture or obstruct the alimentary tract...

  6. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in HIV Positive Nigerian Children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria in HIV positive children and to identify the causative organisms. We studied 155 Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infected children aged 10 months to 17 years attending the Paediatric HIV clinics of the University of Benin Teaching ...

  7. Prevalence and Parasite Density of Asymptomatic Malaria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Malaria in pregnancy has contributed significantly to maternal morbidity and mortality in our environment. Aim: This study was aimed at determining the prevalence, and parasite density of asymptomatic malaria parasitemia among unbooked paturients at Federal Teaching Hospital Abakaliki. Subjects and ...

  8. asymptomatic bacteriuria in hiv positive nigerian children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FinePrint

    children with sickle cell anemia in steady state, overall prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria in children aged 2 ... continued depletion of CD4 cells. This immune deficient state predisposes to a wide variety of infections, ... DNA PCR in the children younger than. 18months and by serology for children older than 18 months.

  9. Prevalence and Parasite Density of Asymptomatic Malaria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    effective use of insecticide treated nets and intermittent prophylaxis therapy for malaria during pregnancy. KEY WORDS: Asymptomatic malaria parasitemia, Nigeria, prevalence, unbooked paturients. INTRODUCTION. Malaria is a parasitic disease of humans especially in the sub‑Saharan Africa, where about 90% of deaths ...

  10. Status and Familial Projections of Mexican-American Migrants and Non-Migrants: Are Migrant Youths Different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Michael V.; Kuvlesky, William P.

    The study investigated whether Mexican American male and female migrants differed from Mexican American male and female non-migrants in reference to: level and type of occupational and educational aspirations and expectations; projected age of marriage and procreation; and valuation of life goals. Using data gathered in a 1973 survey of Mexican…

  11. [Mortality risks of migrants: Analysis of the healthy-migrant-effect after the 2011 German Census].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohls, Martin

    2015-06-01

    In Germany there are 16 million people with a migration background, one in five of the total population. There are relatively few migrant mortality studies in Germany, which is primarily due to the restricted quantity and quality of existing data. The official migrant death statistics for Germany suffer from incomplete migrant population stock data due to non-registered remigration events. After the German census in 2011 especially the migrant stock data was adjusted downwards, and therefore realistic estimates of the migrant mortality risk and the healthy-migrant-effect are possible. Between 2010 and 2013 mortality risks of foreigners rose strongly due to the census corrections of the migrant population. However, the risks for adults and pensioners still lie below the risks for Germans in the same age groups. The lower risks indicate a healthy-migrant-effect, whicht was primarily effective shortly after the immigration event. Analysis based on data from the Statutory Pension Insurance (GRV) shows higher migrant mortality risks in the age group from 65 to 84. In that age group there are supposedly a lot of people, who immigrated to Germany in the context of the guest worker recruitment in the 1950s to 1970s and who had hard working conditions in their lifetimes. Their mortality risk, therefore, increased in the long-term perspective. In the future the lack of data in the migrant population will again rise due to unregistered remigration. Alternative databases need to be used for migrant mortality analyses.

  12. Migrant Education Program. Comprehensive Needs Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The primary purpose of the Minnesota Migrant Education Program (MEP) is to help migrant children and youth overcome challenges of mobility, frequent absences, late enrollment into school, social isolation, and other difficulties associated with a migratory life, in order that they might succeed in school. Furthermore, the Minnesota MEP must give…

  13. Media representations of Zimbabwean women migrants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    'Kids sold, desperate moms need cash' : Media representations of Zimbabwean women migrants. ... contexts in order to account for the migrant women's voices of resilience, defiance and victimhood and of agency, against the normalising and marginalising influences of political institutions and national border controls.

  14. Ghanaian migrant women's involvement in microlevel community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    When migrants remit, there is no expectation to receive a gift but such reciprocity is based on cultural norms, obligations and loyalty to one's kin and community. These cultural norms and obligations override selfinterest in reciprocal arrangements. Keywords: Solidarity, community projects, remittance, Ghanaian migrant ...

  15. Incorporating Migrant Farmers into Nigeria's Agricultural Extension ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper described the rural dynamics of Igbo migrant farmers found among Odolu/Igalamela people of Kogi State of Nigeria. Semi-structured interview schedule were used in collecting data from one hundred heads of migrant households. Percentages, wealth classification, mean scores and T-test were used to analyze ...

  16. Competition for Migrants in a Federation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köthenbürger, Marko

    The paper provides an equilibrium analysis of how countries compete for migrants. The type of competition (tax or transfer competition) depends on whether the competing countries have similar policy preferences. With symmetric preferences, countries compete in taxes for migrants. With asymmetric...

  17. Equity for Migrant Children in Rural Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Garza, Charles

    Economic pressures along with health, nutrition, housing, sanitation, and child labor problems contribute in large measure to the plight of the migrant population. The incomplete and fragmented education migrant children receive is further compounded by low expectations from teachers and inappropriate curriculums. Legislative action has attempted…

  18. Sundhedsloven og sundhedsydelser hos udokumenterede migranter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabenhus, Rune Munck; Hallas, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Health-care workers may experience uncertainty regarding legal matters when attending to medical needs of undocumented migrants. This paper applies a pragmatic focus when addressing the legal aspects involved in providing health-care services to undocumented migrants with examples from the Danish...

  19. MIKROMITSETY- MIGRANTS IN MINGECHEVIR RESERVOIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Salmanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. It is hardly possible to predict the continued stability of the watercourse ecosystems without the study of biological characteristics and composition of organisms inhabiting them. In the last 35-40 years, environmental conditions of the Mingachevir reservoir are determined by the stationary anthropogenic pressure. It was found that such components of plankton as algae, bacteria and fungi play a leading role in the transformation and migration of pollutants. The role of the three groups of organisms is very important in maintaining the water quality by elimination of pollutants. Among the organisms inhabiting the Mingachevir Reservoir, micromycetes have not yet been studied. Therefore, the study of the species composition and seasonal dynamics, peculiarities of their growth and development in the environment with the presence of some of the pollutants should be considered to date.Methods. In order to determine the role of micromycetes-migrants in the mineralization of organic substrates, as an active participant of self-purification process, we used water samples from the bottom sediments as well as decaying and skeletonized stalks of cane, reeds, algae, macrophytes, exuvia of insects and fish remains submerged in water.Findings. For the first time, we obtained the data on the quality and quantity of microscopic mycelial fungi in freshwater bodies on the example of the Mingachevir water reservoir; we also studied the possibilities for oxygenating the autochthonous organic matter of allochthonous origin with micromycetes-migrants.Conclusions. It was found that the seasonal development of micromycetes-migrants within the Mingachevir reservoir is characterized by an increase in the number of species in the summer and a gradual reduction in species diversity in the fall. 

  20. Migrant mortality from diabetes mellitus across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandenheede, Hadewijch; Deboosere, Patrick; Stirbu, Irina

    2012-01-01

    The first objective of this study was to determine and quantify variations in diabetes mortality by migrant status in different European countries. The second objective was to investigate the hypothesis that diabetes mortality is higher in migrant groups for whom the country of residence (COR......) is more affluent than the country of birth (COB). We obtained mortality data from 7 European countries. To assess migrant diabetes mortality, we used direct standardization and Poisson regression. First, migrant mortality was estimated for each country separately. Then, we merged the data from all...... mortality registers. Subsequently, to examine the second hypothesis, we introduced gross domestic product (GDP) per capita of COB in the models, as an indicator of socio-economic circumstances. The overall pattern shows higher diabetes mortality in migrant populations compared to local-born populations...

  1. Bodies Folded in Migrant Crypts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galis, Vasilis; Tzokas, Spyros; Tympas, Aristotle

    2016-01-01

    and human migrants generates a dis/abled subject. In this context, dis/ability may be a cause or consequence of migration, both in physical/material (the folding of bodies in the crypt) and cultural/semiotic terms, and may become a barrier to accessing protection, to entering and/or crossing a country......, and to performing mobility in general. Dis/ability and migration have not been associated in the literature. We adopt an analytical symmetry between humans and non-humans, in this case between bodies and crypts. By suggesting an infected, ambivalent, and hybrid approach to the human subject, the body...

  2. [Asymptomatic classical hereditary xanthinuria type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakubov, Renata; Nir, Vered; Kassem, Eiass; Klein-Kremer, Adi

    2012-06-01

    We report on a girl who was diagnosed with classical hereditary xanthinuria due to an incidental finding of extremely low Levels of uric acid in the blood. The girl is compLetely asymptomatic. Hereditary xanthinuria is a rare autosomal recessive disease that usually causes early urolithiasis but may cause rheumatoid arthritis-like disease and even be associated with defects in the formation of bone, hair and teeth. In Israel it has mostly been described in patients of Bedouin origin. Throughout the world, only about 150 cases have been described; about two thirds of these patients were asymptomatic. Since the clinical presentation and age of symptom appearance are diverse, the case raises questions as to the required follow-up of these patients and as to whether a low oxalate diet should be initiated.

  3. Imported Asymptomatic Bancroftian Filariasis Discovered from a Plasmodium vivax Infected Patient: A Case Report from Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marc Chavatte

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human lymphatic filariasis is a vector-borne disease mainly caused by the parasitic nematode Wuchereria bancrofti and transmitted worldwide within the tropical and subtropical regions. Singapore was once endemic for bancroftian filariasis but recent reports are scarce and the disease is nearly forgotten. The case report presented here reports the incidental hospital laboratory finding of an asymptomatic microfilaremia in a relapsing Plasmodium vivax imported case during a malaria treatment follow-up appointment. The parasite was identified by microscopy as W. bancrofti and retrospective investigation of the sample collected during malaria onset was found to be also positive. Additional confirmation was obtained by DNA amplification, sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis of the mitochondrial cox1 gene that further related the parasite to W. bancrofti strains from the Indian region. Considering the large proportion of asymptomatic filariasis with microfilaremia, the high number of migrants and travellers arriving from the surrounding endemic countries, and the common presence of local competent mosquito vectors, Singapore remains vulnerable to the introduction, reemergence, and the spread of lymphatic filariasis. This report brings out from the shadow the potential risk of lymphatic filariasis in Singapore and could help to maintain awareness about this parasitic disease and its public health importance.

  4. Effects of temperate agriculture on neotropical migrant landbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas L. Rodenhouse; Louis B. Best; Raymond J. O' Connor; Eric K. Bollinger

    1993-01-01

    The ecology of Neotropical migrant landbirds in temperate farmland is reviewed to develop management recommendations for the conservation of migrants. Migrants constitute about 71% of bird species using farmland and 86% of bird species nesting there. The number and abundances of Neotropical migrants using farmland are greatest in uncultivated edges with trees and...

  5. The Undocumented: Educating the Children of Migrant Workers in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Paul E.

    2003-01-01

    Partly because of mobility, but mostly because of poverty, migrant children are systematically denied their right to equal educational opportunity. This review covers migrant families' immigration and illegal immigration, migration patterns, poor living conditions, impact of migrant workers on the U.S. economy, children as migrant workers, impact…

  6. Asymptomatic deer excrete infectious prions in feces

    OpenAIRE

    Tamg?ney, G?ltekin; Miller, Michael W.; Wolfe, Lisa L.; Sirochman, Tracey M.; Glidden, David V.; Palmer, Christina; Lemus, Azucena; DeArmond, Stephen J.; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    2009-01-01

    Infectious prion diseases 1 ? scrapie of sheep 2 and chronic wasting disease (CWD) of several species in the deer family 3,4 ? are transmitted naturally within affected host populations. Although several possible sources of contagion have been identified in excretions and secretions from symptomatic animals 5?8 , the biological importance of these sources in sustaining epidemics remains unclear. Here we show that asymptomatic CWD-infected mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) excrete CWD prions in ...

  7. Asymptomatic deer excrete infectious prions in faeces

    OpenAIRE

    Tamgüney, G; Miller, MW; Wolfe, LL; Sirochman, TM; Glidden, DV; Palmer, C; Lemus, A; Dearmond, SJ; Prusiner, SB

    2009-01-01

    Infectious prion diseasesĝ€"scrapie of sheep and chronic wasting disease (CWD) of several species in the deer familyĝ€" are transmitted naturally within affected host populations. Although several possible sources of contagion have been identified in excretions and secretions from symptomatic animals, the biological importance of these sources in sustaining epidemics remains unclear. Here we show that asymptomatic CWD-infected mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) excrete CWD prions in their faeces...

  8. Asymptomatic atlantoaxial subluxation in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadali Nazarinia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study is conducted to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic cervical spine subluxation in rheumatoid arthritis patients by plain radiographs and its relation to demographic and clinical characteristics, disease activity measures and medications. 100 rheumatoid arthritis patients (18 male and 82 female were selected randomly, according to the American college of Rheumatology Criteria, who were under follow up in the rheumatology clinic. A complete history was taken, and physical examination has been done with focus on the cervical spine to determine their demographic data, disease duration, age of disease onset, drug history, swollen and tender joint counts, and ESR, Hb, CRP, RF levels. The disease activity of patients with rheumatoid arthritis was measured using the disease activity score 28. Radiographs of the cervical spine included lateral views taken in flexion, extension, neutral position of the neck and anterioposterior and odontoid projection view. Asymptomatic cervical spine subluxation was found in 17 of the 100 patients (17%. The prevalence of, anterior atlantoaxial subluxation, atlantoaxial impaction and subaxial subluxation was 10(10%, 5(5% and 6(6%, respectively. Posterior subluxation was not detected. The only characteristic that showed meaningful relationship with cervical spine subluxation was CRP (P=0.036. Our results showed that patients with RA, who have cervical spine subluxation cannot be distinguished on the basis of symptoms. Cervical spine involvement is common and may be asymptomatic, indicating routine cervical spine imaging is needed in patients with RA.

  9. African immigrants' perceptions of the 2010 FIFA World Cup and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... perceptions of African migrants. Given that the latter social category has been relatively marginalised in terms of South Africa's recent political economy, and the World Cup was framed as 'an African World Cup', this research contributes to an under-researched dimension of the politics of mega sport events in South Africa.

  10. Assessing maternal healthcare inequities among migrants: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia Moreira Almeida

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Considering pregnancy and motherhood as periods of increased vulnerability in migrant women, to characterize the healthcare provided to this collective, we sought to identify and understand patterns of satisfaction and demand of maternal and child healthcare, assessing women’s perceptions about its quality. The study followed a qualitative methodology (semi-structured interviews for collecting and analysing data (content analysis and was conducted in Porto, the second largest city of Portugal. Participants were 25 recent immigrant mothers from Eastern European countries, Brazil, Portuguese-speaking African countries and six native Portuguese recent mothers (for comparison, contacted through social associations and institutions. Data suggests that healthcare depends not only on accessibility but especially on social opportunities. Equitable public health action must provide individuals and groups the equal opportunity to meet their needs, which may not be achieved by providing the same standard if care to all.

  11. Development of the Migrant Friendly Maternity Care Questionnaire (MFMCQ) for migrants to Western societies: An international Delphi consensus process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gagnon, A.J.; DeBruyn, R.; Essén, B.; Gissler, M.; Heaman, M.; Jeambey, Z.; Korfker, D.; McCourt, C.; Roth, C.; Zeitlin, J.; Small, R.; Alexander, S.; Racapé, J.; Arntzen, A.; Barros, H.; Blondel, B.; Merry, L.; Glazier, R.; Kirby, R.; Mohangoo, A.; Macfarlane, A.; Dattani, N.; Nybo Andersen, A.M.; Mortensen, L.; Villadsen, S.; Davey, M.A.; Sievers, E.; Stray-Pedersen, B.; Urquia, M.; Janevic, T.; Guendelman, S.; Bolumar, F.; Río Sánchez, M.I.; Hjern, A.; Vangen, S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Through the World Health Assembly Resolution, 'Health of Migrants', the international community has identified migrant health as a priority. Recommendations for general hospital care for international migrants in receiving-countries have been put forward by the Migrant Friendly Hospital

  12. We Have Come to Stay and We Shall Find All Means to Live and Work in this Country: Nigerian Migrants and Life Challenges in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adediran Daniel Ikuomola

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent times many Nigerians have been singled out when it comes to criminal activities and xenophobic attacks in South Africa, which leads to disruption of the hitherto cordial relationship between South African host communities and Nigerian migrants. Nevertheless, the rate of Nigerians migrating to South Africa keeps soaring. Studies of migration between Nigeria and South Africa, have been scanty, often limited to the study of traditional economic disparity between the two countries with less emphasis on the social-cultural challenges facing Nigerian migrants in the host communities. This paper thus examined the socio-economic and cultural challenges facing Nigerian migrants in selected communities in Johannesburg, South Africa. Data for the study were collected through in-depth interviews and focus group discussions with Nigerian migrants in Hillbrow, Braamfontein and Alexandra suburbs in Johannesburg, South Africa.

  13. Undocumented migrants have diverse health problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehmsen, Boje Kvorning; Biswas, Dan; Jensen, Natasja Koitszch

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 2008, 1.9-3.8 million undocumented migrants lived in Europe. We aimed to strengthen the evidence base on undocumented migrants' health problems by describing characteristics of undocumented migrant patients in a Danish non-governmental organisation (NGO) health clinic. MATERIAL...... on the International Classification of Primary Care, 2nd Edition (ICPC-2). RESULTS: A total of 830 patients (39.75% women and 60.25% men) visited the clinic, which led to a total of 2,088 visits and 1,384 ICPC-2 classifications. The patients seen had 94 different nationalities. The most common reasons for medical...

  14. THE MIGRANT WORKER AND LEGISLATIVE PROTECTION. A DISCUSSION OF THE SOUTH AFRICA EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chux G. Iwu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Within the context of this paper, a migrant is defined as an asylum seeker, a refugee, a legal and or an illegal immigrant. Labour migration in South Africa has received little attention due to concerns with immigration, which are regarded as far more immediate and pressing. This consideration and others provide the impetus for this paper, which in the opinion of the authors adds to the growing concern over the issues of xenophobia and incidences of maltreatment of African immigrants in South Africa, especially against the background of the bold posture of South Africa’s constitution as the most promising constitution in the world. One must note that South Africa’s independence in 1994 and the prospects of a booming economy in a democratic setting unleashed a floodgate for immigration into the Republic from a variety of countries in Africa including Eastern Europe. This paper finds that despite narratives that tend to argue that migrant workers are deficiently protected in South Africa, evidence suggests that their rights within and outside of the workplace are indeed under the veil of protection by the legislation and the courts. Nonetheless, we are of the opinion that more interventions need to be in place, especially with regard to mitigating the levels of exploitation of migrant workers. This and many other recommendations have been put forward considering that migrant workers are susceptible to exploitation.

  15. THE ROLE OF MIGRANT ASSOCIATIONS IN LANGUAGE EDUCATION OF UKRAINIAN CHILDREN WITH MIGRANT BACKGROUND IN PORTUGAL

    OpenAIRE

    Gut, Natalia

    2017-01-01

    The article analyses the role the migrant associations play in language education of children with migrant background. The presented research assumes language education of migrants as the process of learning language of host country and other foreign languages as well as mastering the language of the country of origin. It is stated that in Portugal mother tongue tuition is usually offered outside the state school framework and the Ukrainian language education is organised and funded by volunt...

  16. Risk of germ cell testicular cancer according to origin: a migrant cohort study in 1,100,000 Israeli men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Hagai; Afek, Arnon; Shamiss, Ari; Derazne, Estela; Tzur, Dorit; Zavdy, Ofir; Barchana, Micha; Kark, Jeremy D

    2013-04-15

    Testicular cancer incidence is highest among men of northern European ancestry and lowest among men of Asian/African descent. We conducted a large-scale migrant cohort study to assess origin and migrant generation as predictors of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs), controlling for possible confounders. Data on 1,092,373 Jewish Israeli males, who underwent a general health examination prior to compulsory military service at ages 16-19 between the years 1967-2005, were linked to Israel National Cancer Registry to obtain incident TGCTs up to 2006. Cox proportional hazards was used to model time to event. Overall, 1,001 incident cases (534 seminoma and 467 nonseminoma) were detected during 19.2 million person-years of follow-up. Origin was a strong independent predictor of TGCTs with remarkably low incidence for North African-born (HR = 0.10, 95% CI: 0.04-0.21) and Asian-born (HR = 0.35, 0.20-0.62), while intermediate for Israeli-born of North African origin (HR = 0.48, 0.40-0.58) and Asian origin (HR = 0.56, 0.47-0.66), compared to European origin. A comparison of Israeli born of North African and Asian origin with North African and Asian-born yielded a HR of 2.31 (1.36-3.93). Significant risk factors controlled for were year of birth, years of education and height. Findings persisted when analyses were stratified by histologic subtypes of TGCTs. The findings of lower rates of TGCTs among men born in North Africa and Asia compared to European ancestry, but a steep increase in next generation migrants, particularly among the Israeli-born migrants from North Africa, provide clues to direct further research on the role of modern lifestyle and environment in the etiology of TGCTs. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  17. Migrants and non-migrants in Kücükkale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Connie Carøe

    2013-01-01

    migrants and non-migrants are not least in existence when it comes to the cultural style of consumption practices, behaviour and manners. The mutual stereotyping of migrants and non-migrants seems to confirm that at least one version of the meaning made locally of migration is that it has deepened...... dependents. Thus the transnational village has become a space for contesting how social status is acquired—in material wealth or in moral comportment—indicating the social suffering that migration has brought to the local sending society....

  18. Bodies Folded in Migrant Crypts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galis, Vasilis; Tzokas, Spyros; Tympas, Aristotle

    2016-01-01

    This article considers media narratives that suggest that hiding in trucks, buses, and other vehicles to cross borders has, in fact, been a common practice in the context of migration to, and within, Europe. We aim to problematize how the tension between the materiality of bordering practices...... and human migrants generates a dis/abled subject. In this context, dis/ability may be a cause or consequence of migration, both in physical/material (the folding of bodies in the crypt) and cultural/semiotic terms, and may become a barrier to accessing protection, to entering and/or crossing a country......-crypt traveling border challenges the essentialist dichotomies between technology and biology, disability and impairment. The articles and reports upon which we rely were collected through extensive searches of databases/archives of online newspapers and news websites....

  19. Migrant and Ethnic Minority Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise; Agyemang, Charles; Stronks, Karien

    2015-01-01

    European populations have become increasingly ethnically diverse as a result of migration, and evidence supports the existence of health inequalities between ethnic groups in Europe. This chapter addresses two main issues. First, we examine the pathways that are considered causal to inequalities...... in health related to migration and ethnicity. Thereto we will first define the concepts of migration and ethnicity, briefly review the various groups of migrants and ethnic minorities in Europe, and introduce a conceptual model that specifies the link and causal pathways between ethnicity and health....... Then we use the example of ethnic inequalities in cardiovascular disease and diabetes to illustrate the conceptual model. The second issue concerns the potential contribution from the health-care system to minimize the ethnic inequalities in health. As a public health sector, we should do all we can...

  20. Slovene migrant literature in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Maver

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This article on the literary creativity of Slovene rnigrants in Australia after the Second World War, including the most recent publications, discusses only the most artistically accomplished auth­ ors and addresses those works that have received the most enthusiastic reception by the critics and readers alike. Of course, those who are not mentioned are also important to the preservation of Slovene culture and identity among the Slovene migrants in Australia from a documentary, histori­ cal,or ethnological points of view. However, the genresfeatured here include the explicitly literary, the semi-literary fictionalized biography, the memoir and documentary fiction, and the literary journalistic text - all those fields and genres that nowadays straddle the division line between 'high' literature and so-called 'creative fiction'.

  1. Migrant entrepreneurship, economic activity and export performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baklanov, Nikita; Rezaei, Shahamak; Brambini-Pedersen, Jan Vang

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies on transnational entrepreneurship suggest that migrant entrepreneur plays an increasingly significant role as sources of economic activities and especially export revenue. The literature is, however, biased on the US experience, lacks a comparative perspective between migrants...... the transnational entrepreneurship literature to the immigration and internationalisation of entrepreneurship literature. Entrepreneurial economic activity in this paper is proxied by the changing share of self-owned firms across ethic categories. Export revenue is proxied by the number of firms in the different...... and non-migrants and is primarily anecdotal in nature. This paper aims to reduce this gap by mapping the recent changes in the role of migrant entrepreneurs as a source of increased economic activity and export revenue in the Danish context and thereby linking the challenges stemming from...

  2. Undocumented migrants have diverse health problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehmsen, Boje Kvorning; Biswas, Dan Klausholt; Jensen, Natasja Koitszch

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 2008, 1.9-3.8 million undocumented migrants lived in Europe. We aimed to strengthen the evidence base on undocumented migrants' health problems by describing characteristics of undocumented migrant patients in a Danish non-governmental organisation (NGO) health clinic. MATERIAL...... on the International Classification of Primary Care, 2nd Edition (ICPC-2). RESULTS: A total of 830 patients (39.75% women and 60.25% men) visited the clinic, which led to a total of 2,088 visits and 1,384 ICPC-2 classifications. The patients seen had 94 different nationalities. The most common reasons for medical...... on average (16+ weeks). CONCLUSION: Undocumented migrants presented with diverse health problems. Some patients presented with critical disease, and an alarming number of pregnant women did not seek medical care until a late stage, and they did not return for infant care after giving birth. FUNDING...

  3. Mental health challenges of LGBT forced migrants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Shidlo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Many LGBT forced migrants have significant and sometimesincapacitating psychological scars. Mental health providers can assistin documenting the psychological impact of anti-LGBT persecutionand its impact on the ability to secure refugee status.

  4. Work injuries among migrant workers in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering, Karin; Lander, Flemming; Rasmussen, Kurt

    2017-01-01

    . Workers who had migrated recently were at even higher risk. CONCLUSIONS: We found increased risk of work injuries among migrant workers. Studying migrants in registers is a methodological challenge as some migrants are not registered, for legal or illegal reasons; thus, only a selected group is studied...... to methodological difficulties and cultural disparities. We set out to meet these challenges using population-based work injury registers, targeting a specific and representative region in Denmark. METHODS: This population-based study used data on work injuries from an emergency department (ED) and reported...... injuries from the ED's catchment area to the Danish Working Environment Authority during 11 years. We calculated incidences of work injury for groups of migrant workers compared with native Danes and adjusted incidence rate ratios based on information on the complete working population. RESULTS...

  5. Diabetes among Inuit migrants in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moustgaard, Helene; Bjerregaard, Peter; Borch-Johnsen, Knut

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The study aimed to estimate the prevalence of diabetes and impaired glucose intolerance (IGT) among Inuit migrants living in Denmark, and to compare with findings from Greenland. Further, we analyzed determinants for diabetes and impaired glucose metabolism. STUDY DESIGN: Cross......-sectional, population-based epidemiological study. METHODS: This cross-sectional study included randomly selected Inuit migrants in Denmark aged 34 years and above. Diabetes and IGT were diagnosed using the oral glucose tolerance test. Body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference were measured, and blood samples were...... and physical inactivity. The association between waist circumference and diabetes was significantly stronger among Inuit migrants in Denmark than among Inuit in Greenland. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of diabetes is high among the Inuit migrants in Denmark. However, unlike that reported in most studies...

  6. Maternal Mortality Among Migrants in Western Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Grete Skøtt; Grøntved, Anders; Mortensen, Laust Hvas

    2013-01-01

    To examine whether an excess risk of maternal mortality exists among migrant women in Western Europe. We searched electronic databases for studies published 1970 through 2013 for all observational studies comparing maternal mortality between the host country and a defined migrant population....... Compared with indigenous born women, the pooled risk estimate (RR) was 2.00 with 95 % confidence interval (CI) of 1.72, 2.33. Migrant women had a non-significantly higher risk of dying from direct than indirect death causes; pooled RRs of 2.65 CI 1.88, 3.74 and 1.83 CI 1.37, 2.45. This meta......-analysis provides evidence that migrant women in Western European countries have an excess risk of maternal mortality....

  7. Culture Clash: Shona (Zimbabwean) Migrant Women's Experiences ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Culture Clash: Shona (Zimbabwean) Migrant Women's Experiences with Communicating about Sexual Health and Wellbeing across Cultures and Generations. ... and their responsiveness for cross-cultural youth. Keywords: Africa, cross-cultural, Australia, intergenerational, sexual health, intercultural communication ...

  8. Migranter i prostitution klemmes af lovgivning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanger, Marlene

    2008-01-01

    Kvindelige migranter, der prostituerer sig, er en potentielt udsat gruppe, der ofte kommer i klemme mellem to politikområder - myndighedernes menneskehandelsindsats og ægteskabssammenføringslovgivningen....

  9. Developing programs for african families, by african families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halliday, Jennifer A; Green, Julie; Mellor, David

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is an emerging problem for African migrants in Australia, but few prevention programs incorporate their cultural beliefs and values. This study reports on the application of community capacity-building and empowerment principles in 4 workshops with Sudanese families in Australia. Workshop...... effects of physical activity and nutrition to improve health within communities while reducing intergenerational and gender role family conflicts....... participants prioritized health behaviors, skill and knowledge gaps, and environments for change to identify culturally centered approaches to health promotion. The workshops highlighted a need for culturally and age-appropriate interventions that build whole-of-family skills and knowledge around the positive...

  10. Prevalence of asymptomatic urinary abnormalities among adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Fouad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the prevalence of asymptomatic urinary abnormalities in adolescents, first morning clean mid-stream urine specimens were obtained from 2500 individuals and examined by dipstick and light microscopy. Adolescents with abnormal screening results were reexamined after two weeks and those who had abnormal results twice were subjected to systemic clinical examination and further clinical and laboratory investigations. Eight hundred and three (32.1% individuals had urinary abnormalities at the first screening, which significantly decreased to 345 (13.8% at the second screening, (P <0.001. Hematuria was the most common urinary abnormalities detected in 245 (9.8% adolescents who had persistent urine abnormalities; 228 (9.1% individuals had non glomerular hematuria. The hematuria was isolated in 150 (6% individuals, combined with leukocyturia in 83 (3.3% individuals, and combined with proteinuria in 12 (0.5% individuals. Leukocyturia was detected in 150 (6% of all studied adolescents; it was isolated in 39 (1.6% individuals and combined with proteinuria in 28 (1.1% of them. Asymp- tomatic bacteriuria was detected in 23 (0.9% of all studied adolescents; all the cases were females. Proteinuria was detected in 65 (2.6% of all the studied adolescents; 45 (1.8% indivi- duals had <0.5 g/day and twenty (0.8% individuals had 0.5-3 g/day. Asymptomatic urinary abnormalities were more common in males than females and adolescents from rural than urban areas (P <0.01 and (P <0.001, respectively. The present study found a high prevalence of asymptomatic urinary abnormalities among adolescents in our population.

  11. Asymptomatic Central Pontine Myelinolysis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Omar Shah

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM is an acquired demyelinating lesion of the basis pontis that typically occurs after rapid correction of hyponatremia. There are only a few reported cases of patients without symptoms that have demonstrated CPM on imaging. Case Presentation: We report the case of a 26-year-old Hispanic male with history of alcohol abuse who was transferred to our medical center for acute onset diffuse abdominal pain. During his work up, a computed tomography scan demonstrated a large pancreatic mass. He underwent an endoscopic guided biopsy which demonstrated a rare and aggressive natural killer T cell lymphoma. His laboratory values were consistent with hyponatremia, which the medical team gently corrected. An MRI was performed for staging purposes which revealed findings consistent with CPM. A full neurological exam demonstrated no deficits. Materials and Methods: We conducted a PubMed search using the following keywords: asymptomatic, central, pontine, and myelinolysis in order to find other case reports of asymptomatic CPM. Results: Of the 29 results, only 6 previous case reports with English language abstracts of asymptomatic CPM were present since 1995. Conclusion: Despite slow correction of hyponatremia, CPM can be an important consequence, especially in patients with chronic alcoholism. Although this patient did not demonstrate any neurological deficits, the fact that there were changes seen on MRI should caution physicians in aggressively treating hyponatremia. Furthermore, if there is a decision to treat, then fluid restriction and reversal of precipitating factors (i.e. diuretics should be used initially, unless there is concern for hypovolemia.

  12. Review | Mpofu- Muzenda | New Agenda: South African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zimbabwe's Migrants and South Africa's Border Farms: The Root of Impermanence Maxim Bolt Wits University Press: Johannesburg, 2016. 270pp. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for ...

  13. OGIRISI: a New Journal of African Studies - Vol 6 (2009)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Migrants In Spite Of “Fortress” Europe: An Essay In Philosophy Of Popular Culture · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL ... Scientific Tales And Democratic Processes In An Age Of Global Warming: The Afro Nigerian Chapter · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  14. The asymptomatic teenager with an abnormal electrocardiogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harinder R

    2014-02-01

    Use of medications for attention-deficit hyperkinetic disorder and preparticipation sports physical examination has led to an increase in number of electrocardiograms (ECG) performed during adolescence. Interpreting ECGs in children and young adults must take into account the evolutionary changes with age and the benign variants, which are usually not associated with heart disease. It is crucial for primary-care providers to recognize the changes on ECG associated with heart disease and risk of sudden death. In this article, the significance, sensitivity, specificity, and the diagnostic workup of these findings in the asymptomatic teenager are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Type 2 diabetes mellitus management among Ghanaian migrants resident in three European countries and their compatriots in rural and urban Ghana - The RODAM Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlholt, Margriet; Meeks, Karlijn A. C.; Beune, Erik; Addo, Juliet; Smeeth, Liam; Schulze, Matthias B.; Danquah, Ina; Galbete, Cecilia; de-Graft Aikins, Ama; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Spranger, Joachim; Mockenhaupt, Frank P.; Amoah, Stephen K.; Bahendeka, Silver; Stronks, Karien; Agyemang, Charles

    2017-01-01

    To compare Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) awareness, treatment and control between Ghanaians resident in Ghana and Europe. Comparisons were made for the 530 participants of the Research on Obesity and Diabetes among African Migrants (RODAM) study with T2DM (25-70 years) living in Amsterdam, Berlin,

  16. DISCRIMINATION AGAINST MIGRANT WORKERS IN MALAYSIA

    OpenAIRE

    Badarulzaman, Muhammad Hafiz; Ayub, Zainal A; Yusoff, Zuryati M; Wahab, Harlida A

    2017-01-01

    AbstractMigrant workers are often discriminated against in almost every aspect of life. Discrimination against them is due to irrational dislike of them and also negative perception towards them. It is alleged that migrant workers contribute to the crimes hike in Malaysia. Using doctrinal research methodology, this article discusses direct and perceptive discrimination against them. This article concludes that physical discriminations are mostly happened because ineffective enforcement of the...

  17. Transnational Healthcare Practices of Retired Circular Migrants

    OpenAIRE

    Bilecen, Başak; Tezcan-Güntekin, Hürrem

    2014-01-01

    Studies on healthcare of migrants usually focus on their problems including mental health, psychosomatic complaints, assuming that they mainly use the healthcare services of the host country. As migrants may also use healthcare services in their home countries, we examine empirically the influence of being subject to different healthcare systems and services particulary focusing on the migrants’ consumption of medicine. This paper contributes to the literature by specifically exploring the tr...

  18. Migrants in Germany: Separate and Unequal

    OpenAIRE

    Olaf J. de Groot; Sager, Lutz

    2010-01-01

    Migrants of non-Western origin often live among themselves. This residential segregation is, however, not necessarily caused by a lacking will to integrate. It rather seems to a large part explainable with the socio-economic differences between population groups. The key to successful integration of migrants into the German society thus lies in the alleviation of inequalities in respect to education, income and German language skills.

  19. Diabetes among Inuit migrants in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moustgaard, Helene; Bjerregaard, Peter; Borch-Johnsen, Knut

    2005-01-01

    The study aimed to estimate the prevalence of diabetes and impaired glucose intolerance (IGT) among Inuit migrants living in Denmark, and to compare with findings from Greenland. Further, we analyzed determinants for diabetes and impaired glucose metabolism.......The study aimed to estimate the prevalence of diabetes and impaired glucose intolerance (IGT) among Inuit migrants living in Denmark, and to compare with findings from Greenland. Further, we analyzed determinants for diabetes and impaired glucose metabolism....

  20. Barriers to accessing HIV services for Black African communities in Cambridgeshire, the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shangase, Phindile; Egbe, Catherine O

    2015-02-01

    The majority of new HIV diagnoses in the United Kingdom (UK) occur in people with heterosexually acquired HIV infection, the majority of whom are African communities. Current research shows that despite health promotion efforts and advances in therapy these communities are accessing HIV care late. This study therefore explored barriers to equal access to HIV services by African migrants in the UK. Kleinman's (Patients and healers in the context of culture: an exploration of the borderland between anthropology, medicine, and psychiatry, vol 3. University of California Press, Berkeley, 1980) model of health care systems was applied in this research as a theoretical framework and lens through which the reported findings are viewed as it places health within the broader context of culture. In this research a qualitative approach with focus groups was used. A total of thirty participants were recruited from African migrant community organisations in Cambridgeshire in the East of England strategic health authority in order to study the experiences of African migrants when accessing sexual health services. It was found that barriers to equal access to HIV services exist for African communities in Cambridgeshire. These included language barriers and others bordering on the use of traditional medicine by African migrants, understanding of cultural diversity, awareness of how and where to access HIV services, and getting information about HIV. Findings highlighted the importance of taking the sectors of Kleinman's [1] model into consideration when planning HIV services for African communities.

  1. Transnational connections of later-life migrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Sari Johanna; Lumme-Sandt, Kirsi

    2013-04-01

    In this paper a transnational perspective is used to explain whether and how older migrants construct and sustain their social networks. The paper uses a transnational viewpoint on older migrants' lives by analysing their engagement with their former homeland, and the intensity and habitualness of those engagements in old age. The aim of this article is to study the transnational connections of later-life migrants'. Attention is especially paid to the features of old age while maintaining these connections. These considerations are based on analyses of transnational networks in the everyday lives of later-life migrants from the former Soviet Union residing in Finland. The data were collected from 11 later-life migrants. It is found that transnational relationships are a vital part of the everyday lives of older migrants, and that they are sustained in varied ways. These connections mean a concrete source of help, family affiliations, the sharing of emotions, and a larger social network. Economic limitations affect the frequency and type of communication, and various physical limitations may also cause inability to maintain contacts across borders. In these circumstances, family members or other close relatives or friends are needed to deliver messages on the older person's behalf. Old age and immigration status affect the amount and direction of communication across borders, thereby shaping these networks. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Communication in the migrant community in Malta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grech, Helen; Cheng, Li-Rong Lilly

    2010-01-01

    The study aimed to obtain information about communication in the migrant community in Malta. The objectives were to identify the communication skills of the migrants in terms of language use and exposure; to verify whether members of the migrant community have access to participation, education, socialization and opportunities for gainful employment, and to identify if the migrant community is willing to share insights. A questionnaire was specifically devised to collect data via structured interviews. The project targeted candidates seeking refugee status. Forty immigrants consented to participate and were interviewed with the help of interpreters and carers. Results indicate that migrants seem to experience different levels of adaptation and assimilation into the host cultural and social network. Some feel marginalized, while others seem to be adjusting to the new culture; these individuals also reported minimal to no difficulties with communicating with the local people. Communication among themselves was reported to be difficult for some, even though most of the migrants hailed from North Africa. The study provides an overview of challenges identified and highlights the need for service providers to identify cultural and linguistic characteristics to optimize their interpretation of behaviour. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Coronary risk variables in young asymptomatic smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S B; Dwivedi, S; Prabhu, K M; Singh, G; Kumar, N; Lal, M K

    2005-09-01

    Smoking plays a dominant role in premature atherosclerosis particularly among males in South Asian countries. It initiates and promotes atherosclerosis by altering cardiac haemodynamics, causing dyslipidaemia and producing oxidative damage. Not much information is available from our country. We therefore undertook this study to see the effect of smoking on electrocardiogram (ECG), blood pressure, lipids, apolipoprotein B level and free radical activity in young asymptomatic male smokers. The study included 100 consecutive male subjects (50 smokers and 50 non smokers) aged 30-40 yr. Smoking profile, detailed cardiovascular assessment including ECG and lipid profile were evaluated in each subject. Of the 50 smokers, 22 (44%) had grade I hypertension as against 5 of 50 non smokers. Sinus tachycardia (10%) and P-pulmonale (8%) were the only notable ECG abnormalities. Dyslipidaemia was detected in 92 per cent smokers and 48 per cent non smokers (Plevels were significantly higher (Psmokers compared to non smokers. LDL-cholesterol was > or =135 mg/dl in 94 per cent dyslipidaemic smokers. However, no significant difference was found in high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol. Smokers had significantly higher serum malondialdehyde levels (Pnon smokers. Our data indicate that young asymptomatic male smokers tend to have hypertension, dyslipidaemia and increased production of free oxygen radicals, perhaps by attenuation of oxidative stress by cigarette smoking. This makes them prone for premature coronary artery disease. However, the findings need to be confirmed on a larger sample.

  4. Socio-economic impacts of migrant clustering on Dutch neighbourhoods: In search of optimal migrant diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaff, T.; Nijkamp, P.

    2010-01-01

    The recent empirical literature on the impact of migrant clustering on socio-economic welfare indicators shows inconclusive and often even contradictory results. In this paper we argue that there is not an unambiguous empirical outcome of migrant or ethnic diversity, but that it depends on the level

  5. Healthy life expectancy differences between older migrants and non-migrants in three European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reus Pons, Matias; Kibele, Eva; Janssen, Fanny

    2014-01-01

    Migration, ageing and health are on the political agenda in all European countries, but so far little attention has been devoted to the health among older migrants in Europe. At the same time, the share of older migrants in European countries is rising steadily and there are reasons to believe that

  6. The migrant suitcase : Food, belonging and commensality among Indian migrants in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bailey, Ajay

    2017-01-01

    The Migrant Suitcase is a metaphor to understand how social remittances are taken, brought back and transformed. Migrants bring with them different cultural norms, food and eating practices. In this paper I review the concept of social remittances in light of material culture, food and eating

  7. Sumario de Reglamentos Revisados de Titulo I - Educacion Migrante (Summary of Revised Title I - Migrant Regulations).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Ramon

    Extracted from the April 3, 1980 Federal Register, revisions of the Migrant Education regulations are synthesized in this Spanish-English booklet. Revised regulations address program planning and evaluation; needs assessment; identification and recruitment of migrant children; and special discretionary projects for the coordination of migrant…

  8. Cardiovascular risk amongst migrant and non-migrant Greenland Inuit in a gender perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Peter; Jørgensen, Marit Eika; Borch-Johnsen, Knut

    2007-01-01

    surveys among adult Inuit in Greenland and Inuit migrants in Denmark (n = 1542). General Linear Models adjusted for age, smoking, diet (seal, fish, and fruit), and alcohol consumption. RESULTS: Blood pressure was significantly higher among Inuit migrants of either sex than among the Inuit in Greenland...

  9. Migrant and Non-Migrant Families in Chengdu, China: Segregated Lives, Segregated Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Li

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study documented the experiences of Chinese rural-urban migrant children and their parents living in the host city of Chengdu, China. It was informed by previous studies but applied a theoretical lens cultural reproduction theory—to reveal deeper understanding of rural-urban migrant families’ lives in the city of Chengdu. Participants in this study were 10 families—10 migrant parents, 10 local Chengdu resident parents, 5 local Chengdu children, and 5 migrant children. Through qualitative interviews and observations the researchers created 5 family case studies, documenting differences and similarities in the lives of migrant and local resident families in Chengdu. Results indicated that children in the two groups experienced unequal childhoods. Although the Chinese central government has issued a number of proactive policies to allow migrant children to attend local urban public schools since 2003, the negative effect of the longstanding Hukou residency policy still impacts migrant families’ lives in Chengdu. In this article we discuss an entrenched urban-rural divide between urban residents and rural-urban migrant families, in work, community, and schooling.

  10. Does climate change explain the decline of a trans-Saharan Afro-Palaearctic migrant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce-Higgins, J W; Yalden, D W; Dougall, T W; Beale, C M

    2009-03-01

    There is an urgent need to understand how climate change will impact on demographic parameters of vulnerable species. Migrants are regarded as particularly vulnerable to climate change; phenological mismatch has resulted in the local decline of one passerine, whilst variations in the survival of others have been related to African weather conditions. However, there have been few demographic studies on trans-Saharan non-passerine migrants, despite these showing stronger declines across Europe than passerines. We therefore analyse the effects of climate on the survival and productivity of common sandpipers Actitis hypoleucos, a declining non-passerine long-distant migrant using 28 years' data from the Peak District, England. Adult survival rates were significantly negatively correlated with winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), being lower when winters were warm and wet in western Europe and cool and dry in northwest Africa. Annual variation in the productivity of the population was positively correlated with June temperature, but not with an index of phenological mismatch. The 59% population decline appears largely to have been driven by reductions in adult survival, with local productivity poorly correlated with subsequent population change, suggesting a low degree of natal philopatry. Winter NAO was not significantly correlated with adult survival rates in a second, Scottish Borders population, studied for 12 years. Variation in climatic conditions alone does not therefore appear to be responsible for common sandpiper declines. Unlike some passerine migrants, there was no evidence for climate-driven reductions in productivity, although the apparent importance of immigration in determining local recruitment complicates the assessment of productivity effects. We suggest that further studies to diagnose common sandpiper declines should focus on changes in the condition of migratory stop-over or wintering locations. Where possible, these analyses should be repeated

  11. Tunisian Migrant Journeys: Human Rights Concerns for Tunisians Arriving by Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maegan Hendow

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In part due to its location on the North African coast, in conjunction with its history of being a former French protectorate, Tunisia has become an important country of emigration to the European Union. In particular, maritime arrivals have become a concern for European states, for both humanitarian and security reasons. The experiences of Tunisian irregular migrants arriving to the EU by sea, who are then detained and returned, highlights the multitude of human rights issues that arise across their journey as they interact with the various stakeholders involved—Tunisian and Libyan smugglers, EU and Tunisian authorities and NGOs, amongst others. The situation for these migrants at sea and during rescue and interception operations can most directly involve such issues as the right to life, access to food and water, access to emergency healthcare and access to information. The next stages of detention and return (either immediately or when later identified on EU territory can most directly involve human rights issues related to the identification and referral mechanisms for groups at risk, access to information and legal remedy, the right of “non-refoulement” and prohibition of torture, inhuman and degrading treatment and punishment. By examining Tunisian migrant experiences along the entirety of their trajectory, one can see the specific human rights issues that arise at each stage for maritime arrivals—from departure to return. The article will examine these human rights concerns in the context of the Tunisian migrant journey, focusing on the four identified stages of the situation at sea, rescue or interception, detention and return. The article will present results from qualitative in-depth interviews conducted for the EU Fundamental Rights Agency in 2011 with 15 Tunisian migrants who had arrived by sea to Italy between 2005 and 2011 and were returned to Tunisia between 2008 and 2011, complemented by interviews with two Tunisian

  12. AFRICAN BUFFALO OPTIMIZATION ico-pdf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius Beneoluchi Odili

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This is an introductory paper to the newly-designed African Buffalo Optimization (ABO algorithm for solving combinatorial and other optimization problems. The algorithm is inspired by the behavior of African buffalos, a species of wild cows known for their extensive migrant lifestyle. This paper presents an overview of major metaheuristic algorithms with the aim of providing a basis for the development of the African Buffalo Optimization algorithm which is a nature-inspired, population-based metaheuristic algorithm. Experimental results obtained from applying the novel ABO to solve a number of benchmark global optimization test functions as well as some symmetric and asymmetric Traveling Salesman’s Problems when compared to the results obtained from using other popular optimization methods show that the African Buffalo Optimization is a worthy addition to the growing number of swarm intelligence optimization techniques.

  13. Work injuries among migrant workers in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biering, Karin; Lander, Flemming; Rasmussen, Kurt

    2017-03-01

    Work migration into Denmark has increased during the recent decades, especially after the enlargement of the European Union (EU) in 2004. Whether or not migrant workers experience more work injuries than the native workforce has been debated and results are conflicting, most likely due to methodological difficulties and cultural disparities. We set out to meet these challenges using population-based work injury registers, targeting a specific and representative region in Denmark. This population-based study used data on work injuries from an emergency department (ED) and reported injuries from the ED's catchment area to the Danish Working Environment Authority during 11 years. We calculated incidences of work injury for groups of migrant workers compared with native Danes and adjusted incidence rate ratios based on information on the complete working population. The incidences of work injuries among migrant workers from the new EU countries and from the rest of the world were higher compared with Danish workers and workers from the old EU countries and other Western countries. Especially migrants older than 30 years and in low-risk industries were at higher risk. Workers who had migrated recently were at even higher risk. We found increased risk of work injuries among migrant workers. Studying migrants in registers is a methodological challenge as some migrants are not registered, for legal or illegal reasons; thus, only a selected group is studied, but this may most likely underestimate the risk. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  14. Reaching migrants across borders in West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, J

    1998-01-01

    CARE-Niger's AIDS and Migration project was launched in 1993 with primary funding from the European Union and is based in Tahoua, Niger. The project's overall goal is to reduce the rate of STD/HIV infection among the more than 1 million Nigerian migrants who leave their villages annually in search of work in the large coastal cities of West Africa, especially Abidjan. Most migrants are separated from their families for at least 9 months of the year, returning to Niger in May or June to help with Niger's only planting season. Upon completion of the millet harvest, the men return to Abidjan in search of additional work. CARE has trained more than 100 peer educators to provide STD/HIV prevention information to migrants before, during, and after their voyages to Abidjan. In the villages of Tahoua, CARE staff train and supervise volunteer peer educators, including the male migrants, their wives, the prostitutes they encounter along the 2500 km migration route, and the Muslim religious leaders who preach weekly in mosques scattered throughout Tahoua. During the 4-day bus trip back to Abidjan, the bus driver has a range of educational cassettes which he can play, while Abidjan-based migrant peer educators await the men at their ultimate destination. AIDS and Migration project staff traveled by bus from Abidjan to Tahoua to better understand some of the obstacles Nigerian migrants face along the route. If funds can be secured, CARE will help provide STD care in Abidjan, install video and cassette-radio equipment on the Nigerian buses which make the trek between Tahoua and Abidjan, and buy and equip a bus to attract younger migrants.

  15. Mobilities and Sediments : Spatial Dynamics in the Context of Contemporary Sub-Saharan African Migration to Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schapendonk, J.

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary African migration to the European Union (EU) is triggered by global interconnectedness, but at the same time it is opposed by the hard borders of the EU. As a consequence, sub- Saharan African migrants often undertake fragmented and dangerous journeys to the North. These journeys are

  16. Migrants, mission and theological education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayes, Stephen

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Christian Church has faced problems of mission and migrancy from its inception. This paper, however, is limited to southern Africa in the last fifty years, using examples from the Anglican and Orthodox Churches, based mainly on the personal experiences of the author. It begins with the story of a migratory cattle herder in northwestern Namibia who became an evangelist and was trying to plant a church among a nomadic people. There have been other patterns of migration in Southern Africa, including migratory labour, forced removals, refugees, and immigration, both legal and illegal. Theological Education by Extension (TEE, which developed about 40-50 years ago, had the potential to meet some of these needs, though emphasis was often put in the wrong places, so that it did not fulfil the promise of meeting the needs of migrant ministries as well as had been hoped. Materials and resources often had to be improvised, but in many ways much has been achieved.

  17. Current management of asymptomatic carotid stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla-Guerra, L; Fernández-Moreno, M C; Serrano-Rodríguez, L

    2015-05-01

    Asymptomatic carotid stenosis (ACS) is a common problem in daily clinical practice, and its management is still the subject of controversy. In contrast to symptomatic carotid disease, the main studies on surgical treatment of patients with ACS have shown only a modest benefit in the primary prevention of stroke. In addition, current medical treatment has drastically decreased the risk of stroke in patients with ACS. Selecting patients amenable to endovascular treatment and determining how and when to conduct the ultrasound follow-up of these patients are issues that still need resolving. This article analyzes two new studies underway that provide evidence for better management of ACS in daily clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  18. Recurrent Parotid Carcinosarcoma in an Asymptomatic Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Mansour MD

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present the case of a 52-year-old male with a history of parotid carcinosarcoma with initial diagnosis being 18 months prior. Initial treatment included a combination of gamma knife surgery coupled with high dosage chemotherapy and X-ray radiation therapy. At the time of follow-up, the patient presented with no complaints and had a nearly normal physical exam with the exception of some facial nerve weakness on the same side as the initial surgery. Despite being asymptomatic, the patient had a significant progression of disease that was manifested with intracranial lesions, multiple pathologic fractures, and a dramatic increase in overall tumor burden. Ultimately, the patient decided to pursue comfort measures only and succumbed to the disease peacefully soon thereafter.

  19. [Asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis: a reopened debate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urso, Stefano; Sadaba, Rafael; de la Cruz, Elena

    2014-05-06

    Aortic stenosis is a complex disease. About 2-7% of the population over 65 years of age is affected by its degenerative form. In patients with severe aortic stenosis presenting with symptoms or left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF)debate. Recent published data show that about one third of these patients present with low left ventricle stroke volume, which may affect survival. For this reason, and considering that aortic valve replacement is in most cases a low risk procedure, early surgery in this subgroup is a strategy that deserves to be taken into account. In this review we report on these recent findings, which allow understanding why patients with asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis should not be considered and treated as a homogenous population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Migration and hypertension: a cross-sectional study among neo-migrants and settled-migrants in Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusuma, Yadlapalli; Gupta, Sanjeev; Pandav, Chandrakant

    2009-10-01

    Understanding the blood pressure (BP) distribution within populations is fundamental to an understanding of the etiology of cardiovascular diseases and to develop effective preventive strategies. This study focuses on whether the BP levels and hypertension prevalence differ between neo-migrants and settled-migrants in the city of Delhi. Data on BP, anthropometry, social variables, and demographic variables were collected from a cross-sectional sample of 226 settled-migrants and 227 neo-migrants. Men possessed significantly higher BP levels than women. Settled-migrants possessed higher BP levels, except diastolic BP in males. The prevalence of hypertension ranges from 15% (neo-migrant women) to 25% (settled-migrant men), with no significant gender differences. Group differences were significant for men. Hypertension was more prevalent in older settled-migrants and younger neo-migrants. Recent migration was found to be a significant contributor to hypertension prevalence. Age contributed significantly to BP variation in both groups except in neo-migrant men. Pulse rate also contributed to systolic BP among neo-migrant women and settled-migrant men. Thus, urban residence and migration to urban areas can be a leading cause of increased prevalence of hypertension. Neo-migrants were subjected to more lifestyle insults and the stress generated during the adjustment process may be contributing to rise of BP even at younger ages.

  1. Utilization of health care services by migrants in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graetz, V.; Rechel, B.; Groot, W.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Our study reviewed the empirical evidence on the utilization of health care services by migrants in Europe, and on differences in health service utilization between migrants and non-migrants across European countries. Sources of data: A systematic literature review was performed......, searching the databases Medline, Cinahl and Embase and covering the period from January 2009 to April 2016. The final number of articles included was 39. Areas of agreement: Utilization of accident and emergency services and hospitalizations were higher among migrants compared with non-migrants in most...... countries for which evidence was available. In contrast, screening and outpatient visits for specialized care were generally used less often by migrants. Areas of controversy: Utilization of general practitioner services among migrants compared with non-migrants presents a diverging picture. Growing points...

  2. Universal health coverage in 'One ASEAN': are migrants included?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guinto, Ramon Lorenzo Luis R; Curran, Ufara Zuwasti; Suphanchaimat, Rapeepong; Pocock, Nicola S

    2015-01-01

    .... While ASEAN member countries have already signed the Declaration on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Migrant Workers, the health rights of migrants still need to be addressed, especially...

  3. Migrant adults with diabetes in France: Influence of family migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Chambre

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: We may fear that migrants share an increased risk of uncontrolled diabetes. Individual migration could be a risk factor of uncontrolled diabetes. Knowing the migration history of migrant patients is fundamental to understand some barriers of care.

  4. Employment After Parenthood: Women of Migrant Origin and Natives Compared

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kil, T.; Neels, K.; Wood, J.; de Valk, H.A.G.

    2017-01-01

    Motherhood negatively affects female employment in majority populations across Europe. Although employment levels are particularly low among women of migrant origin, little is known about the motherhood–employment link in migrant populations. This paper investigates whether family formation

  5. Becoming less illegal: deservingness frames and undocumented migrant incorporation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chauvin, S.; Garcés-Mascareñas, B.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades, research on unauthorized migration has departed from the equation of migrant illegality with absolute exclusion, emphasizing that formal exclusion typically results in subordinate inclusion. Irregular migrants integrate through informal support networks, the underground

  6. Surgery for small asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filardo, Giovanni; Powell, Janet T; Martinez, Melissa Ashley-Marie; Ballard, David J

    2015-02-08

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is an abnormal ballooning of the major abdominal artery. Some AAAs present as emergencies and require surgery; others remain asymptomatic. Treatment of asymptomatic AAAs depends on many factors, but an important one is the size of the aneurysm, as risk of rupture increases with aneurysm size. Large asymptomatic AAAs (greater than 5.5 cm in diameter) are usually repaired surgically; very small AAAs (less than 4.0 cm diameter) are monitored with ultrasonography. Debate continues over the appropriate roles of immediate repair and surveillance with repair on subsequent enlargement in people presenting with asymptomatic AAAs of 4.0 cm to 5.5 cm diameter. This is the third update of the review first published in 1999. To compare mortality, quality of life, and cost effectiveness of immediate surgical repair versus routine ultrasound surveillance in people with asymptomatic AAAs between 4.0 cm and 5.5 cm in diameter. For this update, the Cochrane Peripheral Vascular Diseases Group Trials Search Co-ordinator searched the Specialised Register (February 2014) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 1). We checked reference lists of relevant articles for additional studies. Randomised controlled trials in which men and women with asymptomatic AAAs of diameter 4.0 cm to 5.5 cm were randomly allocated to immediate repair or imaging-based surveillance at least every six months. Outcomes had to include mortality or survival. Three members of the review team independently extracted the data, which were cross-checked by other team members. Risk ratios (RR) (endovascular aneurysm repair only), hazard ratios (HR) (open repair only), and 95% confidence intervals based on Mantel-Haenszel Chi(2) statistic were estimated at one and six years (open repair only) following randomisation. We included all relevant published studies in this review. For this update, four trials with a combined total of 3314 participants

  7. Health equity and migrants in the Greater Mekong Subregion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, Celia; Healy, Judith

    2017-01-01

    Migrant health is receiving increasing international attention, reflecting recognition of the health inequities experienced among many migrant populations and the need for health systems to adapt to diverse migrant populations. In the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) there is increasing migration associated with uneven economic integration and growth, socio-economic vulnerabilities, and disparities between countries. There has been limited progress, however, in improving migrant access to health services in the Subregion. This paper examines the health needs, access barriers, and policy responses to cross-border migrants in five GMS countries. A review of published literature and research was conducted on migrant health and health service access in Cambodia, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Myanmar, Thailand, and Viet Nam, as well as analysis of current migration trends and universal health coverage (UHC) indicators in the Subregion. The review included different migrant types: i.e. migrant workers, irregular migrants, victims of trafficking, refugees and asylum seekers, and casual cross-border migrants. There is substantial diversity in the capacity of GMS health systems to address migrant populations. Thailand has sought to enhance migrant health coverage, including development of migrant health policies/programs, bilateral migrant worker agreements, and migrant health insurance schemes; Viet Nam provides health protection for emigrant workers. Overall, however, access to good quality health care remains weak for many citizens in GMS countries let alone migrants. Migrant workers - and irregular migrants in particular - face elevated health risks yet are not adequately covered and incur high out-of-pocket (OOP) payments for health services. UHC implies equity: UHC is only achieved when everyone has the opportunity to access and use good-quality health care. Efforts to achieve UHC in the GMS require deliberate policy decisions to include migrants. The emergence of

  8. Northeast Migrants in Delhi : Race, Refuge and Retail

    OpenAIRE

    McDuie-Ra, Duncan

    2012-01-01

    Northeast Migrants in Delhi: Race, Refuge and Retail is an ethnographic study of migrants from India's north-east border region living and working in Delhi, the nation's capital. Northeast India borders China, the Himalayas, and Southeast Asia. Despite burgeoning interest in the region, little attention is given to the thousands of migrants leaving the region for Indian cities for refuge, work, and study. The stories of Northeast migrants reveal an everyday Northeast India rarely captured els...

  9. Differences in healthy life expectancy between older migrants and non-migrants in three European countries: Trends between 2001 and 2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reus Pons, Matias; Kibele, Eva; Janssen, Fanny

    2014-01-01

    The share of older migrants in western Europe is rising steadily. Differences in health between older migrants and non-migrants have not been studied much. Our aim is to analyse health and mortality differences between older migrants and non-migrants in Belgium, the Netherlands, and England and

  10. Myocardial perfusion abnormalities in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Al-Humaidi

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: We found a high prevalence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients. Perfusion abnormalities on myocardial perfusion SPECT images were associated with disease duration, insulin use, nephropathy, and neuropathy. Asymptomatic diabetic patients might be candidates with CAD abnormalities that can be studied using myocardial perfusion SPECT.

  11. Asymptomatic proteinuria in children in Calabar | Etuk | Global ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The urine samples of pupils from 4 Primary schools in Calabar were studied for asymptomatic proteinuria. The aim was to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic proteinuria in children in calabar. For each pupil, two urine samples were tested for proteinuria using the dipstick. The first urine sample was collected at ...

  12. Unholy Screening for Detection of Asymptomatic Haematwria and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ikimalo FE, Elm FU, Nkanginieme KEO, Ikinialo J. Urinary Screening for Detection of. Asymptomatic Haematurla and Pmteinuria in Children in Urban and Periurbaa Schools in Port Harcourt. Nfgeriarrjomalaf Paediatriam 30:1. In order to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic haematuria and proteinuria, a survey was ...

  13. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The global increase in the prevalence of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes has brought asymptomatic bacteriuria, one of its complications to the fore. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria in patients with type 2 diabetes, identify the bacterial pathogens and their ...

  14. Prevalence and association of asymptomatic prostatitis with urinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The link between prostatitis and urinary tract infections (UTIs) has been acknowledged but documented incidences of asymptomatic prostatitis remains a course for concern. This study therefore, assesses the prevalence and association of asymptomatic prostatitis with urinary tract infections among apparently healthy men in ...

  15. Prognostic importance of atrial fibrillation in asymptomatic aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders; Gerdts, Eva; Boman, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The frequency and prognostic importance of atrial fibrillation (AF) in asymptomatic mild-to-moderate aortic stenosis (AS) has not been well described. METHODS: Clinical examination, electrocardiography and echocardiography were obtained in asymptomatic patients with mild-to-moderate A...

  16. Asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy in osogbo with special ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria is a common clinical entity in pregnancy but the prevalence due to S. saprophyticus, an established uro-pathogen in sexually active women, remained largely unknown in Nigeria. The prevalence of asymptomatic significant bacteriuria due to S. saprophyticus was therefore determined among 431 ...

  17. Human rhinovirus infections in symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.N. Camargo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of rhinovirus asymptomatic infections in the transmission among close contacts subjects is unknown. We tested health care workers, a pair of one child and a family member and immunocompromised patients (n =191. HRV were detected on 22.9% symptomatic and 3.6% asymptomatic cases suggesting lower transmission among contacts.

  18. Ultrasound study of the asymptomatic shoulder in patients with a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To document the incidence of asymptomatic rotator cuff tears in patients with a confirmed symptomatic tear in the opposite shoulder, and to identify ultrasound findings that may distinguish symptomatic from asymptomatic tears. Design. When patients are referred for an ultrasound examination for the confirmation ...

  19. An Appraisal of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in Pregnancy-The Lagos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Obstetric care aims at reducing maternal (and perinatal) mortality and morbidity making the identification and management of related risk factors, such as asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy of paramount importance. This study aimed at determining the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria in the booking ...

  20. Alpha-Fetoprotein in Asymptomatic Hepatitis B Virus Infected Subjects

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is high in sub-Saharan Africa. A great number of the infected individuals are asymptomatic and are commonly diagnosed by chance. Alpha-fetoprotein and liver function tests were evaluated in asymptomatic hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positive subjects to ascertain ...

  1. Prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria among pregnant women in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) in pregnancy is associated with obstetric complications including preeclampsia, pyelonephritis, preterm labour, low birth weight and prematurity. Determining the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria among pregnant women locally is needed to justify routine screening for ASB in ...

  2. Influence of urbanisation on asymptomatic malaria in school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence of urbanisation on asymptomatic malaria in school children in Molyko, South Western Cameroon. ... Objective: To determine the impact of urbanisation on the prevalence of asymptomatic malaria in. Molyko ... Results: There was a significant association between axillary temperature and malaria parasitaemia

  3. MRI in clinically asymptomatic neuropathic leprosy feet: a baseline study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, M.; Slim, E. J.; Akkerman, E. M.; Faber, W. R.

    2001-01-01

    This study was undertaken to analyze the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in the clinically asymptomatic neuropathic feet of leprosy patients. Since in the literature no MRI data are available concerning the asymptomatic neuropathic foot in leprosy, the interpretation of MRI examinations in

  4. Migrants in transit: the importance of monitoring HIV risk among migrant flows at the Mexico-US border

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martinez-Donate, Ana P; Hovell, Melbourne F; Rangel, Maria Gudelia; Zhang, Xiao; Sipan, Carol L; Magis-Rodriguez, Carlos; Gonzalez-Fagoaga, J Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a probability-based survey of migrant flows traveling across the Mexico-US border, and we estimated HIV infection rates, risk behaviors, and contextual factors for migrants representing 5...

  5. Desnutrición en prescolares de familias migrantes Malnutrition in preschool children of migrant families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina Mayela Núñez-Rocha

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Comparar la prevalencia de desnutrición entre prescolares migrantes y no migrantes. Material y métodos. Se seleccionaron al azar 160 infantes de 1-6 años de edad, de parvularios de muy alta marginación. Se excluyeron aquellos con malformaciones congénitas o bajo alguna intervención nutricional. La migración se definió como el desplazamiento geográfico Objective. To compare malnutrition rates between migrant and non-migrant children. Material and methods. One-hundred and sixty children 1-6 years old were selected at random from schools located in highly marginated areas. Excluded were infants with congenital malformations or under nutritional intervention. Migration was defined as any geographical movement during the last 6 years. Malnutrition was assessed through the weight/height and height/age indicators, as recommended by the World Health Organization. Results. Fifty-nine percent of the infants belonged to families whose father had a non-qualified occupation, 27.5% of them did not finish elementary school. Fifty-three referred migration; malnutrition rate was 51.3% among migrant infants and 28.8%, among non-migrant infants (OR= 2.6, CI95%= 1.2, 5.2, p= 0.006. Migrant children registered a mean Z score of -2.4±.40 and non-migrant children, -2.3±.33, based on the indicator height for age. Conclusions. Chronic malnutrition among migrant infants justifies a nutritional intervention, they constitute a specific group at risk. Migration should be considered for health planning.

  6. The education problems of migrant children in Shanghai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, M

    2001-01-01

    Due to social discrimination and economic reasons, migrant children in Shanghai often are excluded from local school systems. Resident migrants have established schools for their children but suffer from a lack of supplies, poor conditions, and untrained teachers. Thus far, government attempts at improving the education of migrant children have been less than successful. Suggestions for improving the educational outlook are offered.

  7. From Access to Quality: Migrant Children's Education in Urban China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Jacob, W. James

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of migrant children are involved in public education due largely to the policy for migrant children education outlined by the Government of China from the late 1990s. In this article, we describe the unique and often difficult situation rural migrant children face after they enter urban public schools. Drawing from the Theory…

  8. 75 FR 30047 - Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ...; Reports of Migrant Health Clinics; Data Transferring Efforts of Migrant Education; and the National... secondary data analyses and the opinions of invested experts; the validity and reliability of the... individual, so siblings that might be eligible for MSHS are not identified. Finally, migrant clinics are...

  9. Migrant Rights in Fujian Province (China) | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Migrant Rights in Fujian Province (China). China has the largest internal migrant population in the world, and women account for nearly half of it. Fujian province has been a traditional source of large numbers of Chinese migrants to Southeast Asia and the United States. Now, with the burgeoning economies of southeast ...

  10. To return permanently or to return temporarily?: Explaining migrants' intentions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilgili, Ö.; Siegel, M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies migrants' intentions to return to their origin country by making the distinction between permanent return, temporary return and participation in temporary return programmes. Using survey data from first generation migrants in the Netherlands, we explore how migrants' experiences

  11. Building Migrant Civil Society: Indigenous Mexicans in the US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Fox

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Mexican migrants in the United States are still widely assumed to be an ethnically homogeneous population. Historically, most Mexican migrants did share many common characteristics, coming primarily from rural communities in the central-western part of the country. Over the last two decades, however, the Mexican migrant population has diversified dramatically, both socially and geographically.

  12. Confined mobilities: following Indonesian migrant workers on their way home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloppenburg, S.; Peters, P.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the return journeys of Indonesian migrant domestic workers to their home towns. When migrant workers return home, the Indonesian government sets them apart from other travellers in order to protect the migrants from extortion in the airport environment, and assist them during

  13. The occupational promotion of migrant workers: contribution from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouw, P.

    2009-01-01

    Based on two consecutive studies (the Netherlands Working Condition Survey (NEA), TNO), a review (Discrimination Monitor, SCP) and literature it is concluded that non-western migrants experience more labour market problems than western migrants. In general non-western migrants experience more

  14. An Enrichment Program for Migrant Students: MENTE/UOP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Michael B.

    The report describes the objectives and accomplishments of a summer enrichment program, Migrantes Envueltos en Nuevos Temas de Educacion/Migrants Engaged in New Themes in Education (MENTE), for promising and talented migrant high schoolers. The program is a cooperative one with a university. Students selected by a review committee are tested for…

  15. The role of refugee-established churches in integrating forced migrants: A case study of Word of Life Assembly in Yeoville, Johannesburg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedaste Nzayabino

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The increasing embeddedness of religious issues within contemporary global phenomena has increased the role religion plays in migrants’ spiritual, social, and economic lives. Drawing on the findings of the study, conducted within one of the Pentecostal migrant churches in Johannesburg, this paper explored ways in which a (migrant church shapes a refugee’s motivation to integrate and his resultant quest for a transient alternative belonging and inclusion within diasporic communities through church affiliation. Through interviews with members of the Word of Life Assembly (WOLA, one of the independent churches established by forced migrants in Yeoville, the study revealed that refugees tend to integrate themselves within their own churches, while the refugee church itself – labelled a ‘foreign’ entity by South African community members – works to garner approval and acceptance from South Africans and faith-based institutions. Cultural and linguistic problems were identified as major barriers to a refugee’s attempts to integrate into local churches, thereby becoming important issues that need to be considered in the establishment of migrant churches within the South African host community.

  16. Asymptomatic Moyamoya Disease: Literature Review and Ongoing AMORE Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    KURODA, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Recent development of a non-invasive magnetic resonance examination has increased the opportunity to identify asymptomatic patients with moyamoya disease who have experienced no cerebrovascular events. However, their clinical features, prognosis, and treatment strategy are still unclear because of small number of subjects and short follow-up periods. Therefore, we have designed Asymptomatic Moyamoya Registry (AMORE) study in Japan. The objectives of this nation-wide, multi-center prospective study are to clarify long-term prognosis of asymptomatic patients with moyamoya disease and to determine the risk factors that cause ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in them. In this article, we review the published data on asymptomatic moyamoya disease and report the on-going multi-center prospective cohort study, AMORE study. We would like to emphasize the importance to determine the clinical features, prognosis, and treatment strategies of asymptomatic moyamoya disease in very near future. PMID:25739434

  17. Asymptomatic moyamoya disease: literature review and ongoing AMORE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Recent development of a non-invasive magnetic resonance examination has increased the opportunity to identify asymptomatic patients with moyamoya disease who have experienced no cerebrovascular events. However, their clinical features, prognosis, and treatment strategy are still unclear because of small number of subjects and short follow-up periods. Therefore, we have designed Asymptomatic Moyamoya Registry (AMORE) study in Japan. The objectives of this nation-wide, multi-center prospective study are to clarify long-term prognosis of asymptomatic patients with moyamoya disease and to determine the risk factors that cause ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in them. In this article, we review the published data on asymptomatic moyamoya disease and report the on-going multi-center prospective cohort study, AMORE study. We would like to emphasize the importance to determine the clinical features, prognosis, and treatment strategies of asymptomatic moyamoya disease in very near future.

  18. EPA guidance mental health care of migrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhugra, D; Gupta, S; Schouler-Ocak, M

    2014-01-01

    Migration is an increasingly commonplace phenomenon for a number of reasons. People migrate from rural to urban areas or across borders for reasons including economic, educational or political. There is increasing recent research evidence from many countries in Europe that indicates that migrants...... levels. In this guidance document, we briefly present the evidence and propose that specific measures must be taken to improve and manage psychiatric disorders experienced by migrants and their descendants. This improvement requires involvement at the highest level in governments. This is a guidance...

  19. Informal labor and irregular migrant workers

    OpenAIRE

    Meeteren, Masja

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIrregular migrants, also referred to as “undocumented migrants” or “illegal migrants,” are immigrants who do not have legal permission to stay in the country they have migrated to and frequently take on informal and precarious employment. They may have entered the country legally – on a tourist visa for example – but are not allowed to reside or work there. There is broad consensus that the numbers and the global scale of irregular migration have increased over the last decades. A...

  20. Radical Islamism and Migrant Integration in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goli, Marco; Rezaei, Shahamak

    2011-01-01

    It has been suggested that alienation and failed integration may be causes of “Homegrown Radical Islamism” in Western societies. Western countries often expect that migrants and their descendants residing there as citizens will embrace or support common democratic ideals as a predicate for – or c......It has been suggested that alienation and failed integration may be causes of “Homegrown Radical Islamism” in Western societies. Western countries often expect that migrants and their descendants residing there as citizens will embrace or support common democratic ideals as a predicate...

  1. Dissecting and customising the Childhood Obesity Prevention Advisory Council (COPAC): the development and application of a community engagement framework to improve childhood obesity prevention among migrant populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzaho, A M N

    2017-01-01

    Migrant communities in Australia bear a disproportionate childhood obesity burden. They also show poor engagement in obesity prevention initiatives which may contribute to widening obesity disparities. Community engagement has been shown to be effective in reducing health disparities by improving migrant communities' participation in prevention programmes. This study aimed to develop a community engagement framework to improve childhood obesity prevention among migrants. Based on the African Review Panel model and the Community-Based Participatory Research conceptual logic model, the Childhood Obesity Prevention Advisory Council (COPAC) framework was developed and established in four disadvantaged areas in Victoria, Australia. The COPAC included service providers and migrant community members from the same project's site. COPAC demonstrated several benefits including cross-organisational and multidisciplinary collaborations; understanding of the cultural barriers in childhood obesity prevention; enthusiasm from the COPAC members in addressing childhood obesity in their multicultural communities; equitable involvement, motivation, and empowerment of COPAC members in research development; and establishing organisational affiliations to foster long-term community involvement. This study also documented several challenges in community engagement including lack of prioritisation of migration-related childhood obesity disparities by the policymakers; staffing constraints among service providers leading to frequent disruptions in COPAC members' contributions; and lack of adequate training and skill-building of bicultural workers. The COPAC model adopted a flexible and dynamic community engagement process to suit the ongoing needs of the migrant community which incorporated the existing talents and resources within the community. For effective community engagement of migrant communities, it is important for policymakers to develop the knowledge, capacity and skills of the

  2. Education of Migrant Children: Education Policy Responses for the Inclusion of Migrant Children in Europe. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janta, Barbara; Harte, Emma

    2016-01-01

    This policy brief investigates policies relevant to the education of migrant children across the EU. It outlines the main challenges facing migrant children in schools across Europe, and the existing policy options that aim to redress the disparities in educational outcomes between native children and children with a migrant background. Roughly 10…

  3. Differences in mortality between different groups of older migrants and non-migrants in Belgium, 2001 to 2009

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reus-Pons, Matias; Vandenheede, Hadewijch; Janssen, Fanny; Kibele, Eva U.B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: European societies are rapidly ageing and becoming multicultural, and Belgium is part of the countries ahead in this transition. Differences in mortality between migrants and non-migrants in Europe have been shown to depend on age, sex, socio-economic status, migrant background and

  4. Management of Asymptomatic Renal Stones in Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, David; Locke, James

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Management guidelines were created to screen and manage asymptomatic renal stones in U.S. astronauts. The risks for renal stone formation in astronauts due to bone loss and hypercalcuria are unknown. Astronauts have a stone risk which is about the same as commercial aviation pilots, which is about half that of the general population. However, proper management of this condition is still crucial to mitigate health and mission risks in the spaceflight environment. Methods: An extensive review of the literature and current aeromedical standards for the monitoring and management of renal stones was done. The NASA Flight Medicine Clinic's electronic medical record and Longitudinal Survey of Astronaut Health were also reviewed. Using this work, a screening and management algorithm was created that takes into consideration the unique operational environment of spaceflight. Results: Renal stone screening and management guidelines for astronauts were created based on accepted standards of care, with consideration to the environment of spaceflight. In the proposed algorithm, all astronauts will receive a yearly screening ultrasound for renal calcifications, or mineralized renal material (MRM). Any areas of MRM, 3 millimeters or larger, are considered a positive finding. Three millimeters approaches the detection limit of standard ultrasound, and several studies have shown that any stone that is 3 millimeters or less has an approximately 95 percent chance of spontaneous passage. For mission-assigned astronauts, any positive ultrasound study is followed by low-dose renal computed tomography (CT) scan, and flexible ureteroscopy if CT is positive. Other specific guidelines were also created. Discussion: The term "MRM" is used to account for small areas of calcification that may be outside the renal collecting system, and allows objectivity without otherwise constraining the diagnostic and treatment process for potentially very small calcifications of uncertain

  5. Improving estimates of the prevalence of Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting among migrants in Western countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Elisa Ortensi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting (FGM/C is an emerging topic in immigrant countries as a consequence of the increasing proportion of African women in overseas communities. Objective: While the prevalence of FGM/C is routinely measured in practicing countries, the prevalence of the phenomenon in western countries is substantially unknown, as no standardized methods exist yet for immigrant countries. The aim of this paper is to present an improved method of indirect estimation of the prevalence of FGM/C among first generation migrants based on a migrant selection hypothesis. A criterion to assess reliability of indirect estimates is also provided. Methods: The method is based on data from Demographic Health Surveys (DHS and Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS. Migrants' Selection Hypothesis is used to correct national prevalence estimates and obtain an improved estimation of prevalence among overseas communities. Results: The application of the selection hypothesis modifies national estimates, usually predicting a lower occurrence of FGM/C among immigrants than in their respective practicing countries. A comparison of direct and indirect estimations confirms that the method correctly predicts the direction of the variation in the expected prevalence and satisfactorily approximates direct estimates. Conclusions: Given its wide applicability, this method would be a useful instrument to estimate FGM/C occurrence among first generation immigrants and provide corresponding support for policies in countries where information from ad hoc surveys is unavailable.

  6. Asymptomatic deer excrete infectious prions in faeces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamgüney, Gültekin; Miller, Michael W; Wolfe, Lisa L; Sirochman, Tracey M; Glidden, David V; Palmer, Christina; Lemus, Azucena; DeArmond, Stephen J; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2009-09-24

    Infectious prion diseases-scrapie of sheep and chronic wasting disease (CWD) of several species in the deer family-are transmitted naturally within affected host populations. Although several possible sources of contagion have been identified in excretions and secretions from symptomatic animals, the biological importance of these sources in sustaining epidemics remains unclear. Here we show that asymptomatic CWD-infected mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) excrete CWD prions in their faeces long before they develop clinical signs of prion disease. Intracerebral inoculation of irradiated deer faeces into transgenic mice overexpressing cervid prion protein (PrP) revealed infectivity in 14 of 15 faecal samples collected from five deer at 7-11 months before the onset of neurological disease. Although prion concentrations in deer faeces were considerably lower than in brain tissue from the same deer collected at the end of the disease, the estimated total infectious dose excreted in faeces by an infected deer over the disease course may approximate the total contained in a brain. Prolonged faecal prion excretion by infected deer provides a plausible natural mechanism that might explain the high incidence and efficient horizontal transmission of CWD within deer herds, as well as prion transmission among other susceptible cervids.

  7. Asymptomatic deer excrete infectious prions in feces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamgüney, Gültekin; Miller, Michael W.; Wolfe, Lisa L.; Sirochman, Tracey M.; Glidden, David V.; Palmer, Christina; Lemus, Azucena; DeArmond, Stephen J.; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    2011-01-01

    Infectious prion diseases 1 – scrapie of sheep 2 and chronic wasting disease (CWD) of several species in the deer family 3,4 – are transmitted naturally within affected host populations. Although several possible sources of contagion have been identified in excretions and secretions from symptomatic animals 5–8, the biological importance of these sources in sustaining epidemics remains unclear. Here we show that asymptomatic CWD-infected mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) excrete CWD prions in their feces long before they develop clinical signs of prion disease. Intracerebral (i.c.) inoculation of irradiated deer feces into transgenic (Tg) mice overexpressing cervid PrP revealed infectivity in 14 of 15 fecal samples collected from 5 deer at 7–11 months before the onset of neurological disease. Although prion concentrations in deer feces were considerably lower than in brain tissue from the same deer collected at the disease terminus, the estimated total infectious dose excreted in feces by an infected deer over the disease course may approximate the total contained in brain tissue. Prolonged fecal prion excretion by infected deer provides a plausible natural mechanism that might explain the high incidence and efficient horizontal transmission of CWD within deer herds 3,4,9, as well as prion transmission between susceptible deer species. PMID:19741608

  8. Ethics and Emotions: A Migrant Researcher Doing Research Among Romanian Migrants

    OpenAIRE

    Oana Romocea

    2014-01-01

    This article explores both the ethical and emotional issues that emerge while conducting qualitative research as a Romanian migrant researcher among Romanian migrants settled in the UK. I specifically look at the transformative role played by emotions in the research process and how knowledge is generated by a permanent state of ‘objective reflexivity’ employed by the researcher and self-reflexivity on the part of the participants. While most emotions and ethical considerations transpire ...

  9. Problem Drinking among transnational mexican migrants: Exploring migrant Status and Situational Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Victor

    2008-01-01

    We present research finding son problem drinking among transnational Mexican migrants employed in the mushroom industry of southeastern Pennsylvania. Our research explored the relationship between situational factors—living arrangements, social isolation, and peer pressure to drink—and problem drinking. Individual characteristics of the migrants, such as age, education level, migration history, and work experience in the mushroom industry are also considered. The premise of our study is that ...

  10. Injury Patterns Among Illegal Migrants from Africa in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Amotz; Radomislensky, Irina; Peleg, Kobi

    2015-08-01

    In recent years Israel has become a destination for many migrants from Africa that illegally cross the Egyptian-Israeli border. The objective of this paper is to describe the epidemiological characteristics of injuries among illegal migrants in Israel. The study was carried out retrospectively using data from 19 trauma centers that participated in the Israel National Trauma Registry between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2011. Illegal migrants from Africa were compared to the local population. Migrants were injured more often than the local population from intentional injuries (57.11 %). Migrants were also less likely than the local population (58.38 %) to sustain a minor injury (i.e., injury severity ≤8). The study also shows the hospitalization cost as a result of injuries among migrants from Africa. Preventive measures among illegal migrants from Africa should prioritize intentional injuries and industrial site injuries.

  11. Somatic comorbidity among migrants with posttraumatic stress disorder and depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lolk, Mette; Byberg, Stine; Carlsson, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In a cohort of migrants in Denmark, we compared somatic disease incidence among migrants diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression with migrants without a diagnosed psychiatric disorder. METHODS: The study builds on a unique cohort of migrants who obtained...... for the implementation of the project (No 2012-41-0065). RESULTS: Our results showed that migrants diagnosed with PTSD and depression had significantly higher rates of somatic diseases compared with migrants without diagnosed psychiatric disorders - especially, infectious disease (IRR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.45-2.48; p ....01), neurological disease (IRR, 2.35; 95% CI, 1.91-2.91; p Migrants with PTSD and depression had a significantly higher rates of somatic comorbidity compared...

  12. [Failure to offer parasitology screening to vulnerable migrants in France: Epidemiology and consequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniaud, François; Rouessé, Charles; Collignon, Anne; Domingo, Anita; Rigal, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    of urine for Schistosoma haematobium was performed for 171 patients; 22 positive results were reported, with viable SH eggs (13%). Microscopic examination of stool for ova and parasites was performed for 161 patients; 32 had positive results (20%). These included 14 cases of Entamoeba histolytica/dispar (our laboratory cannot distinguish the 2 strains).DiscussionThe failure to offer screening affects sub-Saharan Africans less than other migrants, perhaps because of a particular visibility due to their mass (they are the most prominent subgroup of migrants) or their higher frequency of abdominal/genitourinary symptoms. Nevertheless, more than 50% of them were not asked to undergo parasite screening, although they are the group with the highest rate of intestinal/urinary parasitosis. The most common and dangerous parasite found was Schistosoma haematobium; we do not know the pathogenicity of the Entamoeba found. Reasons for the frequent failure to suggest these screenings may include that physicians consider parasitosis as diseases of secondary importance, or have forgotten its symptoms, epidemiology, cycles, means of diagnosis, or treatment. Patients accepted the screening well when it was offered. Reasons during the course of consultation might have included insufficient time for pre-test counselling, some difficulties in communicating with the patient in French, or an overriding request or complaint from the patient. We propose the following strategy for parasite screening in CDO: standard "stool ova and parasite exams" proposed to any migrant in France for less than 5 years except sub-Saharan Africans, who should receive presumptive anti-parasite treatment instead; microscopic examination of urine for Schistosoma haematobium for sub-Saharan Africans from endemic regions. This detection can avoid - if treatment is early enough - severe uronephrological complications, which are rare but costly from a health care perspective (bladder tumor, renal failure). Physicians

  13. Problems Portraying Migrants in Applied Linguistics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, David

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a very personal attempt to explore the problematics of portraying migrants in Applied Linguistics research. I begin with a discussion of identity, in particular what we might mean when we use the term, and from there I go on to explore its fundamental imprecision through an analysis of a census question about ethnicity. I then…

  14. MENTE Spells Success for Migrant Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Andres F.; Gilbert, Michael B.

    1985-01-01

    Describes the MENTE (Minorities Engaged in New Things in Education) program which builds migrant students' skills, confidence, and awareness of opportunities. Components include language arts, quantitative skills (science and mathematics), and personal development activities. Participants later entered college at a much higher rate than the…

  15. The economic importance of migrant entrepreneurship: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Migrant entrepreneurs do not only have a substantial impact on the urban economy, but they also act as role models for socio-economic integration. They often operate in interesting market niches and provide a positive stimulus for creative business-making in modern cities. The present article offers first an overview of the ...

  16. Southern Europeans in France: Invisible Migrants?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eremenko, T.; El Qadim, N.; Steichen, E.; Lafleur, J.-M.; Stanek, M.

    2016-01-01

    France fared relatively well at the start of the current economic crisis, but has experienced low economic growth and high unemployment rates in the recent years. As a result it has been a less popular destination with Southern Europeans and EU migrants in general in search of economic

  17. Website Project 'Migrant: Mobilities and connections'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Faassen, M.; Hoekstra, F.G.

    2017-01-01

    Binnen het onderzoeksproject ‘Migrant: mobilities and connections’ wordt onderzoek gedaan naar Nederlandse emigranten die richting Australië vertrokken. Hierbij staan de levensgeschiedenissen van de emigranten centraal, maar er is ook aandacht voor hoe de Nederlandse waarden en identiteit

  18. Incorporating Migrant Farmers into Nigeria's Agricultural Extension ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Madukwe

    Migration in Nigeria is associated with a series of social, cultural, political and more importantly economic factors. ... Migration to farming areas begins with scarcity of land at source area and establishment of farming locations in ..... United Nations (1995). International Migration: Policies and the Status of Female. Migrants.

  19. Social Class, Identity, and Migrant Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvin, Ron; Norton, Bonny

    2014-01-01

    A necessary component of the neoliberal mechanisms of globalization, migration addresses the economic and labor needs of postindustrial countries while producing new modes of social fragmentation and inequality (Crompton, 2008). As migrant students insert themselves into segmented spaces, their countries of origin are themselves implicated in a…

  20. Ultrasonography in the diagnosis of asymptomatic hyperuricemia and gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, J G; Beltrán, L M; Mejía-Chew, C; Tevar, D; Torres, R J

    2016-12-01

    Sonography has detected urate deposits in 34%-42% of the patients with asymptomatic hyperuricemia. This may prompt reclassification of asymptomatic hyperuricemia into "asymptomatic gout" and consideration of urate lowering therapy (ULT) to resolve urate deposits. In patients with gout and no visible tophi, sonography has detected urate deposits in half of the patients. This may allow diagnosing "tophaceous gout" and influencing the serum urate target level, prophylaxis to avoid acute gout flares during ULT, and clinical follow-up. Current accessibility to sonography may better classify patients with hyperuricemia and gout and contribute to delineate therapeutic objectives and clinical guidance.

  1. Migrant workers: victims of war in Gulf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The Persian Gulf War forced millions of migrant workers in the region to return home, causing hardship not only on the workers but also on their home countries. Prior to the war, the region's oil wealth had attracted migrants from around the world. By 1990, some 3 million resided in Iraq and Kuwait alone. Many more worked in other Gulf countries. But only 2 months after the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait, over 2 million workers had fled the region or had been returned home. Yemenis and Egyptians alone accounted for 750,000 and 1/2 million workers, respectively. There were also an estimated 600,000 Asians. Although many of the migrants were unskilled laborers, many also were skilled laborers and professionals. Jordanians and Palestinians made up much of the Kuwaiti civil service. As the war unfolded, it became clear that the migrant workers lacked any of the legal rights and protection granted to other citizens. Many workers were not allowed to return home because of their importance to the economy. Others, like some 35,000 Sri Lankan housemaids in Kuwait, were stranded in the war zone, lacking the money and means to return home. In most cases, the workers also suffered from frozen bank accounts, unpaid wages and benefits, and property loss. Their return home also created problems for their countries. Jordan's population increased by 10% in 1990 due to the returning population. Yemen's unemployment increased from 10% to 25%. As a result of the Gulf war experience, the UN General Assembly adopted the International Convention on the Rights of Migrant Workers and their Families, which must now be ratified by 20 nations before implementation begins.

  2. Increasing numbers of migrants challenge policymakers worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, P

    1996-05-01

    International migration has increased greatly in the 1990s. In the mid-1990s there were about 125 million migrants (about 2% of the world's population) not living in their country of birth or citizenship. There are 2-4 million new migrants each year. The global migrant population is concentrated in only a few countries. In many Middle Eastern countries, foreign workers make up most of the labor force (60-90%). Africa and western Asia have more than 50% of all 27 million refugees and displaced persons. Germany, France, the UK, the US, Italy, Japan, and Canada have about 33% of the migrant population. Newly arriving immigrants make up a large percentage of annual population growth in industrialized countries with low birth rates (100% in Germany and about 33% in the US). Major migration flows are from Mexico, Central America, and Asia to the US; from North Africa and eastern Europe to western Europe; and from the Philippines and India to the Middle East. Two US legalization programs contributed to a resurgence in immigration in the early 1990s. Many of the world's top economic powers are very concerned about immigration. Economic growth can cut down on economic migration. Many specialists think that freer trade, more foreign investment, and, in some cases, aid can spark economic growth. Many residents of countries receiving migrants want immigration curtailed. Many industrial democracies handle difficult migration issues by making trade-offs, particularly combine stricter immigration controls with more assistance to integrate new immigrants and liberalize trade so countries can export goods instead of people.

  3. Education of EU Migrant Children in EU Member States. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harte, Emma; Herrera, Facundo; Stepanek, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This policy brief looks at the education of EU migrant children in the context of intra-EU mobility. It examines some of the literature and data on the topic in order to identify key differences between EU migrant children and non-migrant children. There are disparities in educational performance between migrants and non-migrants. The brief…

  4. Chalmydia trachomatis infection among asymptomatic males in an infertility clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mania - Pramanik J

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis can lead to a variety of complications including tubal infertility. Similarly asymptomatic infection in male partner can also hinder conception. The prevalence of this infection among the infertile female in the Institute′s Infertility Clinic was observed to be 34%. Hence the present study was undertaken to find out these infection among the asymptomatic male partners of these infected women. Fifteen asymptomatic males who were not treated with any antibiotics in recent past were enrolled. First voided urine, semen and blood were collected from each individual for diagnosis of this infection. Chlamydia antigen was detected in 33.3% while Chlamydia antibody was detected in seven (46.7% of these cases. Of these seven, three cases were positive for antigen. This preliminary observation suggests that amongst the infertile couple a sizable percentage (60% of asymptomatic male partners remain infected with Chlamydia trachomatis.

  5. Assessment of Liver and Renal Functions of Asymptomatic Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Winniecure), used in our institute for the treatment of Human Immuno Deficiency Virus (HIV) infection, on liver and renal functions of individuals undergoing therapy. A total of 100 asymptomatic Human Immuno Deficiency Virus (HIV) seropositive ...

  6. MOLECULAR DIAGNOSIS OF Guignardia citricarpa IN ASYMPTOMATIC SWEET ORANGE TISSUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FERNANDA DE SILLOS FAGANELLO

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Citrus black spot, a fungal disease caused by the quarantine fungus Guignardia citricarpa, restricts the exportation of fresh fruit to countries in the European Union. The occurrence of latent infections and the time required for diagnosis using conventional methods have brought about the need to validate fast, efficient and reproducible molecular techniques to detect the pathogen in asymptomatic tissue. As such, this study aims to detect G. citricarpa in the symptomatic fruit and asymptomatic leaf tissue of sweet oranges by conventional and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Specificity and limit of detection (LOD were assessed in tissue samples of fruit lesions and asymptomatic leaves. Low concentrations of the fungus were found in asymptomatic leaves. Under these conditions, real-time PCR proved to be viable, reproducible and highly sensitive to detection of the pathogen.

  7. Clinical characteristics of potential kidney donors with asymptomatic kidney stones

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenz, Elizabeth C.; Lieske, John C.; Vrtiska, Terri J.; Krambeck, Amy E.; Li, Xujian; Bergstralh, Eric J.; Melton, L. Joseph; Rule, Andrew D.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Patients with symptomatic kidney stones are characterized by older age, male gender, white race, hypertension, obesity, metabolic syndrome and chronic kidney disease. Whether these characteristics differ in patients with asymptomatic kidney stones is unknown.

  8. Dextrocardia with asymptomatic right atrial appendage aneurysm: a case report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sate, Hossein; Reshadati, Najmeh; Aliakbarzadeh, Parvaneh; Molazadeh, Negin

    2017-01-01

    .... We report a case of asymptomatic RAAA in a patient with dextrocardia and anomalous origin of RCA from left coronary sinus which was treated successfully by CABG and the aneurysm was completely excised...

  9. The big crossing: illegal boat migrants in the Mediterranean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassar, Hassène; Dourgnon, Paul

    2014-08-01

    This article explores illegal migration routes and groups across North Africa to Europe. We describe sub-Saharan and cross-Mediterranean routes, and how they changed during the years. We propose an analytical framework for the main factors for these migrations, from local to international and regulatory context. We then describe sea-migrants' nationalities and socio-economic and demographic characteristics, from studies undertook in Tunisia and Morocco. While boat migration represents only a fraction of illegal migration to Europe, it raises humanitarian as well as ethical issues for European and North African (NA) countries, as a non-negligible amount of them end up in death tolls of shipwrecks in the Mediterranean Sea. Moreover, existing statistics show that illegal trans-Mediterranean migration is growing exponentially. Ongoing crises in Africa and the Middle East are likely to prompt even larger outflows of refugees in the near future. This should induce NA countries to share closer public policy concerns with European countries. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  10. Prevalence of radiographic markers of femoroacetabular impingement in asymptomatic adults

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo Benedet Scheidt; Carlos Roberto Galia; Cristiano Valter Diesel; Ricardo Rosito; Carlos Alberto de Souza Macedo

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to determine the prevalence of radiographic signs of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) in asymptomatic adults and correlate them with data from physical examinations. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study with 82 asymptomatic volunteers, 164 hips, between 40 and 60 years of age, selected by convenience. They were submitted to anamnesis and clinical examination of the hip, anteroposterior (AP) pelvis radiographs with three incidences, Dunn 45° and Lequesne false profile o...

  11. Asymptomatic internal carotid artery stenosis and cerebrovascular risk stratification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaides, Andrew N; Kakkos, Stavros K; Kyriacou, Efthyvoulos

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the cerebrovascular risk stratification potential of baseline degree of stenosis, clinical features, and ultrasonic plaque characteristics in patients with asymptomatic internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis.......The purpose of this study was to determine the cerebrovascular risk stratification potential of baseline degree of stenosis, clinical features, and ultrasonic plaque characteristics in patients with asymptomatic internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis....

  12. Asymptomatic bacteriuria among an obstetric population in Ibadan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awonuga, D O; Dada-Adegbola, H O; Fawole, A O; Olala, F A; Onimisi-Smith, H O

    2011-01-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy is the major risk factor for symptomatic urinary tract infection during pregnancy. Screening and identification of bacteriuria during pregnancy have been recommended. To determine the prevalence and pattern of asymptomatic bacteriuria associated with pregnancy. The study was a descriptive, cross sectional survey of pattern of asymptomatic bacteriuria among consecutive patients presenting for the first antenatal visit at a University College Hospital, during a period of two months. Relevant information obtained from all the patients recruited for the study included age, parity, educational level, gestational age and occupation of participant. Haemoglobin electrophoresis patterns were also retrieved and recorded. Main outcome measures were prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria, bacterial isolates and their antibiotic sensitivities. There were 205 eligible participants with a mean age of 30.6 ± 4.3 years and a mean gestational age at booking of 20.9 ±7.0 weeks. The prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria was 22(10.7%). The isolated pathogens were predominantly coliforms (Klebsiella and E. coli) accounting for 45.5% and Staphylococcus saprophyticus (27.3%). Only gentamycin, nitrofurantoin and ofloxacin demonstrated high efficacy against these uropathogens with antibiotic sensitivity rates of 72.7%-81.8%. Prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria in this centre is relatively high. This underscores the need for routine screening of pregnant women for bacteriuria.

  13. [Is there a role for asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis screening?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldenberg, Eitan; Bass, Arie

    2014-08-01

    Screening for asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis (CAS) is highly controversial Many surgeons routinely screen their patients for carotid disease prior to major operations, yet the benefit of such practice was never demonstrated. The treatment of symptomatic patients has not changed much during the last twenty years, since the publication of the North American Symptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Trial (NASCET). However, in contrast, the Asymptomatic Carotid Atherosclerosis Study (ACAS) and the Asymptomatic Carotid Surgery Trial (ACST) failed to get the same acceptance among the multidisciplinary group treating CAS.The prevalence of asymptomatic 60-99% carotid artery stenosis among the general population is about 1%. Neither ACAS nor ACST showed that stenosis severity was associated with increasing stroke risk. The 'realpolitik' is that mass interventions in asymptomatic patients will probably only ever prevent about 1% of all strokes. This is even truer regarding patients scheduLed for major operation, in which the incidence of stroke is less than 1%. Moreover the current evidence in the literature suggests that the best medicaL treatment (BMT) results in 0.5% strokes per year, better than resuLts which can be offered by surgery. According to the current evidence, it seems that asymptomatic carotid artery screening should be discontinued, since it is a major waste of resources.

  14. Determinants of internal migrant health and the healthy migrant effect in South India: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Warren; Humphries, Sally; Patel, Kirit; Majowicz, Shannon; Little, Matthew; Dewey, Cate

    2017-09-12

    Internal labour migration is an important and necessary livelihood strategy for millions of individuals and households in India. However, the precarious position of migrant workers within Indian society may have consequences for the health of these individuals. Previous research on the connections between health and labour mobility within India have primarily focused on the negative health outcomes associated with this practice. Thus, there is a need to better identify the determinants of internal migrant health and how these determinants shape migrant health outcomes. An exploratory mixed methods study was conducted in 26 villages in the Krishnagiri district of Tamil Nadu. Sixty-six semi-structured interviews were completed using snowball sampling, followed by 300 household surveys using multi-stage random sampling. For qualitative data, an analysis of themes and content was completed. For quantitative data, information on current participation in internal labour migration, in addition to self-reported morbidity and determinants of internal migrant health, was collected. Morbidity categories were compared between migrant and non-migrant adults (age 14-65 years) using a Fisher's exact test. Of the 300 households surveyed, 137 households (45.7%) had at least one current migrant member, with 205 migrant and 1012 non-migrant adults (age 14-65 years) included in this study. The health profile of migrant and non-migrants was similar in this setting, with 53 migrants (25.9%) currently suffering from a health problem compared to 273 non-migrants (27.0%). Migrant households identified both occupational and livelihood factors that contributed to changes in the health of their migrant members. These determinants of internal migrant health were corroborated and further expanded on through the semi-structured interviews. Internal labour migration in and of itself is not a determinant of health, as participation in labour mobility can contribute to an improvement in health, a

  15. [Xanthoma disseminatum with asymptomatic multisystem involvement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinoun, M; Hali, F; Marnissi, F; Lazaar, S; Benchikhi, H

    2015-04-01

    Xanthogranulomas belong to non-Langerhans histiocytosis of the second group in the Histiocyte Society classification. They comprise a heterogeneous group of rare entities frequently involving cutaneous tropism. Xanthoma disseminatum belongs to this group of non-Langerhans histiocytosis. We report a case of xanthoma disseminatum (XD) in which localized skin and mucous impairment revealed multisystem involvement. A 28-year-old man presented with a two-year history of progressive yellow-orange and infiltrated xanthomatous papulonodular lesions of the face. Lesions of the oral mucosa and genital region were seen, with no functional repercussions. No ophthalmic or other complications were found. Histopathology showed a dense histiocytic infiltrate within the dermis with Touton giant cells, foamy multinucleated giant cells and inflammatory cells, without necrobiosis. Histiocytes were positive for CD68 but negative for CD1a. Gastric and lung involvement was seen and was confirmed at histology. Bone scintigraphy showed suspicious left ulnar hyperfixation suggesting bone involvement. No monoclonal gammopathy or diabetes insipidus was seen. Our patient was treated with corticosteroids 1mg/kg/day and thalidomide 100 mg/day. The outcome was marked by regression and exfiltration of the cutaneous lesions from the second week of treatment, with subsidence continuing at 3 months. This case involves a very rare form of xanthoma disseminatum. The localized facial skin lesions revealed multifocal non-Langerhans histiocytosis that was in fact asymptomatic. The diagnosis of XD was based on clinical, histological and immunohistochemical criteria. Xanthoma disseminatum is a non-Langerhans histiocytic proliferation first described by Montgomery in 1938. This rare entity is characterized by skin and mucous membrane xanthomatosis in which the facial involvement is common, together with diabetes insipidus and normal lipid metabolism. The prognosis is determined by the presence of mucosal

  16. Participation in cancer screening among female migrants and non-migrants in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzoska, Patrick; Abdul-Rida, Chadi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In many European countries, migrants utilize cancer screening less often than non-migrants. In Germany, in contrast, higher rates of utilization among migrants as compared with non-migrants have been reported. The role of demographic and socioeconomic factors potentially confounding the association between migration status and participation in screening, however, could not be studied. The present study aims to investigate the utilization of cancer screening among migrant and nonmigrant women residing in Germany, adjusting for potential confounders. We used self-reported information from women surveyed on whether they have ever participated in screening for cancer (n = 11,709). The data was collected as part of a cross-sectional representative telephone survey conducted by the Robert Koch-Institute in 2010. We distinguished between three groups of women: (1) respondents of non-German nationality, those who had immigrated to Germany after their birth or those who have two foreign-born parents (“migrants with two-sided migration background”), (2) respondents who only have one foreign-born parent (“migrant with one-sided migration background”), and (3) all others (“non-migrants”). To account for confounders, logistic regression analysis was performed. Only individuals proficient in German were included in the survey, allowing to control for a bias arising from poor language proficiency. 84.9% of nonmigrant women, 82.1% of women with a one-sided, and 70.5% of women with a two-sided migration background had utilized screening for cancer at least once in their lifetime before the survey. The adjusted odds ratios (OR) as compared with nonmigrant women were 0.99 (95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 0.77–1.27) and 0.55 (95% CI: 0.47–0.64), respectively. The study shows that migrant women with a two-sided migration background residing in Germany utilize screening for cancer less often than nonmigrant women—independently of demographic and

  17. Do Migrant Girls Perform Better than Migrant Boys? Deviant Gender Differences between the Reading Scores of 15-Year-Old Children of Migrants Compared to Native Pupils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dronkers, Jaap; Kornder, Nils

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we analyse the gender differences between the educational performance of 15-year-old children of migrants from specific regions of origin countries living in different destination countries with the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2009 wave. We study whether this gender difference of migrant pupils deviates…

  18. Assessing psychological stress among Arab migrant women in the City of Cologne/Germany using the Community Oriented Primary Care (COPC) approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irfaeya, Maesa; Maxwell, Annette E; Krämer, Alexander

    2008-08-01

    Migrants suffer from various health problems including psychological stress. This study is the first to use the Community Oriented Primary Care methodology to address a health problem among Arab migrant women in Germany. In partnership with the Muslim Women's Educational Center in Cologne, we defined a community, identified an important health problem through focus groups, key informant interviews and a community discussion group, and studied psychological stress in a sample of Arab migrant women (N = 116) using a questionnaire that included the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) instrument. Almost 90% of participating women were psychologically stressed. About half of the women cited "feeling lonely" as a main source of stress and another third cited religious, moral and personal factors as sources of stress. While the majority of women reacted to stressful situations with crying, 23% coped by talking to others and 20% through worship. Higher stress scores were associated with older age, lower level of education, having more children, coming from a North African rather than Middle Eastern or European country, having lived in Germany for <15 years, having had a disease since migrating to Germany, being ill at the time of the study, and feeling negatively about being a migrant. To date, this study provides the most comprehensive study of psychological distress among Arab migrants in Germany, and provides important information for future studies and interventions.

  19. Unaccompanied migrant child: victims or infringers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelouahed Belattar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This essay is about the issue of migrant offender minors. These children are caught in the double problematic of being immigrants and being law offenders. This is a problem because of the social treatment they suffer those who have been through these kinds of situations (such as the whole migration process and the mentoring in the juvenile centers. We want to shed light on these situations explaining them briefly to know: the reality that these children face (the treatment they receive from the Minor Responsibility Law, the Law on Foreigners and the social services of the Autonomous Community of Valencia, the day-to-day problems they face and their possible consequences. The aim of this essay is to reflect on the criminality of these migrant minors and to try to prevent it

  20. Migrant life stories and the Web

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marselis, Randi

    2013-01-01

    The life stories of migrants are increasingly being told, as part of the work of cultural organizations, and websites are well suited to making such life story projects accessible to the public. However, by using the lives of real people as raw material in a public forum, Web projects raise...... important questions about the terms on which participants are given a voice. This article focuses on a Danish website which depicts the life stories of migrant men through written texts, audio clips, and photographs. It presents a detailed analysis of the life story of one young man from a Muslim background...... who has openly declared himself an atheist. The article examines his experience of having this somewhat sensitive story made public. The religious aspect inevitably positioned his story in relation to broader political debates about Muslims in Denmark. Since migrants’ stories often touch on highly...

  1. Institutional difference affects and migrant entrepreneurs' innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashourizadeh, Shayegheh; Jensen, Kent Wickstrøm

    Entrepreneurs who migrate may deal with new environments. This may trigger their minds for invention and innovation. On the other hand, the novel environment may also impose unknown challenges that the migrant entrepreneur needs to learn how to overcome. In this article we investigate how...... differences between home and host country affects migrants’ innovativeness. Our analyses are based on a sample of 3,803 migrant entrepreneurs in first generation who reside in 64 countries and come from 158 home countries, and which have been surveyed in Global Entrepreneurship Monitor 2012-13. Linear mixed...... model analyses revealed that institutional difference in form of cultural and economic difference is marginally significant, as we hypothesized. We discuss the implications of our findings for theory of institutional impacts on migrants’ innovation....

  2. The Speeds of the Migrant Mongrel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moslund, Sten Pultz

    dobbelthed og "ind-imellemhed" i den transkulturelle migrants/ romans udsyn. I The Carrier bliver den migrerende bastards dobbeltsyn åbenlyst reduceret til et enøjet teleskopisk udsyn. I Naipauls roman er der også en selvreflekterende diskurs, som fremhæver dens egen diskursive begrænsning, men hvorimod...... spørgsmålstegn ved og problematisere den formodede dobbelthed og "ind-imellemhed" i den transkulturelle migrants/ romans udsyn. I bliver den migrerende bastards dobbeltsyn åbenlyst reduceret til et enøjet teleskopisk udsyn. I Naipauls roman er der også en selvreflekterende diskurs, som fremhæver dens egen...

  3. Asymptomatic malaria in children under 5 years old in Benin City ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... not affect significantly the prevalence of asymptomatic malaria. Age, gender and anaemia were significantly associated with asymptomatic malaria. Conclusion: Interventions to reduce asymptomatic malaria are advocated. Keywords: Asymptomatic malaria, Benin City, Children under 5 years. An Erratum was published for ...

  4. The “Culture” of Migrant Pupils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchardt, Mette

    2017-01-01

    Culture seems to function as a central explanation when refugees and other migrants are framed as a risk and a challenge in European and national politics across the member states, including educational politics. Based on the case of Denmark during the 1970s, the article unfolds how education...... historically has been an arena for the internal bordering of the nation in the context of a welfare state model by means of the category of culture....

  5. Unaccompanied migrant child: victims or infringers

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelouahed Belattar

    2014-01-01

    [EN] This essay is about the issue of migrant offender minors. These children are caught in the double problematic of being immigrants and beinglaw offenders. This is a problem because of the social treatment they suffer those who have been through these kinds of situations (such as the whole migration process and the mentoring in the juvenile centers). We want to shed light on these situationsexplaining them briefly to know: the reality that these children face (the treatment they receive fr...

  6. Pre-acculturation among voluntary migrants

    OpenAIRE

    Yijälä, Anu

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation research focused on the pre-migration stage of the migration process and, specifically, the action period, which starts from making a decision to move abroad and lasts until the actual move. The research further developed the concept of pre-acculturation, that is, the active process that voluntary migrants in particular go through during the preparatory stage of migration process. As studies on pre-acculturation are still rather scarce, the theoretical background of the rese...

  7. Migrants' and refugees' rights : a brief international law perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Grech, Omar

    2014-01-01

    The issue of migrants and refugees, especially in a Mediterranean context, has become the subject of political sabre-rattling, emotive language and fractious debate. All of this may be understandable to some extent, but the argument put forward in this paper is that beyond emotion and debate there are rules of international law, which are applicable to migrants and refugees. In essence the paper seeks to remind that migrants, refugees and asylum seekers are human beings who are entitled to th...

  8. The savings behavior of temporary and permanent migrants in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, Thomas K.; Sinning, Mathias

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the relative savings position of migrant households in West Germany, paying particular attention to differences between temporary and permanent migrants. Utilizing household level data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP), our findings reveal significant differences in the savings rates between foreign-born and German-born individuals. These differences disappear, however, for temporary migrants, if their remittances are taken into account. Fixed effects estimation...

  9. Health equity and migrants in the Greater Mekong Subregion

    OpenAIRE

    McMichael, Celia; Healy, Judith

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Migrant health is receiving increasing international attention, reflecting recognition of the health inequities experienced among many migrant populations and the need for health systems to adapt to diverse migrant populations. In the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) there is increasing migration associated with uneven economic integration and growth, socio-economic vulnerabilities, and disparities between countries. There has been limited progress, however, in improving mi...

  10. Fertility Adaptation of Child Migrants to Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adsera, Alicia; Ferrer, Ana

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzes the fertility behavior of immigrant women arriving to Canada before age 19 using the 20 per cent sample of the Canadian Census from 1991 through 2006. Findings show that fertility increases with age at immigration, and is particularly high for those immigrating in their late teens. This pattern prevails regardless of the country of origin or whether the mother tongue of the migrant is an official language in Canada or not. We do not find a ‘critical age’ at which the behavior of migrants with and without official mother tongue start to diverge by more, even though the fertility of migrants without official mother tongue is always higher on average. Formal education matters as the fertility of immigrants who arrived to Canada before adulthood and graduated from college is similar to that of their native peers regardless of their age of arrival. However, the fertility of those with less than tertiary education increasingly diverges with age at migration from similarly educated Canadians. PMID:23800074

  11. Social Support and HIV Risks Among Migrant and Non-Migrant Market Workers in Almaty, Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergenova, Gaukhar; Shaw, Stacey A; Terlikbayeva, Assel; Gilbert, Louisa; Gensburg, Lenore; Primbetova, Sholpan; El-Bassel, Nabila

    2017-08-01

    Migration processes are listed within the primary factors facilitating the heterosexual spread of HIV. The study examines the relationship between social support, sexual HIV risk behaviors and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among 1342 male migrant and non-migrant market workers from Barakholka Market in Almaty, Kazakhstan. (1) higher level of perceived social support [Enhancing Recovery in Coronary Heart Disease (ENRICHD) Social Support Instrument (ESSI score)] was associated with a lower likelihood of having sex with a female sex worker (FSW) [OR = 0.952 (0.927, 0.978) p social support factors should be considered as a component of HIV and STI prevention programs for male migrant workers from Central Asia in Kazakhstan.

  12. Migrant Integration: Case for a Necessary Shift of Paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieu Donné HACK-POLAY

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the antagonism between the need for migrant communities to maintain their native culture and the necessity to integrate in the dominant community in order to achieve social harmony and socio-economic promotion. The article found thatcultural isolation could alienate some migrants who may see in the establishment of the community organisation a way of leading a migrant life that requires neither increased contacts with indigenous groups nor specific training. The migrants find themselves locked in menial jobs and do not experience upward social mobility. The situation points to a need to rethink the management of community organisations and support systems.

  13. Stillbirth and congenital anomalies in migrants in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Gundlund, Anna; Villadsen, Sarah Fredsted

    2016-01-01

    The risk of giving birth to a stillborn child or a child with severe congenital anomaly is higher for women who have immigrated to Europe as compared to the majority population in the receiving country. The literature, however, reveals great differences between migrant groups, even within migrants...... disparity is a result of the socioeconomic disadvantage most migrants face. Consanguinity has been considered as another cause for the increased stillbirth risk and the high risk of congenital anomaly observed in many migrant groups. Utilization and quality of care during pregnancy and childbirth...

  14. Migrants' health and access to healthcare in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnilicová, Helena; Dobiásová, Karolina

    2011-09-01

    The article is dealing with current state of Czech health policy in relation to migration. Overall migration information, available data on migrants' health status as well as accessibility of healthcare are provided. Some health risks connected with migration are mentioned and discussed. Authors concluded that the most urgent problem of Czech health policy in relation to migrants remains the insufficient guarantee of legal entitlement to health care. This concerns a large group of migrants with long-term residence, since the current legal regulation is disadvantageous to migrants coming from countries outside the EU.

  15. A typology of migration in Canada based on migrants' characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P; Krishnan, P

    1994-01-01

    "Data from the 1981 Census of Canada are used to develop a typology of migrants on the basis of their personal characteristics. Migrants are defined as those individuals who have changed their residence since the 1976 Census, crossing at least a municipal boundary. Socio-economic and demographic characteristics are perceived to differentiate stayers from movers, and to distinguish each migrant type [that is to say] intraprovincial, interprovincial and international. Discriminant analysis is applied to classify people into migrant types based on their personal characteristics and the typology developed." excerpt

  16. When strong unions meet precarious migrants: Building trustful relations to unionise labour migrants in a high union-density setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refslund, Bjarke

    2018-01-01

    unions are in a good position to include migrant workers and thereby resist labour market segmentation. The strong Danish unions, faced with the serious challenges of intra-European labour migration, have increased their attention and resources devoted to organising migrant workers and including them......Based on case studies in a fish processing plant and a demolition company, this article shows how strong and institutionally embedded unions interact with migrant workers in a precarious labour market position in order to safeguard their working conditions and organise them. It shows how strong...... in the IR-model. The dynamic relation between migrant workers and national unions in this high-density setting is discussed emphasising the need for building a trustful relation between the migrant workers and the unions in order to empower the migrants to better navigate in the national labour market...

  17. When strong unions meet precarious migrants: Building trustful relations to unionise labour migrants in a high union-density setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refslund, Bjarke

    2018-01-01

    Based on case studies in a fish processing plant and a demolition company, this article shows how strong and institutionally embedded unions interact with migrant workers in a precarious labour market position in order to safeguard their working conditions and organise them. It shows how strong...... unions are in a good position to include migrant workers and thereby resist labour market segmentation. The strong Danish unions, faced with the serious challenges of intra-European labour migration, have increased their attention and resources devoted to organising migrant workers and including them...... in the IR-model. The dynamic relation between migrant workers and national unions in this high-density setting is discussed emphasising the need for building a trustful relation between the migrant workers and the unions in order to empower the migrants to better navigate in the national labour market...

  18. An analysis of African female migration to South Africa: The case of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As with every social phenomenon, migration has a gender dimension, and a gender analysis is therefore pertinent in understanding African migration. The nature, patterns, experiences and forms of interaction between female migrants and members of their host community has its uniqueness. The nature of interaction and ...

  19. Louse-borne relapsing fever among East African refugees in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antinori, Spinello; Mediannikov, Oleg; Corbellino, Mario; Raoult, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Louse-borne relapsing fever a neglected and forgotten disease by western physicians has recently re-emerged among East African migrants seeking asylum in Europe. We review here the cases observed so far together with a critical reappraisal of several issues regarding clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. African immigrants in South Africa: Job takers or job creators?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivence Kalitanyi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade African immigrants have been met with and exposed to severe forms of hostility towards their presence in this country. A significant number of these migrants have successfully applied their entrepreneurial flair in establishing small enterprises and employing workers, often to the envy of their local counterparts. This paper presents the findings of an empirical study conducted in 2007 on job creation by African immigrant entrepreneurs for South Africans with face-to-face interviews with 120 African immigrant entrepreneurs. These findings were triangulated 7 non-governmental organisations that interact with immigrants in Cape Town. A review of the literature on migration, entrepreneurship and immigrant entrepreneurs formed the basis for the study The findings indicate that more than 80% of African immigrant entrepreneurs interviewed employ South Africans in their businesses. Despite a generally negative national perception towards immigrants, this study has also revealed that entrepreneurial skills are transferred from immigrant entrepreneurs to their South African employees. Whilst the study was only conducted in the suburban areas of Cape Town, the researcher believes that the results represent the general trend for South Africa. Furthermore, the study only involved those migrants who come from African continent. The overall result is the acknowledgement of the contribution that non-citizens are making to the country’s growth and development. The findings suggest recommendations geared towards policy changes regarding South African immigration law, an inclusive research about the role of immigrants on job creation in South Africa, as well as the consideration of immigrant entrepreneurs when allocating financial support.

  1. Redrawing the Boundaries of Membership: Labor Migrants in the UN Convention on Migrant Workers, NAFTA, and the European Union

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Joseph Trawicki

    2013-01-01

    Labor migrants occupy an indeterminate place in the rights regimes of nation-states. Even when engaged in documented movements, labor migrants enjoy a set of rights more limited than those of citizens. This dissertation reviews three international legal agreements, the UN Convention on Migrant Workers, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), and the European Union (EU) in order to understand how they influence where this boundary between sets of rights is drawn. In examining this...

  2. Offshore Migrant Workers: Return Migrants in Mexico’s English-Speaking Call Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaël Da Cruz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the offshore bilingual (English/Spanish call centers in Mexico City that serve as the entry into the labor market for young Mexican return migrants. Thanks to the English skills and cultural capital they gained from their experience in the United States, they are able to compete with more-skilled workers and are better suited to manage the cultural dimension of this transnational labor. Return migrants become stuck in this economic niche, however, owing to a lack of professional possibilities outside of the sector.

  3. Violence against women migrant workers in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiyanukij, Charnchao

    2004-10-01

    A paper on "Violence against Women Migrant Workers in Thailand" will show the situation of women migrant workers in Thailand, why they have to come to Thailand, what kind of job they do, how they are abused and exploited by employer in many types of violence and how the Thai government manages to solve the problems and assist them. The term or definition of "violence against women-VAW" and "discrimination against women" is provided and based on the definition stated in the Declaration on the Elimination of Violence Against Women and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW). Readers will see that violence against women is a form of discrimination committed on a basis of sex. In other words, VAW is a clear violation of women's inherent human rights including the rights to life, liberty, and security of person, equality, equal protection under the law and freedom from all forms of discrimination. More than one hundred thousands of women illegal migrant workers work in Thailand. They come from countries in the Mekong Sub-region namely Myanmar Lao PDR, Cambodia, Vietnam and China (Yunnan province). As they come illegally and have low level of education and working skills, they are vulnerable to exploitation, abuse or face violence. In general, they work in small factories, domestic work and restaurant. They are forced begging, forced prostitution or work in a slavery-like condition. Root causes of illegal migration and VAW are interrelated and occur in both sending and receiving countries of migrant workers. Poverty, demand and supply sides of labor, level of education, no knowledge of their own rights, impact of capitalism and gender issues, are mentioned as original factors of migration and VAW. The Thai government has national policy, plan, instrument and measures to cope with in- migration of illegal workers. Not only government agencies are active to solve the problems and assist the women migrant workers, but also non

  4. Symptomatic and asymptomatic candidiasis in a pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslankoylu, Ali Ertug; Kuyucu, Necdet; Yilmaz, Berna Seker; Erdogan, Semra

    2011-11-21

    This study aimed to examine the incidence, epidemiology, and clinical characteristics of symptomatic and asymptomatic candidiasis in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU), and to determine the risk factors associated with symptomatic candidiasis. This retrospective study included 67 patients from a 7-bed PICU in a tertiary care hospital that had Candida-positive cultures between April 2007 and July 2009. Demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients, Candida isolates, antimicrobial and antifungal treatments, and previously identified risk factors for symptomatic candidiasis were recorded, and symptomatic and asymptomatic patients were compared. In all, 36 (53.7%) of the patients with Candida-positive cultures had asymptomatic candidiasis and 31 (46.3%) had symptomatic candidiasis. Candida albicans was the most common Candida sp. in the asymptomatic patients (n = 20, 55.6%), versus Candida parapsilosis in the symptomatic patients (n = 15, 48.4%). The incidence of central venous catheter indwelling, blood transfusion, parenteral nutrition, and surgery was higher in the symptomatic patient group than in the asymptomatic patient group (P candidiasis according to forward stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis (OR: 6.1; 95% CI: 1.798-20.692). Surgery was the only risk factor significantly associated with symptomatic candidiasis and non-albicans Candida species were more common among the patients with symptomatic candidiasis. While treating symptomatic candidiasis in any PICU an increase in the incidence of non-albicans candidiasis should be considered.

  5. Clinical characteristics of potential kidney donors with asymptomatic kidney stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Elizabeth C; Lieske, John C; Vrtiska, Terri J; Krambeck, Amy E; Li, Xujian; Bergstralh, Eric J; Melton, L Joseph; Rule, Andrew D

    2011-08-01

    Patients with symptomatic kidney stones are characterized by older age, male gender, white race, hypertension, obesity, metabolic syndrome and chronic kidney disease. Whether these characteristics differ in patients with asymptomatic kidney stones is unknown. All potential kidney donors who underwent protocol computed tomography angiograms/urograms (2000-08) at the Mayo Clinic were identified. Renal abnormalities, including kidney stones, were assessed radiographically. Comorbidities, including past symptomatic kidney stones, were abstracted from the medical record. Characteristics of persons with and without radiographic stones were compared. Stone burden among persons with and without past symptomatic stones was compared. Among 1957 potential kidney donors, 3% had past symptomatic stones and 11% had radiographic stones (10% had only asymptomatic radiographic stones). Asymptomatic stone formers were more likely to be of white race, have low urine volumes and have radiographic findings of renal parenchymal thinning, focal renal scarring, medullary sponge kidney and polycystic kidney disease. Asymptomatic stone formers were not characterized by older age, male gender, hypertension, obesity, metabolic syndrome, abnormal kidney function, hyperuricemia, hypercalcemia or hypophosphatemia. Among persons with radiographic stones, those with past symptomatic stones had a slightly higher number of stones (mean 2.7 versus 2.4; P = 0.04), but a much greater diameter for the largest stone (mean 4.8 versus 1.6 mm; P kidney stones. These findings suggest that different pathophysiologic mechanisms could be involved in asymptomatic stone formation versus symptomatic stone passage.

  6. African Zoology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Zoology, a peer-reviewed research journal, publishes original scientific contributions and critical reviews that focus principally on African fauna in terrestrial, freshwater, and marine ecosystems. Research from other regions that advances practical and theoretical aspects of zoology will be considered. Rigorous ...

  7. Migrating skills, skilled migrants and migration skills: The influence of contexts on the validation of migrants' skills

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Magdalena Nowicka

    2014-01-01

      Notions of skill are geographically and historically specific; migration regimes, professional regulations and national policies influence possibilities of effective validation of migrant knowledge abroad...

  8. Universal health coverage in 'One ASEAN': are migrants included?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinto, Ramon Lorenzo Luis R; Curran, Ufara Zuwasti; Suphanchaimat, Rapeepong; Pocock, Nicola S

    2015-01-01

    As the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) gears toward full regional integration by 2015, the cross-border mobility of workers and citizens at large is expected to further intensify in the coming years. While ASEAN member countries have already signed the Declaration on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Migrant Workers, the health rights of migrants still need to be addressed, especially with ongoing universal health coverage (UHC) reforms in most ASEAN countries. This paper seeks to examine the inclusion of migrants in the UHC systems of five ASEAN countries which exhibit diverse migration profiles and are currently undergoing varying stages of UHC development. A scoping review of current migration trends and policies as well as ongoing UHC developments and migrant inclusion in UHC in Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand was conducted. In general, all five countries, whether receiving or sending, have schemes that cover migrants to varying extents. Thailand even allows undocumented migrants to opt into its Compulsory Migrant Health Insurance scheme, while Malaysia and Singapore are still yet to consider including migrants in their government-run UHC systems. In terms of predominantly sending countries, the Philippines's social health insurance provides outbound migrants with portable insurance yet with limited benefits, while Indonesia still needs to strengthen the implementation of its compulsory migrant insurance which has a health insurance component. Overall, the five ASEAN countries continue to face implementation challenges, and will need to improve on their UHC design in order to ensure genuine inclusion of migrants, including undocumented migrants. However, such reforms will require strong political decisions from agencies outside the health sector that govern migration and labor policies. Furthermore, countries must engage in multilateral and bilateral dialogue as they redefine UHC beyond the basis of

  9. Migrant's access to preventive health services in five EU countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosano, Aldo; Dauvrin, Marie; Buttigieg, Sandra C; Ronda, Elena; Tafforeau, Jean; Dias, Sonia

    2017-08-23

    Preventive health services (PHSs) form part of primary healthcare with the aim of screening to prevent disease. Migrants show significant differences in lifestyle, health beliefs and risk factors compared with the native populations. This can have a significant impact on migrants' access to health systems and participation in prevention programmes. Even in countries with widely accessible healthcare systems, migrants' access to PHSs may be difficult. The aim of the study was to compare access to preventive health services between migrants and native populations in five European Union (EU) countries. Information from Health Interview Surveys of Belgium, Italy, Malta, Portugal and Spain were used to analyse access to mammography, Pap smear tests, colorectal cancer screening and flu vaccination among migrants. The comparative risk of not accessing PHSs was calculated using a mixed-effects multilevel model, adjusting for potential confounding factors (sex, education and the presence of disability). Migrant status was defined according to citizenship, with a distinction made between EU and non-EU countries. Migrants, in particular those from non-EU countries, were found to have poorer access to PHSs. The overall risk of not reporting a screening test or a flu vaccination ranged from a minimum of 1.8 times (colorectal cancer screening), to a high of 4.4 times (flu vaccination) for migrants. The comparison among the five EU countries included in the study showed similarities, with particularly limited access recorded in Italy and in Belgium for non-EU migrants. The findings of this study are in accordance with evidence from the scientific literature. Poor organization of health services, in Italy, and lack of targeted health policies in Belgium may explain these findings. PHSs should be responsive to patient diversity, probably more so than other health services. There is a need for diversity-oriented, migrant-sensitive prevention. Policies oriented to removing

  10. Spirometry screening for airway obstruction in asymptomatic smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisnivesky, Juan; Skloot, Gwen; Rundle, Andrew; Revenson, Tracey A; Neugut, Alfred

    2014-07-01

    Screening spirometry might help identify patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) at an earlier stage. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of airway obstruction in a cohort of asymptomatic smokers who underwent spirometry as part of a routine health maintenance examination. The study cohort consisted of a consecutive sample of 386 asymptomatic smokers (≥5 pack-years) without a history of COPD or asthma, who completed spirometry testing as part of a routine health maintenance examination. Overall, 9 study subjects (2.3%, 95% confidence interval: 1.1-4.4%) had evidence of airway obstruction on spirometry. Univariate and multiple regression analyses showed that the risk of airway obstruction was not significantly associated with age, sex, race, smoking history or past history of respiratory symptoms. Spirometry screening of asymptomatic smokers may help detect a small number of patients with airway obstruction who are at high risk for COPD.

  11. Coronary calcification among 3477 asymptomatic and symptomatic individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øvrehus, Kristian A; Jasinskiene, Jurgita; Sand, Niels P

    2015-01-01

    referred for cardiac CT, to assess whether differences in CAC may be explained by symptoms or traditional cardiovascular risk factors. METHODS: The presence and extent of CAC, gender, family history of coronary artery disease, hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes and tobacco were compared in 1220......BACKGROUND: Coronary artery calcification (CAC) can be detected by cardiac computed tomography (CT), is associated to cardiovascular risk, and common in asymptomatic individuals and patients referred for cardiac CT. DESIGN: CAC was evaluated in asymptomatic individuals and symptomatic patients...... asymptomatic individuals aged 49-61 years and 2257 age-matched symptomatic patients referred for cardiac CT with suspected coronary artery disease. RESULTS: Symptomatic individuals had a higher frequency of a family history of coronary artery disease (46% vs. 23%, p 

  12. Prevalence and risk factors of asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghafarnezhad M

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Asymptomatic bacteriuria is prevalent during pregnancy. It can lead to pyelonephritis, premature pregnancy and low birth weight. In this prospective study, to determine prevalence and risk factors of asymptomatic bacteriuria, 205 consecutive pregnant women who visited our prenatal care clinic in Mirza-Koochakkhan Hospital and had no urinary symptom were entered. Patients data were recorded using a questionnaire and urine samples were obtained for urinalysis and urine culture. We analysed data by using fisher exact and chi-squared test. 14 cases had positive urine culture (6.8%. Significant correlation was seen between asymptomatic bacteriuria and age, parity, past history of kidney stone, pyelonephritis, urinary tract infection, preterm delivery and pyuria pvalue <0.05. We suggest routine urine culture in first visit of high risk and 16th week of low risk pregnancies.

  13. Psychiatric morbidity in asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V S Chauhan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychiatric morbidity in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV patients is being studied all over the world. There is paucity of Indian literature particularly in asymptomatic HIV individuals. Aim: The aim of the following study is to establish the prevalence and the determinants of psychiatric morbidity in asymptomatic HIV patients. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was undertaken to assess psychiatric morbidity as per ICD-10 dacryocystorhinostomy criteria in 100 consecutive asymptomatic seropositive HIV patients and an equal number of age, sex, education, economic and marital status matched HIV seronegative control. All subjects were assessed with the general health questionnaire (GHQ, mini mental status examination, hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS and sensation seeking scale (SSS and the scores were analyzed statistically. Results: Asymptomatic HIV positive patients had significantly higher GHQ caseness and depression but not anxiety on HADS as compared to HIV seronegative controls. On SSS asymptomatic HIV seropositive subjects showed significant higher scores in thrill and adventure seeking, experience seeking and boredom susceptibility as compared to controls. HIV seropositive patients had significantly higher incidence of total psychiatric morbidity. Among the individual disorders, alcohol dependence syndrome, sexual dysfunction and adjustment disorder were significantly increased compared with HIV seronegative controls. Conclusion: Psychiatric morbidity is higher in asymptomatic HIV patients when compared to HIV seronegative controls. Among the individual disorders, alcohol dependence syndrome, sexual dysfunction and adjustment disorder were significantly increased compared with HIV seronegative controls. High sensation seeking and substance abuse found in HIV seropositive patients may play a vital role in engaging in high-risk behavior resulting in this dreaded illness.

  14. African Journals Online: African Studies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 56 ... The African Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Sport Facilitation will take and publish empirical studies and theoretical propositions as well as ..... The Journal of the Musical Arts in Africa, produced in collaboration with the South African College of Music at University of Cape Town, will henceforth ...

  15. Partnerships & Networks in Migrant Education: Empowering Migrant Families to Support Their Children's Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Valls, Fernando; Torres, Celina

    2014-01-01

    Migrant families are mobile by nature. They are constantly searching--for the next harvest, for a new job opportunity. It too often appears that this transient population drifts in and out of schools without one being appreciably affected by the other. This is a lost opportunity, both for the migratory students and for the communities and schools…

  16. Guide for Migrants in the State of Illinois = Guia para Migrantes en el Estado de Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langemach, Sharon; Koepplinger, Jessica

    Prepared for migrant farmworkers traveling in the State of Illinois, the booklet, written in English and Spanish, provides basic information on (1) employment conditions--requirements of crew leaders and employers, deductions from wages, and laws regulating child labor; (2) housing--conditions of the camp grounds and of living units; (3)…

  17. Migrant Health: A Preliminary Report on the Incidence of Gestational Diabetes in a Hispanic Migrant Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Patrick J.

    1987-01-01

    Presents the preliminary results of an attempt to screen pregnant Hispanic migrant farm workers for gestational diabetes. They are slightly more prone than the overall population of pregnant women to suffer from it. Provides recommendations for management of women with gestational diabetes, and describes how this is performed at the Indian Health…

  18. Modern contraceptive use among migrant and non-migrant women in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochako, Rhoune; Askew, Ian; Okal, Jerry; Oucho, John; Temmerman, Marleen

    2016-06-01

    Manifest socio-economic differences are a trigger for internal migration in many sub-Saharan settings including Kenya. An interplay of the social, political and economic factors often lead to internal migration. Internal migration potentially has significant consequences on an individual's economic growth and on access to health services, however, there has been little research on these dynamics. In Kenya, where regional differentials in population growth and poverty reduction continue to be priorities in the post MDG development agenda, understanding the relationships between contraceptive use and internal migration is highly relevant. Using data from the 2008-09 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), we analyze data from 5,905 women aged 15-49 years who reported being sexually active in the last 12 months prior to the survey. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions are fitted to predict correlates of contraceptive use in the presence of migration streams among other explanatory variables. Modern contraceptive use was significantly higher among women in all migration streams (non-migrant urban (OR = 2.8, p contraception than non-migrant rural women. This phenomenon appears to be due to selection, adaption and disruption effects which are likely to promote use of modern contraceptives. Programmatically, the differentials in modern contraceptive use by the different migration streams should be considered when designing family planning programmes among migrant and non-migrant women.

  19. Development of the Migrant Friendly Maternity Care Questionnaire (MFMCQ) for migrants to Western societies: an international Delphi consensus process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Anita J; DeBruyn, Rebecca; Essén, Birgitta; Gissler, Mika; Heaman, Maureen; Jeambey, Zeinab; Korfker, Dineke; McCourt, Christine; Roth, Carolyn; Zeitlin, Jennifer; Small, Rhonda

    2014-06-10

    Through the World Health Assembly Resolution, 'Health of Migrants', the international community has identified migrant health as a priority. Recommendations for general hospital care for international migrants in receiving-countries have been put forward by the Migrant Friendly Hospital Initiative; adaptations of these recommendations specific to maternity care have yet to be elucidated and validated. We aimed to develop a questionnaire measuring migrant-friendly maternity care (MFMC) which could be used in a range of maternity care settings and countries. This study was conducted in four stages. First, questions related to migrant friendly maternity care were identified from existing questionnaires including the Migrant Friendliness Quality Questionnaire, developed in Europe to capture recommended general hospital care for migrants, and the Mothers In a New Country (MINC) Questionnaire, developed in Australia and revised for use in Canada to capture the maternity care experiences of migrant women, and combined to create an initial MFMC questionnaire. Second, a Delphi consensus process in three rounds with a panel of 89 experts in perinatal health and migration from 17 countries was undertaken to identify priority themes and questions as well as to clarify wording and format. Third, the draft questionnaire was translated from English to French and Spanish and back-translated and subsequently culturally validated (assessed for cultural appropriateness) by migrant women. Fourth, the questionnaire was piloted with migrant women who had recently given birth in Montreal, Canada. A 112-item questionnaire on maternity care from pregnancy, through labour and birth, to postpartum care, and including items on maternal socio-demographic, migration and obstetrical characteristics, and perceptions of care, has been created--the Migrant Friendly Maternity Care Questionnaire (MFMCQ)--in three languages (English, French and Spanish). It is completed in 45 minutes via interview

  20. Homosexuality amongst migrant oil workers in the Niger Delta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims: To determine the prevalence of homosexuality among migrant oil workers in Niger Delta. Methods: A prospective questionnaire – based study was conducted among migrant oil workers in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria. The design was to determine the prevalence of homosexuality in the workers in oil workers.

  1. Ringing and observation of migrants at Ngulia Lodge, Tsavo West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The review of migrant bird ringing at Ngulia Lodge by Pearson et al. (2014) is updated. During late autumn ... and 20 December resulted in 7638 migrants ringed, with Marsh Warbler by far the dominant species. Basra Reed ..... Rafha, Northern Borders, Saudi Arabia, 29°35´N, 43°35´E,. 3665 km, 649 d. Stockholm. 09.12.15.

  2. Truly transnational: the political practices of middle-class migrants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bochove, M.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, scholars have argued that transnational political involvement among migrants is a rather marginal phenomenon. This conclusion is based on the fact that migrants' political activities are much more often directed to their country of settlement than to their country of origin. However, by

  3. Welfare Service Professionals, Migrants, and the Question of Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fersch, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze migrants’ interpretations of their encounters with welfare service professionals in Denmark, focusing on client trust and exploring its diversity across professions. It is based on qualitative interviews with migrants. Migrants as newcomers to the welfare state...

  4. The life struggles and successes of the migrant construction worker ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Globally, the construction sector employs several millions of migrants and is a major entry point for rural-urban migrants into the urban labour force. Its role in sustaining livelihoods both at origin and destination is critical in the development process. This paper provides an empirical assessment of the livelihood struggles of ...

  5. Health Care Access for Migrant Domestic Workers (Philippines ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This translates into an absence of protection and recognition of human rights, including access to health services. Migrant ... This project will endeavor to describe the state of sexual and reproductive health, as well as the health services available to, migrant Filipinas working as domestics in selected countries in three of the ...

  6. Subcontracting, Posted Migrants and Labour Market Segmentation in Finland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lillie, Nathan

    Using evidence from the shipbuilding and construction industries in Finland, this article shows how trade union responses to the introduction of migrant workers can be conditioned by product markets. Growing numbers of posted workers, or intra-European Union work migrants employed via transnational

  7. Emotions in the Curriculum of Migrant and Refugee Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwaruddin, Sardar M.

    2017-01-01

    Emotions are often used to categorize migrant and refugee populations, and to place them into particular subject positions. In much of the literature on the education of migrant and refugee students, emotions are viewed through a therapeutic lens. Against this backdrop, I argue that curriculum inquiries need to pay more sustained attention to how…

  8. Physical activity differences between children from migrant and native origin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J.W. Labree (Wim); F.J.B. Lötters (Freek); H. van de Mheen (Dike); F.F.H. Rutten (Frans); A. Rivera Chavarría; M. de Neve (Melissa); G. Rodenburg (Gerda); H. Machielsen; G.T. Koopmans (Gerrit); M.M.E. Foets (Marleen)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Background: Children from migrant origin are at higher risk for overweight and obesity. As limited physical activity is a key factor in this overweight and obesity risk, in general, the aim of this study is to assess to what degree children from migrant and native

  9. Chinese new migrants in Suriname : the inevitability of ethnic performing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjon Sie Fat, P.B.

    2009-01-01

    This study outlines the challenges to the local positioning of the Chinese community in Suriname in the context of the arrival of new Chinese migrants in the early 2000s. The main conclusion of this study is that the local in many ways takes precedence over the global; Chinese migrants freshly

  10. Depicting the Italo-Australian migrant experience down under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Depicting the Italo-Australian migrant experience down under: Images of estrangement in the cinema of giorgio mangiamele. ... accurate reading of Australian cinema 'in terms of its multiple representations of the non-Anglo Celtic migrant'. Yet, in spite of Giorgio Mangiamele's innovative contribution and efforts and in spite ...

  11. Nutrition and health among migrants in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brussaard, J.H.; Erp-Baart, M.A. van; Brants, H.A.M.; Hulshof, K.F.A.M.; Löwik, M.R.H.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: This paper aims to give a broad overview of published data on nutrition and health among migrants in the Netherlands, as well as data on determinants of health. Results and conclusions: Depending on the definition, 9 to 17% of the population belongs to the group 'migrants' and this

  12. Agricultural Mechanization and the Migrant in New York State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Howard W.

    Commissioned by the New York State Center for Migrant Studies, this study examined the rate and causes of agricultural mechanization in New York State and its effect upon the economic and living conditions of migrants, as well as the possible solutions to the problems uncovered. Examined in various stages of mechanization were 3 specific areas…

  13. The impact of divorce on return migration of family migrants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijwaard, G.E.; van Doeselaar, S.

    2012-01-01

    Many migrants have non-labour motives to migrate and they differ substantially in theirmigration behaviour. Family migrants main migration motive is to join their future spouse. Thus, when their relation breaks down this influences their return decision. Using administrative panel data on the entire

  14. Livelihood activities of migrants from Ghana's northern regions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With migration being one of the strategies adopted for poverty reduction, livelihood activities of migrants have become a topic of particular interest. One of the key issues relates to whether at destination migrants maintain the same livelihood activities of their places of origin or they engage in entirely different ventures.

  15. Irregular Migrants in Belgium and the Netherlands. Aspirations and incorporation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeteren, van M.J.

    2014-01-01

    In 'Irregular Migrants in Belgium and the Netherlands', Masja van Meeteren studies the different ways in which irregular migrants live in Belgium and the Netherlands. The book offers an empirically grounded theoretical critique of the dominant research practice that focuses on 'survival strategies',

  16. Daytime passerine migrants over the Sahara — are these diurnal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    When crossing the Sahara it was expected that nocturnal migrants would continue their flight into the day. We investigated whether migration taking place in the Sahara during daytime comprises the normal diurnal migrant species or the nocturnal ones prolonging their flight into the day. Birds departing from the Sahel in ...

  17. Recent Migrants and Education in the European Union

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osadan, Robert; Reid, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    European schools should improve their methods for teaching migrant students. The European Union has been making efforts to meet the needs of migrant students for some time. From the 2009 Eurydice report "Integrating Immigrant Children into Schools in Europe," which suggests measures to foster inclusion in the larger community and…

  18. Traditional practices and adverse pregnancy outcomes in migrant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Adam

    2017-03-01

    Traditional practices during pregnancy may lead to adverse outcomes in migrant women. Very little is known regarding the efficacy or safety of many cultural practices during pregnancy, and research is required to address this deficiency in knowledge. Greater awareness of traditional practices by health professionals may result in improved pregnancy outcomes in migrant women.

  19. Citizenship experiences of young migrants: Optimism and disadvantages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/343395894

    2012-01-01

    This study analyses the citizenship experiences of young non-western migrants in the Netherlands. Young migrants are in a disadvantaged position in education and in the labour market and this leads to concerns about their integration in Dutch society. The focus of this study is on the participation

  20. State Title I Migrant Participation Information, 1997-98.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Allison; Daft, Julie; Fong, Pauline

    The Migrant Education Program (MEP) is a federal formula grant to states for educational services to migrant children, ages 3-21, who made an eligible move in the past 3 years. States use MEP funds to address effects of continual educational disruption by providing instructional or supporting services. This report summarizes participation…

  1. State Title I Migrant Participation Information, 1998-99.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Allison; Daft, Julie

    States use federal Migrant Education Program (MEP) funds to provide migrant children with services that address the special needs related to continual educational disruption. MEP services can be instructional or supporting. This report summarizes MEP participation information provided by state education agencies for the 1998-99 school year. The…

  2. A global systematic review of Chagas disease prevalence among migrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conners, Erin E; Vinetz, Joseph M; Weeks, John R; Brouwer, Kimberly C

    2016-04-01

    Human migration has been identified as a potential factor for increased Chagas disease risk and has transformed the disease from a Latin American problem to a global one. We conducted a systematic review of the scientific literature between 2004-2014 in order to: summarize recent seroprevalence estimates of Chagas disease among Latin American migrants, in both endemic and non-endemic settings; compare seroprevalence estimates in migrants to countrywide prevalence estimates; and identify risk factors for Chagas disease among migrants. A total of 320 studies were screened and 23 studies were included. We found evidence that the prevalence of Chagas disease is higher than expected in some migrant groups and that reliance on blood donor screening prevalence estimates underestimates the burden of disease. Overall there is a dearth of high quality epidemiologic studies on the prevalence of Chagas disease in migrants, especially among intra-regional migrants within Latin America. Given that this zoonotic disease cannot likely be eradicated, improved surveillance and reporting is vital to continuing control efforts. More accurate health surveillance of both Latin American migrants and the Chagas disease burden will help countries appropriately scale up their response to this chronic disease. Overall, improved estimates of Chagas disease among migrants would likely serve to highlight the real need for better screening, diagnostics, and treatment of individuals living with the disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Interactive Drawing Therapy and Chinese Migrants with Gambling Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenli; Everts, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Ethnic Chinese migrants in a country like New Zealand face a range of well-documented challenges. A proportion of such migrants find that recreational gambling turns into a pernicious gambling problem. This issue is addressed through illustrated case studies of Interactive Drawing Therapy, a drawing-based modality of therapy that facilitates…

  4. With These Hands: The Hidden World of Migrant Farmworkers Today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, Daniel

    Based on over 250 interviews across North America, this book portrays the farm labor system through the stories of migrant workers, the growers and contractors that hire them, and those on the front lines of immigration policy. The first two chapters describe the life of migrant workers and tell the history of the structural inequities that define…

  5. Coping strategies among internal migrant students in Turkey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altinyelken, H.K.

    2009-01-01

    This article is based on a qualitative study that explored educational challenges and coping mechanisms of internal migrant girls whose families moved from the rural areas in the east to the western parts of Turkey. The study revealed that internal migrant girls have encountered a number of

  6. Coping Strategies among Internal Migrant Students in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinyelken, Hulya Kosar

    2009-01-01

    This article is based on a qualitative study that explored educational challenges and coping mechanisms of internal migrant girls whose families moved from the rural areas in the east to the western parts of Turkey. The study revealed that internal migrant girls have encountered a number of challenges that influence their educational achievement…

  7. Sexual Behavior among Employed Male Rural Migrants in Shanghai, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Na; Detels, Roger; Chen, Zheng; Jiang, Qingwu; Zhu, Jinde; Dai, Yiqun; Wu, Min; Zhong, Xing; Fu, Chaowei; Gui, Dexin

    2006-01-01

    A study of sexual behavior in migrant men was conducted in construction sites, markets, and factories in Shanghai, the largest city in China. An anonymous, self-administered questionnaire was completed by the migrants. Among 986 sexually active men, 14% had had more than one sexual partner in their lifetime, 31% premarital sex, 3.3% oral sex, and…

  8. Cardiovascular prevention model from Kenyan slums to migrants in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Vijver, Steven; Oti, Samuel; Moll van Charante, Eric; Allender, Steven; Foster, Charlie; Lange, Joep; Oldenburg, Brian; Kyobutungi, Catherine; Agyemang, Charles

    2015-03-07

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the main cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. As prevention and treatment of CVD often requires active screening and lifelong follow up it is a challenge for health systems both in high-income and low and middle-income countries to deliver adequate care to those in need, with efficient use of resources.We developed a health service model for primary prevention of CVD suitable for implementation in the Nairobi slums, based on best practices from public health and the private sectors. The model consists of four key intervention elements focusing on increasing awareness, incentives for promoting access to screening and treatment, and improvement of long-term adherence to prescribed medications. More than 5,000 slum dwellers aged ≥35 years and above have been screened in the study resulting in more than 1000 diagnosed with hypertension and referred to the clinic.Some marginalized groups in high-income countries like African migrants in the Netherlands also have low rates of awareness, treatment and control of hypertension as the slum population in Nairobi. The parallel between both groups is that they have a combination of risky lifestyle, are prone to chronic diseases such as hypertension, have limited knowledge about hypertension and its complications, and a tendency to stay away from clinics partly due to cultural beliefs in alternative forms of treatment, and lack of trust in health providers. Based on these similarities it was suggested by several policymakers that the model from Nairobi can be applied to other vulnerable populations such as African migrants in high-income countries. The model can be contextualized to the local situation by adapting the key steps of the model to the local settings.The involvement and support of African communities' infrastructures and health care staff is crucial, and the most important enabler for successful implementation of the model in migrant communities in high-income countries

  9. Сoping with stress in migrant workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Granskaya J.V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Migration is an objective process in Russia as worldwide. It has always existed and played an important role in human history. The problem of migrant workers is acute in Russia, because it borders on 18 countries. The collapse of the USSR severely damaged the economy of many former socialist republics. Consequently, people who cannot find employment in their country are forced to migrate to Russia to earn money. Most migrant workers face social, economic and psychological problems. Often, lack of social skills adds more problems to their everyday life difficulties. These things cause stress reactions and slow down their adaptation process. On the other hand, one of the most difficult things for migrants is negative attitudes they encounter as newcomers. People around often associate migrants with illegal work, crime and terrorism. On a regular basis, media report about crimes committed by migrants.

  10. Migrant differences in adolescents’ medicine use for common health problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantarero Arevalo, Lourdes; Andersen, Anette; Holstein, Bjørn Evald

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Despite the substantial proportion of adolescents use medicine for common health problems, prevalence of medicine use among adolescents with migrant background have rarely been documented, and the causal pathway continue to be poorly understood. The aim was to examine whether there are migrant...... and 456 migrants. Logistic regression was applied to assess associations. Multi-level logistic regression was used to assess the independent effect of school cluster. Results: Immigrant girls reported the highest past-month prevalence of medicine use for the four ailments included in the analysis.......26-2.85). Conclusions: Self-reported medicine use for common health problems is high among adolescents with migrant background, particularly among first generations immigrant girls. Feeling safe at school partially mediated the association between migrant background and adolescent’s medicine use. As the process...

  11. Ethnic and migrant differences in medicine use among children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantarero Arévalo, Lourdes

    Background and aims Studies examining ethnic and migrant differences in children’s medicine use are scarce. This thesis seeks to elucidate ethnic and migrant differences in use of medication for the most common health complaints and chronic conditions among children. It investigates the mediating...... role of potential explanations such as psychosocial stressors and socioeconomic characteristics of the household and the area of residence. Concretely, the aims are four: 1. To examine whether psychosocial stressors (not feeling safe at school) can explain migrant differences in medicine use for aches...... (Paper I) 2. To assess whether ethnic and migrant differences in medicine for aches are present across different ethnic minority groups (Paper II) 3. To examine whether household income explains ethnic and migrant differences in asthma medication among children (Paper III) 4. To examine whether area...

  12. Hospital‑based case management for migrant patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ølholm, Anne Mette; Christensen, Janne B; Kamionka, Stine Lundstrøm

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although inequality in access to health care for migrant patients is well described, less is known about inequalities originating within the health - c are system regarding choice of diagnostic procedure, diagnostic delay, treatment options, secondary prevention and follow - u p offered...... to patients with a refugee or immigrant background. Provision of specialized services for migrant patients, including case management with multidisciplinary physical, cognitive and social interventions, has been suggested as a way to tackle inequalities in response to a growing recognition of the complexity...... minority patients. Despite using broad search criteria and searching a wide range of migrant health - r elated information networks and databases, no other hospital - b ased migrant health clinics were identified. The single relevant study indicated that benefits of a specialized hospital - b ased migrant...

  13. Psychosocial aspects of young migrants life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singla, Rashmi

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores some social-psychological aspects for South Asian Young Adults in Denmark such as identity processes through social relations across the geographical borders and psychological diaspora consciousness and is a follow up of the project conducted in the mid-nineties, in Denmark (N...... primarily arrived as migrant labourers in the late sixties and early seventies or a smaller number as refugees in the seventies and eighties such as Gujaratis from the East Africa, Tamils from Sri Lanka and Sikhs from India. Diaspora involves several psychological and mental health issues; the present paper...

  14. Social Capital and Economic Integration of Migrants in Urban China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yao; Ruan, Danching; Lai, Gina

    2013-07-01

    Based on data from a 2005 survey conducted in Shanghai, China, this research examines the role of social capital in income inequality between rural migrants and urbanites. We find strong income return on social capital, in particular on social capital from strong ties. We also observe a great disparity in social capital possession between rural migrants and urban local residents. Although social capital from strong ties seems to be more important for rural migrants than for urbanites, local ties and high-status ties do not seem to benefit rural migrants. Hence, migrants not only suffer severe social capital deficits but also capital return deficits. Given the strong income returns on social capital and the substantial differences in access to and return on social capital between migrants and urban residents, social capital is consequently found to explain a large part of the income inequality between the two groups. Overall, our findings reveal macro-structural effects on the role of social capital in labor market stratification. In China, the lack of formal labor market mechanisms continues to create both a strong need for and opportunities for economic actions to be organized around informal channels via social relations. Yet, the long-standing institutional exclusion of migrants caused by the household registration system has resulted in pervasive social exclusion and discrimination which have substantially limited rural migrants' accumulation and mobilization of social capital. Under these conditions, social capital reinforces the economic inequality between migrants and urban residents in China. Such empirical evidence adds to our understanding of the role of social capital in the economic integration of migrants and in shaping intergroup inequality in general.

  15. Differences in healthy life expectancy between older migrants and non-migrants in three European countries over time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reus Pons, Matias; Kibele, Eva; Janssen, Fanny

    OBJECTIVES: We analysed differences in healthy life expectancy at age 50 (HLE50) between migrants and non-migrants in Belgium , the Netherlands, and England and Wales, and their trends over time between 2001 and 2011 in the latter two countries. METHODS: Population, mortality and health data were

  16. Differences in mortality between groups of older migrants and older non-migrants in Belgium, 2001–09

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reus Pons, M.; Vandenheede, H.; Janssen, F.; Kibele, E.U.B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: European societies are rapidly ageing and becoming multicultural. We studied differences in overall and cause-specific mortality between migrants and non-migrants in Belgium specifically focusing on the older population. Methods: We performed a mortality follow-up until 2009 of the

  17. Differences in healthy life expectancy between older migrants and non-migrants in three European countries over time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reus Pons, M.; Kibele, E.U.B.; Janssen, F.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives We analysed differences in healthy life expectancy at age 50 (HLE50) between migrants and non-migrants in Belgium , the Netherlands, and England and Wales, and their trends over time between 2001 and 2011 in the latter two countries. Methods Population, mortality and health data were

  18. Differences in mortality between groups of older migrants and older non-migrants in Belgium, 2001-09

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reus-Pons, Matias; Vandenheede, Hadewijch; Janssen, Fanny; Kibele, Eva U B

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: European societies are rapidly ageing and becoming multicultural. We studied differences in overall and cause-specific mortality between migrants and non-migrants in Belgium specifically focusing on the older population. METHODS: We performed a mortality follow-up until 2009 of the

  19. Mumbai disease in far western Nepal: HIV infection and syphilis among male migrant-returnees and non-migrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel, Krishna C; Okumura, Junko; Sherchand, Jeevan B; Jimba, Masamine; Murakami, Izumi; Wakai, Susumu

    2003-10-01

    To measure the seroprevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and syphilis, and to assess the behavioural risk factors for these infections among migrant-returnees and non-migrants in far western Nepal. In April 2001, we recruited 97 male migrant-returnees and 40 non-migrants from five rural villages in Doti district where migration to Mumbai is common. For data collection, we conducted a serological examination for HIV and syphilis, and a perception and behaviour survey on HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. We found that 11 of 137 men (8%) were positive for HIV infection and 30 men (22%) for syphilis. The respondents, especially the migrant-returnees from Mumbai, were engaging in risky behaviours such as pre- or extramarital sex, and sex with multiple partners, including sex workers. This study revealed high HIV and syphilis prevalence among the male migrant-returnees and non-migrants in far western Nepal where migration to Mumbai is common. The prevalent behaviours, particularly among the migrant-returnees, imply urgent needs of the behavioural modification programme in this area to prevent the spread of HIV infection to general population.

  20. (Non-)utilization of pre-hospital emergency care by migrants and non-migrants in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kietzmann, Diana; Knuth, Daniela; Schmidt, Silke

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to explore the utilization and non-utilization of pre-hospital emergency care by migrants and non-migrants, and the factors that influence this behaviour. A cross-sectional representative German survey was conducted in a sample of 2.175 people, 295 of whom had a migration background. An additional sample of 50 people with Turkish migration background was conducted, partially in the Turkish language. Apart from socio-demographics, the utilization of emergency services and the reasons for non-utilization were assessed. Migrants had a higher utilization rate of pre-hospital emergency care (RR = 1.492) than non-migrants. Furthermore, migrants who were not born in Germany had a lower utilization rate (RR = 0.793) than migrants who were born in Germany. Regarding non-utilization, the most frequently stated reasons belonged to the categories initial misjudgment of the emergency situation and acting on one's own behalf, with the latter stated more frequently by migrants than by non-migrants. To prevent over-, under-, and lack of supply, it is necessary to transfer knowledge about the functioning of the medical emergency services, including first aid knowledge.

  1. Consequences of asymptomatic bacteriuria in women with diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerlings, SE; Stolk, RP; Camps, MJL; Netten, PM; Collet, JT; Schneeberger, PM; Hoepelman, AIM

    2001-01-01

    Background: Women with diabetes mellitus (DM) have asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) more often than women without DM. It is unknown, however, what the consequences of ASB are in these women. Objectives: To compare women with DM with and without ASB for the development of symptomatic urinary tract

  2. Prevalence and risk factors of asymptomatic colorectal diverticulosis in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fu-Wei; Chuang, Hung-Yi; Tu, Ming-Shium; King, Tai-Ming; Wang, Jui-Ho; Hsu, Chao-Wen; Hsu, Ping-I; Chen, Wen-Chi

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the prevalence and risk factors of asymptomatic colorectal diverticulosis in Taiwanese general population. From January 2009 to December 2011, consecutive asymptomatic subjects undergoing a health check-up were evaluated by colonoscopy. The colorectal diverticulosis was assessed, and a medical history and demographic data were obtained from each subject. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to search the risk factors of colorectal diverticulosis. Of the 1899 asymptomatic subjects, the prevalence of colorectal diverticulosis was 13.5%. On univariate logistic regression analysis, age over 60 years old, male, adenomatous polyp, current smoking and heavy alcohol consumption were significantly associated with diverticulosis. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that age over 60 years old (relative risk [RR], 2.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.64-6.47), adenomatous polyps (RR, 2.18; 95% CI, 1.18-4.61) and heavy alcohol consumption (RR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.04-3.08) were independent predictors for colorectal diverticulosis. The prevalence of asymptomatic colorectal diverticulosis was 13.5% in Taiwan. Age over 60 years old, adenomatous polyp and heavy alcohol consumption may affect the risk of development of the disease.

  3. Lorenzo’s Oil in Treatment of Asymptomatic ALD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of 4:1 glyceryl trioleate-glyceryl trierucate (Lorenzo’s oil on disease progression in 89 asymptomatic boys (mean age 4.7+/-4.1 years; range 0.2-15 years with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD and normal brain MRI was studied at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, and other centers.

  4. Urinary Screening for Detection of Asymptomatic Haematuria and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , a survey was carried out among pupils of two primary schools; one located in the urban area and the other in the periurban area of Port Harcourt Local Government Area. The prevalence rate of significant asymptomatic proteinuria was one ...

  5. High prevalence of asymptomatic plasmodium infection in a suburb ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Malaria is endemic in many parts of the world. Various strategies have been planned to control malaria from time to time in many places. Whatever may be the strategy the prevalence of symptomatic and asymptomatic plasmodium parasitaemics has been of prime importance as useful parameter for its control.

  6. The Prevalence and Outcome of Asymptomatic Chlamydial Infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Of those with HSG result (64), the accuracy of the test kit showed low sensitivity - 44.2% (19/43) and negative predictive value 40.0% (16/40) (but, high specificity - 76.2%(16/21), and positive predictive value - 79.2% (19/24). Conclusion: Asymptomatic Chlamydial infection is common among infertile women and it positively ...

  7. Ultrasound study of the asymptomatic shoulder in patients with a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2. Department of Orthopaedics, University of Pretoria. 3. Department of Statistics, University of Pretoria ... The asymptomatic shoulder had no history of problems severe enough to have required medical ... is little published on the natural history of small rotator cuff tears, and the answer to whether small tears progress to.

  8. Committee Opinion No.703: Asymptomatic Microscopic Hematuria in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Asymptomatic microscopic hematuria is an important clinical sign of urinary tract malignancy. Asymptomatic microscopic hematuria has been variably defined over the years. In addition, the evidence primarily is based on data from male patients. However, whether the patient is a man or a woman influences the differential diagnosis of asymptomatic microscopic hematuria, and the risk of urinary tract malignancy (bladder, ureter, and kidney) is significantly less in women than in men. Among women, being older than 60 years, having a history of smoking, and having gross hematuria are the strongest predictors of urologic cancer. In low-risk, never-smoking women younger than 50 years without gross hematuria and with fewer than 25 red blood cells per high-power field, the risk of urinary tract malignancy is less than or equal to 0.5%. Furthermore, the evaluation may result in more harm than benefit and is unlikely to be cost effective. Thus, data support changing current hematuria recommendations in this low-risk group. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Urogynecologic Society encourage organizations producing future guidelines on the evaluation of microscopic hematuria to perform sex-specific analysis of the data and produce practical sex-specific recommendations. In the meantime, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Urogynecologic Society recommend that asymptomatic, low-risk, never-smoking women aged 35-50 years undergo evaluation only if they have more than 25 red blood cells per high-power field.

  9. Committee Opinion No. 703 Summary: Asymptomatic Microscopic Hematuria in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Asymptomatic microscopic hematuria is an important clinical sign of urinary tract malignancy. Asymptomatic microscopic hematuria has been variably defined over the years. In addition, the evidence primarily is based on data from male patients. However, whether the patient is a man or a woman influences the differential diagnosis of asymptomatic microscopic hematuria, and the risk of urinary tract malignancy (bladder, ureter, and kidney) is significantly less in women than in men. Among women, being older than 60 years, having a history of smoking, and having gross hematuria are the strongest predictors of urologic cancer. In low-risk, never-smoking women younger than 50 years without gross hematuria and with fewer than 25 red blood cells per high-power field, the risk of urinary tract malignancy is less than or equal to 0.5%. Furthermore, the evaluation may result in more harm than benefit and is unlikely to be cost effective. Thus, data support changing current hematuria recommendations in this low-risk group. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Urogynecologic Society encourage organizations producing future guidelines on the evaluation of microscopic hematuria to perform sex-specific analysis of the data and produce practical sex-specific recommendations. In the meantime, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Urogynecologic Society recommend that asymptomatic, low-risk, never-smoking women aged 35-50 years undergo evaluation only if they have more than 25 red blood cells per high-power field.

  10. Pregnancy outcome in asymptomatic women with abnormal vaginal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tract can result in deciduitis, chorioamnionitis, amniotic fluid infection, fetal sepsis and intrauterine death. Intrauterine infection may occur early in pregnancy and remain asymptomatic and undetected for months until preterm labour or premature rupture of the membranes (PROM) occur.[3]. Abnormal genital tract colonisation ...

  11. Multislice computed tomography in an asymptomatic high-risk population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Francesco; Leo, Roberto; Clementi, Fabrizio; Razzini, Cinzia; Borzi, Mauro; Martuscelli, Eugenio; Pizzuto, Francesco; Chiricolo, Gaetano; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2007-02-01

    Approximately 50% of all acute coronary syndromes occur in previously asymptomatic patients. This study evaluated the value of multislice computed tomography for early detection of significant coronary artery disease (CAD) in high-risk asymptomatic subjects. One hundred sixty-eight asymptomatic subjects with >or=1 major risk factor (hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, family history, or smoking) and an inconclusive or unfeasible noninvasive stress test result (stress electrocardiography, echocardiography, or nuclear scintigraphy) were evaluated in an outpatient setting. After clinical examination and laboratory risk analysis, all patients underwent multislice computed tomographic (MSCT) coronary angiography within 1 week. In all subjects, conventional coronary angiography was also carried out. Multislice computed tomography displayed single-vessel CAD in 16% of patients, 2-vessel CAD in 7%, and 3-vessel CAD in 4%. Selective coronary angiography confirmed the results of multislice computed tomography in 99% of all patients. Sensitivity and specificity of MSCT coronary angiography were 100% and 98%, respectively, with a positive predictive value of 95% and a negative predictive value of 100%. In conclusion, MSCT coronary angiography is an excellent noninvasive technique for early identification of significant CAD in high-risk asymptomatic patients with inconclusive or unfeasible noninvasive stress test results.

  12. Asymptomatic Proteinuria and Hematuria in School Going Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaya M. Sorangavi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was undertaken because many cases of asymptomatic proteinuria and hematuria are present in school children.Aims and Objectives:The study was under taken to evaluate asymptomatic proteinuria and hematuria in 100 school children of both sexes from 6 to 15 years of age. Material and Methods: Samples were collected randomly from students of different classes at the Government Kannada Primary School, K H B Colony,Bijapur, Karnataka (India. The midstream urine sample was collected in a clean wide mouth jar,examined by dipsticks for proteinuria and hematuria by microscopy. Results:We found that asymptomatic proteinuria and hematuria was more prevalent amongst the children between 10 to 13 years of age group with female predominance i.e.16% proteinuria and 5% of microscopic hematuria respectively. Conclusion:By this study we conclude that it would be possible to screen a large population of children for asymptomatic proteinuria and hematuria at a relatively low cost.

  13. Profile of Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C Markers in Asymptomatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... was to determine the profile of viral markers of HBV and HCV among asymptomatic individuals with chronic hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Methods: Seventy one subjects who were chronic HBsAg positive were recruited as cases and thirty three apparently normal individuals who were negative for HBsAg served as ...

  14. Endarterectomy or Stenting in Severe Asymptomatic Carotid Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannheim, Dallit; Falah, Batla; Karmeli, Ron

    2017-05-01

    Stroke is a major cause of death in the western world, and carotid endarterectomy has been shown to be effective in treating both symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid stenosis. Carotid stenting is a relatively new form of treatment for carotid stenosis and few studies have looked specifically at asymptomatic patients. To retrospectively examine short- and long-term results in the treatment of asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis with surgery or stenting. We retrospectively collected data of all patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis treated by carotid artery stenting or carotid endarterectomy in our department from 2006-2007. The primary endpoints were stroke, myocardial infarction, or death during the periprocedural period; or any ipsilateral stroke, restenosis, or death within 4 years after the procedure. The study comprised 409 patients who were treated by either stenting or surgery. There was a low morbidity rate in both treatment groups with no significant difference in morbidity or mortality between the treatment groups in both in the short-term as well as long-term. Both treatment methods have a low morbidity and mortality rate and should be considered for patients with few risk factors and a long life expectancy. Treatment method should be selected according to the patient's individual risk factors and imaging data.

  15. Cardiovascular risk factors in patients with asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Martín, Antonia; Reyes-García, Rebeca; García-Castro, José Miguel; Quesada-Charneco, Miguel; Escobar-Jiménez, Fernando; Muñoz-Torres, Manuel

    2014-12-01

    Patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHP), even asymptomatic, have an increased cardiovascular risk. However, data on reversibility or improvement of cardiovascular disorders with surgery are controversial. Our aims were to assess the prevalence of classic cardiovascular risk factors in patients with asymptomatic PHP, to explore their relationship with calcium and PTH levels, and analyze the effect of parathyroidectomy on those cardiovascular risk factors. A retrospective, observational study of two groups of patients with asymptomatic PHP: 40 patients on observation and 33 patients who underwent surgery. Clinical and biochemical data related to PHP and various cardiovascular risk factors were collected from all patients at baseline and one year after surgery in the operated patients. A high prevalence of obesity (59.9%), type 2 diabetes mellitus (25%), high blood pressure (47.2%), and dyslipidemia (44.4%) was found in the total sample, with no difference between the study groups. Serum calcium and PTH levels positively correlated with BMI (r=.568, P=.011, and r=.509, P=.026 respectively) in non-operated patients. One year after parathyroidectomy, no improvement occurred in the cardiovascular risk factors considered. Our results confirm the high prevalence of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, high blood pressure, and dyslipidemia in patients with asymptomatic PHP. However, parathyroidectomy did not improve these cardiovascular risk factors. Copyright © 2014 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Neutrophils ingestion rate of nitroblue tetrazolium in asymptomatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study suggests that the presence of E. coli endotoxin could trigger aggressive antigen phagocytosis in pregnant women with asymptomatic malaria parasiteamia. This could have far reaching consequences in pregnancy. The possibility of co-morbidity of E. coli infection in malaria parasiteamia pregnant women in ...

  17. Pattern of asymptomatic sexually transmitted infections in women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The roles of gonorrhea and non-gonococcal urethritis due to Chlamydia trachomatis in the etiology of infertility due to tubal occlusion have been established by various studies. Hysterosalphingography (HSG) is done to investigate tubal patency. This study was aimed at finding the prevalence of asymptomatic sexually ...

  18. Prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria among pre-school children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    2013-01-08

    Jan 8, 2013 ... Department of Medicine,. University of Nigeria Teaching ... fore escape diagnosis by the primary care physician. Asymptomatic .... Urine microscopy. Ten milliliters of urine specimen from each participant was centrifuged in a test tube at 3,000 revolutions per minute (rpm) for five minutes. The supernatant ...

  19. [Screening of parasitic diseases in the asymptomatic immigrant population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goterris, Lidia; Bocanegra, Cristina; Serre-Delcor, Núria; Moure, Zaira; Treviño, Begoña; Zarzuela, Francesc; Espasa, Mateu; Sulleiro, Elena

    2016-07-01

    Parasitic diseases suppose an important health problem in people from high endemic areas, so these must be discarded properly. Usually, these infections develop asymptomatically but, in propitious situations, are likely to reactivate themselves and can cause clinical symptoms and/or complications in the receiving country. Moreover, in some cases it is possible local transmission. Early diagnosis of these parasitic diseases made by appropriate parasitological techniques and its specific treatment will benefit both, the individual and the community. These techniques must be selected according to geoepidemiological criteria, patient's origin, migration route or time spent outside the endemic area; but other factors must also be considered as its sensitivity and specificity, implementation experience and availability. Given the high prevalence of intestinal parasites on asymptomatic immigrants, it is recommended to conduct a study by coproparasitological techniques. Because of its potential severity, the screening of asymptomatic malaria with sensitive techniques such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction) is also advisable. Serological screening for Chagas disease should be performed on all Latin American immigrants, except for people from the Caribbean islands. Other important parasites, which should be excluded, are filariasis and urinary schistosomiasis, by using microscopic examination. The aim of this paper is to review the different techniques for the screening of parasitic diseases and its advices within the care protocols for asymptomatic immigrants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Large presacral epidermoid cyst in an asymptomatic woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyosuke Izumi, MD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An epidermoid cyst is an infrequent entity among cysts found in the presacral region, frequently coexistent with a meningocele. Diffusion-weighted imaging is known to be a useful diagnostic measure for differentiating presacral epidermoid cysts. Here, we present a large but asymptomatic case found in the presacral region. Epidermoid cysts should be considered in patients with presacral cysts.

  1. A family study of asymptomatic small bowel Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancone, Livia; Calabrese, Emma; Petruzziello, Carmelina; Capanna, Alessandra; Zorzi, Francesca; Onali, Sara; Condino, Giovanna; Lolli, Elisabetta; Ciccacci, Cinzia; Borgiani, Paola; Pallone, Francesco

    2014-03-01

    Discrepancies between severity of lesions and symptoms may be observed in Crohn's disease. We prospectively assessed whether Crohn's disease may be diagnosed among asymptomatic relatives of patients, using Small Bowel Contrast Ultrasonography. Diagnosis of asymptomatic Crohn's disease relatives was defined ultrasonographically as: bowel wall thickness >3mm, bowel dilation/stricture, lumen diameter >2.5 cm. Diagnosis was confirmed by ileocolonoscopy. Subjects were also screened for the Leu3020insC mutation. Consent was given by 35 asymptomatic first-degree relatives of 18 Crohn's disease patients. Ultrasonography indicated increased bowel wall thickness (5mm) compatible with ileal Crohn's disease in 1 relative (2.8%), a 42 year-old male. Ileocolonoscopy, histology, and radiology confirmed the diagnosis of stricturing ileal Crohn's disease. Gallbladder stones were detected in 7/35 (20%) relatives and Leu3020insC mutation in 3/35 (8.5%). Small Bowel Contrast Ultrasonography may be a useful tool to diagnose asymptomatic small bowel Crohn's disease among first-degree relatives of patients. Copyright © 2013 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Asymptomatic brain metastases in patients with cutaneous metastatic malignant melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zukauskaite, Ruta; Schmidt, Henrik; Asmussen, Jon Thor

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the frequency of asymptomatic brain metastases detected by computed tomography (CT) scans in patients with metastatic cutaneous melanoma referred to first-line systemic treatment. Between 1995 and 2009, 697 Danish patients were screened with a contrast...

  3. Human giardiasis in Serbia: asymptomatic vs symptomatic infection*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolić, A.; Klun, I.; Bobić, B.; Ivović, V.; Vujanić, M.; Živković, T.; Djurković-Djaković, O.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the public health importance of giardiasis in all of Europe, reliable data on the incidence and prevalence in Western Balkan Countries (Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Montenegro and FYR Macedonia) are scarce, and the relative contribution of waterborne and food-borne, or person-to-person and/or animalto- person, transmission of human giardiasis is not yet clear. To provide baseline data for the estimation of the public health risk caused by Giardia, we here review the information available on the epidemiological characteristics of asymptomatic and symptomatic human infection in Serbia. Although asymptomatic cases of Giardia represent a major proportion of the total cases of infection, high rates of Giardia infection were found in both asymptomatic and symptomatic populations. No waterborne outbreaks of giardiasis have been reported, and it thus seems that giardiasis mostly occurs sporadically in our milieu. Under such circumstances, control measures to reduce the high prevalence of giardiasis in Serbia have focused on person-to-person transmission, encouraging proper hygiene, but for more targeted intervention measures, studies to identify other risk factors for asymptomatic and symptomatic infections are needed. PMID:21678797

  4. Sonographic evaluation of the plantar fascia in asymptomatic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadalla, N; Kichouh, M; Boulet, C; Machiels, F; De Mey, J; De Maeseneer, M

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the appearance of the plantar fascia in asymptomatic subjects. Thirty-one asymptomatic subjects were examined by 2 musculoskeletal radiologists. The plantar fascia was evaluated for thickness, echogenicity, vascularity on power Doppler, rupture, fluid adjacent to the fascia, andcalcifications. The study included 14 men and 17 women (age, 17-79 years; mean, 45 years). The mean thickness of the plantar fascia in men was 3.7 mm (range 2.5-7 mm), and in women 3.5 mm (range, 1.7-5.1 mm). The thickness was greater than 4 mm in 4 men (bilateral in 2). The mean thickness of fascias thicker than 4 mm in men was 5.4 mm (range, 4.3-7 mm). The thickness was greater than 4 mm in 5 women ( bilateral in 4). The mean thickness of fascias thicker than 4 mm in women was 4.7 mm (range, 4.2-5.1 mm). There was no statistically significant difference between men and women and between both heels. Hypoechogenicity was observed in 3 men (bilateral in 2), and in 5 women (bilateral in 6). Hypervascularity, rupture, fluid adjacent to the fascia, and calcifications were not observed. A thickness greater than 4 mm and hypoechogenicity, are common in the plantar fascia of asymptomatic subjects. Findings that were not seen in asymptomatic subjects include a thickness greater than 7 mm, hypervascularity on power Doppler, rupture, fluid adjacent to the fascia, and calcifications.

  5. Asymptomatic genital infection among pregnant women in Sagamu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Untreated genital tract infections in pregnancy may be associated with adverse effects on foetal and maternal health leading to poor pregnancy outcome. Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence and microbial isolates associated with asymptomatic genital infectionsin pregnancy. Methodology: ...

  6. Vulvovaginal Candida: a study of (a)symptomatic women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engberts, M.K.

    2007-01-01

    The research described in this thesis concerns presence of asymptomatic vaginal Candida and vulvovaginal candidiasis. Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is an infection caused by abnormal growth of yeasts in the mucosa of the female genital tract. Acute vulvar pruritus and vaginal discharge are the

  7. Asymptomatic malaria and associated factors among blood donors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Blood transfusion saves life of patients with severe anaemia. However, blood transfusion can transmit blood-borne parasites. Despite malaria being endemic in Tanzania, there is limited information on asymptomatic malaria among blood donors. This study determined the prevalence and associated factors of ...

  8. Studies On the Incidence of Asymptomatic Plasmodium Infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The incidence of asymptomatic Plasmodium falciparum infection among orphans between age groups, gender and blood groups was investigated. Standard microscopic methods were used to screen for malaria parasites in the blood specimens obtained from eighty-five (85) subjects in three orphanages in Kaduna and ...

  9. Evidence-based treatments for the asymptomatic HIV- positive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    banzi

    Preventing opportunistic infections in the asymptomatic. HIV-positive patient. Is antituberculosis prophylaxis beneficial? There is grade-A evidence from two SRs4,5 and several well-con- ducted RCTs6-9 that shows that in people who are both HIV- and tuberculin-positive, prophylactic anti-TB drugs significantly reduce.

  10. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in Pregnancy: Much Ado about Nothing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chi-square test and analysis for linear trend in proportions were used to determine association between qualitative variables, and a P-value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The incidence of asymptomatic bacteriuria among the recruited pregnant women was 8.0%. Escherichia coli (E coli) and ...

  11. The inclusion of migrants in health impact assessments: A scoping review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benkhalti Jandu, Maria, E-mail: mbenkhal@uottawa.ca [University of Ottawa, Institute of Population Health, 1 Stewart Street, Suite 201, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Canuto de Medeiros, Bruno, E-mail: aporo@hotmail.com [University of Ottawa, Institute of Population Health, 1 Stewart Street, Suite 201, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Bourgeault, Ivy, E-mail: Ivy.Bourgeault@uottawa.ca [University of Ottawa, Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences, 1 Stewart Street, Suite 207, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Tugwell, Peter, E-mail: Tugwell.BB@uottawa.ca [University of Ottawa, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, K1H 8M5 Ottawa (Canada); Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Clinical Epidemiology Program, K1Y 4E9 Ottawa (Canada); University of Ottawa, Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, K1H 8M5 Ottawa (Canada); Institute of Population Health, University of Ottawa, K1N 6N5 Ottawa (Canada)

    2015-01-15

    This article reports the findings of a scoping review assessing the extent and ways in which migrants have been included in health impact assessments (HIAs) and HIA evaluations worldwide. A total of 117 HIAs and two HIA evaluations were included. Only 14% of hand-searched HIAs mentioned migrants, 5% analysed migrants and only 2% included them in their recommendations. Nonetheless, migrants would be expected to be part of the analysis based on the reasons for which migrants were most commonly mentioned. Although the majority of HIAs included in the review mentioned migrants in baseline conditions and impact analysis steps, migrants were seldom included in recommendations. Furthermore, the use of frameworks or tools guiding the completion of an HIA was negatively associated with the inclusion of migrants in recommendations. This is a pivotal risk of frameworks not mentioning migrants. Although workshops and stakeholder engagement were a frequent way of including migrants in HIAs, this usually involved organizations representing migrants, and only seldom included members of the migrant community themselves. The main barriers to including migrants in the HIA impact analysis were the lack of available data on migrants and the significant additional resources required to gather and analyse additional data on migrants. Guidance is needed on ways to optimally include migrants in HIAs and ensure that recommendations for mitigation measures are optimal. - Highlights: • Scoping review found 14% of hand-searched HIAs mentioned migrantsMigrants are seldom mentioned in recommendations even when analysed • Guiding frameworks can hinder the inclusion of migrants if not explicitly mentioned • Often migrants organizations are the ones included in engagement • Main barriers to including migrants are available data and resources required.

  12. The Children of Migrant Workers in West German Schools: A Pool of Hidden Talents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopf, Diether

    This study examined social class indicators of Greek migrants to the Federal Republic of Germany and non-migrants since 1960 to test the hypotheses that migrant workers as a majority are a positive select group (as compared to non-migrants of the same place of origin and time period) in terms of characteristics relevant to educational success and…

  13. Declines in migrant shorebird populations from a winter-quarter perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Robert E; Kolberg, Holger; Braby, Rod; Erni, Birgit

    2015-06-01

    Many long-distance migrating shorebird (i.e., sandpipers, plovers, flamingos, oystercatchers) populations are declining. Although regular shorebird monitoring programs exist worldwide, most estimates of shorebird population trends and sizes are poor or nonexistent. We built a state-space model to estimate shorebird population trends. Compared with more commonly used methods of trend estimation, state-space models are more mechanistic, allow for the separation of observation and state process, and can easily accommodate multivariate time series and nonlinear trends. We fitted the model to count data collected from 1990 to 2013 on 18 common shorebirds at the 2 largest coastal wetlands in southern Africa, Sandwich Harbour (a relatively pristine bay) and Walvis Bay (an international harbor), Namibia. Four of the 12 long-distance migrant species declined since 1990: Ruddy Turnstone (Arenaria interpres), Little Stint (Calidris minuta), Common Ringed Plover (Charadrius hiaticula), and Red Knot (Calidris canutus). Populations of resident species and short-distance migrants increased or were stable. Similar patterns at a key South African wetland suggest that shorebird populations migrating to southern Africa are declining in line with the global decline, but local conditions in southern Africa's largest wetlands are not contributing to these declines. State-space models provide estimates of population levels and trends and could be used widely to improve the current state of water bird estimates. © 2015 Society for Conservation Biology.

  14. Asymptomatic Wolff-Parkinson-White Pattern ECG in USAF Aviators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Eddie D; Rupp, Karen A N; Palileo, Edwin; Haynes, Jared

    2017-01-01

    Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) pattern is occasionally found in asymptomatic aviators during routine ECGs. Aeromedical concerns regarding WPW pattern include risk of dysrhythmia or sudden cardiac death (SCD), thus affecting the safety of flight. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and outcomes of aviators with asymptomatic WPW pattern and assess for risk factors that contribute to progression to dysrhythmia or symptoms. The U.S. Air Force (USAF) ECG library database containing over 1.2 million ECGs collected over the past 68 yr was used to identify 638 individual aviators with WPW pattern. Demographic, medical history, and outcome data were obtained by medical record review. Aviators who developed high risk features defined as symptoms, arrhythmia, or ablation of a high risk pathway, were compared to those who remained asymptomatic. Prevalence of WPW pattern was 0.30% among all USAF aviators. Of the 638 individuals, 64 (10%) progressed to the combined endpoint of SCD, arrhythmia, and/or ablation of a high risk pathway over 6868 patient years, with average follow-up of 10.5 yr. There were two sudden cardiac deaths (0.3%). Annual risk of possible sudden incapacitation was 0.95% and of SCD 0.03%. Those that progressed to high risk were significantly younger, had lower diastolic blood pressure, lower total cholesterol, and better physical fitness testing scores. WPW pattern on ECG found in asymptomatic aviators confers fit populations.Davenport ED, Rupp KAN, Palileo E, Haynes J. Asymptomatic Wolff-Parkinson-White pattern ECG in USAF aviators. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(1):56-60.

  15. International Legal Realities of Migrant Labour Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Di Lieto

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the evolutionary process of the global governance of labour migration, which has led to the progressive privatisation and commodification of international labour mobility. The focus is on the effects of such change on working conditions for migrants. In particular, the analysis is concerned with legal conceptualisations of labour mobility and their repercussions on the normative process of migration governance. For people on the move, the journey almost always entails sacrifices and uncertainty. The possible costs range from the emotional cost of separation from families and friends to high monetary fees. The stakes can include the physical dangers of working in dangerous occupations, or even a risk of death, such as in the case of illegal border crossings. Nevertheless, millions of people are still attempting movement, facing these costs or risks, in order to improve their living standards and those of their families. The implications for international human rights law are striking. Thus, attention is drawn to the human rights of all migrant workers, and more specifically to the protection and development of basic labour rights in the framework of international organisations. Ultimately, the main point of this study is to evaluate to what extent the freedom to choose where to work and to do so in decent conditions is a current legal reality at both the national and international levels.

  16. Maternal healthcare in migrants: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Lígia Moreira; Caldas, José; Ayres-de-Campos, Diogo; Salcedo-Barrientos, Dora; Dias, Sónia

    2013-10-01

    Pregnancy is a period of increased vulnerability for migrant women, and access to healthcare, use and quality of care provided during this period are important aspects to characterize the support provided to this population. A systematic review of the scientific literature contained in the MEDLINE and SCOPUS databases was carried out, searching for population based studies published between 1990 and 2012 and reporting on maternal healthcare in immigrant populations. A total of 854 articles were retrieved and 30 publications met the inclusion criteria, being included in the final evaluation. The majority of studies point to a higher health risk profile in immigrants, with an increased incidence of co-morbidity in some populations, reduced access to health facilities particularly in illegal immigrants, poor communication between women and caregivers, a lower rate of obstetrical interventions, a higher incidence of stillbirth and early neonatal death, an increased risk of maternal death, and a higher incidence of postpartum depression. Incidences vary widely among different population groups. Some migrant populations are at a higher risk of serious complications during pregnancy, for reasons that include reduced access and use of healthcare facilities, as well as less optimal care, resulting in a higher incidence of adverse outcomes. Tackling these problems and achieving equality of care for all is a challenging aim for public healthcare services.

  17. Analysis of physical activity and acculturation among Turkish migrants in Germany and England (.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koca, Canan; Lapa, Tennur Yerlisu

    2014-12-01

    Recent literature shows that migrant populations in Western countries are generally less physically active than their host populations. The purpose of the present study was to expand research investigating associations between physical activity (PA) and acculturation and their relationship with several socio-demographic factors among Turkish migrants in Germany and England. The sample consisted of 521 Turkish migrants. Migrant generation, length of residence, and language proficiency were used as indicators of acculturation. Acculturation was not associated with PA among migrants in Germany and England. PA of migrants was significantly associated with migrant's host country, age, sex, marital status, and education. The total PA of migrants in Germany was higher than that of migrants in England; the large majority of females in both Germany and England had low PA, whereas most males had moderate PA. Seemingly, PA in Turkish migrant populations will not necessarily increase as a result of greater acculturation to the host society.

  18. Asymptomatic bacteriuria may be considered a complication in women with diabetes. Diabetes Mellitus Women Asymptomatic Bacteriuria Utrecht Study Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerlings, S. E.; Stolk, R. P.; Camps, M. J.; Netten, P. M.; Hoekstra, J. B.; Bouter, K. P.; Bravenboer, B.; Collet, J. T.; Jansz, A. R.; Hoepelman, A. I.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the prevalence of and risk factors for asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) in women with and without diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 636 nonpregnant women with diabetes (type 1 and type 2) who were 18-75 years of age and had no abnormalities of the urinary tract, and

  19. Immunizations and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Data > Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Immunizations Immunizations and African Americans African American adults are less ... 19 to 35 months had comparable rates of immunization. African American women are as likely to have ...

  20. Sociodemographic characteristics of the elderly forced migrants in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukić Vesna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the needs and rights of older migrants, migration history is particularly important where the elderly forced migrants are twice as vulnerable. Bearing in mind the intense process of population aging in Serbia which holds the attention of scientists and experts, and the large number of refugees who immigrated in the 90-ies from the former Yugoslav republics, selected sociodemographic structures of the elderly forced migrants in Serbia were analyzed as well as the relevant legal and strategic framework. The aim was to contribute to increasing knowledge of the demographic challenges of this subpopulation of forced migrants, as well as the differences relative to the domicile aging population. The data used in this study included a contingent of forced migrants aged 65 and over, on the basis of additionally processed Census data from 2011, based on questions about the place of birth of the person, year of arrival, the country in which the person lived and the reasons for migration. Hence, the category which is the subject of research, is not defined on the basis of formal refugee status. A comparison of selected sociodemographic characteristics was made in relation to the domicile population, which in the paper means the population of Serbia without forced migrants. The research results indicate that older forced migrants in Serbia have characteristics of the general population of older people in Serbia. Their age gender and marital structures are relatively similar. Most older women are widows who are heads of households, while a significant number are persons with disabilities as well. However, the process of aging of the elderly, present within the local population has not affected forced migrants yet, so this population is to some extent more vital. Data on the economic activity of the elderly forced migrants in Serbia point out to the lack of income as the main problem they are faced with. Older forced migrants are

  1. Migrant adjustment in Seoul, Korea: employment and housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, S C

    1978-01-01

    To examine the role of the migrants in the job and housing markets, a sample survey of 1000 households in Seoul, Korea was conducted. For each sample household chosen, in an area probability sample based on the city registration lists, 1 household member, aged 15-45, was interviewed about employment, housing, migration and family histories, and the social and psychological adjustment in Seoul City of the respondent and his family members. Interveiws were completed for 978 cases in 2 rounds in 1974-75. An important feature of the sample was the inclusion of the control group of lifetime urban residents who were used as the standard by which migrants' adjustment was examined. This group comprised 27% of the sample. Additionally, the migrant group was subdivided according to length of residence in Seoul City. Those who resided there for fewer than 5 years were classified as recent migrants and comprised 20% of the sample. Longterm migrants, those with residence greater than 5 years, comprised 53% of the sample. Recent migrants were concentrated in the blue collar occupations, but there was virtually no difference between the occupational distributions of longterm migrants and lifetime urban residents. Lifetime urban residents showed higher unemployment rates and higher educational enrollment rates than either the recent or longterm migrants groups. There was a 10% differential favoring employment in modern industries (secondary and tertiary) among the lifetime urban residents; fewer than 40% of the recent migrants fell into the modern categories compared to 44% for longterm migrants, and over 50% for lifetime urban residents. Lifetime urban residents were significantly less likely to be employed in traditional service occupations than were recent migrants. Longer term migrants were intermediate for the tertiary traditional sector, but they were significantly less likely to be employed in the manufacturing or secondary sector, especially the modern secondary sector

  2. [Accessibility and quality of rehabilitative services among migrants in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzoska, Patrick; Razum, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Migrants comprise a large proportion of the population in Germany. As compared to non-migrants they are at a higher risk with respect tor occupational accidents, occupational diseases and early retirement due to disability. Tertiary preventive services such as rehabilitation, consequently, are of high relevance for this population group. We provide an overview of the accessibility and quality of preventive services among migrants residing in Germany using medical rehabilitation (tertiary prevention) as an example. We also present strategies which aim to improve health care for this population group. Summary of quantitative routine data analyses and of qualitative interviews with patients and health care professionals in rehabilitative care. Migrants utilize rehabilitative health care services less often than non-migrants. Those who undergo medical rehabilitation report a lower satisfaction with health care and show less favorable health outcomes than non-migrants. This, for instance, becomes evident in the occupational performance and subjective treatment outcome after rehabilitation. Socioeconomic, sociodemographic and health factors only partially explain these associations. In addition, there is evidence that migrants face various barriers which affect the accessibility and quality of health care services. Health care institutions have to provide services which are more sensitive to the heterogeneity of the population in order to reduce barriers in health care. Diversity management can contribute to this goal.

  3. Health problems of newly arrived migrants and refugees in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavli, Androula; Maltezou, Helena

    2017-07-01

    The number of migrants and refugees in Europe in the past few years has increased dramatically due to war, violence or prosecutions in their homeland. Migration may affect physical, mental and social health. The objective of this article is to assess migrants and refugees' health problems, and to recommend appropriate interventions. A PubMed search of published articles on health problems of newly arrived migrants and refugees was conducted from 2003 through 2016, focusing on the current refugee crisis in Europe. In addition to communicable diseases, such as respiratory, gastrointestinal and dermatologic infections, non-communicable diseases, including chronic conditions, mental and social problems, account for a significant morbidity burden in newly arrived migrants and refugees. Vaccine-preventable diseases are also of outmost importance. The appropriate management of newly arrived refugees and migrants' health problems is affected by barriers to access to health care including legal, communication, cultural and bureaucratic difficulties. There is diversity and lack of integration regarding health care provision across Europe due to policy differences between health care systems and social services. There is a notable burden of communicable and non-communicable diseases among newly arrived migrants and refugees. Provision of health care at reception and temporary centres should be integrated and provided by a multidisciplinary team Appropriate health care of migrants and refugees could greatly enhance their health and social status which will benefit also the host countries at large.

  4. Sexual and reproductive health of migrants: does the EU care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keygnaert, Ines; Guieu, Aurore; Ooms, Gorik; Vettenburg, Nicole; Temmerman, Marleen; Roelens, Kristien

    2014-02-01

    The European Union (EU) refers to health as a human right in many internal and external communications, policies and agreements, defending its universality. In parallel, specific health needs of migrants originating from outside the EU have been acknowledged. Yet, their right to health and in particular sexual and reproductive health (SRH) is currently not ensured throughout the EU. This paper reflects on the results of a comprehensive literature review on migrants' SRH in the EU applying the Critical Interpretive Synthesis review method. We highlight the discrepancy between a proclaimed rights-based approach to health and actual obstacles to migrants' attainment of good SRH. Uncertainties on entitlements of diverse migrant groups are fuelled by unclear legal provisions, creating significant barriers to access health systems in general and SRH services in particular. Furthermore, the rare strategies addressing migrants' health fail to address sexual health and are generally limited to perinatal care and HIV screening. Thus, future European public health policy-making should not only strongly encourage its Member States to ensure equal access to health care for migrants as for EU citizens, but also promote migrants' SRH effectively through a holistic and inclusive approach in SRH policies, prevention and care. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Partnership dynamics among migrants and their descendants in Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leen Rahnu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Extensive scholarly literature documents the decline in marriage and increase in non-marital cohabitation and divorce across regions and countries of Europe, but we know less about the extent to which these new family behaviours that have emerged in host societies are adopted by migrants. Objective: The aim of this study is to examine partnership transitions among the migrants and their descendants in Estonia, who mainly originate from the European part of Russia. By investigating an East European context, the study contributes to a more comprehensive account of migrant populations in different socio-economic and cultural settings. Methods: The study is based on the Estonian Generations and Gender Survey (2004/2005 and the Estonian Family and Fertility Survey (1994/1997, and employs proportional hazards models. Results: The results show that new family formation patterns, associated with the Second Demographic Transition, are less prevalent among migrants. The difference between migrants and native Estonians is most pronounced in the mode of partnership formation and outcomes of cohabiting unions, whereas the results pertaining to union dissolution reveal a less systematic difference between population groups. Reflecting the relatively slow integration, the second-generation migrants exhibit partnership behaviour that differs from that of the native population. The observed differences between migrants and the native population appear largely similar for both men and women. Conclusions: The results lend support to socialisation, cultural maintenance, and adaptation hypotheses, and underscore the importance of contextual factors. The analysis reveals disruption effects of migration on partnership processes.

  6. Asymptomatic skin sensitization to birch predicts later development of birch pollen allergy in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodtger, Uffe; Poulsen, Lars K.; Malling, Hans-Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    The skin prick test is the allergologic test of choice, but asymptomatic skin sensitization to aeroallergens is common. However, no data in the literature describe the clinical phenotype of asymptomatic sensitized adults....

  7. Young FSU Migrants in Germany: Educational Attainment and Early Labor Market Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Flake, Regina

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzes the educational attainment and early labor market outcomes of young migrants from the Former Soviet Union (FSU) who arrived in Germany between 1989 and 1994. The results reveal that migrants have lower educational attainments than natives, and that within the group of migrants, Jewish migrants perform better than ethnic German migrants. A decomposition analysis reveals that this competitive edge can, for the most part, be explained by a higher socioeconomic background. In ...

  8. Migrant adults with diabetes in France: Influence of family migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambre, C; Gbedo, C; Kouacou, N; Fysekidis, M; Reach, G; Le Clesiau, H; Bihan, H

    2017-03-01

    To explore the influence of migration and this parameters on the control of diabetes. A cohort of migrant patients with type 2 diabetes was recruited in a center affiliated to the French national insurance system situated in a department with important migratory phenomenon. Patients fulfilled a questionnaire about diabetes, their migration history, and the EPICES score (deprivation score). We have explored by univariate and multivariate analysis if any of the characteristics of migration could be related to the control of diabetes. This cohort was compared to a non-migrant control group of age and sex-matched patients. We included 72 patients, 36 women and 36 men from 20 different countries. The mean age was 57.7 ± 9.6 years. A migration for family reunification was associated with better diabetes equilibrium (Risk of having an HbA1c ⩾8% (63.9 mmol/mol): OR 0.07 (95% IC [0.005-0.86], p = 0.04). The migrant patients who wished to share their time between France and country of origin during their retirement had a better glycaemic control than the migrant patients who would like to go alone into their country (OR 0.08 [0.01-0.78], p = 0.03). Compared to the non migrant group, the EPICES score was higher in the migrant group (52.8 vs. 28.3, p migrant group (8.4 vs. 6.7% (68 vs. 50 mmol/mol)). We may fear that migrants share an increased risk of uncontrolled diabetes. Individual migration could be a risk factor of uncontrolled diabetes. Knowing the migration history of migrant patients is fundamental to understand some barriers of care.

  9. Migrant Networks and Pathways to Child Obesity in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Creighton, Mathew J.; Goldman, Noreen; Teruel, Graciela; Rubalcava, Luis

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is twofold: 1) to assess the link between migrant networks and becoming overweight or obese and 2) to explore the pathways by which migrant networks may contribute to the increasing overweight and obese population of children in Mexico. Using two waves of the Mexican Family Life Survey (MxFLS), we find that children and adolescents (ages 3 to 15) living in households with migrant networks are at an increased risk of becoming overweight or obese over the period of obs...

  10. Ileal ulcer in asymptomatic individuals. Is this Crohn?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henrique Marques dos Santos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The endoscopic finding of ileal ulcers, alone or in small number, is not usual, but when it occurs in asymptomatic patients, an impasse may be generated regarding the action to be taken, since the medical literature is unclear as to how to proceed in this situation. OBJECTIVE: Evaluate patients with ileal ulcers, single or in a small number, asymptomatic, and their follow-up. METHODS: The author reports a series of asymptomatic cases (23 patients of ulcers - single or in small number - found in colonoscopy exams performed for other reasons than typical clinical manifestations of Crohn's disease. RESULTS: Most patients were not treated and remained asymptomatic during the follow-up period. CONCLUSIONS: The patients remained asymptomatic and without treatment in most cases, and, considering the small number of cases and the short observation time, this study does not allow to conclude that this is the best practice in case of asymptomatic patients with ileal ulcer.O achado endoscópico de úlceras ileais, isoladas ou em pequeno número, não é frequente, mas quando ocorre em pacientes assintomáticos pode gerar um impasse quanto à conduta a ser tomada, já que a literatura médica não é clara quanto a como se proceder nessa situação. OBJETIVO: Avaliar pacientes que apresentaram úlceras ileais solitárias ou em pequena quantidade, assintomáticos e a evolução clínica dos mesmos. MÉTODOS: O autor relata uma série de casos (23 pacientes assintomáticos que apresentaram úlceras ileais únicas ou em pequeno número em colonoscopias realizadas por outros motivos que não manifestações clínicas típicas de doença de Crohn. RESULTADOS: A maioria dos pacientes não foi tratada e permaneceu assintomática pelo período de acompanhamento. CONCLUSÕES: Os pacientes permaneceram assintomáticos e sem tratamento em sua maioria, salientando-se o reduzido número de casos e o curto tempo de observação, de modo a não permitirem a este estudo

  11. mHealth information for migrants: an e-health intervention for internal migrants in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Lan Thi Hoang; Nguyen, Ngan Thi Kim; Tran, Hanh Thi Duc; Muhajarine, Nazeem

    2016-05-14

    Socio-economic development in Vietnam has resulted in increased internal migration particularly among young women seeking employment opportunities in cities. Vietnamese female migrants who enter new environments often encounter the loss or neglect of their right to access sexual and reproductive health services. To address this, a mobile health (mHealth) intervention model was implemented over 12 months (2013-2014) in a factory in the Long Bien industrial zone of Hanoi, Vietnam. The intervention provided sexual and reproductive health services for female migrants through text messaging, information booklets accompanied maps, and free counseling via a hotline. To evaluate the impact of the intervention, pre- and post-intervention data were collected to measure changes in women's knowledge and practices related to sexual and reproductive health. Qualitative data in the form of personal interviews were also collected. The sample size for the baseline survey was 411 women, and for the post-intervention survey it was 482 women (the intervention involved an open cohort). The majority of women were unmarried and under the age of 25. Results indicate that there was high uptake of the intervention services and that most women found the services important and useful. In addition, there was evidence that the intervention (1) increased women's knowledge of sexual and reproductive health (e.g., proper use of condoms, identification of high-risk behaviors such as having unprotected sex), and (2) fostered improved practices related to sexual and reproductive health (e.g., increased gynecological check-ups and use of condoms). The study demonstrated the feasibility of implementing a multi-faceted intervention for migrant women working in an industrial zone in Hanoi, Vietnam as well as its successful uptake and some early positive effects. This can be used to inform future design and implementation of mHealth/eHealth intervention models for migrant and other vulnerable/hard to

  12. Cape Verdean Notions of Migrant Remittances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Åkesson

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The transfer of money from migrants to their non-migrant relatives is a key, symbol of the quality and meaning of transnational kinship relations. This article analyses how people in Cape Verde view migrant family members’ economic obligations and it examines the concomitant moral discourse. Through a detailed ethnographic study the article explores how gender and kinship positions interplay with the moral obligation to send remittances, and it also inquires into the differences between rural and urban people’s attitudes towards monetary gifts. Moreover, the importance of the receiver’s status in the local society is discussed and the role of the personal relation between the sender and the receiver. Thus the analysis goes beyond an instrumental and rationalistic approach to remittances, which is common in much research, and explores the significance of this money for emotions and social relations.Para os seus parentes não emigrantes as remessas dos emigrantes são um símbolo chave da qualidade e do significado das relações de parentesco transnacionais. Este artigo analisa como as pessoas em Cabo Verde encaram as obrigações económicas dos emigrantes membros de família e examina o discurso moral concomitante. Através de um estudo etnográfico detalhado o artigo explora como posições de género e parentesco interagem com a obrigação moral de enviar remessas e também investiga as diferenças entre as atitudes das pessoas rurais e urbanas relativamente às ofertas monetárias. Além disso, discute-se a importância do estatuto do receptor na sociedade local e o papel da relação pessoal entre remetente e receptor. Assim, a análise vai além de uma abordagem instrumental e racionalista das remessas, o que é habitual em muitas pesquisas, explorando o significado deste dinheiro em termos de emoções e relações sociais.

  13. The clinical gaze in the practice of migrant health: Mexican migrants in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Seth M

    2012-03-01

    This paper utilizes eighteen months of ethnographic and interview research undertaken in 2003 and 2004 as well as follow-up fieldwork from 2005 to 2007 to explore the sociocultural factors affecting the interactions and barriers between U.S. biomedical professionals and their unauthorized Mexican migrant patients. The participants include unauthorized indigenous Triqui migrants along a transnational circuit from the mountains of Oaxaca, Mexico, to central California, to northwest Washington State and the physicians and nurses staffing the clinics serving Triqui people in these locations. The data show that social and economic structures in health care and subtle cultural factors in biomedicine keep medical professionals from seeing the social determinants of suffering of their unauthorized migrant patients. These barriers lead clinicians inadvertently to blame their patients--specifically their biology or behavior--for their suffering. This paper challenges the focus of mainstream cultural competency training by showing that it is not the culture of the patient, but rather the structure and culture of biomedicine that form the primary barriers to effective multicultural health care. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Should incidental asymptomatic angiographic stenoses and occlusions be treated in patients with peripheral arterial disease?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keeling, Aoife N

    2009-09-01

    The clinical importance of angiographically detected asymptomatic lower-limb stenoses and occlusions is unknown. This study aims to (i) assess the clinical outcome of asymptomatic lesions in the lower limb, (ii) identify predictors of clinical deterioration, and (iii) determine which asymptomatic lower-limb lesions should be treated at presentation.

  15. Engaging new migrants in infectious disease screening: a qualitative semi-structured interview study of UK migrant community health-care leads

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Seedat, Farah; Hargreaves, Sally; Friedland, Jonathan S

    2014-01-01

    .... We undertook a qualitative semi-structured interview study of migrant community health-care leads representing dominant new migrant groups in London, UK, to explore their views around barriers...

  16. Engaging New Migrants in Infectious Disease Screening: A Qualitative Semi-Structured Interview Study of UK Migrant Community Health-Care Leads: e108261

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farah Seedat; Sally Hargreaves; Jonathan S Friedland

    2014-01-01

    .... We undertook a qualitative semi-structured interview study of migrant community health-care leads representing dominant new migrant groups in London, UK, to explore their views around barriers...

  17. Exploring obesogenic environments: the design and development of the migrant obesogenic perception of the environment questionnaire (MOPE-Q) using a sample of Iranian migrants in Australia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Delavari, Maryam; Sønderlund, Anders Larrabee; Mellor, David; Mohebbi, Mohammadreza; Swinburn, Boyd

    2014-01-01

    .... The current study aimed to assess the literature on the link between environment and health for migrants, and on the basis of this information, design and develop the Migrant Obesogenic Perception...

  18. Youth as contested sites of culture: The intergenerational acculturation gap amongst new migrant communities-Parental and young adult perspectives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre M N Renzaho

    Full Text Available Immigration often results in changes in family dynamics, and within this process of dynamic relational adjustment youth can be conceptualised as contested sites of culture and associated intergenerational conflicts. This paper considers the experiences of migrant youth in Greater Western Sydney, New South Wales, Australia using conflict as a useful lens through which to view issues of migrant youth identity and their sense of social connectedness, belonging, and agency. The aim of this study was twofold: 1 to explore how migrant youth cope with acculturative stress and intergenerational conflicts, and 2 to better understand the systemic and family-related factors that facilitate positive settlement experiences for migrant youth.A total of 14 focus group discussions, comprising 164 people, were carried out in Greater Western Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. These focus groups targeted newly arrived migrant parents and young adults (aged 18-24 of African, Burmese, Nepalese, Indian, Afghani, Bangladeshi and Iraqi backgrounds. Each focus group was 1.5 hours in duration and was conducted by a team of three people (an experienced facilitator, an accredited interpreter/bilingual worker, and a note taker. Data were collected using a standard interview schedule, and an accredited interpreter/bilingual worker asked the questions in the appropriate language and translated participant responses into English.The findings highlight how youth in new migrant families become contested sites of culture as they try to balance integration into the new culture while maintaining their originating country's cultural values. Two themes and four subthemes emerged from the analysis: Intergenerational acculturation gap (loss of family capital and intergenerational conflicts; and factors that successfully protected positive family values while still allowing young people to integrate (the legal system that disarm authoritarian parenting practices and family rules; and

  19. Youth as contested sites of culture: The intergenerational acculturation gap amongst new migrant communities-Parental and young adult perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzaho, Andre M N; Dhingra, Nidhi; Georgeou, Nichole

    2017-01-01

    Immigration often results in changes in family dynamics, and within this process of dynamic relational adjustment youth can be conceptualised as contested sites of culture and associated intergenerational conflicts. This paper considers the experiences of migrant youth in Greater Western Sydney, New South Wales, Australia using conflict as a useful lens through which to view issues of migrant youth identity and their sense of social connectedness, belonging, and agency. The aim of this study was twofold: 1) to explore how migrant youth cope with acculturative stress and intergenerational conflicts, and 2) to better understand the systemic and family-related factors that facilitate positive settlement experiences for migrant youth. A total of 14 focus group discussions, comprising 164 people, were carried out in Greater Western Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. These focus groups targeted newly arrived migrant parents and young adults (aged 18-24) of African, Burmese, Nepalese, Indian, Afghani, Bangladeshi and Iraqi backgrounds. Each focus group was 1.5 hours in duration and was conducted by a team of three people (an experienced facilitator, an accredited interpreter/bilingual worker, and a note taker). Data were collected using a standard interview schedule, and an accredited interpreter/bilingual worker asked the questions in the appropriate language and translated participant responses into English. The findings highlight how youth in new migrant families become contested sites of culture as they try to balance integration into the new culture while maintaining their originating country's cultural values. Two themes and four subthemes emerged from the analysis: Intergenerational acculturation gap (loss of family capital and intergenerational conflicts); and factors that successfully protected positive family values while still allowing young people to integrate (the legal system that disarm authoritarian parenting practices and family rules; and parental use

  20. Food consumption, nutrient intake, and dietary patterns in Ghanaian migrants in Europe and their compatriots in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbete, Cecilia; Nicolaou, Mary; Meeks, Karlijn A; de-Graft Aikins, Ama; Addo, Juliet; Amoah, Stephen K; Smeeth, Liam; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Bahendeka, Silver; Agyemang, Charles; Mockenhaupt, Frank P; Beune, Erik J; Stronks, Karien; Schulze, Matthias B; Danquah, Ina

    2017-01-01

    Background: West African immigrants in Europe are disproportionally affected by metabolic conditions compared to European host populations. Nutrition transition through urbanisation and migration may contribute to this observations, but remains to be characterised. Objective: We aimed to describe the dietary behaviour and its socio-demographic factors among Ghanaian migrants in Europe and their compatriots living different Ghanaian settings. Methods: The multi-centre, cross-sectional RODAM (Research on Obesity and Diabetes among African Migrants) study was conducted among Ghanaian adults in rural and urban Ghana, and Europe. Dietary patterns were identified by principal component analysis. Results: Contributions of macronutrient to the daily energy intake was different across the three study sites. Three dietary patterns were identified. Adherence to the 'mixed' pattern was associated with female sex, higher education, and European residency. The 'rice, pasta, meat, and fish' pattern was associated with male sex, younger age, higher education, and urban Ghanaian environment. Adherence to the 'roots, tubers, and plantain' pattern was mainly related to rural Ghanaian residency. Conclusion: We observed differences in food preferences across study sites: in rural Ghana, diet concentrated on starchy foods; in urban Ghana, nutrition was dominated by animal-based products; and in Europe, diet appeared to be highly diverse.