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Sample records for asymmetrical endonuclease double

  1. Bound states in a hyperbolic asymmetric double-well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, R. R., E-mail: richard.hartmann@dlsu.edu.ph [Physics Department, De La Salle University, 2401 Taft Avenue, Manila (Philippines)

    2014-01-15

    We report a new class of hyperbolic asymmetric double-well whose bound state wavefunctions can be expressed in terms of confluent Heun functions. An analytic procedure is used to obtain the energy eigenvalues and the criterion for the potential to support bound states is discussed.

  2. How quantum entanglement in DNA synchronizes double-strand breakage by type II restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurian, P; Dunston, G; Lindesay, J

    2016-02-21

    Macroscopic quantum effects in living systems have been studied widely in pursuit of fundamental explanations for biological energy transport and sensing. While it is known that type II endonucleases, the largest class of restriction enzymes, induce DNA double-strand breaks by attacking phosphodiester bonds, the mechanism by which simultaneous cutting is coordinated between the catalytic centers remains unclear. We propose a quantum mechanical model for collective electronic behavior in the DNA helix, where dipole-dipole oscillations are quantized through boundary conditions imposed by the enzyme. Zero-point modes of coherent oscillations would provide the energy required for double-strand breakage. Such quanta may be preserved in the presence of thermal noise by the enzyme's displacement of water surrounding the DNA recognition sequence. The enzyme thus serves as a decoherence shield. Palindromic mirror symmetry of the enzyme-DNA complex should conserve parity, because symmetric bond-breaking ceases when the symmetry of the complex is violated or when physiological parameters are perturbed from optima. Persistent correlations in DNA across longer spatial separations-a possible signature of quantum entanglement-may be explained by such a mechanism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Asymmetric DNA recognition by the OkrAI endonuclease, an isoschizomer of BamHI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanamee, Éva Scheuring; Viadiu, Hector; Chan, Siu-Hong; Ummat, Ajay; Hartline, Adrian M.; Xu, Shuang-yong; Aggarwal, Aneel K. (Mount Sinai Hospital); (NEB)

    2011-11-18

    Restriction enzymes share little or no sequence homology with the exception of isoschizomers, or enzymes that recognize and cleave the same DNA sequence. We present here the structure of a BamHI isoschizomer, OkrAI, bound to the same DNA sequence (TATGGATCCATA) as that cocrystallized with BamHI. We show that OkrAI is a more minimal version of BamHI, lacking not only the N- and C-terminal helices but also an internal 310 helix and containing {beta}-strands that are shorter than those in BamHI. Despite these structural differences, OkrAI recognizes the DNA in a remarkably similar manner to BamHI, including asymmetric contacts via C-terminal 'arms' that appear to 'compete' for the minor groove. However, the arms are shorter than in BamHI. We observe similar DNA-binding affinities between OkrAI and BamHI but OkrAI has higher star activity (at 37 C) compared to BamHI. Together, the OkrAI and BamHI structures offer a rare opportunity to compare two restriction enzymes that work on exactly the same DNA substrate.

  4. Quantifying DNA double-strand breaks induced by site-specific endonucleases in living cells by ligation-mediated purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chailleux, Catherine; Aymard, François; Caron, Pierre; Daburon, Virginie; Courilleau, Céline; Canitrot, Yvan; Legube, Gaëlle; Trouche, Didier

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of the management and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) rely on the study of targeted DSBs that have been induced in living cells by the controlled activity of site-specific endonucleases, usually recombinant restriction enzymes. Here we describe a protocol for quantifying these endonuclease-induced DSBs; this quantification is essential to an interpretation of how DSBs are managed and repaired. A biotinylated double-stranded oligonucleotide is ligated to enzyme-cleaved genomic DNA, allowing the purification of the cleaved DNA on streptavidin beads. The extent of cleavage is then quantified either by quantitative PCR (qPCR) at a given site or at multiple sites by genome-wide techniques (e.g., microarrays or high-throughput sequencing). This technique, named ligation-mediated purification, can be performed in 2 d. It is more accurate and sensitive than existing alternative methods, and it is compatible with genome-wide analysis. It allows the amount of endonuclease-mediated breaks to be precisely compared between two conditions or across the genome, thereby giving insight into the influence of a given factor or of various chromatin contexts on local repair parameters.

  5. Restriction endonucleases from invasive Neisseria gonorrhoeae cause double-strand breaks and distort mitosis in epithelial cells during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyler, Linda; Engelbrecht, Mattias; Mata Forsberg, Manuel; Brehwens, Karl; Vare, Daniel; Vielfort, Katarina; Wojcik, Andrzej; Aro, Helena

    2014-01-01

    The host epithelium is both a barrier against, and the target for microbial infections. Maintaining regulated cell growth ensures an intact protective layer towards microbial-induced cellular damage. Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections disrupt host cell cycle regulation machinery and the infection causes DNA double strand breaks that delay progression through the G2/M phase. We show that intracellular gonococci upregulate and release restriction endonucleases that enter the nucleus and damage human chromosomal DNA. Bacterial lysates containing restriction endonucleases were able to fragment genomic DNA as detected by PFGE. Lysates were also microinjected into the cytoplasm of cells in interphase and after 20 h, DNA double strand breaks were identified by 53BP1 staining. In addition, by using live-cell microscopy and NHS-ester stained live gonococci we visualized the subcellular location of the bacteria upon mitosis. Infected cells show dysregulation of the spindle assembly checkpoint proteins MAD1 and MAD2, impaired and prolonged M-phase, nuclear swelling, micronuclei formation and chromosomal instability. These data highlight basic molecular functions of how gonococcal infections affect host cell cycle regulation, cause DNA double strand breaks and predispose cellular malignancies.

  6. Double-stranded endonuclease activity in Bacillus halodurans clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated Cas2 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Ding, Fran; Haitjema, Charles; Huang, Qingqiu; DeLisa, Matthew P; Ke, Ailong

    2012-10-19

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) system is a prokaryotic RNA-based adaptive immune system against extrachromosomal genetic elements. Cas2 is a universally conserved core CRISPR-associated protein required for the acquisition of new spacers for CRISPR adaptation. It was previously characterized as an endoribonuclease with preference for single-stranded (ss)RNA. Here, we show using crystallography, mutagenesis, and isothermal titration calorimetry that the Bacillus halodurans Cas2 (Bha_Cas2) from the subtype I-C/Dvulg CRISPR instead possesses metal-dependent endonuclease activity against double-stranded (ds)DNA. This activity is consistent with its putative function in producing new spacers for insertion into the 5'-end of the CRISPR locus. Mutagenesis and isothermal titration calorimetry studies revealed that a single divalent metal ion (Mg(2+) or Mn(2+)), coordinated by a symmetric Asp pair in the Bha_Cas2 dimer, is involved in the catalysis. We envision that a pH-dependent conformational change switches Cas2 into a metal-binding competent conformation for catalysis. We further propose that the distinct substrate preferences among Cas2 proteins may be determined by the sequence and structure in the β1-α1 loop.

  7. The Application of The Double Queue Asymmetric Gated Service Polling Control Theory in Intelligent Traffic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Yi Fan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available paper presents a new use of double queues asymmetric gated service polling system in the intelligent traffic light control system.Usually there are more vehicles in main road than minor road,so there are more green light time be needed in the main road.From the computer simulation and theory analysis,we can find that the application of double queues asymmetric gated service polling theory in intelligent traffic system can balance intersections load and set suitable passing time for vehicles to assure the roads open.

  8. The Application of The Double Queue Asymmetric Gated Service Polling Control Theory in Intelligent Traffic System

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao Yi Fan; Ding Hong Wei; Wang Meng Yao; Liang Zhu Guan

    2016-01-01

    paper presents a new use of double queues asymmetric gated service polling system in the intelligent traffic light control system.Usually there are more vehicles in main road than minor road,so there are more green light time be needed in the main road.From the computer simulation and theory analysis,we can find that the application of double queues asymmetric gated service polling theory in intelligent traffic system can balance intersections load and set suitable passing time for vehicles t...

  9. Electron localization in an asymmetric double quantum well nanostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamedi, Hamid Reza, E-mail: Hamid.r.Hamedi@gmail.com

    2014-05-01

    The localization behavior of an asymmetric coupled quantum well (CQW) driven by two orthogonal standing-wave lasers based on intersubband transitions is investigated. We have shown that the precision of localization of the electron depends on different controlling parameters in the medium. We find that the high-spatial- resolution and high-precision-localization of the electron can be achieved through proper adjustment of the standing-wave fields. This scheme manifests a high controllability for the formation of the electron localization through different parameters such as frequency detuning and intensity of fields and level splitting energy between the bonding and anti-bonding states.

  10. Catalytic and non-catalytic roles of the CtIP endonuclease in double-strand break end resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makharashvili, Nodar; Tubbs, Anthony T.; Yang, Soo-Hyun; Wang, Hailong; Barton, Olivia; Zhou, Yi; Deshpande, Rajashree A.; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Lobrich, Markus; Sleckman, Barry P.; Wu, Xiaohua; Paull, Tanya T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The CtIP protein is known to function in 5′ strand resection during homologous recombination similar to the budding yeast Sae2 protein, although its role in this process is unclear. Here we characterize recombinant human CtIP and find that it exhibits 5′ flap endonuclease activity on branched DNA structures, independent of the MRN complex. Phosphorylation of CtIP at known ATM-dependent sites and other sites is essential for its catalytic activity, although the S327 and T847 phosphorylation sites are dispensable. A catalytic mutant of CtIP that is deficient in endonuclease activity exhibits wild-type levels of homologous recombination at restriction enzyme-generated breaks but is deficient in processing topoisomerase adducts and radiation-induced breaks in human cells, suggesting that the nuclease activity of CtIP is specifically required for the removal of DNA adducts at sites of DNA breaks. PMID:24837676

  11. Guided Modes in a Double-Well Asymmetric Potential of a Graphene Waveguide

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    Yi Xu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The analogy between the electron wave nature in graphene electronics and the electromagnetic waves in dielectrics has suggested a series of optical-like phenomena, which is of great importance for graphene-based electronic devices. In this paper, we propose an asymmetric double-well potential on graphene as an electronic waveguide to confine the graphene electrons. The guided modes in this graphene waveguide are investigated using a modified transfer matrix method. It is found that there are two types of guided modes. The first kind is confined in one well, which is similar to the asymmetric quantum well graphene waveguide. The second kind can appear in two potential wells with double-degeneracy. Characteristics of all the possible guide modes are presented.

  12. Catalytic and noncatalytic roles of the CtIP endonuclease in double-strand break end resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makharashvili, Nodar; Tubbs, Anthony T; Yang, Soo-Hyun; Wang, Hailong; Barton, Olivia; Zhou, Yi; Deshpande, Rajashree A; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Lobrich, Markus; Sleckman, Barry P; Wu, Xiaohua; Paull, Tanya T

    2014-06-19

    The carboxy-terminal binding protein (CtBP)-interacting protein (CtIP) is known to function in 5' strand resection during homologous recombination, similar to the budding yeast Sae2 protein, but its role in this process is unclear. Here, we characterize recombinant human CtIP and find that it exhibits 5' flap endonuclease activity on branched DNA structures, independent of the MRN complex. Phosphorylation of CtIP at known damage-dependent sites and other sites is essential for its catalytic activity, although the S327 and T847 phosphorylation sites are dispensable. A catalytic mutant of CtIP that is deficient in endonuclease activity exhibits wild-type levels of homologous recombination at restriction enzyme-generated breaks but is deficient in processing topoisomerase adducts and radiation-induced breaks in human cells, suggesting that the nuclease activity of CtIP is specifically required for the removal of DNA adducts at sites of DNA breaks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Asymmetric double quantum well structure as a tunable detector in the far-infrared range

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, U; Park, M J; Lee, S J

    1999-01-01

    The eigenvalues and the wave functions of GaAs/Al sub x Ga sub 1 sub - sub x As asymmetric double quantum well structure have been calculated by using of complex energy method. Based on theoretical calculations, tuning ranges from 9 to 14 mu m are predicted for the proposed asymmetric coupled-quantum-well structure. In addition we calculated the energy eigenvalues and the wave functions of an electron in GaAs/Al sub x Ga sub 1 sub - sub x As single quantum well structure (including delta-perturbation). the variation in E sub 1 , the ground state energy eigenvalue of the electron, depends on the strength and position of the perturbation within the well.

  14. Fabrication of the asymmetric double-sided concave microlens arrays by femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Yang, Qing; Bian, Hao; Chen, Feng

    2017-02-01

    In the last decades, fabrication of microlens array in materials with high-damage threshold has attracted increasing interest, especially in the application of high-power laser. In this paper, we propose an advanced strategy to efficiently fabricate microlens array on the surface of glass using a single-pulsed femtosecond laser wet etch process, which is a combination of high-speed laser scanning and the subsequent chemical etch with HF solution. Based on this method, double-sided microlens array, non-regular arrays consisting of close-packed concave microlens array on one side and regular concave MLA on the other side, were fabricated on the 1cm*1cm glass. Especially over one million microlenses could be acquired within an hour, exhibiting great superiority in practical application. Moreover, the optical properties of the asymmetric double-sided MLA were experimentally characterized, and the experimental results reveal the good light homogenization performance.

  15. Asymmetric and double-cathode-pad wire chambers for the LHCb muon system

    CERN Document Server

    Kachtchouk, A; Riegler, W; Schmidt, B; Schneider, T; Souvorov, V

    2005-01-01

    We present results from two types of Multi-Wire Proportional Chambers (MWPCs) with wire pitch of 1.5 mm and cathode–cathode distance of 5 mm intended for triggering purposes in the LHCb experiment. Both prototypes use cathode readout because this allows arbitrary segmentation in order to achieve the required granularity. One MWPC prototype uses a symmetric wire–cathode distance (2.5/2.5 mm) with double cathode readout, which doubles the signal compared to reading only one cathode. The second prototype uses an asymmetric wire–cathode distance (1.25/3.75 mm) with single cathode readout which also doubles the signal and in addition reduces the width of the induced charge distribution and therefore reduces the crosstalk for small cathode pads. We also performed a dedicated optimization of readout traces and guard traces in order to reduce the pad–pad crosstalk. Both prototypes show a few hundred volts of operating plateau defined as the region with 99% efficiency in a 20 ns time window. Close to the plate...

  16. Asymmetric voltage behavior of the tunnel magnetoresistance in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we study the value of the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) as a function of the applied voltage in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions (DMTJs) with the left and right ferromagnetic (FM) layers being pinned and numerically estimate the possible difference of the TMR curves for negative and positive voltages in the homojunctions (equal barriers and electrodes). DMTJs are modeled as two single barrier junctions connected in series with consecutive tunneling (CST). We investigated the asymmetric voltage behavior of the TMR for the CST in the range of a general theoretical model. Significant asymmetries of the experimental curves, which arise due to different annealing regimes, are mostly explained by different heights of the tunnel barriers and asymmetries of spin polarizations in magnetic layers. © (2012) Trans Tech Publications.

  17. Output voltage calculations in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions with asymmetric voltage behavior

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur

    2011-10-22

    In this paper we study the asymmetric voltage behavior (AVB) of the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) for single and double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) in range of a quasi-classical free electron model. Numerical calculations of the TMR-V curves, output voltages and I-V characteristics for negative and positive values of applied voltages were carried out using MTJs with CoFeB/MgO interfaces as an example. Asymmetry of the experimental TMR-V curves is explained by different values of the minority and majority Fermi wave vectors for the left and right sides of the tunnel barrier, which arises due to different annealing regimes. Electron tunneling in DMTJs was simulated in two ways: (i) Coherent tunneling, where the DMTJ is modeled as one tunnel system and (ii) consecutive tunneling, where the DMTJ is modeled by two single barrier junctions connected in series. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Alkylation base damage is converted into repairable double-strand breaks and complex intermediates in G2 cells lacking AP endonuclease.

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    Wenjian Ma

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs are potent sources of genome instability. While there is considerable genetic and molecular information about the disposition of direct DSBs and breaks that arise during replication, relatively little is known about DSBs derived during processing of single-strand lesions, especially for the case of single-strand breaks (SSBs with 3'-blocked termini generated in vivo. Using our recently developed assay for detecting end-processing at random DSBs in budding yeast, we show that single-strand lesions produced by the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS can generate DSBs in G2-arrested cells, i.e., S-phase independent. These derived DSBs were observed in apn1/2 endonuclease mutants and resulted from aborted base excision repair leading to 3' blocked single-strand breaks following the creation of abasic (AP sites. DSB formation was reduced by additional mutations that affect processing of AP sites including ntg1, ntg2, and, unexpectedly, ogg1, or by a lack of AP sites due to deletion of the MAG1 glycosylase gene. Similar to direct DSBs, the derived DSBs were subject to MRX (Mre11, Rad50, Xrs2-determined resection and relied upon the recombinational repair genes RAD51, RAD52, as well as on the MCD1 cohesin gene, for repair. In addition, we identified a novel DNA intermediate, detected as slow-moving chromosomal DNA (SMD in pulsed field electrophoresis gels shortly after MMS exposure in apn1/2 cells. The SMD requires nicked AP sites, but is independent of resection/recombination processes, suggesting that it is a novel structure generated during processing of 3'-blocked SSBs. Collectively, this study provides new insights into the potential consequences of alkylation base damage in vivo, including creation of novel structures as well as generation and repair of DSBs in nonreplicating cells.

  19. Cap-dependent Endonuclease Inhibitor S-033188 for the Treatment of Influenza: Results from a Phase 3, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo- and Active-Controlled Study in Otherwise Healthy Adolescents and Adults with Seasonal Influenza

    OpenAIRE

    Portsmouth, Simon; Kawaguchi, Keiko; Arai, Masatsugu; Tsuchiya, Kenji; Uehara, Takeki

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Cap-dependent endonuclease (CEN) resides in the PA subunit of influenza virus polymerase and mediates the “cap-snatching” process during viral mRNA biosynthesis. S-033188 is a potent, selective, small molecule inhibitor of CEN. Here we report clinical and virologic outcomes from a global Phase 3 study CAPSTONE-1. Method This was a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo- and active-controlled study. Key eligibility criteria included 12–64 years of age, fever (axilla...

  20. Elastic-plastic defect interaction in (asymmetrical double edge notched tension specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Samadian

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Interaction of defects tends to intensify their crack driving force response compared to the situation where these defects act independently. The interaction between multiple defects is addressed in engineering critical assessment standards like BS7910 and ASME B&PV Section XI. Nonetheless, the accuracy of these rules is open to debate since all of them are based on re-characterization procedures which in essence introduce conservativeness. The authors have developed a fully parametric finite element (FE model able to generate multiple notches in different topologies, in order to investigate their interaction effect. An experimental validation study is conducted to verify the FE model in terms of CTOD response and surface strain distribution. To that end, symmetrically and asymmetrically double edge notched tension specimens are tensile tested and their deformation monitored by means of 3D digital image correlation. In this study the CTOD is opted as a local criterion to evaluate the interaction between notches. These results are compared with an evaluation of strain patterns on a specimen’s surface, as a global interaction evaluation. Through this comparison a deeper understanding is gained to allow us to develop a novel approach to address flaw interaction. Moreover, the validation of the FE model allows future studies of interaction between other defect types (e.g., semi-elliptical, surface breaking in plate-like geometries.

  1. Massively parallel characterization of restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamps-Hughes, Nick; Quimby, Aine; Zhu, Zhenyu; Johnson, Eric A

    2013-06-01

    Restriction endonucleases are highly specific in recognizing the particular DNA sequence they act on. However, their activity is affected by sequence context, enzyme concentration and buffer composition. Changes in these factors may lead to either ineffective cleavage at the cognate restriction site or relaxed specificity allowing cleavage of degenerate 'star' sites. Additionally, uncharacterized restriction endonucleases and engineered variants present novel activities. Traditionally, restriction endonuclease activity is assayed on simple substrates such as plasmids and synthesized oligonucleotides. We present and use high-throughput Illumina sequencing-based strategies to assay the sequence specificity and flanking sequence preference of restriction endonucleases. The techniques use fragmented DNA from sequenced genomes to quantify restriction endonuclease cleavage on a complex genomic DNA substrate in a single reaction. By mapping millions of restriction site-flanking reads back to the Escherichia coli and Drosophila melanogaster genomes we were able to quantitatively characterize the cognate and star site activity of EcoRI and MfeI and demonstrate genome-wide decreases in star activity with engineered high-fidelity variants EcoRI-HF and MfeI-HF, as well as quantify the influence on MfeI cleavage conferred by flanking nucleotides. The methods presented are readily applicable to all type II restriction endonucleases that cleave both strands of double-stranded DNA.

  2. Intratarsal fixation at the same level as the skin incision to reduce asymmetric double eyelids: evaluation of symmetry using photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kihwan; Yeo, Hyeonjung; Choi, Tae Hyun; Son, Daegu; Kim, Jun Hyung

    2010-03-01

    One of the most common complications of double eyelid operations is asymmetry. To reduce asymmetry, we fixed the dermis to the tarsal plate at the same level as the skin incision, and objectively evaluated the symmetry of the height using photogrammetry.Of 30 patients who had double eyelid operations by the intratarsal fixation technique, 15 patients completed a minimum follow-up of 6 months. After the skin incision and removal of the orbicularis oculi muscle and the orbital fat, the pretarsal fat pad was excised to expose the superior portion of the tarsal plate. The 3 fixation points were marked on the tarsal plate at the same level with the skin incision using a spreading caliper. The dermis was fixed to the marked points of the tarsal plate and the skin was closed.The height of the double eyelid was measured by clinical photography at 4 points when the eyes were opened and at 3 points when the eyes were closed. The height proportional index at each point was obtained by dividing the height of the left double eyelid by that of the right double eyelid. We compared each height proportional index with "1" to evaluate the symmetry of both double eyelids using a paired t test.The follow-up period was an average of 9.0 months. The mean height proportional indices were 0.97 (a), 0.96 (b), 0.98 (c), 1.08 (d), 0.97 (e), 1.02 (f), and 1.13 (g). According to a paired t test, the height of the left double eyelid was not different from that of the right double eyelid.Intratarsal fixation, along with other previously known methods, decreases asymmetric double eyelids.

  3. Catalytic domain of restriction endonuclease BmrI as a cleavage module for engineering endonucleases with novel substrate specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Siu-hong; Bao, Yongming; Ciszak, Ewa; Laget, Sophie; Xu, Shuang-yong

    2007-01-01

    Creating endonucleases with novel sequence specificities provides more possibilities to manipulate DNA. We have created a chimeric endonuclease (CH-endonuclease) consisting of the DNA cleavage domain of BmrI restriction endonuclease and C.BclI, a controller protein of the BclI restriction-modification system. The purified chimeric endonuclease, BmrI198-C.BclI, cleaves DNA at specific sites in the vicinity of the recognition sequence of C.BclI. Double-strand (ds) breaks were observed at two sites: 8 bp upstream and 18 bp within the C-box sequence. Using DNA substrates with deletions of C-box sequence, we show that the chimeric endonuclease requires the 5' half of the C box only for specific cleavage. A schematic model is proposed for the mode of protein-DNA binding and DNA cleavage. The present study demonstrates that the BmrI cleavage domain can be used to create combinatorial endonucleases that cleave DNA at specific sequences dictated by the DNA-binding partner. The resulting endonucleases will be useful in vitro and in vivo to create ds breaks at specific sites and generate deletions.

  4. Charge carrier dynamics of GaAs/AlGaAs asymmetric double quantum wells at room temperature studied by optical pump terahertz probe spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afalla, Jessica; Ohta, Kaoru; Tokonami, Shunrou; Prieto, Elizabeth Ann; Catindig, Gerald Angelo; Cedric Gonzales, Karl; Jaculbia, Rafael; Vasquez, John Daniel; Somintac, Armando; Salvador, Arnel; Estacio, Elmer; Tani, Masahiko; Tominaga, Keisuke

    2017-11-01

    Two asymmetric double quantum wells of different coupling strengths (barrier widths) were grown via molecular beam epitaxy, both samples allowing tunneling. Photoluminescence was measured at 10 and 300 K to provide evidence of tunneling, barrier dependence, and structural uniformity. Carrier dynamics at room temperature was investigated by optical pump terahertz probe (OPTP) spectroscopy. Carrier population decay rates were obtained and photoconductivity spectra were analyzed using the Drude model. This work demonstrates that carrier, and possibly tunneling dynamics in asymmetric double quantum well structures may be studied at room temperature through OPTP spectroscopy.

  5. Comparison of symmetric and asymmetric double quantum well extended-cavity diode lasers for broadband passive mode-locking at 780  nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Heike; Kovalchuk, Evgeny V; Wenzel, Hans; Bugge, Frank; Weyers, Markus; Wicht, Andreas; Peters, Achim; Tränkle, Günther

    2017-07-01

    We present a compact, mode-locked diode laser system designed to emit a frequency comb in the wavelength range around 780 nm. We compare the mode-locking performance of symmetric and asymmetric double quantum well ridge-waveguide diode laser chips in an extended-cavity diode laser configuration. By reverse biasing a short section of the diode laser chip, passive mode-locking at 3.4 GHz is achieved. Employing an asymmetric double quantum well allows for generation of a mode-locked optical spectrum spanning more than 15 nm (full width at -20  dB) while the symmetric double quantum well device only provides a bandwidth of ∼2.7  nm (full width at -20  dB). Analysis of the RF noise characteristics of the pulse repetition rate shows an RF linewidth of about 7 kHz (full width at half-maximum) and of at most 530 Hz (full width at half-maximum) for the asymmetric and symmetric double quantum well devices, respectively. Investigation of the frequency noise power spectral density at the pulse repetition rate shows a white noise floor of approximately 2100  Hz2/Hz and of at most 170  Hz2/Hz for the diode laser employing the asymmetric and symmetric double quantum well structures, respectively. The pulse width is less than 10 ps for both devices.

  6. Optimal inverter logic gate using 10-nm double gate-all-around (DGAA transistor with asymmetric channel width

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    Myunghwan Ryu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the electrical characteristics of a double-gate-all-around (DGAA transistor with an asymmetric channel width using three-dimensional device simulation. The DGAA structure creates a silicon nanotube field-effect transistor (NTFET with a core-shell gate architecture, which can solve the problem of loss of gate controllability of the channel and provides improved short-channel behavior. The channel width asymmetry is analyzed on both sides of the terminals of the transistors, i.e., source and drain. In addition, we consider both n-type and p-type DGAA FETs, which are essential to forming a unit logic cell, the inverter. Simulation results reveal that, according to the carrier types, the location of the asymmetry has a different effect on the electrical properties of the devices. Thus, we propose the N/P DGAA FET structure with an asymmetric channel width to form the optimal inverter. Various electrical metrics are analyzed to investigate the benefits of the optimal inverter structure over the conventional inverter structure. Simulation results show that 27% delay and 15% leakage power improvement are enabled in the optimum structure.

  7. Asymmetric Synthesis of Double Bond Isomers of the Structure Proposed for Pyrinodemin A and Indication of Its Structural Revision

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    Jun’ichi Kobayashi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Asymmetric synthesis of double bond isomers ( -2 (∆15’,16’ and ( -3 (∆14’,15’ ofthe structure (1 (∆16’,17’ proposed for pyrinodemin A, a cytotoxic bis-pyridine alkaloidwith a unique cis-cyclopent[c]isoxazolidine moiety from a marine sponge, has beenaccomplished. Pyrinodemin A was indicated to be a 1:1 racemic mixture of 2 fromcomparison of C18 and chiral HPLC analysis for pyrinodemin A and the syntheticcompounds as well as ESIMS data of oxidative degradation products of pyrinodemin A.

  8. Shifted one-parameter supersymmetric family of quartic asymmetric double-well potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosu, Haret C., E-mail: hcr@ipicyt.edu.mx [IPICYT, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Camino a la presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a Sección, 78216 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico); Mancas, Stefan C., E-mail: mancass@erau.edu [Department of Mathematics, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, FL 32114-3900 (United States); Chen, Pisin, E-mail: pisinchen@phys.ntu.edu.tw [Leung Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics (LeCosPA) and Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-15

    Extending our previous work (Rosu, 2014), we define supersymmetric partner potentials through a particular Riccati solution of the form F(x)=(x−c){sup 2}−1, where c is a real shift parameter, and work out the quartic double-well family of one-parameter isospectral potentials obtained by using the corresponding general Riccati solution. For these parametric double well potentials, we study how the localization properties of the two wells depend on the parameter of the potentials for various values of the shifting parameter. We also consider the supersymmetric parametric family of the first double-well potential in the Razavy chain of double well potentials corresponding to F(x)=1/2 sinh2x−2((1+√(2))sinh2x)/((1+√(2))cosh2x+1) , both unshifted and shifted, to test and compare the localization properties. - Highlights: • Quartic one-parameter DWs with an additional shift parameter are introduced. • Anomalous localization feature of their zero modes is confirmed at different shifts. • Razavy one-parameter DWs are also introduced and shown not to have this feature.

  9. Kinetic analysis of the thermal isomerisation pathways in an asymmetric double azobenzene switch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robertus, Jort; Reker, Siebren F.; Pijper, Thomas C.; Deuzeman, Albert; Browne, Wesley R.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2012-01-01

    Here we report a photochemical and kinetic study of the thermal relaxation reaction of a double azobenzene system, in which two azobenzene photochromic units are connected via a phenyl ring. Upon UV irradiation, three thermally unstable isomers are formed. Kinetic studies using arrayed H-1-NMR

  10. Engineering a Nickase on the Homing Endonuclease I-DmoI Scaffold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molina, Rafael; Marcaida, María José; Redondo, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Homing endonucleases are useful tools for genome modification because of their capability to recognize and cleave specifically large DNA targets. These endonucleases generate a DNA double strand break that can be repaired by the DNA damage response machinery. The break can be repaired by homologo...

  11. Timing PSR J0453+1559: A likely asymmetric double neutron star system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Jose; Stovall, K.; Freire, P.; Deneva, J. S.; Jenet, F.; McLaughlin, M.

    2014-01-01

    PSR J0453+1559 is a pulsar with a spin period of 45.7 ms discovered in the Arecibo All-Sky 327 MHz Drift Pulsar Survey. Subsequent observations of this source performed at the Arecibo Radio Observatory has revealed that it is in a binary system with an orbit period of 4.07 days with an eccentricity of 0.1125. The semi-major axis of the orbit is 14.5 light seconds, which implies, for a pulsar mass of 1.35 solar masses, a minimum and median companion mass of 1.0 and 1.2 solar masses respectively. This strongly suggests this is a new double neutron star (DNS) system. If confirmed, this would be the tenth DNS known in the Universe.

  12. Impact of Lateral Straggle on the Analog/RF Performance of Asymmetric Gate Stack Double Gate MOSFET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaram, Gollamudi Sai; Chakraborty, Shramana; Das, Rahul; Dasgupta, Arpan; Kundu, Atanu; Sarkar, Chandan K.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a systematic comparative study of Analog and RF performances of an underlapped double gate (U-DG) NMOSFET with Gate Stack (GS) for varying straggle lengths. Asymmetric underlap devices (A-U-DG) have been proposed as one of the remedies for reducing Short Channel Effects (SCE's) with the underlap being present towards the source for sub 20 nm devices. However, the Source to Drain (S/D) implant lateral diffusion leads to a variation in the effective underlap length. This paper investigates the impact of variation of straggle length on the Analog and RF parameters of the device. The RF performance is analyzed by considering the intrinsic capacitances (Cgd, Cgs), intrinsic resistances (Rgd, Rgs), transport delay (τm), inductance (Lsd), cutoff frequency (fT), and the maximum frequency of oscillations (fmax). The circuit performance of the devices are also studied. It is seen that the Analog and RF performances of the devices are improved by optimizing the S/D lateral straggle.

  13. Double coupling: modeling subjectivity and asymmetric organization in social-ecological systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Manuel-Navarrete

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Social-ecological organization is a multidimensional phenomenon that combines material and symbolic processes. However, the coupling between social and ecological subsystem is often conceptualized as purely material, thus reducing the symbolic dimension to its behavioral and actionable expressions. In this paper I conceptualize social-ecological systems as doubly coupled. On the one hand, material expressions of socio-cultural processes affect and are affected by ecological dynamics. On the other hand, coupled social-ecological material dynamics are concurrently coupled with subjective dynamics via coding, decoding, personal experience, and human agency. This second coupling operates across two organizationally heterogeneous dimensions: material and symbolic. Although resilience thinking builds on the recognition of organizational asymmetry between living and nonliving systems, it has overlooked the equivalent asymmetry between ecological and socio-cultural subsystems. Three guiding concepts are proposed to formalize double coupling. The first one, social-ecological asymmetry, expands on past seminal work on ecological self-organization to incorporate reflexivity and subjectivity in social-ecological modeling. Organizational asymmetry is based in the distinction between social rules, which are symbolically produced and changed through human agents' reflexivity and purpose, and biophysical rules, which are determined by functional relations between ecological components. The second guiding concept, conscious power, brings to the fore human agents' distinctive capacity to produce our own subjective identity and the consequences of this capacity for social-ecological organization. The third concept, congruence between subjective and objective dynamics, redefines sustainability as contingent on congruent relations between material and symbolic processes. Social-ecological theories and analyses based on these three guiding concepts would support the

  14. Dual-probe electrochemical DNA biosensor based on the "Y" junction structure and restriction endonuclease assisted cyclic enzymatic amplification for detection of double-strand DNA of PML/RARα related fusion gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Lei, Yun; Zhong, Guang-Xian; Zheng, Yan-Jie; Sun, Zhou-Liang; Peng, Hua-Ping; Chen, Wei; Liu, Ai-Lin; Chen, Yuan-Zhong; Lin, Xin-Hua

    2015-09-15

    Taking advantage of "Y" junction structure and restriction endonuclease assisted cyclic enzymatic amplification, a dual-probe electrochemical DNA (DE-DNA) biosensor was designed to detect double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) related gene. Two groups of detection probes were designed, and each group was composed of a biotinylated capture probe and an assisted probe. They were separately complementary with two strands of target dsDNA in order to prevent the reannealing of the two separate strands from target dsDNA. First, thiol functionalized capture probes (C1 and C2) were severally assembled onto two different gold electrodes, followed by hybridizing with target dsDNA (S1a-S1b) and assistant probes to form two Y-junction-structure ternary complexes. Subsequently, restriction sites on the ternary complexes were digested by Rsa I, which can release S1a, S1b and biotins from the electrode surfaces. Meanwhile, the released S1a and S1b can further hybridize with the unhybridized corresponding detection probes and then initiate another new hybridization-cleavage-separation cycle. Finally, the current signals were produced by the enzyme-catalyzed reaction of streptavidin-horse reddish peroxidase (streptavidin-HRP). The distinct difference in current signals between different sequences allowed detection of target dsDNA down to a low detection limit of 47 fM and presented excellent specificity with discriminating only a single-base mismatched dsDNA sequence. Moreover, this biosensor was also used for assay of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) samples with satisfactory results. According to the results, the power of the DE-DNA biosensor as a promising tool for the detection of APL and other diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Cap-dependent Endonuclease Inhibitor S-033188 for the Treatment of Influenza: Results from a Phase 3, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo- and Active-Controlled Study in Otherwise Healthy Adolescents and Adults with Seasonal Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portsmouth, Simon; Kawaguchi, Keiko; Arai, Masatsugu; Tsuchiya, Kenji; Uehara, Takeki

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Cap-dependent endonuclease (CEN) resides in the PA subunit of influenza virus polymerase and mediates the “cap-snatching” process during viral mRNA biosynthesis. S-033188 is a potent, selective, small molecule inhibitor of CEN. Here we report clinical and virologic outcomes from a global Phase 3 study CAPSTONE-1. Method This was a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo- and active-controlled study. Key eligibility criteria included 12–64 years of age, fever (axillary temperature ≥38.0°C), ≥1 general symptom and ≥1 respiratory symptom (moderate to severe), and ≤48 hours from symptom onset. Patients between 20 and 64 years of age were randomized in 2:2:1 ratio to receive a single oral administration of S-033188, placebo, or 75 mg oseltamivir BID for 5 days. Patients between 12 and 19 years of age were randomized in 2:1 ratio to receive either a single oral administration of S-033188 or placebo. The primary efficacy endpoint was time to alleviation of influenza symptoms (TTAS) in the infected intent to treat population. Viral titer and RNA content were determined from pre- and postdose nasal/throat swabs. Result A total of 1436 patients were randomized. TTAS was significantly shorter in the S-033188 group than that in the placebo group (median TTAS: 53.7 hours vs. 80.2 hours, P S-033188, compared with 72 hours in those treated with oseltamivir (P S-033188 group had significantly greater reductions from baseline in both viral titer and RNA content than those in oseltamivir or placebo groups at all time-points until Day 3 (compared with oseltamivir) or Day 5 (compared with placebo). S-033188 was generally well tolerated, with overall incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events lower than that seen with oseltamivir. Conclusion Treatment with S-033188 was superior to placebo in alleviating influenza symptoms, and superior to both oseltamivir and placebo in virologic outcomes. Safety profile of S-033188 compared

  16. Why Public Employment Services Always Fail. Double-sided Asymmetric Information and the Replacement of Low-skill Workers in six European Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Christian Albrekt; Vesan, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    It has been a general finding across Europe that very few job matches are facilitated by public employment services (PES).The article explains this failure by highlighting the existence of a double-sided asymmetric information problem on the labour market. It is argued that although a PES...... potentially reduces search costs, both employers and employees have strong incentives not to use PES. The reason is that employers try to avoid the ‘worst’ employees, and employees try to avoid the ‘worst’ employers. Therefore these services get caught in a low-end equilibrium that is almost impossible...

  17. Hierarchical Ni-Co layered double hydroxide nanosheets on functionalized 3D-RGO films for high energy density asymmetric supercapacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Liyang; Sui, Yanwei; Qi, Jiqiu; Chang, Yuan; He, Yezeng; Meng, Qingkun; Wei, Fuxiang; Sun, Zhi; Jin, Yunxue

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, ultrathin reduced graphene oxide films on nickel foam were fabricated via a facile dip-coating method combined with thermal reduction. Hierarchical Ni-Co layered double hydroxide nanosheets with network structure were electrodeposited on the ultrathin reduced graphene oxide films in a simple three-electrode system. The thickness of Ni-Co layered double hydroxide nanosheets can be controlled through adjusting the deposition temperature. The as-prepared electrode exhibited excellent electrochemical performance with specific capacitance of 1454.2 F g-1 at a current density of 1 A g-1. An asymmetric supercapacitor device was designed with the as-prepared composites as positive electrode material and Nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide as negative electrode material. This device could be operated in a working voltage range of 0-1.8 V in 1 M KOH aqueous electrolyte, delivering a high energy density of 56.4 W h kg-1 at a power density of 882.5 W kg-1. One supercapacitor can power two LEDs with rated voltage of 1.8-2.0 V. After 10,000 consecutive charge-discharge tests at 10 A g-1, this asymmetric supercapacitor revealed an excellent cycle life with 98.3% specific capacitance retention. These excellent electrochemical performances make it become one of most promising candidates for high energy supercapacitor device.

  18. Selfish DNA: Homing Endonucleases Find a Home

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Edgell, David R

    2009-01-01

    ...] . Intriguingly, many self-splicing introns (and inteins) are also mobile genetic elements at the DNA level because they encode mobility-promoting proteins termed homing endonucleases that have the interesting property of being site-specific but sequence-tolerant DNA endonucleases [4–7] . Intron-encoded homing endonucleases recognize a site, the homing ...

  19. CgII cleaves DNA using a mechanism distinct from other ATP-dependent restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toliusis, Paulius; Zaremba, Mindaugas; Silanskas, Arunas; Szczelkun, Mark D; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2017-08-21

    The restriction endonuclease CglI from Corynebacterium glutamicum recognizes an asymmetric 5'-GCCGC-3' site and cleaves the DNA 7 and 6/7 nucleotides downstream on the top and bottom DNA strands, respectively, in an NTP-hydrolysis dependent reaction. CglI is composed of two different proteins: an endonuclease (R.CglI) and a DEAD-family helicase-like ATPase (H.CglI). These subunits form a heterotetrameric complex with R2H2 stoichiometry. However, the R2H2·CglI complex has only one nuclease active site sufficient to cut one DNA strand suggesting that two complexes are required to introduce a double strand break. Here, we report studies to evaluate the DNA cleavage mechanism of CglI. Using one- and two-site circular DNA substrates we show that CglI does not require two sites on the same DNA for optimal catalytic activity. However, one-site linear DNA is a poor substrate, supporting a mechanism where CglI complexes must communicate along the one-dimensional DNA contour before cleavage is activated. Based on experimental data, we propose that adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis by CglI produces translocation on DNA preferentially in a downstream direction from the target, although upstream translocation is also possible. Our results are consistent with a mechanism of CglI action that is distinct from that of other ATP-dependent restriction-modification enzymes. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Type I restriction endonucleases are true catalytic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Piero R; Xu, Cuiling; Chi, Min

    2009-06-01

    Type I restriction endonucleases are intriguing, multifunctional complexes that restrict DNA randomly, at sites distant from the target sequence. Restriction at distant sites is facilitated by ATP hydrolysis-dependent, translocation of double-stranded DNA towards the stationary enzyme bound at the recognition sequence. Following restriction, the enzymes are thought to remain associated with the DNA at the target site, hydrolyzing copious amounts of ATP. As a result, for the past 35 years type I restriction endonucleases could only be loosely classified as enzymes since they functioned stoichiometrically relative to DNA. To further understand enzyme mechanism, a detailed analysis of DNA cleavage by the EcoR124I holoenzyme was done. We demonstrate for the first time that type I restriction endonucleases are not stoichiometric but are instead catalytic with respect to DNA. Further, the mechanism involves formation of a dimer of holoenzymes, with each monomer bound to a target sequence and, following cleavage, each dissociates in an intact form to bind and restrict subsequent DNA molecules. Therefore, type I restriction endonucleases, like their type II counterparts, are true enzymes. The conclusion that type I restriction enzymes are catalytic relative to DNA has important implications for the in vivo function of these previously enigmatic enzymes.

  1. AP endonuclease independent repair of abasic sites in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Line; Forstrøm, Rune J.; Bjørås, Magnar; Alseth, Ingrun

    2012-01-01

    Abasic (AP) sites are formed spontaneously and are inevitably intermediates during base excision repair of DNA base damages. AP sites are both mutagenic and cytotoxic and key enzymes for their removal are AP endonucleases. However, AP endonuclease independent repair initiated by DNA glycosylases performing β,δ-elimination cleavage of the AP sites has been described in mammalian cells. Here, we describe another AP endonuclease independent repair pathway for removal of AP sites in Schizosaccharomyces pombe that is initiated by a bifunctional DNA glycosylase, Nth1 and followed by cleavage of the baseless sugar residue by tyrosyl phosphodiesterase Tdp1. We propose that repair is completed by the action of a polynucleotide kinase, a DNA polymerase and finally a DNA ligase to seal the gap. A fission yeast double mutant of the major AP endonuclease Apn2 and Tdp1 shows synergistic increase in MMS sensitivity, substantiating that Apn2 and Tdp1 process the same substrate. These results add new knowledge to the complex cellular response to AP sites, which could be exploited in chemotherapy where synthetic lethality is a key strategy of treatment. PMID:22084197

  2. AP endonuclease independent repair of abasic sites in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Line; Forstrøm, Rune J; Bjørås, Magnar; Alseth, Ingrun

    2012-03-01

    Abasic (AP) sites are formed spontaneously and are inevitably intermediates during base excision repair of DNA base damages. AP sites are both mutagenic and cytotoxic and key enzymes for their removal are AP endonucleases. However, AP endonuclease independent repair initiated by DNA glycosylases performing β,δ-elimination cleavage of the AP sites has been described in mammalian cells. Here, we describe another AP endonuclease independent repair pathway for removal of AP sites in Schizosaccharomyces pombe that is initiated by a bifunctional DNA glycosylase, Nth1 and followed by cleavage of the baseless sugar residue by tyrosyl phosphodiesterase Tdp1. We propose that repair is completed by the action of a polynucleotide kinase, a DNA polymerase and finally a DNA ligase to seal the gap. A fission yeast double mutant of the major AP endonuclease Apn2 and Tdp1 shows synergistic increase in MMS sensitivity, substantiating that Apn2 and Tdp1 process the same substrate. These results add new knowledge to the complex cellular response to AP sites, which could be exploited in chemotherapy where synthetic lethality is a key strategy of treatment.

  3. Creation of a type IIS restriction endonuclease with a long recognition sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippow, Shaun M; Aha, Patti M; Parker, Matthew H; Blake, William J; Baynes, Brian M; Lipovsek, Dasa

    2009-05-01

    Type IIS restriction endonucleases cleave DNA outside their recognition sequences, and are therefore particularly useful in the assembly of DNA from smaller fragments. A limitation of type IIS restriction endonucleases in assembly of long DNA sequences is the relative abundance of their target sites. To facilitate ligation-based assembly of extremely long pieces of DNA, we have engineered a new type IIS restriction endonuclease that combines the specificity of the homing endonuclease I-SceI with the type IIS cleavage pattern of FokI. We linked a non-cleaving mutant of I-SceI, which conveys to the chimeric enzyme its specificity for an 18-bp DNA sequence, to the catalytic domain of FokI, which cuts DNA at a defined site outside the target site. Whereas previously described chimeric endonucleases do not produce type IIS-like precise DNA overhangs suitable for ligation, our chimeric endonuclease cleaves double-stranded DNA exactly 2 and 6 nt from the target site to generate homogeneous, 5', four-base overhangs, which can be ligated with 90% fidelity. We anticipate that these enzymes will be particularly useful in manipulation of DNA fragments larger than a thousand bases, which are very likely to contain target sites for all natural type IIS restriction endonucleases.

  4. Engineering strand-specific DNA nicking enzymes from the type IIS restriction endonucleases BsaI, BsmBI, and BsmAI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhenyu; Samuelson, James C; Zhou, Jing; Dore, Andrew; Xu, Shuang-Yong

    2004-03-26

    More than 80 type IIA/IIS restriction endonucleases with different recognition specificities are now known. In contrast, only a limited number of strand-specific nicking endonucleases are currently available. To overcome this limitation, a novel genetic screening method was devised to convert type IIS restriction endonucleases into strand-specific nicking endonucleases. The genetic screen consisted of four steps: (1) random mutagenesis to create a plasmid library, each bearing an inactivated endonuclease gene; (2) restriction digestion of plasmids containing the wild-type and the mutagenized endonuclease gene; (3) back-crosses with the wild-type gene by ligation to the wild-type N-terminal or C-terminal fragment; (4) transformation of the ligated DNA into a pre-modified host and screening for nicking endonuclease activity in total cell culture or cell extracts of the transformants. Nt.BsaI and Nb.BsaI nicking endonucleases were isolated from BsaI using this genetic screen. In addition, site-directed mutagenesis was carried out to isolate BsaI nicking variants with minimal double-stranded DNA cleavage activity. The equivalent amino acid substitutions were introduced into BsmBI and BsmAI restriction endonucleases with similar recognition sequence and significant amino acid sequence identity and their nicking variants were successfully isolated. This work provides strong evidence that some type IIS restriction endonucleases carry two separate active sites. When one of the active sites is inactivated, the type IIS restriction endonuclease may nick only one strand.

  5. Effect of asymmetrical double-pockets and gate-drain underlap on Schottky barrier tunneling FET: Ambipolar conduction vs. high frequency performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaker, Ahmed; Ossaimee, Mahmoud; Zekry, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a proposed structure based on asymmetrical double pockets SB-TFET with gate-drain underlap is presented. 2D extensive modeling and simulation, using Silvaco TCAD, were carried out to study the effect of both underlap length and pockets' doping on the transistor performance. It was found that the underlap from the drain side suppresses the ambipolar conduction and doesn't enhance the high-frequency characteristics. The enhancement of the high-frequency characteristics could be realized by increasing the doping of the drain pocket over the doping of the source pocket. An optimum choice was found which gives the conditions of minimum ambipolar conduction, maximum ON current and maximum cut-off frequency. These enhancements render the device more competitive as a nanometer transistor.

  6. A novel dual-channel chemosensor for CN- using asymmetric double-azine derivatives in aqueous media and its application in bitter almond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Peng-Xiang; Hu, Jing-Han; Chen, Ying; Sun, You; Qi, Jing

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we have designed and synthesized a novel sensor L1 based on asymmetric double-azine derivatives, which showed both ;naked eye; recognition and fluorescence responses for CN- in DMSO/H2O (v/v = 4:1, pH = 7.20) solution. This simple sensor L1 could distinguish CN- from coexisting anions via the way of deprotonation and sensing mechanism of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), and the minimum detection limit on fluorescence response of the sensor L1 towards CN- was down to 9.47 × 10- 7 M. Moreover, we have successfully utilized the sensor L1 to detect CN- in bitter almond. Test strips containing L1 were also prepared, which could act as a practical colorimetric tool to detect CN- in aqueous media.

  7. The dynamics of the monomeric restriction endonuclease BcnI during its interaction with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostiuk, Georgij; Dikic, Jasmina; Schwarz, Friedrich W; Sasnauskas, Giedrius; Seidel, Ralf; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2017-06-02

    Endonucleases that generate DNA double strand breaks often employ two independent subunits such that the active site from each subunit cuts either DNA strand. Restriction enzyme BcnI is a remarkable exception. It binds to the 5΄-CC/SGG-3΄ (where S = C or G, '/' designates the cleavage position) target as a monomer forming an asymmetric complex, where a single catalytic center approaches the scissile phosphodiester bond in one of DNA strands. Bulk kinetic measurements have previously shown that the same BcnI molecule cuts both DNA strands at the target site without dissociation from the DNA. Here, we analyse the BcnI DNA binding and target recognition steps at the single molecule level. We find, using FRET, that BcnI adopts either 'open' or 'closed' conformation in solution. Next, we directly demonstrate that BcnI slides over long distances on DNA using 1D diffusion and show that sliding is accompanied by occasional jumping events, where the enzyme leaves the DNA and rebinds immediately at a distant site. Furthermore, we quantify the dynamics of the BcnI interactions with cognate and non-cognate DNA, and determine the preferred binding orientation of BcnI to the target site. These results provide new insights into the intricate dynamics of BcnI-DNA interactions. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Spin and tunneling dynamics in an asymmetrical double quantum dot with spin-orbit coupling: Selective spin transport device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Madhav K.; Jha, Pradeep K.; Bhattacherjee, Aranya B.

    2017-09-01

    In this article, we study the spin and tunneling dynamics as a function of magnetic field in a one-dimensional GaAs double quantum dot with both the Dresselhaus and Rashba spin-orbit coupling. In particular, we consider different spatial widths for the spin-up and spin-down electronic states. We find that the spin dynamics is a superposition of slow as well as fast Rabi oscillations. It is found that the Rashba interaction strength as well as the external magnetic field strongly modifies the slow Rabi oscillations which is particularly useful for implementing solid state selective spin transport device.

  9. A site-specific endonuclease encoded by a typical archaeal intron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Jacob; Garrett, Roger Antony; Belfort, Malene

    1993-01-01

    . Additionally, although the archaeal and group I introns have entirely different structural properties and splicing pathways, I-Dmo I shares sequence similarity, in the form of the LAGLI-DADG motif, with group I intron endonucleases of eukaryotes. These observations support the independent evolutionary origin......The protein encoded by the archaeal intron in the 23S rRNA gene of the hyperthermophile Desulfurococcus mobilis is a double-strand DNase that, like group I intron homing endonucleases, is capable of cleaving an intronless allele of the gene. This enzyme, I-Dmo I, is unusual among the intron...... endonucleases in that it is thermostable and is expressed only from linear and cyclized intron species and not from the precursor RNA. However, in analogy to its eukaryotic counterparts, but unlike the bacteriophage enzymes, I-Dmo I makes a staggered double-strand cut that generates 4-nt 3' extensions...

  10. Problem-Solving Test: Restriction Endonuclease Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2011-01-01

    The term "restriction endonuclease mapping" covers a number of related techniques used to identify specific restriction enzyme recognition sites on small DNA molecules. A method for restriction endonuclease mapping of a 1,000-basepair (bp)-long DNA molecule is described in the fictitious experiment of this test. The most important fact needed to…

  11. Isothermal detection of RNA with restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lei; Nakayama, Shizuka; Yitbarek, Saron; Greenfield, Isabel; Sintim, Herman O

    2011-01-07

    Herein, we demonstrate how to detect nucleic acids that do not contain restriction endonuclease recognition sites with restriction endonucleases. We show that the topology of DNA probes used in this detection strategy remarkably affects the efficiency of RNA/DNA detection.

  12. Effects of Pioglitazone on Asymmetric Dimethylarginine and Components of the Metabolic Syndrome in Nondiabetic Patients (EPICAMP Study: A Double-Blind, Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedram Shokouh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present trial aimed to investigate the effects of pioglitazone on the serum level of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA, a marker of endothelial function, and some indices of inflammation and glucose and lipid metabolism in nondiabetic metabolic syndrome patients. 104 eligible participants (57% female; age between 20 and 70 were enrolled in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial and were randomized to receive either pioglitazone (uptitrated to 30 mg/day or matching placebo for 24 weeks. Participants were clinically examined and a blood sample was obtained at baseline and at the end of the trial. Pioglitazone significantly improved C-reactive protein level irrespective of changes in insulin sensitivity. Compared with the placebo group, alanine and aspartate transaminases were decreased and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was increased after treatment with pioglitazone. A considerably greater weight gain was also recorded in the intervention group. We failed to observe any significant changes in serum ADMA in either group and between groups with and without adjustment for age, sex, and components of the metabolic syndrome. In a nutshell, pioglitazone seems to have positive effects on lipid profile, liver transaminases, and systemic inflammation. However, its previously demonstrated endothelial function-improving properties do not seem to be mediated by ADMA.

  13. Visualizing phosphodiester-bond hydrolysis by an endonuclease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molina, Rafael; Stella, Stefano; Redondo, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of DNA phosphodiester bonds has been widely studied, but the chemical reaction has not yet been observed. Here we follow the generation of a DNA double-strand break (DSB) by the Desulfurococcus mobilis homing endonuclease I-DmoI, trapping sequential stages of a two....... This third metal ion has a crucial role, triggering the consecutive hydrolysis of the targeted phosphodiester bonds in the DNA strands and leaving its position once the DSB is generated. The multiple structures show the orchestrated conformational changes in the protein residues, nucleotides and metals...

  14. Selection of restriction endonucleases using artificial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Roberts, Richard J

    2007-01-01

    We describe in this article an in vitro system for the selection of restriction endonucleases using artificial cells. The artificial cells are generated in the form of a water-in-oil emulsion by in vitro compartmentalization. Each aqueous compartment contains a reconstituted transcription/translation mix along with the dispersed DNA templates. In the compartments containing endonuclease genes, an endonuclease expressed in vitro cleaves its own DNA template adjacent to the gene, leaving a sticky end. The pooled DNA templates are then ligated to an adaptor with a compatible end. The endonuclease genes are then enriched by adaptor-specific PCR on the ligation mix. We demonstrate that the system can achieve at least 100-fold enrichment in a single round of selection. It is sensitive enough to enrich an active endonuclease gene from a 1:10(5) model library in 2-3 rounds of selection. Finally, we describe experiments where we selected endonuclease genes directly from a bacterial genomic DNA source in three rounds of selections: the known PstI gene from Providencia stuartii and the new TspMI gene from Thermus sp. manalii. This method provides a unique tool for cloning restriction endonuclease genes and has many other potential applications.

  15. [Restriction endonuclease digest - melting curve analysis: a new SNP genotyping and its application in traditional Chinese medicine authentication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chao; Huang, Lu-Qi; Yuan, Yuan; Chen, Min; Hou, Jing-Yi; Wu, Zhi-Gang; Lin, Shu-Fang

    2014-04-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) is an important molecular marker in traditional Chinese medicine research, and it is widely used in TCM authentication. The present study created a new genotyping method by combining restriction endonuclease digesting with melting curve analysis, which is a stable, rapid and easy doing SNP genotyping method. The new method analyzed SNP genotyping of two chloroplast SNP which was located in or out of the endonuclease recognition site, the results showed that when attaching a 14 bp GC-clamp (cggcgggagggcgg) to 5' end of the primer and selecting suited endonuclease to digest the amplification products, the melting curve of Lonicera japonica and Atractylodes macrocephala were all of double peaks and the adulterants Shan-yin-hua and A. lancea were of single peaks. The results indicated that the method had good stability and reproducibility for identifying authentic medicines from its adulterants. It is a potential SNP genotyping method and named restriction endonuclease digest - melting curve analysis.

  16. SLX4 Assembles a Telomere Maintenance Toolkit by Bridging Multiple Endonucleases with Telomeres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingbing Wan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available SLX4 interacts with several endonucleases to resolve structural barriers in DNA metabolism. SLX4 also interacts with telomeric protein TRF2 in human cells. The molecular mechanism of these interactions at telomeres remains unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of the TRF2-binding motif of SLX4 (SLX4TBM in complex with the TRFH domain of TRF2 (TRF2TRFH and map the interactions of SLX4 with endonucleases SLX1, XPF, and MUS81. TRF2 recognizes a unique HxLxP motif on SLX4 via the peptide-binding site in its TRFH domain. Telomeric localization of SLX4 and associated nucleases depend on the SLX4-endonuclease and SLX4-TRF2 interactions and the protein levels of SLX4 and TRF2. SLX4 assembles an endonuclease toolkit that negatively regulates telomere length via SLX1-catalyzed nucleolytic resolution of telomere DNA structures. We propose that the SLX4-TRF2 complex serves as a double-layer scaffold bridging multiple endonucleases with telomeres for recombination-based telomere maintenance.

  17. Purification, crystallization, X-ray diffraction analysis and phasing of an engineered single-chain PvuII restriction endonuclease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meramveliotaki, Chrysi [Department of Science, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Department of Biology, University of Crete, PO Box 2208, GR-71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (IMBB), PO Box 1527, GR-71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Kotsifaki, Dina [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (IMBB), PO Box 1527, GR-71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Androulaki, Maria [Department of Science, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Department of Biology, University of Crete, PO Box 2208, GR-71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (IMBB), PO Box 1527, GR-71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Hountas, Athanasios [Department of Science, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Eliopoulos, Elias [Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Kokkinidis, Michael, E-mail: kokkinid@imbb.forth.gr [Department of Biology, University of Crete, PO Box 2208, GR-71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (IMBB), PO Box 1527, GR-71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Department of Science, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens (Greece)

    2007-10-01

    PvuII is the first type II restriction endonuclease to be converted from its wild-type homodimeric form into an enzymatically active single-chain variant. The enzyme was crystallized and phasing was successfully performed by molecular replacement. The restriction endonuclease PvuII from Proteus vulgaris has been converted from its wild-type homodimeric form into the enzymatically active single-chain variant scPvuII by tandemly joining the two subunits through the peptide linker Gly-Ser-Gly-Gly. scPvuII, which is suitable for the development of programmed restriction endonucleases for highly specific DNA cleavage, was purified and crystallized. The crystals diffract to a resolution of 2.35 Å and belong to space group P4{sub 2}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 101.92, c = 100.28 Å and two molecules per asymmetric unit. Phasing was successfully performed by molecular replacement.

  18. Asymmetric GaAs n-type double δ-doped quantum wells as a source of intersubband-related nonlinear optical response: Effects of an applied electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez-Magdaleno, K.A.; Martínez-Orozco, J.C.; Rodríguez-Vargas, I. [Unidad Académica de Física, Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas, Calz. Solidaridad Esq. Paseo a La Bufa S/N. C.P. 98060 Zacatecas (Mexico); Mora-Ramos, M.E. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, CP 62209 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Física Teórica y Aplicada, Escuela de Ingeniería de Antioquia, AA 7516 Medellín (Colombia); Grupo de Materia Condensada-UdeA, Instituto de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Duque, C.A., E-mail: cduque@fisica.udea.edu.co [Grupo de Materia Condensada-UdeA, Instituto de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia)

    2014-03-15

    In this work, the conduction band electron states and the associated intersubband-related linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficient and relative refractive index change are calculated for an asymmetric double n-type δ-doped quantum well in a GaAs-matrix. The effects of an external applied static electric field are included. Values of the two-dimensional impurities density (N{sub 2d}) of each single δ-doped quantum well are taken to vary within the range of 1.0×10{sup 12} to 7.0×10{sup 12} cm{sup −2}, consistent with the experimental data growth regime. The optical responses are reported as a function of the δ-doped impurities density and the applied electric field. It is shown that single electron states and the related optical quantities are significantly affected by the structural asymmetry of the double δ-doped quantum well system. In addition, a brief comparison with the free-carrier-related optical response is presented. -- Highlights: • Nonlinear optics in asymmetric double n-type δ-doped quantum well in a GaAs-matrix. • The system is considered under external applied electric field in growth direction. • The 2D impurity density is consistent with the experimental data growth regime. • The optical quantities are significantly affected by the structural asymmetry of the system.

  19. Divalent metal ion differentially regulates the sequential nicking reactions of the GIY-YIG homing endonuclease I-BmoI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin P Kleinstiver

    Full Text Available Homing endonucleases are site-specific DNA endonucleases that function as mobile genetic elements by introducing double-strand breaks or nicks at defined locations. Of the major families of homing endonucleases, the modular GIY-YIG endonucleases are least understood in terms of mechanism. The GIY-YIG homing endonuclease I-BmoI generates a double-strand break by sequential nicking reactions during which the single active site of the GIY-YIG nuclease domain must undergo a substantial reorganization. Here, we show that divalent metal ion plays a significant role in regulating the two independent nicking reactions by I-BmoI. Rate constant determination for each nicking reaction revealed that limiting divalent metal ion has a greater impact on the second strand than the first strand nicking reaction. We also show that substrate mutations within the I-BmoI cleavage site can modulate the first strand nicking reaction over a 314-fold range. Additionally, in-gel DNA footprinting with mutant substrates and modeling of an I-BmoI-substrate complex suggest that amino acid contacts to a critical GC-2 base pair are required to induce a bottom-strand distortion that likely directs conformational changes for reaction progress. Collectively, our data implies mechanistic roles for divalent metal ion and substrate bases, suggesting that divalent metal ion facilitates the re-positioning of the GIY-YIG nuclease domain between sequential nicking reactions.

  20. Crystal Structure of the Homing Endonuclease I-CvuI Provides a New Template for Genome Modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molina, Rafael; Redondo, Pilar; López-Méndez, Blanca

    2015-01-01

    Homing endonucleases recognize and generate a DNA double-strand break, which has been used to promote gene targeting. These enzymes recognize long DNA stretches; they are highly sequence-specific enzymes and display a very low frequency of cleavage even in complete genomes. Although a large numbe...

  1. Efficient fdCas9 Synthetic Endonuclease with Improved Specificity for Precise Genome Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouida, Mustapha; Eid, Ayman; Ali, Zahir; Cradick, Thomas; Lee, Ciaran; Deshmukh, Harshavardhan; Atef, Ahmed; AbuSamra, Dina; Gadhoum, Samah Zeineb; Merzaban, Jasmeen; Bao, Gang; Mahfouz, Magdy

    2015-01-01

    The Cas9 endonuclease is used for genome editing applications in diverse eukaryotic species. A high frequency of off-target activity has been reported in many cell types, limiting its applications to genome engineering, especially in genomic medicine. Here, we generated a synthetic chimeric protein between the catalytic domain of the FokI endonuclease and the catalytically inactive Cas9 protein (fdCas9). A pair of guide RNAs (gRNAs) that bind to sense and antisense strands with a defined spacer sequence range can be used to form a catalytically active dimeric fdCas9 protein and generate double-strand breaks (DSBs) within the spacer sequence. Our data demonstrate an improved catalytic activity of the fdCas9 endonuclease, with a spacer range of 15–39 nucleotides, on surrogate reporters and genomic targets. Furthermore, we observed no detectable fdCas9 activity at known Cas9 off-target sites. Taken together, our data suggest that the fdCas9 endonuclease variant is a superior platform for genome editing applications in eukaryotic systems including mammalian cells. PMID:26225561

  2. Efficient fdCas9 Synthetic Endonuclease with Improved Specificity for Precise Genome Engineering

    KAUST Repository

    Aouida, Mustapha

    2015-07-30

    The Cas9 endonuclease is used for genome editing applications in diverse eukaryotic species. A high frequency of off-target activity has been reported in many cell types, limiting its applications to genome engineering, especially in genomic medicine. Here, we generated a synthetic chimeric protein between the catalytic domain of the FokI endonuclease and the catalytically inactive Cas9 protein (fdCas9). A pair of guide RNAs (gRNAs) that bind to sense and antisense strands with a defined spacer sequence range can be used to form a catalytically active dimeric fdCas9 protein and generate double-strand breaks (DSBs) within the spacer sequence. Our data demonstrate an improved catalytic activity of the fdCas9 endonuclease, with a spacer range of 15–39 nucleotides, on surrogate reporters and genomic targets. Furthermore, we observed no detectable fdCas9 activity at known Cas9 off-target sites. Taken together, our data suggest that the fdCas9 endonuclease variant is a superior platform for genome editing applications in eukaryotic systems including mammalian cells.

  3. Assaying multiple restriction endonucleases functionalities and inhibitions on DNA microarray with multifunctional gold nanoparticle probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lan; Zhu, Zhijun; Li, Tao; Wang, Zhenxin

    2014-02-15

    Herein, a double-stranded (ds) DNA microarray-based resonance light scattering (RLS) assay with multifunctional gold nanoparticle (GNP) probes has been developed for studying restriction endonuclease functionality and inhibition. Because of decreasing significantly melting temperature, the enzyme-cleaved dsDNAs easily unwind to form single-stranded (ss) DNAs. The ssDNAs are hybridized with multiplex complementary ssDNAs functionalized GNP probes followed by silver enhancement and RLS detection. Three restriction endonucleases (EcoRI, BamHI and EcoRV) and three potential inhibitors (doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX), ethidium bromide (EB) and an EcoRI-derived helical peptide (α4)) were selected to demonstrate capability of the assay. Enzyme activities of restriction endonucleases are detected simultaneously with high specificity down to the limits of 2.0 × 10(-2)U/mL for EcoRI, 1.1 × 10(-2)U/mL for BamHI and 1.6 × 10(-2)U/mL for EcoRV, respectively. More importantly, the inhibitory potencies of three inhibitors are showed quantitatively, indicating that our approach has great promise for high-throughput screening of restriction endonuclease inhibitors. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. BspRI restriction endonuclease: cloning, expression in Escherichia coli and sequential cleavage mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskó, Tamás; Dér, András; Klement, Eva; Slaska-Kiss, Krystyna; Pósfai, Eszter; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Marshak, Daniel R; Roberts, Richard J; Kiss, Antal

    2010-11-01

    The GGCC-specific restriction endonuclease BspRI is one of the few Type IIP restriction endonucleases, which were suggested to be a monomer. Amino acid sequence information obtained by Edman sequencing and mass spectrometry analysis was used to clone the gene encoding BspRI. The bspRIR gene is located adjacently to the gene of the cognate modification methyltransferase and encodes a 304 aa protein. Expression of the bspRIR gene in Escherichia coli was dependent on the replacement of the native TTG initiation codon with an ATG codon, explaining previous failures in cloning the gene using functional selection. A plasmid containing a single BspRI recognition site was used to analyze kinetically nicking and second-strand cleavage under steady-state conditions. Cleavage of the supercoiled plasmid went through a relaxed intermediate indicating sequential hydrolysis of the two strands. Results of the kinetic analysis of the first- and second-strand cleavage are consistent with cutting the double-stranded substrate site in two independent binding events. A database search identified eight putative restriction-modification systems in which the predicted endonucleases as well as the methyltransferases share high sequence similarity with the corresponding protein of the BspRI system. BspRI and the related putative restriction endonucleases belong to the PD-(D/E)XK nuclease superfamily.

  5. A Flap Endonuclease (TcFEN1) Is Involved in Trypanosoma cruzi Cell Proliferation, DNA Repair, and Parasite Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Ivan; Aldunate, Carmen; Valenzuela, Lucia; Sepúlveda, Sofia; Garrido, Gilda; Kemmerling, Ulrike; Cabrera, Gonzalo; Galanti, Norbel

    2017-07-01

    FLAP endonucleases (FEN) are involved both in DNA replication and repair by processing DNA intermediaries presenting a nucleotide flap using its phosphodiesterase activity. In spite of these important functions in DNA metabolism, this enzyme was not yet studied in Trypanosomatids. Trypanosoma cruzi, the ethiological agent of Chagas disease, presents two dividing cellular forms (epimastigote and amastigote) and one non-proliferative, infective form (trypomastigote). The parasite survives DNA damage produced by reactive species generated in its hosts. The activity of a T. cruzi FLAP endonuclease (TcFEN1) was determined in the three cellular forms of the parasite using a DNA substrate generated by annealing three different oligonucleotides to form a double-stranded DNA with a 5' flap in the middle. This activity showed optimal pH and temperature similar to other known FENs. The substrate cut by the flap endonuclease activity could be ligated by the parasite generating a repaired DNA product. A DNA flap endonuclease coding sequence found in the T. cruzi genome (TcFEN1) was cloned, inserted in parasite expression vectors and transfected to epimastigotes. The purified native recombinant protein showed DNA flap endonuclease activity. This endonuclease was found located in the parasite nucleus of transfected epimastigotes and its over-expression increased both parasite proliferation and survival to H 2 O 2 . The presence of a flap endonuclease activity in T. cruzi and its nuclear location are indicative of the participation of this enzyme in DNA processing of flap fragments during DNA replication and repair in this parasite of ancient evolutive origin. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1722-1732, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Expression, purification and crystallization of two endonuclease III enzymes from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarre, Aili; Ökvist, Mats; Klar, Tobias; Moe, Elin; Timmins, Joanna

    2014-12-01

    Endonuclease III is a bifunctional DNA glycosylase that removes a wide range of oxidized bases in DNA. Deinococcus radiodurans is an extreme radiation-resistant and desiccation-resistant bacterium and possesses three genes encoding endonuclease III enzymes in its genome: DR2438 (EndoIII-1), DR0289 (EndoIII-2) and DR0982 (EndoIII-3). Here, EndoIII-1 and an N-terminally truncated form of EndoIII-3 (EndoIII-3Δ76) have been expressed, purified and crystallized, and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analyses have been performed to 2.15 and 1.31 Å resolution, respectively. The EndoIII-1 crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 181.38, b = 38.56, c = 37.09 Å, β = 89.34° and one molecule per asymmetric unit. The EndoIII-3Δ76 crystals also belonged to the monoclinic space group C2, but with unit-cell parameters a = 91.47, b = 40.53, c = 72.47 Å, β = 102.53° and one molecule per asymmetric unit. The EndoIII-1 structure was determined by molecular replacement, while the truncated EndoIII-3Δ76 structure was determined by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing. Refinement of the structures is in progress.

  7. Spectroelectrochemical insights into structural and redox properties of immobilized endonuclease III and its catalytically inactive mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Elin; Rollo, Filipe; Silveira, Célia M; Sezer, Murat; Hildebrandt, Peter; Todorovic, Smilja

    2018-01-05

    Endonuclease III is a Fe-S containing bifunctional DNA glycosylase which is involved in the repair of oxidation damaged DNA. Here we employ surface enhanced IR spectroelectrochemistry and electrochemistry to study the enzyme from the highly radiation- and desiccation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans (DrEndoIII2). The experiments are designed to shed more light onto specific parameters that are currently proposed to govern damage search and recognition by endonucleases III. We demonstrate that electrostatic interactions required for the redox activation of DrEndoIII2 may result in high electric fields that alter its structural and thermodynamic properties. Analysis of inactive DrEndoIII2 (K132A/D150A double mutant) interacting with undamaged DNA, and the active enzyme interacting with damaged DNA also indicate that the electron transfer is modulated by subtle differences in the protein-DNA complex. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Restriction endonuclease EcaI from Enterobacter cloacae

    OpenAIRE

    Hobom, G.; Schwarz, E.; Melzer, M.; Mayer, H.

    1981-01-01

    Restriction endonuclease EcaI obtained from Enterobacter cloacae DSM30056 recognizes the group of heptanucleotide palindromes 5′-G[unk]G-T-N-A-C-C-3′, and on cleavage (arrow) produces fragments with 5′-terminal pentanucleotide extensions. It is identical in specificity with restriction endonuclease BstEII from Bacillus stearothermophilus ET.

  9. Structure and mutagenesis of the DNA modification-dependent restriction endonuclease AspBHI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, John R; Nugent, Rebecca L; Li, Andrew; Mabuchi, Megumu Yamada; Fomenkov, Alexey; Cohen-Karni, Devora; Griggs, Rose M; Zhang, Xing; Wilson, Geoffrey G; Zheng, Yu; Xu, Shuang-yong; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2014-03-07

    The modification-dependent restriction endonuclease AspBHI recognizes 5-methylcytosine (5mC) in the double-strand DNA sequence context of (C/T)(C/G)(5mC)N(C/G) (N = any nucleotide) and cleaves the two strands a fixed distance (N12/N16) 3' to the modified cytosine. We determined the crystal structure of the homo-tetrameric AspBHI. Each subunit of the protein comprises two domains: an N-terminal DNA-recognition domain and a C-terminal DNA cleavage domain. The N-terminal domain is structurally similar to the eukaryotic SET and RING-associated (SRA) domain, which is known to bind to a hemi-methylated CpG dinucleotide. The C-terminal domain is structurally similar to classic Type II restriction enzymes and contains the endonuclease catalytic-site motif of DX20EAK. To understand how specific amino acids affect AspBHI recognition preference, we generated a homology model of the AspBHI-DNA complex, and probed the importance of individual amino acids by mutagenesis. Ser41 and Arg42 are predicted to be located in the DNA minor groove 5' to the modified cytosine. Substitution of Ser41 with alanine (S41A) and cysteine (S41C) resulted in mutants with altered cleavage activity. All 19 Arg42 variants resulted in loss of endonuclease activity.

  10. Restriction endonuclease AgeI is a monomer which dimerizes to cleave DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamulaitiene, Giedre; Jovaisaite, Virginija; Tamulaitis, Gintautas; Songailiene, Inga; Manakova, Elena; Zaremba, Mindaugas; Grazulis, Saulius; Xu, Shuang-Yong; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2017-04-07

    Although all Type II restriction endonucleases catalyze phosphodiester bond hydrolysis within or close to their DNA target sites, they form different oligomeric assemblies ranging from monomers, dimers, tetramers to higher order oligomers to generate a double strand break in DNA. Type IIP restriction endonuclease AgeI recognizes a palindromic sequence 5΄-A/CCGGT-3΄ and cuts it ('/' denotes the cleavage site) producing staggered DNA ends. Here, we present crystal structures of AgeI in apo and DNA-bound forms. The structure of AgeI is similar to the restriction enzymes that share in their target sites a conserved CCGG tetranucleotide and a cleavage pattern. Structure analysis and biochemical data indicate, that AgeI is a monomer in the apo-form both in the crystal and in solution, however, it binds and cleaves the palindromic target site as a dimer. DNA cleavage mechanism of AgeI is novel among Type IIP restriction endonucleases. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. How driving endonuclease genes can be used to combat pests and disease vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfray, H Charles J; North, Ace; Burt, Austin

    2017-09-11

    Driving endonuclease genes (DEGs) spread through a population by a non-Mendelian mechanism. In a heterozygote, the protein encoded by a DEG causes a double-strand break in the homologous chromosome opposite to where its gene is inserted and when the break is repaired using the homologue as a template the DEG heterozygote is converted to a homozygote. Some DEGs occur naturally while several classes of endonucleases can be engineered to spread in this way, with CRISPR-Cas9 based systems being particularly flexible. There is great interest in using driving endonuclease genes to impose a genetic load on insects that vector diseases or are economic pests to reduce their population density, or to introduce a beneficial gene such as one that might interrupt disease transmission. This paper reviews both the population genetics and population dynamics of DEGs. It summarises the theory that guides the design of DEG constructs intended to perform different functions. It also reviews the studies that have explored the likelihood of resistance to DEG phenotypes arising, and how this risk may be reduced. The review is intended for a general audience and mathematical details are kept to a minimum.

  12. Type II restriction endonucleases--a historical perspective and more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingoud, Alfred; Wilson, Geoffrey G; Wende, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    This article continues the series of Surveys and Summaries on restriction endonucleases (REases) begun this year in Nucleic Acids Research. Here we discuss 'Type II' REases, the kind used for DNA analysis and cloning. We focus on their biochemistry: what they are, what they do, and how they do it. Type II REases are produced by prokaryotes to combat bacteriophages. With extreme accuracy, each recognizes a particular sequence in double-stranded DNA and cleaves at a fixed position within or nearby. The discoveries of these enzymes in the 1970s, and of the uses to which they could be put, have since impacted every corner of the life sciences. They became the enabling tools of molecular biology, genetics and biotechnology, and made analysis at the most fundamental levels routine. Hundreds of different REases have been discovered and are available commercially. Their genes have been cloned, sequenced and overexpressed. Most have been characterized to some extent, but few have been studied in depth. Here, we describe the original discoveries in this field, and the properties of the first Type II REases investigated. We discuss the mechanisms of sequence recognition and catalysis, and the varied oligomeric modes in which Type II REases act. We describe the surprising heterogeneity revealed by comparisons of their sequences and structures. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. The wonders of flap endonucleases: structure, function, mechanism and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, L David; Atack, John M; Tsutakawa, Susan; Classen, Scott; Tainer, John; Grasby, Jane; Shen, Binghui

    2012-01-01

    Processing of Okazaki fragments to complete lagging strand DNA synthesis requires coordination among several proteins. RNA primers and DNA synthesised by DNA polymerase α are displaced by DNA polymerase δ to create bifurcated nucleic acid structures known as 5'-flaps. These 5'-flaps are removed by Flap Endonuclease 1 (FEN), a structure-specific nuclease whose divalent metal ion-dependent phosphodiesterase activity cleaves 5'-flaps with exquisite specificity. FENs are paradigms for the 5' nuclease superfamily, whose members perform a wide variety of roles in nucleic acid metabolism using a similar nuclease core domain that displays common biochemical properties and structural features. A detailed review of FEN structure is undertaken to show how DNA substrate recognition occurs and how FEN achieves cleavage at a single phosphate diester. A proposed double nucleotide unpairing trap (DoNUT) is discussed with regards to FEN and has relevance to the wider 5' nuclease superfamily. The homotrimeric proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein (PCNA) coordinates the actions of DNA polymerase, FEN and DNA ligase by facilitating the hand-off intermediates between each protein during Okazaki fragment maturation to maximise through-put and minimise consequences of intermediates being released into the wider cellular environment. FEN has numerous partner proteins that modulate and control its action during DNA replication and is also controlled by several post-translational modification events, all acting in concert to maintain precise and appropriate cleavage of Okazaki fragment intermediates during DNA replication.

  14. Nonlinear absorption coefficient and relative refraction index change for an asymmetrical double δ-doped quantum well in GaAs with a Schottky barrier potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas-Briseño, J.G.; Martínez-Orozco, J.C.; Rodríguez-Vargas, I. [Unidad Académica de Física, Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas, Calzada Solidaridad esquina con Paseo la Bufa S/N, C.P. 98060, Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); Mora-Ramos, M.E. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, CP 62209, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Instituto de Física, Universidad de Antioquia, AA 1226, Medellín (Colombia); Duque, C.A., E-mail: cduque@fisica.udea.edu.co [Instituto de Física, Universidad de Antioquia, AA 1226, Medellín (Colombia)

    2013-09-01

    In this work we are reporting the energy level spectrum for a quantum system consisting of an n-type double δ-doped quantum well with a Schottky barrier potential in a Gallium Arsenide matrix. The calculated states are taken as the basis for the evaluation of the linear and third-order nonlinear contributions to the optical absorption coefficient and to the relative refractive index change, making particular use of the asymmetry of the potential profile. These optical properties are then reported as a function of the Schottky barrier height (SBH) and the separation distance between the δ-doped quantum wells. Also, the effects of the application of hydrostatic pressure are studied. The results show that the amplitudes of the resonant peaks are of the same order of magnitude of those obtained in the case of single δ-doped field effect transistors; but tailoring the asymmetry of the confining potential profile allows the control the resonant peak positions.

  15. A domain in human EXOG converts apoptotic endonuclease to DNA-repair exonuclease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szymanski, Michal R.; Yu, Wangsheng; Gmyrek, Aleksandra M.; White, Mark A.; Molineux, Ian J.; Lee, J. Ching; Yin, Y. Whitney

    2017-05-03

    Human EXOG (hEXOG) is a 5'-exonuclease that is crucial for mitochondrial DNA repair; the enzyme belongs to a nonspecific nuclease family that includes the apoptotic endonuclease EndoG. Here we report biochemical and structural studies of hEXOG, including structures in its apo form and in a complex with DNA at 1.81 and 1.85 Å resolution, respectively. A Wing domain, absent in other ββα-Me members, suppresses endonuclease activity, but confers on hEXOG a strong 5'-dsDNA exonuclease activity that precisely excises a dinucleotide using an intrinsic ‘tape-measure’. The symmetrical apo hEXOG homodimer becomes asymmetrical upon binding to DNA, providing a structural basis for how substrate DNA bound to one active site allosterically regulates the activity of the other. These properties of hEXOG suggest a pathway for mitochondrial BER that provides an optimal substrate for subsequent gap-filling synthesis by DNA polymerase γ.

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) from Desulfurococcus amylolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mase, Tomoko; Kubota, Keiko; Miyazono, Ken-ichi; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka; Tanokura, Masaru

    2009-09-01

    Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) is a structure-specific nuclease that removes 5'-overhanging flaps in DNA repair and removes the RNA/DNA primer during maturation of the Okazaki fragment in lagging-strand DNA replication. FEN1 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Desulfurococcus amylolyticus was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method with monoammonium dihydrogen phosphate as the precipitant at pH 8.3. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.00 A resolution. The space group of the crystal was determined as the primitive hexagonal space group P321, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 103.76, c = 84.58 A. The crystal contained one molecule in the asymmetric unit.

  17. Asymmetric DNA methylation by dimeric EcoP15I DNA methyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urulangodi, Madhusoodanan; Dhanaraju, Rajkumar; Gupta, Kanchan; Roy, Rajendra P; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Rao, Desirazu N

    2016-01-01

    EcoP15I DNA methyltransferase (M.EcoP15I) recognizes short asymmetric sequence, 5'-CAGCAG-3', and methylates the second adenine only on one strand of the double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). In vivo, this methylation is sufficient to protect the host DNA from cleavage by the cognate restriction endonuclease, R.EcoP15I, because of the stringent cleavage specificity requirements. Biochemical and structural characterization support the notion that purified M.EcoP15I exists and functions as dimer. However, the exact role of dimerization in M.EcoP15I reaction mechanism remains elusive. Here we engineered M.EcoP15I to a stable monomeric form and studied the role of dimerization in enzyme catalyzed methylation reaction. While the monomeric form binds single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) containing the recognition sequence it is unable to methylate it. Further we show that, while the monomeric form has AdoMet binding and Mg(2+) binding motifs intact, optimal dsDNA binding required for methylation is dependent on dimerization. Together, our biochemical data supports a unique subunit organization for M.EcoP15I to catalyze the methylation reaction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  18. PCR-based bioprospecting for homing endonucleases in fungal mitochondrial rRNA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, Mohamed; Guha, Tuhin Kumar; Shen, Chen; Sethuraman, Jyothi; Hausner, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Fungal mitochondrial genomes act as "reservoirs" for homing endonucleases. These enzymes with their DNA site-specific cleavage activities are attractive tools for genome editing and gene therapy applications. Bioprospecting and characterization of naturally occurring homing endonucleases offers an alternative to synthesizing artificial endonucleases. Here, we describe methods for PCR-based screening of fungal mitochondrial rRNA genes for homing endonuclease encoding sequences, and we also provide protocols for the purification and biochemical characterization of putative native homing endonucleases.

  19. Chilo iridescent virus (CIV) ORF 012L encodes a protein with both exonuclease and endonuclease functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizman, Yesim Akturk; Muratoglu, Hacer; Sandalli, Cemal; Nalcacioglu, Remziye; Demirbag, Zihni

    2016-11-01

    Chilo iridescent virus (CIV) is the type member of the genus Iridovirus within the family Iridoviridae. The virions of CIV contain a single linear dsDNA molecule that is circularly permuted and terminally redundant. The genome of CIV contains an open reading frame (ORF 012L) encoding a protein homologous to exonuclease II of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In this study, we focused on the characterization of CIV ORF 012L. The target ORF was cloned into the pET28a vector, expressed in E. coli strain BL21 (DE3) pLysS with an N-terminal His tag and purified to homogeneity by using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. Biochemical characterization of the purified CIV 012L confirmed that this viral protein is a functional 5'-3' exonuclease that digests 3'-biotin-labelled oligonucleotides and linear double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules from their 5' termini in a highly processive manner. CIV 012L also has a potent endonuclease activity on dsDNA in vitro. In addition, CIV 012L converted supercoiled plasmid DNA (replicative form I, RFI) into the open circular form (RFII) and then open circular form into linear form (RFIII). Endonuclease activity of CIV 012L was optimal in the presence of 10 mM Mg(2+) or 30 mM Mn(2+) ions and at 150 mM NaCl or KCl salt concentrations. The highest endonuclease activity was obtained at pH 8, and it reached a maximum at 55 °C. The CIV 012L protein showed deficiencies for both double- and single-stranded RNAs.

  20. Involvement of two endonuclease III homologs in the base excision repair pathway for the processing of DNA alkylation damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Michelle; Chow, Barbara L; Morey, Natalie J; Jinks-Robertson, Sue; Doetsch, Paul W; Xiao, Wei

    2004-01-05

    DNA base excision repair (BER) is initiated by DNA glycosylases that recognize and remove damaged bases. The phosphate backbone adjacent to the resulting apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site is then cleaved by an AP endonuclease or glycosylase-associated AP lyase to invoke subsequent BER steps. We have used a genetic approach in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to determine whether or not AP sites are blocks to DNA replication and the biological consequences if AP sites persist in the genome. We previously reported that yeast cells deficient in the two AP endonucleases (apn1 apn2 double mutant) are extremely sensitive to killing by a model DNA alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and that this sensitivity can be reduced by deleting the MAG1 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase gene. Here we report that in the absence of the AP endonucleases, deletion of two Escherichia coli endonuclease III homologs, NTG1 and NTG2, partially suppresses MMS-induced killing, which indicates that the AP lyase products are deleterious unless they are further processed by an AP endonuclease. The severe MMS sensitivity seen in AP endonuclease deficient strains can also be rescued by treatment of cells with the AP lyase inhibitor methoxyamine, which suggests that the product of AP lyase action on an AP site is indeed an extremely toxic lesion. In addition to the AP endonuclease interactions, deletion of NTG1 and NTG2 enhances the mag1 mutant sensitivity to MMS, whereas overexpression of MAG1 in either the ntg1 or ntg2 mutant severely affects cell growth. These results help to delineate alkylation base lesion flow within the BER pathway.

  1. In silico analysis of evolutionary patterns in restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tiratha Raj; Pardasani, Kamal Raj

    2009-01-01

    Restriction endonucleases represent one of the best studied examples of DNA binding proteins. Type II restriction endonucleases recognize short sequences of foreign DNA and cleave the target on both strands with remarkable sequence specificity. Type II restriction endonucleases are part of restriction modification systems. Restriction modification systems occur ubiquitously among bacteria and archaea. Restriction endonucleases are indispensable tools in molecular biology and biotechnology. They are important model system for specific protein-nucleic acid interactions and also serve as good example for investigating structural, functional and evolutionary relationships among various biomolecules. The interaction between restriction endonucleases and their recognition sequences plays a crucial role in biochemical activities like catalytic site/metal binding, DNA repair and recombination etc. We study various patterns in restriction endonucleases type II and analyzed their structural, functional and evolutionary role. Our studies support X-ray crystallographic studies, arguing for divergence and molecular evolution. Conservation patterns of the nuclease superfamily have also been analyzed by estimating site-specific evolutionary rates for the analyzed structures related to respective chains in this study.

  2. Asymmetric Ashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    that oscillate in certain directions. Reflection or scattering of light favours certain orientations of the electric and magnetic fields over others. This is why polarising sunglasses can filter out the glint of sunlight reflected off a pond. When light scatters through the expanding debris of a supernova, it retains information about the orientation of the scattering layers. If the supernova is spherically symmetric, all orientations will be present equally and will average out, so there will be no net polarisation. If, however, the gas shell is not round, a slight net polarisation will be imprinted on the light. This is what broad-band polarimetry can accomplish. If additional spectral information is available ('spectro-polarimetry'), one can determine whether the asymmetry is in the continuum light or in some spectral lines. In the case of the Type Ia supernovae, the astronomers found that the continuum polarisation is very small so that the overall shape of the explosion is crudely spherical. But the much larger polarization in strongly blue-shifted spectral lines evidences the presence, in the outer regions, of fast moving clumps with peculiar chemical composition. "Our study reveals that explosions of Type Ia supernovae are really three-dimensional phenomena," says Dietrich Baade. "The outer regions of the blast cloud is asymmetric, with different materials found in 'clumps', while the inner regions are smooth." "This study was possible because polarimetry could unfold its full strength thanks to the light-collecting power of the Very Large Telescope and the very precise calibration of the FORS instrument," he adds. The research team first spotted this asymmetry in 2003, as part of the same observational campaign (ESO PR 23/03 and ESO PR Photo 26/05). The new, more extensive results show that the degree of polarisation and, hence, the asphericity, correlates with the intrinsic brightness of the explosion. The brighter the supernova, the smoother, or less clumpy

  3. RNA aptamer inhibitors of a restriction endonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondragón, Estefanía; Maher, L James

    2015-09-03

    Restriction endonucleases (REases) recognize and cleave short palindromic DNA sequences, protecting bacterial cells against bacteriophage infection by attacking foreign DNA. We are interested in the potential of folded RNA to mimic DNA, a concept that might be applied to inhibition of DNA-binding proteins. As a model system, we sought RNA aptamers against the REases BamHI, PacI and KpnI using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). After 20 rounds of selection under different stringent conditions, we identified the 10 most enriched RNA aptamers for each REase. Aptamers were screened for binding and specificity, and assayed for REase inhibition. We obtained eight high-affinity (Kd ∼12-30 nM) selective competitive inhibitors (IC50 ∼20-150 nM) for KpnI. Predicted RNA secondary structures were confirmed by in-line attack assay and a 38-nt derivative of the best anti-KpnI aptamer was sufficient for inhibition. These competitive inhibitors presumably act as KpnI binding site analogs, but lack the primary consensus KpnI cleavage sequence and are not cleaved by KpnI, making their potential mode of DNA mimicry fascinating. Anti-REase RNA aptamers could have value in studies of REase mechanism and may give clues to a code for designing RNAs that competitively inhibit DNA binding proteins including transcription factors. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Solitary restriction endonucleases in prokaryotic genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ershova, Anna S; Karyagina, Anna S; Vasiliev, Mikhail O; Lyashchuk, Alexander M; Lunin, Vladimir G; Spirin, Sergey A; Alexeevski, Andrei V

    2012-11-01

    Prokaryotic restriction-modification (R-M) systems defend the host cell from the invasion of a foreign DNA. They comprise two enzymatic activities: specific DNA cleavage activity and DNA methylation activity preventing cleavage. Typically, these activities are provided by two separate enzymes: a DNA methyltransferase (MTase) and a restriction endonuclease (RE). In the absence of a corresponding MTase, an RE of Type II R-M system is highly toxic for the cell. Genes of the R-M system are linked in the genome in the vast majority of annotated cases. There are only a few reported cases in which the genes of MTase and RE from one R-M system are not linked. Nevertheless, a few hundreds solitary RE genes are present in the Restriction Enzyme Database (http://rebase.neb.com) annotations. Using the comparative genomic approach, we analysed 272 solitary RE genes. For 57 solitary RE genes we predicted corresponding MTase genes located distantly in a genome. Of the 272 solitary RE genes, 99 are likely to be fragments of RE genes. Various explanations for the existence of the remaining 116 solitary RE genes are also discussed.

  5. Screening for restriction endonucleases in methane-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanovskaya, V A; Alexeyev, M F; Gun'kovskaya, N V; Stolyar, S M; Shatohina, E S; Malashenko Yu, R

    1992-01-01

    51 methane-oxidizing bacteria strains such as Methylomonas methanica, M. rubra, Methylococcus capsulatus, M. thermophilus, M. luteus, M. ucrainicus, M. whittenburyi, Methylosinus trichosporium, M. sporium, Methylocystis parvus isolated from various ecological niches and geographical regions of the Ukraine and also the strains received from R. Whittenbury and Y. Heyer were screened for restriction endonucleases. Type II restriction endonucleases were detected in IMV B-3112 (= 12 b), IMV B-3027 (= 26), IMV B-3019 (= 9 c), IMV B-3017 (= 17 c), IMV B-3226 (= 26 v), IMV B-3033 (= Y), IMV B-3100 (= 100) and IMV B-3494 (= 1E494). The results obtained were indicative of relatively high frequency of restriction enzymes occurrence in methane-oxidizing bacteria. There were Kpn I (Asp 7181) restriction endonuclease isoschizomers in crude extracts of IMV B-3112, B-3017, B-3019, B-3027 isolated from fresh-water silt as well as in IMV B-3226 strain isolated from waste-water silt. Although these isolates had bee previously considered as untypical strains of M. ucrainicus, more detailed study of their properties allowed placing them with Methylovarius luteus (= Methylococcus luteus). IMV B-3494 strain was identified as Methylococcus capsulatus. Strain IMV B-3033 had earlier been allocated to Methylovarius whittenburyi (= Methylococcus whittenburyi). Specificity of restriction endonucleases of this strain was not tested. Therefore, for the first time restriction endonucleases were detected in methane-oxidizing bacteria. 8 strains (3 species) among 51 strains (13 species) were found to produce restriction endonucleases displaying three different types of specificity in the least. Producers of restriction endonucleases having Kpn I (Asp 7181) specificity were isolated from different water and silt samples of the Dnieper flood-land more than 20 years ago.

  6. Schizosaccharomyces pombe encodes a mutated AP endonuclease 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laerdahl, Jon K; Korvald, Hanne; Nilsen, Line; Dahl-Michelsen, Kristin; Rognes, Torbjørn; Bjørås, Magnar; Alseth, Ingrun

    2011-03-07

    Mutagenic and cytotoxic apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites are among the most frequent lesions in DNA. Repair of AP sites is initiated by AP endonucleases and most organisms possess two or more of these enzymes. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has AP endonuclease 1 (Apn1) as the major enzymatic activity with AP endonuclease 2 (Apn2) being an important backup. Schizosaccharomyces pombe also encodes two potential AP endonucleases, and Apn2 has been found to be the main repair activity, while Apn1 has no, or only a limited role in AP site repair. Here we have identified a new 5' exon (exon 1) in the apn1 gene and show that the inactivity of S. pombe Apn1 is due to a nonsense mutation in the fifth codon of this new exon. Reversion of this mutation restored the AP endonuclease activity of S. pombe Apn1. Interestingly, the apn1 nonsense mutation was only found in laboratory strains derived from L972 h(-) and not in unrelated isolates of S. pombe. Since all S. pombe laboratory strains originate from L972 h(-), it appears that all experiments involving S. pombe have been conducted in an apn1(-) mutant strain with a corresponding DNA repair deficiency. These observations have implications both for future research in S. pombe and for the interpretation of previously conducted epistatis analysis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Restriction endonucleases: natural and directed evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Richa; Capalash, Neena; Sharma, Prince

    2012-05-01

    Type II restriction endonucleases (REs) are highly sequence-specific compared with other classes of nucleases. PD-(D/E)XK nucleases, initially represented by only type II REs, now comprise a large and extremely diverse superfamily of proteins and, although sharing a structurally conserved core, typically display little or no detectable sequence similarity except for the active site motifs. Sequence similarity can only be observed in methylases and few isoschizomers. As a consequence, REs are classified according to combinations of functional properties rather than on the basis of genetic relatedness. New alignment matrices and classification systems based on structural core connectivity and cleavage mechanisms have been developed to characterize new REs and related proteins. REs recognizing more than 300 distinct specificities have been identified in RE database (REBASE: http://rebase.neb.com/cgi-bin/statlist ) but still the need for newer specificities is increasing due to the advancement in molecular biology and applications. The enzymes have undergone constant evolution through structural changes in protein scaffolds which include random mutations, homologous recombinations, insertions, and deletions of coding DNA sequences but rational mutagenesis or directed evolution delivers protein variants with new functions in accordance with defined biochemical or environmental pressures. Redesigning through random mutation, addition or deletion of amino acids, methylation-based selection, synthetic molecules, combining recognition and cleavage domains from different enzymes, or combination with domains of additional functions change the cleavage specificity or substrate preference and stability. There is a growing number of patents awarded for the creation of engineered REs with new and enhanced properties.

  8. Investigation of mutations induced by radiation and restriction endonucleases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haworth, Kim E.

    The effects of gamma radiation and restriction endonuclease (RE) induced DNA double strand breaks (dsb) upon the mutation frequency and the surviving fraction of three Chinese hamster cell lines V79-4, CHO-K1 and an X-ray sensitive dsb repair deficient cell line xrs-5 were studied. The X-ray sensitive xrs-5 cell line was shown to be more sensitive to both the lethal and the mutagenic effects of gamma radiation having a substantially lower surviving fraction and a higher thymidine kinase (tk) mutation frequency per unit dose than the parental CHO-K1 cells. The frequency of induced hprt- mutations in the V79-4 cell line was comparable to the induced frequency of tk mutations in the CHO-K1 cells. The effect of blunt- and cohesive- ended dsb upon the surviving fraction and the induced mutation frequency was studied by porating different Chinese hamster cell lines (CHO-K1, V79-4 and xrs-5) with RE using Streptolysin O (SLO). The surviving fraction of the different cell lines was reduced with increasing concentrations of Pvu II. Increases in the concentration of Pvu II produced increases in the frequency of hypoxyanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) mutations in the V79-4 cells and tk mutations in the CHO-K1 and xrs-5 cells. However, the xrs-5 cells were shown to be hypomutable to Pvu II compared with the parental CHO-K1 cells. EcoR1 was ineffective at inducing tk mutations in the CHO-Kl cells but was as effective as Pvu II at inducing hprt mutations in the V79-4 cells. None of the spontaneously induced V79-4 hprt- mutant cells were shown to have observable molecular deletions when analysed by PCR deletion screening. One third of the radiation induced hprt - mutants were shown to be deletions. However, too few mutant cells were analysed for any non-random distribution of deletions to be observed. Half of the hprt- mutants induced by SLO poration alone were shown to be due to deletions of oi\\e or more exons. The distribution of the DNA deletions in SLO hprt

  9. In vitro Inactivation of Latent HSV by Targeted Mutagenesis Using an HSV-specific Homing Endonuclease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine Aubert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Following acute infection, herpes simplex virus (HSV establishes latency in sensory neurons, from which it can reactivate and cause recurrent disease. Available antiviral therapies do not affect latent viral genomes; therefore, they do not prevent reactivation following therapy cessation. One possible curative approach involves the introduction of DNA double strand breaks in latent HSV genomes by rare-cutting endonucleases, leading to mutagenesis of essential viral genes. We tested this approach in an in vitro HSV latency model using the engineered homing endonuclease (HE HSV1m5, which recognizes a sequence in the HSV-1 gene UL19, encoding the virion protein VP5. Coexpression of the 3′-exonuclease Trex2 with HEs increased HE-mediated mutagenesis frequencies up to sixfold. Following HSV1m5/Trex2 delivery with adeno-associated viral (AAV vectors, the target site was mutated in latent HSV genomes with no detectable cell toxicity. Importantly, HSV production by latently infected cells after reactivation was decreased after HSV1m5/Trex2 exposure. Exposure to histone deacetylase inhibitors prior to HSV1m5/Trex2 treatment increased mutagenesis frequencies of latent HSV genomes another two- to fivefold, suggesting that chromatin modification may be a useful adjunct to gene-targeting approaches. These results support the continuing development of HEs and other nucleases (ZFNs, TALENs, CRISPRs for cure of chronic viral infections.

  10. In vitro Inactivation of Latent HSV by Targeted Mutagenesis Using an HSV-specific Homing Endonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, Martine; Boyle, Nicole M; Stone, Daniel; Stensland, Laurence; Huang, Meei-Li; Magaret, Amalia S; Galetto, Roman; Rawlings, David J; Scharenberg, Andrew M; Jerome, Keith R

    2014-02-04

    Following acute infection, herpes simplex virus (HSV) establishes latency in sensory neurons, from which it can reactivate and cause recurrent disease. Available antiviral therapies do not affect latent viral genomes; therefore, they do not prevent reactivation following therapy cessation. One possible curative approach involves the introduction of DNA double strand breaks in latent HSV genomes by rare-cutting endonucleases, leading to mutagenesis of essential viral genes. We tested this approach in an in vitro HSV latency model using the engineered homing endonuclease (HE) HSV1m5, which recognizes a sequence in the HSV-1 gene UL19, encoding the virion protein VP5. Coexpression of the 3'-exonuclease Trex2 with HEs increased HE-mediated mutagenesis frequencies up to sixfold. Following HSV1m5/Trex2 delivery with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors, the target site was mutated in latent HSV genomes with no detectable cell toxicity. Importantly, HSV production by latently infected cells after reactivation was decreased after HSV1m5/Trex2 exposure. Exposure to histone deacetylase inhibitors prior to HSV1m5/Trex2 treatment increased mutagenesis frequencies of latent HSV genomes another two- to fivefold, suggesting that chromatin modification may be a useful adjunct to gene-targeting approaches. These results support the continuing development of HEs and other nucleases (ZFNs, TALENs, CRISPRs) for cure of chronic viral infections.Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids (2014) 3, e1; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013.75; published online 4 February 2014.

  11. DNA Modification Methylase Activity of Escherichia coli Restriction Endonucleases K and P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberman, Allan; Heywood, Janet; Meselson, Matthew

    1972-01-01

    The highly purified restriction endonucleases of E. coli K and coliphage P1 transfer methyl groups from S-adenosylmethionine to adenine residues of unmodified DNA. Incubation of unmodified DNA with endonucleases K or P and S-adenosylmethionine renders the DNA resistant to restriction. The enzymes, therefore, have both restriction endonuclease and modification methylase activities. PMID:4564204

  12. Creation of a novel telomere-cutting endonuclease based on the EN domain of telomere-specific non-long terminal repeat retrotransposon, TRAS1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitake Kazutoshi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ends of chromosomes, termed telomeres consist of repetitive DNA. The telomeric sequences shorten with cell division and, when telomeres are critically abbreviated, cells stop proliferating. However, in cancer cells, by the expression of telomerase which elongates telomeres, the cells can continue proliferating. Many approaches for telomere shortening have been pursued in the past, but to our knowledge, cutting telomeres in vivo has not so far been demonstrated. In addition, there is lack of information on the cellular effects of telomere shortening in human cells. Results Here, we created novel chimeric endonucleases to cut telomeres by fusing the endonuclease domain (TRAS1EN of the silkworm's telomere specific non-long terminal repeat retrotransposon TRAS1 to the human telomere-binding protein, TRF1. An in vitro assay demonstrated that the TRAS1EN-TRF1 chimeric endonucleases (T-EN and EN-T cut the human (TTAGGGn repeats specifically. The concentration of TRAS1EN-TRF1 chimeric endonucleases necessary for the cleavage of (TTAGGGn repeats was about 40-fold lower than that of TRAS1EN alone. When TRAS1EN-TRF1 endonucleases were introduced into human U2OS cancer cells using adenovirus vectors, the enzymes localized at telomeres of nuclei, cleaved and shortened the telomeric DNA by double-strand breaks. When human U2OS and HFL-1 fibroblast cells were infected with EN-T recombinant adenovirus, their cellular proliferation was suppressed for about 2 weeks after infection. In contrast, the TRAS1EN mutant (H258A chimeric endonuclease fused with TRF1 (ENmut-T did not show the suppression effect. The EN-T recombinant adenovirus induced telomere shortening in U2OS cells, activated the p53-dependent pathway and caused the senescence associated cellular responses, while the ENmut-T construct did not show such effects. Conclusions A novel TRAS1EN-TRF1 chimeric endonuclease (EN-T cuts the human telomeric repeats (TTAGGGn specifically in

  13. Crystallization of the xeroderma pigmentosum group F endonuclease from Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lally, John; Newman, Matthew; Murray-Rust, Judith; Fadden, Andrew; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka; McDonald, Neil

    2004-09-01

    The xeroderma pigmentosa group F protein (XPF) is a founding member of a family of 3'-flap endonucleases that play an essential role in nucleotide-excision repair, DNA replication and recombination. The XPF gene has been cloned from Aeropyrum pernix, encoding a 254-residue protein (apXPF). Recombinant protein was produced in Escherichia coli and purified by three chromatographic steps. Three different crystal forms of apXPF were grown in trigonal, monoclinic and triclinic systems. The trigonal crystals diffracted to 2.8 A and were grown in the presence of double-stranded DNA. Monoclinic crystals were grown without DNA and diffracted to 3.2 A. Triclinic crystals were grown from a truncated apXPF protein lacking the tandem helix-hairpin-helix motifs and diffracted to 2.1 A.

  14. The Restriction Endonuclease Cleavage Map of Rat Liver Mitochondrial DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, H.; Holtrop, M.; Terpstra, P.

    1977-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA from rat liver contains six sites for cleavage by the restriction endonucleases Hind III and EcoRI. A large stretch of DNA, comprising about 40% of the mitochondrial genome is not cleaved by either of the enzymes; eight cleavage sites are located on a DNA stretch of 35% of the

  15. Identification of Campylobacter pyloridis isolates by restriction endonuclease DNA analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langenberg, W.; Rauws, E. A.; Widjojokusumo, A.; Tytgat, G. N.; Zanen, H. C.

    1986-01-01

    Campylobacter pyloridis isolates recovered from gastric biopsy specimens of 16 patients were examined by restriction endonuclease DNA analysis with HindIII. For 8 of these 16 patients two different isolates were compared to study the persistence of the colonizing strains and the stability of their

  16. Type III restriction endonuclease EcoP15I is a heterotrimeric complex containing one Res subunit with several DNA-binding regions and ATPase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyszomirski, Karol H; Curth, Ute; Alves, Jürgen; Mackeldanz, Petra; Möncke-Buchner, Elisabeth; Schutkowski, Mike; Krüger, Detlev H; Reuter, Monika

    2012-04-01

    For efficient DNA cleavage, the Type III restriction endonuclease EcoP15I communicates with two inversely oriented recognition sites in an ATP-dependent process. EcoP15I consists of methylation (Mod) and restriction (Res) subunits forming a multifunctional enzyme complex able to methylate or to cleave DNA. In this study, we determined by different analytical methods that EcoP15I contains a single Res subunit in a Mod(2)Res stoichiometry. The Res subunit comprises a translocase (Tr) domain carrying functional motifs of superfamily 2 helicases and an endonuclease domain with a PD..D/EXK motif. We show that the isolated Tr domain retains ATP-hydrolyzing activity and binds single- and double-stranded DNA in a sequence-independent manner. To localize the regions of DNA binding, we screened peptide arrays representing the entire Res sequence for their ability to interact with DNA. We discovered four DNA-binding regions in the Tr domain and two DNA-binding regions in the endonuclease domain. Modelling of the Tr domain shows that these multiple DNA-binding regions are located on the surface, free to interact with DNA. Interestingly, the positions of the DNA-binding regions are conserved among other Type III restriction endonucleases.

  17. Interplay between structure-specific endonucleases for crossover control during Caenorhabditis elegans meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takamune T Saito

    Full Text Available The number and distribution of crossover events are tightly regulated at prophase of meiosis I. The resolution of Holliday junctions by structure-specific endonucleases, including MUS-81, SLX-1, XPF-1 and GEN-1, is one of the main mechanisms proposed for crossover formation. However, how these nucleases coordinately resolve Holliday junctions is still unclear. Here we identify both the functional overlap and differences between these four nucleases regarding their roles in crossover formation and control in the Caenorhabditis elegans germline. We show that MUS-81, XPF-1 and SLX-1, but not GEN-1, can bind to HIM-18/SLX4, a key scaffold for nucleases. Analysis of synthetic mitotic defects revealed that MUS-81 and SLX-1, but not XPF-1 and GEN-1, have overlapping roles with the Bloom syndrome helicase ortholog, HIM-6, supporting their in vivo roles in processing recombination intermediates. Taking advantage of the ease of genetic analysis and high-resolution imaging afforded by C. elegans, we examined crossover designation, frequency, distribution and chromosomal morphology in single, double, triple and quadruple mutants of the structure-specific endonucleases. This revealed that XPF-1 functions redundantly with MUS-81 and SLX-1 in executing crossover formation during meiotic double-strand break repair. Analysis of crossover distribution revealed that SLX-1 is required for crossover suppression at the center region of the autosomes. Finally, analysis of chromosome morphology in oocytes at late meiosis I stages uncovered that SLX-1 and XPF-1 promote meiotic chromosomal stability by preventing formation of chromosomal abnormalities. We propose a model in which coordinate action between structure-specific nucleases at different chromosome domains, namely MUS-81, SLX-1 and XPF-1 at the arms and SLX-1 at the center region, exerts positive and negative regulatory roles, respectively, for crossover control during C. elegans meiosis.

  18. A Complete Cleavage Map of Neurospora crassa mtDNA Obtained with Endonucleases Eco RI and Bam HI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terpstra, P.; Holtrop, M.

    1977-01-01

    A physical map of Neurospora crassa mitochondrial DNA has been constructed using specific fragments obtained with restriction endonucleases. The DNA has 5 cleavage sites for endonuclease Bam HI, 12 for endonuclease Eco RI and more than 30 for endonuclease Hind III. The sequence of the Eco RI and Bam

  19. Asymmetric Divisions in Oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilinski, Szczepan M; Kubiak, Jacek Z; Kloc, Malgorzata

    In the majority of animals, the oocyte/egg is structurally, molecularly, and functionally asymmetric. Such asymmetry is a prerequisite for a flawless fertilization and faithful segregation of maternal determinants during subsequent embryonic development. The oocyte asymmetry develops during oogenesis and must be maintained during consecutive and obligatorily asymmetric oogonial divisions, which depending on the species lead to the formation of either oocyte alone or oocyte and nurse cell complex. In the following chapter, we summarize current knowledge on the asymmetric oogonial divisions in invertebrate (insects) and vertebrate (Xenopus) species.

  20. Sensitive fluorescent detection of DNA methyltransferase using nicking endonuclease-mediated multiple primers-like rolling circle amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Juan; Li, Xiao-Yu; Du, Yi-Chen; Zhang, Li-Na; Liu, Ke-Ke; Zhu, Li-Na; Kong, De-Ming

    2017-05-15

    Sensitive and reliable detection of DNA methyltransferase (MTase) is of great significance for both early tumor diagnosis and therapy. In this study, a simple, label-free and sensitive DNA MTase-sensing method was developed on the basis of a nicking endonuclease-mediated multiple primers-like rolling circle amplification (RCA) strategy. In this method, a dumbbell RCA template was prepared by blunt-end ligation of two molecules of hairpin DNA. In addition to the primer-binding sequence, the dumbbell template contained another three important parts: 5'-CCGG-3' sequences in double-stranded stems, nicking endonuclease recognition sites and C-rich sequences in single-stranded loops. The introduction of 5'-CCGG-3' sequences allows the dumbbell template to be destroyed by the restriction endonuclease, HpaII, but is not destroyed in the presence of the target MTase-M.SssI MTase. The introduction of nicking endonuclease recognition sites makes the M.SssI MTase-protected dumbbell template-mediated RCA proceed in a multiple primers-like exponential mode, thus providing the RCA with high amplification efficiency. The introduction of C-rich sequences may promote the folding of amplification products into a G-quadruplex structure, which is specifically recognized by the commercially available fluorescent probe thioflavin T. Improved RCA amplification efficiency and specific fluorescent recognition of RCA products provide the M.SssI MTase-sensing platform with high sensitivity. When a dumbbell template containing four nicking endonuclease sites is used, highly specific M.SssI MTase activity detection can be achieved in the range of 0.008-50U/mL with a detection limit as low as 0.0011U/mL. Simple experimental operation and mix-and-detection fluorescent sensing mode ensures that M.SssI MTase quantitation works well in a real-time RCA mode, thus further simplifying the sensing performance and making high throughput detection possible. The proposed MTase-sensing strategy was also

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of restriction endonuclease EcoRII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpova, E. A.; Meehan, E.; Pusey, M. L.; Chen, L.

    1999-01-01

    Crystals of the restriction endonuclease EcoRII have been obtained by the vapor-diffusion technique in the presence of ammonium sulfate or polyethylene glycol. The best crystals were grown with ammonium sulfate as a precipitant. Crystals with dimensions of up to 0.6 x 0. 6 x 0.6 mm have been observed. The crystals diffract to about 4.0 A resolution at a cryo-temperature of 100 K using a rotating-anode X-ray source and a Rigaku R-AXIS IV imaging-plate detector. The space group has been determined to be either I23 or I2(1)3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 160.3 A, alpha = beta = gamma = 90 degrees. The crystal asymmetric unit contains two protein molecules, and self-rotation function analysis shows a pseudo-twofold symmetry relating the two monomers. Attempts to improve the resolution of crystal diffraction and to search for heavy-atom derivatives are under way.

  2. Genotyping with CRISPR-Cas-derived RNA-guided endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Min; Kim, Daesik; Kim, Seokjoong; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis is one of the oldest, most convenient and least expensive methods of genotyping, but is limited by the availability of restriction endonuclease sites. Here we present a novel method of employing CRISPR/Cas-derived RNA-guided engineered nucleases (RGENs) in RFLP analysis. We prepare RGENs by complexing recombinant Cas9 protein derived from Streptococcus pyogenes with in vitro transcribed guide RNAs that are complementary to the DNA sequences of interest. Then, we genotype recurrent mutations found in cancer and small insertions or deletions (indels) induced in cultured cells and animals by RGENs and other engineered nucleases such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). Unlike T7 endonuclease I or Surveyor assays that are widely used for genotyping engineered nuclease-induced mutations, RGEN-mediated RFLP analysis can detect homozygous mutant clones that contain identical biallelic indel sequences and is not limited by sequence polymorphisms near the nuclease target sites.

  3. Identification of leptospiral isolates by bacterial restriction endonuclease analysis (Brenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesha M

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA samples from 19 reference serovars belonging to 19 different serogroups of Leptospira interrogans and two serovars belonging to Leptospira biflexa were examined by bacterial restriction endonuclease analysis using EcoR I and Hae III enzymes. All the serovars gave unique restriction patterns that differed from each other. DNA from 10 local isolates digested with these enzymes produced patterns which on comparison with the standard patterns produced by reference strains could be identified to serovar level.

  4. Three structure-selective endonucleases are essential in the absence of BLM helicase in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina L Andersen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available DNA repair mechanisms in mitotically proliferating cells avoid generating crossovers, which can contribute to genome instability. Most models for the production of crossovers involve an intermediate with one or more four-stranded Holliday junctions (HJs, which are resolved into duplex molecules through cleavage by specialized endonucleases. In vitro studies have implicated three nuclear enzymes in HJ resolution: MUS81-EME1/Mms4, GEN1/Yen1, and SLX4-SLX1. The Bloom syndrome helicase, BLM, plays key roles in preventing mitotic crossover, either by blocking the formation of HJ intermediates or by removing HJs without cleavage. Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants that lack Sgs1 (the BLM ortholog and either Mus81-Mms4 or Slx4-Slx1 are inviable, but mutants that lack Sgs1 and Yen1 are viable. The current view is that Yen1 serves primarily as a backup to Mus81-Mms4. Previous studies with Drosophila melanogaster showed that, as in yeast, loss of both DmBLM and MUS81 or MUS312 (the ortholog of SLX4 is lethal. We have now recovered and analyzed mutations in Drosophila Gen. As in yeast, there is some redundancy between Gen and mus81; however, in contrast to the case in yeast, GEN plays a more predominant role in responding to DNA damage than MUS81-MMS4. Furthermore, loss of DmBLM and GEN leads to lethality early in development. We present a comparison of phenotypes occurring in double mutants that lack DmBLM and either MUS81, GEN, or MUS312, including chromosome instability and deficiencies in cell proliferation. Our studies of synthetic lethality provide insights into the multiple functions of DmBLM and how various endonucleases may function when DmBLM is absent.

  5. Saccharomyces cerevisiae MutLα IS A MISMATCH REPAIR ENDONUCLEASE*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadyrov, Farid A.; Holmes, Shannon F.; Arana, Mercedes E.; Lukianova, Olga A.; O’Donnell, Mike; Kunkel, Thomas A.; Modrich, Paul

    2008-01-01

    MutL homologs are crucial for mismatch repair and genetic stability, but their function is not well understood. Human MutLα (MLH1-PMS2 heterodimer) harbors a latent endonuclease that is dependent on integrity of a PMS2 DQHA(X)2E(X)4E motif (Kadyrov et al. (2006) Cell 126, 297-308). This sequence element is conserved in many MutL homologs, including the PMS1 subunit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae MutLα, but is absent in MutL proteins from bacteria like Escherichia coli that rely on d(GATC) methylation for strand directionality. We show that yeast MutLα is a strand-directed endonuclease that incises DNA in a reaction that depends on a mismatch, yMutSα, yRFC, yPCNA, ATP, and a pre-existing strand break, whereas E. coli MutL is not. Amino acid substitution within the PMS1 DQHA(X)2E(X)4E motif abolishes yMutLα endonuclease activity in vitro and confers strong genetic instability in vivo, but does not affect yMutLα ATPase activity or the ability of the protein to support assembly of the yMutLα•yMutSα•heteroduplex ternary complex. The loaded form of yPCNA may play an important effector role in directing yMutLα incision to the discontinuous strand of a nicked heteroduplex. PMID:17951253

  6. The Fidelity Index provides a systematic quantitation of star activity of DNA restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hua; Therrien, Caitlin; Blanchard, Aine; Guan, Shengxi; Zhu, Zhenyu

    2008-05-01

    Restriction endonucleases are the basic tools of molecular biology. Many restriction endonucleases show relaxed sequence recognition, called star activity, as an inherent property under various digestion conditions including the optimal ones. To quantify this property we propose the concept of the Fidelity Index (FI), which is defined as the ratio of the maximum enzyme amount showing no star activity to the minimum amount needed for complete digestion at the cognate recognition site for any particular restriction endonuclease. Fidelity indices for a large number of restriction endonucleases are reported here. The effects of reaction vessel, reaction volume, incubation mode, substrate differences, reaction time, reaction temperature and additional glycerol, DMSO, ethanol and Mn(2+) on the FI are also investigated. The FI provides a practical guideline for the use of restriction endonucleases and defines a fundamental property by which restriction endonucleases can be characterized.

  7. The Dissolution of Double Holliday Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bizard, Anna H; Hickson, Ian D

    2014-01-01

    as "double Holliday junction dissolution." This reaction requires the cooperative action of a so-called "dissolvasome" comprising a Holliday junction branch migration enzyme (Sgs1/BLM RecQ helicase) and a type IA topoisomerase (Top3/TopoIIIα) in complex with its OB (oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding......Double Holliday junctions (dHJS) are important intermediates of homologous recombination. The separate junctions can each be cleaved by DNA structure-selective endonucleases known as Holliday junction resolvases. Alternatively, double Holliday junctions can be processed by a reaction known...

  8. Asymmetrical field emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, J.G.; Smith, B.K.

    1995-10-10

    A method is disclosed for providing a field emitter with an asymmetrical emitter structure having a very sharp tip in close proximity to its gate. One preferred embodiment of the present invention includes an asymmetrical emitter and a gate. The emitter having a tip and a side is coupled to a substrate. The gate is connected to a step in the substrate. The step has a top surface and a side wall that is substantially parallel to the side of the emitter. The tip of the emitter is in close proximity to the gate. The emitter is at an emitter potential, and the gate is at a gate potential such that with the two potentials at appropriate values, electrons are emitted from the emitter. In one embodiment, the gate is separated from the emitter by an oxide layer, and the emitter is etched anisotropically to form its tip and its asymmetrical structure. 17 figs.

  9. Exploring both sequence detection and restriction endonuclease cleavage kinetics by recognition site via single-molecule microfluidic trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weilin; Muller, Susan J

    2011-02-07

    We demonstrate the feasibility of a single-molecule microfluidic approach to both sequence detection and obtaining kinetic information for restriction endonucleases on dsDNA. In this method, a microfluidic stagnation point flow is designed to trap, hold, and linearize double-stranded (ds) genomic DNA to which a restriction endonuclease has been pre-bound sequence-specifically. By introducing the cofactor magnesium, we determine the binding location of the enzyme by the cleavage process of dsDNA as in optical restriction mapping, however here the DNA need not be immobilized on a surface. We note that no special labeling of the enzyme is required, which makes it simpler than our previous scheme using stagnation point flows for sequence detection. Our accuracy in determining the location of the recognition site is comparable to or better than other single molecule techniques due to the fidelity with which we can control the linearization of the DNA molecules. In addition, since the cleavage process can be followed in real time, information about the cleavage kinetics, and subtle differences in binding and cleavage frequencies among the recognition sites, may also be obtained. Data for the five recognition sites for the type II restriction endonuclease EcoRI on λ-DNA are presented as a model system. While the roles of the varying fluid velocity and tension along the chain backbone on the measured kinetics remain to be determined, we believe this new method holds promise for a broad range of studies of DNA-protein interactions, including the kinetics of other DNA cleavage processes, the dissociation of a restriction enzyme from the cleaved substrate, and other macromolecular cleavage processes.

  10. Asymmetrical international attitudes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Oudenhoven, JP; Askevis-Leherpeux, F; Hannover, B; Jaarsma, R; Dardenne, B

    2002-01-01

    In general, attitudes towards nations have a fair amount of reciprocity: nations either like each other are relatively indifferent to each other or dislike each other Sometimes, however international attitudes are asymmetrical. In this study, we use social identity theory in order to explain

  11. How Is Nature Asymmetric?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 6. How Is Nature Asymmetric? - Discrete Symmetries in Particle Physics and their Violation ... Indian Institute of Technology, Chennai. Aligarh Muslim University. University of Rajasthan, Jaipur. Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012, India.

  12. Bifunctional TaqII restriction endonuclease: redefining the prototype DNA recognition site and establishing the Fidelity Index for partial cleaving

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zylicz-Stachula, Agnieszka; Zołnierkiewicz, Olga; Sliwińska, Katarzyna; Jeżewska-Frąckowiak, Joanna; Skowron, Piotr M

    2011-01-01

    The TaqII enzyme is a member of the Thermus sp. enzyme family that we propounded previously within Type IIS restriction endonucleases, containing related thermophilic bifunctional endonucleases-methyltransferases from various Thermus sp...

  13. Substrate generation for endonucleases of CRISPR/cas systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoephel, Judith; Dwarakanath, Srivatsa; Richter, Hagen; Plagens, André; Randau, Lennart

    2012-09-08

    The interaction of viruses and their prokaryotic hosts shaped the evolution of bacterial and archaeal life. Prokaryotes developed several strategies to evade viral attacks that include restriction modification, abortive infection and CRISPR/Cas systems. These adaptive immune systems found in many Bacteria and most Archaea consist of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) sequences and a number of CRISPR associated (Cas) genes (Fig. 1) (1-3). Different sets of Cas proteins and repeats define at least three major divergent types of CRISPR/Cas systems (4). The universal proteins Cas1 and Cas2 are proposed to be involved in the uptake of viral DNA that will generate a new spacer element between two repeats at the 5' terminus of an extending CRISPR cluster (5). The entire cluster is transcribed into a precursor-crRNA containing all spacer and repeat sequences and is subsequently processed by an enzyme of the diverse Cas6 family into smaller crRNAs (6-8). These crRNAs consist of the spacer sequence flanked by a 5' terminal (8 nucleotides) and a 3' terminal tag derived from the repeat sequence (9). A repeated infection of the virus can now be blocked as the new crRNA will be directed by a Cas protein complex (Cascade) to the viral DNA and identify it as such via base complementarity(10). Finally, for CRISPR/Cas type 1 systems, the nuclease Cas3 will destroy the detected invader DNA (11,12) . These processes define CRISPR/Cas as an adaptive immune system of prokaryotes and opened a fascinating research field for the study of the involved Cas proteins. The function of many Cas proteins is still elusive and the causes for the apparent diversity of the CRISPR/Cas systems remain to be illuminated. Potential activities of most Cas proteins were predicted via detailed computational analyses. A major fraction of Cas proteins are either shown or proposed to function as endonucleases (4). Here, we present methods to generate crRNAs and precursor-cRNAs for

  14. Nucleosomes Inhibit Cas9 Endonuclease Activity in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, John M; Laughery, Marian F; Wyrick, John J

    2015-12-08

    During Cas9 genome editing in eukaryotic cells, the bacterial Cas9 enzyme cleaves DNA targets within chromatin. To understand how chromatin affects Cas9 targeting, we characterized Cas9 activity on nucleosome substrates in vitro. We find that Cas9 endonuclease activity is strongly inhibited when its target site is located within the nucleosome core. In contrast, the nucleosome structure does not affect Cas9 activity at a target site within the adjacent linker DNA. Analysis of target sites that partially overlap with the nucleosome edge indicates that the accessibility of the protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) is the critical determinant of Cas9 activity on a nucleosome.

  15. Highly asymmetric rice genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Jian-Qun

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individuals in the same species are assumed to share the same genomic set. However, it is not unusual to find an orthologous gene only in small subset of the species, and recent genomic studies suggest that structural rearrangements are very frequent between genomes in the same species. Two recently sequenced rice genomes Oryza sativa L. var. Nipponbare and O. sativa L. var. 93-11 provide an opportunity to systematically investigate the extent of the gene repertoire polymorphism, even though the genomic data of 93-11 derived from whole-short-gun sequencing is not yet as complete as that of Nipponbare. Results We compared gene contents and the genomic locations between two rice genomes. Our conservative estimates suggest that at least 10% of the genes in the genomes were either under presence/absence polymorphism (5.2% or asymmetrically located between genomes (4.7%. The proportion of these "asymmetric genes" varied largely among gene groups, in which disease resistance (R genes and the RLK kinase gene group had 11.6 and 7.8 times higher proportion of asymmetric genes than housekeeping genes (Myb and MADS. The significant difference in the proportion of asymmetric genes among gene groups suggests that natural selection is responsible for maintaining genomic asymmetry. On the other hand, the nucleotide diversity in 17 R genes under presence/absence polymorphism was generally low (average nucleotide diversity = 0.0051. Conclusion The genomic symmetry was disrupted by 10% of asymmetric genes, which could cause genetic variation through more unequal crossing over, because these genes had no allelic counterparts to pair and then they were free to pair with homologues at non-allelic loci, during meiosis in heterozygotes. It might be a consequence of diversifying selection that increased the structural divergence among genomes, and of purifying selection that decreased nucleotide divergence in each R gene locus.

  16. Cleavage of phosphorothioated DNA and methylated DNA by the type IV restriction endonuclease ScoMcrA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Liu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Many taxonomically diverse prokaryotes enzymatically modify their DNA by replacing a non-bridging oxygen with a sulfur atom at specific sequences. The biological implications of this DNA S-modification (phosphorothioation were unknown. We observed that simultaneous expression of the dndA-E gene cluster from Streptomyces lividans 66, which is responsible for the DNA S-modification, and the putative Streptomyces coelicolor A(32 Type IV methyl-dependent restriction endonuclease ScoA3McrA (Sco4631 leads to cell death in the same host. A His-tagged derivative of ScoA3McrA cleaved S-modified DNA and also Dcm-methylated DNA in vitro near the respective modification sites. Double-strand cleavage occurred 16-28 nucleotides away from the phosphorothioate links. DNase I footprinting demonstrated binding of ScoA3McrA to the Dcm methylation site, but no clear binding could be detected at the S-modified site under cleavage conditions. This is the first report of in vitro endonuclease activity of a McrA homologue and also the first demonstration of an enzyme that specifically cleaves S-modified DNA.

  17. Peculiarities of the interaction of the restriction endonuclease BspD6I with DNA containing its recognition site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrosimova, Liudmila A; Kubareva, Elena A; Migur, Anzhela Yu; Gavshina, Aleksandra V; Ryazanova, Aleksandra Yu; Norkin, Maxim V; Perevyazova, Tatiana A; Wende, Wolfgang; Hianik, Tibor; Zheleznaya, Liudmila A; Oretskaya, Tatiana S

    2016-09-01

    Nicking endonucleases are enzymes that recognize specific sites in double-stranded DNA and cleave only one strand at a predetermined position. These enzymes are involved in DNA replication and repair; they can also function as subunits of bacterial heterodimeric restriction endonucleases. One example of such a proteins is the restriction endonuclease BspD6I (R.BspD6I) from Bacillus species strain D6, which consists of the large subunit - nicking endonuclease BspD6I (Nt.BspD6I), and the small subunit (ss.BspD6I). Nt.BspD6I can function independently. Similar enzymes are now widely used in numerous biotechnological applications. The aim of this study was to investigate the fundamental properties of two subunits of R.BspD6I and their interdependence in the course of R.BspD6I activity. The binding and hydrolysis of DNA duplexes by R.BspD6I are primary analyzed by gel electrophoresis. To elucidate the difference between Nt.BspD6I interaction with the substrate and product of hydrolysis, the thickness shear mode acoustic method is used. The thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of the Nt.BspD6I interaction with DNA are determined. For the first time we demonstrated that Nt.BspD6I bends the DNA during complex formation. Nt.BspD6I is able to form complexes with the product nicked in the top strand and ss.BspD6I cleaves the bottom strand of the DNA consecutively. Furthermore, the influence of dA methylation in the R.BspD6I recognition site on ss.BspD6I activity is analyzed. The obtained results provide evidence that Nt.BspD6I coordinates the activity of R.BspD6I by strictly coupling of the bottom strand cleavage by ss.BspD6I to the top strand cleavage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Catalytic Asymmetric Addition Reaction of Dialkylzinc to Nitrone Utilizing Tartaric Acid Ester as a Chiral Auxiliary

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ukaji, Yutaka; Shimizu, Yuuko; Kenmoku, Yuuichi; Ahmed, Alauddin; Inomata, Katsuhiko

    1997-01-01

    The catalytic asymmetric addition reaction of dialkylzinc to carbon-nitrogen double bond in 3,4-dihydroisoquinoline N-oxide derivatives was achieved by utilizing a catalytic amount of dicyclopentyl (R,R...

  19. Multiple Endonuclease Restriction Real-Time Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification: A Novel Analytically Rapid, Sensitive, Multiplex Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Detection Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Yan; Lan, Ruiting; Xu, Huaqing; Ma, Aijing; Li, Dongxun; Dai, Hang; Yuan, Xuejiao; Xu, Jianguo; Ye, Changyun

    2015-07-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is restricted to detecting a single target, limiting the usefulness of this method. To achieve multiplex LAMP-based detection, we developed a novel approach we called the multiple endonuclease restriction real-time-LAMP assay. In this system, the LAMP forward or backward inner primers contain 5' end short sequences that are recognized by the restriction endonuclease Nb.BsrDI, and the new forward or backward inner primers were modified at the 5' end with a fluorophore and in the middle with a dark quencher. Nb.BsrDI digests the newly synthesized double-stranded terminal sequences (5' end short sequences and their complementary sequences), which releases the quenching, resulting in a gain of signal. The assay permitted real-time detection of single or multiple target sequences in a single tube, and the positive results can be obtained in as short as 12 minutes. The novel methodology is highly efficient and specific, detecting down to 250 fg of DNA per reaction of Listeria DNA tested, and was successful in evaluating raw meat samples. The multiple endonuclease restriction real-time-LAMP technology, which is an extension of LAMP to accommodate robust, target-specific, and multiplex detection, provides a molecular diagnostic tool with less detection time and high sensitivity and specificity compared with those of LAMP and quantitative real-time PCR. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A general fluorescent sensor design strategy for "turn-on" activity detection of exonucleases and restriction endonucleases based on graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Kong, De-Ming

    2013-11-07

    Using graphene oxide (GO) as a nanoquencher, a universal sensor design strategy was developed on the basis of significantly different binding affinities of GO to single-stranded DNAs (ss-DNAs) with different lengths. The proposed sensors could be used for the activity detection of both exonucleases and restriction endonucleases. To achieve this, a single-labeled fluorescent oligonucleotide probe, which had a single-stranded structure or a hairpin structure with a long single-stranded loop, was used. Such a probe could be efficiently absorbed on the surface of GO, resulting in the quenching of the fluorescent signal. Excision of the single-stranded probe by exonucleases or site-specific cleavage at the double-stranded stem of the hairpin probe by restriction endonuclease released fluorophore-labeled nucleotide, which could not be efficiently absorbed by GO, thus leading to increase in fluorescence of the corresponding sensing system. As examples, three sensors, which were used for activity detection of the exonuclease Exo 1 and the restriction endonucleases EcoR I and Hind III, were developed. These three sensors could specifically and sensitively detect the activities of Exo 1, EcoR I and Hind III with detection limits of 0.03 U mL(-1), 0.06 U mL(-1) and 0.04 U mL(-1), respectively. Visual detection was also possible.

  1. Ion pumping in nanochannels using an asymmetric electrode array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sparreboom, Wouter; Cucu, C.F.; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; van den Berg, Albert; Locascio, L.E.; Gaitan, M.; Paegel, B.M.; Ross, D.J.; Vreeland, W.N.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate an ion pump, consisting of a nanochannel with an AC driven asymmetric electrode array. Our system enables us to actively pump ions using a low driving voltage. In all experiments the electrical double layers are overlapping. Via viscous coupling ion pumping is accompanied by liquid

  2. Restriction glycosylases: involvement of endonuclease activities in the restriction process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingbiao; Matsuzaka, Tomoyuki; Yano, Hirokazu; Furuta, Yoshikazu; Nakano, Toshiaki; Ishikawa, Ken; Fukuyo, Masaki; Takahashi, Noriko; Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio; Ide, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2017-02-17

    All restriction enzymes examined are phosphodiesterases generating 3΄-OH and 5΄-P ends, but one restriction enzyme (restriction glycosylase) excises unmethylated bases from its recognition sequence. Whether its restriction activity involves endonucleolytic cleavage remains unclear. One report on this enzyme, R.PabI from a hyperthermophile, ascribed the breakage to high temperature while another showed its weak AP lyase activity generates atypical ends. Here, we addressed this issue in mesophiles. We purified R.PabI homologs from Campylobacter coli (R.CcoLI) and Helicobacter pylori (R.HpyAXII) and demonstrated their DNA cleavage, DNA glycosylase and AP lyase activities in vitro at 37°C. The AP lyase activity is more coupled with glycosylase activity in R.CcoLI than in R.PabI. R.CcoLI/R.PabI expression caused restriction of incoming bacteriophage/plasmid DNA and endogenous chromosomal DNA within Escherichia coli at 37°C. The R.PabI-mediated restriction was promoted by AP endonuclease action in vivo or in vitro. These results reveal the role of endonucleolytic DNA cleavage in restriction and yet point to diversity among the endonucleases. The cleaved ends are difficult to repair in vivo, which may indicate their biological significance. These results support generalization of the concept of restriction–modification system to the concept of self-recognizing epigenetic system, which combines any epigenetic labeling and any DNA damaging.

  3. Apurinic endonuclease activity of yeast Apn2 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unk, I; Haracska, L; Johnson, R E; Prakash, S; Prakash, L

    2000-07-21

    Abasic (apurinic/apyrimidinic; AP) sites are generated in vivo through spontaneous base loss and by enzymatic removal of bases damaged by alkylating agents and reactive oxygen species. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the APN1 and APN2 genes function in alternate pathways of AP site removal. Apn2-like proteins have been identified in other eukaryotes including humans, and these proteins form a distinct subfamily within the exonuclease III (ExoIII)/Ape1/Apn2 family of proteins. Apn2 and other members of this subfamily contain a carboxyl-terminal extension not present in the ExoIII/Ape1-like proteins. Here, we purify the Apn2 protein from yeast and show that it is a class II AP endonuclease. Deletion of the carboxyl terminus does not affect the AP endonuclease activity of the protein, but this protein is defective in the removal of AP sites in vivo. The carboxyl terminus may enable Apn2 to complex with other proteins, and such a multiprotein assembly may be necessary for the efficient recognition and cleavage of AP sites in vivo.

  4. Inteins, introns, and homing endonucleases: recent revelations about the life cycle of parasitic genetic elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilario Elena

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Self splicing introns and inteins that rely on a homing endonuclease for propagation are parasitic genetic elements. Their life-cycle and evolutionary fate has been described through the homing cycle. According to this model the homing endonuclease is selected for function only during the spreading phase of the parasite. This phase ends when the parasitic element is fixed in the population. Upon fixation the homing endonuclease is no longer under selection, and its activity is lost through random processes. Recent analyses of these parasitic elements with functional homing endonucleases suggest that this model in its most simple form is not always applicable. Apparently, functioning homing endonuclease can persist over long evolutionary times in populations and species that are thought to be asexual or nearly asexual. Here we review these recent findings and discuss their implications. Reasons for the long-term persistence of a functional homing endonuclease include: More recombination (sexual and as a result of gene transfer than previously assumed for these organisms; complex population structures that prevent the element from being fixed; a balance between active spreading of the homing endonuclease and a decrease in fitness caused by the parasite in the host organism; or a function of the homing endonuclease that increases the fitness of the host organism and results in purifying selection for the homing endonuclease activity, even after fixation in a local population. In the future, more detailed studies of the population dynamics of the activity and regulation of homing endonucleases are needed to decide between these possibilities, and to determine their relative contributions to the long term survival of parasitic genes within a population. Two outstanding publications on the amoeba Naegleria group I intron (Wikmark et al. BMC Evol Biol 2006, 6:39 and the PRP8 inteins in ascomycetes (Butler et al.BMC Evol Biol 2006, 6:42 provide

  5. Deletion of the MAG1 DNA glycosylase gene suppresses alkylation-induced killing and mutagenesis in yeast cells lacking AP endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, W; Chow, B L; Hanna, M; Doetsch, P W

    2001-12-19

    DNA base excision repair (BER) is initiated by DNA glycosylases that recognize and remove damaged bases. The phosphate backbone adjacent to the resulting apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site is then cleaved by an AP endonuclease or glycosylase-associated AP lyase to invoke subsequent BER steps. We have used a genetic approach in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to address whether AP sites are blocks to DNA replication and the biological consequences if AP sites persist in the genome. We found that yeast cells deficient in the two AP endonucleases (apn1 apn2 double mutant) are extremely sensitive to killing by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), a model DNA alkylating agent. Interestingly, this sensitivity can be reduced up to 2500-fold by deleting the MAG1 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase gene, suggesting that Mag1 not only removes lethal base lesions, but also benign lesions and possibly normal bases, and that the resulting AP sites are highly toxic to the cells. This rescuing effect appears to be specific for DNA alkylation damage, since the mag1 mutation reduces killing effects of two other DNA alkylating agents, but does not alter the sensitivity of apn cells to killing by UV, gamma-ray or H(2)O(2). Our mutagenesis assays indicate that nearly half of spontaneous and almost all MMS-induced mutations in the AP endonuclease-deficient cells are due to Mag1 DNA glycosylase activity. Although the DNA replication apparatus appears to be incapable of replicating past AP sites, Polzeta-mediated translesion synthesis is able to bypass AP sites, and accounts for all spontaneous and MMS-induced mutagenesis in the AP endonuclease-deficient cells. These results allow us to delineate base lesion flow within the BER pathway and link AP sites to other DNA damage repair and tolerance pathways.

  6. Asymmetric extractions in orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Aquino Melgaço

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Extraction decisions are extremely important in during treatment planning. In addition to the extraction decision orthodontists have to choose what tooth should be extracted for the best solution of the problem and the esthetic/functional benefit of the patient. OBJECTIVE: This article aims at reviewing the literature relating the advantages, disadvantages and clinical implications of asymmetric extractions to orthodontics. METHODS: Keywords were selected in English and Portuguese and the EndNote 9 program was used for data base search in PubMed, Web of Science (WSc and LILACS. The selected articles were case reports, original articles and prospective or retrospective case-control studies concerning asymmetrical extractions of permanent teeth for the treatment of malocclusions. CONCLUSION: According to the literature reviewed asymmetric extractions can make some specific treatment mechanics easier. Cases finished with first permanent molars in Class II or III relationship in one or both sides seem not to cause esthetic or functional problems. However, diagnosis knowledge and mechanics control are essential for treatment success.

  7. Asymmetric Evolutionary Games.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex McAvoy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary game theory is a powerful framework for studying evolution in populations of interacting individuals. A common assumption in evolutionary game theory is that interactions are symmetric, which means that the players are distinguished by only their strategies. In nature, however, the microscopic interactions between players are nearly always asymmetric due to environmental effects, differing baseline characteristics, and other possible sources of heterogeneity. To model these phenomena, we introduce into evolutionary game theory two broad classes of asymmetric interactions: ecological and genotypic. Ecological asymmetry results from variation in the environments of the players, while genotypic asymmetry is a consequence of the players having differing baseline genotypes. We develop a theory of these forms of asymmetry for games in structured populations and use the classical social dilemmas, the Prisoner's Dilemma and the Snowdrift Game, for illustrations. Interestingly, asymmetric games reveal essential differences between models of genetic evolution based on reproduction and models of cultural evolution based on imitation that are not apparent in symmetric games.

  8. Asymmetric Evolutionary Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAvoy, Alex; Hauert, Christoph

    2015-08-01

    Evolutionary game theory is a powerful framework for studying evolution in populations of interacting individuals. A common assumption in evolutionary game theory is that interactions are symmetric, which means that the players are distinguished by only their strategies. In nature, however, the microscopic interactions between players are nearly always asymmetric due to environmental effects, differing baseline characteristics, and other possible sources of heterogeneity. To model these phenomena, we introduce into evolutionary game theory two broad classes of asymmetric interactions: ecological and genotypic. Ecological asymmetry results from variation in the environments of the players, while genotypic asymmetry is a consequence of the players having differing baseline genotypes. We develop a theory of these forms of asymmetry for games in structured populations and use the classical social dilemmas, the Prisoner's Dilemma and the Snowdrift Game, for illustrations. Interestingly, asymmetric games reveal essential differences between models of genetic evolution based on reproduction and models of cultural evolution based on imitation that are not apparent in symmetric games.

  9. An AP endonuclease functions in active DNA demethylation and gene imprinting in Arabidopsis [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Active DNA demethylation in plants occurs through base excision repair, beginning with removal of methylated cytosine by the ROS1/DME subfamily of 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylases. Active DNA demethylation in animals requires the DNA glycosylase TDG or MBD4, which functions after oxidation or deamination of 5-methylcytosine, respectively. However, little is known about the steps following DNA glycosylase action in the active DNA demethylation pathways in plants and animals. We show here that the Arabidopsis APE1L protein has apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease activities and functions downstream of ROS1 and DME. APE1L and ROS1 interact in vitro and co-localize in vivo. Whole genome bisulfite sequencing of ape1l mutant plants revealed widespread alterations in DNA methylation. We show that the ape1l/zdp double mutant displays embryonic lethality. Notably, the ape1l+/-zdp-/- mutant shows a maternal-effect lethality phenotype. APE1L and the DNA phosphatase ZDP are required for FWA and MEA gene imprinting in the endosperm and are important for seed development. Thus, APE1L is a new component of the active DNA demethylation pathway and, together with ZDP, regulates gene imprinting in Arabidopsis.

  10. DNA interrogation by the CRISPR RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Samuel H.; Redding, Sy; Jinek, Martin; Greene, Eric C.; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2014-03-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated enzyme Cas9 is an RNA-guided endonuclease that uses RNA-DNA base-pairing to target foreign DNA in bacteria. Cas9-guide RNA complexes are also effective genome engineering agents in animals and plants. Here we use single-molecule and bulk biochemical experiments to determine how Cas9-RNA interrogates DNA to find specific cleavage sites. We show that both binding and cleavage of DNA by Cas9-RNA require recognition of a short trinucleotide protospacer adjacent motif (PAM). Non-target DNA binding affinity scales with PAM density, and sequences fully complementary to the guide RNA but lacking a nearby PAM are ignored by Cas9-RNA. Competition assays provide evidence that DNA strand separation and RNA-DNA heteroduplex formation initiate at the PAM and proceed directionally towards the distal end of the target sequence. Furthermore, PAM interactions trigger Cas9 catalytic activity. These results reveal how Cas9 uses PAM recognition to quickly identify potential target sites while scanning large DNA molecules, and to regulate scission of double-stranded DNA.

  11. Early endonuclease-mediated evasion of RNA sensing ensures efficient coronavirus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eveline Kindler

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Coronaviruses are of veterinary and medical importance and include highly pathogenic zoonotic viruses, such as SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. They are known to efficiently evade early innate immune responses, manifesting in almost negligible expression of type-I interferons (IFN-I. This evasion strategy suggests an evolutionary conserved viral function that has evolved to prevent RNA-based sensing of infection in vertebrate hosts. Here we show that the coronavirus endonuclease (EndoU activity is key to prevent early induction of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA host cell responses. Replication of EndoU-deficient coronaviruses is greatly attenuated in vivo and severely restricted in primary cells even during the early phase of the infection. In macrophages we found immediate induction of IFN-I expression and RNase L-mediated breakdown of ribosomal RNA. Accordingly, EndoU-deficient viruses can retain replication only in cells that are deficient in IFN-I expression or sensing, and in cells lacking both RNase L and PKR. Collectively our results demonstrate that the coronavirus EndoU efficiently prevents simultaneous activation of host cell dsRNA sensors, such as Mda5, OAS and PKR. The localization of the EndoU activity at the site of viral RNA synthesis-within the replicase complex-suggests that coronaviruses have evolved a viral RNA decay pathway to evade early innate and intrinsic antiviral host cell responses.

  12. Comparative Structural and Functional Analysis of Bunyavirus and Arenavirus Cap-Snatching Endonucleases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Reguera

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Segmented negative strand RNA viruses of the arena-, bunya- and orthomyxovirus families uniquely carry out viral mRNA transcription by the cap-snatching mechanism. This involves cleavage of host mRNAs close to their capped 5' end by an endonuclease (EN domain located in the N-terminal region of the viral polymerase. We present the structure of the cap-snatching EN of Hantaan virus, a bunyavirus belonging to hantavirus genus. Hantaan EN has an active site configuration, including a metal co-ordinating histidine, and nuclease activity similar to the previously reported La Crosse virus and Influenza virus ENs (orthobunyavirus and orthomyxovirus respectively, but is more active in cleaving a double stranded RNA substrate. In contrast, Lassa arenavirus EN has only acidic metal co-ordinating residues. We present three high resolution structures of Lassa virus EN with different bound ion configurations and show in comparative biophysical and biochemical experiments with Hantaan, La Crosse and influenza ENs that the isolated Lassa EN is essentially inactive. The results are discussed in the light of EN activation mechanisms revealed by recent structures of full-length influenza virus polymerase.

  13. Insights on the Structural Details of Endonuclease EcoRI-DNA Complexes by Electron Spin Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarver, Jessica

    2009-03-01

    Pulsed electron spin resonance (ESR) was used to probe the binding specificity of EcoRI, a restriction endonuclease. Using site-directed spin labeling, a nitroxide side chain was incorporated into the protein, enabling the use of ESR to study structural details of EcoRI. Distance measurements were performed on EcoRI mutants when bound to varying sequences of DNA using the Double Electron-Electron Resonance experiment. These distances demonstrated that the average structure in the arm regions of EcoRI, thought to play a major role in binding specificity, is the same when the protein binds to different sequences of DNA. Also, it was determined that the arms exhibit higher flexibility when bound to sequences other than the specific sequence due to the larger distance distributions acquired from these spin labeled complexes. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed on the spin-label-modified specific EcoRI-DNA crystal structure to model the average nitroxide orientation. The distance distributions from MD were found to be narrower than experiment, indicating the need for a more rigorous sampling of the nitroxide conformers in silico.

  14. Catalytic activity control of restriction endonuclease--triplex forming oligonucleotide conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silanskas, Arunas; Zaremba, Mindaugas; Sasnauskas, Giedrius; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2012-02-15

    Targeting of individual genes in complex genomes requires endonucleases of extremely high specificity. To direct cleavage at the unique site(s) in the genome, both naturally occurring and artificial enzymes have been developed. These include homing endonucleases, zinc-finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and restriction or chemical nucleases coupled to a triple-helix forming oligonucleotide (TFO). The desired cleavage has been demonstrated both in vivo and in vitro for several model systems. However, to limit cleavage strictly to unique sites and avoid undesired reactions, endonucleases with controlled activity are highly desirable. In this study we present a proof-of-concept demonstration of two strategies to generate restriction endonuclease-TFO conjugates with controllable activity. First, we combined the restriction endonuclease caging and TFO coupling procedures to produce a caged MunI-TFO conjugate, which can be activated by UV-light upon formation of a triple helix. Second, we coupled TFO to a subunit interface mutant of restriction endonuclease Bse634I which shows no activity due to impaired dimerization but is assembled into an active dimer when two Bse634I monomers are brought into close proximity by triple helix formation at the targeted site. Our results push the restriction endonuclease-TFO conjugate technology one step closer to potential in vivo applications.

  15. The cap-snatching endonuclease of influenza virus polymerase resides in the PA subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Alexandre; Bouvier, Denis; Crépin, Thibaut; McCarthy, Andrew A; Hart, Darren J; Baudin, Florence; Cusack, Stephen; Ruigrok, Rob W H

    2009-04-16

    The influenza virus polymerase, a heterotrimer composed of three subunits, PA, PB1 and PB2, is responsible for replication and transcription of the eight separate segments of the viral RNA genome in the nuclei of infected cells. The polymerase synthesizes viral messenger RNAs using short capped primers derived from cellular transcripts by a unique 'cap-snatching' mechanism. The PB2 subunit binds the 5' cap of host pre-mRNAs, which are subsequently cleaved after 10-13 nucleotides by the viral endonuclease, hitherto thought to reside in the PB2 (ref. 5) or PB1 (ref. 2) subunits. Here we describe biochemical and structural studies showing that the amino-terminal 209 residues of the PA subunit contain the endonuclease active site. We show that this domain has intrinsic RNA and DNA endonuclease activity that is strongly activated by manganese ions, matching observations reported for the endonuclease activity of the intact trimeric polymerase. Furthermore, this activity is inhibited by 2,4-dioxo-4-phenylbutanoic acid, a known inhibitor of the influenza endonuclease. The crystal structure of the domain reveals a structural core closely resembling resolvases and type II restriction endonucleases. The active site comprises a histidine and a cluster of three acidic residues, conserved in all influenza viruses, which bind two manganese ions in a configuration similar to other two-metal-dependent endonucleases. Two active site residues have previously been shown to specifically eliminate the polymerase endonuclease activity when mutated. These results will facilitate the optimisation of endonuclease inhibitors as potential new anti-influenza drugs.

  16. Structure of the Cpf1 endonuclease R-loop complex after target DNA cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Stefano; Alcón, Pablo; Montoya, Guillermo

    2017-06-22

    Cpf1 is an RNA-guided endonuclease that is emerging as a powerful genome-editing tool. Here we provide insight into its DNA-targeting mechanism by determining the structure of Francisella novicida Cpf1 with the triple-stranded R-loop generated after DNA cleavage. The structure reveals the machinery involved in DNA unwinding to form a CRISPR RNA (crRNA)-DNA hybrid and a displaced DNA strand. The protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) is recognized by the PAM-interacting domain. The loop-lysine helix-loop motif in this domain contains three conserved lysine residues that are inserted in a dentate manner into the double-stranded DNA. Unzipping of the double-stranded DNA occurs in a cleft arranged by acidic and hydrophobic residues facilitating the crRNA-DNA hybrid formation. The PAM single-stranded DNA is funnelled towards the nuclease site through a mixed hydrophobic and basic cavity. In this catalytic conformation, the PAM-interacting domain and the helix-loop-helix motif in the REC1 domain adopt a 'rail' shape and 'flap-on' conformations, respectively, channelling the PAM strand into the cavity. A steric barrier between the RuvC-II and REC1 domains forms the 'septum', separating the displaced PAM strand and the crRNA-DNA hybrid, avoiding DNA re-annealing. Mutations in key residues reveal a mechanism linking the PAM and DNA nuclease sites. Analysis of the Cpf1 structures proposes a singular working model of RNA-guided DNA cleavage, suggesting new avenues for redesign of Cpf1.

  17. Electrostatic-Induced Assembly of Graphene-Encapsulated Carbon@Nickel-Aluminum Layered Double Hydroxide Core-Shell Spheres Hybrid Structure for High-Energy and High-Power-Density Asymmetric Supercapacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuxing; Hui, Kwan San; Hui, Kwun Nam; Kim, Kwang Ho

    2017-01-18

    Achieving high energy density while retaining high power density is difficult in electrical double-layer capacitors and in pseudocapacitors considering the origin of different charge storage mechanisms. Rational structural design became an appealing strategy in circumventing these trade-offs between energy and power densities. A hybrid structure consists of chemically converted graphene-encapsulated carbon@nickel-aluminum layered double hydroxide core-shell spheres as spacers among graphene layers (G-CLS) used as an advanced electrode to achieve high energy density while retaining high power density for high-performance supercapacitors. The merits of the proposed architecture are as follows: (1) CLS act as spacers to avoid the close restacking of graphene; (2) highly conductive carbon sphere and graphene preserve the mechanical integrity and improve the electrical conductivity of LDHs hybrid. Thus, the proposed hybrid structure can simultaneously achieve high electrical double-layer capacitance and pseudocapacitance resulting in the overall highly active electrode. The G-CLS electrode exhibited high specific capacitance (1710.5 F g -1 at 1 A g -1 ) under three-electrode tests. An ASC fabricated using the G-CLS as positive electrode and reduced graphite oxide as negative electrode demonstrated remarkable electrochemical performance. The ASC device operated at 1.4 V and delivered a high energy density of 35.5 Wh kg -1 at a 670.7 W kg -1 power density at 1 A g -1 with an excellent rate capability as well as a robust long-term cycling stability of up to 10 000 cycles.

  18. Asymmetric fluorocyclizations of alkenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolstenhulme, Jamie R; Gouverneur, Véronique

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: The vicinal fluorofunctionalization of alkenes is an attractive transformation that converts feedstock olefins into valuable cyclic fluorinated molecules for application in the pharmaceutical, agrochemical, medical, and material sectors. The challenges associated with asymmetric fluorocyclizations induced by F(+) reagents are distinct from other types of halocyclizations. Processes initiated by the addition of an F(+) reagent onto an alkene do not involve the reversible formation of bridged fluoronium ions but generate acyclic β-fluorocationic intermediates. This mechanistic feature implies that fluorocyclizations are not stereospecific. A discontinuity exists between the importance of this class of fluorocyclization and the activation modes currently available to implement successful catalysis. Progress toward fluorocyclization has been achieved by investing in neutral and cationic [NF] reagent development. The body of work on asymmetric fluorination using chiral cationic [NF](+) reagents prepared by fluorine transfer from the dicationic [NF](2+) reagent Selectfluor to quinuclidines, inspired the development of asymmetric F(+)-induced fluorocyclizations catalyzed by cinchona alkaloids; for catalysis, the use of N-fluorobenzenesulfonimide, which is less reactive than Selectfluor, ensures that the achiral F(+) source remains unreactive toward the alkene. These organocatalyzed enantioselective fluorocyclizations can be applied to indoles to install the fluorine on a quaternary benzylic stereogenic carbon center and to afford fluorinated analogues of natural products featuring the hexahydropyrrolo[2,3-b]indole or the tetrahydro-2H-furo[2,3-b]indole skeleton. In an alternative approach, the poor solubility of dicationic Selectfluor bis(tetrafluoroborate) in nonpolar solvent was exploited with anionic phase transfer catalysis as the operating activation mode. Exchange of the tetrafluoroborate ions of Selectfluor with bulky lipophilic chiral anions (e

  19. Asymmetric strand segregation: epigenetic costs of genetic fidelity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane P Genereux

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Asymmetric strand segregation has been proposed as a mechanism to minimize effective mutation rates in epithelial tissues. Under asymmetric strand segregation, the double-stranded molecule that contains the oldest DNA strand is preferentially targeted to the somatic stem cell after each round of DNA replication. This oldest DNA strand is expected to have fewer errors than younger strands because some of the errors that arise on daughter strands during their synthesis fail to be repaired. Empirical findings suggest the possibility of asymmetric strand segregation in a subset of mammalian cell lineages, indicating that it may indeed function to increase genetic fidelity. However, the implications of asymmetric strand segregation for the fidelity of epigenetic information remain unexplored. Here, I explore the impact of strand-segregation dynamics on epigenetic fidelity using a mathematical-modelling approach that draws on the known molecular mechanisms of DNA methylation and existing rate estimates from empirical methylation data. I find that, for a wide range of starting methylation densities, asymmetric -- but not symmetric -- strand segregation leads to systematic increases in methylation levels if parent strands are subject to de novo methylation events. I found that epigenetic fidelity can be compromised when enhanced genetic fidelity is achieved through asymmetric strand segregation. Strand segregation dynamics could thus explain the increased DNA methylation densities that are observed in structured cellular populations during aging and in disease.

  20. Cofactor requirement of HpyAV restriction endonuclease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siu-Hong Chan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori is the etiologic agent of common gastritis and a risk factor for gastric cancer. It is also one of the richest sources of Type II restriction-modification (R-M systems in microorganisms. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have cloned, expressed and purified a new restriction endonuclease HpyAV from H. pylori strain 26695. We determined the HpyAV DNA recognition sequence and cleavage site as CCTTC 6/5. In addition, we found that HpyAV has a unique metal ion requirement: its cleavage activity is higher with transition metal ions than in Mg(++. The special metal ion requirement of HpyAV can be attributed to the presence of a HNH catalytic site similar to ColE9 nuclease instead of the canonical PD-X-D/EXK catalytic site found in many other REases. Site-directed mutagenesis was carried out to verify the catalytic residues of HpyAV. Mutation of the conserved metal-binding Asn311 and His320 to alanine eliminated cleavage activity. HpyAV variant H295A displayed approximately 1% of wt activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Some HNH-type endonucleases have unique metal ion cofactor requirement for optimal activities. Homology modeling and site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that HpyAV is a member of the HNH nuclease family. The identification of catalytic residues in HpyAV paved the way for further engineering of the metal binding site. A survey of sequenced microbial genomes uncovered 10 putative R-M systems that show high sequence similarity to the HpyAV system, suggesting lateral transfer of a prototypic HpyAV-like R-M system among these microorganisms.

  1. Cofactor requirement of HpyAV restriction endonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Siu-Hong; Opitz, Lars; Higgins, Lauren; O'loane, Diana; Xu, Shuang-Yong

    2010-02-05

    Helicobacter pylori is the etiologic agent of common gastritis and a risk factor for gastric cancer. It is also one of the richest sources of Type II restriction-modification (R-M) systems in microorganisms. We have cloned, expressed and purified a new restriction endonuclease HpyAV from H. pylori strain 26695. We determined the HpyAV DNA recognition sequence and cleavage site as CCTTC 6/5. In addition, we found that HpyAV has a unique metal ion requirement: its cleavage activity is higher with transition metal ions than in Mg(++). The special metal ion requirement of HpyAV can be attributed to the presence of a HNH catalytic site similar to ColE9 nuclease instead of the canonical PD-X-D/EXK catalytic site found in many other REases. Site-directed mutagenesis was carried out to verify the catalytic residues of HpyAV. Mutation of the conserved metal-binding Asn311 and His320 to alanine eliminated cleavage activity. HpyAV variant H295A displayed approximately 1% of wt activity. Some HNH-type endonucleases have unique metal ion cofactor requirement for optimal activities. Homology modeling and site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that HpyAV is a member of the HNH nuclease family. The identification of catalytic residues in HpyAV paved the way for further engineering of the metal binding site. A survey of sequenced microbial genomes uncovered 10 putative R-M systems that show high sequence similarity to the HpyAV system, suggesting lateral transfer of a prototypic HpyAV-like R-M system among these microorganisms.

  2. Asymmetric Flexible Supercapacitor Stack

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leela Mohana Reddy, A; Estaline Amitha, F; Jafri, Imran; Ramaprabhu, S

    2008-01-01

    Electrical double layer supercapacitor is very significant in the field of electrical energy storage which can be the solution for the current revolution in the electronic devices like mobile phones...

  3. Catalytic asymmetric fluorinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbio, Carla; Gouverneur, Véronique

    2006-06-07

    The appearance of structurally diverse fluorinating reagents displaying a large spectrum of reactivity has been critical to the development of the catalytic asymmetric fluorination processes known to date. In this article, we discuss how this area of research emerged and which strategies have allowed for the successful development of both nucleophilic and electrophilic catalytic enantioselective fluorinations. We also present the fundamental understanding of catalytic activity and enantioselectivity for the most efficient processes and highlight the first synthetic application with the preparation of a complex fluorinated target.

  4. Asymmetric synthesis v.4

    CERN Document Server

    Morrison, James

    1984-01-01

    Asymmetric Synthesis, Volume 4: The Chiral Carbon Pool and Chiral Sulfur, Nitrogen, Phosphorus, and Silicon Centers describes the practical methods of obtaining chiral fragments. Divided into five chapters, this book specifically examines initial chiral transmission and extension. The opening chapter describes the so-called chiral carbon pool, the readily available chiral carbon fragments used as building blocks in synthesis. This chapter also provides a list of 375 chiral building blocks, along with their commercial sources, approximate prices, and methods of synthesis. Schemes involving

  5. Asymmetric Organocatalytic Cycloadditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mose, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    were pioneered by Otto Paul Hermann Diels and Kurt Alder who discovered what later became known as the Diels Alder reaction. The Diels Alder reaction is a [4+2] cycloaddition in which a π4 component reacts with a π2 component via a cyclic transition state to generate a 6 membered ring. This reaction...... undergo cascade reactions with different electron deficient dienophiles in Diels Alder – nucleophilic ring closing reactions. This methodology opens up for the direct asymmetric formation of hydroisochromenes and hydroisoquinolines which may possess interesting biological activities. It is also...

  6. Chiral fullerenes from asymmetric catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroto, Enrique E; Izquierdo, Marta; Reboredo, Silvia; Marco-Martínez, Juan; Filippone, Salvatore; Martín, Nazario

    2014-08-19

    Fullerenes are among the most studied molecules during the last three decades, and therefore, a huge number of chemical reactions have been tested on these new carbon allotropes. However, the aim of most of the reactions carried out on fullerenes has been to afford chemically modified fullerenes that are soluble in organic solvents or even water in the search for different mechanical, optical, or electronic properties. Therefore, although a lot of effort has been devoted to the chemical functionalization of these molecular allotropes of carbon, important aspects in the chemistry of fullerenes have not been properly addressed. In particular, the synthesis of chiral fullerenes at will in an efficient manner using asymmetric catalysis has not been previously addressed in fullerene science. Thus, despite the fact that the chirality of fullerenes has always been considered a fundamental issue, the lack of a general stereoselective synthetic methodology has restricted the use of enantiopure fullerene derivatives, which have usually been obtained only after highly expensive HPLC isolation on specific chiral columns or prepared from a pool of chiral starting materials. In this Account, we describe the first stereodivergent catalytic enantioselective syntheses in fullerene science, which have allowed the highly efficient synthesis of enantiomerically pure derivatives with total control of the stereochemical result using metallic catalysts and/or organocatalysts under very mild conditions. Density functional theory calculations strongly support the experimental findings for the assignment of the absolute configuration of the new stereocenters, which has also been ascertained by application of the sector rule and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The use of the curved double bond of fullerene cages as a two-π-electron component in a variety of stereoselective cycloaddition reactions represents a challenging goal considering that, in contrast to most of the substituted

  7. The amino acid linker between the endonuclease and helicase domains of adeno-associated virus type 5 Rep plays a critical role in DNA-dependent oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggin, Jenna E; James, Jeffrey A; Chappie, Joshua S; Dyda, Fred; Hickman, Alison Burgess

    2012-03-01

    The adeno-associated virus (AAV) genome encodes four Rep proteins, all of which contain an SF3 helicase domain. The larger Rep proteins, Rep78 and Rep68, are required for viral replication, whereas Rep40 and Rep52 are needed to package AAV genomes into preformed capsids; these smaller proteins are missing the site-specific DNA-binding and endonuclease domain found in Rep68/78. Other viral SF3 helicases, such as the simian virus 40 large T antigen and the papillomavirus E1 protein, are active as hexameric assemblies. However, Rep40 and Rep52 have not been observed to form stable oligomers on their own or with DNA, suggesting that important determinants of helicase multimerization lie outside the helicase domain. Here, we report that when the 23-residue linker that connects the endonuclease and helicase domains is appended to the adeno-associated virus type 5 (AAV5) helicase domain, the resulting protein forms discrete complexes on DNA consistent with single or double hexamers. The formation of these complexes does not require the Rep binding site sequence, nor is it nucleotide dependent. These complexes have stimulated ATPase and helicase activities relative to the helicase domain alone, indicating that they are catalytically relevant, a result supported by negative-stain electron microscopy images of hexameric rings. Similarly, the addition of the linker region to the AAV5 Rep endonuclease domain also confers on it the ability to bind and multimerize on nonspecific double-stranded DNA. We conclude that the linker is likely a key contributor to Rep68/78 DNA-dependent oligomerization and may play an important role in mediating Rep68/78's conversion from site-specific DNA binding to nonspecific DNA unwinding.

  8. Asymmetric inclusion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuveni, Shlomi; Eliazar, Iddo; Yechiali, Uri

    2011-10-01

    We introduce and explore the asymmetric inclusion process (ASIP), an exactly solvable bosonic counterpart of the fermionic asymmetric exclusion process (ASEP). In both processes, random events cause particles to propagate unidirectionally along a one-dimensional lattice of n sites. In the ASEP, particles are subject to exclusion interactions, whereas in the ASIP, particles are subject to inclusion interactions that coalesce them into inseparable clusters. We study the dynamics of the ASIP, derive evolution equations for the mean and probability generating function (PGF) of the sites' occupancy vector, obtain explicit results for the above mean at steady state, and describe an iterative scheme for the computation of the PGF at steady state. We further obtain explicit results for the load distribution in steady state, with the load being the total number of particles present in all lattice sites. Finally, we address the problem of load optimization, and solve it under various criteria. The ASIP model establishes bridges between statistical physics and queueing theory as it represents a tandem array of queueing systems with (unlimited) batch service, and a tandem array of growth-collapse processes.

  9. Three new active members of the I-OnuI family of homing endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilto, Iman M; Guha, Tuhin K; Wai, Alvan; Hausner, Georg

    2017-08-01

    In vitro characterization of 3 LAGLIDADG-type homing endonucleases (HEs) (I-CcaI, I-CcaII, and I-AstI) that belong to the I-OnuI family showed that they are functional HEs that cleave their respective cognate target sites. These endonucleases are encoded within group ID introns and appear to be orthologues that have inserted into 3 different mitochondrial genes: rns, rnl, and cox3. The endonuclease activity of I-CcaI was tested using various substrates, and its minimum DNA recognition sequence was estimated to be 26 nt. This set of HEs may provide some insight into how these types of mobile elements can migrate into new locations. This study provides additional endonucleases that can be added to the catalog of currently available HEs that may have various biotechnology applications.

  10. Cleavage and protection of locked nucleic acid-modified DNA by restriction endonucleases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crouzier, Lucile; Dubois, Camille; Wengel, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA) is one of the most prominent nucleic acid analogues reported so far. We herein for the first time report cleavage by restriction endonuclease of LNA-modified DNA oligonucleotides. The experiments revealed that RsaI is an efficient enzyme capable of recognizing and cleaving...... LNA-modified DNA oligonucleotides. Furthermore, introduction of LNA nucleotides protects against cleavage by the restriction endonucleases PvuII, PstI, SacI, KpnI and EcoRI....

  11. Symmetric Decomposition of Asymmetric Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuyls, Karl; Pérolat, Julien; Lanctot, Marc; Ostrovski, Georg; Savani, Rahul; Leibo, Joel Z; Ord, Toby; Graepel, Thore; Legg, Shane

    2018-01-17

    We introduce new theoretical insights into two-population asymmetric games allowing for an elegant symmetric decomposition into two single population symmetric games. Specifically, we show how an asymmetric bimatrix game (A,B) can be decomposed into its symmetric counterparts by envisioning and investigating the payoff tables (A and B) that constitute the asymmetric game, as two independent, single population, symmetric games. We reveal several surprising formal relationships between an asymmetric two-population game and its symmetric single population counterparts, which facilitate a convenient analysis of the original asymmetric game due to the dimensionality reduction of the decomposition. The main finding reveals that if (x,y) is a Nash equilibrium of an asymmetric game (A,B), this implies that y is a Nash equilibrium of the symmetric counterpart game determined by payoff table A, and x is a Nash equilibrium of the symmetric counterpart game determined by payoff table B. Also the reverse holds and combinations of Nash equilibria of the counterpart games form Nash equilibria of the asymmetric game. We illustrate how these formal relationships aid in identifying and analysing the Nash structure of asymmetric games, by examining the evolutionary dynamics of the simpler counterpart games in several canonical examples.

  12. Minimal asymmetric dark matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofiane M. Boucenna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the early Universe, any particle carrying a conserved quantum number and in chemical equilibrium with the thermal bath will unavoidably inherit a particle–antiparticle asymmetry. A new particle of this type, if stable, would represent a candidate for asymmetric dark matter (DM with an asymmetry directly related to the baryon asymmetry. We study this possibility for a minimal DM sector constituted by just one (generic SU(2L multiplet χ carrying hypercharge, assuming that at temperatures above the electroweak phase transition an effective operator enforces chemical equilibrium between χ and the Higgs boson. We argue that limits from DM direct detection searches severely constrain this scenario, leaving as the only possibilities scalar or fermion multiplets with hypercharge y=1, preferentially quintuplets or larger SU(2 representations, and with a mass in the few TeV range.

  13. Asymmetric black dyonic holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Cabrera-Munguia

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A 6-parametric asymptotically flat exact solution, describing a two-body system of asymmetric black dyons, is studied. The system consists of two unequal counterrotating Kerr–Newman black holes, endowed with electric and magnetic charges which are equal but opposite in sign, separated by a massless strut. The Smarr formula is generalized in order to take into account their contribution to the mass. The expressions for the horizon half-length parameters σ1 and σ2, as functions of the Komar parameters and of the coordinate distance, are displayed, and the thermodynamic properties of the two-body system are studied. Furthermore, the seven physical parameters satisfy a simple algebraic relation which can be understood as a dynamical scenario, in which the physical properties of one body are affected by the ones of the other body.

  14. Asymmetric Realized Volatility Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E. Allen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we document that realized variation measures constructed from high-frequency returns reveal a large degree of volatility risk in stock and index returns, where we characterize volatility risk by the extent to which forecasting errors in realized volatility are substantive. Even though returns standardized by ex post quadratic variation measures are nearly Gaussian, this unpredictability brings considerably more uncertainty to the empirically relevant ex ante distribution of returns. Explicitly modeling this volatility risk is fundamental. We propose a dually asymmetric realized volatility model, which incorporates the fact that realized volatility series are systematically more volatile in high volatility periods. Returns in this framework display time varying volatility, skewness and kurtosis. We provide a detailed account of the empirical advantages of the model using data on the S&P 500 index and eight other indexes and stocks.

  15. Families of asymmetric periodic solutions in the restricted four-body problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, K. E.

    2016-12-01

    Very recently, we presented five of the basic families of the network of periodic orbits of the restricted four-body problem which are simple, i.e. one intersection with the horizontal x-axis at the half period, symmetric with respect to the same axis and asymmetric with respect to the vertical y-axis. In the present work, using these families, we found series of asymmetric critical orbits for various values of the primaries m2 and m3. From these critical orbits we calculate and present five new families of simple periodic orbits which are asymmetric with respect to both the x- and y-axis. Additionally, we describe a grid method in the (x0, dot{x}0) plane and we obtain initial conditions for new asymmetric double-periodic orbits. We determine ten families of asymmetric double-periodic orbits from the bifurcations of the previous five asymmetric families using the special generating horizontally critical periodic orbits. The stability of each calculated asymmetric periodic orbit is also studied. Characteristic curves as well as stability diagrams of these families are illustrated. In the last section we present the evolution of the five basic families of simple asymmetric periodic orbits when the primaries are the Sun the Jupiter and the 2797 Teucer Asteroid.

  16. Double injection/single detection asymmetric flow injection manifold for spectrophotometric determination of ascorbic acid and uric acid: Selection the optimal conditions by MCDM approach based on different criteria weighting methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroumand, Samira; Chamjangali, Mansour Arab; Bagherian, Ghadamali

    2017-03-01

    A simple and sensitive double injection/single detector flow injection analysis (FIA) method is proposed for the simultaneous kinetic determination of ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA). This method is based upon the difference between the rates of the AA and UA reactions with Fe3 + in the presence of 1, 10-phenanthroline (phen). The absorbance of Fe2 +/1, 10-phenanthroline (Fe-phen) complex obtained as the product was measured spectrophotometrically at 510 nm. To reach a good accuracy in the differential kinetic determination via the mathematical manipulations of the transient signals, different criteria were considered in the selection of the optimum conditions. The multi criteria decision making (MCDM) approach was applied for the selection of the optimum conditions. The importance weights of the evaluation criteria were determined using the analytic hierarchy process, entropy method, and compromised weighting (CW). The experimental conditions (alternatives) were ranked by the technique for order preference by similarity to an ideal solution. Under the selected optimum conditions, the obtained analytical signals were linear in the ranges of 0.50-5.00 and 0.50-4.00 mg L- 1 for AA and UA, respectively. The 3σ detection limits were 0.07 mg L- 1 for AA and 0.12 mg L- 1 for UA. The relative standard deviations for four replicate determinations of AA and UA were 2.03% and 3.30% respectively. The method was also applied for the analysis of analytes in the blood serum, Vitamine C tablets, and tap water with satisfactory results.

  17. Altered endoribonuclease activity of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 variants identified in the human population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Cheol Kim

    Full Text Available Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1 is the major mammalian enzyme in the DNA base excision repair pathway and cleaves the DNA phosphodiester backbone immediately 5' to abasic sites. APE1 also has 3'-5' DNA exonuclease and 3' DNA phosphodiesterase activities, and regulates transcription factor DNA binding through its redox regulatory function. The human APE1 has recently been shown to endonucleolytically cleave single-stranded regions of RNA. Towards understanding the biological significance of the endoribonuclease activity of APE1, we examined eight different amino acid substitution variants of APE1 previously identified in the human population. Our study shows that six APE1 variants, D148E, Q51H, I64V, G241R, R237A, and G306A, exhibit a 76-85% reduction in endoribonuclease activity against a specific coding region of the c-myc RNA, yet fully retain the ability to cleave apurinic/apyrimidinic DNA. We found that two APE1 variants, L104R and E126D, exhibit a unique RNase inhibitor-resistant endoribonuclease activity, where the proteins cleave c-myc RNA 3' of specific single-stranded guanosine residues. Expression of L104R and E126D APE1 variants in bacterial Origami cells leads to a 60-80% reduction in colony formation and a 1.5-fold increase in cell doubling time, whereas the other variants, which exhibit diminished endoribonuclease activity, had no effect. These data indicate that two human APE1 variants exhibit a unique endoribonuclease activity, which correlates with their ability to induce cytotoxicity or slow down growth in bacterial cells and supports the notion of their biological functionality.

  18. Selective microbial genomic DNA isolation using restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Helen E; Liu, Guohong; Weston, Christopher Q; King, Paula; Pham, Long K; Waltz, Shannon; Helzer, Kimberly T; Day, Laura; Sphar, Dan; Yamamoto, Robert T; Forsyth, R Allyn

    2014-01-01

    To improve the metagenomic analysis of complex microbiomes, we have repurposed restriction endonucleases as methyl specific DNA binding proteins. As an example, we use DpnI immobilized on magnetic beads. The ten minute extraction technique allows specific binding of genomes containing the DpnI Gm6ATC motif common in the genomic DNA of many bacteria including γ-proteobacteria. Using synthetic genome mixtures, we demonstrate 80% recovery of Escherichia coli genomic DNA even when only femtogram quantities are spiked into 10 µg of human DNA background. Binding is very specific with less than 0.5% of human DNA bound. Next Generation Sequencing of input and enriched synthetic mixtures results in over 100-fold enrichment of target genomes relative to human and plant DNA. We also show comparable enrichment when sequencing complex microbiomes such as those from creek water and human saliva. The technique can be broadened to other restriction enzymes allowing for the selective enrichment of trace and unculturable organisms from complex microbiomes and the stratification of organisms according to restriction enzyme enrichment.

  19. Peculiarities of Crystallization of the Restriction Endonuclease EcoRII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpove, Elizaveta; Pusey, M.arc L.

    1998-01-01

    Nucleases interfere with most standard molecular biology procedures. We have purified and crystallized the restriction endonuclease EcoRII, which belongs to the type II of restriction- modification enzyme, to study the protein crystallization process using a "non standard" macromolecule. A procedure for the purification of EcoRII was developed and 99% pure protein as determined by SDS PAGE electrophoresis obtained. Light scattering experiments were performed to assist in screening protein suitable crystallization conditions. The second virial coefficient was determined as a function of precipitating salt concentration, using sodium chloride, ammonium sulfate, and sodium sulfate. Small (maximum size approximately 0.2 mm) well shaped crystals have been obtained. Larger poorly formed crystals (ca 0.5 mm) have also been obtained, but we have been unable to mount them for diff-raction analysis due to their extreme fragility. Crystallization experiments with PEG have shown that using this precipitant, the best crystals are obtained from slightly over-saturated solutions. Use of higher precipitant concentration leads to dendritic crystal formation. EcoRII is difficult to solubilize and meticulous attention must be paid to the presence of reducing agents.

  20. Asymmetric bifurcated halogen bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novák, Martin; Foroutan-Nejad, Cina; Marek, Radek

    2015-03-07

    Halogen bonding (XB) is being extensively explored for its potential use in advanced materials and drug design. Despite significant progress in describing this interaction by theoretical and experimental methods, the chemical nature remains somewhat elusive, and it seems to vary with the selected system. In this work we present a detailed DFT analysis of three-center asymmetric halogen bond (XB) formed between dihalogen molecules and variously 4-substituted 1,2-dimethoxybenzene. The energy decomposition, orbital, and electron density analyses suggest that the contribution of electrostatic stabilization is comparable with that of non-electrostatic factors. Both terms increase parallel with increasing negative charge of the electron donor molecule in our model systems. Depending on the orientation of the dihalogen molecules, this bifurcated interaction may be classified as 'σ-hole - lone pair' or 'σ-hole - π' halogen bonds. Arrangement of the XB investigated here deviates significantly from a recent IUPAC definition of XB and, in analogy to the hydrogen bonding, the term bifurcated halogen bond (BXB) seems to be appropriate for this type of interaction.

  1. Magnetically Modified Asymmetric Supercapacitors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project is for the development of an asymmetric supercapacitor that will have improved energy density and cycle life....

  2. Multicatalyst system in asymmetric catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Jian

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces multi-catalyst systems by describing their mechanism and advantages in asymmetric catalysis.  Helps organic chemists perform more efficient catalysis with step-by-step methods  Overviews new concepts and progress for greener and economic catalytic reactions  Covers topics of interest in asymmetric catalysis including bifunctional catalysis, cooperative catalysis, multimetallic catalysis, and novel tandem reactions   Has applications for pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, materials, and flavour and fragrance

  3. Asymmetric Ion-Pairing Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brak, Katrien

    2014-01-01

    Charged intermediates and reagents are ubiquitous in organic transformations. The interaction of these ionic species with chiral neutral, anionic, or cationic small molecules has emerged as a powerful strategy for catalytic, enantioselective synthesis. This review describes developments in the burgeoning field of asymmetric ion-pairing catalysis with an emphasis on the insights that have been gleaned into the structural and mechanistic features that contribute to high asymmetric induction. PMID:23192886

  4. Asymmetric Gepner models (revisited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gato-Rivera, B. [NIKHEF Theory Group, Kruislaan 409, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 123, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Schellekens, A.N., E-mail: t58@nikhef.n [NIKHEF Theory Group, Kruislaan 409, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 123, Madrid 28006 (Spain)] [IMAPP, Radboud Universiteit, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2010-12-11

    We reconsider a class of heterotic string theories studied in 1989, based on tensor products of N=2 minimal models with asymmetric simple current invariants. We extend this analysis from (2,2) and (1,2) spectra to (0,2) spectra with SO(10) broken to the Standard Model. In the latter case the spectrum must contain fractionally charged particles. We find that in nearly all cases at least some of them are massless. However, we identify a large subclass where the fractional charges are at worst half-integer, and often vector-like. The number of families is very often reduced in comparison to the 1989 results, but there are no new tensor combinations yielding three families. All tensor combinations turn out to fall into two classes: those where the number of families is always divisible by three, and those where it is never divisible by three. We find an empirical rule to determine the class, which appears to extend beyond minimal N=2 tensor products. We observe that distributions of physical quantities such as the number of families, singlets and mirrors have an interesting tendency towards smaller values as the gauge groups approaches the Standard Model. We compare our results with an analogous class of free fermionic models. This displays similar features, but with less resolution. Finally we present a complete scan of the three family models based on the triply-exceptional combination (1,16{sup *},16{sup *},16{sup *}) identified originally by Gepner. We find 1220 distinct three family spectra in this case, forming 610 mirror pairs. About half of them have the gauge group SU(3)xSU(2){sub L}xSU(2){sub R}xU(1){sup 5}, the theoretical minimum, and many others are trinification models.

  5. Asymmetric Flexible Supercapacitor Stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Electrical double layer supercapacitor is very significant in the field of electrical energy storage which can be the solution for the current revolution in the electronic devices like mobile phones, camera flashes which needs flexible and miniaturized energy storage device with all non-aqueous components. The multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) have been synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition technique over hydrogen decrepitated Mischmetal (Mm) based AB3alloy hydride. The polymer dispersed MWNTs have been obtained by insitu polymerization and the metal oxide/MWNTs were synthesized by sol-gel method. Morphological characterizations of polymer dispersed MWNTs have been carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM and HRTEM). An assymetric double supercapacitor stack has been fabricated using polymer/MWNTs and metal oxide/MWNTs coated over flexible carbon fabric as electrodes and nafion®membrane as a solid electrolyte. Electrochemical performance of the supercapacitor stack has been investigated using cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  6. Asymmetric Flexible Supercapacitor Stack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leela Mohana Reddy A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractElectrical double layer supercapacitor is very significant in the field of electrical energy storage which can be the solution for the current revolution in the electronic devices like mobile phones, camera flashes which needs flexible and miniaturized energy storage device with all non-aqueous components. The multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs have been synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition technique over hydrogen decrepitated Mischmetal (Mm based AB3alloy hydride. The polymer dispersed MWNTs have been obtained by insitu polymerization and the metal oxide/MWNTs were synthesized by sol-gel method. Morphological characterizations of polymer dispersed MWNTs have been carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and HRTEM. An assymetric double supercapacitor stack has been fabricated using polymer/MWNTs and metal oxide/MWNTs coated over flexible carbon fabric as electrodes and nafion®membrane as a solid electrolyte. Electrochemical performance of the supercapacitor stack has been investigated using cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  7. Simple and sensitive fluorescence assay of restriction endonuclease on graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gang, Jong Back [Dept. of Nano Chemistry, Gachon University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Restriction endonucleases hydrolyze internal phosphodiester bonds at specific sites in a DNA sequence. These enzymes are essential in a variety of fields, such as biotechnology and clinical diagnostics. It is of great importance and necessity for the scientific and biomedical use of enzymes to measure endonuclease activity. In this study, graphene oxide (GO) has been used as a platform to measure enzyme activity with high sensitivity. To increase the detection sensitivity of Hinf I, the endonuclease-digested reaction was treated with exonuclease III (Exo III) and a fluorescence assay was conducted to measure the emission. Results showed that Exo III treatment enhanced 2.7-fold signal-to-background ratio for the detection of Hinf I compared with that done without Exo III in the presence of GO.

  8. PMS2 endonuclease activity has distinct biological functions and is essential for genome maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oers, Johanna M. M.; Roa, Sergio; Werling, Uwe; Liu, Yiyong; Genschel, Jochen; Sellers, Rani S.; Modrich, Paul; Scharff, Matthew D.; Edelmann, Winfried

    2010-01-01

    The DNA mismatch repair protein PMS2 was recently found to encode a novel endonuclease activity. To determine the biological functions of this activity in mammals, we generated endonuclease-deficient Pms2E702K knock-in mice. Pms2EK/EK mice displayed increased genomic mutation rates and a strong cancer predisposition. In addition, class switch recombination, but not somatic hypermutation, was impaired in Pms2EK/EK B cells, indicating a specific role in Ig diversity. In contrast to Pms2−/− mice, Pms2EK/EK male mice were fertile, indicating that this activity is dispensable in spermatogenesis. Therefore, the PMS2 endonuclease activity has distinct biological functions and is essential for genome maintenance and tumor suppression. PMID:20624957

  9. Protein NCRII-18: the role of gene fusion in the molecular evolution of restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibryashkina, Elena M; Solonin, Alexander S; Zakharova, Marina V

    2017-06-01

    This work first constructed the fusion protein NCRII-18 by fusing the restriction endonuclease Ecl18kI gene and part of the gene coding for the N-terminal domain of the endonuclease EcoRII. The fusion of the EcoRII N-terminal domain leads to a change in the properties of the recombinant protein. Unlike Ecl18kI, which made the basis of NCRII-18, the fusion protein predominantly recognizes the CCWGG sites, having lost the capability of interacting with the CCSGG sites. Experimental data support the hypothesis of a close evolutionary relationship between type IIE and IIP restriction endonucleases via a recombination between domains with active site structure and elements for recognition with domains responsible for recognition of DNA sequences. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  10. The DNA repair endonuclease Mus81 facilitates fast DNA replication in the absence of exogenous damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Haiqing; Martin, Melvenia M.; Regairaz, Marie; Huang, Liang; You, Yang; Lin, Chi-Mei; Ryan, Michael; Kim, RyangGuk; Shimura, Tsutomu; Pommier, Yves; Aladjem, Mirit I.

    2015-01-01

    The Mus81 endonuclease resolves recombination intermediates and mediates cellular responses to exogenous replicative stress. Here, we show that Mus81 also regulates the rate of DNA replication during normal growth by promoting replication fork progression while reducing the frequency of replication initiation events. In the absence of Mus81 endonuclease activity, DNA synthesis is slowed and replication initiation events are more frequent. In addition, Mus81 deficient cells fail to recover from exposure to low doses of replication inhibitors and cell viability is dependent on the XPF endonuclease. Despite an increase in replication initiation frequency, cells lacking Mus81 use the same pool of replication origins as Mus81-expressing cells. Therefore, decelerated DNA replication in Mus81 deficient cells does not initiate from cryptic or latent origins not used during normal growth. These results indicate that Mus81 plays a key role in determining the rate of DNA replication without activating a novel group of replication origins. PMID:25879486

  11. DNA-hosted Hoechst dyes: application for label-free fluorescent monitoring of endonuclease activity and inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiao-Qin; Guo, Su-Miao; Zhang, Min; Zhou, Ming; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2014-11-21

    A simple and facile approach was developed for monitoring EcoRI endonuclease activity and inhibition, in which a hairpin-like DNA containing restriction cutting site for EcoRI endonuclease acts as the sensing element and Hoechst dyes as the signal indicator in a label-free format.

  12. The mitochondrial LSU rRNA group II intron of Ustilago maydis encodes an active homing endonuclease likely involved in intron mobility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Pfeifer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The a2 mating type locus gene lga2 is critical for uniparental mitochondrial DNA inheritance during sexual development of Ustilago maydis. Specifically, the absence of lga2 results in biparental inheritance, along with efficient transfer of intronic regions in the large subunit rRNA gene between parental molecules. However, the underlying role of the predicted LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease gene I-UmaI located within the group II intron LRII1 has remained unresolved. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have investigated the enzymatic activity of I-UmaI in vitro based on expression of a tagged full-length and a naturally occurring mutant derivative, which harbors only the N-terminal LAGLIDADG domain. This confirmed Mg²⁺-dependent endonuclease activity and cleavage at the LRII1 insertion site to generate four base pair extensions with 3' overhangs. Specifically, I-UmaI recognizes an asymmetric DNA sequence with a minimum length of 14 base pairs (5'-GACGGGAAGACCCT-3' and tolerates subtle base pair substitutions within the homing site. Enzymatic analysis of the mutant variant indicated a correlation between the activity in vitro and intron homing. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that putatively functional or former functional I-UmaI homologs are confined to a few members within the Ustilaginales and Agaricales, including the phylogenetically distant species Lentinula edodes, and are linked to group II introns inserted into homologous positions in the LSU rDNA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present data provide strong evidence that intron homing efficiently operates under conditions of biparental inheritance in U. maydis. Conversely, uniparental inheritance may be critical to restrict the transmission of mobile introns. Bioinformatic analyses suggest that I-UmaI-associated introns have been acquired independently in distant taxa and are more widespread than anticipated from available genomic data.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the type IV restriction endonuclease ScoMcrA from Streptomyces coelicolor, which cleaves both Dcm-methylated DNA and phosphorothioated DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guang; Zhang, Zhenyi; Zhao, Gong; Deng, Zixin; Wu, Geng; He, Xinyi

    2015-01-01

    ScoMcrA is a type IV modification-dependent restriction endonuclease found in the model strain Streptomyces coelicolor. Unlike type I, II and III restriction endonucleases, which cleave unmodified DNA, type IV restriction endonucleases cleave modified DNA, including methylated, hydroxymethylated, glucosyl-hydroxymethylated and phosphorothioated DNA. ScoMcrA targets both Dcm-methylated DNA and phosphorothioated DNA, and makes double-strand breaks 16-28 nt away from the modified nucleotides or the phosphorothioate links. However, the mechanism by which ScoMcrA recognizes these two entirely different types of modification remains unclear. In this study, the ScoMcrA protein was overexpressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals diffracted to 3.35 Å resolution and belonged to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1). The unit-cell parameters were determined to be a=130.19, b=139.36, c=281.01 Å, α=β=γ=90°. These results will facilitate the detailed structural analysis of ScoMcrA and further elucidation of its biochemical mechanism.

  14. Polymorphic restriction endonuclease fragment segregates and correlates with the gene for HLA-B8.

    OpenAIRE

    Cann, H M; Ascanio, L; Paul, P; Marcadet, A; Dausset, J; Cohen, D

    1983-01-01

    Cellular DNA from HLA-typed individuals was digested with the restriction endonuclease EcoRV. After electrophoresis and transfer to a hybridization membrane, the restriction endonuclease fragments were probed with cDNA carrying the nucleotide sequence encoding a class 1 HLA gene. Polymorphism for presence or absence of various EcoRV fragments was noted in a panel of unrelated HLA-typed individuals. A polymorphic 8.6-kilobase pair EcoRV fragment was found which correlated in the panel with the...

  15. Cleavage and protection of locked nucleic acid-modified DNA by restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouzier, Lucile; Dubois, Camille; Wengel, Jesper; Veedu, Rakesh N

    2012-07-15

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA) is one of the most prominent nucleic acid analogues reported so far. We herein for the first time report cleavage by restriction endonuclease of LNA-modified DNA oligonucleotides. The experiments revealed that RsaI is an efficient enzyme capable of recognizing and cleaving LNA-modified DNA oligonucleotides. Furthermore, introduction of LNA nucleotides protects against cleavage by the restriction endonucleases PvuII, PstI, SacI, KpnI and EcoRI. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Asymmetric distances for binary embeddings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordo, Albert; Perronnin, Florent; Gong, Yunchao; Lazebnik, Svetlana

    2014-01-01

    In large-scale query-by-example retrieval, embedding image signatures in a binary space offers two benefits: data compression and search efficiency. While most embedding algorithms binarize both query and database signatures, it has been noted that this is not strictly a requirement. Indeed, asymmetric schemes that binarize the database signatures but not the query still enjoy the same two benefits but may provide superior accuracy. In this work, we propose two general asymmetric distances that are applicable to a wide variety of embedding techniques including locality sensitive hashing (LSH), locality sensitive binary codes (LSBC), spectral hashing (SH), PCA embedding (PCAE), PCAE with random rotations (PCAE-RR), and PCAE with iterative quantization (PCAE-ITQ). We experiment on four public benchmarks containing up to 1M images and show that the proposed asymmetric distances consistently lead to large improvements over the symmetric Hamming distance for all binary embedding techniques.

  17. Asymmetric cation-binding catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira, Maria Teresa; Lee, Jiwoong

    2017-01-01

    The employment of metal salts is quite limited in asymmetric catalysis, although it would provide an additional arsenal of safe and inexpensive reagents to create molecular functions with high optical purity. Cation chelation by polyethers increases the salts' solubility in conventional organic...... solvents, thus increasing their applicability in synthesis. The expansion of this concept to chiral polyethers led to the emergence of asymmetric cation-binding catalysis, where chiral counter anions are generated from metal salts, particularly using BINOL-based polyethers. Alkali metal salts, namely KF...... and KCN, are selectively bound to the catalyst, providing exceptionally high enantioselectivities for kinetic resolutions, elimination reactions (fluoride base), and Strecker synthesis (cyanide nucleophile). Asymmetric cation-binding catalysis was recently expanded to silicon-based reagents, enabling...

  18. Dark soliton scattering in symmetric and asymmetric double potential barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsitoura, F.; Anastassi, Z. A.; Marzuola, J. L.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Frantzeskakis, D. J.

    2017-08-01

    Motivated by the recent theoretical study of (bright) soliton diode effects in systems with multiple scatterers, as well as by experimental investigations of soliton-impurity interactions, we consider some prototypical case examples of interactions of dark solitons with a pair of scatterers. In a way fundamentally opposite to the case of bright solitons (but consonant to their ;anti-particle character;), we find that dark solitons accelerate as they pass the first barrier and hence cannot be trapped by a second equal-height barrier. A pair of unequal barriers may lead to reflection from the second one, however trapping in the inter-barrier region cannot occur. We also give some examples of dynamical adjusting of the barriers to trap the dark soliton in the inter-barrier region, yet we show that this can only occur over finite time horizons, with the dark soliton always escaping eventually, contrary again to what is potentially the case with bright solitons.

  19. Does asymmetric correlation affect portfolio optimization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryd, Lukas

    2017-07-01

    The classical portfolio optimization problem does not assume asymmetric behavior of relationship among asset returns. The existence of asymmetric response in correlation on the bad news could be important information in portfolio optimization. The paper applies Dynamic conditional correlation model (DCC) and his asymmetric version (ADCC) to propose asymmetric behavior of conditional correlation. We analyse asymmetric correlation among S&P index, bonds index and spot gold price before mortgage crisis in 2008. We evaluate forecast ability of the models during and after mortgage crisis and demonstrate the impact of asymmetric correlation on the reduction of portfolio variance.

  20. Hydroxamic acids in asymmetric synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2013-02-19

    Metal-catalyzed stereoselective reactions are a central theme in organic chemistry research. In these reactions, the stereoselection is achieved predominantly by introducing chiral ligands at the metal catalyst's center. For decades, researchers have sought better chiral ligands for asymmetric catalysis and have made great progress. Nevertheless, to achieve optimal stereoselectivity and to catalyze new reactions, new chiral ligands are needed. Because of their high metal affinity, hydroxamic acids play major roles across a broad spectrum of fields from biochemistry to metal extraction. Dr. K. Barry Sharpless first revealed their potential as chiral ligands for asymmetric synthesis in 1977: He published the chiral vanadium-hydroxamic-acid-catalyzed, enantioselective epoxidation of allylic alcohols before his discovery of Sharpless asymmetric epoxidation, which uses the titanium-tartrate complex as the chiral reagent. However, researchers have reported few highly enantioselective reactions using metal-hydroxamic acid as catalysts since then. This Account summarizes our research on metal-catalyzed asymmetric epoxidation using hydroxamic acids as chiral ligands. We designed and synthesized a series of new hydroxamic acids, most notably the C2-symmetric bis-hydroxamic acid (BHA) family. V-BHA-catalyzed epoxidation of allylic and homoallylic alcohols achieved higher activity and stereoselectivity than Sharpless asymmetric epoxidation in many cases. Changing the metal species led to a series of unprecedented asymmetric epoxidation reactions, such as (i) single olefins and sulfides with Mo-BHA, (ii) homoallylic and bishomoallylic alcohols with Zr- and Hf-BHA, and (iii) N-alkenyl sulfonamides and N-sulfonyl imines with Hf-BHA. These reactions produce uniquely functionalized chiral epoxides with good yields and enantioselectivities.

  1. Endonuclease IV cleaves apurinic/apyrimidinic sites in single-stranded DNA and its application for biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiang-Juan; Wu, Shuang; Cen, Yao; Chen, Ting-Ting; Yu, Ru-Qin; Chu, Xia

    2016-07-21

    Endonuclease IV (Endo IV), as a DNA repairing enzyme, plays a crucial role in repairing damaged DNA comprising abasic sites to maintain genomic integrity. The cleaving capability of Endo IV to apurinic/apyrimidinic sites (AP) in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) was demonstrated. It was found that Endo IV has considerably high cleaving activity to AP sites in ssDNA compared with that in double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). The unique feature of Endo IV in cleaving AP sites in ssDNA was further applied to construct a novel dual signal amplified sensing system for highly sensitive enzyme and protein detection by a combination of exonuclease III (Exo III)-aided cyclic amplification reaction and a rolling circle replication (RCR) technique, which showed a good sensing performance with a detection limit of 0.008 U mL(-1) for Endo IV and 2.5 pM for streptavidin. In addition, the developed method had considerably high specificity for Endo IV and streptavidin over other potential interferences. The developed strategy indeed provides a novel platform for protein and enzyme assays and may find a broad spectrum of applications in bioanalysis, disease diagnosis, and drug development.

  2. Structure-specific DNA endonuclease Mus81/Eme1 generates DNA damage caused by Chk1 inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep V Forment

    Full Text Available The DNA-damage checkpoint kinase Chk1 is essential in higher eukaryotes due to its role in maintaining genome stability in proliferating cells. CHK1 gene deletion is embryonically lethal, and Chk1 inhibition in replicating cells causes cell-cycle defects that eventually lead to perturbed replication and replication-fork collapse, thus generating endogenous DNA damage. What is the cause of replication-fork collapse when Chk1 is inactivated, however, remains poorly understood. Here, we show that generation of DNA double-strand breaks at replication forks when Chk1 activity is compromised relies on the DNA endonuclease complex Mus81/Eme1. Importantly, we show that Mus81/Eme1-dependent DNA damage--rather than a global increase in replication-fork stalling--is the cause of incomplete replication in Chk1-deficient cells. Consequently, Mus81/Eme1 depletion alleviates the S-phase progression defects associated with Chk1 deficiency, thereby increasing cell survival. Chk1-mediated protection of replication forks from Mus81/Eme1 even under otherwise unchallenged conditions is therefore vital to prevent uncontrolled fork collapse and ensure proper S-phase progression in human cells.

  3. Antibiotic resistance and restriction endonucleases in fecal enterococci of chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra Linnaeus, 1758).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandžurová, A; Hrašková, I; Júdová, J; Javorský, P; Pristaš, P

    2012-07-01

    Two hundred eighty-four isolates of enterococci from feces of wild living chamois from alpine environments were tested for sensitivity to three antibiotics. Low frequency of resistance was observed in studied enterococcal populations (about 5 % for tetracycline and erythromycin and 0 % for ampicillin). In six animals, the population of enterococci lacked any detectable resistance. Our data indicated that enterococcal population in feces of the majority of studied animals did not encounter mobile genetic elements encoding antibiotic resistance probably due to spatial separation and/or due to low exposure to the antibiotics. Based on resistance profiles observed, three populations were analyzed for the presence of restriction endonucleases. The restriction enzymes from two isolates-31K and 1K-were further purified and characterized. Restriction endonuclease Efa1KI recognizes CCWGG sequence and is an isoschizomer of BstNI. Endonuclease Efc31KI, a BsmAI isoschizomer, recognizes the sequence GTCTC and it is a first restriction endonuclease identified in Enterococcus faecium. Our data indicate that restriction-modification (R-M) systems do not represent an efficient barrier for antibiotic resistance spreading; enterococcal populations colonized by antibiotics resistance genes were also colonized by the R-M systems.

  4. Structural studies on metal-containing enzymes: T4 endonuclease VII and D. gigas formate dehydrogenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaijmakers, H.C.A.

    2001-01-01

    Many biological processes require metal ions, and many of these metal-ion functions involve metalloproteins. The metal ions in metalloproteins are often critical to the protein's function, structure, or stability. This thesis focuses on two of these proteins, bacteriophage T4 endonuclease

  5. Altered UV resistance and UV mutational spectrum in repair-proficient murine fibroblasts expressing endonuclease V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusewitt, D F; Dyble, J; Sherburn, T E; Ryan, S L; Ji, J Y

    1998-03-01

    In previously reported studies, we transfected repair-proficient murine fibroblasts with the denV gene of bacteriophage T4 and showed that expression of encoded endonuclease V markedly enhanced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) repair and reduced the frequency of ultraviolet radiation (UV)-induced mutations. In the present studies, we compared the spectra of UV-induced mutations at the hprt locus in denV-transfected and control cells. A significant difference in mutation types was observed. While multiple base deletions and single base insertions were found in denV-transfected but not control cells, multiple tandem and non-tandem point mutations identified in control cells were absent in denV-transfected cells. When we compared colony survival following UV exposure in the two cell lines, it appeared that endonuclease V expression did not enhance UV resistance, instead denV-transfected cells had increased susceptibility to low fluences of UV. The effects of endonuclease V expression on UV resistance and on UV mutational spectrum are likely to be due both to the removal of CPDs and to the novel enzymatic activity of endonuclease V.

  6. [Flap endonuclease-1 and its role in the processes of DNA metabolism in eucaryotic cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarkina, Zh K; Lavrik, O I; Khodyreva, S N

    2008-01-01

    Flap endonuclease-1 (FEN1) is a structure specific endonuclease. The natural substrates of FEN1 are 5'-flap structures formed by three DNA chains one of them has unannealed flapped 5'-end (flap). Flap structures are the intermediates of different processes of DNA metabolism, such as DNA recombination, Okazaki fragment maturation during replication of lagging strand, as well as strand displacement DNA synthesis in base excision repair. FEN1 also possesses 5'-exonuclease activity and newly discovered gap endonuclease activity. FEN1 is known to interact physically and functionally with a number of DNA replication and repair proteins such as the proliferating cell nuclear antigen, helicase/nuclease Dna2, WRN and BLM proteins, replication protein A, apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1, DNA polymerase beta, poly(ADP-riboso) polymerase 1, high mobility group protein 1, integrase of human immunodeficiency virus, transcription coactivator p300, chromatin proteins, cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdk1, Cdk2, Cyclin A). FEN1 activity is significant for maintaining the integrity of repeat sequences in genome. Recent data suppose the correlation between the abnormality of hFEN1 activity and arising/progression of neurodegenerative and cancer diseases. FEN1 has the dramatic effect on cell growth and development thereby attracting the interest to this enzyme.

  7. Structural aspects of catalytic mechanisms of endonucleases and their binding to nucleic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Balaev, V. V.; Lyashenko, A. V.; Lashkov, A. A.

    2012-05-01

    Endonucleases (EC 3.1) are enzymes of the hydrolase class that catalyze the hydrolytic cleavage of deoxyribonucleic and ribonucleic acids at any region of the polynucleotide chain. Endonucleases are widely used both in biotechnological processes and in veterinary medicine as antiviral agents. Medical applications of endonucleases in human cancer therapy hold promise. The results of X-ray diffraction studies of the spatial organization of endonucleases and their complexes and the mechanism of their action are analyzed and generalized. An analysis of the structural studies of this class of enzymes showed that the specific binding of enzymes to nucleic acids is characterized by interactions with nitrogen bases and the nucleotide backbone, whereas the nonspecific binding of enzymes is generally characterized by interactions only with the nucleic-acid backbone. It should be taken into account that the specificity can be modulated by metal ions and certain low-molecular-weight organic compounds. To test the hypotheses about specific and nonspecific nucleic-acid-binding proteins, it is necessary to perform additional studies of atomic-resolution three-dimensional structures of enzyme-nucleic-acid complexes by methods of structural biology.

  8. Molecular Recognition of DNA Damage Sites by Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonucleases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, W. A.

    2005-07-28

    The DNA repair/redox factor AP endonuclease 1 (APE1) is a multifunctional protein which is known to to be essential for DNA repair activity in human cells. Structural/functional analyses of the APE activity is thus been an important research field to assess cellular defense mechanisms against ionizing radiation.

  9. PCNA function in the activation and strand direction of MutLα endonuclease in mismatch repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluciennik, Anna; Dzantiev, Leonid; Iyer, Ravi R.; Constantin, Nicoleta; Kadyrov, Farid A.; Modrich, Paul

    2010-01-01

    MutLα (MLH1–PMS2) is a latent endonuclease that is activated in a mismatch-, MutSα-, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-, replication factor C (RFC)-, and ATP-dependent manner, with nuclease action directed to the heteroduplex strand that contains a preexisting break. RFC depletion experiments and use of linear DNAs indicate that RFC function in endonuclease activation is limited to PCNA loading. Whereas nicked circular heteroduplex DNA is a good substrate for PCNA loading and for endonuclease activation on the incised strand, covalently closed, relaxed circular DNA is a poor substrate for both reactions. However, covalently closed supercoiled or bubble-containing relaxed heteroduplexes, which do support PCNA loading, also support MutLα activation, but in this case cleavage strand bias is largely abolished. Based on these findings we suggest that PCNA has two roles in MutLα function: The clamp is required for endonuclease activation, an effect that apparently involves interaction of the two proteins, and by virtue of its loading orientation, PCNA determines the strand direction of MutLα incision. These results also provide a potential mechanism for activation of mismatch repair on nonreplicating DNA, an effect that may have implications for the somatic phase of triplet repeat expansion. PMID:20713735

  10. Structural aspects of catalytic mechanisms of endonucleases and their binding to nucleic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Balaev, V. V.; Lyashenko, A. V.; Lashkov, A. A., E-mail: alashkov83@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2012-05-15

    Endonucleases (EC 3.1) are enzymes of the hydrolase class that catalyze the hydrolytic cleavage of deoxyribonucleic and ribonucleic acids at any region of the polynucleotide chain. Endonucleases are widely used both in biotechnological processes and in veterinary medicine as antiviral agents. Medical applications of endonucleases in human cancer therapy hold promise. The results of X-ray diffraction studies of the spatial organization of endonucleases and their complexes and the mechanism of their action are analyzed and generalized. An analysis of the structural studies of this class of enzymes showed that the specific binding of enzymes to nucleic acids is characterized by interactions with nitrogen bases and the nucleotide backbone, whereas the nonspecific binding of enzymes is generally characterized by interactions only with the nucleic-acid backbone. It should be taken into account that the specificity can be modulated by metal ions and certain low-molecular-weight organic compounds. To test the hypotheses about specific and nonspecific nucleic-acid-binding proteins, it is necessary to perform additional studies of atomic-resolution three-dimensional structures of enzyme-nucleic-acid complexes by methods of structural biology.

  11. Arthrobacter luteus restriction endonuclease cleavage map of X174 RF DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vereijken, J.M.; Mansfeld, A.D.M. van; Baas, P.D.; Jansz, H.S.

    1975-01-01

    Cleavage of X174 RF DNA with the restriction endonuclease from Arthrobacter luteus (Alu I) produces 23 fragments of approximately 24–1100 base pairs in length. The order of most of these fragments has been established by digestion of Haemophilus influenzae Rd (Hind II) and Haemophilus aegyptius (Hae

  12. Sequence-dependent cleavage of mismatched DNA by Ban I restriction endonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Weimin; Zhu, Dan; Keohavong, Phouthone

    2017-10-01

    Restriction enzymes have previously shown the ability to cleave DNA substrates with mismatched base(s) in recognition sequences; in this study, Ban I endonuclease demonstrated this same ability. Single base substitutions were introduced, and fragments containing various types of unpaired base(s) (heteroduplex fragments) within the Ban I endonuclease recognition sequence, 5'-G|GPyPuCC-3', were generated. Each of the heteroduplex fragments was treated with Ban I endonuclease and analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Our results showed that heteroduplex fragments containing mismatched bases at either the first or third position of the Ban I recognition sequence or, because of the symmetrical structure of the sequence, the sixth or fourth position on the opposite strand were cleaved by the enzyme. Furthermore, these cleaved fragments contained at least one strand corresponding to the original Ban I recognition sequence. Fragments with mismatches formed by an A (noncanonical, nc) opposite a purine (canonical, ca) or a T (nc) opposite a pyrimidine (ca) were cleaved more efficiently than other types of mismatched bases. These results may help elucidate the mechanisms by which DNA and protein interact during the process of DNA cleavage by Ban I endonuclease. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Problem-solving test: digestion of a plasmid with restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberényi, József

    2013-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: plasmid, restriction endonuclease, agarose gel electrophoresis, ethidium bromide staining, autoradiography, Coomassie staining, Southern blotting, linear and circular DNA, superhelical DNA, exonuclease, modification methylase, palindrome, sticky and blunt ends, nicked circular DNA. Copyright © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Direct endonuclease digestion and multi-analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphisms by microchip electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamine, Rie; Yatsushiro, Shouki; Yamamura, Shouhei; Kido, Jun-ichi; Shinohara, Yasuo; Baba, Yoshinobu; Kataoka, Masatoshi

    2009-12-05

    A high-performance multi-analysis system for genotypic mutation by means of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) involving endonuclease treatment of PCR-amplified DNA on a microchip and subsequent analysis by microchip electrophoresis for DNA sizing was developed. A Hitachi SV1210 system, with which 12 samples can be analyzed on a plastic chip with good accuracy as to DNA sizing between 25 and 300 bp, was employed for RFLP analysis. We performed RFLP analysis of the ABO genotypes of blood donors for whom the ABO type was known. Six blood samples were analyzed by PCR to amplify two different regions of the genomic DNA, each of the amplified DNAs containing a different nucleotide polymorphism. To analyze the genes at polymorphic sites 261 and 526, restriction endonucleases Kpn I and Ban I were employed, respectively. When an amplified DNA was digested with each endonuclease on a microchip for 20 min, sequential analysis revealed the presence or absence of the respective restriction site. This analysis was performed within 7 min using a 1/10 volume of a DNA sample in comparison with the conventional method, and the estimated DNA size differed from the predicted size by less than 10 bp. The results indicate the potential of microchip electrophoresis for RFLP with on-chip direct endonuclease digestion and sequential analysis, offering high resolution in a short time.

  15. Accurate scanning of the BssHII endonuclease in search for its DNA cleavage site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, B.; van Wamel, J.

    1996-01-01

    A facilitated diffusion mechanism has been proposed to account for the kinetic efficiency with which restriction endonucleases are able to locate DNA recognition sites. Such a mechanism involves the initial formation of a nonspecific complex upon collision of the protein with the DNA, with the

  16. Insights into the DNA cleavage mechanism of human LINE-1 retrotransposon endonuclease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Repanas, K.; Fuentes, G.; Cohen, S.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.; Perrakis, A.

    2008-01-01

    The human LINE-1 endonuclease (L1-EN) contributes in defining the genomic integration sites of the abundant human L1 and Alu retrotransposons. LINEs have been considered as possible vehicles for gene delivery and understanding the mechanism of L1-EN could help engineering them as genetic tools. We

  17. Asymmetric hydrogenation using monodentate phosphoramidite ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minnaard, Adriaan J.; Feringa, Ben L.; Lefort, Laurent; De Vries, Johannes G.

    2007-01-01

    Monodentate phosphoramidites are excellent ligands for Rh-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenations of substituted olefins. Enantioselectivities between 95 and 99% were obtained in the asymmetric hydrogenation of protected alpha- and beta-dehydroamino acids and esters, itaconic acid and esters, aromatic

  18. Asymmetric Synthesis via Chiral Aziridines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanner, David Ackland; Harden, Adrian; Wyatt, Paul

    1996-01-01

    A series of chiral bis(aziridines) has been synthesised and evaluated as chelating ligands for a variety of asymmetric transformations mediated by metals [Os (dihydroxylation), Pd (allylic alkylation) Cu (cyclopropanation and aziridination, Li (1,2-addition of organolithiums to imines)]. In the b...

  19. Structure of asymmetrical peptide dendrimers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okrugin, B.M.; Neelov, I.M.; Leermakers, F.A.M.; Borisov, Oleg V.

    2017-01-01

    Structural properties of asymmetric peptide dendrimers up to the 11th generation are studied on the basis of the self-consistent field Scheutjens-Fleer numerical approach. It is demonstrated that large scale properties such as, e.g., the gyration radius, are relatively weakly affected by the

  20. Second human protein with homology to the Escherichia coli abasic endonuclease exonuclease III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, M Z; Wilson, D M

    2000-01-01

    There are two major apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease/3'-diesterase families designated after the Escherichia coli proteins exonuclease III (ExoIII) and endonuclease IV (EndoIV). These repair proteins function to excise mutagenic and cytotoxic AP sites or 3'-phosphate/phosphoglycolate groups from DNA. In mammals, the predominant repair endonuclease is Ape1, a homolog of ExoIII, whereas a mammalian homolog to EndoIV has not been identified to date. We have identified a human protein termed Ape2 that represents a subclass of the ExoIII family (exhibiting highest similarity to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ETH1/APN2 gene product) and maintains many of the essential functional residues of the ExoIII-like proteins. The human protein is 518 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 57.3 kDa and a pI of 8.65. Unlike Ape1, this protein exhibited only weak ability to complement the repair defects of AP endonuclease/3'-repair-defective bacteria and yeast. Similarly, a weak, but specific, DNA-binding and incision activity for abasic site-containing substrates was observed with partially purified Ape2 protein. APE2 is located on the X chromosome at position p11.21 and consists of six exons. The transcript for APE2 is ubiquitously expressed, suggesting an important function for the encoded protein. An Ape2 green fluorescent fusion protein localized predominantly to the nucleus of HeLa cells, indicating a nuclear function; this localization was dependent on the C-terminal domain. We discuss our results in the context of the evolutionary conservation of the AP endonuclease families and their divergent activities and biological contributions.

  1. Cyclodextrins in Asymmetric and Stereospecific Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fliur Macaev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Since their discovery, cyclodextrins have widely been used as green and easily available alternatives to promoters or catalysts of different chemical reactions in water. This review covers the research and application of cyclodextrins and their derivatives in asymmetric and stereospecific syntheses, with their division into three main groups: (1 cyclodextrins promoting asymmetric and stereospecific catalysis in water; (2 cyclodextrins’ complexes with transition metals as asymmetric and stereospecific catalysts; and (3 cyclodextrins’ non-metallic derivatives as asymmetric and stereospecific catalysts. The scope of this review is to systematize existing information on the contribution of cyclodextrins to asymmetric and stereospecific synthesis and, thus, to facilitate further development in this direction.

  2. A Note on Asymmetric Thick Branes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bazeia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study asymmetric thick braneworld scenarios, generated after adding a constant to the superpotential associated with the scalar field. We study in particular models with odd and even polynomial superpotentials, and we show that asymmetric brane can be generated irrespective of the potential being symmetric or asymmetric. We study in addition the nonpolynomial sine-Gordon like model, also constructed with the inclusion of a constant in the standard superpotential, and we investigate gravitational stability of the asymmetric brane. The results suggest robustness of the new braneworld scenarios and add further possibilities of the construction of asymmetric branes.

  3. Scaling of cross-sections for asymmetric (e, 3e) process on helium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 63; Issue 5. Scaling of ... An approximate simple scaling law is obtained for asymmetric (, 3) process on helium-like ions for double ionization by fast electrons. ... The scaling law becomes increasingly accurate as the target nuclear charge and the energy increase.

  4. Quantitation and analysis of the formation of HO-endonuclease stimulated chromosomal translocations by single-strand annealing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddell, Lauren; Manthey, Glenn; Pannunzio, Nicholas; Bailis, Adam

    2011-09-23

    Genetic variation is frequently mediated by genomic rearrangements that arise through interaction between dispersed repetitive elements present in every eukaryotic genome. This process is an important mechanism for generating diversity between and within organisms(1-3). The human genome consists of approximately 40% repetitive sequence of retrotransposon origin, including a variety of LINEs and SINEs(4). Exchange events between these repetitive elements can lead to genome rearrangements, including translocations, that can disrupt gene dosage and expression that can result in autoimmune and cardiovascular diseases(5), as well as cancer in humans(6-9). Exchange between repetitive elements occurs in a variety of ways. Exchange between sequences that share perfect (or near-perfect) homology occurs by a process called homologous recombination (HR). By contrast, non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) uses little-or-no sequence homology for exchange(10,11). The primary purpose of HR, in mitotic cells, is to repair double-strand breaks (DSBs) generated endogenously by aberrant DNA replication and oxidative lesions, or by exposure to ionizing radiation (IR), and other exogenous DNA damaging agents. In the assay described here, DSBs are simultaneously created bordering recombination substrates at two different chromosomal loci in diploid cells by a galactose-inducible HO-endonuclease (Figure 1). The repair of the broken chromosomes generates chromosomal translocations by single strand annealing (SSA), a process where homologous sequences adjacent to the chromosome ends are covalently joined subsequent to annealing. One of the substrates, his3-Δ3', contains a 3' truncated HIS3 allele and is located on one copy of chromosome XV at the native HIS3 locus. The second substrate, his3-Δ5', is located at the LEU2 locus on one copy of chromosome III, and contains a 5' truncated HIS3 allele. Both substrates are flanked by a HO endonuclease recognition site that can be targeted for

  5. Geodesics in Asymmetric Metric Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mennucci Andrea C. G.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In a recent paper [17] we studied asymmetric metric spaces; in this context we studied the length of paths, introduced the class of run-continuous paths; and noted that there are different definitions of “length spaces” (also known as “path-metric spaces” or “intrinsic spaces”. In this paper we continue the analysis of asymmetric metric spaces.We propose possible definitions of completeness and (local compactness.We define the geodesics using as admissible paths the class of run-continuous paths.We define midpoints, convexity, and quasi-midpoints, but without assuming the space be intrinsic.We distinguish all along those results that need a stronger separation hypothesis. Eventually we discuss how the newly developed theory impacts the most important results, such as the existence of geodesics, and the renowned Hopf-Rinow (or Cohn-Vossen theorem.

  6. Electron Jet of Asymmetric Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Graham, D. B.; Norgren, C.; Eriksson, E.; Li, W.; Johlander, A.; Vaivads, A.; Andre, M.; Pritchett, P. L.; Retino, A.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present Magnetospheric Multiscale observations of an electron-scale current sheet and electron outflow jet for asymmetric reconnection with guide field at the subsolar magnetopause. The electron jet observed within the reconnection region has an electron Mach number of 0.35 and is associated with electron agyrotropy. The jet is unstable to an electrostatic instability which generates intense waves with E(sub parallel lines) amplitudes reaching up to 300 mV/m and potentials up to 20% of the electron thermal energy. We see evidence of interaction between the waves and the electron beam, leading to quick thermalization of the beam and stabilization of the instability. The wave phase speed is comparable to the ion thermal speed, suggesting that the instability is of Buneman type, and therefore introduces electron-ion drag and leads to braking of the electron flow. Our observations demonstrate that electrostatic turbulence plays an important role in the electron-scale physics of asymmetric reconnection.

  7. Conserved structural chemistry for incision activity in structurally non-homologous apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease APE1 and endonuclease IV DNA repair enzymes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Shin, David S.; Mol, Clifford D.; Izum, Tadahide; Arvai, Andrew S.; Mantha, Anil K.; Szczesny, Bartosz; Ivanov, Ivaylo N.; Hosfield, David J.; Maiti, Buddhadev; Pique, Mike E.; Frankel, Kenneth A.; Hitomi, Kenichi; Cunningham, Richard P.; Mitra, Sankar; Tainer, John A.

    2013-03-22

    Non-coding apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites in DNA form spontaneously and as DNA base excision repair intermediates are the most common toxic and mutagenic in vivo DNA lesion. For repair, AP sites must be processed by 5' AP endonucleases in initial stages of base repair. Human APE1 and bacterial Nfo represent the two conserved 5' AP endonuclease families in the biosphere; they both recognize AP sites and incise the phosphodiester backbone 5' to the lesion, yet they lack similar structures and metal ion requirements. Here, we determined and analyzed crystal structures of a 2.4 ? resolution APE1-DNA product complex with Mg(2+) and a 0.92 Nfo with three metal ions. Structural and biochemical comparisons of these two evolutionarily distinct enzymes characterize key APE1 catalytic residues that are potentially functionally similar to Nfo active site components, as further tested and supported by computational analyses. We observe a magnesium-water cluster in the APE1 active site, with only Glu-96 forming the direct protein coordination to the Mg(2+). Despite differences in structure and metal requirements of APE1 and Nfo, comparison of their active site structures surprisingly reveals strong geometric conservation of the catalytic reaction, with APE1 catalytic side chains positioned analogously to Nfo metal positions, suggesting surprising functional equivalence between Nfo metal ions and APE1 residues. The finding that APE1 residues are positioned to substitute for Nfo metal ions is supported by the impact of mutations on activity. Collectively, the results illuminate the activities of residues, metal ions, and active site features for abasic site endonucleases.

  8. Asymmetric information and macroeconomic dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Raymond J.; Aoki, Masanao; Roy Frieden, B.

    2010-09-01

    We show how macroeconomic dynamics can be derived from asymmetric information. As an illustration of the utility of this approach we derive the equilibrium density, non-equilibrium densities and the equation of motion for the response to a demand shock for productivity in a simple economy. Novel consequences of this approach include a natural incorporation of time dependence into macroeconomics and a common information-theoretic basis for economics and other fields seeking to link micro-dynamics and macro-observables.

  9. Comprehensive asymmetric dark matter model

    OpenAIRE

    Lonsdale, Stephen J.; Volkas, Raymond R.

    2018-01-01

    Asymmetric dark matter (ADM) is motivated by the similar cosmological mass densities measured for ordinary and dark matter. We present a comprehensive theory for ADM that addresses the mass density similarity, going beyond the usual ADM explanations of similar number densities. It features an explicit matter-antimatter asymmetry generation mechanism, has one fully worked out thermal history and suggestions for other possibilities, and meets all phenomenological, cosmological and astrophysical...

  10. Up-down asymmetric tokamaks

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Bulk toroidal rotation has proven capable of stabilising both dangerous MHD modes and turbulence. In this thesis, we explore a method to drive rotation in large tokamaks: up-down asymmetry in the magnetic equilibrium. We seek to maximise this rotation by finding optimal up-down asymmetric flux surface shapes. First, we use the ideal MHD model to show that low order external shaping (e.g. elongation) is best for creating up-down asymmetric flux surfaces throughout the device. Then, we calculate realistic up-down asymmetric equilibria for input into nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence analysis. Analytic gyrokinetics shows that, in the limit of fast shaping effects, a poloidal tilt of the flux surface shaping has little effect on turbulent transport. Since up-down symmetric surfaces do not transport momentum, this invariance to tilt implies that devices with mirror symmetry about any line in the poloidal plane will drive minimal rotation. Accordingly, further analytic investigation suggests that non-mirror symmetri...

  11. Identification of Egyptian Fasciola species by PCR and restriction endonucleases digestion of the nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gozamy, Bothina R; Shoukry, Nahla M

    2009-08-01

    Fascioliasis is one of the familiar zoonotic health problems of worldwide distribution including Egypt. In this study, a simple and rapid polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphisms (PCR/RFLPs) assay, using the common restriction endonucleases Aval, EcoRI, Eael, Sac11 and Avail was applied to differentiate between both Fasciola gigantica and F. hepatica. The five restriction endonucleases were used to differentiate between the two species of Fasciola based on -1950 bp long sequence of the 18S nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA gene. Aval and EcoRI restriction endonucleases failed to differentiate between the two Fasciola species when each restriction enzyme gave the same restriction patterns in both of them. However, F. gigantica and F. hepatica were well-differentiated when their small subunit ribosomal DNA were digested with Eael and Sac 11 restriction endonucleases.

  12. UVI31+ is a DNA endonuclease that dynamically localizes to chloroplast pyrenoids in C. reinhardtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Shukla

    Full Text Available UVI31+ is an evolutionarily conserved BolA family protein. In this study we examine the presence, localization and possible functions of this protein in the context of a unicellular alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. UVI31+ in C. reinhardtii exhibits DNA endonuclease activity and is induced upon UV stress. Further, UVI31+ that normally localizes to the cell wall and pyrenoid regions gets redistributed into punctate foci within the whole chloroplast, away from the pyrenoid, upon UV stress. The observed induction upon UV-stress as well as the endonuclease activity suggests plausible role of this protein in DNA repair. We have also observed that UV31+ is induced in C. reinhardtii grown in dark conditions, whereby the protein localization is enhanced in the pyrenoid. Biomolecular interaction between the purified pyrenoids and UVI31+ studied by NMR demonstrates the involvement of the disordered loop domain of the protein in its interaction.

  13. Does quantum entanglement in DNA synchronize the catalytic centers of type II restriction endonucleases?

    CERN Document Server

    Kurian, P; Lindesay, J

    2014-01-01

    Several living systems have been examined for their apparent optimization of structure and function for quantum behavior at biological length scales. Orthodox type II endonucleases, the largest class of restriction enzymes, recognize four-to-eight base pair sequences of palindromic DNA, cut both strands symmetrically, and act without an external metabolite such as ATP. While it is known that these enzymes induce strand breaks by attacking phosphodiester bonds, what remains unclear is the mechanism by which cutting occurs in concert at the catalytic centers. Previous studies indicate the primacy of intimate DNA contacts made by the specifically bound enzyme in coordinating the two synchronized cuts. We propose that collective electronic behavior in the DNA helix generates coherent oscillations, quantized through boundary conditions imposed by the endonuclease, that provide the energy required to break two phosphodiester bonds. Such quanta may be preserved in the presence of thermal noise and electromagnetic in...

  14. Assembly of Francisella novicida Cpf1 endonuclease in complex with guide RNA and target DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alcón, Pablo; Montoya, Guillermo; Stella, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    a target DNA preceded by a 5'-TTN-3' protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) complementary to the RNA guide. To obtain structural insight into the inner workings of Cpf1, the crystallization of an active complex containing the full extent of the crRNA and a 31-nucleotide dsDNA target was attempted. The gene...... encoding Cpf1 from Francisella novicida was cloned, overexpressed and purified. The crRNA was transcribed and purified in vitro. Finally, the ternary FnCpf1-crRNA-DNA complex was assembled and purified by preparative electrophoresis before crystallization. Crystals belonging to space group C2221, with unit...... into six types and 19 subtypes according to conservation of the cas gene and loci organization. Recently, a new protein with endonuclease activity belonging to class 2 type V has been identified. This endonuclease, termed Cpf1, in complex with a single CRISPR RNA (crRNA) is able to recognize and cleave...

  15. Zinc finger nuclease and homing endonuclease-mediated assembly of multigene plant transformation vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeevi, Vardit; Liang, Zhuobin; Arieli, Uri; Tzfira, Tzvi

    2012-01-01

    Binary vectors are an indispensable component of modern Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated plant genetic transformation systems. A remarkable variety of binary plasmids have been developed to support the cloning and transfer of foreign genes into plant cells. The majority of these systems, however, are limited to the cloning and transfer of just a single gene of interest. Thus, plant biologists and biotechnologists face a major obstacle when planning the introduction of multigene traits into transgenic plants. Here, we describe the assembly of multitransgene binary vectors by using a combination of engineered zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and homing endonucleases. Our system is composed of a modified binary vector that has been engineered to carry an array of unique recognition sites for ZFNs and homing endonucleases and a family of modular satellite vectors. By combining the use of designed ZFNs and commercial restriction enzymes, multiple plant expression cassettes were sequentially cloned into the acceptor binary vector. Using this system, we produced binary vectors that carried up to nine genes. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) protoplasts and plants were transiently and stably transformed, respectively, by several multigene constructs, and the expression of the transformed genes was monitored across several generations. Because ZFNs can potentially be engineered to digest a wide variety of target sequences, our system allows overcoming the problem of the very limited number of commercial homing endonucleases. Thus, users of our system can enjoy a rich resource of plasmids that can be easily adapted to their various needs, and since our cloning system is based on ZFN and homing endonucleases, it may be possible to reconstruct other types of binary vectors and adapt our vectors for cloning on multigene vector systems in various binary plasmids.

  16. Identification of two groups of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis strains by restriction endonuclease analysis and DNA hybridization.

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, D M; Gabric, D M; de Lisle, G W

    1990-01-01

    Genomic DNA was prepared from four reference strains of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis and 46 isolates of this organism from New Zealand, Australia, Canada, and Norway and also from two mycobactin-dependent "wood pigeon" strains. The DNA was characterized by restriction endonuclease analysis, both with and without DNA hybridization, with a probe specific to a repetitive DNA sequence in M. paratuberculosis. Both techniques differentiated M. paratuberculosis strains into two groups, but DNA hyb...

  17. Endonuclease VIII-like 3 (Neil3) DNA glycosylase promotes neurogenesis induced by hypoxia-ischemia

    OpenAIRE

    Sejersted, Yngve; Hildrestrand, Gunn A.; Kunke, David; Rolseth, Veslemøy; Krokeide, Silje Z.; Neurauter, Christine G.; Suganthan, Rajikala; Atneosen-Åsegg, Monica; Fleming, Aaron M.; Saugstad, Ola D.; Burrows, Cynthia J.; Luna, Luisa; Bjørås, Magnar

    2011-01-01

    Neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation are required to replace damaged neurons and regain brain function after hypoxic-ischemic events. DNA base lesions accumulating during hypoxic-ischemic stress are removed by DNA glycosylases in the base-excision repair pathway to prevent cytotoxicity and mutagenesis. Expression of the DNA glycosylase endonuclease VIII-like 3 (Neil3) is confined to regenerative subregions in the embryonic and perinatal brains. Here we show profound n...

  18. Engineering of restriction endonucleases: using methylation activity of the bifunctional endonuclease Eco57I to select the mutant with a novel sequence specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimseliene, Renata; Maneliene, Zita; Lubys, Arvydas; Janulaitis, Arvydas

    2003-03-21

    Type II restriction endonucleases (REs) are widely used tools in molecular biology, biotechnology and diagnostics. Efforts to generate new specificities by structure-guided design and random mutagenesis have been unsuccessful so far. We have developed a new procedure called the methylation activity-based selection (MABS) for generating REs with a new specificity. MABS uses a unique property of bifunctional type II REs to methylate DNA targets they recognize. The procedure includes three steps: (1) conversion of a bifunctional RE into a monofunctional DNA-modifying enzyme by cleavage center disruption; (2) mutagenesis and selection of mutants with altered DNA modification specificity based on their ability to protect predetermined DNA targets; (3) reconstitution of the cleavage center's wild-type structure. The efficiency of the MABS technique was demonstrated by altering the sequence specificity of the bifunctional RE Eco57I from 5'-CTGAAG to 5'-CTGRAG, and thus generating the mutant restriction endonuclease (and DNA methyltransferase) of a specificity not known before. This study provides evidence that MABS is a promising technique for generation of REs with new specificities.

  19. Dependence of DNA-protein cross-linking via guanine oxidation upon local DNA sequence as studied by restriction endonuclease inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, Amanda L; Perez, Zitadel A; To, Phuong; Maisonet, Tiffany; Rios, Eunice V; Trejo, Yuri; Ochoa-Paniagua, Carmen; Reno, Anita; Stemp, Eric D A

    2012-01-10

    Oxidative damage plays a causative role in many diseases, and DNA-protein cross-linking is one important consequence of such damage. It is known that GG and GGG sites are particularly prone to one-electron oxidation, and here we examined how the local DNA sequence influences the formation of DNA-protein cross-links induced by guanine oxidation. Oxidative DNA-protein cross-linking was induced between DNA and histone protein via the flash quench technique, a photochemical method that selectively oxidizes the guanine base in double-stranded DNA. An assay based on restriction enzyme cleavage was developed to detect the cross-linking in plasmid DNA. Following oxidation of pBR322 DNA by flash quench, several restriction enzymes (PpuMI, BamHI, EcoRI) were then used to probe the plasmid surface for the expected damage at guanine sites. These three endonucleases were strongly inhibited by DNA-protein cross-linking, whereas the AT-recognizing enzyme AseI was unaffected in its cleavage. These experiments also reveal the susceptibility of different guanine sites toward oxidative cross-linking. The percent inhibition observed for the endonucleases, and their pBR322 cleavage sites, decreased in the order: PpuMI (5'-GGGTCCT-3' and 5'-AGGACCC-3') > BamHI (5'-GGATCC-3') > EcoRI (5'-GAATTC-3'), a trend consistent with the observed and predicted tendencies for guanine to undergo one-electron oxidation: 5'-GGG-3' > 5'-GG-3' > 5'-GA-3'. Thus, it appears that in mixed DNA sequences the guanine sites most vulnerable to oxidative cross-linking are those that are easiest to oxidize. These results further indicate that equilibration of the electron hole in the plasmid DNA occurs on a time scale faster than that of cross-linking.

  20. Investigation of the salicylaldehyde thiosemicarbazone scaffold for inhibition of influenza virus PA endonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogolino, Dominga; Bacchi, Alessia; De Luca, Laura; Rispoli, Gabriele; Sechi, Mario; Stevaert, Annelies; Naesens, Lieve; Carcelli, Mauro

    2015-10-01

    The influenza virus PA endonuclease is an attractive target for the development of novel anti-influenza virus therapeutics, which are urgently needed because of the emergence of drug-resistant viral strains. Reported PA inhibitors are assumed to chelate the divalent metal ion(s) (Mg²⁺ or Mn²⁺) in the enzyme's catalytic site, which is located in the N-terminal part of PA (PA-Nter). In the present work, a series of salicylaldehyde thiosemicarbazone derivatives have been synthesized and evaluated for their ability to inhibit the PA-Nter catalytic activity. Compounds 1-6 have been evaluated against influenza virus, both in enzymatic assays with influenza virus PA-Nter and in virus yield assays in MDCK cells. In order to establish a structure-activity relationship, the hydrazone analogue of the most active thiosemicarbazone has also been evaluated. Since chelation may represent a mode of action of such class of molecules, we studied the interaction of two of them, one with and one without biological activity versus the PA enzyme, towards Mg²⁺, the ion that is probably involved in the endonuclease activity of the heterotrimeric influenza polymerase complex. The crystal structure of the magnesium complex of the o-vanillin thiosemicarbazone ligand 1 is also described. Moreover, docking studies of PA endonuclease with compounds 1 and 2 were performed, to further analyse the possible mechanism of action of this class of inhibitors.

  1. Structure of the endonuclease domain of MutL: unlicensed to cut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillon, Monica C.; Lorenowicz, Jessica J.; Uckelmann, Michael; Klocko, Andrew D.; Mitchell, Ryan R.; Chung, Yu Seon; Modrich, Paul; Walker, Graham C.; Simmons, Lyle A.; Friedhoff, Peter; Guarné, Alba

    2010-01-01

    Summary DNA mismatch repair corrects errors that have escaped polymerase proofreading, increasing replication fidelity 100- to 1000-fold in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. The MutL protein plays a central role in mismatch repair by coordinating multiple protein-protein interactions that signal strand removal upon mismatch recognition by MutS. Here we report the crystal structure of the endonuclease domain of Bacillus subtilis MutL. The structure is organized in dimerization and regulatory subdomains connected by a helical lever spanning the conserved endonuclease motif. Additional conserved motifs cluster around the lever and define a Zn2+-binding site that is critical for MutL function in vivo. The structure unveils a powerful inhibitory mechanism to prevent undesired DNA nicking and allows us to propose a model describing how the interaction with MutS and the processivity clamp could license the endonuclease activity of MutL. The structure also provides a molecular framework to propose and test additional roles of MutL in mismatch repair. PMID:20603082

  2. Simple and cost-effective restriction endonuclease analysis of human adenoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikary, Arun Kumar; Hanaoka, Nozomu; Fujimoto, Tsuguto

    2014-01-01

    Restriction endonuclease analyses (REAs) constitute the only inexpensive molecular approach capable of typing and characterizing human adenovirus (HAdV) strains based on the entire genome. However, the application of this method is limited by the need for time-consuming and labor-intensive procedures. We herein developed a simple and cost-effective REA for assessing HAdV. The method consists of (1) simple and cost-effective DNA extraction, (2) fast restriction endonuclease (RE) digestion, and (3) speedy mini agarose gel electrophoresis. In this study, DNA was isolated according to the kit-based method and 21.0 to 28.0  μg of viral DNA was extracted from prototypes (HAdV-1, HAdV-3, HAdV-4, and HAdV-37) in each flask. The amount of DNA ranged from 11.4 to 57.0  μg among the HAdV-3 (n=73) isolates. The obtained viral DNA was found to be applicable to more than 10 types of REAs. Fast-cut restriction endonucleases (REs) were able to digest the DNA within 15 minutes, and restriction fragments were easily separated via horizontal mini agarose gel electrophoresis. The whole procedure for 10 samples can be completed within approximately six hours (the conventional method requires at least two days). These results show that our REA is potentially applicable in many laboratories in which HAdVs are isolated.

  3. On the role of steric clashes in methylation control of restriction endonuclease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierzejewska, Karolina; Bochtler, Matthias; Czapinska, Honorata

    2016-01-08

    Restriction-modification systems digest non-methylated invading DNA, while protecting host DNA against the endonuclease activity by methylation. It is widely believed that the methylated DNA would not 'fit' into the binding site of the endonuclease in the productive orientation, and thus steric clashes should account for most of the protection. We test this concept statistically by grafting methyl groups in silico onto non-methylated DNA in co-crystal structures with restriction endonucleases. Clash scores are significantly higher for protective than non-protective methylation (P < 0.05% according to the Wilcoxon rank sum test). Structural data alone are sufficient to distinguish between protective and non-protective DNA methylation with 90% confidence and decision thresholds of 1.1 Å and 48 Å(3) for the most severe distance-based and cumulative volume-based clash with the protein, respectively (0.1 Å was deducted from each interatomic distance to allow for coordinate errors). The most severe clashes are more pronounced for protective methyl groups attached to the nitrogen atoms (N6-methyladenines and N4-methylcytosines) than for C5-methyl groups on cytosines. Cumulative clashes are comparable for all three types of protective methylation. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. RNA-dependent DNA endonuclease Cas9 of the CRISPR system: Holy Grail of genome editing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasiunas, Giedrius; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2013-11-01

    Tailor-made nucleases for precise genome modification, such as zinc finger or TALE nucleases, currently represent the state-of-the-art for genome editing. These nucleases combine a programmable protein module which guides the enzyme to the target site with a nuclease domain which cuts DNA at the addressed site. Reprogramming of these nucleases to cut genomes at specific locations requires major protein engineering efforts. RNA-guided DNA endonuclease Cas9 of the type II (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat) CRISPR-Cas system uses CRISPR RNA (crRNA) as a guide to locate the DNA target and the Cas9 protein to cut DNA. Easy programmability of the Cas9 endonuclease using customizable RNAs brings unprecedented flexibility and versatility for targeted genome modification. We highlight the potential of the Cas9 RNA-guided DNA endonuclease as a novel tool for genome surgery, and discuss possible constraints and future prospects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. LG tools for asymmetric wargaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stilman, Boris; Yakhnis, Alex; Yakhnis, Vladimir

    2002-07-01

    Asymmetric operations represent conflict where one of the sides would apply military power to influence the political and civil environment, to facilitate diplomacy, and to interrupt specified illegal activities. This is a special type of conflict where the participants do not initiate full-scale war. Instead, the sides may be engaged in a limited open conflict or one or several sides may covertly engage another side using unconventional or less conventional methods of engagement. They may include peace operations, combating terrorism, counterdrug operations, arms control, support of insurgencies or counterinsurgencies, show of force. An asymmetric conflict can be represented as several concurrent interlinked games of various kinds: military, transportation, economic, political, etc. Thus, various actions of peace violators, terrorists, drug traffickers, etc., can be expressed via moves in different interlinked games. LG tools allow us to fully capture the specificity of asymmetric conflicts employing the major LG concept of hypergame. Hypergame allows modeling concurrent interlinked processes taking place in geographically remote locations at different levels of resolution and time scale. For example, it allows us to model an antiterrorist operation taking place simultaneously in a number of countries around the globe and involving wide range of entities from individuals to combat units to governments. Additionally, LG allows us to model all sides of the conflict at their level of sophistication. Intelligent stakeholders are represented by means of LG generated intelligent strategies. TO generate those strategies, in addition to its own mathematical intelligence, the LG algorithm may incorporate the intelligence of the top-level experts in the respective problem domains. LG models the individual differences between intelligent stakeholders. The LG tools make it possible to incorporate most of the known traits of a stakeholder, i.e., real personalities involved in

  6. Rad10 exhibits lesion-dependent genetic requirements for recruitment to DNA double-strand breaks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Destaye M; Karlin, Justin; González-Barrera, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    . Here we show that yeast strains expressing fluorescently labeled Rad10 protein (Rad10-YFP) form foci in response to double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by a site-specific restriction enzyme, I-SceI or by ionizing radiation (IR). Additionally, for endonuclease-induced DSBs, Rad10-YFP localization to DSB......In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Rad1-Rad10 protein complex participates in nucleotide excision repair (NER) and homologous recombination (HR). During HR, the Rad1-Rad10 endonuclease cleaves 3' branches of DNA and aberrant 3' DNA ends that are refractory to other 3' processing enzymes...

  7. Loan sales under asymmetric information

    OpenAIRE

    Vargas Martínez, Mónica

    2010-01-01

    Loans are illiquid assets that can be sold in a secondary market even that buyers have no certainty about their quality. I study a model in which a lender has access to new investment opportunities when all her assets are illiquid. To raise funds, the lender may either borrow using her assets as collateral, or she can sell them in a secondary market. Given asymmetric information about assets quality, the lender cannot recover the total value of her assets. There is then a role for the governm...

  8. Mm19, a Mycoplasma meleagridis Major Surface Nuclease that Is Related to the RE_AlwI Superfamily of Endonucleases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elhem Yacoub

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma meleagridis infection is widespread in turkeys, causing poor growth and feathering, airsacculitis, osteodystrophy, and reduction in hatchability. Like most mycoplasma species, M. meleagridis is characterized by its inability to synthesize purine and pyrimidine nucleotides de novo. Consistent with this intrinsic deficiency, we here report the cloning, expression, and characterization of a M. meleagridis gene sequence encoding a major surface nuclease, referred to as Mm19. Mm19 consists of a 1941-bp ORF encoding a 646-amino-acid polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass of 74,825 kDa. BLASTP analysis revealed a significant match with the catalytic/dimerization domain of type II restriction enzymes of the RE_AlwI superfamily. This finding is consistent with the genomic location of Mm19 sequence, which dispalys characteristics of a typical type II restriction-modification locus. Like intact M. meleagridis cells, the E. coli-expressed Mm19 fusion product was found to exhibit a nuclease activity against plasmid DNA, double-stranded DNA, single-stranded DNA, and RNA. The Mm19-associated nuclease activity was consistently enhanced with Mg2+ divalent cations, a hallmark of type II restriction enzymes. A rabbit hyperimmune antiserum raised against the bacterially expressed Mm19 strongly reacted with M. meleagridis intact cells and fully neutralized the surface-bound nuclease activity. Collectively, the results show that M. meleagridis expresses a strong surface-bound nuclease activity, which is the product of a single gene sequence that is related to the RE_AlwI superfamily of endonucleases.

  9. Translational independence between overlapping genes for a restriction endonuclease and its transcriptional regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blumenthal Robert M

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most type II restriction-modification (RM systems have two independent enzymes that act on the same DNA sequence: a modification methyltransferase that protects target sites, and a restriction endonuclease that cleaves unmethylated target sites. When RM genes enter a new cell, methylation must occur before restriction activity appears, or the host's chromosome is digested. Transcriptional mechanisms that delay endonuclease expression have been identified in some RM systems. A substantial subset of those systems is controlled by a family of small transcription activators called C proteins. In the PvuII system, C.PvuII activates transcription of its own gene, along with that of the downstream endonuclease gene. This regulation results in very low R.PvuII mRNA levels early after gene entry, followed by rapid increase due to positive feedback. However, given the lethal consequences of premature REase accumulation, transcriptional control alone might be insufficient. In C-controlled RM systems, there is a ± 20 nt overlap between the C termination codon and the R (endonuclease initiation codon, suggesting possible translational coupling, and in many cases predicted RNA hairpins could occlude the ribosome binding site for the endonuclease gene. Results Expression levels of lacZ translational fusions to pvuIIR or pvuIIC were determined, with the native pvuII promoter having been replaced by one not controlled by C.PvuII. In-frame pvuIIC insertions did not substantially decrease either pvuIIC-lacZ or pvuIIR-lacZ expression (with or without C.PvuII provided in trans. In contrast, a frameshift mutation in pvuIIC decreased expression markedly in both fusions, but mRNA measurements indicated that this decrease could be explained by transcriptional polarity. Expression of pvuIIR-lacZ was unaffected when the pvuIIC stop codon was moved 21 nt downstream from its WT location, or 25 or 40 bp upstream of the pvuIIR initiation codon. Disrupting

  10. Translational independence between overlapping genes for a restriction endonuclease and its transcriptional regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaw, Meenakshi K; Blumenthal, Robert M

    2010-11-19

    Most type II restriction-modification (RM) systems have two independent enzymes that act on the same DNA sequence: a modification methyltransferase that protects target sites, and a restriction endonuclease that cleaves unmethylated target sites. When RM genes enter a new cell, methylation must occur before restriction activity appears, or the host's chromosome is digested. Transcriptional mechanisms that delay endonuclease expression have been identified in some RM systems. A substantial subset of those systems is controlled by a family of small transcription activators called C proteins. In the PvuII system, C.PvuII activates transcription of its own gene, along with that of the downstream endonuclease gene. This regulation results in very low R.PvuII mRNA levels early after gene entry, followed by rapid increase due to positive feedback. However, given the lethal consequences of premature REase accumulation, transcriptional control alone might be insufficient. In C-controlled RM systems, there is a ± 20 nt overlap between the C termination codon and the R (endonuclease) initiation codon, suggesting possible translational coupling, and in many cases predicted RNA hairpins could occlude the ribosome binding site for the endonuclease gene. Expression levels of lacZ translational fusions to pvuIIR or pvuIIC were determined, with the native pvuII promoter having been replaced by one not controlled by C.PvuII. In-frame pvuIIC insertions did not substantially decrease either pvuIIC-lacZ or pvuIIR-lacZ expression (with or without C.PvuII provided in trans). In contrast, a frameshift mutation in pvuIIC decreased expression markedly in both fusions, but mRNA measurements indicated that this decrease could be explained by transcriptional polarity. Expression of pvuIIR-lacZ was unaffected when the pvuIIC stop codon was moved 21 nt downstream from its WT location, or 25 or 40 bp upstream of the pvuIIR initiation codon. Disrupting the putative hairpins had no significant

  11. Asymmetric liberations in exterior resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauge, C.

    1994-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a general analysis of the planar circular restricted problem of three bodies in the case of exterior mean-motion resonances. Particularly, our aim is to map the phase space of various commensurabilities and determine the singular solutions of the averaged system, comparing them to the well-known case of interior resonances. In some commensurabilities (e.g. 1/2, 1/3) we show the existence of asymmetric librations; that is, librations in which the stationary value of the critical angle theta = (p+q) lambda1-p lambda-q pi is not equal to either zero or pi. The origin, stability and morphogenesis of these solutions are discussed and compared to symmetric librations. However, in some other resonances (e.g. 2/3, 3/4), these fixed points of the mean system seem to be absent. Librations in such cases are restricted to theta = O mod(pi). Asymmetric singular solutions of the plane circular problem are unknown in the case of interior resonances and cannot be reproduced by the reduced Andoyer Hamiltonian known as the Second Fundamental Model for Resonance. However, we show that the extended version of this Hamiltonian function, in which harmonics up to order two are considered, can reproduce fairly well the principal topological characteristics of the phase space and thereby constitutes a simple and useful analytical approximation for these resonances.

  12. Asymmetric Laguerre-Gaussian beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, A. A.; Kotlyar, V. V.; Porfirev, A. P.

    2016-06-01

    We introduce a family of asymmetric Laguerre-Gaussian (aLG) laser beams. The beams have been derived via a complex-valued shift of conventional LG beams in the Cartesian plane. While propagating in a uniform medium, the first bright ring of the aLG beam becomes less asymmetric and the energy is redistributed toward peripheral diffraction rings. The projection of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) onto the optical axis is calculated. The OAM is shown to grow quadratically with increasing asymmetry parameter of the aLG beam, which equals the ratio of the shift to the waist radius. Conditions for the OAM becoming equal to the topological charge have been derived. For aLG beams with zero radial index, we have deduced an expression to define the intensity maximum coordinates and shown the crescent-shaped intensity pattern to rotate during propagation. Results of the experimental generation and rotation of aLG beams agree well with theoretical predictions.

  13. Thin lenses of asymmetric power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. F. Harris

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available It is generally supposed that thin systems, including refracting surfaces and thin lenses, have powers that are necessarily symmetric.  In other words they have powers which can be represented assymmetric dioptric power matrices and in the familar spherocylindrical form used in optometry and ophthalmology.  This paper shows that this is not correct and that it is indeed possible for a thin system to have a power that is not symmetric and which cannot be expressed in spherocylindrical form.  Thin systems of asymmetric power are illustratedby means of a thin lens that is modelled with small prisms and is chosen to have a dioptric power ma-trix that is antisymmetric.  Similar models can be devised for a thin system whose dioptric power matrix is any  2 2 ×  matrix.  Thus any power, symmetric, asymmetric or antisymmetric, is possible for a thin system.  In this sense our understanding of the power of thin systems is now complete.

  14. Asymmetric Warfare and the Will to Win

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Herrera, Cary

    2001-01-01

    This thesis explores the will to win in asymmetric war. Asymmetric war, in which one side has an overwhelming advantage over its opponent, will likely be the war of the future for the United States in the post-Cold War uni-polar world...

  15. Renewable resource management under asymmetric information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank; Andersen, Peder; Nielsen, Max

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetric information between fishermen and the regulator is important within fisheries. The regulator may have less information about stock sizes, prices, costs, effort, productivity and catches than fishermen. With asymmetric information, a strong analytical tool is principal-agent analysis. I...

  16. Asymmetric Quantum Codes on Toric Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Johan P.

    2017-01-01

    Asymmetric quantum error-correcting codes are quantum codes defined over biased quantum channels: qubit-flip and phase-shift errors may have equal or different probabilities. The code construction is the Calderbank-Shor-Steane construction based on two linear codes. We present families of toric...... surfaces, toric codes and associated asymmetric quantum error-correcting codes....

  17. Mechanochemistry assisted asymmetric organocatalysis: A sustainable approach

    OpenAIRE

    Chauhan, Pankaj; Chimni, Swapandeep Singh

    2012-01-01

    Summary Ball-milling and pestle and mortar grinding have emerged as powerful methods for the development of environmentally benign chemical transformations. Recently, the use of these mechanochemical techniques in asymmetric organocatalysis has increased. This review highlights the progress in asymmetric organocatalytic reactions assisted by mechanochemical techniques.

  18. Mechanochemistry assisted asymmetric organocatalysis: A sustainable approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Pankaj

    2012-01-01

    Summary Ball-milling and pestle and mortar grinding have emerged as powerful methods for the development of environmentally benign chemical transformations. Recently, the use of these mechanochemical techniques in asymmetric organocatalysis has increased. This review highlights the progress in asymmetric organocatalytic reactions assisted by mechanochemical techniques. PMID:23243475

  19. Worst Asymmetrical Short-Circuit Current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arana Aristi, Iván; Holmstrøm, O; Grastrup, L

    2010-01-01

    In a typical power plant, the production scenario and the short-circuit time were found for the worst asymmetrical short-circuit current. Then, a sensitivity analysis on the missing generator values was realized in order to minimize the uncertainty of the results. Afterward the worst asymmetrical...

  20. Mechanochemistry assisted asymmetric organocatalysis: A sustainable approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Chauhan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Ball-milling and pestle and mortar grinding have emerged as powerful methods for the development of environmentally benign chemical transformations. Recently, the use of these mechanochemical techniques in asymmetric organocatalysis has increased. This review highlights the progress in asymmetric organocatalytic reactions assisted by mechanochemical techniques.

  1. Temporal dynamics of methyltransferase and restriction endonuclease accumulation in individual cells after introducing a restriction-modification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, Natalia; Sabantsev, Anton; Bogdanova, Ekaterina; Fedorova, Yana; Maikova, Anna; Vedyaykin, Alexey; Rodic, Andjela; Djordjevic, Marko; Khodorkovskii, Mikhail; Severinov, Konstantin

    2016-01-29

    Type II restriction-modification (R-M) systems encode a restriction endonuclease that cleaves DNA at specific sites, and a methyltransferase that modifies same sites protecting them from restriction endonuclease cleavage. Type II R-M systems benefit bacteria by protecting them from bacteriophages. Many type II R-M systems are plasmid-based and thus capable of horizontal transfer. Upon the entry of such plasmids into a naïve host with unmodified genomic recognition sites, methyltransferase should be synthesized first and given sufficient time to methylate recognition sites in the bacterial genome before the toxic restriction endonuclease activity appears. Here, we directly demonstrate a delay in restriction endonuclease synthesis after transformation of Escherichia coli cells with a plasmid carrying the Esp1396I type II R-M system, using single-cell microscopy. We further demonstrate that before the appearance of the Esp1396I restriction endonuclease the intracellular concentration of Esp1396I methyltransferase undergoes a sharp peak, which should allow rapid methylation of host genome recognition sites. A mathematical model that satisfactorily describes the observed dynamics of both Esp1396I enzymes is presented. The results reported here were obtained using a functional Esp1396I type II R-M system encoding both enzymes fused to fluorescent proteins. Similar approaches should be applicable to the studies of other R-M systems at single-cell level. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Crystal structure of endonuclease G in complex with DNA reveals how it nonspecifically degrades DNA as a homodimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jason L J; Wu, Chyuan-Chuan; Yang, Wei-Zen; Yuan, Hanna S

    2016-12-01

    Endonuclease G (EndoG) is an evolutionarily conserved mitochondrial protein in eukaryotes that digests nucleus chromosomal DNA during apoptosis and paternal mitochondrial DNA during embryogenesis. Under oxidative stress, homodimeric EndoG becomes oxidized and converts to monomers with diminished nuclease activity. However, it remains unclear why EndoG has to function as a homodimer in DNA degradation. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Caenorhabditis elegans EndoG homologue, CPS-6, in complex with single-stranded DNA at a resolution of 2.3 Å. Two separate DNA strands are bound at the ββα-metal motifs in the homodimer with their nucleobases pointing away from the enzyme, explaining why CPS-6 degrades DNA without sequence specificity. Two obligatory monomeric CPS-6 mutants (P207E and K131D/F132N) were constructed, and they degrade DNA with diminished activity due to poorer DNA-binding affinity as compared to wild-type CPS-6. Moreover, the P207E mutant exhibits predominantly 3'-to-5' exonuclease activity, indicating a possible endonuclease to exonuclease activity change. Thus, the dimer conformation of CPS-6 is essential for maintaining its optimal DNA-binding and endonuclease activity. Compared to other non-specific endonucleases, which are usually monomeric enzymes, EndoG is a unique dimeric endonuclease, whose activity hence can be modulated by oxidation to induce conformational changes. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Enzymatic cleavage of type II restriction endonucleases on the 2'-O-methyl nucleotide and phosphorothioate substituted DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guojie Zhao

    Full Text Available The effects of nucleotide analogue substitution on the cleavage efficiencies of type II restriction endonucleases have been investigated. Six restriction endonucleases (EcoRV, SpeI, XbaI, XhoI, PstI and SphI were investigated respectively regarding their cleavage when substrates were substituted by 2'-O-methyl nucleotide (2'-OMeN and phosphorothioate (PS. Substitutions were made in the recognition sequence and the two nucleotides flanking the recognition sequence for each endonuclease. The endonuclease cleavage efficiencies were determined using FRET-based assay. Results demonstrated a position-dependent inhibitory effect of substitution on the cleavage efficiency for all the six endonucleases. In general, the 2'-OMeN substitutions had greater impact than the PS substitutions on the enzymatic activities. Nucleotides of optimal substitutions for protection against RE cleavage were identified. Experimental results and conclusions in this study facilitate our insight into the DNA-protein interactions and the enzymatic cleavage mechanism, particularly for those whose detailed structure information is not available. In addition, the information could benefit the development of bioengineering and synthetic biology.

  4. Enzymatic cleavage of type II restriction endonucleases on the 2'-O-methyl nucleotide and phosphorothioate substituted DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guojie; Li, Jun; Tong, Zhaoxue; Zhao, Bin; Mu, Runqing; Guan, Yifu

    2013-01-01

    The effects of nucleotide analogue substitution on the cleavage efficiencies of type II restriction endonucleases have been investigated. Six restriction endonucleases (EcoRV, SpeI, XbaI, XhoI, PstI and SphI) were investigated respectively regarding their cleavage when substrates were substituted by 2'-O-methyl nucleotide (2'-OMeN) and phosphorothioate (PS). Substitutions were made in the recognition sequence and the two nucleotides flanking the recognition sequence for each endonuclease. The endonuclease cleavage efficiencies were determined using FRET-based assay. Results demonstrated a position-dependent inhibitory effect of substitution on the cleavage efficiency for all the six endonucleases. In general, the 2'-OMeN substitutions had greater impact than the PS substitutions on the enzymatic activities. Nucleotides of optimal substitutions for protection against RE cleavage were identified. Experimental results and conclusions in this study facilitate our insight into the DNA-protein interactions and the enzymatic cleavage mechanism, particularly for those whose detailed structure information is not available. In addition, the information could benefit the development of bioengineering and synthetic biology.

  5. Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line (ADSL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavko Šarić

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available ADSL (Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line is a technologythat allows transmission at 8.488 Mbps over the existingtelephone copper line (speed range depending on the distance.ADSL circuit connects the ADSL modems by twisted-pairtelephone lines creating three infonnation channels: high speedsimplex (maximum 9 Mbps, medium speed duplex channel(maximum 2 Mbps and plain old telephone service channel.ADSL technology supports up to seven synchronous channelsthat can be configured to meet the needs of the end user.One could simultaneously view four movies stored in MPEG 1fonnat on separate television sets (MPEG 1 transmitted at 1.5Mbps, hold a video-conference (transmitted at 348 kbps,download data files from a server at 128 kbps via ISDN andeven receive a telephone call.

  6. Research on asymmetric searchable encryption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zonghua; Wu, Yudong

    2017-05-01

    Cloud server side to ease the user's local storage pressure at the same time, there are hidden data on the hidden dangers, the user often choose to upload the data in the form of cipher text to the cloud server. However, the classic data encryption and decryption algorithms are not provided search function, affecting the user's efficiency. To this end, an asymmetric searchable encryption scheme is proposed. The scheme can be used for any person can generate a trapdoor, cipher text can be free modified, the key pair generated by the user themselves, encrypt the identity, S-shaped virtual and other five loopholes to improve. The analysis results show that the scheme solves the above five vulnerabilities in the original scheme, so that the information semantics of both parties of communication can be guaranteed.

  7. Short-channel drain current model for asymmetric heavily / lightly doped DG MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Pradipta; Syamal, Binit; Koley, Kalyan; Dutta, Arka; Sarkar, C. K.

    2017-08-01

    The paper presents a drain current model for double gate metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (DG MOSFETs) based on a new velocity saturation model that accounts for short-channel velocity saturation effect independently in the front and the back gate controlled channels under asymmetric front and back gate bias and oxide thickness. To determine the front and the back-channel velocity saturation, drain-induced barrier lowering is evaluated by effective gate voltages at the front and back gates obtained from surface potential at the threshold condition after considering symmetric and asymmetric front and back oxide thickness. The model also incorporates surface roughness scattering and ionized impurity scattering to estimate drain current for heavily / lightly doped channel for short-channel asymmetric DG MOSFET and a good agreement has been achieved with TCAD simulations, with a relative error of around 3-7%.

  8. Metal ion dependence of DNA cleavage by SepMI and EhoI restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkebir, Abdelkarim; Azeddoug, Houssine

    2013-02-22

    Most of type II restriction endonucleases show an absolute requirement for divalent metal ions as cofactors for DNA cleavage. While Mg(2+) is the natural cofactor other metal ions can substitute it and mediate the catalysis, however Ca(2+) (alone) only supports DNA binding. To investigate the role of Mg(2+) in DNA cleavage by restriction endonucleases, we have studied the Mg(2+) and Mn(2+) concentration dependence of DNA cleavage by SepMI and EhoI. Digestion reactions were carried out at different Mg(2+) and Mn(2+) concentrations at constant ionic strength. These enzymes showed different behavior regarding the ions requirement, SepMI reached near maximal level of activity between 10 and 20mM while no activity was detected in the presence of Mn(2+) and in the presence of Ca(2+) cleavage activity was significantly decreased. However, EhoI was more highly active in the presence of Mn(2+) than in the presence of Mg(2+) and can be activated by Ca(2+). Our results propose the two-metal ion mechanism for EhoI and the one-metal ion mechanism for SepMI restriction endonuclease. The analysis of the kinetic parameters under steady state conditions showed that SepMI had a K(m) value for pTrcHisB DNA of 6.15 nM and a V(max) of 1.79×10(-2)nM min(-1), while EhoI had a K(m) for pUC19 plasmid of 8.66 nM and a V(max) of 2×10(-2)nM min(-1). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Purification of Restriction Endonuclease EcoRII and its Co-Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpova, E. A.; Chen, L.; Meehan, E.; Pusey, M.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Restriction endonuclease EcoRII (EcoRII) is a homodimeric DNA-binding protein. It belongs to the type II family of restriction-modification enzymes (subclass IIe). EcoRII recognizes the nucleotide sequence 5'-CCWGG (W=A or T) and cleaves the phosphodiester bond preceding the first cytosine. Methylation at C5 of the second cytosine inhibits cleavage. The enzyme has a unique ability to search for the presence of two substrate sites before cleavage. To the best of our knowledge no other subclass IIe restriction endonuclease has been crystallized yet, without or with a DNA-substrate. We have recently grown and characterized the crystals of this enzyme (1) Here we report on the result of co-crystallization experiments of EcoRII with an 11 b.p. oligonucleotide substrate. The dissociation constant (Kd) EcoRII: 11 b.p. was determined earlier (unpublished results). The needle-like crystals of oligonucleotide-EcoRII protein complex were obtained with this substrate by the technique of vapor diffusion hanging drops. The crystals obtained were washed and dissolved in an aliquot of 10 mM Tris-HCl buffer, pH=7.5. Running a portion of this solution on the SDS-get indicated the presence of endonuclease in the solution. A UV-spectrophotometric test of a second portion confirmed the presence of DNA. We are now working on improvement of the DNA-EcoRII protein crystals. Results obtained from these and ongoing efforts will be reported.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of deoxyribonucleic acids and repair enzyme T4 endonuclease V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinak, Miroslav

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) and specific repair enzyme T4 endonuclease V. Namely research described here is focused on the examination of specific recognition process, in which this repair enzyme recognizes the damaged site on the DNA molecule-thymine dimer (TD). TD is frequent DNA damage induced by UV radiation in sun light and unless properly repaired it may be mutagenic or lethal for cell, and is also considered among the major causes of skin cancer. T4 endonuclease V is a DNA specific repair enzyme from bacteriophage T4 that catalyzes the first reaction step of TD repair pathway. MD simulations of three molecules - native DNA dodecamer (12 base pairs), DNA of the same sequence of nucleotides as native one but with TD, and repair enzyme T4 endonuclease V - were performed for 1 ns individually for each molecule. Simulations were analyzed to determine the role of electrostatic interaction in the recognition process. It is found that electrostatic energies calculated for amino acids of the enzyme have positive values of around +15 kcal/mol. The electrostatic energy of TD site has negative value of approximately -9 kcal/mol, different from the nearly neutral value of the respective thymines site of the native DNA. The electrostatic interaction of TD site with surrounding water environment differs from the electrostatic interaction of other nucleotides. Differences found between TD site and respective thymines site of native DNA indicate that the electrostatic energy is an important factor contributing to proper recognition of TD site during scanning process in which enzyme scans the DNA. In addition to the electrostatic energy, the important factor in recognition process might be structural complementarity of enzyme and bent DNA with TD. There is significant kink formed around TD site, that is not observed in native DNA. (author)

  11. Creation of targeted inversion mutations in plants using an RNA-guided endonuclease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congsheng Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Inversions are DNA rearrangements that are essential for plant gene evolution and adaptation to environmental changes. We demonstrate the creation of targeted inversions and previously reported targeted deletion mutations via delivery of a pair of RNA-guided endonucleases (RGENs of CRISPR/Cas9. The efficiencies of the targeted inversions were 2.6% and 2.2% in the Arabidopsis FLOWERING TIME (AtFT and TERMINAL FLOWER 1 (AtTFL1 loci, respectively. Thus, we successfully established an approach that can potentially be used to introduce targeted DNA inversions of interest for functional studies and crop improvement.

  12. Intermolecular interaction between a branching ribozyme and associated homing endonuclease mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birgisdottir, Asa B; Nielsen, Henrik; Beckert, Bertrand

    2011-01-01

    Abstract RNA tertiary interactions involving docking of GNRA (N; any base; R; purine) hairpin loops into helical stem structures on other regions of the same RNA are one of the most common RNA tertiary interactions. In this study, we investigated a tertiary association between a GAAA hairpin......-like motif (UCUAAG-CAAGA) found within the HEG P1. The biological role of this interaction appears to be linked to the homing endonuclease expression by promoting post-cleavage release of the lariat capped mRNA. These findings add to our understanding of how protein-coding genes embedded in nuclear ribosomal...

  13. Structure of the Cpf1 endonuclease R-loop complex after target DNA cleavage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stella, Stefano; Alcón, Pablo; Montoya, Guillermo

    2017-01-01

    Cpf1 is an RNA-guided endonuclease that is emerging as a powerful genome-editing tool. Here we provide insight into its DNA-targeting mechanism by determining the structure of Francisella novicida Cpf1 with the triple-stranded R-loop generated after DNA cleavage. The structure reveals the machine...... and the crRNA-DNA hybrid, avoiding DNA re-annealing. Mutations in key residues reveal a mechanism linking the PAM and DNA nuclease sites. Analysis of the Cpf1 structures proposes a singular working model of RNA-guided DNA cleavage, suggesting new avenues for redesign of Cpf1....

  14. Interdomain communication in the endonuclease/motor subunit of type I restriction-modification enzyme EcoR124I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Dhiraj; Shamayeva, Katsiaryna; Ramasubramani, Vyas; Řeha, David; Bialevich, Vitali; Khabiri, Morteza; Guzanová, Alena; Milbar, Niv; Weiserová, Marie; Csefalvay, Eva; Carey, Jannette; Ettrich, Rüdiger

    2014-07-01

    Restriction-modification systems protect bacteria from foreign DNA. Type I restriction-modification enzymes are multifunctional heteromeric complexes with DNA-cleavage and ATP-dependent DNA translocation activities located on endonuclease/motor subunit HsdR. The recent structure of the first intact motor subunit of the type I restriction enzyme from plasmid EcoR124I suggested a mechanism by which stalled translocation triggers DNA cleavage via a lysine residue on the endonuclease domain that contacts ATP bound between the two helicase domains. In the present work, molecular dynamics simulations are used to explore this proposal. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the Lys-ATP contact alternates with a contact with a nearby loop housing the conserved QxxxY motif that had been implicated in DNA cleavage. This model is tested here using in vivo and in vitro experiments. The results indicate how local interactions are transduced to domain motions within the endonuclease/motor subunit.

  15. Genome of orf virus. Restriction endonuclease analysis of viral DNA isolated from lesions of orf in sheep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, A.J.; Ellis, G.; Balassu, T. (Massay Univ., Palmerston North (New Zealand). Dept. of Veterinary Pathology and Public Health)

    1982-01-01

    The purification of orf virus directly from scab material from clinical cases of orf in sheep and restriction endonuclease analysis of the viral DNA is described. Between 7 x 10/sup 9/ and 1.6 x 10/sup 11/ virus particles, and 0.7 to 22.8 ..mu..g of viral DNA could be recovered from lg of scab material. Considerable heterogeneity was observed between different field isolates when restriction endonuclease digests of orf DNA were compared by gel electrophoresis. It was also shown, for two isolates that these fragment patterns did not change after plaque purification and passage in cell culture. It is suggested that restriction endonuclease analysis of viral DNA offers a convenient method of identification of isolates of orf virus. The molecular weight of orf DNA was determined and found to be 88.8 x 10/sup 6/.

  16. A mean-field theory on the differential capacitance of asymmetric ionic liquid electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yining; Huang, Shanghui; Yan, Tianying

    2014-07-16

    The size of ions significantly influences the electric double layer structure of room temperature ionic liquid (IL) electrolytes and their differential capacitance (Cd). In this study, we extended the mean-field theory (MFT) developed independently by Kornyshev (2007J. Phys. Chem. B 111 5545-57) and Kilic, Bazant, and Ajdari (2007 Phys. Rev. E 75 021502) (the KKBA MFT) to take into account the asymmetric 1:1 IL electrolytes by introducing an additional parameter ξ for the anion/cation volume ratio, besides the ionic compressibility γ in the KKBA MFT. The MFT of asymmetric ions becomes KKBA MFT upon ξ = 1, and further reduces to Gouy-Chapman theory in the γ → 0 limit. The result of the extended MFT demonstrates that the asymmetric ILs give rise to an asymmetric Cd, with the higher peak in Cd occurring at positive polarization for the smaller anionic size. At high potential, Cd decays asymptotically toward KKBA MFT characterized by γ for the negative polarization, and characterized by ξγ for the positive polarization, with inverse-square-root behavior. At low potential, around the potential of zero charge, the asymmetric ions cause a higher Cd, which exceeds that of Gouy-Chapman theory.

  17. Modelling asymmetric growth in crowded plant communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Christian

    2010-01-01

    A class of models that may be used to quantify the effect of size-asymmetric competition in crowded plant communities by estimating a community specific degree of size-asymmetric growth for each species in the community is suggested. The model consists of two parts: an individual size......-asymmetric growth part, where growth is assumed to be proportional to a power function of the size of the individual, and a term that reduces the relative growth rate as a decreasing function of the individual plant size and the competitive interactions from other plants in the neighbourhood....

  18. Nondeterministic self-assembly with asymmetric interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesoro, S.; Göpfrich, K.; Kartanas, T.; Keyser, U. F.; Ahnert, S. E.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate general properties of nondeterministic self-assembly with asymmetric interactions, using a computational model and DNA tile assembly experiments. By contrasting symmetric and asymmetric interactions we show that the latter can lead to self-limiting cluster growth. Furthermore, by adjusting the relative abundance of self-assembly particles in a two-particle mixture, we are able to tune the final sizes of these clusters. We show that this is a fundamental property of asymmetric interactions, which has potential applications in bioengineering, and provides insights into the study of diseases caused by protein aggregation.

  19. Molecular diversity of Pasteurella multocida isolated from cattle and buffaloes in East Azerbaijan province based on restriction endonuclease analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    jalal shayegh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to increase information about the molecular diversity of Pasteurella multocida isolated from cattle and buffalo, 2 buffalo and 8 cattle isolates were investigated by Restriction Endonuclease Analysis (REA. REA was performed with Hha-I Endonuclease which established 2 distinct profiles: I and II.  Cattle and buffalo isolates fell into both REA profiles. Contrary to previous studies, the genetic diversity of the isolates was negligible. Considering the similarity of cattle and buffalo isolates is the present study, further studies witch larger samples should be carried out to investigate the possibility of inter-species transmission.

  20. A model of EcoRII restriction endonuclease action: the active complex is most likely formed by one protein subunit and one DNA recognition site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpova, E. A.; Kubareva, E. A.; Shabarova, Z. A.

    1999-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of interaction of restriction endonuclease EcoRII with DNA, we studied by native gel electrophoresis the binding of this endonuclease to a set of synthetic DNA-duplexes containing the modified or canonical recognition sequence 5'-d(CCA/TGG)-3'. All binding substrate or substrate analogues tested could be divided into two major groups: (i) duplexes that, at the interaction with endonuclease EcoRII, form two types of stable complexes on native gel in the absence of Mg2+ cofactor; (ii) duplexes that form only one type of complex, observed both in the presence and absence of Mg2+. Unlike the latter, duplexes under the first group can be hydrolyzed by endonuclease. Data obtained suggest that the active complex is most likely formed by one protein subunit and one DNA recognition sequence. A model of EcoRII endonuclease action is presented.

  1. Double Swing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lisbeth

    2017-01-01

    There are two main streams of understanding intercultural communication. The “classic” transmission models include the basic elements of communication involved in sending messages from a sender to a receiver. These models enable analysis of all communication elements and effects by focusing...... on sameness in communication. In contrast, Muneo Jay Yoshikawa's “double-swing” model of intercultural communication between the East and West is based on an eastern understanding of dialogue, collaborative communication, and co-creation of meaning. The double-swing model enables an understanding...... of communication as an ongoing encounter where both sender and receiver have mutual respect. It has four modes of communication: the ethnocentric, the dialectic, the control, and the dialogic. Both models have something to offer intercultural communication, but the double-swing model enables a worldview...

  2. Scaling of cross-sections for asymmetric (e,3e) process on helium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. An approximate simple scaling law is obtained for asymmetric (e, 3e) process on helium-like ions for double ionization by fast electrons. It is based on the equation. (Z 3/π) exp[−Z (r1 + r2)], Z = Z − (5/16) for ground state wave function of helium- like ions and Z 2 scaling of energies. The scaling law is found to work ...

  3. A new prototype IIS/IIC/IIG endonuclease-methyltransferase TsoI from the thermophile Thermus scotoductus, recognising 5'-TARCCA(N11/9)-3' sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezewska-Frackowiak, Joanna; Lubys, Arvydas; Vitkute, Jolanta; Zakareviciene, Laimute; Zebrowska, Joanna; Krefft, Daria; Skowron, Marta A; Zylicz-Stachula, Agnieszka; Skowron, Piotr M

    2015-01-20

    The Thermus sp. family of IIS/IIG/IIC enzymes includes the thermostable, bifunctional, fused restriction endonuclease (REase)-methyltransferases (MTase): TaqII, Tth111II/TthHB27I, TspGWI, TspDTI and TsoI. The enzymes are large proteins (approximately 120kDa), their enzymatic activities are affected by S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), they recognise similar asymmetric cognate sites and cleave at a distance of 11/9 nucleotides (nt). The enzymes exhibit similarities of their amino acid (aa) sequences and DNA catalytic motifs. Thermus sp. enzymes are an example of functional aa sequence homologies among REases recognising different, yet related DNA sequences. The family consists of TspGWI- and TspDTI-subfamilies. TsoI appears to be a non-identical 'triplet', related to TspDTI and Tth111II/TthHB27I. The discovery of TsoI, purified from Thermus scotoductus, is described. This prototype, displaying a novel specificity, which was determined by: (i) cleavage of a reference plasmid and bacteriophage DNA, (ii) cleavage of custom PCR DNA substrates, (iii) run-off sequencing of cleavage products and (iv) shotgun cloning and sequencing of bacteriophage lambda (λ) DNA digested with TsoI. The enzyme recognises a degenerated 5'-TARCCA-3' sequence, whereas DNA strands are cut 11/9 nt downstream. The discovery of the TsoI prototype is of practical importance in biotechnology, as it extends the palette of cleavage specificities for gene cloning. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Polymerase-endonuclease amplification reaction (PEAR for large-scale enzymatic production of antisense oligonucleotides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolong Wang

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotides targeting microRNAs or their mRNA targets prove to be powerful tools for molecular biology research and may eventually emerge as new therapeutic agents. Synthetic oligonucleotides are often contaminated with highly homologous failure sequences. Synthesis of a certain oligonucleotide is difficult to scale up because it requires expensive equipment, hazardous chemicals and a tedious purification process. Here we report a novel thermocyclic reaction, polymerase-endonuclease amplification reaction (PEAR, for the amplification of oligonucleotides. A target oligonucleotide and a tandem repeated antisense probe are subjected to repeated cycles of denaturing, annealing, elongation and cleaving, in which thermostable DNA polymerase elongation and strand slipping generate duplex tandem repeats, and thermostable endonuclease (PspGI cleavage releases monomeric duplex oligonucleotides. Each round of PEAR achieves over 100-fold amplification. The product can be used in one more round of PEAR directly, and the process can be further repeated. In addition to avoiding dangerous materials and improved product purity, this reaction is easy to scale up and amenable to full automation. PEAR has the potential to be a useful tool for large-scale production of antisense oligonucleotide drugs.

  5. RPA activates the XPF‐ERCC1 endonuclease to initiate processing of DNA interstrand crosslinks

    KAUST Repository

    Abdullah, Ummi B

    2017-06-13

    During replication‐coupled DNA interstrand crosslink (ICL) repair, the XPF‐ERCC1 endonuclease is required for the incisions that release, or “unhook”, ICLs, but the mechanism of ICL unhooking remains largely unknown. Incisions are triggered when the nascent leading strand of a replication fork strikes the ICL. Here, we report that while purified XPF‐ERCC1 incises simple ICL‐containing model replication fork structures, the presence of a nascent leading strand, modelling the effects of replication arrest, inhibits this activity. Strikingly, the addition of the single‐stranded DNA (ssDNA)‐binding replication protein A (RPA) selectively restores XPF‐ERCC1 endonuclease activity on this structure. The 5′–3′ exonuclease SNM1A can load from the XPF‐ERCC1‐RPA‐induced incisions and digest past the crosslink to quantitatively complete the unhooking reaction. We postulate that these collaborative activities of XPF‐ERCC1, RPA and SNM1A might explain how ICL unhooking is achieved in vivo.

  6. Telomere-associated endonuclease-deficient Penelope-like retroelements in diverse eukaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladyshev, Eugene A.; Arkhipova, Irina R.

    2007-01-01

    The evolutionary origin of telomerases, enzymes that maintain the ends of linear chromosomes in most eukaryotes, is a subject of debate. Penelope-like elements (PLEs) are a recently described class of eukaryotic retroelements characterized by a GIY-YIG endonuclease domain and by a reverse transcriptase domain with similarity to telomerases and group II introns. Here we report that a subset of PLEs found in bdelloid rotifers, basidiomycete fungi, stramenopiles, and plants, representing four different eukaryotic kingdoms, lack the endonuclease domain and are located at telomeres. The 5′ truncated ends of these elements are telomere-oriented and typically capped by species-specific telomeric repeats. Most of them also carry several shorter stretches of telomeric repeats at or near their 3′ ends, which could facilitate utilization of the telomeric G-rich 3′ overhangs to prime reverse transcription. Many of these telomere-associated PLEs occupy a basal phylogenetic position close to the point of divergence from the telomerase-PLE common ancestor and may descend from the missing link between early eukaryotic retroelements and present-day telomerases. PMID:17483479

  7. Expression of flap endonuclease-1 during meiosis in a basidiomycete, Coprinus cinereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Taiki; Namekawa, Satoshi H; Hamada, Fumika N; Kasai, Nobuyuki; Nara, Takayuki; Watanabe, Kei; Iwabata, Kazuki; Ishizaki, Takashi; Ishii, Satomi; Koshiyama, Akiyo; Inagaki, Sachiyo; Kimura, Seisuke; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2004-05-01

    In the basidiomycete Coprinus cinereus (C. cinereus), which shows a highly synchronous meiotic cell cycle, the meiotic prophase I cells demonstrate flap endonuclease-1 activity. To investigate its role during meiosis, we isolated a C. cinereus cDNA homolog of flap endonuclease-1 (CcFEN-1), 1377bp in length with the open reading frame (ORF) encoding a predicted molecular mass of 51 kDa. At amino-acid residues Glu276-Pro345, a specific inserted sequence composed of 70 amino acids rich in polar forms was found to exist, without sequence identity to other eukaryotic FEN-1 or the polar amino acid rich sequences found in C. cinereus PCNA and C. cinereus DNA ligase IV, although the lengths and percentages of polar amino acids were similar. Northern hybridization analysis indicated CcFEN-1 to be expressed not only in the pre-meiotic S phase but also in meiotic prophase I. The roles of CcFEN-1 during meiosis are discussed.

  8. Atypical myxomatosis--virus isolation, experimental infection of rabbits and restriction endonuclease analysis of the isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psikal, I; Smíd, B; Rodák, L; Valícek, L; Bendová, J

    2003-08-01

    Atypical form of myxomatosis, which caused non-lethal and clinically mild disease in domestic rabbits 1 month after immunization with a commercially available vaccine MXT, is described. The isolated myxoma virus designated as Litovel 2 (Li-2) did not induce systemic disease following subcutaneous and intradermal applications in susceptible experimental rabbits but led to the immune response demonstrated by ELISA. No severe disease was induced in those Li-2 inoculated rabbits by challenge with the virulent strains Lausanne (Lu) or Sanar (SA), while the control animals showed nodular form of myxomatosis with lethal course of the illness. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of genomic DNA with KpnI and BamHI endonucleases was used for genetic characterization of the Li-2 isolate, the vaccine strain MXT and both virulent strains Lu and SA, respectively. In general, RFLP analysis has shown to be informative for inferring genetic relatedness between myxoma viruses. Based on restriction endonuclease DNA fragment size distribution, it was evident that the pathogenic strain SA is genetically related to the reference strain Lu and the isolate Li-2 is more related, but not identical, to the vaccination strain MXT.

  9. Assembly of Francisella novicida Cpf1 endonuclease in complex with guide RNA and target DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcón, Pablo; Montoya, Guillermo; Stella, Stefano

    2017-07-01

    Bacteria and archaea use the CRISPR-Cas system as an adaptive response against infection by foreign nucleic acids. Owing to its remarkable flexibility, this mechanism has been harnessed and adopted as a powerful tool for genome editing. The CRISPR-Cas system includes two classes that are subdivided into six types and 19 subtypes according to conservation of the cas gene and loci organization. Recently, a new protein with endonuclease activity belonging to class 2 type V has been identified. This endonuclease, termed Cpf1, in complex with a single CRISPR RNA (crRNA) is able to recognize and cleave a target DNA preceded by a 5'-TTN-3' protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) complementary to the RNA guide. To obtain structural insight into the inner workings of Cpf1, the crystallization of an active complex containing the full extent of the crRNA and a 31-nucleotide dsDNA target was attempted. The gene encoding Cpf1 from Francisella novicida was cloned, overexpressed and purified. The crRNA was transcribed and purified in vitro. Finally, the ternary FnCpf1-crRNA-DNA complex was assembled and purified by preparative electrophoresis before crystallization. Crystals belonging to space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 85.2, b = 137.6, c = 320.5 Å, were obtained and subjected to preliminary diffraction experiments.

  10. Nuclease escape elements protect messenger RNA against cleavage by multiple viral endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Mandy; Glaunsinger, Britt A

    2017-08-01

    During lytic Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection, the viral endonu- clease SOX promotes widespread degradation of cytoplasmic messenger RNA (mRNA). However, select mRNAs, including the transcript encoding interleukin-6 (IL-6), escape SOX-induced cleavage. IL-6 escape is mediated through a 3' UTR RNA regulatory element that overrides the SOX targeting mechanism. Here, we reveal that this protective RNA element functions to broadly restrict cleavage by a range of homologous and non-homologous viral endonucleases. However, it does not impede cleavage by cellular endonucleases. The IL-6 protective sequence may be representative of a larger class of nuclease escape elements, as we identified a similar protective element in the GADD45B mRNA. The IL-6 and GADD45B-derived elements display similarities in their sequence, putative structure, and several associated RNA binding proteins. However, the overall composition of their ribonucleoprotein complexes appears distinct, leading to differences in the breadth of nucleases restricted. These findings highlight how RNA elements can selectively control transcript abundance in the background of widespread virus-induced mRNA degradation.

  11. Identification and characterization of inhibitors of human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease APE1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Simeonov

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available APE1 is the major nuclease for excising abasic (AP sites and particular 3'-obstructive termini from DNA, and is an integral participant in the base excision repair (BER pathway. BER capacity plays a prominent role in dictating responsiveness to agents that generate oxidative or alkylation DNA damage, as well as certain chain-terminating nucleoside analogs and 5-fluorouracil. We describe within the development of a robust, 1536-well automated screening assay that employs a deoxyoligonucleotide substrate operating in the red-shifted fluorescence spectral region to identify APE1 endonuclease inhibitors. This AP site incision assay was used in a titration-based high-throughput screen of the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC(1280, a collection of well-characterized, drug-like molecules representing all major target classes. Prioritized hits were authenticated and characterized via two high-throughput screening assays -- a Thiazole Orange fluorophore-DNA displacement test and an E. coli endonuclease IV counterscreen -- and a conventional, gel-based radiotracer incision assay. The top, validated compounds, i.e. 6-hydroxy-DL-DOPA, Reactive Blue 2 and myricetin, were shown to inhibit AP site cleavage activity of whole cell protein extracts from HEK 293T and HeLa cell lines, and to enhance the cytotoxic and genotoxic potency of the alkylating agent methylmethane sulfonate. The studies herein report on the identification of novel, small molecule APE1-targeted bioactive inhibitor probes, which represent initial chemotypes towards the development of potential pharmaceuticals.

  12. A unique family of Mrr-like modification-dependent restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Cohen-Karni, Devora; Xu, Derrick; Chin, Hang Gyeong; Wilson, Geoffrey; Pradhan, Sriharsa; Roberts, Richard J

    2010-09-01

    Mrr superfamily of homologous genes in microbial genomes restricts modified DNA in vivo. However, their biochemical properties in vitro have remained obscure. Here, we report the experimental characterization of MspJI, a remote homolog of Escherichia coli's Mrr and show it is a DNA modification-dependent restriction endonuclease. Our results suggest MspJI recognizes (m)CNNR (R = G/A) sites and cleaves DNA at fixed distances (N(12)/N(16)) away from the modified cytosine at the 3' side (or N(9)/N(13) from R). Besides 5-methylcytosine, MspJI also recognizes 5-hydroxymethylcytosine but is blocked by 5-glucosylhydroxymethylcytosine. Several other close homologs of MspJI show similar modification-dependent endonuclease activity and display substrate preferences different from MspJI. A unique feature of these modification-dependent enzymes is that they are able to extract small DNA fragments containing modified sites on genomic DNA, for example ∼32 bp around symmetrically methylated CG sites and ∼31 bp around methylated CNG sites. The digested fragments can be directly selected for high-throughput sequencing to map the location of the modification on the genomic DNA. The MspJI enzyme family, with their different recognition specificities and cleavage properties, provides a basis on which many future methods can build to decode the epigenomes of different organisms.

  13. Probing the dynamics of restriction endonuclease NgoMIV-DNA interaction by single-molecule FRET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutkus, Marijonas; Sasnauskas, Giedrius; Rutkauskas, Danielis

    2017-12-01

    Many type II restriction endonucleases require two copies of their recognition sequence for optimal activity. Concomitant binding of two DNA sites by such an enzyme produces a DNA loop. Here we exploit single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) of surface-immobilized DNA fragments to study the dynamics of DNA looping induced by tetrameric endonuclease NgoMIV. We have employed a DNA fragment with two NgoMIV recognition sites and a FRET dye pair such that upon protein-induced DNA looping the dyes are brought to close proximity resulting in a FRET signal. The dynamics of DNA-NgoMIV interactions proved to be heterogeneous, with individual smFRET trajectories exhibiting broadly different average looped state durations. Distinct types of the dynamics were attributed to different types of DNA-protein complexes, mediated either by one NgoMIV tetramer simultaneously bound to two specific sites ("slow" trajectories) or by semi-specific interactions of two DNA-bound NgoMIV tetramers ("fast" trajectories), as well as to conformational heterogeneity of individual NgoMIV molecules. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Natural transformation of an engineered Helicobacter pylori strain deficient in type II restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-Song; Blaser, Martin J

    2012-07-01

    Restriction-modification (RM) systems are important for bacteria to limit foreign DNA invasion. The naturally competent bacterium Helicobacter pylori has highly diverse strain-specific type II systems. To evaluate the roles of strain-specific restriction in H. pylori natural transformation, a markerless type II restriction endonuclease-deficient (REd) mutant was constructed. We deleted the genes encoding all four active type II restriction endonucleases in H. pylori strain 26695 using sacB-mediated counterselection. Transformation by donor DNA with exogenous cassettes methylated by Escherichia coli was substantially (1.7 and 2.0 log(10) for cat and aphA, respectively) increased in the REd strain. There also was significantly increased transformation of the REd strain by donor DNA from other H. pylori strains, to an extent corresponding to their shared type II R-M system strain specificity with 26695. Comparison of the REd and wild-type strains indicates that restriction did not affect the length of DNA fragment integration during natural transformation. There also were no differentials in cell growth or susceptibility to DNA damage. In total, the data indicate that the type II REd mutant has enhanced competence with no loss of growth or repair facility compared to the wild type, facilitating H. pylori mutant construction and other genetic engineering.

  15. Modeling of asymmetrical boost converters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Isabel Arango Zuluaga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetrical interleaved dual boost (AIDB is a fifth-order DC/DC converter designed to interface photovoltaic (PV panels. The AIDB produces small current harmonics to the PV panels, reducing the power losses caused by the converter operation. Moreover, the AIDB provides a large voltage conversion ratio, which is required to step-up the PV voltage to the large dc-link voltage used in grid-connected inverters. To reject irradiance and load disturbances, the AIDB must be operated in a closed-loop and a dynamic model is required. Given that the AIDB converter operates in Discontinuous Conduction Mode (DCM, classical modeling approaches based on Continuous Conduction Mode (CCM are not valid. Moreover, classical DCM modeling techniques are not suitable for the AIDB converter. Therefore, this paper develops a novel mathematical model for the AIDB converter, which is suitable for control-pur-poses. The proposed model is based on the calculation of a diode current that is typically disregarded. Moreover, because the traditional correction to the second duty cycle reported in literature is not effective, a new equation is designed. The model accuracy is contrasted with circuital simulations in time and frequency domains, obtaining satisfactory results. Finally, the usefulness of the model in control applications is illustrated with an application example.

  16. Modeling of asymmetrical boost converters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Isabel Arango Zuluaga

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetrical interleaved dual boost (AIDB is a fifth-order DC/DC converter designed to interface photovoltaic (PV panels. The AIDB produces small current harmonics to the PV panels, reducing the power losses caused by the converter operation. Moreover, the AIDB provides a large voltage conversion ratio, which is required to step-up the PV voltage to the large dc-link voltage used in grid-connected inverters. To reject irradiance and load disturbances, the AIDB must be operated in a closed-loop and a dynamic model is required. Given that the AIDB converter operates in Discontinuous Conduction Mode (DCM, classical modeling approaches based on Continuous Conduction Mode (CCM are not valid. Moreover, classical DCM modeling techniques are not suitable for the AIDB converter. Therefore, this paper develops a novel mathematical model for the AIDB converter, which is suitable for control-pur-poses. The proposed model is based on the calculation of a diode current that is typically disregarded. Moreover, because the traditional correction to the second duty cycle reported in literature is not effective, a new equation is designed. The model accuracy is contrasted with circuital simulations in time and frequency domains, obtaining satisfactory results. Finally, the usefulness of the model in control applications is illustrated with an application example.

  17. Basin boundaries in asymmetric vibrations of a circular plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H. D.; Lee, W. K.

    2008-08-01

    In order to investigate further nonlinear asymmetric vibrations of a clamped circular plate under a harmonic excitation, we reexamine a primary resonance, studied by Yeo and Lee [Corrected solvability conditions for non-linear asymmetric vibrations of a circular plate, Journal of Sound and Vibration 257 (2002) 653-665] in which at most three stable steady-state responses (one standing wave and two traveling waves) are observed to exist. Further examination, however, tells that there exist at most five stable steady-state responses: one standing wave and four traveling waves. Two of the traveling waves lose their stability by Hopf bifurcation and have a sequence of period-doubling bifurcations leading to chaos. When the system has five attractors: three equilibrium solutions (one standing wave and two traveling waves) and two chaotic attractors (two modulated traveling waves), the basin boundaries of the attractors on the principal plane are obtained. Also examined is how basin boundaries of the modulated motions (quasi-periodic and chaotic motions) evolve as a system parameter varies. The basin boundaries of the modulated motions turn out to have the fractal nature.

  18. An asymmetric mesoscopic model for single bulges in RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Martins, Erik; Weber, Gerald

    2017-10-01

    Simple one-dimensional DNA or RNA mesoscopic models are of interest for their computational efficiency while retaining the key elements of the molecular interactions. However, they only deal with perfectly formed DNA or RNA double helices and consider the intra-strand interactions to be the same on both strands. This makes it difficult to describe highly asymmetric structures such as bulges and loops and, for instance, prevents the application of mesoscopic models to determine RNA secondary structures. Here we derived the conditions for the Peyrard-Bishop mesoscopic model to overcome these limitations and applied it to the calculation of single bulges, the smallest and simplest of these asymmetric structures. We found that these theoretical conditions can indeed be applied to any situation where stacking asymmetry needs to be considered. The full set of parameters for group I RNA bulges was determined from experimental melting temperatures using an optimization procedure, and we also calculated average opening profiles for several RNA sequences. We found that guanosine bulges show the strongest perturbation on their neighboring base pairs, considerably reducing the on-site interactions of their neighboring base pairs.

  19. Asymmetrical Warfare, Transformation, and Foreign Language Capability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Porter, Clifford F

    2006-01-01

    .... There is no doubt that the current global war on terrorism is an asymmetrical war against an unpredictable enemy rather than the predictable or symmetrical threats against self-important dictators or the Soviet Union...

  20. Asymmetric cryptography based on wavefront sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiang; Wei, Hengzheng; Zhang, Peng

    2006-12-15

    A system of asymmetric cryptography based on wavefront sensing (ACWS) is proposed for the first time to our knowledge. One of the most significant features of the asymmetric cryptography is that a trapdoor one-way function is required and constructed by analogy to wavefront sensing, in which the public key may be derived from optical parameters, such as the wavelength or the focal length, while the private key may be obtained from a kind of regular point array. The ciphertext is generated by the encoded wavefront and represented with an irregular array. In such an ACWS system, the encryption key is not identical to the decryption key, which is another important feature of an asymmetric cryptographic system. The processes of asymmetric encryption and decryption are formulized mathematically and demonstrated with a set of numerical experiments.

  1. Congenital asymmetric crying face: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Kara

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Congenital asymmetric crying face is an anomalia caused by unilateral absence or weakness of depressor anguli oris muscle The major finding of the disease is the absence or weakness in the outer and lower movement of the commissure during crying. The other expression muscles are normal and the face is symmetric at rest. The asymmetry in congenital asymmetric crying face is most evident during infancy but decreases by age. Congenital asymmetric crying face can be associated with cervicofacial, musclebone, respiratory, genitourinary and central nervous system anomalia. It is diagnosed by physical examination. This paper presents a six days old infant with Congenital asymmetric crying face and discusses the case in terms of diagnosis and disease features.

  2. Modeling Asymmetric Volatility In Oil Prices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Syed Aun Hassan

    2011-01-01

    .... The paper uses daily crude oil price data for the past 10 years to test and model the oil price volatility by fitting different variations of GARCH including a univariate asymmetric GARCH model to the series...

  3. Asymmetric dense matter in holographic QCD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Ik Jae

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We study asymmetric dense matter in holographic QCD.We construct asymmetric dense matter by considering two quark flavor branes with dierent quark masses in a D4/D6/D6 model. To calculate the symmetry energy in nuclear matter, we consider two quarks with equal masses and observe that the symmetry energy increases with the total charge showing the stiff dependence. This behavior is universal in the sense that the result is independent of parameters in the model. We also study strange (or hyperon matter with one light and one intermediate mass quarks. In addition to the vacuum properties of asymmetric matter, we calculate meson masses in asymmetric dense matter and discuss our results in the light of in-medium kaon masses.

  4. Asymmetric electroresistance of cluster glass state in manganites

    KAUST Repository

    Lourembam, James

    2014-03-31

    We report the electrostatic modulation of transport in strained Pr0.65(Ca0.75Sr0.25)0.35MnO3 thin films grown on SrTiO3 by gating with ionic liquid in electric double layer transistors (EDLT). In such manganite films with strong phase separation, a cluster glass magnetic state emerges at low temperatures with a spin freezing temperature of about 99 K, which is accompanied by the reentrant insulating state with high resistance below 30 K. In the EDLT, we observe bipolar and asymmetric modulation of the channel resistance, as well as an enhanced electroresistance up to 200% at positive gate bias. Our results provide insights on the carrier-density-dependent correlated electron physics of cluster glass systems.

  5. Designing Asymmetric Multiferroics with Strong Magnetoelectric Coupling

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, X. Z.; Xiang, H. J.

    2014-01-01

    Multiferroics offer exciting opportunities for electric-field control of magnetism. Unfortunately, single-phase multiferroics suitable for such applications at room temperature has not been discovered. Here, we propose the concept of a new type of multiferroics, namely, "asymmetric multiferroic". In asymmetric multiferroics, two locally stable ferroelectric states are not symmetrically equivalent, leading to different magnetic properties between these two states. Furthermore, we predict from ...

  6. Stable Bound States of Asymmetric Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, Mark B.; Zhang, Yue

    2014-01-01

    The simplest renormalizable effective field theories with asymmetric dark matter bound states contain two additional gauge singlet fields one being the dark matter and the other a mediator particle that the dark matter annihilates into. We examine the physics of one such model with a Dirac fermion as the dark matter and a real scalar mediator. For a range of parameters the Yukawa coupling of the dark matter to the mediator gives rise to stable asymmetric dark matter bound states. We derive pr...

  7. KINEMATIC DETECTION OF THE DOUBLE NUCLEUS IN M31

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GERSSEN, J; KUIJKEN, K; MERRIFIELD, MR

    1995-01-01

    Using a spectrum obtained under moderate (similar to 1 arcsec) seeing, we show that the double nucleus in M31 produces a strong kinematic signature even though the individual components are not spatially resolved. The signature consists of a significant asymmetric wing in the stellar velocity

  8. Characteristics of Braced Excavation under Asymmetrical Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changjie Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous excavation practices have shown that large discrepancies exist between field monitoring data and calculated results when the conventional symmetry-plane method (with half-width is used to design the retaining structure under asymmetrical loads. To examine the characteristics of a retaining structure under asymmetrical loads, we use the finite element method (FEM to simulate the excavation process under four different groups of asymmetrical loads and create an integrated model to tackle this problem. The effects of strut stiffness and wall length are also investigated. The results of numerical analysis clearly imply that the deformation and bending moment of diaphragm walls are distinct on different sides, indicating the need for different rebar arrangements when the excavation is subjected to asymmetrical loads. This study provides a practical approach to designing excavations under asymmetrical loads. We analyze and compare the monitoring and calculation data at different excavation stages and find some general trends. Several guidelines on excavation design under asymmetrical loads are drawn.

  9. Apn1 and Apn2 endonucleases prevent accumulation of repair-associated DNA breaks in budding yeast as revealed by direct chromosomal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wenjian; Resnick, Michael A; Gordenin, Dmitry A

    2008-04-01

    Base excision repair (BER) provides relief from many DNA lesions. While BER enzymes have been characterized biochemically, BER functions within cells are much less understood, in part because replication bypass and double-strand break (DSB) repair can also impact resistance to base damage. To investigate BER in vivo, we examined the repair of methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) induced DNA damage in haploid G1 yeast cells, so that replication bypass and recombinational DSB repair cannot occur. Based on the heat-lability of MMS-induced base damage, an assay was developed that monitors secondary breaks in full-length yeast chromosomes where closely spaced breaks yield DSBs that are observed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The assay detects damaged bases and abasic (AP) sites as heat-dependent breaks as well as intermediate heat-independent breaks that arise during BER. Using a circular chromosome, lesion frequency and repair kinetics could be easily determined. Monitoring BER in single and multiple glycosylase and AP-endonuclease mutants confirmed that Mag1 is the major enzyme that removes MMS-damaged bases. This approach provided direct physical evidence that Apn1 and Apn2 not only repair cellular base damage but also prevent break accumulation that can result from AP sites being channeled into other BER pathway(s).

  10. Asymmetric Bessel-Gauss beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlyar, V V; Kovalev, A A; Skidanov, R V; Soifer, V A

    2014-09-01

    We propose a three-parameter family of asymmetric Bessel-Gauss (aBG) beams with integer and fractional orbital angular momentum (OAM). The aBG beams are described by the product of a Gaussian function by the nth-order Bessel function of the first kind of complex argument, having finite energy. The aBG beam's asymmetry degree depends on a real parameter c≥0: at c=0, the aBG beam is coincident with a conventional radially symmetric Bessel-Gauss (BG) beam; with increasing c, the aBG beam acquires a semicrescent shape, then becoming elongated along the y axis and shifting along the x axis for c≫1. In the initial plane, the intensity distribution of the aBG beams has a countable number of isolated optical nulls on the x axis, which result in optical vortices with unit topological charge and opposite signs on the different sides of the origin. As the aBG beam propagates, the vortex centers undergo a nonuniform rotation with the entire beam about the optical axis (c≫1), making a π/4 turn at the Rayleigh range and another π/4 turn after traveling the remaining distance. At different values of the c parameter, the optical nulls of the transverse intensity distribution change their position, thus changing the OAM that the beam carries. An isolated optical null on the optical axis generates an optical vortex with topological charge n. A vortex laser beam shaped as a rotating semicrescent has been generated using a spatial light modulator.

  11. Recruitment and positioning determine the specific role of the XPF-ERCC1 endonuclease in interstrand crosslink repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein Douwel, Daisy; Hoogenboom, Wouter S; Boonen, Rick Acm; Knipscheer, Puck

    2017-01-01

    XPF-ERCC1 is a structure-specific endonuclease pivotal for several DNA repair pathways and, when mutated, can cause multiple diseases. Although the disease-specific mutations are thought to affect different DNA repair pathways, the molecular basis for this is unknown. Here we examine the function of

  12. Recruitment of the nucleotide excision repair endonuclease XPG to sites of UV-induced DNA damage depends on functional TFIIH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Zotter (Angelika); A.B. Houtsmuller (Adriaan); M.S. Luijsterburg (Martijn); D.O. Warmerdam (Daniël); S.M. Ibrahim (Shehu); A.L. Nigg (Alex); W.A. van Cappellen (Gert); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); R. van Driel; W. Vermeulen (Wim)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe structure-specific endonuclease XPG is an indispensable core protein of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) machinery. XPG cleaves the DNA strand at the 3′ side of the DNA damage. XPG binding stabilizes the NER preincision complex and is essential for the 5′ incision by the

  13. RECQ5 Helicase Cooperates with MUS81 Endonuclease in Processing Stalled Replication Forks at Common Fragile Sites during Mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Marco, Stefano; Hasanova, Zdenka; Kanagaraj, Radhakrishnan

    2017-01-01

    The MUS81-EME1 endonuclease cleaves late replication intermediates at common fragile sites (CFSs) during early mitosis to trigger DNA-repair synthesis that ensures faithful chromosome segregation. Here, we show that these DNA transactions are promoted by RECQ5 DNA helicase in a manner dependent o...

  14. A newly discovered Bordetella species carries a transcriptionally active CRISPR-Cas with a small Cas9 endonuclease

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cas9 endonuclease of the Type II-a clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), of Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9) has been adapted as a widely used tool for genome editing and genome engineering. Herein, we describe a gene encoding a novel Cas9 ortholog (BpsuCas9) and th...

  15. The structure-specific endonuclease Ercc1-Xpf is required for targeted gene replacement in embryonic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J. Niedernhofer (Laura); J. Essers (Jeroen); G. Weeda (Geert); H.B. Beverloo (Berna); J. de Wit (Jan); M. Muijtjens (Manja); H. Odijk (Hanny); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); R. Kanaar (Roland)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThe Ercc1-Xpf heterodimer, a highly conserved structure-specific endonuclease, functions in multiple DNA repair pathways that are pivotal for maintaining genome stability, including nucleotide excision repair, interstrand crosslink repair and homologous recombination. Erccl-Xpf incises

  16. Genetic location of a mutant of bacteriophage T4 deficient in the ability to induce endonuclease II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, P; Sinha, N K; Warner, H R; Snustad, D P

    1972-01-01

    Reciprocal three-factor crosses and the use of a partial revertant of a putative ribonucleotide reductase mutant of Escherichia coli B/5 as indicator have made it possible to map denA (deficient in endonuclease II) between nrd-11 (ribonucleotide reductase gene B) and amM69 (gene 63) on the bacteriophage T4 chromosome.

  17. Endonuclease G, a candidate human enzyme for the initiation of genomic inversion in herpes simplex type 1 virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ke-Jung; Zemelman, Boris V; Lehman, I Robert

    2002-06-07

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) a sequence is present as a direct repeat at the two termini of the 152-kilobase viral genome and as an inverted repeat at the junction of the two unique components L and S. During replication, the HSV-1 genome undergoes inversion of L and S, producing an equimolar mixture of the four possible isomers. Isomerization is believed to result from recombination triggered by breakage at the a sequence, a recombinational hot spot. We have identified an enzyme in HeLa cell extracts that preferentially cleaves the a sequence and have purified it to near homogeneity. Microsequencing showed it to be human endonuclease G, an enzyme with a strong preference for G+C-rich sequences. Endonuclease G appears to be the only cellular enzyme that can specifically cleave the a sequence. Endonuclease G also showed the predicted recombination properties in an in vitro recombination assay. Based on these findings, we propose that endonuclease G initiates the a sequence-mediated inversion of the L and S components during HSV-1 DNA replication.

  18. Stereocontrolled synthesis of substituted chiral piperidines via one-pot asymmetric 6π-azaelectrocyclization: asymmetric syntheses of (-)-dendroprimine, (+)-7-epidendroprimine, (+)-5-epidendroprimine, and (+)-5,7-epidendroprimine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Toyoharu; Hasegawa, Futoshi; Hirose, Yoshikatsu; Tanaka, Katsunori; Mori, Hajime; Katsumura, Shigeo

    2012-02-17

    The asymmetric one-pot 6π-azaelectrocyclization of alkenyl vinyl stannane, ethyl (Z)-2-iodo-4-oxobutenoate, and (-)-7-isopropyl-cis-aminoindanol in the presence of a Pd(0) catalyst stereoselectively produced the tetracyclic aminoacetal compounds, resulting from the four-bond formation accompanying by controlling the stereochemistry at the two asymmetric centers. The produced cyclic aminoacetals can be regarded as synthetic precursors of substituted chiral piperidines, and the syntheses of 2,4- and 2,4,6-substituted piperidines were realized from the obtained aminoacetals by the stereoselective hydrogenation of the double bond conjugated with the C-4 ester group and alkylation at the aminoacetal moiety. In addition, the stereoselective synthesis of an indolizidine alkaloid, (-)-dendroprimine, and its three stereoisomers, (+)-7-epidendroprimine, (+)-5-epidendroprimine, and (+)-5,7-epidendroprimine, were achieved.

  19. Chiral Aminophosphines as Catalysts for Enantioselective Double-Michael Indoline Syntheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohyun Kwon

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The bisphosphine-catalyzed double-Michael addition of dinucleophiles to electron-deficient acetylenes is an efficient process for the synthesis of many nitrogen-containing heterocycles. Because the resulting heterocycles contain at least one stereogenic center, this double-Michael reaction would be even more useful if an asymmetric variant of the reaction were to be developed. Aminophosphines can also facilitate the double-Michael reaction and chiral amines are more readily available in Nature and synthetically; therefore, in this study we prepared several new chiral aminophosphines. When employed in the asymmetric double-Michael reaction between ortho-tosylamidophenyl malonate and 3-butyn-2-one, the chiral aminophosphines produced indolines in excellent yields with moderate asymmetric induction.

  20. Double screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gratia, Pierre [Department of Physics, University of Chicago,South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Hu, Wayne [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago,South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Enrico Fermi Institute and Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago,South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Joyce, Austin [Enrico Fermi Institute and Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago,South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Ribeiro, Raquel H. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London,Mile End Road, London, E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    Attempts to modify gravity in the infrared typically require a screening mechanism to ensure consistency with local tests of gravity. These screening mechanisms fit into three broad classes; we investigate theories which are capable of exhibiting more than one type of screening. Specifically, we focus on a simple model which exhibits both Vainshtein and kinetic screening. We point out that due to the two characteristic length scales in the problem, the type of screening that dominates depends on the mass of the sourcing object, allowing for different phenomenology at different scales. We consider embedding this double screening phenomenology in a broader cosmological scenario and show that the simplest examples that exhibit double screening are radiatively stable.

  1. Atomic Structure and Biochemical Characterization of an RNA Endonuclease in the N Terminus of Andes Virus L Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaiza Fernández-García

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Andes virus (ANDV is a human-pathogenic hantavirus. Hantaviruses presumably initiate their mRNA synthesis by using cap structures derived from host cell mRNAs, a mechanism called cap-snatching. A signature for a cap-snatching endonuclease is present in the N terminus of hantavirus L proteins. In this study, we aimed to solve the atomic structure of the ANDV endonuclease and characterize its biochemical features. However, the wild-type protein was refractory to expression in Escherichia coli, presumably due to toxic enzyme activity. To circumvent this problem, we introduced attenuating mutations in the domain that were previously shown to enhance L protein expression in mammalian cells. Using this approach, 13 mutant proteins encompassing ANDV L protein residues 1-200 were successfully expressed and purified. Protein stability and nuclease activity of the mutants was analyzed and the crystal structure of one mutant was solved to a resolution of 2.4 Å. Shape in solution was determined by small angle X-ray scattering. The ANDV endonuclease showed structural similarities to related enzymes of orthobunya-, arena-, and orthomyxoviruses, but also differences such as elongated shape and positively charged patches surrounding the active site. The enzyme was dependent on manganese, which is bound to the active site, most efficiently cleaved single-stranded RNA substrates, did not cleave DNA, and could be inhibited by known endonuclease inhibitors. The atomic structure in conjunction with stability and activity data for the 13 mutant enzymes facilitated inference of structure-function relationships in the protein. In conclusion, we solved the structure of a hantavirus cap-snatching endonuclease, elucidated its catalytic properties, and present a highly active mutant form, which allows for inhibitor screening.

  2. Restriction enzyme body doubles and PCR cloning: on the general use of type IIs restriction enzymes for cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Eszter; Huszár, Krisztina; Bencsura, Petra; Kulcsár, Péter István; Vodicska, Barbara; Nyeste, Antal; Welker, Zsombor; Tóth, Szilvia; Welker, Ervin

    2014-01-01

    The procedure described here allows the cloning of PCR fragments containing a recognition site of the restriction endonuclease (Type IIP) used for cloning in the sequence of the insert. A Type IIS endonuclease--a Body Double of the Type IIP enzyme--is used to generate the same protruding palindrome. Thus, the insert can be cloned to the Type IIP site of the vector without digesting the PCR product with the same Type IIP enzyme. We achieve this by incorporating the recognition site of a Type IIS restriction enzyme that cleaves the DNA outside of its recognition site in the PCR primer in such a way that the cutting positions straddle the desired overhang sequence. Digestion of the PCR product by the Body Double generates the required overhang. Hitherto the use of Type IIS restriction enzymes in cloning reactions has only been used for special applications, the approach presented here makes Type IIS enzymes as useful as Type IIP enzymes for general cloning purposes. To assist in finding Body Double enzymes, we summarised the available Type IIS enzymes which are potentially useful for Body Double cloning and created an online program (http://group.szbk.u-szeged.hu/welkergr/body_double/index.html) for the selection of suitable Body Double enzymes and the design of the appropriate primers.

  3. A physical map of human Alu repeats cleavage by restriction endonucleases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernukhin Valery A

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alu repetitive elements are the abundant sequences in human genome. Diversity of DNA sequences of these elements makes difficult the construction of theoretical patterns of Alu repeats cleavage by restriction endonucleases. We have proposed a method of restriction analysis of Alu repeats sequences in silico. Results Simple software to analyze Alu repeats database has been suggested and Alu repeats digestion patterns for several restriction enzymes' recognition sites have been constructed. Restriction maps of Alu repeats cleavage for corresponding restriction enzymes have been calculated and plotted. Theoretical data have been compared with experimental results on DNA hydrolysis with restriction enzymes, which we obtained earlier. Conclusion Alu repeats digestions provide the main contribution to the patterns of human chromosomal DNA cleavage. This corresponds to the experimental data on total human DNA hydrolysis with restriction enzymes.

  4. Structure of flap endonuclease 1 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Desulfuro­coccus amylolyticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mase, Tomoko; Kubota, Keiko; Miyazono, Ken-ichi; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka; Tanokura, Masaru

    2011-01-01

    Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) is a key enzyme in DNA repair and DNA replication. It is a structure-specific nuclease that removes 5′-overhanging flaps and the RNA/DNA primer during maturation of the Okazaki fragment. Homologues of FEN1 exist in a wide range of bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes. In order to further understand the structural basis of the DNA recognition, binding and cleavage mechanism of FEN1, the structure of FEN1 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Desulfurococcus amylolyticus (DaFEN1) was determined at 2.00 Å resolution. The overall fold of DaFEN1 was similar to those of other archaeal FEN1 proteins; however, the helical clamp and the flexible loop exhibited a putative substrate-binding pocket with a unique conformation. PMID:21301087

  5. Alternative nucleophilic substrates for the endonuclease activities of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ealy, Julie B. [Department of Medicine, Penn State College of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Mail Services H036, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Penn State Lehigh Valley, 2809 E. Saucon Valley Road, Center Valley, PA 18034 (United States); Sudol, Malgorzata [Department of Medicine, Penn State College of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Mail Services H036, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Krzeminski, Jacek; Amin, Shantu [Department of Pharmacology, Penn State College of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Katzman, Michael, E-mail: mkatzman@psu.edu [Department of Medicine, Penn State College of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Mail Services H036, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Penn State College of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States)

    2012-11-10

    Retroviral integrase can use water or some small alcohols as the attacking nucleophile to nick DNA. To characterize the range of compounds that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase can accommodate for its endonuclease activities, we tested 45 potential electron donors (having varied size and number or spacing of nucleophilic groups) as substrates during site-specific nicking at viral DNA ends and during nonspecific nicking reactions. We found that integrase used 22 of the 45 compounds to nick DNA, but not all active compounds were used for both activities. In particular, 13 compounds were used for site-specific and nonspecific nicking, 5 only for site-specific nicking, and 4 only for nonspecific nicking; 23 other compounds were not used for either activity. Thus, integrase can accommodate a large number of nucleophilic substrates but has selective requirements for its different activities, underscoring its dynamic properties and providing new information for modeling and understanding integrase.

  6. Structure and dynamics of mesophilic variants from the homing endonuclease I-DmoI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alba, Josephine; Marcaida, Maria Jose; Prieto, Jesus

    2017-01-01

    this particular application, many efforts have been made to generate mesophilic variants of I-DmoI that function at lower temperatures than the wild-type. Here, we report a structural and computational analysis of two I-DmoI mesophilic mutants. Despite very limited structural variations between the crystal......I-DmoI, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Desulfurococcus mobilis, belongs to the LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease protein family. Its members are highly specific enzymes capable of recognizing long DNA target sequences, thus providing potential tools for genome manipulation. Working towards...... structures of these variants and the wild-type, a different dynamical behaviour near the cleavage sites is observed. In particular, both the dynamics of the water molecules and the protein perturbation effect on the cleavage site correlate well with the changes observed in the experimental enzymatic activity....

  7. The basic N-terminal domain of TRF2 limits recombination endonuclease action at human telomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Léger, Adélaïde; Koelblen, Melanie; Civitelli, Livia; Bah, Amadou; Djerbi, Nadir; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe; Londoño-Vallejo, Arturo; Ascenzioni, Fiorentina; Gilson, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The stability of mammalian telomeres depends upon TRF2, which prevents inappropriate repair and checkpoint activation. By using a plasmid integration assay in yeasts carrying humanized telomeres, we demonstrated that TRF2 possesses the intrinsic property to both stimulate initial homologous recombination events and to prevent their resolution via its basic N-terminal domain. In human cells, we further showed that this TRF2 domain prevents telomere shortening mediated by the resolvase-associated protein SLX4 as well as GEN1 and MUS81, 2 different types of endonucleases with resolvase activities. We propose that various types of resolvase activities are kept in check by the basic N-terminal domain of TRF2 in order to favor an accurate repair of the stalled forks that occur during telomere replication.

  8. Sequential and Multistep Substrate Interrogation Provides the Scaffold for Specificity in Human Flap Endonuclease 1

    KAUST Repository

    Sobhy, M.

    2013-06-06

    Human flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1), one of the structure-specific 5\\' nucleases, is integral in replication, repair, and recombination of cellular DNA. The 5\\' nucleases share significant unifying features yet cleave diverse substrates at similar positions relative to 5\\' end junctions. Using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer, we find a multistep mechanism that verifies all substrate features before inducing the intermediary-DNA bending step that is believed to unify 5\\' nuclease mechanisms. This is achieved by coordinating threading of the 5\\' flap of a nick junction into the conserved capped-helical gateway, overseeing the active site, and bending by binding at the base of the junction. We propose that this sequential and multistep substrate recognition process allows different 5\\' nucleases to recognize different substrates and restrict the induction of DNA bending to the last common step. Such mechanisms would also ensure the protection ofDNA junctions from nonspecific bending and cleavage. 2013 The Authors.

  9. Insights on copper coordination and reactivity of endonuclease EcoRI by ESR spectroscopy and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ming

    2009-03-01

    The cleavage of DNA by restriction endonuclease EcoRI is catalyzed by metal ions such as Mg^2+. However, Cu^2+ does not catalyze the cleavage of DNA by EcoRI. In order to understand the functional difference between Cu^2+ and Mg^2+, coordination of Cu^2+ in the EcoRI--DNA complex was clarified by ESR and MD simulation. There are two Cu^2+ components in the specific EcoRI-DNA complex. Each component has one N atom from histidine imidazole and one oxygen atom from the phosphate backbone of DNA coordinate to Cu^2+ based on the ESR experimental results. MD simulation further confirmed that the Nδ atom of His114 imidazole and one oxygen atom from the phosphate backbone of DNA coordinate to Cu^2+. Difference in the coordination of Cu^2+ and Mg^2+ explains their different functional behaviors.

  10. A web-based restriction endonuclease tool for mycobacteriophage cluster prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gissendanner, Chris R; Wiedemeier, Allison M D; Wiedemeier, Paul D; Minton, Russell L; Bhuiyan, Swapan; Harmson, Jeremy S; Findley, Ann M

    2014-10-01

    A recent explosion in the amount of genomic data has revealed a large genetic diversity in the bacteriophages that infect Mycobacterium smegmatis. In an effort to assess the novelty of newly described mycobacteriophage isolates and provide a preliminary determination of their probable cluster assignment prior to full genome sequencing, we have developed a systematic approach that relies on restriction endonuclease analysis. We demonstrate that a web-based tool, the Phage Enzyme Tool (or PET), is capable of rapidly facilitating this analysis and exhibits reliability in the putative placement of mycobacteriophages into specific clusters of previously sequenced phages. We propose that this tool represents a useful analytical step in the initial study of phage genomes and that this tool will increase the efficiency of phage genome characterization and enhance the educational activities involving mycobacteriophage discovery. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Cleavage of DNA containing 5-fluorocytosine or 5-fluorouracil by type II restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewska, Agata; Dadová, Jitka; Mačková, Michaela; Hocek, Michal

    2015-11-01

    A systematic study of the cleavage of DNA sequences containing 5-fluorocytosine or 5-fluorouracil by type II restriction endonucleases (REs) was performed and the results compared with the same sequences containing natural pyrimidine bases, uracil or 5-methylcytosine. The results show that some REs recognize fluorine as a hydrogen on cytosine and cleave the corresponding sequences where the presence of m5dC leads to blocking of the cleavage. However, on uracil, the same REs recognize the F as a methyl surrogate and cleave the sequences which are not cleaved if uracil is incorporated instead of thymine. These results are interesting for understanding the recognition of DNA sequences by REs and for manipulation of the specific DNA cutting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Role of Magnesium Ions in DNA Recognition by the EcoRV Restriction Endonuclease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahran, Mai [ORNL; Berezniak, Tomasz [University of Heidelberg; Imhof, Petra [University of Heidelberg; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The restriction endonuclease EcoRV binds two magnesium ions. One of these ions, Mg2+A, binds to the phosphate group where the cleavage occurs and is required for catalysis, but the role of the other ion, Mg2+B is debated. Here, multiple independent molecular dynamics simulations suggest that Mg2+B is crucial for achieving a tightly bound protein DNA complex and stabilizing a conformation that allows cleavage. In the absence of Mg2+B in all simulations the protein DNA hydrogen bond network is significantly disrupted and the sharp kink at the central base pair step of the DNA, which is observed in the two-metal complex, is not present. Also, the active site residues rearrange in such a way that the formation of a nucleophile, required for DNA hydrolysis, is unlikely.

  13. Structure and dynamics of mesophilic variants from the homing endonuclease I-DmoI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, Josephine; Marcaida, Maria Jose; Prieto, Jesus; Montoya, Guillermo; Molina, Rafael; D'Abramo, Marco

    2017-12-01

    I-DmoI, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Desulfurococcus mobilis, belongs to the LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease protein family. Its members are highly specific enzymes capable of recognizing long DNA target sequences, thus providing potential tools for genome manipulation. Working towards this particular application, many efforts have been made to generate mesophilic variants of I-DmoI that function at lower temperatures than the wild-type. Here, we report a structural and computational analysis of two I-DmoI mesophilic mutants. Despite very limited structural variations between the crystal structures of these variants and the wild-type, a different dynamical behaviour near the cleavage sites is observed. In particular, both the dynamics of the water molecules and the protein perturbation effect on the cleavage site correlate well with the changes observed in the experimental enzymatic activity.

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the small subunit of the heterodimeric restriction endonuclease R.BspD6I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachalova, Galina S. [Max-Planck Unit for Structural Molecular Biology, Hamburg 22607 (Germany); Yunusova, Alfiya K.; Artyukh, Rimma I.; Rogulin, Eugeny A.; Perevyazova, Tatyana A.; Zheleznaya, Ludmila A. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Biophysics, Pushchino 142290 (Russian Federation); Matvienko, Nickolay I. [Institute of Protein Research, Pushchino 14229 (Russian Federation); Bartunik, Hans D., E-mail: bartunik@mpghdb.desy.de [Max-Planck Unit for Structural Molecular Biology, Hamburg 22607 (Germany)

    2007-09-01

    The crystallization of the small subunit of the heterodimeric restriction endonuclease R.BspD6I and diffraction data collection to 1.5 Å resolution are reported. The heterodimeric restriction endonuclease R.BspD6I is composed of a small subunit with a cleavage site and a large subunit, containing a recognition domain and a cleavage domain, that may function separately as a monomeric nicking endonuclease. Here, the crystallization of the small subunit and diffraction data collection to 1.5 Å resolution are reported.

  15. Ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of microRNA with star trigon structure and endonuclease mediated signal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Peng; Wang, Bidou; Yu, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Jing; Tang, Yuguo

    2015-01-15

    MicroRNAs play important roles in gene regulation. They can be used as effective biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of diseases like cancers. Due to their intrinsic properties of short length, low abundance and sequence homology among family members, it is difficult to realize sensitive and selective detection with economical use of time and cost. Herein, we report an ultrasensitive electrochemical method for microRNA analysis employing two oligonucleotides and one endonuclease. Generally, a glassy carbon electrode is first covered with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) mediated by poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA). Then, thiolated capture probe (CP) with methylene blue (MB) labeled at 5' end is modified on the pretreated electrode. Hybridization occurs among target microRNA, CP and auxiliary probe (AP), forming a star trigon structure on the electrode surface. Subsequently, endonuclease recognizes and cleaves CP on CP/AP duplex, releasing microRNA and AP back to the solution. The two regenerated elements can then form another star trigon with other CP molecules, initiating cycles of CP cleavage and MB departure. Significant decrease of electrochemical signals is thus observed, which can be used to reflect the concentration of microRNA. This proposed method has a linear response to microRNA in a wide range from 100 aM to 1 nM and the sensitivity of attomolar level can be achieved. Moreover, it has high selectivity against single-base mismatch sequences and can be used directly in serum samples. Therefore, this method shows great feasibility for the detection of microRNA and may have potential applications in cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Asymmetrical soft palate cleft repair: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bütow, K-W; Engelbrecht, H; Naidoo, S

    2014-06-01

    The reconstructions of the asymmetrical soft palate cleft is a surgical challenge when it comes to achieving symmetry and optimal soft palate muscular function. Three different versions of the intravelar veloplasty have been used: the intravelar veloplasty (1969) (type I), the modification according to anatomical defects (1991) (type II), and the modification using part of Sommerlad's technique and part of Ivanov's technique (2008) (type III). The perioperative outcomes of the type II and type III intravelar veloplasty were assessed and compared in asymmetrical cleft cases. Two hundred and seventy-seven soft palate clefts were reconstructed: 153 type II and 124 type III. Of these, 49 were asymmetrical (17.7%); 23 underwent the type II procedure and 26 the type III procedure. Of the type II procedure cases, 30.4% remained asymmetrical postoperatively compared to 3.8% of the type III cases. The uvula appeared subjectively atrophic in 47.8% of the type II cases and in 7.7% of type III cases. Oro-nasal fistula occurred in 13.0% of the type II cases and 3.8% of the type III cases. Speech results will only be assessed after 4 years of age. The type III modified intravelar veloplasty has had a major beneficial impact on patients who had an asymmetrical soft palate cleft. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Control of apoptosis by asymmetric cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzold, Julia; Conradt, Barbara

    2008-04-08

    Asymmetric cell division and apoptosis (programmed cell death) are two fundamental processes that are important for the development and function of multicellular organisms. We have found that the processes of asymmetric cell division and apoptosis can be functionally linked. Specifically, we show that asymmetric cell division in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is mediated by a pathway involving three genes, dnj-11 MIDA1, ces-2 HLF, and ces-1 Snail, that directly control the enzymatic machinery responsible for apoptosis. Interestingly, the MIDA1-like protein GlsA of the alga Volvox carteri, as well as the Snail-related proteins Snail, Escargot, and Worniu of Drosophila melanogaster, have previously been implicated in asymmetric cell division. Therefore, C. elegans dnj-11 MIDA1, ces-2 HLF, and ces-1 Snail may be components of a pathway involved in asymmetric cell division that is conserved throughout the plant and animal kingdoms. Furthermore, based on our results, we propose that this pathway directly controls the apoptotic fate in C. elegans, and possibly other animals as well.

  18. Control of apoptosis by asymmetric cell division.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Hatzold

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Asymmetric cell division and apoptosis (programmed cell death are two fundamental processes that are important for the development and function of multicellular organisms. We have found that the processes of asymmetric cell division and apoptosis can be functionally linked. Specifically, we show that asymmetric cell division in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is mediated by a pathway involving three genes, dnj-11 MIDA1, ces-2 HLF, and ces-1 Snail, that directly control the enzymatic machinery responsible for apoptosis. Interestingly, the MIDA1-like protein GlsA of the alga Volvox carteri, as well as the Snail-related proteins Snail, Escargot, and Worniu of Drosophila melanogaster, have previously been implicated in asymmetric cell division. Therefore, C. elegans dnj-11 MIDA1, ces-2 HLF, and ces-1 Snail may be components of a pathway involved in asymmetric cell division that is conserved throughout the plant and animal kingdoms. Furthermore, based on our results, we propose that this pathway directly controls the apoptotic fate in C. elegans, and possibly other animals as well.

  19. A sampling theory for asymmetric communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Andrew E; Temme, Nico M; Fagan, William F; Keitt, Timothy H

    2011-03-21

    We introduce the first analytical model of asymmetric community dynamics to yield Hubbell's neutral theory in the limit of functional equivalence among all species. Our focus centers on an asymmetric extension of Hubbell's local community dynamics, while an analogous extension of Hubbell's metacommunity dynamics is deferred to an appendix. We find that mass-effects may facilitate coexistence in asymmetric local communities and generate unimodal species abundance distributions indistinguishable from those of symmetric communities. Multiple modes, however, only arise from asymmetric processes and provide a strong indication of non-neutral dynamics. Although the exact stationary distributions of fully asymmetric communities must be calculated numerically, we derive approximate sampling distributions for the general case and for nearly neutral communities where symmetry is broken by a single species distinct from all others in ecological fitness and dispersal ability. In the latter case, our approximate distributions are fully normalized, and novel asymptotic expansions of the required hypergeometric functions are provided to make evaluations tractable for large communities. Employing these results in a bayesian analysis may provide a novel statistical test to assess the consistency of species abundance data with the neutral hypothesis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Asymmetric microscope. Fusho no kenbisho [exclamation point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Tadashi. (Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan))

    1999-07-01

    It is difficult for a conventional optical analysis means to determine the configuration of a substance with an ultra low optical purity. Recently, an asymmetric microscope has been reported as a new concept for solving the above-mentioned problem. Specifically, a product with slight asymmetry is obtained by using the substance with an ultra low optical purity as the chiral initiation, and then the asymmetry of the product is amplified dramatically due to the asymmetric autocatalysis, thus obtaining a product having a high optical purity. A new means is to determine the configuration of the original substance having the low optical purity from the configuration of the substance having the high optical purity. According to this method, the chirality of the substance having the low optical purity is transcribed to alkanol, and the chirality is amplified due to the asymmetric autocatalysis, thus the absolute configuration of the original compound can be determined from the absolute configuration of the final product. (NEDO)

  1. Multi-agent Bargaining under Asymmetric Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asplund, Marcus; Genesove, David

    information aspect is due to partly unobserved individual valuations of an elevator. We tailor Hellwig (2003) to the features of the retrofitting problem and use this to predict which building characteristics should make it easier for owners to agree. Data from Copenhagen broadly support the model......It is well know that asymmetric information might lead to underprovision of public goods. To test the theoretical prediction, we study the decision to retrofit an elevator into an old apartment building, in which each owner has to agree on how the investment cost is split. The asymmetric......'s predictions. We use transaction data to estimate the market value of an elevator and conclude that for approximately 30-40 percent of the buildings without an elevator the aggregate increase in value exceeds the investment cost....

  2. Asymmetric synthesis II more methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Christmann, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    After the overwhelming success of 'Asymmetric Synthesis - The Essentials', narrating the colorful history of asymmetric synthesis, this is the second edition with latest subjects and authors. While the aim of the first edition was mainly to honor the achievements of the pioneers in asymmetric syntheses, the aim of this new edition was bringing the current developments, especially from younger colleagues, to the attention of students. The format of the book remained unchanged, i.e. short conceptual overviews by young leaders in their field including a short biography of the authors. The growing multidisciplinary research within chemistry is reflected in the selection of topics including metal catalysis, organocatalysis, physical organic chemistry, analytical chemistry, and its applications in total synthesis. The prospective reader of this book is a graduate or undergraduate student of advanced organic chemistry as well as the industrial chemist who wants to get a brief update on the current developments in th...

  3. The deal with diel: Temperature fluctuations, asymmetrical warming, and ubiquitous metals contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallman, Tyler A; Brooks, Marjorie L

    2015-11-01

    Climate projections over the next century include disproportionately warmer nighttime temperatures ("asymmetrical warming"). Cool nighttime temperatures lower metabolic rates of aquatic ectotherms. In contaminated waters, areas with cool nights may provide thermal refugia from high rates of daytime contaminant uptake. We exposed Cope's gray tree frogs (Hyla chrysoscelis), southern leopard frogs (Lithobates sphenocephalus), and spotted salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum) to five concentrations of a mixture of cadmium, copper, and lead under three to four temperature regimes, representing asymmetrical warming. At concentrations with intermediate toxicosis at test termination (96 h), temperature effects on acute toxicity or escape distance were evident in all study species. Asymmetrical warming (day:night, 22:20 °C; 22:22 °C) doubled or tripled mortality relative to overall cooler temperatures (20:20 °C) or cool nights (22:18 °C). Escape distances were 40-70% shorter under asymmetrical warming. Results suggest potentially grave ecological impacts from unexpected toxicosis under climate change. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. An alternative pathway for Alu retrotransposition suggests a role in DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikanta, Deepa; Sen, Shurjo K; Huang, Charles T; Conlin, Erin M; Rhodes, Ryan M; Batzer, Mark A

    2009-03-01

    The Alu family is a highly successful group of non-LTR retrotransposons ubiquitously found in primate genomes. Similar to the L1 retrotransposon family, Alu elements integrate primarily through an endonuclease-dependent mechanism termed target site-primed reverse transcription (TPRT). Recent studies have suggested that, in addition to TPRT, L1 elements occasionally utilize an alternative endonuclease-independent pathway for genomic integration. To determine whether an analogous mechanism exists for Alu elements, we have analyzed three publicly available primate genomes (human, chimpanzee and rhesus macaque) for endonuclease-independent recently integrated or lineage specific Alu insertions. We recovered twenty-three examples of such insertions and show that these insertions are recognizably different from classical TPRT-mediated Alu element integration. We suggest a role for this process in DNA double-strand break repair and present evidence to suggest its association with intra-chromosomal translocations, in-vitro RNA recombination (IVRR), and synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA).

  5. Algebraic Davis decomposition and asymmetric Doob inequalities

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Guixiang; Junge, Marius; Parcet, Javier

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate asymmetric forms of Doob maximal inequality. The asymmetry is imposed by noncommutativity. Let $(\\M,\\tau)$ be a noncommutative probability space equipped with a weak-$*$ dense filtration of von Neumann subalgebras $(\\M_n)_{n \\ge 1}$. Let $\\E_n$ denote the corresponding family of conditional expectations. As an illustration for an asymmetric result, we prove that for $1 < p < 2$ and $x \\in L_p(\\M,\\tau)$ one can find $a, b \\in L_p(\\M,\\tau)$ and contractions $u_n, v_...

  6. Asymmetric multiscale behavior in PM2.5 time series: Based on asymmetric MS-DFA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen; Ni, Zhiwei; Ni, Liping

    2016-11-01

    Particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 mm or less (PM2.5) is one of the most serious air pollution, considered most harmful for people by World Health Organisation. In this paper, we utilized the asymmetric multiscale detrended fluctuation analysis (A-MSDFA) method to explore the existence of asymmetric correlation properties for PM2.5 daily average concentration in two USA cities (Fresno and Los Angeles) and two Chinese cities (Hong Kong and Shanghai), and to assess the properties of these asymmetric correlations. The results show the existences of asymmetric correlations, and the degree of asymmetric for two USA cities is stronger than that of two Chinese cities. Further, most of the local exponent β(n) are smaller than 0.5, which indicates the existence of anti-persistent long-range correlation for PM2.5 time series in four cities. In addition, we reanalyze the asymmetric correlation by the A-MSDFA method with secant rolling windows of different sizes, which can investigate dynamic changes in the multiscale correlation for PM2.5 time series with changing window size. Whatever window sizes, the correlations are asymmetric and display smaller asymmetries at small scales and larger asymmetries at large scales. Moreover, the asymmetries become increasingly weaker with the increase of window sizes.

  7. Cell-sized asymmetric lipid vesicles facilitate the investigation of asymmetric membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Koki; Kawano, Ryuji; Osaki, Toshihisa; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2016-09-01

    Asymmetric lipid giant vesicles have been used to model the biochemical reactions in cell membranes. However, methods for producing asymmetric giant vesicles lead to the inclusion of an organic solvent layer that affects the mechanical and physical characteristics of the membrane. Here we describe the formation of asymmetric giant vesicles that include little organic solvent, and use them to investigate the dynamic responses of lipid molecules in the vesicle membrane. We formed the giant vesicles via the inhomogeneous break-up of a lipid microtube generated by applying a jet flow to an asymmetric planar lipid bilayer. The asymmetric giant vesicles showed a lipid flip-flop behaviour in the membrane, superficially similar to the lipid flip-flop activity observed in apoptotic cells. In vitro synthesis of membrane proteins into the asymmetric giant vesicles revealed that the lipid asymmetry in bilayer membranes improves the reconstitution ratio of membrane proteins. Our asymmetric giant vesicles will be useful in elucidating lipid-lipid and lipid-membrane protein interactions involved in the regulation of cellular functions.

  8. Bifunctional TaqII restriction endonuclease: redefining the prototype DNA recognition site and establishing the Fidelity Index for partial cleaving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Żylicz-Stachula Agnieszka

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The TaqII enzyme is a member of the Thermus sp. enzyme family that we propounded previously within Type IIS restriction endonucleases, containing related thermophilic bifunctional endonucleases-methyltransferases from various Thermus sp.: TaqII, Tth111II, TthHB27I, TspGWI, TspDTI and TsoI. These enzymes show significant nucleotide and amino acid sequence similarities, a rare phenomenon among restriction endonucleases, along with similarities in biochemical properties, molecular size, DNA recognition sequences and cleavage sites. They also feature some characteristics of Types I and III. Results Barker et al. reported the Type IIS/IIC restriction endonuclease TaqII as recognizing two distinct cognate site variants (5'-GACCGA-3' and 5'-CACCCA-3' while cleaving 11/9 nucleotides downstream. We used four independent methods, namely, shotgun cloning and sequencing, restriction pattern analysis, digestion of particular custom substrates and GeneScan analysis, to demonstrate that the recombinant enzyme recognizes only 5'-GACCGA-3' sites and cleaves 11/9 nucleotides downstream. We did not observe any 5'-CACCCA-3' cleavage under a variety of conditions and site arrangements tested. We also characterized the enzyme biochemically and established new digestion conditions optimal for practical enzyme applications. Finally, we developed and propose a new version of the Fidelity Index - the Fidelity Index for Partial Cleavage (FI-PC. Conclusions The DNA recognition sequence of the bifunctional prototype TaqII endonuclease-methyltransferase from Thermus aquaticus has been redefined as recognizing only 5'-GACCGA-3' cognate sites. The reaction conditions (pH and salt concentrations were designed either to minimize (pH = 8.0 and 10 mM ammonium sulphate or to enhance star activity (pH = 6.0 and no salt. Redefinition of the recognition site and reaction conditions makes this prototype endonuclease a useful tool for DNA manipulation; as yet, this

  9. Bifunctional TaqII restriction endonuclease: redefining the prototype DNA recognition site and establishing the Fidelity Index for partial cleaving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylicz-Stachula, Agnieszka; Zołnierkiewicz, Olga; Sliwińska, Katarzyna; Jeżewska-Frąckowiak, Joanna; Skowron, Piotr M

    2011-12-05

    The TaqII enzyme is a member of the Thermus sp. enzyme family that we propounded previously within Type IIS restriction endonucleases, containing related thermophilic bifunctional endonucleases-methyltransferases from various Thermus sp.: TaqII, Tth111II, TthHB27I, TspGWI, TspDTI and TsoI. These enzymes show significant nucleotide and amino acid sequence similarities, a rare phenomenon among restriction endonucleases, along with similarities in biochemical properties, molecular size, DNA recognition sequences and cleavage sites. They also feature some characteristics of Types I and III. Barker et al. reported the Type IIS/IIC restriction endonuclease TaqII as recognizing two distinct cognate site variants (5'-GACCGA-3' and 5'-CACCCA-3') while cleaving 11/9 nucleotides downstream. We used four independent methods, namely, shotgun cloning and sequencing, restriction pattern analysis, digestion of particular custom substrates and GeneScan analysis, to demonstrate that the recombinant enzyme recognizes only 5'-GACCGA-3' sites and cleaves 11/9 nucleotides downstream. We did not observe any 5'-CACCCA-3' cleavage under a variety of conditions and site arrangements tested. We also characterized the enzyme biochemically and established new digestion conditions optimal for practical enzyme applications. Finally, we developed and propose a new version of the Fidelity Index - the Fidelity Index for Partial Cleavage (FI-PC). The DNA recognition sequence of the bifunctional prototype TaqII endonuclease-methyltransferase from Thermus aquaticus has been redefined as recognizing only 5'-GACCGA-3' cognate sites. The reaction conditions (pH and salt concentrations) were designed either to minimize (pH = 8.0 and 10 mM ammonium sulphate) or to enhance star activity (pH = 6.0 and no salt). Redefinition of the recognition site and reaction conditions makes this prototype endonuclease a useful tool for DNA manipulation; as yet, this enzyme has no practical applications. The extension of

  10. Effects of gemcitabine on APE/ref-1 endonuclease activity in pancreatic cancer cells, and the therapeutic potential of antisense oligonucleotides

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, J P; Weatherdon, K L; Skalski, V; Hedley, D. W.

    2004-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE) is a key enzyme involved in DNA base excision repair (BER) that is often expressed at elevated levels in human cancers. Pancreatic cancer cells treated with the nucleoside analogue gemcitabine (2?, 2?-difluoro-2?deoxycytidine) showed increases in APE/redox effector factor (ref-1) protein levels (approximately two-fold for Panc-1 and six-fold for MiaPaCa-2), with corresponding increases in endonuclease activity. These results suggested that the activati...

  11. Characterization of the restriction enzyme-like endonuclease encoded by the Entamoeba histolytica non-long terminal repeat retrotransposon EhLINE1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vijay Pal; Mandal, Prabhat Kumar; Rao, Desirazu N; Bhattacharya, Sudha

    2009-12-01

    The genome of the human pathogen Entamoeba histolytica, a primitive protist, contains non-long terminal repeat retrotransposable elements called EhLINEs. These encode reverse transcriptase and endonuclease required for retrotransposition. The endonuclease shows sequence similarity with bacterial restriction endonucleases. Here we report the salient enzymatic features of one such endonuclease. The kinetics of an EhLINE1-encoded endonuclease catalyzed reaction, determined under steady-state and single-turnover conditions, revealed a significant burst phase followed by a slower steady-state phase, indicating that release of product could be the slower step in this reaction. For circular supercoiled DNA the K(m) was 2.6 x 10(-8) M and the k(cat) was 1.6 x 10(-2) sec(-1). For linear E. histolytica DNA substrate the K(m) and k(cat) values were 1.3 x 10(-8) M and 2.2 x 10(-4) sec(-1) respectively. Single-turnover reaction kinetics suggested a noncooperative mode of hydrolysis. The enzyme behaved as a monomer. While Mg(2+) was required for activity, 60% activity was seen with Mn(2+) and none with other divalent metal ions. Substitution of PDX(12-14)D (a metal-binding motif) with PAX(12-14)D caused local conformational change in the protein tertiary structure, which could contribute to reduced enzyme activity in the mutated protein. The protein underwent conformational change upon the addition of DNA, which is consistent with the known behavior of restriction endonucleases. The similarities with bacterial restriction endonucleases suggest that the EhLINE1-encoded endonuclease was possibly acquired from bacteria through horizontal gene transfer. The loss of strict sequence specificity for nicking may have been subsequently selected to facilitate spread of the retrotransposon to intergenic regions of the E. histolytica genome.

  12. RSA Asymmetric Cryptosystem beyond Homogeneous Transformation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. O. E. OSUAGWU

    2013-12-01

    Dec 1, 2013 ... The Internet is an insecure open network and its use and connectivity have witnessed a significant growth, and this has made it vulnerable to all forms of attacks. A threat to a network can cause harm or interrupt the network. In this paper, we looked at the security of data and message, using asymmetric.

  13. Settling dynamics of asymmetric rigid fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.J. Tozzi; C Tim Scott; David Vahey; D.J. Klingenberg

    2011-01-01

    The three-dimensional motion of asymmetric rigid fibers settling under gravity in a quiescent fluid was experimentally measured using a pair of cameras located on a movable platform. The particle motion typically consisted of an initial transient after which the particle approached a steady rate of rotation about an axis parallel to the acceleration of gravity, with...

  14. Computing modal dispersion characteristics of radially Asymmetric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    determine how the modal characteristics change as circular Bragg fiber is changed to asymmetric Bragg fiber. The key to this transfer matrix method (TMM) is the accurate calculation of the propagation constants of modes. And validity of this method is verified by FDTD method. We compare these results with obtained from ...

  15. Organocatalytic asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of imines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Johannes G.; Mrsic, Natasa; Mršić, Nataša

    2011-01-01

    The asymmetric organocatalytic transfer hydrogenation of imines can be accomplished in good yields with high enantioselectivities through the use of BINOL-derived phosphoric acids as catalysts and Hantzsch esters or benzothiazoles as the hydride source. The same method can also be applied to the

  16. Spatially inhomogeneous condensate in asymmetric nuclear matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedrakian, A

    We study the isospin singlet pairing in asymmetric nuclear matter with nonzero total momentum of the condensate Cooper pairs. The quasiparticle excitation spectrum is fourfold split compared to the usual BCS spectrum of the symmetric, homogeneous matter. A twofold splitting of the spectrum into

  17. Asymmetric volatility connectedness on the forex market

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Baruník, Jozef; Kočenda, Evžen; Vácha, Lukáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 1 (2017), s. 39-56 ISSN 0261-5606 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-14179S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : volatility * connectedness * asymmetric effects Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 1.853, year: 2016 http:// library .utia.cas.cz/separaty/2017/E/barunik-0478477.pdf

  18. Asymmetric Drift and the Stellar Velocity Ellipsoid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westfall, Kyle B.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Verheijen, Marc A. W.; Andersen, David R.; Swaters, Rob A.

    2007-01-01

    We present the decomposition of the stellar velocity ellipsoid using stellar velocity dispersions within a 40° wedge about the major-axis (smaj), the epicycle approximation, and the asymmetric drift equation. Thus, we employ no fitted forms for smaj and escape interpolation errors resulting from

  19. Dynamic Conditional Correlations for Asymmetric Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Asai (Manabu); M.J. McAleer (Michael)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe paper develops two Dynamic Conditional Correlation (DCC) models, namely the Wishart DCC (WDCC) model and the Matrix-Exponential Conditional Correlation (MECC) model. The paper applies the WDCC approach to the exponential GARCH (EGARCH) and GJR models to propose asymmetric DCC models.

  20. Asymmetric conditional volatility in international stock markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Nuno B.; Menezes, Rui; Mendes, Diana A.

    2007-08-01

    Recent studies show that a negative shock in stock prices will generate more volatility than a positive shock of similar magnitude. The aim of this paper is to appraise the hypothesis under which the conditional mean and the conditional variance of stock returns are asymmetric functions of past information. We compare the results for the Portuguese Stock Market Index PSI 20 with six other Stock Market Indices, namely the SP 500, FTSE 100, DAX 30, CAC 40, ASE 20, and IBEX 35. In order to assess asymmetric volatility we use autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity specifications known as TARCH and EGARCH. We also test for asymmetry after controlling for the effect of macroeconomic factors on stock market returns using TAR and M-TAR specifications within a VAR framework. Our results show that the conditional variance is an asymmetric function of past innovations raising proportionately more during market declines, a phenomenon known as the leverage effect. However, when we control for the effect of changes in macroeconomic variables, we find no significant evidence of asymmetric behaviour of the stock market returns. There are some signs that the Portuguese Stock Market tends to show somewhat less market efficiency than other markets since the effect of the shocks appear to take a longer time to dissipate.

  1. Spectral inequalities for the quantum asymmetric top

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourget, Alain; McMillen, Tyler [Department of Mathematics, California State University (Fullerton), McCarthy Hall 154, Fullerton, CA 92834 (United States)], E-mail: abourget@fullerton.edu, E-mail: tmcmillen@fullerton.edu

    2009-03-06

    We consider the spectrum of the quantum asymmetric top. Unlike in the case when two or three moments of inertia are equal, when the moments of inertia are distinct all degeneracy in the spectrum of the operator is removed. We derive inequalities for the spectra based on recent results on the interlacing of Van Vleck zeros.

  2. Palladium catalysed asymmetric alkylation of benzophenone Schiff ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 123; Issue 4. Palladium catalysed asymmetric alkylation of benzophenone Schiff base glycine esters in ionic liquids. Dae Hyun Kim Jin Kyu Im Dae Won Kim Minserk Cheong Hoon Sik Kim Deb Kumar Mukherjee. Volume 123 Issue 4 July 2011 pp 467-476 ...

  3. RSA Asymmetric Cryptosystem beyond Homogeneous Transformation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Internet is an insecure open network and its use and connectivity have witnessed a significant growth, and this has made it vulnerable to all forms of attacks. A threat to a network can cause harm or interrupt the network. In this paper, we looked at the security of data and message, using asymmetric cryptography, with ...

  4. Mixed gas plasticization phenomena in asymmetric membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Tymen

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes the thorough investigation of mixed gas transport behavior of asymmetric membranes in the separation of feed streams containing plasticizing gases in order to gain more insights into the complicated behavior of plasticization. To successfully employ gas separation membranes in

  5. Pulsatile flow in a compliant stenosed asymmetric model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmani, Abdullah Y.; Muralidhar, K.

    2016-12-01

    Time-varying velocity field in an asymmetric constricted tube is experimentally studied using a two-dimensional particle image velocimetry system. The geometry resembles a vascular disease which is characterized by arterial narrowing due to plaque deposition. The present study compares the nature of flow patterns in rigid and compliant asymmetric constricted tubes for a range of dimensionless parameters appearing in a human artery. A blood analogue fluid is employed along with a pump that mimics cardioflow conditions. The peak Reynolds number range is Re 300-800, while the Womersley number range considered in experiments is Wo 6-8. These values are based on the peak velocity in a straight rigid tube connected to the model, over a pulsation frequency range of 1.2-2.4 Hz. The medial-plane velocity distribution is used to investigate the nature of flow patterns. Temporal distribution of stream traces and hemodynamic factors including WSS, TAWSS and OSI at important phases of the pulsation cycle are discussed. The flow patterns obtained from PIV are compared to a limited extent against numerical simulation. Results show that the region downstream of the constriction is characterized by a high-velocity jet at the throat, while a recirculation zone, attached to the wall, evolves in time. Compliant models reveal large flow disturbances upstream during the retrograde flow. Wall shear stress values are lower in a compliant model as compared to the rigid. Cross-plane flow structures normal to the main flow direction are visible at select phases of the cycle. Positive values of largest Lyapunov exponent are realized for wall movement and are indicative of chaotic motion transferred from the flow to the wall. These exponents increase with Reynolds number as well as compliance. Period doubling is observed in wall displacement of highly compliant models, indicating possible triggering of hemodynamic events in a real artery that may cause fissure in the plaque deposits.

  6. Epigenetic Segregation of Microbial Genomes from Complex Samples Using Restriction Endonucleases HpaII and McrB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guohong; Weston, Christopher Q; Pham, Long K; Waltz, Shannon; Barnes, Helen; King, Paula; Sphar, Dan; Yamamoto, Robert T; Forsyth, R Allyn

    2016-01-01

    We describe continuing work to develop restriction endonucleases as tools to enrich targeted genomes of interest from diverse populations. Two approaches were developed in parallel to segregate genomic DNA based on cytosine methylation. First, the methyl-sensitive endonuclease HpaII was used to bind non-CG methylated DNA. Second, a truncated fragment of McrB was used to bind CpG methylated DNA. Enrichment levels of microbial genomes can exceed 100-fold with HpaII allowing improved genomic detection and coverage of otherwise trace microbial genomes from sputum. Additionally, we observe interesting enrichment results that correlate with the methylation states not only of bacteria, but of fungi, viruses, a protist and plants. The methods presented here offer promise for testing biological samples for pathogens and global analysis of population methylomes.

  7. Epigenetic Segregation of Microbial Genomes from Complex Samples Using Restriction Endonucleases HpaII and McrB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohong Liu

    Full Text Available We describe continuing work to develop restriction endonucleases as tools to enrich targeted genomes of interest from diverse populations. Two approaches were developed in parallel to segregate genomic DNA based on cytosine methylation. First, the methyl-sensitive endonuclease HpaII was used to bind non-CG methylated DNA. Second, a truncated fragment of McrB was used to bind CpG methylated DNA. Enrichment levels of microbial genomes can exceed 100-fold with HpaII allowing improved genomic detection and coverage of otherwise trace microbial genomes from sputum. Additionally, we observe interesting enrichment results that correlate with the methylation states not only of bacteria, but of fungi, viruses, a protist and plants. The methods presented here offer promise for testing biological samples for pathogens and global analysis of population methylomes.

  8. Asymmetric overlap and hysteresis current control of zero-current switched alternate arm converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wickramasinghe, Harith R.; Konstantinou, Georgios; Pou, Josep

    2016-01-01

    The alternate arm converter (AAC) is a multilevel converter of the same family as the modular multilevel converter (MMC). Contrary to the MMC, the AAC offers dc-fault tolerant capabilities but requires complex submodule (SM) capacitor voltage/energy regulation and circulating current control....... Such control is also limited due to the small overlap period where both arms conduct and energy between the arms can be exchanged. This paper develops a double-band hysteresis-based circulating current control strategy by introducing an asymmetric overlap period control of the director switches (DSs......). The proposed controller ensures zero-current switching operation of the DSs, and increases the flexibility of SM capacitor voltage regulation owing to the asymmetric overlap period. It improves the performance of current control and energy regulation for the AAC at both near sweet-spot and non sweet...

  9. Asymmetric Electrodes Constructed with PAN-Based Activated Carbon Fiber in Capacitive Deionization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingzhe Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Capacitive deionization (CDI method has drawn much attention for its low energy consumption, low pollution, and convenient manipulation. Activated carbon fibers (ACFs possess high adsorption ability and can be used as CDI electrode material. Herein, two kinds of PAN-based ACFs with different specific surface area (SSA were used for the CDI electrodes. The CDI performance was investigated; especially asymmetric electrodes’ effect was evaluated. The results demonstrated that PAN-based ACFs showed a high electrosorption rate (complete electrosorption in less than half an hour and moderate electrosorption capacity (up to 0.2 mmol/g. CDI experiments with asymmetric electrodes displayed a variation in electrosorption capacity between forward voltage and reverse voltage. It can be attributed to the electrical double layer (EDL overlap effect and inner pore potential; thus the ions with smaller hydrated ionic radius can be adsorbed more easily.

  10. Charge Asymmetric Cosmic Rays as a probe of Flavor Violating Asymmetric Dark Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masina, Isabella; Sannino, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    The recently introduced cosmic sum rules combine the data from PAMELA and Fermi-LAT cosmic ray experiments in a way that permits to neatly investigate whether the experimentally observed lepton excesses violate charge symmetry. One can in a simple way determine universal properties of the unknown...... component of the cosmic rays. Here we attribute a potential charge asymmetry to the dark sector. In particular we provide models of asymmetric dark matter able to produce charge asymmetric cosmic rays. We consider spin zero, spin one and spin one-half decaying dark matter candidates. We show that lepton...... flavor violation and asymmetric dark matter are both required to have a charge asymmetry in the cosmic ray lepton excesses. Therefore, an experimental evidence of charge asymmetry in the cosmic ray lepton excesses implies that dark matter is asymmetric....

  11. Quantum Entanglement in the Genome? The Role of Quantum Effects in Catalytic Synchronization of Type II Restriction Endonucleases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurian, P.

    Several living systems have been examined for their exhibition of macroscopic quantum effects, showcasing biology's apparent optimization of structure and function for quantum behavior. Prevalent in lower organisms with analogues in eukaryotes, type II restriction endonucleases are the largest class of restriction enzymes. Orthodox type II endonucleases recognize four-to-eight base pair sequences of palindromic DNA, cut both strands symmetrically, and act without an external metabolite such as ATP. While it is known that these enzymes induce strand breaks by nucleophilic attack on opposing phosphodiester bonds of the DNA helix, what remains unclear is the mechanism by which cutting occurs in concert at the catalytic centers. Previous studies indicate the primacy of intimate DNA contacts made by the specifically bound enzyme in coordinating the two synchronized cuts. We propose that collective electronic behavior in the DNA helix generates coherent oscillations---quantized through boundary conditions imposed by the endonuclease---that provide the energy required to break two phosphodiester bonds. Such quanta may be preserved in the presence of thermal noise and electromagnetic interference through the specific complex's exclusion of water and ions surrounding the helix, with the enzyme serving as a decoherence shield. Clamping energy imparted by the decoherence shield is comparable with zero-point modes of the dipole-dipole oscillations in the DNA recognition sequence. The palindromic mirror symmetry of this sequence should conserve parity during the process. Experimental data corroborate that symmetric bond-breaking ceases when the symmetry of the endonuclease complex is violated, or when environmental parameters are perturbed far from biological optima. Persistent correlation between states in DNA sequence across spatial separations of any length---a characteristic signature of quantum entanglement---may be explained by such a physical mechanism.

  12. Role of endonucleases XPF and XPG in nucleotide excision repair of platinated DNA and cisplatin/oxaliplatin cytotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Graf, Nora; Ang, Wee Han; Zhu, Guangyu; Myint, MyatNoeZin; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Resistance of tumor cells to platinum anticancer agents poses a major problem in cancer chemotherapy. One of the mechanisms associated with platinum-based drug resistance is the enhanced capacity of the cell to carry out nucleotide excision repair (NER) on platinum-damaged DNA. Endonucleases XPF and XPG are critical components of NER, responsible for excising the damaged DNA strand to remove the DNA lesion. Here, we investigated possible consequences of down-regulation of XPF and XPG gene exp...

  13. Genomic Disruption of VEGF-A Expression in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells Using CRISPR-Cas9 Endonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiu, Glenn; Tieu, Eric; Nguyen, Anthony T; Wong, Brittany; Smit-McBride, Zeljka

    2016-10-01

    To employ type II clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 endonuclease to suppress ocular angiogenesis by genomic disruption of VEGF-A in human RPE cells. CRISPR sequences targeting exon 1 of human VEGF-A were computationally identified based on predicted Cas9 on- and off-target probabilities. Single guide RNA (gRNA) cassettes with these target sequences were cloned into lentiviral vectors encoding the Streptococcuspyogenes Cas9 endonuclease (SpCas9) gene. The lentiviral vectors were used to infect ARPE-19 cells, a human RPE cell line. Frequency of insertion or deletion (indel) mutations was assessed by T7 endonuclease 1 mismatch detection assay; mRNA levels were assessed with quantitative real-time PCR; and VEGF-A protein levels were determined by ELISA. In vitro angiogenesis was measured using an endothelial cell tube formation assay. Five gRNAs targeting VEGF-A were selected based on the highest predicted on-target probabilities, lowest off-target probabilities, or combined average of both scores. Lentiviral delivery of the top-scoring gRNAs with SpCas9 resulted in indel formation in the VEGF-A gene at frequencies up to 37.0% ± 4.0% with corresponding decreases in secreted VEGF-A protein up to 41.2% ± 7.4% (P CRISPR-Cas9 endonuclease system may reduce VEGF-A secretion from human RPE cells and suppress angiogenesis, supporting the possibility of employing gene editing for antiangiogenesis therapy in ocular diseases.

  14. Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease 1 Upregulation Reduces Oxidative DNA Damage and Protects Hippocampal Neurons from Ischemic Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Leak, Rehana K.; Li, Peiying; Zhang, Feng; Sulaiman, Hassan H.; Weng, Zhongfang; Wang, Guohua; Stetler, R. Anne; Shi, Yejie; Cao, Guodong; Gao, Yanqin; Chen, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) is a multifunctional enzyme that participates in base-excision repair of oxidative DNA damage and in the redox activation of transcription factors. We tested the hypothesis that APE1 upregulation protects neuronal structure and function against transient global cerebral ischemia (tGCI). Results: Upregulation of APE1 by low-dose proton irradiation (PI) or by transgene overexpression protected hippocampal CA1 neurons against tGCI-induced cell lo...

  15. Biological significance of facilitated diffusion in protein-DNA interactions. Applications to T4 endonuclease V-initiated DNA repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowd, D.R.; Lloyd, R.S. (Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (USA))

    1990-02-25

    Facilitated diffusion along nontarget DNA is employed by numerous DNA-interactive proteins to locate specific targets. Until now, the biological significance of DNA scanning has remained elusive. T4 endonuclease V is a DNA repair enzyme which scans nontarget DNA and processively incises DNA at the site of pyrimidine dimers which are produced by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light. In this study we tested the hypothesis that there exists a direct correlation between the degree of processivity of wild type and mutant endonuclease V molecules and the degree of enhanced UV resistance which is conferred to repair-deficient Eshcerichia coli. This was accomplished by first creating a series of endonuclease V mutants whose in vitro catalytic activities were shown to be very similar to that of the wild type enzyme. However, when the mechanisms by which these enzymes search nontarget DNA for its substrate were analyzed in vitro and in vivo, the mutants displayed varying degrees of nontarget DNA scanning ranging from being nearly as processive as wild type to randomly incising dimers within the DNA population. The ability of these altered endonuclease V molecules to enhance UV survival in DNA repair-deficient E. coli then was assessed. The degree of enhanced UV survival was directly correlated with the level of facilitated diffusion. This is the first conclusive evidence directly relating a reduction of in vivo facilitated diffusion with a change in an observed phenotype. These results support the assertion that the mechanisms which DNA-interactive proteins employ in locating their target sites are of biological significance.

  16. Biological significance of facilitated diffusion in protein-DNA interactions. Applications to T4 endonuclease V-initiated DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowd, D R; Lloyd, R S

    1990-02-25

    Facilitated diffusion along nontarget DNA is employed by numerous DNA-interactive proteins to locate specific targets. Until now, the biological significance of DNA scanning has remained elusive. T4 endonuclease V is a DNA repair enzyme which scans nontarget DNA and processively incises DNA at the site of pyrimidine dimers which are produced by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light. In this study we tested the hypothesis that there exists a direct correlation between the degree of processivity of wild type and mutant endonuclease V molecules and the degree of enhanced UV resistance which is conferred to repair-deficient Eshcerichia coli. This was accomplished by first creating a series of endonuclease V mutants whose in vitro catalytic activities were shown to be very similar to that of the wild type enzyme. However, when the mechanisms by which these enzymes search nontarget DNA for its substrate were analyzed in vitro and in vivo, the mutants displayed varying degrees of nontarget DNA scanning ranging from being nearly as processive as wild type to randomly incising dimers within the DNA population. The ability of these altered endonuclease V molecules to enhance UV survival in DNA repair-deficient E. coli then was assessed. The degree of enhanced UV survival was directly correlated with the level of facilitated diffusion. This is the first conclusive evidence directly relating a reduction of in vivo facilitated diffusion with a change in an observed phenotype. These results support the assertion that the mechanisms which DNA-interactive proteins employ in locating their target sites are of biological significance.

  17. Differential regulation of the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks in G1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlow, Jacqueline H; Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2008-01-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are potentially lethal DNA lesions that can be repaired by either homologous recombination (HR) or nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ). We show that DSBs induced by ionizing radiation (IR) are efficiently processed for HR and bound by Rfa1 during G1, while endonuclease......-induced breaks are recognized by Rfa1 only after the cell enters S phase. This difference is dependent on the DNA end-binding Yku70/Yku80 complex. Cell-cycle regulation is also observed in the DNA damage checkpoint response. Specifically, the 9-1-1 complex is required in G1 cells to recruit the Ddc2 checkpoint...

  18. SAW1 is Required for SDSA Double-Strand Break Repair in S. cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Diamante, Graciel; Phan, Claire; Celis, Angie S.; Krueger, Jonas; Kelson, Eric P.; Fischhaber, Paula L.

    2014-01-01

    SAW1 , coding for Saw1, is required for single-strand annealing (SSA) DNA Double-strand Break (DSB) Repair in S. cerevisiae. Saw1 physically associates with Rad1 and Rad52 and recruits the Rad1-Rad10 endonuclease. Herein we show by fluorescence microscopy that SAW1 is similarly required for recruitment of Rad10 to sites of Synthesis-Dependent Strand Annealing (SDSA) and associates with sites of SDSA repair in a manner temporally overlapped with Rad10. The magnitude of induction of colocalized...

  19. [Endonuclease modified comet assay for oxidative DNA damage induced by detection of genetic toxicants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian; Li, Hongli; Zhai, Qingfeng; Qiu, Yugang; Niu, Yong; Dai, Yufei; Zheng, Yuxin; Duan, Huawei

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the use of the lesion-specific endonucleases-modified comet assay for analysis of DNA oxidation in cell lines. DNA breaks and oxidative damage were evaluated by normal alkaline and formamidopyrimidine-DNA-glycosylase (FPG) modified comet assays. Cytotoxicity were assessed by MTT method. The human bronchial epithelial cell (16HBE) were treated with benzo (a) pyrene (B(a)P), methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), colchicine (COL) and vincristine (VCR) respectively, and the dose is 20 µmol/L, 25 mg/ml, 5 mg/L and 0.5 mg/L for 24 h, respectively. Oxidative damage was also detected by levels of reactive oxygen species in treated cells. Four genotoxicants give higher cytotoxicity and no significant changes on parameters of comet assay treated by enzyme buffer. Cell survival rate were (59.69 ± 2.60) %, (54.33 ± 2.81) %, (53.11 ± 4.00) %, (51.43 ± 3.92) % in four groups, respectively. There was the direct DNA damage induced by test genotoxicants presented by tail length, Olive tail moment (TM) and tail DNA (%) in the comet assay. The presence of FPG in the assays increased DNA migration in treated groups when compared to those without it, and the difference was statistically significant which indicated that the clastogen and aneugen could induce oxidative damage in DNA strand. In the three parameters, the Olive TM was changed most obviously after genotoxicants treatment. In the contrast group, the Olive TM of B(a) P,MMS, COL,VCR in the contrast groups were 22.99 ± 17.33, 31.65 ± 18.86, 19.86 ± 9.56 and 17.02 ± 9.39, respectively, after dealing with the FPG, the Olive TM were 34.50 ± 17.29, 43.80 ± 10.06, 33.10 ± 12.38, 28.60 ± 10.53, increased by 58.94%, 38.48%, 66.86% and 68.21%, respectively (t value was 3.91, 3.89, 6.66 and 3.87, respectively, and all P comet assay appears more specific for detecting oxidative DNA damage induced by genotoxicants exposure, and the application of comet assay will be expanded. The endonuclease

  20. Determinant of asymmetric risks in Nigerian loan market: any ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bank lending in Nigeria was dominated by the presence of asymmetric information, a wedge to financial intermediation. Using probit and correlation test methodology, evidence of low level asymmetric risk was found and the determinants of asymmetric risks in the market were not significantly different. The size of default ...

  1. The human homolog of Escherichia coli endonuclease V is a nucleolar protein with affinity for branched DNA structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathrine Fladeby

    Full Text Available Loss of amino groups from adenines in DNA results in the formation of hypoxanthine (Hx bases with miscoding properties. The primary enzyme in Escherichia coli for DNA repair initiation at deaminated adenine is endonuclease V (endoV, encoded by the nfi gene, which cleaves the second phosphodiester bond 3' of an Hx lesion. Endonuclease V orthologs are widespread in nature and belong to a family of highly conserved proteins. Whereas prokaryotic endoV enzymes are well characterized, the function of the eukaryotic homologs remains obscure. Here we describe the human endoV ortholog and show with bioinformatics and experimental analysis that a large number of transcript variants exist for the human endonuclease V gene (ENDOV, many of which are unlikely to be translated into functional protein. Full-length ENDOV is encoded by 8 evolutionary conserved exons covering the core region of the enzyme, in addition to one or more 3'-exons encoding an unstructured and poorly conserved C-terminus. In contrast to the E. coli enzyme, we find recombinant ENDOV neither to incise nor bind Hx-containing DNA. While both enzymes have strong affinity for several branched DNA substrates, cleavage is observed only with E. coli endoV. We find that ENDOV is localized in the cytoplasm and nucleoli of human cells. As nucleoli harbor the rRNA genes, this may suggest a role for the protein in rRNA gene transactions such as DNA replication or RNA transcription.

  2. Structural and functional analysis of the symmetrical Type I restriction endonuclease R.EcoR124I(NT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E Taylor

    Full Text Available Type I restriction-modification (RM systems are comprised of two multi-subunit enzymes, the methyltransferase (∼160 kDa, responsible for methylation of DNA, and the restriction endonuclease (∼400 kDa, responsible for DNA cleavage. Both enzymes share a number of subunits. An engineered RM system, EcoR124I(NT, based on the N-terminal domain of the specificity subunit of EcoR124I was constructed that recognises the symmetrical sequence GAAN(7TTC and is active as a methyltransferase. Here, we investigate the restriction endonuclease activity of R. EcoR124I(NTin vitro and the subunit assembly of the multi-subunit enzyme. Finally, using small-angle neutron scattering and selective deuteration, we present a low-resolution structural model of the endonuclease and locate the motor subunits within the multi-subunit enzyme. We show that the covalent linkage between the two target recognition domains of the specificity subunit is not required for subunit assembly or enzyme activity, and discuss the implications for the evolution of Type I enzymes.

  3. Structural basis for the substrate selectivity of PvuRts1I, a 5-hydroxymethylcytosine DNA restriction endonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Chen; Wang, Chengliang; Zang, Jianye

    2014-09-01

    5-Hydroxymethylation is a curious modification of cytosine that was discovered some decades ago, but its functional role in eukaryotes still awaits elucidation. 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine is an epigenetic marker that is crucial for multiple biological processes. The profile is altered under certain disease conditions such as cancer, Huntington's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Using the DNA-modification-dependent restriction endonuclease AbaSI coupled with sequencing (Aba-seq), the hydroxymethylome can be deciphered at the resolution of individual bases. The method is based on the enzymatic properties of AbaSI, a member of the PvuRts1I family of endonucleases. PvuRts1I is a modification-dependent endonuclease with high selectivity for 5-hydroxymethylcytosine over 5-methylcytosine and cytosine. In this study, the crystal structure of PvuRts1I was determined in order to understand and improve the substrate selectivity. A nuclease domain and an SRA-like domain are located at the N- and C-termini, respectively. Through comparison with other SRA-domain structures, the SRA-like domain was proposed to be the 5-hmC recognition module. Several mutants of PvuRts1I with enzymatic activity restricted to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine only were generated based on the structural analysis, and these enzyme variants are appropriate for separating the hydroxymethylome from the wider methylome.

  4. Characterization of LlaKI, a New Metal Ion-Independent Restriction Endonuclease from Lactococcus lactis KLDS4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkebir, Abdelkarim; Azeddoug, Houssine

    2012-01-01

    Requirement of divalent cations for DNA cleavage is a general feature of type II restriction enzymes with the exception of few members of this group. A new type II restriction endonuclease has been partially purified from Lactococcus lactis KLDS4. The enzyme was denoted as LlaKI and showed to recognize and cleave the same site as FokI. The enzyme displayed a denatured molecular weight of 50 kDa and behaved as a dimer in solution as evidenced by the size exclusion chromatography. To investigate the role of divalent cations in DNA cleavage by LlaKI, digestion reactions were carried out at different Mg(2+), Mn(2+), and Ca(2+) concentrations. Unlike most of type II restriction endonucleases, LlaKI did not require divalent metal ions to cleave DNA and is one of the few metal-independent restriction endonucleases found in bacteria. The enzyme showed near-maximal levels of activity in 10 mM Tris-HCl pH 7.9, 50 mM NaCl, 10 mM MgCl2, and 1 mM dithiothreitol at 30°C. The presence of DNA modification was also determined and was correlated with the correspondent restriction enzyme.

  5. A palmprint-based cryptosystem using double encryption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amioy; Kumar, Ajay

    2008-03-01

    We propose a novel cryptographic construct incorporating biometrics which insures a secure communication between two channels just by using Palmprint. The cryptosystem utilizes the advantages of both symmetric and asymmetric cryptographic approaches simultaneously; we denote it as double encryption. Any document in communication is first encrypted using symmetric cryptographic approach; the symmetric key involved is then encrypted using Asymmetric approach. Finally, the concept of fuzzy vault is explored to create a secure vault around the asymmetric key. We investigate the possible usage of palmprints in fuzzy vault to develop a user friendly and reliable crypto system. The experimental results from the proposed approach on the real palmprint images suggest its possible usage in an automated palmprint based key generation system.

  6. Two-stage gene assembly/cloning of a member of the TspDTI subfamily of bifunctional restriction endonucleases, TthHB27I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krefft, Daria; Zylicz-Stachula, Agnieszka; Mulkiewicz, Ewa; Papkov, Aliaksei; Jezewska-Frackowiak, Joanna; Skowron, Piotr M

    2015-01-20

    The Thermus sp. family of bifunctional type IIS/IIG/IIC restriction endonucleases (REase)-methyltransferases (MTase) comprises thermo-stable TaqII, TspGWI, TspDTI, TsoI, Tth111II/TthHB27I enzymes as well as a number of putative enzymes/open reading frames (ORFs). All of the family members share properties including a large protein size (ca. 120kDa), amino acid (aa) sequence homologies, enzymatic activity modulation by S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), recognition of similar asymmetric cognate DNA sites and cleavage at a distance of 11/9 nt. Analysis of the enzyme aa sequences and domain/motif organisation led to further Thermus sp. family division into the TspDTI and TspGWI subfamilies. The latter exhibits an unprecedented phenomenon of DNA recognition change upon substitution of SAM by its analogue, sinefungin (SIN), towards a very frequent DNA cleavage. We report cloning in Escherichia coli (E. coli), using a two-stage procedure and a putative tthHB27IRM gene, detected by bioinformatics analysis of the Thermus thermophilus HB27 (T. thermophilus) genome. The functionality of a 3366 base pair (bp)-/1121 aa-long, high GC content ORF was validated experimentally through the expression in E. coli. Protein features corroborated with the reclassification of TthHB27I into the TspDTI subfamily, which manifested in terms of aa-sequence/motif homologies and insensitivity to SIN-induced specificity shift. However, both SAM and SIN stimulated the REase DNA cleavage activity by at least 16-32 times; the highest was observed for the Thermus sp. family. The availability of TthHB27I and the need to include SAM or SIN in the reaction in order to convert the enzyme from "hibernation" status to efficient DNA cleavage is of practical significance in molecular biotechnology, extending the palette of available REase specificities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Endonuclease Restriction-Mediated Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction: A Novel Technique for Rapid, Sensitive and Quantitative Detection of Nucleic-Acid Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Lu; Li, Machao; Luo, Lijuan; Liu, Dongxin; Li, Hua; Cao, Xiaolong; Hu, Shoukui; Jin, Dong; Xu, Jianguo; Ye, Changyun

    2016-01-01

    The article reported a novel methodology for real-time PCR analysis of nucleic acids, termed endonuclease restriction-mediated real-time polymerase chain reaction (ET-PCR). Just like PCR, ET-PCR only required one pair of primers. A short sequence, which was recognized by restriction enzyme BstUI, was attached to the 5′ end of the forward (F) or reverse (R) PCR primer, and the new F or R primer was named EF or ER. EF/ER was labeled at the 5′ end with a reporter dye and in the middle with a quenching dye. BstUI cleaves the newly synthesized double-stranded terminal sequences (5′ end recognition sequences and their complementary sequences) during the extension phase, which separates the reporter molecule from the quenching dye, leading to a gain of fluorescence signal. This process is repeated in each amplification cycle and unaffected the exponential synthesis of the PCR amplification. ET-PCR allowed real-time analysis of single or multiple targets in a single vessel, and provided the reproducible quantitation of nucleic acids. The analytical sensitivity and specificity of ET-PCR were successfully evaluated, detecting down to 250 fg of genomic DNA per tube of target pathogen DNA examined, and the positive results were generated in a relatively short period. Moreover, the practical application of ET-PCR for simultaneous detection of multiple target pathogens was also demonstrated in artificially contaminated blood samples. In conclusion, due to the technique’s simplicity of design, reproducible data and low contamination risk, ET-PCR assay is an appealing alternative to conventional approaches currently used for real-time nucleic acid analysis. PMID:27468284

  8. Chemical display of pyrimidine bases flipped out by modification-dependent restriction endonucleases of MspJI and PvuRts1I families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagorskaitė, Evelina; Sasnauskas, Giedrius

    2014-01-01

    The epigenetic DNA modifications 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) in eukaryotes are recognized either in the context of double-stranded DNA (e.g., by the methyl-CpG binding domain of MeCP2), or in the flipped-out state (e.g., by the SRA domain of UHRF1). The SRA-like domains and the base-flipping mechanism for 5(h)mC recognition are also shared by the recently discovered prokaryotic modification-dependent endonucleases of the MspJI and PvuRts1I families. Since the mechanism of modified cytosine recognition by many potential eukaryotic and prokaryotic 5(h)mC "readers" is still unknown, a fast solution based method for the detection of extrahelical 5(h)mC would be very useful. In the present study we tested base-flipping by MspJI- and PvuRts1I-like restriction enzymes using several solution-based methods, including fluorescence measurements of the cytosine analog pyrrolocytosine and chemical modification of extrahelical pyrimidines with chloroacetaldehyde and KMnO4. We find that only KMnO4 proved an efficient probe for the positive display of flipped out pyrimidines, albeit the method required either non-physiological pH (4.3) or a substitution of the target cytosine with thymine. Our results imply that DNA recognition mechanism of 5(h)mC binding proteins should be tested using a combination of all available methods, as the lack of a positive signal in some assays does not exclude the base flipping mechanism.

  9. A new restriction endonuclease-based method for highly-specific detection of DNA targets from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Maria W; Ghindilis, Andrei L; Seoudi, Ihab A; Smith, Kenneth; Billharz, Rosalind; Simon, Holly M

    2014-01-01

    PCR multiplexing has proven to be challenging, and thus has provided limited means for pathogen genotyping. We developed a new approach for analysis of PCR amplicons based on restriction endonuclease digestion. The first stage of the restriction enzyme assay is hybridization of a target DNA to immobilized complementary oligonucleotide probes that carry a molecular marker, horseradish peroxidase (HRP). At the second stage, a target-specific restriction enzyme is added, cleaving the target-probe duplex at the corresponding restriction site and releasing the HRP marker into solution, where it is quantified colorimetrically. The assay was tested for detection of the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) pathogen, using the mecA gene as a target. Calibration curves indicated that the limit of detection for both target oligonucleotide and PCR amplicon was approximately 1 nM. Sequences of target oligonucleotides were altered to demonstrate that (i) any mutation of the restriction site reduced the signal to zero; (ii) double and triple point mutations of sequences flanking the restriction site reduced restriction to 50-80% of the positive control; and (iii) a minimum of a 16-bp target-probe dsDNA hybrid was required for significant cleavage. Further experiments showed that the assay could detect the mecA amplicon from an unpurified PCR mixture with detection limits similar to those with standard fluorescence-based qPCR. Furthermore, addition of a large excess of heterologous genomic DNA did not affect amplicon detection. Specificity of the assay is very high because it involves two biorecognition steps. The proposed assay is low-cost and can be completed in less than 1 hour. Thus, we have demonstrated an efficient new approach for pathogen detection and amplicon genotyping in conjunction with various end-point and qPCR applications. The restriction enzyme assay may also be used for parallel analysis of multiple different amplicons from the same unpurified

  10. A new restriction endonuclease-based method for highly-specific detection of DNA targets from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria W Smith

    Full Text Available PCR multiplexing has proven to be challenging, and thus has provided limited means for pathogen genotyping. We developed a new approach for analysis of PCR amplicons based on restriction endonuclease digestion. The first stage of the restriction enzyme assay is hybridization of a target DNA to immobilized complementary oligonucleotide probes that carry a molecular marker, horseradish peroxidase (HRP. At the second stage, a target-specific restriction enzyme is added, cleaving the target-probe duplex at the corresponding restriction site and releasing the HRP marker into solution, where it is quantified colorimetrically. The assay was tested for detection of the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA pathogen, using the mecA gene as a target. Calibration curves indicated that the limit of detection for both target oligonucleotide and PCR amplicon was approximately 1 nM. Sequences of target oligonucleotides were altered to demonstrate that (i any mutation of the restriction site reduced the signal to zero; (ii double and triple point mutations of sequences flanking the restriction site reduced restriction to 50-80% of the positive control; and (iii a minimum of a 16-bp target-probe dsDNA hybrid was required for significant cleavage. Further experiments showed that the assay could detect the mecA amplicon from an unpurified PCR mixture with detection limits similar to those with standard fluorescence-based qPCR. Furthermore, addition of a large excess of heterologous genomic DNA did not affect amplicon detection. Specificity of the assay is very high because it involves two biorecognition steps. The proposed assay is low-cost and can be completed in less than 1 hour. Thus, we have demonstrated an efficient new approach for pathogen detection and amplicon genotyping in conjunction with various end-point and qPCR applications. The restriction enzyme assay may also be used for parallel analysis of multiple different amplicons from the same

  11. Chemical Display of Pyrimidine Bases Flipped Out by Modification-Dependent Restriction Endonucleases of MspJI and PvuRts1I Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagorskaitė, Evelina; Sasnauskas, Giedrius

    2014-01-01

    The epigenetic DNA modifications 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) in eukaryotes are recognized either in the context of double-stranded DNA (e.g., by the methyl-CpG binding domain of MeCP2), or in the flipped-out state (e.g., by the SRA domain of UHRF1). The SRA-like domains and the base-flipping mechanism for 5(h)mC recognition are also shared by the recently discovered prokaryotic modification-dependent endonucleases of the MspJI and PvuRts1I families. Since the mechanism of modified cytosine recognition by many potential eukaryotic and prokaryotic 5(h)mC “readers” is still unknown, a fast solution based method for the detection of extrahelical 5(h)mC would be very useful. In the present study we tested base-flipping by MspJI- and PvuRts1I-like restriction enzymes using several solution-based methods, including fluorescence measurements of the cytosine analog pyrrolocytosine and chemical modification of extrahelical pyrimidines with chloroacetaldehyde and KMnO4. We find that only KMnO4 proved an efficient probe for the positive display of flipped out pyrimidines, albeit the method required either non-physiological pH (4.3) or a substitution of the target cytosine with thymine. Our results imply that DNA recognition mechanism of 5(h)mC binding proteins should be tested using a combination of all available methods, as the lack of a positive signal in some assays does not exclude the base flipping mechanism. PMID:25486533

  12. Sequential and Multistep Substrate Interrogation Provides the Scaffold for Specificity in Human Flap Endonuclease 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Sobhy

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Human flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1, one of the structure-specific 5′ nucleases, is integral in replication, repair, and recombination of cellular DNA. The 5′ nucleases share significant unifying features yet cleave diverse substrates at similar positions relative to 5′ end junctions. Using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer, we find a multistep mechanism that verifies all substrate features before inducing the intermediary-DNA bending step that is believed to unify 5′ nuclease mechanisms. This is achieved by coordinating threading of the 5′ flap of a nick junction into the conserved capped-helical gateway, overseeing the active site, and bending by binding at the base of the junction. We propose that this sequential and multistep substrate recognition process allows different 5′ nucleases to recognize different substrates and restrict the induction of DNA bending to the last common step. Such mechanisms would also ensure the protection of DNA junctions from nonspecific bending and cleavage.

  13. Polymorphism of the Flap Endonuclease 1 Gene in Keratoconus and Fuchs Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna A. Wojcik

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases, including serious ocular diseases, keratoconus (KC and Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD. Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1 plays an important role in the repair of oxidative DNA damage in the base excision repair pathway. We determined the association between two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, c.–441G>A (rs174538 and g.61564299G>T (rs4246215, in the FEN1 gene and the occurrence of KC and FECD. This study involved 279 patients with KC, 225 patients with FECD and 322 control individuals. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR and length polymorphism restriction fragment analysis (RFLP were applied. The T/T genotype of the g.61564299G>T polymorphism was associated with an increased occurrence of KC and FECD. There was no association between the c.–441G>A polymorphism and either disease. However, the GG haplotype of both polymorphisms was observed more frequently and the GT haplotype less frequently in the KC group than the control. The AG haplotype was associated with increased FECD occurrence. Our findings suggest that the g.61564299G>T and c.–441G>A polymorphisms in the FEN1 gene may modulate the risk of keratoconus and Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy.

  14. Restriction endonuclease triggered bacterial apoptosis as a mechanism for long time survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamalleswari, Easa; Rao, Sandhya; Vasu, Kommireddy; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2017-08-21

    Programmed cell death (PCD) under certain conditions is one of the features of bacterial altruism. Given the bacterial diversity and varied life style, different PCD mechanisms must be operational that remain largely unexplored. We describe restriction endonuclease (REase) mediated cell death by an apoptotic pathway, beneficial for isogenic bacterial communities. Cell death is pronounced in stationary phase and when the enzyme exhibits promiscuous DNA cleavage activity. We have elucidated the molecular mechanism of REase mediated cell killing and demonstrate that released nutrients from dying cells support the growth of the remaining cells in the population. These findings illustrate a new intracellular moonlighting role for REases which are otherwise established host defence arsenals. REase induced PCD appears to be a cellular design to replenish nutrients for cells undergoing starvation stress and the phenomenon could be wide spread in bacteria, given the abundance of restriction-modification (R-M) systems in the microbial population. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. Human AP Endonuclease 1: A Potential Marker for the Prediction of Environmental Carcinogenesis Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Sung Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1 functions mainly in DNA repair as an enzyme removing AP sites and in redox signaling as a coactivator of various transcription factors. Based on these multifunctions of APE1 within cells, numerous studies have reported that the alteration of APE1 could be a crucial factor in development of human diseases such as cancer and neurodegeneration. In fact, the study on the combination of an individual’s genetic make-up with environmental factors (gene-environment interaction is of great importance to understand the development of diseases, especially lethal diseases including cancer. Recent reports have suggested that the human carcinogenic risk following exposure to environmental toxicants is affected by APE1 alterations in terms of gene-environment interactions. In this review, we initially outline the critical APE1 functions in the various intracellular mechanisms including DNA repair and redox regulation and its roles in human diseases. Several findings demonstrate that the change in expression and activity as well as genetic variability of APE1 caused by environmental chemical (e.g., heavy metals and cigarette smoke and physical carcinogens (ultraviolet and ionizing radiation is likely associated with various cancers. These enable us to ultimately suggest APE1 as a vital marker for the prediction of environmental carcinogenesis risk.

  16. Mitochondrial Targeted Endonuclease III DNA Repair Enzyme Protects against Ventilator Induced Lung Injury in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Hashizume

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial targeted DNA repair enzyme, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1, was previously reported to protect against mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA damage and ventilator induced lung injury (VILI. In the present study we determined whether mitochondrial targeted endonuclease III (EndoIII which cleaves oxidized pyrimidines rather than purines from damaged DNA would also protect the lung. Minimal injury from 1 h ventilation at 40 cmH2O peak inflation pressure (PIP was reversed by EndoIII pretreatment. Moderate lung injury due to ventilation for 2 h at 40 cmH2O PIP produced a 25-fold increase in total extravascular albumin space, a 60% increase in W/D weight ratio, and marked increases in MIP-2 and IL-6. Oxidative mtDNA damage and decreases in the total tissue glutathione (GSH and the GSH/GSSH ratio also occurred. All of these indices of injury were attenuated by mitochondrial targeted EndoIII. Massive lung injury caused by 2 h ventilation at 50 cmH2O PIP was not attenuated by EndoIII pretreatment, but all untreated mice died prior to completing the two hour ventilation protocol, whereas all EndoIII-treated mice lived for the duration of ventilation. Thus, mitochondrial targeted DNA repair enzymes were protective against mild and moderate lung damage and they enhanced survival in the most severely injured group.

  17. Reverse transcriptase and endonuclease activities encoded by Penelope-like retroelements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyatkov, Konstantin I.; Arkhipova, Irina R.; Malkova, Natalia V.; Finnegan, David J.; Evgen'ev, Michael B.

    2004-01-01

    Penelope-like elements are a class of retroelement that have now been identified in >50 species belonging to at least 10 animal phyla. The Penelope element isolated from Drosophila virilis is the only transpositionally active representative of this class isolated so far. The single ORF of Penelope and its relatives contains regions homologous to a reverse transcriptase of atypical structure and to the GIY-YIG, or Uri, an endonuclease (EN) domain not previously found in retroelements. We have expressed the single ORF of Penelope in a baculovirus expression system and have shown that it encodes a polyprotein with reverse transcriptase activity that requires divalent cations (Mn2+ and Mg2+). We have also expressed and purified the EN domain in Escherichia coli and have demonstrated that it has EN activity in vitro. Mutations in the conserved residues of the EN catalytic module abolish its nicking activity, whereas the DNA-binding properties of the mutant proteins remain unaffected. Only one strand of the target sequence is cleaved, and there is a certain degree of cleavage specificity. We propose that the Penelope EN cleaves the target DNA during transposition, generating a primer for reverse transcription. Our results show that an active Uri EN has been adopted by a retrotransposon. PMID:15465912

  18. DNA interrogation by the CRISPR RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Samuel H.; Redding, Sy; Jinek, Martin; Greene, Eric C.; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    The CRISPR-associated enzyme Cas9 is an RNA-guided endonuclease that uses RNA:DNA base-pairing to target foreign DNA in bacteria. Cas9:guide RNA complexes are also effective genome engineering agents in animals and plants. Here we use single-molecule and bulk biochemical experiments to determine how Cas9:RNA interrogates DNA to find specific cleavage sites. We show that both binding and cleavage of DNA by Cas9:RNA require recognition of a short trinucleotide protospacer adjacent motif (PAM). Non-target DNA binding affinity scales with PAM density, and sequences fully complementary to the guide RNA but lacking a nearby PAM are ignored by Cas9:RNA. DNA strand separation and RNA:DNA heteroduplex formation initiate at the PAM and proceed directionally towards the distal end of the target sequence. Furthermore, PAM interactions trigger Cas9 catalytic activity. These results reveal how Cas9 employs PAM recognition to quickly identify potential target sites while scanning large DNA molecules, and to regulate dsDNA scission. PMID:24476820

  19. Single-molecule FRET unveils induced-fit mechanism for substrate selectivity in flap endonuclease 1

    KAUST Repository

    Rashid, Fahad

    2017-02-23

    Human flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) and related structure-specific 5\\'nucleases precisely identify and incise aberrant DNA structures during replication, repair and recombination to avoid genomic instability. Yet, it is unclear how the 5\\'nuclease mechanisms of DNA distortion and protein ordering robustly mediate efficient and accurate substrate recognition and catalytic selectivity. Here, single-molecule sub-millisecond and millisecond analyses of FEN1 reveal a protein-DNA induced-fit mechanism that efficiently verifies substrate and suppresses off-target cleavage. FEN1 sculpts DNA with diffusion-limited kinetics to test DNA substrate. This DNA distortion mutually \\'locks\\' protein and DNA conformation and enables substrate verification with extreme precision. Strikingly, FEN1 never misses cleavage of its cognate substrate while blocking probable formation of catalytically competent interactions with noncognate substrates and fostering their pre-incision dissociation. These findings establish FEN1 has practically perfect precision and that separate control of induced-fit substrate recognition sets up the catalytic selectivity of the nuclease active site for genome stability.

  20. Structure-guided sequence specificity engineering of the modification-dependent restriction endonuclease LpnPI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasnauskas, Giedrius; Zagorskaitė, Evelina; Kauneckaitė, Kotryna; Tamulaitiene, Giedre; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2015-07-13

    The eukaryotic Set and Ring Associated (SRA) domains and structurally similar DNA recognition domains of prokaryotic cytosine modification-dependent restriction endonucleases recognize methylated, hydroxymethylated or glucosylated cytosine in various sequence contexts. Here, we report the apo-structure of the N-terminal SRA-like domain of the cytosine modification-dependent restriction enzyme LpnPI that recognizes modified cytosine in the 5'-C(mC)DG-3' target sequence (where mC is 5-methylcytosine or 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and D = A/T/G). Structure-guided mutational analysis revealed LpnPI residues involved in base-specific interactions and demonstrated binding site plasticity that allowed limited target sequence degeneracy. Furthermore, modular exchange of the LpnPI specificity loops by structural equivalents of related enzymes AspBHI and SgrTI altered sequence specificity of LpnPI. Taken together, our results pave the way for specificity engineering of the cytosine modification-dependent restriction enzymes. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. Enhancement of PCR Detection Limit by Single-Tube Restriction Endonuclease-PCR (RE-PCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sibnarayan; Budhauliya, Raghvendra; Chatterjee, Soumya; Vanlalhmuaka; Veer, Vijay; Chakravarty, Runu

    2016-06-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is widely used in biological research and diagnostics because of its high sensitivity and specificity. However, the sensitivity of PCR is strongly influenced by topological characteristics of the template. Supercoiled templates are known to inhibit PCR, whereas linearized forms of the same supercoiled templates facilitate PCR. This study was conducted to compare the PCR efficiency of circular supercoiled DNA templates to their restriction endonuclease (RE)-mediated linearized forms. Additionally, we also evaluated the possibility of RE digestion of the circular supercoiled templates within the complete PCR buffer. Following a systematic approach, we demonstrated that circular supercoiled templates could be efficiently linearized by RE in the complete PCR buffer itself. This allowed linearization of circular supercoiled templates and their subsequent amplification in the PCR buffer in a single-tube format. Using this extremely simple RE-PCR approach, we documented up to tenfold increases in detection efficiency of PCR with two different circular supercoiled templates of clinical origin, including an international calibration standard. This inexpensive and easy approach to increasing PCR sensitivity can be easily adapted to any standard PCR protocol aimed at amplifying circular supercoiled genomes. Apart from its application in the development of sensitive clinical diagnostic PCR assays for a large number of organisms, this method could also prove to be very useful in simplifying the existing protocols for other applications where pre-PCR restriction digestion is required, such as mutation detection, genotyping, and selective template amplification.

  2. High pressure activation of the Mrr restriction endonuclease in Escherichia coli involves tetramer dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourges, Anaïs C; Torres Montaguth, Oscar E; Ghosh, Anirban; Tadesse, Wubishet M; Declerck, Nathalie; Aertsen, Abram; Royer, Catherine A

    2017-05-19

    A sub-lethal hydrostatic pressure (HP) shock of ∼100 MPa elicits a RecA-dependent DNA damage (SOS) response in Escherichia coli K-12, despite the fact that pressure cannot compromise the covalent integrity of DNA. Prior screens for HP resistance identified Mrr (Methylated adenine Recognition and Restriction), a Type IV restriction endonuclease (REase), as instigator for this enigmatic HP-induced SOS response. Type IV REases tend to target modified DNA sites, and E. coli Mrr activity was previously shown to be elicited by expression of the foreign M.HhaII Type II methytransferase (MTase), as well. Here we measured the concentration and stoichiometry of a functional GFP-Mrr fusion protein using in vivo fluorescence fluctuation microscopy. Our results demonstrate that Mrr is a tetramer in unstressed cells, but shifts to a dimer after HP shock or co-expression with M.HhaII. Based on the differences in reversibility of tetramer dissociation observed for wild-type GFP-Mrr and a catalytic mutant upon HP shock compared to M.HhaII expression, we propose a model by which (i) HP triggers Mrr activity by directly pushing inactive Mrr tetramers to dissociate into active Mrr dimers, while (ii) M.HhaII triggers Mrr activity by creating high affinity target sites on the chromosome, which pull the equilibrium from inactive tetrameric Mrr toward active dimer. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Primary processing of CRISPR RNA by the endonuclease Cas6 in Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Noelle; Rajan, Rakhi; Sontheimer, Erik J

    2015-10-07

    In many bacteria and archaea, an adaptive immune system (CRISPR-Cas) provides immunity against foreign genetic elements. This system uses CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) derived from the CRISPR array, along with CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins, to target foreign nucleic acids. In most CRISPR systems, endonucleolytic processing of crRNA precursors (pre-crRNAs) is essential for the pathway. Here we study the Cas6 endonuclease responsible for crRNA processing in the Type III-A CRISPR-Cas system from Staphylococcus epidermidis RP62a, a model for Type III-A CRISPR-Cas systems, and define substrate requirements for SeCas6 activity. We find that SeCas6 is necessary and sufficient for full-length crRNA biogenesis in vitro, and that it relies on both sequence and stem-loop structure in the 3' half of the CRISPR repeat for recognition and processing. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Nicking endonuclease and target recycles signal amplification assisted quantum dots for fluorescence detection of DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu Shuyan; Li Quanyi; Qu Lijing; Wang Wei [Key Lab of Eco-chemical Engineering, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042 (China)

    2010-11-08

    An ultrasensitive fluorescence detection method for DNA based on nicking endonuclease (NEase) and target recycles assisted with CdTe quantum dots (QDs) is reported. In the detection system, when the target DNA is present, it hybridizes with a linker strand to from a duplex, in which the NEase recognizes specific nucleotide sequences and cleaves the linker strand. After nicking, the fragments of the linker strand spontaneously dissociate from the target DNA and another linker strand hybridizes to the target to trigger another strand-scission cycle. On the other hand, when the target was absent, no duplex is formed and no fragment of linker strand is produced. Then CdTe QDs and magnetic beads (MBs), which were all modified with DNA sequences complementary to that of the linker strands are added to the solution to detect the presence of a target DNA. The signal was generated through the difference in Foerster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the MB and CdTe QDs. This method indicates that one target DNA leads to cleavage of hundreds of linker DNA, increasing detection sensitivity by nearly three orders of magnitude. This method should be applicable whenever there is a requirement to detect a specific DNA sequence and can also be used for multicomponent detection.

  5. Asymmetric total synthesis of Apocynaceae hydrocarbazole alkaloids (+)-deethylibophyllidine and (+)-limaspermidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ji-Yuan; Zeng, Chao; Han, Xiao-Jie; Qu, Hu; Zhao, Xian-He; An, Xian-Tao; Fan, Chun-An

    2015-04-01

    An unprecedented asymmetric catalytic tandem aminolysis/aza-Michael addition reaction of spirocyclic para-dienoneimides has been designed and developed through organocatalytic enantioselective desymmetrization. A unified strategy based on this key tandem methodology has been divergently explored for the asymmetric total synthesis of two natural Apocynaceae alkaloids, (+)-deethylibophyllidine and (+)-limaspermidine. The present studies not only enrich the tandem reaction design concerning the asymmetric catalytic assembly of a chiral all-carbon quaternary stereocenter contained in the densely functionalized hydrocarbazole synthons but also manifest the potential for the application of the asymmetric catalysis based on the para-dienone chemistry in asymmetric synthesis of natural products.

  6. Method of simulated screen sensitometry for asymmetric, low crossover medical x-ray films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, R E; Haus, A G; Baker, C W

    1994-04-01

    Recognition of the importance of performing simulated screen-light sensitometry of medical x-ray films for the purpose of processor quality control has increased over the past several years. As a result there is a greater need to provide new techniques for performing simulated screen-light sensitometry. Medical films with reduced intensifying screen-light crossover intended to achieve reduced blur and higher spatial resolution pose particular problems in doing simulated screen-light sensitometry if care is not taken to choose a proper simulated light sensitometer with the capability of simultaneous double-sided exposures. Misleading and incorrect sensitometric data can be obtained for film contrast evaluation if a single side exposure is used. Asymmetric, near-zero crossover films pose even greater problems as proper orientation of the film and proper degree of light output asymmetry need be achieved in order to obtain correct sensitometry. The films used in this study were three double emulsion films varying in crossover from 3% to 24%. Of the two very-low-crossover films, one had symmetric emulsion layers while the second featured emulsion layers which were asymmetric in terms of contrast and speed. Sensitometric data show several curve shapes with significant distortions, depending on orientation, for the asymmetric, low-crossover film when exposed using a single-sided exposure. Only by using a double-sided exposure and an appropriate neutral density filter to simulate the degree of screen-light asymmetry in this system could one achieve a characteristic curve comparable to that achieved by inverse square sensitometry.

  7. Double inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silk, J.; Turner, M.S.

    1986-04-01

    The Zel'dovich spectrum of adiabatic density perturbations is a generic prediction of inflation. There is increasing evidence that when the spectrum is normalized by observational data on small scales, there is not enough power on large scales to account for the observed large-scale structure in the Universe. Decoupling the spectrum on large and small scales could solve this problem. As a means of decoupling the large and small scales we propose double inflation (i.e., two episodes of inflation). In this scenario the spectrum on large scales is determined by the first episode of inflation and those on small scales by a second episode of inflation. We present three models for such a scenario. By nearly saturating the large angular-scale cosmic microwave anisotropy bound, we can easily account for the observed large-scale structure. We take the perturbations on small scales to be very large, deltarho/rho approx. = 0.1 to 0.01, which results in the production of primordial black holes (PBHs), early formation of structure, reionization of the Universe, and a rich array of astrophysical events. The ..cap omega..-problem is also addressed by our scenario. Allowing the density perturbations produced by the second episode of inflation to be large also lessens the fine-tuning required in the scalar potential and makes reheating much easier. We briefly speculate on the possibility that the second episode of inflation proceeds through the nucleation of bubbles, which today manifest themselves as empty bubbles whose surfaces are covered with galaxies. 37 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Seeing Double

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesic, Peter

    2003-10-01

    The separateness and connection of individuals is perhaps the central question of human life: What, exactly, is my individuality? To what degree is it unique? To what degree can it be shared, and how? To the many philosophical and literary speculations about these topics over time, modern science has added the curious twist of quantum theory, which requires that the elementary particles of which everything consists have no individuality at all. All aspects of chemistry depend on this lack of individuality, as do many branches of physics. From where, then, does our individuality come? In Seeing Double, Peter Pesic invites readers to explore this intriguing set of questions. He draws on literary and historical examples that open the mind (from Homer to Martin Guerre to Kafka), philosophical analyses that have helped to make our thinking and speech more precise, and scientific work that has enabled us to characterize the phenomena of nature. Though he does not try to be all-inclusive, Pesic presents a broad range of ideas, building toward a specific point of view: that the crux of modern quantum theory is its clash with our ordinary concept of individuality. This represents a departure from the usual understanding of quantum theory. Pesic argues that what is bizarre about quantum theory becomes more intelligible as we reconsider what we mean by individuality and identity in ordinary experience. In turn, quantum identity opens a new perspective on us. Peter Pesic is a Tutor and Musician-in-Residence at St. John's College, Santa Fe, New Mexico. He has a Ph.D. in physics from Stanford University.

  9. Settling dynamics of asymmetric rigid fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzi, E. J.; Scott, C. T.; Vahey, D.; Klingenberg, D. J.

    2011-03-01

    The three-dimensional motion of asymmetric rigid fibers settling under gravity in a quiescent fluid was experimentally measured using a pair of cameras located on a movable platform. The particle motion typically consisted of an initial transient after which the particle approached a steady rate of rotation about an axis parallel to the acceleration of gravity, with its center of mass following a helical trajectory. Numerical and analytical methods were used to predict translational and angular velocities as well as the evolution of the fiber orientation as a function of time. A comparison of calculated and measured values shows that it is possible to quantitatively predict complex motions of particles that have highly asymmetric shape. The relations between particle shape and settling trajectory have potential applications for hydrodynamic characterization of fiber shapes and fiber separation.

  10. Enhancing molecule fluorescence with asymmetrical plasmonic antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guowei; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Tianyue; Shen, Hongming; Perriat, Pascal; Martini, Matteo; Tillement, Olivier; Gu, Ying; He, Yingbo; Wang, Yuwei; Gong, Qihuang

    2013-07-21

    We propose and justify by the finite-difference time-domain method an efficient strategy to enhance the spontaneous emission of a fluorophore with a multi-resonance plasmonic antenna. The custom-designed asymmetrical antenna consists of two plasmonic nanoparticles with different sizes and is able to couple efficiently to free space light through multiple localized surface plasmon resonances. This design simultaneously permits a large near-field excitation near the antenna as well as a high quantum efficiency, which results in an unusual and significant enhancement of the fluorescence of a single emitter. Such an asymmetrical antenna presents intrinsic advantages over single particle or dimer based antennas made using two identical nanostructures. This promising concept can be exploited in the large domain of light-matter interaction processes involving multiple frequencies.

  11. Defect induced asymmetric pit formation on hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ki-Young; Wang, Eddie; Chung, Alice; Chang, Neil; Saiz, Eduardo; Choe, Uh-Joo; Koobatian, Maxwell; Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2008-10-07

    Defect sites on bone minerals play a critical role in bone remodeling processes. We investigated single crystal hydroxyapatite (100) surfaces bearing crystal defects under acidic dissolution conditions using real-time in situ atomic force microscopy. At defect sites, surface structure-dependent asymmetric hexagonal etch pits were formed, which dominated the overall dissolution rate. Meanwhile, dissolution from the flat terraces proceeded by stochastic formation of flat bottom etch pits. The resulting pit shapes were intrinsically dictated by the HAP crystal structure. Computational modeling also predicted different step energies associated with different facets of the asymmetric etch pits. Our microscopic observations of HAP dissolution are significant for understanding the effects of local surface structure on the bone mineral remodeling process and provide useful insights for the design of novel therapies for treating osteoporosis and dental caries.

  12. High-resolution structure of the N-terminal endonuclease domain of the Lassa virus L polymerase in complex with magnesium ions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor D Wallat

    Full Text Available Lassa virus (LASV causes deadly hemorrhagic fever disease for which there are no vaccines and limited treatments. LASV-encoded L polymerase is required for viral RNA replication and transcription. The functional domains of L-a large protein of 2218 amino acid residues-are largely undefined, except for the centrally located RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP motif. Recent structural and functional analyses of the N-terminal region of the L protein from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV, which is in the same Arenaviridae family as LASV, have identified an endonuclease domain that presumably cleaves the cap structures of host mRNAs in order to initiate viral transcription. Here we present a high-resolution crystal structure of the N-terminal 173-aa region of the LASV L protein (LASV L173 in complex with magnesium ions at 1.72 Å. The structure is highly homologous to other known viral endonucleases of arena- (LCMV NL1, orthomyxo- (influenza virus PA, and bunyaviruses (La Crosse virus NL1. Although the catalytic residues (D89, E102 and K122 are highly conserved among the known viral endonucleases, LASV L endonuclease structure shows some notable differences. Our data collected from in vitro endonuclease assays and a reporter-based LASV minigenome transcriptional assay in mammalian cells confirm structural prediction of LASV L173 as an active endonuclease. The high-resolution structure of the LASV L endonuclease domain in complex with magnesium ions should aid the development of antivirals against lethal Lassa hemorrhagic fever.

  13. Asymmetric synthesis and sensory evaluation of sedanenolide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguro, Daichi; Watanabe, Hidenori

    2011-01-01

    The synthesis and sensory evaluation of enantiomeric sets of sedanenolide (1) and 3-butylphthalide (3) are described. The asymmetric synthesis was achieved via the intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction of chiral propargylester (5) which was prepared from optically active propargyl alcohol (4) and 2,4-pentadienoic acid. The sensory evaluation of these enantiomers revealed that there were distinct differences between their aroma character and odor threshold.

  14. Catalytic Asymmetric Synthesis of Phosphine Boronates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornillos, Valentín; Vila, Carlos; Otten, Edwin; Feringa, Ben L

    2015-06-26

    The first catalytic enantioselective synthesis of ambiphilic phosphine boronate esters is presented. The asymmetric boration of α,β-unsaturated phosphine oxides catalyzed by a copper bisphosphine complex affords optically active organoboronate esters that bear a vicinal phosphine oxide group in good yields and high enantiomeric excess. The synthetic utility of the products is demonstrated through stereospecific transformations into multifunctional optically active compounds. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Asymmetric k-Center with Minimum Coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gørtz, Inge Li

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we give approximation algorithms and inapproximability results for various asymmetric k-center with minimum coverage problems. In the k-center with minimum coverage problem, each center is required to serve a minimum number of clients. These problems have been studied by Lim et al. [A....... Lim, B. Rodrigues, F. Wang, Z. Xu, k-center problems with minimum coverage, Theoret. Comput. Sci. 332 (1–3) (2005) 1–17] in the symmetric setting....

  16. Asymmetric monetary policy effects in EMU

    OpenAIRE

    Clausen, Volker; Hayo, Bernd

    2002-01-01

    This paper uses a semi-structural dynamic modelling approach to investigate asymmetric monetary transmission in Europe. A system of equations containing reaction functions for monetary policy, output and inflation equations is simultaneously estimated for France, Germany, and Italy. Extensive cross equation tests show that relatively large differences in simulated impulse responses are still consistent with the notion that the transmission mechanism is homogeneous across the three major EMU c...

  17. Flexible and Asymmetric Ligand in Constructing Coordinated Complexes: Synthesis, Crystal Structures and Fluorescent Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Lin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Flexible and asymmetric ligand L [L = 1-((pyridin-3-ylmethyl-1H-benzotriazole], is used as a basic backbone to construct complicated metal-organic frameworks. Two new polymers, namely, [Ag2(L2(NO32]n (1 and [Ag(L(ClO4]n (2, were synthesized and characterized by X-ray structure analysis and fluorescent spectroscopy. The complex 1 gives an “S” type double helical conformation, whereas complex 2 exhibits a 1D zigzag configuration. Different anions affect the silver coordination geometry and crystal packing topology.

  18. Predicting tensorial electrophoretic effects in asymmetric colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowitz, Aaron J.; Witten, T. A.

    2017-12-01

    We formulate a numerical method for predicting the tensorial linear response of a rigid, asymmetrically charged body to an applied electric field. This prediction requires calculating the response of the fluid to the Stokes drag forces on the moving body and on the countercharges near its surface. To determine the fluid's motion, we represent both the body and the countercharges using many point sources of drag known as Stokeslets. Finding the correct flow field amounts to finding the set of drag forces on the Stokeslets that is consistent with the relative velocities experienced by each Stokeslet. The method rigorously satisfies the condition that the object moves with no transfer of momentum to the fluid. We demonstrate that a sphere represented by 1999 well-separated Stokeslets on its surface produces flow and drag force like a solid sphere to 1% accuracy. We show that a uniformly charged sphere with 3998 body and countercharge Stokeslets obeys the Smoluchowski prediction [F. Morrison, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 34, 210 (1970), 10.1016/0021-9797(70)90171-2] for electrophoretic mobility when the countercharges lie close to the sphere. Spheres with dipolar and quadrupolar charge distributions rotate and translate as predicted analytically to 4% accuracy or better. We describe how the method can treat general asymmetric shapes and charge distributions. This method offers promise as a way to characterize and manipulate asymmetrically charged colloid-scale objects from biology (e.g., viruses) and technology (e.g., self-assembled clusters).

  19. Asymmetric threat data mining and knowledge discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, John F.; Pagels, Michael A.; Palk, Justin

    2001-03-01

    Asymmetric threats differ from the conventional force-on- force military encounters that the Defense Department has historically been trained to engage. Terrorism by its nature is now an operational activity that is neither easily detected or countered as its very existence depends on small covert attacks exploiting the element of surprise. But terrorism does have defined forms, motivations, tactics and organizational structure. Exploiting a terrorism taxonomy provides the opportunity to discover and assess knowledge of terrorist operations. This paper describes the Asymmetric Threat Terrorist Assessment, Countering, and Knowledge (ATTACK) system. ATTACK has been developed to (a) data mine open source intelligence (OSINT) information from web-based newspaper sources, video news web casts, and actual terrorist web sites, (b) evaluate this information against a terrorism taxonomy, (c) exploit country/region specific social, economic, political, and religious knowledge, and (d) discover and predict potential terrorist activities and association links. Details of the asymmetric threat structure and the ATTACK system architecture are presented with results of an actual terrorist data mining and knowledge discovery test case shown.

  20. Asymmetric micro-Doppler frequency comb generation via magnetoelectric coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filonov, Dmitry; Steinberg, Ben Z.; Ginzburg, Pavel

    2017-06-01

    Electromagnetic scattering from moving bodies, being an inherently time-dependent phenomenon, gives rise to a generation of new frequencies, which can be used to characterize the motion. Whereas an ordinary motion along a linear path produces a constant Doppler shift, an accelerated scatterer can generate a micro-Doppler frequency comb. The spectra produced by rotating objects were studied and observed in a bistatic lock-in detection scheme. The internal geometry of a scatterer was shown to determine the spectrum, and the degree of structural asymmetry was suggested to be identified via signatures in the micro-Doppler comb. In particular, hybrid magnetoelectric particles, showing an ultimate degree of asymmetry in forward and backward scattering directions, were investigated. It was shown that the comb in the backward direction has signatures at the fundamental rotation frequency and its odd harmonics, whereas the comb of the forward scattered field has a prevailing peak at the doubled frequency and its multiples. Additional features of the comb were shown to be affected by the dimensions of the particle and by the strength of the magnetoelectric coupling. Experimental verification was performed with a printed circuit board antenna based on a wire and a split ring, while the structure was illuminated at a 2 GHz carrier frequency. Detailed analysis of micro-Doppler combs enables remote detection of asymmetric features of distant objects and could find use in a span of applications, including stellar radiometry and radio identification.

  1. Double hard scattering without double counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Markus; Gaunt, Jonathan R.; Schönwald, Kay

    2017-06-01

    Double parton scattering in proton-proton collisions includes kinematic regions in which two partons inside a proton originate from the perturbative splitting of a single parton. This leads to a double counting problem between single and double hard scattering. We present a solution to this problem, which allows for the definition of double parton distributions as operator matrix elements in a proton, and which can be used at higher orders in perturbation theory. We show how the evaluation of double hard scattering in this framework can provide a rough estimate for the size of the higher-order contributions to single hard scattering that are affected by double counting. In a numeric study, we identify situations in which these higher-order contributions must be explicitly calculated and included if one wants to attain an accuracy at which double hard scattering becomes relevant, and other situations where such contributions may be neglected.

  2. Double hard scattering without double counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diehl, Markus [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Gaunt, Jonathan R. [VU Univ. Amsterdam (Netherlands). NIKHEF Theory Group; Schoenwald, Kay [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Double parton scattering in proton-proton collisions includes kinematic regions in which two partons inside a proton originate from the perturbative splitting of a single parton. This leads to a double counting problem between single and double hard scattering. We present a solution to this problem, which allows for the definition of double parton distributions as operator matrix elements in a proton, and which can be used at higher orders in perturbation theory. We show how the evaluation of double hard scattering in this framework can provide a rough estimate for the size of the higher-order contributions to single hard scattering that are affected by double counting. In a numeric study, we identify situations in which these higher-order contributions must be explicitly calculated and included if one wants to attain an accuracy at which double hard scattering becomes relevant, and other situations where such contributions may be neglected.

  3. Asymmetrical lumbosacral transitional vertebrae in dogs may promote asymmetrical hip joint development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flückiger, Mark A; Steffen, Frank; Hässig, Michael; Morgan, Joseph P

    2017-03-20

    This study examines the relationship between the morphology of the lumbosacral transitional vertebra (LTV) and asymmetrical development of the hip joints in dogs. A total of 4000 dogs which had been consecutively scored for canine hip dysplasia were checked for the presence of a LTV. A LTV was noted in 138 dogs and classified depending on the morphology of the transverse processes and the degree of contact with the ilium. In dogs with an asymmetrical LTV, the hip joint was significantly more predisposed to subluxation and malformation on the side of the intermediate or sacral-like transverse process (p hip joint conformation was less affected on the side featuring a free transverse process (p hip joint, and secondary osteoarthritis. Asymmetrical hip conformation may therefore be the sequela of a LTV and mask or aggravate genetically induced canine hip dysplasia.

  4. Dominant mutations in S. cerevisiae PMS1 identify the Mlh1-Pms1 endonuclease active site and an exonuclease 1-independent mismatch repair pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E Smith

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolypsis colorectal cancer or HNPCC is a common cancer predisposition syndrome. Predisposition to cancer in this syndrome results from increased accumulation of mutations due to defective mismatch repair (MMR caused by a mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2/scPMS1. To better understand the function of Mlh1-Pms1 in MMR, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify six pms1 mutations (pms1-G683E, pms1-C817R, pms1-C848S, pms1-H850R, pms1-H703A and pms1-E707A that were weakly dominant in wild-type cells, which surprisingly caused a strong MMR defect when present on low copy plasmids in an exo1Δ mutant. Molecular modeling showed these mutations caused amino acid substitutions in the metal coordination pocket of the Pms1 endonuclease active site and biochemical studies showed that they inactivated the endonuclease activity. This model of Mlh1-Pms1 suggested that the Mlh1-FERC motif contributes to the endonuclease active site. Consistent with this, the mlh1-E767stp mutation caused both MMR and endonuclease defects similar to those caused by the dominant pms1 mutations whereas mutations affecting the predicted metal coordinating residue Mlh1-C769 had no effect. These studies establish that the Mlh1-Pms1 endonuclease is required for MMR in a previously uncharacterized Exo1-independent MMR pathway.

  5. Cell-autonomous progeroid changes in conditional mouse models for repair endonuclease XPG deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Barnhoorn

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available As part of the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER process, the endonuclease XPG is involved in repair of helix-distorting DNA lesions, but the protein has also been implicated in several other DNA repair systems, complicating genotype-phenotype relationship in XPG patients. Defects in XPG can cause either the cancer-prone condition xeroderma pigmentosum (XP alone, or XP combined with the severe neurodevelopmental disorder Cockayne Syndrome (CS, or the infantile lethal cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS syndrome, characterized by dramatic growth failure, progressive neurodevelopmental abnormalities and greatly reduced life expectancy. Here, we present a novel (conditional Xpg-/- mouse model which -in a C57BL6/FVB F1 hybrid genetic background- displays many progeroid features, including cessation of growth, loss of subcutaneous fat, kyphosis, osteoporosis, retinal photoreceptor loss, liver aging, extensive neurodegeneration, and a short lifespan of 4-5 months. We show that deletion of XPG specifically in the liver reproduces the progeroid features in the liver, yet abolishes the effect on growth or lifespan. In addition, specific XPG deletion in neurons and glia of the forebrain creates a progressive neurodegenerative phenotype that shows many characteristics of human XPG deficiency. Our findings therefore exclude that both the liver as well as the neurological phenotype are a secondary consequence of derailment in other cell types, organs or tissues (e.g. vascular abnormalities and support a cell-autonomous origin caused by the DNA repair defect itself. In addition they allow the dissection of the complex aging process in tissue- and cell-type-specific components. Moreover, our data highlight the critical importance of genetic background in mouse aging studies, establish the Xpg-/- mouse as a valid model for the severe form of human XPG patients and segmental accelerated aging, and strengthen the link between DNA damage and aging.

  6. Total sequence decomposition distinguishes functional modules, "molegos" in apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braun Werner

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Total sequence decomposition, using the web-based MASIA tool, identifies areas of conservation in aligned protein sequences. By structurally annotating these motifs, the sequence can be parsed into individual building blocks, molecular legos ("molegos", that can eventually be related to function. Here, the approach is applied to the apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE DNA repair proteins, essential enzymes that have been highly conserved throughout evolution. The APEs, DNase-1 and inositol 5'-polyphosphate phosphatases (IPP form a superfamily that catalyze metal ion based phosphorolysis, but recognize different substrates. Results MASIA decomposition of APE yielded 12 sequence motifs, 10 of which are also structurally conserved within the family and are designated as molegos. The 12 motifs include all the residues known to be essential for DNA cleavage by APE. Five of these molegos are sequentially and structurally conserved in DNase-1 and the IPP family. Correcting the sequence alignment to match the residues at the ends of two of the molegos that are absolutely conserved in each of the three families greatly improved the local structural alignment of APEs, DNase-1 and synaptojanin. Comparing substrate/product binding of molegos common to DNase-1 showed that those distinctive for APEs are not directly involved in cleavage, but establish protein-DNA interactions 3' to the abasic site. These additional bonds enhance both specific binding to damaged DNA and the processivity of APE1. Conclusion A modular approach can improve structurally predictive alignments of homologous proteins with low sequence identity and reveal residues peripheral to the traditional "active site" that control the specificity of enzymatic activity.

  7. DNA and Protein Requirements for Substrate Conformational Changes Necessary for Human Flap Endonuclease-1-catalyzed Reaction*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algasaier, Sana I.; Exell, Jack C.; Bennet, Ian A.; Thompson, Mark J.; Gotham, Victoria J. B.; Shaw, Steven J.; Craggs, Timothy D.; Finger, L. David; Grasby, Jane A.

    2016-01-01

    Human flap endonuclease-1 (hFEN1) catalyzes the essential removal of single-stranded flaps arising at DNA junctions during replication and repair processes. hFEN1 biological function must be precisely controlled, and consequently, the protein relies on a combination of protein and substrate conformational changes as a prerequisite for reaction. These include substrate bending at the duplex-duplex junction and transfer of unpaired reacting duplex end into the active site. When present, 5′-flaps are thought to thread under the helical cap, limiting reaction to flaps with free 5′-termini in vivo. Here we monitored DNA bending by FRET and DNA unpairing using 2-aminopurine exciton pair CD to determine the DNA and protein requirements for these substrate conformational changes. Binding of DNA to hFEN1 in a bent conformation occurred independently of 5′-flap accommodation and did not require active site metal ions or the presence of conserved active site residues. More stringent requirements exist for transfer of the substrate to the active site. Placement of the scissile phosphate diester in the active site required the presence of divalent metal ions, a free 5′-flap (if present), a Watson-Crick base pair at the terminus of the reacting duplex, and the intact secondary structure of the enzyme helical cap. Optimal positioning of the scissile phosphate additionally required active site conserved residues Tyr40, Asp181, and Arg100 and a reacting duplex 5′-phosphate. These studies suggest a FEN1 reaction mechanism where junctions are bound and 5′-flaps are threaded (when present), and finally the substrate is transferred onto active site metals initiating cleavage. PMID:26884332

  8. Induction of Apurinic Endonuclease 1 Overexpression by Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Hepatoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Lin Cheng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most common malignancies worldwide with poor prognosis due to resistance to conventional chemotherapy and limited efficacy of radiotherapy. Previous studies have noted the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress or apurinic endonuclease 1 (APE1 expression in many tumors. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and APE1 in hepatocellular carcinoma. Here we investigate the expression of APE1 during ER stress in HepG2 and Huh-7 cell lines. Tunicamycin or brefeldin A, two ER stress inducers, increased APE1 and GRP78, an ER stress marker, expression in HepG2 and Huh-7 cells. Induction of APE1 expression was observed through transcription level in response to ER stress. APE1 nuclear localization during ER stress was determined using immunofluorescence assays in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, expression of Hepatitis B virus pre-S2∆ large mutant surface protein (pre-S2∆, an ER stress-induced protein, also increased GRP78 and APE1 expression in the normal hepatocyte NeHepLxHT cell line. Similarly, tumor samples showed higher expression of APE1 in ER stress-correlated liver cancer tissue in vivo. Our results demonstrate that ER stress and HBV pre-S2∆ increased APE1 expression, which may play an important role in resistance to chemotherapeutic agents or tumor development. Therefore, these data provide an important chemotherapeutic strategy in ER stress and HBV pre-S2∆-associated tumors.

  9. Evidence for the Formation of Symmetric and Asymmetric DLPC-DAPC Lipid Bilayer Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Ritter

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: We investigated if mixtures of the phosphatidylcholine (PC lipids 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (C12:0 PC; DLPC and 1,2-diarachidoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (C20:0 PC; DAPC, which differ by eight methylene groups in acyl chain length, lead to the spontaneous formation of distinct lipid rafts and asymmetric bilayers. Methods: The experiments were performed using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM. Results: We show that DLPC and DAPC mixed at a molar ratio of 1:1 lead to the formation of single, double and triple bilayers with peaks at 6.14 ± 0.11, 13.27 ± 0.17 and 20.54 ± 0.46 nm, respectively (n=750. Within these formations discrete height steps of 0.92 nm can be resolved (n=422. Conclusion: The most frequently observed height steps value of 0.92 nm matches best with the calculated mean lipid hydrophobic thickness difference for asymmetric C12:0 PC and C20:0 PC lipid bilayers of 0.88 nm. This indicates the ability of DLPC and DAPC to form asymmetric lipid bilayers.

  10. Three-dimensional shock wave configurations induced by two asymmetrical intersecting wedges in supersonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, G.; Wang, C.; Teng, H.; Jiang, Z.

    2017-09-01

    This study explores the three-dimensional (3D) wave configurations induced by 3D asymmetrical intersecting compression wedges in supersonic and hypersonic inviscid flows. By using the "spatial dimension reduction" approach, the problem of 3D steady shock/shock interaction is converted to that of the interaction of two moving shock waves in the characteristic two-dimensional (2D) plane. Shock polar theory is used to analyze the shock configurations in asymmetrical situations. The results show that various shock configurations exist in 3D asymmetrical shock wave interactions, including regular interaction, transitioned regular interaction, single Mach interaction, inverse single Mach interaction, transitional double Mach interaction, weak shock interaction, and weak single Mach interaction. All of the above 3D steady shock/shock interactions have their corresponding 2D moving shock/shock interaction configurations. Numerical simulations are performed by solving the 3D inviscid Euler equations with the non-oscillatory, non-free parameters, dissipative (NND) numerical scheme, and good agreement with the theoretical analysis is obtained. Furthermore, the comparison of results show that the concept of the "virtual wall" in shock dynamics theory is helpful for understanding the mechanism of two-dimensional shock/shock interactions.

  11. On the Eccentricities and Merger Rates of Double Neutron Star Binaries and the Creation of "Double Supernovae"

    OpenAIRE

    Chaurasia, H. K.; Bailes, M.

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate that a natural consequence of an asymmetric kick imparted to neutron stars at birth is that the majority of double neutron star binaries should possess highly eccentric orbits. This leads to greatly accelerated orbital decay, due to the enormous increase in the emission of gravitational radiation at periastron as originally demonstrated by Peters (1964). A uniform distribution of kick velocities constrained to the orbital plane would result in ~24% of surviving binaries coalesc...

  12. Synthetic Applications of Chiral Unsaturated Epoxy Alcohols Prepared by Sharpless Asymmetric Epoxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Moreno

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available An overview of the synthesis and applications of chiral 2,3-epoxy alcohols containing unsaturated chains is presented. One of the fundamental synthetic routes to these compounds is Sharpless asymmetric epoxidation, which is reliable, highly chemoselective and enables easy prediction of the product enantioselectivity. Thus, unsaturated epoxy alcohols are readily obtained by selective oxidation of the allylic double bond in the presence of other carbon-carbon double or triple bonds. The wide availability of epoxy alcohols with unsaturated chains, the versatility of the epoxy alcohol functionality (e.g. regio- and stereo-selective ring opening; oxidation; and reduction, and the arsenal of established alkene chemistries, make unsaturated epoxy alcohols powerful starting materials for the synthesis of complex targets such as biologically active molecules. The popularization of ring-closing metathesis has further increased their value, making them excellent precursors to cyclic compounds.

  13. Extrahelical (CAG)/(CTG) triplet repeat elements support proliferating cell nuclear antigen loading and MutLα endonuclease activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluciennik, Anna; Burdett, Vickers; Baitinger, Celia; Iyer, Ravi R; Shi, Kevin; Modrich, Paul

    2013-07-23

    MutLα endonuclease can be activated on covalently continuous DNA that contains a MutSα- or MutSβ-recognizable lesion and a helix perturbation that supports proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) loading by replication factor C, providing a potential mechanism for triggering mismatch repair on nonreplicating DNA. Because mouse models for somatic expansion of disease-associated (CAG)n/(CTG)n triplet repeat sequences have implicated both MutSβ and MutLα and have suggested that expansions can occur in the absence of replication, we have asked whether an extrahelical (CAG)n or (CTG)n element is sufficient to trigger MutLα activation. (CAG)n and (CTG)n extrusions in relaxed closed circular DNA do in fact support MutSβ-, replication factor C-, and PCNA-dependent activation of MutLα endonuclease, which can incise either DNA strand. Extrahelical elements of two or three repeat units are the preferred substrates for MutLα activation, and extrusions of this size also serve as moderately effective sites for loading the PCNA clamp. Relaxed heteroduplex DNA containing a two or three-repeat unit extrusion also triggers MutSβ- and MutLα-endonuclease-dependent mismatch repair in nuclear extracts of human cells. This reaction occurs without obvious strand bias at about 10% the rate of that observed with otherwise identical nicked heteroduplex DNA. These findings provide a mechanism for initiation of triplet repeat processing in nonreplicating DNA that is consistent with several features of the model of Gomes-Pereira et al. [Gomes-Pereira M, Fortune MT, Ingram L, McAbney JP, Monckton DG (2004) Hum Mol Genet 13(16):1815-1825]. They may also have implications for triplet repeat processing at a replication fork.

  14. Small molecule activation of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 reduces DNA damage induced by cisplatin in cultured sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, Millie M; Chen, Qiujia; Meng, Jingwei; Guo, Chunlu; Wireman, Randall; Reed, April; Vasko, Michael R; Kelley, Mark R

    2016-05-01

    Although chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) affects approximately 5-60% of cancer patients, there are currently no treatments available in part due to the fact that the underlying causes of CIPN are not well understood. One contributing factor in CIPN may be persistence of DNA lesions resulting from treatment with platinum-based agents such as cisplatin. In support of this hypothesis, overexpression of the base excision repair (BER) enzyme, apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), reduces DNA damage and protects cultured sensory neurons treated with cisplatin. Here, we address stimulation of APE1's endonuclease through a small molecule, nicorandil, as a means of mimicking the beneficial effects observed for overexpression of APE1. Nicorandil, was identified through high-throughput screening of small molecule libraries and found to stimulate APE1 endonuclease activity by increasing catalytic efficiency approximately 2-fold. This stimulation is primarily due to an increase in kcat. To prevent metabolism of nicorandil, an approved drug in Europe for the treatment of angina, cultured sensory neurons were pretreated with nicorandil and daidzin, an aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 inhibitor, resulting in decreased DNA damage but not altered transmitter release by cisplatin. This finding suggests that activation of APE1 by nicorandil in cisplatin-treated cultured sensory neurons does not imbalance the BER pathway in contrast to overexpression of the kinetically faster R177A APE1. Taken together, our results suggest that APE1 activators can be used to reduce DNA damage induced by cisplatin in cultured sensory neurons, although further studies will be required to fully assess their protective effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Extrahelical (CAG)/(CTG) triplet repeat elements support proliferating cell nuclear antigen loading and MutLα endonuclease activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluciennik, Anna; Burdett, Vickers; Baitinger, Celia; Iyer, Ravi R.; Shi, Kevin; Modrich, Paul

    2013-01-01

    MutLα endonuclease can be activated on covalently continuous DNA that contains a MutSα- or MutSβ-recognizable lesion and a helix perturbation that supports proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) loading by replication factor C, providing a potential mechanism for triggering mismatch repair on nonreplicating DNA. Because mouse models for somatic expansion of disease-associated (CAG)n/(CTG)n triplet repeat sequences have implicated both MutSβ and MutLα and have suggested that expansions can occur in the absence of replication, we have asked whether an extrahelical (CAG)n or (CTG)n element is sufficient to trigger MutLα activation. (CAG)n and (CTG)n extrusions in relaxed closed circular DNA do in fact support MutSβ-, replication factor C-, and PCNA-dependent activation of MutLα endonuclease, which can incise either DNA strand. Extrahelical elements of two or three repeat units are the preferred substrates for MutLα activation, and extrusions of this size also serve as moderately effective sites for loading the PCNA clamp. Relaxed heteroduplex DNA containing a two or three-repeat unit extrusion also triggers MutSβ- and MutLα-endonuclease-dependent mismatch repair in nuclear extracts of human cells. This reaction occurs without obvious strand bias at about 10% the rate of that observed with otherwise identical nicked heteroduplex DNA. These findings provide a mechanism for initiation of triplet repeat processing in nonreplicating DNA that is consistent with several features of the model of Gomes-Pereira et al. [Gomes-Pereira M, Fortune MT, Ingram L, McAbney JP, Monckton DG (2004) Hum Mol Genet 13(16):1815–1825]. They may also have implications for triplet repeat processing at a replication fork. PMID:23840062

  16. Interaction of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 2 (Apn2) with Myh1 DNA glycosylase in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jin; Hwang, Bor-Jang; Chang, Po-Wen; Toth, Eric A; Lu, A-Lien

    2014-03-01

    Oxidative DNA damage is repaired primarily by the base excision repair (BER) pathway in a process initiated by removal of base lesions or mismatched bases by DNA glycosylases. MutY homolog (MYH, MUTYH, or Myh1) is a DNA glycosylase which excises adenine paired with the oxidative lesion 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG, or G°), thus reducing G:C to T:A mutations. The resulting apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site is processed by an AP-endonuclease or a bifunctional glycosylase/lyase. We show here that the major Schizosaccharomyces pombe AP endonuclease, Apn2, binds to the inter-domain connector located between the N- and C-terminal domains of Myh1. This Myh1 inter-domain connector also interacts with the Hus1 subunit of the Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 checkpoint clamp. Mutagenesis studies indicate that Apn2 and Hus1 bind overlapping but different sequence motifs on Myh1. Mutation on I(261) of Myh1 reduces its interaction with Hus1, but only slightly attenuates its interaction with Apn2. However, E(262) of Myh1 is a key determinant for both Apn2 and Hus1 interactions. Like human APE1, Apn2 has 3'-phosphodiesterase activity. However, unlike hAPE1, Apn2 has a weak AP endonuclease activity which cleaves the AP sites generated by Myh1 glycosylase. Functionally, Apn2 stimulates Myh1 glycosylase activity and Apn2 phosphodiesterase activity is stimulated by Myh1. The cross stimulation of Myh1 and Apn2 enzymatic activities is dependent on their physical interaction. Thus, Myh1 and Apn2 constitute an initial BER complex. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Using Group II Introns for Attenuating the In Vitro and In Vivo Expression of a Homing Endonuclease

    OpenAIRE

    Tuhin Kumar Guha; Georg Hausner

    2016-01-01

    In Chaetomium thermophilum (DSM 1495) within the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) small ribosomal subunit (rns) gene a group IIA1 intron interrupts an open reading frame (ORF) encoded within a group I intron (mS1247). This arrangement offers the opportunity to examine if the nested group II intron could be utilized as a regulatory element for the expression of the homing endonuclease (HEase). Constructs were generated where the codon-optimized ORF was interrupted with either the native group IIA1 in...

  18. Next-generation sequencing of multiple individuals per barcoded library by deconvolution of sequenced amplicons using endonuclease fragment analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jeppe D; Pereira, Vania; Pietroni, Carlotta

    2014-01-01

    The simultaneous sequencing of samples from multiple individuals increases the efficiency of next-generation sequencing (NGS) while also reducing costs. Here we describe a novel and simple approach for sequencing DNA from multiple individuals per barcode. Our strategy relies on the endonuclease...... digestion of PCR amplicons prior to library preparation, creating a specific fragment pattern for each individual that can be resolved after sequencing. By using both barcodes and restriction fragment patterns, we demonstrate the ability to sequence the human melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) genes from 72...

  19. Next-generation sequencing of multiple individuals per barcoded library by deconvolution of sequenced amplicons using endonuclease fragment analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Jeppe D; Pereira, Vania; Pietroni, Carlotta; Mikkelsen, Martin; Johansen, Peter; Børsting, Claus; Morling, Niels

    2014-08-01

    The simultaneous sequencing of samples from multiple individuals increases the efficiency of next-generation sequencing (NGS) while also reducing costs. Here we describe a novel and simple approach for sequencing DNA from multiple individuals per barcode. Our strategy relies on the endonuclease digestion of PCR amplicons prior to library preparation, creating a specific fragment pattern for each individual that can be resolved after sequencing. By using both barcodes and restriction fragment patterns, we demonstrate the ability to sequence the human melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) genes from 72 individuals using only 24 barcoded libraries.

  20. Genomic DNA restriction endonuclease from Pasteurella multocida isolated from Indonesia, katha strain and reference strains and analysed by PFGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supar

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Pasteurella multocida strains are the causative disease agents of wide range of domestic and wild animals in Indonesia. The most important serotypes are associated with Hemorrhagic septicaemic (HS diseases in cattle and buffaloes, cholera in ducks and chickens. The HS disease associated with P. multocia in large ruminants in Indonesia is controled by killed whole cell vaccines produced by the use of P. multocida Katha strains. There is no discriminatory data of the molecular biology technique has been applied to investigate P. multocida isolates from different geographic locations in Indonesia. The purpose of this studies were to observe the genetic diversity among P. multocida isolated from various geograpic locations and compared with Katha vaccine strain and other reference strains. A total samples of 38 isolates and strains of P. multocida were analysed by means of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. Each sample was grown in nutrient broth, cells were separeted by centrifugation. Whole cell pellet was mixed with agarose and then prepared agarose plugs. The genomic DNA of each sample was digested in situ (plug with either restriction endonuclease of ApaI and/or BamHI. The digested genomic DNA of each sample was analysed by PFGE, the genomic DNA restricted profile of each sample was compared with others. The use of ApaI restriction endonuclease digestion and analysed by PFGE, demonstrated that 34 out of 38 P. multocia samples could be differentiated into 16 ApaI types, whereas based on the BamHI digestion of these samples were differentiated into 20 BamHI types. Genomic DNA restriction pattern of Indonesian P. multocida isolates originated from cattle and buffaloes associated with haemorrhagic septicaemic diseases demonstrated different pattern to those of vaccine Katha strain, poultry strains as well as the reference strains currenly kept at Balitvet Culture Collection (BCC unit. Two P. multocida isolates derived from ducks with cholera

  1. Interaction of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 2 (Apn2) with Myh1 DNA glycosylase in fission yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Jin; Hwang, Bor-Jang; Chang, Po-Wen; Toth, Eric A.; Lu, A-Lien

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative DNA damage is repaired primarily by the base excision repair (BER) pathway in a process initiated by removal of base lesions or mismatched bases by DNA glycosylases. MutY homolog (MYH, MUTYH, or Myh1) is a DNA glycosylase which excises adenine paired with the oxidative lesion 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG, or Go), thus reducing G:C to T:A mutations. The resulting apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site is processed by an AP-endonuclease or a bifunctional glycosylase/lya...

  2. The major role of human AP-endonuclease homolog Apn2 in repair of abasic sites in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    OpenAIRE

    Ribar, Balazs; Izumi, Tadahide; Mitra, Sankar

    2004-01-01

    The abasic (AP) sites, the major mutagenic and cytotoxic genomic lesions, induced directly by oxidative stress and indirectly after excision of damaged bases by DNA glycosylases, are repaired by AP-endonucleases (APEs). Among two APEs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Apn1 provides the major APE activity, and Apn2, the ortholog of the mammalian APE, provides back-up activity. We have cloned apn1 and apn2 genes of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and have shown that inactivation of Apn2 and not Apn1 sens...

  3. HIGLE is a bifunctional homing endonuclease that directly interacts with HYL1 and SERRATE in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cho, Seok Keun; Ryu, Moon Young; Poulsen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    A highly coordinated complex known as the microprocessor precisely processes primary transcripts of MIRNA genes into mature miRNAs. In plants, the microprocessor minimally consists of three components: Dicer-like protein 1 (DCL1), HYPONASTIC LEAF 1 (HYL1), and SERRATE (SE). To precisely modulate mi......RNA maturation, the microprocessor cooperates with at least 12 proteins in plants. In addition, we here show the involvement of a novel gene, HYL1-interacting GIY-YIG-like endonuclease (HIGLE). The encoded protein has a GIY-YIG domain that is generally found within a class of homing endonucleases. HIGLE directly...... interacts with the microprocessor components HYL1 and SE. Unlike the functions of other GIY-YIG endonucleases, the catalytic core of HIGLE has both DNase and RNase activities that sufficiently processes miRNA precursors into short fragments in vitro....

  4. Preview-based Asymmetric Load Reduction of Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mathias; Filsø, Jakob; Soltani, Mohsen

    2012-01-01

    Fatigue loads on wind turbines caused by an asymmetric wind field become an increasing concern when the scale of wind turbines increases. This paper presents a model based predictive approach to reduce asymmetric loads by using Light Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) measurements. The Model Predictive...... to the same controller without LIDAR data. The results showed that the MPC with LIDAR was able to reduce the asymmetric loads compared to the MPC without LIDAR while still maintaining the power reference....

  5. Asymmetric joint multifractal analysis in Chinese stock markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuwen; Zheng, Tingting

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, the asymmetric joint multifractal analysis method based on statistical physics is proposed to explore the asymmetric correlation between daily returns and trading volumes in Chinese stock markets. The result shows asymmetric multifractal correlations exist between return and trading volume in Chinese stock markets. Moreover, when the stock indexes are upward, the fluctuations of returns are always weaker than when they are downward, whether the trading volumes are more or less.

  6. Combined shear/compression structural testing of asymmetric sandwich structures

    OpenAIRE

    Castanié, Bruno; Barrau, Jean-Jacques; Jaouen, Jean-Pierre; Rivallant, Samuel

    2004-01-01

    Asymmetric sandwich technology can be applied in the design of lightweight, non-pressurized aeronautical structures such as those of helicopters. A test rig of asymmetric sandwich structures subjected to compression/shear loads was designed, validated, and set up. It conforms to the standard certification procedure for composite aeronautical structures set out in the “test pyramid”, a multiscale approach. The static tests until failure showed asymmetric sandwich structures to be extremely res...

  7. Asymmetric acoustic transmission in graded beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, Li, E-mail: lj94172350@hotmail.com [School of Mechanical Engineering and State Key laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Wu, Jiu Hui, E-mail: ejhwu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Engineering and State Key laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Guan, Dong; Lu, Kuan [School of Mechanical Engineering and State Key laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Gao, Nansha [School of Marine Science and Technology, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710072 (China); Songhua, Cao [School of Mechanical Engineering and State Key laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate the dynamic effective material parameters and vibration performance of a graded beam. The structure of the beam was composed of several unit cells with different fill factors. The dispersion relations and energy band structures of each unit cell were calculated using the finite element method (FEM). The dynamic effective material parameters in each unit cell of the graded beam were determined by the dispersion relations and energy band structures. Longitudinal wave propagation was investigated using a numerical method and FEM. The results show that the graded beam allows asymmetric acoustic transmission over a wide range of frequencies.

  8. On asymmetric causal relationships in Petropolitics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balan Feyza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to examine whether the First Law of Petropolitics denominated by Friedman in 2006 is valid for OPEC countries. To do this, this paper analyses the relationship between political risk and oil supply by applying the asymmetric panel causality test suggested by Hatemi-J (2011 to these countries for the period 1984-2014. The results show that the First Law of Petropolitics is valid for Angola, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the UAE, given that positive oil supply shocks significantly lead to negative political stability shocks, and negative oil supply shocks significantly lead to positive shocks in political stability.

  9. RHIC operation with asymmetric collisions in 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Aschenauer, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Atoian, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blaskiewicz, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Brown, K. A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bruno, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Connolly, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ottavio, T. D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Drees, K. A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fischer, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gardner, C. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gu, X. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hayes, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Huang, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Laster, J. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Luo, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Makdisi, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Marr, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Marusic, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Meot, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Mernick, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Michnoff, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Montag, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Morris, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Narayan, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Nayak, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Nemesure, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pile, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Poblaguev, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ranjbar, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Robert-Demolaize, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Roser, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Schmidke, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Schoefer, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Severino, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Shrey, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Smith, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Steski, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tepikian, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Trbojevic, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tsoupas, N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wang, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); White, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yip, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zaltsman, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zeno, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zhang, S. Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-08-07

    To study low-x shadowing/saturation physics as well as other nuclear effects [1], [2], proton-gold (p-Au, for 5 weeks) and proton-Aluminum (p-Al, for 2 weeks) collisions were provided for experiments in 2015 at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), with polarized proton beam in the Blue ring and Au/Al beam in the Yellow ring. The special features of the asymmetric run in 2015 will be introduced. The operation experience will be reviewed as well in the report.

  10. Chiral Diamine-catalyzed Asymmetric Aldol Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hui; XU Da-zhen; WU Lu-lu; WANG Yong-mei

    2012-01-01

    A highly efficient catalytic system composed of a simple and commercially available chiral primary diamine (1R,2R)-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine(6) and trifluoroacetic acid(TFA) was employed for asymmetric Aldol reaction in i-PrOH at room temperature.A loading of 10%(molar fraction) catalyst 6 with TFA as a cocatalyst could catalyze the Aldol reactions of various ketones or aldehydes with a series of aromatic aldehydes,furnishing Aldol products in moderate to high yields(up to >99%) with enantioselectivities of up to >99% and diastereoselectivities of up to 99:1.

  11. Nanotribology of Symmetric and Asymmetric Liquid Lubricants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Yamada

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available When liquid molecules are confined in a narrow gap between smooth surfaces, their dynamic properties are completely different from those of the bulk. The molecular motions are highly restricted and the system exhibits solid-like responses when sheared slowly. This solidification behavior is very dependent on the molecular geometry (shape of liquids because the solidification is induced by the packing of molecules into ordered structures in confinement. This paper reviews the measurements of confined structures and friction of symmetric and asymmetric liquid lubricants using the surface forces apparatus. The results show subtle and complex friction mechanisms at the molecular scale.

  12. Copper-catalyzed asymmetric oxidation of sulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahony, Graham E; Ford, Alan; Maguire, Anita R

    2012-04-06

    Copper-catalyzed asymmetric sulfoxidation of aryl benzyl and aryl alkyl sulfides, using aqueous hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant, has been investigated. A relationship between the steric effects of the sulfide substituents and the enantioselectivity of the oxidation has been observed, with up to 93% ee for 2-naphthylmethyl phenyl sulfoxide, in modest yield in this instance (up to 30%). The influence of variation of solvent and ligand structure was examined, and the optimized conditions were then used to oxidize a number of aryl alkyl and aryl benzyl sulfides, producing sulfoxides in excellent yields in most cases (up to 92%), and good enantiopurities in certain cases (up to 84% ee).

  13. Crystal structure and DNA-binding property of the ATPase domain of bacterial mismatch repair endonuclease MutL from Aquifex aeolicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Kenji; Iino, Hitoshi; Baba, Seiki; Kumasaka, Takashi; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Yano, Takato

    2017-09-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system corrects mismatched bases that are generated mainly by DNA replication errors. The repair system excises the error-containing single-stranded region and enables the re-synthesis of the strand. In the early reactions of MMR, MutL endonuclease incises the newly-synthesized/error-containing strand of the duplex to initiate the downstream excision reaction. MutL endonuclease consists of the N-terminal ATPase and C-terminal endonuclease domains. In this study, we report the crystal structure of the ATPase domain of MutL endonuclease from Aquifex aeolicus. The overall structure of the domain was similar to those of human MutL homologs and Escherichia coli MutL, although E. coli MutL has no endonuclease activity. The ATPase domain was comprised of two subdomains: the N-terminal ATP-binding subdomain and the C-terminal α-β sandwich subdomain. Site-directed mutagenesis experiment identified DNA-interacting eight basic amino acid residues, which were distributed across both the two subdomains and formed a DNA-binding cleft. Docking simulation between the structures of the ATPase and endonuclease domains generated a reliable model structure for the full-length A. aeolicus MutL, which satisfies our previous result of small-angle X-ray scattering analysis. On the basis of the model structure and further experimental results, we concluded that the two separate DNA-binding sites in the full-length A. aeolicus MutL simultaneously bind a dsDNA molecule. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Autoscreening of restriction endonucleases for PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism identification of fungal species, with Pleurotus spp. as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi-Hui; Huang, Ji-Xiang; Yao, Yi-Jian

    2007-12-01

    A molecular method based on PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) ribosomal DNA sequences was designed to rapidly identify fungal species, with members of the genus Pleurotus as an example. Based on the results of phylogenetic analysis of ITS sequences from Pleurotus, a PCR-RFLP endonuclease autoscreening (PRE Auto) program was developed to screen restriction endonucleases for discriminating multiple sequences from different species. The PRE Auto program analyzes the endonuclease recognition sites and calculates the sizes of the fragments in the sequences that are imported into the program in groups according to species recognition. Every restriction endonuclease is scored through the calculation of the average coefficient for the sequence groups and the average coefficient for the sequences within a group, and then virtual electrophoresis maps for the selected restriction enzymes, based on the results of the scoring system, are displayed for the rapid determination of the candidate endonucleases. A total of 85 haplotypes representing 151 ITS sequences were used for the analysis, and 2,992 restriction endonucleases were screened to find the candidates for the identification of species. This method was verified by an experiment with 28 samples representing 12 species of Pleurotus. The results of the digestion by the restriction enzymes showed the same patterns of DNA fragments anticipated by the PRE Auto program, apart from those for four misidentified samples. ITS sequences from 14 samples (of which nine sequences were obtained in this study), including four originally misidentified samples, confirmed the species identities revealed by the PCR-RFLP analysis. The method developed here can be used for the identification of species of other living microorganisms.

  15. Identification of APN2, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog of the major human AP endonuclease HAP1, and its role in the repair of abasic sites

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Robert E.; Torres-Ramos, Carlos A.; Izumi, Tadahide; Mitra, Sankar; Prakash, Satya; Prakash, Louise

    1998-01-01

    Abasic (AP) sites arise in DNA through spontaneous base loss and enzymatic removal of damaged bases. APN1 encodes the major AP-endonuclease of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Human HAP1 (REF1) encodes the major AP endonuclease which, in addition to its role in DNA repair, functions as a redox regulatory protein. We identify APN2, the yeast homolog of HAP1 and provide evidence that Apn1 and Apn2 represent alternate pathways for repairing AP sites. The apn1Δ apn2Δ strain displays a highly elevated le...

  16. Analysis of gene repair tracts from Cas9/gRNA double-stranded breaks in the human CFTR gene

    OpenAIRE

    Hollywood, Jennifer A.; Lee, Ciaran M.; Scallan, Martina F.; Harrison, Patrick T.

    2016-01-01

    To maximise the efficiency of template-dependent gene editing, most studies describe programmable and/or RNA-guided endonucleases that make a double-stranded break at, or close to, the target sequence to be modified. The rationale for this design strategy is that most gene repair tracts will be very short. Here, we describe a CRISPR Cas9/gRNA selection-free strategy which uses deep sequencing to characterise repair tracts from a donor plasmid containing seven nucleotide differences across a 2...

  17. Modeling and characterization of double resonant tunneling diodes for application as energy selective contacts in hot carrier solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehl, Zacharie; Suchet, Daniel; Julian, Anatole; Bernard, Cyril; Miyashita, Naoya; Gibelli, Francois; Okada, Yoshitaka; Guillemolles, Jean-Francois

    2017-02-01

    Double resonant tunneling barriers are considered for an application as energy selective contacts in hot carrier solar cells. Experimental symmetric and asymmetric double resonant tunneling barriers are realized by molecular beam epitaxy and characterized by temperature dependent current-voltage measurements. The negative differential resistance signal is enhanced for asymmetric heterostructures, and remains unchanged between low- and room-temperatures. Within Tsu-Esaki description of the tunnel current, this observation can be explained by the voltage dependence of the tunnel transmission amplitude, which presents a resonance under finite bias for asymmetric structures. This effect is notably discussed with respect to series resistance. Different parameters related to the electronic transmission of the structure and the influence of these parameters on the current voltage characteristic are investigated, bringing insights on critical processes to optimize in double resonant tunneling barriers applied to hot carrier solar cells.

  18. At Low SNR Asymmetric Quantizers Are Better

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    We study the capacity of the discrete-time Gaussian channel when its output is quantized with a one-bit quantizer. We focus on the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) regime, where communication at very low spectral efficiencies takes place. In this regime a symmetric threshold quantizer is known to reduce channel capacity by 2/pi, i.e., to cause an asymptotic power loss of approximately two decibels. Here it is shown that this power loss can be entirely avoided by using asymmetric threshold quantizers and asymmetric signaling constellations. We prove that in order to avoid this power loss flash-signaling input-distributions are essential. Consequently, one-bit output quantization of the Gaussian channel reduces spectral efficiency. Threshold quantizers are not only asymptotically optimal: as we prove, at every fixed SNR, a threshold quantizer maximizes capacity among all one-bit output quantizers. The picture changes on the Rayleigh-fading channel. In the noncoherent case we show that a one-bit output quantizer ...

  19. Asymmetric DSL Technology of Signal Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dražen Kovačević

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Asymmetric flow of information is the key feature of theADSL (Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Loop technology, i.e.higher data transmission rate towards the user than from theuser towards the network. Characteristic is the short messagesending by the user with a certain request to the se!Ver. These!Ver responds to the request by a significantly longer messageof various electronic forms (data, digitized speech, pictures orvideo. Therefore, this technology is most often used by smalland medium users. ADSL is currently the only commerciallyavailable DSL technology which is still experiencing the breakthroughon the seiVice market. It enables faster access to theInternet, LAN (Local Area Network, videoconferencing, VoD(Video on Demand and interactive multimedia. In order tostandardize such se/Vices, the !TU (International TelecommunicationsUnion G. 992.1 (standardized DMT-discrete multi-tone line coding technology and ANSJ (American NationalStandards Institution Tl.413-95!98 are used for ADSL. DMT(Discrete Multi Tone, as the more popular one, uses the linecoding technique, which splits a certain frequency range intoseveral sub-channels. Most of these sub-channels are used forupstream and downstream transmission of speech and data,whereas some are used as pilot signals or kept in rese/Ve. Suchmodulation technique expands the frequency spectrum, allowingthe usage ofbroadband se/Vices per one pair of wires. In thisway the sharing of speech and data se/Vice transmission is realized.

  20. Asymmetric Uncertainty Expression for High Gradient Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinier, Jeremy T

    2012-01-01

    When the physics of the flow around an aircraft changes very abruptly either in time or space (e.g., flow separation/reattachment, boundary layer transition, unsteadiness, shocks, etc), the measurements that are performed in a simulated environment like a wind tunnel test or a computational simulation will most likely incorrectly predict the exact location of where (or when) the change in physics happens. There are many reasons for this, includ- ing the error introduced by simulating a real system at a smaller scale and at non-ideal conditions, or the error due to turbulence models in a computational simulation. The un- certainty analysis principles that have been developed and are being implemented today do not fully account for uncertainty in the knowledge of the location of abrupt physics changes or sharp gradients, leading to a potentially underestimated uncertainty in those areas. To address this problem, a new asymmetric aerodynamic uncertainty expression containing an extra term to account for a phase-uncertainty, the magnitude of which is emphasized in the high-gradient aerodynamic regions is proposed in this paper. Additionally, based on previous work, a method for dispersing aerodynamic data within asymmetric uncer- tainty bounds in a more realistic way has been developed for use within Monte Carlo-type analyses.

  1. Algebraic Davis Decomposition and Asymmetric Doob Inequalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Guixiang; Junge, Marius; Parcet, Javier

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we investigate asymmetric forms of Doob maximal inequality. The asymmetry is imposed by noncommutativity. Let {({M}, τ)} be a noncommutative probability space equipped with a filtration of von Neumann subalgebras {({M}_n)_{n ≥ 1}}, whose union {bigcup_{n≥1}{M}_n} is weak-* dense in {{M}}. Let {{E}_n} denote the corresponding family of conditional expectations. As an illustration for an asymmetric result, we prove that for {1 Hardy spaces {{H}_p^r({M})} and {{H}_p^c({M})} respectively. In particular, this solves a problem posed by the Defant and Junge in 2004. In the case p = 1, our results establish a noncommutative form of the Davis celebrated theorem on the relation betwe en martingale maximal and square functions in L 1, whose noncommutative form has remained open for quite some time. Given {1 ≤ p ≤ 2}, we also provide new weak type maximal estimates, which imply in turn left/right almost uniform convergence of {{E}_n(x)} in row/column Hardy spaces. This improves the bilateral convergence known so far. Our approach is based on new forms of Davis martingale decomposition which are of independent interest, and an algebraic atomic description for the involved Hardy spaces. The latter results are new even for commutative von Neumann algebras.

  2. [Asymmetric hypertrophy of the masticatory muscles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzul, L; Corre, P; Khonsari, R H; Mercier, J-M; Piot, B

    2012-06-01

    Hypertrophy of the masticatory muscles most commonly affects the masseter. Less common cases of isolated or associated temporalis hypertrophy are also reported. Parafunctional habits, and more precisely bruxism, can favor the onset of the hypertrophy. This condition is generally idiopathic and can require both medical and/or surgical management. A 29-year-old patient was referred to our department for an asymmetric swelling of the masticatory muscles. Physical examination revealed a bilateral hypertrophy of the masticatory muscles, predominantly affecting the right temporalis and the left masseter. Major bruxism was assessed by premature dental wearing. The additional examinations confirmed the isolated muscle hypertrophy. Benign asymmetric hypertrophy of the masticatory muscles promoted by bruxism was diagnosed. Treatment with injections of type A botulinum toxin was conducted in association with a splint and relaxation. Its effectiveness has been observed at six months. Few cases of unilateral or bilateral temporalis hypertrophy have been reported, added to the more common isolated masseter muscles hypertrophy. The diagnosis requires to rule out secondary hypertrophies and tumors using Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The condition is thought to be favoured by parafunctional habits such as bruxism. The conservative treatment consists in reducing the volume of the masticatory muscles using intramuscular injections of type A botulinum toxin. Other potential conservative treatments are wearing splints and muscle relaxant drugs. Surgical procedures aiming to reduce the muscle volume and/or the bone volume (mandibular gonioplasty) can be proposed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. An asymmetric B factory based on PEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-02-01

    In this report we describe a design for a high-luminosity Asymmetric B Factory to be built in the PEP tunnel on the SLAC site. This proposal, a collaborative effort SLAC, LBL, and LLNL, is the culmination of more than two years of effort aimed at the design and construction of an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider capable of achieving a luminosity of L = 3 {times} 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. The configuration adopted utilizes two storage rings, and electron ring operating at 9 GeV and a positron ring at 3.1 GeV, each with a circumference of 2200 m. The high-energy ring is an upgrade of the PEP storage ring at SLAC; all PEP magnets and most power supplies will be reused. The upgrade consists primarily of replacing the PEP vacuum chamber and RF system with newly designed versions optimized for the high-current environment of the B Factory. The low-energy ring will be newly constructed and will be situated atop the high-energy ring in the PEP tunnel. Utilities already installed in the PEP tunnel are largely sufficient to operate the two B Factory storage rings.

  4. Asymmetric inheritance of cytoophidia in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A general view is that Schizosaccharomyces pombe undergoes symmetric cell division with two daughter cells inheriting equal shares of the content from the mother cell. Here we show that CTP synthase, a metabolic enzyme responsible for the de novo synthesis of the nucleotide CTP, can form filamentous cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus of S. pombe cells. Surprisingly, we observe that both cytoplasmic and nuclear cytoophidia are asymmetrically inherited during cell division. Our time-lapse studies suggest that cytoophidia are dynamic. Once the mother cell divides, the cytoplasmic and nuclear cytoophidia independently partition into one of the two daughter cells. Although the two daughter cells differ from one another morphologically, they possess similar chances of inheriting the cytoplasmic cytoophidium from the mother cell, suggesting that the partition of cytoophidium is a stochastic process. Our findings on asymmetric inheritance of cytoophidia in S. pombe offer an exciting opportunity to study the inheritance of metabolic enzymes in a well-studied model system.

  5. Asymmetric Cell Divisions in the Epidermis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulson, Nicholas D.; Lechler, Terry

    2012-01-01

    Generation of three-dimensional tissue with distinct cell types is required for the development of all organs. On its own, mitotic spindle orientation allows tissues to change in length or shape. In combination with intrinsic or extrinsic cues this can also be coupled to the generation of diverse cell fates - a process known as asymmetric cell division (ACD). Understanding ACD’s has been greatly aided by studies in invertebrate model systems, where genetics and live imaging have provided the basis for much of what we know. ACD’s also drive the development and differentiation of the epidermis in mammals. While similar to the invertebrate models, the epidermis is distinct in balancing symmetric and asymmetric divisions to yield a tissue of the correct surface area and thickness. Here we review the roles of spindle orientation in driving both morphogenesis and cell fate decisions. We highlight the epidermis as a unique model system to study not only basic mechanisms of ACD, but also to study their regulation during development. PMID:22449491

  6. The NF1 gene contains hotspots for L1 endonuclease-dependent de novo insertion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Wimmer

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Long interspersed (L1 and Alu elements are actively amplified in the human genome through retrotransposition of their RNA intermediates by the -100 still retrotranspositionally fully competent L1 elements. Retrotransposition can cause inherited disease if such an element is inserted near or within a functional gene. Using direct cDNA sequencing as the primary assay for comprehensive NF1 mutation analysis, we uncovered in 18 unrelated index patients splicing alterations not readily explained at the genomic level by an underlying point-mutation or deletion. Improved PCR protocols avoiding allelic drop-out of the mutant alleles uncovered insertions of fourteen Alu elements, three L1 elements, and one poly(T stretch to cause these splicing defects. Taken together, the 18 pathogenic L1 endonuclease-mediated de novo insertions represent the largest number of this type of mutations characterized in a single human gene. Our findings show that retrotransposon insertions account for as many as -0.4% of all NF1 mutations. Since altered splicing was the main effect of the inserted elements, the current finding was facilitated by the use of RNA-based mutation analysis protocols, resulting in improved detection compared to gDNA-based approaches. Six different insertions clustered in a relatively small 1.5-kb region (NF1 exons 21(16-23(18 within the 280-kb NF1 gene. Furthermore, three different specific integration sites, one of them located in this cluster region, were each used twice, i.e. NM_000267.3(NF1:c.1642-1_1642 in intron 14(10c, NM_000267.3(NF1:c.2835_2836 in exon 21(16, and NM_000267.3(NF1:c.4319_4320 in exon 33(25. Identification of three loci that each served twice as integration site for independent retrotransposition events as well as 1.5-kb cluster region harboring six independent insertions supports the notion of non-random insertion of retrotransposons in the human genome. Currently, little is known about which features make sites

  7. Naturally-occurring, dually-functional fusions between restriction endonucleases and regulatory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jixiao; Blumenthal, Robert M

    2013-10-02

    Restriction-modification (RM) systems appear to play key roles in modulating gene flow among bacteria and archaea. Because the restriction endonuclease (REase) is potentially lethal to unmethylated new host cells, regulation to ensure pre-expression of the protective DNA methyltransferase (MTase) is essential to the spread of RM genes. This is particularly true for Type IIP RM systems, in which the REase and MTase are separate, independently-active proteins. A substantial subset of Type IIP RM systems are controlled by an activator-repressor called C protein. In these systems, C controls the promoter for its own gene, and for the downstream REase gene that lacks its own promoter. Thus MTase is expressed immediately after the RM genes enter a new cell, while expression of REase is delayed until sufficient C protein accumulates. To study the variation in and evolution of this regulatory mechanism, we searched for RM systems closely related to the well-studied C protein-dependent PvuII RM system. Unexpectedly, among those found were several in which the C protein and REase genes were fused. The gene for CR.NsoJS138I fusion protein (nsoJS138ICR, from the bacterium Niabella soli) was cloned, and the fusion protein produced and partially purified. Western blots provided no evidence that, under the conditions tested, anything other than full-length fusion protein is produced. This protein had REase activity in vitro and, as expected from the sequence similarity, its specificity was indistinguishable from that for PvuII REase, though the optimal reaction conditions were different. Furthermore, the fusion was active as a C protein, as revealed by in vivo activation of a lacZ reporter fusion to the promoter region for the nsoJS138ICR gene. Fusions between C proteins and REases have not previously been characterized, though other fusions have (such as between REases and MTases). These results reinforce the evidence for impressive modularity among RM system proteins, and raise

  8. An AP endonuclease 1-DNA polymerase beta complex: theoretical prediction of interacting surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abyzov, Alexej; Uzun, Alper; Strauss, Phyllis R; Ilyin, Valentin A

    2008-04-25

    Abasic (AP) sites in DNA arise through both endogenous and exogenous mechanisms. Since AP sites can prevent replication and transcription, the cell contains systems for their identification and repair. AP endonuclease (APEX1) cleaves the phosphodiester backbone 5' to the AP site. The cleavage, a key step in the base excision repair pathway, is followed by nucleotide insertion and removal of the downstream deoxyribose moiety, performed most often by DNA polymerase beta (pol-beta). While yeast two-hybrid studies and electrophoretic mobility shift assays provide evidence for interaction of APEX1 and pol-beta, the specifics remain obscure. We describe a theoretical study designed to predict detailed interacting surfaces between APEX1 and pol-beta based on published co-crystal structures of each enzyme bound to DNA. Several potentially interacting complexes were identified by sliding the protein molecules along DNA: two with pol-beta located downstream of APEX1 (3' to the damaged site) and three with pol-beta located upstream of APEX1 (5' to the damaged site). Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, ensuring geometrical complementarity of interfaces, enabled us to predict interacting residues and calculate binding energies, which in two cases were sufficient (approximately -10.0 kcal/mol) to form a stable complex and in one case a weakly interacting complex. Analysis of interface behavior during MD simulation and visual inspection of interfaces allowed us to conclude that complexes with pol-beta at the 3'-side of APEX1 are those most likely to occur in vivo. Additional multiple sequence analyses of APEX1 and pol-beta in related organisms identified a set of correlated mutations of specific residues at the predicted interfaces. Based on these results, we propose that pol-beta in the open or closed conformation interacts and makes a stable interface with APEX1 bound to a cleaved abasic site on the 3' side. The method described here can be used for analysis in any DNA

  9. An AP endonuclease 1-DNA polymerase beta complex: theoretical prediction of interacting surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexej Abyzov

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abasic (AP sites in DNA arise through both endogenous and exogenous mechanisms. Since AP sites can prevent replication and transcription, the cell contains systems for their identification and repair. AP endonuclease (APEX1 cleaves the phosphodiester backbone 5' to the AP site. The cleavage, a key step in the base excision repair pathway, is followed by nucleotide insertion and removal of the downstream deoxyribose moiety, performed most often by DNA polymerase beta (pol-beta. While yeast two-hybrid studies and electrophoretic mobility shift assays provide evidence for interaction of APEX1 and pol-beta, the specifics remain obscure. We describe a theoretical study designed to predict detailed interacting surfaces between APEX1 and pol-beta based on published co-crystal structures of each enzyme bound to DNA. Several potentially interacting complexes were identified by sliding the protein molecules along DNA: two with pol-beta located downstream of APEX1 (3' to the damaged site and three with pol-beta located upstream of APEX1 (5' to the damaged site. Molecular dynamics (MD simulations, ensuring geometrical complementarity of interfaces, enabled us to predict interacting residues and calculate binding energies, which in two cases were sufficient (approximately -10.0 kcal/mol to form a stable complex and in one case a weakly interacting complex. Analysis of interface behavior during MD simulation and visual inspection of interfaces allowed us to conclude that complexes with pol-beta at the 3'-side of APEX1 are those most likely to occur in vivo. Additional multiple sequence analyses of APEX1 and pol-beta in related organisms identified a set of correlated mutations of specific residues at the predicted interfaces. Based on these results, we propose that pol-beta in the open or closed conformation interacts and makes a stable interface with APEX1 bound to a cleaved abasic site on the 3' side. The method described here can be used for analysis in

  10. Double orifice mitral valve: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musić Ljilja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Double orifice mitrol valve (DOMV is a very rare congenital heart defect. Case report. We reported 20-year-old male referred to our center due to evaluation of his cardiologic status. He was operated on shortly after birth for a tracheoesophageal fistula. Accidentally, echocardiography examination at the age of 4 years revealed double orifice mitral valve (DOMV without the presence of mitral regurgitation, as well as mitral stenosis, with normal dimensions of all cardiac chambers. The patient was asymptomatic, even more he was a kick boxer. His physical finding was normal. Electrocardiography showed regular sinus rhythm, incomplete right bundle branch block. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE examination revealed the normal size of the left atrial, mitral leaflets were slightly more redundant. The left and right heart chambers, aorta, tricuspid valve and pulmonary artery valve were normal. During TTE examination on a short axis view two asymmetric mitral orifices were seen as a double mitral orifice through which we registered normal flow, without regurgitation and mitral stenosis. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE examination from the transgastric view at the level of mitral valve, showed 2 single asymmetric mitral orifices separated by fibrous tissue, mitral leaflet with a separate insertion of hordes for each orifice. Conclusion. The presented patient with DOMV is the only one recognized in our country. The case is interesting because during 16-year a follow-up period there were no functional changes despite the fact that he performed very demanded sport activities. This is very important because there is no information in the literature about that.

  11. Use of an rRNA probe and restriction endonuclease analysis to fingerprint Pasteurella multocida isolated from turkeys and wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snipes, K P; Hirsh, D C; Kasten, R W; Hansen, L M; Hird, D W; Carpenter, T E; McCapes, R H

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-five isolates of the bacterium Pasteurella multocida were characterized (fingerprinted) phenotypically and genotypically in order to compare the abilities of various techniques to differentiate strains for epidemiologic studies of fowl cholera. Isolates were obtained over a 16-month period from turkeys dying from fowl cholera (six outbreak flocks) and from wildlife captured on premises with a history of the disease. The characteristics compared included (i) serotype, (ii) subspecies, (iii) antibiogram, (iv) presence of plasmid DNA, (v) restriction endonuclease analysis patterns of whole-cell DNA, and (vi) ribotype. Ribotyping, a method of highlighting DNA restriction site heterogeneity by using an rRNA probe, worked well for differentiating the strains of P. multocida when the majority of the other techniques could not. Ribotyping results correlated directly with and confirmed results obtained from restriction endonuclease analysis. Ribotyping demonstrated the presence of up to three strains of P. multocida in one outbreak flock, recurrence of a single strain in five of the flocks over an 11-month period, and the presence of common strains in turkeys and wildlife on the premises. Images PMID:2768471

  12. Resolution of the EcoRII restriction endonuclease-DNA complex structure in solution using fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subach, Fedor; Kirsanova, Olga; Liquier, Jean; Gromova, Elizaveta S

    2008-12-01

    The X-ray structure for the type IIE EcoRII restriction endonuclease has been resolved [X.E. Zhou, Y. Wang, M. Reuter, M. Mucke, D.H. Kruger, E.J. Meehan and L. Chen. Crystal structure of type IIE restriction endonuclease EcoRII reveals an autoinhibition mechanism by a novel effector-binding fold. J. Mol. Biol. 335 (2004) 307-319.], but the structure of the R.EcoRII-DNA complex is still unknown. The aim of this article was to examine the structure of the pre-reactive R.EcoRII-DNA complex in solution by fluorescence spectroscopy. The structure for the R.EcoRII-DNA complex was resolved by determining the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between two fluorescent dyes, covalently attached near the EcoRII recognition sites, that were located at opposite ends of a lengthy two-site DNA molecule. Analysis of the FRET data from the two-site DNA revealed a likely model for the arrangement of the two EcoRII recognition sites relative to each other in the R.EcoRII-DNA complex in the presence of Ca(2+) ions. According to this model, the R.EcoRII binds the two-site DNA and forms a DNA loop in which the EcoRII recognition sites are 20+/-10 A distant to each other and situated at an angle of 70+/-10 degrees.

  13. Functional significance of protein assemblies predicted by the crystal structure of the restriction endonuclease BsaWI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamulaitis, Gintautas; Rutkauskas, Marius; Zaremba, Mindaugas; Grazulis, Saulius; Tamulaitiene, Giedre; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2015-09-18

    Type II restriction endonuclease BsaWI recognizes a degenerated sequence 5'-W/CCGGW-3' (W stands for A or T, '/' denotes the cleavage site). It belongs to a large family of restriction enzymes that contain a conserved CCGG tetranucleotide in their target sites. These enzymes are arranged as dimers or tetramers, and require binding of one, two or three DNA targets for their optimal catalytic activity. Here, we present a crystal structure and biochemical characterization of the restriction endonuclease BsaWI. BsaWI is arranged as an 'open' configuration dimer and binds a single DNA copy through a minor groove contacts. In the crystal primary BsaWI dimers form an indefinite linear chain via the C-terminal domain contacts implying possible higher order aggregates. We show that in solution BsaWI protein exists in a dimer-tetramer-oligomer equilibrium, but in the presence of specific DNA forms a tetramer bound to two target sites. Site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic experiments show that BsaWI is active as a tetramer and requires two target sites for optimal activity. We propose BsaWI mechanism that shares common features both with dimeric Ecl18kI/SgrAI and bona fide tetrameric NgoMIV/SfiI enzymes. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. A homing endonuclease and the 50-nt ribosomal bypass sequence of phage T4 constitute a mobile DNA cassette

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonocora, Richard P.; Zeng, Qinglu; Abel, Ethan V.; Shub, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Since its initial description more than two decades ago, the ribosome bypass (or “hop”) sequence of phage T4 stands out as a uniquely extreme example of programmed translational frameshifting. The gene for a DNA topoisomerase subunit of T4 has been split by a 1-kb insertion into two genes that retain topoisomerase function. A second 50-nt insertion, beginning with an in-phase stop codon, is inserted near the start of the newly created downstream gene 60. Instead of terminating at this stop codon, approximately half of the ribosomes skip 50 nucleotides and continue translation in a new reading frame. However, no functions, regulatory or otherwise, have been imputed for the truncated peptide that results from termination at codon 46 or for the bypass sequence itself. Moreover, how this unusual mRNA organization arose and why it is maintained have never been explained. We show here that a homing endonuclease (MobA) is encoded in the insertion that created gene 60, and the mobA gene together with the bypass sequence constitute a mobile DNA cassette. The bypass sequence provides protection against self-cleavage by the nuclease, whereas the nuclease promotes horizontal spread of the entire cassette to related bacteriophages. Group I introns frequently provide protection against self-cleavage by associated homing endonucleases. We present a scenario by which the bypass sequence, which is otherwise a unique genetic element, might have been derived from a degenerate group I intron. PMID:21930924

  15. Computational study of hydration at the TD damaged site of DNA in complex with repair enzyme T4 endonuclease V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinak, Miroslav [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-02-01

    An analysis of the distribution of water around DNA surface focusing on the role of the distribution of water molecules in the proper recognition of damaged site by repair enzyme T4 Endonuclease V was performed. The native DNA dodecamer, dodecamer with the thymine dimer (TD) and complex of DNA and part of repair enzyme T4 Endonuclease V were examined throughout the 500 ps of molecular dynamics simulation. During simulation the number of water molecules close to the DNA atoms and the residence time were calculated. There is an increase in number of water molecules lying in the close vicinity to TD if compared with those lying close to two native thymines (TT). Densely populated area with water molecules around TD is one of the factors detected by enzyme during scanning process. The residence time was found higher for molecule of the complex and the six water molecules were found occupying the stabile positions between the TD and catalytic center close to atoms P, C3' and N3. These molecules originate water mediated hydrogen bond network that contribute to the stability of complex required for the onset of repair process. (author)

  16. Double outlet right ventricle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007328.htm Double outlet right ventricle To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Double outlet right ventricle (DORV) is a heart disease that is ...

  17. Decrease in back strength in asymmetric trunk postures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, P.; Daanen, H. A M; Meijst, W. J.; Ligteringen, J.

    1992-01-01

    The extension force against resistance was recorded in 23 postures for 12 subjects to find explanations for the decrease in back strength in asymmetric postures. A reduction in muscle force in asymmetric postures was found up to 40%, but was strongly dependent on the plane in which asymmetry

  18. The Clustered, Regularly Interspaced, Short Palindromic Repeats-associated Endonuclease 9 (CRISPR/Cas9)-created MDM2 T309G Mutation Enhances Vitreous-induced Expression of MDM2 and Proliferation and Survival of Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yajian; Ma, Gaoen; Huang, Xionggao; D'Amore, Patricia A; Zhang, Feng; Lei, Hetian

    2016-07-29

    The G309 allele of SNPs in the mouse double minute (MDM2) promoter locus is associated with a higher risk of cancer and proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), but whether SNP G309 contributes to the pathogenesis of PVR is to date unknown. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated endonuclease (Cas) 9 from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9) can be harnessed to manipulate a single or multiple nucleotides in mammalian cells. Here we delivered SpCas9 and guide RNAs using dual adeno-associated virus-derived vectors to target the MDM2 genomic locus together with a homologous repair template for creating the mutation of MDM2 T309G in human primary retinal pigment epithelial (hPRPE) cells whose genotype is MDM2 T309T. The next-generation sequencing results indicated that there was 42.51% MDM2 G309 in the edited hPRPE cells using adeno-associated viral CRISPR/Cas9. Our data showed that vitreous induced an increase in MDM2 and subsequent attenuation of p53 expression in MDM2 T309G hPRPE cells. Furthermore, our experimental results demonstrated that MDM2 T309G in hPRPE cells enhanced vitreous-induced cell proliferation and survival, suggesting that this SNP contributes to the pathogenesis of PVR. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. The Clustered, Regularly Interspaced, Short Palindromic Repeats-associated Endonuclease 9 (CRISPR/Cas9)-created MDM2 T309G Mutation Enhances Vitreous-induced Expression of MDM2 and Proliferation and Survival of Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yajian; Ma, Gaoen; Huang, Xionggao; D'Amore, Patricia A.; Zhang, Feng; Lei, Hetian

    2016-01-01

    The G309 allele of SNPs in the mouse double minute (MDM2) promoter locus is associated with a higher risk of cancer and proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), but whether SNP G309 contributes to the pathogenesis of PVR is to date unknown. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated endonuclease (Cas) 9 from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9) can be harnessed to manipulate a single or multiple nucleotides in mammalian cells. Here we delivered SpCas9 and guide RNAs using dual adeno-associated virus-derived vectors to target the MDM2 genomic locus together with a homologous repair template for creating the mutation of MDM2 T309G in human primary retinal pigment epithelial (hPRPE) cells whose genotype is MDM2 T309T. The next-generation sequencing results indicated that there was 42.51% MDM2 G309 in the edited hPRPE cells using adeno-associated viral CRISPR/Cas9. Our data showed that vitreous induced an increase in MDM2 and subsequent attenuation of p53 expression in MDM2 T309G hPRPE cells. Furthermore, our experimental results demonstrated that MDM2 T309G in hPRPE cells enhanced vitreous-induced cell proliferation and survival, suggesting that this SNP contributes to the pathogenesis of PVR. PMID:27246850

  20. Double Outlet Right Ventricle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Right Ventricle Menu Topics Topics FAQs Double Outlet Right Ventricle Double outlet right ventricle (DORV) is a rare form of congenital heart disease. Article Info En español Double outlet right ventricle (DORV) is a rare form of congenital ...

  1. Asymmetric pair distribution functions in catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, B. S.; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2000-01-01

    of asymmetric pair distribution functions for nano-sized particles and how they influence the structural parameters obtained from the standard data analysis. An alternative method, which takes into account deviations from the Gaussian pair distribution function typically used in the analysis of EXAFS spectra......, will be described. The method is based on an analysis of the pair distribution functions derived from molecular dynamics simulations of small metal particles and its reliability is demonstrated by comparing structural parameters obtained from independent X-ray diffraction experiments.......The structural parameters, i.e., coordination numbers, bond distances and disorder obtained from the analysis of EXAFS spectra may sometimes be significantly influenced by errors introduced due to the inadequacy of the analysis method applied. Especially in the case of heterogeneous catalysts...

  2. Polyimides Derived from Novel Asymmetric Benzophenone Dianhydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Chun-Hua (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    This invention relates to the composition and processes for preparing thermoset polyimides derived from an asymmetric dianhydride, namely 2,3,3',4'-benzophenone dianhydride (a-BTDA) with at least one diamine, and a monofunctional terminal endcaps. The monofunctional terminating groups include 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride ester-acid derivatives, phenylethyl trimellitic anhydride (PETA) and its ester derivatives as well as 3-phenylethynylaniline. The process of polyimide composite comprises impregnating monomer reactants of dianhydride or its ester-acid derivatives, diamine and with monofunctional reactive endcaps into glass, carbon, quartz or synthetic fibers and fabrics, and then stack up into laminates and subsequently heated to between 150-375.degree. C. either at atmosphere or under pressure to promote the curing and crosslinking of the reactive endcaps to form a network of thermoset polyimides.

  3. Optical Nonreciprocity in Asymmetric Optomechanical Couplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheqi; Shi, Lei; Liu, Yi; Xu, Xinbiao; Zhang, Xinliang

    2015-03-01

    We propose an all-optical integrated nonreciprocal device on the optomechanical platform with a large nonreciprocal bandwidth and low operating power. The device is based on an asymmetric silicon coupler consisting of two branches. One of them is a conventional strip waveguide fixed on the substrate, and the other is a freestanding nanostring suspended above a groove in the substrate. When light is launched into the coupler, the optical gradient force between the freestanding nanostring and the underlying substrate leads to the deflection of the nanostring, and finally results in destruction of the initial phase-matching condition between the two branches. The suspended branch would achieve distinct deflections when light is incident from different ports. The simulation results show a nonreciprocal bandwidth of 13.1 nm with operating power of 390 μW. With the advantages of simple structure, low power consumption and large operating bandwidth, our work provides a promising solution for on-chip passive nonreciprocal device.

  4. Asymmetric adsorption in an open electrolytic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousiadi, S.; Lelidis, I.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the effect of adsorption-desorption phenomenon of ions in an asymmetric electrolytic cell at open circuit conditions. Our approach is based on the Poisson-Nernst-Planck theory for electrolytes and the kinetic model of Langmuir for the description of adsorption-desorption phenomena on the electrodes. When the electrodes are immersed into the solution, selective ion adsorption takes place. It is shown, that the selective ion adsorption is responsible for generating an electrical potential difference between the electrodes of the cell. The analytical expressions for the potential difference and for the charge distribution are calculated. Finally, the time evolution of the system is investigated and the relaxation times of the problem are deduced numerically.

  5. Bilateral asymmetrical traumatic sternoclavicular joint dislocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarrag, Mohammed K

    2012-11-01

    Unilateral and bilateral sternoclavicular joint (SCJ) dislocations are rare injuries. The difficulty in assessing this condition often leads to delay in diagnosis and treatment. We report a rare case of bilateral asymmetrical traumatic SCJ dislocations in a 45-year-old male. The right anterior SCJ dislocation was reduced in the emergency room (ER) and resulted in residual instability. The left posterior SCJ dislocation was asymptomatic and unnoticed for six months. It is important for ER physicians and orthopaedic surgeons to be able identify and treat this condition. All suspected SCJ dislocations should be evaluated by computed tomography (CT) scan for confirmation of the diagnosis and evaluation of both SCJs. Posterior SCJ dislocation is a potentially fatal injury and should not be overlooked due to the presence of other injuries. Surgical intervention is often necessary in acute and old cases.

  6. Bilateral Asymmetrical Traumatic Sternoclavicular Joint Dislocations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarrag, Mohammed K.

    2012-01-01

    Unilateral and bilateral sternoclavicular joint (SCJ) dislocations are rare injuries. The difficulty in assessing this condition often leads to delay in diagnosis and treatment. We report a rare case of bilateral asymmetrical traumatic SCJ dislocations in a 45-year-old male. The right anterior SCJ dislocation was reduced in the emergency room (ER) and resulted in residual instability. The left posterior SCJ dislocation was asymptomatic and unnoticed for six months. It is important for ER physicians and orthopaedic surgeons to be able identify and treat this condition. All suspected SCJ dislocations should be evaluated by computed tomography (CT) scan for confirmation of the diagnosis and evaluation of both SCJs. Posterior SCJ dislocation is a potentially fatal injury and should not be overlooked due to the presence of other injuries. Surgical intervention is often necessary in acute and old cases. PMID:23275851

  7. Asymmetrical Integration: Lessons from a Railway Empire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kate

    2015-01-01

    This article reexamines railway imperialism in Manchuria from the perspective of global network building. Through a case study of the Japanese-owned South Manchuria Railway Company (SMR), I trace how one railway empire used through traffic agreements to integrate Northeast Asian railways into a global network while at the same time installing itself as the necessary intermediary between European and Asian overland traffic. I argue that the SMR's pursuit of global reach and local dominance compels us to reconsider the traditional division of border-crossing railways into international and imperialist types, and instead to examine how border-crossing railways contributed to the uneven or "asymmetrical" integration of the global transportation infrastructure.

  8. Continuous monitoring of restriction endonuclease cleavage activity by universal molecular beacon light quenching coupled with real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaomin; Song, Chen; Zhao, Meiping; Li, Yuanzong

    2008-10-01

    We describe a method for sensitive monitoring of restriction endonuclease kinetics and activity by use of a universal molecular beacon (U-MB) coupled with real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The method is used to monitor the progress of DNA cleavage in a sealed reaction tube and offers more accurate and high-throughput detection. The template has a universal tail hybridized with the U-MB and the remaining sequence is complementary to one of the restriction endonuclease digestion products. The U-MB is replaced by the extension of digested product and the fluorescence quenches. With this concept, one universal fluorescence probe can be used in different enzyme analytical systems. In the work described here, homogenous assays were performed with the restriction endonucleases AluI, EcoRI, XhoI, and SacI at smoothly controlled temperature. Cleavage efficiencies were determined, and the potential applications of this method were discussed. Furthermore, the AluI and EcoRI cleavage reactions were monitored online at varying substrate concentrations at the molecular level, and K(m), V(max), and K(cat) values were calculated. The results suggest that U-MB monitoring of restriction endonuclease assays based on real-time PCR will be very useful for high-throughput, sensitive, and precise assays for enzyme activity screening and evolutionary biotechnology analysis.

  9. Microinjection of Micrococcus luteus UV-endonuclease restores UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis in cells of 9 xeroderma pigmentosum complementation groups.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.R. de Jonge; W. Vermeulen (Wim); W. Keijzer; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); D. Bootsma (Dirk)

    1985-01-01

    textabstractThe UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in cultured cells of excision-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation groups A through I was assayed after injection of Micrococcus luteus UV-endonuclease using glass microneedles. In all complementation groups a restoration of

  10. Comparison of the mismatch-specific endonuclease method and denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography for the identification of HBB gene mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chia-Cheng; Su, Yi-Ning; Lin, Chia-Yun; Chang, Yin-Fei; Chang, Chien-Hui; Cheng, Wen-Fang; Chen, Chi-An; Lee, Chien-Nan; Lin, Win-Li

    2008-01-01

    Background Beta-thalassemia is a common autosomal recessive hereditary disease in the Meditertanean, Asia and African areas. Over 600 mutations have been described in the beta-globin (HBB), of which more than 200 are associated with a beta-thalassemia phenotype. Results We used two highly-specific mutation screening methods, mismatch-specific endonuclease and denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography, to identify mutations in the HBB gene. The sensitivity and specificity of these two methods were compared. We successfully distinguished mutations in the HBB gene by the mismatch-specific endonuclease method without need for further assay. This technique had 100% sensitivity and specificity for the study sample. Conclusion Compared to the DHPLC approach, the mismatch-specific endonuclease method allows mutational screening of a large number of samples because of its speed, sensitivity and adaptability to semi-automated systems. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of using the mismatch-specific endonuclease method as a tool for mutation screening. PMID:18694524

  11. Comparison of the mismatch-specific endonuclease method and denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography for the identification of HBB gene mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Wen-Fang

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Beta-thalassemia is a common autosomal recessive hereditary disease in the Meditertanean, Asia and African areas. Over 600 mutations have been described in the beta-globin (HBB, of which more than 200 are associated with a beta-thalassemia phenotype. Results We used two highly-specific mutation screening methods, mismatch-specific endonuclease and denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography, to identify mutations in the HBB gene. The sensitivity and specificity of these two methods were compared. We successfully distinguished mutations in the HBB gene by the mismatch-specific endonuclease method without need for further assay. This technique had 100% sensitivity and specificity for the study sample. Conclusion Compared to the DHPLC approach, the mismatch-specific endonuclease method allows mutational screening of a large number of samples because of its speed, sensitivity and adaptability to semi-automated systems. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of using the mismatch-specific endonuclease method as a tool for mutation screening.

  12. Design of the influenza virus inhibitors targeting the PA endonuclease using 3D-QSAR modeling, side-chain hopping, and docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhihui; Zhang, Lijie; Fu, Haiyang; Wang, Zhonghua; Lin, Jianping

    2014-01-15

    With the emergence of drug resistance and the structural determination of the PA N-terminal domain (PAN), influenza endonucleases have become an attractive target for antiviral therapies for influenza infection. Here, we combined 3D-QSAR with side-chain hopping and molecular docking to produce novel structures as endonuclease inhibitors. First, a new molecular library was generated with side-chain hopping on an existing template molecule, L-742001, using an in-house fragment library that targets bivalent-cation-binding proteins. Then, the best 3D-QSAR model (AAAHR.500), with q(2)=0.76 and r(2)=0.97 from phase modeling, was constructed from 23 endonuclease inhibitors and validated with 17 test compounds. The AAAHR.500 model was then used to select effective candidates from the new molecular library. Combining 3D-QSAR with docking using Glide and Autodock, 13 compounds were considered the most likely candidate inhibitors. Docking studies showed that the binding modes of these compounds were consistent with the crystal structures of known inhibitors. These compounds could serve as potential endonuclease inhibitors for further biological activity tests. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. DNA recognition by the SwaI restriction endonuclease involves unusual distortion of an 8 base pair A:T-rich target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Betty W; Heiter, Daniel F; Lunnen, Keith D; Wilson, Geoffrey G; Stoddard, Barry L

    2017-02-17

    R.SwaI, a Type IIP restriction endonuclease, recognizes a palindromic eight base pair (bp) symmetric sequence, 5΄-ATTTAAAT-3΄, and cleaves that target at its center to generate blunt-ended DNA fragments. Here, we report three crystal structures of SwaI: unbound enzyme, a DNA-bound complex with calcium ions; and a DNA-bound, fully cleaved complex with magnesium ions. We compare these structures to two structurally similar ‘PD-D/ExK’ restriction endonucleases (EcoRV and HincII) that also generate blunt-ended products, and to a structurally distinct enzyme (the HNH endonuclease PacI) that also recognizes an 8-bp target site consisting solely of A:T base pairs. Binding by SwaI induces an extreme bend in the target sequence accompanied by un-pairing and re-ordering of its central A:T base pairs. This result is reminiscent of a more dramatic target deformation previously described for PacI, implying that long A:T-rich target sites might display structural or dynamic behaviors that play a significant role in endonuclease recognition and cleavage.

  14. Selection of DC voltage magnitude using Fibonacci series for new hybrid asymmetrical multilevel inverter with minimum PIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Banaei

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Multilevel inverters are suggested to obtain high quality output voltage. In this paper, a new hybrid configuration is proposed, obtained by cascading one four switches H-bridge cell with a family of multilevel inverters. In addition, by the use of specific sequence for value of DC sources named Fibonacci series, asymmetrical topology of proposed inverter is introduced. Main advantages are that proposed inverter has least Peak Inverse Voltage (PIV than other conventional multilevel converters in both symmetric and asymmetric modes. Also, this topology doubles the number of output levels using only one cascaded four switches H-bridge cell. The PCI-1716 DAQ using PC has been used to generate switching pulses in experimental results. For presenting valid performance of proposed configuration, simulation results carried out by MATLAB/SIMULINK software and the validity of the proposed multilevel inverter is verified by experimental results.

  15. Three-stage biochemical selection: cloning of prototype class IIS/IIC/IIG restriction endonuclease-methyltransferase TsoI from the thermophile Thermus scotoductus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowron, Piotr M; Vitkute, Jolanta; Ramanauskaite, Danute; Mitkaite, Goda; Jezewska-Frackowiak, Joanna; Zebrowska, Joanna; Zylicz-Stachula, Agnieszka; Lubys, Arvydas

    2013-08-06

    In continuing our research into the new family of bifunctional restriction endonucleases (REases), we describe the cloning of the tsoIRM gene. Currently, the family includes six thermostable enzymes: TaqII, Tth111II, TthHB27I, TspGWI, TspDTI, TsoI, isolated from various Thermus sp. and two thermolabile enzymes: RpaI and CchII, isolated from mesophilic bacteria Rhodopseudomonas palustris and Chlorobium chlorochromatii, respectively. The enzymes have several properties in common. They are large proteins (molecular size app. 120 kDa), coded by fused genes, with the REase and methyltransferase (MTase) in a single polypeptide, where both activities are affected by S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). They recognize similar asymmetric cognate sites and cleave at a distance of 11/9 nt from the recognition site. Thus far, we have cloned and characterised TaqII, Tth111II, TthHB27I, TspGWI and TspDTI. TsoI REase, which originate from thermophilic Thermus scotoductus RFL4 (T. scotoductus), was cloned in Escherichia coli (E. coli) using two rounds of biochemical selection of the T. scotoductus genomic library for the TsoI methylation phenotype. DNA sequencing of restriction-resistant clones revealed the common open reading frame (ORF) of 3348 bp, coding for a large polypeptide of 1116 aminoacid (aa) residues, which exhibited a high level of similarity to Tth111II (50% identity, 60% similarity). The ORF was PCR-amplified, subcloned into a pET21 derivative under the control of a T7 promoter and was subjected to the third round of biochemical selection in order to isolate error-free clones. Induction experiments resulted in synthesis of an app. 125 kDa protein, exhibiting TsoI-specific DNA cleavage. Also, the wild-type (wt) protein was purified and reaction optima were determined. Previously we identified and cloned the Thermus family RM genes using a specially developed method based on partial proteolysis of thermostable REases. In the case of TsoI the classic biochemical selection

  16. Three-stage biochemical selection: cloning of prototype class IIS/IIC/IIG restriction endonuclease-methyltransferase TsoI from the thermophile Thermus scotoductus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In continuing our research into the new family of bifunctional restriction endonucleases (REases), we describe the cloning of the tsoIRM gene. Currently, the family includes six thermostable enzymes: TaqII, Tth111II, TthHB27I, TspGWI, TspDTI, TsoI, isolated from various Thermus sp. and two thermolabile enzymes: RpaI and CchII, isolated from mesophilic bacteria Rhodopseudomonas palustris and Chlorobium chlorochromatii, respectively. The enzymes have several properties in common. They are large proteins (molecular size app. 120 kDa), coded by fused genes, with the REase and methyltransferase (MTase) in a single polypeptide, where both activities are affected by S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). They recognize similar asymmetric cognate sites and cleave at a distance of 11/9 nt from the recognition site. Thus far, we have cloned and characterised TaqII, Tth111II, TthHB27I, TspGWI and TspDTI. Results TsoI REase, which originate from thermophilic Thermus scotoductus RFL4 (T. scotoductus), was cloned in Escherichia coli (E. coli) using two rounds of biochemical selection of the T. scotoductus genomic library for the TsoI methylation phenotype. DNA sequencing of restriction-resistant clones revealed the common open reading frame (ORF) of 3348 bp, coding for a large polypeptide of 1116 aminoacid (aa) residues, which exhibited a high level of similarity to Tth111II (50% identity, 60% similarity). The ORF was PCR-amplified, subcloned into a pET21 derivative under the control of a T7 promoter and was subjected to the third round of biochemical selection in order to isolate error-free clones. Induction experiments resulted in synthesis of an app. 125 kDa protein, exhibiting TsoI-specific DNA cleavage. Also, the wild-type (wt) protein was purified and reaction optima were determined. Conclusions Previously we identified and cloned the Thermus family RM genes using a specially developed method based on partial proteolysis of thermostable REases. In the case of TsoI the

  17. Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease 1 Is the Essential Nuclease during Immunoglobulin Class Switch Recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Masani, Shahnaz; Han, Li; Yu, Kefei

    2013-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch recombination (CSR) is initiated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) that catalyzes numerous DNA cytosine deaminations within switch regions. The resulting uracils are processed by uracil base excision and/or mismatch repair enzymes that ultimately generate switch region DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Uracil glycosylase 2 (UNG2) is required for CSR, most likely by removing uracils to generate abasic sites. Although it is presumed that the apurinic...

  18. Electron localization in an asymmetric double quantum well nanostructure (II): Improvement via Fano-type interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedi, H. R.

    2014-10-01

    This letter explores the one dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) position dependent probe absorption spectrum in a four-subband semiconductor quantum-well (QW) system in presence of Fano-type interference. Compared with obtained results for the maximal detecting probability of electron in Hamedi (2014. Physica B 440, 83) which was 50%, in this paper, we show that the detecting probability and precision of electron localization in one period can be significantly improved and reaches to 100% at the origin of coordinates, through proper tuning the strength of Fano-type interference. Also, the influence of other controlling parameters on the localization behavior of the QW system is discussed. The obtained results may provide some new possibilities for technological applications in laser cooling or nanolithography via high-precision and high-resolution electron localization.

  19. Effect of spacer dielectric engineering on Asymmetric Source Underlapped Double Gate MOSFET using Gate Stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Ankush; Dasgupta, Arpan; Das, Rahul; Kundu, Atanu; Sarkar, Chandan K.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the use of high-k spacers in a source underlapped nMOSFET is explored. The effects have been reported by varying the dielectric constant of the spacer from 3.9 to 22.5 and the study includes a comparison of analog parameters such as transconductance, transconductance generation factor, intrinsic gain, and RF parameters such as parasitic capacitances, resistances, and cut-off frequency. The RF parameters are calculated using the Non-Quasi Static (NQS) Approach which is required for sub 20 nm technology node. The device with high-k spacers features an improvement of 33% in DIBL, significantly increases the on current and reducing the off current by 60%. However, there is a slight compromise in the RF performance of the device, owing to an increase in intrinsic capacitance by about 0.35 fF. The Voltage Transfer Characteristics (VTC) and AC gain analysis of the circuit is also done in this paper. The circuit performance using single stage amplifier with the proposed device as the driver MOS has been analysed. High-k spacers also account for 19% improvement in small signal gain when used in a single stage amplifier circuit.

  20. Cross-linking of bromodeoxyuridine-substituted oligonucleotides to the EcoRI and EcoRV restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfes, H; Fliess, A; Winkler, F; Pingoud, A

    1986-09-01

    We have synthesized several self-complementary oligodeoxynucleotides which contain bromodeoxyuridine in various positions within and outside of the recognition sequence for the EcoRI and EcoRV restriction endonucleases. These oligodeoxynucleotides are cleaved in the presence of Mg2+ by their respective enzyme. Upon irradiation by long-wavelength ultraviolet light and in the absence of Mg2+ they are cross-linked in low yield to their enzymes, forming 1:1 and 1:2 (oligodeoxynucleotide:enzyme subunit) adducts. Cross-linking occurs with both specific and non-specific complexes. With EcoRI the site of cross-linking was determined to be at or close to Met-137, i.e. in a region of the molecule implicated by other studies from our laboratory [Scholtissek et al. (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 2228-2234] in the binding and cleavage of the substrate.

  1. I-ApeI: a novel intron-encoded LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease from the archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Norimichi; Morinaga, Yayoi; Shirai, Nobuaki; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2005-01-01

    Over 50 introns have been reported in archaeal rRNA genes (rDNAs), a subset of which nests putative homing endonuclease (HEase) genes. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a novel archaeal LAGLIDADG-type HEase, I-ApeI, encoded by the ApeK1.S908 intron within the 16S rDNA of Aeropyrum pernix K1. I-ApeI consists of 222 amino acids and harbors two LAGLIDADG-like sequences. It recognizes the 20 bp non-palindromic sequence 5′-GCAAGGCTGAAAC↓TTAAAGG and cleaves target DNA to produce protruding tetranucleotide 3′ ends. Either Mn2+ or Co2+ can be substituted for Mg2+ as a cofactor in the cleavage reaction. Of the 20 bases within the minimal recognition site, 7 are essential for cleavage and are located at positions proximal to the cleavage sites. PMID:16049020

  2. I-ApeKI [corrected]: a novel intron-encoded LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease from the archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Norimichi; Morinaga, Yayoi; Shirai, Nobuaki; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2005-07-26

    Over 50 introns have been reported in archaeal rRNA genes (rDNAs), a subset of which nests putative homing endonuclease (HEase) genes. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a novel archaeal LAGLIDADG-type HEase, I-ApeKI [corrected], encoded by the ApeK1.S908 intron within the 16S rDNA of Aeropyrum pernix K1. I-ApeKI [corrected] consists of 222 amino acids and harbors two LAGLIDADG-like sequences. It recognizes the 20 bp non-palindromic sequence 5'-GCAAGGCTGAAAC downward arrowTTAAAGG and cleaves target DNA to produce protruding tetranucleotide 3' ends. Either Mn2+ or Co2+ can be substituted for Mg2+ as a cofactor in the cleavage reaction. Of the 20 bases within the minimal recognition site, 7 are essential for cleavage and are located at positions proximal to the cleavage sites.

  3. MmoSTI restriction endonuclease, isolated from Morganella morganii infecting a tropical moth, Actias selene, cleaving 5'-|CCNGG-3' sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowron, Marta A; Zebrowska, Joanna; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz; Skowron, Piotr M

    2016-02-01

    A type II restriction endonuclease, MmoSTI, from the pathogenic bacterium Morganella morganii infecting a tropical moth, Actias selene, has been detected and biochemically characterized, as a potential etiological differentiation factor. The described REase recognizes interrupted palindromes, i.e., 5'-CCNGG-3' sequences and cleaves DNA leaving 5-nucleotide (nt) long, single-stranded (ss), 5'-cohesive ends, which was determined by three complementary methods: (i) cleavage of custom and standard DNA substrates, (ii) run-off sequencing of cleavage products, and (iii) shotgun cloning and sequencing of bacteriophage lambda (λ) DNA digested with MmoSTI. MmoSTI, the first 5'-CCNGG-3' REase characterized from M. morganii, is a neoschizomer of ScrFI, which cleaves DNA leaving 1-nt long, ss, 5'-cohesive ends. It is a high-frequency cutter and can be isolated from easily cultured bacteria, thus it can potentially serve as a tool for DNA manipulations.

  4. Polymerase synthesis of DNAs bearing vinyl groups in the major groove and their cleavage by restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mačková, Michaela; Pohl, Radek; Hocek, Michal

    2014-10-13

    DNA molecules containing 5-vinyluracil, 5-vinylcytosine, or 7-deaza-7-vinyladenine were prepared by polymerase incorporation of the corresponding vinyl-modified 2'-deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, and the influence of the vinyl group in the major groove of DNA on the cleavage by diverse type II restriction endonucleases (REs) was studied. The presence of 5-vinyluracil was tolerated by most of the REs, whereas only some REs were able to cleave sequences containing 7-deaza-7-vinyladenine. The enzyme ScaI was found to cleave DNA containing 5-vinylcytosine efficiently but not DNA containing the related 5-ethynylcytosine. All other REs failed to cleave sequences containing any cytosine modifications. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Double field theory on group manifolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenhagen, Ralph; Hassler, Falk; Lüst, Dieter

    2015-02-01

    A new version of double field theory (DFT) is derived for the exactly solvable background of an in general left-right asymmetric WZW model in the large level limit. This generalizes the original DFT that was derived via expanding closed string field theory on a torus up to cubic order. The action and gauge transformations are derived for fluctuations around the generalized group manifold background up to cubic order, revealing the appearance of a generalized Lie derivative and a corresponding C-bracket upon invoking a new version of the strong constraint. In all these quantities a background dependent covariant derivative appears reducing to the partial derivative for a toroidal background. This approach sheds some new light on the conceptual status of DFT, its background (in-)dependence and the up-lift of non-geometric Scherk-Schwarz reductions.

  6. The DNA repair endonuclease XPG interacts directly and functionally with the WRN helicase defective in Werner syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trego, Kelly S.; Chernikova, Sophia B.; Davalos, Albert R.; Perry, J. Jefferson P.; Finger, L. David; Ng, Cliff; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Yannone, Steven M.; Tainer, John A.; Campisi, Judith; Cooper, Priscilla K.

    2011-04-20

    XPG is a structure-specific endonuclease required for nucleotide excision repair (NER). XPG incision defects result in the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum, whereas truncating mutations of XPG cause the severe postnatal progeroid developmental disorder Cockayne syndrome. We show that XPG interacts directly with WRN protein, which is defective in the premature aging disorder Werner syndrome, and that the two proteins undergo similar sub-nuclear redistribution in S-phase and co-localize in nuclear foci. The co-localization was observed in mid- to late-S-phase, when WRN moves from nucleoli to nuclear foci that have been shown to contain protein markers of both stalled replication forks and telomeric proteins. We mapped the interaction between XPG and WRN to the C-terminal domains of each and show that interaction with the C-terminal domain of XPG strongly stimulates WRN helicase activity. WRN also possesses a competing DNA single-strand annealing activity that, combined with unwinding, has been shown to coordinate regression of model replication forks to form Holliday junction/chicken foot intermediate structures. We tested whether XPG stimulated WRN annealing activity and found that XPG itself has intrinsic strand annealing activity that requires the unstructured R- and C-terminal domains, but not the conserved catalytic core or endonuclease activity. Annealing by XPG is cooperative, rather than additive, with WRN annealing. Taken together, our results suggest a novel function for XPG in S-phase that is at least in part carried out coordinately with WRN, and which may contribute to the severity of the phenotypes that occur upon loss of XPG.

  7. Positioning the 5'-flap junction in the active site controls the rate of flap endonuclease-1-catalyzed DNA cleavage

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Bo

    2018-02-09

    Flap endonucleases catalyze cleavage of single-stranded DNA flaps formed during replication, repair and recombination, and are therefore essential for genome processing and stability. Recent crystal structures of DNA-bound human flap endonuclease (hFEN1) offer new insights into how conformational changes in the DNA and hFEN1 may facilitate the reaction mechanism. For example, previous biochemical studies of DNA conformation performed under non-catalytic conditions with Ca2+ have suggested that base unpairing at the 5\\'-flap:template junction is an important step in the reaction, but the new structural data suggest otherwise. To clarify the role of DNA changes in the kinetic mechanism, we measured a series of transient steps - from substrate binding to product release - during the hFEN1-catalyzed reaction in the presence of Mg2+. We found that while hFEN1 binds and bends DNA at a fast, diffusion-limited rate, much slower Mg2+-dependent conformational changes in DNA around the active site are subsequently necessary and rate-limiting for 5\\'-flap cleavage. These changes are reported overall by fluorescence of 2-aminopurine at the 5\\'-flap:template junction, indicating that local DNA distortion (e.g., disruption of base stacking observed in structures), associated with positioning the 5\\'-flap scissile phosphodiester bond in the hFEN1 active site, controls catalysis. hFEN1 residues with distinct roles in the catalytic mechanism, including those binding metal ions (Asp-34, Asp-181), steering the 5\\'-flap through the active site and binding the scissile phosphate (Lys-93, Arg-100), and stacking against the base 5\\' to the scissile phosphate (Tyr-40), all contribute to these rate-limiting conformational changes, ensuring efficient and specific cleavage of 5\\'-flaps.

  8. Crystal structure of the R-protein of the multisubunit ATP-dependent restriction endonuclease NgoAVII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamulaitiene, Giedre; Silanskas, Arunas; Grazulis, Saulius; Zaremba, Mindaugas; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2014-12-16

    The restriction endonuclease (REase) NgoAVII is composed of two proteins, R.NgoAVII and N.NgoAVII, and shares features of both Type II restriction enzymes and Type I/III ATP-dependent restriction enzymes (see accompanying paper Zaremba et al., 2014). Here we present crystal structures of the R.NgoAVII apo-protein and the R.NgoAVII C-terminal domain bound to a specific DNA. R.NgoAVII is composed of two domains: an N-terminal nucleolytic PLD domain; and a C-terminal B3-like DNA-binding domain identified previously in BfiI and EcoRII REases, and in plant transcription factors. Structural comparison of the B3-like domains of R.NgoAVII, EcoRII, BfiI and the plant transcription factors revealed a conserved DNA-binding surface comprised of N- and C-arms that together grip the DNA. The C-arms of R.NgoAVII, EcoRII, BfiI and plant B3 domains are similar in size, but the R.NgoAVII N-arm which makes the majority of the contacts to the target site is much longer. The overall structures of R.NgoAVII and BfiI are similar; however, whilst BfiI has stand-alone catalytic activity, R.NgoAVII requires an auxiliary cognate N.NgoAVII protein and ATP hydrolysis in order to cleave DNA at the target site. The structures we present will help formulate future experiments to explore the molecular mechanisms of intersubunit crosstalk that control DNA cleavage by R.NgoAVII and related endonucleases. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Homogenous asymmetric hydrogenation: Recent trends and industrial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Andreas M; Zanotti-Gerosa, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in the field of homogeneous asymmetric hydrogenation are presented in this review. An analysis of academic literature published in the past 2 years highlights significant advances in the asymmetric hydrogenation of functional groups that previously were considered difficult to hydrogenate, as well as the emergence of novel concepts in catalysis, such as the use of non-traditional metals, phosphine-free catalysts and chiral counterions. An analysis of industry publications from 2009 and 2010 highlights more established applications of asymmetric hydrogenation reactions; these are discussed with a particular focus on practical aspects, such as catalyst selection, experimental conditions and the removal of metal residues.

  10. Coping with Asymmetric Channel Losses in CSMA/CA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paramanathan, Achuthan; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani; Fitzek, Frank

    2013-01-01

    /CA is very sensitive to asymmetric channel losses caused by channel conditions. Leveraging this analysis, we present an adaptive channel priority protocol that copes with asymmetric channel losses while being compatible with CSMA/CA. We implement this protocol and perform real-life measurements that (i......) confirm the sensitivity of the CSMA/CA scheme in real implementations, and (ii) shows that our adaptive protocol provides a simple, yet potent mechanism to cope with asymmetric channel losses and ultimately to enhance end-to-end throughput in high-load scenarios....

  11. Generic approach for synthesizing asymmetric nanoparticles and nanoassemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yugang; Hu, Yongxing

    2015-05-26

    A generic route for synthesis of asymmetric nanostructures. This approach utilizes submicron magnetic particles (Fe.sub.3O.sub.4--SiO.sub.2) as recyclable solid substrates for the assembly of asymmetric nanostructures and purification of the final product. Importantly, an additional SiO.sub.2 layer is employed as a mediation layer to allow for selective modification of target nanoparticles. The partially patched nanoparticles are used as building blocks for different kinds of complex asymmetric nanostructures that cannot be fabricated by conventional approaches. The potential applications such as ultra-sensitive substrates for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) have been included.

  12. Asymmetric Branching in Biological Resource Distribution Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummer, Alexander Byers

    There is a remarkable relationship between an organism's metabolic rate (resting power consumption) and the organism's mass. It may be a universal law of nature that an organism's resting metabolic rate is proportional to its mass to the power of 3/4. This relationship, known as Kleiber's Law, appears to be valid for both plants and animals. This law is important because it implies that larger organisms are more efficient than smaller organisms, and knowledge regarding metabolic rates are essential to a multitude of other fields in ecology and biology. This includes modeling the interactions of many species across multiple trophic levels, distributions of species abundances across large spatial landscapes, and even medical diagnostics for respiratory and cardiovascular pathologies. Previous models of vascular networks that seek to identify the origin of metabolic scaling have all been based on the unrealistic assumption of perfectly symmetric branching. In this dissertation I will present a theory of asymmetric branching in self-similar vascular networks (published by Brummer et al. in [9]). The theory shows that there can exist a suite of vascular forms that result in the often observed 3/4 metabolic scaling exponent of Kleiber's Law. Furthermore, the theory makes predictions regarding major morphological features related to vascular branching patterns and their relationships to metabolic scaling. These predictions are suggestive of evolutionary convergence in vascular branching. To test these predictions, I will present an analysis of real mammalian and plant vascular data that shows: (i) broad patterns in vascular networks across entire animal kingdoms and (ii) within these patterns, plant and mammalian vascular networks can be uniquely distinguished from one another (publication in preparation by Brummer et al.). I will also present results from a computational study in support of point (i). Namely, that asymmetric branching may be the optimal strategy to

  13. Transition Metal-Catalyzed Regioselective Asymmetric Mono-hydrogenation of Dienes and Polyenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margarita, Cristiana; Rabten, Wangchuk; Andersson, Pher G

    2018-02-28

    Organic compounds containing multiple C=C bonds are attractive substrates for catalytic asymmetric hydrogenation. The full saturation of prochiral double bonds, controlling the creation of two or more stereocenters in one step, is obviously a remarkable goal. However, another fascinating and useful option is to selectively introduce a new defined stereogenic center, while leaving other double bonds untouched. Thus, the retained functionalities can be further exploited in synthesis. Examples of regio- and enantioselective mono-hydrogenations of polyolefins are highlighted in this Concept article, and are divided according to the nature of the reduced double bond and the transition-metal catalyst used. Alkenes bearing coordinating functional groups are often preferentially hydrogenated by Rh- and Ru-complexes, while the more recently developed Ir-based catalysts promote the selective saturation on alkyl-substituted olefins. Relevant applications of this effective methodology in the synthesis of natural products are included to demonstrate its value in organic synthesis. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Asymmetric interlimb role-sharing in mechanical power during human sideways locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Daichi; Fujii, Keisuke; Yoshioka, Shinsuke; Isaka, Tadao; Kouzaki, Motoki

    2017-05-24

    Sideways movement at a wide variety of speeds is required in daily life and sports. The purpose of this study was to identify the characteristics of asymmetry in power output between lower limbs during sideways gait patterns. Seven healthy men performed steady-state sideways locomotion at various speeds. The mechanical external power of each limb was calculated and decomposed to the lateral and vertical components by the center of mass velocity and ground reaction force. We acquired data from 126 steps of sideways walking at 0.44-1.21m/s, and from 41 steps of sideways galloping at 1.04-3.00m/s. The results showed asymmetric power production between the limbs during sideways locomotion. During sideways walking, the trailing limb predominantly produced positive external power and the leading limb produced predominantly negative external power, and these amplitudes increased with step speed. In contrast, during sideways galloping, negative and subsequent positive power production was observed in both limbs. These differences in asymmetric interlimb role-sharing were mainly due to the vertical component. During sideways galloping, the trailing limb absorbs vertical power produced by the leading limb due to the longer flight time. This characteristic of vertical power production in the trailing limb may explain the presence of a double-support phase, which is not observed during forward running, even at high speeds. Our results will help to elucidate the asymmetric movements of the limbs in lateral directions at various speeds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Energy capture and storage in asymmetrically multistable modular structures inspired by skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidambi, Narayanan; Harne, Ryan L.; Wang, K. W.

    2017-08-01

    The remarkable versatility and adaptability of skeletal muscle that arises from the assembly of its nanoscale cross-bridges into micro-scale assemblies known as sarcomeres provides great inspiration for the development of advanced adaptive structures and material systems. Motivated by the capability of cross-bridges to capture elastic strain energy to improve the energetic efficiency of sudden movements and repeated motions, and by models of cross-bridge power stroke motions and sarcomere contractile behaviors that incorporate asymmetric, bistable potential energy landscapes, this research develops and studies modular mechanical structures that trap and store energy in higher-energy configurations. Modules exhibiting tailorable asymmetric bistability are first designed and fabricated, revealing how geometric parameters influence the asymmetry of the resulting double-well energy landscapes. These experimentally-observed characteristics are then investigated with numerical and analytical methods to characterize the dynamics of asymmetrically bistable modules. The assembly of such modules into greater structures generates complex, multi-well energy landscapes with stable system configurations exhibiting different quantities of stored elastic potential energy. Dynamic analyses illustrate the ability of these structures to capture a portion of the initial kinetic energy due to impulsive excitations as recoverable strain potential energy, and reveal how stiffness parameters, damping, and the presence of thermal noise in micro- and nano-scale applications influence energy capture behaviors. The insights gained could foster the development of advanced structural/material systems inspired by skeletal muscle, including actuators that effectively capture, store, and release energy, as well as adaptive, robust, and reusable armors and protective devices.

  16. Asymmetric Supercapacitors Based on Reduced Graphene Oxide with Different Polyoxometalates as Positive and Negative Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubal, Deepak P; Chodankar, Nilesh R; Vinu, Ajayan; Kim, Do-Heyoung; Gomez-Romero, Pedro

    2017-07-10

    Nanofabrication using a "bottom-up" approach of hybrid electrode materials into a well-defined architecture is essential for next-generation miniaturized energy storage devices. This paper describes the design and fabrication of reduced graphene oxide (rGO)/polyoxometalate (POM)-based hybrid electrode materials and their successful exploitation for asymmetric supercapacitors. First, redox active nanoclusters of POMs [phosphomolybdic acid (PMo12 ) and phosphotungstic acid (PW12 )] were uniformly decorated on the surface of rGO nanosheets to take full advantage of both charge-storing mechanisms (faradaic from POMs and electric double layer from rGO). The as-synthesized rGO-PMo12 and rGO-PW12 hybrid electrodes exhibited impressive electrochemical performances with specific capacitances of 299 (269 mF cm-2 ) and 370 F g-1 (369 mF cm-2 ) in 1 m H2 SO4 as electrolyte at 5 mA cm-2 . An asymmetric supercapacitor was then fabricated using rGO-PMo12 as the positive and rGO-PW12 as the negative electrode. This rGO-PMo12 ∥rGO-PW12 asymmetric cell could be successfully cycled in a wide voltage window up to 1.6 V and hence exhibited an excellent energy density of 39 Wh kg-1 (1.3 mWh cm-3 ) at a power density of 658 W kg-1 (23 mW cm-3 ). © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. The double identity of linguistic doubling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berent, Iris; Bat-El, Outi; Brentari, Diane; Dupuis, Amanda; Vaknin-Nusbaum, Vered

    2016-11-29

    Does knowledge of language consist of abstract principles, or is it fully embodied in the sensorimotor system? To address this question, we investigate the double identity of doubling (e.g., slaflaf, or generally, XX; where X stands for a phonological constituent). Across languages, doubling is known to elicit conflicting preferences at different levels of linguistic analysis (phonology vs. morphology). Here, we show that these preferences are active in the brains of individual speakers, and they are demonstrably distinct from sensorimotor pressures. We first demonstrate that doubling in novel English words elicits divergent percepts: Viewed as meaningless (phonological) forms, doubling is disliked (e.g., slaflaf Language, and their capacity to do so depends on the structure of their spoken language (English vs. Hebrew). These results demonstrate that linguistic preferences doubly dissociate from sensorimotor demands: A single stimulus can elicit diverse percepts, yet these percepts are invariant across stimulus modality--for speech and signs. These conclusions are in line with the possibility that some linguistic principles are abstract, and they apply broadly across language modality.

  18. Asymmetrized tris(hydroxymethyl)methane as a precursor of N- and O-containing 6-membered heterocycles through ring-closing metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfi, Luca; Guanti, Giuseppe; Paravidino, Monica; Riva, Renata

    2005-05-07

    A novel synthetic application of asymmetrized tris(hydroxymethyl)methane (THYM), obtained in both enantiomeric forms in high e.e. via a chemoenzymatic procedure, is described. Starting from the common precursor , N- and O-containing 6-membered heterocycles have been prepared exploiting ring-closing metathesis as the key step. Possible elaborations of the double bond in and have been explored and, in the case of , conversion into the glycosidase inhibitor isofagomine has been achieved.

  19. Project Half Double

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svejvig, Per; Ehlers, Michael; Adland, Karoline Thorp

    activities carried out within the framework of the projects. The formal part of Project Half Double was initiated in June 2015. We started out by developing, refining and testing the Half Double methodology on seven pilot projects in the first phase of the project, which will end June 2016. The current...... many of the key performance indicators associated with them can be evaluated (Grundfos and Siemens Wind Power). In addition to the current status of delivering impact faster for the seven pilot projects, it is important to highlight that Project Half Double phase 1 has planted many seeds in the pilot...... organisations concerning project methodology and beyond. The many learning points from each pilot project show that Project Half Double has left its clear footprint in the pilot organisations, and that the Half Double methodology has evolved and developed very much during Project Half Double phase 1....

  20. Computation in Dynamically Bounded Asymmetric Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutishauser, Ueli; Slotine, Jean-Jacques; Douglas, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Previous explanations of computations performed by recurrent networks have focused on symmetrically connected saturating neurons and their convergence toward attractors. Here we analyze the behavior of asymmetrical connected networks of linear threshold neurons, whose positive response is unbounded. We show that, for a wide range of parameters, this asymmetry brings interesting and computationally useful dynamical properties. When driven by input, the network explores potential solutions through highly unstable ‘expansion’ dynamics. This expansion is steered and constrained by negative divergence of the dynamics, which ensures that the dimensionality of the solution space continues to reduce until an acceptable solution manifold is reached. Then the system contracts stably on this manifold towards its final solution trajectory. The unstable positive feedback and cross inhibition that underlie expansion and divergence are common motifs in molecular and neuronal networks. Therefore we propose that very simple organizational constraints that combine these motifs can lead to spontaneous computation and so to the spontaneous modification of entropy that is characteristic of living systems. PMID:25617645