WorldWideScience

Sample records for asv integrase proteins

  1. Coevolutionary Analysis Identifies Protein–Protein Interaction Sites between HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase and Integrase

    OpenAIRE

    Arachchilage, Madara Hetti; Piontkivska, Helen

    2016-01-01

    The replication of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) requires reverse transcription of the viral RNA genome and integration of newly synthesized pro-viral DNA into the host genome. This is mediated by the viral proteins reverse transcriptase (RT) and integrase (IN). The formation and stabilization of the pre-integration complex (PIC), which is an essential step for reverse transcription, nuclear import, chromatin targeting, and subsequent integration, involves direct and indirect modes o...

  2. LEDGF dominant interference proteins demonstrate prenuclear exposure of HIV-1 integrase and synergize with LEDGF depletion to destroy viral infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Anne M; Saenz, Dyana T; Morrison, James; Hu, Chunling; Peretz, Mary; Poeschla, Eric M

    2011-04-01

    Target cell overexpression of the integrase binding domain (IBD) of LEDGF/p75 (LEDGF) inhibits HIV-1 replication. The mechanism and protein structure requirements for this dominant interference are unclear. More generally, how and when HIV-1 uncoating occurs postentry is poorly defined, and it is unknown whether integrase within the evolving viral core becomes accessible to cellular proteins prior to nuclear entry. We used LEDGF dominant interference to address the latter question while characterizing determinants of IBD antiviral activity. Fusions of green fluorescent protein (GFP) with multiple C-terminal segments of LEDGF inhibited HIV-1 replication substantially, but minimal chimeras of either polarity (GFP-IBD or IBD-GFP) were most effective. Combining GFP-IBD expression with LEDGF depletion was profoundly antiviral. CD4(+) T cell lines were rendered virtually uninfectable, with single-cycle HIV-1 infectivity reduced 4 logs and high-input (multiplicity of infection = 5.0) replication completely blocked. We restricted GFP-IBD to specific intracellular locations and found that antiviral activity was preserved when the protein was confined to the cytoplasm or directed to the nuclear envelope. The life cycle block triggered by the cytoplasm-restricted protein manifested after nuclear entry, at the level of integration. We conclude that integrase within the viral core becomes accessible to host cell protein interaction in the cytoplasm. LEDGF dominant interference and depletion impair HIV-1 integration at distinct postentry stages. GFP-IBD may trigger premature or improper integrase oligomerization. PMID:21270171

  3. Changes in the accessibility of the HIV-1 Integrase C-terminus in the presence of cellular proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Zanta-Boussif Maria-Antonietta; Bucher Stéphanie; Benkhelifa-Ziyyat Sofia; Pasquet Julie; Danos Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Following entry, uncoating, and reverse transcription, a number of cellular proteins become associated with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) pre-integration complex (PIC). With the goal of obtaining reagents for the analysis of the HIV-1 PIC composition and localisation, we have constructed functional integrase (IN) and matrix (MA) proteins that can be biotinylated during virus production and captured using streptavidin-coated beads. Results Although the lab...

  4. LEDGF Dominant Interference Proteins Demonstrate Prenuclear Exposure of HIV-1 Integrase and Synergize with LEDGF Depletion To Destroy Viral Infectivity ▿ ‡

    OpenAIRE

    Meehan, Anne M.; Saenz, Dyana T.; Morrison, James; Hu, Chunling; Peretz, Mary; Poeschla, Eric M.

    2011-01-01

    Target cell overexpression of the integrase binding domain (IBD) of LEDGF/p75 (LEDGF) inhibits HIV-1 replication. The mechanism and protein structure requirements for this dominant interference are unclear. More generally, how and when HIV-1 uncoating occurs postentry is poorly defined, and it is unknown whether integrase within the evolving viral core becomes accessible to cellular proteins prior to nuclear entry. We used LEDGF dominant interference to address the latter question while chara...

  5. B′-protein phosphatase 2A is a functional binding partner of delta-retroviral integrase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maertens, Goedele N.

    2016-01-01

    To establish infection, a retrovirus must insert a DNA copy of its RNA genome into host chromatin. This reaction is catalysed by the virally encoded enzyme integrase (IN) and is facilitated by viral genus-specific host factors. Herein, cellular serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is identified as a functional IN binding partner exclusive to δ-retroviruses, including human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2) and bovine leukaemia virus (BLV). PP2A is a heterotrimer composed of a scaffold, catalytic and one of any of four families of regulatory subunits, and the interaction is specific to the B′ family of the regulatory subunits. B′-PP2A and HTLV-1 IN display nuclear co-localization, and the B′ subunit stimulates concerted strand transfer activity of δ-retroviral INs in vitro. The protein–protein interaction interface maps to a patch of highly conserved residues on B′, which when mutated render B′ incapable of binding to and stimulating HTLV-1 and -2 IN strand transfer activity. PMID:26657642

  6. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 capsid protein is a substrate of the retroviral proteinase while integrase is resistant toward proteolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The capsid protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 was observed to undergo proteolytic cleavage in vitro when viral lysate was incubated in the presence of dithiothreitol at acidic pH. Purified HIV-1 capsid protein was also found to be a substrate of the viral proteinase in a pH-dependent manner; acidic pH (<7) was necessary for cleavage, and decreasing the pH toward 4 increased the degree of processing. Based on N-terminal sequencing of the cleavage products, the capsid protein was found to be cleaved at two sites, between residues 77 and 78 as well as between residues 189 and 190. Oligopeptides representing these cleavage sites were also cleaved at the expected peptide bonds. The presence of cyclophilin A decreased the degree of capsid protein processing. Unlike the capsid protein, integrase was found to be resistant toward proteolysis in good agreement with its presence in the preintegration complex

  7. Changes in the accessibility of the HIV-1 Integrase C-terminus in the presence of cellular proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zanta-Boussif Maria-Antonietta

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following entry, uncoating, and reverse transcription, a number of cellular proteins become associated with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1 pre-integration complex (PIC. With the goal of obtaining reagents for the analysis of the HIV-1 PIC composition and localisation, we have constructed functional integrase (IN and matrix (MA proteins that can be biotinylated during virus production and captured using streptavidin-coated beads. Results Although the labelled C-terminus allows for the sensitive detection of virion-associated IN, it becomes inaccessible in the presence of cellular proteins. This masking is not dependent on the nature of the tag and does not occur with the tagged MA. It was not observed either with an IN mutant unable to interact with LEDGF/p75, or when LEDGF/p75 was depleted from cells. Conclusion Our observation suggests that a structural rearrangement or oligomerization of the IN protein occurs during the early steps of infection and that this process is related to the presence of LEDGF/p75.

  8. HIV-2 integrase variation in integrase inhibitor-naive adults in Senegal, West Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey S Gottlieb

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antiretroviral therapy for HIV-2 infection is hampered by intrinsic resistance to many of the drugs used to treat HIV-1. Limited studies suggest that the integrase inhibitors (INIs raltegravir and elvitegravir have potent activity against HIV-2 in culture and in infected patients. There is a paucity of data on genotypic variation in HIV-2 integrase that might confer intrinsic or transmitted INI resistance. METHODS: We PCR amplified and analyzed 122 HIV-2 integrase consensus sequences from 39 HIV-2-infected, INI-naive adults in Senegal, West Africa. We assessed genetic variation and canonical mutations known to confer INI-resistance in HIV-1. RESULTS: No amino acid-altering mutations were detected at sites known to be pivotal for INI resistance in HIV-1 (integrase positions 143, 148 and 155. Polymorphisms at several other HIV-1 INI resistance-associated sites were detected at positions 72, 95, 125, 154, 165, 201, 203, and 263 of the HIV-2 integrase protein. CONCLUSION: Emerging genotypic and phenotypic data suggest that HIV-2 is susceptible to the new class of HIV integrase inhibitors. We hypothesize that intrinsic HIV-2 integrase variation at "secondary" HIV-1 INI-resistance sites may affect the genetic barrier to HIV-2 INI resistance. Further studies will be needed to assess INI efficacy as part of combination antiretroviral therapy in HIV-2-infected patients.

  9. Hamming distance geometry of a protein conformational space. Application to the clustering of a 4 ns molecular dynamics trajectory of the HIV-1 integrase catalytic core

    CERN Document Server

    Laboulais, C; Le Bret, M; Gabarro-Arpa, J; Laboulais, Cyril; Ouali, Mohammed; Bret, Marc Le; Gabarro-Arpa, Jacques

    2001-01-01

    Protein structures can be encoded into binary sequences, these are used to define a Hamming distance in conformational space: the distance between two different molecular conformations is the number of different bits in their sequences. Each bit in the sequence arises from a partition of conformational space in two halves. Thus, the information encoded in the binary sequences is also used to characterize the regions of conformational space visited by the system. We apply this distance and their associated geometric structures, to the clustering and analysis of conformations sampled during a 4 ns molecular dynamics simulation of the HIV-1 integrase catalytic core. The cluster analysis of the simulation shows a division of the trajectory into two segments of 2.6 and 1.4 ns length, which are qualitatively different: the data points to the fact that equilibration is only reached at the end of the first segment. Some length of the paper is devoted to compare the Hamming distance to the r.m.s. deviation measure. Th...

  10. Multifunctional facets of retrovirus integrase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duane; P; Grandgenett; Krishan; K; Pandey; Sibes; Bera; Hideki; Aihara

    2015-01-01

    The retrovirus integrase(IN) is responsible for integration of the reverse transcribed linear c DNA into the host DNA genome. First, IN cleaves a dinucleotide from the 3’ OH blunt ends of the viral DNA exposing the highly conserved CA sequence in the recessed ends. IN utilizes the 3’ OH ends to catalyze the concerted integration of the two ends into opposite strands of the cellular DNA producing 4 to 6 bp staggered insertions, depending on the retrovirus species. The staggered ends are repaired by host cell machinery that results in a permanent copy of the viral DNA in the cellular genome. Besides integration, IN performs other functions in the replication cycle of several studied retroviruses. The proper organization of IN within the viral internal core is essential for the correct maturation of the virus. IN plays a major role in reverse transcription by interacting directly with the reverse transcriptase and by binding to the viral capsid protein and a cellular protein. Recruitment of several other host proteins into the viral particle are also promoted by IN. IN assists with the nuclear transport of the preintegration complex across the nuclear membrane. With several retroviruses, IN specifically interacts with different host protein factors that guide the preintegration complex to preferentially integrate the viral genome into specific regions of the host chromosomal target. Human gene therapy using retrovirus vectors is directly affected by the interactions of IN with these host factors. Inhibitors directed against the human immunodeficiency virus(HIV) IN bind within the active site of IN containing viral DNA ends thus preventing integration and subsequent HIV/AIDS.

  11. Multifunctional facets of retrovirus integrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandgenett, Duane P; Pandey, Krishan K; Bera, Sibes; Aihara, Hideki

    2015-08-26

    The retrovirus integrase (IN) is responsible for integration of the reverse transcribed linear cDNA into the host DNA genome. First, IN cleaves a dinucleotide from the 3' OH blunt ends of the viral DNA exposing the highly conserved CA sequence in the recessed ends. IN utilizes the 3' OH ends to catalyze the concerted integration of the two ends into opposite strands of the cellular DNA producing 4 to 6 bp staggered insertions, depending on the retrovirus species. The staggered ends are repaired by host cell machinery that results in a permanent copy of the viral DNA in the cellular genome. Besides integration, IN performs other functions in the replication cycle of several studied retroviruses. The proper organization of IN within the viral internal core is essential for the correct maturation of the virus. IN plays a major role in reverse transcription by interacting directly with the reverse transcriptase and by binding to the viral capsid protein and a cellular protein. Recruitment of several other host proteins into the viral particle are also promoted by IN. IN assists with the nuclear transport of the preintegration complex across the nuclear membrane. With several retroviruses, IN specifically interacts with different host protein factors that guide the preintegration complex to preferentially integrate the viral genome into specific regions of the host chromosomal target. Human gene therapy using retrovirus vectors is directly affected by the interactions of IN with these host factors. Inhibitors directed against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) IN bind within the active site of IN containing viral DNA ends thus preventing integration and subsequent HIV/AIDS. PMID:26322168

  12. Integrase and integration: biochemical activities of HIV-1 integrase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deprez Eric

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Integration of retroviral DNA is an obligatory step of retrovirus replication because proviral DNA is the template for productive infection. Integrase, a retroviral enzyme, catalyses integration. The process of integration can be divided into two sequential reactions. The first one, named 3'-processing, corresponds to a specific endonucleolytic reaction which prepares the viral DNA extremities to be competent for the subsequent covalent insertion, named strand transfer, into the host cell genome by a trans-esterification reaction. Recently, a novel specific activity of the full length integrase was reported, in vitro, by our group for two retroviral integrases (HIV-1 and PFV-1. This activity of internal cleavage occurs at a specific palindromic sequence mimicking the LTR-LTR junction described into the 2-LTR circles which are peculiar viral DNA forms found during viral infection. Moreover, recent studies demonstrated the existence of a weak palindromic consensus found at the integration sites. Taken together, these data underline the propensity of retroviral integrases for binding symmetrical sequences and give perspectives for targeting specific sequences used for gene therapy.

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase: effect on viral replication of mutations at highly conserved residues.

    OpenAIRE

    Cannon, P M; Wilson, W; Byles, E; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1994-01-01

    Sequence comparisons of the integrase (IN) proteins from different retroviruses have identified several highly conserved residues. We have introduced mutations at 16 of these sites into the integrase gene of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and analyzed the phenotypes of the resulting viruses. The viruses were all normal for p24 content and reverse transcriptase activity. In addition, all of the mutants could infect T-cell lines and undergo reverse transcription, as assessed by PCR analysi...

  14. Developing a Dynamic Pharmacophore Model for HIV-1 Integrase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the first receptor-based pharmacophore model for HIV-1 integrase. The development of ''dynamic'' pharmacophore models is a new method that accounts for the inherent flexibility of the active site and aims to reduce the entropic penalties associated with binding a ligand. Furthermore, this new drug discovery method overcomes the limitation of an incomplete crystal structure of the target protein. A molecular dynamics (MD) simulation describes the flexibility of the uncomplexed protein. Many conformational models of the protein are saved from the MD simulations and used in a series of multi-unit search for interacting conformers (MUSIC) simulations. MUSIC is a multiple-copy minimization method, available in the BOSS program; it is used to determine binding regions for probe molecules containing functional groups that complement the active site. All protein conformations from the MD are overlaid, and conserved binding regions for the probe molecules are identified. Those conserved binding regions define the dynamic pharmacophore model. Here, the dynamic model is compared to known inhibitors of the integrase as well as a three-point, ligand-based pharmacophore model from the literature. Also, a ''static'' pharmacophore model was determined in the standard fashion, using a single crystal structure. Inhibitors thought to bind in the active site of HIV-1 integrase fit the dynamic model but not the static model. Finally, we have identified a set of compounds from the Available Chemicals Directory that fit the dynamic pharmacophore model, and experimental testing of the compounds has confirmed several new inhibitors

  15. Developing a dynamic pharmacophore model for HIV-1 integrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, H A; Masukawa, K M; Rubins, K; Bushman, F D; Jorgensen, W L; Lins, R D; Briggs, J M; McCammon, J A

    2000-06-01

    We present the first receptor-based pharmacophore model for HIV-1 integrase. The development of "dynamic" pharmacophore models is a new method that accounts for the inherent flexibility of the active site and aims to reduce the entropic penalties associated with binding a ligand. Furthermore, this new drug discovery method overcomes the limitation of an incomplete crystal structure of the target protein. A molecular dynamics (MD) simulation describes the flexibility of the uncomplexed protein. Many conformational models of the protein are saved from the MD simulations and used in a series of multi-unit search for interacting conformers (MUSIC) simulations. MUSIC is a multiple-copy minimization method, available in the BOSS program; it is used to determine binding regions for probe molecules containing functional groups that complement the active site. All protein conformations from the MD are overlaid, and conserved binding regions for the probe molecules are identified. Those conserved binding regions define the dynamic pharmacophore model. Here, the dynamic model is compared to known inhibitors of the integrase as well as a three-point, ligand-based pharmacophore model from the literature. Also, a "static" pharmacophore model was determined in the standard fashion, using a single crystal structure. Inhibitors thought to bind in the active site of HIV-1 integrase fit the dynamic model but not the static model. Finally, we have identified a set of compounds from the Available Chemicals Directory that fit the dynamic pharmacophore model, and experimental testing of the compounds has confirmed several new inhibitors. PMID:10841789

  16. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Employs the Cellular Dynein Light Chain 1 Protein for Reverse Transcription through Interaction with Its Integrase Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Jayappa, Kallesh Danappa; Ao, Zhujun; Wang, Xiaoxia; Mouland, Andrew J.; Shekhar, Sudhanshu; Yang, Xi; Yao, Xiaojian

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined the requirement for host dynein adapter proteins such as dynein light chain 1 (DYNLL1), dynein light chain Tctex-type 1 (DYNLT1), and p150Glued in early steps of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. We found that the knockdown (KD) of DYNLL1, but not DYNLT1 or p150Glued, resulted in significantly lower levels of HIV-1 reverse transcription in cells. Following an attempt to determine how DYNLL1 could impact HIV-1 reverse transcription, we detected...

  17. Identification of Residues in the C-terminal Domain of HIV-1 Integrase That Mediate Binding to the Transportin-SR2 Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Houwer, Stephanie; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Thys, Wannes; Taltynov, Oliver; Zmajkovicova, Katarina; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger

    2012-01-01

    Transportin-SR2 (TRN-SR2 and TNPO3) is a cellular cofactor of HIV replication that has been implicated in the nuclear import of HIV. TRN-SR2 was originally identified in a yeast two-hybrid screen as an interaction partner of HIV integrase (IN) and in two independent siRNA screens as a cofactor of viral replication. We have now studied the interaction of TRN-SR2 and HIV IN in molecular detail and identified the TRN-SR2 interacting regions of IN. A weak interaction with the catalytic core domain (CCD) and a strong interaction with the C-terminal domain (CTD) of IN were detected. By dissecting the catalytic core domain (CCD) of IN into short structural fragments, we identified a peptide (INIP1, amino acids 170EHLKTAVQMAVFIHNFKRKGGI191) retaining the ability to interact with TRN-SR2. By dissecting the C-terminal domain (CTD) of IN, we could identify two interacting peptides (amino acids 214QKQITKIQNFRVYYR228 and 262RRKVKIIRDYGK273) that come together in the CTD tertiary structure to form an exposed antiparallel β-sheet. Through site-specific mutagenesis, we defined the following sets of amino acids in IN as important for the interaction with TRN-SR2: Phe-185/Lys-186/Arg-187/Lys-188 in the CCD and Arg-262/Arg-263/Lys-264 and Lys-266/Arg-269 in the CTD. An HIV-1 strain carrying K266A/R269A in IN was replication-defective due to a block in reverse transcription, confounding the study of nuclear import. Insight into the IN/TRN-SR2 interaction interface is necessary to guide drug discovery efforts targeting the nuclear entry step of replication. PMID:22872638

  18. In vitro selection of G-rich RNA aptamers that target HIV-1 integrase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Aptamers that interact with various HIV-1 proteins,such as reverse transcriptase,Rev,Tat protein,and nuclear capsule protein,have been prepared through SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by ex-ponential enrichment) technique. However,there are few reports about the DNA or RNA aptamers that target HIV-1 integrase. In this investigation,we selected alternative RNA aptamers specific for the HIV-1 integrase by using a different binding buffer containing 10 mmol·L-1 MgCl2 and 100 mmol·L-1 KCl. Aptamer IN1,IN2,IN3 had similar and the highest Kd values from 145 to 239 nmol·L-1. Structural studies showed that they formed similar stem-loop structure. Deletion of any stem structure resulted in diminished affinity. In addition,structure probing study with antisense DNA indicated that the stem-loop structure in the random region was critical for integrase binding. Although aptamer IN1 failed to form G-quartet structure,it might directly interact with the DDE motif of integrase,which is the virus DNA-binding site,because G-quadruplex T40214 competitively inhibited the interaction between IN1 and integrase. Together,this study generated a novel RNA aptamer IN1,which could be useful in basic research and anti-HIV drug screening.

  19. HIV-2 Integrase Variation in Integrase Inhibitor-Naïve Adults in Senegal, West Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Geoffrey S Gottlieb; Smith, Robert A.; Dia Badiane, Ndeye Mery; Ba, Selly; Stephen E Hawes; Toure, Macoumba; Starling, Alison K.; Traore, Fatou; Sall, Fatima; Cherne, Stephen L.; Stern, Joshua; Kim G Wong; Lu, Paul; Kim, Moon; Dana N Raugi

    2011-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral therapy for HIV-2 infection is hampered by intrinsic resistance to many of the drugs used to treat HIV-1. Limited studies suggest that the integrase inhibitors (INIs) raltegravir and elvitegravir have potent activity against HIV-2 in culture and in infected patients. There is a paucity of data on genotypic variation in HIV-2 integrase that might confer intrinsic or transmitted INI resistance. Methods We PCR amplified and analyzed 122 HIV-2 integrase consensus sequenc...

  20. Dolutegravir (S/GSK1349572) Exhibits Significantly Slower Dissociation than Raltegravir and Elvitegravir from Wild-Type and Integrase Inhibitor-Resistant HIV-1 Integrase-DNA Complexes▿†

    OpenAIRE

    Hightower, Kendra E.; Wang, RuoLan; DeAnda, Felix; Johns, Brian A.; Weaver, Kurt; Shen, Yingnian; Tomberlin, Ginger H.; Carter, H. Luke; Broderick, Timothy; Sigethy, Scott; Seki, Takahiro; KOBAYASHI, Masanori; Underwood, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    The integrase inhibitor (INI) dolutegravir (DTG; S/GSK1349572) has significant activity against HIV-1 isolates with raltegravir (RAL)- and elvitegravir (ELV)-associated resistance mutations. As an initial step in characterizing the different resistance profiles of DTG, RAL, and ELV, we determined the dissociation rates of these INIs with integrase (IN)-DNA complexes containing a broad panel of IN proteins, including IN substitutions corresponding to signature RAL and ELV resistance mutations....

  1. Inhibition of HIV-1 Integrase gene expression by 10-23 DNAzyme

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nirpendra Singh; Atul Ranjan; Souvik Sur; Ramesh Chandra; Vibha Tandon

    2012-07-01

    HIV Integrase (IN) is an enzyme that is responsible for the integration of the proviral genome into the human genome, and this integration step is the first step of the virus hijacking the human cell machinery for its propagation and replication. 10-23 DNAzyme has the potential to suppress gene expressions through sequence-specific mRNA cleavage. We have designed three novel DNAzymes, DIN54, DIN116, and DIN152, against HIV-1 Integrase gene using Mfold software and evaluated them for target site cleavage activity on the in vitro transcribed mRNA. All DNAzymes were tested for its inhibition of expression of HIV Integrase protein in the transiently transfected cell lines. DIN116 and DIN152 inhibited IN-EGFP expression by 80% and 70% respectively.

  2. Prevalence of SOS-mediated control of integron integrase expression as an adaptive trait of chromosomal and mobile integrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cambray Guillaume

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integrons are found in hundreds of environmental bacterial species, but are mainly known as the agents responsible for the capture and spread of antibiotic-resistance determinants between Gram-negative pathogens. The SOS response is a regulatory network under control of the repressor protein LexA targeted at addressing DNA damage, thus promoting genetic variation in times of stress. We recently reported a direct link between the SOS response and the expression of integron integrases in Vibrio cholerae and a plasmid-borne class 1 mobile integron. SOS regulation enhances cassette swapping and capture in stressful conditions, while freezing the integron in steady environments. We conducted a systematic study of available integron integrase promoter sequences to analyze the extent of this relationship across the Bacteria domain. Results Our results showed that LexA controls the expression of a large fraction of integron integrases by binding to Escherichia coli-like LexA binding sites. In addition, the results provide experimental validation of LexA control of the integrase gene for another Vibrio chromosomal integron and for a multiresistance plasmid harboring two integrons. There was a significant correlation between lack of LexA control and predicted inactivation of integrase genes, even though experimental evidence also indicates that LexA regulation may be lost to enhance expression of integron cassettes. Conclusions Ancestral-state reconstruction on an integron integrase phylogeny led us to conclude that the ancestral integron was already regulated by LexA. The data also indicated that SOS regulation has been actively preserved in mobile integrons and large chromosomal integrons, suggesting that unregulated integrase activity is selected against. Nonetheless, additional adaptations have probably arisen to cope with unregulated integrase activity. Identifying them may be fundamental in deciphering the uneven distribution of

  3. In vitro selection of G-rich RNA aptamers that target HIV-1 integrase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU YingChun; ZHANG Yan; YE GuoZhu; YANG ZhenJun; ZHANG LiangRen; ZHANG LiHe

    2008-01-01

    Aptamers that interact with various HIV-1 proteins, such as reverse transcriptase, Rev, Tat protein, and nuclear capsule protein, have been prepared through SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by ex-ponential enrichment) technique. However, there are few reports about the DNA or RNA aptamers that target HIV-1 integrase. In this investigation, we selected alternative RNA aptamers specific for the HIV-1 Aptamer IN1, IN2, IN3 had similar and the highest Kd values from 145 to 239 nmol. L-1. Structural studies showed that they formed similar stem-loop structure. Deletion of any stem structure resulted in diminished affinity. In addition, structure probing study with antisense DNA indicated that the stem-loop structure in the random region was critical for integrase binding. Although aptamer IN1 failed to form G-quartet structure, it might directly interact with the DDE motif of integrase, which is the virus DNA-binding site, because G-quadruplex T40214 competitively inhibited the interaction between IN1 and integrase. Together, this study generated a novel RNA aptamer IN1, which could be useful in basic research and anti-HIV drug screening.

  4. Use of Integrase-Minus Lentiviral Vector for Transient Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Azadeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Lentivirus-derived vectors are among the most promising viral vectors for gene therapy which is currently available, but their use in clinical practice is limited due to associated risk of insertional mutagenesis. Gene targeting is an ideal method for gene therapy, but it has low efficiency in comparison to viral vector methods. In this study, we are going to design and construct an integrase-minus lentiviral vector. This vector is suitable for transient expression of gene and gene targeting with viral vector.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, three missense mutations were induced in the catalytic domain of Integrase gene in the pLP1 plasmid and resulted D64V, D116A and E152G changes in the amino acid sequence through site directed mutagenesis. The pLenti6.2-GW/EmGFP transfer vector, associated with native and mutated packaging mix, was transfected into 293T cell line. In order to titer the lentivirus stock, the viruses were harvested. Finally, the viruses transduced into COS-7 cell line to assess green fluorescent protein (GFP gene expression by a fluorescence microscopy.Results: Recombinant and wild lentiviruses titer was about 5~8×106 transducing units/ml in COS-7 cell line. The number of GFP-positive cells transduced with native viruses was decreased slightly during two weeks after viral transduction. In contrast, in the case of integrase-minus viruses, a dramatic decrease in the number of GFP positive cells was observed.Conclusion: This study was conducted to overcome the integration of lentiviral genome into a host genome. Nonintegrating lentiviral vectors can be used for transient gene expression and gene targeting if a Target gene cassette is placed in the lentivirus gene structure. This combination method decreases disadvantages of both processes, such as random integration of lentiviruses and low efficiency of gene targeting.

  5. Integrase of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Snášel, Jan; Krejčík, Zdeněk; Jenčová, Věra; Rosenberg, Ivan; Ruml, Tomáš; Alexandratos, J.; Gustchina, A.; Pichová, Iva

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 272, č. 1 (2005), s. 203-216. ISSN 1742-464X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4055304 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : integrase * Mason-Pfizer monkey virus * HIV-1 Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  6. Cloning, Expression, and In Vitro Functional Activity Assay of phiC31 Integrase cDNA in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hadi Sekhavati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of present study was cloning and expression of phiC31 integrase cDNA in a bacterial expression vector. Thus, an intra molecular assay vector was applied to show in vitro activity of recombinant protein.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, phiC31 cDNA was subcloned into a prokaryotic expression vector and transformed into E.coli Bl21 (DE3. Recombinant phiC31 integrase was purified form the bacterial cell lysates and its activity was verified by an in vitro functional assessment.Results: Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE of the purifi ed phiC31 integrase confirmed the size of protein (70 kDa. Finally, the functionality of purified phiC31 integrase was verified.Conclusion: The results of this study indicated that the purified integrase has a great potential application for in vitro site-specific integration.

  7. Raltegravir: first in class HIV integrase inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zelalem Temesgen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Zelalem Temesgen1, Dawd S Siraj21Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2East Carolina University Greenville, NC, USAAbstract: On October 16, 2007, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA approved raltegravir for treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 infection in combination with other antiretroviral agents in treatment-experienced adult patients who have evidence of viral replication and HIV-1 strains resistant to multiple antiretroviral agents. Raltegravir is first in a novel class of antiretroviral drugs known as integrase inhibitors. It has demonstrated potent anti HIV activity in both antiretroviral treatment-naïve and experienced patients. The most common adverse events reported with raltegravir during phase 2 and 3 clinical trials were diarrhea, nausea, and headache. Laboratory abnormalities include mild elevations in liver transaminases and creatine phosphokinase.Keywords: raltegravir, HIV, antiretroviral agents, integrase inhibitors

  8. HIV-1 integrase inhibitors that compete with the target DNA substrate define a unique strand transfer conformation for integrase

    OpenAIRE

    Espeseth, Amy S.; Felock, Peter; Wolfe, Abigail; Witmer, Marc; Grobler, Jay; Anthony, Neville; Egbertson, Melissa; Melamed, Jeffrey Y.; Young, Steve; Hamill, Terence; Cole, James L.; Hazuda, Daria J.

    2000-01-01

    Diketo acids such as L-731,988 are potent inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase that inhibit integration and viral replication in cells. These compounds exhibit the unique ability to inhibit the strand transfer activity of integrase in the absence of an effect on 3′ end processing. To understand the reasons for this distinct inhibitory profile, we developed a scintillation proximity assay that permits analysis of radiolabeled inhibitor binding and integrase function. High-...

  9. Cloning, Expression, and in vitro Functional Activity Assay of phiC31 Integrase cDNA in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Hadi Sekhavati; Mojtaba Tahmoorespur; Kamran Ghaedi; Kianoush Dormiani, Pharm; Mohammad Reza Nassiri; Yahya Khazaie; Mahboubeh Foruzanfar; Morteza Hosseini; Mohammad Hossein Nasr Esfahani

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of present study was cloning and expression of phiC31 integrase cDNA in a bacterial expression vector. Thus, an intra molecular assay vector was applied to show in vitro activity of recombinant protein. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, phiC31 cDNA was subcloned into a prokaryotic expression vector and transformed into E.coli Bl21 (DE3). Recombinant phiC31 integrase was purified form the bacterial cell lysates and its activity was verified by an in vitro fu...

  10. Primary resistance to integrase strand-transfer inhibitors in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casadellà, M; van Ham, P M; Noguera-Julian, M;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to define the natural genotypic variation of the HIV-1 integrase gene across Europe for epidemiological surveillance of integrase strand-transfer inhibitor (InSTI) resistance. METHODS: This was a multicentre, cross-sectional study within the European...

  11. Tight regulation of the intS gene of the KplE1 prophage: a new paradigm for integrase gene regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaël Panis

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Temperate phages have the ability to maintain their genome in their host, a process called lysogeny. For most, passive replication of the phage genome relies on integration into the host's chromosome and becoming a prophage. Prophages remain silent in the absence of stress and replicate passively within their host genome. However, when stressful conditions occur, a prophage excises itself and resumes the viral cycle. Integration and excision of phage genomes are mediated by regulated site-specific recombination catalyzed by tyrosine and serine recombinases. In the KplE1 prophage, site-specific recombination is mediated by the IntS integrase and the TorI recombination directionality factor (RDF. We previously described a sub-family of temperate phages that is characterized by an unusual organization of the recombination module. Consequently, the attL recombination region overlaps with the integrase promoter, and the integrase and RDF genes do not share a common activated promoter upon lytic induction as in the lambda prophage. In this study, we show that the intS gene is tightly regulated by its own product as well as by the TorI RDF protein. In silico analysis revealed that overlap of the attL region with the integrase promoter is widely encountered in prophages present in prokaryotic genomes, suggesting a general occurrence of negatively autoregulated integrase genes. The prediction that these integrase genes are negatively autoregulated was biologically assessed by studying the regulation of several integrase genes from two different Escherichia coli strains. Our results suggest that the majority of tRNA-associated integrase genes in prokaryotic genomes could be autoregulated and that this might be correlated with the recombination efficiency as in KplE1. The consequences of this unprecedented regulation for excessive recombination are discussed.

  12. Intraarterial calcium stimulation (ASVS) for pancreatic insulinoma: comparison of preoperative localization procedures; Der Kalziumstimulationstest (ASVS) bei Insulinomen des Pankreas: Vergleich mit der bildgebenden Lokalisationsdiagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchhoff, T.D.; Frericks, B.; Galanski, M.; Chavan, A. [Abteilung fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany); Merkesdal, S. [Abt. fuer Rheumatologie, AG Gesundheitsoekonomie und Epidemiologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany); Brabant, G. [Abteilung fuer Gastroenterologie, Hepatologie und Endokrinologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany); Scheumann, G. [Abteilung fuer Viszeral- und Transplantationschirurgie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany)

    2003-04-01

    Evaluation of clinical relevance of the arterial stimulation procedure with venous sampling (ASVS) in the preoperative localization of insulinoma. Thirteen patients with endogenous hyperinsulinism underwent preoperative transabdominal ultrasound (US), helical CT (CT), MRI, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), and angiography (DSA) in conjunction with the ASVS-test for the detection of insulinoma. The results were compared with intraoperative findings, intraoperative ultrasound (IOUS) and histology. Sensitivity was as follows: US 8%, MRI 27%, CT 46%, EUS 50%,DSA 69%,and ASVS 92%.Intraoperative palpation and IOUS yielded a sensitivity of 77%. In 3 patients the tumors were neither palpable nor detectable by IOUS, the mode of resection was based on preoperative diagnostics.The ASVS procedure as a functional test was superior to all other modalities for the preoperative tumor detection. The ASVS was the most sensitive diagnostic modality. It should especially be considered in terms of health economical aspects when CT or MRI do not yield conclusive results. (orig.) [German] Bestimmung des Stellenwertes des arteriellen Stimulationstests mit venoeser Blutentnahme (ASVS) zur praeoperativen Lokalisation von Insulinomen.Methodik Dreizehn Patienten mit endogenem Hyperinsulinismus wurden bei nichtkonklusiver externer Vordiagnostik praeoperativ mittels transabdominellem Ultraschall (US), Spiral-CT (CT),MRT, endoskopischem Ultraschall (EUS), digitaler Subtraktionsangiographie (DSA) in Verbindung mit dem ASVS-Test untersucht. Die Resultate wurden mit intraoperativen Befunden und den histologischen Ergebnissen korreliert.Ergebnisse Die Sensitivitaeten betrugen fuer US 8%,MRT 27%, CT 46%, EUS 50%,DAS 69% und ASVS 92%.Die intraoperative Palpation und Ultraschall (IOUS) erzielten eine Sensitvitaet von 77%.Bei 3 Patienten war das Insulinom intraoperativ weder palpabel noch durch IOUS lokalisierbar, die Resektion erfolgte anhand der praeoperativen Diagnostik. Der ASVS-Test als funktionelles

  13. The hunt for HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lataillade, Max; Kozal, Michael J

    2006-07-01

    Currently, there are three distinct mechanistic classes of antiretrovirals: inhibitors of the HIV- 1 reverse transcriptase and protease enzymes and inhibitors of HIV entry, including receptor and coreceptor binding and cell fusion. A new drug class that inhibits the HIV-1 integrase enzyme (IN) is in development and may soon be available in the clinic. IN is an attractive drug target because it is essential for a stable and productive HIV-1 infection and there is no mammalian homologue of IN. Inhibitors of integrase enzyme (INI) block the integration of viral double-stranded DNA into the host cell's chromosomal DNA. HIV-1 integration has many potential steps that can be inhibited and several new compounds that target specific integration steps have been identified by drug developers. Recently, two INIs, GS-9137 and MK-0518, demonstrated promising early clinical trial results and have been advanced into later stage trials. In this review, we describe how IN facilitates HIV-1 integration, the needed enzyme cofactors, and the resultant byproducts created during integration. Furthermore, we review the different INIs under development, their mechanism of actions, site of IN inhibition, potency, resistance patterns, and discuss the early clinical trial results. PMID:16839248

  14. Outer domains of integrase within retroviral intasomes are dispensible for catalysis of DNA integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Lin, Shiqiang; Craigie, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Retroviral DNA integration is mediated by nucleoprotein complexes (intasomes) comprising a pair of viral DNA ends synapsed by a tetramer of integrase. Current integrase inhibitors act on intasomes rather than free integrase protein. Structural and functional studies of intasomes are essential to understand their mechanism of action and how the virus can escape by mutation. To date, prototype foamy virus (PFV) is the only retrovirus for which high-resolution structures of intasomes have been determined. In the PFV intasome structure, only the core domains of the outer subunits are ordered; the N-terminal domain, C-terminal domain, and N-terminal extension domain are disordered. Are these "missing domains" required for function or are they dispensable? We have devised a strategy to assemble "hetero-intasomes" in which the outer domains are not present as a tool to assess the functional role of the missing domains for catalysis of integration. We find that the disordered domains of outer subunits are not required for intasome assembly or catalytic activity as catalytic core domains can substitute for the outer subunits in the case of both PFV and HIV-1 intasomes. PMID:26537415

  15. Detection of integron integrase genes on King George Island, Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vernica Antelo; Hctor Romero; Silvia Batista

    2015-01-01

    The presence and diversity of class 1 integrase gene (intI) sequences were evaluated by PCR using previously designed primers. Two clone libraries were constructed from DNA in sediment and microbial mat samples collected on Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, Antarctica.The libraries constructed from samples collected at Halfthree Point (HP) and Norma Cove (NC) contained 62 and 36 partial intI sequences, respectively. These sequences clustered into 10 different groups with <95% amino acid identity. Alignment of the deduced amino acid sequences with those from recognized integron-encoded integrases demonstrated the presence of highly conserved motifs characteristic of intI integrases. The HP library contained 42 nucleotide sequences identical to the class 1 intI gene found in a collection of trimethoprim-resistant (Tmpr) Antarctic Enterobacter sp. isolates, previously collected in the same area. These integrons, located on plasmids, had a genetic organization similar to that of pKOX105 from Klebsiella oxytoca. The 20 remaining HP and NC library sequences were similar to integrase sequences previously determined in a metagenomic analysis of environmental samples. We have demonstrated the presence of integron integrase genes in Antarctic sediment samples. About half these genes were very similar to the class 1 integrons found in human-associated microbiota, suggesting that they originated from human-dominated ecosystems. The remaining integrase genes were probably associated with endemic bacteria.

  16. Intraarterial calcium stimulation (ASVS) for pancreatic insulinoma: comparison of preoperative localization procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of clinical relevance of the arterial stimulation procedure with venous sampling (ASVS) in the preoperative localization of insulinoma. Thirteen patients with endogenous hyperinsulinism underwent preoperative transabdominal ultrasound (US), helical CT (CT), MRI, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), and angiography (DSA) in conjunction with the ASVS-test for the detection of insulinoma. The results were compared with intraoperative findings, intraoperative ultrasound (IOUS) and histology. Sensitivity was as follows: US 8%, MRI 27%, CT 46%, EUS 50%,DSA 69%,and ASVS 92%.Intraoperative palpation and IOUS yielded a sensitivity of 77%. In 3 patients the tumors were neither palpable nor detectable by IOUS, the mode of resection was based on preoperative diagnostics.The ASVS procedure as a functional test was superior to all other modalities for the preoperative tumor detection. The ASVS was the most sensitive diagnostic modality. It should especially be considered in terms of health economical aspects when CT or MRI do not yield conclusive results. (orig.)

  17. Anodic stripping voltammetry – ASV for determination of heavy metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although voltammetric methods presented a number of difficulties in its early stages, nowadays ''ASV'' anodic stripping voltammetry is considered one of the most sensitive electro-analytical and suitable for trace-level determination of many metals and compounds in environmental samples, clinical and industrial. Its sensitivity is attributed to the combination of a step of pre-concentration effective together with an electrochemical advanced measurement of accumulated analyte. This paper presents an overview of the voltammetry, which includes a group of electro-analytical methods, in them the information about analyte is obtained from measurements of the current flowing in an electrochemical cell when applied a potential difference to an suitable electrode system

  18. Quaternized dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate strong base anion exchange fibers for As(V) adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N,N-Dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) grafted polyethylene/polypropylene (PE/PP) nonwoven fibers (DMAEMA-g-PE/PP) was prepared by radiation-induced graft polymerization. DMAEMA graft chains on nonwoven fibers were quaternized with dimethyl sulfate solution for the preparation of strong base anion exchange fibers (QDMAEMA-g-PE/PP). Fiber structures were characterized by FTIR, XPS and SEM techniques. The effect of solution pH, contact time, initial As(V) ion concentration and coexisting ions on the As(V) adsorption capacity of the QDMAEMA-g-PE/PP fibers were investigated by performing batch adsorption experiments. The adsorption of As(V) by QDMAEMA-g-PE/PP fibers was found to be independent on solution pH in the range 4.00–10.00. Kinetic experiments show that the As(V) adsorption rate was rapid and As(V) adsorption follows pseudo second-order kinetic model. As(V) adsorption equilibrium data were analyzed using Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm model equations. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models fitted the experimental data well. The maximum adsorption capacity (qmax) calculated from Langmuir isotherm was found to be 83.33 mg As(V)/g polymer at pH 7.00. The adsorbent was used for three cycles without significant loss of adsorption capacity. The adsorbed As(V) ions were desorbed effectively by a 0.1 M NaOH solution. - Highlights: • QDMAEMA-g-PE/PP fibers have high adsorption capacity for As(V) ions. • Adsorption of As(V) is independent on the solution pH over a wide range (4−10). • As(V) adsorption rate of QDMAEMA-g-PE/PP fibers is considerably fast. • The maximum adsorption capacity (qmax) was found to be 83.33 mg As(V)/g polymer

  19. Crystal structure of the HIV-1 integrase core domain in complex with sucrose reveals details of an allosteric inhibitory binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielens, Jerome; Headey, Stephen J.; Jeevarajah, Dharshini; Rhodes, David I.; Deadman, John; Chalmers, David K.; Scanlon, Martin J.; Parker, Michael W. (SVIMR-A); (Avea); (Monash IPS)

    2010-04-19

    HIV integrase (IN) is an essential enzyme in HIV replication and an important target for drug design. IN has been shown to interact with a number of cellular and viral proteins during the integration process. Disruption of these important interactions could provide a mechanism for allosteric inhibition of IN. We present the highest resolution crystal structure of the IN core domain to date. We also present a crystal structure of the IN core domain in complex with sucrose which is bound at the dimer interface in a region that has previously been reported to bind integrase inhibitors.

  20. Rapid Optimization of Engineered Metabolic Pathways with Serine Integrase Recombinational Assembly (SIRA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, C A; Wardrope, C; Paget, J E; Colloms, S D; Rosser, S J

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic pathway engineering in microbial hosts for heterologous biosynthesis of commodity compounds and fine chemicals offers a cheaper, greener, and more reliable method of production than does chemical synthesis. However, engineering metabolic pathways within a microbe is a complicated process: levels of gene expression, protein stability, enzyme activity, and metabolic flux must be balanced for high productivity without compromising host cell viability. A major rate-limiting step in engineering microbes for optimum biosynthesis of a target compound is DNA assembly, as current methods can be cumbersome and costly. Serine integrase recombinational assembly (SIRA) is a rapid DNA assembly method that utilizes serine integrases, and is particularly applicable to rapid optimization of engineered metabolic pathways. Using six pairs of orthogonal attP and attB sites with different central dinucleotide sequences that follow SIRA design principles, we have demonstrated that ΦC31 integrase can be used to (1) insert a single piece of DNA into a substrate plasmid; (2) assemble three, four, and five DNA parts encoding the enzymes for functional metabolic pathways in a one-pot reaction; (3) generate combinatorial libraries of metabolic pathway constructs with varied ribosome binding site strengths or gene orders in a one-pot reaction; and (4) replace and add DNA parts within a construct through targeted postassembly modification. We explain the mechanism of SIRA and the principles behind designing a SIRA reaction. We also provide protocols for making SIRA reaction components and practical methods for applying SIRA to rapid optimization of metabolic pathways. PMID:27417934

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase: effect on viral replication of mutations at highly conserved residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, P M; Wilson, W; Byles, E; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1994-08-01

    Sequence comparisons of the integrase (IN) proteins from different retroviruses have identified several highly conserved residues. We have introduced mutations at 16 of these sites into the integrase gene of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and analyzed the phenotypes of the resulting viruses. The viruses were all normal for p24 content and reverse transcriptase activity. In addition, all of the mutants could infect T-cell lines and undergo reverse transcription, as assessed by PCR analysis. Most of the mutant viruses also had normal Western blot (immunoblot) profiles, although three of the mutations resulted in reduced signals for IN relative to the wild type on the immunoblots and mutation of residue W235 completely abolished recognition of the protein by pooled sera from human immunodeficiency virus type 1-positive patients. Mutations that have previously been shown to abolish activity in in vitro studies produced noninfectious viruses. The substitution of W235 was notable in producing a noninfectious virus, despite previous reports of this residue being nonessential for IN activity in vitro (A.D. Leavitt, L. Shiue, and H.E. Varmus, J. Biol. Chem. 268:2113-2119, 1993). In addition, we have identified four highly conserved residues that can be mutated without any affect on viral replication in T-cell lines. PMID:8035478

  2. HIV-1 Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors with Reduced Susceptibility to Drug Resistant Mutant Integrases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xue Zhi; Smith, Steven J; Maskell, Daniel P; Metifiot, Mathieu; Pye, Valerie E; Fesen, Katherine; Marchand, Christophe; Pommier, Yves; Cherepanov, Peter; Hughes, Stephen H; Burke, Terrence R

    2016-04-15

    HIV integrase (IN) strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are among the newest anti-AIDS drugs; however, mutant forms of IN can confer resistance. We developed noncytotoxic naphthyridine-containing INSTIs that retain low nanomolar IC50 values against HIV-1 variants harboring all of the major INSTI-resistant mutations. We found by analyzing crystal structures of inhibitors bound to the IN from the prototype foamy virus (PFV) that the most successful inhibitors show striking mimicry of the bound viral DNA prior to 3'-processing and the bound host DNA prior to strand transfer. Using this concept of "bi-substrate mimicry," we developed a new broadly effective inhibitor that not only mimics aspects of both the bound target and viral DNA but also more completely fills the space they would normally occupy. Maximizing shape complementarity and recapitulating structural components encompassing both of the IN DNA substrates could serve as a guiding principle for the development of new INSTIs. PMID:26808478

  3. The role of lysine 186 in HIV-1 integrase multimerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) catalyzes biochemical reactions required for viral cDNA insertion into host cell chromosomal DNA, an essential step in the HIV-1 replication cycle. In one of these reactions, the two ends of the linear viral cDNA are believed to be simultaneously ligated to chromosomal DNA by a tetrameric form of IN. The structure of the full-length IN tetramer is not known but a model consisting of the N-terminal domain and the catalytic core revealed basic residues 186 to 188 at the interface between the two IN dimers. We found that alteration of these residues, in particular changing IN lysine residue 186 to glutamate (K186Q), impairs IN oligomerization in the yeast two-hybrid system and decreases oligomeric forms of IN within virions. When expressed independently of other viral proteins in human cells, IN-K186Q did not concentrate in the nucleus as did wild-type IN. Co-expression of wild-type IN restored the multimerization defects of IN-K186Q, in both the two-hybrid system and in virions, and also rescued the nuclear targeting defects. Virions bearing IN-K186Q were not infectious in a single cycle of replication but when mixed virions containing two different IN mutants were produced, IN-K186Q was capable of complementing the catalytically inactive mutant IN-D116A. Our biochemical and functional data support the crystallographic model in which IN residue K186 lies at the interface between IN dimers and suggest that tetramerization is important, not only for concerted integration, but also for IN nuclear targeting

  4. Lead Screening for HIV-1 Integrase (IN Inhibited by Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Chieh Hung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus causes the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS and becomes a serious world-wide problem because of this disease's rapid propagation and incurability. Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs supports HIV have rapid drug resistance for antitreatment. Screening the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM database by simulating molecular docking and molecular dynamics may select molecular compounds to inhibit INSTIs against HIV drug resistance. (S-cathinone and (1S,2S-norpseudoephedrine are selected based on structure and ligand-based drugs are designed and then get higher bioactivity predicted score from SVM than Raltegravir and other TCM compounds. The molecular dynamics are helpful in the analysis and detection of protein-ligand interactions. According to the docking poses, hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bond variations define the main regions of important amino acids in integrase. In addition to the detection of TCM compound efficacy, we suggest (1S,2S-norpseudoephedrine is better than the others based on the analysis of interaction and the effect on the structural variation.

  5. Effect of fulvic acid on adsorptive removal of Cr(VI) and As(V) from groundwater by iron oxide-based adsorbents

    KAUST Repository

    Uwamariya, V.

    2015-05-15

    Abstract Natural contamination has become a challenging problem in drinking water production due to metal contamination of groundwater throughout the world, and arsenic and chromium are well-known toxic elements. In this study, iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS) and granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) were used to study the effects of fulvic acid (FA) on the adsorptive removal of Cr(VI) and As(V) from synthetic groundwater. IOCS and GFH were characterized by SEM/EDS, and experiments were performed at different pH levels (6, 7, and 8). The surface of IOCS and GFH showed a high content of Fe and O (75 and 60 % of the atomic composition, respectively), suggesting that they can highly effectively adsorb Cr(VI) and As(V). Adsorption tests with the simultaneous presence of As(V) and FA, on the one hand, and Cr(VI) with FA, on the other hand, revealed that the role of FA on chromate and arsenate adsorption was insignificant at almost all pH values investigated with both adsorbents. A small influence as a result of FA was only observed for the removal of As(V) by IOCS at pH 6 with a decrease of 13 and 23 % when 2 and 5 mg/l were added to the synthetic water, respectively. It was also found that organic matter (OM) was leached from the IOCS during batch adsorption experiments. The use of FEEM revealed that humic-like, fulvic-like, and protein-like organic matter fractions are present on the IOCS surface. © 2015 Springer International Publishing Switzerland.

  6. As(V) adsorption onto nanoporous titania adsorbents (NTAs): effects of solution composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dong Suk; Batchelor, Bill; Park, Sung Hyuk; Abdel-Wahab, Ahmed

    2012-08-30

    This study has focused on developing two nanoporous titania adsorbents (NTA) to enhance removal efficiency of adsorption process for As(V) by characterizing the effects of pH and phosphate concentration on their sorption capacities and behaviors. One type of adsorbent is a mesoporous titania (MT) solid phase and the other is group of a highly ordered mesoporous silica solids (SBA-15) that can incorporate different levels of reactive titania sorption sites. Microscopic analysis showed that Ti((25))-SBA-15 (Ti/SBA=0.25 g/g) had titania nanostructured mesopores that do not rupture the highly ordered hexagonal silica framework. However, MT has disordered, wormhole-like mesopores that are caused by interparticle porosity. Adsorption experiments showed that Ti((25))-SBA-15 had a greater sorption capacity for As(V) than did Ti((15))-SBA-15 or Ti((35))-SBA-15 and the amount of As(V) adsorbed generally decreased as pH increased. Higher removal of As(V) was observed with Ti((25))-SBA-15 than with MT at pH 4, but MT had higher removals at higher pH (7, 9.5), even though MT has a lower specific surface area. However, in the presence of phosphate, MT showed higher removal of As(V) at low pH rather than did Ti((25))-SBA-15. As expected, the NTAs showed very fast sorption kinetics, but they followed a bi-phasic sorption pattern. PMID:22727482

  7. An experimental design approach for modeling As(V) adsorption from aqueous solution by activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkal Gula, C; Bilgin Simsek, E; Duranoglu, D; Beker, U

    2015-01-01

    The present paper discusses response surface methodology as an efficient approach for predictive model building and optimization of As(V) adsorption on activated carbon derived from a food industry waste: peach stones. The objectives of the study are application of a three-factor 2³ full factorial and central composite design technique for maximizing As(V) removal by produced activated carbon, and examination of the interactive effects of three independent variables (i.e., solution pH, temperature, and initial concentration) on As(V) adsorption capacity. Adsorption equilibrium was investigated by using Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models. First-order and second-order kinetic equations were used for modeling of adsorption kinetics. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔG °, ΔH °, and ΔS °) were calculated and used to explain the As(V) adsorption mechanism. The negative value of ΔH (-7.778 kJ mol⁻¹) supported the exothermic nature of the sorption process and the Gibbs free energy values (ΔG°) were found to be negative, which indicates that the As(V) adsorption is feasible and spontaneous. PMID:25633943

  8. Dolutegravir (S/GSK1349572) exhibits significantly slower dissociation than raltegravir and elvitegravir from wild-type and integrase inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 integrase-DNA complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hightower, Kendra E; Wang, Ruolan; Deanda, Felix; Johns, Brian A; Weaver, Kurt; Shen, Yingnian; Tomberlin, Ginger H; Carter, H Luke; Broderick, Timothy; Sigethy, Scott; Seki, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Masanori; Underwood, Mark R

    2011-10-01

    The integrase inhibitor (INI) dolutegravir (DTG; S/GSK1349572) has significant activity against HIV-1 isolates with raltegravir (RAL)- and elvitegravir (ELV)-associated resistance mutations. As an initial step in characterizing the different resistance profiles of DTG, RAL, and ELV, we determined the dissociation rates of these INIs with integrase (IN)-DNA complexes containing a broad panel of IN proteins, including IN substitutions corresponding to signature RAL and ELV resistance mutations. DTG dissociates slowly from a wild-type IN-DNA complex at 37°C with an off-rate of 2.7 × 10(-6) s(-1) and a dissociative half-life (t(1/2)) of 71 h, significantly longer than the half-lives for RAL (8.8 h) and ELV (2.7 h). Prolonged binding (t(1/2), at least 5 h) was observed for DTG with IN-DNA complexes containing E92, Y143, Q148, and N155 substitutions. The addition of a second substitution to either Q148 or N155 typically resulted in an increase in the off-rate compared to that with the single substitution. For all of the IN substitutions tested, the off-rate of DTG from IN-DNA complexes was significantly slower (from 5 to 40 times slower) than the off-rate of RAL or ELV. These data are consistent with the potential for DTG to have a higher genetic barrier to resistance, provide evidence that the INI off-rate may be an important component of the mechanism of INI resistance, and suggest that the slow dissociation of DTG may contribute to its distinctive resistance profile. PMID:21807982

  9. Magnetite nanoparticles coated glass wool for As(V) removal from drinking water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kango, Sarita; Kumar, Rajesh

    2015-08-01

    Arsenic (As) removal from contaminated groundwater is a key environmental concern worldwide. In this study, glass wool was coated with magnetite nanoparticles under argon gas flow and magnetite coated glass wool have been investigated for application as an adsorbent for As(V) removal from water. The adsorbent was characterized by using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and arsenic contaminated water treated with adsorbent was analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The ICP-MS results showed that 10 g/L of adsorbent removed 99.4% of As(V) within 5 hours at pH-7 and initial arsenic concentration of 360µg/L. Adsorption kinetics data fitted well in pseudo-first-order kinetics model with high correlation coefficient (R2 = 0.995). As magnetite nanoparticles coated glass wool showed favorable adsorption behavior for As(V), it can be a promising tool for water purification.

  10. Magnetite nanoparticles coated glass wool for As(V) removal from drinking water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kango, Sarita; Kumar, Rajesh, E-mail: rajesh.kumar@juit.ac.in [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Jaypee University of Information Technology, Waknaghat, District Solan (H.P.)- 173 234 (India)

    2015-08-28

    Arsenic (As) removal from contaminated groundwater is a key environmental concern worldwide. In this study, glass wool was coated with magnetite nanoparticles under argon gas flow and magnetite coated glass wool have been investigated for application as an adsorbent for As(V) removal from water. The adsorbent was characterized by using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and arsenic contaminated water treated with adsorbent was analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The ICP-MS results showed that 10 g/L of adsorbent removed 99.4% of As(V) within 5 hours at pH-7 and initial arsenic concentration of 360µg/L. Adsorption kinetics data fitted well in pseudo-first-order kinetics model with high correlation coefficient (R{sup 2} = 0.995). As magnetite nanoparticles coated glass wool showed favorable adsorption behavior for As(V), it can be a promising tool for water purification.

  11. Application of Liquid Emulsion Membrane Technique for the Removal of As(V) from Aqueous Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binnal, Prakash; Hiremath, Poornima G.

    2012-08-01

    Liquid emulsion membrane technique was used to remove As(V) from synthetic aqueous solutions. The emulsion was composed of Aliquat 336 as an extractant, commercial kerosene as a diluent and Span 80 (Sorbiton monooleate) as an emulsifying agent. Different types of internal phases were used, namely, sodium hydroxide, sodium carbonate, ammonium bicarbonate, sodium sulphate and sodium chloride. The effect of process parameters affecting extraction efficiency, such as, initial concentration of As(V) in feed solution, pH of feed solution, concentrations of Aliquat 336 and Span 80 in membrane phase, volume ratio of stripping phase to membrane phase, concentration of internal phase, type of internal phase, volume ratio of emulsion to feed, agitation speed during extraction and time of extraction was investigated. The optimum conditions for the extraction were determined. A maximum As(V) removal rate of 97.8 was observed under optimum conditions.

  12. Magnetite nanoparticles coated glass wool for As(V) removal from drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic (As) removal from contaminated groundwater is a key environmental concern worldwide. In this study, glass wool was coated with magnetite nanoparticles under argon gas flow and magnetite coated glass wool have been investigated for application as an adsorbent for As(V) removal from water. The adsorbent was characterized by using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and arsenic contaminated water treated with adsorbent was analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The ICP-MS results showed that 10 g/L of adsorbent removed 99.4% of As(V) within 5 hours at pH-7 and initial arsenic concentration of 360µg/L. Adsorption kinetics data fitted well in pseudo-first-order kinetics model with high correlation coefficient (R2 = 0.995). As magnetite nanoparticles coated glass wool showed favorable adsorption behavior for As(V), it can be a promising tool for water purification

  13. Lack of integrase inhibitors associated resistance mutations among HIV-1C isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Mulu, Andargachew; Maier, Melanie; Liebert, Uwe Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Background Although biochemical analysis of HIV-1 integrase enzyme suggested the use of integrase inhibitors (INIs) against HIV-1C, different viral subtypes may favor different mutational pathways potentially leading to varying levels of drug resistance. Thus, the aim of this study was to search for the occurrence and natural evolution of integrase polymorphisms and/or resistance mutations in HIV-1C Ethiopian clinical isolates prior to the introduction of INIs. Methods Plasma samples from chr...

  14. The mechanism of φC31 integrase directionality: experimental analysis and computational modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Pokhilko, Alexandra; Zhao, Jia; Ebenhöh, Oliver; Smith, Margaret C M; Stark, W. Marshall; Colloms, Sean D.

    2016-01-01

    Serine integrases, DNA site-specific recombinases used by bacteriophages for integration and excision of their DNA to and from their host genomes, are increasingly being used as tools for programmed rearrangements of DNA molecules for biotechnology and synthetic biology. A useful feature of serine integrases is the simple regulation and unidirectionality of their reactions. Recombination between the phage attP and host attB sites is promoted by the serine integrase alone, giving recombinant a...

  15. Pharmacokinetics and Dose-range Finding Toxicity of a Novel anti-HIV Active Integrase Inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Nair, Vasu; Okello, Maurice; Mishra, Sanjay; Mirsalis, Jon; O’Loughlin, Kathleen; Zhong, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Integration of viral DNA into human chromosomal DNA catalyzed by HIV integrase represents the “point of no return” in HIV infection. For this reason, HIV integrase is considered a crucial target in the development of new anti-HIV therapeutic agents. We have discovered a novel HIV integrase inhibitor 1, that exhibits potent antiviral activity and a favorable metabolism profile. This paper reports on the pharmacokinetics and toxicokinetics of compound 1 and the relevance of these findings with ...

  16. Electrodialytic separation of Cu(II) and As(V) in acidic electrolytes; Separacion electrodialitica de Cu(II) y As(V) en electrolitos acidos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibanez, J. P.; Ipinza, J.; Cifuentes, L.

    2007-07-01

    The separation of copper and arsenic from acidic electrolytes by electrodialysis was investigated at room temperature. the effect of current density and pH was studied in a batch cell during 3 hours. The kinetic parameters showed that Cu(II) transport rate was 0.75 mol/m''2/h and the As(V) transport rate was 0.002 mol/m''2/h. An efficient separation between Cu(II) and As(V) was achieved; Generating a concentrated solution of copper with no arsenic, which was obtained independently of the electrolyte acidity and current density used. The effect of the arsenic speciation with pH is discussed as well. (Author) 23 refs.

  17. Integrase Inhibitor Prodrugs: Approaches to Enhancing the Anti-HIV Activity of β-Diketo Acids

    OpenAIRE

    Vasu Nair; Maurice Okello

    2015-01-01

    HIV integrase, encoded at the 3′-end of the HIV pol gene, is essential for HIV replication. This enzyme catalyzes the incorporation of HIV DNA into human DNA, which represents the point of “no-return” in HIV infection. Integrase is a significant target in anti-HIV drug discovery. This review article focuses largely on the design of integrase inhibitors that are β-diketo acids constructed on pyridinone scaffolds. Methodologies for synthesis of these compounds are discussed. Integrase inhibiti...

  18. Determination of As(III) and As(V) by Flow Injection-Hydride Generation-Atomic Absorption Spectrometry via On-line Reduction of As(V) by KI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Steffen; Hansen, Elo Harald

    1997-01-01

    A volume-based flow injection (FI) procedure is described for the determination and speciation of trace inorganic arsenic, As(III) and As(V), via hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS) of As(III). The determination of total arsenic is obtained by on-line reduction of As(V) to As...

  19. Next-generation site-directed transgenesis in the malaria vector mosquito Anopheles gambiae: self-docking strains expressing germline-specific phiC31 integrase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet M Meredith

    Full Text Available Diseases transmitted by mosquitoes have a devastating impact on global health and the situation is complicated due to difficulties with both existing control measures and the impact of climate change. Genetically modified mosquitoes that are refractory to disease transmission are seen as having great potential in the delivery of novel control strategies. The Streptomyces phage phiC31 integrase system has been successfully adapted for site-directed transgene integration in a range of insects, thus overcoming many limitations due to size constraints and random integration associated with transposon-mediated transformation. Using this technology, we previously published the first site-directed transformation of Anopheles gambiae, the principal vector of human malaria. Mosquitoes were initially engineered to incorporate the phiC31 docking site at a defined genomic location. A second phase of genetic modification then achieved site-directed integration of an anti-malarial effector gene. In the current publication we report improved efficiency and utility of the phiC31 integrase system following the generation of Anopheles gambiae self-docking strains. Four independent strains, with docking sites at known locations on three different chromosome arms, were engineered to express integrase under control of the regulatory regions of the nanos gene from Anopheles gambiae. The resulting protein accumulates in the posterior oocyte to provide integrase activity at the site of germline development. Two self-docking strains, exhibiting significantly different levels of integrase expression, were assessed for site-directed transgene integration and found to demonstrate greatly improved survival and efficiency of transformation. In the fight against malaria, it is imperative to establish a broad repertoire of both anti-malarial effector genes and tissue-specific promoters to regulate their expression, enabling those offering maximum effect with minimum fitness

  20. The strand transfer oligonucleotide inhibitors of HIV-integrase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Snášel, Jan; Rosenberg, Ivan; Pačes, Ondřej; Pichová, Iva

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 1 (2009), s. 241-246. ISSN 1475-6366 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508; GA ČR GA203/05/0827; GA ČR GP203/05/P557; GA AV ČR IAA4055304 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : HIV-1 integrase * inhibition * phosphonate oligonucleotides Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.496, year: 2009

  1. HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitor Resistance and Its Clinical Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco, Jose-Luis; Varghese, Vici; Rhee, Soo-Yon; Gatell, Jose M.; Shafer, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    With the approval in 2007 of the first integrase inhibitor (INI), raltegravir, clinicians became better able to suppress virus replication in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) who were harboring many of the most highly drug-resistant viruses. Raltegravir also provided clinicians with additional options for first-line therapy and for the simplification of regimens in patients with stable virological suppression. Two additional INIs in advanced clinical developm...

  2. Development of a high-throughput assay for the HIV-1 integrase disintegration reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Both HIV-1 integrase (IN) and the central catalytic domain of IN (IN-CCD) catalyze the disintegration reaction in vitro.In this study,IN and IN-CCD proteins were expressed and purified,and a high-throughput format enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed for the disintegration reaction.IN exhibited a marked preference for Mn2+ over Mg2+ as the divalent cation cofactor in disintegration.Baicalein,a known IN inhibitor,was found to be an IN-CCD inhibitor.The assay is sensitive and specific for the study of disintegration reaction as well as for the in vitro identification of antiviral drugs targeting IN,especially targeting IN-CCD.

  3. Adsorption, desorption and fractionation of As(V on untreated and mussel shell-treated granitic material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Seco-Reigosa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available As(V adsorption and desorption were studied on granitic material, coarse and fine mussel shell, and granitic material amended with 12 and 24 t ha−1 fine shell, investigating the effect of different As(V concentrations and different pH, as well as the fractions where the adsorbed As(V was retained. As(V adsorption was higher on fine than on coarse shell. Mussel shell amendment increased As(V adsorption on granitic material. Adsorption data corresponding to the un-amended and shell-amended granitic material were satisfactory fitted to the Langmuir and Freundlich models. Desorption was always < 19% when the highest As(V concentration (100 mg L−1 was added. Regarding the effect of pH, the granitic material showed its highest adsorption (66% at pH < 6, and it was lower as pH increased. Fine shell presented notable adsorption in the whole pH range between 6 and 12, with a maximum of 83%. The shell-amended granitic material showed high As(V adsorption, with a maximum (99% at pH near 8, but decreasing as pH increased. Desorption varying pH was always < 26%. In the granitic material, desorption increased progressively when pH increased from 4 to 6, contrary to what happened to mussel shell. Regarding the fractionation of the adsorbed As(V, most of it was in the soluble fraction (weakly bound. Globally, the granitic material did not show high As(V retention capacity, which implies risks of water pollution and transfer to the food chain; however, the mussel shell amendment increased As(V retention, making this practice recommendable.

  4. Identification of a Novel Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Integrase Interactor, Gemin2, That Facilitates Efficient Viral cDNA Synthesis In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Hamamoto, Seiji; Nishitsuji, Hironori; Amagasa, Teruo; Kannagi, Mari; Masuda, Takao

    2006-01-01

    Retroviral integrase (IN) catalyzes the integration of viral cDNA into a host chromosome. Additional roles have been suggested for IN, including uncoating, reverse transcription, and nuclear import of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genome. However, the underlying mechanism is largely unknown. Here, using a yeast two-hybrid system, we identified a survival motor neuron (SMN)-interacting protein 1 (Gemin2) that binds to HIV-1 IN. Reduction of Gemin2 with small interfering RNA d...

  5. HIV-1 Protease, Reverse Transcriptase, and Integrase Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Kris; Varghese, Vici; Winters, Mark A.; Hurt, Christopher B.; Eron, Joseph J.; Parkin, Neil; Holmes, Susan P.; Holodniy, Mark; Shafer, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 protease (PR), reverse transcriptase (RT), and integrase (IN) variability presents a challenge to laboratories performing genotypic resistance testing. This challenge will grow with increased sequencing of samples enriched for proviral DNA such as dried blood spots and increased use of next-generation sequencing (NGS) to detect low-abundance HIV-1 variants. We analyzed PR and RT sequences from >100,000 individuals and IN sequences from >10,000 individuals to characterize variation at each amino acid position, identify mutations indicating APOBEC-mediated G-to-A editing, and identify mutations resulting from selective drug pressure. Forty-seven percent of PR, 37% of RT, and 34% of IN positions had one or more amino acid variants with a prevalence of ≥1%. Seventy percent of PR, 60% of RT, and 60% of IN positions had one or more variants with a prevalence of ≥0.1%. Overall 201 PR, 636 RT, and 346 IN variants had a prevalence of ≥0.1%. The median intersubtype prevalence ratios were 2.9-, 2.1-, and 1.9-fold for these PR, RT, and IN variants, respectively. Only 5.0% of PR, 3.7% of RT, and 2.0% of IN variants had a median intersubtype prevalence ratio of ≥10-fold. Variants at lower prevalences were more likely to differ biochemically and to be part of an electrophoretic mixture compared to high-prevalence variants. There were 209 mutations indicative of APOBEC-mediated G-to-A editing and 326 mutations nonpolymorphic treatment selected. Identification of viruses with a high number of APOBEC-associated mutations will facilitate the quality control of dried blood spot sequencing. Identifying sequences with a high proportion of rare mutations will facilitate the quality control of NGS. IMPORTANCE Most antiretroviral drugs target three HIV-1 proteins: PR, RT, and IN. These proteins are highly variable: many different amino acids can be present at the same position in viruses from different individuals. Some of the amino acid variants cause drug

  6. Alternative nucleophilic substrates for the endonuclease activities of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ealy, Julie B. [Department of Medicine, Penn State College of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Mail Services H036, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Penn State Lehigh Valley, 2809 E. Saucon Valley Road, Center Valley, PA 18034 (United States); Sudol, Malgorzata [Department of Medicine, Penn State College of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Mail Services H036, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Krzeminski, Jacek; Amin, Shantu [Department of Pharmacology, Penn State College of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Katzman, Michael, E-mail: mkatzman@psu.edu [Department of Medicine, Penn State College of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Mail Services H036, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Penn State College of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States)

    2012-11-10

    Retroviral integrase can use water or some small alcohols as the attacking nucleophile to nick DNA. To characterize the range of compounds that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase can accommodate for its endonuclease activities, we tested 45 potential electron donors (having varied size and number or spacing of nucleophilic groups) as substrates during site-specific nicking at viral DNA ends and during nonspecific nicking reactions. We found that integrase used 22 of the 45 compounds to nick DNA, but not all active compounds were used for both activities. In particular, 13 compounds were used for site-specific and nonspecific nicking, 5 only for site-specific nicking, and 4 only for nonspecific nicking; 23 other compounds were not used for either activity. Thus, integrase can accommodate a large number of nucleophilic substrates but has selective requirements for its different activities, underscoring its dynamic properties and providing new information for modeling and understanding integrase.

  7. Alternative nucleophilic substrates for the endonuclease activities of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retroviral integrase can use water or some small alcohols as the attacking nucleophile to nick DNA. To characterize the range of compounds that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase can accommodate for its endonuclease activities, we tested 45 potential electron donors (having varied size and number or spacing of nucleophilic groups) as substrates during site-specific nicking at viral DNA ends and during nonspecific nicking reactions. We found that integrase used 22 of the 45 compounds to nick DNA, but not all active compounds were used for both activities. In particular, 13 compounds were used for site-specific and nonspecific nicking, 5 only for site-specific nicking, and 4 only for nonspecific nicking; 23 other compounds were not used for either activity. Thus, integrase can accommodate a large number of nucleophilic substrates but has selective requirements for its different activities, underscoring its dynamic properties and providing new information for modeling and understanding integrase.

  8. The discovery of S/GSK1265744: a carbamoyl pyridone HIV-1 integrase inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Murai

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: HIV-1 integrase is a virally encoded enzyme essential for lentiviral replication. Assiduous medicinal chemistry efforts culminated in the discovery of raltegravir, the first marketed HIV-1 integrase inhibitor (INI. However, there is significant opportunity for improvement including overall dose burden, dosing interval and potency against resistant viruses. Our molecular design approach used a two-metal binding pharmacophore strategy and succeeded in identification of carbamoyl pyridone HIV-1 INIs. This enriched core scaffold has abundant structural features expanding the opportunity to control drug properties, leading to the discovery of S/GSK1265744. Methods: The carbamoyl pyridone scaffold was derivatized and evaluated for antiviral activity against wild-type virus (±HSA along with key INI-resistant mutants. Animal pharmacokinetic profiles including a key measure of the trough drug concentration over protein-adjusted antiviral potency (C24/PAIC50 along with in vitro DMPK properties, were used along with the virological data for compound selection. Results: The carbamoyl pyridone series inhibitors exhibited potent antiviral profiles with promising DMPK properties. S/GSK1265744 demonstrated good coverage of C24 over PAIC50 predicting low mg unboosted once daily dosing, now validated in phase 2 clinical studies. These preclinical data along with a long human T1/2 of ~30 hours in oral tablet study supports S/GSK1265744 as a long acting parenteral agent for once-monthly or less frequent dosing. Conclusions: A medicinal chemistry approach utilizing key viral mutants in combination with C24/PAIC50 has allowed for discovery of S/GSK1265744. This agent is currently in phase 2 development evaluating a novel, long-acting parenteral route of administration and may enable new approaches to HIV therapy and prevention.

  9. Architecture of a Full-length Retroviral Integrase Monomer and Dimer, Revealed by Small Angle X-ray Scattering and Chemical Cross-linking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bojja, Ravi S.; Andrake, Mark D.; Weigand, Steven; Merkel, George; Yarychkivska, Olya; Henderson, Adam; Kummerling, Marissa; Skalka, Anna Marie (Fox Chase); (NWU)

    2012-02-07

    We determined the size and shape of full-length avian sarcoma virus (ASV) integrase (IN) monomers and dimers in solution using small angle x-ray scattering. The low resolution data obtained establish constraints for the relative arrangements of the three component domains in both forms. Domain organization within the small angle x-ray envelopes was determined by combining available atomic resolution data for individual domains with results from cross-linking coupled with mass spectrometry. The full-length dimer architecture so revealed is unequivocally different from that proposed from x-ray crystallographic analyses of two-domain fragments, in which interactions between the catalytic core domains play a prominent role. Core-core interactions are detected only in cross-linked IN tetramers and are required for concerted integration. The solution dimer is stabilized by C-terminal domain (CTD-CTD) interactions and by interactions of the N-terminal domain in one subunit with the core and CTD in the second subunit. These results suggest a pathway for formation of functional IN-DNA complexes that has not previously been considered and possible strategies for preventing such assembly.

  10. A novel function for spumaretrovirus integrase: an early requirement for integrase-mediated cleavage of 2 LTR circles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouscadet Jean-François

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Retroviral integration is central to viral persistence and pathogenesis, cancer as well as host genome evolution. However, it is unclear why integration appears essential for retrovirus production, especially given the abundance and transcriptional potential of non-integrated viral genomes. The involvement of retroviral endonuclease, also called integrase (IN, in replication steps apart from integration has been proposed, but is usually considered to be accessory. We observe here that integration of a retrovirus from the spumavirus family depends mainly on the quantity of viral DNA produced. Moreover, we found that IN directly participates to linear DNA production from 2-LTR circles by specifically cleaving the conserved palindromic sequence found at LTR-LTR junctions. These results challenge the prevailing view that integrase essential function is to catalyze retroviral DNA integration. Integrase activity upstream of this step, by controlling linear DNA production, is sufficient to explain the absolute requirement for this enzyme. The novel role of IN over 2-LTR circle junctions accounts for the pleiotropic effects observed in cells infected with IN mutants. It may explain why 1 2-LTR circles accumulate in vivo in mutants carrying a defective IN while their linear and integrated DNA pools decrease; 2 why both LTRs are processed in a concerted manner. It also resolves the original puzzle concerning the integration of spumaretroviruses. More generally, it suggests to reassess 2-LTR circles as functional intermediates in the retrovirus cycle and to reconsider the idea that formation of the integrated provirus is an essential step of retrovirus production.

  11. Differential multimerization of Moloney murine leukemia virus integrase purified under nondenaturing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retroviral integrases (IN) catalyze the integration of the reverse-transcribed viral DNA into the host genome, an essential process leading to virus replication. For Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) IN, the limited solubility of the recombinant protein has restricted the development of biophysical and structural analyses. Herein, recombinant M-MuLV IN proteins, either full length or two nonoverlapping domain constructs, were purified under non-denaturing conditions from solubilized bacterial extracts by Ni2+-NTA resins. Additionally, WT IN was further purified by heparin chromatography. All of the purified proteins were shown to be active and stable. WT M-MuLV IN chromatographed with a peak corresponding with a dimer by gel filtration chromatography. In contrast, the single point mutant C209A IN migrated predominantly as a tetramer. For both proteins, fractions in equilibrium between dimers and tetramers were competent to assemble concerted two-end integrations and yielded a unique strand-transfer profile in the presence of a 28-mer U5 oligonucleotide substrate, indicative of a distinct conformation within the synaptic complex. This specific target-site selection was not observed with a shorter 20-mer U5 substrate. These studies provide the foundation for biophysical and structural analysis on M-MuLV IN and the mechanism of retroviral integration

  12. [Mechanism of groundwater As(V) removal with ferric flocculation and direct filtration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ying; Duan, Jin-Ming; Jing, Chuan-Yong

    2015-02-01

    The As removal process and mechanism from groundwater using ferric flocculation-direct filtration system was investigated using batch, field pilot tests, extended X-ray absorption fine structure ( EXAFS) spectroscopy, and charge-distribution multisite complexation (CD-MUSIC) model. The results showed that arsenate [As(V)] was the dominant As species in the groundwater with a concentration of 40 μg x L(-1). The treatment system could supply 64 984 L As-safe drinking water (concentration (5 mg x L(-1)). EXAFS and CD-MUSIC model indicated that As(V) was adsorbed onto ferric hydroxide via bidentate binuclear complexes in the pH range of 3 to 9.5, while formation of precipitate with Ca or Mg dominated the As removal at pH > 9.5. PMID:26031078

  13. Electromembrane extraction and spectrophotometric determination of As(V) in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamyabi, Mohammad Ali; Aghaei, Ali

    2016-12-01

    In this study, for the first time electromembrane extraction (EME) was used as a highly efficient sample pre-treatment method for the UV-VIS spectrophotometric determination of As(V) in water samples. The influences of experimental parameters during EME were investigated and optimized using one-variable-at-a-time methodology as follows: organic solvent: 1-octanol+2.5% (V/V) di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate, applied voltage: 70V, extraction time: 15min, pH of acceptor: 13, stirring rate: 750rpm. The method allowed the determination of As(V) in the range of 5-300ngmL(-1). The relative standard deviation was found to be within the range of 3.4-7.6%. The limit of detection, corresponding to a signal to noise ratio of three, was 1.5ngmL(-1). The proposed method was finally applied to the determination of As(V) in water samples and relative recoveries ranging from 95 to 102% were obtained. PMID:27374507

  14. Transgenic Xenopus laevis embryos can be generated using ϕC31 integrase

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Bryan G.; Weeks, Daniel L.

    2005-01-01

    Phage ϕC31 encodes an integrase that can mediate the insertion of extrachromosomal DNA into genomic DNA1. Here we show ϕC31 integrase can be used to generate transgenic Xenopus laevis embryos. mRNA encoding integrase was co-injected with a reporter plasmid containing a CMV promoter driven GFP into one cell embryos. The reporter plasmid was integrated into the genome. GFP expression, though robust, was in a limited number of tissues and varied among the embryos analyzed. We attributed this res...

  15. HIV Integrase Inhibitors with Nucleobase Scaffolds: Discovery of a Highly Potent anti-HIV Agent

    OpenAIRE

    Nair, Vasu; Chi, Guochen; Ptak, Roger; Neamati, Nouri

    2006-01-01

    HIV integrase is essential for HIV replication. However, there are currently no integrase inhibitors in clinical use for AIDS. We have discovered a conceptually new β-diketo acid that is a powerful inhibitor of both the 3′-processing and strand transfer steps of HIV-1 integrase. The in vitro anti-HIV data of this inhibitor were remarkable as exemplified by its highly potent antiviral therapeutic efficacy against HIVTEKI and HIV-1NL4-3 replication in PBMC (TI >4,000 and >10,000, respectively).

  16. D77, one benzoic acid derivative, functions as a novel anti-HIV-1 inhibitor targeting the interaction between integrase and cellular LEDGF/p75

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integration of viral-DNA into host chromosome mediated by the viral protein HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an essential step in the HIV-1 life cycle. In this process, Lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75) is discovered to function as a cellular co-factor for integration. Since LEDGF/p75 plays an important role in HIV integration, disruption of the LEDGF/p75 interaction with IN has provided a special interest for anti-HIV agent discovery. In this work, we reported that a benzoic acid derivative, 4-[(5-bromo-4-{[2,4-dioxo-3-(2-oxo-2-phenylethyl) -1,3-thiazolidin-5-ylidene]methyl}-2-ethoxyphenoxy)methyl]benzoic acid (D77) could potently inhibit the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction and affect the HIV-1 IN nuclear distribution thus exhibiting antiretroviral activity. Molecular docking with site-directed mutagenesis analysis and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) binding assays has clarified possible binding mode of D77 against HIV-1 integrase. As the firstly discovered small molecular compound targeting HIV-1 integrase interaction with LEDGF/p75, D77 might supply useful structural information for further anti-HIV agent discovery

  17. Cellular Cofactors of Lentiviral Integrase: From Target Validation to Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taltynov, Oliver; Desimmie, Belete A.; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger

    2012-01-01

    To accomplish their life cycle, lentiviruses make use of host proteins, the so-called cellular cofactors. Interactions between host cell and viral proteins during early stages of lentiviral infection provide attractive new antiviral targets. The insertion of lentiviral cDNA in a host cell chromosome is a step of no return in the replication cycle, after which the host cell becomes a permanent carrier of the viral genome and a producer of lentiviral progeny. Integration is carried out by integrase (IN), an enzyme playing also an important role during nuclear import. Plenty of cellular cofactors of HIV-1 IN have been proposed. To date, the lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75) is the best studied cofactor of HIV-1 IN. Moreover, small molecules that block the LEDGF/p75-IN interaction have recently been developed for the treatment of HIV infection. The nuclear import factor transportin-SR2 (TRN-SR2) has been proposed as another interactor of HIV IN-mediating nuclear import of the virus. Using both proteins as examples, we will describe approaches to be taken to identify and validate novel cofactors as new antiviral targets. Finally, we will highlight recent advances in the design and the development of small-molecule inhibitors binding to the LEDGF/p75-binding pocket in IN (LEDGINs). PMID:22928108

  18. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the LEDGF/p75 Binding Site of Integrase Block HIV Replication and Modulate Integrase Multimerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Frauke; Shaw, Stephen; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Desimmie, Belete A.; Marchand, Arnaud; Butler, Scott; Smets, Wim; Chaltin, Patrick; Westby, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Targeting the HIV integrase (HIV IN) is a clinically validated approach for designing novel anti-HIV therapies. We have previously described the discovery of a novel class of integration inhibitors, 2-(quinolin-3-yl)acetic acid derivatives, blocking HIV replication at a low micromolar concentration through binding in the LEDGF/p75 binding pocket of HIV integrase, hence referred to as LEDGINs. Here we report the detailed characterization of their mode of action. The design of novel and more potent analogues with nanomolar activity enabled full virological evaluation and a profound mechanistic study. As allosteric inhibitors, LEDGINs bind to the LEDGF/p75 binding pocket in integrase, thereby blocking the interaction with LEDGF/p75 and interfering indirectly with the catalytic activity of integrase. Detailed mechanism-of-action studies reveal that the allosteric mode of inhibition is likely caused by an effect on HIV-1 integrase oligomerization. The multimodal inhibition by LEDGINs results in a block in HIV integration and in a replication deficiency of progeny virus. The allosteric nature of LEDGINs leads to synergy in combination with the clinically approved active site HIV IN strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) raltegravir, and cross-resistance profiling proves the distinct mode of action of LEDGINs and INSTIs. The allosteric nature of inhibition and compatibility with INSTIs underline an interest in further (clinical) development of LEDGINs. PMID:22664975

  19. HIV-1 group O integrase displays lower susceptibility to raltegravir and has a different mutational pathway for resistance than HIV-1 group M

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnès Depatureaux

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: HIV-1 group O (HIV-O is a rare HIV-1 variant characterized by a high number of polymorphisms, especially in the integrase gene, e.g. positions L74I, S153A, G163Q and T206S. As HIV-O integrase enzymes have not previously been studied, our aim was to assess the impact of HIV-O integrase polymorphisms on susceptibility to integrase inhibitors and emergence of resistance associated mutations. Viruses and Methods: We cloned and purified integrase proteins from each of HIV-1 Group O clades A (HIV-O/A and B (HIV-O/B, a HIV-O divergent strain (HIV-O/Div, and HIV-1 group M (subtype B, HIV-M/B and characterized these enzymes for susceptibility to integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs in cell-free assays and in tissue culture, in the absence or presence of varying concentrations of several INSTIs. The inhibition constant (Ki and IC50 were calculated and compared for HIV-M and HIV-O integrases. Selections for resistance-related mutations were performed using cord blood mononuclear cells and increasing concentration of INSTIs. Results: HIV-O integrase and viruses were more susceptible to raltegravir (RAL in competitive inhibition assays and in tissue culture than were HIV-M enzymes and viruses, respectively. During selection, we observed different pathways of resistance depending on the drug and clade. Mutations selected in HIV-O can be classified as follows: (1 mutations described for HIV-M such as T97A, Q148R, V151A/I (RAL, T66I, E92Q, E157Q (EVG and M50I, R263K (DTG and (2 signature mutations for HIV-O (i.e. not described in HIV-M F121C (HIV-O/B for RAL, V75I (HIV-O/A for RAL and S153V (HIV-O/A for DTG. Only the HIV-O/Div selected the Q148R mutation for RAL and R263K+M50I for DTG, as previously described for HIV-M. None of the HIV-O viruses selected either N155H or Y143C. The selection of the specific S153V mutation could be explained at the nucleotide level: HIV-O at this position contains an alanine and substitution of alanine to

  20. Sketching the historical development of pyrimidones as the inhibitors of the HIV integrase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Patel, Rahul V.; Keum, Y.S.; Park, S.W.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 97, JUN 5 (2015), s. 649-663. ISSN 0223-5234 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Pyrimidones * Anti- HIV * Integrase inhibitors Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.447, year: 2014

  1. Development of a receptor model for efficient in silico screening of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo, Mario A; Ribone, Sergio R; Briñón, Margarita C; Dehaen, Wim

    2014-07-01

    Integrase (IN) is a key viral enzyme for the replication of the type-1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), and as such constitutes a relevant therapeutic target for the development of anti-HIV agents. However, the lack of crystallographic data of HIV IN complexed with the corresponding viral DNA has historically hindered the application of modern structure-based drug design techniques to the discovery of new potent IN inhibitors (INIs). Consequently, the development and validation of reliable HIV IN structural models that may be useful for the screening of large databases of chemical compounds is of particular interest. In this study, four HIV-1 IN homology models were evaluated respect to their capability to predict the inhibition potency of a training set comprising 36 previously reported INIs with IC50 values in the low nanomolar to the high micromolar range. Also, 9 inactive structurally related compounds were included in this training set. In addition, a crystallographic structure of the IN-DNA complex corresponding to the prototype foamy virus (PFV) was also evaluated as structural model for the screening of inhibitors. The applicability of high throughput screening techniques, such as blind and ligand-guided exhaustive rigid docking was assessed. The receptor models were also refined by molecular dynamics and clustering techniques to assess protein sidechain flexibility and solvent effect on inhibitor binding. Among the studied models, we conclude that the one derived from the X-ray structure of the PFV integrase exhibited the best performance to rank the potencies of the compounds in the training set, with the predictive power being further improved by explicitly modeling five water molecules within the catalytic side of IN. Also, accounting for protein sidechain flexibility enhanced the prediction of inhibition potencies among the studied compounds. Finally, an interaction fingerprint pattern was established for the fast identification of potent IN

  2. Chemistry and Structure-Activity Relationship of the Styrylquinoline-Type HIV Integrase Inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Didier Desmaële; Jean-François Mouscadet

    2010-01-01

    In spite of significant progress in anti-HIV-1 therapy, current antiviral chemo-therapy still suffers from deleterious side effects and emerging drug resistance. Therefore, the development of novel antiviral drugs remains a crucial issue for the fight against AIDS. HIV-1 integrase is a key enzyme in the replication cycle of the retrovirus since it catalyzes the integration of the reverse transcribed viral DNA into the chromosomal DNA. Efforts to develop anti-integrase drugs started during the...

  3. Dicaffeoylquinic and Dicaffeoyltartaric Acids Are Selective Inhibitors of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Integrase

    OpenAIRE

    McDougall, Brenda; King, Peter J.; Wu, Bor Wen; Hostomsky, Zdenek; Reinecke, Manfred G.; Robinson, W. Edward

    1998-01-01

    Current pharmacological agents for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection include drugs targeted against HIV reverse transcriptase and HIV protease. An understudied therapeutic target is HIV integrase, an essential enzyme that mediates integration of the HIV genome into the host chromosome. The dicaffeoylquinic acids (DCQAs) and the dicaffeoyltartaric acids (DCTAs) have potent activity against HIV integrase in vitro and prevent HIV replication in tissue culture. However, their specifici...

  4. Effects of Etravirine on the Pharmacokinetics of the Integrase Inhibitor S/GSK1265744

    OpenAIRE

    Ford, Susan L.; Gould, Elizabeth; Chen, Shuguang; Lou, Yu; Dumont, Etienne; Spreen, William; Piscitelli, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    HIV integrase inhibitors such as raltegravir and elvitegravir halt HIV progression, but treatment-emergent resistance and cross-resistance have been observed. The nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor etravirine (ETR) may be used in combination with integrase inhibitors in patients with drug resistance. This single-center, open-label, two-period, single-sequence crossover study evaluated the effects of ETR coadministration on the pharmacokinetic profile of S/GSK1265744, an investigati...

  5. Serine integrase chimeras with activity in E. coli and HeLa cells

    OpenAIRE

    Farruggio, Alfonso P.; Calos, Michele P.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, application of serine integrases for genomic engineering has increased in popularity. The factor-independence and unidirectionality of these large serine recombinases makes them well suited for reactions such as site-directed vector integration and cassette exchange in a wide variety of organisms. In order to generate information that might be useful for altering the specificity of serine integrases and to improve their efficiency, we tested a hybridization strategy that has ...

  6. Serine integrase chimeras with activity in E. coli and HeLa cells

    OpenAIRE

    Farruggio, Alfonso P.; Calos, Michele P.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT In recent years, application of serine integrases for genomic engineering has increased in popularity. The factor-independence and unidirectionality of these large serine recombinases makes them well suited for reactions such as site-directed vector integration and cassette exchange in a wide variety of organisms. In order to generate information that might be useful for altering the specificity of serine integrases and to improve their efficiency, we tested a hybridization strategy ...

  7. Anti - HIV-1 integrase activity of Thai Medicinal Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kingkan Bunluepuech

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available For the purpose of discovering anti-HIV-1 agents from natural sources, the aqueous and EtOH extracts of eight Thaiplants including Clerodendron indicum (whole plant, Tiliacora triandra (stem, Capparis micracantha (wood, Harrissoniaperforata (wood, Ficus glomerata (wood, Diospyros decandra (wood, Dracaena loureiri (heartwood, and Tinospora crispa (stem were screened for their inhibitory activities against HIV-1 integrase (IN using the multiplate integration assay(MIA. Of the EtOH extracts, Ficus glomerata (wood was the most potent with an IC50 value of 7.8 g/ml; whereas the water extract of Harrisonia perforata (wood was the most potent aqueous extract with an IC50 value of 2.3 g/ml. The isolation of active principles against HIV-1 IN from Ficus glomerata is now actively pursued.

  8. HIV-1 integrase inhibitor resistance and its clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Jose-Luis; Varghese, Vici; Rhee, Soo-Yon; Gatell, Jose M; Shafer, Robert W

    2011-05-01

    With the approval in 2007 of the first integrase inhibitor (INI), raltegravir, clinicians became better able to suppress virus replication in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) who were harboring many of the most highly drug-resistant viruses. Raltegravir also provided clinicians with additional options for first-line therapy and for the simplification of regimens in patients with stable virological suppression. Two additional INIs in advanced clinical development-elvitegravir and S/GSK1349572-may prove equally versatile. However, the INIs have a relatively low genetic barrier to resistance in that 1 or 2 mutations are capable of causing marked reductions in susceptibility to raltegravir and elvitegravir, the most well-studied INIs. This perspective reviews the genetic mechanisms of INI resistance and their implications for initial INI therapy, the treatment of antiretroviral-experienced patients, and regimen simplification. PMID:21459813

  9. QSAR study of curcumine derivatives as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pawan; Sharma, Anju; Garg, Prabha; Roy, Nilanjan

    2013-03-01

    A QSAR study was performed on curcumine derivatives as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors using multiple linear regression. The statistically significant model was developed with squared correlation coefficients (r(2)) 0.891 and cross validated r(2) (r(2) cv) 0.825. The developed model revealed that electronic, shape, size, geometry, substitution's information and hydrophilicity were important atomic properties for determining the inhibitory activity of these molecules. The model was also tested successfully for external validation (r(2) pred = 0.849) as well as Tropsha's test for model predictability. Furthermore, the domain analysis was carried out to evaluate the prediction reliability of external set molecules. The model was statistically robust and had good predictive power which can be successfully utilized for screening of new molecules. PMID:23286784

  10. Small molecule inhibitors of the LEDGF site of human immunodeficiency virus integrase identified by fragment screening and structure based design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas S Peat

    Full Text Available A fragment-based screen against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV integrase led to a number of compounds that bound to the lens epithelium derived growth factor (LEDGF binding site of the integrase catalytic core domain. We determined the crystallographic structures of complexes of the HIV integrase catalytic core domain for 10 of these compounds and quantitated the binding by surface plasmon resonance. We demonstrate that the compounds inhibit the interaction of LEDGF with HIV integrase in a proximity AlphaScreen assay, an assay for the LEDGF enhancement of HIV integrase strand transfer and in a cell based assay. The compounds identified represent a potential framework for the development of a new series of HIV integrase inhibitors that do not bind to the catalytic site of the enzyme.

  11. Self-assessment test on concepts related to Anodic Stripping Voltammetry (ASV)

    OpenAIRE

    Milla González, Miguel; Espada Bellido, Estrella

    2014-01-01

    This exercise is intended to reinforce and assess knowledge on Anodic Stripping Voltammetry (ASV) as an electroanalytical technique. It is designed as a multiple entry test in which several options for a concept related to this analysis technique is proposed. The exercise can be resolved page to page (answers are ticked and the truth or falsity of the chosen option is obtained) or globally. In the latter, the user ticks the "correct" answers and obtains a grade at the end of the test. Going ...

  12. As(V), Cr(III) and Cr(VI) sorption on biochars and soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamadopoulos, Evan; Agrafioti, Evita; Kalderis, Dimitrios

    2014-05-01

    The use of biochar, as a cost effective sorbent for heavy metal removal from contaminated water and soils is becoming a very promising practice. In this study, rice husk, the organic fraction of solid wastes, as well as sewage sludge were used as precursors for biochar production. The first was chosen as one of the most abundant types of biomass worldwide and the other two in order to find alternative innovative uses of these wastes. A series of batch kinetic and equilibrium (sorption and desorption) experiments was conducted using As(V), Cr(III) and Cr(VI) as adsorbates. The specific heavy metals were chosen in order to assess biochars removal capacity towards both anionic and cationic metals. Apart from biochars, a sandy loam soil was also used as adsorbent for metal removal. Knowing the separate behavior of biochars and soil towards metal sorption, it could be the first step in explaining the fate of heavy metals in a biochar amended soil. The kinetic study showed that, for all adsorbents and metals examined, sorption can be well described by the pseudo-second order kinetic model. What is more, simulation of sorption isotherms gave a better fit for the Freundlich model, possibly due to the heterogeneous surface of the initial biomasses and the fine aggregates that soil consists of. Based on the equilibrium study, the materials examined removed more than 95% of the initial Cr(III). This is possibly related to the electrostatic interactions between adsorbents negative surface charge and Cr(III) cations. However, removal rates for As(V) and Cr(VI) anions were significantly lower. Biochar derived from sewage sludge was efficient in removing 89% of Cr(VI) and 53% of As(V). Its ash high Fe2O3 content may have enhanced metal adsorption via precipitation. Soil was the most effective material for the removal of As(V), yet it could not strongly retain metal anions compared to biochars, as a significant amount of the adsorbed metal was released during desorption

  13. A Resolvase-like Protein is required for the Site-Specific Integration of the Temperate Lactococcal Bacteriophage TP901-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Bettina; Brøndsted, Lone; Vogensen, Finn K.; Hammer, Karin

    1996-01-01

    -180 amino acids of Orf1 showed 38-44 % similarity to the resolvase group of site-specific integrases, while no similarity to known proteins was found in the C-terminal end. Bacteriophage TP901-1 therefore contains a unique integration system, not resembling the Int-class of site-specific integrases usually...

  14. Effect of calcium on adsorptive removal of As(III) and As(V) by iron oxide-based adsorbents

    KAUST Repository

    Uwamariya, V.

    2014-06-25

    The effects of calcium on the equilibrium adsorption capacity of As(III) and As(V) onto iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS) and granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) were investigated through batch experiments, rapid small-scale column tests (RSSCT) and kinetics modelling. Batch experiments showed that at calcium concentrations≤20 mg/L, high As(III) and As(V) removal efficiencies by IOCS and GFH are achieved at pH 6. An increase of the calcium concentration to 40 and 80 mg/L reversed this trend, giving higher removal efficiencies at higher pH (8). The adsorption capacities of IOCS and GFH at an equilibrium arsenic concentration of 10 g/L were found to be between 2.0 and 3.1 mg/g for synthetic water without calcium and between 2.8 and 5.3 mg/g when 80 mg/L of calcium was present at the studied pH values. After 10 hours of filter run in RSSCT, approximately 1000 empty bed volumes, the ratios of C/Co for As(V) were 26% and 18% for calcium-free model water; and only 1% and 0.2% after addition of 80 mg/L of Ca for filter columns with IOCS and GFH, respectively. The adsorption of As(III) and As(V) onto GFH follows a second-order reaction, with and without addition of calcium. The adsorption of As(III) and As(V) onto IOCS follows a first-order reaction without calcium addition, and moves to the second-reaction-order kinetics when calcium is added. Based on the intraparticle diffusion model, the main controlling mechanism for As(III) adsorption is intraparticle diffusion, while surface diffusion contributes greatly to the adsorption of As(V).

  15. Present status of promotion of advanced safety vehicle in phase 2 (ASV2); Dai 2 ki senshin anzen jidosha (ASV) suishin keikaku ni okeru kenkyu jokyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    For active safety enhancement, drivers will be provided with information and warning that will help them drive with safety. Studies are under way about functions to facilitate drivers' perception and to lighten the burdens imposed on them. As for accident avoidance techniques, onboard systems will perform controls involving vehicle maneuver for safety enhancement. This includes the improvement of vehicle maneuvering performance, in addition to brake control and steering control, for lightening drivers' burdens and for complementing their operating skill. Danger avoidance is based on the concept that the related system is to work in case warnings alone are not enough to avoid a collision. Full automation will be implemented by two ways, the autonomous way aided by the existing infrastructures such as GPS (Global Positioning System) or the way in which infrastructures to be newly built will be utilized. Passive safety technologies aim at minimizing damage upon collision, and involve structural improvement, air bags, etc. Disaster aggravation prevention means to prevent disaster from spreading after collision. Communication is one of safety-related elements on which studies will continue. Under the Phase 2 ASV program, research and development will be conducted for putting passenger cars to practical use, and the same will be conducted, in the case of large vehicles and motorcycles, for the construction of their prototypes. (NEDO)

  16. The mechanisms of detoxification of As(III), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and As(V) in the microalga Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantoja Munoz, L; Purchase, D; Jones, H; Raab, A; Urgast, D; Feldmann, J; Garelick, H

    2016-06-01

    The response of Chlorella vulgaris when challenged by As(III), As(V) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) was assessed through experiments on adsorption, efflux and speciation of arsenic (reduction, oxidation, methylation and chelation with glutathione/phytochelatin [GSH/PC]). Our study indicates that at high concentrations of phosphate (1.62mM of HPO4(2-)), upon exposure to As(V), cells are able to shift towards methylation of As(V) rather than PC formation. Treatment with As(V) caused a moderate decrease in intracellular pH and a strong increase in the concentration of free thiols (GSH). Passive surface adsorption was found to be negligible for living cells exposed to DMA and As(V). However, adsorption of As(III) was observed to be an active process in C. vulgaris, because it did not show saturation at any of the exposure periods. Chelation of As(III) with GS/PC and to a lesser extent hGS/hPC is a major detoxification mechanism employed by C. vulgaris cells when exposed to As(III). The increase of bound As-GS/PC complexes was found to be strongly related to an increase in concentration of As(III) in media. C. vulgaris cells did not produce any As-GS/PC complex when exposed to As(V). This may indicate that a reduction step is needed for As(V) complexation with GSH/PC. C. vulgaris cells formed DMAS(V)-GS upon exposure to DMA independent of the exposure period. As(III) triggers the formation of arsenic complexes with PC and homophytochelatins (hPC) and their compartmentalisation to vacuoles. A conceptual model was devised to explain the mechanisms involving ABCC1/2 transport. The potential of C. vulgaris to bio-remediate arsenic from water appeared to be highly selective and effective without the potential hazard of reducing As(V) to As(III), which is more toxic to humans. PMID:26994369

  17. Speciation of As(III) and As(V) in biological tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weigert, P.; Sappl, A.

    1983-10-01

    A determination of the valency of inorganic arsenic by the AAS method described will not meet with problems in cases where trivalent and/or pentavalent arsenic is present in a solution that is suitable for measurement by means of AAS. Since reference materials with a certified As(III) content are not available, organic material with admixtures of As(III) and As(V), respectively, was used in studies of the influence of methods of digestion upon the valency of arsenic. In the studies described, all methods of mineralization used were found to change the original valency of arsenic to a degree that was not reproducible. Mainly, processes of oxidation were observed.

  18. Chemistry and Structure-Activity Relationship of the Styrylquinoline-Type HIV Integrase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didier Desmaële

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In spite of significant progress in anti-HIV-1 therapy, current antiviral chemo-therapy still suffers from deleterious side effects and emerging drug resistance. Therefore, the development of novel antiviral drugs remains a crucial issue for the fight against AIDS. HIV-1 integrase is a key enzyme in the replication cycle of the retrovirus since it catalyzes the integration of the reverse transcribed viral DNA into the chromosomal DNA. Efforts to develop anti-integrase drugs started during the early nineties, culminating with the recent approval of Raltegravir. The discovery and the development of the styrylquinoline inhibitor class was an important step in the overall process. In this review we have described the key synthetic issues and the structure-activity relationship of this family of integrase inhibitors. Crystallographic and docking studies that shed light on their mechanism of action are also examined.

  19. A method for producing transgenic cells using a multi-integrase system on a human artificial chromosome vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeyuki Yamaguchi

    Full Text Available The production of cells capable of expressing gene(s of interest is important for a variety of applications in biomedicine and biotechnology, including gene therapy and animal transgenesis. The ability to insert transgenes at a precise location in the genome, using site-specific recombinases such as Cre, FLP, and ΦC31, has major benefits for the efficiency of transgenesis. Recent work on integrases from ΦC31, R4, TP901-1 and Bxb1 phages demonstrated that these recombinases catalyze site-specific recombination in mammalian cells. In the present study, we examined the activities of integrases on site-specific recombination and gene expression in mammalian cells. We designed a human artificial chromosome (HAC vector containing five recombination sites (ΦC31 attP, R4 attP, TP901-1 attP, Bxb1 attP and FRT; multi-integrase HAC vector and de novo mammalian codon-optimized integrases. The multi-integrase HAC vector has several functions, including gene integration in a precise locus and avoiding genomic position effects; therefore, it was used as a platform to investigate integrase activities. Integrases carried out site-specific recombination at frequencies ranging from 39.3-96.8%. Additionally, we observed homogenous gene expression in 77.3-87.5% of colonies obtained using the multi-integrase HAC vector. This vector is also transferable to another cell line, and is capable of accepting genes of interest in this environment. These data suggest that integrases have high DNA recombination efficiencies in mammalian cells. The multi-integrase HAC vector enables us to produce transgene-expressing cells efficiently and create platform cell lines for gene expression.

  20. Pharmacovirological impact of an integrase inhibitor on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 cDNA species in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffinet, Christine; Allespach, Ina; Oberbremer, Lena; Golden, Pamela L; Foster, Scott A; Johns, Brian A; Weatherhead, Jason G; Novick, Steven J; Chiswell, Karen E; Garvey, Edward P; Keppler, Oliver T

    2009-08-01

    Clinical trials of the first approved integrase inhibitor (INI), raltegravir, have demonstrated a drop in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA loads of infected patients that was unexpectedly more rapid than that with a potent reverse transcriptase inhibitor, and apparently dose independent. These clinical outcomes are not understood. In tissue culture, although their inhibition of integration is well documented, the effects of INIs on levels of unintegrated HIV-1 cDNAs have been variable. Furthermore, there has been no report to date on an INI's effect on these episomal species in vivo. Here, we show that prophylactic treatment of transgenic rats with the strand transfer INI GSK501015 reduced levels of viral integrants in the spleen by up to 99.7%. Episomal two-long-terminal-repeat (LTR) circles accumulated up to sevenfold in this secondary lymphoid organ, and this inversely correlated with the impact on the proviral burden. Contrasting raltegravir's dose-ranging study with HIV patients, titration of GSK501015 in HIV-infected animals demonstrated dependence of the INI's antiviral effect on its serum concentration. Furthermore, the in vivo 50% effective concentration calculated from these data best matched GSK501015's in vitro potency when serum protein binding was accounted for. Collectively, this study demonstrates a titratable, antipodal impact of an INI on integrated and episomal HIV-1 cDNAs in vivo. Based on these findings and known biological characteristics of viral episomes, we discuss how integrase inhibition may result in additional indirect antiviral effects that contribute to more rapid HIV-1 decay in HIV/AIDS patients. PMID:19458008

  1. Discovery of small-molecule HIV-1 fusion and integrase inhibitors oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol: Part I. Integrase inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have identified oleuropein (Ole) and hydroxytyrosol (HT) as a unique class of HIV-1 inhibitors from olive leaf extracts effective against viral fusion and integration. We used molecular docking simulation to study the interactions of Ole and HT with viral targets. We find that Ole and HT bind to the conserved hydrophobic pocket on the surface of the HIV-gp41 fusion domain by hydrogen bonds with Q577 and hydrophobic interactions with I573, G572, and L568 on the gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat peptide N36, interfering with formation of the gp41 fusion-active core. To test and confirm modeling predications, we examined the effect of Ole and HT on HIV-1 fusion complex formation using native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Ole and HT exhibit dose-dependent inhibition on HIV-1 fusion core formation with EC50s of 66-58 nM, with no detectable toxicity. Our findings on effects of HIV-1 integrase are reported in the subsequent article

  2. TISSUE DISTRIBUTION OF INORGANIC ARSENIC (AS) AND ITS METHYLATED METABOLITES IN MICE FOLLOWING ORAL ADMINISTRATION OF ARSENATE (ASV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    TISSUE DISTRIBUTION OF INORGANIC ARSENIC (iAs) AND ITS METHYLATED METABOLITES IN MICE FOLLOWING ORAL ADMINISTRATION OF ARSENATE (AsV). E M Kenyon1, L M Del Razo2, and M F Hughes1. 1NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC, USA; 2CINVESTAV-IPN, Mexico City, Mexico.The relationship o...

  3. Quantitative prediction of integrase inhibitor resistance from genotype through consensus linear regression modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Integrase inhibitors (INI) form a new drug class in the treatment of HIV-1 patients. We developed a linear regression modeling approach to make a quantitative raltegravir (RAL) resistance phenotype prediction, as Fold Change in IC50 against a wild type virus, from mutations in the integrase genotype. Methods We developed a clonal genotype-phenotype database with 991 clones from 153 clinical isolates of INI naïve and RAL treated patients, and 28 site-directed mutants. We did the development of the RAL linear regression model in two stages, employing a genetic algorithm (GA) to select integrase mutations by consensus. First, we ran multiple GAs to generate first order linear regression models (GA models) that were stochastically optimized to reach a goal R2 accuracy, and consisted of a fixed-length subset of integrase mutations to estimate INI resistance. Secondly, we derived a consensus linear regression model in a forward stepwise regression procedure, considering integrase mutations or mutation pairs by descending prevalence in the GA models. Results The most frequently occurring mutations in the GA models were 92Q, 97A, 143R and 155H (all 100%), 143G (90%), 148H/R (89%), 148K (88%), 151I (81%), 121Y (75%), 143C (72%), and 74M (69%). The RAL second order model contained 30 single mutations and five mutation pairs (p INI naïve patients. Conclusions We describe a systematic approach to derive a model for predicting INI resistance from a limited amount of clonal samples. Our RAL second order model is made available as an Additional file for calculating a resistance phenotype as the sum of integrase mutations and mutation pairs. PMID:23282253

  4. Subtype diversity associated with the development of HIV-1 resistance to integrase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Bluma G; Lowe, Matthew; Moisi, Daniela; Hardy, Isabelle; Gagnon, Simon; Charest, Hugues; Baril, Jean Guy; Wainberg, Mark A; Roger, Michel

    2011-05-01

    We used genotypic and phylogenetic analysis to determine integrase diversity among subtypes, and studied natural polymorphisms and mutations implicated in resistance to integrase inhibitors (INI) in treatment-naïve persons (n = 220) and -experienced individuals (n = 24). Phylogenetics revealed 7 and 10% inter-subtype diversity in the integrase and reverse transcriptase (RT)/protease regions, respectively. Integrase sequencing identified a novel A/B recombinant in which all viruses in a male-sex-male (MSM) transmission cluster (n = 12) appeared to possess subtype B in integrase and subtype A in the remainder of the pol region. Natural variations and signature polymorphisms were observed at codon positions 140, 148, 151, 157, and 160 among HIV subtypes. These variations predicted higher genetic barriers to G140S and G140C in subtypes C, CRF02_AG, and A/CRF01_AE, as well as higher genetic barriers toward acquisition of V151I in subtypes CRF02_AG and A/CRF01_AE. The E157Q and E160Q mutational motif was observed in 35% of INI-naïve patients harboring subtype C infections, indicating intra-subtype variations. Thirteen patients failed raltegravir (RAL)-containing regimens within 8 ± 1 months, in association with the major Q148K/R/H and G140A/S (n = 8/24) or N155H (n = 5/24) mutational pathways. Of note, the remaining patients on RAL regimens for 14 ± 3 months harbored no or only minor integrase mutations/polymorphisms (T66I, T97A, H114P, S119P, A124S, G163R, I203M, R263K). These results demonstrate the importance of understanding subtype variability in the development of resistance to INIs. PMID:21360548

  5. Identification of minority resistance mutations in the HIV-1 integrase coding region using next generation sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonager, Jannik; Larsson, Jonas T; Hussing, Christian;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The current widely applied standard method to screen for HIV-1 genotypic resistance is based on Sanger population sequencing (Sseq), which does not allow for the identification of minority variants (MVs) below the limit of detection for the Sseq-method in patients receiving integrase...... mutations were detected by NGS analysis of integrase sequences from all three INSTI Res+ and one INSTI Res- patient. CONCLUSION: Our observations suggested that NGS demonstrated a higher sensitivity than sSEQ in the identification of INSTI relevant MVs both in patients at treatment baseline and in patients...

  6. Biosorption of Cr(VI) and As(V) at high concentrations by organic and inorganic wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    María Rivas Pérez, Ivana; Paradelo Núñez, Remigio; Nóvoa Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Arias Estévez, Manuel; José Fernández Sanjurjo, María; Álvarez Rodríguez, Esperanza; Núñez Delgado, Avelino

    2016-04-01

    The potential reutilization of several wastes as biosorbents for As(V) and Cr(VI) has been assessed in batch-type experiments. The materials studied were one inorganic: mussel shell, and three organic: pine bark, oak ash and hemp waste. Batch experiments were performed in order to determine the removal capacity of the wastes under conditions of high As(V) and Cr(VI) loads. For this, 3 g of each waste material were added with 30 mL NaNO3 0.01 M dissolutions containing 0, 0.5, 1.5, 3 and 6 mmol As(V) L‑1 or Cr(VI) L‑1, prepared from analytical grade Na2HAsO4 or K2Cr2O7. The resulting suspensions were shaken for 24 h, centrifuged and filtered. Once each batch experiment corresponding to the sorption trials ended, each individual sample was added with 30 mL of NaNO3 0.01 M to desorb As(V) or Cr(VI), shaken for 24 h, centrifuged and filtered as in the sorption trials. Oak ash showed high sorption (>76%) and low desorption (98%) with very low desorption (<0.5%), followed by oak ash (27% sorption), and hemp waste and mussel shell, that presented very low Cr(VI) sorption (<10%). Sorption data for both elements were better described by the Freundlich than by the Langmuir model. The variable results obtained for the removal of the two anionic contaminants for a given sorbent suggest that different mechanisms govern removal from the solution in each case. In summary, oak ash would be an efficient sorbent material for As(V), but not for Cr(VI), while pine bark would be the best sorbent for Cr(VI) removal.

  7. Role of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase in uncoating of the viral core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briones, Marisa S; Dobard, Charles W; Chow, Samson A

    2010-05-01

    After membrane fusion with a target cell, the core of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) enters into the cytoplasm, where uncoating occurs. The cone-shaped core is composed of the viral capsid protein (CA), which disassembles during uncoating. The underlying factors and mechanisms governing uncoating are poorly understood. Several CA mutations can cause changes in core stability and a block at reverse transcription, demonstrating the requirement for optimal core stability during viral replication. HIV-1 integrase (IN) catalyzes the insertion of the viral cDNA into the host genome, and certain IN mutations are pleiotropic. Similar to some CA mutants, two IN mutants, one with a complete deletion of IN (NL-DeltaIN) and the other with a Cys-to-Ser substitution (NL-C130S), were noninfectious, with a replication block at reverse transcription. Compared to the wild type (WT), the cytoplasmic CA levels of the IN mutants in infected cells were reduced, suggesting accelerated uncoating. The role of IN during uncoating was examined by isolating and characterizing cores from NL-DeltaIN and NL-C130S. Both IN mutants could form functional cores, but the core yield and stability were decreased. Also, virion incorporation of cyclophilin A (CypA), a cellular peptidyl-prolyl isomerase that binds specifically to CA, was decreased in the IN mutants. Cores isolated from WT virus depleted of CypA had an unstable-core phenotype, confirming a role of CypA in promoting optimal core stability. Taken together, our results indicate that IN is required during uncoating for maintaining CypA-CA interaction, which promotes optimal stability of the viral core. PMID:20219923

  8. Inhibition of HIV-1 integrase nuclear import and replication by a peptide bearing integrase putative nuclear localization signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waigmann Elisabeth

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The integrase (IN of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 has been implicated in different steps during viral replication, including nuclear import of the viral pre-integration complex. The exact mechanisms underlying the nuclear import of IN and especially the question of whether it bears a functional nuclear localization signal (NLS remain controversial. Results Here, we studied the nuclear import pathway of IN by using multiple in vivo and in vitro systems. Nuclear import was not observed in an importin α temperature-sensitive yeast mutant, indicating an importin α-mediated process. Direct interaction between the full-length IN and importin α was demonstrated in vivo using bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay (BiFC. Nuclear import studies in yeast cells, with permeabilized mammalian cells, or microinjected cultured mammalian cells strongly suggest that the IN bears a NLS domain located between residues 161 and 173. A peptide bearing this sequence -NLS-IN peptide- inhibited nuclear accumulation of IN in transfected cell-cycle arrested cells. Integration of viral cDNA as well as HIV-1 replication in viral cell-cycle arrested infected cells were blocked by the NLS-IN peptide. Conclusion Our present findings support the view that nuclear import of IN occurs via the importin α pathway and is promoted by a specific NLS domain. This import could be blocked by NLS-IN peptide, resulting in inhibition of viral infection, confirming the view that nuclear import of the viral pre-integration complex is mediated by viral IN.

  9. Mapping of HIV-1 integrase preferences for target site selection with various oligonucleotides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Snášel, Jan; Rosenberg, Ivan; Pačes, Ondřej; Pichová, Iva

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 488, č. 2 (2009), s. 153-162. ISSN 0003-9861 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06077 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : HIV integrase * strand transfer reaction * oligonucleotide substrates Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.046, year: 2009

  10. Integrase Inhibitor Prodrugs: Approaches to Enhancing the Anti-HIV Activity of β-Diketo Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasu Nair

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available HIV integrase, encoded at the 3′-end of the HIV pol gene, is essential for HIV replication. This enzyme catalyzes the incorporation of HIV DNA into human DNA, which represents the point of “no-return” in HIV infection. Integrase is a significant target in anti-HIV drug discovery. This review article focuses largely on the design of integrase inhibitors that are β-diketo acids constructed on pyridinone scaffolds. Methodologies for synthesis of these compounds are discussed. Integrase inhibition data for the strand transfer (ST step are compared with in vitro anti-HIV data. The review also examines the issue of the lack of correlation between the ST enzymology data and anti-HIV assay results. Because this disconnect appeared to be a problem associated with permeability, prodrugs of these inhibitors were designed and synthesized. Prodrugs dramatically improved the anti-HIV activity data. For example, for compound, 96, the anti-HIV activity (EC50 improved from 500 nM for this diketo acid to 9 nM for its prodrug 116. In addition, there was excellent correlation between the IC50 and IC90 ST enzymology data for 96 (6 nM and 97 nM, respectively and the EC50 and EC90 anti-HIV data for its prodrug 116 (9 nM and 94 nM, respectively. Finally, it was confirmed that the prodrug 116 was rapidly hydrolyzed in cells to the active compound 96.

  11. Integrase Inhibitor Prodrugs: Approaches to Enhancing the Anti-HIV Activity of β-Diketo Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Vasu; Okello, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    HIV integrase, encoded at the 3'-end of the HIV pol gene, is essential for HIV replication. This enzyme catalyzes the incorporation of HIV DNA into human DNA, which represents the point of "no-return" in HIV infection. Integrase is a significant target in anti-HIV drug discovery. This review article focuses largely on the design of integrase inhibitors that are β-diketo acids constructed on pyridinone scaffolds. Methodologies for synthesis of these compounds are discussed. Integrase inhibition data for the strand transfer (ST) step are compared with in vitro anti-HIV data. The review also examines the issue of the lack of correlation between the ST enzymology data and anti-HIV assay results. Because this disconnect appeared to be a problem associated with permeability, prodrugs of these inhibitors were designed and synthesized. Prodrugs dramatically improved the anti-HIV activity data. For example, for compound, 96, the anti-HIV activity (EC50) improved from 500 nM for this diketo acid to 9 nM for its prodrug 116. In addition, there was excellent correlation between the IC50 and IC90 ST enzymology data for 96 (6 nM and 97 nM, respectively) and the EC50 and EC90 anti-HIV data for its prodrug 116 (9 nM and 94 nM, respectively). Finally, it was confirmed that the prodrug 116 was rapidly hydrolyzed in cells to the active compound 96. PMID:26184144

  12. Simulink-Based Simulation Architecture for Evaluating Controls for Aerospace Vehicles (SAREC-ASV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christhilf, David m.; Bacon, Barton J.

    2006-01-01

    The Simulation Architecture for Evaluating Controls for Aerospace Vehicles (SAREC-ASV) is a Simulink-based approach to providing an engineering quality desktop simulation capability for finding trim solutions, extracting linear models for vehicle analysis and control law development, and generating open-loop and closed-loop time history responses for control system evaluation. It represents a useful level of maturity rather than a finished product. The layout is hierarchical and supports concurrent component development and validation, with support from the Concurrent Versions System (CVS) software management tool. Real Time Workshop (RTW) is used to generate pre-compiled code for substantial component modules, and templates permit switching seamlessly between original Simulink and code compiled for various platforms. Two previous limitations are addressed. Turn around time for incorporating tabular model components was improved through auto-generation of required Simulink diagrams based on data received in XML format. The layout was modified to exploit a Simulink "compile once, evaluate multiple times" capability for zero elapsed time for use in trimming and linearizing. Trim is achieved through a Graphical User Interface (GUI) with a narrow, script definable interface to the vehicle model which facilitates incorporating new models.

  13. Speciation of As(III), As(V), MMA and DMA in contaminated soil extracts by HPLC-ICP/MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bissen, M.; Frimmel, F.H. [Engler-Bunte-Institut, Univ. Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2000-05-01

    A method to separate and quantify two inorganic arsenic species As(III) and As(V) and two organic arsenic species, monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), by HPLC-ICP/MS has been developed. The separation of arsenic species was achieved on the anionic exchange column IonPac {sup trademark} AS11 (Dionex) with NaOH as mobile phase. The technique was successfully applied to analyze extracts of two contaminated soils, sampled at a former tannery site (soil 1) and a former paint production site (soil 2). The soils were extracted at pH values similar to the natural environment. Extractions were performed at different pH values with 0.3 M ammonium oxalate (pH = 3), milli-Q water (pH = 5.8), 0.3 M sodium carbonate (pH = 8) and 0.3 M sodium bicarbonate (pH = 11). No organically bound arsenic was found in the extracts. As(V) was the major component. Only up to 0.04% of the total arsenic contained in soil 1 were mobilized. The highest amount of extracted arsenic was found at the highest pH. In the milli-Q water extract of soil 1 As(III) and As(V) were found. High amounts of As(V) were found in the extracts of soil 2. Up to 20% of the total arsenic bound to soil 2 constituents were released. The results show that the mobilization of arsenic depended on the pH value of the extraction solution and the kind of extracted soil. Dramatic consequences have to be expected for pH changes in the environment especially in cases where soils contain high amounts of mobile arsenic. (orig.)

  14. Synthesis of 6-sulfamoyl-4-oxoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid derivatives as integrase antagonists with anti-HIV activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zai Gang Luo; Cheng Chu Zeng; Lei Fu Yang; Hong Qiu He; Cun Xin Wang; Li Ming Hu

    2009-01-01

    A series of novel 6-sulfamoyl-4-oxoquinoline-3-earboxylic acids derivatives have been synthesized and screened for HIV integrase inhibition activity. Their structures were confirmed by ESI-MS, 1H NMR and 13C NMR.

  15. Discovery of a novel HIV-1 integrase inhibitor from natural compounds through structure based virtual screening and cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wan-Gang; Zhang, Xuan; Ip, Denis Tsz-Ming; Yang, Liu-Meng; Zheng, Yong-Tang; Wan, David Chi-Cheong

    2014-09-17

    The interaction between HIV-1 integrase and LEDGF/P75 has been validated as a target for anti-HIV drug development. Based on the crystal structure of integrase in complex with LEDGF/P75, a library containing 80 thousand natural compounds was filtered with virtual screening. 11 hits were selected for cell based assays. One compound, 3-(1,3-benzothiazol-2-yl)-8-{[bis(2-hydroxyethyl)amino]methyl}-7-hydroxy-2H-chromen-2-one (D719) inhibited integrase nuclear translocation in cell imaging. The binding mode of D719 was analyzed with molecular simulation. The anti-HIV activity of D719 was assayed by measuring the p24 antigen production in acute infection. The structure characteristics of D719 may provide valuable information for integrase inhibitor design. PMID:25128456

  16. Notable Difference in anti-HIV Activity of Integrase Inhibitors as a Consequence of Geometric and Enantiomeric Configurations

    OpenAIRE

    Okello, Maurice; Mishra, Sanjay; Nishonov, Malik; Nair, Vasu

    2013-01-01

    While some examples are known of integrase inhibitors that exhibit potent anti-HIV activity, there are very few cases reported of integrase inhibitors that show significant differences in anti-HIV activity that result from distinctions in cis-and trans-configurations as well as enantiomeric stereostructure. We describe here the design and synthesis of two enantiomeric trans-hydroxycyclopentyl carboxamides which exhibit notable difference in anti-HIV activity. This difference is explained thro...

  17. Actinophage R4 integrase-based site-specific chromosomal integration of non-replicative closed circular DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Takamasa; Nishizawa, Akito; Nishizawa, Tomoyasu; Asayama, Munehiko; Shirai, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    The actinophage R4 integrase (Sre)-based molecular genetic engineering system was developed for the chromosomal integration of multiple genes in Escherichia coli. A cloned DNA fragment containing two attP sites, green fluorescent protein (gfp) as a first transgene, and an antibiotic resistance gene as a selection marker was self-ligated to generate non-replicative closed circular DNA (nrccDNA) for integration. nrccDNA was introduced into attB-inserted E. coli cells harboring the plasmid expressing Sre by electroporation. The expressed Sre catalyzed site-specific integration between one of the two attP sites on nrccDNA and the attB site on the E. coli chromosome. The integration frequency was affected by the chromosomal location of the target site. A second nrccDNA containing two attB sites, lacZα encoding the alpha fragment of β-galactosidase as a transgene, and another antibiotic resistance gene was integrated into the residual attP site on the gfp-integrated E. coli chromosome via one of the two attB sites according to reiterating site-specific recombination. The integrants clearly exhibited β-galactosidase activity and green fluorescence, suggesting the simultaneous expression of multiple recombinant proteins in E. coli. The results of the present study showed that a step-by-step integration procedure using nrccDNA achieved the chromosomal integration of multiple genes. PMID:26870903

  18. Comparison of Fe-Al-modified natural materials by an electrochemical method and chemical precipitation for the adsorption of F(-) and As(V).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez Mejía, G; Martínez-Miranda, V; Fall, C; Linares-Hernández, I; Solache-Ríos, M

    2016-03-01

    The adsorption of fluoride and arsenic ions by modified natural materials may have an impact on the removal of F(-) and As(V) from waters. In this work, a zeolitic material and pozzolan (commonly known as pumicite) were modified with aluminium an iron by an electrochemical method and chemical precipitation, respectively. The adsorbents were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy with energy X-ray disperse spectroscopy analysis and the point of zero charge (pHzpc). F(-) and As(V) adsorption properties of both materials were investigated. Adsorption kinetic data were best fitted to pseudo-second-order model and equilibrium data to the Langmuir isotherm model. The highest F(-) and As(V) sorption capacities were obtained for modified zeolitic (0.866 mg/g) and pozzolan (3.35 mg/g) materials, respectively, with initial F(-) or As(V) concentrations of 10 mg/L. It was found that the unmodified materials did not show either adsorption of F(-) ions or As(V), which indicated that Al and Fe in the adsorbents are responsible for the adsorption of these ions. In general, both modified materials show similar capacities for the adsorption of F(-) and As(V). PMID:26362939

  19. Optimization of Streptomyces bacteriophage φC31 integrase system to prevent post integrative gene silencing in pulmonary type II cells

    OpenAIRE

    Aneja, Manish Kumar; Geiger, Johannes; Imker, Rabea; Üzgün, Senta; Kormann, Michael; Hasenpusch, Guenther; Maucksch, Christof; Rudolph, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    φC31 integrase has emerged as a potent tool for achieving long-term gene expression in different tissues. The present study aimed at optimizing elements of φC31 integrase system for alveolar type II cells. Luciferase and β-galactosidase activities were measured at different time points post transfection. 5-Aza-2'deoxycytidine (AZA) and trichostatin A (TSA) were used to inhibit DNA methyltransferase and histone deacetylase complex (HDAC) respectively. In A549 cells, expression of the integrase...

  20. Novel 3′-Processing Integrase Activity Assay by Real-Time PCR for Screening and Identification of HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Supachai Sakkhachornphop; Weeraya Thongkum; Chatchai Tayapiwatana

    2015-01-01

    The 3′-end processing (3′P) of each viral long terminal repeat (LTR) during human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) integration is a vital step in the HIV life cycle. Blocking the 3′P using 3′P inhibitor has recently become an attractive strategy for HIV-1 therapeutic intervention. Recently, we have developed a novel real-time PCR based assay for the detection of 3′P activity in vitro. The methodology usually involves biotinylated HIV-1 LTR, HIV-1 integrase (IN), and specific primers and ...

  1. Cancer-specific binary expression system activated in mice by bacteriophage HK022 Integrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Amer; Spector, Itay; Sogolovsky-Bard, Ilana; Gritsenko, Natalia; Rask, Lene; Mainbakh, Yuli; Zilberstein, Yael; Yagil, Ezra; Kolot, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Binary systems based on site-specific recombination have been used for tumor specific transcription targeting of suicide genes in animal models. In these binary systems a site specific recombinase or integrase that is expressed from a tumor specific promoter drives tumor specific expression of a cytotoxic gene. In the present study we developed a new cancer specific binary expression system activated by the Integrase (Int) of the lambdoid phage HK022. We demonstrate the validity of this system by the specific expression of a luciferase (luc) reporter in human embryonic kidney 293T (HEK293T) cells and in a lung cancer mouse model. Due to the absence viral vectors and of cytotoxicity the Int based binary system offers advantages over previously described counterparts and may therefore be developed into a safer cancer cell killing system. PMID:27117628

  2. Molecular modeling study on the allosteric inhibition mechanism of HIV-1 integrase by LEDGF/p75 binding site inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Xue

    Full Text Available HIV-1 integrase (IN is essential for the integration of viral DNA into the host genome and an attractive therapeutic target for developing antiretroviral inhibitors. LEDGINs are a class of allosteric inhibitors targeting LEDGF/p75 binding site of HIV-1 IN. Yet, the detailed binding mode and allosteric inhibition mechanism of LEDGINs to HIV-1 IN is only partially understood, which hinders the structure-based design of more potent anti-HIV agents. A molecular modeling study combining molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, and binding free energy calculation were performed to investigate the interaction details of HIV-1 IN catalytic core domain (CCD with two recently discovered LEDGINs BI-1001 and CX14442, as well as the LEDGF/p75 protein. Simulation results demonstrated the hydrophobic domain of BI-1001 and CX14442 engages one subunit of HIV-1 IN CCD dimer through hydrophobic interactions, and the hydrophilic group forms hydrogen bonds with HIV-1 IN CCD residues from other subunit. CX14442 has a larger tert-butyl group than the methyl of BI-1001, and forms better interactions with the highly hydrophobic binding pocket of HIV-1 IN CCD dimer interface, which can explain the stronger affinity of CX14442 than BI-1001. Analysis of the binding mode of LEDGF/p75 with HIV-1 IN CCD reveals that the LEDGF/p75 integrase binding domain residues Ile365, Asp366, Phe406 and Val408 have significant contributions to the binding of the LEDGF/p75 to HIV1-IN. Remarkably, we found that binding of BI-1001 and CX14442 to HIV-1 IN CCD induced the structural rearrangements of the 140 s loop and oration displacements of the side chains of the three conserved catalytic residues Asp64, Asp116, and Glu152 located at the active site. These results we obtained will be valuable not only for understanding the allosteric inhibition mechanism of LEDGINs but also for the rational design of allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 IN targeting LEDGF/p75 binding site.

  3. Identifying and Characterizing a Functional HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase-binding Site on Integrase*

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkinson, Thomas A.; Januszyk, Kurt; Phillips, Martin L.; Tekeste, Shewit S.; Zhang, Min; Miller, Jennifer T.; Stuart F. J. Le Grice; Clubb, Robert T.; Chow, Samson A

    2009-01-01

    Integrase (IN) from human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) exerts pleiotropic effects in the viral replication cycle. Besides integration, IN mutations can impact nuclear import, viral maturation, and reverse transcription. IN and reverse transcriptase (RT) interact in vitro, and the IN C-terminal domain (CTD) is both necessary and sufficient for binding RT. We used nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to identify a putative RT-binding surface on the IN CTD, a...

  4. 3-Hydroxypyrimidine-2,4-diones as an Inhibitor Scaffold of HIV Integrase

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Jing; Maddali, Kasthuraiah; Sham, Yuk Y.; Vince, Robert; Pommier, Yves; Wang, Zhengqiang

    2011-01-01

    Integrase (IN) represents a clinically validated target for the development of antivirals against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Inhibitors with a novel structure core are essential for combating resistance associated with known IN inhibitors (INIs). We have previously disclosed a novel dual inhibitor scaffold of HIV IN and reverse transcriptase (RT). Here we report the complete structure-activity relationship (SAR), molecular modeling and resistance profile of this inhibitor type on IN ...

  5. Solution Conformation and Dynamics of the HIV-1 Integrase Core Domain*

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzkee, Nicholas C.; Masse, James E.; Shen, Yang; Davies, David R.; Bax, Ad

    2010-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase (IN) is a critical enzyme involved in infection. It catalyzes two reactions to integrate the viral cDNA into the host genome, 3′ processing and strand transfer, but the dynamic behavior of the active site during catalysis of these two processes remains poorly characterized. NMR spectroscopy can reveal important structural details about enzyme mechanisms, but to date the IN catalytic core domain has proven resistant to such an analysis....

  6. Lack of Pharmacokinetic Interaction between Rilpivirine and Integrase Inhibitors Dolutegravir and GSK1265744

    OpenAIRE

    Ford, Susan L.; Gould, Elizabeth; Chen, Shuguang; Margolis, David; Spreen, William; Crauwels, Herta; Piscitelli, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Dolutegravir (DTG) and GSK1265744 are HIV integrase inhibitors (INIs) in clinical development. The oral formulation of rilpivirine (RPV), a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), has been approved for treatment-naive HIV infection. Long-acting depot injections of GSK1265744 and RPV are also being developed. This study evaluated the potential for drug interactions between RPV and these INIs. This phase 1, open-label, two-cohort, three-period, single-sequence crossover study eva...

  7. Sketching the historical development of pyrimidones as the inhibitors of the HIV integrase

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Rahul V.; Keum, Y.S.; Park, S. W.

    2015-01-01

    Heterocyclic substances perform a very unique role in drug design and discovery. This article provides the primary objectives of the analysis within pyrimidine centered new heterocyclic elements chronologically from their finding focusing on one of the essential enzyme of HIV virus particle that is integrase upon suppressing its strand transfer function. The class of compounds reviewed here includes bicyclic pyrimidines, dihydroxypyrimidines, pyrimidine-2,4-dinones, N-methylpyrimidones, pyran...

  8. Computer tools in the discovery of HIV-I integrase inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Chenzhong; Nicklaus, Marc C.

    2010-01-01

    Computer-aided drug design (CADD) methodologies have made great advances and contributed significantly to the discovery and/or optimization of many clinically used drugs in recent years. CADD tools have likewise been applied to the discovery of inhibitors of HIV-I integrase, a difficult and worthwhile target for the development of efficient anti-HIV drugs. This article reviews the application of CADD tools, including pharmacophore search, quantitative structure–activity relationships, model b...

  9. HIV-1 integrase inhibitors are substrates for the multidrug transporter MDR1-P-glycoprotein

    OpenAIRE

    Cara Andrea; Andreotti Mauro; Galluzzo Clementina; Verdoliva Antonio; Costi Roberta; Molinari Agnese; Dupuis Maria; Cianfriglia Maurizio; Di Santo Roberto; Palmisano Lucia

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The discovery of diketoacid-containing derivatives as inhibitors of HIV-1 Integrase (IN) (IN inhibitors, IINs) has played a major role in validating this enzyme as an important target for antiretroviral therapy. Since the in vivo efficacy depends on access of these drugs to intracellular sites where HIV-1 replicates, we determined whether the IINs are recognized by the multidrug transporter MDR1-P-glycoprotein (P-gp) thereby reducing their intracellular accumulation. To ad...

  10. LEDGINs inhibit late stage HIV-1 replication by modulating integrase multimerization in the virions

    OpenAIRE

    Desimmie, Belete Ayele; Schrijvers, Rik; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Borrenberghs, Doortje; Weydert, Caroline; Thys, Wannes; Vets, Sofie; Van Remoortel, Barbara; Hofkens, Johan; De Rijck, Jan; Hendrix, Jelle; Bannert, Norbert; Gijsbers, Rik; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger

    2013-01-01

    Background: LEDGINs are novel allosteric HIV integrase (IN) inhibitors that target the lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF)/p75 binding pocket of IN. They block HIV-1 integration by abrogating the interaction between LEDGF/p75 and IN as well as by allosterically inhibiting the catalytic activity of IN. Results: Here we demonstrate that LEDGINs reduce the replication capacity of HIV particles produced in their presence. We systematically studied the molecular basis of this late...

  11. Molecular mechanisms of retroviral integrase inhibition and the evolution of viral resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Hare, Stephen; Vos, Ann M.; Clayton, Reginald F.; Thuring, Jan W.; Cummings, Maxwell D.; Cherepanov, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The development of HIV integrase (IN) strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) and our understanding of viral resistance to these molecules have been hampered by a paucity of available structural data. We recently reported cocrystal structures of the prototype foamy virus (PFV) intasome with raltegravir and elvitegravir, establishing the general INSTI binding mode. We now present an expanded set of cocrystal structures containing PFV intasomes complexed with first- and second-generation INSTIs at ...

  12. The Promise of Dolutegravir: A Novel Second Generation Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harmanjit; Kaur, Mandeep; Kakkar, Ashish K; Kumar, Harish

    2016-01-01

    Dolutegravir (DTG), a novel integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI), is one of the newest addition to the arsenal of anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) therapeutics. Dolutegravir is the first member of the class of second generation integrase strand transfer inhibitors aimed primarily to address the current unmet need for novel unboosted integrase inhibitors with convenient once-daily dosing and a superior resistance profile. During its clinical development, DTG has demonstrated noninferior or superior efficacy in both treatment-naive as well as treatmentexperienced individuals including those who have previously failed first generation INSTIs. Other potential advantages include a favorable safety profile, low propensity for drug-drug interactions, and prolonged serum half-life permitting once-daily administration in treatment-naive or treatment-experienced INSTI naive HIV patients. Twice-daily administration is recommended in individuals with established or suspected resistance to first-generation INSTIs. This review outlines the need for new HIV therapeutics and summarizes the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetic profile of dolutegravir. PMID:27157040

  13. Increasing Deaths Due to Malignancy in HIV+ Patients is Associated with Integrase Inhibitor Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniel O. Griffin[1,2,3; Arif Dharsee[1; Juan Carlos Rico[1; Joseph McGowan[1

    2014-01-01

    Despite reductions in AIDS-related deaths, registries show HIV+ patients are still dying at a younger age than HIV-peers. Although overall mortality has declined in this population, a growing percent of deaths are due to malignancy. Since the data demonstrating the growing percentage of deaths due to malignancy in the HIV+ population is derived from registries, the study explores whether the subset dying from malignancy has particular characteristics that can be seen in a well-characterized cohort. In the well-characterized HIV+ cohort, the percentage of deaths due to cancer was seen to increase over four years (2010-2013) from 21% to 24% to 38% to 40%. The mean CD4-count of those who died from malignancy was 252+/-42 and 333+/-36 in patients with death from other causes. The viral load was not suppressed in 26% of patients dying from malignancy. Of patients on integrase inhibitor therapy, 48% of deaths were due to malignancy while in patients not on this therapy, 10% of deaths were due to malignancy (relative risk = 4.8). In HIV+ patients, a low CD4-count, failure to achieve viral suppression, and use of integrase inhibitors were associated with malignancy as the cause of death. The association of a specific therapy, integrase inhibition, with malignancy is seen in the study.

  14. Sketching the historical development of pyrimidones as the inhibitors of the HIV integrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rahul V; Keum, Young-Soo; Park, Se Won

    2015-06-01

    Heterocyclic substances perform a very unique role in drug design and discovery. This article provides the primary objectives of the analysis within pyrimidine centered new heterocyclic elements chronologically from their finding focusing on one of the essential enzyme of HIV virus particle that is integrase upon suppressing its strand transfer function. The class of compounds reviewed here includes bicyclic pyrimidines, dihydroxypyrimidines, pyrimidine-2,4-dinones, N-methylpyrimidones, pyranopyrimidine, pyridine-quinoline conjugates, pyrimidine-2-carboxamides, N-3 hydroxylated pyrimidine-2,4-diones as well as their various substituted analogues. Such initiatives released an effective drug Raltegravir as a first FDA approved anti-HIV integrase inhibitor as well as several of its derivatives along with other pyrimidones is under clinical or preclinical growth. Some of the provided scaffolds indicated dual anti-HIV efficacies against HIV reverse transcriptase and integrase enzymes at both cites as 3'-processing and strand transfer, while several scaffolds exhibited potency against Raltegravir resistant HIV mutant strains determining themselves a potent class of compounds having appealing upcoming implementations. Connections of the new compounds' molecular structure and HIV viral target has been overviewed to be able to accomplish further growth of promising anti-HIV agents in future drug discovery process. PMID:25084622

  15. Structural Properties of HIV Integrase. Lens Epithelium-derived Growth Factor Oligomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, K.; Diamond, T; Hwang, Y; Bushman, F; Van Duyne, G

    2010-01-01

    Integrase (IN) is the catalytic component of the preintegration complex, a large nucleoprotein assembly critical for the integration of the retroviral genome into a host chromosome. Although partial crystal structures of human immunodeficiency virus IN alone and its complex with the integrase binding domain of the host factor PSIP1/lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF)/p75 are available, many questions remain regarding the properties and structures of LEDGF-bound IN oligomers. Using analytical ultracentrifugation, multiangle light scattering, and small angle x-ray scattering, we have established the oligomeric state, stoichiometry, and molecular shapes of IN {center_dot} LEDGF complexes in solution. Analyses of intact IN tetramers bound to two different LEDGF truncations allow for placement of the integrase binding domain by difference analysis. Modeling of the small angle x-ray scattering envelopes using existing structural data suggests domain arrangements in the IN oligomers that support and extend existing biochemical data for IN {center_dot} LEDGF complexes and lend new insights into the quaternary structure of LEDGF-bound IN tetramers. These IN oligomers may be involved in stages of the viral life cycle other than integration, including assembly, budding, and early replication.

  16. Molecular features related to HIV integrase inhibition obtained from structure- and ligand-based approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana L de Carvalho

    Full Text Available Among several biological targets to treat AIDS, HIV integrase is a promising enzyme that can be employed to develop new anti-HIV agents. The aim of this work is to propose a mechanistic interpretation of HIV-1 integrase inhibition and to rationalize the molecular features related to the binding affinity of studied ligands. A set of 79 HIV-1 integrase inhibitors and its relationship with biological activity are investigated employing 2D and 3D QSAR models, docking analysis and DFT studies. Analyses of docking poses and frontier molecular orbitals revealed important features on the main ligand-receptor interactions. 2D and 3D models presenting good internal consistency, predictive power and stability were obtained in all cases. Significant correlation coefficients (r(2 = 0.908 and q(2= 0.643 for 2D model; r(2= 0.904 and q(2= 0.719 for 3D model were obtained, indicating the potential of these models for untested compounds. The generated holograms and contribution maps revealed important molecular requirements to HIV-1 IN inhibition and several evidences for molecular modifications. The final models along with information resulting from molecular orbitals, 2D contribution and 3D contour maps should be useful in the design of new inhibitors with increased potency and selectivity within the chemical diversity of the data.

  17. Adeno-associated virus Rep-mediated targeting of integrase-defective retroviral vector DNA circles into human chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Shuohao [Graduate School of Systems Life Sciences, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Kawabe, Yoshinori; Ito, Akira [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Kamihira, Masamichi, E-mail: kamihira@chem-eng.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Systems Life Sciences, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is capable of targeted integration in human cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrase-defective retroviral vector (IDRV) enables a circular DNA delivery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A targeted integration system of IDRV DNA using the AAV integration mechanism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeted IDRV integration ameliorates the safety concerns for retroviral vectors. -- Abstract: Retroviral vectors have been employed in clinical trials for gene therapy owing to their relative large packaging capacity, alterable cell tropism, and chromosomal integration for stable transgene expression. However, uncontrollable integrations of transgenes are likely to cause safety issues, such as insertional mutagenesis. A targeted transgene integration system for retroviral vectors, therefore, is a straightforward way to address the insertional mutagenesis issue. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is the only known virus capable of targeted integration in human cells. In the presence of AAV Rep proteins, plasmids possessing the p5 integration efficiency element (p5IEE) can be integrated into the AAV integration site (AAVS1) in the human genome. In this report, we describe a system that can target the circular DNA derived from non-integrating retroviral vectors to the AAVS1 site by utilizing the Rep/p5IEE integration mechanism. Our results showed that after G418 selection 30% of collected clones had retroviral DNA targeted at the AAVS1 site.

  18. Adeno-associated virus Rep-mediated targeting of integrase-defective retroviral vector DNA circles into human chromosome 19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is capable of targeted integration in human cells. ► Integrase-defective retroviral vector (IDRV) enables a circular DNA delivery. ► A targeted integration system of IDRV DNA using the AAV integration mechanism. ► Targeted IDRV integration ameliorates the safety concerns for retroviral vectors. -- Abstract: Retroviral vectors have been employed in clinical trials for gene therapy owing to their relative large packaging capacity, alterable cell tropism, and chromosomal integration for stable transgene expression. However, uncontrollable integrations of transgenes are likely to cause safety issues, such as insertional mutagenesis. A targeted transgene integration system for retroviral vectors, therefore, is a straightforward way to address the insertional mutagenesis issue. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is the only known virus capable of targeted integration in human cells. In the presence of AAV Rep proteins, plasmids possessing the p5 integration efficiency element (p5IEE) can be integrated into the AAV integration site (AAVS1) in the human genome. In this report, we describe a system that can target the circular DNA derived from non-integrating retroviral vectors to the AAVS1 site by utilizing the Rep/p5IEE integration mechanism. Our results showed that after G418 selection 30% of collected clones had retroviral DNA targeted at the AAVS1 site.

  19. Four-tiered π interaction at the dimeric interface of HIV-1 integrase critical for DNA integration and viral infectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an essential enzyme for viral infection. Here, we report an extensive π electron orbital interaction between four amino acids, W132, M178, F181 and F185, located at the dimeric interface of IN that is critical for the strand transfer activity alone. Catalysis of nine different mutant IN proteins at these positions were evaluated. Whereas the 3'-processing activity is predominantly strong, the strand transfer activity of each enzyme was completely dependent on an intact π electron orbital interaction at the dimeric interface. Four representative IN mutants were constructed in the context of the infectious NL4.3 HIV-1 viral clone. Whereas viruses with an intact π electron orbital interaction at the IN dimeric interface replicated comparable to wild type, viruses containing an abolished π interaction were non-infectious. Q-PCR analysis of viral DNA forms during viral replication revealed pleiotropic effects of most mutations. We hypothesize that the π interaction is a critical contact point for the assembly of functional IN multimeric complexes, and that IN multimerization is required for a functional pre-integration complex. The rational design of small molecule inhibitors targeting the disruption of this π-π interaction should lead to powerful anti-retroviral drugs

  20. Integrase-independent HIV-1 infection is augmented under conditions of DNA damage and produces a viral reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HIV-1 possesses a viral protein, integrase (IN), which is necessary for its efficient integration in target cells. However, it has been reported that an IN-defective HIV strain is still capable of integration. Here, we assessed the ability of wild type (WT) HIV-1 to establish infection in the presence of IN inhibitors. We observed a low, yet clear infection of inhibitor-incubated cells infected with WT HIV which was identical to cells infected with IN-deficient HIV, D64A. Furthermore, the IN-independent integration could be enhanced by the pretreatment of cells with DNA-damaging agents suggesting that integration is mediated by a DNA repair system. Moreover, significantly faster viral replication kinetics with augmented viral DNA integration was observed after infection in irradiated cells treated with IN inhibitor compared to nonirradiated cells. Altogether, our results suggest that HIV DNA has integration potential in the presence of an IN inhibitor and may serve as a virus reservoir.

  1. Huwe1, a novel cellular interactor of Gag-Pol through integrase binding, negatively influences HIV-1 infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiji P; Okawa, Katsuya; Nakano, Takashi; Sano, Kouichi; Ogawa, Kanako; Masuda, Takao; Morikawa, Yuko; Koyanagi, Yoshio; Suzuki, Youichi

    2011-04-01

    Integration, an indispensable step for retrovirus replication, is executed by integrase (IN), which is expressed as a part of a Gag-Pol precursor. Although mechanistic detail of the IN-catalyzed integration reaction is well defined, numerous evidence have demonstrated that IN is involved in multiple steps of retrovirus replication other than integration. In this study, Huwe1, a HECT-type E3 ubiquitin ligase, was identified as a new cellular interactor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) IN. The interaction was mediated through the catalytic core domain of IN and a wide-range region of Huwe1. Interestingly, although depletion of Huwe1 in target cells did not affect the early phase of HIV-1 infection in a human T cell line, we found that infectivity of HIV-1 released from the Huwe1 knockdown cells was significantly augmented more than that of virus produced from control cells. The increase in infectivity occurred in proviral DNA synthesis. Further analysis revealed that Huwe1 interacted with HIV-1 Gag-Pol precursor protein through an IN domain. Our results suggest that Huwe1 in HIV-1 producer cells has a negative impact on early post-entry events during the next round of virus infection via association with an IN region of Gag-Pol. PMID:21167302

  2. Integrase-independent HIV-1 infection is augmented under conditions of DNA damage and produces a viral reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebina, Hirotaka, E-mail: hebina@virus.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Kanemura, Yuka; Suzuki, Yasutsugu; Urata, Kozue; Misawa, Naoko; Koyanagi, Yoshio

    2012-05-25

    HIV-1 possesses a viral protein, integrase (IN), which is necessary for its efficient integration in target cells. However, it has been reported that an IN-defective HIV strain is still capable of integration. Here, we assessed the ability of wild type (WT) HIV-1 to establish infection in the presence of IN inhibitors. We observed a low, yet clear infection of inhibitor-incubated cells infected with WT HIV which was identical to cells infected with IN-deficient HIV, D64A. Furthermore, the IN-independent integration could be enhanced by the pretreatment of cells with DNA-damaging agents suggesting that integration is mediated by a DNA repair system. Moreover, significantly faster viral replication kinetics with augmented viral DNA integration was observed after infection in irradiated cells treated with IN inhibitor compared to nonirradiated cells. Altogether, our results suggest that HIV DNA has integration potential in the presence of an IN inhibitor and may serve as a virus reservoir.

  3. Biosorption of As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solution by macrofungus (Inonotus hispidus) biomass: Equilibrium and kinetic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biosorption characteristics of As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solution using the macrofungus (Inonotus hispidus) biomass were investigated as a function of pH, biomass dosage, contact time, and temperature. Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) models were applied to describe the biosorption isotherm of the metal ions by I. hispidus biomass. Langmuir model fitted the equilibrium data better than the Freundlich isotherm. The biosorption capacity of I. hispidus for As(III) and As(V) was found to be 51.9 mg/g and 59.6 mg/g, respectively at optimum conditions of pH 6 for As(III) and pH 2 for As(V), contact time of 30 min and temperature of 20 deg. C. The metal ions were desorbed from I. hispidus using both 1 M HCl and 1 M HNO3. The high stability of I. hispidus permitted 10 times of adsorption-elution process along the studies with a decrease about 11-28% in recovery of As(III) and 10-25% for As(V). The mean free energy values evaluated from the D-R model indicated that the biosorption of As(III) and As(V) onto I. hispidus biomass was taken place by chemical ion-exchange. The calculated thermodynamic parameters showed that the biosorption of As(III) and As(V) ions onto I. hispidus biomass was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic under examined conditions. Kinetic examination of the experimental data were showed that the biosorption processes of both As(III) and As(V) followed well pseudo-second-order kinetics.

  4. Structural requirements for potential HIV-integrase inhibitors identified using pharmacophore-based virtual screening and molecular dynamics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Ataul; Pillay, Tahir S

    2016-02-23

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a life-threatening disease which is a collection of symptoms and infections caused by a retrovirus, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). There is currently no curative treatment and therapy is reliant on the use of existing anti-retroviral drugs. Pharmacoinformatics approaches have already proven their pivotal role in the pharmaceutical industry for lead identification and optimization. In the current study, we analysed the binding preferences and inhibitory activity of HIV-integrase inhibitors using pharmacoinformatics. A set of 30 compounds were selected as the training set of a total 540 molecules for pharmacophore model generation. The final model was validated by statistical parameters and further used for virtual screening. The best mapped model (R = 0.940, RMSD = 2.847, Q(2) = 0.912, se = 0.498, Rpred(2) = 0.847 and rm(test)(2) = 0.636) explained that two hydrogen bond acceptor and one aromatic ring features were crucial for the inhibition of HIV-integrase. From virtual screening, initial hits were sorted using a number of parameters and finally two compounds were proposed as promising HIV-integrase inhibitors. Drug-likeness properties of the final screened compounds were compared to FDA approved HIV-integrase inhibitors. HIV-integrase structure in complex with the most active and final screened compounds were subjected to 50 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies to check comparative stability of the complexes. The study suggested that the screened compounds might be promising HIV-integrase inhibitors. The new chemical entities obtained from the NCI database will be subjected to experimental studies to confirm potential inhibition of HIV integrase. PMID:26809073

  5. Determination of As(III) and As(V) in soils using sequential extraction combined with flow injection hydride generation atomic fluorescence detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analytical procedure for determination of As(III) and As(V) in soils using sequential extraction combined with flow injection (FI) hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS) was presented. The soils were sequentially extracted by water, 0.6 mol l-1 KH2PO4 solution, 1% (v/v) HCl solution and 1% (w/v) NaOH solution. The arsenite (As(III)) in extract was analyzed by HG-AFS in the medium of 0.1 mol l-1 citric acid solution, then the total arsenic in extract was determined by HG-AFS using on-line reduction of arsenate with L-cysteine. The concentration of arsenate (As(V)) was calculated by the difference. The optimum conditions of extraction and determination were studied in detail. The detection limit (3σ) for As(III) and As(V) were 0.11 and 0.07 μg l-1, respectively. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) was 1.43% (n=11) at the 10 μg l-1 As level. The method was applied in the determination of As(III) and As(V) of real soils and the recoveries of As(III) and As(V) were in the range of 89.3-118 and 80.4-111%, respectively

  6. A new large-DNA-fragment delivery system based on integrase activity from an integrative and conjugative element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Ryo; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2013-07-01

    During the past few decades, numerous plasmid vectors have been developed for cloning, gene expression analysis, and genetic engineering. Cloning procedures typically rely on PCR amplification, DNA fragment restriction digestion, recovery, and ligation, but increasingly, procedures are being developed to assemble large synthetic DNAs. In this study, we developed a new gene delivery system using the integrase activity of an integrative and conjugative element (ICE). The advantage of the integrase-based delivery is that it can stably introduce a large DNA fragment (at least 75 kb) into one or more specific sites (the gene for glycine-accepting tRNA) on a target chromosome. Integrase recombination activity in Escherichia coli is kept low by using a synthetic hybrid promoter, which, however, is unleashed in the final target host, forcing the integration of the construct. Upon integration, the system is again silenced. Two variants with different genetic features were produced, one in the form of a cloning vector in E. coli and the other as a mini-transposable element by which large DNA constructs assembled in E. coli can be tagged with the integrase gene. We confirmed that the system could successfully introduce cosmid and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) DNAs from E. coli into the chromosome of Pseudomonas putida in a site-specific manner. The integrase delivery system works in concert with existing vector systems and could thus be a powerful tool for synthetic constructions of new metabolic pathways in a variety of host bacteria. PMID:23686268

  7. Exploring binding mode for styrylquinoline HIV-1 integrase inhibitors using comparative molecular field analysis and docking studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-hui MA; Xiao-yi ZHANG; Jian-jun TAN; Wei-zu CHEN; Cun-xin WANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To understand pharmacophore properties of styrylquinoline derivatives and to design inhibitors of HIV-1integrase. METHODS: Comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) was performed to analyze three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) of styrylquinoline derivatives. Thirty-eight compounds were randomly divided into a training set of 28 compounds and a test set of 10 compounds. The stability of 3DQSAR models was proved by the analysis of cross-validated and non-cross-validated methods. Moreover, the binding mode of these compounds and integrase was constructed by AutoDock program. RESULTS: The CoMFA model of the training compounds was reasonably predicted with cross-validated coefficient (q2) and conventional (r2) values (up to 0.696 and 0.754). Then the model was validated by the test set. The resulting CoMFA maps visualized structural requirements for the biological activity of these inhibitors. Docking results showed that a carboxyl group at C-7 and a hydroxyl group at C-8 in the quinoline subunit, bound closely to the divalent metal cofactor (Mg2+) around the integrase catalytic site. Moreover, there is a linear correlation between the binding energy of the inhibitors with integrase and their inhibitory effect. CONCLUSIONS: The present study indicated that the CoMFA model together with docking results could give us helpful hints for drug design as well as interpretation of the binding affinity between these inhibitors and integrase.

  8. Determination of total arsenic and speciation of As(III) and As(V) in ground water by charged particle activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of charged particle activation analysis (CPAA) to determine at trace level of arsenic directly in ground water has been reported in this paper. The CPAA has been applied to determine total arsenic, As(III) and As(V) species in ground water collected from eastern part of India using ∼16 MeV proton beam. The speciation of As(III) and As(V) was carried out using DOWEX 1 x 8 resin. The total arsenic concentrations were also determined by other conventional techniques for validation and values are in good agreement with that obtained by CPAA. As(III) concentration was found to be double than that of As(V) in ground water sample. (author)

  9. OUTCOME OF PATIENT WITH NEUROPARALYTIC SNAKE BITE TREATED WITH LOW DOSE (50 ML V/S HIGH DOSE (100 ML ASV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available It was always been a matter of great-controversy regarding the dosage protocol of anti-snake venom (ASV in the management of snake envenomation. The only definitive treatment of poisonous snake bite is ASV administration. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study was carried out for a period of two years. All patients of neuroparaplytic snake bite who presented to the emergency department were included in this prospectively study. RESULTS: Fifty eight patients of neurotoxic snake bite became eligible for the study over a period of 2 yrs. By using chi-square test, the outcomes in low and high bolus dose group were statistically non-significant (P>0.05. Statistical analysis showed no significant difference in both groups. From this study it can be firmly concluded that low dose ASV is as effective as high dose in treatment of neurotoxic snake bite.

  10. The use of artificial neural network for modelling of phycoremediation of toxic elements As(III) and As(V) from wastewater using Botryococcus braunii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podder, M. S.; Majumder, C. B.

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, a thorough investigation has been done on the removal efficiency of both As(III) and As (V) from synthetic wastewater by phycoremediation of Botryococcus braunii algal biomass. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) are practised for predicting % phycoremediation efficiency of both As(III) and As(V) ions. The influence of several parameters for example initial pH, inoculum size, contact time and initial arsenic concentration (either As(III) or As(V)) was examined systematically. The maximum phycoremediation of As(III) and As(V) was found to be 85.22% and 88.15% at pH 9.0, equilibrium time of 144 h by using algal inoculum size of 10% (v/v) and initial arsenic concentration of 50 mg/L. The data acquired from laboratory scale experimental set up was utilized for training a three-layer feed-forward back propagation (BP) with Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) training algorithm having 4:5:1 architecture. A comparison between the experimental data and model outputs provided a high correlation coefficient (R2all_ANN equal to 0.9998) and exhibited that the model was capable for predicting the phycoremediation of both As(III) and As(V) from wastewater. The network topology was optimized by changing number of neurons in hidden layers. ANNs are efficient to model and simulate highly non-liner multivariable relationships. Absolute error and Standard deviation (SD) with respect to experimental output were calculated for ANN model outputs. The comparison of phycoremediation efficiencies of both As(III) and As(V) between experimental results and ANN model outputs exhibited that ANN model can determine the behaviour of As(III) and As(V) elimination process under various circumstances.

  11. Genetic diversity on the integrase region of the pol gene among HIV type 1-infected patients naive for integrase inhibitors in São Paulo City, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, Liã Bárbara; Fonseca, Luiz Augusto M; Duarte, Alberto J S; Casseb, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    The presence of mutations associated with integrase inhibitor (INI) resistance among INI-naive patients may play an important clinical role in the use of those drugs Samples from 76 HIV-1-infected subjects naive to INIs were submitted to direct sequencing. No differences were found between naive (25%) subjects and subjects on HAART (75%). No primary mutation associated with raltegravir or elvitegravir resistance was found. However, 78% of sequences showed at least one accessory mutation associated with resistance. The analysis of the 76 IN sequences showed a high polymorphic level on this region among Brazilian HIV-1-infected subjects, including a high prevalence of aa substitutions related to INI resistance. The impact of these findings remains unclear and further studies are necessary to address these questions. PMID:20055590

  12. Effects of etravirine on the pharmacokinetics of the integrase inhibitor S/GSK1265744.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Susan L; Gould, Elizabeth; Chen, Shuguang; Lou, Yu; Dumont, Etienne; Spreen, William; Piscitelli, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    HIV integrase inhibitors such as raltegravir and elvitegravir halt HIV progression, but treatment-emergent resistance and cross-resistance have been observed. The nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor etravirine (ETR) may be used in combination with integrase inhibitors in patients with drug resistance. This single-center, open-label, two-period, single-sequence crossover study evaluated the effects of ETR coadministration on the pharmacokinetic profile of S/GSK1265744, an investigational integrase inhibitor in phase 2 studies. Healthy subjects received 30 mg of S/GSK1265744 alone once daily for 10 days (period 1) and in combination with 200 mg of ETR twice daily for 14 days (period 2). Serial plasma samples for pharmacokinetic analyses were collected on day 10 during period 1 and on day 14 during period 2. All treatments were well tolerated. Etravirine had no effects on S/GSK1265744 geometric mean ratios of the area under the curve from time zero until the end of the dosing interval (1.01; 90% confidence interval [CI], 0.956 to 1.06), of the maximum observed plasma concentration (1.04; 90% CI, 0.987 to 1.09), or of the plasma concentration at the end of the dosing interval (0.999; 90% CI, 0.942 to 1.06). Etravirine pharmacokinetics (PK) parameters observed following coadministration with S/GSK1265744 were in the range of historical values reported for ETR alone in healthy subjects. These results indicate that 30 mg of S/GSK1265744 for 10 days as monotherapy followed by an additional 14 days in combination with ETR was well tolerated in healthy subjects and that no dose adjustment of S/GSK1265744 is required when it is coadministered with ETR. PMID:23114768

  13. Conserved sequences in the carboxyl terminus of integrase that are essential for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication.

    OpenAIRE

    Cannon, P M; Byles, E D; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1996-01-01

    We have previously identified a residue in the carboxyl terminus of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase (HIV-1 IN), W-235, the requirement for which is only revealed in viral assays for integrase function (P. M. Cannon, W. Wilson, E. Byles, S. M. Kingsman, and A. J. Kingsman, J. Virol. 68:4768-4775, 1994). Our further analysis of this region of retroviral IN has now identified several sequence motifs which are conserved in all the retroviruses we examined, apart from human spumaretr...

  14. 3-Hydroxypyrimidine-2,4-diones as an inhibitor scaffold of HIV integrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Maddali, Kasthuraiah; Metifiot, Mathieu; Sham, Yuk Y; Vince, Robert; Pommier, Yves; Wang, Zhengqiang

    2011-04-14

    Integrase (IN) represents a clinically validated target for the development of antivirals against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Inhibitors with a novel structure core are essential for combating resistance associated with known IN inhibitors (INIs). We have previously disclosed a novel dual inhibitor scaffold of HIV IN and reverse transcriptase (RT). Here we report the complete structure-activity relationship (SAR), molecular modeling, and resistance profile of this inhibitor type on IN inhibition. These studies support an antiviral mechanism of dual inhibition against both IN and RT and validate 3-hydroxypyrimidine-2,4-diones as an IN inhibitor scaffold. PMID:21381765

  15. Review of integrase strand transfer inhibitors for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Tae Eun; Mohamed, Abdilahi; Kalabalik, Julie; Sharma, Roopali

    2015-10-01

    Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are oral antiretroviral agents used against HIV infection. There are three agents available, including raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir, some of which are available as combination medications with other antiretroviral drugs. The efficacy and safety of INSTIs in treatment-naïve and experienced HIV-infected patients have been established by multiple studies. Based on the current practice guidelines, INSTI-based regimens are considered as one of the first-line therapies for treatment-naïve HIV-infected patients. There are new INSTIs in development to improve the resistance profile and to decrease the frequency of drug administration. PMID:26293294

  16. Anti-HIV-1 integrase activity of medicinal plants used as self medication by AIDS patients

    OpenAIRE

    Sopa Kummee; Supinya Tewtrakul; Sanan Subhadhirasakul

    2006-01-01

    The extracts of selected medicinal plants used as self medication by AIDS patients were investigated for their inhibitory activities against HIV-1 integrase (HIV-1 IN) using the multiplate integration assay (MIA). Of these, the water extract of Eclipta prostrata (whole plant) exhibited the most potent inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 4.8 μg/ml, followed by the methanol extract of Eclipta prostrata (whole plant, IC50 = 21.1 μg/ ml), the water extract of Barleria lupulina (stem, IC50 =...

  17. Toxicity of As(III and As(V on morphological traits and pigments of Gram Seed (Cicer arietinum during germination and early seedling growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naba Kumar Mondal

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic (As contamination is an important environmental consequence in some part of India and other countries. In this study, we investigated that individual phytotoxicity of both As(III and As(V on Cicer arietinum. Total five different concentrations (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 mg/L of both As(III and As(V have been considered for this study. Results indicate that percent germination significantly (p < 0.05 reduced with increasing concentration of both As(III and As(V. However, As(III showed pronounced effects than As(V. The variation of root and shoot length was equally affected by arsenite, where as arsenate showed higher negative impact on shoot length than root length up to the concentration 6 mg/L. However, arsenate concentration greater than 6 mg/L showed opposite trend of variation in root and shoot length. The pigment (Chlorophyll ‘a’, ‘b’ and total chlorophylls and carotenoids level also gradually decrease with increasing concentration of both forms of arsenic.

  18. Impact of carbon nanotubes on the toxicity of inorganic arsenic [AS(III) and AS(V)] to Daphnia magna: The role of certain arsenic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinghao; Qu, Ruijuan; Allam, Ahmed A; Ajarem, Jamaan; Wei, Zhongbo; Wang, Zuoyao

    2016-07-01

    As a type of emerging nanomaterial, hydroxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (OH-MWCNTs) may interact with other pollutants in the aquatic environments and further influence their toxicity, transport, and fate. Thus, evaluation of toxicity to arsenic in the presence of CNTs needs to receive much more attention. The present study was conducted to explore the underlying mechanisms of OH-MWCNT-induced arsenic (As[III] and As[V]) toxicity changes in the aquatic organism Daphnia magna at different pH levels. The most toxic species for As(III) and As(V) to D. magna were found to be H2 AsO3 (-) and H2 AsO4 (-) . It appeared that the pH values were of greatest importance when the biological toxicity of As(III) and As(V) was compared. Furthermore, the effects of OH-MWCNTs on arsenic toxicity to D. magna indicated that the presence of OH-MWCNTs could enhance the toxicity of arsenic. The interactions of arsenic with OH-MWCNTs were further investigated by conducting adsorption experiments. The adsorption capacity of As(V) by OH-MWCNTs was found to be higher than that of As(III). To conclude, adsorption of certain arsenic species onto OH-MWCNTs is crucial for a reliable interpretation of enhanced toxicity. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1852-1859. © 2016 SETAC. PMID:26681408

  19. Speciation of AsIII and AsV in fruit juices by dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction and hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new procedure was developed to speciate and quantify As(III) and As(V) in fruit juices. At pH 3.0, As(III) and ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) formed a complex, which was extracted into carbon tetrachloride by dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction (DLLME) and subsequently quantified...

  20. Nature and reactivity of layered double hydroxides formed by coprecipitating Mg, Al and As(V): Effect of arsenic concentration, pH, and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommella, Alessia; Caporale, Antonio G; Denecke, Melissa A; Mangold, Stefan; Pigna, Massimo; Santoro, Anna; Terzano, Roberto; Violante, Antonio

    2015-12-30

    Arsenic (As) co-precipitation is one of the major processes controlling As solubility in soils and waters. When As is co-precipitated with Al and Mg, the possible formation of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) and other nanocomposites can stabilize As in their structures thus making this toxic element less available. We investigated the nature and reactivity of Mg-Al-arsenate [As(V)] co-precipitated LDHs formed in solution affected by As concentration, pH, and aging. At the beginning of the co-precipitation process, poorly crystalline LDH and non-crystalline Al(Mg)-oxides form. Prolonged aging of the samples promotes crystallization of LDHs, evidenced by an increase in As K XANES intensities and XRD peak intensities. During aging Al- and/or Mg-oxides are likely transformed by dissolution/re-precipitation processes into more crystalline but still defective LDHs. Surface area, chemical composition, reactivity of the precipitates, and anion exchange properties of As(V) in the co-precipitates are influenced by pH, aging, and As concentration. This study demonstrates that (i) As(V) retards or inhibits the formation and transformation of LDHs and (ii) more As(V) is removed from solution if co-precipitated with Mg and Al than by sorption onto well crystallized LDHs. PMID:26241870

  1. HIV-1 integrase strand-transfer inhibitors: design, synthesis and molecular modeling investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Laura; De Grazia, Sara; Ferro, Stefania; Gitto, Rosaria; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger; Chimirri, Alba

    2011-02-01

    This study is focused on a new series of benzylindole derivatives with various substituents at the benzene-fused ring, suggested by our 3D pharmacophore model developed for HIV-1 integrase inhibitors (INIs). All synthesized compounds proved to be active in the nanomolar range (6-35 nM) on the strand-transfer step (ST). In particular, derivative 4-[1-(4-fluorobenzyl)-5,7-dimethoxy-1H-indol-3-yl]-2-hydroxy-4-oxobut-2-enoic acid (8e), presenting the highest best-fit value on pharmacophore model, showed a potency comparable to that of clinical INSTIs GS 9137 (1) and MK-0518 (2). The binding mode of our molecules has been investigated using the recently published crystal structure of the complex of full-length integrase from the prototype foamy virus in complex with its cognate DNA (PFV-IN/DNA). The results highlighted the ability of derivative 8e to assume the same binding mode of MK-0518 and GS 9137. PMID:21227550

  2. Pyrroloaryls and pyrroloheteroaryls: Inhibitors of the HIV fusion/attachment, reverse transcriptase and integrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rahul V; Park, Se Won

    2015-09-01

    Heterocyclic compounds execute a very important role in drug design and discovery. This article provides the basic milestones of the research for pyrroloaryl and pyrroloheteroaryl based components targeting HIV viral replication cycle. Anti-HIV activity is elaborated for several classes of pyrrolo-compounds as pyrrolopyridines, pyrrolopyrimidines, pyrrolopyridazines, pyrrolobenzodiazepinones, pyrrolobenzothiazepines, pyrrolobenzoxazepinones, pyrrolophenanthridines, pyrroloquinoxalines, pyrrolotriazines, pyrroloquinolines, pyrrolopyrazinones, pyrrolothiatriazines, arylthiopyrroles and pyrrolopyrazolones targeting two essential HIV enzymes, reverse transcriptase and integrase as well as attachment/fusion of HIV virons to the host CD-4 cell. Such attempts were resulted in a discovery of highly potent anti-HIV agents suitable for clinical trials, for example, BMS-378806, BMS-585248, BMS-626529, BMS-663068, BMS-488043 and BMS-663749, etc. as anti-HIV attachment agents, triciribine, QX432, BI-1 and BI-2 as HIV RT inhibitors which are in preclinical or clinical development. Mechanism of action of compounds presented in this article towards the suppression of HIV attachment/fusion as well as against the activities of HIV enzymes reverse transcriptase and integrase has been discussed. Relationships of new compounds' molecular framework and HIV viral target has been overviewed in order to facilitate further construction of promising anti-HIV agents in future drug discovery process. PMID:26116177

  3. Three-dimensional Quantitative Structure-activity Relationship Models of HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors of DKAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Mei-Qing; ZHAO Wen-Na; LU Shao-Yong

    2012-01-01

    As one of the three viral encoded enzymes of HIV-1 infection, HIV-1 integrase has become an attractive drug target for the treatment. Diketoacid compounds (DKAs) are one kind of potent and selective inhibitors of HIV-1 IN. In the present work, two three-dimensional QSAR techniques (CoMFA and CoMSIA) were employed to correlate the molecular structure with the activity of inhibiting the strand transfer for 147 DKAs. The all-oritation search (AOS) and all-placement search (APS) were used to optimize the CoMFA model. The diketo and keto-enol tautomers of DKAs were also used to establish the CoMFA models. The results indicated that the enol was the dominant conformation in the HIV-1 IN and DKAs complexes. It can provide a new method and reference to identify the bioactive conformation of drugs by using QSAR analysis. The best CoMSIA model, with five fields combined, implied that the hydrophobic field is very important as well as the steric and electrostatic fields. All models indicated favorable internal validation. A comparative analysis with the three models demonstrated that the CoMFA model seems to be more predictive. The contour maps could afford steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic and H-bond information about the interaction of ligand-receptor complex visually. The models would give some useful guidelines for designing novel and potent HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

  4. Mode of inhibition of HIV-1 Integrase by a C-terminal domain-specific monoclonal antibody*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merkel George

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To further our understanding of the structure and function of HIV-1 integrase (IN we developed and characterized a library of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs directed against this protein. One of these antibodies, mAb33, which is specific for the C-terminal domain, was found to inhibit HIV-1 IN processing activity in vitro; a corresponding Fv fragment was able to inhibit HIV-1 integration in vivo. Our subsequent studies, using heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, identified six solvent accessible residues on the surface of the C-terminal domain that were immobilized upon binding of the antibody, which were proposed to comprise the epitope. Here we test this hypothesis by measuring the affinity of mAb33 to HIV-1 proteins that contain Ala substitutions in each of these positions. To gain additional insight into the mode of inhibition we also measured the DNA binding capacity and enzymatic activities of the Ala substituted proteins. Results We found that Ala substitution of any one of five of the putative epitope residues, F223, R224, Y226, I267, and I268, caused a decrease in the affinity of the mAb33 for HIV-1 IN, confirming the prediction from NMR data. Although IN derivatives with Ala substitutions in or near the mAb33 epitope exhibited decreased enzymatic activity, none of the epitope substitutions compromised DNA binding to full length HIV-1 IN, as measured by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Two of these derivatives, IN (I276A and IN (I267A/I268A, exhibited both increased DNA binding affinity and uncharacteristic dissociation kinetics; these proteins also exhibited non-specific nuclease activity. Results from these investigations are discussed in the context of current models for how the C-terminal domain interacts with substrate DNA. Conclusion It is unlikely that inhibition of HIV-1 IN activity by mAb33 is caused by direct interaction with residues that are essential for substrate binding. Rather

  5. Nanobody-based chimeric receptor gene integration in Jurkat cells mediated by PhiC31 integrase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iri-Sofla, Farnoush Jafari [Department of Medical Biotechnology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh, E-mail: rahbarif@modares.ac.ir [Department of Medical Biotechnology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ahmadvand, Davoud [Center of Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology, Department of Pharmaceutics and Analytical Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 2, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark); Rasaee, Mohammad J. [Department of Medical Biotechnology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-11-01

    The crucial role of T lymphocytes in anti-tumor immunity has led to the development of novel strategies that can target and activate T cells against tumor cells. Recombinant DNA technology has been used to generate non-MHC-restricted chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). Here, we constructed a panel of recombinant CAR that harbors the anti-MUC1 nanobody and the signaling and co-signaling moieties (CD3{zeta}/CD28) with different spacer regions derived from human IgG3 with one or two repeats of the hinge sequence or the hinge region of Fc{gamma}RII. The PhiC31 integrase system was employed to investigate if the recombination efficiency could be recruited for high and stable expression of T cell chimeric receptor genes. The effect of nuclear localization signal (NLS) and two different promoters (CMV and CAG) on efficacy of PhiC31 integrase in human T cell lines was evaluated. The presence of integrase in combination with NLS, mediated up to 7.6 and 8.5 fold increases in CAR expression in ZCHN-attB and ZCHHN-attB cassette integrated T cells, respectively. Our results showed that highly efficient and stable transduction of the Jurkat cell line by PhiC31 integrase is a feasible modality for generating anti-cancer chimeric T cells for use in cancer immunotherapy.

  6. Nanobody-based chimeric receptor gene integration in Jurkat cells mediated by PhiC31 integrase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crucial role of T lymphocytes in anti-tumor immunity has led to the development of novel strategies that can target and activate T cells against tumor cells. Recombinant DNA technology has been used to generate non-MHC-restricted chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). Here, we constructed a panel of recombinant CAR that harbors the anti-MUC1 nanobody and the signaling and co-signaling moieties (CD3ζ/CD28) with different spacer regions derived from human IgG3 with one or two repeats of the hinge sequence or the hinge region of FcγRII. The PhiC31 integrase system was employed to investigate if the recombination efficiency could be recruited for high and stable expression of T cell chimeric receptor genes. The effect of nuclear localization signal (NLS) and two different promoters (CMV and CAG) on efficacy of PhiC31 integrase in human T cell lines was evaluated. The presence of integrase in combination with NLS, mediated up to 7.6 and 8.5 fold increases in CAR expression in ZCHN-attB and ZCHHN-attB cassette integrated T cells, respectively. Our results showed that highly efficient and stable transduction of the Jurkat cell line by PhiC31 integrase is a feasible modality for generating anti-cancer chimeric T cells for use in cancer immunotherapy.

  7. Design, Synthesis and Anti-HIV Integrase Evaluation of 4-Oxo-4H-quinolizine-3-carboxylic Acid Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ming Hu

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available 4-Oxo-4H-quinolizine-3-carboxylic acid derivatives bearing sulfamido, carboxylamido, benzimidazole and benzothiazole substituents have been designed and synthesized. The structures of these new compounds were confirmed by 1H-NMR, 13C- NMR, IR and ESI (or HRMS spectra. Compounds were screened for possible HIV integrase inhibitory activity.

  8. Contribution of HIV minority variants to drug resistance in an integrase strand transfer inhibitor-based therapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weber, Jan; Gibson, R. M.; Meyer, A. M.; Winner, D.; Robertson, D. L.; Miller, M. D.; Quinones-Mateu, M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 18, Suppl. 1 (2013), A66-A66. ISSN 1359-6535. [International Workshop on HIV & Hepatitis Virus Drug Resistance Curative Strategies. 04.06.2013-08.06.2013, Toronto] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : HIV minority variants * integrase inhibitor * replicative fitness Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  9. Cross-Resistance Profile Determination of Two Second-Generation HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors Using a Panel of Recombinant Viruses Derived from Raltegravir-Treated Clinical Isolates ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Van Wesenbeeck, L.; Rondelez, E.; Feyaerts, M.; Verheyen, A.; Van der Borght, K; Smits, V.; Cleybergh, C.; Wolf, H; Van Baelen, K.; Stuyver, L. J.

    2010-01-01

    The integrase inhibitor raltegravir (RAL) is currently used for the treatment of both treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced HIV-1-infected patients. Elvitegravir (EVG) is in late phases of clinical development. Since significant cross-resistance between RAL and EVG is observed, there is a need for second-generation integrase inhibitors (INIs) with a higher genetic barrier and limited cross-resistance to RAL/EVG. A panel of HIV-1 integrase recombinants, derived from plasma samples from ral...

  10. Development, characterization and evaluation of iron-coated honeycomb briquette cinders for the removal of As(V from aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiantian Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorptive removal of As(V from aqueous solutions using iron-coated honeycomb briquette cinder (Fe-HBC is presented. Low cost mechanical granulation process was integrated with surface amendment technology to prepare iron-oxide modified granular adsorbent for clean water production. Detailed characterizations were performed using FTIR, XRD, EDS and SEM techniques. Operating parameters including initial As(V concentration, pH, contact time, adsorbent dose, iron leaching and the effects of competing ions on As(V removal were evaluated. Results demonstrated that high amount of arsenate (961.5 μg g−1 was adsorbed at pH 7.5 in 14 h contact time. Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models were used to analyze the adsorption data, whereas Langmuir model was found to best represent the data with a correlation co-efficient (R2 = 0.999. Thus, As(V sorption on Fe-HBC surface suggested monolayer adsorption and indicated surface homogeneity. Moreover, the dimensionless parameter (RL value calculated to be about 0.118 that reiterated the process is favorable and spontaneous. The influences of competing ions on As(V removal decreased in the following order:PO43−>HCO3−>F−>Cl−. The profound inhibition effects ofPO43− revealed a high affinity toward iron(oxy hydroxide. Life-cycle assessment confirmed that spent HBC is non-hazardous and can be used as a promising sorbent for arsenic removal.

  11. Novel 3′-Processing Integrase Activity Assay by Real-Time PCR for Screening and Identification of HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supachai Sakkhachornphop

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The 3′-end processing (3′P of each viral long terminal repeat (LTR during human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 integration is a vital step in the HIV life cycle. Blocking the 3′P using 3′P inhibitor has recently become an attractive strategy for HIV-1 therapeutic intervention. Recently, we have developed a novel real-time PCR based assay for the detection of 3′P activity in vitro. The methodology usually involves biotinylated HIV-1 LTR, HIV-1 integrase (IN, and specific primers and probe. In this novel assay, we designed the HIV-1 LTR substrate based on a sequence with a homology to HIV-1 LTR labeled at its 3′ end with biotin on the sense strand. Two nucleotides at the 3′ end were subsequently removed by IN activity. Only two nucleotides labeled biotin were captured on an avidin-coated tube; therefore, inhibiting the binding of primers and probe results in late signals in the real-time PCR. This novel assay has successfully detected both the 3′P activity of HIV-1 IN and the anti-IN activity by Raltegravir and sodium azide agent. This real-time PCR assay has been shown to be effective and inexpensive for a high-throughput screening of novel IN inhibitors.

  12. Removal and co-transport of Zn, As(V), and Cd during leachate seepage through downgradient mine soils: A batch sorption and column study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Juhee; Nam, Seung Mo; Hyun, Seunghun

    2016-05-01

    The removal of Zn, As(V), and Cd during the leachate seepage process was measured in single, binary, and ternary solute systems by batch sorption and 1-D column flow experiments, followed by a sequential extraction procedure (SEP). In single-solute systems, sorption (Kd(⁎)) occurred in the order of As(V)>Zn≫Cd, and this sequence did not change in the presence of other solutes. In multi-solute systems, the sorption of Zn (~20%) and Cd (~27%) was enhanced by As(V), while Zn and Cd suppressed the sorption of each other. In all cases, As(V) sorption was not affected by the cations, indicating that As(V) is prioritized by sorption sites to a much greater degree than Zn and Cd. Element retention by column soils was strongly correlated (r(2)=0.77) with Kd(⁎). Across column segments, mass retention was in the order of inlet (36-54%)>middle (26-35%)>outlet (20-31%), except for Cd in the Zn-Cd binary system. The result of SEP revealed that most of the retained Cd (98-99%) and Zn (56-71%) was in the labile fraction (e.g., the sum of F1 and F2) while only 9-12% of As(V) was labile and most (>55%) was specifically adsorbed to Fe/Al oxides. Plots of the labile fraction (f(labile)) and the fast sorption fraction (f(fast)) suggested that the kinetics of specific As(V) sorption occur rapidly (f(fast)>f(labile)), whereas labile Zn and Cd sorption occurs slowly (f(labile)>f(fast)), indicating the occurrence of kinetically limited labile sorption sites, probably due to Zn-Cd competition. In conclusion, the element leaching potential of mine leachate can be greatly attenuated during downgradient soil seepage. However, when assessing the soil attenuation process, the impact of sorption competitors and the lability of adsorbed elements should first be considered. PMID:26896586

  13. Determination of traces of Sb(III) using ASV in Sb-rich water samples affected by mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cidu, Rosa, E-mail: cidur@unica.it; Biddau, Riccardo; Dore, Elisabetta

    2015-01-07

    Highlights: • Antimony speciation affects the toxicity of this element. • A simple method for Sb(III) analyses in Sb-rich waters was developed. • Sb(III) was determined by ASV in water stabilized with tartaric and nitric acids. • Pre-concentration and/or separation of Sb(III) prior to analysis are not required. - Abstract: Chemical speciation [Sb(V) and Sb(III)] affects the mobility, bioavailability and toxicity of antimony. In oxygenated environments Sb(V) dominates whereas thermodynamically unstable Sb(III) may occur. In this study, a simple method for the determination of Sb(III) in non acidic, oxygenated water contaminated with antimony is proposed. The determination of Sb(III) was performed by anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV, 1–20 μg L{sup −1} working range), the total antimony, Sb(tot), was determined either by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS, 1–100 μg L{sup −1} working range) or inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES, 100–10,000 μg L{sup −1} working range) depending on concentration. Water samples were filtered on site through 0.45 μm pore size filters. The aliquot for determination of Sb(tot) was acidified with 1% (v/v) HNO{sub 3}. Different preservatives, namely HCl, L(+) ascorbic acid or L(+) tartaric acid plus HNO{sub 3}, were used to assess the stability of Sb(III) in synthetic solutions. The method was tested on groundwater and surface water draining the abandoned mine of Su Suergiu (Sardinia, Italy), an area heavily contaminated with Sb. The waters interacting with Sb-rich mining residues were non acidic, oxygenated, and showed extreme concentrations of Sb(tot) (up to 13,000 μg L{sup −1}), with Sb(III) <10% of total antimony. The stabilization with L(+) tartaric acid plus HNO{sub 3} appears useful for the determination of Sb(III) in oxygenated, Sb-rich waters. Due to the instability of Sb(III), analyses should be carried out within 7 days upon the water collection. The main

  14. Determination of traces of Sb(III) using ASV in Sb-rich water samples affected by mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Antimony speciation affects the toxicity of this element. • A simple method for Sb(III) analyses in Sb-rich waters was developed. • Sb(III) was determined by ASV in water stabilized with tartaric and nitric acids. • Pre-concentration and/or separation of Sb(III) prior to analysis are not required. - Abstract: Chemical speciation [Sb(V) and Sb(III)] affects the mobility, bioavailability and toxicity of antimony. In oxygenated environments Sb(V) dominates whereas thermodynamically unstable Sb(III) may occur. In this study, a simple method for the determination of Sb(III) in non acidic, oxygenated water contaminated with antimony is proposed. The determination of Sb(III) was performed by anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV, 1–20 μg L−1 working range), the total antimony, Sb(tot), was determined either by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS, 1–100 μg L−1 working range) or inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES, 100–10,000 μg L−1 working range) depending on concentration. Water samples were filtered on site through 0.45 μm pore size filters. The aliquot for determination of Sb(tot) was acidified with 1% (v/v) HNO3. Different preservatives, namely HCl, L(+) ascorbic acid or L(+) tartaric acid plus HNO3, were used to assess the stability of Sb(III) in synthetic solutions. The method was tested on groundwater and surface water draining the abandoned mine of Su Suergiu (Sardinia, Italy), an area heavily contaminated with Sb. The waters interacting with Sb-rich mining residues were non acidic, oxygenated, and showed extreme concentrations of Sb(tot) (up to 13,000 μg L−1), with Sb(III) <10% of total antimony. The stabilization with L(+) tartaric acid plus HNO3 appears useful for the determination of Sb(III) in oxygenated, Sb-rich waters. Due to the instability of Sb(III), analyses should be carried out within 7 days upon the water collection. The main advantage of the proposed method is that it

  15. Evaluation of five reaction media for AS(III) determination in model solutions containing AS(V) by Hg AAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Many methodologies exist for the speciation analysis of As in water samples. Selective reduction procedure based on the highly pH-dependent reaction between arsenic species and NaBH4 to generate arsine in HG AAS system is relatively commonly used. In this case, for As(V) strongly acidic solution is required (pH ≤ 1), while for As(III) hydride formation occurs in mildly acidic solutions. The aim of this study was to critically evaluate the most frequently used reaction media for the speciation analysis of arsenite in the presence of arsenate. Five different reaction media has been used to achieve a selective volatilization of arsenite: 1.5 M HCl (pH <1.0), 0.1 M acetic acid (pH ∼2.9), citrate buffer (pH ∼3.1), acetate buffer (pH ∼5.0) and phosphate buffer (pH ∼7.2). All the studied reaction media can be used for the selective volatilization of As(III) but the serious problem caused by the interference of As(V) was observed (in 0.1 M acetic acid, citrate buffer and acetate buffer) when relative content of As(III) was less than 10% (from all the present arsenic). Natural waters usually contain less than 10% of As(III), so speciation in the real samples should be accompanied with another speciation analysis procedure to confirm the accuracy of obtained data. This problem was not observed in phosphate buffer but in this case the sensitivity was significantly lower and the speciation analysis in this medium can be done only if relatively high contents of As(III) in the samples are present. The work was supported by Slovak Research and Development Agency under the contracts No. APVT-20-010204, LPP-0038-06, LPP-0188-06, LPP-0146-09 and SK-CZ-0044-07, by Scientific Grant Agency of Ministry of Education of Slovak Republic and the Slovak Academy of Sciences under the contracts No. VEGA 1/4463/07, VEGA 1/4464/07 and VEGA 1/0272/08 and by Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of Czech Republic under the contract No. MEB 080813.

  16. Development and identification of a novel anti-HIV-1 peptide derived by modification of the N-terminal domain of HIV-1 integrase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina eSala

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The viral enzyme integrase (IN is essential for the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 and represents an important target for the development of new antiretroviral drugs. In this study, we focused on the N-terminal domain (NTD, which is mainly involved into protein oligomerization process, for the development and synthesis of a library of overlapping peptide sequences, with specific length and specific offset covering the entire native protein sequence NTD IN 1-50. The most potent fragment, VVAKEIVAH (peptide 18, which includes a His residue instead of the natural Ser at position 39, inhibits the HIV-1 IN activity with an IC50 value of 4.5 M. Amino acid substitution analysis on this peptide revealed essential residues for activity and allowed us to identify two nonapeptides (peptides 24 and 25, that show a potency of inhibition similar to the one of peptide 18. Interestingly, peptide 18 does not interfere with the dynamic interplay between IN subunits, while peptides 24 and 25 modulated these interactions in different manners. In fact, peptide 24 inhibited the IN-IN dimerization, while peptide 25 promoted IN multimerization, with IC50 values of 32 and 4.8 µM, respectively. In addition, peptide 25 has shown to have selective anti-infective cell activity for HIV-1. These results confirmed peptide 25 as a hit for further development of new chemotherapeutic agents against HIV-1.

  17. A novel co-crystal structure affords the design of gain-of-function lentiviral integrase mutants in the presence of modified PSIP1/LEDGF/p75.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Hare

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Lens epithelium derived growth factor (LEDGF, also known as PC4 and SFRS1 interacting protein 1 (PSIP1 and transcriptional co-activator p75, is the cellular binding partner of lentiviral integrase (IN proteins. LEDGF accounts for the characteristic propensity of Lentivirus to integrate within active transcription units and is required for efficient viral replication. We now present a crystal structure containing the N-terminal and catalytic core domains (NTD and CCD of HIV-2 IN in complex with the IN binding domain (IBD of LEDGF. The structure extends the known IN-LEDGF interface, elucidating primarily charge-charge interactions between the NTD of IN and the IBD. A constellation of acidic residues on the NTD is characteristic of lentiviral INs, and mutations of the positively charged residues on the IBD severely affect interaction with all lentiviral INs tested. We show that the novel NTD-IBD contacts are critical for stimulation of concerted lentiviral DNA integration by LEDGF in vitro and for its function during the early steps of HIV-1 replication. Furthermore, the new structural details enabled us to engineer a mutant of HIV-1 IN that primarily functions only when presented with a complementary LEDGF mutant. These findings provide structural basis for the high affinity lentiviral IN-LEDGF interaction and pave the way for development of LEDGF-based targeting technologies for gene therapy.

  18. Development and Identification of a Novel Anti-HIV-1 Peptide Derived by Modification of the N-Terminal Domain of HIV-1 Integrase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Marina; Spensiero, Antonia; Esposito, Francesca; Scala, Maria C.; Vernieri, Ermelinda; Bertamino, Alessia; Manfra, Michele; Carotenuto, Alfonso; Grieco, Paolo; Novellino, Ettore; Cadeddu, Marta; Tramontano, Enzo; Schols, Dominique; Campiglia, Pietro; Gomez-Monterrey, Isabel M.

    2016-01-01

    The viral enzyme integrase (IN) is essential for the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and represents an important target for the development of new antiretroviral drugs. In this study, we focused on the N-terminal domain (NTD), which is mainly involved into protein oligomerization process, for the development and synthesis of a library of overlapping peptide sequences, with specific length and specific offset covering the entire native protein sequence NTD IN 1–50. The most potent fragment, VVAKEIVAH (peptide 18), which includes a His residue instead of the natural Ser at position 39, inhibits the HIV-1 IN activity with an IC50 value of 4.5 μM. Amino acid substitution analysis on this peptide revealed essential residues for activity and allowed us to identify two nonapeptides (peptides 24 and 25), that show a potency of inhibition similar to the one of peptide 18. Interestingly, peptide 18 does not interfere with the dynamic interplay between IN subunits, while peptides 24 and 25 modulated these interactions in different manners. In fact, peptide 24 inhibited the IN-IN dimerization, while peptide 25 promoted IN multimerization, with IC50 values of 32 and 4.8 μM, respectively. In addition, peptide 25 has shown to have selective anti-infective cell activity for HIV-1. These results confirmed peptide 25 as a hit for further development of new chemotherapeutic agents against HIV-1. PMID:27375570

  19. The HIV-1 Integrase Mutant R263A/K264A Is 2-fold Defective for TRN-SR2 Binding and Viral Nuclear Import*

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Houwer, Stéphanie; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Thys, Wannes; Rocha, Susana; Dirix, Lieve; Gijsbers, Rik; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger

    2014-01-01

    Transportin-SR2 (Tnpo3, TRN-SR2), a human karyopherin encoded by the TNPO3 gene, has been identified as a cellular cofactor of HIV-1 replication, specifically interacting with HIV-1 integrase (IN). Whether this interaction mediates the nuclear import of HIV remains controversial. We previously characterized the TRN-SR2 binding interface in IN and introduced mutations at these positions to corroborate the biological relevance of the interaction. The pleiotropic nature of IN mutations complicated the interpretation. Indeed, all previously tested IN interaction mutants also affected RT. Here we report on a virus with a pair of IN mutations, INR263A/K264A, that significantly reduce interaction with TRN-SR2. The virus retains wild-type reverse transcription activity but displays a block in nuclear import and integration, as measured by quantitative PCR. The defect in integration of this mutant resulted in a smaller increase in the number of two-long terminal repeat circles than for virus specifically blocked at integration by raltegravir or catalytic site mutations (IND64N/D116N/E152Q). Finally, using an eGFP-IN-labeled HIV fluorescence-based import assay, the defect in nuclear import was corroborated. These data altogether underscore the importance of the HIV-IN TRN-SR2 protein-protein interaction for HIV nuclear import and validate the IN/TRN-SR2 interaction interface as a promising target for future antiviral therapy. PMID:25063804

  20. Comparative docking and CoMFA analysis of curcumine derivatives as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pawan; Garg, Prabha; Roy, Nilanjan

    2011-08-01

    The docking studies and comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) were performed on highly active molecules of curcumine derivatives against 3' processing activity of HIV-1 integrase (IN) enzyme. The optimum CoMFA model was selected with statistically significant cross-validated r(2) value of 0.815 and non-cross validated r (2) value of 0.99. The common pharmacophore of highly active molecules was used for screening of HIV-1 IN inhibitors. The high contribution of polar interactions in pharmacophore mapping is well supported by docking and CoMFA results. The results of docking, CoMFA, and pharmacophore mapping give structural insights as well as important binding features of curcumine derivatives as HIV-1 IN inhibitors which can provide guidance for the rational design of novel HIV-1 IN inhibitors. PMID:21327540

  1. Modification of magadiite surface by organofunctionalization for application in removing As(V) from aqueous media: Kinetic and thermodynamic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A synthetic Na-magadiite sample has been modified by organofunctionalization process using synthetic route involved the reaction of 2-mercaptopyrimidine with 3-chloropropyltriethoxysilane. The ability of these materials to remove As(V) from aqueous solution was followed by a series of adsorption isotherms adjusted to the Langmuir equation at room temperature and pH 2.0. The kinetic parameters analyzed by the Lagergren and Elovich models gave a good fit for a pseudo-second-order reaction with k2 in the 4.9-14.0 mmol-1 min-1 range for MMPY. The adsorption process was exothermic (ΔintH = -4.09 to -5.79 kJ mol-1) accompanied by increase in entropy (ΔintS = 41.29-61.80 J K-1 mol-1) and Gibbs energy (ΔintG = -22.34 to -24.19 kJ mol-1). The energetic effect caused by arsenic(V) cation adsorption was determined through calorimetric titration at the solid-liquid interface and gave a net thermal effect that enabled the calculation of the exothermic values and the equilibrium constant.

  2. Ukrainas un Sīrijas konfliktu loma ASV Āzijas Klusā okeāna reģiona politikā

    OpenAIRE

    Skladovs, Salvis

    2016-01-01

    Krievijas agresija Ukrainā un Sīrijas pilsoņu kara eskalācija, tajā iesaistoties Daesh, aktualizēja ASV globālo lomu, īpaši Eiropā un Tuvajos Austrumos. ASV tobrīd par stratēģisko prioritāti bija izsludinājusi Āzijas Klusā okeāna reģiona politiku. Atbilstoši ofensīvā reālisma nostādnēm lielvaras tiecas iegrožot potenciālo hegemonu, lai saglabātu savas pozīcijas starptautiskajā sistēmā. Līdz ar to maģistra darbā „Ukrainas un Sīrijas konfliktu loma ASV Āzijas Klusā okeāna reģiona politikā” tiek...

  3. Biochar pyrolytically produced from municipal solid wastes for aqueous As(V) removal: adsorption property and its improvement with KOH activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hongmei; Capareda, Sergio; Chang, Zhizhou; Gao, Jun; Xu, Yueding; Zhang, Jianying

    2014-10-01

    Biochar converted from waste products is being considered as an alternative adsorbent for removal of aqueous heavy metal(loid)s. In this work, experimental and modeling investigations were conducted to examine the effect of biochars pyrolytically produced from municipal solid wastes on removing aqueous As(V) before and after activated by 2M KOH solution. Results showed that the highest adsorption capacity of pristine biochars was 24.49 mg/g. The pseudo-second-order model and Langmuir adsorption isotherm model can preferably describe the adsorption process. The activated biochar showed enhanced As(V) adsorption ability with an adsorption capacity of 30.98 mg/g, which was more than 1.3 times of pristine biochars, and 2-10 times of modified biochars reported by other literatures. Increase of surface area and changes of porous texture, especially the functional groups on the surface of activated biochars are the major contributors to its more efficient adsorption of As(V). PMID:25103038

  4. Pharmacovirological Impact of an Integrase Inhibitor on Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 cDNA Species In Vivo ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Goffinet, Christine; Allespach, Ina; Oberbremer, Lena; Golden, Pamela L.; Foster, Scott A.; Johns, Brian A.; Weatherhead, Jason G.; Novick, Steven J.; Chiswell, Karen E.; Garvey, Edward P.; Keppler, Oliver T.

    2009-01-01

    Clinical trials of the first approved integrase inhibitor (INI), raltegravir, have demonstrated a drop in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA loads of infected patients that was unexpectedly more rapid than that with a potent reverse transcriptase inhibitor, and apparently dose independent. These clinical outcomes are not understood. In tissue culture, although their inhibition of integration is well documented, the effects of INIs on levels of unintegrated HIV-1 cDNAs have be...

  5. A New Large-DNA-Fragment Delivery System Based on Integrase Activity from an Integrative and Conjugative Element

    OpenAIRE

    Miyazaki, Ryo; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2013-01-01

    During the past few decades, numerous plasmid vectors have been developed for cloning, gene expression analysis, and genetic engineering. Cloning procedures typically rely on PCR amplification, DNA fragment restriction digestion, recovery, and ligation, but increasingly, procedures are being developed to assemble large synthetic DNAs. In this study, we developed a new gene delivery system using the integrase activity of an integrative and conjugative element (ICE). The advantage of the integr...

  6. Non-Enzymatic Functions of Retroviral Integrase: The Next Target for Novel Anti-HIV Drug Development

    OpenAIRE

    TakaoMasuda

    2011-01-01

    Integrase (IN) is a retroviral enzyme that catalyzes the insertion of viral DNA (vDNA) into host chromosomal DNA, which is necessary for efficient viral replication. The crystal structure of prototype foamy virus IN bound to cognate vDNA ends, a complex referred to as the intasome, has recently been resolved. Structure analysis of the intasome revealed a tetramer structure of IN that was required for its catalytic function, and also showed the inhibitory mechanism of the IN inhibitor. Genetic...

  7. Diketo acid inhibitor mechanism and HIV-1 integrase: Implications for metal binding in the active site of phosphotransferase enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Grobler, Jay A.; Stillmock, Kara; Hu, Binghua; Witmer, Marc; Felock, Peter; Espeseth, Amy S.; Wolfe, Abigail; Egbertson, Melissa; Bourgeois, Michele; Melamed, Jeffrey; Wai, John S.; Young, Steve; Vacca, Joseph; Hazuda, Daria J.

    2002-01-01

    The process of integrating the reverse-transcribed HIV-1 DNA into the host chromosomal DNA is catalyzed by the virally encoded enzyme integrase (IN). Integration requires two metal-dependent reactions, 3′ end processing and strand transfer. Compounds that contain a diketo acid moiety have been shown to selectively inhibit the strand transfer reaction of IN in vitro and in infected cells and are effective as inhibitors of HIV-1 replication. To characterize the molecular basis of inhibition, we...

  8. A Novel Strategy to Assemble the β-Diketo Acid Pharmacophore of HIV Integrase Inhibitors on Purine Nucleobase Scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Uchil, Vinod; Seo, Byung; Nair, Vasu

    2007-01-01

    Claisen condensation, the key step in constructing the pharmacophore of aryl β-diketo acids (DKA) as integrase inhibitors, fails in certain cases of highly electron-deficient heterocycles such as purines. A general synthetic strategy to assemble the DKA motif on the purine scaffold has been accomplished. The synthetic sequence entails a palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling, a C-acylation involving a tandem addition/elimination reaction and a novel ferric ion-catalyzed selective hydrolysis of an...

  9. Secondary mutations in viruses resistant to HIV-1 integrase inhibitors that restore viral infectivity and replication kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Koichiro; Wakasa-Morimoto, Chiaki; Kobayashi, Masanori; Miki, Shigeru; Noshi, Takeshi; Seki, Takahiro; Kanamori-Koyama, Mikiko; Kawauchi, Shinobu; Suyama, Akemi; Fujishita, Toshio; Yoshinaga, Tomokazu; Garvey, Edward P; Johns, Brian A; Foster, Scott A; Underwood, Mark R; Sato, Akihiko; Fujiwara, Tamio

    2009-02-01

    Passage of HIV-1 in the presence of integrase inhibitors (INIs) generates resistant viruses that have mutations in the integrase region. Integrase-resistant mutations Q148K and Q148R were identified as primary mutations with the passage of HIV-1 IIIB in the presence of INIs S-1360 or S/GSK-364735, respectively. Secondary amino acid substitutions E138K or G140S were observed when passage with INI was continued. The role of these mutations was investigated with molecular clones. Relative to Q148K alone, Q148K/E138K had 2- and >6-fold increases in resistance to S-1360 and S/GSK-364735, respectively, and the double mutant had slightly better infectivity and replication kinetics. In contrast, Q148K/G140S and Q148R/E138K had nearly equivalent or slightly reduced fold resistance to the INI compared with their respective Q148 primary mutants, and had increases in infectivity and replication kinetics. Recovery of these surrogates of viral fitness coincided with the recovery of integration efficiency of viral DNA into the host cell chromosome for these double mutants. These data show that recovery of viral integration efficiency can be an important factor for the emergence and maintenance of INI-resistant mutations. PMID:19027039

  10. Separación electrodialítica de Cu(II y As(V en electrolitos ácidos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibáñez, J. P.

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The separation of copper and arsenic from acidic electrolytes by electrodialysis was investigated at room temperature. The effect of current density and pH was studied in a batch cell during 3 hours. The kinetic parameters showed that Cu(II transport rate was 0.75 mol/m2/h and the As(V transport rate was 0.002 mol/m2/h. An efficient separation between Cu(II and As(V was achieved; generating a concentrated solution of copper with no arsenic, which was obtained independently of the electrolyte acidity and current density used. The effect of the arsenic speciation with pH is discussed as well.

    Se investigó el uso de la electrodiálisis para separar cobre y arsénico desde soluciones ácidas a temperatura ambiente. Se estudió el efecto de la densidad de corriente y grado de
    acidez del electrolito en la separación a través de experimentos en celda batch de 5 compartimientos durante 3 h. Los parámetros cinéticos indican que la velocidad de transporte de Cu(II fue de 0,75 mol/h/m2 y de As(V fue de 0,002 mol/h/m2 a una densidad de corriente de 225 A/m2. Se logró obtener una eficiente separación de Cu(II y As(V, con la generación de una solución concentrada de cobre sin presencia de arsénico, lo cual fue independiente del grado de acidez de la operación y de la densidad de corriente. El efecto de la distribución de las especies iónicas de As(V con el pH también se discute.

  11. Adsorption of As(III) and As(V) onto colloidal microparticles of commercial cross-linked polyallylamine (Sevelamer) from single and binary ion solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyzas, George Z; Siafaka, Panoraia I; Kostoglou, Margaritis; Bikiaris, Dimitrios N

    2016-07-15

    This work investigates the removal of arsenic ions in trivalent (As(III)) or pentavalent form (As(V)) from single-component and binary (equal initial ion concentrations) aqueous solutions using commercial cross-linked polyallylamine (namely as Sevelamer) as adsorbent. This is the first work in literature regarding the application of that commercial material as adsorbent for ions. Sevelamer (SVL) is a widely known pharmaceutical compound and the existence of primary and secondary amino groups (with different ratios) in its molecule increases its adsorption potential. For this purpose can be easily proposed as potential sorbent. The adsorption evaluation was based on the pH-effect (optimum pH=6, where As(III) and As(V) removal was 69 and 86%, respectively), isotherms and kinetic curves. The maximum theoretical adsorption capacity (Qm) was 86 and 133mg/g for single-component solutions of As(III) and As(V), respectively. The respective values for binary mixtures of the same concentration (100mg/L) were 84 and 116mg/g, respectively (calculated after fitting to Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm model at 20°C). A novel kinetic interpretation based on the raw experimental kinetics data was also developed. Although adsorption of As(III) and As(V) occurs mainly at different sites, there is an interdependence in their adsorption kinetics. It was found that adsorption from the binary mixtures is a two-stage process. The adsorption mechanism of SVL and arsenic ions interaction was elucidated using FTIR spectroscopy before and after adsorption. SEM images and XRD patterns (the material was amorphous both before and after arsenic adsorption indicating that the mechanism did not alter its physical state) were also taken for the characterization of SVL before and after arsenic adsorption. The adsorption mechanism was mainly attributed to the electrostatic interactions between negatively As ions and positively charged amino groups of SVL. For this reason, As(V) adsorption is higher than

  12. Impact of hydrodynamic injection and phiC31 integrase on tumor latency in a mouse model of MYC-induced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren E Woodard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hydrodynamic injection is an effective method for DNA delivery in mouse liver and is being translated to larger animals for possible clinical use. Similarly, phiC31 integrase has proven effective in mediating long-term gene therapy in mice when delivered by hydrodynamic injection and is being considered for clinical gene therapy applications. However, chromosomal aberrations have been associated with phiC31 integrase expression in tissue culture, leading to questions about safety. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To study whether hydrodynamic delivery alone, or in conjunction with delivery of phiC31 integrase for long-term transgene expression, could facilitate tumor formation, we used a transgenic mouse model in which sustained induction of the human C-MYC oncogene in the liver was followed by hydrodynamic injection. Without injection, mice had a median tumor latency of 154 days. With hydrodynamic injection of saline alone, the median tumor latency was significantly reduced, to 105 days. The median tumor latency was similar, 106 days, when a luciferase donor plasmid and backbone plasmid without integrase were administered. In contrast, when active or inactive phiC31 integrase and donor plasmid were supplied to the mouse liver, the median tumor latency was 153 days, similar to mice receiving no injection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that phiC31 integrase does not facilitate tumor formation in this C-MYC transgenic mouse model. However, in groups lacking phiC31 integrase, hydrodynamic injection appeared to contribute to C-MYC-induced hepatocellular carcinoma in adult mice. Although it remains to be seen to what extent these findings may be extrapolated to catheter-mediated hydrodynamic delivery in larger species, they suggest that caution should be used during translation of hydrodynamic injection to clinical applications.

  13. A new perovskite-type NdFeO3 adsorbent: synthesis, characterization, and As(V) adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Minh Dai; Nhiem Dao, Ngoc; Van Nguyen, Duc; Chuc Pham, Ngoc; Ninh Vu, The; Dung Doan, Trung

    2016-06-01

    Nanocrystalline NdFeO3 perovskite oxide was prepared by the combustion method using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and corresponding metal nitrate precursors under optimum process conditions, using a solution with a pH of 2, a metal/PVA molar ratio of 1:3, and a calcination temperature of 600 °C, and was characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller nitrogen adsorption and desorption, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, laser Raman spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis. The synthesized perovskite NdFeO3, which had an average size of 20 nm and a relatively high surface area of 20 m2 g‑1, was investigated for adsorbing hazardous arsenate from aqueous solution. Arsenate adsorption by perovskite NdFeO3 is a pH-dependent process with a high adsorption capacity at pH levels between 4 and 7 and a maximum As(V) adsorption capacity of 126.58 mg g‑1, higher than most arsenate adsorbents reported in the literature. Kinetic and equilibrium data of reaction under the experimental conditions are best described by a pseudo-second-order and the Langmuir isotherm equation. The values of enthalpy, Gibbs free energy and entropy changes (ΔH0 = +63.916 kJ mol‑1, ΔG0 = ‑6.551 kJ mol‑1 to ‑14.021 kJ mol‑1 at T = 283‑313 K, ΔS0 = +0.249 kJ mol‑1 K‑1) suggested that the reaction was endothermic, spontaneous, and took place with increasing entropy.

  14. Porcine endogenous retrovirus-A/C: biochemical properties of its integrase and susceptibility to raltegravir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demange, Antonin; Yajjou-Hamalian, Halima; Gallay, Kathy; Luengo, Catherine; Beven, Véronique; Leroux, Aurélie; Confort, Marie-Pierre; Al Andary, Elsy; Gouet, Patrice; Moreau, Karen; Ronfort, Corinne; Blanchard, Yannick

    2015-10-01

    Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) are present in the genomes of pig cells. The PERV-A/C recombinant virus can infect human cells and is a major risk of zoonotic disease in the case of xenotransplantation of pig organs to humans. Raltegravir (RAL) is a viral integrase (IN) inhibitor used in highly active antiretroviral treatment. In the present study, we explored the potential use of RAL against PERV-A/C. We report (i) a three-dimensional model of the PERV-A/C intasome complexed with RAL, (ii) the sensitivity of PERV-A/C IN to RAL in vitro and (iii) the sensitivity of a PERV-A/C-IRES-GFP recombinant virus to RAL in cellulo. We demonstrated that RAL is a potent inhibitor against PERV-A/C IN and PERV-A/C replication with IC50s in the nanomolar range. To date, the use of retroviral inhibitors remains the only way to control the risk of zoonotic PERV infection during pig-to-human xenotransplantation. PMID:26296914

  15. Selection of diverse and clinically relevant integrase inhibitor-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Masanori; Nakahara, Koichiro; Seki, Takahiro; Miki, Shigeru; Kawauchi, Shinobu; Suyama, Akemi; Wakasa-Morimoto, Chiaki; Kodama, Makoto; Endoh, Takeshi; Oosugi, Eiichi; Matsushita, Yoshihiro; Murai, Hitoshi; Fujishita, Toshio; Yoshinaga, Tomokazu; Garvey, Edward; Foster, Scott; Underwood, Mark; Johns, Brian; Sato, Akihiko; Fujiwara, Tamio

    2008-11-01

    Resistance passage studies were conducted with five INIs (integrase inhibitors) that have been tested in clinical trials to date: a new naphthyridinone-type INI S/GSK-364735, raltegravir, elvitegravir, L-870,810 and S-1360. In establishing the passage system and starting from concentrations several fold above the EC(50) value, resistance mutations against S-1360 and related diketoacid-type compounds could be isolated from infected MT-2 cell cultures from day 14 to 28. Q148R and F121Y were the two main pathways of resistance to S/GSK-364735. Q148R/K and N155H, which were found in patients failing raltegravir treatment in Phase IIb studies, were observed during passage with raltegravir with this method. The fold resistance of 40 mutant molecular clones versus wild type virus was compared with these five INIs. The overall resistance pattern of S/GSK-364735 was similar to that of raltegravir and other INIs. However, different fold resistances of particular mutations were noted among different INIs, reflecting a potential to develop INIs with distinctly different resistant profiles. PMID:18625269

  16. HIV integrase variability and genetic barrier in antiretroviral naïve and experienced patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Comolli Giuditta

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 integrase (IN variability in treatment naïve patients with different HIV-1 subtypes is a major issue. In fact, the effect of previous exposure to antiretrovirals other than IN inhibitors (INI on IN variability has not been satisfactorily defined. In addition, the genetic barrier for specific INI resistance mutations remains to be calculated. Methods IN variability was analyzed and compared with reverse transcriptase (RT and protease (PR variability in 41 treatment naïve and 54 RT inhibitor (RTI and protease inhibitor (PRI experienced patients from subjects infected with subtype B and non-B strains. In addition, four HIV-2 strains were analyzed in parallel. Frequency and distribution of IN mutations were compared between HAART-naïve and RTI/PI-experienced patients; the genetic barrier for 27 amino acid positions related to INI susceptibility was calculated as well. Results Primary mutations associated with resistance to INI were not detected in patients not previously treated with this class of drug. However, some secondary mutations which have been shown to contribute to INI resistance were found. Only limited differences in codon usage distribution between patient groups were found. HIV-2 strains from INI naïve patients showed the presence of both primary and secondary resistance mutations. Conclusion Exposure to antivirals other than INI does not seem to significantly influence the emergence of mutations implicated in INI resistance. HIV-2 strain might have reduced susceptibility to INI.

  17. A Symmetric Region of the HIV-1 Integrase Dimerization Interface Is Essential for Viral Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrao, Erik; Thys, Wannes; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Al-Mawsawi, Laith Q.; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger; Neamati, Nouri

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an important target for contemporary antiretroviral drug design research. Historically, efforts at inactivating the enzyme have focused upon blocking its active site. However, it has become apparent that new classes of allosteric inhibitors will be necessary to advance the antiretroviral field in light of the emergence of viral strains resistant to contemporary clinically used IN drugs. In this study we have characterized the importance of a close network of IN residues, distant from the active site, as important for the obligatory multimerization of the enzyme and viral replication as a whole. Specifically, we have determined that the configuration of six residues within a highly symmetrical region at the IN dimerization interface, composed of a four-tiered aromatic interaction flanked by two salt bridges, significantly contributes to proper HIV-1 replication. Additionally, we have utilized a quantitative luminescence assay to examine IN oligomerization and have determined that there is a very low tolerance for amino acid substitutions along this region. Even conservative residue substitutions negatively impacted IN multimerization, resulting in an inactive viral enzyme and a non-replicative virus. We have shown that there is a very low tolerance for amino acid variation at the symmetrical dimeric interface region characterized in this study, and therefore drugs designed to target the amino acid network detailed here could be expected to yield a significantly reduced number of drug-resistant escape mutations compared to contemporary clinically-evaluated antiretrovirals. PMID:23028829

  18. Initial Characterization of Integrase-Defective Lentiviral Vectors for Pancreatic Cancer Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanoun, Naima; Gayral, Marion; Pointreau, Adeline; Buscail, Louis; Cordelier, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    The vast majority (85%) of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) are discovered at too of a late stage to allow curative surgery. In addition, PDAC is highly resistant to conventional methods of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which only offer a marginal clinical benefit. Consequently, the prognosis of this cancer is devastating, with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. In this dismal context, we recently demonstrated that PDAC gene therapy using nonviral vectors is safe and feasible, with early signs of efficacy in selected patients. Our next step is to transfer to the clinic HIV-1-based lentiviral vectors (LVs) that outshine other therapeutic vectors to treat experimental models of PDAC. However, a primary safety issue presented by LVs that may delay their use in patients is the risk of oncogenesis after vector integration in the host's cell DNA. Thus, we developed a novel anticancerous approach based on integrase-defective lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) and demonstrated that IDLVs can be successfully engineered to transiently deliver therapeutic genes to inhibit pancreatic cancer cells proliferation. This work stems for the use of therapeutic IDLVs for the management of PDAC, in forthcoming early phase gene therapy clinical trial for this disease with no cure. PMID:26731312

  19. Novel HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitor Development by Virtual Screening Based on QSAR Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasch, Laura; Zakharov, Alexey V; Tarasova, Olga A; Poroikov, Vladimir V; Liao, Chenzhong; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) plays an important role in the life cycle of HIV and is responsible for integration of the virus into the human genome. We present computational approaches used to design novel HIV-1 IN inhibitors. We created an IN inhibitor database by collecting experimental data from the literature. We developed quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models of HIV-1 IN strand transfer (ST) inhibitors using this database. The prediction accuracy of these models was estimated by external 5-fold cross-validation as well as with an additional validation set of 308 structurally distinct compounds from the publicly accessible BindingDB database. The validated models were used to screen a small combinatorial library of potential synthetic candidates to identify hits, with a subsequent docking approach applied to further filter out compounds to arrive at a small set of potential HIV-1 IN inhibitors. As result, 236 compounds with good druglikeness properties and with correct docking poses were identified as potential candidates for synthesis. One of the six compounds finally chosen for synthesis was experimentally confirmed to inhibit the ST reaction with an IC50(ST) of 37 µM. The IN inhibitor database is available for download from http://cactus.nci.nih.gov/download/iidb/. PMID:26268340

  20. Class 1 integrase, sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes in wastewater treatment plant and surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowska, Nicoletta; Koczura, Ryszard; Mokracka, Joanna

    2016-02-01

    Wastewater treatment plants are considered hot spots for multiplication and dissemination of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and resistance genes. In this study, we determined the presence of class 1 integron integrase and genes conferring resistance to tetracyclines and sulfonamides in the genomes of culturable bacteria isolated from a wastewater treatment plant and the river that receives the treated wastewater. Moreover, using PCR-based metagenomic approach, we quantified intI1, tet and sul genes. Wastewater treatment caused the decrease in the total number of culturable heterotrophs and bacteria resistant to tetracycline and sulfonamides, along with the decrease in the number of intI1, sul and tet gene copies per ml, with significant reduction of tet(B). On the other hand, the treatment process increased both the frequency of tetracycline- and sulfonamide-resistant bacteria and intI1-positive strains, and the relative abundance of all quantified antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and intI1 gene; in the case of tet(A) and sul2 significantly. The discharge of treated wastewater increased the number of intI1, tet and sul genes in the receiving river water both in terms of copy number per ml and relative abundance. Hence, despite the reduction of the number of ARGs and ARBs, wastewater treatment selects for bacteria with ARGs in effluent. PMID:26519797

  1. Application of an R-group search technique into molecular design of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Jian-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR study for 62 HIV-1 integrase(IN inhibitors was established using Topomer CoMFA. The multiple correlation coefficient of fitting, cross validation and external validation were 0.942, 0.670 and 0.748, respectively. The results indicated that the Topomer CoMFA model obtained has both favorable estimation stability and good prediction capability. Topomer Search was used to search R group from ZINC database. As the result, a series of R groups with relatively high activity contribution was obtained. By filtering with the most potent molecule in the set, 1 Ra group and 21 Rb groups were selected. We employed the 1 Ra groups and 21 Rb groups to alternately substitute the Ra and Rb of sample 42. Finally, we designed 21 new compounds and further predicted their activities using the Topomer CoMFA model and there were 10 new compounds with higher activity than that of the template molecule. The results suggested the Topomer Search technology could be effectively used to screen and design new HIV-1 IN inhibitors and has good predictive capability to guide the design of new HIV/AIDS drugs.

  2. The influence of particle size and structure on the sorption and oxidation behavior of birnessite: I. Adsorption of As(V) and oxidation of As(III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Mario; Escobar-Quiroz, Ingrid N.; Salazar-Camacho, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Sorption and oxidation reactions in the environment may affect substantially the mobility of redox-sensitive toxic trace elements and compounds. Investigating the environmental factors that influence these reactions is crucial in understanding and predicting the geochemical fate of these environmental species, as well as to design appropriate engineered remediation schemes. Arsenic is a widespread contaminant of concern, especially in its oxidized forms, and Mn oxide minerals are some of the major contributors to its oxidation. The goal of this work was to investigate the influence of particle size and structural differences of environmentally-relevant Mn(IV) birnessites on the adsorption of As(V) and on the oxidation of As(III). An acid birnessite of 39 m2/g and a δ-MnO2 of 114 m2/g were used. Both birnessites sorbed a maximum Pb(II) of 0.3 Pb/Mn, indicating a significantly larger layer cationic vacancy content for acid birnessite, and a density of reactive edge sites for both of 12 sites/nm2. As(V) forms a bidentate bridging complex on singly-coordinated surface sites at the birnessite particle edges regardless of loading, pH, birnessite type, and presence of pre-sorbed metals(II). Maximum As(V) adsorption, under repulsive electrostatic pH conditions did not yield adsorption congruency behavior between both birnessites at constant pH, presumably because the increase in internal vacancy content causes negative electrostatic repulsion towards external As(V) oxyanion binding. At pH 4.5 As(III) oxidation on birnessites was fast and quantitative at As/Mn ratios of 0.3-0.33, the reaction being largely driven by the proton concentration. At pH 6 δ-MnO2 oxidized As(III) faster and to a higher extent than acid birnessite, at equal masses; but the reverse at equal total surface areas. The oxidation driving force (independently from protons) was higher at pH 6 than at pH 4.5 because of Mn(II) product removal by sorption to interlayer vacancies, which overcomes reactive

  3. Removal of As(V) and simultaneous production of copper powder from a Cu(II)-As(V)-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} electrolyte by using reactive electrodialysis; Eliminacion de As (V) y produccion simultanea de polvo de cobre de un electrolito de Cu(II) - As(V) - H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} mediante electrodialisis reactiva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibanez, J. P.

    2012-11-01

    The removal of As(V) and the simultaneous generation of powder of copper from an electrolyte made of As(V) - Cu(II) - H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} was studied by using electro dialysis at several current densities, temperatures and aeration of the electrolyte. The removal of arsenic was proportional to the current density, temperature and aeration used. The removal of arsenic reached a value of 0.14 mmol/h at 500 A/m2, 25 degree centigrade and without aeration, this value increased to 0.31 mmol/h by increasing the aeration to 6.6 l/h. The Cu(II) was recovered in a 98 % as a fine arsenic free powder of metallic copper with oxides of copper. The arsenic was removed from the electrolyte by adsorption onto the anodic slimes generated from the lead anode oxidation. (Author) 24 refs.

  4. Superparamagnetic nanomaterial Fe3O4-TiO2 for the removal of As(V) and As(III) from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beduk, Fatma

    2016-07-01

    A magnetically separable nanomaterial Fe3O4-TiO2 was synthesized and characterized which was subsequently used for the removal of arsenic (V) from aqueous solutions. The surface morphology, magnetic properties, crystalline structure, thermal stability and Brunauer-Emmet-Teller surface area of the synthesized Fe3O4-TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) are characterized by scanning electron microscope and high-resolution transmission electron microscope, vibrating sample magnetometry, X-ray diffractometer, thermogravimetric analysis and multi point function surface area analyzer. The saturation magnetization of Fe3O4-TiO2 NPs was determined to be 50.97 emu/g, which makes them superparamagnetic. The surface area of Fe3O4-TiO2 NPs was as much as 94.9 m(2)/g. The main factors affecting adsorption efficiency, such as solution pH, reaction time, initial As(V) concentration and adsorbent concentration are investigated. When the adsorption isotherms were analyzed by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich models, equilibrium data were found to be well represented by Freundlich isotherm, and adsorption on Fe3O4-TiO2 NPs fitted well with pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The maximum adsorption capacity of As(V) on Fe3O4-TiO2 NPs, calculated by the Freundlich model was determined at 11.434 µg/g. 1.0 g/L of Fe3O4-TiO2 NPs was efficient for complete removal of 100 µg/L As(V) in 1 h. Fe3O4-TiO2 NPs was also effective for 93% removal of 100 µg/L As(III). Matrix effect was determined using As(V)-contaminated well water. Successfull results were obtained for purification of real well water containing 137.12 µg/L As(V). Results show that Fe3O4-TiO2 NPs are promising adsorbents with an advantage of magnetic separation. PMID:26831455

  5. Corynebacterium glutamicum MTCC 2745 immobilized on granular activated carbon/MnFe2O4 composite: A novel biosorbent for removal of As(III) and As(V) ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podder, M S; Majumder, C B

    2016-11-01

    The optimization of biosorption/bioaccumulation process of both As(III) and As(V) has been investigated by using the biosorbent; biofilm of Corynebacterium glutamicum MTCC 2745 supported on granular activated carbon/MnFe2O4 composite (MGAC). The presence of functional groups on the cell wall surface of the biomass that may interact with the metal ions was proved by FT-IR. To determine the most appropriate correlation for the equilibrium curves employing the procedure of the non-linear regression for curve fitting analysis, isotherm studies were performed for As(III) and As(V) using 30 isotherm models. The pattern of biosorption/bioaccumulation fitted well with Vieth-Sladek isotherm model for As(III) and Brouers-Sotolongo and Fritz-Schlunder-V isotherm models for As(V). The maximum biosorption/bioaccumulation capacity estimated using Langmuir model were 2584.668mg/g for As(III) and 2651.675mg/g for As(V) at 30°C temperature and 220min contact time. The results showed that As(III) and As(V) removal was strongly pH-dependent with an optimum pH value of 7.0. D-R isotherm studies specified that ion exchange might play a prominent role. PMID:27289352

  6. Non-catalytic site HIV-1 integrase inhibitors disrupt core maturation and induce a reverse transcription block in target cells.

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    Mini Balakrishnan

    Full Text Available HIV-1 integrase (IN is the target for two classes of antiretrovirals: i the integrase strand-transfer inhibitors (INSTIs and ii the non-catalytic site integrase inhibitors (NCINIs. NCINIs bind at the IN dimer interface and are thought to interfere primarily with viral DNA (vDNA integration in the target cell by blocking IN-vDNA assembly as well as the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction. Herein we show that treatment of virus-producing cells, but not of mature virions or target cells, drives NCINI antiviral potency. NCINIs target an essential late-stage event in HIV replication that is insensitive to LEDGF levels in the producer cells. Virus particles produced in the presence of NCINIs displayed normal Gag-Pol processing and endogenous reverse transcriptase activity, but were defective at initiating vDNA synthesis following entry into the target cell. NCINI-resistant virus carrying a T174I mutation in the IN dimer interface was less sensitive to the compound-induced late-stage effects, including the reverse transcription block. Wild-type, but not T174I virus, produced in the presence of NCINIs exhibited striking defects in core morphology and an increased level of IN oligomers that was not observed upon treatment of mature cell-free particles. Collectively, these results reveal that NCINIs act through a novel mechanism that is unrelated to the previously observed inhibition of IN activity or IN-LEDGF interaction, and instead involves the disruption of an IN function during HIV-1 core maturation and assembly.

  7. Non-catalytic site HIV-1 integrase inhibitors disrupt core maturation and induce a reverse transcription block in target cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Mini; Yant, Stephen R; Tsai, Luong; O'Sullivan, Christopher; Bam, Rujuta A; Tsai, Angela; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Stray, Kirsten M; Sakowicz, Roman; Cihlar, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is the target for two classes of antiretrovirals: i) the integrase strand-transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) and ii) the non-catalytic site integrase inhibitors (NCINIs). NCINIs bind at the IN dimer interface and are thought to interfere primarily with viral DNA (vDNA) integration in the target cell by blocking IN-vDNA assembly as well as the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction. Herein we show that treatment of virus-producing cells, but not of mature virions or target cells, drives NCINI antiviral potency. NCINIs target an essential late-stage event in HIV replication that is insensitive to LEDGF levels in the producer cells. Virus particles produced in the presence of NCINIs displayed normal Gag-Pol processing and endogenous reverse transcriptase activity, but were defective at initiating vDNA synthesis following entry into the target cell. NCINI-resistant virus carrying a T174I mutation in the IN dimer interface was less sensitive to the compound-induced late-stage effects, including the reverse transcription block. Wild-type, but not T174I virus, produced in the presence of NCINIs exhibited striking defects in core morphology and an increased level of IN oligomers that was not observed upon treatment of mature cell-free particles. Collectively, these results reveal that NCINIs act through a novel mechanism that is unrelated to the previously observed inhibition of IN activity or IN-LEDGF interaction, and instead involves the disruption of an IN function during HIV-1 core maturation and assembly. PMID:24040198

  8. BF integrase genes of HIV-1 circulating in São Paulo, Brazil, with a recurrent recombination region.

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    Iamarino, Atila; de Melo, Fernando Lucas; Braconi, Carla Torres; Zanotto, Paolo Marinho de Andrade

    2012-01-01

    Although some studies have shown diversity in HIV integrase (IN) genes, none has focused particularly on the gene evolving in epidemics in the context of recombination. The IN gene in 157 HIV-1 integrase inhibitor-naïve patients from the São Paulo State, Brazil, were sequenced tallying 128 of subtype B (23 of which were found in non-B genomes), 17 of subtype F (8 of which were found in recombinant genomes), 11 integrases were BF recombinants, and 1 from subtype C. Crucially, we found that 4 BF recombinant viruses shared a recurrent recombination breakpoint region between positions 4900 and 4924 (relative to the HXB2) that includes 2 gRNA loops, where the RT may stutter. Since these recombinants had independent phylogenetic origin, we argue that these results suggest a possible recombination hotspot not observed so far in BF CRF in particular, or in any other HIV-1 CRF in general. Additionally, 40% of the drug-naïve and 45% of the drug-treated patients had at least 1 raltegravir (RAL) or elvitegravir (EVG) resistance-associated amino acid change, but no major resistance mutations were found, in line with other studies. Importantly, V151I was the most common minor resistance mutation among B, F, and BF IN genes. Most codon sites of the IN genes had higher rates of synonymous substitutions (dS) indicative of a strong negative selection. Nevertheless, several codon sites mainly in the subtype B were found under positive selection. Consequently, we observed a higher genetic diversity in the B portions of the mosaics, possibly due to the more recent introduction of subtype F on top of an ongoing subtype B epidemics and a fast spread of subtype F alleles among the B population. PMID:22485165

  9. Integrase inhibitor (INI) genotypic resistance in treatment-naive and raltegravir-experienced patients infected with diverse HIV-1 clades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Tomas; Dunn, David T.; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; De Mendoza, Carmen; Garcia, Frederico; Smit, Erasmus; Fearnhill, Esther; Marcelin, Anne-Genevieve; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Kaiser, Rolf; Geretti, Anna Maria

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to characterize the prevalence and patterns of genotypic integrase inhibitor (INI) resistance in relation to HIV-1 clade. Methods The cohort comprised 533 INI-naive subjects and 255 raltegravir recipients with viraemia who underwent integrase sequencing in routine care across Europe, including 134/533 (25.1%) and 46/255 (18.0%), respectively, with non-B clades (A, C, D, F, G, CRF01, CRF02, other CRFs, complex). Results No major INI resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) occurred in INI-naive subjects. Among raltegravir recipients with viraemia (median 3523 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL), 113/255 (44.3%) had one or more major INI RAMs, most commonly N155H (45/255, 17.6%), Q148H/R/K + G140S/A (35/255, 13.7%) and Y143R/C/H (12/255, 4.7%). In addition, four (1.6%) raltegravir recipients showed novel mutations at recognized resistance sites (E92A, S147I, N155D, N155Q) and novel mutations at other integrase positions that were statistically associated with raltegravir exposure (K159Q/R, I161L/M/T/V, E170A/G). Comparing subtype B with non-B clades, Q148H/R/K occurred in 42/209 (20.1%) versus 2/46 (4.3%) subjects (P = 0.009) and G140S/A occurred in 36/209 (17.2%) versus 1/46 (2.2%) subjects (P = 0.005). Intermediate- to high-level cross-resistance to twice-daily dolutegravir was predicted in 40/255 (15.7%) subjects, more commonly in subtype B versus non-B clades (39/209, 18.7% versus 1/46, 2.2%; P = 0.003). A glycine (G) to serine (S) substitution at integrase position 140 required one nucleotide change in subtype B and two nucleotide changes in all non-B clades. Conclusions No major INI resistance mutations occurred in INI-naive subjects. Reduced occurrence of Q148H/R/K + G140S/A was seen in non-B clades versus subtype B, and was explained by the higher genetic barrier to the G140S mutation observed in all non-B clades analysed. PMID:26311843

  10. Mechanism of inhibition of HIV-1 integrase by G-tetrad-forming oligonucleotides in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, N; Marchand, C; Liu, J; Mitra, R; Hogan, M E; Pommier, Y

    2000-07-14

    The G-tetrad-forming oligonucleotides and have been identified as potent inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase (HIV-1 IN) activity (Rando, R. F., Ojwang, J., Elbaggari, A., Reyes, G. R., Tinder, R., McGrath, M. S., and Hogan, M. E. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 1754-1760; Mazumder, A., Neamati, N., Ojwang, J. O., Sunder, S., Rando, R. F., and Pommier, Y. (1996) Biochemistry 35, 13762-13771; Jing, N., and Hogan, M. E. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 34992-34999). To understand the inhibition of HIV-1 IN activity by the G-quartet inhibitors, we have designed the oligonucleotides and, composed of three and four G-quartets with stem lengths of 19 and 24 A, respectively. The fact that increasing the G-quartet stem length from 15 to 24 A kept inhibition of HIV-1 IN activity unchanged suggests that the binding interaction occurs between a GTGT loop domain of the G-quartet inhibitors and a catalytic site of HIV-1 IN, referred to as a face-to-face interaction. Docking the NMR structure of (Jing and Hogan (1998)) into the x-ray structure of the core domain of HIV-1 IN, HIV-1 IN-(51-209) (Maignan, S., Guilloteau, J.-P. , Qing, Z.-L., Clement-Mella, C., and Mikol, V. (1998) J. Mol. Biol. 282, 359-368), was performed using the GRAMM program. The statistical distributions of hydrogen bonding between HIV-1 IN and were obtained from the analyses of 1000 random docking structures. The docking results show a high probability of interaction between the GTGT loop residues of the G-quartet inhibitors and the catalytic site of HIV-1 IN, in agreement with the experimental observation. PMID:10801812

  11. HIV-1 integrase inhibitors are substrates for the multidrug transporter MDR1-P-glycoprotein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara Andrea

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery of diketoacid-containing derivatives as inhibitors of HIV-1 Integrase (IN (IN inhibitors, IINs has played a major role in validating this enzyme as an important target for antiretroviral therapy. Since the in vivo efficacy depends on access of these drugs to intracellular sites where HIV-1 replicates, we determined whether the IINs are recognized by the multidrug transporter MDR1-P-glycoprotein (P-gp thereby reducing their intracellular accumulation. To address the effect of IINs on drug transport, nine quinolonyl diketo acid (DKA derivatives active on the HIV-1 IN strand transfer (ST step and with EC50 ranging from 1.83 to >50 μm in cell-based assays were tested for their in vitro interaction with P-gp in the CEM-MDR cell system. IINs were investigated for the inhibition and induction of the P-gp function and expression as well as for multidrug resistance (MDR reversing ability. Results The HIV-1 IINs act as genuine P-gp substrates by inhibiting doxorubicin efflux and inducing P-gp functional conformation changes as evaluated by the modulation of UIC2 mAb epitope. Further, IINs chemosensitize MDR cells to vinblastine and induce P-gp expression in drug sensitive revertants of CEM-MDR cells. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that HIV-1 IINs are P-gp substrates. This biological property may influence the absorption, distribution and elimination of these novels anti HIV-1 compounds.

  12. GCN5-dependent acetylation of HIV-1 integrase enhances viral integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albanese Alberto

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An essential event during the replication cycle of HIV-1 is the integration of the reverse transcribed viral DNA into the host cellular genome. Our former report revealed that HIV-1 integrase (IN, the enzyme that catalyzes the integration reaction, is positively regulated by acetylation mediated by the histone acetyltransferase (HAT p300. Results In this study we demonstrate that another cellular HAT, GCN5, acetylates IN leading to enhanced 3'-end processing and strand transfer activities. GCN5 participates in the integration step of HIV-1 replication cycle as demonstrated by the reduced infectivity, due to inefficient provirus formation, in GCN5 knockdown cells. Within the C-terminal domain of IN, four lysines (K258, K264, K266, and K273 are targeted by GCN5 acetylation, three of which (K264, K266, and K273 are also modified by p300. Replication analysis of HIV-1 clones carrying substitutions at the IN lysines acetylated by both GCN5 and p300, or exclusively by GCN5, demonstrated that these residues are required for efficient viral integration. In addition, a comparative analysis of the replication efficiencies of the IN triple- and quadruple-mutant viruses revealed that even though the lysines targeted by both GCN5 and p300 are required for efficient virus integration, the residue exclusively modified by GCN5 (K258 does not affect this process. Conclusions The results presented here further demonstrate the relevance of IN post-translational modification by acetylation, which results from the catalytic activities of multiple HATs during the viral replication cycle. Finally, this study contributes to clarifying the recent debate raised on the role of IN acetylated lysines during HIV-1 infection.

  13. Improving the use of ranking in virtual screening against HIV-1 integrase with triangular numbers and including ligand profiling with antitargets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sosa, Alfonso T; Maran, Uko

    2014-11-24

    A delicate balance exists between a drug molecule's toxicity and its activity. Indeed, efficacy, toxicity, and side effect problems are a common cause for the termination of drug candidate compounds and development projects. To address this, an antitarget interaction profile is built and combined with virtual screening and cross docking for new inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase, in order to consider possible off-target interactions as early as possible in a drug or hit discovery program. New ranking techniques using triangular numbers improve ranking information on the compounds and recovery of known inhibitors into the top compounds using different docking programs. This improved ranking arises from using consensus of ranks between docking programs and ligand efficiencies to derive a new rank, instead of using absolute score values, or average of ranks. The triangular number rerank also allowed the objective combination of results from several protein targets or screen conditions and several programs. Triangular number reranking conserves more information than other reranking methods such as average of scores or averages of ranks. In addition, the use of triangular numbers for reranking makes possible the use of thresholds with a justified leeway based on the number of available known inhibitors, so that the majority of the compounds above the threshold in ranks compare to the compounds that have known experimentally determined biological activity. The battery of anti- or off-targets can be tailored to specific molecular or drug design challenges. In silico filters can thus be deployed in successive stages, for prefiltering, activity profiling, and for further analysis and triaging of libraries of compounds. PMID:25303089

  14. LEDGIN-mediated Inhibition of Integrase-LEDGF/p75 Interaction Reduces Reactivation of Residual Latent HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranckx, Lenard S; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Saleh, Suha; Boll, Annegret; Vansant, Gerlinde; Schrijvers, Rik; Weydert, Caroline; Battivelli, Emilie; Verdin, Eric; Cereseto, Anna; Christ, Frauke; Gijsbers, Rik; Debyser, Zeger

    2016-06-01

    Persistence of latent, replication-competent Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) provirus is the main impediment towards a cure for HIV/AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). Therefore, different therapeutic strategies to eliminate the viral reservoirs are currently being explored. We here propose a novel strategy to reduce the replicating HIV reservoir during primary HIV infection by means of drug-induced retargeting of HIV integration. A novel class of integration inhibitors, referred to as LEDGINs, inhibit the interaction between HIV integrase and the LEDGF/p75 host cofactor, the main determinant of lentiviral integration site selection. We show for the first time that LEDGF/p75 depletion hampers HIV-1 reactivation in cell culture. Next we demonstrate that LEDGINs relocate and retarget HIV integration resulting in a HIV reservoir that is refractory to reactivation by different latency-reversing agents. Taken together, these results support the potential of integrase inhibitors that modulate integration site targeting to reduce the likeliness of viral rebound. PMID:27428435

  15. Conserved sequences in the carboxyl terminus of integrase that are essential for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, P M; Byles, E D; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1996-01-01

    We have previously identified a residue in the carboxyl terminus of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase (HIV-1 IN), W-235, the requirement for which is only revealed in viral assays for integrase function (P. M. Cannon, W. Wilson, E. Byles, S. M. Kingsman, and A. J. Kingsman, J. Virol. 68:4768-4775, 1994). Our further analysis of this region of retroviral IN has now identified several sequence motifs which are conserved in all the retroviruses we examined, apart from human spumaretrovirus. We have made mutations within these motifs in HIV-1 IN and examined their phenotypes when reintroduced into an infectious proviral clone. The deleterious effects of several of these mutations demonstrate the importance of these regions for IN function in vivo. We observed a further discrepancy, at a motif that is only conserved in the lentiviruses, in the ability of mutants to function in in vitro and in vivo assays. Substitutions both in this region and at W-235 abolish HIV-1 infectivity but do not affect particle production, morphology, reverse transcription, or nuclear import in T-cell lines. Taken together with the in vitro data suggesting that neither of these residues is directly involved in the catalytic reactions of IN, it seems likely that we have identified regions of IN that are essential for interactions with other components of the integration machinery. PMID:8523588

  16. Cross-resistance profile determination of two second-generation HIV-1 integrase inhibitors using a panel of recombinant viruses derived from raltegravir-treated clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wesenbeeck, L; Rondelez, E; Feyaerts, M; Verheyen, A; Van der Borght, K; Smits, V; Cleybergh, C; De Wolf, H; Van Baelen, K; Stuyver, L J

    2011-01-01

    The integrase inhibitor raltegravir (RAL) is currently used for the treatment of both treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced HIV-1-infected patients. Elvitegravir (EVG) is in late phases of clinical development. Since significant cross-resistance between RAL and EVG is observed, there is a need for second-generation integrase inhibitors (INIs) with a higher genetic barrier and limited cross-resistance to RAL/EVG. A panel of HIV-1 integrase recombinants, derived from plasma samples from raltegravir-treated patients (baseline and follow-up samples), were used to study the cross-resistance profile of two second-generation integrase inhibitors, MK-2048 and compound G. Samples with Q148H/R mutations had elevated fold change values with all compounds tested. Although samples with the Y143R/C mutation had reduced susceptibility to RAL, they remained susceptible to MK-2048 and compound G. Samples with the N155H mutation had no reduced susceptibility to compound G. In conclusion, our results allowed ranking of the INIs on the basis of the antiviral activities using recombinant virus stocks from RAL-treated patient viruses. The order according to decreasing susceptibility is compound G, MK-2048, and EVG. PMID:20956600

  17. Lack of pharmacokinetic interaction between rilpivirine and integrase inhibitors dolutegravir and GSK1265744.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Susan L; Gould, Elizabeth; Chen, Shuguang; Margolis, David; Spreen, William; Crauwels, Herta; Piscitelli, Stephen

    2013-11-01

    Dolutegravir (DTG) and GSK1265744 are HIV integrase inhibitors (INIs) in clinical development. The oral formulation of rilpivirine (RPV), a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), has been approved for treatment-naive HIV infection. Long-acting depot injections of GSK1265744 and RPV are also being developed. This study evaluated the potential for drug interactions between RPV and these INIs. This phase 1, open-label, two-cohort, three-period, single-sequence crossover study evaluated oral coadministration of RPV with DTG or GSK1265744. Healthy subjects received DTG (50 mg every 24 h for 5 days) or GSK1265744 (30 mg every 24 h for 12 days) in period 1 followed by a washout, RPV (25 mg every 24 h for 11 or 12 days) in period 2, immediately followed by RPV (25 mg every 24 h) plus DTG (50 mg every 24 h) for 5 days or GSK1265744 (30 mg every 24 h) for 12 days in period 3. Steady-state pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters were estimated using noncompartmental analysis of data collected on the last day of each period. The combinations of RPV and DTG (n = 16) and of RPV and GSK1265744 (n = 11) were well tolerated; no grade 3 or 4 adverse events (AEs) or AE-related discontinuations were observed. The 90% confidence intervals for the area under the curve from time zero until the end of the dosage interval [AUC0-τ] and maximum concentration of drug in serum (Cmax) geometric mean ratios were within 0.8 to 1.25. Following administration of DTG + RPV, DTG and RPV Cτ increased by 22% and 21%, respectively. Following administration of GSK1265744 + RPV, RPV Cτ decreased 8%. DTG and GSK1265744 can be administered with RPV without dosage adjustment for either agent. These results support coadministration of RPV with DTG or GSK1265744 as either oral or long-acting depot injection regimens. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01467531.). PMID:23979733

  18. Anti-HIV-1 integrase compounds from Dioscorea bulbifera and molecular docking study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaniad, Prapaporn; Wattanapiromsakul, Chatchai; Pianwanit, Somsak; Tewtrakul, Supinya

    2016-06-01

    Context Dioscorea bulbifera L. (Dioscoreaceae) has been used in a traditional Thai longevity medicine preparation. Isolation of inhibitors from natural products is a potential source for continuous development of new HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors. Objective The objective of this study is to isolate the compounds and evaluate their anti-HIV-1 IN activity, as well as to predict the potential interactions of the compounds with an IN. Materials and methods The ethyl acetate and water fractions (1-100 μg/mL) of Dioscorea bulbifera bulbils were isolated and tested for their anti-HIV-1 IN activity using the multiplate integration assay (MIA). The interactions of the active compounds with IN were investigated using a molecular docking method. Results and discussions The ethyl acetate and water fractions of Dioscorea bulbifera bulbils afforded seven compounds. Among these, allantoin (1), 2,4,3',5'-tetrahydroxybibenzyl (2), and 5,7,4'-trihydroxy-2-styrylchromone (5) were isolated for the first time from this plant. Myricetin (4) exhibited the most potent activity with an IC50 value of 3.15 μM, followed by 2,4,6,7-tetrahydroxy-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene (3, IC50 value= 14.20 μM), quercetin-3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (6, IC50 value = 19.39 μM) and quercetin-3-O-β-d-galactopyranoside (7, IC50 value = 21.80 μM). Potential interactions of the active compounds (3, 4, 6, and 7) with the IN active site were additionally investigated. Compound 4 showed the best binding affinity to IN and formed strong interactions with various amino acid residues. These compounds interacted with Asp64, Thr66, His67, Glu92, Asp116, Gln148, Glu152, Asn155, and Lys159, which are involved in both the 3'-processing and strand transfer reactions of IN. In particular, galloyl, catechol, and sugar moieties were successful inhibitors for HIV-1 IN. PMID:26864337

  19. Contribution of the C-terminal tri-lysine regions of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase for efficient reverse transcription and viral DNA nuclear import

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fowke Keith R

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In addition to mediating the integration process, HIV-1 integrase (IN has also been implicated in different steps during viral life cycle including reverse transcription and viral DNA nuclear import. Although the karyophilic property of HIV-1 IN has been well demonstrated using a variety of experimental approaches, the definition of domain(s and/or motif(s within the protein that mediate viral DNA nuclear import and its mechanism are still disputed and controversial. In this study, we performed mutagenic analyses to investigate the contribution of different regions in the C-terminal domain of HIV-1 IN to protein nuclear localization as well as their effects on virus infection. Results Our analysis showed that replacing lysine residues in two highly conserved tri-lysine regions, which are located within previously described Region C (235WKGPAKLLWKGEGAVV and sequence Q (211KELQKQITK in the C-terminal domain of HIV-1 IN, impaired protein nuclear accumulation, while mutations for RK263,4 had no significant effect. Analysis of their effects on viral infection in a VSV-G pseudotyped RT/IN trans-complemented HIV-1 single cycle replication system revealed that all three C-terminal mutant viruses (KK215,9AA, KK240,4AE and RK263,4AA exhibited more severe defect of induction of β-Gal positive cells and luciferase activity than an IN class 1 mutant D64E in HeLa-CD4-CCR5-β-Gal cells, and in dividing as well as non-dividing C8166 T cells, suggesting that some viral defects are occurring prior to viral integration. Furthermore, by analyzing viral DNA synthesis and the nucleus-associated viral DNA level, the results clearly showed that, although all three C-terminal mutants inhibited viral reverse transcription to different extents, the KK240,4AE mutant exhibited most profound effect on this step, whereas KK215,9AA significantly impaired viral DNA nuclear import. In addition, our analysis could not detect viral DNA integration in each C

  20. The effect of adaptive servo ventilation (ASV) on objective and subjective outcomes in Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) with central sleep apnea (CSA) in heart failure (HF): A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyunju; Sawyer, Amy M

    2016-01-01

    To summarize the current evidence for adaptive servo ventilation (ASV) in Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) with central sleep apnea (CSA) in heart failure (HF) and advance a research agenda and clinical considerations for ASV-treated CSR-CSA in HF. CSR-CSA in HF is associated with higher overall mortality, worse outcomes and lower quality of life (QOL) than HF without CSR-CSA. Five databases were searched using key words (n = 234). Randomized controlled trials assessed objective sleep quality, cardiac, and self-reported outcomes in adults (≥18 years) with HF (n = 10). ASV has a beneficial effect on the reduction of central sleep apnea in adult patients with CSR-CSA in HF, but it is not be superior to CPAP, bilevel PPV, or supplemental oxygen in terms of sleep quality defined by polysomnography, cardiovascular outcomes, subjective daytime sleepiness, and quality of life. ASV is not recommended for CSR-CSA in HF. It is important to continue to refer HF patients for sleep evaluation to clearly discern OSA from CSR-CSA. Symptom management research, inclusive of objective and subjective outcomes, in CSR-CSA in HF adults is needed. PMID:26995256

  1. Mucosal tissue pharmacokinetics of the integrase inhibitor raltegravir in a humanized mouse model: Implications for HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselinovic, Milena; Yang, Kuo-Hsiung; Sykes, Craig; Remling-Mulder, Leila; Kashuba, Angela D M; Akkina, Ramesh

    2016-02-01

    Orally administered anti-retroviral drugs show considerable promise for HIV/AIDS pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). For the success of these strategies, pharmacokinetic (PK) data defining the optimal concentration of the drug needed for protection in relevant mucosal exposure sites is essential. Here we employed a humanized mouse model to derive comprehensive PK data on the HIV integrase inhibitor raltegravir (RAL), a leading PrEP drug candidate. Under steady state conditions following oral dosing, plasma and multiple mucosal tissues were sampled simultaneously. RAL exhibited higher drug exposure in mucosal tissues relative to that in plasma with one log higher exposure in vaginal and rectal tissue and two logs higher exposure in intestinal mucosa reflecting the trends seen in the human studies. These data demonstrate the suitability of RAL for HIV PrEP and validate the utility of humanized mouse models for deriving important preclinical PK-PD data. PMID:26771889

  2. A Simple and Highly Efficient Preparation of Structurally Diverse Aryl β-diketoacids as HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Xiao-Hua姜晓华; LONG Ya-Qiu龙亚秋

    2004-01-01

    In order to provide a facile and practical access to structurally diverse aryl β-diketoacids, An improved and highly efficient oxalylation method was developed which employed commercially available and cheap reagents.The oxalylation of aryl methyl ketones, the key step to construct the pharmacophore of aryl β-diketoacids, was considerably facilitated by a new combination of dimethyl oxalate as an oxalic source and sodium tert-butoxide as a base. A wide variety of aryl β-diketoacids bearing different functional groups can be prepared rapidly in high yields at room t. emperature with this method, which has significant advantages over the previously reported procedures in a wider application range, much less amount of reagents, pretty higher yields and quite shorter reaction time. The bis-aryldiketoacids 3k and 31, readily prepared by this method, displayed interesting and promising inhibitory activities against HIV-1 integrase and HIV-1 replication in cells.

  3. High-throughput real-time assay based on molecular beacons for HIV-1 integrase 3'-processing reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-qiu HE; Xiao-hui MA; Bin LIU; Xiao-yi ZHANG; Wei-zu CHEN; Cun-xin WANG; Shao-hui CHENG

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To develop a high-throughput real-time assay based on molecular beacons to monitor the integrase 3'-processing reaction in vitro and apply it to inhibitor screening.Methods: The recombinant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 integrase (IN) is incubated with a 38 mer oligonucleotide substrate, a sequence identical to the U5 end of HIV-1 long terminal repeats (LTR). Based on the fluores-cence properties of molecular beacons, the substrate is designed to form a stem-loop structure labeled with a fluorophore at the 5' end and a quencher at the 3'end.IN cleaves the terminal 3'-dinucleotide containing the quencher, resulting in an increase in fluorescence which can be monitored on a spectrofluorometer. To optimize this assay, tests were performed to investigate the effects of substrates, enzyme and the metal ion concentrations on the IN activity and optimal param-eters were obtained. Moreover, 2 IN inhibitors were employed to test the perfor-mance of this assay in antiviral compound screening.Results: The fluorescent intensity of the reaction mixture varies linearly with time and is proportional to the velocity of the 3'-processing reaction. Tests were performed and the results showed that the optimal rate was obtained for a reaction mixture containing 50 mg/L recom-binant HIV-1 IN, 400 nmol/L substrate, and 10 mmol/L Mn2+. The IN 3'-processing reaction under the optimal conditions showed a more than 18-fold increase in the fluorescence intensity compared to the enzyme-free control. The IC50 values of the IN inhibitors obtained in our assay were similar to the values obtained from a radiolabeled substrate assay.Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that this is a fast, reliable, and sensitive method to monitor HIV IN 3'-processing reaction and that it can be used for inhibitor screening.

  4. Symmetrical 1-pyrrolidineacetamide showing anti-HIV activity through a new binding site on HIV-1 integrase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li DU; Ya-xue ZHAO; Liu-meng YANG; Yong-tang ZHENG; Yun TANG; Xu SHEN; Hua-liang JIANG

    2008-01-01

    Aim:To characterize the functional and pharmacological features of a symmetrical 1-pyrrolidineacetamide,N,N'-(methylene-di-4,1-phenylene) bis-1-pyrrolidineacetamide,as a new anti-HIV compound which could competitively inhibit HIV-1 integrase (IN) binding to viral DNA.Methods:A surface plasma resonance (SPR)-based competitive assay was employed to determine the compound's inhibitory activity,and the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide cell assay was used to qualify the antiviral activity.The potential binding sites were predicted by molecular modeling and determined by site-directed mutagenesis and a SPR binding assay.Results:l-pyrrolidineacetamide,N,N'-(methylene-di-4,1-phenylene) bis-1-pyrrolidineacetamide could competitively inhibit IN binding to viral DNA with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 7.29±0.68 μmol/L as investigated by SPR-based investigation.Another antiretroviral activity assay showed that this compound exhibited inhibition against HⅣ-Ⅰ(ⅢB) replication with a 50% effective concentration (EC50) value of 40.54 μmol/L in C8166 cells,and cytotoxicity with a cytotoxic concentration value of 173.84 μmol/L in mock-infected C8166 cells.Molecular docking predicted 3 potential residues as 1-pyrrolidineacetamide,N,N'-(methylene-di-4,1-phenylene)bis-1-pyrrolidineacetamide binding sites.The importance of 3 key amino acid residues (Lys103,Lys173,and Thr174) involved in the binding was further identified by site-directed mutagenesis and a SPR binding assay.Conclusion:This present work identified a new anti-HIV compound through a new IN-binding site which is expected to supply new potential drug-binding site information for HIV-1 integrase inhibitor discovery and development.

  5. A crystal structure of the catalytic core domain of an avian sarcoma and leukemia virus integrase suggests an alternate dimeric assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Ballandras

    Full Text Available Integrase (IN is an important therapeutic target in the search for anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV inhibitors. This enzyme is composed of three domains and is hard to crystallize in its full form. First structural results on IN were obtained on the catalytic core domain (CCD of the avian Rous and Sarcoma Virus strain Schmidt-Ruppin A (RSV-A and on the CCD of HIV-1 IN. A ribonuclease-H like motif was revealed as well as a dimeric interface stabilized by two pairs of α-helices (α1/α5, α5/α1. These structural features have been validated in other structures of IN CCDs. We have determined the crystal structure of the Rous-associated virus type-1 (RAV-1 IN CCD to 1.8 Å resolution. RAV-1 IN shows a standard activity for integration and its CCD differs in sequence from that of RSV-A by a single accessible residue in position 182 (substitution A182T. Surprisingly, the CCD of RAV-1 IN associates itself with an unexpected dimeric interface characterized by three pairs of α-helices (α3/α5, α1/α1, α5/α3. A182 is not involved in this novel interface, which results from a rigid body rearrangement of the protein at its α1, α3, α5 surface. A new basic groove that is suitable for single-stranded nucleic acid binding is observed at the surface of the dimer. We have subsequently determined the structure of the mutant A182T of RAV-1 IN CCD and obtained a RSV-A IN CCD-like structure with two pairs of buried α-helices at the interface. Our results suggest that the CCD of avian INs can dimerize in more than one state. Such flexibility can further explain the multifunctionality of retroviral INs, which beside integration of dsDNA are implicated in different steps of the retroviral cycle in presence of viral ssRNA.

  6. A crystal structure of the catalytic core domain of an avian sarcoma and leukemia virus integrase suggests an alternate dimeric assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballandras, Allison; Moreau, Karen; Robert, Xavier; Confort, Marie-Pierre; Merceron, Romain; Haser, Richard; Ronfort, Corinne; Gouet, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Integrase (IN) is an important therapeutic target in the search for anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) inhibitors. This enzyme is composed of three domains and is hard to crystallize in its full form. First structural results on IN were obtained on the catalytic core domain (CCD) of the avian Rous and Sarcoma Virus strain Schmidt-Ruppin A (RSV-A) and on the CCD of HIV-1 IN. A ribonuclease-H like motif was revealed as well as a dimeric interface stabilized by two pairs of α-helices (α1/α5, α5/α1). These structural features have been validated in other structures of IN CCDs. We have determined the crystal structure of the Rous-associated virus type-1 (RAV-1) IN CCD to 1.8 Å resolution. RAV-1 IN shows a standard activity for integration and its CCD differs in sequence from that of RSV-A by a single accessible residue in position 182 (substitution A182T). Surprisingly, the CCD of RAV-1 IN associates itself with an unexpected dimeric interface characterized by three pairs of α-helices (α3/α5, α1/α1, α5/α3). A182 is not involved in this novel interface, which results from a rigid body rearrangement of the protein at its α1, α3, α5 surface. A new basic groove that is suitable for single-stranded nucleic acid binding is observed at the surface of the dimer. We have subsequently determined the structure of the mutant A182T of RAV-1 IN CCD and obtained a RSV-A IN CCD-like structure with two pairs of buried α-helices at the interface. Our results suggest that the CCD of avian INs can dimerize in more than one state. Such flexibility can further explain the multifunctionality of retroviral INs, which beside integration of dsDNA are implicated in different steps of the retroviral cycle in presence of viral ssRNA. PMID:21857987

  7. Synthesis and evaluation of substituted 4-(N-benzylamino)cinnamate esters as potential anti-cancer agents and HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faridoon; Edkins, Adrienne L; Isaacs, Michelle; Mnkandhla, Dumisani; Hoppe, Heinrich C; Kaye, Perry T

    2016-08-01

    Encouraging selectivity and low micromolar activity against HeLa cervical carcinoma (IC50⩾3.0μM) and the aggressive MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast carcinoma (IC50⩾9.6μM) cell lines has been exhibited by a number of readily accessible 4-(N-benzylamino)cinnamate esters. The potential of the ligands as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors has also been examined. PMID:27317645

  8. Evidence for the horizontal transfer of an integrase gene from a fusellovirus to a pRN-like plasmid within a single strain of Sulfolobus and the implications for plasmid survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Xu

    2008-01-01

    A fusellovirus SSV4 and a pRN-like plasmid pXZ1 were co-isolated from a single strain of Sulfolobus. In contrast to the previously characterized virus-plasmid hybrids pSSVx and pSSVi, which can coexist intracellulary with a fusellovirus, pXZ1 is not packaged into viral particles and shows no viral...... infectivity. The virus and plasmid carry genomes of 15 135 and 6970 bp, respectively. For SSV4, 33 predicted ORFs are compactly organized with a strong preference for UGA stop codons, three-quarters of which overlap with either the Shine-Dalgarno motif or the start codon of the following gene. pXZ1 carries...... seven ORFs, three of which encode an atypical RepA, a PlrA and a CopG protein. A fourth ORF exhibits a high nucleotide sequence identity to the SSV4 integrase gene, which suggests that it has been transferred to the plasmid from SSV4. A single point mutation within an otherwise identical 500 bp region...

  9. Synthesis of green nano iron particles (GnIP) and their application in adsorptive removal of As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Kumar Suranjit; Gandhi, Pooja; Selvaraj, Kaliaperumal

    2014-10-01

    The present study reports a new approach to synthesise nano iron particles using leaf extract of Mint (Mentha spicata L.) plant. The synthesised GnIPs were subjected to detailed adsorption studies for removal of arsenite and arsenate from aqueous solution of defined concentration. Iron nanoparticles synthesised using leaf extract showed UV-vis absorption peaks at 360 and 430 nm. TEM result showed the formation of polydispersed nanoparticles of size ranging from 20 to 45 nm. Nanoparticles were found to have core-shell structure. The planer reflection of selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and XRD analysis suggested that iron particles were crystalline and belonged to fcc (face centred cubic) type. Energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) shows that Fe was an integral component of synthesised nanoparticles. The content of Fe in nanoparticles was found to be 40%, in addition to other elements like C (16%), O (19%) and Cl (23%). FT-IR study suggested that functional groups like sbnd NH, sbnd Cdbnd O, sbnd Cdbnd N and sbnd Cdbnd C were involved in particle formation. The removal efficiency of GnIP-chitosan composite for As(III) and As(V) was found to be 98.79 and 99.65%. Regeneration of adsorbent suggested that synthesised green GnIP may work as an effective tool for removal of arsenic from contaminated water.

  10. Synthesis and Characterization of β-Cyclodextrin Functionalized Ionic Liquid Polymer as a Macroporous Material for the Removal of Phenols and As(V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muggundha Raoov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available β-Cyclodextrin-ionic liquid polymer (CD-ILP was first synthesized by functionalized β-cyclodextrin (CD with 1-benzylimidazole (BIM to form monofunctionalized CD (βCD-BIMOTs and was further polymerized using a toluene diisocyanate (TDI linker to form insoluble CD-ILP (βCD-BIMOTs-TDI. The βCD-BIMOTs-TDI polymer was characterized using various tools and the results obtained were compared with those derived from the native β-cyclodextrin polymer (βCD-TDI. The SEM result shows that the presence of ionic liquid (IL increases the pore size, while the thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA result shows that the presence of IL increases the stability of the polymer. Meanwhile, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET results show that βCD-BIMOTs-TDI polymer has 1.254 m2/g surface areas and the Barret-Joyner-Halenda (BJH pore size distribution result reveals that the polymer exhibits macropores with a pore size of 77.66 nm. Preliminary sorption experiments were carried out and the βCD-BIMOTs-TDI polymer shows enhanced sorption capacity and high removal towards phenols and As(V.

  11. Production of transgenic cattle highly expressing human serum albumin in milk by phiC31 integrase-mediated gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yan; Wang, Yongsheng; Liu, Jun; Lan, Hui; Shao, Minghao; Yu, Yuan; Quan, Fusheng; Zhang, Yong

    2015-10-01

    Transgenic cattle expressing high levels of recombinant human serum albumin (HSA) in their milk may as an alternative source for commercial production. Our objective was to produce transgenic cattle highly expressing HSA in milk by using phiC31 integrase system and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). The mammary-specific expression plasmid pIACH(-), containing the attB recognition site for phiC31 integrase, were co-transfected with integrase expression plasmid pCMVInt into bovine fetal fibroblast cells (BFFs). PhiC31 integrase-mediated integrations in genome of BFFs were screened by nested inverse PCR. After analysis of sequence of the PCR products, 46.0% (23/50) of the both attB-genome junction sites (attL and attR) were confirmed, and four pseudo attP sites were identified. The integration rates in BF3, BF11, BF19 and BF4 sites were 4.0% (2/50), 6.0% (3/50), 16.0% (8/50) and 20.0% (10/50), respectively. BF3 is located in the bovine chromosome 3 collagen alpha-3 (VI) chain isomer 2 gene, while the other three sites are located in the non-coding region. The transgenic cell lines from BF11, BF19 and BF4 sites were used as donors for SCNT. Two calves from transgenic cells BF19 were born, one died within a few hours after birth, and another calf survived healthy. PCR and Southern blot analysis revealed integration of the transgene in the genome of cloned calves. The nested reverse PCR confirmed that the integration site in cloned calves was identical to the donor cells. The western blotting assessment indicated that recombinant HSA was expressed in the milk of transgenic cattle and the expression level was about 4-8 mg/mL. The present study demonstrated that phiC31 integrase system was an efficient and safety gene delivery tool for producing HSA transgenic cattle. The production of recombinant HSA in the milk of cattle may provide a large-scale and cost-effective resource. PMID:26198751

  12. G140S/Q148R and N155H mutations render HIV-2 Integrase resistant to Raltegravir whereas Y143C does not

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damond Florence

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-2 is endemic in West Africa and has spread throughout Europe. However, the alternatives for HIV-2-infected patients are more limited than for HIV-1. Raltegravir, an integrase inhibitor, is active against wild-type HIV-2, with a susceptibility to this drug similar to that of HIV-1, and is therefore a promising option for use in the treatment of HIV-2-infected patients. Recent studies have shown that HIV-2 resistance to raltegravir involves one of three resistance mutations, N155H, Q148R/H and Y143C, previously identified as resistance determinants in the HIV-1 integrase coding sequence. The resistance of HIV-1 IN has been confirmed in vitro for mutated enzymes harboring these mutations, but no such confirmation has yet been obtained for HIV-2. Results The integrase coding sequence was amplified from plasma samples collected from ten patients infected with HIV-2 viruses, of whom three RAL-naïve and seven on RAL-based treatment at the time of virological failure. The genomes of the resistant strains were cloned and three patterns involving N155H, G140S/Q148R or Y143C mutations were identified. Study of the susceptibility of integrases, either amplified from clinical isolates or obtained by mutagenesis demonstrated that mutations at positions 155 and 148 render the integrase resistant to RAL. The G140S mutation conferred little resistance, but compensated for the catalytic defect due to the Q148R mutation. Conversely, Y143C alone did not confer resistance to RAL unless E92Q is also present. Furthermore, the introduction of the Y143C mutation into the N155H resistant background decreased the resistance level of enzymes containing the N155H mutation. Conclusion This study confirms that HIV-2 resistance to RAL is due to the N155H, G140S/Q148R or E92Q/Y143C mutations. The N155H and G140S/Q148R mutations make similar contributions to resistance in both HIV-1 and HIV-2, but Y143C is not sufficient to account for the resistance of

  13. Exposure to As(III) and As(V) changes the Ca²⁺-activation properties of the two major fibre types from the chelae of the freshwater crustacean Cherax destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gemma; Snow, Elizabeth T; West, Jan M

    2014-10-01

    Arsenic is a known carcinogen found in the soil in gold mining regions at concentrations thousands of times greater than gold. Mining releases arsenic into the environment and surrounding water bodies. The main chemical forms of arsenic found in the environment are inorganic arsenite (As(III)) and arsenate (As(V)). Yabbies (Cherax destructor) accumulate arsenic at levels comparable to those in the sediment of their environment but the effect on their physiological function is not known. The effects of arsenic exposure (10 ppm sodium arsenite, AsNaO2 - 5.7 ppm As(III)) and 10 ppm arsenic acid, Na2HAsO4·7H2O - 2.6 ppm As(V)) for 40 days on the contractile function of the two major fibre types from the chelae were determined. After exposure, individual fibres were isolated from the chela, "skinned" (membrane removed) and attached to the force recording apparatus. Contraction was induced in solutions containing increasing [Ca(2+)] until a maximum Ca(2+)-activation was obtained. Submaximal force responses were plotted as a percentage of the maximum Ca(2+)-activated force. As(V) exposure resulted in lower levels of calcium required for activation than As(III) indicating an increased sensitivity to Ca(2+) after long term exposure to arsenate compared to arsenite. Myosin heavy chain and tropomyosin content in individual fibres was also decreased as a result of arsenic exposure. Single fibres exposed to As(V) produced significantly more force than muscle fibres from control animals. Long-term exposure of yabbies to arsenic alters the contractile function of the two major fibre types in the chelae. PMID:25014018

  14. Application of granular activated carbon/MnFe2O4 composite immobilized on C. glutamicum MTCC 2745 to remove As(III) and As(V): Kinetic, mechanistic and thermodynamic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podder, M. S.; Majumder, C. B.

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of the present study was to investigate the efficiency of Corynebacterium glutamicum MTCC 2745 immobilized on granular activated carbon/MnFe2O4 (GAC/MnFe2O4) composite to treat high concentration of arsenic bearing wastewater. Non-linear regression analysis was done for determining the best-fit kinetic model on the basis of three correlation coefficients and three error functions and also for predicting the parameters involved in kinetic models. The results showed that Fractal-like mixed 1,2 order model for As(III) and Brouser-Weron-Sototlongo as well as Fractal-like pseudo second order models for As(V) were proficient to provide realistic description of biosorption/bioaccumulation kinetic. Applicability of mechanistic models in the current study exhibited that the rate governing step in biosorption/bioaccumulation of both As(III) and As(V) was film diffusion rather than intraparticle diffusion. The evaluated thermodynamic parameters ΔG0, ΔH0 and ΔS0 revealed that biosorption/bioaccumulation of both As(III) and As(V) was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic under studied conditions.

  15. Application of granular activated carbon/MnFe₂O₄ composite immobilized on C. glutamicum MTCC 2745 to remove As(III) and As(V): Kinetic, mechanistic and thermodynamic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podder, M S; Majumder, C B

    2016-01-15

    The main objective of the present study was to investigate the efficiency of Corynebacterium glutamicum MTCC 2745 immobilized on granular activated carbon/MnFe2O4 (GAC/MnFe2O4) composite to treat high concentration of arsenic bearing wastewater. Non-linear regression analysis was done for determining the best-fit kinetic model on the basis of three correlation coefficients and three error functions and also for predicting the parameters involved in kinetic models. The results showed that Fractal-like mixed 1,2 order model for As(III) and Brouser-Weron-Sototlongo as well as Fractal-like pseudo second order models for As(V) were proficient to provide realistic description of biosorption/bioaccumulation kinetic. Applicability of mechanistic models in the current study exhibited that the rate governing step in biosorption/bioaccumulation of both As(III) and As(V) was film diffusion rather than intraparticle diffusion. The evaluated thermodynamic parameters ΔG(0), ΔH(0) and ΔS(0) revealed that biosorption/bioaccumulation of both As(III) and As(V) was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic under studied conditions. PMID:26322840

  16. The Need for Development of New HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase and Integrase Inhibitors in the Aftermath of Antiviral Drug Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Wainberg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART involves combinations of drugs to achieve maximal virological response and reduce the potential for the emergence of antiviral resistance. There are two broad classes of reverse transcriptase inhibitors, the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs. Since the first classes of such compounds were developed, viral resistance against them has necessitated the continuous development of novel compounds within each class. This paper considers the NRTIs and NNRTIs currently in both preclinical and clinical development or approved for second line therapy and describes the patterns of resistance associated with their use, as well as the underlying mechanisms that have been described. Due to reasons of both affordability and availability, some reverse transcriptase inhibitors with low genetic barrier are more commonly used in resource-limited settings. Their use results to the emergence of specific patterns of antiviral resistance and so may require specific actions to preserve therapeutic options for patients in such settings. More recently, the advent of integrase strand transfer inhibitors represents another major step forward toward control of HIV infection, but these compounds are also susceptible to problems of HIV drug resistance.

  17. Drug interaction profile of the HIV integrase inhibitor cabotegravir: assessment from in vitro studies and a clinical investigation with midazolam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Melinda J; Bowers, Gary D; Humphreys, Joan E; Gould, Elizabeth P; Ford, Susan L; Webster, Lindsey O; Polli, Joseph W

    2016-01-01

    1. Cabotegravir (CAB; GSK1265744) is a potent HIV integrase inhibitor in clinical development as an oral lead-in tablet and long-acting injectable for the treatment and prevention of HIV infection. 2. This work investigated if CAB was a substrate for efflux transporters, the potential for CAB to interact with drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters to cause clinical drug interactions, and the effect of CAB on the pharmacokinetics of midazolam, a CYP3A4 probe substrate, in humans. 3. CAB is a substrate for Pgp and BCRP; however, its high intrinsic membrane permeability limits the impact of these transporters on its intestinal absorption. 4. At clinically relevant concentrations, CAB did not inhibit or induce any of the CYP or UGT enzymes evaluated in vitro and had no effect on the clinical pharmacokinetics of midazolam. 5. CAB is an inhibitor of OAT1 (IC50 0.81 µM) and OAT3 (IC50 0.41 µM) but did not or only weakly inhibited Pgp, BCRP, MRP2, MRP4, MATE1, MATE2-K, OATP1B1, OATP1B3, OCT1, OCT2 or BSEP. 6. Based on regulatory guidelines and quantitative extrapolations, CAB has a low propensity to cause clinically significant drug interactions, except for coadministration with OAT1 or OAT3 substrates. PMID:26340566

  18. Q148N, a Novel Integrase Inhibitor Resistance Mutation Associated with Low-Level Reduction in Elvitegravir Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Vici; Pinsky, Benjamin A; Smith, Darvin S; Klein, Daniel; Shafer, Robert W

    2016-07-01

    The integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI)-resistance mutations Q148H/K/R are arguably the most important INSTI-resistance mutations as they represented the first step to high-level dolutegravir cross-resistance. We describe an individual with transmitted four-class drug resistance whose virus sequence had the previously uncharacterized mutation Q148N. Infectious molecular HIV-1 clones containing Q148N alone and in combination with G140S demonstrated ∼2.4-4.5 reduced elvitegravir susceptibility depending on the virus's genetic context but retained susceptibility to raltegravir and dolutegravir. This level of reduced elvitegravir susceptibility is lower than that observed with Q148H/K/R and in fact the infected individual responded to an initial treatment regimen containing tenofovir/emtricitabine/elvitegravir/cobicistat. Q148N was associated with a higher replication capacity than Q148H, suggesting that this mutation may be more fit in the absence of selective INSTI therapy. PMID:27009474

  19. A novel assay for screening inhibitors targeting HIV-1 integrase dimerization based on Ni-NTA magnetic agarose beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dawei; He, Hongqiu; Liu, Mengmeng; Meng, Zhixia; Guo, Shunxing

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 integrase (IN), which mediates integration of viral cDNA into the cellular chromosome, is a validated antiviral drug target. Three IN inhibitors, raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir, have been clinically approved since 2008. However, drug resistance have emerged in infected patients receiving treatment using these drugs which share the same mechanism of action and have a low genetic barrier for resistance. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop drugs with novel mechanism. IN requires a precise and dynamic equilibrium between several oligomeric species for its activities. The modulation of the process which is termed as IN oligomerization, presents an interesting allosteric target for drug development. In this research, we developed a magnetic beads based approach to assay the IN dimerization. Then, using the assay we screened a library of 1000 Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs for IN dimerization inhibitors and identified dexlansoprazole as a potential IN dimerization inhibitor. In conclusion, the assay presented here has been proven to be sensitive and specific for the detection of IN dimerization as well as for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting IN dimerization. Moreover, a FDA-approved proton-pump inhibitors, dexlansoprazole, was identified as a potential inhibitor for IN dimerization. PMID:27137477

  20. Eliminación de As (V y producción simultánea de polvo de cobre de un electrolito de Cu(II - As(V - H2SO4 mediante electrodiálisis reactiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibáñez, J. P.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The removal of As(V and the simultaneous generation of powder of copper from an electrolyte made of As(V - Cu(II - H2SO4 was studied by using electro dialysis at several current densities, temperatures and aeration of the electrolyte. The removal of arsenic was proportional to the current density, temperature and aeration used. The removal of arsenic reached a value of 0.14 mmol/h at 500 A/m2, 25 °C and without aeration, this value increased to 0.31 mmol/h by increasing the aeration to 6.6 l/h. The Cu(II was recovered in a 98 % as a fine arsenic free powder of metallic copper with oxides of copper. The arsenic was removed from the electrolyte by adsorption onto the anodic slimes generated from the lead anode oxidation.Se investigó la utilización de la electrodiálisis reactiva para eliminar arsénico y producir en forma simultánea polvo de cobre de una solución de Cu(II - As(V - H2SO4, a distintas densidades de corriente, temperatura y nivel de aireación de la solución. La eliminación de arsénico fue directamente proporcional a la densidad de corriente, aireación y temperatura. La eliminación alcanzada de As(V fue de 0,14 mmol/h a 500 A/m2, 25 °C y sin aireación, al introducir un flujo de 6,6 l/h de aire a la solución de trabajo se incrementa la eliminación a 0,31 mmol/h. El Cu(II se recupera en un 98 % en la forma de polvo de cobre metálico y óxidos de cobre libres de arsénico. El As(V es eliminado de la solución de trabajo mediante su adsorción en la borra anódica generada por la oxidación del ánodo de plomo empleado.

  1. Synthesis of green nano iron particles (GnIP) and their application in adsorptive removal of As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Kumar Suranjit, E-mail: suranjit@gmail.com [Department of Environmental Studies, Faculty of Science, The M. S. University of Baroda, Vadodara, 390002, Gujarat (India); Gandhi, Pooja, E-mail: poojagandhi.3090@gmail.com [Department of Environmental Sciences, Ashok and Rita Patel Institute of Integrated Study and Research in Biotechnology and Allied Sciences (ARIBAS), New Vallabh Vidyanagar, Anand, Gujarat, 388121 (India); Selvaraj, Kaliaperumal, E-mail: k.selvaraj@ncl.res.in [Nano and Computational Materials Lab, Catalysis Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Pune, 411008 (India)

    2014-10-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Colloidal GnIP synthesised using extract of Mint leaves were entrapped in chitosan beads. • GnIP loaded beads were employed for removal of As ions, showed excellent removal efficiency. • Iron and chitosan are cost effective materials hence can be a good adsorbent for removal of arsenic. - Abstract: The present study reports a new approach to synthesise nano iron particles using leaf extract of Mint (Mentha spicata L.) plant. The synthesised GnIPs were subjected to detailed adsorption studies for removal of arsenite and arsenate from aqueous solution of defined concentration. Iron nanoparticles synthesised using leaf extract showed UV–vis absorption peaks at 360 and 430 nm. TEM result showed the formation of polydispersed nanoparticles of size ranging from 20 to 45 nm. Nanoparticles were found to have core–shell structure. The planer reflection of selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and XRD analysis suggested that iron particles were crystalline and belonged to fcc (face centred cubic) type. Energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) shows that Fe was an integral component of synthesised nanoparticles. The content of Fe in nanoparticles was found to be 40%, in addition to other elements like C (16%), O (19%) and Cl (23%). FT-IR study suggested that functional groups like -NH, -C=O, -C=N and -C=C were involved in particle formation. The removal efficiency of GnIP-chitosan composite for As(III) and As(V) was found to be 98.79 and 99.65%. Regeneration of adsorbent suggested that synthesised green GnIP may work as an effective tool for removal of arsenic from contaminated water.

  2. Advances of screening methods in vitro for HIV-1 integrase inhibitors%HIV-1整合酶抑制剂体外筛选方法研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张旋; 杨柳萌; 郑永唐

    2013-01-01

    整合酶是HIV基因表达和复制所必需的酶,而且宿主细胞内不存在该酶的类似物.因此,HIV-1整合酶已成为设计、筛选抗HIV药物的理想靶点.迄今为止,Raltegravir仍是唯一上市的HIV整合酶抑制剂,而且临床上也已经出现耐药问题.研发新一代整合酶抑制剂非常必要.高通量、高灵敏度、简单易行的筛选方法是研究开发新一代HIV-1整合酶抑制剂的关键.目前,HIV-1整合酶抑制剂筛选方法有多种,各有优缺点,该文将对文献报道的整合酶抑制剂体外筛选方法的最新进展做一介绍.%Integrase is an essential enzyme for HIV-1 replication and has no functional analogue in host cells. The integrase is an ideal target for designing and screening anti-HIV drugs. Ralte-gravir is the only marked HIV-1 integrase inhibitor so far, and has caused drug resistance. It is necessary to developing new generation of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors. High-throughput, highly sensitive, easy and feasible screening methods are the key to developing new HIV-1 integrase inhibitors. This review introduces the various HIV-1 integrase inhibitors screening methods that were reported recently.

  3. Identification of two catalytic residues in RAG1 that define a single active site within the RAG1/RAG2 protein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugmann, S D; Villey, I J; Ptaszek, L M; Schatz, D G

    2000-01-01

    During V(D)J recombination, the RAG1 and RAG2 proteins cooperate to catalyze a series of DNA bond breakage and strand transfer reactions. The structure, location, and number of active sites involved in RAG-mediated catalysis have as yet not been determined. Using protein secondary structure prediction algorithms, we have identified a region of RAG1 with possible structural similarities to the active site regions of transposases and retroviral integrases. Based on this information, we have identified two aspartic acid residues in RAG1 (D600 and D708) that function specifically in catalysis. The results support a model in which RAG1 contains a single, divalent metal ion binding active site structurally related to the active sites of transposases/integrases and responsible for all catalytic functions of the RAG protein complex. PMID:10678172

  4. Role of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Integrase in Uncoating of the Viral Core▿

    OpenAIRE

    Briones, Marisa S.; Dobard, Charles W; Chow, Samson A.

    2010-01-01

    After membrane fusion with a target cell, the core of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) enters into the cytoplasm, where uncoating occurs. The cone-shaped core is composed of the viral capsid protein (CA), which disassembles during uncoating. The underlying factors and mechanisms governing uncoating are poorly understood. Several CA mutations can cause changes in core stability and a block at reverse transcription, demonstrating the requirement for optimal core stability during vira...

  5. HIV Virions as Nanoscopic Test Tubes for Probing Oligomerization of the Integrase Enzyme

    OpenAIRE

    Borrenberghs, Doortje; Thys, Wannes; Rocha, Susana; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Weydert, Caroline; Dedecker, Peter; Hofkens, Johan; Debyser, Zeger; Hendrix, Jelle

    2014-01-01

    Employing viruses as nanoscopic lipid-enveloped test tubes allows the miniaturization of protein–protein interaction (PPI) assays while preserving the physiological environment necessary for particular biological processes. Applied to the study of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), viral biology and pathology can also be investigated in novel ways, both in vitro as well as in infected cells. In this work we report on an experimental strategy that makes use of engineered HIV-1 vi...

  6. Development of Lentiviral Vectors for Targeted Integration and Protein Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkwein, Diana; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2016-01-01

    The method in this chapter describes the design of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase (IN)-fusion proteins which we have developed to transport different proteins into the nuclei of lentiviral vector (LV)-transduced cells. The IN-fusion protein cDNA is incorporated into the LV packaging plasmid, which leads to its incorporation into vector particles as part of a large Gag-Pol polyprotein. This specific feature of protein packaging enables also the incorporation of cytotoxic and proapoptotic proteins, such as frequently cutting endonucleases and P53. The vectors can hence be used for various protein transduction needs. An outline of the necessary methods is also given to study the functionality of a chosen IN-fusion protein in a cell culture assay. PMID:27317182

  7. Substrate recognition and motion mode analyses of PFV integrase in complex with viral DNA via coarse-grained models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Hu

    Full Text Available HIV-1 integrase (IN is an important target in the development of drugs against the AIDS virus. Drug design based on the structure of IN was markedly hampered due to the lack of three-dimensional structure information of HIV-1 IN-viral DNA complex. The prototype foamy virus (PFV IN has a highly functional and structural homology with HIV-1 IN. Recently, the X-ray crystal complex structure of PFV IN with its cognate viral DNA has been obtained. In this study, both Gaussian network model (GNM and anisotropy network model (ANM have been applied to comparatively investigate the motion modes of PFV DNA-free and DNA-bound IN. The results show that the motion mode of PFV IN has only a slight change after binding with DNA. The motion of this enzyme is in favor of association with DNA, and the binding ability is determined by its intrinsic structural topology. Molecular docking experiments were performed to gain the binding modes of a series of diketo acid (DKA inhibitors with PFV IN obtained from ANM, from which the dependability of PFV IN-DNA used in the drug screen for strand transfer (ST inhibitors was confirmed. It is also found that the functional groups of keto-enol, bis-diketo, tetrazole and azido play a key role in aiding the recognition of viral DNA, and thus finally increase the inhibition capability for the corresponding DKA inhibitor. Our study provides some theoretical information and helps to design anti-AIDS drug based on the structure of IN.

  8. Implications of integrase inhibitors for HIV-infected transplantation recipients: raltegravir and dolutegravir (S/GSK 1349572).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waki, Kayo; Sugawara, Yasuhiko

    2011-01-01

    In the modern era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), reluctance to perform transplantation (Tx) in HIV-infected individuals is no longer justified. Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) or protease inhibitors (PIs), the current first line regimens of HAART, are metabolized by the cytochrome P450 family (CYP3A4). Most NNRTIs induce CYP3A4, whereas PIs inhibit it. Calcinuerin inhibitors (CNIs), which are mandatory for Tx, need the same enzyme complex for their clearance. Therefore, a significant drug-drug interaction (DDI) is encountered between current HAART and CNIs. This results in extreme difficulty in adjusting the optimal dose of CNIs, for which the therapeutic range is narrow. Of interest, integrase inhibitors (INIs) - novel, potent anti-HIV drugs - are mainly metabolized by uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1 and do not induce or inhibit CYP3A4. DDI is presumably absent when NNTRIs or PIs are replaced by INIs. Raltegravir (RAL), a first generation INI, has been introduced into kidney and liver Tx. There is increasing evidence that rejection is well controlled without renal impairment due to CNI over-exposure while persistent, robust suppression of HIV is achieved. Global phase III clinical trials of dolutegravir (DTG), a second generation INI, are currently in progress. In vitro data has suggested that DTG may be less prone to resistance than RAL (referred to as having a higher genetic barrier). The time has come to extensively discuss the implications of INIs in Tx for HIV positive patients. PMID:22101373

  9. Speciation of the immediately mobilisable As(III), As(V), MMA and DMA in river sediments by high performance liquid chromatography-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry following ultrasonic extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, a fast method is developed for the speciation of As(III), As(V), MMA and DMA in the immediately mobilisable fraction of river sediments (i.e. water-soluble and phosphate-exchangeable) by high performance liquid chromatography-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence detection (HPLC-HG-AFD) after extraction using focused ultrasound. The influence of relevant parameters influencing an ion-pairing chromatographic separation following isocratic elution (i.e. amount of MeOH in the mobile phase, ion pair reagent concentration, pH, flow rate) was studied. Focused ultrasound transmitted from an ultrasonic probe provided the same extractable contents as conventional extraction with no changes in the species distribution. The effect of the drying step over extraction of As species was investigated. The following drying procedures were compared: freeze-, oven-, microwave- and air-drying. No influence of the drying operation on the water-extractable fraction was observed. However, freeze- and air-drying yielded significantly higher phosphate-extractable amounts of As(III) and As(V) as compared to oven and microwaves. Detection limits for the As species were in the range 1.3-4.1 ng/g for the water-soluble fraction and 1.6-4.8 ng/g for the phosphate buffer exchangeable fraction. The method was applied to the speciation of immediately mobilisable As(III), As(V), DMA and MMA in 11 sediment samples collected along the beds of the Louro River (southern Galicia, Spain)

  10. Speciation of As(III) and As(V) in water samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after solid phase extraction combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic drop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Fattahi, Nazir; Assadi, Yaghoub; Sadeghi, Marzieh; Sharafi, Kiomars

    2014-12-01

    A solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) method, using diethyldithiphosphate (DDTP) as a proper chelating agent, has been developed as an ultra preconcentration technique for the determination of inorganic arsenic in water samples prior to graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Variables affecting the performance of both steps were thoroughly investigated. Under optimized conditions, 100mL of As(ΙΙΙ) solution was first concentrated using a solid phase sorbent. The extract was collected in 2.0 mL of acetone and 60.0 µL of 1-undecanol was added into the collecting solvent. The mixture was then injected rapidly into 5.0 mL of pure water for further DLLME-SFO. Total inorganic As(III, V) was extracted similarly after reduction of As(V) to As(III) with potassium iodide and sodium thiosulfate and As(V) concentration was calculated by difference. A mixture of Pd(NO3)2 and Mg(NO3)2 was used as a chemical modifier in GFAAS. The analytical characteristics of the method were determined. The calibration graph was linear in the rage of 10-100 ng L(-1) with detection limit of 2.5 ng L(-1). Repeatability (intra-day) and reproducibility (inter-day) of method based on seven replicate measurements of 80 ng L(-1) of As(ΙΙΙ) were 6.8% and 7.5%, respectively. The method was successfully applied to speciation of As(III), As(V) and determination of the total amount of As in water samples and in a certified reference material (NIST RSM 1643e). PMID:25159375

  11. Short communication: analysis of the integrase gene from HIV type 1-positive patients living in a rural area of West Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turriziani, Ombretta; Montagna, Claudia; Falasca, Francesca; Bucci, Mauro; Russo, Gianluca; Lichtner, Miriam; Sobze, Martin Sanou; Vullo, Vincenzo; Pistello, Mauro; Antonelli, Guido

    2012-12-01

    Major mutations associated with HIV-I integrase inhibitors (INI) resistance are rare in INI-naive patients. However, polymorphisms at positions that may influence the genetic barrier and/or drive the selection of specific INI resistance pathways are common in HIV non-B subtypes. The aim was to evaluate the presence of natural polymorphisms and/or INI resistance mutations in HIV-1 non-B subtype samples obtained from INI-naive patients living in rural west Cameroon. Thirty-three HIV-1 non-B samples were obtained from INI-naive African women and, as controls, 15 samples of HIV-1 subtype B were obtained from antiretroviral-naive Italian patients. The integrase gene was amplified and sequenced using Trugene Core Reagents. Several amino acid positions in B and non-B subtypes were found to be polymorphic. Interestingly, two patients infected with the CRF02_AG subtype had the resistance mutations N155H and E157Q/E and 12% of African samples had an amino acid substitution at position 143. Silent mutations leading to a higher increment of genetic barriers were detected at 140 and 151 positions in non B-subtypes. Although most polymorphisms may have little effect on INI susceptibility, the IN gene variations found in the present study should be taken into consideration as they may facilitate or delay the emergence of variants fully resistant to INIs. PMID:22214532

  12. HIV整合酶抑制剂的应用及耐药研究进展%Research progress in appbication of HIV-1 integrase inhibitor and drug resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王欣; 程绍辉

    2012-01-01

    Objective HIV integrase is one of the most important enzymes to virus reproduction. It can catalyzes the course of integration involved in HIV replication cycle, by which the reverse transcribed cDNA of HIV is inserted into the host genome. Raltegravir, which is a new drug for treating AIDS, belongs to integrase inhibitor. With the clinical application of integrase inhibitor, drug-resistance is emerging inevitably. This review describes the recent development in researches on HIV integrase inhibitor resistance and its clinical implications.%目的 艾滋病病毒(HIV)整合酶是病毒复制所必需的基本酶之一.它能够催化病毒复制周期中的整合过程,将病毒的cDNA整合入宿主基因组中.以雷替格韦(Raltegravir,RAL)为代表的整合酶抑制剂,是新一代治疗艾滋病的药物.随着其在临床上的应用,也不可避免地出现了耐药问题.文章综述了目前HIV整合酶抑制剂在临床上的应用以及耐药情况的最新进展.

  13. Natural polymorphisms of HIV-1 CRF01_AE integrase coding region in ARV-naïve individuals in Cambodia, Thailand and Vietnam: an ANRS AC12 working group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouhin, Janin; Donchai, Tawee; Hoang, Khanh Thu Huynh; Ken, Sreymom; Kamkorn, Jiraporn; Tran, Ton; Ayouba, Ahidjo; Peeters, Martine; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Lien, Truong Xuan; Nerrienet, Eric; Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    The HIV integrase enzyme is essential for the HIV life cycle as it mediates integration of HIV-1 proviral DNA into the infected cell's genome. Recently, the development of drugs capable of inhibiting integrase has provided major new options for HIV-infected, treatment-experienced patients with multidrug resistant virus, as well treatment-naïve patients. More than 40 amino acid substitutions within integrase have been described as associated mostly with resistance of HIV B-subtypes to currently available integrase inhibitors (INIs). We have analyzed the natural polymorphisms of the integrase coding region in 87 antiretroviral-naïve subjects (32 from Cambodia, 37 from Thailand and 18 from Vietnam) infected with CRF01_AE virus, the predominant HIV-1 strain circulating in Southeast Asia. The 864bp integrase coding region was sequenced using the ANRS consensus sequencing technique from plasma samples, and amino acid results were interpreted for drug resistance according to the ANRS (Updated July 2009, version 18) and Stanford algorithms (Version November 6, 2009). Alignment of the 87 amino acid sequences against the 2004 Los Alamos HIV-1 clade B consensus sequence showed that overall, 119 of 288 (41.3%) amino acid positions presented at least one polymorphism each. Substitutions found in >60% of study subjects occurred at: K14, A21, V31, S39, I72, T112, T124, T125, G134, I135, K136, D167, V201, L234 and S283. Also, new amino acid substitutions of as yet unknown significance were identified: E152K/H, S153F/L, N155I and E157G. None of the known integrase resistance mutations were observed, except E157Q found in one Cambodian subject (1.1%, CI 95% 0.02-6.3%). The clinical impact of this substitution on resistance of B and nonB-viruses to the licensed INI raltegravir is unclear. If this substitution is confirmed to compromise the virologic response to raltegravir, further studies will be needed to better assess the prevalence of this substitution among CRF01_AE virus

  14. Development of Elvitegravir Resistance and Linkage of Integrase Inhibitor Mutations with Protease and Reverse Transcriptase Resistance Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Mark A.; Lloyd, Robert M.; Shafer, Robert W.; Kozal, Michael J.; Miller, Michael D.; Holodniy, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Failure of antiretroviral regimens containing elvitegravir (EVG) and raltegravir (RAL) can result in the appearance of integrase inhibitor (INI) drug-resistance mutations (DRMs). While several INI DRMs have been identified, the evolution of EVG DRMs and the linkage of these DRMs with protease inhibitor (PI) and reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) DRMs have not been studied at the clonal level. We examined the development of INI DRMs in 10 patients failing EVG-containing regimens over time, and the linkage of INI DRMs with PI and RTI DRMs in these patients plus 6 RAL-treated patients. A one-step RT-nested PCR protocol was used to generate a 2.7 kB amplicon that included the PR, RT, and IN coding region, and standard cloning and sequencing techniques were used to determine DRMs in 1,277 clones (mean 21 clones per time point). Results showed all patients had multiple PI, NRTI, and/or NNRTI DRMs at baseline, but no primary INI DRM. EVG-treated patients developed from 2 to 6 strains with different primary INI DRMs as early as 2 weeks after initiation of treatment, predominantly as single mutations. The prevalence of these strains fluctuated and new strains, and/or strains with new combinations of INI DRMs, developed over time. Final failure samples (weeks 14 to 48) typically showed a dominant strain with multiple mutations or N155H alone. Single N155H or multiple mutations were also observed in RAL-treated patients at virologic failure. All patient strains showed evidence of INI DRM co-located with single or multiple PI and/or RTI DRMs on the same viral strand. Our study shows that EVG treatment can select for a number of distinct INI-resistant strains whose prevalence fluctuates over time. Continued appearance of new INI DRMs after initial INI failure suggests a potent, highly dynamic selection of INI resistant strains that is unaffected by co-location with PI and RTI DRMs. PMID:22815755

  15. Potential disruption of protein-protein interactions by graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Mei; Kang, Hongsuk; Yang, Zaixing; Luan, Binquan; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-06-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is a promising novel nanomaterial with a wide range of potential biomedical applications due to its many intriguing properties. However, very little research has been conducted to study its possible adverse effects on protein-protein interactions (and thus subsequent toxicity to human). Here, the potential cytotoxicity of GO is investigated at molecular level using large-scale, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interaction mechanism between a protein dimer and a GO nanosheet oxidized at different levels. Our theoretical results reveal that GO nanosheet could intercalate between the two monomers of HIV-1 integrase dimer, disrupting the protein-protein interactions and eventually lead to dimer disassociation as graphene does [B. Luan et al., ACS Nano 9(1), 663 (2015)], albeit its insertion process is slower when compared with graphene due to the additional steric and attractive interactions. This study helps to better understand the toxicity of GO to cell functions which could shed light on how to improve its biocompatibility and biosafety for its wide potential biomedical applications.

  16. 4-Substituted 2-Hydroxyisoquinoline-1,3(2H,4H)-diones as a Novel Class of HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billamboz, Muriel; Suchaud, Virginie; Bailly, Fabrice; Lion, Cedric; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Calmels, Christina; Andréola, Marie-Line; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger; Cotelle, Philippe

    2013-07-11

    A series of 2-hydroxy-1,3-dioxoisoquinoline-4-carboxamides featuring an N-hydroxyimide chelating functionality was evaluated for their inhibitory properties against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase (HIV-1 IN). Several derivatives displayed low nanomolar IC50 values comparable to that of the clinically used raltegravir. A marked effect of one compound on both primary IN-catalyzed reactions, strand transfer (ST), and 3' processing (3'-P), emphasizes a novel IN inhibition mechanism establishing it as a potential new generation IN inhibitor. Substitution of the 2-hydroxyisoquinoline-1,3-dione scaffold at position 4 by carboxamido chains was beneficial for antiviral activity since reproducible low micromolar anti-HIV activities were obtained for the first time within this scaffold. PMID:24900718

  17. 2-hydroxyisoquinoline-1,3(2H,4H)-diones (HIDs) as human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase inhibitors: Influence of the alkylcarboxamide substitution of position 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billamboz, Muriel; Suchaud, Virginie; Bailly, Fabrice; Lion, Cedric; Andréola, Marie-Line; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger; Cotelle, Philippe

    2016-07-19

    Herein, we report further insight into the biological activities displayed by the 2-hydroxyisoquinoline-1,3(2H,4H)-dione (HID) scaffold. Previous studies have evidenced the marked fruitful effect of substitution of this two-metal binding pharmacophore at position 4 by phenyl and benzyl carboxamido chains. Strong human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase (HIV-1 IN) inhibitors in the low nanomolar range with micromolar (even down to low nanomolar) anti-HIV activities were obtained. Keeping this essential 4-carboxamido function, we investigated the influence of the replacement of phenyl and benzyl groups by various alkyl chains. This study shows that the recurrent halogenobenzyl pharmacophore found in the INSTIs can be efficiently replaced by an n-alkyl group. With an optimal length of six carbons, we observed a biological profile and a high barrier to resistance equivalent to those of a previously reported hit compound bearing a 4-fluorobenzyl group. PMID:27105029

  18. Synthesis and anti-HIV activity of some [Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor]-C5'-linker-[Integrase Inhibitor] heterodimers as inhibitors of HIV replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugeac, Elena; Fossey, Christine; Ladurée, Daniel; Schmidt, Sylvie; Laumond, Geraldine; Aubertin, Anne-Marie

    2004-12-01

    Selected for their expected ability to inhibit HIV replication, a series of eight heterodimers containing a Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor (NRTI) and an Integrase Inhibitor (INI), bound by a linker, were designed and synthesized. For the NRTIs, d4U, d2U and d4T were chosen. For the INIs, 4-[1-(4-fluorobenzyl)-1H-pyrrol-2-yl]-2,4-dioxobutyric acid (6) and 4-(3,5-dibenzyloxyphenyl)-2,4-dioxobutyric acid (9) (belonging to the beta-diketo acids class) were chosen. The conjugation of the two different inhibitors (NRTI and INI) was performed using an amino acid (glycine or beta-alanine) as a cleavable linker. PMID:15662954

  19. Mutations in the catalytic core or the C-terminus of murine leukemia virus (MLV) integrase disrupt virion infectivity and exert diverse effects on reverse transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding of the structures and functions of the retroviral integrase (IN), a key enzyme in the viral replication cycle, is essential for developing antiretroviral treatments and facilitating the development of safer gene therapy vehicles. Thus, four MLV IN-mutants were constructed in the context of a retroviral vector system, harbouring either a substitution in the catalytic centre, deletions in the C-terminus, or combinations of both modifications. IN-mutants were tested for their performance in different stages of the viral replication cycle: RNA-packaging; RT-activity; transient and stable infection efficiency; dynamics of reverse transcription and nuclear entry. All mutant vectors packaged viral RNA with wild-type efficiencies and displayed only slight reductions in RT-activity. Deletion of either the IN C-terminus alone, or in addition to part of the catalytic domain exerted contrasting effects on intracellular viral DNA levels, implying that IN influences reverse transcription in more than one direction

  20. Genetic variation of the HIV-1 integrase region in newly diagnosed anti-retroviral drug-naïve patients with HIV/AIDS in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J-Y; Kim, E-J; Choi, J-Y; Kwon, O-K; Kim, G J; Choi, S Y; Kim, S S

    2011-08-01

    The survival time of HIV/AIDS patients in Korea has increased since HAART (highly active anti-retroviral therapy) was introduced. However, the occurrence of drug-resistant strains requires new anti-retroviral drugs, one of which, an integrase inhibitor (INI), was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2007. INIs have been used for therapy in many countries and are about to be employed in Korea. Therefore, it is important to identify basic mutant variants prior to the introduction of INIs in order to estimate their efficacy. To monitor potential drug-resistant INI mutations in Korean HIV/AIDS patients, the polymorphism of the int gene was investigated together with the pol gene using a genotypic assay for 75 randomly selected Korean HIV-1 patients newly diagnosed in 2007. The drug-resistant mutation sequences were analysed using the Stanford HIV DB and the International AIDS Society resistance testing-USA panel (IAS-USA). Seventy strains of Korean subtype B were compared with foreign subtype-B strains, and there were no significantly different variants of the int gene region in the study population. Major mutation sites in the integrase (E92Q, F121Y, G140A/S, Y143C/R, Q148H/R/K and N155H) were not detected, and only a few minor mutation sites (L74M, V151I, E157Q, V165I, I203M, S230N and D232N) were identified in 21 strains (28%). Resistance due to mutations in the pol gene was observed in a single strain (1.3%) resistant to protease inhibitors (PIs) and in four strains (5.3%) resistant to reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTIs). In summary, this demonstrates that INIs will be susceptible to drug naïve HIV/AIDS patients in Korea. PMID:20946407

  1. Inorganic and organic fertilizers impact the abundance and proportion of antibiotic resistance and integron-integrase genes in agricultural grassland soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nõlvak, Hiie; Truu, Marika; Kanger, Kärt; Tampere, Mailiis; Espenberg, Mikk; Loit, Evelin; Raave, Henn; Truu, Jaak

    2016-08-15

    Soil fertilization with animal manure or its digestate may facilitate an important antibiotic resistance dissemination route from anthropogenic sources to the environment. This study examines the effect of mineral fertilizer (NH4NO3), cattle slurry and cattle slurry digestate amendment on the abundance and proportion dynamics of five antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and two classes of integron-integrase genes (intI1 and intI2) in agricultural grassland soil. Fertilization was performed thrice throughout one vegetation period. The targeted ARGs (sul1, tetA, blaCTX-M, blaOXA2 and qnrS) encode resistance to several major antibiotic classes used in veterinary medicine such as sulfonamides, tetracycline, cephalosporins, penicillin and fluoroquinolones, respectively. The non-fertilized grassland soil contained a stable background of tetA, blaCTX-M and sul1 genes. The type of applied fertilizer significantly affected ARGs and integron-integrase genes abundances and proportions in the bacterial community (pfertilizer's application event, but this increase was followed by a stage of decrease, suggesting that microbes possessing these genes were predominantly entrained into soil via cattle slurry or its digestate application and had somewhat limited survival potential in a soil environment. However, the abundance of these three target genes did not decrease to a background level by the end of the study period. TetA was most abundant in mineral fertilizer treated soil and blaCTX-M in cattle slurry digestate amended soil. Despite significantly different abundances, the abundance dynamics of bacteria possessing these genes were similar (p<0.05 in all cases) in different treatments and resembled the dynamics of the whole bacterial community abundance in each soil treatment. PMID:27115621

  2. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 34163 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YP_382434.1 1117:642 1118:47 1129:1360 110662:553 phage integrase Synechococcus sp. CC9605 MISAM...AVNWEKNLRRLIKYTHGQGWSLRQKGLGATQVTRRWSDNSRSSATVRIPWKRSSGPKLLAVVERLAIAIAPEAEGGQGLTLARAAELIQLRARAI ...

  3. The BET family of proteins targets Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus integration near transcription start sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rijck, Jan; de Kogel, Christine; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Vets, Sofie; Ashkar, Sara El; Malani, Nirav; Bushman, Frederic D; Landuyt, Bart; Husson, Steven J.; Busschots, Katrien; Gijsbers, Rik; Debyser, Zeger

    2014-01-01

    Summary A hallmark of retroviral replication is integration of the viral genome in the host cell DNA. This characteristic makes retrovirus-based vectors attractive delivery vehicles for gene therapy. However, adverse events in gene therapeutic trials, caused by activation of proto-oncogenes due to Murine Leukemia Virus (MLV)-derived vector integration, hamper their application. Here we show that bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) proteins (BRD2, BRD3 and BRD4) and MLV integrase specifically interact and co-localize within the nucleus of the cell. Inhibition of the BET proteins chromatin interaction via specific bromodomain inhibitors blocks MLV virus replication at the integration step. MLV integration site distribution parallels the chromatin binding profile of BET proteins, and expression of an artificial fusion protein of the BET integrase binding domain with the chromatin interaction domain of the lentiviral targeting factor LEDGF/p75, retargets MLV integration away from TSS and into the body of actively transcribed genes, conform to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) integration pattern. Together these data validate BET proteins as MLV integration targeting factors. PMID:24183673

  4. Studies on voltammetric determination of cadmium in samples containing native and digested proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drozd, Marcin; Pietrzak, Mariusz, E-mail: mariusz@ch.pw.edu.pl; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Proteins exhibit diverse impact on the DPASV cadmium signals. • Proteins subjected to HNO{sub 3} introduce less interference, than the native ones. • Optimal amount of SDS depends on the kind of protein. • Presence of thiolated coating agents of QDs do not influence the analysis. - Abstract: This work focuses on determination of cadmium ions using anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) on thin film mercury electrode in conditions corresponding to those obtained after digestion of cadmium-based quantum dots and their conjugates. It presents the impact of selected proteins, including potential receptors and surface blocking agents on the voltammetric determination of cadmium. Experiments regarding elimination of interferences related to proteins presence using sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) are also shown. Effect of SDS on selected analytical parameters and simplicity of analyses carried out was investigated in the framework of current studies. The significant differences of influence among tested proteins on ASV cadmium determination, as well as the variability in SDS effectiveness as the antifouling agent were observed and explained. This work is especially important for those, who design new bioassays and biosensors with a use of quantum dots as electrochemical labels, as it shows what problems may arise from presence of native and digested proteins in tested samples.

  5. Characterization of the binding sites of two proteins involved in the bacteriophage P2 site-specific recombination system.

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, A.; Haggård-Ljungquist, E

    1993-01-01

    Integration of the bacteriophage P2 genome into the Escherichia coli host chromosome occurs by site-specific recombination between the phage attP and E. coli attB sites. The phage-encoded 38-kDa protein, integrase, is known to be necessary for both phage integration as well as excision. In order to begin the molecular characterization of this recombination event, we have cloned the int gene and overproduced and partially purified the Int protein and an N-terminal truncated form of Int. Both t...

  6. Mapping the λ Integrase bridges in the nucleoprotein Holliday junction intermediates of viral integrative and excisive recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Tong, Wenjun; Warren, David; Seah, Nicole E.; Laxmikanthan, Gurunathan; Van Duyne, Gregory D.; Landy, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    The bacteriophage encoded λ Int protein is distinguished from other well-studied and widely exploited tyrosine recombinase family members as a heterobivalent DNA binding protein. With the help of accessory DNA bending proteins, Int bridges two different classes of DNA sites within the unique 400-kDa recombinogenic complexes of integrative and excisive recombination. The absence of any overarching investigations or structural models for these key complexes stems from the inability to determine...

  7. Antiviral activities of whey proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Wong, Jack Ho; Wang, Yan; Ip, Denis Tsz Ming; Wan, David Chi Cheong; Xia, Jiang

    2015-09-01

    Milk contains an array of proteins with useful bioactivities. Many milk proteins encompassing native or chemically modified casein, lactoferrin, alpha-lactalbumin, and beta-lactoglobulin demonstrated antiviral activities. Casein and alpha-lactalbumin gained anti-HIV activity after modification with 3-hydroxyphthalic anhydride. Many milk proteins inhibited HIV reverse transcriptase. Bovine glycolactin, angiogenin-1, lactogenin, casein, alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, bovine lactoferrampin, and human lactoferrampin inhibited HIV-1 protease and integrase. Several mammalian lactoferrins prevented hepatitis C infection. Lactoferrin, methylated alpha-lactalbumin and methylated beta-lactoglobulin inhibited human cytomegalovirus. Chemically modified alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin and lysozyme, lactoferrin and lactoferricin, methylated alpha-lactalbumin, methylated and ethylated beta-lactoglobulins inhibited HSV. Chemically modified bovine beta-lactoglobulin had antihuman papillomavirus activity. Beta-lactoglobulin, lactoferrin, esterified beta-lactoglobulin, and esterified lactoferrindisplayed anti-avian influenza A (H5N1) activity. Lactoferrin inhibited respiratory syncytial virus, hepatitis B virus, adenovirus, poliovirus, hantavirus, sindbis virus, semliki forest virus, echovirus, and enterovirus. Milk mucin, apolactoferrin, Fe(3+)-lactoferrin, beta-lactoglobulin, human lactadherin, bovine IgG, and bovine kappa-casein demonstrated antihuman rotavirus activity. PMID:26198883

  8. The BET Family of Proteins Targets Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus Integration near Transcription Start Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan De Rijck

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark of retroviral replication is integration of the viral genome into host cell DNA. This characteristic makes retrovirus-based vectors attractive delivery vehicles for gene therapy. However, adverse events in gene therapeutic trials, caused by activation of proto-oncogenes due to murine leukemia virus (MLV-derived vector integration, hamper their application. Here, we show that bromodomain and extraterminal (BET proteins (BRD2, BRD3, and BRD4 and MLV integrase specifically interact and colocalize within the nucleus of the cell. Inhibition of the BET proteins’ chromatin interaction via specific bromodomain inhibitors blocks MLV virus replication at the integration step. MLV integration site distribution parallels the chromatin binding profile of BET proteins, and expression of an artificial fusion protein of the BET integrase binding domain with the chromatin interaction domain of the lentiviral targeting factor LEDGF/p75 retargets MLV integration away from transcription start sites and into the body of actively transcribed genes, conforming to the HIV integration pattern. Together, these data validate BET proteins as MLV integration targeting factors.

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus integrase inhibitors efficiently suppress feline immunodeficiency virus replication in vitro and provide a rationale to redesign antiretroviral treatment for feline AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciervo Alessandra

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV infection has been hampered by the absence of a specific combination antiretroviral treatment (ART. Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs are emerging as a promising new drug class for HIV-1 treatment, and we evaluated the possibility of inhibiting FIV replication using INSTIs. Methods Phylogenetic analysis of lentiviral integrase (IN sequences was carried out using the PAUP* software. A theoretical three-dimensional structure of the FIV IN catalytic core domain (CCD was obtained by homology modeling based on a crystal structure of HIV-1 IN CCD. The interaction of the transferred strand of viral DNA with the catalytic cavity of FIV IN was deduced from a crystal structure of a structurally similar transposase complexed with transposable DNA. Molecular docking simulations were conducted using a genetic algorithm (GOLD. Antiviral activity was tested in feline lymphoblastoid MBM cells acutely infected with the FIV Petaluma strain. Circular and total proviral DNA was quantified by real-time PCR. Results The calculated INSTI-binding sites were found to be nearly identical in FIV and HIV-1 IN CCDs. The close similarity of primate and feline lentivirus IN CCDs was also supported by phylogenetic analysis. In line with these bioinformatic analyses, FIV replication was efficiently inhibited in acutely infected cell cultures by three investigational INSTIs, designed for HIV-1 and belonging to different classes. Of note, the naphthyridine carboxamide INSTI, L-870,810 displayed an EC50 in the low nanomolar range. Inhibition of FIV integration in situ was shown by real-time PCR experiments that revealed accumulation of circular forms of FIV DNA within cells treated with L-870,810. Conclusion We report a drug class (other than nucleosidic reverse transcriptase inhibitors that is capable of inhibiting FIV replication in vitro. The present study helped establish L-870,810, a compound

  10. Virtual-screening targeting Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 integrase-lens epithelium-derived growth factor/p75 interaction for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wan-Gang; Liu, Bai-Nan; Yuan, Jun-Fa

    2015-02-01

    Three integrase (IN) inhibitors have been approved by FDA for clinical treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. This stimulates more researchers to focus their studies on this target for anti-HIV drug development. Three steps regarding of IN activity have been validated for inhibitor discovery: strand transfer, 3'-terminal processing, and IN-lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF)/p75 interaction. Among them, IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction is a new target validated in recent years. Emergence of drug-resistant virus strains makes this target appealing to pharmacologists. Compared with the traditional screening methods such as AlphaScreen and cell-based screening developed for IN inhibitor discovery, virtual screening is a powerful technique in modern drug discovery. Here we summarized the recent advances of virtual-screening targeting IN-LEDFG/p75 interaction. The combined application of virtual screening and experiments in drug discovery against IN-LEDFG/p75 interaction sheds light on anti-HIV research and drug discovery. PMID:25230778

  11. Production of unstable proteins through the formation of stable core complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Nicolas; Eiler, Sylvia; Pradeau-Aubreton, Karine; Maillot, Benoit; Stricher, François; Ruff, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Purification of proteins that participate in large transient complexes is impeded by low amounts, heterogeneity, instability and poor solubility. To circumvent these difficulties we set up a methodology that enables the production of stable complexes for structural and functional studies. This procedure is benchmarked and applied to two challenging protein families: the human steroid nuclear receptors (SNR) and the HIV-1 pre-integration complex. In the context of transcriptional regulation studies, we produce and characterize the ligand-binding domains of the glucocorticoid nuclear receptor and the oestrogen receptor beta in complex with a TIF2 (transcriptional intermediary factor 2) domain containing the three SNR-binding motifs. In the context of retroviral integration, we demonstrate the stabilization of the HIV-1 integrase by formation of complexes with partner proteins and DNA. This procedure provides a powerful research tool for structural and functional studies of proteins participating in non-covalent macromolecular complexes. PMID:26983699

  12. Diversity of gene cassettes and the abundance of the class 1 integron-integrase gene in sediment polluted by metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Pinto, Clarisse; Costa, Patrícia S; Reis, Mariana P; Chartone-Souza, Edmar; Nascimento, Andréa M A

    2016-05-01

    The integron-gene cassette system has typically been associated with antibiotic-resistant pathogens. However, the diversity of gene cassettes and the abundance of class 1 integrons outside of the clinical context are not fully explored. Primers targeting the conserved segments of attC recombination sites were used to amplify gene cassettes from the sediment of the Mina stream, which exhibited a higher degree of stress to metal pollution in the dry season than the rainy season. Of the 143 total analyzed sequences, 101 had no matches to proteins in the database, where cassette open reading frames could be identified by homology with database entries. There was a predominance of sequences encoding essential cellular functions. Each season that was sampled yielded a specific pool of gene cassettes. Real-time PCR revealed that 8.5 and 41.6 % of bacterial cells potentially harbored a class 1 integron in the rainy and dry seasons, respectively. In summary, our findings demonstrate that most of the gene cassettes have no ascribable function and, apparently, historically metal-contaminated sediment favors the maintenance of bacteria containing the intI1 gene. Thus, the diversity of gene cassettes is far from being fully explored deserving further attention. PMID:26961777

  13. Effects of Combined CCR5/Integrase Inhibitors-Based Regimen on Mucosal Immunity in HIV-Infected Patients Naive to Antiretroviral Therapy: A Pilot Randomized Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Serrano-Villar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Whether initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART regimens aimed at achieving greater concentrations within gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT impacts the level of mucosal immune reconstitution, inflammatory markers and the viral reservoir remains unknown. We included 12 HIV- controls and 32 ART-naïve HIV patients who were randomized to efavirenz, maraviroc or maraviroc+raltegravir, each with fixed-dose tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine. Rectal and duodenal biopsies were obtained at baseline and at 9 months of ART. We performed a comprehensive assay of T-cell subsets by flow cytometry, T-cell density in intestinal biopsies, plasma and tissue concentrations of antiretroviral drugs by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy, and plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6, lipoteichoic acid (LTA, soluble CD14 (sCD14 and zonulin-1 each measured by ELISA. Total cell-associated HIV DNA was measured in PBMC and rectal and duodenal mononuclear cells. Twenty-six HIV-infected patients completed the follow-up. In the duodenum, the quadruple regimen resulted in greater CD8+ T-cell density decline, greater normalization of mucosal CCR5+CD4+ T-cells and increase of the naïve/memory CD8+ T-cell ratio, and a greater decline of sCD14 levels and duodenal HIV DNA levels (P = 0.004 and P = 0.067, respectively, with no changes in HIV RNA in plasma or tissue. Maraviroc showed the highest drug distribution to the gut tissue, and duodenal concentrations correlated well with other T-cell markers in duodenum, i.e., the CD4/CD8 ratio, %CD4+ and %CD8+ HLA-DR+CD38+ T-cells. Maraviroc use elicited greater activation of the mucosal naïve CD8+ T-cell subset, ameliorated the distribution of the CD8+ T-cell maturational subsets and induced higher improvement of zonulin-1 levels. These data suggest that combined CCR5 and integrase inhibitor based combination therapy in ART treatment naïve patients might more effectively reconstitute duodenal immunity, decrease

  14. A novel integrase-containing element may interact with Laem-Singh virus (LSNV to cause slow growth in giant tiger shrimp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriurairatana Siriporn

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background From 2001-2003 monodon slow growth syndrome (MSGS caused severe economic losses for Thai shrimp farmers who cultivated the native, giant tiger shrimp, and this led them to adopt exotic stocks of the domesticated whiteleg shrimp as the species of cultivation choice, despite the higher value of giant tiger shrimp. In 2008, newly discovered Laem-Singh virus (LSNV was proposed as a necessary but insufficient cause of MSGS, and this stimulated the search for the additional component cause(s of MSGS in the hope that discovery would lead to preventative measures that could revive cultivation of the higher value native shrimp species. Results Using a universal shotgun cloning protocol, a novel RNA, integrase-containing element (ICE was found in giant tiger shrimp from MSGS ponds (GenBank accession number FJ498866. In situ hybridization probes and RT-PCR tests revealed that ICE and Laem-Singh virus (LSNV occurred together in lymphoid organs (LO of shrimp from MSGS ponds but not in shrimp from normal ponds. Tissue homogenates of shrimp from MSGS ponds yielded a fraction that gave positive RT-PCR reactions for both ICE and LSNV and showed viral-like particles by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Bioassays of this fraction with juvenile giant tiger shrimp resulted in retarded growth with gross signs of MSGS, and in situ hybridization assays revealed ICE and LSNV together in LO, eyes and gills. Viral-like particles similar to those seen in tissue extracts from natural infections were also seen by TEM. Conclusions ICE and LSNV were found together only in shrimp from MSGS ponds and only in shrimp showing gross signs of MSGS after injection with a preparation containing ICE and LSNV. ICE was never found in the absence of LSNV although LSNV was sometimes found in normal shrimp in the absence of ICE. The results suggest that ICE and LSNV may act together as component causes of MSGS, but this cannot be proven conclusively without single

  15. Basic Principles of Anodic Stripping Voltammetry (ASV)

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    In this interactive exercise, the basic principles of Anodic Stripping Voltammetry are shown. Each step of the voltammetric process is described using simulated animations. This activity illustrates what takes place in the voltammetric cell when this technique is applied to the determination of cadmium as well as to the simultaneous determination of copper and cadmium.

  16. Marine ASV Range Surveillance System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — United States spaceports carry out the critical task of launching and recovering vehicles and payloads. These are extremely unique and expensive assets, and their...

  17. Marine ASV Range Surveillance System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — United States spaceports carry out the impressive task of launching and recovering spacecrafts and payloads which represent extremely unique and expensive assets....

  18. Potent inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase display a two-step, slow-binding inhibition mechanism which is absent in a drug-resistant T66I/M154I mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Edward P; Schwartz, Benjamin; Gartland, Margaret J; Lang, Scott; Halsey, Wendy; Sathe, Ganesh; Carter, H Luke; Weaver, Kurt L

    2009-02-24

    Two-metal binding HIV-1 integrase inhibitors (INIs) are potent inhibitors of HIV-1 in vitro and in patients. We report here for the first time the kinetics of inhibition of integrase-catalyzed strand transfer. First, the IC(50) values for each of six structurally distinct INIs decreased when a preincubation was included: S-1360 (1.3 microM vs 0.12 microM), L-731,988 (130 nM vs 9 nM), L-870,810 (130 nM vs 4 nM), raltegravir (300 nM vs 9 nM), elvitegravir (90 nM vs 6 nM), and GSK364735 (90 nM vs 6 nM). When reactions with these INIs were initiated with integrase, progress curve analyses indicated time-dependent inhibition, which could be fitted to a two-step mechanism of binding. Overall fitted K(i) values matched the IC(50) values measured with a preincubation: S-1360 (0.17 microM), L-731,988 (34 nM), L-870,810 (2.4 nM), raltegravir (10 nM), elvitegravir (4.0 nM), and GSK364735 (2.5 nM). To begin to understand the mechanism for this slow onset of inhibition and its possible impact on drug resistance, studies of resistance mutations were initiated. T66I/M154I exhibited little if any time-dependent inhibition by any of the six INIs, as measured by differences in potency upon preincubation or by progress curve analysis. These data demonstrate that slow binding is a signature of two-metal binding INIs, and that the second slow step is required for full potency. We discuss a possible structural explanation of the second slow step of inhibition and also the relationship between loss of time-dependent inhibition and drug resistance of this important new class of HIV-1 antiretroviral drugs. PMID:19178153

  19. Identification of proteolytic cleavage sites within the gag-analogue protein of Ty1 virus-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Rendon, E; Hurd, D W; Marfany, G; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1996-12-01

    Like retroviruses, the yeast retrotransposon Ty1 produces its proteins as precursors that are subsequently cleaved by a protease encoded by the element. These cleavage events are essential for transposition as they release the active reverse transcriptase and integrase and they modify the structure of the virus-like particles in a way that is analogous to the morphological changes that occur during retrovirus core maturation. Using a combination of epitope tagging, amino acid analysis and mutagenesis, we have identified the major cleavage sites for the Ty1 protease within the particle-forming protein, p1, at 407S/408N. In addition, we present evidence indicating that the Ty1 protease may be a 17 kDa protein. PMID:8971723

  20. Synthesis and anti-HIV evaluation of hybrid-type prodrugs conjugating HIV integrase inhibitors with d4t by self-cleavable spacers containing an amino acid residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossey, Christine; Huynh, Ngoc-Trinh; Vu, Anh-Hoang; Vidu, Anamaria; Zarafu, Irina; Laduree, Daniel; Schmidt, Sylvie; Laumond, Geraldine; Aubertin, Anne-Marie

    2007-10-01

    In an attempt to combine the anti-HIV inhibitory capacity of reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTIs) and integrase (IN) inhibitors (INIs), several heterodimer analogues of the previously reported [d4T]-PABC-[INI] and [d4T]-OABC-[INI] prototypes have been prepared. In these novel series, we wished to extend our results to conjugates which incorporated an enzymatically labile aminoacid unit (L-alanine) connected to d4T through a self-immolative para- or ortho-aminobenzyl carbonate (PABC or OABC) spacer. Among the novel heterodimers, several derivatives show a potent anti-HIV-1 activity, which proved comparable to that of the [L-708,906]-PABC-[d4T] Heterodimer A prototype. However, although the compounds proved inhibitory to HIV-1, they were less potent than the parent compounds from which they were derived. PMID:18035829

  1. Design, synthesis, molecular modeling and anti-HIV 1 integrase activity of a series of photoactivable diketo acid-containing inhibitors as affinity probes

    OpenAIRE

    Sechi, Mario; Carta, Fabrizio; Sannia, Luciano; Dallocchio, Roberto; Dessì, Alessandro; Cosseddu, Alessia; Neamati, Nouri

    2008-01-01

    Photoaffinity Labelling (PL) is a powerful method in the chemical proteomic approach of protein functions. This method is especially useful for the identification of ligand-binding sites of target proteins and for the investigation of ligand–receptor interactions. The use of affinity-labeled inhibitors to covalently modify the site of interaction and subsequent analysis of the protein have been very effective in providing useful informations about inhibitor binding for a multitude...

  2. HIV-1逆转录酶和整合酶双靶点抑制剂研究进展%Research progress of dual inhibitors targeting HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and integrase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘鸿; 展鹏; 刘新泳

    2013-01-01

    在HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus type l)的复制周期中,逆转录酶(reverse transcriptase,RT)和整合酶(integrase,IN)均发挥着非常重要的作用,它们一直是抗HIV药物研究的热门靶点.逆转录酶抑制剂(RT inhibitors)是目前临床上治疗艾滋病(AIDS)患者和HIV感染者的一线药物,而整合酶抑制剂(IN inhibitors)新近也有药物上市,两方面的单独研究均取得了可喜的成果.近年来,多靶点药物研究策略渐渐引起科研工作者的浓厚兴趣,经过合理药物设计及随机筛选发现了多类具有HIV逆转录酶和整合酶双重抑制活性的化合物.本文主要就HIV逆转录酶和整合酶双靶点抑制剂的发现与结构修饰的最新研究进展进行介绍,以期对抗HIV药物研究有所启示.

  3. Protein Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Protein Foods Foods high in protein such as fish, ... the vegetarian proteins, whether they have carbohydrate. Best Protein Choices The best choices are: Plant-based proteins ...

  4. Protein-protein interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byron, Olwyn; Vestergaard, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Responsive formation of protein:protein interaction (PPI) upon diverse stimuli is a fundament of cellular function. As a consequence, PPIs are complex, adaptive entities, and exist in structurally heterogeneous interplays defined by the energetic states of the free and complexed protomers. The...

  5. Identification of multiple integration sites for Stx-phage Phi24B in the Escherichia coli genome, description of a novel integrase and evidence for a functional anti-repressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogg, Paul C M; Gossage, Sharon M; Smith, Darren L; Saunders, Jon R; McCarthy, Alan J; Allison, Heather E

    2007-12-01

    The key virulence factor in Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli is the expression of Shiga toxin (Stx), which is conferred by Stx-encoding temperate lambdoid phages (Stx-phages). It had been assumed that Stx-phages would behave similarly to lambda phage. However, contrary to the lambda superinfection immunity model, it has been demonstrated that double lysogens can be produced with the Stx-phage Phi24(B). Here, the Phi24(B) integrase gene is identified, and the preferred site of integration defined. Although an E. coli int gene was identified close to the Phi24(B) integration site, it was shown not to be involved in the phage integration event. An additional six potential integration sites were identified in the E. coli genome, and three of these were confirmed experimentally. Two of the other potential sites lie within genes predicted to be essential to E. coli and are therefore unlikely to support phage integration. A Phi24(B) gene, possessing similarity to the well-characterized P22 ant gene, was identified. RT-PCR was used to demonstrate that ant is transcribed in a Phi24(B) E. coli lysogen, and expression of an anti-repressor is the likely explanation for the absence of immunity to superinfection. Demonstration of the ability of Phi24(B) to form multiple lysogens has two potentially serious impacts. First, multiple integrated prophages will drive the evolution of bacterial pathogens as novel Stx-phages emerge following intracellular mutation/recombination events. Second, multiple copies of the stx gene may lead to an increase in toxin production and consequently increased virulence. PMID:18048923

  6. A chromosome-centric human proteome project (C-HPP) to characterize the sets of proteins encoded in chromosome 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Suli; Im, Hogune; Bairoch, Amos; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Chen, Rui; Deutsch, Eric W; Dalton, Stephen; Fenyo, David; Fanayan, Susan; Gates, Chris; Gaudet, Pascale; Hincapie, Marina; Hanash, Samir; Kim, Hoguen; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Lundberg, Emma; Mias, George; Menon, Rajasree; Mu, Zhaomei; Nice, Edouard; Paik, Young-Ki; Uhlen, Mathias; Wells, Lance; Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Yan, Fangfei; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Yue; Snyder, Michael; Omenn, Gilbert S; Beavis, Ronald C; Hancock, William S

    2013-01-01

    We report progress assembling the parts list for chromosome 17 and illustrate the various processes that we have developed to integrate available data from diverse genomic and proteomic knowledge bases. As primary resources, we have used GPMDB, neXtProt, PeptideAtlas, Human Protein Atlas (HPA), and GeneCards. All sites share the common resource of Ensembl for the genome modeling information. We have defined the chromosome 17 parts list with the following information: 1169 protein-coding genes, the numbers of proteins confidently identified by various experimental approaches as documented in GPMDB, neXtProt, PeptideAtlas, and HPA, examples of typical data sets obtained by RNASeq and proteomic studies of epithelial derived tumor cell lines (disease proteome) and a normal proteome (peripheral mononuclear cells), reported evidence of post-translational modifications, and examples of alternative splice variants (ASVs). We have constructed a list of the 59 "missing" proteins as well as 201 proteins that have inconclusive mass spectrometric (MS) identifications. In this report we have defined a process to establish a baseline for the incorporation of new evidence on protein identification and characterization as well as related information from transcriptome analyses. This initial list of "missing" proteins that will guide the selection of appropriate samples for discovery studies as well as antibody reagents. Also we have illustrated the significant diversity of protein variants (including post-translational modifications, PTMs) using regions on chromosome 17 that contain important oncogenes. We emphasize the need for mandated deposition of proteomics data in public databases, the further development of improved PTM, ASV, and single nucleotide variant (SNV) databases, and the construction of Web sites that can integrate and regularly update such information. In addition, we describe the distribution of both clustered and scattered sets of protein families on the

  7. : Protein flexibility

    OpenAIRE

    Bornot, Aurélie; Offmann, Bernard; De Brevern, Alexandre

    2007-01-01

    Protein structures and protein structural models are great tools to reach protein function and provide very relevant information for drug design. Nevertheless, protein structures are not rigid entities. Cutting-edge bioinformatics methods tend to take into account the flexibility of these macromolecules. We present new approaches used to define protein structure flexibility.

  8. Nanopore current transduction analysis of protein binding to non-terminal and terminal DNA regions: analysis of transcription factor binding, retroviral DNA terminus dynamics, and retroviral integrase-DNA binding

    OpenAIRE

    Amin Iftekhar; Davis Amanda; Winters-Hilt Stephen; Morales Eric

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Synthetic transcription factors (STFs) promise to offer a powerful new therapeutic against Cancer, AIDS, and genetic disease. Currently, 10% of drugs are of this type, including salicylate and tamoxifen. STFs that can appropriately target (and release) their transcription factor binding sites on native genomic DNA provide a means to directly influence cellular mRNA production. An effective mechanism for screening amongst transcription factor (TF) candidates would itself be...

  9. Effects of Combined CCR5/Integrase Inhibitors-Based Regimen on Mucosal Immunity in HIV-Infected Patients Naïve to Antiretroviral Therapy: A Pilot Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhong-Min; Utay, Netanya S.; Wook-Chun, Tae; Mann, Surinder; Kashuba, Angela D.; Siewe, Basile; Albanese, Anthony; Troia-Cancio, Paolo; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Somasunderam, Anoma; Yotter, Tammy; Deeks, Steven G.; Landay, Alan; Pollard, Richard B.; Miller, Christopher J.; Moreno, Santiago; Asmuth, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Whether initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens aimed at achieving greater concentrations within gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) impacts the level of mucosal immune reconstitution, inflammatory markers and the viral reservoir remains unknown. We included 12 HIV- controls and 32 ART-naïve HIV patients who were randomized to efavirenz, maraviroc or maraviroc+raltegravir, each with fixed-dose tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine. Rectal and duodenal biopsies were obtained at baseline and at 9 months of ART. We performed a comprehensive assay of T-cell subsets by flow cytometry, T-cell density in intestinal biopsies, plasma and tissue concentrations of antiretroviral drugs by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy, and plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), soluble CD14 (sCD14) and zonulin-1 each measured by ELISA. Total cell-associated HIV DNA was measured in PBMC and rectal and duodenal mononuclear cells. Twenty-six HIV-infected patients completed the follow-up. In the duodenum, the quadruple regimen resulted in greater CD8+ T-cell density decline, greater normalization of mucosal CCR5+CD4+ T-cells and increase of the naïve/memory CD8+ T-cell ratio, and a greater decline of sCD14 levels and duodenal HIV DNA levels (P = 0.004 and P = 0.067, respectively), with no changes in HIV RNA in plasma or tissue. Maraviroc showed the highest drug distribution to the gut tissue, and duodenal concentrations correlated well with other T-cell markers in duodenum, i.e., the CD4/CD8 ratio, %CD4+ and %CD8+ HLA-DR+CD38+ T-cells. Maraviroc use elicited greater activation of the mucosal naïve CD8+ T-cell subset, ameliorated the distribution of the CD8+ T-cell maturational subsets and induced higher improvement of zonulin-1 levels. These data suggest that combined CCR5 and integrase inhibitor based combination therapy in ART treatment naïve patients might more effectively reconstitute duodenal immunity, decrease inflammatory

  10. Total protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes of proteins found in the fluid portion of your ... nutritional problems, kidney disease or liver disease . If total protein is abnormal, you will need to have more ...

  11. [Prokaryotic soluble expression, purification and function study of LEDGF/p75 protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Da-Wei; He, Hong-Qiu; Guo, Shun-Xing

    2014-08-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is a key enzyme for the viral replication. The protein-protein interaction (PPI) between HIV-1 IN and a cellular cofactor lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75) is a validated target for anti-HIV drug discovery. In order to build the platform for screening inhibitor against PPI between IN and LEDGF/p75, the vector containing the LEDGF/p75 protein cDNA was constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli and the function of the LEDGF/p75 protein was assayed. The LGDGF/p75 encoding gene optimized according to the preference codon usage of E. coli, was synthesized and cloned into the expression vector pGEX-4T-1 to form a recombined plasmid, then transformed into host cell E. coli BL21 (DE3). The recombined clones were identified and confirmed by BamH I/Sal I digestion and sequencing, the successfully recombined plasmid in the host cell was induced by IPTG and the condition of the expression was optimized. The expressed protein was purified by the Ni2+ affinity chromatography column and SDS-PAGE was used to analyze the molecular weight and specificity. In addition, ELISA assay was used to analyze the function of the recombinant protein. The recombinant LGDGF/p75 was soluble, and expressed highly and stably in E. coli. The protein was proved to enhance HIV-1 IN strand transfer activity in vitro by ELISA. It will be helpful to build the platform of screening inhibitors against PPI between IN and LEDGF/p75. PMID:25322565

  12. 用分子模拟方法研究HIV-1整合酶突变体的耐药性机理%A Study on Drug Resistance Mechanism of HIV-1 Integrase Mutants by Molecular Modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张小轶; 何红秋; 刘斌; 王存新

    2009-01-01

    二酮酸类化合物(DKAs)是目前最有前景的HIV-1整合酶(integrase,IN)抑制剂.为了解DKAs引起的多种耐药株共有的耐药性机理,选择3种S-1360引起的IN耐药突变体,用分子对接和分子动力学模拟,研究了野生型和突变型IN与S-1360的结合模式,基于该结合模式探讨了3种耐药突变体所共有的耐药性机理.结果表明:在突变体中,S-1360结合到耐药突变IN核心区中的位置靠近功能loop 3区却远离与DNA结合的关键残基,结合位置不同导致S-1360的抑制作用部分丧失;残基138到166区域的柔性对IN发挥生物学功能很重要,S-1360能与DNA结合的关键残基N155及K159形成氢键,这2个氢键作用降低了该区域的柔性,突变体中无类似氢键,因而该区域柔性增高;在突变体中,S-1360的苯环远离病毒DNA结合区,不能阻止病毒DNA末端暴露给宿主DNA;T66I突变导敛残基Ⅰ的长侧链占据IN的活性口袋,阻止抑制剂以与野生型中相同的方式结合到活性中心,这均是产生抗药性的重要原因.这些模拟结果与实验结果吻合,可为抗IN的抑制剂设计和改造提供帮助.%The drug resistant mutations in human immunodefieiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are a major impediment to successful highly active antiretrovirai therapy (HAART) and new drug design. In order to understand the drug resistance mechanism of HIV-1 integrase (IN) mutually existed for multiple drug-resistant strains to the most potent IN inhibitors diketo acids (DKAs), three S-1360-resistant HIV-1 strains were selected and molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to obtain the inhibitor binding modes. Based on the binding modes, compelling differences between the wild-type and the 3 mutants for IN have been observed. The results showed that: 1) In the mutants, the inhibitor is close to the funetional loop 3 region but far away from the DNA binding site. Different binding sites lead to the decrease in

  13. Interfacial Protein-Protein Associations

    OpenAIRE

    Langdon, Blake B.; Kastantin, Mark; Walder, Robert; Schwartz, Daniel K.

    2013-01-01

    While traditional models of protein adsorption focus primarily on direct protein-surface interactions, recent findings suggest that protein-protein interactions may play a central role. Using high-throughput intermolecular resonance energy transfer (RET) tracking, we directly observed dynamic, protein-protein associations of bovine serum albumin on poly(ethylene glycol) modified surfaces. The associations were heterogeneous and reversible, and associating molecules resided on the surface for ...

  14. Patterns of recombination in HIV-1M are influenced by selection disfavouring the survival of recombinants with disrupted genomic RNA and protein structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Golden

    Full Text Available Genetic recombination is a major contributor to the ongoing diversification of HIV. It is clearly apparent that across the HIV-genome there are defined recombination hot and cold spots which tend to co-localise both with genomic secondary structures and with either inter-gene boundaries or intra-gene domain boundaries. There is also good evidence that most recombination breakpoints that are detectable within the genes of natural HIV recombinants are likely to be minimally disruptive of intra-protein amino acid contacts and that these breakpoints should therefore have little impact on protein folding. Here we further investigate the impact on patterns of genetic recombination in HIV of selection favouring the maintenance of functional RNA and protein structures. We confirm that chimaeric Gag p24, reverse transcriptase, integrase, gp120 and Nef proteins that are expressed by natural HIV-1 recombinants have significantly lower degrees of predicted folding disruption than randomly generated recombinants. Similarly, we use a novel single-stranded RNA folding disruption test to show that there is significant, albeit weak, evidence that natural HIV recombinants tend to have genomic secondary structures that more closely resemble parental structures than do randomly generated recombinants. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that natural selection has acted both in the short term to purge recombinants with disrupted RNA and protein folds, and in the longer term to modify the genome architecture of HIV to ensure that recombination prone sites correspond with those where recombination will be minimally deleterious.

  15. Flotation removal of As(V) onto goethite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matis, K A; Zouboulis, A I; Malamas, F B; Ramos Afonso, M D; Hudson, M J

    1997-01-01

    Arsenic oxyanions, considered as priority pollutants, were removed from dilute aqueous solutions by sorption onto synthetic goethite, a typical inorganic adsorbent. Flotation was subsequently applied as an effective solid/liquid separation method. The combined process produced a foam concentrate, containing the arsenic-loaded goethite particles. The dispersed-air flotation technique was used for the generation of fine gas bubbles. The main parameters affecting the process were studied and promising results, in terms of arsenic removal and of goethite separation, were obtained. PMID:15093361

  16. Total protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003483.htm Total protein To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes ...

  17. The biochemical study of two retroviral integrases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Snášel, Jan

    Praha : UOCHB AV ČR, 1998. s. 65. ISBN 80-902130-8-1. [Conference on Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of Young Scientists /10./. 15.06.1998-20.06.1998, Liblice] Keywords : biochemistry * organic chemistry

  18. Protein Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmus, Elaine Garbarino

    2007-01-01

    Individual students model specific amino acids and then, through dehydration synthesis, a class of students models a protein. The students clearly learn amino acid structure, primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structure in proteins and the nature of the bonds maintaining a protein's shape. This activity is fun, concrete, inexpensive and…

  19. Redox Transformations of Arsenic Oxyanions in Periphyton Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Kulp, Thomas R.; Hoeft, Shelley E.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2004-01-01

    Periphyton (Cladophora sp.) samples from a suburban stream lacking detectable dissolved As were able to reduce added As(V) to As(III) when incubated under anoxic conditions and, conversely, oxidized added As(III) to As(V) with aerobic incubation. Both types of activity were abolished in autoclaved controls, thereby demonstrating its biological nature. The reduction of As(V) was inhibited by chloramphenicol, indicating that it required the synthesis of new protein. Nitrate also inhibited As(V)...

  20. Tau protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup Battistini; Kristensen, Kim; Bahl, Jmc;

    2011-01-01

    Background: Tau protein has been proposed as biomarker of axonal damage leading to irreversible neurological impairment in MS. CSF concentrations may be useful when determining risk of progression from ON to MS. Objective: To investigate the association between tau protein concentration and 14...... the Department of Neurology of Glostrup Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, were included. CSF samples were analysed for tau protein and 14-3-3 protein, and clinical and paraclinical information was obtained from medical records. Results: The study shows a significantly increased...... concentration of tau protein in CSF from patients with relapsing-remitting MS and patients monosymptomatic at onset who progressed to MS, but interestingly no increased tau protein concentration in monosymptomatic ON. The concentration of tau protein was significantly correlated to Expanded Disability Status...

  1. Protein politics

    OpenAIRE

    Vijver, Marike

    2005-01-01

    This study is part of the program of the interdisciplinary research group Profetas (protein foods, environment, technology and society). Profetas consists of technological, environmental and socio-economic research projects on protein food systems which result in the development of scenarios and strategies for guiding a shift towards a more plant protein based diet. The different research projects focus on the goal of identifying viable options for a more sustainable food system. Profetas aro...

  2. Principles of protein-protein interactions.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, S; Thornton, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    This review examines protein complexes in the Brookhaven Protein Databank to gain a better understanding of the principles governing the interactions involved in protein-protein recognition. The factors that influence the formation of protein-protein complexes are explored in four different types of protein-protein complexes--homodimeric proteins, heterodimeric proteins, enzyme-inhibitor complexes, and antibody-protein complexes. The comparison between the complexes highlights differences tha...

  3. In situ microliter-droplet anodic stripping voltammetry of copper stained on the gold label after galvanic replacement reaction enlargement for ultrasensitive immunoassay of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xiaoli; Xu, Aigui; Wang, Linchun; Liu, Ling; Chao, Long; He, Fang; Tan, Yueming; Chen, Chao; Xie, Qingji

    2016-05-15

    We report a new protocol for ultrasensitive electrochemical sandwich-type immunosensing, on the basis of signal amplification by gold-label/copper-staining, galvanic replacement reactions (GRRs), and in situ microliter-droplet anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) after an enhanced cathodic preconcentration of copper. First, a sandwich-type immuno-structure is appropriately assembled at a glassy carbon electrode. Second, copper is selectively stained on the catalytic surfaces of second antibody-conjugated Au nanoparticles through CuSO4-ascorbic acid redox reaction, and the GRRs between HAuCl4 and the stained copper are used to amplify the quantity of copper. Finally, the corresponding antigen is determined based on simultaneous chemical-dissolution/cathodic-preconcentration of copper for in-situ ASV analysis directly at the immunoelectrode. Cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, quartz crystal microbalance and scanning electron microscopy are used for film characterization and/or process monitoring. Under optimized conditions, ultrasensitive analyses of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) and human carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125) are achieved. The limits of detection are 0.3 fg mL(-1) (equivalent to 7 IgG molecules in the 6 μL sample employed) for IgG (S/N=3) and 1.3 nU mL(-1) for CA125 (S/N=3), respectively, which are amongst the best reported to date for the two proteins. The theoretical feasibility of such a single-molecule-level amperometric immunoassay is also discussed based on the immunological reaction thermodynamics. PMID:26802573

  4. Protein-Protein Interaction Databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szklarczyk, Damian; Jensen, Lars Juhl

    2015-01-01

    of research are explored. Here we present an overview of the most widely used protein-protein interaction databases and the methods they employ to gather, combine, and predict interactions. We also point out the trade-off between comprehensiveness and accuracy and the main pitfall scientists have to be aware...

  5. Whey Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... quality of life in people with mitochondrial diseases. Ovarian cysts (Polycystic ovarian syndrome). Early research suggests that taking ... weight, fat mass, and cholesterol in people with ovarian cysts. However, whey protein does not improve blood sugar ...

  6. Human Polycomb group EED protein negatively affects HIV-1 assembly and release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darlix Jean-Luc

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human EED protein, a member of the superfamily of Polycomb group (PcG proteins with WD-40 repeats, has been found to interact with three HIV-1 components, namely the structural Gag matrix protein (MA, the integrase enzyme (IN and the Nef protein. The aim of the present study was to analyze the possible biological role of EED in HIV-1 replication, using the HIV-1-based vector HIV-Luc and EED protein expressed by DNA transfection of 293T cells. Results During the early phase of HIV-1 infection, a slight negative effect on virus infectivity occurred in EED-expressing cells, which appeared to be dependent on EED-MA interaction. At late times post infection, EED caused an important reduction of virus production, from 20- to 25-fold as determined by CAp24 immunoassay, to 10- to 80-fold based on genomic RNA levels, and this decrease was not due to a reduction of Gag protein synthesis. Coexpression of WTNef, or the non-N-myristoylated mutant NefG2A, restored virus yields to levels obtained in the absence of exogenous EED protein. This effect was not observed with mutant NefΔ57 mimicking the Nef core, or with the lipid raft-retargeted fusion protein LAT-Nef. LATAA-Nef, a mutant defective in the lipid raft addressing function, had the same anti-EED effect as WTNef. Cell fractionation and confocal imaging showed that, in the absence of Nef, EED mainly localized in membrane domains different from the lipid rafts. Upon co-expression with WTNef, NefG2A or LATAA-Nef, but not with NefΔ57 or LAT-Nef, EED was found to relocate into an insoluble fraction along with Nef protein. Electron microscopy of HIV-Luc producer cells overexpressing EED showed significant less virus budding at the cell surface compared to control cells, and ectopic assembly and clustering of nuclear pore complexes within the cytoplasm. Conclusion Our data suggested that EED exerted an antiviral activity at the late stage of HIV-1 replication, which included genomic

  7. Protein Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, Alexander A.

    2005-01-01

    Nucleation, growth and perfection of protein crystals will be overviewed along with crystal mechanical properties. The knowledge is based on experiments using optical and force crystals behave similar to inorganic crystals, though with a difference in orders of magnitude in growing parameters. For example, the low incorporation rate of large biomolecules requires up to 100 times larger supersaturation to grow protein, rather than inorganic crystals. Nucleation is often poorly reproducible, partly because of turbulence accompanying the mixing of precipitant with protein solution. Light scattering reveals fluctuations of molecular cluster size, its growth, surface energies and increased clustering as protein ages. Growth most often occurs layer-by-layer resulting in faceted crystals. New molecular layer on crystal face is terminated by a step where molecular incorporation occurs. Quantitative data on the incorporation rate will be discussed. Rounded crystals with molecularly disordered interfaces will be explained. Defects in crystals compromise the x-ray diffraction resolution crucially needed to find the 3D atomic structure of biomolecules. The defects are immobile so that birth defects stay forever. All lattice defects known for inorganics are revealed in protein crystals. Contribution of molecular conformations to lattice disorder is important, but not studied. This contribution may be enhanced by stress field from other defects. Homologous impurities (e.g., dimers, acetylated molecules) are trapped more willingly by a growing crystal than foreign protein impurities. The trapped impurities induce internal stress eliminated in crystals exceeding a critical size (part of mni for ferritin, lysozyme). Lesser impurities are trapped from stagnant, as compared to the flowing, solution. Freezing may induce much more defects unless quickly amorphysizing intracrystalline water.

  8. A microarray study of gene and protein regulation in human and rat brain following middle cerebral artery occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Pat

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Altered gene expression is an important feature of ischemic cerebral injury and affects proteins of many functional classes. We have used microarrays to investigate the changes in gene expression at various times after middle cerebral artery occlusion in human and rat brain. Results Our results demonstrated a significant difference in the number of genes affected and the time-course of expression between the two cases. The total number of deregulated genes in the rat was 335 versus 126 in the human, while, of 393 overlapping genes between the two array sets, 184 were changed only in the rat and 36 in the human with a total of 41 genes deregulated in both cases. Interestingly, the mean fold changes were much higher in the human. The expression of novel genes, including p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1, matrix metalloproteinase 11 (MMP11 and integrase interactor 1, was further analyzed by RT-PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Strong neuronal staining was seen for PAK1 and MMP11. Conclusion Our findings confirmed previous studies reporting that gene expression screening can detect known and unknown transcriptional features of stroke and highlight the importance of research using human brain tissue in the search for novel therapeutic agents.

  9. Arabinogalactan proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knoch, Eva; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Geshi, Naomi

    2014-01-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are a highly diverse class of cell surface proteoglycans that are commonly found in most plant species. AGPs play important roles in many cellular processes during plant development, such as reproduction, cell proliferation, pattern formation and growth, and in plant...

  10. Optimizing HIV-1 protease production in Escherichia coli as fusion protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piubelli Luciano

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is the etiological agent in AIDS and related diseases. The aspartyl protease encoded by the 5' portion of the pol gene is responsible for proteolytic processing of the gag-pol polyprotein precursor to yield the mature capsid protein and the reverse transcriptase and integrase enzymes. The HIV protease (HIV-1Pr is considered an attractive target for designing inhibitors which could be used to tackle AIDS and therefore it is still the object of a number of investigations. Results A recombinant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease (HIV-1Pr was overexpressed in Escherichia coli cells as a fusion protein with bacterial periplasmic protein dithiol oxidase (DsbA or glutathione S-transferase (GST, also containing a six-histidine tag sequence. Protein expression was optimized by designing a suitable HIV-1Pr cDNA (for E. coli expression and to avoid autoproteolysis and by screening six different E. coli strains and five growth media. The best expression yields were achieved in E. coli BL21-Codon Plus(DE3-RIL host and in TB or M9 medium to which 1% (w/v glucose was added to minimize basal expression. Among the different parameters assayed, the presence of a buffer system (based on phosphate salts and a growth temperature of 37°C after adding IPTG played the main role in enhancing protease expression (up to 10 mg of chimeric DsbA:HIV-1Pr/L fermentation broth. GST:HIVPr was in part (50% produced as soluble protein while the overexpressed DsbA:HIV-1Pr chimeric protein largely accumulated in inclusion bodies as unprocessed fusion protein. A simple refolding procedure was developed on HiTrap Chelating column that yielded a refolded DsbA:HIV-1Pr with a > 80% recovery. Finally, enterokinase digestion of resolubilized DsbA:HIV-1Pr gave more than 2 mg of HIV-1Pr per liter of fermentation broth with a purity ≤ 80%, while PreScission protease cleavage of soluble GST:HIVPr yielded ~ 0.15 mg of pure HIV-1

  11. Prediction of Protein-Protein Interactions Related to Protein Complexes Based on Protein Interaction Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Peng Liu; Lei Yang; Daming Shi; Xianglong Tang

    2015-01-01

    A method for predicting protein-protein interactions based on detected protein complexes is proposed to repair deficient interactions derived from high-throughput biological experiments. Protein complexes are pruned and decomposed into small parts based on the adaptive k-cores method to predict protein-protein interactions associated with the complexes. The proposed method is adaptive to protein complexes with different structure, number, and size of nodes in a protein-protein interaction net...

  12. Exploring the Genome and Proteome of Desulfitobacterium hafniense DCB2 for its Protein Complexes Involved in Metal Reduction and Dechlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sang-Hoon, Kim; Hardzman, Christina; Davis, John k.; Hutcheson, Rachel; Broderick, Joan B.; Marsh, Terence L.; Tiedje, James M.

    2012-09-27

    Desulfitobacteria are of interest to DOE mission because of their ability to reduce many electron acceptors including Fe(III), U(VI), Cr(VI), As(V), Mn(IV), Se(VI), NO3- and well as CO2, sulfite, fumarate and humates, their ability to colonize more stressful environments because they form spores, fix nitrogen and they have the more protective Gram positive cell walls. Furthermore at least some of them reductively dechlorinate aromatic and aliphatic pollutants. Importantly, most of the metals and the organochlorine reductions are coupled to ATP production and support growth providing for the organism's natural selection at DOE's contaminant sites. This work was undertaken to gain insight into the genetic and metabolic pathways involved in dissimilatory metal reduction and reductive dechlorination, (ii) to discern the commonalities among these electron-accepting processes, (iii) to identify multi-protein complexes catalyzing these functions and (iv) to elucidate the coordination in expression of these pathways and processes.

  13. Grafting of protein-protein binding sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A strategy for grafting protein-protein binding sites is described. Firstly, key interaction residues at the interface of ligand protein to be grafted are identified and suitable positions in scaffold protein for grafting these key residues are sought. Secondly, the scaffold proteins are superposed onto the ligand protein based on the corresponding Ca and Cb atoms. The complementarity between the scaffold protein and the receptor protein is evaluated and only matches with high score are accepted. The relative position between scaffold and receptor proteins is adjusted so that the interface has a reasonable packing density. Then the scaffold protein is mutated to corresponding residues in ligand protein at each candidate position. And the residues having bad steric contacts with the receptor proteins, or buried charged residues not involved in the formation of any salt bridge are mutated. Finally, the mutated scaffold protein in complex with receptor protein is co-minimized by Charmm. In addition, we deduce a scoring function to evaluate the affinity between mutated scaffold protein and receptor protein by statistical analysis of rigid binding data sets.

  14. Mapping of immunogenic and protein-interacting regions at the surface of the seven-bladed β-propeller domain of the HIV-1 cellular interactor EED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gouet Patrice

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human EED protein, a member of the superfamily of Polycomb group proteins, is involved in multiple cellular protein complexes. Its C-terminal domain, which is common to the four EED isoforms, contains seven repeats of a canonical WD-40 motif. EED is an interactor of three HIV-1 proteins, matrix (MA, integrase (IN and Nef. An antiviral activity has been found to be associated with isoforms EED3 and EED4 at the late stage of HIV-1 replication, due to a negative effect on virus assembly and genomic RNA packaging. The aim of the present study was to determine the regions of the EED C-terminal core domain which were accessible and available to protein interactions, using three-dimensional (3D protein homology modelling with a WD-40 protein of known structure, and epitope mapping of anti-EED antibodies. Results Our data suggested that the C-terminal domain of EED was folded as a seven-bladed β-propeller protein. During the completion of our work, crystallographic data of EED became available from co-crystals of the EED C-terminal core with the N-terminal domain of its cellular partner EZH2. Our 3D-model was in good congruence with the refined structural model determined from crystallographic data, except for a unique α-helix in the fourth β-blade. More importantly, the position of flexible loops and accessible β-strands on the β-propeller was consistent with our mapping of immunogenic epitopes and sites of interaction with HIV-1 MA and IN. Certain immunoreactive regions were found to overlap with the EZH2, MA and IN binding sites, confirming their accessibility and reactivity at the surface of EED. Crystal structure of EED showed that the two discrete regions of interaction with MA and IN did not overlap with each other, nor with the EZH2 binding pocket, but were contiguous, and formed a continuous binding groove running along the lateral face of the β-propeller. Conclusion Identification of antibody-, MA-, IN- and EZH2

  15. Detecting overlapping protein complexes in protein-protein interaction networks

    OpenAIRE

    Nepusz, Tamás; Yu, Haiyuan; Paccanaro, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    We introduce clustering with overlapping neighborhood expansion (ClusterONE), a method for detecting potentially overlapping protein complexes from protein-protein interaction data. ClusterONE-derived complexes for several yeast data sets showed better correspondence with reference complexes in the Munich Information Center for Protein Sequence (MIPS) catalog and complexes derived from the Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD) than the results of seven popular methods. The results also showed a...

  16. EDITORIAL: Precision proteins Precision proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-06-01

    Since the birth of modern day medicine, during the times of Hippocrates in ancient Greece, the profession has developed from the rudimentary classification of disease into a rigorous science with an inspiring capability to treat and cure. Scientific methodology has distilled clinical diagnostic tools from the early arts of prognosis, which used to rely as much on revelation and prophecy, as intuition and judgement [1]. Over the past decade, research into the interactions between proteins and nanosystems has provided some ingenious and apt techniques for delving into the intricacies of anatomical systems. In vivo biosensing has emerged as a vibrant field of research, as much of medical diagnosis relies on the detection of substances or an imbalance in the chemicals in the body. The inherent properties of nanoscale structures, such as cantilevers, make them well suited to biosensing applications that demand the detection of molecules at very low concentrations. Measurable deflections in cantilevers functionalised with antibodies provide quantitative indicators of the presence of specific antigens when the two react. Such developments have roused mounting interest in the interactions of proteins with nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes [3], which have demonstrated great potential as generic biomarkers. Plasmonic properties are also being exploited in sensing applications, such as the molecular sentinel recently devised by researchers in the US. The device uses the plasmonic properties of a silver nanoparticle linked to a Raman labelled hairpin DNA probe to signal changes in the probe geometry resulting from interactions with substances in the environment. Success stories so far include the detection of two specific genes associated with breast cancer [4]. A greater understanding of how RNA interference regulates gene expression has highlighted the potential of using this natural process as another agent for combating disease in personalized medicine. However, the

  17. Protein Crystal Based Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jeffrey A.; VanRoey, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report on a NASA Grant. It concerns a description of work done, which includes: (1) Protein crystals cross-linked to form fibers; (2) Engineering of protein to favor crystallization; (3) Better knowledge-based potentials for protein-protein contacts; (4) Simulation of protein crystallization.

  18. Shotgun protein sequencing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Heffelfinger, Grant S.

    2009-06-01

    A novel experimental and computational technique based on multiple enzymatic digestion of a protein or protein mixture that reconstructs protein sequences from sequences of overlapping peptides is described in this SAND report. This approach, analogous to shotgun sequencing of DNA, is to be used to sequence alternative spliced proteins, to identify post-translational modifications, and to sequence genetically engineered proteins.

  19. Protein-protein complexation in bioluminescence

    OpenAIRE

    Titushin, Maxim S.; Feng, Yingang; Lee, John; Vysotski, Eugene S.; Liu, Zhi-jie

    2011-01-01

    In this review we summarize the progress made towards understanding the role of protein-protein interactions in the function of various bioluminescence systems of marine organisms, including bacteria, jellyfish and soft corals, with particular focus on methodology used to detect and characterize these interactions. In some bioluminescence systems, protein-protein interactions involve an “accessory protein” whereby a stored substrate is efficiently delivered to the bioluminescent enzyme lucife...

  20. Protein folding, protein homeostasis, and cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John H. Van Drie

    2011-01-01

    Proteins fold into their functional 3-dimensional structures from a linear amino acid sequence. In vitro this process is spontaneous; while in vivo it is orchestrated by a specialized set of proteins, called chaperones. Protein folding is an ongoing cellular process, as cellular proteins constantly undergo synthesis and degradation. Here emerging links between this process and cancer are reviewed. This perspective both yields insights into the current struggle to develop novel cancer chemotherapeutics and has implications for future chemotherapy discovery.

  1. Protein-Protein Interaction Analysis by Docking

    OpenAIRE

    Stephan Ederer; Florian Fink; Wolfram Gronwald

    2009-01-01

    Based on a protein-protein docking approach we have developed a procedure to verify or falsify protein-protein interactions that were proposed by other methods such as yeast-2-hybrid assays. Our method currently utilizes intermolecular energies but can be expanded to incorporate additional terms such as amino acid based pair-potentials. We show some early results that demonstrate the general applicability of our approach.

  2. Protein-losing enteropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007338.htm Protein-losing enteropathy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Protein-losing enteropathy is an abnormal loss of protein ...

  3. Protein and Heart Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recognition & Awards Healthy Workplace Food and Beverage Toolkit Protein and Heart Health Updated:May 5,2015 Protein ... said. What’s the harm in getting too much protein? The main problem is that often the extra ...

  4. SPIDer: Saccharomyces protein-protein interaction database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhenbo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since proteins perform their functions by interacting with one another and with other biomolecules, reconstructing a map of the protein-protein interactions of a cell, experimentally or computationally, is an important first step toward understanding cellular function and machinery of a proteome. Solely derived from the Gene Ontology (GO, we have defined an effective method of reconstructing a yeast protein interaction network by measuring relative specificity similarity (RSS between two GO terms. Description Based on the RSS method, here, we introduce a predicted Saccharomyces protein-protein interaction database called SPIDer. It houses a gold standard positive dataset (GSP with high confidence level that covered 79.2% of the high-quality interaction dataset. Our predicted protein-protein interaction network reconstructed from the GSPs consists of 92 257 interactions among 3600 proteins, and forms 23 connected components. It also provides general links to connect predicted protein-protein interactions with three other databases, DIP, BIND and MIPS. An Internet-based interface provides users with fast and convenient access to protein-protein interactions based on various search features (searching by protein information, GO term information or sequence similarity. In addition, the RSS value of two GO terms in the same ontology, and the inter-member interactions in a list of proteins of interest or in a protein complex could be retrieved. Furthermore, the database presents a user-friendly graphical interface which is created dynamically for visualizing an interaction sub-network. The database is accessible at http://cmb.bnu.edu.cn/SPIDer/index.html. Conclusion SPIDer is a public database server for protein-protein interactions based on the yeast genome. It provides a variety of search options and graphical visualization of an interaction network. In particular, it will be very useful for the study of inter-member interactions

  5. PIC: Protein Interactions Calculator

    OpenAIRE

    Tina, KG; Bhadra, R.; Srinivasan, N.

    2007-01-01

    Interactions within a protein structure and interactions between proteins in an assembly are essential considerations in understanding molecular basis of stability and functions of proteins and their complexes. There are several weak and strong interactions that render stability to a protein structure or an assembly. Protein Interactions Calculator (PIC) is a server which, given the coordinate set of 3D structure of a protein or an assembly, computes various interactions such as disulphide bo...

  6. Drugging Membrane Protein Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hang; Flynn, Aaron D

    2016-07-11

    The majority of therapeutics target membrane proteins, accessible on the surface of cells, to alter cellular signaling. Cells use membrane proteins to transduce signals into cells, transport ions and molecules, bind cells to a surface or substrate, and catalyze reactions. Newly devised technologies allow us to drug conventionally "undruggable" regions of membrane proteins, enabling modulation of protein-protein, protein-lipid, and protein-nucleic acid interactions. In this review, we survey the state of the art of high-throughput screening and rational design in drug discovery, and we evaluate the advances in biological understanding and technological capacity that will drive pharmacotherapy forward against unorthodox membrane protein targets. PMID:26863923

  7. PREFACE: Protein protein interactions: principles and predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussinov, Ruth; Tsai, Chung-Jung

    2005-06-01

    Proteins are the `workhorses' of the cell. Their roles span functions as diverse as being molecular machines and signalling. They carry out catalytic reactions, transport, form viral capsids, traverse membranes and form regulated channels, transmit information from DNA to RNA, making possible the synthesis of new proteins, and they are responsible for the degradation of unnecessary proteins and nucleic acids. They are the vehicles of the immune response and are responsible for viral entry into the cell. Given their importance, considerable effort has been centered on the prediction of protein function. A prime way to do this is through identification of binding partners. If the function of at least one of the components with which the protein interacts is known, that should let us assign its function(s) and the pathway(s) in which it plays a role. This holds since the vast majority of their chores in the living cell involve protein-protein interactions. Hence, through the intricate network of these interactions we can map cellular pathways, their interconnectivities and their dynamic regulation. Their identification is at the heart of functional genomics; their prediction is crucial for drug discovery. Knowledge of the pathway, its topology, length, and dynamics may provide useful information for forecasting side effects. The goal of predicting protein-protein interactions is daunting. Some associations are obligatory, others are continuously forming and dissociating. In principle, from the physical standpoint, any two proteins can interact, but under what conditions and at which strength? The principles of protein-protein interactions are general: the non-covalent interactions of two proteins are largely the outcome of the hydrophobic effect, which drives the interactions. In addition, hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions play important roles. Thus, many of the interactions observed in vitro are the outcome of experimental overexpression. Protein disorder

  8. Protein sequence comparison and protein evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, W.R. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry

    1995-12-31

    This tutorial was one of eight tutorials selected to be presented at the Third International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology which was held in the United Kingdom from July 16 to 19, 1995. This tutorial examines how the information conserved during the evolution of a protein molecule can be used to infer reliably homology, and thus a shared proteinfold and possibly a shared active site or function. The authors start by reviewing a geological/evolutionary time scale. Next they look at the evolution of several protein families. During the tutorial, these families will be used to demonstrate that homologous protein ancestry can be inferred with confidence. They also examine different modes of protein evolution and consider some hypotheses that have been presented to explain the very earliest events in protein evolution. The next part of the tutorial will examine the technical aspects of protein sequence comparison. Both optimal and heuristic algorithms and their associated parameters that are used to characterize protein sequence similarities are discussed. Perhaps more importantly, they survey the statistics of local similarity scores, and how these statistics can both be used to improve the selectivity of a search and to evaluate the significance of a match. They them examine distantly related members of three protein families, the serine proteases, the glutathione transferases, and the G-protein-coupled receptors (GCRs). Finally, the discuss how sequence similarity can be used to examine internal repeated or mosaic structures in proteins.

  9. Prediction of Protein-Protein Interactions Using Protein Signature Profiling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahmood; A.; Mahdavi; Yen-Han; Lin

    2007-01-01

    Protein domains are conserved and functionally independent structures that play an important role in interactions among related proteins. Domain-domain inter- actions have been recently used to predict protein-protein interactions (PPI). In general, the interaction probability of a pair of domains is scored using a trained scoring function. Satisfying a threshold, the protein pairs carrying those domains are regarded as "interacting". In this study, the signature contents of proteins were utilized to predict PPI pairs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Caenorhabditis ele- gans, and Homo sapiens. Similarity between protein signature patterns was scored and PPI predictions were drawn based on the binary similarity scoring function. Results show that the true positive rate of prediction by the proposed approach is approximately 32% higher than that using the maximum likelihood estimation method when compared with a test set, resulting in 22% increase in the area un- der the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. When proteins containing one or two signatures were removed, the sensitivity of the predicted PPI pairs in- creased significantly. The predicted PPI pairs are on average 11 times more likely to interact than the random selection at a confidence level of 0.95, and on aver- age 4 times better than those predicted by either phylogenetic profiling or gene expression profiling.

  10. ASV_SEISMICSHOT500 - Shot Points at 500 Shot Intervals for Seismic Data Collected with Autonomous Surface Vehicle (ASV) IRIS in Apalachicola Bay and St. George Sound, FL.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data were collected under a cooperative mapping program between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Office...

  11. Urine Protein and Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Urine Protein and Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: 24-Hour Urine Protein; Urine Total Protein; Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio; ...

  12. Protein- protein interaction detection system using fluorescent protein microdomains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2010-02-23

    The invention provides a protein labeling and interaction detection system based on engineered fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins that require fused interacting polypeptides to drive the association of the fragments, and further are soluble and stable, and do not change the solubility of polypeptides to which they are fused. In one embodiment, a test protein X is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 10, amino acids 198-214), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. A second test protein Y is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 11, amino acids 215-230), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. When X and Y interact, they bring the GFP strands into proximity, and are detected by complementation with a third GFP fragment consisting of GFP amino acids 1-198 (strands 1-9). When GFP strands 10 and 11 are held together by interaction of protein X and Y, they spontaneous association with GFP strands 1-9, resulting in structural complementation, folding, and concomitant GFP fluorescence.

  13. IGSF9 Family Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Maria; Walmod, Peter Schledermann

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila protein Turtle and the vertebrate proteins immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF), member 9 (IGSF9/Dasm1) and IGSF9B are members of an evolutionarily ancient protein family. A bioinformatics analysis of the protein family revealed that invertebrates contain only a single IGSF9 family gene......, whereas vertebrates contain two to four genes. In cnidarians, the gene appears to encode a secreted protein, but transmembrane isoforms of the protein have also evolved, and in many species, alternative splicing facilitates the expression of both transmembrane and secreted isoforms. In most species, the...... longest isoforms of the proteins have the same general organization as the neural cell adhesion molecule family of cell adhesion molecule proteins, and like this family of proteins, IGSF9 family members are expressed in the nervous system. A review of the literature revealed that Drosophila Turtle...

  14. Surface Mediated Protein Disaggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishna, Mithun; Kumar, Sanat K.

    2014-03-01

    Preventing protein aggregation is of both biological and industrial importance. Biologically these aggregates are known to cause amyloid type diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Protein aggregation leads to reduced activity of the enzymes in industrial applications. Inter-protein interactions between the hydrophobic residues of the protein are known to be the major driving force for protein aggregation. In the current paper we show how surface chemistry and curvature can be tuned to mitigate these inter-protein interactions. Our results calculated in the framework of the Hydrophobic-Polar (HP) lattice model show that, inter-protein interactions can be drastically reduced by increasing the surface hydrophobicity to a critical value corresponding to the adsorption transition of the protein. At this value of surface hydrophobicity, proteins lose inter-protein contacts to gain surface contacts and thus the surface helps in reducing the inter-protein interactions. Further, we show that the adsorption of the proteins inside hydrophobic pores of optimal sizes are most efficient both in reducing inter-protein contacts and simultaneously retaining most of the native-contacts due to strong protein-surface interactions coupled with stabilization due to the confinement. Department of Energy (Grant No DE-FG02-11ER46811).

  15. Discover protein sequence signatures from protein-protein interaction data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haasl Ryan J

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of high-throughput technologies such as yeast two-hybrid systems and mass spectrometry technologies has made it possible to generate large protein-protein interaction (PPI datasets. Mining these datasets for underlying biological knowledge has, however, remained a challenge. Results A total of 3108 sequence signatures were found, each of which was shared by a set of guest proteins interacting with one of 944 host proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. Approximately 94% of these sequence signatures matched entries in InterPro member databases. We identified 84 distinct sequence signatures from the remaining 172 unknown signatures. The signature sharing information was then applied in predicting sub-cellular localization of yeast proteins and the novel signatures were used in identifying possible interacting sites. Conclusion We reported a method of PPI data mining that facilitated the discovery of novel sequence signatures using a large PPI dataset from S. cerevisiae genome as input. The fact that 94% of discovered signatures were known validated the ability of the approach to identify large numbers of signatures from PPI data. The significance of these discovered signatures was demonstrated by their application in predicting sub-cellular localizations and identifying potential interaction binding sites of yeast proteins.

  16. Polymer Directed Protein Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick van Rijn

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation and protein self-assembly is an important occurrence in natural systems, and is in some form or other dictated by biopolymers. Very obvious influences of biopolymers on protein assemblies are, e.g., virus particles. Viruses are a multi-protein assembly of which the morphology is dictated by poly-nucleotides namely RNA or DNA. This “biopolymer” directs the proteins and imposes limitations on the structure like the length or diameter of the particle. Not only do these bionanoparticles use polymer-directed self-assembly, also processes like amyloid formation are in a way a result of directed protein assembly by partial unfolded/misfolded biopolymers namely, polypeptides. The combination of proteins and synthetic polymers, inspired by the natural processes, are therefore regarded as a highly promising area of research. Directed protein assembly is versatile with respect to the possible interactions which brings together the protein and polymer, e.g., electrostatic, v.d. Waals forces or covalent conjugation, and possible combinations are numerous due to the large amounts of different polymers and proteins available. The protein-polymer interacting behavior and overall morphology is envisioned to aid in clarifying protein-protein interactions and are thought to entail some interesting new functions and properties which will ultimately lead to novel bio-hybrid materials.

  17. Protein Dynamics in an RNA Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kathleen

    2006-03-01

    Using ^15N NMR relaxation measurements, analyzed with the Lipari-Szabo formalism, we have found that the human U1A RNA binding protein has ps-ns motions in those loops that make contact with RNA. Specific mutations can alter the extent and pattern of motions, and those proteins inevitably lose RNA binding affinity. Proteins with enhanced mobility of loops and termini presumably lose affinity due to increased conformational sampling by those parts of the protein that interact directly with RNA. There is an entropic penalty associated with locking down those elements upon RNA binding, in addition to a loss of binding efficiency caused by the increased number of conformations adopted by the protein. However, in addition to local conformational heterogeneity, analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories by Reorientational Eigenmode Dynamics reveals that loops of the wild type protein undergo correlated motions that link distal sites across the binding surface. Mutations that disrupt correlated motions result in weaker RNA binding, implying that there is a network of interactions across the surface of the protein. (KBH was a Postdoctoral Fellow with Al Redfield from 1985-1990). This work was supported by the NIH (to KBH) and NSF (SAS).

  18. Anisotropic Contributions to Protein-Protein Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quang, Leigh J; Sandler, Stanley I; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2014-02-11

    The anisotropy of shape and functionality of proteins complicates the prediction of protein-protein interactions. We examine the distribution of electrostatic and nonelectrostatic contributions to these interactions for two globular proteins, lysozyme and chymosin B, which differ in molecular weight by about a factor of 2. The interaction trends for these proteins are computed in terms of contributions to the osmotic second virial coefficient that are evaluated using atomistic models of the proteins. Our emphasis is on identifying the orientational configurations that contribute most strongly to the overall interactions due to high-complementarity interactions, and on calculating the effect of ionic strength on such interactions. The results emphasize the quantitative importance of several features of protein interactions, notably that despite differences in their frequency of occurrence, configurations differing appreciably in interaction energy can contribute meaningfully to overall interactions. However, relatively small effects due to charge anisotropy or specific hydration can affect the overall interaction significantly only if they contribute to strongly attractive configurations. The results emphasize the necessity of accounting for detailed anisotropy to capture actual experimental trends, and the sensitivity of even very detailed atomistic models to subtle solution contributions. PMID:26580057

  19. Protein Data Bank (PDB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Protein Data Bank (PDB) archive is the single worldwide repository of information about the 3D structures of large biological molecules, including proteins and...

  20. [Protein-losing enteropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiot, A

    2015-07-01

    Protein-losing enteropathy is a rare syndrome of gastrointestinal protein loss. The primary causes can be classified into lymphatic leakage due to increased interstitial pressure and increased leakage of protein-rich fluids due to erosive or non-erosive gastrointestinal disorders. The diagnosis of protein-losing enteropathy should be considered in patients with chronic diarrhea and peripheral oedema. The diagnosis of protein-losing enteropathy is most commonly based on the determination of fecal alpha-1 antitrypsin clearance. Most protein-losing enteropathy cases are the result of either lymphatic obstruction or a variety of gastrointestinal disorders and cardiac diseases, while primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (Waldmann's disease) is less common. Treatment of protein-losing enteropathy targets the underlying disease but also includes dietary modification, such as high-protein and low-fat diet along with medium-chain triglyceride supplementation. PMID:25618488

  1. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 360792 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YP_007146453.1 1117:17211 1161:2741 1162:3098 56106:1490 142864:1490 56107:1490 putative stress ... protein (general stress ... protein 26) Cylindrospermum stagnale PCC 7417 MTTS ...

  2. Hydrodynamic effects in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymczak, Piotr; Cieplak, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Experimental and numerical results pertaining to flow-induced effects in proteins are reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on shear-induced unfolding and on the role of solvent mediated hydrodynamic interactions in the conformational transitions in proteins.

  3. Hydrodynamic effects in proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szymczak, Piotr [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Cieplak, Marek, E-mail: piotr.szymczak@fuw.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Aleja Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2011-01-26

    Experimental and numerical results pertaining to flow-induced effects in proteins are reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on shear-induced unfolding and on the role of solvent mediated hydrodynamic interactions in the conformational transitions in proteins. (topical review)

  4. Protein electrophoresis - serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003540.htm Protein electrophoresis - serum To use the sharing features on ... JavaScript. This lab test measures the types of protein in the fluid (serum) part of a blood ...

  5. Protein: CAD [Trypanosomes Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CAD carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, aspartate transcarbamylase, and dihydroorotaseCAD trifunct ... ional protein carbamoylphosphate synthetase 2/aspartate transcarb ... amylase/dihydroorotasemultifunctional protein ... CAD H.sapiens 47458828 18105007 790 P27708 CAD_(ge ...

  6. Learning about Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... need from peanuts alone, but if you have peanut butter on whole-grain bread, you're set. Likewise, ... protein in a day: 2 tablespoons (15 milliliters) peanut butter (7 grams protein) 1 cup (240 milliliters) low- ...

  7. Electrophoretic Separation of Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Chakavarti, Bulbul; Chakavarti, Deb

    2008-01-01

    Electrophoresis is used to separate complex mixtures of proteins (e.g., from cells, subcellular fractions, column fractions, or immunoprecipitates), to investigate subunit compositions, and to verify homogeneity of protein samples. It can also serve to purify proteins for use in further applications. In polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, proteins migrate in response to an electrical field through pores in a polyacrylamide gel matrix; pore size decreases with increasing acrylamide concentrati...

  8. Simulations of protein folding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a simple, phenomenological, Monte-Carlo code that predicts the three-dimensional structure of globular proteins from the DNA sequences that define them. We have applied this code to two small proteins, the villin headpiece (1VII) and colel rop (1ROP). Our code folds both proteins to within 5 A rms of their native structures

  9. Destabilized bioluminescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Michael S.; Rakesh, Gupta; Gary, Sayler S.

    2007-07-31

    Purified nucleic acids, vectors and cells containing a gene cassette encoding at least one modified bioluminescent protein, wherein the modification includes the addition of a peptide sequence. The duration of bioluminescence emitted by the modified bioluminescent protein is shorter than the duration of bioluminescence emitted by an unmodified form of the bioluminescent protein.

  10. Protein domain prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingolfsson, Helgi; Yona, Golan

    2008-01-01

    Domains are considered to be the building blocks of protein structures. A protein can contain a single domain or multiple domains, each one typically associated with a specific function. The combination of domains determines the function of the protein, its subcellular localization and the interacti

  11. CSF total protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    CSF total protein is a test to determine the amount of protein in your spinal fluid, also called cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). ... The normal protein range varies from lab to lab, but is typically about 15 to 60 mg/dL. Note: mg/dL = ...

  12. Modeling Protein Domain Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton "Buck"; Hull, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This simple but effective laboratory exercise helps students understand the concept of protein domain function. They use foam beads, Styrofoam craft balls, and pipe cleaners to explore how domains within protein active sites interact to form a functional protein. The activity allows students to gain content mastery and an understanding of the…

  13. Protein - Which is Best?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jay R; Falvo, Michael J

    2004-09-01

    Protein intake that exceeds the recommended daily allowance is widely accepted for both endurance and power athletes. However, considering the variety of proteins that are available much less is known concerning the benefits of consuming one protein versus another. The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyze key factors in order to make responsible recommendations to both the general and athletic populations. Evaluation of a protein is fundamental in determining its appropriateness in the human diet. Proteins that are of inferior content and digestibility are important to recognize and restrict or limit in the diet. Similarly, such knowledge will provide an ability to identify proteins that provide the greatest benefit and should be consumed. The various techniques utilized to rate protein will be discussed. Traditionally, sources of dietary protein are seen as either being of animal or vegetable origin. Animal sources provide a complete source of protein (i.e. containing all essential amino acids), whereas vegetable sources generally lack one or more of the essential amino acids. Animal sources of dietary protein, despite providing a complete protein and numerous vitamins and minerals, have some health professionals concerned about the amount of saturated fat common in these foods compared to vegetable sources. The advent of processing techniques has shifted some of this attention and ignited the sports supplement marketplace with derivative products such as whey, casein and soy. Individually, these products vary in quality and applicability to certain populations. The benefits that these particular proteins possess are discussed. In addition, the impact that elevated protein consumption has on health and safety issues (i.e. bone health, renal function) are also reviewed. Key PointsHigher protein needs are seen in athletic populations.Animal proteins is an important source of protein, however potential health concerns do exist from a diet of protein

  14. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  15. Protein hydration and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inelastic neutron scattering can measure the protein thermal fluctuations under the physiological aqueous environment, especially it is powerful to observe the low-energy protein dynamics in THz region, which are revealed theoretically to be coupled with solvations. Neutron enables the selective observation of protein and hydration water by deuteration. The complementary analysis with molecular dynamics simulation is also effective for the study of protein hydration. Some examples of the application toward the understanding of molecular basis of protein functions will be introduced. (author)

  16. Protein crystallization with paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Miki; Kakinouchi, Keisuke; Adachi, Hiroaki; Maruyama, Mihoko; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Sano, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Yoshimura, Masashi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Takano, Kazufumi

    2016-05-01

    We developed a new protein crystallization method that incorporates paper. A small piece of paper, such as facial tissue or KimWipes, was added to a drop of protein solution in the traditional sitting drop vapor diffusion technique, and protein crystals grew by incorporating paper. By this method, we achieved the growth of protein crystals with reducing osmotic shock. Because the technique is very simple and the materials are easy to obtain, this method will come into wide use for protein crystallization. In the future, it could be applied to nanoliter-scale crystallization screening on a paper sheet such as in inkjet printing.

  17. Protein and vegetarian diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Kate A; Munn, Elizabeth A; Baines, Surinder K

    2013-08-19

    A vegetarian diet can easily meet human dietary protein requirements as long as energy needs are met and a variety of foods are eaten. Vegetarians should obtain protein from a variety of plant sources, including legumes, soy products, grains, nuts and seeds. Eggs and dairy products also provide protein for those following a lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet. There is no need to consciously combine different plant proteins at each meal as long as a variety of foods are eaten from day to day, because the human body maintains a pool of amino acids which can be used to complement dietary protein. The consumption of plant proteins rather than animal proteins by vegetarians may contribute to their reduced risk of chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease. PMID:25369930

  18. Protein kinesis: The dynamics of protein trafficking and stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference is to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on protein kinesis. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: protein folding and modification in the endoplasmic reticulum; protein trafficking; protein translocation and folding; protein degradation; polarity; nuclear trafficking; membrane dynamics; and protein import into organelles.

  19. Protein Electrophoresis/Immunofixation Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Protein Electrophoresis Immunofixation Electrophoresis Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Serum Protein Electrophoresis; Protein ELP; SPE; SPEP; Urine Protein Electrophoresis; ...

  20. Protein: FEB6 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FEB6 Photoresponse regulatory proteins HD1 SE1 Zinc finger protein HD1 Protein CONSTANS-like, Pr ... otein HEADING DATE 1, Protein PHOTOPERIOD SENSITIVITY ... 1 39947 Oryza sativa subsp. japonica 4340746 Q9FDX ...

  1. Identifying novel protein phenotype annotations by hybridizing protein-protein interactions and protein sequence similarities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Yu-Hang; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2016-04-01

    Studies of protein phenotypes represent a central challenge of modern genetics in the post-genome era because effective and accurate investigation of protein phenotypes is one of the most critical procedures to identify functional biological processes in microscale, which involves the analysis of multifactorial traits and has greatly contributed to the development of modern biology in the post genome era. Therefore, we have developed a novel computational method that identifies novel proteins associated with certain phenotypes in yeast based on the protein-protein interaction network. Unlike some existing network-based computational methods that identify the phenotype of a query protein based on its direct neighbors in the local network, the proposed method identifies novel candidate proteins for a certain phenotype by considering all annotated proteins with this phenotype on the global network using a shortest path (SP) algorithm. The identified proteins are further filtered using both a permutation test and their interactions and sequence similarities to annotated proteins. We compared our method with another widely used method called random walk with restart (RWR). The biological functions of proteins for each phenotype identified by our SP method and the RWR method were analyzed and compared. The results confirmed a large proportion of our novel protein phenotype annotation, and the RWR method showed a higher false positive rate than the SP method. Our method is equally effective for the prediction of proteins involving in all the eleven clustered yeast phenotypes with a quite low false positive rate. Considering the universality and generalizability of our supporting materials and computing strategies, our method can further be applied to study other organisms and the new functions we predicted can provide pertinent instructions for the further experimental verifications. PMID:26728152

  2. A New Activity of Anti-HIV and Anti-tumor Protein GAP31: DNA Adenosine Glycosidase – Structural and Modeling Insight into its Functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.; Huang, P; Zhang, D; Sun, Y; Chen, H; Zhang, J; Huang, P; Kong, X; Lee-Huang, S

    2010-01-01

    We report here the high-resolution atomic structures of GAP31 crystallized in the presence of HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotides systematically designed to examine the adenosine glycosidase activity of this anti-HIV and anti-tumor plant protein. Structural analysis and molecular modeling lead to several novel findings. First, adenine is bound at the active site in the crystal structures of GAP31 to HIV-LTR duplex DNA with 5' overhanging adenosine ends, such as the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA but not to DNA duplex with blunt ends. Second, the active site pocket of GAP31 is ideally suited to accommodate the 5' overhanging adenosine of the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA and the active site residues are positioned to perform the adenosine glycosidase activity. Third, GAP31 also removes the 5'-end adenine from single-stranded HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotide as well as any exposed adenosine, including that of single nucleotide dAMP but not from AMP. Fourth, GAP31 does not de-purinate guanosine from di-nucleotide GT. These results suggest that GAP31 has DNA adenosine glycosidase activity against accessible adenosine. This activity is distinct from the generally known RNA N-glycosidase activity toward the 28S rRNA. It may be an alternative function that contributes to the antiviral and anti-tumor activities of GAP31. These results provide molecular insights consistent with the anti-HIV mechanisms of GAP31 in its inhibition on the integration of viral DNA into the host genome by HIV-integrase as well as irreversible topological relaxation of the supercoiled viral DNA.

  3. A new activity of anti-HIV and anti-tumor protein GAP31: DNA adenosine glycosidase - Structural and modeling insight into its functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hui-Guang [Department of Biochemistry, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Huang, Philip L. [American Biosciences, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Zhang, Dawei; Sun, Yongtao [Department of Biochemistry, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Chen, Hao-Chia [Endocrinology and Reproduction Research Branch, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Zhang, John [Department of Chemistry, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Huang, Paul L. [Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Kong, Xiang-Peng, E-mail: xiangpeng.kong@med.nyu.edu [Department of Biochemistry, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Lee-Huang, Sylvia, E-mail: sylvia.lee-huang@med.nyu.edu [Department of Biochemistry, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016 (United States)

    2010-01-01

    We report here the high-resolution atomic structures of GAP31 crystallized in the presence of HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotides systematically designed to examine the adenosine glycosidase activity of this anti-HIV and anti-tumor plant protein. Structural analysis and molecular modeling lead to several novel findings. First, adenine is bound at the active site in the crystal structures of GAP31 to HIV-LTR duplex DNA with 5' overhanging adenosine ends, such as the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA but not to DNA duplex with blunt ends. Second, the active site pocket of GAP31 is ideally suited to accommodate the 5' overhanging adenosine of the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA and the active site residues are positioned to perform the adenosine glycosidase activity. Third, GAP31 also removes the 5'-end adenine from single-stranded HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotide as well as any exposed adenosine, including that of single nucleotide dAMP but not from AMP. Fourth, GAP31 does not de-purinate guanosine from di-nucleotide GT. These results suggest that GAP31 has DNA adenosine glycosidase activity against accessible adenosine. This activity is distinct from the generally known RNA N-glycosidase activity toward the 28S rRNA. It may be an alternative function that contributes to the antiviral and anti-tumor activities of GAP31. These results provide molecular insights consistent with the anti-HIV mechanisms of GAP31 in its inhibition on the integration of viral DNA into the host genome by HIV-integrase as well as irreversible topological relaxation of the supercoiled viral DNA.

  4. A new activity of anti-HIV and anti-tumor protein GAP31: DNA adenosine glycosidase - Structural and modeling insight into its functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report here the high-resolution atomic structures of GAP31 crystallized in the presence of HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotides systematically designed to examine the adenosine glycosidase activity of this anti-HIV and anti-tumor plant protein. Structural analysis and molecular modeling lead to several novel findings. First, adenine is bound at the active site in the crystal structures of GAP31 to HIV-LTR duplex DNA with 5' overhanging adenosine ends, such as the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA but not to DNA duplex with blunt ends. Second, the active site pocket of GAP31 is ideally suited to accommodate the 5' overhanging adenosine of the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA and the active site residues are positioned to perform the adenosine glycosidase activity. Third, GAP31 also removes the 5'-end adenine from single-stranded HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotide as well as any exposed adenosine, including that of single nucleotide dAMP but not from AMP. Fourth, GAP31 does not de-purinate guanosine from di-nucleotide GT. These results suggest that GAP31 has DNA adenosine glycosidase activity against accessible adenosine. This activity is distinct from the generally known RNA N-glycosidase activity toward the 28S rRNA. It may be an alternative function that contributes to the antiviral and anti-tumor activities of GAP31. These results provide molecular insights consistent with the anti-HIV mechanisms of GAP31 in its inhibition on the integration of viral DNA into the host genome by HIV-integrase as well as irreversible topological relaxation of the supercoiled viral DNA.

  5. Sensitizing properties of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Lars K.; Ladics, Gregory S; McClain, Scott;

    2014-01-01

    The scope of allergy risk is diverse considering the myriad ways in which protein allergenicity is affected by physiochemical characteristics of proteins. The complexity created by the matrices of foods and the variability of the human immune system add additional challenges to understanding the...... relationship between sensitization potential and allergy disease. To address these and other issues, an April 2012 international symposium was held in Prague, Czech Republic, to review and discuss the state-of-the-science of sensitizing properties of protein allergens. The symposium, organized by the Protein...... scientists from academia, government, and industry participated in the symposium. Experts provided overviews on known mechanisms by which proteins in food may cause sensitization, discussed experimental models to predict protein sensitizing potential, and explored whether such experimental techniques may be...

  6. NMR of unfolded proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amarnath Chtterjee; Ashutosh Kumar; Jeetender Chugh; Sudha Srivastava; Neel S Bhavesh; Ramakrishna V Hosur

    2005-01-01

    In the post-genomic era, as more and more genome sequences are becoming known and hectic efforts are underway to decode the information content in them, it is becoming increasingly evident that flexibility in proteins plays a crucial role in many of the biological functions. Many proteins have intrinsic disorder either wholly or in specific regions. It appears that this disorder may be important for regulatory functions of the proteins, on the one hand, and may help in directing the folding process to reach the compact native state, on the other. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has over the last two decades emerged as the sole, most powerful technique to help characterize these disordered protein systems. In this review, we first discuss the significance of disorder in proteins and then describe the recent developments in NMR methods for their characterization. A brief description of the results obtained on several disordered proteins is presented at the end.

  7. Computational Protein Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Kristoffer Enøe

    to a central method that enables new developments. For example, novel enzymes with functions not found in natural proteins have been de novo designed to give enough activity for experimental optimization. This thesis presents the current state-of-the-art within computational design methods together......Proteins are the major functional group of molecules in biology. The impact of protein science on medicine and chemical productions is rapidly increasing. However, the greatest potential remains to be realized. The fi eld of protein design has advanced computational modeling from a tool of support...... with a novel method based on probability theory. With the aim of assembling a complete pipeline for protein design, this work touches upon several aspects of protein design. The presented work is the computational half of a design project where the other half is dedicated to the experimental part of...

  8. Protein Models Comparator

    CERN Document Server

    Widera, Paweł

    2011-01-01

    The process of comparison of computer generated protein structural models is an important element of protein structure prediction. It has many uses including model quality evaluation, selection of the final models from a large set of candidates or optimisation of parameters of energy functions used in template free modelling and refinement. Although many protein comparison methods are available online on numerous web servers, their ability to handle a large scale model comparison is often very limited. Most of the servers offer only a single pairwise structural comparison, and they usually do not provide a model-specific comparison with a fixed alignment between the models. To bridge the gap between the protein and model structure comparison we have developed the Protein Models Comparator (pm-cmp). To be able to deliver the scalability on demand and handle large comparison experiments the pm-cmp was implemented "in the cloud". Protein Models Comparator is a scalable web application for a fast distributed comp...

  9. Protein oxidation and peroxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Proteins are major targets for radicals and two-electron oxidants in biological systems due to their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. With highly reactive radicals damage occurs at multiple side-chain and backbone sites. Less reactive species show greater selectivity with regard to the residues targeted and their spatial location. Modification can result in increased side-chain hydrophilicity, side-chain and backbone fragmentation, aggregation via covalent cross-linking or hydrophobic interactions, protein unfolding and altered conformation, altered interactions with biological partners and modified turnover. In the presence of O2, high yields of peroxyl radicals and peroxides (protein peroxidation) are formed; the latter account for up to 70% of the initial oxidant flux. Protein peroxides can oxidize both proteins and other targets. One-electron reduction results in additional radicals and chain reactions with alcohols and carbonyls as major products; the latter are commonly used markers of protein damage. Direct oxidation of cysteine (and less commonly) methionine residues is a major reaction; this is typically faster than with H2O2, and results in altered protein activity and function. Unlike H2O2, which is rapidly removed by protective enzymes, protein peroxides are only slowly removed, and catabolism is a major fate. Although turnover of modified proteins by proteasomal and lysosomal enzymes, and other proteases (e.g. mitochondrial Lon), can be efficient, protein hydroperoxides inhibit these pathways and this may contribute to the accumulation of modified proteins in cells. Available evidence supports an association between protein oxidation and multiple human pathologies, but whether this link is causal remains to be established. PMID:27026395

  10. Proteins at interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Evers, Florian

    2011-01-01

    Protein adsorption is a fundamental and ubiquitous phenomenon, which has severe implications in the fields of biomaterials as well as bio- and nanotechnology, e.g., in drug delivery, biofouling, the biocompatibility of implants, food chemistry, and biosensors. Therefore, the mechanisms of protein adsorption and controlling the interfacial affinity of proteins have become intriguing and interdisciplinary research topics. In this work, X-ray and neutron reflectometry are the main...

  11. Protein-surfactant interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Valstar, Ank

    2000-01-01

    Protein-surfactant interactions in aqueous media have been investigated. The globular proteins lysozyme and bovine serum albumin (BSA) served as model proteins. Several ionic and non-ionic surfactants were used. Fluorescence probe measurements showed that at low sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) concentration (< 0.1 M) one micelle-like SDS cluster is bound to lysozyme. From dynamic light scattering (DLS) results it was observed that lysozyme in the complex does not correspond to the fully unfol...

  12. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae Un; Gruner, Sol M.

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  13. Biofilm Matrix Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Fong, Jiunn N. C.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    2015-01-01

    Proteinaceous components of the biofilm matrix include secreted extracellular proteins, cell surface adhesins and protein subunits of cell appendages such as flagella and pili. Biofilm matrix proteins play diverse roles in biofilm formation and dissolution. They are involved in attaching cells to surfaces, stabilizing the biofilm matrix via interactions with exopolysaccharide and nucleic acid components, developing three-dimensional biofilm architectures, and dissolving biofilm matrix via enz...

  14. Ribosome-inactivating proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Matthew J; Dodd, Jennifer E; Hautbergue, Guillaume M.

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) were first isolated over a century ago and have been shown to be catalytic toxins that irreversibly inactivate protein synthesis. Elucidation of atomic structures and molecular mechanism has revealed these proteins to be a diverse group subdivided into two classes. RIPs have been shown to exhibit RNA N-glycosidase activity and depurinate the 28S rRNA of the eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunit. In this review, we compare archetypal RIP family members with oth...

  15. Trisulfides in Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus W.; Tachibana, Christine; Hansen, Niels Erik;

    2011-01-01

    post-translational modification, and the number of proteins in which a trisulfide has been unambiguously identified is small. Nevertheless, we believe that its prevalence may be underestimated, particularly with the increasing evidence for significant pools of sulfides in living tissues and their...... possible roles in cellular metabolism. This review focuses on examples of proteins that are known to contain a trisulfide bridge, and gives an overview of the chemistry of trisulfide formation, and the methods by which it is detected in proteins....

  16. Staining Proteins in Gels

    OpenAIRE

    Gallagher, Sean; Chakavarti, Deb

    2008-01-01

    Following separation by electrophoretic methods, proteins in a gel can be detected by several staining methods. This unit describes protocols for detecting proteins by four popular methods. Coomassie blue staining is an easy and rapid method. Silver staining, while more time consuming, is considerably more sensitive and can thus be used to detect smaller amounts of protein. Fluorescent staining is a popular alternative to traditional staining procedures, mainly because it is more sensitive th...

  17. Acanthamoeba castellanii STAT protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kicinska, Anna; Leluk, Jacek; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2014-01-01

    STAT (signal transducers and activators of transcription) proteins are one of the important mediators of phosphotyrosine-regulated signaling in metazoan cells. We described the presence of STAT protein in a unicellular, free-living amoebae with a simple life cycle, Acanthamoeba castellanii. A. castellanii is the only, studied to date, Amoebozoan that does not belong to Mycetozoa but possesses STATs. A sequence of the A. castellanii STAT protein includes domains similar to those of the Dictyostelium STAT proteins: a coiled coil (characteristic for Dictyostelium STAT coiled coil), a STAT DNA-binding domain and a Src-homology domain. The search for protein sequences homologous to A. castellanii STAT revealed 17 additional sequences from lower eukaryotes. Interestingly, all of these sequences come from Amoebozoa organisms that belong to either Mycetozoa (slime molds) or Centramoebida. We showed that there are four separated clades within the slime mold STAT proteins. The A. castellanii STAT protein branches next to a group of STATc proteins from Mycetozoa. We also demonstrate that Amoebozoa form a distinct monophyletic lineage within the STAT protein world that is well separated from the other groups. PMID:25338074

  18. Acanthamoeba castellanii STAT protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kicinska

    Full Text Available STAT (signal transducers and activators of transcription proteins are one of the important mediators of phosphotyrosine-regulated signaling in metazoan cells. We described the presence of STAT protein in a unicellular, free-living amoebae with a simple life cycle, Acanthamoeba castellanii. A. castellanii is the only, studied to date, Amoebozoan that does not belong to Mycetozoa but possesses STATs. A sequence of the A. castellanii STAT protein includes domains similar to those of the Dictyostelium STAT proteins: a coiled coil (characteristic for Dictyostelium STAT coiled coil, a STAT DNA-binding domain and a Src-homology domain. The search for protein sequences homologous to A. castellanii STAT revealed 17 additional sequences from lower eukaryotes. Interestingly, all of these sequences come from Amoebozoa organisms that belong to either Mycetozoa (slime molds or Centramoebida. We showed that there are four separated clades within the slime mold STAT proteins. The A. castellanii STAT protein branches next to a group of STATc proteins from Mycetozoa. We also demonstrate that Amoebozoa form a distinct monophyletic lineage within the STAT protein world that is well separated from the other groups.

  19. Consensus protein design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porebski, Benjamin T.; Buckle, Ashley M.

    2016-01-01

    A popular and successful strategy in semi-rational design of protein stability is the use of evolutionary information encapsulated in homologous protein sequences. Consensus design is based on the hypothesis that at a given position, the respective consensus amino acid contributes more than average to the stability of the protein than non-conserved amino acids. Here, we review the consensus design approach, its theoretical underpinnings, successes, limitations and challenges, as well as providing a detailed guide to its application in protein engineering. PMID:27274091

  20. Engineering therapeutic protein disaggregases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorter, James

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic agents are urgently required to cure several common and fatal neurodegenerative disorders caused by protein misfolding and aggregation, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Protein disaggregases that reverse protein misfolding and restore proteins to native structure, function, and localization could mitigate neurodegeneration by simultaneously reversing 1) any toxic gain of function of the misfolded form and 2) any loss of function due to misfolding. Potentiated variants of Hsp104, a hexameric AAA+ ATPase and protein disaggregase from yeast, have been engineered to robustly disaggregate misfolded proteins connected with ALS (e.g., TDP-43 and FUS) and PD (e.g., α-synuclein). However, Hsp104 has no metazoan homologue. Metazoa possess protein disaggregase systems distinct from Hsp104, including Hsp110, Hsp70, and Hsp40, as well as HtrA1, which might be harnessed to reverse deleterious protein misfolding. Nevertheless, vicissitudes of aging, environment, or genetics conspire to negate these disaggregase systems in neurodegenerative disease. Thus, engineering potentiated human protein disaggregases or isolating small-molecule enhancers of their activity could yield transformative therapeutics for ALS, PD, and AD. PMID:27255695

  1. Simulations of Protein Folding

    CERN Document Server

    Cahill, M; Cahill, K E; Cahill, Michael; Fleharty, Mark; Cahill, Kevin

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a simple, phenomenological, Monte-Carlo code that predicts the three-dimensional structure of globular proteins from the DNA sequences that define them. We have applied this code to two small proteins, the villin headpiece (1VII) and cole1 rop (1ROP). Our code folded the 36-residue villin headpiece to a mean rms distance of less than 5 A from its native structure as revealed by NMR; it folded a 56-residue fragment of the protein cole1 rop to within 11 A of its native structure. The denatured starting configurations of these two proteins were, respectively, 29 A and 55 A distant from their native structures.

  2. Ultrafiltration of pegylated proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molek, Jessica R.

    There is considerable clinical interest in the use of "second-generation" therapeutics produced by conjugation of a native protein with various polymers including polyethylene glycol (PEG). PEG--protein conjugates, so-called PEGylated proteins, can exhibit enhanced stability, half-life, and bioavailability. One of the challenges in the commercial production of PEGylated proteins is the purification required to remove unreacted polymer, native protein, and in many cases PEGylated proteins with nonoptimal degrees of conjugation. The overall objective of this thesis was to examine the use of ultrafiltration for the purification of PEGylated proteins. This included: (1) analysis of size-based separation of PEGylated proteins using conventional ultrafiltration membranes, (2) use of electrically-charged membranes to exploit differences in electrostatic interactions, and (3) examination of the effects of PEGylation on protein fouling. The experimental results were analyzed using appropriate theoretical models, with the underlying physical properties of the PEGylated proteins evaluated using size exclusion chromatography, capillary electrophoresis, dynamic light scattering, and reverse phase chromatography. PEGylated proteins were produced by covalent attachment of activated PEG to a protein via primary amines on the lysine residues. A simple model was developed for the reaction kinetics, which was used to explore the effect of reaction conditions and mode of operation on the distribution of PEGylated products. The effective size of the PEGylated proteins was evaluated using size exclusion chromatography, with appropriate correlations developed for the size in terms of the molecular weight of the native protein and attached PEG. The electrophoretic mobility of the PEGylated proteins were evaluated by capillary electrophoresis with the data in good agreement with a simple model accounting for the increase in protein size and the reduction in the number of protonated amine

  3. How Many Protein-Protein Interactions Types Exist in Nature?

    OpenAIRE

    Garma, Leonardo; Mukherjee, Srayanta; Mitra, Pralay; Zhang, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Protein quaternary structure universe” refers to the ensemble of all protein-protein complexes across all organisms in nature. The number of quaternary folds thus corresponds to the number of ways proteins physically interact with other proteins. This study focuses on answering two basic questions: Whether the number of protein-protein interactions is limited and, if yes, how many different quaternary folds exist in nature. By all-to-all sequence and structure comparisons, we grouped the pro...

  4. How Many Protein-Protein Interactions Types Exist in Nature?

    OpenAIRE

    Leonardo Garma; Srayanta Mukherjee; Pralay Mitra; Yang Zhang

    2012-01-01

    "Protein quaternary structure universe" refers to the ensemble of all protein-protein complexes across all organisms in nature. The number of quaternary folds thus corresponds to the number of ways proteins physically interact with other proteins. This study focuses on answering two basic questions: Whether the number of protein-protein interactions is limited and, if yes, how many different quaternary folds exist in nature. By all-to-all sequence and structure comparisons, we grouped the pro...

  5. Joint ASV/AUV Range-Based Formation Control: Theory and Experimental Results

    OpenAIRE

    Soares, Jorge Miguel; Aguiar, António Pedro; Pascoal, António; Martinoli, Alcherio

    2013-01-01

    The use of groups of autonomous marine vehicles has enormous potential in numerous marine applications, perhaps the most relevant of which is the surveying and exploration of the oceans, still widely unknown and misunderstood. In many mission scenarios requiring the concerted operation of multiple marine vehicles carrying distinct, yet complementary sensor suites, relative positioning and formation control becomes mandatory. However, the constraints placed by the medium make it hard to both ...

  6. Autonomous Surface Vehicle Sidescan-sonar mosaic from Hotel Bar, Apalachicola Bay, Florida (ASV162.TIF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data were collected under a cooperative mapping program between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coastal...

  7. Autonomous Surface Vehicle Sidescan-sonar mosaic from Norman's Bar, Apalachicola Bay, Florida (ASV174.TIF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data were collected under a cooperative mapping program between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coastal...

  8. Autonomous Surface Vehicle Sidescan-sonar mosaic from North Spur, Apalachicola Bay, Florida (ASV178.TIF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data were collected under a cooperative mapping program between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coastal...

  9. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 286011 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YP_007057271.1 1117:4890 1161:684 1185:224 373984:129 373994:129 histidine kinase,PAS ... domain-con ... taining protein,PAS ... domain-containing protein,histidine kinase,GAF dom ...

  10. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357488463 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003614519.1 33090:2423 35493:1202 131221:1202 3193:1202 58023:2056 78536:1595 58024:1595 3398 ... 938 3814:1938 163742:3028 3877:3028 3880:3028 Cyst nematode ... resistance protein-like protein Medicago truncatul ...

  11. Poxviral Ankyrin Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H. Herbert

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Multiple repeats of the ankyrin motif (ANK are ubiquitous throughout the kingdoms of life but are absent from most viruses. The main exception to this is the poxvirus family, and specifically the chordopoxviruses, with ANK repeat proteins present in all but three species from separate genera. The poxviral ANK repeat proteins belong to distinct orthologue groups spread over different species, and align well with the phylogeny of their genera. This distribution throughout the chordopoxviruses indicates these proteins were present in an ancestral vertebrate poxvirus, and have since undergone numerous duplication events. Most poxviral ANK repeat proteins contain an unusual topology of multiple ANK motifs starting at the N-terminus with a C-terminal poxviral homologue of the cellular F-box enabling interaction with the cellular SCF ubiquitin ligase complex. The subtle variations between ANK repeat proteins of individual poxviruses suggest an array of different substrates may be bound by these protein-protein interaction domains and, via the F-box, potentially directed to cellular ubiquitination pathways and possible degradation. Known interaction partners of several of these proteins indicate that the NF-κB coordinated anti-viral response is a key target, whilst some poxviral ANK repeat domains also have an F-box independent affect on viral host-range.

  12. Protein (Viridiplantae): 186478918 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_001117362.1 33090:264 35493:490 131221:490 3193:490 58023:763 78536:5554 58024:5554 3398:5554 ... 88 3699:588 3700:588 980083:588 3701:588 3702:2514 StaR -like protein domain-containing protein Arabidopsis ...

  13. Protein (Viridiplantae): 145336153 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_174031.2 33090:264 35493:490 131221:490 3193:490 58023:763 78536:5554 58024:5554 3398:5554 71 ... 88 3699:588 3700:588 980083:588 3701:588 3702:2514 StaR -like protein domain-containing protein Arabidopsis ...

  14. Protein (Viridiplantae): 186478920 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_001117363.1 33090:264 35493:490 131221:490 3193:490 58023:763 78536:5554 58024:5554 3398:5554 ... 88 3699:588 3700:588 980083:588 3701:588 3702:2514 StaR -like protein domain-containing protein Arabidopsis ...

  15. Protein (Viridiplantae): 18396209 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_564271.1 33090:264 35493:490 131221:490 3193:490 58023:763 78536:5554 58024:5554 3398:5554 71 ... 88 3699:588 3700:588 980083:588 3701:588 3702:2514 StaR -like protein domain-containing protein Arabidopsis ...

  16. Proteins in biomass streams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, W.J.

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this study is to give an overview of traditional and new biomasses and biomass streams that contain proteins. When information was available, the differences in molecular structure and physical and chemical properties for the different proteins is given. For optimal biomass use, isolati

  17. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 187726 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_00515693.1 1117:3739 1118:294 263510:556 263511:556 165597:1102 Cobalamin synthesis ... protein/P ... 47K:Cobalamin synthesis ... protein/P47K Crocosphaera watsonii WH 8501 MHKIPVT ...

  18. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 187721 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_00515086.1 1117:3739 1118:294 263510:556 263511:556 165597:1102 Cobalamin synthesis ... protein/P ... 47K:Cobalamin synthesis ... protein/P47K Crocosphaera watsonii WH 8501 MSGINQQ ...

  19. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 187724 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_00514782.1 1117:3739 1118:294 263510:556 263511:556 165597:1102 Cobalamin synthesis ... protein/P ... 47K:Cobalamin synthesis ... protein/P47K Crocosphaera watsonii WH 8501 MQIVDKK ...

  20. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 187722 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_00515750.1 1117:3739 1118:294 263510:556 263511:556 165597:1102 Cobalamin synthesis ... protein/P ... 47K:Cobalamin synthesis ... protein/P47K Crocosphaera watsonii WH 8501 MTPLNFN ...

  1. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 187723 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_00515087.1 1117:3739 1118:294 263510:556 263511:556 165597:1102 Cobalamin synthesis ... protein/P ... 47K:Cobalamin synthesis ... protein/P47K Crocosphaera watsonii WH 8501 MTRLDFN ...

  2. Protein (Viridiplantae): 15240110 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_201488.1 33090:325 35493:1944 131221:1944 3193:1944 58023:3713 78536:2650 58024:2650 3398:265 ... :1852 LOB domain-containing protein 36 (ASYMMETRIC LEAVES ... 2-like protein 1) Arabidopsis thaliana MASSSSPCAAC ...

  3. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357505877 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003623227.1 33090:2309 35493:2314 131221:2314 3193:2314 58023:1780 78536:1486 58024:1486 3398 ... 163742:9849 3877:9849 3880:9849 Cell cycle control crn ... (Crooked neck) protein-like protein Medicago trunc ...

  4. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357472389 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003606479.1 33090:29954 35493:20452 131221:20452 3193:20452 58023:15679 78536:15788 58024:157 ... 2228 163742:12813 3877:12813 3880:12813 Defects in morphology ... protein-like protein Medicago truncatula MAETSSSNN ...

  5. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357472385 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003606477.1 33090:29954 35493:20452 131221:20452 3193:20452 58023:15679 78536:15788 58024:157 ... 2228 163742:12813 3877:12813 3880:12813 Defects in morphology ... protein-like protein Medicago truncatula MAETSSSNN ...

  6. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357440307 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003590431.1 33090:29954 35493:20452 131221:20452 3193:20452 58023:15679 78536:15788 58024:157 ... 2228 163742:12813 3877:12813 3880:12813 Defects in morphology ... protein-like protein Medicago truncatula MAGTSSKIP ...

  7. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357444551 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003592553.1 33090:29954 35493:20452 131221:20452 3193:20452 58023:15679 78536:15788 58024:157 ... 2228 163742:12813 3877:12813 3880:12813 Defects in morphology ... protein-like protein Medicago truncatula MAGTSSKIP ...

  8. C-reactive protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is produced by the liver. The level of CRP rises when there is inflammation throughout the body. It is one of a group of proteins called "acute phase reactants" that go up in response to inflammation. ...

  9. Protein (Viridiplantae): 18414878 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_567527.1 33090:1722 35493:20777 131221:20777 3193:20777 58023:13588 78536:13546 58024:13546 3 ... 83:5979 3701:5979 3702:6150 Tryptophan RNA-binding attenuator ... protein-like protein Arabidopsis thaliana MAAPFFST ...

  10. Protein (Viridiplantae): 238480800 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_001154247.1 33090:1722 35493:20777 131221:20777 3193:20777 58023:13588 78536:13546 58024:1354 ... 83:5979 3701:5979 3702:6150 Tryptophan RNA-binding attenuator ... protein-like protein Arabidopsis thaliana MAAPFFST ...

  11. Protein (Viridiplantae): 238480798 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_001154246.1 33090:1722 35493:20777 131221:20777 3193:20777 58023:13588 78536:13546 58024:1354 ... 83:5979 3701:5979 3702:6150 Tryptophan RNA-binding attenuator ... protein-like protein Arabidopsis thaliana MAAPFFST ...

  12. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 305313 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_09781770.1 1117:5986 1150:1684 35823:2516 376219:684 Cytochrome b6-f complex iron -sulfur subu ... nit 1 (Rieske iron -sulfur protein 1) (Plastohydroquinone:plastocyanin ... oxidoreductase iron -sulfur protein 1) (ISP 1) (RISP 1) Arthrospira sp. ...

  13. Protein Attachment on Nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chung-Lun; Lin, Cheng-Huang; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Su, Meng-Chih

    2015-07-16

    A recent advance in nanotechnology is the scale-up production of small and nonaggregated diamond nanoparticles suitable for biological applications. Using detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) with an average diameter of ∼4 nm as the adsorbents, we have studied the static attachment of three proteins (myoglobin, bovine serum albumin, and insulin) onto the nanoparticles by optical spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and dynamic light scattering, and electrophoretic zeta potential measurements. Results show that the protein surface coverage is predominantly determined by the competition between protein-protein and protein-ND interactions, giving each protein a unique and characteristic structural configuration in its own complex. Specifically, both myoglobin and bovine serum albumin show a Langmuir-type adsorption behavior, forming 1:1 complexes at saturation, whereas insulin folds into a tightly bound multimer before adsorption. The markedly different adsorption patterns appear to be independent of the protein concentration and are closely related to the affinity of the individual proteins for the NDs. The present study provides a fundamental understanding for the use of NDs as a platform for nanomedical drug delivery. PMID:25815400

  14. Protein sequence databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apweiler, Rolf; Bairoch, Amos; Wu, Cathy H

    2004-02-01

    A variety of protein sequence databases exist, ranging from simple sequence repositories, which store data with little or no manual intervention in the creation of the records, to expertly curated universal databases that cover all species and in which the original sequence data are enhanced by the manual addition of further information in each sequence record. As the focus of researchers moves from the genome to the proteins encoded by it, these databases will play an even more important role as central comprehensive resources of protein information. Several the leading protein sequence databases are discussed here, with special emphasis on the databases now provided by the Universal Protein Knowledgebase (UniProt) consortium. PMID:15036160

  15. Manipulating and Visualizing Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Horst D.

    2003-12-05

    ProteinShop Gives Researchers a Hands-On Tool for Manipulating, Visualizing Protein Structures. The Human Genome Project and other biological research efforts are creating an avalanche of new data about the chemical makeup and genetic codes of living organisms. But in order to make sense of this raw data, researchers need software tools which let them explore and model data in a more intuitive fashion. With this in mind, researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Davis, have developed ProteinShop, a visualization and modeling program which allows researchers to manipulate protein structures with pinpoint control, guided in large part by their own biological and experimental instincts. Biologists have spent the last half century trying to unravel the ''protein folding problem,'' which refers to the way chains of amino acids physically fold themselves into three-dimensional proteins. This final shape, which resembles a crumpled ribbon or piece of origami, is what determines how the protein functions and translates genetic information. Understanding and modeling this geometrically complex formation is no easy matter. ProteinShop takes a given sequence of amino acids and uses visualization guides to help generate predictions about the secondary structures, identifying alpha helices and flat beta strands, and the coil regions that bind them. Once secondary structures are in place, researchers can twist and turn these pre-configurations until they come up with a number of possible tertiary structure conformations. In turn, these are fed into a computationally intensive optimization procedure that tries to find the final, three-dimensional protein structure. Most importantly, ProteinShop allows users to add human knowledge and intuition to the protein structure prediction process, thus bypassing bad configurations that would otherwise be fruitless for optimization. This saves compute cycles and accelerates

  16. MicroProteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eguen, Teinai Ebimienere; Straub, Daniel; Graeff, Moritz;

    2015-01-01

    MicroProteins (miPs) are short, usually single-domain proteins that, in analogy to miRNAs, heterodimerize with their targets and exert a dominant-negative effect. Recent bioinformatic attempts to identify miPs have resulted in a list of potential miPs, many of which lack the defining...... characteristics of a miP. In this opinion article, we clearly state the characteristics of a miP as evidenced by known proteins that fit the definition; we explain why modulatory proteins misrepresented as miPs do not qualify as true miPs. We also discuss the evolutionary history of miPs, and how the miP concept...... can extend beyond transcription factors (TFs) to encompass different non-TF proteins that require dimerization for full function....

  17. The centrality of cancer proteins in human protein-protein interaction network: a revisit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wei; Xie, Luyu; Zhou, Shuigeng; Liu, Hui; Guan, Jihong

    2014-01-01

    Topological analysis of protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks has been widely applied to the investigation on cancer mechanisms. However, there is still a debate on whether cancer proteins exhibit more topological centrality compared to the other proteins in the human PPI network. To resolve this debate, we first identified four sets of human proteins, and then mapped these proteins into the yeast PPI network by homologous genes. Finally, we compared these proteins' properties in human and yeast PPI networks. Experiments over two real datasets demonstrated that cancer proteins tend to have higher degree and smaller clustering coefficient than non-cancer proteins. Experimental results also validated that cancer proteins have larger betweenness centrality compared to the other proteins on the STRING dataset. However, on the BioGRID dataset, the average betweenness centrality of cancer proteins is larger than that of disease and control proteins, but smaller than that of essential proteins. PMID:24878726

  18. Predictive and interpretive simulation of green fluorescent protein expression in reporter bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveau, J H; Lindow, S E

    2001-12-01

    We have formulated a numerical model that simulates the accumulation of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in bacterial cells from a generic promoter-gfp fusion. The model takes into account the activity of the promoter, the time it takes GFP to mature into its fluorescent form, the susceptibility of GFP to proteolytic degradation, and the growth rate of the bacteria. From the model, we derived a simple formula with which promoter activity can be inferred easily and quantitatively from actual measurements of GFP fluorescence in growing bacterial cultures. To test the usefulness of the formula, we determined the activity of the LacI-repressible promoter P(A1/O4/O3) in response to increasing concentrations of the inducer IPTG (isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside) and were able to predict cooperativity between the LacI repressors on each of the two operator sites within P(A1/O4/O3). Aided by the model, we also quantified the proteolytic degradation of GFP[AAV], GFP[ASV], and GFP[LVA], which are popular variants of GFP with reduced stability in bacteria. Best described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics, the rate at which these variants were degraded was a function of the activity of the promoter that drives their synthesis: a weak promoter yielded proportionally less GFP fluorescence than a strong one. The degree of disproportionality is species dependent: the effect was more pronounced in Erwinia herbicola than in Escherichia coli. This phenomenon has important implications for the interpretation of fluorescence from bacterial reporters based on these GFP variants. The model furthermore predicted a significant effect of growth rate on the GFP content of individual bacteria, which if not accounted for might lead to misinterpretation of GFP data. In practice, our model will be helpful for prior testing of different combinations of promoter-gfp fusions that best fit the application of a particular bacterial reporter strain, and also for the interpretation of actual GFP

  19. Protein oxidation in aquatic foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Caroline P.

    2014-01-01

    The chapter discusses general considerations about protein oxidation and reviews the mechanisms involved in protein oxidation and consequences of protein oxidation on fish proteins. It presents two case studies, the first deals with protein and lipid oxidation in frozen rainbow trout......, and the second with oxidation in salted herring. The mechanisms responsible for initiation of protein oxidation are unclear, but it is generally accepted that free radical species initiating lipid oxidation can also initiate protein oxidation. The chapter focuses on interaction between protein and lipid...... oxidation. The protein carbonyl group measurement is the widely used method for estimating protein oxidation in foods and has been used in fish muscle. The chapter also talks about the impact of protein oxidation on protein functionality, fish muscle texture, and food nutritional value. Protein oxidation...

  20. An Algorithm for Finding Functional Modules and Protein Complexes in Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Guangyu Cui; Yu Chen; De-Shuang Huang; Kyungsook Han

    2008-01-01

    Biological processes are often performed by a group of proteins rather than by individual proteins, and proteins in a same biological group form a densely connected subgraph in a protein-protein interaction network. Therefore, finding a densely connected subgraph provides useful information to predict the function or protein complex of uncharacterized proteins in the highly connected subgraph. We have developed an efficient algorithm and program for finding cliques and near-cliques in a prote...

  1. Quantification of the Influence of Protein-Protein Interactions on Adsorbed Protein Structure and Bioactivity

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Yang; Thyparambil, Aby A.; Latour, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    While protein-surface interactions have been widely studied, relatively little is understood at this time regarding how protein-surface interaction effects are influenced by protein-protein interactions and how these effects combine with the internal stability of a protein to influence its adsorbed-state structure and bioactivity. The objectives of this study were to develop a method to study these combined effects under widely varying protein-protein interaction conditions using hen egg-whit...

  2. New approach for predicting protein-protein interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are of vital importance for virtually all processes of a living cell. The study of these associations of protein molecules could improve people's understanding of diseases and provide basis for therapeutic approaches.

  3. Analysis of correlations between protein complex and protein-protein interaction and mRNA expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Lun; XUE Hong; LU Hongchao; ZHAO Yi; ZHU Xiaopeng; BU Dongbo; LING Lunjiang; CHEN Runsheng

    2003-01-01

    Protein-protein interaction is a physical interaction of two proteins in living cells. In budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, large-scale protein-protein interaction data have been obtained through high-throughput yeast two-hybrid systems (Y2H) and protein complex purification techniques based on mass-spectrometry. Here, we collect 11855 interactions between total 2617 proteins. Through seriate genome-wide mRNA expression data, similarity between two genes could be measured. Protein complex data can also be obtained publicly and can be translated to pair relationship that any two proteins can only exist in the same complex or not. Analysis of protein complex data, protein-protein interaction data and mRNA expression data can elucidate correlations between them. The results show that proteins that have interactions or similar expression patterns have a higher possibility to be in the same protein complex than randomized selected proteins, and proteins which have interactions and similar expression patterns are even more possible to exist in the same protein complex. The work indicates that comprehensive integration and analysis of public large-scale bioinformatical data, such as protein complex data, protein-protein interaction data and mRNA expression data, may help to uncover their relationships and common biological information underlying these data. The strategies described here may help to integrate and analyze other functional genomic and proteomic data, such as gene expression profiling, protein-localization mapping and large-scale phenotypic data, both in yeast and in other organisms.

  4. Piezoelectric allostery of protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnuki, Jun; Sato, Takato; Takano, Mitsunori

    2016-07-01

    Allostery is indispensable for a protein to work, where a locally applied stimulus is transmitted to a distant part of the molecule. While the allostery due to chemical stimuli such as ligand binding has long been studied, the growing interest in mechanobiology prompts the study of the mechanically stimulated allostery, the physical mechanism of which has not been established. By molecular dynamics simulation of a motor protein myosin, we found that a locally applied mechanical stimulus induces electrostatic potential change at distant regions, just like the piezoelectricity. This novel allosteric mechanism, "piezoelectric allostery", should be of particularly high value for mechanosensor/transducer proteins. PMID:27575163

  5. Alpha Shapes and Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Pawel; Sterner, Henrik; Sterner, Peter

    We provide a unified description of (weighted) alpha shapes, beta shapes and the corresponding simplicialcomplexes. We discuss their applicability to various protein-related problems. We also discuss filtrations of alpha shapes and touch upon related persistence issues.We claim that the full...... potential of alpha-shapes and related geometrical constructs in protein-related problems yet remains to be realized and verified. We suggest parallel algorithms for (weighted) alpha shapes, and we argue that future use of filtrations and kinetic variants for larger proteins will need such implementation....

  6. Protein crystallography prescreen kit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segelke, Brent W.; Krupka, Heike I.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2005-07-12

    A kit for prescreening protein concentration for crystallization includes a multiplicity of vials, a multiplicity of pre-selected reagents, and a multiplicity of sample plates. The reagents and a corresponding multiplicity of samples of the protein in solutions of varying concentrations are placed on sample plates. The sample plates containing the reagents and samples are incubated. After incubation the sample plates are examined to determine which of the sample concentrations are too low and which the sample concentrations are too high. The sample concentrations that are optimal for protein crystallization are selected and used.

  7. Human Protein Z.

    OpenAIRE

    Broze, G J; Miletich, J P

    1984-01-01

    Protein Z was purified from human plasma by a four-step procedure which included barium citrate adsorption, ammonium sulfate fractionation, DEAE-Sepharose chromatography, and blue agarose chromatography with a yield of 20%. It is a 62,000 mol wt protein with an extinction coefficient of 12.0. The concentration of Protein Z in pooled, citrated plasma is 2.2 micrograms/ml and its half-life in patients starting warfarin anticoagulation therapy is estimated to be less than 2.5 d. The NH2-terminal...

  8. Evolution of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayhoff, M. O.

    1971-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of proteins from living organisms are dealt with. The structure of proteins is first discussed; the variation in this structure from one biological group to another is illustrated by the first halves of the sequences of cytochrome c, and a phylogenetic tree is derived from the cytochrome c data. The relative geological times associated with the events of this tree are discussed. Errors which occur in the duplication of cells during the evolutionary process are examined. Particular attention is given to evolution of mutant proteins, globins, ferredoxin, and transfer ribonucleic acids (tRNA's). Finally, a general outline of biological evolution is presented.

  9. The characterisation and prediction of protein-protein interfaces.

    OpenAIRE

    Kabir, T.

    2004-01-01

    Understanding how proteins interact with each other is of fundamental importance and is one of the most important goals of molecular biology. In order to study the characteristics of protein-protein interaction sites datasets of non-homologous protein-complexes have been compiled. These datasets include 142 obligate homocomplexes, 20 obligate hetero-complexes, 20 enzyme-inhibitor complexes, 15 antibody-antigen complexes, and 10 signaling complexes. Overall, the protein-protein interfaces of o...

  10. Whey Protein- The Role of Protein Supplementation in Resistance Training

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmer, Raymond

    2005-01-01

    Adequate protein intake is an important concern for many athletes who are undergoing strength-training programs. Many athletes choose to take a protein supplement, such as whey protein, in order to help them build lean muscle mass more efficiently. But the benefit of very high levels of dietary protein in resistance training remains questionable. This paper examines the effectiveness of whey protein, and other forms of protein supplements, in helping athletes augment their muscle mass. A comp...

  11. Protein-protein interaction databases: keeping up with growing interactomes

    OpenAIRE

    Lehne Benjamin; Schlitt Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Over the past few years, the number of known protein-protein interactions has increased substantially. To make this information more readily available, a number of publicly available databases have set out to collect and store protein-protein interaction data. Protein-protein interactions have been retrieved from six major databases, integrated and the results compared. The six databases (the Biological General Repository for Interaction Datasets [BioGRID], the Molecular INTeraction ...

  12. The effect of protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions on membrane fouling in ultrafiltration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, I.H.; Prádanos, P.; Hernández, A.

    2000-01-01

    It was studied how protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions influence the filtration performance during the ultrafiltration of protein solutions over polymeric membranes. This was done by measuring flux, streaming potential, and protein transmission during filtration of bovine serum albumin

  13. Polymers for Protein Conjugation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Pasut

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyethylene glycol (PEG at the moment is considered the leading polymer for protein conjugation in view of its unique properties, as well as to its low toxicity in humans, qualities which have been confirmed by its extensive use in clinical practice. Other polymers that are safe, biodegradable and custom-designed have, nevertheless, also been investigated as potential candidates for protein conjugation. This review will focus on natural polymers and synthetic linear polymers that have been used for protein delivery and the results associated with their use. Genetic fusion approaches for the preparation of protein-polypeptide conjugates will be also reviewed and compared with the best known chemical conjugation ones.

  14. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 292092 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_11392515.1 1117:5087 1150:2441 44887:135 864702:135 PAS ... domain type 3-containing protein,PAS ... STISDITSQKRTEAALQRSTARYENLASNIPGMIYQVVLETNGHFRFAYASPAS REIFGLEPEQLMKSAALGMTVIHPDDVVSFRQSIAQSAKTLQTQLGKLPK ...

  15. Protein turnover in sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considerable advances have been made in the knowledge of the mechanisms and control of synthesis and degradation of proteins in animal tissues during the last decade. Most of the work on the measurement of synthetic and degradative rates of the mixed protein fraction from tissues has been conducted in the rat. There have, unfortunately, been few publications describing results of protein turnover studies with ruminants. Consideration is given here to the techniques used to measure protein turnover, and some of the results obtained, particularly with sheep, are summarized. No attempt has been made to discuss directly the situation in parasitized animals; rather the aim is to provide background information which complements other work dealing with the effects of parasites on the nitrogen metabolism of ruminants. (author)

  16. Engineered Proteins for Bioelectrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Muhammad Safwan; Rehman, Jawad Ur; Hall, Elizabeth A. H.

    2014-06-01

    It is only in the past two decades that excellent protein engineering tools have begun to meet parallel advances in materials chemistry, nanofabrication, and electronics. This is revealing scenarios from which synthetic enzymes can emerge, which were previously impossible, as well as interfaces with novel electrode materials. That means the control of the protein structure, electron transport pathway, and electrode surface can usher us into a new era of bioelectrochemistry. This article reviews the principle of electron transfer (ET) and considers how its application at the electrode, within the protein, and at a redox group is directing key advances in the understanding of protein structure to create systems that exhibit better efficiency and unique bioelectrochemistry.

  17. Protein (Viridiplantae): 308813231 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003083922.1 33090:9527 3041:5078 1035538:3664 13792:3664 70447:4128 70448:5494 Protein requir ... ed for actin cytoskeleton organization ... and cell cycle progression (ISS) Ostreococcus taur ...

  18. Protein (Viridiplantae): 308808566 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003081593.1 33090:6182 3041:4098 1035538:2508 13792:2508 70447:3211 70448:4097 Mitochondrial ... inheritance and actin cytoskeleton organization ... protein (ISS) Ostreococcus tauri MPPKKPPPPPPDAKSYP ...

  19. The Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetting,M.; Hegde, S.; Fajardo, J.; Fiser, A.; Roderick, S.; Takiff, H.; Blanchard, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Pentapeptide Repeat Protein (PRP) family has over 500 members in the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms. These proteins are composed of, or contain domains composed of, tandemly repeated amino acid sequences with a consensus sequence of [S, T,A, V][D, N][L, F]-[S, T,R][G]. The biochemical function of the vast majority of PRP family members is unknown. The three-dimensional structure of the first member of the PRP family was determined for the fluoroquinolone resistance protein (MfpA) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The structure revealed that the pentapeptide repeats encode the folding of a novel right-handed quadrilateral {beta}-helix. MfpA binds to DNA gyrase and inhibits its activity. The rod-shaped, dimeric protein exhibits remarkable size, shape and electrostatic similarity to DNA.

  20. Protein (Viridiplantae): 255084748 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_002504805.1 33090:7862 3041:6362 1035538:5159 13792:5159 38832:5340 296587:5427 DUF1244/molyb ... denum cofactor synthesis ... fusion protein Micromonas sp. RCC299 MASTRTEIEAYAF ...

  1. Protein (Viridiplantae): 303283029 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003060806.1 33090:7862 3041:6362 1035538:5159 13792:5159 38832:5340 38833:5093 564608:5093 mo ... lybdenum cofactor synthesis ... protein Micromonas pusilla CCMP1545 MVDAQTTEKIEAYA ...

  2. Protein (Viridiplantae): 308812183 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003083399.1 33090:12970 3041:5897 1035538:4613 13792:4613 70447:1628 70448:5196 Glycosylphosp ... hatidylinositol anchor synthesis ... protein (ISS) Ostreococcus tauri MSARRASFQSRFNDSSQ ...

  3. Protein (Viridiplantae): 308810647 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003082632.1 33090:15674 3041:5296 1035538:3911 13792:3911 70447:3635 70448:4717 senescence-in ... ducible chloroplast stay-green ... protein (ISS) Ostreococcus tauri MDRATTSSRASTARTFH ...

  4. Protein (Viridiplantae): 308811905 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003083260.1 33090:255 3041:4962 1035538:3528 13792:3528 70447:3840 70448:5111 T08009 probable ... ribosomal protein L5-green ... alga (ISS) Ostreococcus tauri MGKRRQKRKSQSVAKTTAYQ ...

  5. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 28423 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_10226597.1 1117:517 1118:7626 1125:2051 1160279:627 Type 4 prepilin-like proteins leader ... pept ... ide-processing enzyme (Includes: Leader ... peptidase ; N-methyltransferase) Microcystis sp. T ...

  6. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 360784 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YP_007097029.1 1117:17211 1118:17546 217161:1718 1173032:1718 1173020:1718 putative stress ... prote ... in (general stress ... protein 26) Chamaesiphon minutus PCC 6605 MANATENQ ...

  7. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 392180 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_07113914.1 1117:24513 1150:7038 1158:3915 272129:3709 Bifunctional protein birA (Includes: Biotin ... otin operon repressor; Biotin --(acetyl-CoA-carboxylase) synthetase (Biotin --prot ...

  8. Interactive protein manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SNCrivelli@lbl.gov

    2003-07-01

    We describe an interactive visualization and modeling program for the creation of protein structures ''from scratch''. The input to our program is an amino acid sequence -decoded from a gene- and a sequence of predicted secondary structure types for each amino acid-provided by external structure prediction programs. Our program can be used in the set-up phase of a protein structure prediction process; the structures created with it serve as input for a subsequent global internal energy minimization, or another method of protein structure prediction. Our program supports basic visualization methods for protein structures, interactive manipulation based on inverse kinematics, and visualization guides to aid a user in creating ''good'' initial structures.

  9. Protein (Viridiplantae): 308811366 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003082991.1 33090:1951 3041:1340 1035538:592 13792:592 70447:610 70448:205 Transporter, ABC s ... uperfamily (Breast cancer ... resistance protein) (ISS), partial Ostreococcus ta ...

  10. Protein (Viridiplantae): 308810513 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003082565.1 33090:8864 3041:8803 1035538:7822 13792:7822 70447:3615 70448:4680 Predicted memb ... rane protein (associated with esophageal cancer ... in humans) (ISS) Ostreococcus tauri MTSSRKLCAFVRDA ...

  11. Protein (Viridiplantae): 308804289 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003079457.1 33090:1951 3041:1340 1035538:592 13792:592 70447:610 70448:205 Transporter, ABC s ... uperfamily (Breast cancer ... resistance protein) (ISS) Ostreococcus tauri MASRV ...

  12. Untying knots in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sułkowska, Joanna I; Sułkowski, Piotr; Szymczak, Piotr; Cieplak, Marek

    2010-10-13

    A shoelace can be readily untied by pulling its ends rather than its loops. Attempting to untie a native knot in a protein can also succeed or fail depending on where one pulls. However, thermal fluctuations induced by the surrounding water affect conformations stochastically and may add to the uncertainty of the outcome. When the protein is pulled by the termini, the knot can only get tightened, and any attempt at untying results in failure. We show that, by pulling specific amino acids, one may easily retract a terminal segment of the backbone from the knotting loop and untangle the knot. At still other amino acids, the outcome of pulling can go either way. We study the dependence of the untying probability on the way the protein is grasped, the pulling speed, and the temperature. Elucidation of the mechanisms underlying this dependence is critical for a successful experimental realization of protein knot untying. PMID:20857930

  13. Protein (Viridiplantae): 308806666 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003080644.1 33090:21099 3041:5360 1035538:3986 13792:3986 70447:3049 70448:3532 COG3310: Unch ... aracterized protein conserved in bacteria ... (ISS) Ostreococcus tauri MRRTCASRNLARSPVAARERCRQMV ...

  14. Protein (Viridiplantae): 308803575 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003079100.1 33090:20519 3041:4460 1035538:2940 13792:2940 70447:2035 70448:2555 COG4399: Unch ... aracterized protein conserved in bacteria ... (ISS) Ostreococcus tauri MKALQRLVLRGSTDGVRPACERAMA ...

  15. Protein (Viridiplantae): 308804123 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003079374.1 33090:20519 3041:4460 1035538:2940 13792:2940 70447:2035 70448:2555 COG4399: Unch ... aracterized protein conserved in bacteria ... (ISS) Ostreococcus tauri MDSLATSRRRRLARAGAAIATALAL ...

  16. Protein (Viridiplantae): 255077633 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_002502450.1 33090:20956 3041:5145 1035538:3740 13792:3740 38832:3722 296587:3525 isocitrate d ... ehydrogenase (NADP+), bacteria -like protein Micromonas sp. RCC299 MAAASAGGKIQAAPM ...

  17. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 228257 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_09784859.1 1117:4333 1150:1533 35823:3512 376219:3411 Protein ushA precursor (Includes: UDP-sugar ... ugar hydrolase (UDP-sugar ... pyrophosphatase) (UDP-sugar ... diphosphatase); 5'-nuc ...

  18. Protein folding and cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    González-Diáz, P F

    1997-01-01

    Protein denaturing induced by supercooling is interpreted as a process where some or all internal symmetries of the native protein are spontaneously broken. Hence, the free-energy potential corresponding to a folding-funnel landscape becomes temperature-dependent and describes a phase transition. The idea that deformed vortices could be produced in the transition induced by temperature quenching, from native proteins to unfolded conformations is discussed in terms of the Zurek mechanism that implements the analogy between vortices, created in the laboratory at low energy, and the cosmic strings which are thought to have been left after symmetry breaking phase transitions in the early universe. An experiment is proposed to test the above idea which generalizes the cosmological analogy to also encompass biological systems and push a step ahead the view that protein folding is a biological equivalent of the big bang.

  19. Protein (Viridiplantae): 308804764 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003079694.1 33090:24290 3041:9393 1035538:8433 13792:8433 70447:5209 70448:2928 probable memb ... rane protein YCR013c-yeast ... (ISS) Ostreococcus tauri MQLREVKERLRAYFSSSAATPGRTR ...

  20. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 338848 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YP_007172477.1 1117:11758 1118:7408 13034:1671 292566:1671 13035:1671 cell envelope-related func ... tion transcriptional attenuator ... common domain protein Dactylococcopsis salina PCC ...

  1. Electron transfer in proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1991-01-01

    Electron migration between and within proteins is one of the most prevalent forms of biological energy conversion processes. Electron transfer reactions take place between active centers such as transition metal ions or organic cofactors over considerable distances at fast rates and with remarkable...... specificity. The electron transfer is attained through weak electronic interaction between the active sites, so that considerable research efforts are centered on resolving the factors that control the rates of long-distance electron transfer reactions in proteins. These factors include (in addition to the......-containing proteins. These proteins serve almost exclusively in electron transfer reactions, and as it turns out, their metal coordination sites are endowed with properties uniquely optimized for their function....

  2. Protein Colloidal Aggregation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the pathways and kinetics of protein aggregation to allow accurate predictive modeling of the process and evaluation of potential inhibitors to prevalent diseases including cataract formation, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and others.

  3. Interactive protein manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe an interactive visualization and modeling program for the creation of protein structures ''from scratch''. The input to our program is an amino acid sequence -decoded from a gene- and a sequence of predicted secondary structure types for each amino acid-provided by external structure prediction programs. Our program can be used in the set-up phase of a protein structure prediction process; the structures created with it serve as input for a subsequent global internal energy minimization, or another method of protein structure prediction. Our program supports basic visualization methods for protein structures, interactive manipulation based on inverse kinematics, and visualization guides to aid a user in creating ''good'' initial structures

  4. Egg protein hydrolysates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amerongen, van A.; Beelen, M.J.C.; Wolbers, L.A.M.; Gilst, van W.H.; Buikema, J.H.; Nelissen, J.W.P.M.

    2009-01-01

    The present invention provides egg-protein hydrolysates with DPP-IV inhibitory activity which are particularly suited for the treatment of diabetes. Particularly advantageous is to use hydrolysate of lysozyme for the treatment of diabetes.

  5. Bence-Jones protein - quantitative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immunoglobulin light chains - urine; Urine Bence-Jones protein ... Bence-Jones proteins are a part of regular antibodies called light chains. These proteins are not normally in urine. Sometimes, when ...

  6. The Malignant Protein Puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Lary C; Jucker, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    When most people hear the words malignant and brain, cancer immediately comes to mind. But our authors argue that proteins can be malignant too, and can spread harmfully through the brain in neurodegenerative diseases that include Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, CTE, and ALS. Studying how proteins such as PrP, amyloid beta, tau, and others aggregate and spread, and kill brain cells, represents a crucial new frontier in neuroscience. PMID:27408676

  7. Fish protein hydrolysates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackie, I.M.

    1982-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes now available in commercial quantities can be used to liquefy the fish and fish waste presently considered suitable for conversion to fish meal. The products obtained are readily dispersed or dissolved in water and have a high nutritional value. They have been satisfactorily used as substitutes for milk proteins in milk replacers for young animals. Further research is necessary on means of controlling the degree of hydrolysis to give protein preparations with acceptable functional properties as human food supplements. (Refs. 21).

  8. Recombinant Collagenlike Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertala, Andzej

    2007-01-01

    A group of collagenlike recombinant proteins containing high densities of biologically active sites has been invented. The method used to express these proteins is similar to a method of expressing recombinant procollagens and collagens described in U. S. Patent 5,593,859, "Synthesis of human procollagens and collagens in recombinant DNA systems." Customized collagenous proteins are needed for biomedical applications. In particular, fibrillar collagens are attractive for production of matrices needed for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Prior to this invention, there was no way of producing customized collagenous proteins for these and other applications. Heretofore, collagenous proteins have been produced by use of such biological systems as yeasts, bacteria, and transgenic animals and plants. These products are normal collagens that can also be extracted from such sources as tendons, bones, and hides. These products cannot be made to consist only of biologically active, specific amino acid sequences that may be needed for specific applications. Prior to this invention, it had been established that fibrillar collagens consist of domains that are responsible for such processes as interaction with cells, binding of growth factors, and interaction with a number of structural proteins present in the extracellular matrix. A normal collagen consists of a sequence of domains that can be represented by a corresponding sequence of labels, e.g., D1D2D3D4. A collagenlike protein of the present invention contains regions of collagen II that contain multiples of a single domain (e.g., D1D1D1D1 or D4D4D4D4) chosen for its specific biological activity. By virtue of the multiplicity of the chosen domain, the density of sites having that specific biological activity is greater than it is in a normal collagen. A collagenlike protein according to this invention can thus be made to have properties that are necessary for tissue engineering.

  9. Untying Knots in Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Sułkowska, Joanna I.; Sułkowski, Piotr; Szymczak, Piotr; Cieplak, Marek

    2010-01-01

    A shoelace can be readily untied by pulling its ends rather than its loops. Attempting to untie a native knot in a protein can also succeed or fail depending on where one pulls. However, thermal fluctuations induced by the surrounding water affect conformations stochastically and may add to the uncertainty of the outcome. When the protein is pulled by the termini, the knot can only get tightened, and any attempt at untying results in failure. We show that, by pulling specific amino acids, ...

  10. Digestibility of sorghum proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Axtell, J D; Kirleis, A. W.; Hassen, M M; D'Croz Mason, N; Mertz, E T; Munck, L.

    1981-01-01

    Published information indicates that rice, maize, and wheat proteins are much more digestible in children than sorghum proteins are (66-81% compared with 46%). However, this digestibility difference cannot be demonstrated with the weanling rat, which gave digestibility values of 80% for cooked and 85% for uncooked sorghum gruels. Therefore, a search was made for a laboratory system sensitive to the digestibility differences between sorghum and other cereals. We found that porcine pepsin in vi...

  11. Identifying Unknown Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Barker, Winona C.; Dayhoff, Margaret O.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper we discuss ways to identify a protein, both when its amino acid sequence is known and, particularly, prior to the determination of the complete sequence. If a similar sequence is in the Protein Sequence Database, an unknown may be identified on the basis of partial or ambiguous sequence data, or on the basis of amino acid composition. Identification in the early stages of structural determination can save time and scarce resources by preventing duplicate effort or by suggesting ...

  12. Proteins and their crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kutá-Smatanová, Ivana; Hogg, T.; Hilgenfeld, R.; Grandori, R.; Carey, J.; Vácha, František; Štys, Dalibor

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 1 (2003), s. 31-32. ISSN 1211-5894 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A141; GA ČR GA206/00/D007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5051902; CEZ:MSM 123100001 Keywords : pokeweed antiviral protein * flavodoxin-like protein * PSII Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  13. Occupational protein contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaud, Annick; Poreaux, Claire; Penven, Emmanuelle; Waton, Julie

    2015-12-01

    Occupational contact dermatitis is generally caused by haptens but can also be induced by proteins causing mainly immunological contact urticaria (ICU); chronic hand eczema in the context of protein contact dermatitis (PCD). In a monocentric retrospective study, from our database, only 31 (0.41%) of patients with contact dermatitis had positive skin tests with proteins: 22 had occupational PCD, 3 had non-occupational PCD, 5 occupational ICU and 1 cook had a neutrophilic fixed food eruption (NFFE) due to fish. From these results and analysis of literature, the characteristics of PCD can be summarized as follows. It is a chronic eczematous dermatitis, possibly exacerbated by work, suggestive if associated with inflammatory perionyxix and immediate erythema with pruritis, to be investigated when the patient resumes work after a period of interruption. Prick tests with the suspected protein-containing material are essential, as patch tests have negative results. In case of multisensitisation revealed by prick tests, it is advisable to analyse IgE against recombinant allergens. A history of atopy, found in 56 to 68% of the patients, has to be checked for. Most of the cases are observed among food-handlers but PCD can also be due to non-edible plants, latex, hydrolysed proteins or animal proteins. Occupational exposure to proteins can thus lead to the development of ICU. Reflecting hypersensitivity to very low concentrations of allergens, investigating ICU therefore requires caution and prick tests should be performed with a diluted form of the causative protein-containing product. Causes are food, especially fruit peel, non-edible plants, cosmetic products, latex, animals. PMID:26242922

  14. Protein hydrolysates in sports nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manninen Anssi H

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It has been suggested that protein hydrolysates providing mainly di- and tripeptides are superior to intact (whole proteins and free amino acids in terms of skeletal muscle protein anabolism. This review provides a critical examination of protein hydrolysate studies conducted in healthy humans with special reference to sports nutrition. The effects of protein hydrolysate ingestion on blood amino acid levels, muscle protein anabolism, body composition, exercise performance and muscle glycogen resynthesis are discussed.

  15. Protein Functionality in Food Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Panpan

    2010-01-01

    The structure,shape,color,smell and taste of food were decided by protein functionality.The utilization of protein will improve by changing the protein functionality.Protein functionality is also advantage to maintain and utilize the nutrition of food.This paper summarized the nature,classification,factors and prospect of protein functionality.It ccn provide a theoretical basis for application of protein in food industry.

  16. Protein Databases on the Internet

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Dong

    2004-01-01

    Protein databases have become a crucial part of modern biology. Huge amounts of data for protein structures, functions, and particularly sequences are being generated. Searching databases is often the first step in the study of a new protein. Comparison between proteins or between protein families provides information about the relationship between proteins within a genome or across different species, and hence offers much more information than can be obtained by studying only an isolated pro...

  17. More protein in cereals?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ways in which the protein content of plant crops may be raised by the use of nuclear radiation are to be discussed at a symposium in Vienna in June next year, organized by the joint Food and Agriculture Organization/Agency Division of Atomic Energy in Food and Agriculture. Plant crops - especially cereal grains - are the basic food and protein source of most of the world's population, particularly in less-developed countries. But their natural protein content is low; increasing the quantity and nutritional quality of plant protein is potentially the most feasible way to combat widespread protein malnutrition. This improvement in seed stock can be achieved by plant breeding methods in which nuclear irradiation techniques are used to induce mutations in grain, and other isotopic techniques can be used to select only those mutants which have the desired properties. The scientists who attend the symposium will have an opportunity to review what mutation plant breeders have achieved, the application of nuclear techniques to screening for protein and amino-acid content and nutritional value, and isotopic methods which contribute to research in plant nutrition and physiology. (author)

  18. Stretching to Understand Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieplak, Marek

    2007-03-01

    Mechanical stretching of single proteins has been studied experimentally for about 50 proteins yielding a variety of force patterns and values of the peak forces. We have performed a theoretical survey of 7749 proteins of known native structure and map out the landscape of possible dynamical behaviors unders stretching at constant speed. The model used is constructed based on the native geometry. It is solved by methods of molecular dynamics and validated by comparing the theoretical predictions to experimental results. We characterize the distribution of peak forces and on correlations with the system size and with the structure classification as characterized by the CATH scheme. We identify proteins with the biggest forces and show that they belong to few topology classes. We determine which protein segments act as mechanical clamps and show that, in most cases, they correspond to long stretches of parallel beta-strands, but other mechanisms are also possible. We then consider stretching by fluid flows. We show that unfolding induced by a uniform flow shows a richer behavior than that in the force clamp. The dynamics of unfolding is found to depend strongly on the selection of the amino acid, usually one of the termini, which is anchored. These features offer potentially wider diagnostic tools to investigate structure of proteins compared to experiments based on the atomic force microscopy.

  19. Inferring protein function by domain context similarities in protein-protein interaction networks

    OpenAIRE

    Sun Zhirong; Liu Ke; Chen Hu; Zhang Song

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Genome sequencing projects generate massive amounts of sequence data but there are still many proteins whose functions remain unknown. The availability of large scale protein-protein interaction data sets makes it possible to develop new function prediction methods based on protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. Although several existing methods combine multiple information resources, there is no study that integrates protein domain information and PPI networks to pre...

  20. ADSORPTION OF PROTEIN ON NANOPARTICLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Qi

    1994-01-01

    The adsorption of protein on nanoparticles was studied by using dynamic light scattering to measure the hydrodynamic size of both pure protein and nanoparticles adsorbed with different amounts of protein. The thickness of the adsorbed protein layer increases as protein concentration, but decreases as the initial size of nanoparticles. After properly scaling the thickness with the initial diameter, we are able to fit all experimental data with a single master curve. Our experimental results suggest that the adsorbed proteins form a monolayeron the nanoparticle surface and the adsorbed protein molecules are attached to the particle surface at many points through a possible hydrogen-bonding. Our results also indicate that as protein concentration increases, the overall shape of the adsorbed protein molecule continuously changes from a flat layer on the particle surface to a stretched coil extended into water. During the change, the hydrodynamic volume of the adsorbed protein increases linearly with protein concentration.

  1. Measuring protein breakdown rate in individual proteins in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars; Kjaer, Michael

    2010-01-01

    To outline different approaches of how protein breakdown can be quantified and to present a new approach to determine the fractional breakdown rate of individual slow turnover proteins in vivo.......To outline different approaches of how protein breakdown can be quantified and to present a new approach to determine the fractional breakdown rate of individual slow turnover proteins in vivo....

  2. Histophilus somni Surface Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbeil, Lynette B

    2016-01-01

    The pathogen surface is usually the first site of interaction with the host. Histophilus somni was earlier thought to only have an outer membrane on its surface. Now it is known that the surface is composed of many virulence factors, including outer membrane proteins, lipooligosaccharide or endotoxin, a fibrillar network, and an exopolysaccharide. Outer membrane blebs, endotoxin, the fibrillar network, and the exopolysaccharide are also shed from the surface. This review will focus on the surface proteins of this pathogen that may colonize the mucosal surface of ruminants as a commensal or may cause pneumonia, septicemia, myocarditis, thrombotic meningoencephalitis, arthritis, and/or abortion. The major outer membrane protein has been well studied. Since its size and epitopes vary from strain to strain, it may be useful for typing strains. Iron-regulated OMPs have also received much attention because of their role in iron uptake for in vivo growth of H. somni. Other OMPs may be protective, based on passive immunization with monospecific antibodies and active immunization experiments. The surface and shed fibrillar network has been shown to be an immunoglobulin-binding protein in that it binds bovine IgG2 by the Fc portion. Two repeat domains (DR1 and DR2) have cytotoxic Fic motifs. Vaccine studies with recombinant DR2 are promising. Studies of the bacterial genome as well as comparison of surface proteins of different strains from the various H. somni syndromes and carrier states will be discussed and have provided much insight into pathogenesis and protection. PMID:26728061

  3. Ontology integration to identify protein complex in protein interaction networks

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Zhihao; Lin Hongfei; Xu Bo

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Protein complexes can be identified from the protein interaction networks derived from experimental data sets. However, these analyses are challenging because of the presence of unreliable interactions and the complex connectivity of the network. The integration of protein-protein interactions with the data from other sources can be leveraged for improving the effectiveness of protein complexes detection algorithms. Methods We have developed novel semantic similarity metho...

  4. Identifying Protein-Protein Interaction Sites Using Covering Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Jie Song; Jiaxing Cheng; Xiuquan Du

    2009-01-01

    Identification of protein-protein interface residues is crucial for structural biology. This paper proposes a covering algorithm for predicting protein-protein interface residues with features including protein sequence profile and residue accessible area. This method adequately utilizes the characters of a covering algorithm which have simple, lower complexity and high accuracy for high dimension data. The covering algorithm can achieve a comparable performance (69.62%, Complete dataset; 60....

  5. Protein-Protein Interaction Detection: Methods and Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    V. Srinivasa Rao; Srinivas, K.; Sujini, G. N.; G. N. Sunand Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interaction plays key role in predicting the protein function of target protein and drug ability of molecules. The majority of genes and proteins realize resulting phenotype functions as a set of interactions. The in vitro and in vivo methods like affinity purification, Y2H (yeast 2 hybrid), TAP (tandem affinity purification), and so forth have their own limitations like cost, time, and so forth, and the resultant data sets are noisy and have more false positives to annotate t...

  6. Protein Microarray On-Demand: A Novel Protein Microarray System

    OpenAIRE

    Chatterjee, Deb K.; Sitaraman, Kalavathy; Baptista, Cassio; Hartley, James; Hill, Thomas M.; David J. Munroe

    2008-01-01

    We describe a novel, simple and low-cost protein microarray strategy wherein the microarrays are generated by printing expression ready plasmid DNAs onto slides that can be converted into protein arrays on-demand. The printed expression plasmids serve dual purposes as they not only direct the synthesis of the protein of interest; they also serve to capture the newly synthesized proteins through a high affinity DNA-protein interaction. To accomplish this we have exploited the high-affinity bin...

  7. Polarizable protein packing

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, Albert H.

    2011-01-24

    To incorporate protein polarization effects within a protein combinatorial optimization framework, we decompose the polarizable force field AMOEBA into low order terms. Including terms up to the third-order provides a fair approximation to the full energy while maintaining tractability. We represent the polarizable packing problem for protein G as a hypergraph and solve for optimal rotamers with the FASTER combinatorial optimization algorithm. These approximate energy models can be improved to high accuracy [root mean square deviation (rmsd) < 1 kJ mol -1] via ridge regression. The resulting trained approximations are used to efficiently identify new, low-energy solutions. The approach is general and should allow combinatorial optimization of other many-body problems. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Comput Chem, 2011 Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Polarizable protein packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Albert H; Snow, Christopher D

    2011-05-01

    To incorporate protein polarization effects within a protein combinatorial optimization framework, we decompose the polarizable force field AMOEBA into low order terms. Including terms up to the third-order provides a fair approximation to the full energy while maintaining tractability. We represent the polarizable packing problem for protein G as a hypergraph and solve for optimal rotamers with the FASTER combinatorial optimization algorithm. These approximate energy models can be improved to high accuracy [root mean square deviation (rmsd) < 1 kJ mol(-1)] via ridge regression. The resulting trained approximations are used to efficiently identify new, low-energy solutions. The approach is general and should allow combinatorial optimization of other many-body problems. PMID:21264879

  9. Electron transfer in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, H B; Winkler, J R

    1996-01-01

    Electron-transfer (ET) reactions are key steps in a diverse array of biological transformations ranging from photosynthesis to aerobic respiration. A powerful theoretical formalism has been developed that describes ET rates in terms of two parameters: the nuclear reorganization energy (lambda) and the electronic-coupling strength (HAB). Studies of ET reactions in ruthenium-modified proteins have probed lambda and HAB in several metalloproteins (cytochrome c, myoglobin, azurin). This work has shown that protein reorganization energies are sensitive to the medium surrounding the redox sites and that an aqueous environment, in particular, leads to large reorganization energies. Analyses of electronic-coupling strengths suggest that the efficiency of long-range ET depends on the protein secondary structure: beta sheets appear to mediate coupling more efficiently than alpha-helical structures, and hydrogen bonds play a critical role in both. PMID:8811189

  10. Accessory Proteins at ERES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinkenberg, Rafael David

    proteins. Together these components co‐operate in cargo‐selection as well as forming, loading and releasing budding vesicles from specific regions on the membrane surface of the ER. Coat components furthermore convey vesicle targeting towards the Golgi. However, not much is known about the mechanisms that...... regulate the COPII assembly at the vesicle bud site. This thesis provides the first regulatory mechanism of COPII assembly in relation to ER‐membrane lipid‐signal recognition by the accessory protein p125A (Sec23IP). The aim of the project was to characterize p125A function by dissecting two main domains...... in the protein; a putative lipid‐associating domain termed the DDHD domain that is defined by the four amino acid motif that gives the domain its name; and a ubiquitously found domain termed Sterile α‐motif (SAM), which is mostly associated with oligomerization and polymerization. We first show, that...

  11. Sound of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    In my group we work with Molecular Dynamics to model several different proteins and protein systems. We submit our modelled molecules to changes in temperature, changes in solvent composition and even external pulling forces. To analyze our simulation results we have so far used visual inspection...... and statistical analysis of the resulting molecular trajectories (as everybody else!). However, recently I started assigning a particular sound frequency to each amino acid in the protein, and by setting the amplitude of each frequency according to the movement amplitude we can "hear" whenever two aminoacids....... These are early days, and it still remains to be proven that this method has any advantage over other methods, but at least it is fun to do and the harmonies produced invoke an eerie sounding futuristic landscape...

  12. Ubiquitin domain proteins in disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Louise Kjær; Schulze, Andrea; Seeger, Michael;

    2007-01-01

    The human genome encodes several ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain proteins (UDPs). Members of this protein family are involved in a variety of cellular functions and many are connected to the ubiquitin proteasome system, an essential pathway for protein degradation in eukaryotic cells. Despite their...... and cancer. Publication history: Republished from Current BioData's Targeted Proteins database (TPdb; http://www.targetedproteinsdb.com)....

  13. SOY PROTEIN NANOPARTICLES AND NANOCOMPOSITES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soy protein isolate (SPI) is obtained from soybean by removing soybean oil and soy carbohydrates. SPI contains more than 90% protein. Structurally, SPI is a globular protein and its aggregates in water consist of sphere-like protein particles. The number average aggregate size of SPI at pH=5.2 is...

  14. The Formation of Protein Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob; Bohr, Henrik; Brunak, Søren

    1996-01-01

    Dynamically induced curvature owing to long-range excitations along the backbones of protein molecules with non-linear elastic properties may control the folding of proteins.......Dynamically induced curvature owing to long-range excitations along the backbones of protein molecules with non-linear elastic properties may control the folding of proteins....

  15. Clustered epitopes within the Gag-Pol fusion protein DNA vaccine enhance immune responses and protection against challenge with recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing HIV-1 Gag and Pol antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have generated a codon-optimized hGagp17p24-Polp51 plasmid DNA expressing the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag-Pol fusion protein that consists of clusters of highly conserved cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes presented by multiple MHC class I alleles. In the hGagp17p24-Polp51 construct, the ribosomal frameshift site had been deleted together with the potentially immunosuppressive Gag nucleocapsid (p15) as well as Pol protease (p10) and integrase (p31). Analyses of the magnitude and breadth of cellular responses demonstrated that immunization of HLA-A2/Kb transgenic mice with the hGagp17p24-Polp51 construct induced 2- to 5-fold higher CD8+ T-cell responses to Gag p17-, p24-, and Pol reverse transcriptase (RT)-specific CTL epitopes than the full-length hGag-PolΔFsΔPr counterpart. The increases were correlated with higher protection against challenge with recombinant vaccinia viruses (rVVs) expressing gag and pol gene products. Consistent with the profile of Gag- and Pol-specific CD8+ T cell responses, an elevated level of type 1 cytokine production was noted in p24- and RT-stimulated splenocyte cultures established from hGagp17p24-Polp51-immunized mice compared to responses induced with the hGag-PolΔFsΔPr vaccine. Sera of mice immunized with the hGagp17p24-Polp51 vaccine also exhibited an increased titer of p24- and RT-specific IgG2 antibody responses. The results from our studies provide insights into approaches for boosting the breadth of Gag- and Pol-specific immune responses

  16. Vibrational spectroscopy of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two important steps for the development of a biosensor are the immobilization of the biological component (e.g. protein) on a surface and the enhancement of the signal to improve the sensitivity of detection. To address these subjects, the present work describes Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) investigations of several proteins bound to the surface of an attenuated total reflection (ATR) crystal. Furthermore, new nanostructured surfaces for signal enhancement were developed for use in FTIR microscopy. The mitochondrial redox-protein cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) was incorporated into a protein-tethered bilayer lipid membrane (ptBLM) on an ATR crystal featuring a roughened two-layer gold surface for signal enhancement. Electrochemical excitation by periodic potential pulses at different modulation frequencies was followed by time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy. Phase sensitive detection was used for deconvolution of the IR spectra into vibrational components. A model based on protonation-dependent chemical reaction kinetics could be fitted to the time evolution of IR bands attributed to several different redox centers of the CcO. Further investigations involved the odorant binding protein 14 (OBP14) of the honey bee (Apis mellifera), which was studied using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and circular dichroism. OBP14 was found to be thermally stable up to 45 °C, thus permitting the potential application of this protein for the fabrication of biosensors. Thermal denaturation measurements showed that odorant binding increases the thermal stability of the OBP-odorant complex. In another project, plasmonic nanostructures were fabricated that enhance the absorbance in FTIR microscopy measurements. The nanostructures are composed of an array of round-shaped insulator and gold discs on top of a continuous gold layer. Enhancement factors of up to ⁓125 could be observed with self-assembled monolayers of dodecanethiol molecules immobilized on the gold surface (author)

  17. Modeling Mercury in Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, J M; Smith, J C

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that is released into the biosphere both by natural processes and anthropogenic activities. Although its reduced, elemental form Hg(0) is relatively nontoxic, other forms such as Hg(2+) and, in particular, its methylated form, methylmercury, are toxic, with deleterious effects on both ecosystems and humans. Microorganisms play important roles in the transformation of mercury in the environment. Inorganic Hg(2+) can be methylated by certain bacteria and archaea to form methylmercury. Conversely, bacteria also demethylate methylmercury and reduce Hg(2+) to relatively inert Hg(0). Transformations and toxicity occur as a result of mercury interacting with various proteins. Clearly, then, understanding the toxic effects of mercury and its cycling in the environment requires characterization of these interactions. Computational approaches are ideally suited to studies of mercury in proteins because they can provide a detailed molecular picture and circumvent issues associated with toxicity. Here, we describe computational methods for investigating and characterizing how mercury binds to proteins, how inter- and intraprotein transfer of mercury is orchestrated in biological systems, and how chemical reactions in proteins transform the metal. We describe quantum chemical analyses of aqueous Hg(II), which reveal critical factors that determine ligand-binding propensities. We then provide a perspective on how we used chemical reasoning to discover how microorganisms methylate mercury. We also highlight our combined computational and experimental studies of the proteins and enzymes of the mer operon, a suite of genes that confer mercury resistance in many bacteria. Lastly, we place work on mercury in proteins in the context of what is needed for a comprehensive multiscale model of environmental mercury cycling. PMID:27497164

  18. Mining protein structure data

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, José Carlos Almeida

    2006-01-01

    The principal topic of this work is the application of data mining techniques, in particular of machine learning, to the discovery of knowledge in a protein database. In the first chapter a general background is presented. Namely, in section 1.1 we overview the methodology of a Data Mining project and its main algorithms. In section 1.2 an introduction to the proteins and its supporting file formats is outlined. This chapter is concluded with section 1.3 which defines that main problem we...

  19. Protein-based ferrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Puja; Hart, Cassidy; Romano, Siena; El-Magbri, Mariam; Esson, Moira M; Ibeh, Trisha; Knowlton, Elizabeth D; Zhang, Ming; Wagner, Michael J; Hartings, Matthew R

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel synthesis in which hemoglobin and Fe(2+) react, in the presence of KNO3 and KOH, to produce protein microgels that contain magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. The synthesis results in microgels with polymer properties (denaturing and glass transition temperatures) that are consistent with the dried protein. The iron oxide nanoparticles that exhibit an average diameter of 22nm, are ferrimagnetic, and display properties consistent with Fe3O4. The multiple functional capabilities displayed by these materials: biocompatibility, magnetism, dye uptake and controlled release, and other properties archetypal of hydrogels, will make the magnetic hydrogels attractive for a number of biomedical applications. PMID:26901627

  20. Lipid-transfer proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Wong, Jack Ho; Ye, Xiujuan

    2012-01-01

    Lipid-transfer proteins (LTPs) are basic proteins found in abundance in higher plants. LTPs play lots of roles in plants such as participation in cutin formation, embryogenesis, defense reactions against phytopathogens, symbiosis, and the adaptation of plants to various environmental conditions. In addition, LTPs from field mustard and Chinese daffodil exhibit antiproliferative activity against human cancer cells. LTPs from chili pepper and coffee manifest inhibitory activity against fungi pathogenic to humans such as Candida species. The intent of this article is to review LTPs in the plant kingdom. PMID:23193591