WorldWideScience

Sample records for astrophysics stellar collapse

  1. Research in nuclear astrophysics: stellar collapse and supernovae. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction between nuclear theory and some outstanding problems in astrophysics is examined. The chief emphasis of our program is on stellar collapse, supernovae and neutron star formation. Central to these topics are the parallel development of the equation of state of hot, dense matter and a novel type of hydrodynamical code. The LLPR compressible liquid drop model forms the basis for the former, and we propose to further refine it by including curvature corrections to the surface energy and by considering other nuclear force parameters which are in better agreement with experimentally determined quantities. The development of the equation of state has another bonus - it can be used to analyze intermediate energy heavy ion collisions, which, in turn, may illuminate the nucleon-nucleon force. The hydrodynamical code includes detailed neutrino transport and a fast, but accurate, approximation to the complete LLPR equation of state, which is necessary for numerical use. We propose to model not only the stellar collapse leading up to a supernova, but also the quasi-static deleptonization and cooling stages of the nascent neutron star. Our detailed studies of the role of neutrinos in stellar collapse and neutron star formation concentrate on their detectability and signatures - after all, neutrinos are the only direct method of observationally checking supernova theory. Complementary studies include modelling both mass accretion in the nuclei of galaxies (which is probably responsible for the quasar phenomenon) and investigations of galaxy clustering and the large scale structure of the universe

  2. Research in astrophysics: Stellar collapse and supernovae: Termination report, August 1, 1980-November 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction between nuclear theory and some outstanding problems in astrophysics has been examined. The chief emphasis of the program was on stellar collapse, Type II supernovae and neutron star formation. Central to these topics are the development of an equation of state of hot, dense matter and numerical simulations of gravitational collapse and neutron star birth. The LLPR compressible liquid drop model is the basis of the former. It has been refined to include curvature corrections to the surface energy and nuclear force parameters which are in better agreement with experimental quantities. Numerically optimized versions were used in supernova simulations. Such studies of the equation of state can also be used to analyze intermediate energy heavy ion collisions, which, in turn, may illuminate the nucleon-nucleon force. A novel hydrodynamical code in which shocks are treated via Riemann resolution rather than with artificial viscosity was developed. We modeled not only the stellar collapse leading up to a supernova, but also the quasi-static deleptonization and cooling of the nascent neutron star. For the latter evolution we also used a hydrostatic code with detailed neutrino transport. Our studies of neutrinos in stellar collapse and neutron star formation concentrated on their detectability and signatures, as neutrinos are the only direct probe of collapse and early supernova dynamics. The neutrino signatures seen from SN1987a are in complete accord with the predictions our group has been making since 1982. Complementary studies included modeling nucleosynthesis and the accretion process in quasars, and investigating the influence of galaxy clustering on the large scale structure of the universe. The last study might impose constraints on high energy theories, such as those of inflation and GUT, which can now only be tested astrophysically. 38 refs

  3. Black-hole formation from stellar collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I review the end-state of massive stellar evolution, following the evolution of these massive stars from the onset of collapse through the formation of a compact remnant and the possible supernova or hypernova explosion. In particular, I concentrate on the formation of black holes from stellar collapse: the fraction of stars that form black holes, the black-hole mass distribution and the velocities these black-hole remnants may receive during their formation process

  4. Electron capture and stellar collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order, to investigate the function of electron capture in the phenomenon of pre-supernovae gravitacional collapse, an hydrodynamic caculation was carried out, coupling capture, decay and nuclear reaction equation system. A star simplified model (homogeneous model) was adopted using fermi ideal gas approximation for tthe sea of free electrons and neutrons. The non simplified treatment from quasi-static evolution to collapse is presented. The capture and beta decay rates, as wellas neutron delayed emission, were calculated by beta decay crude theory, while the other reaction rates were determined by usual theories. The preliminary results are presented. (M.C.K.)

  5. Degeneracy, the virial theorem, and stellar collapse

    OpenAIRE

    Cardall, Christian Y.

    2008-01-01

    Formulae for the energies of degenerate non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic Fermi gases play multiple roles in simple arguments related to the collapse of a stellar core to a neutron star. These formulae, deployed in conjunction with the virial theorem and a few other basic physical principles, provide surprisingly good estimates of the temperature, mass, and radius (and therefore also density and entropy) of the core at the onset of collapse; the final radius and composition of the cold ...

  6. Search for stellar gravitational collapse by MACRO: Characteristics and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first MACRO lower supermodule has been sensitive to antineutrinos from stellar gravitational collapse since spring 1989. The results with the 44 tonnes of liquid scintillator which have been instrumented to search for stellar gravitational collapse are discussed here. (orig.)

  7. Precision Stellar Astrophysics in the Kepler Era

    CERN Document Server

    Huber, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The study of fundamental properties (such as temperatures, radii, masses, and ages) and interior processes (such as convection and angular momentum transport) of stars has implications on various topics in astrophysics, ranging from the evolution of galaxies to understanding exoplanets. In this contribution I will review the basic principles of two key observational methods for constraining fundamental and interior properties of single field stars: the study stellar oscillations (asteroseismology) and optical long-baseline interferometry. I will highlight recent breakthrough discoveries in asteroseismology such as the measurement of core rotation rates in red giants and the characterization of exoplanet systems. I will furthermore comment on the reliability of interferometry as a tool to calibrate indirect methods to estimate fundamental properties, and present a new angular diameter measurement for the exoplanet host star HD219134 which demonstrates that diameters for stars which are relatively well resolved...

  8. A general method of estimating stellar astrophysical parameters from photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Belikov, A N

    2008-01-01

    Applying photometric catalogs to the study of the population of the Galaxy is obscured by the impossibility to map directly photometric colors into astrophysical parameters. Most of all-sky catalogs like ASCC or 2MASS are based upon broad-band photometric systems, and the use of broad photometric bands complicates the determination of the astrophysical parameters for individual stars. This paper presents an algorithm for determining stellar astrophysical parameters (effective temperature, gravity and metallicity) from broad-band photometry even in the presence of interstellar reddening. This method suits the combination of narrow bands as well. We applied the method of interval-cluster analysis to finding stellar astrophysical parameters based on the newest Kurucz models calibrated with the use of a compiled catalog of stellar parameters. Our new method of determining astrophysical parameters allows all possible solutions to be located in the effective temperature-gravity-metallicity space for the star and se...

  9. Black Holes: Physics and Astrophysics - Stellar-mass, supermassive and primordial black holes

    OpenAIRE

    Bekenstein, Jacob D.

    2004-01-01

    I present an elementary primer of black hole physics, including its general relativity basis, all peppered with astrophysical illustrations. Following a brief review of the process stellar collapse to a black hole, I discuss the gravitational redshift, particle trajectories in gravitational fields, the Schwarzschild and Kerr solutions to Einstein's equations, orbits in Schwarzschild and in Kerr geometry, and the dragging of inertial frames. I follow with a brief review of galactic X-ray binar...

  10. Theoretical Astrophysics, Volume 2: Stars and Stellar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, T.

    2001-04-01

    This second volume of a comprehensive three-volume work on theoretical astrophysics deals with stellar physics. After reviewing the key observational results and nomenclature used in stellar astronomy, the book develops a solid understanding of central concepts including stellar structure and evolution, the physics of stellar remnants, pulsars, binary stars, the sun and planetary systems, interstellar medium and globular clusters. Throughout, the reader's comprehension is developed and tested with more than seventy-five exercises. This indispensable volume will allow graduate students to master the material sufficiently to read and engage in research with heightened understanding. It can be used alone or in conjunction with Volume 1, which covers a wide range of astrophysical processes, and the forthcoming Volume 3, on galaxies and cosmology.

  11. A Riccati equation in radiative stellar collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Rajah, S S

    2008-01-01

    We model the behaviour of a relativistic spherically symmetric shearing fluid undergoing gravitational collapse with heat flux. It is demonstrated that the governing equation for the gravitational behaviour is a Riccati equation. We show that the Riccati equation admits two classes of new solutions in closed form. We regain particular models, obtained in previous investigations, as special cases. A significant feature of our solutions is the general spatial dependence in the metric functions which allows for a wider study of the physical features of the model, such as the behaviour of the causal temperature in inhomogeneous spacetimes.

  12. Gravitational Waves from Stellar Collapse: Correlations to Explosion Asymmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Fryer, C L; Hughes, S A; Fryer, Chris L.; Holz, Daniel E.; Hughes, Scott A.

    2004-01-01

    The collapse of massive stars not only produces observable outbursts across the entire electromagnetic spectrum but, for Galactic (or near-Galactic) supernovae, detectable signals for ground-based neutrino and gravitational wave detectors. Gravitational waves and neutrinos provide the only means to study the actual engine behind the optical outbursts: the collapsed stellar core. While the neutrinos are most sensitive to details of the equation of state, gravitational waves provide a means to study the mass asymmetries in this central core. We present gravitational wave signals from a series of 3-dimensional core-collapse simulations with asymmetries derived from initial perturbations caused by pre-collapse convection, core rotation, and low-mode convection in the explosion engine itself. A Galactic supernovae will allow us to differentiate these different sources of asymmetry. Combining this signal with other observations of the supernova, from neutrinos to gamma-rays to the compact remnant, dramatically incr...

  13. Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA): Binaries, Pulsations, and Explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Paxton, Bill; Schwab, Josiah; Bauer, Evan B; Bildsten, Lars; Cantiello, Matteo; Dessart, Luc; Farmer, R; Hu, H; Langer, N; Townsend, R H D; Townsley, Dean M; Timmes, F X

    2015-01-01

    We substantially update the capabilities of the open-source software instrument Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA). MESA can now simultaneously evolve an interacting pair of differentially rotating stars undergoing transfer and loss of mass and angular momentum, greatly enhancing the prior ability to model binary evolution. New MESA capabilities in fully coupled calculation of nuclear networks with hundreds of isotopes now allow MESA to accurately simulate advanced burning stages needed to construct supernova progenitor models. Implicit hydrodynamics with shocks can now be treated with MESA, enabling modeling of the entire massive star lifecycle, from pre-main sequence evolution to the onset of core collapse and nucleosynthesis from the resulting explosion. Coupling of the GYRE non-adiabatic pulsation instrument with MESA allows for new explorations of the instability strips for massive stars while also accelerating the astrophysical use of asteroseismology data. We improve treatment of ma...

  14. Neutrino pair emission from thermally excited nuclei in stellar collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Dzhioev, Alan A

    2013-01-01

    We examine the rate of neutrino-antineutrino pair emission by hot nuclei in collapsing stellar cores. The rates are calculated assuming that only allowed charge-neutral Gamow-Teller (GT$_0$) transitions contribute to the decay of thermally excited nuclear states. To obtain the GT$_0$ transition matrix elements, we employ the quasiparticle random phase approximation extended to finite temperatures within the thermo field dynamics formalism. The decay rates and the energy emission rates are calculated for the sample nuclei ${}^{56}$Fe and $^{82}$Ge at temperatures relevant to core collapse supernovae.

  15. Nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized

  16. New Discoveries in Stars and Stellar Evolution through Advances in Laboratory Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Brickhouse, AAS WGLA: Nancy; Drake, Paul; Federman, Steven; Ferland, Gary; Frank, Adam; Herbst, Eric; Olive, Keith; Salama, Farid; Savin, Daniel Wolf; Ziurys, Lucy

    2009-01-01

    As the Stars and Stellar Evolution (SSE) panel is fully aware, the next decade will see major advances in our understanding of these areas of research. To quote from their charge, these advances will occur in studies of the Sun as a star, stellar astrophysics, the structure and evolution of single and multiple stars, compact objects, SNe, gamma-ray bursts, solar neutrinos, and extreme physics on stellar scales. Central to the progress in these areas are the corresponding advances in laboratory astrophysics, required to fully realize the SSE scientific opportunities within the decade 2010-2020. Laboratory astrophysics comprises both theoretical and experimental studies of the underlying physics that produces the observed astrophysical processes. The 6 areas of laboratory astrophysics, which we have identified as relevant to the CFP panel, are atomic, molecular, solid matter, plasma, nuclear physics, and particle physics. In this white paper, we describe in Section 2 the scientific context and some of the new s...

  17. Solar, Stellar and Galactic Connections between Particle Physics and Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Carraminana, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    This book collects extended and specialized reviews on topics linking astrophysics and particle physics at a level intermediate between a graduate student and a young researcher. The book includes also three reviews on observational techniques used in forefront astrophysics and short articles on research performed in Latin America. The reviews, updated and written by specialized researchers, describe the state of the art in the related research topics. This book is a valuable complement not only for research but also for lecturers in specialized course of high energy astrophysics, cosmic ray astrophysics and particle physics.

  18. New Kepler Data Products At MAST For Stellar Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Scott W.; Shiao, B.; Tseng, S.; Million, C.; Thompson, R.; Seibert, M.; Abney, F.; Donaldson, T.; Dower, T.; Fraquelli, D. A.; Handy, S.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Levay, K.; Matuskey, J.; McLean, B.; Quick, L.; Rogers, A.; Wallace, G.; White, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    The Kepler Mission has collected high-precision, time-series photometry of over 200,000 stars. The reduced lightcurves, target pixel files, and a variety of catalog metadata are already available at MAST. We present new data products and services at MAST that will further aid researchers as Kepler begins its transition to a legacy mission, particularly in the realm of stellar astrophysics. New photometric catalogs to accompany the Kepler targets have arrived at MAST within the past year, and several more will be coming in the relative future. These include the second half of the Kepler INT survey (U,g,r,i,H_alpha; available now), an improved GALEX source catalog (NUV and FUV; available now), PanSTARRS (g,r,i,z; available soon), and WISE (3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 microns; planned). We expect searches for variability will become one of the most active areas of archive use, so MAST is including a wide range of variability statistics as part of the archive database. In addition to being searchable through database queries and web forms, each Preview page will now include a summary of these variability indices for each of the target's lightcurves within a Quarter. Along with updated NUV and FUV fluxes, a new tool at MAST called gPhoton will allow users to create time-series lightcurves, including animated movies and intensity images, from any set of GALEX photons with arbitrary aperture and bin sizes. We show some examples of the ways GALEX UV lightcurves generated with gPhoton can be used in conjunction with the Kepler data. Finally, MAST has released an initial version of its Data Discovery Portal. This one-stop, interactive web application gives users the ability to search and access data from any of MAST's missions (HST, GALEX, Kepler, FUSE, IUE, JWST, etc.), as well as any data available through the Virtual Observatory. It includes filtering options, access to interactive displays, an accompanying AstroViewer with data footprints on-sky, the ability to upload your own

  19. The r-process of stellar nucleosynthesis: Astrophysics and nuclear physics achievements and mysteries

    CERN Document Server

    Arnould, M; Takahashi, K

    2007-01-01

    The r-process, or the rapid neutron-capture process, of stellar nucleosynthesis is called for to explain the production of the stable (and some long-lived radioactive) neutron-rich nuclides heavier than iron that are observed in stars of various metallicities, as well as in the solar system. A very large amount of nuclear information is necessary in order to model the r-process. This concerns the static characteristics of a large variety of light to heavy nuclei between the valley of stability and the vicinity of the neutron-drip line, as well as their beta-decay branches or their reactivity. The enormously challenging experimental and theoretical task imposed by all these requirements is reviewed, and the state-of-the-art development in the field is presented. Nuclear-physics-based and astrophysics-free r-process models of different levels of sophistication have been constructed over the years. We review their merits and their shortcomings. For long, the core collapse supernova of massive stars has been envi...

  20. Astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume 5 of the proceedings contains 62 papers of which 61 have been incorporated in INIS. They are divided by subject into several groups: early-type stars, late-type stars, binaries and multiple systems, theoretical considerations, ultraviolet stellar spectra, high energy astrophysics and binary stars. Many papers dealt with variable stars, star development and star models. (M.D.). 200 figs., 38 tabs., 1189 refs

  1. The r-process of stellar nucleosynthesis: Astrophysics and nuclear physics achievements and mysteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnould, M.; Goriely, S.; Takahashi, K.

    2007-09-01

    The r-process, or the rapid neutron-capture process, of stellar nucleosynthesis is called for to explain the production of the stable (and some long-lived radioactive) neutron-rich nuclides heavier than iron that are observed in stars of various metallicities, as well as in the solar system. A very large amount of nuclear information is necessary in order to model the r-process. This concerns the static characteristics of a large variety of light to heavy nuclei between the valley of stability and the vicinity of the neutron-drip line, as well as their beta-decay branches or their reactivity. Fission probabilities of very neutron-rich actinides have also to be known in order to determine the most massive nuclei that have a chance to be involved in the r-process. Even the properties of asymmetric nuclear matter may enter the problem. The enormously challenging experimental and theoretical task imposed by all these requirements is reviewed, and the state-of-the-art development in the field is presented. Nuclear-physics-based and astrophysics-free r-process models of different levels of sophistication have been constructed over the years. We review their merits and their shortcomings. The ultimate goal of r-process studies is clearly to identify realistic sites for the development of the r-process. Here too, the challenge is enormous, and the solution still eludes us. For long, the core collapse supernova of massive stars has been envisioned as the privileged r-process location. We present a brief summary of the one- or multidimensional spherical or non-spherical explosion simulations available to-date. Their predictions are confronted with the requirements imposed to obtain an r-process. The possibility of r-nuclide synthesis during the decompression of the matter of neutron stars following their merging is also discussed. Given the uncertainties remaining on the astrophysical r-process site and on the involved nuclear physics, any confrontation between predicted r

  2. The r-process of stellar nucleosynthesis: Astrophysics and nuclear physics achievements and mysteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnould, M. [Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, CP226, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: marnould@astro.ulb.ac.be; Goriely, S.; Takahashi, K. [Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, CP226, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2007-09-15

    The r-process, or the rapid neutron-capture process, of stellar nucleosynthesis is called for to explain the production of the stable (and some long-lived radioactive) neutron-rich nuclides heavier than iron that are observed in stars of various metallicities, as well as in the solar system. A very large amount of nuclear information is necessary in order to model the r-process. This concerns the static characteristics of a large variety of light to heavy nuclei between the valley of stability and the vicinity of the neutron-drip line, as well as their beta-decay branches or their reactivity. Fission probabilities of very neutron-rich actinides have also to be known in order to determine the most massive nuclei that have a chance to be involved in the r-process. Even the properties of asymmetric nuclear matter may enter the problem. The enormously challenging experimental and theoretical task imposed by all these requirements is reviewed, and the state-of-the-art development in the field is presented. Nuclear-physics-based and astrophysics-free r-process models of different levels of sophistication have been constructed over the years. We review their merits and their shortcomings. The ultimate goal of r-process studies is clearly to identify realistic sites for the development of the r-process. Here too, the challenge is enormous, and the solution still eludes us. For long, the core collapse supernova of massive stars has been envisioned as the privileged r-process location. We present a brief summary of the one- or multidimensional spherical or non-spherical explosion simulations available to-date. Their predictions are confronted with the requirements imposed to obtain an r-process. The possibility of r-nuclide synthesis during the decompression of the matter of neutron stars following their merging is also discussed. Given the uncertainties remaining on the astrophysical r-process site and on the involved nuclear physics, any confrontation between predicted r

  3. A family of models of partially relaxed stellar systems - II. Comparison with the products of collisionless collapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trenti, M; Bertin, G; van Albada, TS

    2005-01-01

    N-body simulations of collisionless collapse have offered important clues for the construction of realistic stellar dynamical models of elliptical galaxies. Understanding this idealized and relatively simple process, by which stellar systems can reach partially relaxed equilibrium configurations ( c

  4. Applications of generalized special functions in stellar astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Hans J. Haubold; Mathai, Arak Mathai

    1993-01-01

    This article gives an brief outline of the applications of generalized special functions such as generalized hypergeometric functions, G-functions and H-functions into the general area of nuclear energy generation and reaction rate theory such as the energy generation in a simple stellar model and nuclear reaction rates in non-resonant and resonant as well as screened non-resonant

  5. Towards optical intensity interferometry for high angular resolution stellar astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Nunez, Paul D

    2012-01-01

    Most neighboring stars are still detected as point sources and are beyond the angular resolution reach of current observatories. Methods to improve our understanding of stars at high angular resolution are investigated. Air Cherenkov telescopes (ACTs), primarily used for Gamma-ray astronomy, enable us to increase our understanding of the circumstellar environment of a particular system. When used as optical intensity interferometers, future ACT arrays will allow us to detect stars as extended objects and image their surfaces at high angular resolution. Optical stellar intensity interferometry (SII) with ACT arrays, composed of nearly 100 telescopes, will provide means to measure fundamental stellar parameters and also open the possibility of model-independent imaging. A data analysis algorithm is developed and permits the reconstruction of high angular resolution images from simulated SII data. The capabilities and limitations of future ACT arrays used for high angular resolution imaging are investigated via ...

  6. Flares: solar and stellar. Rutherford Appleton Laboratory workshop on astronomy and astrophysics, Abingdon, 19-21 May 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper concerns solar and stellar flare phenomena reported at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory Workshop on Astronomy and Astrophysics, May 1986. Eleven papers were presented at the Workshop on: the solar-stellar connection, observational evidence for solar and stellar flares, and flare models; and all are indexed separately. (UK)

  7. Understanding Astrophysical Noise from Stellar Surface Magneto-Convection

    CERN Document Server

    Cegla, H M; Shelyag, S; Mathioudakis, M

    2014-01-01

    To obtain cm/s precision, stellar surface magneto-convection must be disentangled from observed radial velocities (RVs). In order to understand and remove the convective signature, we create Sun-as-a-star model observations based on a 3D magnetohydrodynamic solar simulation. From these Sun-as-a-star model observations, we find several line characteristics are correlated with the induced RV shifts. The aim of this campaign is to feed directly into future high precision RV studies, such as the search for habitable, rocky worlds, with forthcoming spectrographs such as ESPRESSO.

  8. Comments on Biological Effects of Stellar Collapse Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Abbas, S; Abbas, Samar; Abbas, Afsar

    1996-01-01

    Extraterrestrial processes like neutrinos from collapsing stars, cosmic rays from supernovae and cosmic rays from neutron star mergers etc. have recently been proposed as models to explain the periodic mass extinctions such as that which wiped out the dinosaurs at the K-T boundary. Here we show that these models fail to give any reasonable explanation of several empirically established facts related to these mass extinctions.

  9. Stellar Intensity Interferometry: Astrophysical targets for sub-milliarcsecond imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Dravins, Dainis; LeBohec, Stephan; Nuñez, Paul D; 10.1117/12.856394

    2010-01-01

    Intensity interferometry permits very long optical baselines and the observation of sub-milliarcsecond structures. Using planned kilometric arrays of air Cherenkov telescopes at short wavelengths, intensity interferometry may increase the spatial resolution achieved in optical astronomy by an order of magnitude, inviting detailed studies of the shapes of rapidly rotating hot stars with structures in their circumstellar disks and winds, or mapping out patterns of nonradial pulsations across stellar surfaces. Signal-to-noise in intensity interferometry favors high-temperature sources and emission-line structures, and is independent of the optical passband, be it a single spectral line or the broad spectral continuum. Prime candidate sources have been identified among classes of bright and hot stars. Observations are simulated for telescope configurations envisioned for large Cherenkov facilities, synthesizing numerous optical baselines in software, confirming that resolutions of tens of microarcseconds are feas...

  10. UVESP: Ultraviolet Visible Echellé Spectropolarimeter for Stellar Astrophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yushkin, Maxim; Sachkov, Mikhail; Gomez De Castro, Ana; Marcos-Arenal, Pablo; Belén Perea Abarca, G.; Panchuk, Vladimir

    2016-07-01

    UVESP is an efficient instrument designed for mid resolution (30,000) spectropolarimetric observations in the 119-888nm wavelength range. Simultaneous spectropolarimetry in the optical and ultraviolet (UV) range is the only tool to study the precise characteristics of stellars magnetic fields and their connection with atmospheric structures, outflows, envelopes. The UV range is very rich in atomic and molecular lines. Moreover, hot stars radiation peaks in the UV range. The visible (VIS) spectrum provides information of the surface of the stars. Simultaneous UV and visible wavelength coverage will allow the extension of Doppler mapping methods into the winds, chromospheres and discs of stars, providing the 3D maps of their magnetospheres and immediate environments. The formation of planets around stars and the environmental conditions for emergence of life on these planets can be studied by monitoring the UV spectrum and the magnetic activity. In this contribution, we describe the optical design of UVESP. The instrument is fed by the radiation of an F/13 telescope that goes through an on-focus single polarimeter. The two spectrographs (UV and VIS) are fed by light coming from the polarimeter. The polarimeter splits the incoming beam into two states of polarization At the entrance of the instrument, a beam splitter divides the beam into the ultraviolet (UV) and the visible (VIS) channels with wavelength ranges of 355 nm to 888 nm for the VIS channel and 119 to 320 nm for the UV channel. In the VIS channel the beam continues to the slit and then a collimator is placed in order to illuminate a prism (double pass) with a collimated beam. After the prism an Echellé-grating and a a concave diffraction grating are allocated . After the grating, objective lenses are allocated. In the UV channel the beam continues from the slit to a collimator mirror. After, an Echelle-grating is allocated. The cross-dispersion is made with a toroidal diffraction grating. This design is

  11. The p-process of stellar nucleosynthesis: astrophysics and nuclear physics status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnould, M.; Goriely, S.

    2003-09-01

    The p-process of stellar nucleosynthesis is aimed at explaining the production of the stable neutron-deficient nuclides heavier than iron that are observed up to now in the solar system exclusively. Various scenarios have been proposed to account for the bulk p-nuclide content of the solar system, as well as for deviations (`anomalies') with respect to the bulk p-isotope composition of some elements discovered in primitive meteorites. The astrophysics of these models is reviewed, and the involved nuclear physics is discussed, including a brief account of recent experimental efforts. Already published results are complemented with new ones. A specific attention is paid to the very rare odd-odd nuclides 138La and 180Tam, as well as to the puzzling case of the light Mo and Ru isotopes. Astrophysics and nuclear physics prospects of improvements in the p-process modeling are presented.

  12. The p-process of stellar nucleosynthesis: astrophysics and nuclear physics status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnould, M.; Goriely, S

    2003-09-01

    The p-process of stellar nucleosynthesis is aimed at explaining the production of the stable neutron-deficient nuclides heavier than iron that are observed up to now in the solar system exclusively. Various scenarios have been proposed to account for the bulk p-nuclide content of the solar system, as well as for deviations ('anomalies') with respect to the bulk p-isotope composition of some elements discovered in primitive meteorites. The astrophysics of these models is reviewed, and the involved nuclear physics is discussed, including a brief account of recent experimental efforts. Already published results are complemented with new ones. A specific attention is paid to the very rare odd-odd nuclides {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta{sup m}, as well as to the puzzling case of the light Mo and Ru isotopes. Astrophysics and nuclear physics prospects of improvements in the p-process modeling are presented.

  13. Collapse of a molecular cloud core to stellar densities: the radiative impact of stellar core formation on the circumstellar disc

    CERN Document Server

    Bate, Matthew R

    2010-01-01

    We present results from the first three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamical calculations to follow the collapse of a molecular cloud core beyond the formation of the stellar core. We find the energy released by the formation of the stellar core, within the optically-thick first hydrostatic core, is comparable to the binding energy of the disc-like first core. This heats the inner regions of the disc, drives a shock wave through the disc, dramatically decreases the accretion rate on to the stellar core, and launches a temporary bipolar outflow perpendicular to the rotation axis that travels in excess of 50 AU into the infalling envelope. This outburst may assist the young protostar in launching a conventional magnetic jet. Furthermore, if these events are cyclic, they may provide a mechanism for intense bursts of accretion separated by long periods of relatively quiescent accretion which can potentially solve both the protostellar luminosity problem and the apparent age spread of stars in young clusters. Such...

  14. Effects of stellar rotation on star formation rates and comparison to core-collapse supernova rates

    CERN Document Server

    Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Bothwell, Matt S; Thompson, Todd A

    2013-01-01

    We investigate star formation rate (SFR) calibrations in light of recent developments in the modeling of stellar rotation. Using new published non-rotating and rotating stellar tracks, we study the integrated properties of synthetic stellar populations and find that the UV to SFR calibration for the rotating stellar population is 30% smaller than for the non-rotating stellar population, and 40% smaller for the Halpha to SFR calibration. These reductions translate to smaller SFR estimates made from observed UV and Halpha luminosities. Using the UV and Halpha fluxes of a sample of ~300 local galaxies, we derive a total (i.e., sky-coverage corrected) SFR within 11 Mpc of 120-170 Msun/yr and 80-130 Msun/yr for the non-rotating and rotating estimators, respectively. Independently, the number of core-collapse supernovae discovered in the same volume requires a total SFR of 270^{+110}_{-80} Msun/yr, suggesting a mild tension with the SFR estimates made with rotating calibrations. More generally, when compared with t...

  15. Effects of binary stellar populations on direct collapse black hole formation

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, Bhaskar; Khochfar, Sadegh; Klessen, Ralf; Glover, Simon; Johnson, Jarrett

    2016-01-01

    The critical Lyman-Werner (LW) flux required for direct collapse blackholes (DCBH) formation, or J$_{\\rm crit}$, depends on the shape of the irradiating spectral energy distribution (SED). The SEDs employed thus far have been representative of realistic single stellar populations. We study the effect of binary stellar populations on the formation of DCBH, as a result of their contribution to the LW radiation field. Although binary populations with ages $>$ 10 Myr yield a larger LW photon output, we find that the corresponding values of J$_{\\rm crit}$ can be up to 100 times higher than single stellar populations. We attribute this to the shape of the binary SEDs as they produce a sub-critical rate of H$^-$ photodetaching 0.76 eV photons as compared to single stellar populations, reaffirming the role that H$^-$ plays in DCBH formation. This further corroborates the idea that DCBH formation is better understood in terms of a critical region in the H$_2$-H$^-$ photodestruction rate parameter space, rather than a ...

  16. FORMATION OF BLACK HOLE AND ACCRETION DISK IN A MASSIVE HIGH-ENTROPY STELLAR CORE COLLAPSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the first numerical result of fully general relativistic axisymmetric simulations for the collapse of a rotating high-entropy stellar core to a black hole and an accretion disk. The simulations are performed taking into account the relevant microphysics. We adopt as initial conditions a spherical core with constant electron fraction (Ye = 0.5) and entropy per baryon s = 8 kB , and angular velocity is superimposed. In the early phase, the core collapses in a homologous manner. Then it experiences a weak bounce due to the gas pressure of free nucleons. Because the bounce is weak, the core eventually collapses to a black hole. Subsequent evolution depends on initial angular velocity. When the rotation is not fast, a geometrically thin (but optically thick) accretion disk is formed, and shock waves are formed in the inner part of the disk. For the moderately rotating case, the thin accretion disk eventually expands to become a geometrically thick torus after sufficient accumulation of the thermal energy is generated at the shocks. Furthermore, convection occurs inside the torus. Neutrino luminosities vary violently with time because of the convective motion. For the rapidly rotating case, by contrast, a geometrically thick torus is formed soon after the black hole formation, and the convective activity is weak due to the presence of an epicyclic mode.

  17. Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA): Giant Planets, Oscillations, Rotation, and Massive Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Paxton, Bill; Arras, Phil; Bildsten, Lars; Brown, Edward F; Dotter, Aaron; Mankovich, Christopher; Montgomery, M H; Stello, Dennis; Timmes, F X; Townsend, Richard

    2013-01-01

    We substantially update the capabilities of the open source software package Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA), and its one-dimensional stellar evolution module, MESA Star. Improvements in MESA Star's ability to model the evolution of giant planets now extends its applicability down to masses as low as one-tenth that of Jupiter. The dramatic improvement in asteroseismology enabled by the space-based Kepler and CoRoT missions motivates our full coupling of the ADIPLS adiabatic pulsation code with MESA Star. This also motivates a numerical recasting of the Ledoux criterion that is more easily implemented when many nuclei are present at non-negligible abundances. This impacts the way in which MESA Star calculates semi-convective and thermohaline mixing. We exhibit the evolution of 3-8 Msun stars through the end of core He burning, the onset of He thermal pulses, and arrival on the white dwarf cooling sequence. We implement diffusion of angular momentum and chemical abundances that enable cal...

  18. A Comprehensive Stellar Astrophysical Study of the Old Open Cluster M67 with Kepler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Robert D.; Vanderburg, Andrew; K2 M67 Team

    2016-06-01

    M67 is among the best studied of all star clusters. Being at an age and metallicity very near solar, at an accessible distance of 850 pc with low reddening, and rich in content (over 1000 members including main-sequence dwarfs, a well populated subgiant branch and red giant branch, white dwarfs, blue stragglers, sub-subgiants, X-ray sources and CVs), M67 is a cornerstone of stellar astrophysics.The K2 mission (Campaign 5) has obtained long-cadence observations for 2373 stars, both within an optimized central superaperture and as specified targets outside the superaperture. 1,432 of these stars are likely cluster members based on kinematic and photometric criteria.We have extracted light curves and corrected for K2 roll systematics, producing light curves with noise characteristics qualitatively similar to Kepler light curves of stars of similar magnitudes. The data quality is slightly poorer than for field stars observed by K2 due to crowding near the cluster core, but the data are of sufficient quality to detect seismic oscillations, binary star eclipses, flares, and candidate transit events. We are in the process of uploading light curves and various diagnostic files to MAST; light curves and supporting data will also be made available on ExoFOP.Importantly, several investigators within the M67 K2 team are independently doing light curve extractions and analyses for confirmation of science results. We also are adding extensive ground-based supporting data, including APOGEE near-infrared spectra, TRES and WIYN optical spectra, LCOGT photometry, and more.Our science goals encompass asteroseismology and stellar evolution, alternative stellar evolution pathways in binary stars, stellar rotation and angular momentum evolution, stellar activity, eclipsing binaries and beaming, and exoplanets. We will present early science results as available by the time of the meeting, and certainly including asteroseismology, blue stragglers and sub-subgiants, and newly discovered

  19. Hans A. Bethe Prize Talk: Neutron stars and stellar collapse: the physics of strongly interacting Fermi systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pethick, C. J.

    2011-04-01

    The talk will touch on a number of themes in the application of many-body theory to neutron stars and stellar collapse. One of these will be the composition and equation of state of nuclear matter. Specific topics will include nuclei in neutron stars, superfluidity and superconductivity of nuclear matter, and inhomogeneous phases of nuclear matter. A second major theme will be neutrino processes in dense matter: neutrino emission is the most powerful cooling mechanism for young neutron stars, and rates of neutrino processes are a key ingredient in simulations of stellar collapse.

  20. Recent Progress in Nuclear Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Langanke, K

    1999-01-01

    The manuscript reviews progress achieved in recent years in various aspects of nuclear astrophysics, including stellar nucleosynthesis, nuclear aspects of supernova collapse and explosion, neutrino-induced reactions and their possible role in the supernova mechanism and nucleosynthesis, explosive hydrogen burning in binary systems, and finally the observation of $\\gamma$-rays from supernova remnants.

  1. Astrophysical Shrapnel: Discriminating Among Near-Earth Stellar Explosion Sources of Live Radioactive Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Fry, Brian J; Ellis, John R

    2015-01-01

    We consider the production and deposition on Earth of isotopes with half-lives in the range 10$^{5}$ to 10$^{8}$ years that might provide signatures of nearby stellar explosions, extending previous analyses of Core-Collapse Supernovae (CCSNe) to include Electron-Capture Supernovae (ECSNe), Super-Asymptotic Giant Branch (SAGBs) stars, Thermonuclear/Type Ia Supernovae (TNSNe), and Kilonovae/Neutron Star Mergers (KNe). We revisit previous estimates of the $^{60}$Fe and $^{26}$Al signatures, and extend these estimates to include $^{244}$Pu and $^{53}$Mn. We discuss interpretations of the $^{60}$Fe signals in terrestrial and lunar reservoirs in terms of a nearby stellar ejection ~2.2 Myr ago, showing that (i) the $^{60}$Fe yield rules out the TNSN and KN interpretations, (ii) the $^{60}$Fe signals highly constrain a SAGB interpretation but do not completely them rule out, (iii) are consistent with a CCSN origin, and (iv) are highly compatible with an ECSN interpretation. Future measurements could resolve the radio...

  2. ASTROPHYSICAL SHRAPNEL: DISCRIMINATING AMONG NEAR-EARTH STELLAR EXPLOSION SOURCES OF LIVE RADIOACTIVE ISOTOPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, Brian J.; Fields, Brian D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Ellis, John R. [Theoretical Physics and Cosmology Group, Department of Physics, King' s College London, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-10

    We consider the production and deposition on Earth of isotopes with half-lives in the range 10{sup 5}-10{sup 8} yr that might provide signatures of nearby stellar explosions, extending previous analyses of Core-Collapse Supernovae (CCSNe) to include Electron-Capture Supernovae (ECSNe), Super-Asymptotic Giant Branch (SAGB) stars, Thermonuclear/Type Ia Supernovae (TNSNe), and Kilonovae/Neutron Star Mergers (KNe). We revisit previous estimates of the {sup 60}Fe and {sup 26}Al signatures, and extend these estimates to include {sup 244}Pu and {sup 53}Mn. We discuss interpretations of the {sup 60}Fe signals in terrestrial and lunar reservoirs in terms of a nearby stellar ejection ∼2.2 Myr ago, showing that (1) the {sup 60}Fe yield rules out the TNSN and KN interpretations, (2) the {sup 60}Fe signals highly constrain SAGB interpretations but do not completely them rule out, (3) are consistent with a CCSN origin, and (4) are highly compatible with an ECSN interpretation. Future measurements could resolve the radioisotope deposition over time, and we use the Sedov blast wave solution to illustrate possible time-resolved profiles. Measuring such profiles would independently probe the blast properties including distance, and would provide additional constraints for the nature of the explosion.

  3. ASTROPHYSICAL SHRAPNEL: DISCRIMINATING AMONG NEAR-EARTH STELLAR EXPLOSION SOURCES OF LIVE RADIOACTIVE ISOTOPES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider the production and deposition on Earth of isotopes with half-lives in the range 105-108 yr that might provide signatures of nearby stellar explosions, extending previous analyses of Core-Collapse Supernovae (CCSNe) to include Electron-Capture Supernovae (ECSNe), Super-Asymptotic Giant Branch (SAGB) stars, Thermonuclear/Type Ia Supernovae (TNSNe), and Kilonovae/Neutron Star Mergers (KNe). We revisit previous estimates of the 60Fe and 26Al signatures, and extend these estimates to include 244Pu and 53Mn. We discuss interpretations of the 60Fe signals in terrestrial and lunar reservoirs in terms of a nearby stellar ejection ∼2.2 Myr ago, showing that (1) the 60Fe yield rules out the TNSN and KN interpretations, (2) the 60Fe signals highly constrain SAGB interpretations but do not completely them rule out, (3) are consistent with a CCSN origin, and (4) are highly compatible with an ECSN interpretation. Future measurements could resolve the radioisotope deposition over time, and we use the Sedov blast wave solution to illustrate possible time-resolved profiles. Measuring such profiles would independently probe the blast properties including distance, and would provide additional constraints for the nature of the explosion

  4. Gravity wave and neutrino bursts from stellar collapse: A sensitive test of neutrino masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New methods are proposed with the goal to determine absolute neutrino masses from the simultaneous observation of the bursts of neutrinos and gravitational waves emitted during a stellar collapse. It is shown that the neutronization electron neutrino flash and the maximum amplitude of the gravitational wave signal are tightly synchronized with the bounce occurring at the end of the core collapse on a time scale better than 1 ms. The existing underground neutrino detectors (SuperKamiokande, SNO,...) and the gravity wave antennas soon to operate (LIGO, VIRGO,...) are well matched in their performance for detecting galactic supernovae and for making use of the proposed approach. Several methods are described, which apply to the different scenarios depending on neutrino mixing. Given the present knowledge on neutrino oscillations, the methods proposed are sensitive to a mass range where neutrinos would essentially be mass degenerate. The 95% C.L. upper limit which can be achieved varies from 0.75 eV/c2 for large νe survival probabilities to 1.1 eV/c2 when in practice all νe's convert into νμ's or ντ's. The sensitivity is nearly independent of the supernova distance

  5. A Combined Spectral/Godunov Code for the Simulation of Gravitational Waves from Stellar Supernova Core Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, J.; Dimmelmeier, H.; Font, J. A.

    2008-04-01

    Supernovae represent powerful sources of gravitational radiation. Their numerical simulation, even of simplified core collapse models, requires numerical techniques that are able to handle strong hydrodynamic shocks and a general-relativistic gravitational field. Such hydrodynamics can be modeled with high-resolution shock-capturing (HRSC) schemes, also known as Godunov schemes, in general relativity, while the Einstein equations for the gravitational field may require much computer power, if solved in the same way. It is therefore interesting to use spectral methods to model the gravitational field, which is always regular enough to avoid any Gibbs phenomenon, in conjunction with HRSC schemes for the hydrodynamics equations. We present such a code combining both methods to model stellar core collapse simulations and the resulting gravitational waves, with the most recent equations of state and a simplified neutrino treatment. Some additional results on neutron star oscillations are also shown.

  6. Estimations of the Distances of Stellar Collapses in the Galaxy by Analyzing the Energy Spectrum of Neutrino Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Kemp, Ernesto; Fulgione, Walter; 10.1142/S0218301311040591

    2012-01-01

    The neutrino telescopes of the present generation, depending on their specific features, can reconstruct the neutrino spectra from a galactic burst. Since the optical counterpart could be not available, it is desirable to have at hand alternative methods to estimate the distance of the supernova explosion using only the neutrino data. In this work we present preliminary results on the method we are proposing to estimate the distance from a galactic supernova based only on the spectral shape of the neutrino burst and assumptions on the gravitational binding energy released an a typical supernova explosion due to stellar collapses.

  7. Laboratory Astrophysics and Collimated Stellar Outflows The Production of Radiatively Cooled Hypersonic Plasma Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Lebedev, S V; Beg, F N; Bland, S N; Ciardi, A; Ampleford, D; Hughes, S; Haines, M G; Frank, A; Blackman, E G; Gardiner, T

    2002-01-01

    We present first results of astrophysically relevant experiments where highly supersonic plasma jets are generated via conically convergent flows. The convergent flows are created by electrodynamic acceleration of plasma in a conical array of fine metallic wires (a modification of the wire array Z-pinch). Stagnation of plasma flow on the axis of symmetry forms a standing conical shock effectively collimating the flow in the axial direction. This scenario is essentially similar to that discussed by Canto\\' ~and collaborators as a purely hydrodynamic mechanism for jet formation in astrophysical systems. Experiments using different materials (Al, Fe and W) show that a highly supersonic ($M\\sim 20$), well-collimated jet is generated when the radiative cooling rate of the plasma is significant. We discuss scaling issues for the experiments and their potential use for numerical code verification. The experiments also may allow direct exploration of astrophysically relevant issues such as collimation, stability and ...

  8. Numerical simulations of stellar collapse in scalar-tensor theories of gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Gerosa, Davide; Ott, Christian D

    2016-01-01

    We present numerical-relativity simulations of spherically symmetric core collapse and compact-object formation in scalar-tensor theories of gravity. The additional scalar degree of freedom introduces a propagating monopole gravitational-wave mode. Detection of monopole scalar waves with current and future gravitational-wave experiments may constitute smoking gun evidence for strong-field modifications of General Relativity. We collapse both polytropic and more realistic pre-supernova profiles using a high-resolution shock-capturing scheme and an approximate prescription for the nuclear equation of state. The most promising sources of scalar radiation are protoneutron stars collapsing to black holes. In case of a Galactic core collapse event forming a black hole, Advanced LIGO may be able to place independent constraints on the parameters of the theory at a level comparable to current Solar-System and binary-pulsar measurements. In the region of the parameter space admitting spontaneously scalarised stars, tr...

  9. Neutrino Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Volpe, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    We summarize the progress in neutrino astrophysics and emphasize open issues in our understanding of neutrino flavor conversion in media. We discuss solar neutrinos, core-collapse supernova neutrinos and conclude with ultra-high energy neutrinos.

  10. Atomic Data for Stellar Astrophysics: from the UV to the IR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlgren, Glenn M.

    2011-01-01

    The study of stars and stellar evolution relies heavily on the analysis of stellar spectra. The need for atomic line data from the ultraviolet (UV) to the infrared (lR) regions is greater now than ever. In the past twenty years, the time since the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope, great progress has been made in acquiring atomic data for UV transitions. The optical wavelength region, now expanded by progress in detector technology, continues to provide motivation for new atomic data. In addition, investments in new instrumentation for ground-based and space observatories has lead to the availability of high-quality spectra at IR wavelengths, where the need for atomic data is most critical. In this review, examples are provided of the progress made in generating atomic data for stellar studies, with a look to the future for addressing the accuracy and completeness of atomic data for anticipated needs.

  11. Topics in Nuclear Astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some topics in nuclear astrophysics are discussed, e.g.: highly evolved stellar cores, stellar evolution (through the temperature analysis of stellar surface), nucleosynthesis and finally the solar neutrino problem. (L.C.)

  12. Stellar Surface Magneto-Convection as a Source of Astrophysical Noise. I. Multi-component Parameterisation of Absorption Line Profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Cegla, H M; Watson, C A; Mathioudakis, M

    2012-01-01

    We outline our techniques to characterise photospheric granulation as an astrophysical noise source. A four component parameterisation of granulation is developed that can be used to reconstruct stellar line asymmetries and radial velocity shifts due to photospheric convective motions. The four components are made up of absorption line profiles calculated for granules, magnetic intergranular lanes, non-magnetic intergranular lanes, and magnetic bright points at disc centre. These components are constructed by averaging Fe I $6302 \\mathrm{\\AA}$ magnetically sensitive absorption line profiles output from detailed radiative transport calculations of the solar photosphere. Each of the four categories adopted are based on magnetic field and continuum intensity limits determined from examining three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations with an average magnetic flux of $200 \\mathrm{G}$. Using these four component line profiles we accurately reconstruct granulation profiles, produced from modelling 12 x 12 Mm$...

  13. Stellar $\\beta^{\\pm}$ decay rates of iron isotopes and its implications in astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Nabi, Jameel-Un

    2014-01-01

    $\\beta$-decay and positron decay are believed to play a consequential role during the late phases of stellar evolution of a massive star culminating in a supernova explosion. Recently the microscopic calculation of weak-interaction mediated rates on key isotopes of iron was introduced using the proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA) theory with improved model parameters. Here I discuss in detail the improved calculation of $\\beta^{\\pm}$ decay rates for iron isotopes ($^{54,55,56}$Fe) in stellar environment. The pn-QRPA theory allows a microscopic "state-by-state" calculation of stellar rates as explained later in text. Excited state Gamow-Teller distributions are much different from ground state and a microscopic calculation of decay rates from these excited states greatly increases the reliability of the total decay rate calculation specially during the late stages of stellar evolution. The reported decay rates are also compared with earlier calculations. The positron decay rates a...

  14. Principles of astrophysics using gravity and stellar physics to explore the cosmos

    CERN Document Server

    Keeton, Charles

    2014-01-01

    This book gives a survey of astrophysics at the advanced undergraduate level.  It originates from a two-semester course sequence at Rutgers University that is meant to appeal not only to astrophysics students but also more broadly to physics and engineering students.  The organization is driven more by physics than by astronomy; in other words, topics are first developed in physics and then applied to astronomical systems that can be investigated, rather than the other way around. The first half of the book focuses on gravity.  Gravity is the dominant force in many astronomical systems, so a tremendous amount can be learned by studying gravity, motion and mass.  The theme in this part of the book, as well as throughout astrophysics, is using motion to investigate mass.  The goal of Chapters 2-11 is to develop a progressively richer understanding of gravity as it applies to objects ranging from planets and moons to galaxies and the universe as a whole. The second half uses other aspects of physics to addr...

  15. Relativistic astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Demianski, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Relativistic Astrophysics brings together important astronomical discoveries and the significant achievements, as well as the difficulties in the field of relativistic astrophysics. This book is divided into 10 chapters that tackle some aspects of the field, including the gravitational field, stellar equilibrium, black holes, and cosmology. The opening chapters introduce the theories to delineate gravitational field and the elements of relativistic thermodynamics and hydrodynamics. The succeeding chapters deal with the gravitational fields in matter; stellar equilibrium and general relativity

  16. Numerical simulations of stellar collapse in scalar-tensor theories of gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerosa, Davide; Sperhake, Ulrich; Ott, Christian D.

    2016-07-01

    We present numerical-relativity simulations of spherically symmetric core collapse and compact-object formation in scalar-tensor theories of gravity. The additional scalar degree of freedom introduces a propagating monopole gravitational-wave mode. Detection of monopole scalar waves with current and future gravitational-wave experiments may constitute smoking gun evidence for strong-field modifications of general relativity. We collapse both polytropic and more realistic pre-supernova profiles using a high-resolution shock-capturing scheme and an approximate prescription for the nuclear equation of state. The most promising sources of scalar radiation are protoneutron stars collapsing to black holes. In case of a galactic core collapse event forming a black hole, Advanced LIGO may be able to place independent constraints on the parameters of the theory at a level comparable to current solar-system and binary-pulsar measurements. In the region of the parameter space admitting spontaneously scalarised stars, transition to configurations with prominent scalar hair before black-hole formation further enhances the emitted signal. Although a more realistic treatment of the microphysics is necessary to fully investigate the occurrence of spontaneous scalarisation of neutron star remnants, we speculate that formation of such objects could constrain the parameters of the theory beyond the current bounds obtained with solar-system and binary-pulsar experiments.

  17. Multicore and Accelerator Development for a Leadership-Class Stellar Astrophysics Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Harris, James A [ORNL; Parete-Koon, Suzanne T [ORNL; Chertkow, Merek A [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    We describe recent development work on the core-collapse supernova code CHIMERA. CHIMERA has consumed more than 100 million cpu-hours on Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) platforms in the past 3 years, ranking it among the most important applications at the OLCF. Most of the work described has been focused on exploiting the multicore nature of the current platform (Jaguar) via, e.g., multithreading using OpenMP. In addition, we have begun a major effort to marshal the computational power of GPUs with CHIMERA. The impending upgrade of Jaguar to Titan a 20+ PF machine with an NVIDIA GPU on many nodes makes this work essential.

  18. New criterion for direct black hole formation in rapidly rotating stellar collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Sekiguchi, Y; Sekiguchi, Yu-ichirou; Shibata, Masaru

    2004-01-01

    We study gravitational collapse of rapidly rotating relativistic polytropes of the adiabatic index $\\Gamma = 1.5$ and 2, in which the spin parameter $q \\equiv J/M^{2} > 1$ where $J$ and $M$ are total angular momentum and gravitational mass, in full general relativity. First, analyzing initial distributions of the mass and the spin parameter inside stars, we predict the final outcome after the collapse. Then, we perform fully general relativistic simulations on assumption of axial and equatorial symmetries and confirm our predictions. As a result of simulations, we find that in contrast with the previous belief, even for stars with $q > 1$, the collapse proceeds to form a seed black hole at central region, and the seed black hole subsequently grows as the ambient fluids accrete onto it. We also find that growth of angular momentum and mass of the seed black hole can be approximately determined from the initial profiles of the density and the specific angular momentum. We define an effective spin parameter at t...

  19. A New Open-Source Code for Spherically-Symmetric Stellar Collapse to Neutron Stars and Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    O'Connor, Evan

    2009-01-01

    We present the new open-source spherically-symmetric general-relativistic (GR) hydrodynamics code GR1D. It is based on the Eulerian formulation of GR hydrodynamics (GRHD) put forth by Romero-Ibanez-Gourgoulhon and employs radial-gauge, polar-slicing coordinates in which the 3+1 equations simplify substantially. We discretize the GRHD equations with a finite-volume scheme, employing piecewise-parabolic reconstruction and an approximate Riemann solver. GR1D is intended for the simulation of stellar collapse to neutron stars and black holes and will also serve as a testbed for modeling technology to be incorporated in multi-D GR codes. Its GRHD part is coupled to various finite-temperature microphysical equations of state in tabulated form that we make available with GR1D. An approximate deleptonization scheme for the collapse phase and a neutrino-leakage/heating scheme for the postbounce epoch are included and described. We also derive the equations for effective rotation in 1D and implement them in GR1D. We pr...

  20. Stellar Astrophysics and a Fundamental Description of Thermonuclear Reactions ? 04-ERD-058 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ormand, W E; Navratil, P; Libby, S B

    2007-02-22

    Report on the progress achieved in 04-ERD-058. The primary goal of the project was to investigate new methods to provide a comprehensive understanding of how reactions between light nuclei proceed in hot, dense environments, such as stellar interiors. The project sought to develop an entirely new theoretical framework to describe the dynamics of nuclear collisions based on the fundamental nuclear interactions. Based on the new theoretical framework, new computational tools were developed to address specific questions in nuclear structure and reactions. A full study of the true nature of the three-nucleon interaction was undertaken within the formalism of effective field theory. We undertook a preliminary theoretical study of the quantum corrections to electron screening in thermal plasmas to resolve a discrepancy exhibited in previous theoretical approaches.

  1. Two effects relevant for the study of astrophysical reaction rates: gamma transitions in capture reactions and Coulomb suppression of the stellar enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Rauscher, T

    2008-01-01

    Nucleosynthesis processes involve reactions on several thousand nuclei, both close to and far off stability. The preparation of reaction rates to be used in astrophysical investigations requires experimental and theoretical input. In this context, two interesting aspects are discussed: (i) the relevant gamma transition energies in astrophysical capture reactions, and (ii) the newly discovered Coulomb suppression of the stellar enhancement factor. The latter makes a number of reactions with negative Q value more favorable for experimental investigation than their inverse reactions, contrary to common belief.

  2. Magnetic field amplification and magnetically supported explosions of collapsing, non-rotating stellar cores

    CERN Document Server

    Obergaulinger, Martin; Toras, Miguel Angel Aloy

    2014-01-01

    We study the amplification of magnetic fields in the collapse and the post-bounce evolution of the core of a non-rotating star of 15 solar masses in axisymmetry. To this end, we solve the coupled equations of magnetohydrodynamics and neutrino transport in the two-moment approximation. The pre-collapse magnetic field is strongly amplified by compression in the infall. Initial fields of the order of 1010 G translate into proto-neutron star fields similar to the ones observed in pulsars, while stronger initial fields yield magnetar-like final field strengths. After core bounce, the field is advected through the hydrodynamically unstable neutrino-heating layer, where non-radial flows due to convection and the standing accretion shock instability amplify the field further. Consequently, the resulting amplification factor of order five is the result of the number of small-eddy turnovers taking place within the time scale of advection through the post-shock layer. Due to this limit, most of our models do not reach e...

  3. The First Feedback and Stellar Tidal Disruptions by Direct Collapse Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Kashiyama, Kazumi

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the early growth stage of direct-collapse black holes (DCBHs) with $\\sim 10^{5} \\ \\rm M_\\odot$, which are formed by collapse of supermassive stars in atomic-cooling halos at $z \\gtrsim 10$. A nuclear accretion disk around a newborn DCBH is gravitationally unstable and fragments into clumps with a few $10 \\ \\rm M_\\odot$ at $\\sim 0.01-0.1 \\ \\rm pc$ from the center. Such clumps evolve into massive metal-poor stars with a few $10-100 \\ \\rm M_\\odot$ via successive gas accretion and a nuclear star cluster is formed. Radiative and mechanical feedback from an inner slim disk and the star cluster will significantly reduce the gas accretion rate onto the DCBH within $\\sim 10^6$ yr. Some of the nuclear stars can be scattered onto the loss cone orbits also within $\\lesssim 10^6$ yr and tidally disrupted by the central DCBH. The jet luminosity powered by such tidal disruption events can be $L_{\\rm j} \\gtrsim 10^{50} \\ \\rm erg \\ s^{-1}$. The prompt emission will be observed in X-ray bands with a peak duration of...

  4. Songlines from Direct Collapse Seed Black Holes: Effects of X-rays on Black Hole Growth and Stellar Populations

    CERN Document Server

    Aykutalp, Aycin; Spaans, Marco; Meijerink, Rowin

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, the growth of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) has been intricately linked to galaxy formation and evolution and is a key ingredient in the assembly of galaxies. To investigate the origin of SMBHs, we perform cosmological simulations that target the direct collapse black hole (DCBH) seed formation scenario in the presence of two different strong Lyman-Werner (LW) background fields. These simulations include the X-ray irradiation from a central massive black hole (MBH), $\\rm{H}_2$ self-shielding and stellar feedback from metal-free and metal-enriched stars. We find in both simulations that local X-ray feedback induces metal-free star formation $\\sim 0.5$ Myr after the MBH forms. The MBH accretion rate reaches a maximum of $10^{-3}$ $M_{\\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ in both simulations. However, the duty cycle differs which is derived to be $6\\%$ and $50\\%$ for high and low LW cases, respectively. The MBH in the high LW case grows only $\\sim 6\\%$ in 100 Myr compared to $16\\%$ in the low LW case. We find...

  5. Songlines from Direct Collapse Seed Black Holes: Effects of X-Rays on Black Hole Growth and Stellar Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aykutalp, Aycin; Wise, John H.; Spaans, Marco; Meijerink, Rowin

    2014-12-01

    In the last decade, the growth of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) has been intricately linked to galaxy formation and evolution and is a key ingredient in the assembly of galaxies. To investigate the origin of SMBHs, we perform cosmological simulations that target the direct collapse black hole seed formation scenario in the presence of two different strong Lyman-Werner (LW) background fields. These simulations include the X-ray irradiation from a central massive black hole (MBH), H2 self-shielding, and stellar feedback from metal-free and metal-enriched stars. We find in both simulations that local X-ray feedback induces metal-free star formation ~0.5 Myr after the MBH forms. The MBH accretion rate reaches a maximum of 10-3 M ⊙ yr-1 in both simulations. However, the duty cycle differs and is derived to be 6% and 50% for the high and low LW cases, respectively. The MBH in the high LW case grows only ~6% in 100 Myr compared to 16% in the low LW case. We find that the maximum accretion rate is determined by the local gas thermodynamics, whereas the duty cycle is determined by the large-scale gas dynamics and gas reservoir. We conclude that radiative feedback from the central MBH plays an important role in star formation in the nuclear regions and stifling initial MBH growth relative to the typical Eddington rate argument, and that initial MBH growth might be affected by the local LW radiation field.

  6. Nuclear astrophysics with neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillmann, I.; Reifarth, R.

    2012-04-01

    Neutrons play a crucial role in astrophysics during the heavy element nucleosynthesis. The largest fraction of isotopes heavier than iron is produced by neutron capture processes on short (r process) and long timescales (s process). During the ``slow neutron capture process'' (s process) heavier elements are produced by successive captures of in-situ produced neutrons from the reactions 13C(α,n)16O and 22Ne(α,n)25Mg (with densities of 106-1010 cm-3) in the interior of stars and following β-decays. With this scenario the reaction path runs along the valley of stability up to 209Bi and produces about 50% of the solar abundances of the heavy elements. Important nuclear physics parameters for s-process nucleosynthesis are neutron capture cross sections (for En = 0.3-300 keV, corresponding to stellar temperatures between kT= 8 and 90 keV) and β-decay half-lives. Neutron capture measurements can be performed via activation in a quasi-stellar neutron spectrum utilizing several (p,n) reactions, or by the time-of-flight technique. The ``rapid neutron capture process'' (r process) is responsible for the remaining 50% of the solar abundances. Here neutrons with densities of 1020-1030 cm-3 are captured on a very fast timescale (ms) during a Core Collapse Supernova in a region close to the forming neutron star. The r-process nuclei are thus very short-lived, neutron-rich isotopes up to the actinides, which can only be produced and investigated at large-scale radioactive-beam facilities. Here the most important nuclear physics parameters are masses, half-lives, and at later stages also β-delayed neutrons. This paper will summarize the role of neutrons in nuclear astrophysics and give a short overview about the related astrophysics programs at the GSI Helmholtz research center and the FRANZ facility in Germany.

  7. Astrophysics: An Integrative Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutsche, Graham D.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a one semester course in introductory stellar astrophysics at the advanced undergraduate level. The course aims to integrate all previously learned physics by applying it to the study of stars. After a brief introductory section on basic astronomical measurements, the main topics covered are stellar atmospheres, stellar structure, and…

  8. Modification of magicity towards the dripline and its impact on electron-capture rates for stellar core-collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Raduta, Ad R; Oertel, M

    2015-01-01

    The importance of microphysical inputs from laboratory nuclear experiments and theoretical nuclear structure calculations in the understanding of the core collapse dynamics, and the subsequent supernova explosion, is largely recognized in the recent literature. In this work, we analyze the impact of the masses of very neutron rich nuclei on the matter composition during collapse, and the corresponding electron capture rate. To this aim, we introduce an empirical modification of the popular Duflo-Zuker mass model to account for possible shell quenching far from stability, and study the effect of the quenching on the average electron capture rate. We show that the preeminence of the $N=50$ and $N=82$ closed shells in the collapse dynamics is considerably decreased if the shell gaps are reduced in the region of $^{78}$Ni and beyond. As a consequence, local modifications of the overall electron capture rate up to 30\\% can be expected, with integrated values strongly dependent on the stiffness of magicity quenchin...

  9. The First 50 Years at Palomar: 1949-1999 The Early Years of Stellar Evolution, Cosmology, and High-Energy Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandage, Allan

    An account is given of the history of two observational programs set for the Palomar 200-inch telescope, one by Walter Baade and the other by Edwin Hubble near the start of the scheduled operation of the telescope 50 years ago. The review is partly an assessment of whether, and how well, these programs have been carried to completion, and partly an account of the response of Palomar to new discoveries and developments not foreseen in 1950. Stellar evolution, the discovery of variations in the metallicity of stars of different populations, the chemical evolution of the Galaxy, the Cepheid P-L relation, the redshift-distance relation of the expanding universe, and the extragalactic distance scale are discussed as they relate to the predictions for progress on the programs set out by Baade and Hubble. Not foreseen was the invention and development of radio astronomy and high energy astrophysics, leading to the discovery of radio galaxies, quasars, and the gradual realization of violent events, both in stars and in galaxies. The review is highly restricted to these subjects, covering only three areas among the totality of the work in observational astrophysics studied during the first 50 years at Palomar.

  10. IMPACT OF QUARKS AND PIONS ON DYNAMICS AND NEUTRINO SIGNAL OF BLACK HOLE FORMATION IN NON-ROTATING STELLAR CORE COLLAPSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the formation process of black holes, the density and temperature of matter become sufficiently high for quarks and pions to appear. In this study, we numerically investigate stellar core collapse and black hole formation taking into account the equations of state involving quarks and/or pions. In our simulations, we utilize a code that solves the general relativistic hydrodynamics and neutrino transfer equations simultaneously, treating neutrino reactions in detail under spherical symmetry. Initial models with three different masses, namely, 40, 100, and 375 Msun, are adopted. Our results show that quarks and pions shorten the duration of neutrino emission if the collapse bounces before black hole formation. In addition, pions increase the luminosity and average energy of neutrinos before black hole formation. We also find that the hadron-quark phase transition leads to an interesting evolution of temperature. Moreover, the neutrino event number is evaluated for the currently operating neutrino detector, SuperKamiokande, to confirm that it is not only detectable but also affected by the emergence of quarks and pions for Galactic events. While there are some issues, such as hyperons, beyond the scope of this study, this is the first serious attempt to assess the impact of quarks and pions in dynamical simulations of black hole formation and will serve as an important foundation for future studies.

  11. Observational astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Robert C

    1995-01-01

    Combining a critical account of observational methods (telescopes and instrumentation) with a lucid description of the Universe, including stars, galaxies and cosmology, Smith provides a comprehensive introduction to the whole of modern astrophysics beyond the solar system. The first half describes the techniques used by astronomers to observe the Universe: optical telescopes and instruments are discussed in detail, but observations at all wavelengths are covered, from radio to gamma-rays. After a short interlude describing the appearance of the sky at all wavelengths, the role of positional astronomy is highlighted. In the second half, a clear description is given of the contents of the Universe, including accounts of stellar evolution and cosmological models. Fully illustrated throughout, with exercises given in each chapter, this textbook provides a thorough introduction to astrophysics for all physics undergraduates, and a valuable background for physics graduates turning to research in astronomy.

  12. Introduction to Nuclear Astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the first lecture of this volume, we will present the basic fundamental ideas regarding nuclear processes occurring in stars. We start from stellar observations, will then elaborate on some important quantum-mechanical phenomena governing nuclear reactions, continue with how nuclear reactions proceed in a hot stellar plasma and, finally, we will provide an overview of stellar burning stages. At the end, the current knowledge regarding the origin of the elements is briefly summarized. This lecture is directed towards the student of nuclear astrophysics. Our intention is to present seemingly unrelated phenomena of nuclear physics and astrophysics in a coherent framework.

  13. The Dominance of Dynamic Barlike Instabilities in the Evolution of a Massive Stellar Core Collapse That ``Fizzles''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, James N.; Durisen, Richard H.

    2001-03-01

    Core collapse in a massive rotating star may halt at subnuclear density if the core contains angular momentum J>~1049 g cm2 s-1. An aborted collapse can lead to the formation of a rapidly rotating equilibrium object, which, because of its high electron fraction, Ye>0.4, and high entropy per baryon, Sb/k~1-2, is secularly and dynamically stable. The further evolution of such a ``fizzler'' is driven by deleptonization and cooling of the hot, dense material. These processes cause the fizzler both to contract toward neutron star densities and to spin up, driving it toward instability points of the barlike modes. Using linear stability analyses to study the latter case, we find that the stability properties of fizzlers are similar to those of Maclaurin spheroids and polytropes despite the nonpolytropic nature and extreme compressibility of the fizzler equation of state. For fizzlers with the specific angular momentum distribution of the Maclaurin spheroids, secular and dynamic barlike instabilities set in at T/|W|~0.14 and 0.27, respectively, where T is the rotational kinetic energy and W is the gravitational energy of the fizzler, the same limits as found for Maclaurin spheroids. For fizzlers in which angular momentum is more concentrated toward the equator, the secular stability limits drop dramatically. For the most extreme angular momentum distribution we consider, the secular stability limit for the barlike modes falls to T/|W|~0.038, compared with T/|W|~0.09-0.10 for the most extreme polytropic cases known previously (Imamura et al.). For fixed equation-of-state parameters, the secular and dynamic stability limits occur at roughly constant mass over the range of typical fizzler central densities. Deleptonization and cooling decrease the limiting masses on timescales shorter than the growth time for secular instability. Consequently, unless an evolving fizzler reaches neutron star densities first, it will always encounter dynamic barlike instabilities before

  14. The long-term evolution of warped, magnetised discs, and precessing outflows in collapsing pre-stellar cores

    CERN Document Server

    Duffin, Dennis F; Seifried, Daniel; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S

    2011-01-01

    (abridged) The nature of early Class 0/I protostellar discs is not clearly understood. Early protostellar discs are needed to drive molecular outflows and jets observed in star forming regions, but there has been some debate to how they form. From a theoretical perspective, the consequences of disc and outflow generation are crucial to understanding the very nature of how stars are assembled. We have performed 3D ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of collapsing Bonnor-Ebert spheres, employing sink particles with a radius of 3.2 AU alongside an AMR grid and using a cooling function to model radiative cooling of the gas. This has allowed us to explore 2-8x10^4 yr further into the evolution of an early Class 0 disc-outflow system than previous simulations. Our outflow is precessing, kinked, turbulent, contains internal shocks and has a scale of 0.1 pc end-to-end. We form a rotationally dominated disc with a radius of 100 AU embedded inside a transient, unstable, flattened, rotating core extending out to...

  15. Linear astrophysical dynamos in rotating spheres Differential rotation, anisotropic turbulent magnetic diffusivity, and solar-stellar cycle magnetic parity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, H.; Wang, Z.; Wu, F.

    1984-05-01

    Differential rotation dependence of the selection mechanism for magnetic parity of solar and stellar cycles is studied by assuming various differential rotation profiles in the dynamo equation. The parity selection depends on propagation direction of oscillating magnetic fields in the form of dynamo waves which propagate along isorotation surfaces. When there is any radial gradient in the differential rotation, dynamo waves propagate either equatorward or poleward. In the former case, field systems of the two hemispheres approach each other and collide at the equator. Then, odd parity is selected. In the latter case, field systems of the two hemispheres recede from each other and do not collide at the equator, and even parity is selected. Thus the equatorial migration of wings of the butterfly diagram of the solar cycle and its odd parity are intrinsically related. In the case of purely latitudinal differential rotation, dynamo waves propagate purely radially and growth rates of odd and even modes are nearly the same even when dynamo strength is weak when the parity selection mechanism should work most efficiently. In this case, anisotropy of turbulent diffusivity is a decisive factor to separate odd and even modes. Unlike in the case of radial-gradient-dominated differential rotation in which any difference between diffusivities for poloidal and toroidal fields enhances the parity selection without changing the parity, the parity selection in the case of latitudinal-gradient-dominated differential rotation depends on the difference of diffusivities for poloidal and toroidal fields. When diffusivity for poloidal fields is larger than that for toroidal fields, odd parity is selected; and when diffusivity for toroidal fields is larger, even parity is selected. This suggests that diffusivity for poloidal fields is larger than that for toroidal fields in the solar convection zone where magnetic parity is odd and where radial gradient influence on the parity selection

  16. Detection regimes of the cosmological gravitational wave background from astrophysical sources

    OpenAIRE

    Coward, David; Regimbau, Tania

    2006-01-01

    Key targets for gravitational wave (GW) observatories, such as LIGO and the next generation interferometric detector, Advanced LIGO, include core-collapse of massive stars and the final stage of coalescence of compact stellar remnants. The combined GW signal from such events occurring throughout the Universe will produce an astrophysical GW background (AGB), one that is fundamentally different from the GW background by very early Universe processes. One can classify contributions to the AGB f...

  17. Theoretical astrophysics an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Bartelmann, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    A concise yet comprehensive introduction to the central theoretical concepts of modern astrophysics, presenting hydrodynamics, radiation, and stellar dynamics all in one textbook. Adopting a modular structure, the author illustrates a small number of fundamental physical methods and principles, which are sufficient to describe and understand a wide range of seemingly very diverse astrophysical phenomena and processes. For example, the formulae that define the macroscopic behavior of stellar systems are all derived in the same way from the microscopic distribution function. This function it

  18. Astrophysics in a nutshell

    CERN Document Server

    Maoz, Dan

    2007-01-01

    A concise but thorough introduction to the observational data and theoretical concepts underlying modern astronomy, Astrophysics in a Nutshell is designed for advanced undergraduate science majors taking a one-semester course. This well-balanced and up-to-date textbook covers the essentials of modern astrophysics--from stars to cosmology--emphasizing the common, familiar physical principles that govern astronomical phenomena, and the interplay between theory and observation. In addition to traditional topics such as stellar remnants, galaxies, and the interstellar medium, Astrophysics in a N

  19. Astrophysics: Birth of stellar siblings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plunkett, Adele

    2016-10-01

    Binary and multiple star systems result from the fragmentation of dense material in young molecular clouds. Observations reveal that this can occur on small scales, supporting a previous model of star formation. See Letter p.483

  20. LUNA: Nuclear Astrophysics Deep Underground

    OpenAIRE

    Broggini, Carlo; Bemmerer, Daniel; Guglielmetti, Alessandra; Menegazzo, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear astrophysics strives for a comprehensive picture of the nuclear reactions responsible for synthesizing the chemical elements and for powering the stellar evolution engine. Deep underground in the Gran Sasso laboratory the cross sections of the key reactions of the proton-proton chain and of the Carbon-Nitrogen-Oxygen (CNO) cycle have been measured right down to the energies of astrophysical interest. The salient features of underground nuclear astrophysics are summarized here. The mai...

  1. The Masses and Spins of Neutron Stars and Stellar-Mass Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, M Coleman

    2014-01-01

    Stellar-mass black holes and neutron stars represent extremes in gravity, density, and magnetic fields. They therefore serve as key objects in the study of multiple frontiers of physics. In addition, their origin (mainly in core-collapse supernovae) and evolution (via accretion or, for neutron stars, magnetic spindown and reconfiguration) touch upon multiple open issues in astrophysics. In this review, we discuss current mass and spin measurements and their reliability for neutron stars and stellar-mass black holes, as well as the overall importance of spins and masses for compact object astrophysics. Current masses are obtained primarily through electromagnetic observations of binaries, although future microlensing observations promise to enhance our understanding substantially. The spins of neutron stars are straightforward to measure for pulsars, but the birth spins of neutron stars are more difficult to determine. In contrast, even the current spins of stellar-mass black holes are challenging to measure. ...

  2. Gravitational Waves from Gravitational Collapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris L. Fryer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gravitational-wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion-induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

  3. Gravitational waves from gravitational collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fryer, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; New, Kimberly C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Gravitational wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

  4. Minicourses in Astrophysics, Modular Approach, Vol. II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Univ., Chicago.

    This is the second of a two-volume minicourse in astrophysics. It contains chapters on the following topics: stellar nuclear energy sources and nucleosynthesis; stellar evolution; stellar structure and its determination; and pulsars. Each chapter gives much technical discussion, mathematical treatment, diagrams, and examples. References are…

  5. Gravitational collapse of Hagedorn fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malafarina, Daniele

    2016-05-01

    We consider a toy model for the relativistic collapse of a homogeneous perfect fluid that takes into account an equation of state for high density matter, in the form of a Hagedorn phase, and semiclassical corrections in the strong field. We show that collapse reaches a critical minimum size and then bounces. We discuss the conditions needed for the collapse to halt and form a compact object. We argue that implications of models such as the one presented here are of great importance for astrophysics as they show that black holes may not be the only final outcome of collapse of very massive stars.

  6. Gravitational collapse of Hagedorn fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Malafarina, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    We consider a toy model for relativistic collapse of an homogeneous perfect fluid that takes into account an equation of state for high density matter, in the form of an Hagedorn phase, and semiclassical corrections in the strong field. We show that collapse reaches a critical minimum size and then bounces. We discuss the conditions for collapse to halt and form a compact object. We argue that implications of models such as the one presented here are of great importance for astrophysics as they show that black holes may not be the only final outcome of collapse of very massive stars.

  7. Some aspects of neutrino astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Athar, H

    2002-01-01

    Selected topics in neutrino astrophysics are reviewed. These include the production of low energy neutrino flux from cores of collapsing stars and the expected high energy neutrino flux from some other astrophysical sites such as the galactic plane as well as the center of some distant galaxies. The expected changes in these neutrino fluxes because of neutrino oscillations during their propagation to us are described. Observational signatures for these neutrino fluxes with and without neutrino oscillations are discussed.

  8. LUNA: Nuclear Astrophysics Deep Underground

    CERN Document Server

    Broggini, Carlo; Guglielmetti, Alessandra; Menegazzo, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear astrophysics strives for a comprehensive picture of the nuclear reactions responsible for synthesizing the chemical elements and for powering the stellar evolution engine. Deep underground in the Gran Sasso laboratory the cross sections of the key reactions of the proton-proton chain and of the Carbon-Nitrogen-Oxygen (CNO) cycle have been measured right down to the energies of astrophysical interest. The salient features of underground nuclear astrophysics are summarized here. The main results obtained by LUNA in the last twenty years are reviewed, and their influence on the comprehension of the properties of the neutrino, of the Sun and of the Universe itself are discussed. Future directions of underground nuclear astrophysics towards the study of helium and carbon burning and of stellar neutron sources in stars are pointed out.

  9. Nuclear reactions in astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnould, M.; Rayet, M. (Universite Libre de Bruxelles (BE))

    1990-06-01

    At all times and at all astrophysical scales, nuclear reactions have played and continue to play a key role. This concerns the energetics as well as the production of nuclides (nucleosynthesis). After a brief review of the observed composition of various objects in the universe, and especially of the solar system, the basic ingredients that are required in order to build up models for the chemical evolution of galaxies are sketched. Special attention is paid to the evaluation of the stellar yields through an overview of the important burning episodes and nucleosynthetic processes that can develop in non-exploding or exploding stars. Emphasis is put on the remaining astrophysical and nuclear physics uncertainties that hamper a clear understanding of the observed characteristics, and especially compositions, of a large variety of astrophysical objects.

  10. 55 Cancri: Stellar Astrophysical Parameters, a Planet in the Habitable Zone, and Implications for the Radius of a Transiting Super-Earth

    CERN Document Server

    von Braun, Kaspar; Brummelaar, Theo A ten; van Belle, Gerard T; Kane, Stephen R; Ciardi, David R; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; McAlister, Harold A; Schaefer, Gail; Ridgway, Stephen T; Sturmann, Laszlo; Sturmann, Judit; White, Russel; Turner, Nils H; Farrington, Chris; Goldfinger, P J

    2011-01-01

    The bright star 55 Cancri is known to host five planets, including a transiting super-Earth. The interferometric study presented here yields directly determined values for 55 Cnc's stellar astrophyiscal parameters: $R=0.943 \\pm 0.010 R_{\\odot}$, $T_{\\rm EFF} = 5196 \\pm 24$ K. We use isochrone fitting to determine 55 Cnc's age to be 10.2 $\\pm$ 2.5 Gyr, implying a stellar mass of $0.905 \\pm 0.015 M_{\\odot}$. Our analysis of the location and extent of the system's habitable zone (0.67--1.32 AU) shows that planet f ($M \\sin i = 0.155 M_{Jupiter}$) spends the majority of the duration of its elliptical orbit in the circumstellar habitable zone, where, with moderate greenhouse heating, it could harbor liquid water. Finally, our direct value for 55 Cancri's stellar radius allows for a model-independent calculation of the physical diameter of the transiting super-Earth 55 Cnc e ($\\sim 2.05 \\pm 0.15 R_{\\earth}$), which, depending on the planetary mass assumed, implies a bulk density of 0.76 $\\rho_{\\earth}$ or 1.07 $\\rh...

  11. Nuclear astrophysics: the unfinished quest for the origin of the elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jose, Jordi [Departament de Fisica i Enginyeria Nuclear, EUETIB, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, E-08036 Barcelona (Spain); Iliadis, Christian, E-mail: jordi.jose@upc.edu, E-mail: iliadis@unc.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Half a century has passed since the foundation of nuclear astrophysics. Since then, this discipline has reached its maturity. Today, nuclear astrophysics constitutes a multidisciplinary crucible of knowledge that combines the achievements in theoretical astrophysics, observational astronomy, cosmochemistry and nuclear physics. New tools and developments have revolutionized our understanding of the origin of the elements: supercomputers have provided astrophysicists with the required computational capabilities to study the evolution of stars in a multidimensional framework; the emergence of high-energy astrophysics with space-borne observatories has opened new windows to observe the Universe, from a novel panchromatic perspective; cosmochemists have isolated tiny pieces of stardust embedded in primitive meteorites, giving clues on the processes operating in stars as well as on the way matter condenses to form solids; and nuclear physicists have measured reactions near stellar energies, through the combined efforts using stable and radioactive-ion beam facilities. This review provides comprehensive insight into the nuclear history of the Universe and related topics: starting from the Big Bang, when the ashes from the primordial explosion were transformed to hydrogen, helium and a few trace elements, to the rich variety of nucleosynthesis mechanisms and sites in the Universe. Particular attention is paid to the hydrostatic processes governing the evolution of low-mass stars, red giants and asymptotic giant-branch stars, as well as to the explosive nucleosynthesis occurring in core-collapse and thermonuclear supernovae, {gamma}-ray bursts, classical novae, x-ray bursts, superbursts and stellar mergers.

  12. The astrophysically important 3{sup +} state in {sup 18}Ne and the {sup 17}F(p,{gamma}){sup 18}Ne stellar rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Brune, C. R.; Champagne, A. E.; Chen, A. A.; Cox, J. M.; Davinson, T.; Hansper, V. Y.; Hofstee, M. A.; Johnson, B. A. (and others)

    2000-11-01

    Knowledge of the {sup 17}F(p,{gamma}){sup 18}Ne reaction rate is important for understanding stellar explosions, but it was uncertain because the properties of an expected but previously unobserved 3{sup +} state in {sup 18}Ne were not known. This state would provide a strong s-wave resonance for the {sup 17}F+p system and, depending on its excitation energy, could dominate the stellar reaction rate at temperatures above 0.2 GK. We have observed this missing 3{sup +} state by measuring the {sup 1}H({sup 17}F,p){sup 17}F excitation function with a radioactive {sup 17}F beam at the ORNL Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF). We find that the state lies at a center-of-mass energy of E{sub r}=599.8{+-}1.5{sub stat}{+-}2.0{sub sys} keV (E{sub x}=4523.7{+-}2.9keV) and has a width of {Gamma}=18{+-}2{sub stat}{+-}1{sub sys}keV. The measured properties of the resonance are only consistent with a J{sup {pi}}=3{sup +} assignment.

  13. Nuclear physics in astrophysics. Part 2. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings of the 20. International Nuclear Physics Divisional Conference of the European Physical Society covers a wide range of topics in nuclear astrophysics. The topics addressed are big bang nucleosynthesis, stellar nucleosynthesis, measurements and nuclear data for astrophysics, nuclear structure far from stability, neutrino physics, and rare-ion-beam facilities and experiments. The perspectives of nuclear physics and astrophysics are also overviewed. 77 items are indexed separately for the INIS database. (K.A.)

  14. Direct measurements of astrophysically important α-induced reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Melina

    2016-03-01

    Understanding stellar evolution is one of the primary objectives of nuclear astrophysics. Reaction rates involving α-particles are often key nuclear physics inputs in stellar models. For instance, there are numerous (α , p) reactions fundamental for the understanding of X-ray bursts and the production of 44Ti in core-collapse supernovae. Furthermore, some (α , n) reactions are considered as one of the main neutron sources in the s-process. However, direct measurements of these reactions at relevant astrophysical energies are experimentally challenging because of their small cross section and intensity limitation of radioactive beams. The active target system MUSIC offers a unique opportunity to study (α , p) and (α , n) reactions because its segmented anode allows the investigation of a large energy range in the excitation function with a single measurement. Recent results on the direct measurement of (α , n) and (α , p) measurements in the MUSIC detector will be discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract Number DE-AC02-06CH11357. This research used resources of ANL's ATLAS facility, which is a DOE Office of Science User.

  15. Chaos and complexity in astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Regev, Oded

    2007-01-01

    Methods and techniques of the theory of nonlinear dynamical systems and patterns can be useful in astrophysical applications. Some works on the subjects of dynamical astronomy, stellar pulsation and variability, as well as spatial complexity in extended systems, in which such approaches have already been utilized, are reviewed. Prospects for future directions in applications of this kind are outlined.

  16. Indirect methods in nuclear astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Bertulani, C A; Mukhamedzhanov, A; Kadyrov, A S; Kruppa, A; Pang, D Y

    2015-01-01

    We discuss recent developments in indirect methods used in nuclear astrophysics to determine the capture cross sections and subsequent rates of various stellar burning processes, when it is difficult to perform the corresponding direct measurements. We discuss in brief, the basic concepts of Asymptotic Normalization Coefficients, the Trojan Horse Method, the Coulomb Dissociation Method, (d,p), and charge-exchange reactions.

  17. Astrophysics on the Lab Bench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    In this article some basic laboratory bench experiments are described that are useful for teaching high school students some of the basic principles of stellar astrophysics. For example, in one experiment, students slam a plastic water-filled bottle down onto a bench, ejecting water towards the ceiling, illustrating the physics associated with a…

  18. An introduction to nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of nuclear reactions in astrophysics is described. Stellar energy generation and heavy element nucleosynthesis is explained in terms of specific sequences of charged-particle and neutron induced reactions. The evolution and final states of stars are examined. 20 refs. 11 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Indirect methods in nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertulani, C. A.; Shubhchintak; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Kruppa, A.; Pang, D. Y.

    2016-04-01

    We discuss recent developments in indirect methods used in nuclear astrophysics to determine the capture cross sections and subsequent rates of various stellar burning processes, when it is difficult to perform the corresponding direct measurements. We discuss in brief, the basic concepts of Asymptotic Normalization Coefficients, the Trojan Horse Method, the Coulomb Dissociation Method, (d,p), and charge-exchange reactions.

  20. Essential astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Kenneth R

    2013-01-01

    Essential Astrophysics is a book to learn or teach from, as well as a fundamental reference volume for anyone interested in astronomy and astrophysics. It presents astrophysics from basic principles without requiring any previous study of astronomy or astrophysics. It serves as a comprehensive introductory text, which takes the student through the field of astrophysics in lecture-sized chapters of basic physical principles applied to the cosmos. This one-semester overview will be enjoyed by undergraduate students with an interest in the physical sciences, such as astronomy, chemistry, engineering or physics, as well as by any curious student interested in learning about our celestial science. The mathematics required for understanding the text is on the level of simple algebra, for that is all that is needed to describe the fundamental principles. The text is of sufficient breadth and depth to prepare the interested student for more advanced specialized courses in the future. Astronomical examples are provide...

  1. High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Lebedev, Sergey V

    2007-01-01

    During the past decade, research teams around the world have developed astrophysics-relevant research utilizing high energy-density facilities such as intense lasers and z-pinches. Every two years, at the International conference on High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics, scientists interested in this emerging field discuss the progress in topics covering: - Stellar evolution, stellar envelopes, opacities, radiation transport - Planetary Interiors, high-pressure EOS, dense plasma atomic physics - Supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, exploding systems, strong shocks, turbulent mixing - Supernova remnants, shock processing, radiative shocks - Astrophysical jets, high-Mach-number flows, magnetized radiative jets, magnetic reconnection - Compact object accretion disks, x-ray photoionized plasmas - Ultrastrong fields, particle acceleration, collisionless shocks. These proceedings cover many of the invited and contributed papers presented at the 6th International Conference on High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophys...

  2. Astrophysical Conditions for Planetary Habitability

    CERN Document Server

    Guedel, M; Erkaev, N; Kasting, J; Khodachenko, M; Lammer, H; Pilat-Lohinger, E; Rauer, H; Ribas, I; Wood, B E

    2014-01-01

    With the discovery of hundreds of exoplanets and a potentially huge number of Earth-like planets waiting to be discovered, the conditions for their habitability have become a focal point in exoplanetary research. The classical picture of habitable zones primarily relies on the stellar flux allowing liquid water to exist on the surface of an Earth-like planet with a suitable atmosphere. However, numerous further stellar and planetary properties constrain habitability. Apart from "geophysical" processes depending on the internal structure and composition of a planet, a complex array of astrophysical factors additionally determine habitability. Among these, variable stellar UV, EUV, and X-ray radiation, stellar and interplanetary magnetic fields, ionized winds, and energetic particles control the constitution of upper planetary atmospheres and their physical and chemical evolution. Short- and long-term stellar variability necessitates full time-dependent studies to understand planetary habitability at any point ...

  3. Astrophysics. An introduction into theory and foundations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics are covered: general and physical foundations, star burning, Jeans instability, protostars, radiation transport, stellar energy sources, models for burning stars and compact objects, white dwarfs, neutron stars, pulsars and black holes, stability theory, collapsing objects

  4. Astrophysical Explosions: From Solar Flares to Cosmic Gamma-ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Wheeler, J Craig

    2011-01-01

    Astrophysical explosions result from the release of magnetic, gravitational, or thermonuclear energy on dynamical timescales, typically the sound-crossing time for the system. These explosions include solar and stellar flares, eruptive phenomena in accretion disks, thermonuclear combustion on the surfaces of white dwarfs and neutron stars, violent magnetic reconnection in neutron stars, thermonuclear and gravitational collapse supernovae and cosmic gamma-ray bursts, each representing a different type and amount of energy release. This paper summarizes the properties of these explosions and describes new research on thermonuclear explosions and explosions in extended circumstellar media. Parallels are drawn between studies of terrestrial and astrophysical explosions, especially the physics of the transition from deflagration to detonation. Keywords: neutron stars, black holes, supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, deflagration, detonation.

  5. LUNA: Nuclear astrophysics underground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underground nuclear astrophysics with LUNA at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso spans a history of 20 years. By using the rock overburden of the Gran Sasso mountain chain as a natural cosmic-ray shield very low signal rates compared to an experiment on the surface can be tolerated. The cross sectons of important astrophysical reactions directly in the stellar energy range have been successfully measured. In this proceeding we give an overview over the key accomplishments of the experiment and an outlook on its future with the expected addition of an additional accelerator to the underground facilities, enabling the coverage of a wider energy range and the measurement of previously inaccessible reactions

  6. LUNA: Nuclear astrophysics underground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Best, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy)

    2015-02-24

    Underground nuclear astrophysics with LUNA at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso spans a history of 20 years. By using the rock overburden of the Gran Sasso mountain chain as a natural cosmic-ray shield very low signal rates compared to an experiment on the surface can be tolerated. The cross sectons of important astrophysical reactions directly in the stellar energy range have been successfully measured. In this proceeding we give an overview over the key accomplishments of the experiment and an outlook on its future with the expected addition of an additional accelerator to the underground facilities, enabling the coverage of a wider energy range and the measurement of previously inaccessible reactions.

  7. Astrophysical black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Gorini, Vittorio; Moschella, Ugo; Treves, Aldo; Colpi, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Based on graduate school lectures in contemporary relativity and gravitational physics, this book gives a complete and unified picture of the present status of theoretical and observational properties of astrophysical black holes. The chapters are written by internationally recognized specialists. They cover general theoretical aspects of black hole astrophysics, the theory of accretion and ejection of gas and jets, stellar-sized black holes observed in the Milky Way, the formation and evolution of supermassive black holes in galactic centers and quasars as well as their influence on the dynamics in galactic nuclei. The final chapter addresses analytical relativity of black holes supporting theoretical understanding of the coalescence of black holes as well as being of great relevance in identifying gravitational wave signals. With its introductory chapters the book is aimed at advanced graduate and post-graduate students, but it will also be useful for specialists.

  8. Numerical Relativity Beyond Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Garfinkle, David

    2016-01-01

    Though the main applications of computer simulations in relativity are to astrophysical systems such as black holes and neutron stars, nonetheless there are important applications of numerical methods to the investigation of general relativity as a fundamental theory of the nature of space and time. This paper gives an overview of some of these applications. In particular we cover (i) investigations of the properties of spacetime singularities such as those that occur in the interior of black holes and in big bang cosmology. (ii) investigations of critical behavior at the threshold of black hole formation in gravitational collapse. (iii) investigations inspired by string theory, in particular analogs of black holes in more than 4 spacetime dimensions and gravitational collapse in spacetimes with a negative cosmological constant.

  9. New Two-Dimensional Models of Supernova Explosions by the Neutrino-Heating Mechanism: Evidence for Different Instability Regimes in Collapsing Stellar Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, B; Heger, A

    2012-01-01

    The neutrino-driven explosion mechanism for core-collapse supernovae in its modern flavor relies on the additional support of hydrodynamical instabilities in achieving shock revival. Two possible candidates, convection and the so-called standing accretion shock instability (SASI), have been proposed for this role. In this paper, we discuss new successful simulations of supernova explosions that shed light on the relative importance of these two instabilities. While convection has so far emerged as the primary agent in self-consistent hydrodynamical models with multi-group neutrino transport, we here present the first such simulation in which the SASI grows faster while the development of convection is initially inhibited. We illustrate the features of this SASI-dominated regime using an explosion model of a 27 solar mass progenitor, which is contrasted with a convectively-dominated model of an 8.1 solar mass progenitor with subsolar metallicity, whose early post-bounce behavior is more in line with previous 1...

  10. The Wisconsin Plasma Astrophysics Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Forest, C B; Brookhart, M; Cooper, C M; Clark, M; Desangles, V; Egedal, J; Endrizzi, D; Miesch, M; Khalzov, I V; Li, H; Milhone, J; Nornberg, M; Olson, J; Peterson, E; Roesler, F; Schekochihin, A; Schmitz, O; Siller, R; Spitkovsky, A; Stemo, A; Wallace, J; Weisberg, D; Zweibel, E

    2015-01-01

    The Wisconsin Plasma Astrophysics Laboratory (WiPAL) is a flexible user facility designed to study a range of astrophysically relevant plasma processes as well as novel geometries which mimic astrophysical systems. A multi-cusp magnetic bucket constructed from strong samarium cobalt permanent magnets now confines a 10 m$^3$, fully ionized, magnetic-field free plasma in a spherical geometry. Plasma parameters of $ T_{e}\\approx5-20$ eV and $n_{e}\\approx10^{11}-5\\times10^{12}$ cm$^{-3}$ provide an ideal testbed for a range of astrophysical experiments including self-exciting dynamos, collisionless magnetic reconnection, jet stability, stellar winds, and more. This article describes the capabilities of WiPAL along with several experiments, in both operating and planning stages, that illustrate the range of possibilities for future users.

  11. Recent results in nuclear astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Coc, Alain; Kiener, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we emphasize the interplay between astrophysical observations, modeling, and nuclear physics laboratory experiments. Several important nuclear cross sections for astrophysics have long been identified e.g. 12C(alpha,gamma)16O for stellar evolution, or 13C(alpha,n)16O and 22Ne(alpha,n)25Mg as neutron sources for the s-process. More recently, observations of lithium abundances in the oldest stars, or of nuclear gamma-ray lines from space, have required new laboratory experiments. New evaluation of thermonuclear reaction rates now includes the associated rate uncertainties that are used in astrophysical models to i) estimate final uncertainties on nucleosynthesis yields and ii) identify those reactions that require further experimental investigation. Sometimes direct cross section measurements are possible, but more generally the use of indirect methods is compulsory in view of the very low cross sections. Non-thermal processes are often overlooked but are also important for nuclear astrophysics,...

  12. Nuclear Data for Astrophysical Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Pritychenko, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear physics has been playing an important role in modern astrophysics and cosmology. Since the early 1950's it has been successfully applied for the interpretation and prediction of astrophysical phenomena. Nuclear physics models helped to explain the observed elemental and isotopic abundances and star evolution and provided valuable insights on the Big Bang theory. Today, the variety of elements observed in stellar surfaces, solar system and cosmic rays, and isotope abundances are calculated and compared with the observed values. Consequently, the overall success of the modeling critically depends on the quality of underlying nuclear data that helps to bring physics of macro and micro scales together. To broaden the scope of traditional nuclear astrophysics activities and produce additional complementary information, I will investigate applicability of the U.S. Nuclear Data Program (USNDP) databases for astrophysical applications. EXFOR (Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data) and ENDF (Evaluated Nuclear Dat...

  13. Nuclear astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Arnould, M

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear astrophysics is that branch of astrophysics which helps understanding some of the many facets of the Universe through the knowledge of the microcosm of the atomic nucleus. In the last decades much advance has been made in nuclear astrophysics thanks to the sometimes spectacular progress in the modelling of the structure and evolution of the stars, in the quality and diversity of the astronomical observations, as well as in the experimental and theoretical understanding of the atomic nucleus and of its spontaneous or induced transformations. Developments in other sub-fields of physics and chemistry have also contributed to that advance. Many long-standing problems remain to be solved, however, and the theoretical understanding of a large variety of observational facts needs to be put on safer grounds. In addition, new questions are continuously emerging, and new facts endanger old ideas. This review shows that astrophysics has been, and still is, highly demanding to nuclear physics in both its experime...

  14. Recent advances in neutrino astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Volpe, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Neutrinos are produced by a variety of sources that comprise our Sun, explosive environments such as core-collapse supernovae, the Earth and the Early Universe. The precise origin of the recently discovered ultra-high energy neutrinos is to be determined yet. These weakly interacting particles give us information on their sources, although the neutrino fluxes can be modified when neutrinos traverse an astrophysical environment. Here we highlight recent advances in neutrino astrophysics and emphasise the important progress in our understanding of neutrino flavour conversion in media.

  15. Nuclear physics in astrophysics; La physique nucleaire en astrophysique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnould, M. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium). Inst. d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique; Samyn, M. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium). Inst. d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique; Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique, Brussels (Belgium)

    2001-07-01

    In this review the following topics are covered: nuclei in astrophysics, weak and electromagnetic interactions in nuclei, primordial nucleosynthesis, big bang, stellar evolution and stellar structure and stability, non-explosive stellar nucleosynthesis, element abundances, explosive nucleosynthesis in massive stars, supernovae (WL)

  16. Advances in astronomy and astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kopal, Zdenek

    1962-01-01

    Advances in Astronomy and Astrophysics, Volume 1 brings together numerous research works on different aspects of astronomy and astrophysics. This book is divided into five chapters and begins with an observational summary of the shock-wave theory of novae. The subsequent chapter provides the properties and problems of T tauri stars and related objects. These topics are followed by discussions on the structure and origin of meteorites and cosmic dust, as well as the models for evaluation of mass distribution in oblate stellar systems. The final chapter describes the methods of polarization mea

  17. Astrophysical Concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Harwit, Martin

    2006-01-01

    This classic text, aimed at senior undergraduates and beginning graduate students in physics and astronomy, presents a wide range of astrophysical concepts in sufficient depth to give the reader a quantitative understanding of the subject. Emphasizing physical concepts, the book outlines cosmic events but does not portray them in detail: it provides a series of astrophysical sketches. For this fourth edition, nearly every part of the text has been reconsidered and rewritten, new sections have been added to cover recent developments, and others have been extensively revised and brought up to date. The book begins with an outline of the scope of modern astrophysics and enumerates some of the outstanding problems faced in the field today. The basic physics needed to tackle these questions are developed in the next few chapters using specific astronomical processes as examples. The second half of the book enlarges on these topics and shows how we can obtain quantitative insight into the structure and evolution of...

  18. Nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnould, M. [Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Bruxelles (Belgium); Takahashi, K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Garching (Germany)

    1999-03-01

    Nuclear astrophysics is that branch of astrophysics which helps understanding of the Universe, or at least some of its many faces, through the knowledge of the microcosm of the atomic nucleus. It attempts to find as many nuclear physics imprints as possible in the macrocosm, and to decipher what those messages are telling us about the varied constituent objects in the Universe at present and in the past. In the last decades much advance has been made in nuclear astrophysics thanks to the sometimes spectacular progress made in the modelling of the structure and evolution of the stars, in the quality and diversity of the astronomical observations, as well as in the experimental and theoretical understanding of the atomic nucleus and of its spontaneous or induced transformations. Developments in other subfields of physics and chemistry have also contributed to that advance. Notwithstanding the accomplishment, many long-standing problems remain to be solved, and the theoretical understanding of a large variety of observational facts needs to be put on safer grounds. In addition, new questions are continuously emerging, and new facts endangering old ideas. This review shows that astrophysics has been, and still is, highly demanding to nuclear physics in both its experimental and theoretical components. On top of the fact that large varieties of nuclei have to be dealt with, these nuclei are immersed in highly unusual environments which may have a significant impact on their static properties, the diversity of their transmutation modes, and on the probabilities of these modes. In order to have a chance of solving some of the problems nuclear astrophysics is facing, the astrophysicists and nuclear physicists are obviously bound to put their competence in common, and have sometimes to benefit from the help of other fields of physics, like particle physics, plasma physics or solid-state physics. Given the highly varied and complex aspects, we pick here some specific nuclear

  19. Nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnould, M.; Takahashi, K.

    1999-03-01

    Nuclear astrophysics is that branch of astrophysics which helps understanding of the Universe, or at least some of its many faces, through the knowledge of the microcosm of the atomic nucleus. It attempts to find as many nuclear physics imprints as possible in the macrocosm, and to decipher what those messages are telling us about the varied constituent objects in the Universe at present and in the past. In the last decades much advance has been made in nuclear astrophysics thanks to the sometimes spectacular progress made in the modelling of the structure and evolution of the stars, in the quality and diversity of the astronomical observations, as well as in the experimental and theoretical understanding of the atomic nucleus and of its spontaneous or induced transformations. Developments in other subfields of physics and chemistry have also contributed to that advance. Notwithstanding the accomplishment, many long-standing problems remain to be solved, and the theoretical understanding of a large variety of observational facts needs to be put on safer grounds. In addition, new questions are continuously emerging, and new facts endangering old ideas. This review shows that astrophysics has been, and still is, highly demanding to nuclear physics in both its experimental and theoretical components. On top of the fact that large varieties of nuclei have to be dealt with, these nuclei are immersed in highly unusual environments which may have a significant impact on their static properties, the diversity of their transmutation modes, and on the probabilities of these modes. In order to have a chance of solving some of the problems nuclear astrophysics is facing, the astrophysicists and nuclear physicists are obviously bound to put their competence in common, and have sometimes to benefit from the help of other fields of physics, like particle physics, plasma physics or solid-state physics. Given the highly varied and complex aspects, we pick here some specific nuclear

  20. Neutrino astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general overview of neutrino physics and astrophysics is given, starting with a historical account of the development of our understanding of neutrinos and how they helped to unravel the structure of the Standard Model. We discuss why it is so important to establish if neutrinos are massive and introduce the main scenarios to provide them a mass. The present bounds and the positive indications in favor of non-zero neutrino masses are discussed, including the recent results on atmospheric and solar neutrinos. The major role that neutrinos play in astrophysics and cosmology is illustrated. (author)

  1. Plasma astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, S A; ter Haar, D

    2013-01-01

    Plasma Astrophysics is a translation from the Russian language; the topics discussed are based on lectures given by V.N. Tsytovich at several universities. The book describes the physics of the various phenomena and their mathematical formulation connected with plasma astrophysics. This book also explains the theory of the interaction of fast particles plasma, their radiation activities, as well as the plasma behavior when exposed to a very strong magnetic field. The text describes the nature of collective plasma processes and of plasma turbulence. One author explains the method of elementary

  2. Stellar granulation and interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Chiavassa, A

    2015-01-01

    Stars are not smooth. Their photosphere is covered by a granulation pattern associated with the heat transport by convection. The convection-related surface structures have different size, depth, and temporal variations with respect to the stellar type. The related activity (in addition to other phenomena such as magnetic spots, rotation, dust, etc.) potentially causes bias in stellar parameters determination, radial velocity, chemical abundances determinations, and exoplanet transit detections. The role of long-baseline interferometric observations in this astrophysical context is crucial to characterize the stellar surface dynamics and correct the potential biases. In this Chapter, we present how the granulation pattern is expected for different kind of stellar types ranging from main sequence to extremely evolved stars of different masses and how interferometric techniques help to study their photospheric dynamics.

  3. Astrophysics on the lab bench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen W.

    2010-05-01

    In this article some basic laboratory bench experiments are described that are useful for teaching high school students some of the basic principles of stellar astrophysics. For example, in one experiment, students slam a plastic water-filled bottle down onto a bench, ejecting water towards the ceiling, illustrating the physics associated with a type II supernova explosion. In another experiment, students roll marbles up and down a double ramp in an attempt to get a marble to enter a tube halfway up the slope, which illustrates quantum tunnelling in stellar cores. The experiments are reasonably low cost to either purchase or manufacture.

  4. Nuclear Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Alessandro

    2005-04-01

    The activity of the Italian nuclear physicists community in the field of Nuclear Astrophysics is reported. The researches here described have been performed within the project "Fisica teorica del nucleo e dei sistemi a multi corpi", supported by the Ministero dell'Istruzione, dell'Università e della Ricerca.

  5. Collapsed Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    A collapsed lung happens when air enters the pleural space, the area between the lung and the chest wall. If it is a ... is called pneumothorax. If only part of the lung is affected, it is called atelectasis. Causes of ...

  6. Stellar populations in the ELT perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Bono, G; Fabrizio, M; Gilmozzi, R; Buonanno, R; Ferraro, I; Iannicola, G; Monelli, M; Milone, A; Nonino, M; Pulone, L; Stetson, P B; Thevénin, F; Walker, A R

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the impact that the next generation of Extremely Large Telescopes will have on the open astrophysical problems of resolved stellar populations. In particular, we address the interplay between multiband photometry and spectroscopy.

  7. The Astrophysical Multipurpose Software Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Pelupessy, F I; de Vries, N; McMillan, S L W; Drost, N; Zwart, S F Portegies

    2013-01-01

    We present the open source Astrophysical Multi-purpose Software Environment (AMUSE, www.amusecode.org), a component library for performing astrophysical simulations involving different physical domains and scales. It couples existing codes within a Python framework based on a communication layer using MPI. The interfaces are standardized for each domain and their implementation based on MPI guarantees that the whole framework is well-suited for distributed computation. It includes facilities for unit handling and data storage. Currently it includes codes for gravitational dynamics, stellar evolution, hydrodynamics and radiative transfer. Within each domain the interfaces to the codes are as similar as possible. We describe the design and implementation of AMUSE, as well as the main components and community codes currently supported and we discuss the code interactions facilitated by the framework. Additionally, we demonstrate how AMUSE can be used to resolve complex astrophysical problems by presenting exampl...

  8. Solar-stellar astrophysics and dark matter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sylvaine Turck-Chièze; Ilídio Lopes

    2012-01-01

    In this review,we recall how stars contribute to the search for dark matter and the specific role of the Sun.We describe a more complete picture of the solar interior that emerges from neutrino detections,gravity and acoustic mode measurements of the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite,becoming a reference for the most common stars in the Universe.The Sun is a unique star in that we can observe directly the effect of dark matter.The absence of a signature related to Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) in its core disfavors a WIMP mass range below 12 GeV.We give arguments to continue this search on the Sun and other promising cases.We also examine another dark matter candidate,the sterile neutrino,and infer the limitations of the classical structural equations.Open questions on the young Sun,when planets formed,and on its present internal dynamics are finally discussed.Future directions are proposed for the next decade:a better description of the solar core,a generalization to stars coming from seismic missions and a better understanding of the dynamics of our galaxy which are all crucial keys for understanding dark matter.

  9. Stellar evolution, nuclear astrophysics, and nucleogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, AGW

    2013-01-01

    ""The content of this work, which was independently presented by Burbidge, Burbidge, Fowler, and Hoyle in 1957, represents one of the major advances in the natural sciences in the twentieth century. It effectively answered, in one fell swoop, several interrelated questions that humans have been asking since the beginning of inquiry, such as 'What are stars?' 'How does the sun shine?' 'Why is gold so rare?' 'Where did the elements in our world and in our bodies come from?'"" - Alan A. Chen, Associate Professor, McMaster UniversityHarvard professor A. G. W. Cameron - who helped develop the Giant

  10. Bubble Chambers for Experiments in Nuclear Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    DiGiovine, B.; Henderson, D.; Holt, R. J.; Rehm, K. E.; Raut, R.; Robinson, A.; Sonnenschein, A.; Rusev, G.; A.P. Tonchev; Ugalde, C.

    2015-01-01

    A bubble chamber has been developed to be used as an active target system for low energy nuclear astrophysics experiments. Adopting ideas from dark matter detection with superheated liquids, a detector system compatible with gamma-ray beams has been developed. This detector alleviates some of the limitations encountered in standard measurements of the minute cross sections of interest to stellar environments. While the astrophysically relevant nuclear reaction processes at hydrostatic burning...

  11. astrophysical significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dartois E.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Clathrate hydrates, ice inclusion compounds, are of major importance for the Earth’s permafrost regions and may control the stability of gases in many astrophysical bodies such as the planets, comets and possibly interstellar grains. Their physical behavior may provide a trapping mechanism to modify the absolute and relative composition of icy bodies that could be the source of late-time injection of gaseous species in planetary atmospheres or hot cores. In this study, we provide and discuss laboratory-recorded infrared signatures of clathrate hydrates in the near to mid-infrared and the implications for space-based astrophysical tele-detection in order to constrain their possible presence.

  12. Neutrino Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Haxton, W. C.

    2000-01-01

    A general overview of neutrino physics and astrophysics is given, starting with a historical account of the development of our understanding of neutrinos and how they helped to unravel the structure of the Standard Model. We discuss why it is so important to establish if neutrinos are massive and introduce the main scenarios to provide them a mass. The present bounds and the positive indications in favor of non-zero neutrino masses are discussed, including the recent results on atmospheric an...

  13. Cluster Assembly in Hierarchically Collapsing Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Vazquez-Semadeni, Enrique; Zamora-Aviles, Manuel; Colin, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the mechanism of cluster formation in hierarchically collapsing molecular clouds. Recent evidence, both observational and numerical, suggests that molecular clouds (MCs) may be undergoing global, hierarchical gravitational collapse. The "hierarchical" regime consists of small-scale collapses within larger-scale ones. The latter implies that the star formation rate increases systematically during the early stages of evolution, and occurs via filamentary flows onto "hubs" of higher density, mass, and velocity dispersion, and culminates a few Myr after than the small-scale collapses have started to form stars. In turn, the small-scale collapses occur in clumps embedded in the filaments, and are themselves falling into the larger potential well of the still-ongoing large-scale collapse. The stars formed in the early, small-scale collapses share the infall motion of their parent clumps towards the larger potential trough, so that the filaments feed both gaseous and stellar material to the hubs. This lea...

  14. The solar-stellar connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampapa, Mark S.

    2016-07-01

    A review of some principal results achieved in the area of stellar astrophysics with its origins in solar physics - the Solar-Stellar Connection - is presented from the perspective of an observational astronomer. The historical origins of the Solar-Stellar Connection are discussed followed by a review of key results from observations of stellar cycles analogous to the solar cycle in terms of parameters relevant to dynamo theory. A review of facets of angular momentum evolution and irradiance variations, each of which is determined by emergent, dynamo-generated magnetic fields, is given. Recent considerations of the impacts of stellar magnetic activity on the ambient radiative and energetic particle environment of the habitable zone of exoplanet systems are summarized. Some anticipated directions of the Solar-Stellar Connection in the new era of astronomy as defined by the advent of transformative facilities are presented.

  15. Magnetic reconnection acceleration of astrophysical jets for different jet geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The acceleration mechanisms of relativistic jets are of great importance for understanding various astrophysical phenomena such as gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei and microquasars. One of the most popular scenarios is that the jets are initially Poynting-flux dominated and succumb to magnetohydrodynamic instability leading to magnetic reconnections. We suggest that the reconnection timescale and efficiency could strongly depend on the geometry of the jet, which determines the length scale on which the orientations of the field lines change. In contrast to a usually-assumed conical jet, the acceleration of a collimated jet can be found to be more rapid and efficient (i.e. a much more highly saturated Lorentz factor can be reached) while the jets with lateral expansion show the opposite behavior. The shape of the jet could be formed due to the lateral squeezing on the jet by the stellar envelope of a collapsing massive star or the interaction of the jet with stellar winds. (paper)

  16. Impact of THM reaction rates for astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.; Tognelli, E.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Pizzone, R. G.; Moroni, P. G. Prada; Puglia, S. M. R.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.

    2015-10-01

    Burning reaction S(E)-factor determinations are among the key ingredients for stellar models when one has to deal with energy generation evaluation and the genesis of the elements at stellar conditions. To by pass the still present uncertainties in extrapolating low-energies values, S(E)-factor measurements for charged-particle induced reactions involving light elements have been made available by devote Trojan Horse Method (THM) experiments. The recent results are here discussed together with their impact in astrophysics.

  17. Nonradiative collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronnikov, K.A.; Kovalchuk, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    An investigation is made of matter-distribution evolution for pressure in general relativity in the presence of an electromagnetic field in the framework of six types of symmetry: spherical, plane, pseudospherical, cylindrical, pseudoplane, and toroidal. For the first three types, the scalar zero-mass field with minimum coupling is also taken into account. The investigation is carried out for exact solutions of field equations obtained under the assumption of nonradiative collapse, meaning the absence of scalar or gravitational radiation of the system during collapse. The results are interpreted in light of the cosmic-censorship hypothesis. 13 references.

  18. Astrophysical cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardeen, J. M.

    The last several years have seen a tremendous ferment of activity in astrophysical cosmology. Much of the theoretical impetus has come from particle physics theories of the early universe and candidates for dark matter, but what promise to be even more significant are improved direct observations of high z galaxies and intergalactic matter, deeper and more comprehensive redshift surveys, and the increasing power of computer simulations of the dynamical evolution of large scale structure. Upper limits on the anisotropy of the microwave background radiation are gradually getting tighter and constraining more severely theoretical scenarios for the evolution of the universe.

  19. Stark broadening data for stellar plasma research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrijević, M. S.

    Results of an effort to provide to astrophysicists and physicists an as much as possible complete set of Stark broadening parameters needed for stellar opacity calculations, stellar atmosphere modelling, abundance determinations and diagnostics of different plasmas in astrophysics, physics and plasma technology, are presented. Stark broadening has been considered within the semiclassical perturbation, and the modified semiempirical approaches.

  20. Computational Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Astsatryan, H. V.

    2015-07-01

    Present astronomical archives that contain billions of objects, both Galactic and extragalactic, and the vast amount of data on them allow new studies and discoveries. Astrophysical Virtual Observatories (VO) use available databases and current observing material as a collection of interoperating data archives and software tools to form a research environment in which complex research programs can be conducted. Most of the modern databases give at present VO access to the stored information, which makes possible also a fast analysis and managing of these data. Cross-correlations result in revealing new objects and new samples. Very often dozens of thousands of sources hide a few very interesting ones that are needed to be discovered by comparison of various physical characteristics. VO is a prototype of Grid technologies that allows distributed data computation, analysis and imaging. Particularly important are data reduction and analysis systems: spectral analysis, SED building and fitting, modelling, variability studies, cross correlations, etc. Computational astrophysics has become an indissoluble part of astronomy and most of modern research is being done by means of it.

  1. Pluto's Atmosphere Does Not Collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Olkin, C B; Borncamp, D; Pickles, A; Sicardy, B; Assafin, M; Bianco, F B; Buie, M W; de Oliveira, A Dias; Gillon, M; French, R G; Gomes, A Ramos; Jehin, E; Morales, N; Opitom, C; Ortiz, J L; Maury, A; Norbury, M; Ribas, F B; Smith, R; Wasserman, L H; Young, E F; Zacharias, M; Zacharias, N

    2013-01-01

    Combining stellar occultation observations probing Pluto's atmosphere from 1988 to 2013 and models of energy balance between Pluto's surface and atmosphere, we conclude that Pluto's atmosphere does not collapse at any point in its 248-year orbit. The occultation results show an increasing atmospheric pressure with time in the current epoch, a trend present only in models with a high thermal inertia and a permanent N2 ice cap at Pluto's north rotational pole.

  2. Temperature evolution during dissipative collapse

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S D Maharaj; G Govender; M Govender

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the gravitational collapse of a radiating sphere evolving into a final static configuration described by the interior Schwarzschild solution. The temperature profiles of this particular model are obtained within the framework of causal thermodynamics. The overall temperature evolution is enhanced by contributions from the temperature gradient induced by perturbations as well as relaxational effects within the stellar core.

  3. Numerical Relativity and Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Lehner, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Throughout the Universe many powerful events are driven by strong gravitational effects that require general relativity to fully describe them. These include compact binary mergers, black hole accretion and stellar collapse, where velocities can approach the speed of light, and extreme gravitational fields --$\\Phi_{\\rm Newt}/c^2 \\simeq 1$-- mediate the interactions. Many of these processes trigger emission across a broad range of the electromagnetic spectrum. Compact binaries further source strong gravitational wave emission that could directly be detected in the near future. This feat will open up a gravitational wave window into our Universe and revolutionize its understanding. Describing these phenomena requires general relativity, and --where dynamical effects strongly modify gravitational fields-- the full Einstein equations coupled to matter sources. Numerical relativity is a field within general relativity concerned with studying such scenarios that cannot be accurately modeled via perturbative or anal...

  4. The masses and spins of neutron stars and stellar-mass black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stellar-mass black holes and neutron stars represent extremes in gravity, density, and magnetic fields. They therefore serve as key objects in the study of multiple frontiers of physics. In addition, their origin (mainly in core-collapse supernovae) and evolution (via accretion or, for neutron stars, magnetic spindown and reconfiguration) touch upon multiple open issues in astrophysics. In this review, we discuss current mass and spin measurements and their reliability for neutron stars and stellar-mass black holes, as well as the overall importance of spins and masses for compact object astrophysics. Current masses are obtained primarily through electromagnetic observations of binaries, although future microlensing observations promise to enhance our understanding substantially. The spins of neutron stars are straightforward to measure for pulsars, but the birth spins of neutron stars are more difficult to determine. In contrast, even the current spins of stellar-mass black holes are challenging to measure. As we discuss, major inroads have been made in black hole spin estimates via analysis of iron lines and continuum emission, with reasonable agreement when both types of estimate are possible for individual objects, and future X-ray polarization measurements may provide additional independent information. We conclude by exploring the exciting prospects for mass and spin measurements from future gravitational wave detections, which are expected to revolutionize our understanding of strong gravity and compact objects

  5. Radioactive ion beams in nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gialanella, L.

    2016-09-01

    Unstable nuclei play a crucial role in the Universe. In this lecture, after a short introduction to the field of Nuclear Astrophysics, few selected cases in stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis are discussed to illustrate the importance and peculiarities of processes involving unstable species. Finally, some experimental techniques useful for measurements using radioactive ion beams and the perspectives in this field are presented.

  6. Neutron cross sections of importance to astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron reactions of importance to the various stellar burning cycles are discussed. The role of isomeric states in the branched s-process is considered for particular cases. Neutron cross section needs for the 187Re-187Os, 87Rb-87Sr clocks for nuclear cosmochronology are discussed. Other reactions of interest to astrophysical processes are presented. 35 references

  7. Astrophysics with Microarcsecond Accuracy Astrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, Stephen C.

    2008-01-01

    Space-based astrometry promises to provide a powerful new tool for astrophysics. At a precision level of a few microarcsonds, a wide range of phenomena are opened up for study. In this paper we discuss the capabilities of the SIM Lite mission, the first space-based long-baseline optical interferometer, which will deliver parallaxes to 4 microarcsec. A companion paper in this volume will cover the development and operation of this instrument. At the level that SIM Lite will reach, better than 1 microarcsec in a single measurement, planets as small as one Earth can be detected around many dozen of the nearest stars. Not only can planet masses be definitely measured, but also the full orbital parameters determined, allowing study of system stability in multiple planet systems. This capability to survey our nearby stellar neighbors for terrestrial planets will be a unique contribution to our understanding of the local universe. SIM Lite will be able to tackle a wide range of interesting problems in stellar and Galactic astrophysics. By tracing the motions of stars in dwarf spheroidal galaxies orbiting our Milky Way, SIM Lite will probe the shape of the galactic potential history of the formation of the galaxy, and the nature of dark matter. Because it is flexibly scheduled, the instrument can dwell on faint targets, maintaining its full accuracy on objects as faint as V=19. This paper is a brief survey of the diverse problems in modern astrophysics that SIM Lite will be able to address.

  8. Trends of Stellar Entropy along Stellar Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    de Avellar, Marcio G B; Horvath, Jorge E

    2015-01-01

    This paper is devoted to discuss the difference in the thermodynamic entropy budget {\\it per baryon} in each type of stellar object found in Universe. We track and discuss the actual {\\it decrease} of the stored baryonic thermodynamic entropy from the most primitive molecular cloud up to the final fate of matter in the black holes, passing through evolved states of matter as found in white dwarfs and neutron stars. We then discuss the case of actual stars of different masses throughout their {\\it evolution}, clarifying the role of virial equilibrium condition for the decrease of the entropy and related issues. Finally, we discuss how gravity ultimately drives composition, hence structural changes along the stellar evolution all the way until the ultimate collapse to black holes, which may increase dramatically their entropy because of the gravitational contribution itself.

  9. Detection regimes of the cosmological gravitational wave background from astrophysical sources

    CERN Document Server

    Coward, D; Coward, David; Regimbau, Tania

    2006-01-01

    Key targets for gravitational wave (GW) observatories, such as LIGO and the next generation interferometric detector, Advanced LIGO, include core-collapse of massive stars and the final stage of coalescence of compact stellar remnants. The combined GW signal from such events occurring throughout the Universe will produce an astrophysical GW background (AGB), one that is fundamentally different from the GW background by very early Universe processes. One can classify contributions to the AGB for different classes of sources based on the strength of the GW emissions from the individual sources, their peak emission frequency, emission duration and their event rate density distribution. This article provides an overview of the detectability regimes of the AGB in the context of current and planned gravitational wave observatories. We show that there are two important AGB signal detection regimes, which we define as `continuous' and `popcorn noise'. We describe how the `popcorn noise' AGB regime evolves with observ...

  10. Einstein Toolkit for Relativistic Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collaborative Effort

    2011-02-01

    The Einstein Toolkit is a collection of software components and tools for simulating and analyzing general relativistic astrophysical systems. Such systems include gravitational wave space-times, collisions of compact objects such as black holes or neutron stars, accretion onto compact objects, core collapse supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts. The Einstein Toolkit builds on numerous software efforts in the numerical relativity community including CactusEinstein, Whisky, and Carpet. The Einstein Toolkit currently uses the Cactus Framework as the underlying computational infrastructure that provides large-scale parallelization, general computational components, and a model for collaborative, portable code development.

  11. Gravitational collapse: The story so far

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pankaj S Joshi

    2000-10-01

    An outstanding problem in gravitation theory and relativistic astrophysics today is to understand the final outcome of an endless gravitational collapse. Such a continual collapse would take place when stars more massive than few times the mass of the sun collapse under their own gravity on exhausting their nuclear fuel. According to the general theory of relativity, this results either in a black hole, or a naked singularity – which can communicate with far away observers in the universe. While black holes are (almost) being detected and are increasingly used to model high energy astrophysical phenomena, naked singularities have turned into a topic of active discussion, aimed at understanding their structure and implications. Recent developments here are reviewed, indicating future directions.

  12. Gravitational Collapse The Story so far

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, P S

    2000-01-01

    An outstanding problem in gravitation theory and relativistic astrophysics today is to understand the final outcome of an endless gravitational collapse. Such a continual collapse would take place when stars more massive than few times the mass of the sun collapse under their own gravity on exhausting their nuclear fuel. According to the general theory of relativity, this results either in a black hole, or a naked singularity- which can communicate with faraway observers in the universe. While black holes are (almost) being detected and are increasingly used to model high energy astrophysical phenomena, naked singularities have turned into a topic of active discussion, aimed at understanding their structure and implications. Recent developments here are reviewed, indicating future directions.

  13. ACCESS: Enabling an Improved Flux Scale for Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kaiser, Mary Elizabeth; McCandliss, Stephan R; Sahnow, David J; Barkhouser, Robert H; Van Dixon, W; Feldman, Paul D; Moos, H Warren; Orndorff, Joseph; Pelton, Russell; Riess, Adam G; Rauscher, Bernard J; Kimble, Randy A; Benford, Dominic J; Gardner, Jonathan P; Hill, Robert J; Woodgate, Bruce E; Bohlin, Ralph C; Deustua, Susana E; Kurucz, Robert; Lampton, Michael; Perlmutter, Saul; Wright, Edward L

    2010-01-01

    Improvements in the precision of the astrophysical flux scale are needed to answer fundamental scientific questions ranging from cosmology to stellar physics. The unexpected discovery that the expansion of the universe is accelerating was based upon the measurement of astrophysical standard candles that appeared fainter than expected. To characterize the underlying physical mechanism of the "Dark Energy" responsible for this phenomenon requires an improvement in the visible-NIR flux calibration of astrophysical sources to 1% precision. These improvements will also enable large surveys of white dwarf stars, e.g. GAIA, to advance stellar astrophysics by testing and providing constraints for the mass-radius relationship of these stars. ACCESS (Absolute Color Calibration Experiment for Standard Stars) is a rocket-borne payload that will enable the transfer of absolute laboratory detector standards from NIST to a network of stellar standards with a calibration accuracy of 1% and a spectral resolving power of R = 5...

  14. Towards 21st Century Stellar Models: Star Clusters, Supercomputing, and Asteroseismology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, S. W.; Constantino, T. N.; D'Orazi, V.;

    2016-01-01

    Stellar models provide a vital basis for many aspects of astronomy and astrophysics. Recent advances in observational astronomy -- through asteroseismology, precision photometry, high-resolution spectroscopy, and large-scale surveys -- are placing stellar models under greater quantitative scrutin...

  15. Underground nuclear astrophysics: Why and how

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Best, A.; Laubenstein, M. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, INFN, Assergi (AQ) (Italy); Caciolli, A. [Universita di Padova, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Padova (Italy); INFN, Padova (Italy); Fueloep, Zs.; Gyuerky, Gy. [Institute for Nuclear Research (MTA Atomki), Debrecen (Hungary); Napolitani, E. [Universita di Padova, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Padova (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, INFN, Legnaro (Italy); Rigato, V. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, INFN, Legnaro (Italy); Roca, V. [Universita di Napoli ' ' Federico II' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Napoli (Italy); INFN, Napoli (Italy); Szuecs, T. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf (HZDR), Dresden (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    The goal of nuclear astrophysics is to measure cross-sections of nuclear physics reactions of interest in astrophysics. At stars temperatures, these cross-sections are very low due to the suppression of the Coulomb barrier. Cosmic-ray-induced background can seriously limit the determination of reaction cross-sections at energies relevant to astrophysical processes and experimental setups should be arranged in order to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Placing experiments in underground sites, however, reduces this background opening the way towards ultra low cross-section determination. LUNA (Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics) was pioneer in this sense. Two accelerators were mounted at the INFN National Laboratories of Gran Sasso (LNGS) allowing to study nuclear reactions close to stellar energies. A summary of the relevant technology used, including accelerators, target production and characterisation, and background treatment is given. (orig.)

  16. Underground nuclear astrophysics: why and how

    CERN Document Server

    Best, A; Fülöp, Zs; Gyürky, Gy; Laubenstein, M; Napolitani, E; Rigato, V; Roca, V; Szücs, T

    2016-01-01

    The goal of nuclear astrophysics is to measure cross sections of nuclear physics reactions of interest in astrophysics. At stars temperatures, these cross sections are very low due to the suppression of the Coulomb barrier. Cosmic ray induced background can seriously limit the determination of reaction cross sections at energies relevant to astrophysical processes and experimental setups should be arranged in order to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Placing experiments in underground sites, however, reduces this background opening the way towards ultra low cross section determination. LUNA (Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics) was pioneer in this sense. Two accelerators were mounted at the INFN National Laboratories of Gran Sasso (LNGS) allowing to study nuclear reactions close to stellar energies. A summary of the relevant technology used, including accelerators, target production and characterisation, and background treatment is given.

  17. Trends in Nuclear Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Schatz, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Astrophysics is a vibrant field at the intersection of nuclear physics and astrophysics that encompasses research in nuclear physics, astrophysics, astronomy, and computational science. This paper is not a review. It is intended to provide an incomplete personal perspective on current trends in nuclear astrophysics and the specific role of nuclear physics in this field.

  18. The astrophysical gravitational wave stochastic background

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tania Regimbau

    2011-01-01

    A stochastic background of gravitational waves with astrophysical origins may have resulted from the superposition of a large number of unresolved sources since the beginning of stellar activity.Its detection would put very strong constraints on the physical properties of compact objects, the initial mass function and star formarion history.On the other hand, it could be a ‘noise' that would mask the stochastic background of its cosmological origin.We review the main astrophysical processes which are able to produce a stochastic background and discuss how they may differ from the primordial contribution in terms of statistical properties.Current detection methods are also presented.

  19. Stellar Evolution Models of Young Stars: Progress and Limitations

    CERN Document Server

    Feiden, Gregory A

    2015-01-01

    Stellar evolution models are a cornerstone of young star astrophysics, which necessitates that they yield accurate and reliable predictions of stellar properties. Here, I review the current performance of stellar evolution models against young astrophysical benchmarks and highlight recent progress incorporating non-standard physics, such as magnetic field and starspots, to explain observed deficiencies. While addition of these physical processes leads to improved agreement between models and observations, there are several fundamental limitations in our understanding about how these physical processes operate. These limitations inhibit our ability to form a coherent picture of the essential physics needed to accurately compute young stellar models, but provide rich avenues for further exploration.

  20. Stellar Explosions: Hydrodynamics and Nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    José, Jordi

    2015-12-01

    Stars are the main factories of element production in the universe through a suite of complex and intertwined physical processes. Such stellar alchemy is driven by multiple nuclear interactions that through eons have transformed the pristine, metal-poor ashes leftover by the Big Bang into a cosmos with 100 distinct chemical species. The products of stellar nucleosynthesis frequently get mixed inside stars by convective transport or through hydrodynamic instabilities, and a fraction of them is eventually ejected into the interstellar medium, thus polluting the cosmos with gas and dust. The study of the physics of the stars and their role as nucleosynthesis factories owes much to cross-fertilization of different, somehow disconnected fields, ranging from observational astronomy, computational astrophysics, and cosmochemistry to experimental and theoretical nuclear physics. Few books have simultaneously addressed the multidisciplinary nature of this field in an engaging way suitable for students and young scientists. Providing the required multidisciplinary background in a coherent way has been the driving force for Stellar Explosions: Hydrodynamics and Nucleosynthesis. Written by a specialist in stellar astrophysics, this book presents a rigorous but accessible treatment of the physics of stellar explosions from a multidisciplinary perspective at the crossroads of computational astrophysics, observational astronomy, cosmochemistry, and nuclear physics. Basic concepts from all these different fields are applied to the study of classical and recurrent novae, type I and II supernovae, X-ray bursts and superbursts, and stellar mergers. The book shows how a multidisciplinary approach has been instrumental in our understanding of nucleosynthesis in stars, particularly during explosive events.

  1. The gravitational-wave signature of core-collapse supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Ott, Christian D.

    2009-01-01

    We review the ensemble of anticipated gravitational-wave (GW) emission processes in stellar core collapse and postbounce core-collapse supernova evolution. We discuss recent progress in the modeling of these processes and summarize most recent GW signal estimates. In addition, we present new results on the GW emission from postbounce convective overturn and protoneutron star g-mode pulsations based on axisymmetric radiation-hydrodynamic calculations. Galactic core-collapse supernovae are very...

  2. The final outcome of dissipative collapse in the presence of

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Thirukkanesh; S Moopanar; M Govender

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the role played by the cosmological constant during gravitational collapse of a radiating star with vanishing Weyl stresses in the interior. We highlight the role played by the cosmological constant during the latter stages of collapse. The evolution of the temperature of the collapsing body is studied by employing causal heat transport equation. We show that the inclusion of the cosmological constant enhances the temperature within the stellar core.

  3. Hierarchical Cluster Assembly in Globally Collapsing Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Vazquez-Semadeni, Enrique; Colin, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the mechanism of cluster formation in a numerical simulation of a molecular cloud (MC) undergoing global hierarchical collapse (GHC). The global nature of the collapse implies that the SFR increases over time. The hierarchical nature of the collapse consists of small-scale collapses within larger-scale ones. The large-scale collapses culminate a few Myr later than the small-scale ones and consist of filamentary flows that accrete onto massive central clumps. The small-scale collapses form clumps that are embedded in the filaments and falling onto the large-scale collapse centers. The stars formed in the early, small-scale collapses share the infall motion of their parent clumps. Thus, the filaments feed both gaseous and stellar material to the massive central clump. This leads to the presence of a few older stars in a region where new protostars are forming, and also to a self-similar structure, in which each unit is composed of smaller-scale sub-units that approach each other and may merge. Becaus...

  4. Frontiers in nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertulani, C. A.; Kajino, T.

    2016-07-01

    The synthesis of nuclei in diverse cosmic scenarios is reviewed, with a summary of the basic concepts involved before a discussion of the current status in each case is made. We review the physics of the early universe, the proton to neutron ratio influence in the observed helium abundance, reaction networks, the formation of elements up to beryllium, the inhomogeneous Big Bang model, and the Big Bang nucleosynthesis constraints on cosmological models. Attention is paid to element production in stars, together with the details of the pp chain, the pp reaction, 3He formation and destruction, electron capture on 7Be, the importance of 8B formation and its relation to solar neutrinos, and neutrino oscillations. Nucleosynthesis in massive stars is also reviewed, with focus on the CNO cycle and its hot companion cycle, the rp-process, triple- α capture, and red giants and AGB stars. The stellar burning of carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon is presented in a separate section, as well as the slow and rapid nucleon capture processes and the importance of medium modifications due to electrons also for pycnonuclear reactions. The nucleosynthesis in cataclysmic events such as in novae, X-ray bursters and in core-collapse supernovae, the role of neutrinos, and the supernova radioactivity and light-curve is further discussed, as well as the structure of neutron stars and its equation of state. A brief review of the element composition found in cosmic rays is made in the end.

  5. Nuclear Astrophysics: CIPANP 2006

    OpenAIRE

    Haxton, W. C.

    2006-01-01

    I review progress that has been made in nuclear astrophysics over the past few years and summarize some of the questions that remain. Topics selected include solar neutrinos, supernovae (the explosion and associated nucleosynthesis), laboratory astrophysics, and neutron star structure.

  6. Stellar Nucleosynthesis Nuclear Data Mining

    OpenAIRE

    Pritychenko, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Stellar nucleosynthesis is an important nuclear physics phenomenon that is responsible for presently observed chemical elements and isotope abundances. It is also one of the corner stone hypotheses that provides basis for our understanding of Nature. Its theoretical predictions are often verified through the astrophysical observation and comparison of calculated isotopic abundances with the observed values. These calculations depend heavily on the availability of nuclear reaction rate, cross ...

  7. Life Cycles of Magnetic Fields in Stellar Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Uzdensky, D; Balbus, S; Blackman, E; Goodman, J; Medvedev, M; Spitkovsky, A; Stone, J

    2009-01-01

    This is a white paper submitted to the Stars and Stellar Evolution (SSE) Science Frontier Panel (SFP) of the NRC's Astronomy and Astrophysics 2010 Decadal Survey. The white paper is endorsed by the American Physical Society's (APS) Topical Group on Plasma Astrophysics (GPAP).

  8. Intense Electromagnetic Outbursts from Collapsing Hypermassive Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven L; Thompson, Christopher; Hanna, Chad

    2012-01-01

    We study the gravitational collapse of a magnetized neutron star using a novel numerical approach able to capture both the dynamics of the star and the behavior of the surrounding plasma. In this approach, a fully general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics implementation models the collapse of the star and provides appropriate boundary conditions to a force-free model which describes the stellar exterior. We validate this strategy by comparing with known results for the rotating monopole and aligned rotator solutions and then apply it to study both rotating and non-rotating stellar collapse scenarios, and contrast the behavior with what is obtained when employing the electrovacuum approximation outside the star. The non-rotating electrovacuum collapse is shown to agree qualitatively with a Newtonian model of the electromagnetic field outside a collapsing star. We illustrate and discuss a fundamental difference between the force-free and electrovacuum solutions, involving the appearance of large zones of electr...

  9. Seismological challenges for stellar structure

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, J

    2010-01-01

    Helioseismology has provided very detailed information about the solar interior, and extensive data on a large number of stars, although at less detail, are promised by the ongoing and upcoming asteroseismic projects. In the solar case there remain serious challenges in understanding the inferred solar structure, particularly in the light of the revised determinations of the solar surface composition. Also, a secure understanding of the origins of solar rotation as inferred from helioseismology, both in the radiative interior and in the convection zone, is still missing. In the stellar case challenges are certain to appear as the data allow more detailed inferences of the properties of stellar cores. Large remaining uncertainties in modelling concerns the properties of convective cores and other processes that may cause mixing. As a result of developing asteroseismic signatures addressing these and other issues, we can look forward to a highly challenging, and hence exciting, era of stellar astrophysics.

  10. Planets, stars and stellar systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bond, Howard; McLean, Ian; Barstow, Martin; Gilmore, Gerard; Keel, William; French, Linda

    2013-01-01

    This is volume 3 of Planets, Stars and Stellar Systems, a six-volume compendium of modern astronomical research covering subjects of key interest to the main fields of contemporary astronomy. This volume on “Solar and Stellar Planetary Systems” edited by Linda French and Paul Kalas presents accessible review chapters From Disks to Planets, Dynamical Evolution of Planetary Systems, The Terrestrial Planets, Gas and Ice Giant Interiors, Atmospheres of Jovian Planets, Planetary Magnetospheres, Planetary Rings, An Overview of the Asteroids and Meteorites, Dusty Planetary Systems and Exoplanet Detection Methods. All chapters of the handbook were written by practicing professionals. They include sufficient background material and references to the current literature to allow readers to learn enough about a specialty within astronomy, astrophysics and cosmology to get started on their own practical research projects. In the spirit of the series Stars and Stellar Systems published by Chicago University Press in...

  11. Blue straggler formation at core collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Sambaran

    2016-01-01

    Among the most striking feature of blue straggler stars (BSS) is the presence of multiple sequences of BSSs in the colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of several globular clusters. It is often envisaged that such a multiple BSS sequence would arise due a recent core collapse of the host cluster, triggering a number of stellar collisions and binary mass transfers simultaneously over a brief episode of time. Here we examine this scenario using direct N-body computations of moderately massive star clusters (of order 10^4 Msun ). As a preliminary attempt, these models are initiated with approx. 8-10 Gyr old stellar population and King profiles of high concentrations, being "tuned" to undergo core collapse quickly. BSSs are indeed found to form in a "burst" at the onset of the core collapse and several of such BS-bursts occur during the post-core-collapse phase. In those models that include a few percent primordial binaries, both collisional and binary BSSs form after the onset of the (near) core-collapse. However, t...

  12. Magnetic Modulation of Stellar Angular Momentum Loss

    CERN Document Server

    Garraffo, Cecilia; Cohen, Ofer

    2014-01-01

    Angular Momentum Loss is important for understanding astrophysical phenomena such as stellar rotation, magnetic activity, close binaries, and cataclysmic variables. Magnetic breaking is the dominant mechanism in the spin down of young late-type stars. We have studied angular momentum loss as a function of stellar magnetic activity. We argue that the complexity of the field and its latitudinal distribution are crucial for angular momentum loss rates. In this work we discuss how angular momentum is modulated by magnetic cycles, and how stellar spin down is not just a simple function of large scale magnetic field strength.

  13. Clusters: age scales for stellar physics

    CERN Document Server

    Barrado, David

    2016-01-01

    Ages are key to truly understand a large plethora of astrophysical phenomena. On the other hand, stellar clusters are open windows to understand stellar evolution, specifically, the change with time and mass of different stellar properties. As such, they are our laboratories where different theories can be tested, but without accurate ages, our knowledge would impaired. We revisit here a large number of age-dating techniques and discuss their advantages and draw-backs. In addition, a step-by step process is suggested in order to built a coherent age scale ladder, minimizing the error budget and the sources of uncertainty.

  14. Relativistic axions from collapsing Bose stars

    CERN Document Server

    Levkov, D G; Tkachev, I I

    2016-01-01

    The substructures of light bosonic (axion-like) dark matter may condense into compact Bose stars. We study collapses of the critical-mass stars caused by attractive self-interaction of the axion-like particles and find that these processes proceed in an unexpected universal way. First, nonlinear self-similar evolution (similar to "wave collapse" in plasma physics) forces the particles to fall into the star center. Second, collisions in the dense center create an outgoing stream of mildly relativistic particles which carries away an essential part of the star mass. The collapse stops when the star remnant is no longer able to support the self-similar infall feeding the collisions. We shortly discuss possible astrophysical and cosmological implications of these phenomena.

  15. Stellar Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peletier, Reynier F.

    2013-10-01

    This is a summary of my lectures during the 2011 Canary Islands Winter School in Puerto de la Cruz. I give an introduction to the field of stellar populations in galaxies, and highlight some new results. Since the title of the Winter School is Secular Evolution in Galaxies I mostly concentrate on nearby galaxies, which are best suited to study this theme. Of course, the understanding of stellar populations is intimately connected to understanding the formation and evolution of galaxies, one of the great outstanding problems of astronomy. We are currently in a situation where very large observational advances have been made in recent years. Galaxies have been detected up to a redshift of ten. A huge effort has to be made so that stellar population theory can catch up with observations. Since most galaxies are far away, information about them has to come from stellar population synthesis of integrated light. Here I will discuss how stellar evolution theory, together with observations in our Milky Way and Local Group, are used as building blocks to analyse these integrated stellar populations.

  16. Astrophysical Hydrodynamics An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Shore, Steven N

    2007-01-01

    This latest edition of the proven and comprehensive treatment on the topic -- from the bestselling author of ""Tapestry of Modern Astrophysics"" -- has been updated and revised to reflect the newest research results. Suitable for AS0000 and AS0200 courses, as well as advanced astrophysics and astronomy lectures, this is an indispensable theoretical backup for studies on celestial body formation and astrophysics. Includes exercises with solutions.

  17. Analytic studies in nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzochero, Pierre

    Five studies are presented in nuclear astrophysics, which deal with different stages of stellar evolution and which use analytic techniques as opposed to numerical ones. Two problems are described in neutrino astrophysics: the solar-neutrino puzzle is analyzed in the framework of the MSW mechanism for the enhancement of neutrino oscillations in matter; and the cooling of neutron stars is studied by calculating the neutrino emissivity from strangeness condensation. Radiative transfer is then examined as applied to SN1987A: its early spectrum and bolometric corrections are calculated by developing an analytic model which can describe both the extended nature of the envelope and the non-LTE state of the radiation field in the scattering-dominated early atmosphere; and a model-independent relation is derived between mass and kinetic energy for the hydrogen envelope of SN1987A, using only direct observations of its luminosity and photospheric velocity. Finally, an analytic approach is presented to relate the softness of the EOS of dense nuclear matter in the core of a supernova, the hydrostatic structure of such core and the initial strength of the shock wave.

  18. Astrophysics and Space Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mould, Jeremy; Brinks, Elias; Khanna, Ramon

    2015-08-01

    Astrophysics and Space Science publishes original contributions and invited reviews covering the entire range of astronomy, astrophysics, astrophysical cosmology, planetary and space science, and the astrophysical aspects of astrobiology. This includes both observational and theoretical research, the techniques of astronomical instrumentation and data analysis, and astronomical space instrumentation. We particularly welcome papers in the general fields of high-energy astrophysics, astrophysical and astrochemical studies of the interstellar medium including star formation, planetary astrophysics, the formation and evolution of galaxies and the evolution of large scale structure in the Universe. Papers in mathematical physics or in general relativity which do not establish clear astrophysical applications will not longer be considered.The journal also publishes topical collections consisting of invited reviews and original research papers selected special issues in research fields of particular scientific interest. These consist of both invited reviews and original research papers.Conference proceedings will not be considered. All papers published in the journal are subject to thorough and strict peer-reviewing.Astrophysics and Space Science has an Impact Factor of 2.4 and features short editorial turnaround times as well as short publication times after acceptance, and colour printing free of charge. Published by Springer the journal has a very wide online dissemination and can be accessed by researchers at a very large number of institutes worldwide.

  19. Stellar Alchemy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassé, Michel; Lyle, Translated by Stephen

    2003-08-01

    Preface; 1. Nuclear astrophysics: defence and illustration; 2. Light from atoms, light from the sky; 3. Visions; 4. Contents of the sky: atomic sources and fountains; 5. Nuclear suns; 6. Sociology of stars and clouds; 7. Histories; 8. Ancient stars in the galactic halo; 9. Conclusion; Appendices.

  20. Unscreened cross-sections for nuclear astrophysics via the Trojan Horse Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumino, A.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Sergi, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    The bare nucleus astrophysical S(E) factor is the Nuclear Physics parameter to determine the reaction rates in stellar plasmas. Whilst not being accessed in direct measurements, it can be easily determined using the Trojan Horse Method, successful indirect technique for nuclear astrophysics. The basic features of the method will be discussed and some recent results will be presented.

  1. Nuclear astrophysics: a new era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiescher, Michael; Aprahamian, Ani [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame (United States); Regan, Paddy [Department of Physics, University of Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2002-02-01

    The latest generation of radioactive-ion-beam facilities promises to shed light on the complex nuclear processes that control the evolution of stars and stellar explosions. The most fundamental question in nature is where do we come from, or, put another way, what are we made of? The late Carl Sagan poetically said that we are all made of stardust, but the origin of the elements has fascinated scientists for thousands of years. Many of the greatest medieval and renaissance scientists dabbled in alchemy, trying to create the elements that make up the cosmos, but we had to wait until the early 20th century to recognize that elements are really defined by the number of protons in the nucleus. According to our current understanding, after the big bang most of the normal or baryonic material in the universe consisted of the lightest two elements, hydrogen and helium, with only trace amounts of lithium and beryllium. All the heavier elements that occur naturally on Earth were created from this original material via a series of nuclear reactions in the cores of stars or in stellar explosions. Over the last decade, ground-based telescopes and satellite-based Observatories have opened new windows on the stars across the electromagnetic spectrum, from infrared to gamma radiation. New technology now makes it possible to observe and analyse short-lived stellar explosions. Indeed, the distribution of elements in 'planetary nebula' and in the ejecta of supernovae and novae give a direct glimpse of individual nucleosynthesis processes. In the February issue of Physics World, Michael Wiescher, Paddy Regan and Ani Aprahamian describe how sate-of-the-art facilities are set to plug many of the gaps in our understanding of nuclear astrophysics. (U.K.)

  2. Nuclear astrophysics: a new era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The latest generation of radioactive-ion-beam facilities promises to shed light on the complex nuclear processes that control the evolution of stars and stellar explosions. The most fundamental question in nature is where do we come from, or, put another way, what are we made of? The late Carl Sagan poetically said that we are all made of stardust, but the origin of the elements has fascinated scientists for thousands of years. Many of the greatest medieval and renaissance scientists dabbled in alchemy, trying to create the elements that make up the cosmos, but we had to wait until the early 20th century to recognize that elements are really defined by the number of protons in the nucleus. According to our current understanding, after the big bang most of the normal or baryonic material in the universe consisted of the lightest two elements, hydrogen and helium, with only trace amounts of lithium and beryllium. All the heavier elements that occur naturally on Earth were created from this original material via a series of nuclear reactions in the cores of stars or in stellar explosions. Over the last decade, ground-based telescopes and satellite-based Observatories have opened new windows on the stars across the electromagnetic spectrum, from infrared to gamma radiation. New technology now makes it possible to observe and analyse short-lived stellar explosions. Indeed, the distribution of elements in 'planetary nebula' and in the ejecta of supernovae and novae give a direct glimpse of individual nucleosynthesis processes. In the February issue of Physics World, Michael Wiescher, Paddy Regan and Ani Aprahamian describe how sate-of-the-art facilities are set to plug many of the gaps in our understanding of nuclear astrophysics. (U.K.)

  3. Astrophysical Quark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, R. X.

    2004-01-01

    The quark matter may have great implications in astrophysical studies, which could appear in the early Universe, in compact stars, and/or as cosmic rays. After a general review of astrophysical quark matter, the density-dominated quark matter is focused.

  4. Relativistic Astrophysics; Astrofisica Relativista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Font, J. A.

    2015-07-01

    The relativistic astrophysics is the field of astrophysics employing the theory of relativity Einstein as physical-mathematical model is to study the universe. This discipline analyzes astronomical contexts in which the laws of classical mechanics of Newton's law of gravitation are not valid. (Author)

  5. Stellar formation

    CERN Document Server

    Reddish, V C

    1978-01-01

    Stellar Formation brings together knowledge about the formation of stars. In seeking to determine the conditions necessary for star formation, this book examines questions such as how, where, and why stars form, and at what rate and with what properties. This text also considers whether the formation of a star is an accident or an integral part of the physical properties of matter. This book consists of 13 chapters divided into two sections and begins with an overview of theories that explain star formation as well as the state of knowledge of star formation in comparison to stellar structure

  6. Criticality and convergence in Newtonian collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study through numerical simulation the spherical collapse of isothermal gas in Newtonian gravity. We observe a critical behavior which occurs at the threshold of gravitational instability leading to core formation. This was predicted in a previous work by two of the present authors. We describe it in detail in this work. For a given initial density profile, we find a critical temperature T*, which is of the same order as the virial temperature of the initial configuration. For the exact critical temperature, the collapse converges to a self-similar form, the first member in Hunter's family of self-similar solutions. For a temperature close to T*, the collapse first approaches this critical solution. Later on, in the supercritical case (TT*), the gas bounces and disperses to infinity. We find two scaling laws with respect to vertical bar T-T* vertical bar: one for the collapsed mass in the supercritical case and the other, which was not predicted before, for the maximum density reached before dispersal in the subcritical case. The value of the critical exponent is measured to be ≅0.11 in the supercritical case, which agrees well with the predicted value ≅0.10567. These critical properties are quite similar to those observed in the collapse of a radiation fluid in general relativity. We study the response of the system to temperature fluctuation and discuss astrophysical implications for the interstellar medium structure and for the star formation process. Newtonian critical behavior is important not only because it provides a simple model for general relativity but also because it is relevant for astrophysical systems such as molecular clouds

  7. Stellar Populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peletier, Reynier F.

    2013-01-01

    This is a summary of my lectures during the 2011 Canary Islands Winter School in Puerto de la Cruz. I give an introduction to the field of stellar populations in galaxies, and highlight some new results. Since the title of the Winter School is Secular Evolution in Galaxies I mostly concentrate on ne

  8. Stellar remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Kawaler, S D; Srinivasan, G

    1997-01-01

    This volume examines the internal structure, origin and evolution of white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes, all objects at the final stage of stellar evolution. It covers topics such as: pulsation of white dwarfs; millisecond pulsars; and the dynamics around black holes.

  9. Collapse and Outflow Towards an Integrated Theory of Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Pudritz, R E; Ouyed, R

    1997-01-01

    Observational advances over the last decade reveal that star formation is associated with the simultaneous presence of gravitationally collapsing gas, bipolar outflow, and an accretion disk. Two theoretical views of star formation suppose that either stellar mass is determined from the outset by gravitational instability, or by the outflow which sweeps away the collapsing envelope of initially singular density distributions. Neither picture appears to explain all of the facts. This contribution examines some of the key issues facing star formation theory.

  10. Astronomical optical interferometry, II: Astrophysical results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jankov S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical interferometry is entering a new age with several ground- based long-baseline observatories now making observations of unprecedented spatial resolution. Based on a great leap forward in the quality and quantity of interferometric data, the astrophysical applications are not limited anymore to classical subjects, such as determination of fundamental properties of stars; namely, their effective temperatures, radii, luminosities and masses, but the present rapid development in this field allowed to move to a situation where optical interferometry is a general tool in studies of many astrophysical phenomena. Particularly, the advent of long-baseline interferometers making use of very large pupils has opened the way to faint objects science and first results on extragalactic objects have made it a reality. The first decade of XXI century is also remarkable for aperture synthesis in the visual and near-infrared wavelength regimes, which provided image reconstructions from stellar surfaces to Active Galactic Nuclei. Here I review the numerous astrophysical results obtained up to date, except for binary and multiple stars milliarcsecond astrometry, which should be a subject of an independent detailed review, taking into account its importance and expected results at microarcsecond precision level. To the results obtained with currently available interferometers, I associate the adopted instrumental settings in order to provide a guide for potential users concerning the appropriate instruments which can be used to obtain the desired astrophysical information.

  11. Bubble Chambers for Experiments in Nuclear Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    DiGiovine, B; Holt, R J; Rehm, K E; Raut, R; Robinson, A; Sonnenschein, A; Rusev, G; Tonchev, A P; Ugalde, C

    2015-01-01

    A bubble chamber has been developed to be used as an active target system for low energy nuclear astrophysics experiments. Adopting ideas from dark matter detection with superheated liquids, a detector system compatible with gamma-ray beams has been developed. This detector alleviates some of the limitations encountered in standard measurements of the minute cross sections of interest to stellar environments. While the astrophysically relevant nuclear reaction processes at hydrostatic burning temperatures are dominated by radiative captures, in this experimental scheme we measure the time-reversed processes. Such photodisintegrations allow us to compute the radiative capture cross sections when transitions to excited states of the reaction products are negligible. Due to the transformation of phase space, the photodisintegration cross sections are up to two orders of magnitude higher. The main advantage of the new target-detector system is a density several orders of magnitude higher than conventional gas tar...

  12. An invitation to astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Padmanabhan, Thanu

    2006-01-01

    This unique book provides a clear and lucid description of several aspects of astrophysics and cosmology in a language understandable to a physicist or beginner in astrophysics. It presents the key topics in all branches of astrophysics and cosmology in a simple and concise language. The emphasis is on currently active research areas and exciting new frontiers rather than on more pedantic topics. Many complicated results are introduced with simple, novel derivations which strengthen the conceptual understanding of the subject. The book also contains over one hundred exercises which will help s

  13. Truncations in stellar disks

    CERN Document Server

    Van der Kruit, P C

    2000-01-01

    The presence of radial truncations in stellar disks is reviewed. There is ample evidence that many disk galaxies have relatively shaprt truncations in their disks. These often are symmetric and independent of the wavelength band of the observations. The ratio of the truncation radius R_{max} to the disk scalelength h appears often less then 4.5, as expected on a simple model for the disk collapse. Current samples of galaxies observed may however not be representative and heavily biased towards sisks witht he largest scalelengths. Many spiral galaxies also have HI warps and these generally start at the truncation radius of the stellar disk. The HI surface density suddenly becomes much flatter with radius. In some galaxies the start of the warp and the position of the disk truncation radius is accompanied by a drop in the rotation velocity. In the regiosn beyond the dis truncation in the HI layer some star formation does occur, but the heavy element abundance and the dust content are very low. All evidence is c...

  14. General polytropic self-gravitating cylinder free-fall and accreting mass string with a chain of collapsed objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Yu-Qing; Hu, Xu-Yao

    2016-06-01

    We present a theoretical model framework for general polytropic (GP) hydrodynamic cylinder under self-gravity of infinite length with axial uniformity and axisymmetry. For self-similar dynamic solutions, we derive valuable integrals, analytic asymptotic solutions, sonic critical curves, shock conditions, and global numerical solutions with or without expansion shocks. Among others, we investigate various dynamic solutions featured with central free-fall asymptotic behaviours, corresponding to a collapsed mass string with a sustained dynamic accretion from a surrounding mass reservoir. Depending on the allowed ranges of a scaling index a dynamic mass accretion rate could be steady, increasing with time and decreasing with time. Physically, such a collapsed mass string or filament would break up into a sequence of sub-clumps and segments as induced by gravitational Jeans instabilities. Depending on the scales involved, such sub-clumps would evolve into collapsed objects or gravitationally bound systems. In diverse astrophysical and cosmological contexts, such a scenario can be adapted on various temporal, spatial and mass scales to form a chain of collapsed clumps and/or compact objects. Examples include the formation of chains of proto-stars, brown dwarfs and gaseous planets along molecular filaments; the formation of luminous massive stars along magnetized spiral arms and circum-nuclear starburst rings in barred spiral galaxies; the formation of chains of compact stellar objects such as white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes along a highly condensed mass string. On cosmological scales, one can perceive the formation of chains of galaxies, chains of galaxy clusters or even chains of supermassive and hypermassive black holes in the Universe including the early Universe. All these chains referred to above include possible binaries.

  15. Radial Velocity Planet Detection Biases at the Stellar Rotational Period

    CERN Document Server

    Vanderburg, Andrew; Johnson, John Asher; Ciardi, David R; Swift, Jonathan; Kane, Stephen R

    2016-01-01

    Future generations of precise radial velocity (RV) surveys aim to achieve sensitivity sufficient to detect Earth mass planets orbiting in their stars' habitable zones. A major obstacle to this goal is astrophysical radial velocity noise caused by active areas moving across the stellar limb as a star rotates. In this paper, we quantify how stellar activity impacts exoplanet detection with radial velocities as a function of orbital and stellar rotational periods. We perform data-driven simulations of how stellar rotation affects planet detectability and compile and present relations for the typical timescale and amplitude of stellar radial velocity noise as a function of stellar mass. We show that the characteristic timescales of quasi-periodic radial velocity jitter from stellar rotational modulations coincides with the orbital period of habitable zone exoplanets around early M-dwarfs. These coincident periods underscore the importance of monitoring the targets of RV habitable zone planet surveys through simul...

  16. Maximum stellar iron core mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F W Giacobbe

    2003-03-01

    An analytical method of estimating the mass of a stellar iron core, just prior to core collapse, is described in this paper. The method employed depends, in part, upon an estimate of the true relativistic mass increase experienced by electrons within a highly compressed iron core, just prior to core collapse, and is significantly different from a more typical Chandrasekhar mass limit approach. This technique produced a maximum stellar iron core mass value of 2.69 × 1030 kg (1.35 solar masses). This mass value is very near to the typical mass values found for neutron stars in a recent survey of actual neutron star masses. Although slightly lower and higher neutron star masses may also be found, lower mass neutron stars are believed to be formed as a result of enhanced iron core compression due to the weight of non-ferrous matter overlying the iron cores within large stars. And, higher mass neutron stars are likely to be formed as a result of fallback or accretion of additional matter after an initial collapse event involving an iron core having a mass no greater than 2.69 × 1030 kg.

  17. Deriving stellar inclination of slow rotators using stellar activity

    CERN Document Server

    Dumusque, X

    2014-01-01

    Stellar inclination is an important parameter for many astrophysical studies. Although different techniques allow us to estimate stellar inclinationt for fast rotators, it becomes much more difficult when stars are rotating slower than $\\sim2$-2.5 \\kms. By using the new activity simulation SOAP 2.0 that can reproduce the photometric and spectroscopic variations induced by stellar activity, we are able to fit observations of solar-type stars and derive their inclination. For HD189733, we estimate the stellar inclination to be $i=84^{+6}_{-20}$ degrees, which implies a star-planet obliquity of $\\psi=4^{+18}_{-4}$ considering previous measurements of the spin-orbit angle. For $\\alpha$ Cen B, we derive an inclination of $i=45^{+9}_{-19}$, which implies that the rotational spin of the star is not aligned with the orbital spin of the $\\alpha$ Cen binary system. In addition, assuming that $\\alpha$ Cen Bb is aligned with its host star, no transit would occur. The inclination of $\\alpha$ Cen B can be measured using 40...

  18. Deriving stellar inclination of slow rotators using stellar activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumusque, X., E-mail: xdumusque@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Stellar inclination is an important parameter for many astrophysical studies. Although different techniques allow us to estimate stellar inclination for fast rotators, it becomes much more difficult when stars are rotating slower than ∼2-2.5 km s{sup –1}. By using the new activity simulation SOAP 2.0 which can reproduce the photometric and spectroscopic variations induced by stellar activity, we are able to fit observations of solar-type stars and derive their inclination. For HD 189733, we estimate the stellar inclination to be i=84{sub −20}{sup +6} deg, which implies a star-planet obliquity of ψ=4{sub −4}{sup +18} considering previous measurements of the spin-orbit angle. For α Cen B, we derive an inclination of i=45{sub −19}{sup +9}, which implies that the rotational spin of the star is not aligned with the orbital spin of the α Cen binary system. In addition, assuming that α Cen Bb is aligned with its host star, no transit would occur. The inclination of α Cen B can be measured using 40 radial-velocity measurements, which is remarkable given that the projected rotational velocity of the star is smaller than 1.15 km s{sup –1}.

  19. Astrophysical Black Holes: Evidence of a Horizon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpi, Monica

    In this Lecture Note we first follow a short account of the history of the black hole hypothesis. We then review on the current status of the search for astrophysical black holes with particular attention to the black holes of stellar origin. Later, we highlight a series of observations that reveal the albeit indirect presence of supermassive black holes in galactic nuclei, with mention to forthcoming experiments aimed at testing directly the black hole hypothesis. We further focus on evidences of a black hole event horizon in cosmic sources.

  20. Dimensional analysis and group theory in astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kurth, Rudolf

    2013-01-01

    Dimensional Analysis and Group Theory in Astrophysics describes how dimensional analysis, refined by mathematical regularity hypotheses, can be applied to purely qualitative physical assumptions. The book focuses on the continuous spectral of the stars and the mass-luminosity relationship. The text discusses the technique of dimensional analysis, covering both relativistic phenomena and the stellar systems. The book also explains the fundamental conclusion of dimensional analysis, wherein the unknown functions shall be given certain specified forms. The Wien and Stefan-Boltzmann Laws can be si

  1. Neutrino physics and astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The plenary reports of Neutrino '80 are presented by experts in neutrino physics and astrophysics. Their International Conference on Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics was held in Erice (Italy), June 23 through 28, 1980. The proceedings include reviews of part research, the history of neutrino research and coverage of recent results and theoretical speculations. Topics include high- and low-energy neutrino astrophysics, weak charged and neutral currents, low and intermediate weak interactions, neutrino oscillations, and parity violation in atoms and nuclei conservation laws. Weak interactions in lepton-lepton and lepton-nucleon collisions, beam dump experiments, new theoretical ideas, and future developments in accelerators and detectors are also included. The topics are introduced by a historical perspective section and then grouped under the headings of neutrino astrophysics, weak charged currents, weak neutral currents, low and intermediate energy interactions, conservation laws, weak interactions in electron and hadron experiments, and a final section on future accelerator, new neutrino detection technology and concluding remarks

  2. Astrophysics Decoding the cosmos

    CERN Document Server

    Irwin, Judith A

    2007-01-01

    Astrophysics: Decoding the Cosmos is an accessible introduction to the key principles and theories underlying astrophysics. This text takes a close look at the radiation and particles that we receive from astronomical objects, providing a thorough understanding of what this tells us, drawing the information together using examples to illustrate the process of astrophysics. Chapters dedicated to objects showing complex processes are written in an accessible manner and pull relevant background information together to put the subject firmly into context. The intention of the author is that the book will be a 'tool chest' for undergraduate astronomers wanting to know the how of astrophysics. Students will gain a thorough grasp of the key principles, ensuring that this often-difficult subject becomes more accessible.

  3. Stellarator physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document consists of the proceedings of the Seventh International Workshop on Stellarators, held in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA, 10-14 April, 1989. The document consists of a summary of presentations, an overview of experimental results, and papers presented at the workshop on transport, impurities and divertors, diagnostics, ECH confinement experiments, equilibrium and stability studies, RF heating, confinement, magnetic configurations, and new experiments. Refs, figs and tabs

  4. Accelerator Experiments for Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Johnny S. T.

    2003-01-01

    Many recent discoveries in astrophysics involve phenomena that are highly complex. Carefully designed experiments, together with sophisticated computer simulations, are required to gain insights into the underlying physics. We show that particle accelerators are unique tools in this area of research, by providing precision calibration data and by creating extreme experimental conditions relevant for astrophysics. In this paper we discuss laboratory experiments that can be carried out at the S...

  5. Theoretical physics and astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Ginzburg, VL

    1979-01-01

    The aim of this book is to present, on the one hand various topics in theoretical physics in depth - especially topics related to electrodynamics - and on the other hand to show how these topics find applications in various aspects of astrophysics. The first text on theoretical physics and astrophysical applications, it covers many recent advances including those in X-ray, &ggr;-ray and radio-astronomy, with comprehensive coverage of the literature

  6. Constraints of noncommutativity from Astrophysical studies

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Aspeitia, Miguel A; Ortiz, C; Hinojosa-Ruiz, Sinhue; Rodriguez-Meza, Mario A

    2015-01-01

    This paper is devoted to study the astrophysical consequences of noncommutativity, focusing in stellar dynamics and rotational curves of galaxies. We start exploring a star filled with an incompressible fluid and a noncommutative fluid under the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff background. We analyze the effective pressure and mass, resulting in a constraint for the noncommutative parameter. Also we explore the rotation curves of galaxies assuming that the dark matter halo is a noncommutative fluid, obtaining an average value of the noncommutative parameter through an analysis of twelve LSB galaxies; our results are compared with traditional models like Pseudoisothermal, Navarro-Frenk-White and Burkert. As a final remark, we summarize our results as: $\\sqrt{\\theta}>0.075R$, from star constraints which is strong dependent of the stellar radius and $\\langle\\sqrt{\\theta}\\rangle\\simeq2.666\\rm kpc$ with standard deviation $\\sigma\\simeq1.090\\rm kpc$ from the galactic constraints.

  7. Laboratory Astrophysics White Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickhouse, Nancy; Federman, Steve; Kwong, Victor; Salama, Farid; Savin, Daniel; Stancil, Phillip; Weingartner, Joe; Ziurys, Lucy

    2006-01-01

    Laboratory astrophysics and complementary theoretical calculations are the foundations of astronomical and planetary research and will remain so for many generations to come. From the level of scientific conception to that of the scientific return, it is our understanding of the underlying processes that allows us to address fundamental questions regarding the origins and evolution of galaxies, stars, planetary systems, and life in the cosmos. In this regard, laboratory astrophysics is much like detector and instrument development at NASA and NSF; these efforts are necessary for the astronomical research being funded by the agencies. The NASA Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop met at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) from 14-16 February, 2006 to identify the current laboratory data needed to support existing and future NASA missions and programs in the Astrophysics Division of the Science Mission Directorate (SMD). Here we refer to both laboratory and theoretical work as laboratory astrophysics unless a distinction is necessary. The format for the Workshop involved invited talks by users of laboratory data, shorter contributed talks and poster presentations by both users and providers that highlighted exciting developments in laboratory astrophysics, and breakout sessions where users and providers discussed each others' needs and limitations. We also note that the members of the Scientific Organizing Committee are users as well as providers of laboratory data. As in previous workshops, the focus was on atomic, molecular, and solid state physics.

  8. Astrophysical applications of gravitational microlensing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shude Mao

    2012-01-01

    Since the first discovery of microlensing events nearly two decades ago,gravitational microlensing has accumulated tens of TBytes of data and developed into a powerful astrophysical technique with diverse applications.The review starts with a theoretical overview of the field and then proceeds to discuss the scientific highlights.(1) Microlensing observations toward the Magellanic Clouds rule out the Milky Way halo being dominated by MAssive Compact Halo Objects (MACHOs).This confirms most dark matter is non-baryonic,consistent with other observations.(2) Microlensing has discovered about 20 extrasolar planets (16 published),including the first two Jupiter-Saturn like systems and the only five "cold Neptunes" yet detected.They probe a different part of the parameter space and will likely provide the most stringent test of core accretion theory of planet formation.(3) Microlensing provides a unique way to measure the mass of isolated stars,including brown dwarfs and normal stars.Half a dozen or so stellar mass black hole candidates have also been proposed.(4) High-resolution,target-of-opportunity spectra of highly-magnified dwarf stars provide intriguing "age" determinations which may either hint at enhanced helium enrichment or unusual bulge formation theories.(5) Microlensing also measured limb-darkening profiles for close to ten giant stars,which challenges stellar atmosphere models.(6) Data from surveys also provide strong constraints on the geometry and kinematics of the Milky Way bar (through proper motions); the latter indicates predictions from current models appear to be too anisotropic compared with observations.The future of microlensing is bright given the new capabilities of current surveys and forthcoming new telescope networks from the ground and from space.Some open issues in the field are identified and briefly discussed.

  9. First forbidden stellar $\\beta$-decay rates for neutron-rich nickel isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Nabi, Jameel-Un

    2012-01-01

    In astrophysical environments, allowed Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions are important, particularly for $\\beta$-decay rates in presupernova evolution of massive stars, since they contribute to the fine-tuning of the lepton-to-baryon content of the stellar matter prior to and during the collapse of a heavy star. In environments where GT transitions are unfavored, first-forbidden transitions become important especially in medium heavy and heavy nuclei. Particularly in case of neutron-rich nuclei, first-forbidden transitions are favored primarily due to the phase-space amplification for these transitions. In this work the total $\\beta$-decay half-lives and the unique first-forbidden(U1F) $\\beta$-decay rates for a number of neutron-rich nickel isotopes, $^{72-78}$Ni, are calculated using the proton-neutron quasi-particle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA) theory for the first time in stellar matter. For the calculation of the $\\beta$-decay half-lives both allowed and first-forbidden transitions were considered. Co...

  10. BONNSAI: a Bayesian tool for comparing stars with stellar evolution models

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Fabian R N; de Koter, Alex; Brott, Ines; Izzard, Robert G; Lau, Herbert H B

    2014-01-01

    Powerful telescopes equipped with multi-fibre or integral field spectrographs combined with detailed models of stellar atmospheres and automated fitting techniques allow for the analysis of large number of stars. These datasets contain a wealth of information that require new analysis techniques to bridge the gap between observations and stellar evolution models. To that end, we develop BONNSAI (BONN Stellar Astrophysics Interface), a Bayesian statistical method, that is capable of comparing all available observables simultaneously to stellar models while taking observed uncertainties and prior knowledge such as initial mass functions and distributions of stellar rotational velocities into account. BONNSAI can be used to (1) determine probability distributions of fundamental stellar parameters such as initial masses and stellar ages from complex datasets, (2) predict stellar parameters that were not yet observationally determined and (3) test stellar models to further advance our understanding of stellar evol...

  11. Stellar evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Meadows, A J

    2013-01-01

    Stellar Evolution, Second Edition covers the significant advances in the understanding of birth, life, and death of stars.This book is divided into nine chapters and begins with a description of the characteristics of stars according to their brightness, distance, size, mass, age, and chemical composition. The next chapters deal with the families, structure, and birth of stars. These topics are followed by discussions of the chemical composition and the evolution of main-sequence stars. A chapter focuses on the unique features of the sun as a star, including its evolution, magnetic fields, act

  12. Critical chemotactic collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lushnikov, Pavel M.

    2010-04-01

    A Keller-Segel model describes macroscopic dynamics of bacterial colonies and biological cells as well as dynamics of a gas of self-gravitating Brownian particles. Bacteria secret chemical which attracts other bacteria so that they move towards chemical gradient creating nonlocal attraction between bacteria. If bacterial (or Brownian particle) density exceeds a critical value then the density collapses (blows up) in a finite time which corresponds to bacterial aggregation or gravitational collapse. Collapse in the Keller-Segel model has striking qualitative similarities with a nonlinear Schrödinger equation including critical collapse in two dimensions and supercritical collapse in three dimensions. A self-similar solution near blow up point is studied in the critical two-dimensional case and it has a form of a rescaled steady state solution which contains a critical number of bacteria. Time dependence of scaling of that solution has square root scaling law with logarithmic modification.

  13. Critical chemotactic collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Keller-Segel model describes macroscopic dynamics of bacterial colonies and biological cells as well as dynamics of a gas of self-gravitating Brownian particles. Bacteria secret chemical which attracts other bacteria so that they move towards chemical gradient creating nonlocal attraction between bacteria. If bacterial (or Brownian particle) density exceeds a critical value then the density collapses (blows up) in a finite time which corresponds to bacterial aggregation or gravitational collapse. Collapse in the Keller-Segel model has striking qualitative similarities with a nonlinear Schroedinger equation including critical collapse in two dimensions and supercritical collapse in three dimensions. A self-similar solution near blow up point is studied in the critical two-dimensional case and it has a form of a rescaled steady state solution which contains a critical number of bacteria. Time dependence of scaling of that solution has square root scaling law with logarithmic modification.

  14. Critical chemotactic collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lushnikov, Pavel M., E-mail: plushnik@math.unm.ed [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2010-04-05

    A Keller-Segel model describes macroscopic dynamics of bacterial colonies and biological cells as well as dynamics of a gas of self-gravitating Brownian particles. Bacteria secret chemical which attracts other bacteria so that they move towards chemical gradient creating nonlocal attraction between bacteria. If bacterial (or Brownian particle) density exceeds a critical value then the density collapses (blows up) in a finite time which corresponds to bacterial aggregation or gravitational collapse. Collapse in the Keller-Segel model has striking qualitative similarities with a nonlinear Schroedinger equation including critical collapse in two dimensions and supercritical collapse in three dimensions. A self-similar solution near blow up point is studied in the critical two-dimensional case and it has a form of a rescaled steady state solution which contains a critical number of bacteria. Time dependence of scaling of that solution has square root scaling law with logarithmic modification.

  15. Nuclear Astrophysics at DANCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most interesting nuclear physics challenges is obtaining a detailed understanding of the nucleosynthesis processes of the elements. Knowledge about the stellar sites, and how they are governed by stellar evolution and cosmology are crucial in understanding the overall picture. Information on reaction rates for neutron- and charged-particle-induced reactions have a direct impact on existing stellar models. Except for the stable isotopes, very few neutron-induced reactions in the energy range of interest have been measured to date. DANCE measurements on stable and unstable isotopes will provide many of the missing key reactions that are needed to understand the nucleosynthesis of the heavy elements

  16. Coronal seismology waves and oscillations in stellar coronae

    CERN Document Server

    Stepanov, Alexander; Nakariakov, Valery M

    2012-01-01

    This concise and systematic account of the current state of this new branch of astrophysics presents the theoretical foundations of plasma astrophysics, magneto-hydrodynamics and coronal magnetic structures, taking into account the full range of available observation techniques -- from radio to gamma. The book discusses stellar loops during flare energy releases, MHD waves and oscillations, plasma instabilities and heating and charged particle acceleration. Current trends and developments in MHD seismology of solar and stellar coronal plasma systems are also covered, while recent p

  17. Stellar Encounter Rate in Galactic Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Bahramian, Arash; Sivakoff, Gregory R; Gladstone, Jeanette C

    2013-01-01

    The high stellar densities in the cores of globular clusters cause significant stellar interactions. These stellar interactions can produce close binary mass-transferring systems involving compact objects and their progeny, such as X-ray binaries and radio millisecond pulsars. Comparing the numbers of these systems and interaction rates in different clusters drives our understanding of how cluster parameters affect the production of close binaries. In this paper we estimate stellar encounter rates (Gamma) for 124 Galactic globular clusters based on observational data as opposed to the methods previously employed, which assumed "King-model" profiles for all clusters. By deprojecting cluster surface brightness profiles to estimate luminosity density profiles, we treat "King-model" and "core-collapsed" clusters in the same way. In addition, we use Monte-Carlo simulations to investigate the effects of uncertainties in various observational parameters (distance, reddening, surface brightness) on Gamma, producing t...

  18. A multiphysics and multiscale software environment for modeling astrophysical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zwart, Simon Portegies; Harfst, Stefan; Groen, Derek; Fujii, Michiko

    2008-01-01

    We present MUSE, a software framework for combining existing computational tools for different astrophysical domains into a single multiphysics, multiscale application. MUSE facilitates the coupling of existing codes written in different languages by providing inter-language tools and by specifying an interface between each module and the framework that represents a balance between generality and computational efficiency. This approach allows scientists to use combinations of codes to solve highly-coupled problems without the need to write new codes for other domains or significantly alter their existing codes. MUSE currently incorporates the domains of stellar dynamics, stellar evolution and stellar hydrodynamics for studying generalized stellar systems. We have now reached a ``Noah's Ark'' milestone, with (at least) two available numerical solvers for each domain. MUSE can treat multi-scale and multi-physics systems in which the time- and size-scales are well separated, like simulating the evolution of plan...

  19. The formation and evolution of very massive stars in dense stellar systems

    OpenAIRE

    Belkus, H.; Van Bever, J.; Vanbeveren, D.

    2007-01-01

    The early evolution of dense stellar systems is governed by massive single star and binary evolution. Core collapse of dense massive star clusters can lead to the formation of very massive objects through stellar collisions ($M\\geq$ 1000 \\msun). Stellar wind mass loss determines the evolution and final fate of these objects, and decides upon whether they form black holes (with stellar or intermediate mass) or explode as pair instability supernovae, leaving no remnant. We present a computation...

  20. Astrophysics Source Code Library

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, Alice; Berriman, Bruce; Hanisch, Robert J; Mink, Jessica; Teuben, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL), founded in 1999, is a free on-line registry for source codes of interest to astronomers and astrophysicists. The library is housed on the discussion forum for Astronomy Picture of the Day (APOD) and can be accessed at http://ascl.net. The ASCL has a comprehensive listing that covers a significant number of the astrophysics source codes used to generate results published in or submitted to refereed journals and continues to grow. The ASCL currently has entries for over 500 codes; its records are citable and are indexed by ADS. The editors of the ASCL and members of its Advisory Committee were on hand at a demonstration table in the ADASS poster room to present the ASCL, accept code submissions, show how the ASCL is starting to be used by the astrophysics community, and take questions on and suggestions for improving the resource.

  1. Surprises in astrophysical gasdynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Balbus, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    Much of astrophysics consists of the study of ionised gas under the influence of gravitational and magnetic fields. Thus, it is not possible to understand the astrophysical universe without a detailed knowledge of the dynamics of magnetised fluids. Fluid dynamics is, however, a notoriously tricky subject, in which it is all too easy for one's a priori intuition to go astray. In this review, we seek to guide the reader through a series of illuminating yet deceptive problems, all with an enlightening twist. We cover a broad range of topics including the instabilities acting in accretion discs, the hydrodynamics governing the convective zone of the Sun, the magnetic shielding of a cooling galaxy cluster, and the behaviour of thermal instabilities and evaporating clouds. The aim of this review is to surprise and intrigue even veteran astrophysical theorists with an idiosynchratic choice of problems and counterintuitive results. At the same time, we endeavour to bring forth the fundamental ideas, to set out import...

  2. Augmented Reality in Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Vogt, Frédéric P A

    2013-01-01

    Augmented Reality consists of merging live images with virtual layers of information. The rapid growth in the popularity of smartphones and tablets over recent years has provided a large base of potential users of Augmented Reality technology, and virtual layers of information can now be attached to a wide variety of physical objects. In this article, we explore the potential of Augmented Reality for astrophysical research with two distinct experiments: (1) Augmented Posters and (2) Augmented Articles. We demonstrate that the emerging technology of Augmented Reality can already be used and implemented without expert knowledge using currently available apps. Our experiments highlight the potential of Augmented Reality to improve the communication of scientific results in the field of astrophysics. We also present feedback gathered from the Australian astrophysics community that reveals evidence of some interest in this technology by astronomers who experimented with Augmented Posters. In addition, we discuss p...

  3. The astrophysical r-process and its dependence on properties of nuclei far from stability: Beta strength functions and neutron capture rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The question of the astrophysical site of the rapid neutron capture (r-) process which is believed to be responsible for the production of the heavy elements in the universe has been a problem in astrophysics for more than two decades. The solution of this problem is not only dependent on the development of realistic astrophysical supernova models, i.e. correct treatment of the hydrodynamics of gravitational collapse and supernova explosion and the equation of state of hot and dense matter, but is shown in this paper to be very sensitive also to 'standard' nuclear physics properties of nuclei far from stability such as beta decay properties and neutron capture rates. For both of the latter, strongly oversimplifying assumptions, not applying the development in nuclear physics during the last decade, have been made in almost all r-process calculations performed up to now. A critical discussion of the state of the art of such calculations seems therefore to be indicated. In this paper procedures are described which allow one to obtain: 1) β-decay properties (decay rates, β-delayed neutron emissions and fission rates); 2) neutron capture rates for neutron-rich nuclei considerably improved over what has been used up to now. The beta strength functions are calculated for approx. equal to6000 nuclei between beta stability line and neutron drip line. By hydrodynamical supernova explosion calculations using realistic stellar models it is shown that as a consequence of the improved β-rates explosive He burning is a convincing alternative site to the 'classical' r-process whose existence still is questionable. The new β-rates will be important also for the investigation of further astrophysical sites producing heavy elements such as the r(n)-processes in explosive C or Ne burning. (orig.)

  4. Simulating Convection in Stellar Envelopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Joel

    Understanding convection in stellar envelopes, and providing a mathematical description of it, would represent a substantial advance in stellar astrophysics. As one of the largest sources of uncertainty in stellar models, existing treatments of convection fail to account for many of the dynamical effects of convection, such as turbulent pressure and asymmetry in the velocity field. To better understand stellar convection, we must be able to study and examine it in detail, and one of the best tools for doing so is numerical simulation. Near the stellar surface, both convective and radiative process play a critical role in determining the structure and gas dynamics. By following these processes from first principles, convection can be simulated self-consistently and accurately, even in regions of inefficient energy transport where existing descriptions of convection fail. Our simulation code includes two radiative transfer solvers that are based on different assumptions and approximations. By comparing simulations that differ only in their respective radiative transfer methods, we are able to isolate the effect that radiative efficiency has on the structure of the superadiabatic layer. We find the simulations to be in good general agreement, but they show distinct differences in the thermal structure in the superadiabatic layer and atmosphere. Using the code to construct a grid of three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations, we investigate the link between convection and various chemical compositions. The stellar parameters correspond to main-sequence stars at several surface gravities, and span a range in effective temperatures (4500 matches the thermodynamics of the simulations. In particular, we consider adjusting the mixing length parameter such that the specific entropy of the model matches that of an equivalent simulation eliminates the need to arbitrarily set the parameter, and in principle will produce stellar models with more accurate radii. By

  5. Experimental Study of Stellar Reactions at CNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a brief review on low-energy RI beam production technology, nuclear astrophysics programs at CNS are presented including a scope of the field in the Wako campus. The CRIB project involves a total development of the whole facility to maximize the low-energy RI beam intensities, including the ion source, the AVF cyclotron and the low-energy RI beam separator CRIB, Some recent nuclear astrophysics experiments performed with the RI beams were discussed, including the measurement of the 14O(α,p)17F reaction, the key stellar reaction for the onset of the high-temperature rp-process. The first experiment performed with a newly installed high-resolution magnetic spectrograph PA of CNS was also presented. Collaboration possibilities for nuclear astrophysics in the RIKEN campus are also touched

  6. Challenges of Relativistic Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Opher, Reuven

    2013-01-01

    I discuss some of the most outstanding challenges in relativistic astrophysics in the subjects of: compact objects (Black Holes and Neutron Stars); dark sector (Dark Matter and Dark Energy); plasma astrophysics (Origin of Jets, Cosmic Rays and Magnetic Fields) and the primordial universe (Physics at the beginning of the Universe). In these four subjects, I discuss twelve of the most important challenges. These challenges give us insight into new physics that can only be studied in the large scale Universe. The near future possibilities, in observations and theory, for addressing these challenges, are also discussed.

  7. Astrophysics in a nutshell

    CERN Document Server

    Maoz, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Winner of the American Astronomical Society's Chambliss Award, Astrophysics in a Nutshell has become the text of choice in astrophysics courses for science majors at top universities in North America and beyond. In this expanded and fully updated second edition, the book gets even better, with a new chapter on extrasolar planets; a greatly expanded chapter on the interstellar medium; fully updated facts and figures on all subjects, from the observed properties of white dwarfs to the latest results from precision cosmology; and additional instructive problem sets. Throughout, the text features the same focused, concise style and emphasis on physics intuition that have made the book a favorite of students and teachers.

  8. Constraining the astrophysical origin of the p-nuclei through nuclear physics and meteoritic data

    CERN Document Server

    Rauscher, T; Dillmann, I; Fröhlich, C; Fülöp, Zs; Gyürky, Gy

    2013-01-01

    A small number of naturally occurring, proton-rich nuclides (the p-nuclei) cannot be made in the s- and r-process. Their origin is not well understood. Massive stars can produce p-nuclei through photodisintegration of pre-existing intermediate and heavy nuclei. This so-called gamma-process requires high stellar plasma temperatures and occurs mainly in explosive O/Ne burning during a core-collapse supernova. Although the gamma-process in massive stars has been successful in producing a large range of p-nuclei, significant deficiences remain. An increasing number of processes and sites has been studied in recent years in search of viable alternatives replacing or supplementing the massive star models. A large number of unstable nuclei, however, with only theoretically predicted reaction rates are included in the reaction network and thus the nuclear input may also bear considerable uncertainties. The current status of astrophysical models, nuclear input, and observational constraints is reviewed. After an overv...

  9. Astrophysics and the exploration of the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This special issue of Clefs CEA journal is entirely devoted to astrophysics and to the exploration and probing of the Universe. A first part of this dossier, described here, makes a status of our present day knowledge about stars, planets, galaxies, the Universe structure and dark matter. Content: 1 - Stars seed the Universe: What does the Sun tell us?, Probing stellar interiors, From the Sun to the stars, A tour of stellar nurseries, How heavy elements arise, How supernovae explode, Supernova remnants, High-energy objects - sources for astonishment, Focus: A Probing the Universe across the entire light spectrum; 2 - Planets: a dance of small bodies, swirling around up to the finale of their birth: How our world was born, The rings of Saturn: a magnificent research laboratory, Planetary cocoons; 3 - Galaxies: a richly paradoxical evolution: The active life of galaxies, A mysterious black hole, Elucidating the cosmic ray acceleration mechanism, Seeking out the great ancestors, The formation of galaxies: a story of paradoxes, The morphogenesis of galaxies; 4 - The Universe, a homogeneous 'soup' that has turned into a hierarchical structure: The grand thermal history of the Universe, The cosmic web, The formation of the structures of the Universe: the interplay of models, Does the Universe have a shape? Is it finite, or infinite?; 5 - Odyssey across the dark side of the Universe: The puzzle of dark matter, Astrophysics and the observation of dark matter, The theory of dark matter, Could dark matter be generated some day at LHC? A Universe dominated by dark energy, Astrophysics and the observation of dark energy, Theories of dark energy, The matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe; 6 - Journey into the lights of the Universe: Microwave - ESA Planck Surveyor, Submillimeter and infrared - ArTeMis, Herschel Space Observatory, VLT-VISIR, Cassini-CIRS, Visible - SoHo-GOLF, X-ray - XMM-Newton, Gamma ray - INTEGRAL, Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope, HESS, EDELWEISS

  10. Scaling stellar jets to the laboratory: the power of simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Stehle, Chantal; Colombier, Jean-Philippe; Gonzalez, Matthias; Lanz, Thierry; Marocchino, Alberto; Kozlova, Michaela; Rus, Bedrich; 10.1017/S0263034609990449

    2009-01-01

    Advances in laser and Z-pinch technology, coupled with the development of plasma diagnostics and the availability of high-performance computers, have recently stimulated the growth of high-energy density laboratory astrophysics. In particular a number of experiments have been designed to study radiative shocks and jets with the aim of shedding new light on physical processes linked to the ejection and accretion of mass by newly born stars. Although general scaling laws are a powerful tools to link laboratory experiments with astrophysical plasmas, the phenomena modelled are often too complicated for simple scaling to remain relevant. Nevertheless, the experiments can still give important insights into the physics of astrophysical systems and can be used to provide the basic experimental validation of numerical simulations in regimes of interest to astrophysics. We will illustrate the possible links between laboratory experiments, numerical simulations and astrophysics in the context of stellar jets. First we ...

  11. Description of anomalous Zeeman patterns in stellar astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Pain, Jean-Christophe

    2013-01-01

    The influence of a magnetic field on the broadening of spectral lines and transition arrays in complex spectra is investigated. The anomalous absorption or emission Zeeman pattern is a superposition of many profiles with different relative strengths, shifts, widths, asymmetries and sharpnesses. The "sigma" and "pi" profiles can be described statistically, using the moments of the Zeeman components. We present two statistical modellings: the first one provides a diagnostic of the magnetic field and the second one can be used to include the effect of a magnetic field on simulated atomic spectra in an approximate way.

  12. New GALEX UV Data Products At MAST For Stellar Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiao, Bernie; Fleming, S. W.; Million, C.; Seibert, M.; Bianchi, L.; Thompson, R.; Tseng, S.; Adler, W. J.; Hubbard, M.; Levay, K.; Madore, B. F.; Martin, C. D.; Nieto-Santisteban, M. A.; Sahai, R.; Schiminovich, D.; White, R. L.; Wyder, T. K.

    2014-01-01

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) mission ended in June 2013 after ten years in orbit. Its FUV and NUV microchannel plate detectors were used to conduct a variety of direct imaging and spectroscopic astronomical surveys with various depths and sky coverage, recording individual photon events with a time resolution of five thousandths of a second. Although the mission has ended, MAST is continuing to provide new data products as the mission transitions to a legacy archive. One product is the GCAT (Seibert et al., in prep), a catalog of GALEX sources across the entire GR6 data release that removes duplicate objects found in the GALEX MCAT. The GCAT defines "primary" NUV and FUV fluxes within the AIS and MIS surveys 40 million and 22 million sources, respectively), accounting for tile overlaps, and with visual inspection of every tile to flag artifacts and conduct other quality control checks. Another catalog of unique sources is that of Bianchi et al. (2013). Similar to the GCAT, their catalog produces a list of distinct GALEX sources in both the FUV and NUV from the AIS and MIS surveys, and includes data from GR7 (through the end of 2012). They have also cross-matched their sources with SDSS DR9, GSC-II, PanSTARRS, and 2MASS. We review access options for these catalogs, including updated matches between the GCAT and SDSS / Kepler available at MAST. In addition to these unique GALEX source catalogs, MAST will provide a database and software package that archives each of the ~1.5 trillion photon events detected over the lifetime of the mission. For the first time, users will be able to create calibrated lightcurves, intensity maps, and animated movies from any set of photons selected across any tile, and with specified aperture sizes, coordinates, and time steps. Users can access the data using either a python-based command-line software package, through a web interface at MAST, or (eventually) through CasJobs using direct SQL queries. We present some example GALEX lightcurves and images using this new data product to highlight just some of the possibilities available for users to mine the GALEX photon database, particularly with variable sources.

  13. Countdown to Systems Collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tysseling, John C.; Easton, Jeff; Weaks, Julie

    2002-01-01

    Describes how the University of New Mexico Albuquerque developed a strategic business plan for renewing its utility systems when faced with the imminent collapse of its entire energy infrastructure and a $75-100 million price tag for upgrades. (EV)

  14. Collapse of Axion Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Eby, Joshua; Suranyi, Peter; Wijewardhana, L C R

    2016-01-01

    Axion stars, gravitationally bound states of low-energy axion particles, have a maximum mass allowed by gravitational stability. Weakly bound states obtaining this maximum mass have sufficiently large radii such that they are dilute, and as a result, they are well described by a leading-order expansion of the axion potential. Heavier states are susceptible to gravitational collapse. Inclusion of higher-order interactions, present in the full potential, can give qualitatively different results in the analysis of collapsing heavy states, as compared to the leading-order expansion. In this work, we find that collapsing axion stars are stabilized by repulsive interactions present in the full potential, providing evidence that such objects do not form black holes. These dense configurations, which are the endpoints of collapse, have extremely high binding energy, and as a result, decay through number changing $3\\,a\\rightarrow a$ interactions with an extremely short lifetime.

  15. Surprises in astrophysical gasdynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbus, Steven A; Potter, William J

    2016-06-01

    Much of astrophysics consists of the study of ionized gas under the influence of gravitational and magnetic fields. Thus, it is not possible to understand the astrophysical universe without a detailed knowledge of the dynamics of magnetized fluids. Fluid dynamics is, however, a notoriously tricky subject, in which it is all too easy for one's a priori intuition to go astray. In this review, we seek to guide the reader through a series of illuminating yet deceptive problems, all with an enlightening twist. We cover a broad range of topics including the instabilities acting in accretion discs, the hydrodynamics governing the convective zone of the Sun, the magnetic shielding of a cooling galaxy cluster, and the behaviour of thermal instabilities and evaporating clouds. The aim of this review is to surprise and intrigue even veteran astrophysical theorists with an idiosyncratic choice of problems and counterintuitive results. At the same time, we endeavour to bring forth the fundamental ideas, to set out important assumptions, and to describe carefully whatever novel techniques may be appropriate to the problem at hand. By beginning at the beginning, and analysing a wide variety of astrophysical settings, we seek not only to make this review suitable for fluid dynamic veterans, but to engage novice recruits as well with what we hope will be an unusual and instructive introduction to the subject. PMID:27116247

  16. The NASA Astrophysics Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebulum, Ricardo S.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's scientists are enjoying unprecedented access to astronomy data from space, both from missions launched and operated only by NASA, as well as missions led by other space agencies to which NASA contributed instruments or technology. This paper describes the NASA astrophysics program for the next decade, including NASA's response to the ASTRO2010 Decadal Survey.

  17. Surprises in astrophysical gasdynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbus, Steven A.; Potter, William J.

    2016-06-01

    Much of astrophysics consists of the study of ionized gas under the influence of gravitational and magnetic fields. Thus, it is not possible to understand the astrophysical universe without a detailed knowledge of the dynamics of magnetized fluids. Fluid dynamics is, however, a notoriously tricky subject, in which it is all too easy for one’s a priori intuition to go astray. In this review, we seek to guide the reader through a series of illuminating yet deceptive problems, all with an enlightening twist. We cover a broad range of topics including the instabilities acting in accretion discs, the hydrodynamics governing the convective zone of the Sun, the magnetic shielding of a cooling galaxy cluster, and the behaviour of thermal instabilities and evaporating clouds. The aim of this review is to surprise and intrigue even veteran astrophysical theorists with an idiosyncratic choice of problems and counterintuitive results. At the same time, we endeavour to bring forth the fundamental ideas, to set out important assumptions, and to describe carefully whatever novel techniques may be appropriate to the problem at hand. By beginning at the beginning, and analysing a wide variety of astrophysical settings, we seek not only to make this review suitable for fluid dynamic veterans, but to engage novice recruits as well with what we hope will be an unusual and instructive introduction to the subject.

  18. Critical chemotactic collapse

    OpenAIRE

    Lushnikov, Pavel M.

    2009-01-01

    A Keller-Segel model describes macroscopic dynamics of bacterial colonies and biological cells. Bacteria secret chemical which attracts other bacteria so that they move towards chemical gradient creating nonlocal attraction between bacteria. If bacterial density exceeds a critical value then the density collapses (blows up) in a finite time which corresponds to bacterial aggregation. Collapse in the Keller-Segel model has striking qualitative similarities with a nonlinear Schrodinger equation...

  19. KROME - a package to embed chemistry in astrophysical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Grassi, T; Schleicher, D R G; Prieto, J; Seifried, D; Simoncini, E; Gianturco, F A

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry plays a key role in many astrophysical situations, and therefore needs to be included in astrophysical simulations modelling such environments. In particular, the chemical evolution regulates the cooling, and the thermal properties of the gas, which are relevant during gravitational collapse, the evolution of disks and the fragmentation process. At the same time, the chemistry of the gas also determines the observational appearance, in particular with respect to the emission through atomic, ionic or molecular lines. In order to simplify the usage of chemical networks in large numerical simulations, we present the chemistry package KROME, consisting of a Python pre-processor which generates a subroutine for the solution of chemical networks which can be embedded in any numerical code. For the solution of the rate equations, we make use of the high-order solver DLSODES, which was shown to be both accurate and efficient for sparse networks, which are typical in astrophysical applications. KROME also pr...

  20. Numerical modeling of core-collapse supernovae and compact objects

    CERN Document Server

    Sumiyoshi, K

    2012-01-01

    Massive stars (M> 10Msun) end their lives with spectacular explosions due to gravitational collapse. The collapse turns the stars into compact objects such as neutron stars and black holes with the ejection of cosmic rays and heavy elements. Despite the importance of these astrophysical events, the mechanism of supernova explosions has been an unsolved issue in astrophysics. This is because clarification of the supernova dynamics requires the full knowledge of nuclear and neutrino physics at extreme conditions, and large-scale numerical simulations of neutrino radiation hydrodynamics in multi-dimensions. This article is a brief overview of the understanding (with difficulty) of the supernova mechanism through the recent advance of numerical modeling at supercomputing facilities. Numerical studies with the progress of nuclear physics are applied to follow the evolution of compact objects with neutrino emissions in order to reveal the birth of pulsars/black holes from the massive stars.

  1. Selected topics in nuclear- and astro-physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subjects cover the properties of hot and dense matter created in laboratory (the dynamics of the nucleus-nucleus collisions, the structure of hot and spinning nuclei), the properties of hot and dense stellar matter, the nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest (including the latest developments of the tools such as e.g. the radioactive beams) and the nucleosynthesis (esp. R-processes). (author)

  2. Stellar abundances of beryllium and CUBES

    CERN Document Server

    Smiljanic, R

    2014-01-01

    Stellar abundances of beryllium are useful in different areas of astrophysics, including studies of the Galactic chemical evolution, of stellar evolution, and of the formation of globular clusters. Determining Be abundances in stars is, however, a challenging endeavor. The two Be II resonance lines useful for abundance analyses are in the near UV, a region strongly affected by atmospheric extinction. CUBES is a new spectrograph planned for the VLT that will be more sensitive than current instruments in the near UV spectral region. It will allow the observation of fainter stars, expanding the number of targets where Be abundances can be determined. Here, a brief review of stellar abundances of Be is presented together with a discussion of science cases for CUBES. In particular, preliminary simulations of CUBES spectra are presented, highlighting its possible impact in investigations of Be abundances of extremely metal-poor stars and of stars in globular clusters.

  3. Laboratory Astrophysics and the State of Astronomy and Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Brickhouse, AAS WGLA: Nancy; Drake, Paul; Federman, Steven; Ferland, Gary; Frank, Adam; Haxton, Wick; Herbst, Eric; Olive, Keith; Salama, Farid; Savin, Daniel Wolf; Ziurys, Lucy

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory astrophysics and complementary theoretical calculations are the foundations of astronomy and astrophysics and will remain so into the foreseeable future. The impact of laboratory astrophysics ranges from the scientific conception stage for ground-based, airborne, and space-based observatories, all the way through to the scientific return of these projects and missions. It is our understanding of the under-lying physical processes and the measurements of critical physical parameters that allows us to address fundamental questions in astronomy and astrophysics. In this regard, laboratory astrophysics is much like detector and instrument development at NASA, NSF, and DOE. These efforts are necessary for the success of astronomical research being funded by the agencies. Without concomitant efforts in all three directions (observational facilities, detector/instrument development, and laboratory astrophysics) the future progress of astronomy and astrophysics is imperiled. In addition, new developments i...

  4. Experimental astrophysics with high power lasers and Z pinches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remington, B A; Drake, R P; Ryutov, D D

    2004-12-10

    With the advent of high energy density (HED) experimental facilities, such as high-energy lasers and fast Z-pinch, pulsed-power facilities, mm-scale quantities of matter can be placed in extreme states of density, temperature, and/or velocity. This has enabled the emergence of a new class of experimental science, HED laboratory astrophysics, wherein the properties of matter and the processes that occur under extreme astrophysical conditions can be examined in the laboratory. Areas particularly suitable to this class of experimental astrophysics include the study of opacities relevant to stellar interiors; equations of state relevant to planetary interiors; strong shock driven nonlinear hydrodynamics and radiative dynamics, relevant to supernova explosions and subsequent evolution; protostellar jets and high Mach-number flows; radiatively driven molecular clouds and nonlinear photoevaporation front dynamics; and photoionized plasmas relevant to accretion disks around compact objects, such as black holes and neutron stars.

  5. Stellar processes near AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Nayakshin, S

    2007-01-01

    Precise mechanisms by which Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) receive their gaseous fuel is still a mystery. Here I draw attention to the extra ordinary star formation event that took place in the central ~ 0.5 parsec of our Galaxy. The most reliable explanation of the event seems to be that two somewhat massive nearly co-eval gaseous disks failed to accrete on Sgr A*, the super-massive black hole (SMBH) in our Galaxy, and instead cooled down and gravitationally collapsed, forming the stars observed now. This emphasises that star formation must be an important part of AGN feeding puzzle. I also discuss a model in which stellar winds create the observed obscuration of AGN. These winds are cold, clumpy and dusty, as required by the observations, but they are Compton-thin unless wind outflow rate is highly super-Eddington. This argument is in fact a general one, independent of the wind driving mechanism. I thus suggest that winds may be important for optically thin absorbers, and that a better model for optically thi...

  6. Nuclear astrophysics at DRAGON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hager, U. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado (United States)

    2014-05-02

    The DRAGON recoil separator is located at the ISAC facility at TRIUMF, Vancouver. It is designed to measure radiative alpha and proton capture reactions of astrophysical importance. Over the last years, the DRAGON collaboration has measured several reactions using both radioactive and high-intensity stable beams. For example, the 160(a, g) cross section was recently measured. The reaction plays a role in steady-state helium burning in massive stars, where it follows the 12C(a, g) reaction. At astrophysically relevant energies, the reaction proceeds exclusively via direct capture, resulting in a low rate. In this measurement, the unique capabilities of DRAGON enabled determination not only of the total reaction rates, but also of decay branching ratios. In addition, results from other recent measurements will be presented.

  7. Nuclear Astrophysics with LUNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broggini, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    One of the main ingredients of nuclear astrophysics is the knowledge of the thermonuclear reactions which power the stars and synthesize the chemical elements. Deep underground in the Gran Sasso Laboratory the cross section of the key reactions of the proton-proton chain and of the Carbon-Nitrogen-Oxygen (CNO) cycle have been measured right down to the energies of astrophysical interest. The main results obtained during the 'solar' phase of LUNA are reviewed and their influence on our understanding of the properties of the neutrino and of the Sun is discussed. We then describe the current LUNA program mainly devoted to the study of the nucleosynthesis of the light elements in AGB stars and Classical Novae. Finally, the future of LUNA towards the study of helium and carbon burning with a new 3.5 MV accelerator is outlined.

  8. Astrophysics a new approach

    CERN Document Server

    Kundt, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    For a quantitative understanding of the physics of the universe - from the solar system through the milky way to clusters of galaxies all the way to cosmology - these edited lecture notes are perhaps among the most concise and also among the most critical ones: Astrophysics has not yet stood the redundancy test of laboratory physics, hence should be wary of early interpretations. Special chapters are devoted to magnetic and radiation processes, supernovae, disks, black-hole candidacy, bipolar flows, cosmic rays, gamma-ray bursts, image distortions, and special sources. At the same time, planet earth is viewed as the arena for life, with plants and animals having evolved to homo sapiens during cosmic time. -- This text is unique in covering the basic qualitative and quantitative tools, formulae as well as numbers, needed for the precise interpretation of frontline phenomena in astrophysical research. The author compares mainstream interpretations with new and even controversial ones he wishes to emphasize. The...

  9. Numerical Relativity Beyond Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Garfinkle, David

    2016-01-01

    Though the main applications of computer simulations in relativity are to astrophysical systems such as black holes and neutron stars, nonetheless there are important applications of numerical methods to the investigation of general relativity as a fundamental theory of the nature of space and time. This paper gives an overview of some of these applications. In particular we cover (i) investigations of the properties of spacetime singularities such as those that occur in the interior of black...

  10. Astrophysics in 2006

    CERN Document Server

    Trimble, Virginia; Hansen, Carl J

    2007-01-01

    The fastest pulsar and the slowest nova; the oldest galaxies and the youngest stars; the weirdest life forms and the commonest dwarfs; the highest energy particles and the lowest energy photons. These were some of the extremes of Astrophysics 2006. We attempt also to bring you updates on things of which there is currently only one (habitable planets, the Sun, and the universe) and others of which there are always many, like meteors and molecules, black holes and binaries.

  11. Augmented Reality in Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Vogt, Frédéric P. A.; Shingles, Luke J.

    2013-01-01

    Augmented Reality consists of merging live images with virtual layers of information. The rapid growth in the popularity of smartphones and tablets over recent years has provided a large base of potential users of Augmented Reality technology, and virtual layers of information can now be attached to a wide variety of physical objects. In this article, we explore the potential of Augmented Reality for astrophysical research with two distinct experiments: (1) Augmented Posters and (2) Augmented...

  12. Astrophysical fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, Gordon I.

    2016-06-01

    > These lecture notes and example problems are based on a course given at the University of Cambridge in Part III of the Mathematical Tripos. Fluid dynamics is involved in a very wide range of astrophysical phenomena, such as the formation and internal dynamics of stars and giant planets, the workings of jets and accretion discs around stars and black holes and the dynamics of the expanding Universe. Effects that can be important in astrophysical fluids include compressibility, self-gravitation and the dynamical influence of the magnetic field that is `frozen in' to a highly conducting plasma. The basic models introduced and applied in this course are Newtonian gas dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) for an ideal compressible fluid. The mathematical structure of the governing equations and the associated conservation laws are explored in some detail because of their importance for both analytical and numerical methods of solution, as well as for physical interpretation. Linear and nonlinear waves, including shocks and other discontinuities, are discussed. The spherical blast wave resulting from a supernova, and involving a strong shock, is a classic problem that can be solved analytically. Steady solutions with spherical or axial symmetry reveal the physics of winds and jets from stars and discs. The linearized equations determine the oscillation modes of astrophysical bodies, as well as their stability and their response to tidal forcing.

  13. Optics in Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Foy, Renaud

    2005-01-01

    Astrophysics is facing challenging aims such as deep cosmology at redshift higher than 10 to constrain cosmology models, or the detection of exoplanets, and possibly terrestrial exoplanets, and several others. It requires unprecedented ambitious R&D programs, which have definitely to rely on a tight cooperation between astrophysics and optics communities. The book addresses most of the most critical interdisciplinary domains where they interact, or where they will do. A first need is to collect more light, i.e. telescopes still larger than the current 8-10 meter class ones. Decametric, and even hectometric, optical (from UV to IR wavelengths) telescopes are being studied. Whereas up to now the light collecting surface of new telescopes was approximately 4 times that of the previous generation, now this factor is growing to 10 to 100. This quantum leap urges to implement new methods or technologies developed in the optics community, both in academic labs and in the industry. Given the astrophysical goals a...

  14. Integrating Out Astrophysical Uncertainties

    CERN Document Server

    Fox, Patrick J; Weiner, Neal

    2010-01-01

    Underground searches for dark matter involve a complicated interplay of particle physics, nuclear physics, atomic physics and astrophysics. We attempt to remove the uncertainties associated with astrophysics by developing the means to map the observed signal in one experiment directly into a predicted rate at another. We argue that it is possible to make experimental comparisons that are completely free of astrophysical uncertainties by focusing on {\\em integral} quantities, such as $g(v_{min})=\\int_{v_{min}} dv\\, f(v)/v $ and $\\int_{v_{thresh}} dv\\, v g(v)$. Direct comparisons are possible when the $v_{min}$ space probed by different experiments overlap. As examples, we consider the possible dark matter signals at CoGeNT, DAMA and CRESST-Oxygen. We find that expected rate from CoGeNT in the XENON10 experiment is higher than observed, unless scintillation light output is low. Moreover, we determine that S2-only analyses are constraining, unless the charge yield $Q_y< 2.4 {\\, \\rm electrons/keV}$. For DAMA t...

  15. STELLAR ENCOUNTER RATE IN GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahramian, Arash; Heinke, Craig O.; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Gladstone, Jeanette C., E-mail: bahramia@ualberta.ca [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, CCIS 4-183, Edmonton, AB, T5K 1V4 (Canada)

    2013-04-01

    The high stellar densities in the cores of globular clusters cause significant stellar interactions. These stellar interactions can produce close binary mass-transferring systems involving compact objects and their progeny, such as X-ray binaries and radio millisecond pulsars. Comparing the numbers of these systems and interaction rates in different clusters drives our understanding of how cluster parameters affect the production of close binaries. In this paper we estimate stellar encounter rates ({Gamma}) for 124 Galactic globular clusters based on observational data as opposed to the methods previously employed, which assumed 'King-model' profiles for all clusters. By deprojecting cluster surface brightness profiles to estimate luminosity density profiles, we treat 'King-model' and 'core-collapsed' clusters in the same way. In addition, we use Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the effects of uncertainties in various observational parameters (distance, reddening, surface brightness) on {Gamma}, producing the first catalog of globular cluster stellar encounter rates with estimated errors. Comparing our results with published observations of likely products of stellar interactions (numbers of X-ray binaries, numbers of radio millisecond pulsars, and {gamma}-ray luminosity) we find both clear correlations and some differences with published results.

  16. Growth cone collapse assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Geoffrey M W; Jareonsettasin, Prem; Keynes, Roger J

    2014-01-01

    The growth cone collapse assay has proved invaluable in detecting and purifying axonal repellents. Glycoproteins/proteins present in detergent extracts of biological tissues are incorporated into liposomes, added to growth cones in culture and changes in morphology are then assessed. Alternatively purified or recombinant molecules in aqueous solution may be added directly to the cultures. In both cases after a defined period of time (up to 1 h), the cultures are fixed and then assessed by inverted phase contrast microscopy for the percentage of growth cones showing a collapsed profile with loss of flattened morphology, filopodia, and lamellipodia.

  17. Improving 1D Stellar Models with 3D Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Mosumgaard, Jakob Rørsted; Weiss, Achim; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Trampedach, Regner

    2016-01-01

    Stellar evolution codes play a major role in present-day astrophysics, yet they share common issues. In this work we seek to remedy some of those by the use of results from realistic and highly detailed 3D hydrodynamical simulations of stellar atmospheres. We have implemented a new temperature stratification extracted directly from the 3D simulations into the Garching Stellar Evolution Code to replace the simplified atmosphere normally used. Secondly, we have implemented the use of a variable mixing-length parameter, which changes as a function of the stellar surface gravity and temperature -- also derived from the 3D simulations. Furthermore, to make our models consistent, we have calculated new opacity tables to match the atmospheric simulations. Here, we present the modified code and initial results on stellar evolution using it.

  18. Electron capture cross sections for stellar nucleosynthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Giannaka, P G

    2015-01-01

    In the first stage of this work, we perform detailed calculations for the cross sections of the electron capture on nuclei under laboratory conditions. Towards this aim we exploit the advantages of a refined version of the proton-neutron quasi-particle random-phase approximation (pn-QRPA) and carry out state-by-state evaluations of the rates of exclusive processes that lead to any of the accessible transitions within the chosen model space. In the second stage of our present study, we translate the above mentioned $e^-$-capture cross sections to the stellar environment ones by inserting the temperature dependence through a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution describing the stellar electron gas. As a concrete nuclear target we use the $^{66}Zn$ isotope, which belongs to the iron group nuclei and plays prominent role in stellar nucleosynthesis at core collapse supernovae environment.

  19. {alpha}-{alpha} interaction reexamined in the context of the Sao Paulo potential: possible applications in astrophysics?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasques, L.R.; Chamon, L.C.; Botero, D.F.M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (DFN/USP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica Nuclear; Alves, L.F.M. [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia (Brazil); Carlson, B.V. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (CTA/ITA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica Nuclear; Rossi Junior, E.S. [Centro Universitario FIEO(UNIFIEO), SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: We have analyzed a large set of {alpha}-{alpha} elastic scattering data for bombarding energies ranging from 0.6 to 29.5 MeV. The complete lack of open reaction channels at these somehow low energies results in a vanishing imaginary part for the optical interaction. This characteristic makes the {alpha}-{alpha} reaction particularly interesting as the corresponding elastic scattering cross sections and phase shifts become very sensitive to the real part of the interaction. The data were analyzed within the context of the velocity-dependent Sao Paulo potential, which is a successful theoretical model for the description of heavy-ion reactions from sub-barrier to intermediate energies. We have shown that, even in this low energy region, the velocity dependence of the Sao Paulo potential model is a necessary ingredient for describing the data. Despite the reasonable description obtained with the Sao Paulo potential, the analyses indicate the necessity of an additional weak dependence of the interaction on the angular momentum. These important characteristics open the possibility for studying reactions with astrophysical interested. In particular, predictions of the astrophysical S-factor for the {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}) reaction will be presented. The understanding of the reaction rate for the {alpha}-capture process by a {sup 12}C nucleus is a crucial ingredient for predicting the stellar helium burning and the subsequent fate of stars as this reaction determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen towards the end of the Red Giants phase. It is well known that low mass stars evolve to White Dwarfs and this ratio determines the final abundance composition in White Dwarf matter and sets the trigger conditions for type Ia supernova explosions. The carbon-oxygen ratio also dictates the subsequent sequence of burning processes during the final stages of stellar evolution for massive stars. Thus, it has a key role in the determination of the abundance composition in

  20. Some perspectives in nuclear astrophysics on non-thermal phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this HDR (Accreditation to Supervise Researches) report, the author presents and comments his research activities on nuclear phenomena in stellar eruptions (solar eruptions, lithium nucleosynthesis in stellar eruptions), on particle acceleration in shock waves of stellar explosions (diffusive acceleration by shock wave, particle acceleration in symbiotic novae, particle acceleration in radio-detected supernovae), of research on low energy cosmic rays (galactic emission of nuclear gamma rays, non thermal soft X rays as new tracer of accelerated particles), and on the origin of short period radioactivities in the primitive solar system (extinguished radio-activities and formation of the solar system, origin of berylium-10 in the primitive solar system). The author concludes with some perspectives on non thermal phenomena in nuclear astrophysics, and on research and development for the future of medium-energy gamma astronomy

  1. A multiphysics and multiscale software environment for modeling astrophysical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portegies Zwart, Simon; McMillan, Steve; Harfst, Stefan; Groen, Derek; Fujii, Michiko; Nualláin, Breanndán Ó.; Glebbeek, Evert; Heggie, Douglas; Lombardi, James; Hut, Piet; Angelou, Vangelis; Banerjee, Sambaran; Belkus, Houria; Fragos, Tassos; Fregeau, John; Gaburov, Evghenii; Izzard, Rob; Jurić, Mario; Justham, Stephen; Sottoriva, Andrea; Teuben, Peter; van Bever, Joris; Yaron, Ofer; Zemp, Marcel

    2009-05-01

    We present MUSE, a software framework for combining existing computational tools for different astrophysical domains into a single multiphysics, multiscale application. MUSE facilitates the coupling of existing codes written in different languages by providing inter-language tools and by specifying an interface between each module and the framework that represents a balance between generality and computational efficiency. This approach allows scientists to use combinations of codes to solve highly coupled problems without the need to write new codes for other domains or significantly alter their existing codes. MUSE currently incorporates the domains of stellar dynamics, stellar evolution and stellar hydrodynamics for studying generalized stellar systems. We have now reached a "Noah's Ark" milestone, with (at least) two available numerical solvers for each domain. MUSE can treat multiscale and multiphysics systems in which the time- and size-scales are well separated, like simulating the evolution of planetary systems, small stellar associations, dense stellar clusters, galaxies and galactic nuclei. In this paper we describe three examples calculated using MUSE: the merger of two galaxies, the merger of two evolving stars, and a hybrid N-body simulation. In addition, we demonstrate an implementation of MUSE on a distributed computer which may also include special-purpose hardware, such as GRAPEs or GPUs, to accelerate computations. The current MUSE code base is publicly available as open source at http://muse.li.

  2. Plasma physics of extreme astrophysical environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A; Rightley, Shane

    2014-03-01

    Among the incredibly diverse variety of astrophysical objects, there are some that are characterized by very extreme physical conditions not encountered anywhere else in the Universe. Of special interest are ultra-magnetized systems that possess magnetic fields exceeding the critical quantum field of about 44 TG. There are basically only two classes of such objects: magnetars, whose magnetic activity is manifested, e.g., via their very short but intense gamma-ray flares, and central engines of supernovae (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)--the most powerful explosions in the modern Universe. Figuring out how these complex systems work necessarily requires understanding various plasma processes, both small-scale kinetic and large-scale magnetohydrodynamic (MHD), that govern their behavior. However, the presence of an ultra-strong magnetic field modifies the underlying basic physics to such a great extent that relying on conventional, classical plasma physics is often not justified. Instead, plasma-physical problems relevant to these extreme astrophysical environments call for constructing relativistic quantum plasma (RQP) physics based on quantum electrodynamics (QED). In this review, after briefly describing the astrophysical systems of interest and identifying some of the key plasma-physical problems important to them, we survey the recent progress in the development of such a theory. We first discuss the ways in which the presence of a super-critical field modifies the properties of vacuum and matter and then outline the basic theoretical framework for describing both non-relativistic and RQPs. We then turn to some specific astrophysical applications of relativistic QED plasma physics relevant to magnetar magnetospheres and to central engines of core-collapse SNe and long GRBs. Specifically, we discuss the propagation of light through a magnetar magnetosphere; large-scale MHD processes driving magnetar activity and responsible for jet launching and propagation in

  3. Laboratory Astrophysics and the State of Astronomy and Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    WGLA, AAS; :; Brickhouse, Nancy; Cowan, John; Drake, Paul; Federman, Steven; Ferland, Gary; Frank, Adam; Haxton, Wick; Herbst, Eric; Olive, Keith(School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, U.S.A.); Salama, Farid; Savin, Daniel Wolf; Ziurys, Lucy

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory astrophysics and complementary theoretical calculations are the foundations of astronomy and astrophysics and will remain so into the foreseeable future. The impact of laboratory astrophysics ranges from the scientific conception stage for ground-based, airborne, and space-based observatories, all the way through to the scientific return of these projects and missions. It is our understanding of the under-lying physical processes and the measurements of critical physical parameters...

  4. Astrophysical and cosmological doomsdays

    CERN Document Server

    Tavakoli, Yaser

    2014-01-01

    In this dissertation we study two well known gravitational scenarios in which singularities may appear; the final state of gravitational collapse and the late time evolution of the universe. In the first scenario, we study a spherically symmetric space-time whose matter content includes a tachyon scalar field and a barotropic fluid. By employing a dynamical system analysis, we find classical solutions corresponding to a naked singularity or a black hole formation. We then investigate, in a semiclassical manner, loop quantum gravity induced effects on the fate of the classical singularities. By employing an inverse triad correction, we identify a subset which corresponds to an outward flux of energy, thus avoiding either a naked singularity or a black hole formation. Within a holonomy correction, we obtain the semiclassical counterpart of our (classical) general relativistic collapse in which, classical singularity is resolved and replaced by a bounce. In addition, we find a threshold scale for non-singular bl...

  5. The molecular universe: from astronomy to laboratory astrophysics and back

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dishoeck, Ewine

    2015-08-01

    Molecules are found in a wide range of astronomical environments, fromour Solar System to distant starburst galaxies at the highest redshifts. Thanks to the opening up of the infrared and (sub)millimeter wavelength regime, culminating with Herschel and ALMA, more than 180 different species have now been found throughout the various stages of stellar birth and death: diffuse and dense interstellar clouds, protostars and disks, the envelopes of evolved stars and planetary nebulae, and exo-planetary atmospheres. Molecules and solid-state features are now also routinely detected in the interstellar medium of external galaxies, near and far.There are many motivations for studying this molecular universe. From the chemical perspective, interstellar space provides a unique laboratory to study basic molecular processes under very different conditions from those normally found in a laboratory on Earth. For astronomers, molecules are unique probes of the many environments where they are found, providing information on density, temperature, dynamics, ionization fractions and magnetic fields. Molecules also play an important role in the cooling of clouds allowing them to collapse, including the formation of the very first stars and galaxies. Finally, the molecular composition is sensitive to the history of the material, and ultimately provides critical information on our origins.This talk will summarize a number of recent observational highlights and provide examples of cases where the availability of new laboratory data proved crucial in the analysis. This includes basic data such as spectroscopy and collisional rate coefficients, but also an improved understanding of photoprocesses in the gaseous and solid state. Much of the chemistry in star- and planet-forming regions is now thought to be driven by gas-grain chemistry rather than pure gas-phase chemistry, and a few examples of the close link between models and laboratory experiments will be given. In spite of lingering

  6. Core-Collapse Supernovae: Modeling between Pragmatism and Perfectionism

    CERN Document Server

    Janka, H T; Kitaura Joyanes, F S; Marek, A; Rampp, M

    2004-01-01

    We briefly summarize recent efforts in Garching for modeling stellar core collapse and post-bounce evolution in one and two dimensions. The transport of neutrinos of all flavors is treated by iteratively solving the coupled system of frequency-dependent moment equations together with a model Boltzmann equation which provides the closure. A variety of progenitor stars, different nuclear equations of state, stellar rotation, and global asymmetries due to large-mode hydrodynamic instabilities have been investigated to ascertain the road to finally successful, convectively supported neutrino-driven explosions.

  7. The Trojan Horse method for nuclear astrophysics: Recent results on resonance reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Romano, S.; Tumino, A.

    2014-05-01

    Nuclear astrophysics aims to measure nuclear-reaction cross sections of astrophysical interest to be included into models to study stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis. Low energies, Trojan Horse Method have been devised yielding new cutting-edge results. In particular, I will focus on the application of this indirect method to resonance reactions. Resonances might dramatically enhance the astrophysical S(E)-factor so, when they occur right at astrophysical energies, their measurement is crucial to pin down the astrophysical scenario. Unknown or unpredicted resonances might introduce large systematic errors in nucleosynthesis models. These considerations apply to low-energy resonances and to sub-threshold resonances as well, as they may produce sizable modifications of the S-factor due to, for instance, destructive interference with another resonance.

  8. VI European Summer School on Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The European Summer School on Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics has reached the sixth edition, marking the tenth year's anniversary. The spirit of the school is to provide a very important occasion for a deep education of young researchers about the main topics of experimental nuclear astrophysics. Moreover, it should be regarded as a forum for the discussion of the last-decade research activity. Lectures are focused on various aspects of primordial and stellar nucleosynthesis, including novel experimental approaches and detectors, indirect methods and radioactive ion beams. Moreover, in order to give a wide educational offer, some lectures cover complementary subjects of nuclear astrophysics such as gamma ray astronomy, neutron-induced reactions, short-lived radionuclides, weak interaction and cutting-edge facilities used to investigate nuclear reactions of interest for astrophysics. Large room is also given to young researcher oral contributions. Traditionally, particular attention is devoted to the participation of students from less-favoured countries, especially from the southern coast of the Mediterranean Sea. The school is organised by the Catania Nuclear Astrophysics research group with the collaboration of Dipartimento di Fisica e Astromomia - Università di Catania and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare.

  9. Goddard's Astrophysics Science Divsion Annual Report 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Kimberly (Editor); Reddy, Francis (Editor); Tyler, Pat (Editor)

    2015-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division (ASD, Code 660) is one of the world's largest and most diverse astronomical organizations. Space flight missions are conceived, built and launched to observe the entire range of the electromagnetic spectrum, from gamma rays to centimeter waves. In addition, experiments are flown to gather data on high-energy cosmic rays, and plans are being made to detect gravitational radiation from space-borne missions. To enable these missions, we have vigorous programs of instrument and detector development. Division scientists also carry out preparatory theoretical work and subsequent data analysis and modeling. In addition to space flight missions, we have a vibrant suborbital program with numerous sounding rocket and balloon payloads in development or operation. The ASD is organized into five labs: the Astroparticle Physics Lab, the X-ray Astrophysics Lab, the Gravitational Astrophysics Lab, the Observational Cosmology Lab, and the Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Lab. The High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) is an Office at the Division level. Approximately 400 scientists and engineers work in ASD. Of these, 80 are civil servant scientists, while the rest are resident university-based scientists, contractors, postdoctoral fellows, graduate students, and administrative staff. We currently operate the Swift Explorer mission and the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. In addition, we provide data archiving and operational support for the XMM mission (jointly with ESA) and the Suzaku mission (with JAXA). We are also a partner with Caltech on the NuSTAR mission. The Hubble Space Telescope Project is headquartered at Goddard, and ASD provides Project Scientists to oversee operations at the Space Telescope Science Institute. Projects in development include the Neutron Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) mission, an X-ray timing experiment for the International Space Station; the Transiting Exoplanet Sky Survey (TESS

  10. Dancing building prevents collapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, R.

    2007-01-01

    In future, anybody caught inside a building during an earthquake need no longer fear the roof collapsing on them. Thanks to the use of composite materials, all the building will do is dance along, riding the waves of the earthquake. At least, according to Professor Ir. Adriaan Beukers of the Aerospa

  11. Investigating High Field Gravity using Astrophysical Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, Elliott D.; /SLAC

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of these lectures is to introduce particle physicists to astrophysical techniques. These techniques can help us understand certain phenomena important to particle physics that are currently impossible to address using standard particle physics experimental techniques. As the subject matter is vast, compromises are necessary in order to convey the central ideas to the reader. Many general references are included for those who want to learn more. The paragraphs below elaborate on the structure of these lectures. I hope this discussion will clarify my motivation and make the lectures easier to follow. The lectures begin with a brief review of more theoretical ideas. First, elements of general relativity are reviewed, concentrating on those aspects that are needed to understand compact stellar objects (white dwarf stars, neutron stars, and black holes). I then review the equations of state of these objects, concentrating on the simplest standard models from astrophysics. After these mathematical preliminaries, Sec. 2(c) discusses 'The End State of Stars'. Most of this section also uses the simplest standard models. However, as these lectures are for particle physicists, I also discuss some of the more recent approaches to the equation of state of very dense compact objects. These particle-physics-motivated equations of state can dramatically change how we view the formation of black holes. Section 3 focuses on the properties of the objects that we want to characterize and measure. X-ray binary systems and Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are stressed because the lectures center on understanding very dense stellar objects, black hole candidates (BHCs), and their accompanying high gravitational fields. The use of x-ray timing and gamma-ray experiments is also introduced in this section. Sections 4 and 5 review information from x-ray and gamma-ray experiments. These sections also discuss the current state of the art in x-ray and gamma-ray satellite

  12. General relativity and relativistic astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2016-01-01

    Einstein established the theory of general relativity and the corresponding field equation in 1915 and its vacuum solutions were obtained by Schwarzschild and Kerr for, respectively, static and rotating black holes, in 1916 and 1963, respectively. They are, however, still playing an indispensable role, even after 100 years of their original discovery, to explain high energy astrophysical phenomena. Application of the solutions of Einstein's equation to resolve astrophysical phenomena has formed an important branch, namely relativistic astrophysics. I devote this article to enlightening some of the current astrophysical problems based on general relativity. However, there seem to be some issues with regard to explaining certain astrophysical phenomena based on Einstein's theory alone. I show that Einstein's theory and its modified form, both are necessary to explain modern astrophysical processes, in particular, those related to compact objects.

  13. ZAPP: The Z Astrophysical Plasma Properties collaborationa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochau, G. A.; Bailey, J. E.; Falcon, R. E.; Loisel, G. P.; Nagayama, T.; Mancini, R. C.; Hall, I.; Winget, D. E.; Montgomery, M. H.; Liedahl, D. A.

    2014-05-01

    The Z Facility at Sandia National Laboratories [Matzen et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 055503 (2005)] provides MJ-class x-ray sources that can emit powers >0.3 PW. This capability enables benchmark experiments of fundamental material properties in radiation-heated matter at conditions previously unattainable in the laboratory. Experiments on Z can produce uniform, long-lived, and large plasmas with volumes up to 20 cc, temperatures from 1-200 eV, and electron densities from 1017-23 cc-1. These unique characteristics and the ability to radiatively heat multiple experiments in a single shot have led to a new effort called the Z Astrophysical Plasma Properties (ZAPP) collaboration. The focus of the ZAPP collaboration is to reproduce the radiation and material characteristics of astrophysical plasmas as closely as possible in the laboratory and use detailed spectral measurements to strengthen models for atoms in plasmas. Specific issues under investigation include the LTE opacity of iron at stellar-interior conditions, photoionization around active galactic nuclei, the efficiency of resonant Auger destruction in black-hole accretion disks, and H-Balmer line shapes in white dwarf photospheres.

  14. Bubble chambers for experiments in nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiovine, B.; Henderson, D.; Holt, R. J.; Raut, R.; Rehm, K. E.; Robinson, A.; Sonnenschein, A.; Rusev, G.; Tonchev, A. P.; Ugalde, C.

    2015-05-01

    A bubble chamber has been developed to be used as an active target system for low energy nuclear astrophysics experiments. Adopting ideas from dark matter detection with superheated liquids, a detector system compatible with γ-ray beams has been developed. This detector alleviates some of the limitations encountered in standard measurements of the minute cross-sections of interest to stellar environments. While the astrophysically relevant nuclear reaction processes at hydrostatic burning temperatures are dominated by radiative captures, in this experimental scheme we measure the time-reversed processes. Such photodisintegrations allow us to compute the radiative capture cross-sections when transitions to excited states of the reaction products are negligible. Due to the transformation of phase space, the photodisintegration cross-sections are up to two orders of magnitude higher. The main advantage of the new target-detector system is a density several orders of magnitude higher than conventional gas targets. Also, the detector is virtually insensitive to the γ-ray beam itself, thus allowing us to detect only the products of the nuclear reaction of interest. The development and the operation as well as the advantages and disadvantages of the bubble chamber are discussed.

  15. Bubble chambers for experiments in nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bubble chamber has been developed to be used as an active target system for low energy nuclear astrophysics experiments. Adopting ideas from dark matter detection with superheated liquids, a detector system compatible with γ-ray beams has been developed. This detector alleviates some of the limitations encountered in standard measurements of the minute cross-sections of interest to stellar environments. While the astrophysically relevant nuclear reaction processes at hydrostatic burning temperatures are dominated by radiative captures, in this experimental scheme we measure the time-reversed processes. Such photodisintegrations allow us to compute the radiative capture cross-sections when transitions to excited states of the reaction products are negligible. Due to the transformation of phase space, the photodisintegration cross-sections are up to two orders of magnitude higher. The main advantage of the new target-detector system is a density several orders of magnitude higher than conventional gas targets. Also, the detector is virtually insensitive to the γ-ray beam itself, thus allowing us to detect only the products of the nuclear reaction of interest. The development and the operation as well as the advantages and disadvantages of the bubble chamber are discussed

  16. The Radiative Tail of Realistic Gravitational Collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Hod, S

    2000-01-01

    An astrophysically realistic model of wave dynamics in black-hole spacetimes must involve a {\\it non}-spherical background geometry with {\\it angular momentum}. We consider the evolution of {\\it gravitational} (and electromagnetic) perturbations in {\\it rotating} Kerr spacetimes. We show that a rotating Kerr black hole becomes ``bald'' {\\it slower} than the corresponding spherically-symmetric Schwarzschild black hole. Moreover, our results {\\it turn over} the traditional belief (which has been widely accepted during the last three decades) that the late-time tail of gravitational collapse is universal. In particular, we show that different fields have {\\it different} decaying rates. Our results are also of importance both to the study of the no-hair conjecture and the mass-inflation scenario (stability of Cauchy horizons).

  17. BOOK REVIEW: Particle Astrophysics (Second Edition)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Nicole

    2009-07-01

    Particle astrophysics, the interface of elementary particle physics with astrophysics and cosmology, is a rapidly evolving field. Perkins' book provides a nice introduction to this field, at a level appropriate for senior undergraduate students. Perkins develops the foundations underlying both the particle and astrophysics areas, and also covers some of the most recent developments in this field. The latter is an appealing feature, as students rarely encounter topics of current research in their undergraduate textbooks. Part 1 of the text introduces the elementary particle content, and interactions, of the standard model of particle physics. Relativity is addressed at the level of special relativistic kinematics, the equivalence principle and the Robertson-Walker metric. Part 2 covers cosmology, starting with the expansion of the Universe and basic thermodynamics. It then moves on to primordial nucleosynthesis, baryogenesis, dark matter, dark energy, structure formation and the cosmic microwave background. Part 3 covers cosmic rays, stellar evolution, and related topics. Cutting edge topics include the use of the cosmological large scale structure power spectrum to constrain neutrino mass, the creation of the baryon asymmetry via leptogenesis, and the equation of state for dark energy. While the treatment of many topics is quite brief, the level of depth is about right for undergraduates who are being exposed to these topics for the first time. The breadth of topics spanned is excellent. Perkins does a good job connecting theory with the experimental underpinnings, and of simplifying the theoretical presentation of complex subjects to a level that senior undergraduate students should find accessible. Each chapter includes a number of exercises. Brief solutions are provided for all the exercises, while fully worked solutions are provided for a smaller subset.

  18. Mechanics of collapsing cavitation bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaarden, van L.

    2016-01-01

    A brief survey is given of the dynamical phenomena accompanying the collapse of cavitation bubbles. The discussion includes shock waves, microjets and the various ways in which collapsing bubbles produce damage.

  19. Core-collapse supernova simulations: Variations of the input physics

    OpenAIRE

    Rampp, M.; Buras, R.; Janka, H. -Th.; Raffelt, G.

    2002-01-01

    Spherically symmetric simulations of stellar core collapse and post-bounce evolution are used to test the sensitivity of the supernova dynamics to different variations of the input physics. We consider a state-of-the-art description of the neutrino-nucleon interactions, possible lepton-number changing neutrino reactions in the neutron star, and the potential impact of hydrodynamic mixing behind the supernova shock.

  20. Multiplicity in Early Stellar Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Reipurth, Bo; Boss, Alan P; Goodwin, Simon P; Rodriguez, Luis Felipe; Stassun, Keivan G; Tokovinin, Andrei; Zinnecker, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Observations from optical to centimeter wavelengths have demonstrated that multiple systems of two or more bodies is the norm at all stellar evolutionary stages. Multiple systems are widely agreed to result from the collapse and fragmentation of cloud cores, despite the inhibiting influence of magnetic fields. Surveys of Class 0 protostars with mm interferometers have revealed a very high multiplicity frequency of about 2/3, even though there are observational difficulties in resolving close protobinaries, thus supporting the possibility that all stars could be born in multiple systems. Near-infrared adaptive optics observations of Class I protostars show a lower binary frequency relative to the Class 0 phase, a declining trend that continues through the Class II/III stages to the field population. This loss of companions is a natural consequence of dynamical interplay in small multiple systems, leading to ejection of members. We discuss observational consequences of this dynamical evolution, and its influenc...

  1. Advanced stellarator power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.L.

    1994-07-01

    The stellarator is a class of helical/toroidal magnetic fusion devices. Recent international progress in stellarator power plant conceptual design is reviewed and comparisons in the areas of physics, engineering, and economics are made with recent tokamak design studies.

  2. Walter Baade : a life in astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterbrock, Donald E.

    Although less well known outside the field than Edwin Hubble, Walter Baade (1893-1960) was arguably the most influential observational astronomer of the twentieth century. Written by a fellow astronomer deeply familiar with Baade and his work, this is the first biography of this major figure in American astronomy. In it, Donald Osterbrock suggests that Baade's greatest contribution to astrophysics was not, as is often contended, his revision of Hubble's distance and age scales for the universe. Rather, it was his discovery of two distinct stellar populations: old and young stars. This discovery opened wide the previously marginal fields of stellar and galactic evolution. Baade was born, educated, and gained his early research experience in Germany. He came to the United States in 1931 as a staff member of Mount Wilson Observatory, which housed the world's largest telescope. There, he pioneered research on supernovae. With the 100-inch telescope, he studied globular clusters and the structure of the Milky Way, every step leading him closer to the population concept he discovered during the wartime years, when the skies of southern California were briefly darkened. After his great discovery, Baade continued his research with the new 200-inch telescope at Palomar. Always respected and well liked, he became even more famous among astronomers as they shifted their research to the fields he had opened. Publicity-shy and seemingly unconcerned with publication, however, Baade's celebrity remained largely within the field.

  3. The gravitational-wave signature of core-collapse supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review the ensemble of anticipated gravitational-wave (GW) emission processes in stellar core collapse and postbounce core-collapse supernova evolution. We discuss recent progress in the modeling of these processes and summarize most recent GW signal estimates. In addition, we present new results on the GW emission from postbounce convective overturn and protoneutron star g-mode pulsations based on axisymmetric radiation-hydrodynamic calculations. Galactic core-collapse supernovae are very rare events, but within 3-5 Mpc from Earth, the rate jumps to 1 in ∼2 years. Using the set of currently available theoretical gravitational waveforms, we compute upper-limit optimal signal-to-noise ratios based on current and advanced LIGO/GEO600/VIRGO noise curves for the recent SN 2008bk which exploded at ∼3.9 Mpc. While initial LIGOs cannot detect GWs emitted by core-collapse events at such a distance, we find that advanced LIGO-class detectors could put significant upper limits on the GW emission strength for such events. We study the potential occurrence of the various GW emission processes in particular supernova explosion scenarios and argue that the GW signatures of neutrino-driven, magneto-rotational, and acoustically-driven core-collapse SNe may be mutually exclusive. We suggest that even initial LIGOs could distinguish these explosion mechanisms based on the detection (or non-detection) of GWs from a galactic core-collapse supernova. (topical review)

  4. Collapse of an antibubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jun; Ji, Chen; Yuan, BaoGang; Ruan, XiaoDong; Fu, Xin

    2013-06-01

    In contrast to a soap bubble, an antibubble is a liquid globule surrounded by a thin film of air. The collapse behavior of an antibubble is studied using a high-speed video camera. It is found that the retraction velocity of the thin air film of antibubbles depends on the thickness of the air film, e, the surface tension coefficient σ, etc., and varies linearly with (σ/ρe)(1/2), according to theoretical analysis and experimental observations. During the collapse of the antibubble, many tiny bubbles can be formed at the rim of the air film due to the Rayleigh instability. In most cases, a larger bubble will emerge finally, which holds most of the volume of the air film. PMID:23848619

  5. Collapse, environment, and society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butzer, Karl W

    2012-03-01

    Historical collapse of ancient states poses intriguing social-ecological questions, as well as potential applications to global change and contemporary strategies for sustainability. Five Old World case studies are developed to identify interactive inputs, triggers, and feedbacks in devolution. Collapse is multicausal and rarely abrupt. Political simplification undermines traditional structures of authority to favor militarization, whereas disintegration is preconditioned or triggered by acute stress (insecurity, environmental or economic crises, famine), with breakdown accompanied or followed by demographic decline. Undue attention to stressors risks underestimating the intricate interplay of environmental, political, and sociocultural resilience in limiting the damages of collapse or in facilitating reconstruction. The conceptual model emphasizes resilience, as well as the historical roles of leaders, elites, and ideology. However, a historical model cannot simply be applied to contemporary problems of sustainability without adjustment for cumulative information and increasing possibilities for popular participation. Between the 14th and 18th centuries, Western Europe responded to environmental crises by innovation and intensification; such modernization was decentralized, protracted, flexible, and broadly based. Much of the current alarmist literature that claims to draw from historical experience is poorly focused, simplistic, and unhelpful. It fails to appreciate that resilience and readaptation depend on identified options, improved understanding, cultural solidarity, enlightened leadership, and opportunities for participation and fresh ideas.

  6. Stellarator status, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present status of stellarator experiments and recent progress in stellarator research (both experimental and theoretical) are reported by groups in the United States, the USSR, Japan, Australia, and the European Community (the Federal Republic of Germany and Spain). Experiments under construction and studies of large, next-generation stellarators are also described. 73 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs

  7. MOSAIC at the E-ELT: A multi-object spectrograph for astrophysics, IGM and cosmology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Hammer; B. Barbuy; J.G. Cuby; L. Kaper; S. Morris; C.J. Evans; P. Jagourel; G. Dalton; P. Rees; M. Puech; M. Rodriques; D. Pearson; K. Disseau

    2014-01-01

    The Universe is comprised of hundreds of billions of galaxies, each populated by hundreds of billions of stars. Astrophysics aims to understand the complexity of this almost incommensurable number of stars, stellar clusters and galaxies, including their spatial distribution, formation, and current i

  8. Laboratory Mesurements in Nuclear Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Gai, Moshe

    1994-01-01

    After reviewing some of the basic concepts, nomenclatures and parametrizations of Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology, we introduce a few central problems in Nuclear Astrophysics, including the hot-CNO cycle, helium burning in massive stars, and solar neutrino's. We demonstarte that SECONDARY (RADIOACTIVE) NUCLEAR BEAMS allow for considerable progress on these problems.

  9. Charged-particle and neutron-capture processes in the high-entropy wind of core-collapse supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The astrophysical site of the r-process is still uncertain, and a full exploration of the systematics of this process in terms of its dependence on nuclear properties from stability to the neutron drip-line within realistic stellar environments has still to be undertaken. Sufficiently high neutron-to-seed ratios can only be obtained either in very neutron-rich low-entropy environments or moderately neutron-rich high-entropy environments, related to neutron star mergers (or jets of neutron star matter) and the high-entropy wind of core-collapse supernova explosions. As chemical evolution models seem to disfavor neutron star mergers, we focus here on high-entropy environments characterized by entropy S, electron abundance Ye, and expansion velocity Vexp. We investigate the termination point of charged-particle reactions, and we define a maximum entropy Sfinal for a given Vexp and Ye, beyond which the seed production of heavy elements fails due to the very small matter density. We then investigate whether an r-process subsequent to the charged-particle freeze-out can in principle be understood on the basis of the classical approach, which assumes a chemical equilibrium between neutron captures and photodisintegrations, possibly followed by a β-flow equilibrium. In particular, we illustrate how long such a chemical equilibrium approximation holds, how the freeze-out from such conditions affects the abundance pattern, and which role the late capture of neutrons originating from β-delayed neutron emission can play. Furthermore, we analyze the impact of nuclear properties from different theoretical mass models on the final abundances after these late freeze-out phases and β-decays back to stability. As only a superposition of astrophysical conditions can provide a good fit to the solar r-abundances, the question remains how such superpositions are attained, resulting in the apparently robust r-process pattern observed in low metallicity stars.

  10. Collapsing spherical stars in f(R) gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Goswami, Rituparno; Maharaj, Sunil D; Ghosh, Sushant G

    2014-01-01

    We perform a careful investigation of the problem of physically realistic gravitational collapse of massive stars in f(R)-gravity. We show that the extra matching conditions that arise in the modified gravity imposes strong constraints on the stellar structure and thermodynamic properties. In our opinion these constraints are unphysical. We prove that no homogeneous stars with non-constant Ricci scalar can be matched smoothly with a static exterior for any nonlinear function f(R). Therefore, these extra constraints make classes of physically realistic collapse scenarios in general relativity, non-admissible in these theories. We also find an exact solution for an inhomogeneous collapsing star in the Starobinski model that obeys all the energy and matching conditions. However, we argue that such solutions are fine-tuned and unstable to matter perturbations. Possible consequences on black hole physics and the cosmic censorship conjecture are also discussed.

  11. Perspectives on Core-Collapse Supernova Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Burrows, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Core-collapse theory brings together many facets of high-energy and nuclear astrophysics and the numerical arts to present theorists with one of the most important, yet frustrating, astronomical questions: "What is the mechanism of core-collapse supernova explosions?" A review of all the physics and the fifty-year history involved would soon bury the reader in minutiae that could easily obscure the essential elements of the phenomenon, as we understand it today. Moreover, much remains to be discovered and explained, and a complicated review of an unresolved subject in flux could grow stale fast. Therefore, in this paper I describe what I think are various important facts and perspectives that may have escaped the attention of those interested in this puzzle. Furthermore, I attempt to describe the modern theory's physical underpinnings and briefly summarize the current state of play. In the process, I identify a few myths (as I see them) that have crept into modern discourse. However, there is much more to do ...

  12. Null fluid collapse in brane world models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harko, Tiberiu; Lake, Matthew J.

    2014-03-01

    The brane world description of our Universe entails a large extra dimension and a fundamental scale of gravity that may be lower than the Planck scale by several orders of magnitude. An interesting consequence of this scenario occurs in the nature of spherically symmetric vacuum solutions to the brane gravitational field equations, which often have properties quite distinct from the standard black hole solutions of general relativity. In this paper, the spherically symmetric collapse on the brane world of four types of null fluid, governed by the barotropic, polytropic, strange quark "bag" model and Hagedorn equations of state, is investigated. In each case, we solve the approximate gravitational field equations, obtained in the high-density limit, determine the equation which governs the formation of apparent horizons and investigate the conditions for the formation of naked singularities. Though, naively, one would expect the increased effective energy density on the brane to favor the formation of black holes over naked singularities, we find that, for the types of fluid considered, this is not the case. However, the black hole solutions differ substantially from their general-relativistic counterparts and brane world corrections often play a role analogous to charge in general relativity. As an astrophysical application of this work, the possibility that energy emission from a Hagedorn fluid collapsing to form a naked singularity may be a source of GRBs in the brane world is also considered.

  13. Relativistic Astrophysics Explorer

    CERN Document Server

    Kaaret, P E

    2003-01-01

    The great success of the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) has shown that X-ray timing is an excellent tool for the study of strong gravitational fields and the measurement of fundamental physical properties of black holes and neutron stars. Here, we describe a next-generation X-ray timing mission, the Relativistic Astrophysics Explorer (RAE), designed to fit within the envelope of a medium-sized mission. The instruments will be a narrow-field X-ray detector array with an area of 6 m^2 equal to ten times that of RXTE and a wide-field X-ray monitor. We describe the science made possible with this mission, the design of the instruments, and results on prototype large-area X-ray detectors.

  14. The Relativistic Astrophysics Explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaaret, P.

    The great success of the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) has shown that X-ray timing is an excellent tool for the study of strong gravitational fields and the measurement of fundamental physical properties of black holes and neutron stars. Here, we describe a next-generation X-ray timing mission, the Relativistic Astrophysics Explorer (RAE), designed to fit within the envelope of a medium-sized mission. The instruments will be a narrow-field X-ray detector array with an area of 60,000 cm2 equal to ten times that of RXTE and a wide-field X-ray monitor. We describe the science made possible with this mission, the design of the instruments, and results on prototype large-area X-ray detectors.

  15. Exotic nuclei and astrophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penionzhkevich Yu.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, nuclear physics investigations of the laws of the microscopic world contributed significantly to extension of our knowledge of phenomena occurring in the macroscopic world (Universe and made a formidable contribution to the development of astrophysical and cosmological theories. First of all, this concerns the expanding universe model, the evolution of stars, and the abundances of elements, as well as the properties of various stars and cosmic objects, including “cold” and neutron stars, black holes, and pulsars. Without claiming to give a full account of all cosmological problems, we will dwell upon those of them that, in my opinion, have much in common with nuclear-matter properties manifesting themselves in nuclear interactions.

  16. Black-hole astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, P. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Bloom, E. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Cominsky, L. [Sonoma State Univ., Rohnert Park, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy] [and others

    1995-07-01

    Black-hole astrophysics is not just the investigation of yet another, even if extremely remarkable type of celestial body, but a test of the correctness of the understanding of the very properties of space and time in very strong gravitational fields. Physicists` excitement at this new prospect for testing theories of fundamental processes is matched by that of astronomers at the possibility to discover and study a new and dramatically different kind of astronomical object. Here the authors review the currently known ways that black holes can be identified by their effects on their neighborhood--since, of course, the hole itself does not yield any direct evidence of its existence or information about its properties. The two most important empirical considerations are determination of masses, or lower limits thereof, of unseen companions in binary star systems, and measurement of luminosity fluctuations on very short time scales.

  17. Instabilities in astrophysical jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Instabilities in astrophysical jets are studied in the nonlinear regime by performing 2D numerical classical gasdynamical calculations. The instabilities which arise from unsteadiness in output from the central engine feeding the jets, and those which arise from a beam in a turbulent surrounding are studied. An extra power output an order of magnitude higher than is normally delivered by the engine over a time equal to (nozzle length)/(sound velocity at centre) causes a nonlinear Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the jet walls. Constrictions move outwards, but the jet structure is left untouched. A beam in turbulent surroundings produces internal shocks over distances of a few beam widths. If viscosity is present the throughput of material is hampered on time scales of a few beam radius sound travel times. The implications are discussed. (Auth.)

  18. NASA's Astrophysics Data Archives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, H.; Hanisch, R.; Bredekamp, J.

    2000-09-01

    The NASA Office of Space Science has established a series of archival centers where science data acquired through its space science missions is deposited. The availability of high quality data to the general public through these open archives enables the maximization of science return of the flight missions. The Astrophysics Data Centers Coordinating Council, an informal collaboration of archival centers, coordinates data from five archival centers distiguished primarily by the wavelength range of the data deposited there. Data are available in FITS format. An overview of NASA's data centers and services is presented in this paper. A standard front-end modifyer called `Astrowbrowse' is described. Other catalog browsers and tools include WISARD and AMASE supported by the National Space Scince Data Center, as well as ISAIA, a follow on to Astrobrowse.

  19. Beauty and Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessell, Michael S.

    2000-08-01

    Spectacular colour images have been made by combining CCD images in three different passbands using Adobe Photoshop. These beautiful images highlight a variety of astrophysical phenomena and should be a valuable resource for science education and public awareness of science. The wide field images were obtained at the Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) by mounting a Hasselblad or Nikkor telephoto lens in front of a 2K × 2K CCD. Options of more than 30 degrees or 6 degrees square coverage are produced in a single exposure in this way. Narrow band or broad band filters were placed between lens and CCD enabling deep, linear images in a variety of passbands to be obtained. We have mapped the LMC and SMC and are mapping the Galactic Plane for comparison with the Molonglo Radio Survey. Higher resolution images have also been made with the 40 inch telescope of galaxies and star forming regions in the Milky Way.

  20. Essential Magnetohydrodynamics for Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Spruit, H C

    2013-01-01

    This text is intended as an introduction to magnetohydrodynamics in astrophysics, emphasizing a fast path to the elements essential for physical understanding. It assumes experience with concepts from fluid mechanics: the fluid equation of motion and the Lagrangian and Eulerian descriptions of fluid flow. In addition, the basics of vector calculus and elementary special relativity are needed. Not much knowledge of electromagnetic theory is required. In fact, since MHD is much closer in spirit to fluid mechanics than to electromagnetism, an important part of the learning curve is to overcome intuitions based on the vacuum electrodynamics of one's high school days. The first chapter (only 36 pp) is meant as a practical introduction including exercises. This is the `essential' part. The exercises are important as illustrations of the points made in the text (especially the less intuitive ones). Almost all are mathematically unchallenging. The supplement in chapter 2 contains further explanations, more specialize...

  1. Photoneutron reactions in astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varlamov, V. V., E-mail: Varlamov@depni.sinp.msu.ru; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Orlin, V. N.; Peskov, N. N.; Stopani, K. A. [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15

    Among key problems in nuclear astrophysics, that of obtaining deeper insight into the mechanism of synthesis of chemical elements is of paramount importance. The majority of heavy elements existing in nature are produced in stars via radiative neutron capture in so-called s- and r processes, which are, respectively, slow and fast, in relation to competing β{sup −}-decay processes. At the same time, we know 35 neutron-deficient so-called bypassed p-nuclei that lie between {sup 74}Se and {sup 196}Hg and which cannot originate from the aforementioned s- and r-processes. Their production is possible in (γ, n), (γ, p), or (γ, α) photonuclear reactions. In view of this, data on photoneutron reactions play an important role in predicting and describing processes leading to the production of p-nuclei. Interest in determining cross sections for photoneutron reactions in the threshold energy region, which is of particular importance for astrophysics, has grown substantially in recent years. The use of modern sources of quasimonoenergetic photons obtained in processes of inverse Compton laser-radiation scattering on relativistic electronsmakes it possible to reveal rather interesting special features of respective cross sections, manifestations of pygmy E1 and M1 resonances, or the production of nuclei in isomeric states, on one hand, and to revisit the problem of systematic discrepancies between data on reaction cross sections from experiments of different types, on the other hand. Data obtained on the basis of our new experimental-theoretical approach to evaluating cross sections for partial photoneutron reactions are invoked in considering these problems.

  2. Theoretical Astrophysics at Fermilab

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The Theoretical Astrophysics Group works on a broad range of topics ranging from string theory to data analysis in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The group is motivated by the belief that a deep understanding of fundamental physics is necessary to explain a wide variety of phenomena in the universe. During the three years 2001-2003 of our previous NASA grant, over 120 papers were written; ten of our postdocs went on to faculty positions; and we hosted or organized many workshops and conferences. Kolb and collaborators focused on the early universe, in particular and models and ramifications of the theory of inflation. They also studied models with extra dimensions, new types of dark matter, and the second order effects of super-horizon perturbations. S tebbins, Frieman, Hui, and Dodelson worked on phenomenological cosmology, extracting cosmological constraints from surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. They also worked on theoretical topics such as weak lensing, reionization, and dark energy. This work has proved important to a number of experimental groups [including those at Fermilab] planning future observations. In general, the work of the Theoretical Astrophysics Group has served as a catalyst for experimental projects at Fennilab. An example of this is the Joint Dark Energy Mission. Fennilab is now a member of SNAP, and much of the work done here is by people formerly working on the accelerator. We have created an environment where many of these people made transition from physics to astronomy. We also worked on many other topics related to NASA s focus: cosmic rays, dark matter, the Sunyaev-Zel dovich effect, the galaxy distribution in the universe, and the Lyman alpha forest. The group organized and hosted a number of conferences and workshop over the years covered by the grant. Among them were:

  3. Direct Collapse Black Holes Can Launch Gamma-Ray Bursts and Get Fat to Supermassive Black Holes?

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Tatsuya; Ioka, Kunihito; Heger, Alexander; Nakamura, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The existence of black holes (BHs) of mass ~ 10^{9} M_sun at z > 6 is a big puzzle in astrophysics because even optimistic estimates of the accretion time are insufficient for stellar mass BHs of ~ 10 M_sun to grow into such supermassive BHs. A resolution of this puzzle might be the direct collapse of supermassive stars with mass M ~ 10^{5} M_sun into massive seed BHs. We find that if a jet is launched from the accretion disk around the central BH, the jet can break out the star because of the structure of the radiation pressure-dominated envelope. Such ultra-long gamma-ray bursts with duration of ~ 10^{4} - 10^{6} s and flux of 10^{-11} - 10^{-8} erg s^{-1} cm^{-2} could be detectable by Swift. We estimate an event rate of 10^{55} - 10^{56} erg. The resulting negative feedback delays the growth of the remnant BH by about 70 Myr or evacuates the host galaxy completely.

  4. Book Review: "Inside Stars. A Theory of the Internal Constitution of Stars, and the Sources of Stellar Energy According to General Relativity" (Letters to Progress in Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millette P. A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This book provides a general relativistic theory of the internal constitution of liquid stars. It is a solid contribution to our understanding of stellar structure from a general relativistic perspective. It raises new ideas on the constitution of stars and planetary systems, and proposes a new approach to stellar structure an d stellar energy generation which is bound to help us better understand stellar astrophysics.

  5. Book Review: "Inside Stars. A Theory of the Internal Constitution of Stars, and the Sources of Stellar Energy According to General Relativity" (Letters to Progress in Physics)

    OpenAIRE

    Millette P. A.

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a general relativistic theory of the internal constitution of liquid stars. It is a solid contribution to our understanding of stellar structure from a general relativistic perspective. It raises new ideas on the constitution of stars and planetary systems, and proposes a new approach to stellar structure an d stellar energy generation which is bound to help us better understand stellar astrophysics.

  6. The explosion mechanism of core-collapse supernovae: progress in supernova theory and experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Foglizzo, Thierry; Guilet, Jérôme; Masset, Frédéric; González, Matthias; Krueger, Brendan K; Novak, Jérôme; Oertel, Micaela; Margueron, Jérôme; Faure, Julien; Martin, Noël; Blottiau, Patrick; Peres, Bruno; Durand, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    The explosion of core-collapse supernova depends on a sequence of events taking place in less than a second in a region of a few hundred kilometers at the center of a supergiant star, after the stellar core approaches the Chandrasekhar mass and collapses into a proto-neutron star, and before a shock wave is launched across the stellar envelope. Theoretical efforts to understand stellar death focus on the mechanism which transforms the collapse into an explosion. Progress in understanding this mechanism is reviewed with particular attention to its asymmetric character. We highlight a series of successful studies connecting observations of supernova remnants and pulsars properties to the theory of core-collapse using numerical simulations. The encouraging results from first principles models in axisymmetric simulations is tempered by new puzzles in 3D. The diversity of explosion paths and the dependence on the pre-collapse stellar structure is stressed, as well as the need to gain a better understanding of hydr...

  7. Fingerprinting Hydrogen in Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nance, Sarafina; Parrent, Jerod; Soderberg, Alicia Margarita

    2016-01-01

    This is a preliminary report on the mass of remaining hydrogen envelopes for stars massive enough to explode under core collapse. Using the stellar evolution code, MESA, our initial findings suggest that a significant fraction of massive stars with M_ZAMS = 20-60 Msun lose all but 10^-3 Msun -10^-1 Msun as they near eventual core collapse. This result is dependent on the mass-loss prescription, degree of rotation, metallicity, rates of nuclear burning in the core, and the final stellar configuration. Nevertheless, each of our test cases include a few stars that retain trace amounts of surface hydrogen, which would then be detected as faint H in type IIb/Ib/Ic supernova spectra. We also compare our findings to the progenitor candidate identified for iPTF13bvn using the most recent photometric corrections. We agree with the previous conclusion found by Groh et al. (2013) that the progenitor had an initial mass of 32 Msun, but now with an additional condition of 0.06 Msun of hydrogen on its surface just prior to the explosion. We demonstrate through our study that not all Type Ib supernovae are fully devoid of hydrogen at the time of explosion, which has implications for the nature of the progenitor star and thus provides impetus for a revised classification scheme for 'stripped envelope' supernovae. This work was supported in part by the NSF REU and DoD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  8. Trojan Horse Method: recent results in nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitaleri, C.; Lamia, L.; Gimenez Del Santo, M.; Burjan, V.; Carlin, N.; Li, Chengbo; Cherubini, S.; Crucilla, V.; Gulino, M.; Hons, Z.; Kroha, V.; Irgaziev, B.; La Cognata, M.; Mrazek, J.; Mukhamedzhanov, M.; Munhoz, M. G.; Palmerini, S.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, L.; Zhou, Shu-Hua; Somorjai, E.; Souza, F. A.; Tabacaru, G.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Tumino, A.; Wen, Qungang; Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.

    2015-07-01

    The accurate knowledge of thermonuclear reaction rates is important in understanding the energy generation, the neutrinos luminosity and the synthesis of elements in stars. The physical conditions under which the majority of astrophysical reactions proceed in stellar environments make it difficult or impossible to measure them under the same conditions in the laboratory. That is why different indirect techniques are being used along with direct measurements. The Trojan Horse Method (THM) is introduced as an independent technique to obtain the bare nucleus astrophysical S(E)-factor. As examples the results of recent the application of THM to the 2H(11B, σ08Be)n and 2H(10B, σ07Be)n reactions are presented.

  9. Astrophysical Dynamics 1999/2000 Merging Research and Education

    CERN Document Server

    Romeo, A B

    2000-01-01

    The workshop `Astrophysical Dynamics 1999/2000' followed a homonymous advanced research course, and both activities were organized by me. In this opening paper of the proceedings book, I describe them and document their strong impact on the academic life of the local institutions. The advanced research course was open to graduate students, senior researchers, and motivated under-graduate students with good background in physics and mathematics. The course covered several multi-disciplinary issues of modern research on astrophysical dynamics, and thus also of interest to physicists, mathematicians and engineers. The major topic was gas dynamics, viewed in context with stellar dynamics and plasma physics. The course was complemented by parallel seminars on hot topics given by experts in such fields, and open to a wide scientific audience. In particular, I gave a friendly introduction to wavelets, which are becoming an increasingly powerful tool not only for processing signals and images but also for analysing f...

  10. Nuclear Theory for Astrophysics, Stockpile Stewardship, and Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Anna

    2004-10-01

    A large number of problems key to astrophysics, stockpile stewardship, and homeland defense rely on knowledge of nuclear physics in regimes inaccessible to experiment. In stellar and nuclear explosions unstable nuclei and nuclear isomers are produced in copious quantities and are used to diagnose the explosion. Similarly, analysis of the unstable nuclei from the debris will be key to attribution in the event of a terrorist domestic nuclear attack. In the case of nuclear non-proliferation a number of new schemes are being considered by the IAEA to address the ever greater needs, including neutrino monitoring of the plutonium content of reactors. For all of these problems detailed nuclear theory is required. In this talk I discuss the theoretical physics needs for the type of problems of overlapping interest to astrophysics and national security.

  11. Astrophysical components from Planck maps

    CERN Document Server

    Burigana, Carlo; Paoletti, Daniela; Mandolesi, Nazzareno; Natoli, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The Planck Collaboration has recently released maps of the microwave sky in both temperature and polarization. Diffuse astrophysical components (including Galactic emissions, cosmic far infrared (IR) background, y-maps of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect) and catalogs of many thousands of Galactic and extragalactic radio and far-IR sources, and galaxy clusters detected through the SZ effect are the main astrophysical products of the mission. A concise overview of these results and of astrophysical studies based on Planck data is presented.

  12. GenASiS: General Astrophysical Simulation System. I. Fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Cardall, Christian Y; Endeve, Eirik; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    GenASiS (General Astrophysical Simulation System) is a new code being developed initially and primarily, though by no means exclusively, for the simulation of core-collapse supernovae on the world's leading capability supercomputers. Using the features of Fortran 2003 that allow for object-oriented programming, its classes are grouped into three major divisions: (1) Basics, which contains some basic utilitarian functionality for large-scale simulations on distributed-memory supercomputers; (2) Mathematics, which includes generic mathematical constructs and solvers that are as agnostic as possible with regard to the specifics of any particular system; and (3) Physics, which sets up physical spaces associated with various theories of spacetime (including gravity), defines various forms of stress-energy, and combines these into `universes.' To provide a foundation for subsequent papers focusing on the implementation of various pieces of physics needed for the simulation of core-collapse supernovae and other astr...

  13. Failure of a neutrino-driven explosion after core-collapse may lead to a thermonuclear supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Kushnir, Doron

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that $\\sim10$ seconds after core-collapse of a massive star, a thermonuclear explosion of the outer shells is possible for some (tuned) initial density and composition profiles, assuming the neutrinos failed to explode the star. The explosion may lead to a successful supernova, as first suggested by Burbidge, Burbidge, Fowler and Hoyle (1957). We perform a series of one-dimensional (1D) calculations of collapsing massive stars with simplified initial density profiles (similar to the results of stellar evolution calculations) and various compositions (not similar to 1D stellar evolution calculations). We assume that the neutrinos escaped with negligible effect on the outer layers, which inevitably collapse. As the shells collapse, they compress and heat up adiabatically, enhancing the rate of thermonuclear burning. In some cases, where significant shells of mixed helium and oxygen are present with pre-collapsed burning times of $\\lesssim100\\,\\textrm{s}$ ($\\approx10$ times the free-fall time), a ...

  14. PREFACE: Collapse Calderas Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottsmann, Jo; Aguirre-Diaz, Gerardo

    2008-10-01

    Caldera-formation is one of the most awe-inspiring and powerful displays of nature's force. Resultant deposits may cover vast areas and significantly alter the immediate topography. Post-collapse activity may include resurgence, unrest, intra-caldera volcanism and potentially the start of a new magmatic cycle, perhaps eventually leading to renewed collapse. Since volcanoes and their eruptions are the surface manifestation of magmatic processes, calderas provide key insights into the generation and evolution of large-volume silicic magma bodies in the Earth's crust. Despite their potentially ferocious nature, calderas play a crucial role in modern society's life. Collapse calderas host essential economic deposits and supply power for many via the exploitation of geothermal reservoirs, and thus receive considerable scientific, economic and industrial attention. Calderas also attract millions of visitors world-wide with their spectacular scenic displays. To build on the outcomes of the 2005 calderas workshop in Tenerife (Spain) and to assess the most recent advances on caldera research, a follow-up meeting was proposed to be held in Mexico in 2008. This abstract volume presents contributions to the 2nd Calderas Workshop held at Hotel Misión La Muralla, Querétaro, Mexico, 19-25 October 2008. The title of the workshop `Reconstructing the evolution of collapse calderas: Magma storage, mobilisation and eruption' set the theme for five days of presentations and discussions, both at the venue as well as during visits to the surrounding calderas of Amealco, Amazcala and Huichapan. The multi-disciplinary workshop was attended by more than 40 scientist from North, Central and South America, Europe, Australia and Asia. Contributions covered five thematic topics: geology, geochemistry/petrology, structural analysis/modelling, geophysics, and hazards. The workshop was generously supported by the International Association of Volcanology and the Chemistry of The Earth's Interior

  15. Astrophysical Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Rosswog, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    In this review the basic principles of smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) are outlined in a pedagogical fashion. To start, a basic set of SPH equations that is used in many codes throughout the astrophysics community is derived explicitly. Much of SPH's success relies on its excellent conservation properties and therefore the numerical conservation of physical invariants receives much attention throughout this review. The self-consistent derivation of the SPH equations from the Lagrangian of an ideal fluid is the common theme of the remainder of the text. Such a variational approach is applied to derive a modern SPH version of Newtonian hydrodynamics. It accounts for gradients in the local resolution lengths which result in corrective, so-called "grad-h-terms". This strategy naturally carries over to the special-relativistic case for which we derive the corresponding grad-h set of equations. This approach is further generalized to the case of a fluid that evolves on a curved, but fixed background space-time.

  16. Atoms in astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Eissner, W; Hummer, D; Percival, I

    1983-01-01

    It is hard to appreciate but nevertheless true that Michael John Seaton, known internationally for the enthusiasm and skill with which he pursues his research in atomic physics and astrophysics, will be sixty years old on the 16th of January 1983. To mark this occasion some of his colleagues and former students have prepared this volume. It contains articles that de­ scribe some of the topics that have attracted his attention since he first started his research work at University College London so many years ago. Seaton's association with University College London has now stretched over a period of some 37 years, first as an undergraduate student, then as a research student, and then, successively, as Assistant Lecturer, Lecturer, Reader, and Professor. Seaton arrived at University College London in 1946 to become an undergraduate in the Physics Department, having just left the Royal Air Force in which he had served as a navigator in the Pathfinder Force of Bomber Command. There are a number of stories of ho...

  17. Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickaelian, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    This booklet is devoted to NAS RA V. Ambartsumian Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory and is aimed at people interested in astronomy and BAO, pupils and students, BAO visitors and others. The booklet is made as a visiting card and presents concise and full information about BAO. A brief history of BAO, the biography of the great scientist Viktor Ambartsumian, brief biographies of 13 other deserved scientists formerly working at BAO (B.E. Markarian, G.A. Gurzadyan, L.V. Mirzoyan, M.A. Arakelian, et al.), information on BAO telescopes (2.6m, 1m Schmidt, etc.) and other scientific instruments, scientific library and photographic plate archive, Byurakan surveys (including the famous Markarian Survey included in the UNESCO Memory of the World International Register), all scientific meetings held in Byurakan, international scientific collaboration, data on full research staff of the Observatory, as well as former BAO researchers, who have moved to foreign institutions are given in the booklet. At the end, the list of the most important books published by Armenian astronomers and about them is given.

  18. Protostellar collapse: rotation and disk formation

    CERN Document Server

    Tscharnuter, W M; Gail, H -P; Lüttjohann, E

    2009-01-01

    We present some important conclusions from recent calculations pertaining to the collapse of rotating molecular cloud cores with axial symmetry, corresponding to evolution of young stellar objects through classes 0 and begin of class I. Three main issues have been addressed: (1) The typical timescale for building up a preplanetary disk - once more it turned out that it is of the order of one free-fall time which is decisively shorter than the widely assumed timescale related to the so-called 'inside-out collapse'; (2) Redistribution of angular momentum and the accompanying dissipation of kinetic (rotational) energy - together these processes govern the mechanical and thermal evolution of the protostellar core to a large extent; (3) The origin of calcium-aluminium-rich inclusions (CAIs) - due to the specific pattern of the accretion flow, material that has undergone substantial chemical and mineralogical modifications in the hot (exceeding 900 K) interior of the protostellar core may have a good chance to be a...

  19. New Discoveries in the Galactic Neighborhood through Advances in Laboratory Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    WGLA, AAS; Cowan, John; Drake, Paul; Federman, Steven; Ferland, Gary; Frank, Adam; Herbst, Eric; Olive, Keith; Salama, Farid; Savin, Daniel Wolf; Ziurys, Lucy

    2009-01-01

    As the Galactic Neighborhood (GAN) panel is fully aware, the next decade will see major advances in our understanding of this area of research. To quote from their charge, these advances will occur in studies of the galactic neighborhood, including the structure and properties of the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, and their stellar populations and evolution, as well as interstellar media and star clusters. Central to the progress in these areas are the corresponding advances in laboratory astrophysics that are required for fully realizing the GAN scientific opportunities within the decade 2010-2020. Laboratory astrophysics comprises both theoretical and experimental studies of the underlying physics and chemistry that produces the observed astrophysical processes. The 5 areas of laboratory astrophysics that we have identified as relevant to the GAN panel are atomic, molecular, solid matter, plasma, and nuclear physics. In this white paper, we describe in Section 2 some of the new scientific opportunities and ...

  20. Nuclear astrophysics: the unfinished quest for the origin of the elements

    CERN Document Server

    Jose, Jordi

    2011-01-01

    Half a century has passed since the foundation of nuclear astrophysics. Since then, this discipline has reached its maturity. Today, nuclear astrophysics constitutes a multidisciplinary crucible of knowledge that combines the achievements in theoretical astrophysics, observational astronomy, cosmochemistry and nuclear physics. New tools and developments have revolutionized our understanding of the origin of the elements: supercomputers have provided astrophysicists with the required computational capabilities to study the evolution of stars in a multidimensional framework; the emergence of high-energy astrophysics with space-borne observatories has opened new windows to observe the Universe, from a novel panchromatic perspective; cosmochemists have isolated tiny pieces of stardust embedded in primitive meteorites, giving clues on the processes operating in stars as well as on the way matter condenses to form solids; and nuclear physicists have measured reactions near stellar energies, through the combined eff...

  1. J-PAS: The Javalambre Physics of the Accelerated Universe Astrophysical Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepa, J.; Benítez, N.; Dupke, R.; Moles, M.; Sodré, L.; Cenarro, A. J.; Marín-Franch, A.; Taylor, K.; Cristóbal, D.; Fernández-Soto, A.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.; Abramo, L. R.; Alcaniz, J. S.; Overzier, R.; Hernández-Monteagudo, A.; Alfaro, E. J.; Kanaan, A.; Carvano, M.; Reis, R. R. R.; J-PAS Team

    2016-10-01

    The Javalambre Physics of the Accelerated Universe Astrophysical Survey (J-PAS) is a narrow band, very wide field Cosmological Survey to be carried out from the Javalambre Observatory in Spain with a purpose-built, dedicated 2.5 m telescope and a 4.7 sq.deg. camera with 1.2 Gpix. Starting in late 2016, J-PAS will observe 8500 sq.deg. of Northern Sky and measure Δz˜0.003(1+z) photo-z for 9× 107 LRG and ELG galaxies plus several million QSOs, sampling an effective volume of ˜ 14 Gpc3 up to z=1.3 and becoming the first radial BAO experiment to reach Stage IV. J-PAS will detect 7× 105 galaxy clusters and groups, setting constraints on Dark Energy which rival those obtained from its BAO measurements. Thanks to the superb characteristics of the site (seeing ˜ 0.7 arcsec), J-PAS is expected to obtain a deep, sub-arcsec image of the Northern sky, which combined with its unique photo-z precision will produce one of the most powerful cosmological lensing surveys before the arrival of Euclid. J-PAS's unprecedented spectral time domain information will enable a self-contained SN survey that, without the need for external spectroscopic follow-up, will detect, classify and measure σz˜ 0.5 redshifts for ˜ 4000 SNeIa and ˜ 900 core-collapse SNe. The key to the J-PAS potential is its innovative approach: a contiguous system of 54 filters with 145 Å width, placed 100 Å apart over a multi-degree FoV is a powerful redshift machine, with the survey speed of a 4000 multiplexing low resolution spectrograph, but many times cheaper and much faster to build. The J-PAS camera is equivalent to a 4.7 sq.deg. IFU and it will produce a time-resolved, 3D image of the Northern Sky with a very wide range of Astrophysical applications in Galaxy Evolution, the nearby Universe and the study of resolved stellar populations.

  2. The differing locations of massive stellar explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Fruchter, A S; Burud, I; Castro-Tirado, A J; Cerón, J M C; Conselice, C J; Dahlen, T; Ferguson, H C; Fynbo, J P U; Garnavich, P M; Gibbons, R A; Gorosabel, J; Gull, T R; Hjorth, J; Holland, S T; Kouveliotou, C; Levan, A J; Levay, Z; Livio, M; Metzger, M R; Nugent, P; Petro, L; Pian, E; Rhoads, J E; Riess, A G; Sahu, K C; Smette, A; Strolger, L; Tanvir, N R; Thorsett, S E; Vreeswijk, P M; Wijers, R A M J; Woosley, S E

    2006-01-01

    When massive stars exhaust their fuel they collapse and often produce the extraordinarily bright explosions known as core-collapse supernovae. On occasion, this stellar collapse also powers an even more brilliant relativistic explosion known as a long-duration gamma-ray burst. One would then expect that gamma-ray bursts and supernovae should be found in similar environments. Here we show that this expectation is wrong. Using Hubble Space Telescope imaging of the host galaxies of long-duration gamma-ray bursts and core-collapse supernovae, we find that the gamma-ray bursts are far more concentrated on the very brightest regions of their hosts than are the supernovae. Furthermore, the host galaxies of the gamma-ray bursts are significantly fainter and more irregular than the hosts of the supernovae. Together these results suggest that long-duration gamma-ray bursts are associated with the very most massive stars and may be restricted to galaxies of limited chemical evolution. Our results directly imply that lon...

  3. Hierarchical Visual Analysis and Steering Framework for Astrophysical Simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖健; 张加万; 原野; 周鑫; 纪丽; 孙济洲

    2015-01-01

    A framework for accelerating modern long-running astrophysical simulations is presented, which is based on a hierarchical architecture where computational steering in the high-resolution run is performed under the guide of knowledge obtained in the gradually refined ensemble analyses. Several visualization schemes for facilitating ensem-ble management, error analysis, parameter grouping and tuning are also integrated owing to the pluggable modular design. The proposed approach is prototyped based on the Flash code, and it can be extended by introducing user-defined visualization for specific requirements. Two real-world simulations, i.e., stellar wind and supernova remnant, are carried out to verify the proposed approach.

  4. Cylindrical Collapse and Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Herrera, L

    2005-01-01

    We study the matching conditions for a collapsing anisotropic cylindrical perfect fluid, and we show that its radial pressure is non zero on the surface of the cylinder and proportional to the time dependent part of the field produced by the collapsing fluid. This result resembles the one that arises for the radiation - though non-gravitational - in the spherically symmetric collapsing dissipative fluid, in the diffusion approximation.

  5. On collapsibilities of Yule's measure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    impson's paradox reminds people that the statistical inference in a low-dimensional space probably distorts the reality in a high one seriously.To study the paradox with respect to Yule's measure,this paper discusses simple collapsibility,strong collapsibility and consecutive collapsibility,and presents necessary and sufficient conditions of them.In fact,these conditions are of great importance for observational and experimental designs,eliminating confounding bias,categorizing discrete variables and so on.

  6. Theory of the Antibubble Collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Sob'yanin, Denis Nikolaevich

    2015-01-01

    A theory of the collapse of a punctured antibubble is developed. The motion of the rim of air formed at the edge of the collapsing air film cannot be described by a potential flow and is characterized by high Reynolds numbers. The rim velocity is not constant but gradually decreases with time and is determined by the balance between the surface tension and hydrodynamic drag forces. A collapse equation is derived and solved. The agreement between the theory and existing experiments is shown.

  7. SIGNATURES OF STAR CLUSTER FORMATION BY COLD COLLAPSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsova, Aleksandra; Hartmann, Lee [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 1085 S. University Ave., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier, E-mail: kuza@umich.edu [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 72-3 (Xangari), Morelia, Michocán 58089, México (Mexico)

    2015-12-10

    Subvirial gravitational collapse is one mechanism by which star clusters may form. Here we investigate whether this mechanism can be inferred from observations of young clusters. To address this question, we have computed smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the initial formation and evolution of a dynamically young star cluster through cold (subvirial) collapse, starting with an ellipsoidal, turbulently seeded distribution of gas, and forming sink particles representing (proto)stars. While the initial density distributions of the clouds do not have large initial mass concentrations, gravitational focusing due to the global morphology leads to cluster formation. We use the resulting structures to extract observable morphological and kinematic signatures for the case of subvirial collapse. We find that the signatures of the initial conditions can be erased rapidly as the gas and stars collapse, suggesting that kinematic observations need to be made early in cluster formation and/or at larger scales, away from the growing cluster core. Our results emphasize that a dynamically young system is inherently evolving on short timescales, so that it can be highly misleading to use current-epoch conditions to study aspects such as star formation rates as a function of local density. Our simulations serve as a starting point for further studies of collapse including other factors such as magnetic fields and stellar feedback.

  8. An introduction to observational astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Gallaway, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Observational Astrophysics follows the general outline of an astrophysics undergraduate curriculum targeting practical observing information to what will be covered at the university level. This includes the basics of optics and coordinate systems to the technical details of CCD imaging, photometry, spectography and radio astronomy.  General enough to be used by students at a variety of institutions and advanced enough to be far more useful than observing guides targeted at amateurs, the author provides a comprehensive and up-to-date treatment of observational astrophysics at undergraduate level to be used with a university’s teaching telescope.  The practical approach takes the reader from basic first year techniques to those required for a final year project. Using this textbook as a resource, students can easily become conversant in the practical aspects of astrophysics in the field as opposed to the classroom.

  9. Three Puzzles from Nuclear Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Haxton, W. C.

    2012-01-01

    I discuss three open problems in astrophysics where nuclear physics can make important contributions: the solar abundance problem, dark matter particle detection, and the origin of the r-process elements.

  10. The Fermilab Particle Astrophysics Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-11-01

    The Particle Astrophysics Center was established in fall of 2004. Fermilab director Michael S. Witherell has named Fermilab cosmologist Edward ''Rocky'' Kolb as its first director. The Center will function as an intellectual focus for particle astrophysics at Fermilab, bringing together the Theoretical and Experimental Astrophysics Groups. It also encompasses existing astrophysics projects, including the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search, and the Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory, as well as proposed projects, including the SuperNova Acceleration Probe to study dark energy as part of the Joint Dark Energy Mission, and the ground-based Dark Energy Survey aimed at measuring the dark energy equation of state.

  11. Resolved Host Studies of Stellar Explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Levesque, Emily M

    2016-01-01

    The host galaxies of nearby (z<0.3) core-collapse supernovae and long-duration gamma-ray bursts offer an excellent means of probing the environments and populations that produce these events' varied massive progenitors. These same young stellar progenitors make LGRBs and SNe valuable and potentially powerful tracers of star formation, metallicity, the IMF, and the end phases of stellar evolution. However, properly utilizing these progenitors as tools requires a thorough understanding of their formation and, consequently, the physical properties of their parent host environments. This review looks at some of the recent work on LGRB and SN hosts with resolved environments that allows us to probe the precise explosion sites and surrounding environments of these events in incredible detail.

  12. Measurement of reaction rates of interest in stellar structure and evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrasi, F.; D`Onofrio, A. [Dipt. di Scienze Ambientali, Seconda Univ. di Napoli, Caserta (Italy)]|[INFN, Napoli (Italy); Campajola, L.; Imbriani, G. [INFN, Napoli (Italy)]|[Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Gialanella, L. [INFN, Napoli (Italy)]|[Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. Federico II, Napoli (Italy)]|[Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik III, Ruhr-Univ. Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Greife, U.; Rolfs, C.; Strieder, F.; Trautvetter, H.P. [Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik III, Ruhr-Univ. Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Roca, V.; Romano, M. [INFN, Napoli (Italy)]|[Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Straniero, O. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, Teramo (Italy)

    1998-06-01

    Accurate determinations of reaction rates at astrophysical energies are very important in stellar structure and evolution studies. The cases of two key reactions, namely {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B and {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O are discussed, both from the point of view of their astrophysical interest and of the experimental difficulties in the measurement of their cross section. (orig.)

  13. FOREWORD: Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Naftali; Hass, Michael; Paul, Michael

    2012-02-01

    the conference dinner banquet at the Dan hotel. An excursion to the 'Red Canyon' in the Eilat Mountains on Wednesday afternoon was one of the social highlights of the conference. A total number of 140 scientists attended NPA5 and about 30 accompanying persons; about 25% of these were young participants (less than 36 years old). 23 participants were from Israel, and 27 were from outside of Europe (including two from Africa). The subjects covered at the conference in Eilat concentrated mainly on the spirit of the original idea - to probe experimental and theoretical activity in nuclear structure and reactions that is directly related to the physics of the Universe. There were also sessions of general interest in astrophysics, as well as a poster session on Tuesday evening featuring 40 posters. The topics included: Nuclear Structure - Theory and Experiment Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis and Formation of First Stars Stellar Reactions and Solar Neutrinos Explosive Nucleosynthesis, Radioactive Beams and Exotic Nuclei-New Facilities and Future Possibilities for Astrophysics Neutrino Physics - the Low and High-Energy Frontiers Rare events, Dark Matter, Double beta-decay, Symmetries The conference started with an excellent exposé of the progress made in the discovery of super-heavy elements and the study of their properties. The progress in this field is enormous, and this subject should be communicated to more general audiences. The role of the nuclear equation of state and of the precise determination of nuclear masses in nucleosynthesis was emphasized in several talks. The role of neutrinos in astrophysics was discussed extensively in several sessions. One of the highlights of this was the presentation about the IceCube and DeepCore detectors operating deep in the Antarctic ice. These facilities are able to detect cosmogenic neutrinos in a wide energy range, from 10 GeV to 1010 GeV. The subject of solar neutrinos was discussed in a number of talks. Topics related to properties

  14. Neutrinos in astrophysics and cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balantekin, A. B.

    2016-06-01

    Neutrinos play a crucial role in many aspects of astrophysics and cosmology. Since they control the electron fraction, or equivalently neutron-to-proton ratio, neutrino properties impact yields of r-process nucleosynthesis. Similarly the weak decoupling temperature in the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis epoch is exponentially dependent on the neutron-to-proton ratio. In these conference proceedings, I briefly summarize some of the recent work exploring the role of neutrinos in astrophysics and cosmology.

  15. An introduction to astrophysical hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Shore, Steven N

    1992-01-01

    This book is an introduction to astrophysical hydrodynamics for both astronomy and physics students. It provides a comprehensive and unified view of the general problems associated with fluids in a cosmic context, with a discussion of fluid dynamics and plasma physics. It is the only book on hydrodynamics that addresses the astrophysical context. Researchers and students will find this work to be an exceptional reference. Contents include chapters on irrotational and rotational flows, turbulence, magnetohydrodynamics, and instabilities.

  16. Nuclear astrophysics from direct reactions

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Accurate nuclear reaction rates are needed for primordial nucleosynthesis and hydrostatic burning in stars. The relevant reactions are extremely difficult to measure directly in the laboratory at the small astrophysical energies. In recent years direct reactions have been developed and applied to extract low-energy astrophysical S-factors. These methods require a combination of new experimental techniques and theoretical efforts, which are the subject of this presentation.

  17. Neutrinos in Astrophysics and Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Balantekin, A B

    2016-01-01

    Neutrinos play a crucial role in many aspects of astrophysics and cosmology. Since they control the electron fraction, or equivalently neutron-to-proton ratio, neutrino properties impact yields of r-process nucleosynthesis. Similarly the weak decoupling temperature in the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis epoch is exponentially dependent on the neutron-to-proton ratio. In these conference proceedings, I briefly summarize some of the recent work exploring the role of neutrinos in astrophysics and cosmology.

  18. Progress of Jinping Underground laboratory for Nuclear Astrophysics (JUNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu WeiPing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Jinping Underground lab for Nuclear Astrophysics (JUNA will take the advantage of the ultralow background in Jinping underground lab, high current accelerator based on an ECR source and highly sensitive detector to study directly a number of crucial reactions to the hydrostatic stellar evolution for the first time at their relevant stellar energies. In its first phase, JUNA aims at the direct measurements of 25Mg(p,γ26Al, 19F(p,α16O, 13C(α,n16O and 12C(α,γ16O. The experimental setup, which include the accelerator system with high stability and high intensity, the detector system, and the shielding material with low background, will be established during the above research. The current progress of JUNA will be given.

  19. Minicourses in Astrophysics, Modular Approach, Vol. I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Univ., Chicago.

    This is the first volume of a two-volume minicourse in astrophysics. It contains chapters on the following topics: planetary atmospheres; X-ray astronomy; radio astrophysics; molecular astrophysics; and gamma-ray astrophysics. Each chapter gives much technical discussion, mathematical treatment, diagrams, and examples. References are included with…

  20. Frontiers in Nuclear Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Bertulani, Carlos A

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of nuclei in diverse cosmic scenarios is reviewed, with a summary of the basic concepts involved before a discussion of the current status in each case is made. We review the physics of the early universe, the proton to neutron ratio influence in the observed helium abundance, reaction networks, the formation of elements up to beryllium, the inhomogeneous Big Bang model, and the Big Bang nucleosynthesis constraints on cosmological models. Attention is paid to element production in stars, together with the details of the pp chain, the pp reaction, $^3$He formation and destruction, electron capture on $^7$Be, the importance of $^8$B formation and its relation to solar neutrinos, and neutrino oscillations. Nucleosynthesis in massive stars is also reviewed, with focus on the CNO cycle and its hot companion cycle, the rp-process, triple-$\\alpha$ capture, and red giants and AGB stars. The stellar burning of carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon is presented in a separate section, as well as the slow and r...

  1. Astrophysics and air travel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If you have a fear of flying, then probably the last thing on your mind when you are 10 km above the ground is what might be going on in the depths of the galaxy. But airline pilots and cabin crew might want to brush up on their astroparticle physics. High-energy particles coming from violent galactic events mean that radiation exposure for aircrew is higher than it is for most people classified as radiation workers. But the type of radiation that they are exposed to is very different. The majority of the exposure comes from cosmic radiation that originates outside our solar system. Violent events such as stellar flares, supernovae and the explosion of galactic nuclei produce a concoction of subatomic particles, primarily protons and electrons. The energies of these particles can be greater than 1020 eV - billions of times higher than in the most powerful particle accelerators - although such energetic particles are very rare. Nuclear particles, which comprise about 98% of the radiation, typically have energies that are between 100 MeV and 10 GeV per nucleon. Proportional counter that can measure cosmic radiation is described. (U.K.)

  2. Collapse and post-collapse behavior of steel pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Steel pipes under external pressure plus bending may reach their load carrying capacity due to two failure modes: (i)global buckling: in this case the pipe structure buckles in a 'column mode'; (ii) localized collapse: in this case the pipe structure collapses with its sections loosing their round shape. In many engineering applications such as the design of pressure vessels or the design of marine pipe lines it is very important to be able to determine the collapse pressure of steel pipes subjected to external pressure and bending; besides it is very important to also be able to quantify the effect of imperfections such as ovality, eccentricity or residual stresses on the collapse pressure. The determination of the post-collapse equilibrium paths is also very important in order to be able to assess on the stability of the post-collapse regime; that is to say in order to assess if a collapse will be localized in a section or will propagate along the tubular structure. It is also important in this case to analyze the effect of the imperfections on the post-collapse regime. In a previous publication we presented finite element models that we developed for studying the influence of the above described imperfections on the collapse behavior of steel pipes under external pressure; in that publication we also presented the experimental qualification of the numerical models. Our purpose in the present paper is to extend the study to the post-collapse regime and to the loading case of external pressure plus bending. We present the finite element models developed using shell elements, we discuss the validation of those models and then we use the validated models to perform parametric studies in order to investigate the significance of the different imperfections in load cases that combine external pressure with different degrees of bending. Refs. 3 (author)

  3. The Dynamical Evolution of Stellar-Mass Black Holes in Dense Star Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morscher, Maggie

    Globular clusters are gravitationally bound systems containing up to millions of stars, and are found ubiquitously in massive galaxies, including the Milky Way. With densities as high as a million stars per cubic parsec, they are one of the few places in the Universe where stars interact with one another. They therefore provide us with a unique laboratory for studying how gravitational interactions can facilitate the formation of exotic systems, such as X-ray binaries containing black holes, and merging double black hole binaries, which are produced much less efficiently in isolation. While telescopes can provide us with a snapshot of what these dense clusters look like at present, we must rely on detailed numerical simulations to learn about their evolution. These simulations are quite challenging, however, since dense star clusters are described by a complicated set of physical processes occurring on many different length and time scales, including stellar and binary evolution, weak gravitational scattering encounters, strong resonant binary interactions, and tidal stripping by the host galaxy. Until very recently, it was not possible to model the evolution of systems with millions of stars, the actual number contained in the largest clusters, including all the relevant physics required describe these systems accurately. The Northwestern Group's Henon Monte Carlo code, CMC, which has been in development for over a decade, is a powerful tool that can be used to construct detailed evolutionary models of large star clusters. With its recent parallelization, CMC is now capable of addressing a particularly interesting unsolved problem in astrophysics: the dynamical evolution of stellar black holes in dense star clusters. Our current understanding of the stellar initial mass function and massive star evolution suggests that young globular clusters may have formed hundreds to thousands of stellar-mass black holes, the remnants of stars with initial masses from 20 - 100

  4. BRAVO (Brazilian Astrophysical Virtual Observatory): data mining development

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Carvalho, R. R.; Capelato, H. V.; Velho, H. C.

    2007-08-01

    The primary goal of the BRAVO project is to generate investment in information technology, with particular emphasis on datamining and statistical analysis. From a scientific standpoint, the participants assembled to date are engaged in several scientific projects in various fields of cosmology, astrophysics, and data analysis, with significant contributions from international partners. These scientists conduct research on clusters of galaxies, small groups of galaxies, elliptical galaxies, population synthesis, N-body simulations, and a variety of studies in stellar astrophysics. One of the main aspects of this project is the incorporation of these disparate areas of astrophysical research within the context of the coherent development of database technology.Observational cosmology is one of the branches of science experiencing the largest growth in the past few decades. large photometric and spectroscopic surveys have been carried out in both hemispheres. As a result, an extraordinary amount of data in all portions of the electromagnetic spectrum exists, but without standard techniques for storage and distribution. This project will utilize several specific astronomical databases, created to store data generated by several instruments (including SOAR, Gemini, BDA, etc), uniting them within a common framework and with standard interfaces. We are inviting members of the entire Brazilian astronomical community to partake in this effort. This will certainly impact both education and outreach efforts, as well as the future development of astrophysical research. Finally, this project will provide a constant investment in human resources. First, it will do so by stimulating ongoing short technical visits to Johns Hopkins University and Caltech. These will allow us to bring software technology and expertise in datamining back to Brazil. Second, we will organize the Summer School on Software Technology in Astrophysics, which will be designed to ensure that the Brazilian

  5. BLACK HOLE FORMATION IN FAILING CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present results of a systematic study of failing core-collapse supernovae and the formation of stellar-mass black holes (BHs). Using our open-source general-relativistic 1.5D code GR1D equipped with a three-species neutrino leakage/heating scheme and over 100 presupernova models, we study the effects of the choice of nuclear equation of state (EOS), zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) mass and metallicity, rotation, and mass-loss prescription on BH formation. We find that the outcome, for a given EOS, can be estimated, to first order, by a single parameter, the compactness of the stellar core at bounce. By comparing protoneutron star (PNS) structure at the onset of gravitational instability with solutions of the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkof equations, we find that thermal pressure support in the outer PNS core is responsible for raising the maximum PNS mass by up to 25% above the cold NS value. By artificially increasing neutrino heating, we find the critical neutrino heating efficiency required for exploding a given progenitor structure and connect these findings with ZAMS conditions, establishing, albeit approximately, for the first time based on actual collapse simulations, the mapping between ZAMS parameters and the outcome of core collapse. We also study the effect of progenitor rotation and find that the dimensionless spin of nascent BHs may be robustly limited below a* = Jc/GM2 = 1 by the appearance of nonaxisymmetric rotational instabilities.

  6. High energy astrophysics. An introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on observational examples this book reveals and explains high-energy astrophysical processes. Presents the theory of astrophysical processes in a didactic approach by deriving equations step by step. With several attractive astronomical pictures. High-energy astrophysics has unveiled a Universe very different from that only known from optical observations. It has revealed many types of objects in which typical variability timescales are as short as years, months, days, and hours (in quasars, X-ray binaries, and other objects), and even down to milli-seconds in gamma ray bursts. The sources of energy that are encountered are only very seldom nuclear fusion, and most of the time gravitation, a paradox when one thinks that gravitation is, by many orders of magnitude, the weakest of the fundamental interactions. The understanding of these objects' physical conditions and the processes revealed by high-energy astrophysics in the last decades is nowadays part of astrophysicists' culture, even of those active in other domains of astronomy. This book evolved from lectures given to master and PhD students at the University of Geneva since the early 1990s. It aims at providing astronomers and physicists intending to be active in high-energy astrophysics a broad basis on which they should be able to build the more specific knowledge they will need. While in the first part of the book the physical processes are described and derived in detail, the second part studies astrophysical objects in which high-energy astrophysics plays a crucial role. This two-pronged approach will help students recognise physical processes by their observational signatures in contexts that may differ widely from those presented here.

  7. High energy astrophysics. An introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courvoisier, Thierry J.L. [Geneva Univ., Versoix (Switzerland). ISDC, Data Centre for Astrophysics

    2013-07-01

    Based on observational examples this book reveals and explains high-energy astrophysical processes. Presents the theory of astrophysical processes in a didactic approach by deriving equations step by step. With several attractive astronomical pictures. High-energy astrophysics has unveiled a Universe very different from that only known from optical observations. It has revealed many types of objects in which typical variability timescales are as short as years, months, days, and hours (in quasars, X-ray binaries, and other objects), and even down to milli-seconds in gamma ray bursts. The sources of energy that are encountered are only very seldom nuclear fusion, and most of the time gravitation, a paradox when one thinks that gravitation is, by many orders of magnitude, the weakest of the fundamental interactions. The understanding of these objects' physical conditions and the processes revealed by high-energy astrophysics in the last decades is nowadays part of astrophysicists' culture, even of those active in other domains of astronomy. This book evolved from lectures given to master and PhD students at the University of Geneva since the early 1990s. It aims at providing astronomers and physicists intending to be active in high-energy astrophysics a broad basis on which they should be able to build the more specific knowledge they will need. While in the first part of the book the physical processes are described and derived in detail, the second part studies astrophysical objects in which high-energy astrophysics plays a crucial role. This two-pronged approach will help students recognise physical processes by their observational signatures in contexts that may differ widely from those presented here.

  8. Towards 21st Century Stellar Models: Star Clusters, Supercomputing, and Asteroseismology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, S. W.; Constantino, T. N.; D'Orazi, V.;

    2016-01-01

    Stellar models provide a vital basis for many aspects of astronomy and astrophysics. Recent advances in observational astronomy -- through asteroseismology, precision photometry, high-resolution spectroscopy, and large-scale surveys -- are placing stellar models under greater quantitative scrutin...... a brief overview of the evolution, importance, and substantial uncertainties of core helium burning stars in particular and then briefly discuss a range of methods, both theoretical and observational, that we are using to advance the modelling....

  9. KROME - a package to embed chemistry in astrophysical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, T.; Bovino, S.; Schleicher, D. R. G.; Prieto, J.; Seifried, D.; Simoncini, E.; Gianturco, F. A.

    2014-04-01

    Chemistry plays a key role in many astrophysical situations regulating the cooling and the thermal properties of the gas, which are relevant during gravitational collapse, the evolution of discs and the fragmentation process. In order to simplify the usage of chemical networks in large numerical simulations, we present the chemistry package KROME, consisting of a PYTHON pre-processor which generates a subroutine for the solution of chemical networks which can be embedded in any numerical code. For the solution of the rate equations, we make use of the high-order solver DLSODES, which was shown to be both accurate and efficient for sparse networks, which are typical in astrophysical applications. KROME also provides a large set of physical processes connected to chemistry, including photochemistry, cooling, heating, dust treatment and reverse kinetics. The package presented here already contains a network for primordial chemistry, a small metal network appropriate for the modelling of low metallicities environments, a detailed network for the modelling of molecular clouds, a network for planetary atmospheres, as well as a framework for the modelling of the dust grain population. In this paper, we present an extended test suite ranging from one-zone and 1D models to first applications including cosmological simulations with ENZO and RAMSES and 3D collapse simulations with the FLASH code. The package presented here is publicly available at http://kromepackage.org/ and https://bitbucket.org/krome/krome_stable.

  10. Astrophysical and Cosmological Consequences of the Dynamical Localization of Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Germani, C

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis I review cosmological and astrophysical exact models for Randall-Sundrum-type braneworlds and their physical implications. I present new insights and show their analogies with quantum theories via the holographic idea. In astrophysics I study the two fundamental models of a spherically symmetric static star and spherically symmetric collapsing objects. I show how matching for the pressure of a static star encodes braneworld effects. In addition I study the problem of the vacuum exterior conjecturing a uniqueness theorem. Furthermore I show that a collapsing dust cloud in the braneworld has a non-static exterior, in contrast to the General Relativistic case. This non-static behaviour is linked to the presence of a "surplus potential energy" that must be released, producing a non-zero flux of energy. Via holography this can be connected with the Hawking process, giving an indirect measure of the brane tension. In cosmology I investigate the generalization of the Randall-Sundrum-type model obtaine...

  11. Las Campanas Stellar Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilingarian, Igor; Zolotukhin, Ivan; Beletsky, Yuri; Worthey, Guy

    2015-08-01

    Stellar libraries are fundamental tools required to understand stellar populations in star clusters and galaxies as well as properties of individual stars. Comprehensive libraries exist in the optical domain, but the near-infrared (NIR) domain stays a couple of decades behind. Here we present the Las Campanas Stellar Library project aiming at obtaining high signal-to-noise intermediate-resolution (R=8000) NIR spectra (0.83library the largest homogeneous collection of stellar spectra covering the entire NIR domain. We also re-calibrated in flux and wavelength the two existing optical stellar libraries, INDO-US and UVES-POP and followed up about 400 non-variable stars in the NIR in order to get complete optical-NIR coverage. Worth mentioning that our current sample includes about 80 AGB stars and a few dozens of bulge/LMC/SMC stars.

  12. Astrophysical Effects of Scalar Dark Matter Miniclusters

    CERN Document Server

    Zurek, K M; Quinn, T R; Zurek, Kathryn M.; Hogan, Craig J.; Quinn, Thomas R.

    2006-01-01

    We model the formation, evolution and astrophysical effects of dark compact Scalar Miniclusters (``ScaMs''). These objects arise when a scalar field, with an axion-like or Higgs-like potential, undergoes a second order phase transition below the QCD scale. Such a scalar field may couple too weakly to the standard model to be detectable directly through particle interactions, but may still be detectable by gravitational effects, such as lensing and baryon accretion by large, gravitationally bound miniclusters. The masses of these objects are shown to be constrained by the Ly$\\alpha$ power spectrum to be less than $\\sim 10^4 M_\\odot$, but they may be as light as classical axion miniclusters, of the order of $10^{-12} M_\\odot$. We simulate the formation and nonlinear gravitational collapse of these objects around matter-radiation equality using an N-body code, estimate their gravitational lensing properties, and assess the feasibility of studying them using current and future lensing experiments. Future MACHO-ty...

  13. Stellar matter with pseudoscalar condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrianov, A.A. [Saint-Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Universitat de Barcelona, Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos (ICCUB), Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Andrianov, V.A.; Kolevatov, S.S. [Saint-Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Espriu, D. [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos (ICCUB), Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2016-03-15

    In this work we consider how the appearance of gradients of pseudoscalar condensates in dense systems may possibly influence the transport properties of photons in such a medium as well as other thermodynamic characteristics. We adopt the hypothesis that in regions where the pseudoscalar density gradient is large the properties of photons and fermions are governed by the usual lagrangian extended with a Chern-Simons interaction for photons and a constant axial field for fermions. We find that these new pieces in the lagrangian produce non-trivial reflection coefficients both for photons and fermions when entering or leaving a region where the pseudoscalar has a non-zero gradient. A varying pseudoscalar density may also lead to instability of some fermion and boson modes and modify some properties of the Fermi sea. We speculate that some of these modifications could influence the cooling rate of stellar matter (for instance in compact stars) and have other observable consequences. While quantitative results may depend on the precise astrophysical details most of the consequences are quite universal and consideration should be given to this possibility. (orig.)

  14. White Paper on Nuclear Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Arcones, Almudena; Beers, Timothy; Berstein, Lee; Blackmon, Jeff; Bronson, Messer; Brown, Alex; Brown, Edward; Brune, Carl; Champagne, Art; Chieffi, Alessandro; Couture, Aaron; Danielewicz, Pawel; Diehl, Roland; El-Eid, Mounib; Escher, Jutta; Fields, Brian; Frohlich, Carla; Herwig, Falk; Hix, William Raphael; Iliadis, Christian; Lynch, William; McLaughlin, Gail; Meyer, Bradley; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Nunes, Filomena; O'Shea, Brian; Prakash, Madappa; Pritychenko, Boris; Reddy, Sanjay; Rehm, Ernst; Rogachev, Grigory; Rutledge, Robert; Schatz, Hendrik; Smith, Michael; Stairs, Ingrid; Steiner, Andrew; Strohmayer, Tod; Timmes, Frank; Townsley, Dean; Wiescher, Michael; Zegers, Remco; Zingale, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This white paper informs the nuclear astrophysics community and funding agencies about the scientific directions and priorities of the field and provides input from this community for the 2015 Nuclear Science Long Range Plan. It summarizes the outcome of the nuclear astrophysics town meeting that was held on August 21-23, 2014 in College Station at the campus of Texas A&M University in preparation of the NSAC Nuclear Science Long Range Plan. It also reflects the outcome of an earlier town meeting of the nuclear astrophysics community organized by the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA) on October 9- 10, 2012 Detroit, Michigan, with the purpose of developing a vision for nuclear astrophysics in light of the recent NRC decadal surveys in nuclear physics (NP2010) and astronomy (ASTRO2010). The white paper is furthermore informed by the town meeting of the Association of Research at University Nuclear Accelerators (ARUNA) that took place at the University of Notre Dame on June 12-13, 2014. In summ...

  15. Stellar feedback efficiencies: supernovae versus stellar winds

    CERN Document Server

    Fierlinger, Katharina M; Ntormousi, Evangelia; Fierlinger, Peter; Schartmann, Marc; Ballone, Alessandro; Krause, Martin G H; Diehl, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Stellar winds and supernova (SN) explosions of massive stars ("stellar feedback") create bubbles in the interstellar medium (ISM) and insert newly produced heavy elements and kinetic energy into their surroundings, possibly driving turbulence. Most of this energy is thermalized and immediately removed from the ISM by radiative cooling. The rest is available for driving ISM dynamics. In this work we estimate the amount of feedback energy retained as kinetic energy when the bubble walls have decelerated to the sound speed of the ambient medium. We show that the feedback of the most massive star outweighs the feedback from less massive stars. For a giant molecular cloud (GMC) mass of 1e5 solar masses (as e.g. found in the Orion GMCs) and a star formation efficiency of 8% the initial mass function predicts a most massive star of approximately 60 solar masses. For this stellar evolution model we test the dependence of the retained kinetic energy of the cold GMC gas on the inclusion of stellar winds. In our model w...

  16. The Stellar Imager (SI) - A Mission to Resolve Stellar Surfaces, Interiors, and Magnetic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Karovska, Margarita; Si Team

    2011-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is a space-based, UV/Optical Interferometer (UVOI) designed to enable 0.1 milli-arcsecond (mas) spectral imaging of stellar surfaces and of the Universe in general. It will also probe via asteroseismology flows and structures in stellar interiors. SI will enable the development and testing of a predictive dynamo model for the Sun, by observing patterns of surface activity and imaging of the structure and differential rotation of stellar interiors in a population study of Sun-like stars to determine the dependence of dynamo action on mass, internal structure and flows, and time. SI's science focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe and will revolutionize our understanding of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant planets, and of many magneto-hydrodynamically controlled processes in the Universe. SI is a "Landmark/Discovery Mission" in the 2005 Heliophysics Roadmap, an implementation of the UVOI in the 2006 Astrophysics Strategic Plan, and a NASA Vision Mission ("NASA Space Science Vision Missions" (2008), ed. M. Allen). We present here the science goals of the SI Mission, a mission architecture that could meet those goals, and the technology development needed to enable this mission. Additional information on SI can be found at: http://hires.gsfc.nasa.gov/si/.

  17. Cosmology, astrophysics and elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In most of this review it is assumed that the laws of physics are unchanging in space and time and it is discussed how modern developments in elementary particle physics influence one's understanding of the Universe and conversely the possibility that astronomical observations may give information about elementary particle physics. In particular the physics of the early Universe is studied and the role of new particles such as heavy leptons, neutrinos and quarks and the possible relationship of the net baryon number of the Universe to unified models of elementary particle physics is discussed. The role of neutrinos in stellar evolution, particularly in the explosion of supernovae and in the cooling of neutron stars is considered, black holes are discussed, especially in connection with Hawking's discovery that low-mass black holes can emit a thermal distribution of particles which could be of cosmological or astrophysical importance. Finally the evidence that the laws of physics are, in fact, unchanging is discussed and it is concluded that there is no clear case in favour of change. 346 references. (author)

  18. Recent Laboratory Astrophysics Experiments at LULI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Michel; Michaut, Claire; Loupias, Bérénice; Falize, Emeric; Gregory, Chris; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Dono, Seiichi; Vinci, Tommaso; Waugh, Jonny; Woolsey, Nigel; Ozaki, Norimasa; Benuzzi-Mounaix, Alessandra; Ravasio, Alessandra; Bouquet, Serge; Goahec, Marc Rabec Le; Nazarov, Wigen; Pikuz, Serguey; Sakawa, Youichi; Takabe, Hideaki; Kodama, Ryosuke

    At the LULI laboratory we developed since a few years a program on several topics related to laboratory astrophysics: high velocity jets, shock waves in density gradients, collisionless shocks, and radiative shocks (RS). In this paper, the latest experiments related to RS’s obtained on the new LULI2000 facility and on GEKKOXII are presented. In particular a strong radiative precursor was observed and its time evolution compared with 2D radiative simulations. The second topic developed at LULI is related to plasma jets which are often observed in Young Stellar Objects (YSO), during their phase of bulk contraction. They interact with the interstellar medium resulting in emission lobes, including the so-called bow shocks. The objective of our experiments was to generate plasma jets propagating through an ambient medium. To this aim, we developed a new target design (a foam filled cone ended with a “nozzle”) in order to generate a plasma jet. A jet-like structure was observed and its time evolution studied by varying the foam density. Interaction with ambient medium was recently performed showing growing instabilities for low density gas.

  19. The Stellar Imager (SI) Vision Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Carpenter, K G; Karovska, M; SI Vision Mission Team; Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Karovska, Margarita; Team, SI Vision Mission

    2006-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is a UV-Optical, Space-Based Interferometer designed to enable 0.1 milli-arcsecond (mas) spectral imaging of stellar surfaces and of the Universe in general and asteroseismic imaging of stellar interiors. SI is identified as a "Flagship and Landmark Discovery Mission" in the 2005 Sun Solar System Connection (SSSC) Roadmap and as a candidate for a "Pathways to Life Observatory" in the Exploration of the Universe Division (EUD) Roadmap (May, 2005). SI will revolutionize our view of many dynamic astrophysical processes: its resolution will transform point sources into extended sources, and snapshots into evolving views. SI's science focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe, particularly on magnetic activity on the surfaces of stars like the Sun. SI's prime goal is to enable long-term forecasting of solar activity and the space weather that it drives. SI will also revolutionize our understanding of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant p...

  20. Astrophysics a very short introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Binney, James

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysics is the physics of the stars, and more widely the physics of the Universe. It enables us to understand the structure and evolution of planetary systems, stars, galaxies, interstellar gas, and the cosmos as a whole. In this Very Short Introduction, the leading astrophysicist James Binney shows how the field of astrophysics has expanded rapidly in the past century, with vast quantities of data gathered by telescopes exploiting all parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, combined with the rapid advance of computing power, which has allowed increasingly effective mathematical modelling. He illustrates how the application of fundamental principles of physics - the consideration of energy and mass, and momentum - and the two pillars of relativity and quantum mechanics, has provided insights into phenomena ranging from rapidly spinning millisecond pulsars to the collision of giant spiral galaxies. This is a clear, rigorous introduction to astrophysics for those keen to cut their teeth on a conceptual trea...

  1. Radiative Magnetic Reconnection in Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A

    2015-01-01

    I review a new rapidly growing area of high-energy plasma astrophysics --- radiative magnetic reconnection, i.e., a reconnection regime where radiation reaction influences reconnection dynamics, energetics, and nonthermal particle acceleration. This influence be may be manifested via a number of astrophysically important radiative effects, such as radiation-reaction limits on particle acceleration, radiative cooling, radiative resistivity, braking of reconnection outflows by radiation drag, radiation pressure, viscosity, and even pair creation at highest energy densities. Self-consistent inclusion of these effects in magnetic reconnection theory and modeling calls for serious modifications to our overall theoretical approach to the problem. In addition, prompt reconnection-powered radiation often represents our only observational diagnostic tool for studying remote astrophysical systems; this underscores the importance of developing predictive modeling capabilities to connect the underlying physical condition...

  2. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics in Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Springel, Volker

    2011-01-01

    This review discusses Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) in the astrophysical context, with a focus on inviscid gas dynamics. The particle-based SPH technique allows an intuitive and simple formulation of hydrodynamics that has excellent conservation properties and can be coupled to self-gravity easily and highly accurately. The Lagrangian character of SPH allows it to automatically adjust its resolution to the clumping of matter, a property that makes the scheme ideal for many applications in astrophysics, where often a large dynamic range in density is encountered. We discuss the derivation of the basic SPH equations in their modern formulation, and give an overview about extensions of SPH developed to treat physics such as radiative transfer, thermal conduction, relativistic dynamics or magnetic fields. We also briefly describe some of the most important applications areas of SPH in astrophysical research. Finally, we provide a critical discussion of the accuracy of SPH for different hydrodynamical prob...

  3. Advances in astronomy and astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kopal, Zdenek

    1963-01-01

    Advances in Astronomy and Astrophysics, Volume 2 brings together numerous research works on different aspects of astronomy and astrophysics. This volume is composed of six chapters and begins with a summary of observational record on twilight extensions of the Venus cusps. The next chapter deals with the common and related properties of binary stars, with emphasis on the evaluation of their cataclysmic variables. Cataclysmic variables refer to an object in one of three classes: dwarf nova, nova, or supernova. These topics are followed by discussions on the eclipse phenomena and the eclipses i

  4. Advances in astronomy and astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kopal, Zdenek

    1966-01-01

    Advances in Astronomy and Astrophysics, Volume 4 brings together numerous research works on different aspects of astronomy and astrophysics. This volume is composed of five chapters, and starts with a description of objective prism and its application in space observations. The next chapter deals with the possibilities of deriving reliable models of the figure, density distribution, and gravity field of the Moon based on data obtained through Earth-bound telescopes. These topics are followed by a discussion on the ideal partially relativistic, partially degenerate gas in an exact manner. A ch

  5. Nuclear astrophysics lessons from INTEGRAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Roland

    2013-02-01

    Measurements of high-energy photons from cosmic sources of nuclear radiation through ESA's INTEGRAL mission have advanced our knowledge: new data with high spectral resolution showed that characteristic gamma-ray lines from radioactive decays occur throughout the Galaxy in its interstellar medium. Although the number of detected sources and often the significance of the astrophysical results remain modest, conclusions derived from this unique astronomical window of radiation originating from nuclear processes are important, complementing the widely-employed atomic-line based spectroscopy. We review the results and insights obtained in the past decade from gamma-ray line measurements of cosmic sources in the context of their astrophysical questions.

  6. Nuclear astrophysics data at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a new program of evaluation and dissemination of nuclear data of critical importance for nuclear astrophysics within the Physics Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Recent activities include determining the rates of the important 14O(α,p)17 F and 17F(p,γ) 18Ne reactions, disseminating the Caughlan and Fowler reaction rate compilation on the World Wide Web, and evaluating the 17O(p,α)14N reaction rate. These projects, which are closely coupled to current ORNL nuclear astrophysics research, are briefly discussed along with future plans

  7. Dielectronic recombination for oxygenlike ions relevant to astrophysical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M. H.

    2002-11-01

    In the modeling of the astrophysical plasmas, the relative elemental abundance inferred from solar and stellar upper atmosphere can be affected by as much as a factor of 5 due to the uncertainties in the current dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients used to analyze the spectra [Savin and Laming, Astrophys. J. 566, 1166 (2002)]. DR rate coefficients for oxygenlike ions have been identified as the most urgent needs for the astrophysical applications. In this work, we report on the calculations of DR rate coefficients for Mg V, Si VII, S IX, and Fe XIX ions which are important for the modeling of the astrophysical plasmas. The calculations are carried out in isolated resonance and distorted-wave approximations. The relevant atomic data are calculated using the multiconfigurational Dirac-Fock method. We include 2s-2p, 2p1/2-2p3/2, 2l-3l', and 1s-2p excitations and cover temperatures ranging from 0.001 eV to 10 000 eV. For low temperatures, it is essential to have accurate DR resonance energies and to include fine-structure excitations in order to obtain reliable DR rate coefficients. Good agreement with experiment has been found for Fe XIX. For Mg V, Si VII, and S IX, significant discrepancies are noted between this work and recommended rate coefficients.

  8. Dielectronic recombination for oxygenlike ions relevant to astrophysical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the modeling of the astrophysical plasmas, the relative elemental abundance inferred from solar and stellar upper atmosphere can be affected by as much as a factor of 5 due to the uncertainties in the current dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients used to analyze the spectra [Savin and Laming, Astrophys. J. 566, 1166 (2002)]. DR rate coefficients for oxygenlike ions have been identified as the most urgent needs for the astrophysical applications. In this work, we report on the calculations of DR rate coefficients for Mg V, Si VII, S IX, and Fe XIX ions which are important for the modeling of the astrophysical plasmas. The calculations are carried out in isolated resonance and distorted-wave approximations. The relevant atomic data are calculated using the multiconfigurational Dirac-Fock method. We include 2s-2p, 2p1/2-2p3/2, 2l-3l', and 1s-2p excitations and cover temperatures ranging from 0.001 eV to 10 000 eV. For low temperatures, it is essential to have accurate DR resonance energies and to include fine-structure excitations in order to obtain reliable DR rate coefficients. Good agreement with experiment has been found for Fe XIX. For Mg V, Si VII, and S IX, significant discrepancies are noted between this work and recommended rate coefficients

  9. Stellarator theory and stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes our work in the past year on stellarator transport theory and stability. We have developed two methods of calculating diffusion rates due to ripple transport: a ''hybrid'' bounce-averaged/guiding-center Monte Carlo code, and a numerical method of solving the bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck equation. We have modified a one-dimensional transport code to describe the Wisconsin stellarator experiments and applied it to interpret experimental results, and we have studied stability in stellarators by writing a computer code which solves the linearized ''double-adiabatic'' equations as an initial value problem. 20 refs., 7 figs

  10. Parametric initial conditions for core-collapse supernova simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Suwa, Yudai

    2016-01-01

    We investigate a method to construct parametrized progenitor models for core-collapse supernova simulations. Different from all modern core-collapse supernova studies, which rely on progenitor models from stellar evolution calculations, we follow the methodology of Baron & Cooperstein (1990) to construct initial models. Choosing parametrized spatial distributions of entropy and electron fraction as a function of mass coordinate and solving the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium, we obtain the initial density structures of our progenitor models. First, we calculate structures with parameters fitting broadly the evolutionary model s11.2 of Woosley et al. (2002). We then demonstrate the reliability of our method by performing general relativistic hydrodynamic simulations in spherical symmetry with the isotropic diffusion source approximation to solve the neutrino transport. Our comprehensive parameter study shows that initial models with a small central entropy ($\\lesssim 0.4\\,k_B$ nucleon$^{-1}$) can explo...

  11. Atmospheric heat redistribution and collapse on tidally locked rocky planets

    CERN Document Server

    Wordsworth, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric collapse is likely to be of fundamental importance to tidally locked rocky exoplanets but remains understudied. Here, general results on the heat transport and stability of tidally locked terrestrial-type atmospheres are reported. First, the problem is modeled with an idealized 3D general circulation model (GCM) with gray gas radiative transfer. It is shown that over a wide range of parameters the atmospheric boundary layer, rather than the large-scale circulation, is the key to understanding the planetary energy balance. Through a scaling analysis of the interhemispheric energy transfer, theoretical expressions for the day-night temperature difference and surface wind speed are created that reproduce the GCM results without tuning. Next, the GCM is used with correlated-k radiative transfer to study heat transport for two real gases (CO2 and CO). For CO2, empirical formulae for the collapse pressure as a function of planetary mass and stellar flux are produced, and critical pressures for atmospher...

  12. Laboratory Plasma Source as an MHD Model for Astrophysical Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Robert M.

    1997-01-01

    The significance of the work described herein lies in the demonstration of Magnetized Coaxial Plasma Gun (MCG) devices like CPS-1 to produce energetic laboratory magneto-flows with embedded magnetic fields that can be used as a simulation tool to study flow interaction dynamic of jet flows, to demonstrate the magnetic acceleration and collimation of flows with primarily toroidal fields, and study cross field transport in turbulent accreting flows. Since plasma produced in MCG devices have magnetic topology and MHD flow regime similarity to stellar and extragalactic jets, we expect that careful investigation of these flows in the laboratory will reveal fundamental physical mechanisms influencing astrophysical flows. Discussion in the next section (sec.2) focuses on recent results describing collimation, leading flow surface interaction layers, and turbulent accretion. The primary objectives for a new three year effort would involve the development and deployment of novel electrostatic, magnetic, and visible plasma diagnostic techniques to measure plasma and flow parameters of the CPS-1 device in the flow chamber downstream of the plasma source to study, (1) mass ejection, morphology, and collimation and stability of energetic outflows, (2) the effects of external magnetization on collimation and stability, (3) the interaction of such flows with background neutral gas, the generation of visible emission in such interaction, and effect of neutral clouds on jet flow dynamics, and (4) the cross magnetic field transport of turbulent accreting flows. The applicability of existing laboratory plasma facilities to the study of stellar and extragalactic plasma should be exploited to elucidate underlying physical mechanisms that cannot be ascertained though astrophysical observation, and provide baseline to a wide variety of proposed models, MHD and otherwise. The work proposed herin represents a continued effort on a novel approach in relating laboratory experiments to

  13. Unveiling the High Energy Obscured Universe: Hunting Collapsed Objects Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubertini, P.; Bazzano, A.; Cocchi, M.; Natalucci, L.; Bassani, L.; Caroli, E.; Stephen, J. B.; Caraveo, P.; Mereghetti, S.; Villa, G.

    2005-01-01

    A large part of energy from space is coming from collapsing stars (SN, Hypernovae) and collapsed stars (black holes, neutron stars and white dwarfs). The peak of their energy release is in the hard-X and gamma-ray wavelengths where photons are insensitive to absorption and can travel from the edge the Universe or the central core of the Galaxy without loosing the primordial information of energy, time signature and polarization. The most efficient process to produce energetic photons is gravitational accretion of matter from a "normal" star onto a collapsed companion (LGxMcollxdMacc/dtx( 1Rdisc)-dMacc/dt x c2), exceeding by far the nuclear reaction capability to generate high energy quanta. Thus our natural laboratory for "in situ" investigations are collapsed objects in which matter and radiation co-exist in extreme conditions of temperature and density due to gravitationally bent geometry and magnetic fields. This is a unique opportunity to study the physics of accretion flows in stellar mass and super-massive Black Holes (SMBHs), plasmoids generated in relativistic jets in galactic microQSOs and AGNs, ionised plasma interacting at the touching point of weakly magnetized NS surface, GRB/Supernovae connection, and the mysterious origins of "dark" GRB and X-ray flash.

  14. Core-collapse supernovae - successes, problems, and perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Janka, H T

    2000-01-01

    Multi-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the post-bounce evolution of collapsed stellar iron cores have demonstrated that convective overturn between the stalled shock and the neutrinosphere can have an important effect on the neutrino-driven explosion mechanism. Whether a model yields a successful explosion or not, however, still depends on the power of neutrino energy deposition behind the stalled shock. The neutrino interaction with the stellar gas in the 'hot bubble' also determines the duration of the shock stagnation phase, the explosion energy, and the composition of the neutrino-heated supernova ejecta. More accurate models require a more precise calculation of the neutrino luminosities and spectra and of the angular distributions of the neutrinos in the heating region. Therefore it is necessary to improve the numerical treatment of the neutrino transport, to take into account convective processes inside the newly formed neutron star, and to develop a better understanding of the neutrino opacitie...

  15. Precise calculations of astrophysically important allowed and forbidden transitions of Xe VIII

    CERN Document Server

    Bhowmik, Anal; Roy, Sourav

    2016-01-01

    The present work reports astrophysically important transition line parameters for Xe VIII. The relativistic coupled-cluster method is employed here to calculate the E1, E2, and M1 transition line parameters with a high accuracy. The E1 oscillator strengths and probabilities of E2 and M1 transitions are determined using theoretical amplitudes and experimental energy values. The calculated branching ratios and the lifetimes are supplement to the transition parameters. The accurate presentations of these calculated data are crucial for the density estimations in several stellar and inter-stellar mediums.

  16. On the formation of massive stellar clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Tenorio-Tagle, G; Silich, S A; Medina-Tanco, G A; Muñoz-Tunón, C; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Palous, Jan; Silich, Sergiy; Medina-Tanco, Gustavo A.; Munoz-Tunon, Casiana

    2003-01-01

    Here we model a star forming factory in which the continuous creation of stars results in a highly concentrated, massive (globular cluster-like) stellar system. We show that under very general conditions a large-scale gravitational instability in the ISM, which triggers the collapse of a massive cloud, leads with the aid of a spontaneous first generation of massive stars, to a standing, small-radius, cold and dense shell. Eventually, as more of the collapsing matter is processed and incorporated, the shell becomes gravitationally unstable and begins to fragment, allowing the formation of new stars, while keeping its location. This is due to a detailed balance established between the ram pressure from the collapsing cloud which, together with the gravitational force exerted on the shell by the forming cluster, acts against the mechanical energy deposited by the collection of new stars. We analyze the mass spectrum of fragments that result from the continuous fragmentation of the standing shell and show that it...

  17. Stellar Chromospheric Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall Jeffrey C.

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The Sun, stars similar to it, and many rather dissimilar to it, have chromospheres, regions classically viewed as lying above the brilliant photosphere and characterized by a positive temperature gradient and a marked departure from radiative equilibrium. Stellar chromospheres exhibit a wide range of phenomena collectively called activity, stemming largely from the time evolution of their magnetic fields and the mass flux and transfer of radiation through the complex magnetic topology and the increasingly optically thin plasma of the outer stellar atmosphere. In this review, I will (1 outline the development of our understanding of chromospheric structure from 1960 to the present, (2 discuss the major observational programs and theoretical lines of inquiry, (3 review the origin and nature of both solar and stellar chromospheric activity and its relationship to, and effect on, stellar parameters including total energy output, and (4 summarize the outstanding problems today.

  18. Astrophysical Black Hole horizons in a cosmological context: Nature and possible consequences on Hawking Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Ellis, George F. R.; Goswami, Rituparno; Hamid, Aymen I. M.; Maharaj, Sunil D.(Astrophysics and Cosmology Research Unit, School of Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag 54001, 4000, Durban, South Africa)

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers the nature of apparent horizons for astrophysical black hole situated in a realistic cosmological context. Using semi-tetrad covariant methods we study the local evolutions of the boundaries of the trapped region in the spacetime. For a collapsing massive star immersed in a cosmology with Cosmic Background Radiation (CBR), we show that the initial 2 dimensional marginally trapped surface bifurcates into inner and outer horizons. The inner horizon is timelike while the con...

  19. Astrophysics at very high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presents three complementary lectures on very-high-energy astrophysics given by worldwide leaders in the field. Reviews the recent advances in and prospects of gamma-ray astrophysics and of multi-messenger astronomy. Prepares readers for using space and ground-based gamma-ray observatories, as well as neutrino and other multi-messenger detectors. With the success of Cherenkov Astronomy and more recently with the launch of NASA's Fermi mission, very-high-energy astrophysics has undergone a revolution in the last years. This book provides three comprehensive and up-to-date reviews of the recent advances in gamma-ray astrophysics and of multi-messenger astronomy. Felix Aharonian and Charles Dermer address our current knowledge on the sources of GeV and TeV photons, gleaned from the precise measurements made by the new instrumentation. Lars Bergstroem presents the challenges and prospects of astro-particle physics with a particular emphasis on the detection of dark matter candidates. The topics covered by the 40th Saas-Fee Course present the capabilities of current instrumentation and the physics at play in sources of very-high-energy radiation to students and researchers alike. This book will encourage and prepare readers for using space and ground-based gamma-ray observatories, as well as neutrino and other multi-messenger detectors.

  20. Neutrino in Astrophysics and Cosmology

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Zuxiang

    2003-01-01

    At first we introduce the Neutrino in the standard Model, then the Dirac and Majorana Masses. After introducing the See-Saw Mechanism, we discuss the neutrino oscillations and the neutrino in astrophysics and cosmology. We finish this paper with a brief summary of the neutrino experiments.

  1. Astronomy & Astrophysics: an international journal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertout, C.

    2011-07-01

    After a brief historical introduction, we review the scope, editorial process, and production organization of A&A, one of the leading journals worldwide dedicated to publishing the results of astrophysical research. We then briefly discuss the economic model of the Journal and some current issues in scientific publishing.

  2. Astronomy and Astrophysics in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narlikar, J.; Murdin, P.

    2001-07-01

    The growth in astronomy and astrophysics (A&A) in India has been mostly since the country achieved independence in 1947. The present work is carried out in a few select research institutes and in some university departments. The Astronomical Society of India has around 300 working A&A scientists as members, with another 50-60 graduate students....

  3. Nuclear astrophysics of light nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fynbo, Hans Otto Uldall

    2013-01-01

    A review of nuclear astrophysics of light nuclei using radioactive beams or techniques developed for radioactive beams is given. We discuss Big Bang nucleosynthesis, with special focus on the lithium problem, aspects of neutrino-physics, helium-burning and finally selected examples of studies...

  4. Advanced Stellar Compass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Buch; Jørgensen, John Leif; Thuesen, Gøsta;

    1997-01-01

    This document describes all interface properties for the Advanced Stellar Compass, developed for the German Research Satellite "CHAMP". Basic operations, modes, software protocol, calibration methods and closed loop test strategies are described.......This document describes all interface properties for the Advanced Stellar Compass, developed for the German Research Satellite "CHAMP". Basic operations, modes, software protocol, calibration methods and closed loop test strategies are described....

  5. The Trojan Horse method for nuclear astrophysics: Recent results on resonance reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cognata, M. La; Pizzone, R. G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Romano, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania, Italy and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Gulino, M.; Tumino, A. [Kore University, Enna, Italy and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Lamia, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania (Italy)

    2014-05-09

    Nuclear astrophysics aims to measure nuclear-reaction cross sections of astrophysical interest to be included into models to study stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis. Low energies, < 1 MeV or even < 10 keV, are requested for this is the window where these processes are more effective. Two effects have prevented to achieve a satisfactory knowledge of the relevant nuclear processes, namely, the Coulomb barrier exponentially suppressing the cross section and the presence of atomic electrons. These difficulties have triggered theoretical and experimental investigations to extend our knowledge down to astrophysical energies. For instance, indirect techniques such as the Trojan Horse Method have been devised yielding new cutting-edge results. In particular, I will focus on the application of this indirect method to resonance reactions. Resonances might dramatically enhance the astrophysical S(E)-factor so, when they occur right at astrophysical energies, their measurement is crucial to pin down the astrophysical scenario. Unknown or unpredicted resonances might introduce large systematic errors in nucleosynthesis models. These considerations apply to low-energy resonances and to sub-threshold resonances as well, as they may produce sizable modifications of the S-factor due to, for instance, destructive interference with another resonance.

  6. Introducing Astrophysics Research to High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etkina, Eugenia; Lawrence, Michael; Charney, Jeff

    1999-01-01

    Presents an analysis of an astrophysics institute designed for high school students. Investigates how students respond cognitively in an active science-learning environment in which they serve as apprentices to university astrophysics professors. (Author/CCM)

  7. International Olympiad on Astronomy and Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soonthornthum, B.; Kunjaya, C.

    2011-01-01

    The International Olympiad on Astronomy and Astrophysics, an annual astronomy and astrophysics competition for high school students, is described. Examples of problems and solutions from the competition are also given. (Contains 3 figures.)

  8. First Detection of Water Vapor in a Pre-stellar Core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caselli, Paola; Keto, Eric; Bergin, Edwin A.; Tafalla, Mario; Aikawa, Yuri; Douglas, Thomas; Pagani, Laurent; Yildiz, Umut A.; van der Tak, Floris F. S.; Walmsley, C. Malcolm; Codella, Claudio; Nisini, Brunella; Kristensen, Lars E.; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2012-01-01

    Water is a crucial molecule in molecular astrophysics as it controls much of the gas/grain chemistry, including the formation and evolution of more complex organic molecules in ices. Pre-stellar cores provide the original reservoir of material from which future planetary systems are built, but few o

  9. Formation of a protocluster: A virialized structure from gravoturbulent collapse. I. Simulation of cluster formation in a collapsing molecular cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yueh-Ning; Hennebelle, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Context. Stars are often observed to form in clusters and it is therefore important to understand how such a region of concentrated mass is assembled out of the diffuse medium. The properties of such a region eventually prescribe the important physical mechanisms and determine the characteristics of the stellar cluster. Aims: We study the formation of a gaseous protocluster inside a molecular cloud and associate its internal properties with those of the parent cloud by varying the level of the initial turbulence of the cloud with a view to better characterize the subsequent stellar cluster formation. Methods: We performed high resolution magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of gaseous protoclusters forming in molecular clouds collapsing under self-gravity. We determined ellipsoidal cluster regions via gas kinematics and sink particle distribution, permitting us to determine the mass, size, and aspect ratio of the cluster. We studied the cluster properties, such as kinetic and gravitational energy, and made links to the parent cloud. Results: The gaseous protocluster is formed out of global collapse of a molecular cloud and has non-negligible rotation owing to angular momentum conservation during the collapse of the object. Most of the star formation occurs in this region, which occupies only a small volume fraction of the whole cloud. This dense entity is a result of the interplay between turbulence and gravity. We identify such regions in simulations and compare the gas and sink particles to observed star-forming clumps and embedded clusters, respectively. The gaseous protocluster inferred from simulation results presents a mass-size relation that is compatible with observations. We stress that the stellar cluster radius, although clearly correlated with the gas cluster radius, depends sensitively on its definition. Energy analysis is performed to confirm that the gaseous protocluster is a product of gravoturbulent reprocessing and that the support of turbulent

  10. Extra dimensions, orthopositronium decay, and stellar cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Friedland, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    In a class of extra dimensional models with a warped metric and a single brane the photon can be localized on the brane by gravity only. An intriguing feature of these models is the possibility of the photon escaping into the extra dimensions. The search for this effect has motivated the present round of precision orthopositronium decay experiments. We point out that in this framework a photon in plasma should be metastable. We consider the astrophysical consequences of this observation, in particular, what it implies for the plasmon decay rate in globular cluster stars and for the core-collapse supernova cooling rate. The resulting bounds on the model parameter exceed the possible reach of orthopositronium experiments by many orders of magnitude.

  11. Precision laboratory measurements in nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gai, M. [Connecticut Univ., Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2000-07-01

    After reviewing some of the basic concepts, nomenclatures and parametrizations of astronomy, astrophysics, cosmology, and nuclear physics, we introduce a few central problems in nuclear astrophysics, including the hot-CNO cycle, helium burning and solar neutrinos. We demonstrate that in this new era of precision nuclear astrophysics secondary or radioactive nuclear beams allow for progress. (orig.)

  12. Suppression of the stellar enhancement factor and the reaction 85Rb(p,n)85Sr

    CERN Document Server

    Rauscher, T; Gyürky, Gy; Simon, A; Fülöp, Z; Somorjai, E

    2009-01-01

    It is shown that a Coulomb suppression of the stellar enhancement factor occurs in many endothermic reactions at and far from stability. Contrary to common assumptions, reaction measurements for astrophysics with minimal impact of stellar enhancement should be preferably performed for those reactions instead of their reverses, despite of their negative reaction Q-value. As a demonstration, the cross section of the astrophysically relevant 85Rb(p,n)85Sr reaction has been measured by activation between 2.16<=E_{c.m.}<= 3.96 MeV and the astrophysical reaction rates at p-process temperatures for (p,n) as well as (n,p) are directly inferred from the data. Additionally, our results confirm a previously derived modification of a global optical proton potential. The presented arguments are also relevant for other alpha- and proton-induced reactions in the p-, rp-, and nu-p-processes.

  13. Stability Bounds on Compact Astrophysical Objects from Information-Entropic Measure

    OpenAIRE

    Gleiser, Marcelo; Jiang, Nan

    2015-01-01

    We obtain bounds on the stability of various self-gravitating astrophysical objects using a new measure of shape complexity known as configurational entropy. We apply the method to Newtonian polytropes, neutron stars with an Oppenheimer-Volkoff equation of state, and to self-gravitating configurations of complex scalar field (boson stars) with different self-couplings, showing that the critical stability region of these stellar configurations obtained from traditional perturbation methods cor...

  14. Ludwig Franz Benedikt Biermann: the doyen of German post-war astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielebinski, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Ludwig Biermann was a major figure in theoretical astrophysics in Germany in the twentieth century. His work on stellar interiors, comets and magnetic fields advanced our knowledge. He also predicted the existence and the nature of the solar wind. His predictions were vindicated by space probes. Ludwig Biermann also was an important figure behind the scenes working on the revival of German astronomy after the demise of WWII. For his work he earned important national and international honors.

  15. The Iron Project:. Radiative Atomic Processes in Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahar, Sultana N.

    2011-06-01

    Astronomical objects, such as, stars, galaxies, blackhole environments, etc are studied through their spectra produced by various atomic processes in their plasmas. The positions, shifts, and strengths of the spectral lines provide information on physical processes with elements in all ionization states, and various diagnostics for temperature, density, distance, etc of these objects. With presence of a radiative source, such as a star, the astrophysical plasma is dominated by radiative atomic processes such as photoionization, electron-ion recombination, bound-bound transitions or photo-excitations and de-excitations. The relevant atomic parameters, such as photoionization cross sections, electron-ion recombination rate coefficients, oscillator strengths, radiative transition rates, rates for dielectronic satellite lines etc are needed to be highly accurate for precise diagnostics of physical conditions as well as accurate modeling, such as, for opacities of astrophysical plasmas. for opacities of astrophysical plasmas. This report illustrates detailed features of radiative atomic processes obtained from accurate ab initio methods of the latest developments in theoretical quantum mechanical calculations, especially under the international collaborations known as the Iron Project (IP) and the Opacity Project (OP). These projects aim in accurate study of radiative and collsional atomic processes of all astrophysically abundant atoms and ions, from hydrogen to nickel, and calculate stellar opacities and have resulted in a large number of atomic parameters for photoionization and radiative transition probabilities. The unified method, which is an extension of the OP and the IP, is a self-consistent treatment for the total electron-ion recombination and photoionization. It incorporates both the radiative and the dielectronic recombination processes and provides total recombination rates and level-specific recombination rates for hundreds of levels for a wide range of

  16. Space and Astrophysical Plasmas : Space and astrophysical plasmas: Pervasive problems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chanchal Uberoi

    2000-11-01

    The observations and measurements given by Earth orbiting satellites, deep space probes, sub-orbital systems and orbiting astronomical observatories point out that there are important physical processes which are responsible for a wide variety of phenomena in solar-terrestrial, solar-system and astrophysical plasmas. In this review these topics are exemplified both from an observational and a theoretical point of view.

  17. Hydrodynamic Instability, Integrated Code, Laboratory Astrophysics, and Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takabe, Hideaki

    2016-10-01

    This is an article for the memorial lecture of Edward Teller Medal and is presented as memorial lecture at the IFSA03 conference held on September 12th, 2003, at Monterey, CA. The author focuses on his main contributions to fusion science and its extension to astrophysics in the field of theory and computation by picking up five topics. The first one is the anomalous resisitivity to hot electrons penetrating over-dense region through the ion wave turbulence driven by the return current compensating the current flow by the hot electrons. It is concluded that almost the same value of potential as the average kinetic energy of the hot electrons is realized to prevent the penetration of the hot electrons. The second is the ablative stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability at ablation front and its dispersion relation so-called Takabe formula. This formula gave a principal guideline for stable target design. The author has developed an integrated code ILESTA (ID & 2D) for analyses and design of laser produced plasma including implosion dynamics. It is also applied to design high gain targets. The third is the development of the integrated code ILESTA. The forth is on Laboratory Astrophysics with intense lasers. This consists of two parts; one is review on its historical background and the other is on how we relate laser plasma to wide-ranging astrophysics and the purposes for promoting such research. In relation to one purpose, I gave a comment on anomalous transport of relativistic electrons in Fast Ignition laser fusion scheme. Finally, I briefly summarize recent activity in relation to application of the author's experience to the development of an integrated code for studying extreme phenomena in astrophysics.

  18. The Power of Principled Bayesian Methods in the Study of Stellar Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    von Hippel, Ted; Stenning, David C; Robinson, Elliot; Jeffery, Elizabeth; Stein, Nathan; Jefferys, William H; O'Malley, Erin

    2016-01-01

    It takes years of effort employing the best telescopes and instruments to obtain high-quality stellar photometry, astrometry, and spectroscopy. Stellar evolution models contain the experience of lifetimes of theoretical calculations and testing. Yet most astronomers fit these valuable models to these precious datasets by eye. We show that a principled Bayesian approach to fitting models to stellar data yields substantially more information over a range of stellar astrophysics. We highlight advances in determining the ages of star clusters, mass ratios of binary stars, limitations in the accuracy of stellar models, post-main-sequence mass loss, and the ages of individual white dwarfs. We also outline a number of unsolved problems that would benefit from principled Bayesian analyses.

  19. Eclipsing binary systems as tests of low-mass stellar evolution theory

    CERN Document Server

    Feiden, Gregory A

    2015-01-01

    Stellar fundamental properties (masses, radii, effective temperatures) can be extracted from observations of eclipsing binary systems with remarkable precision, often better than 2%. Such precise measurements afford us the opportunity to confront the validity of basic predictions of stellar evolution theory, such as the mass-radius relationship. A brief historical overview of confrontations between stellar models and data from eclipsing binaries is given, highlighting key results and physical insight that have led directly to our present understanding. The current paradigm that standard stellar evolution theory is insufficient to describe the most basic relation, that of a star's mass to its radius, along the main sequence is then described. Departures of theoretical expectations from empirical data, however, provide a rich opportunity to explore various physical solutions, improving our understanding of important stellar astrophysical processes.

  20. Towards 21st Century Stellar Models: Star Clusters, Supercomputing, and Asteroseismology

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, S W; D'Orazi, V; Meakin, C; Stello, D; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Kuehn, C; De Silva, G M; Arnett, W D; Lattanzio, J C; MacLean, B T

    2015-01-01

    Stellar models provide a vital basis for many aspects of astronomy and astrophysics. Recent advances in observational astronomy -- through asteroseismology, precision photometry, high-resolution spectroscopy, and large-scale surveys -- are placing stellar models under greater quantitative scrutiny than ever. The model limitations are being exposed and the next generation of stellar models is needed as soon as possible. The current uncertainties in the models propagate to the later phases of stellar evolution, hindering our understanding of stellar populations and chemical evolution. Here we give a brief overview of the evolution, importance, and substantial uncertainties of core helium burning stars in particular and then briefly discuss a range of methods, both theoretical and observational, that we are using to advance the modelling.

  1. Towards 21st century stellar models: Star clusters, supercomputing and asteroseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, S. W.; Constantino, T. N.; D'Orazi, V.; Meakin, C.; Stello, D.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Kuehn, C.; De Silva, G. M.; Arnett, W. D.; Lattanzio, J. C.; MacLean, B. T.

    2016-09-01

    Stellar models provide a vital basis for many aspects of astronomy and astrophysics. Recent advances in observational astronomy - through asteroseismology, precision photometry, high-resolution spectroscopy, and large-scale surveys - are placing stellar models under greater quantitative scrutiny than ever. The model limitations are being exposed and the next generation of stellar models is needed as soon as possible. The current uncertainties in the models propagate to the later phases of stellar evolution, hindering our understanding of stellar populations and chemical evolution. Here we give a brief overview of the evolution, importance, and substantial uncertainties of core helium burning stars in particular and then briefly discuss a range of methods, both theoretical and observational, that we are using to advance the modelling. This study uses observational data from from HST, VLT, AAT, Kepler, and supercomputing resources in Australia provided by the National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) and Pawsey Supercomputing Centre.

  2. Improved Diffusion Coefficients for Stellar Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassard, P.; Fontaine, G.

    2014-04-01

    We are currently working on the fourth generation of our codes for building evolutionary and static models of hot subdwarf and white dwarf stars. One of the improvements of these codes consists in an update of all the microphysics involved in the computations. As part of our efforts, we have taken a look at possible improvements for the diffusion coefficients. Since the publication of the widely used diffusion coefficients of Paquette et al. (1986), the number-crunching power of computers has immensely increased, allowing more accurate computations of the triple collision integrals. We have thus produced new tables of diffusion coefficients with higher accuracy and higher resolution than before, of general use in stellar astrophysics.

  3. Stellar Pulsations in Beyond Horndeski Gravity Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Sakstein, Jeremy; Koyama, Kazuya

    2016-01-01

    Theories of gravity in the beyond Horndeski class recover the predictions of general relativity in the solar system whilst admitting novel cosmologies, including late-time de Sitter solutions in the absence of a cosmological constant. Deviations from Newton's law are predicted inside astrophysical bodies, which allow for falsifiable, smoking-gun tests of the theory. In this work we study the pulsations of stars by deriving and solving the wave equation governing linear adiabatic oscillations to find the modified period of pulsation. Using both semi-analytic and numerical models, we perform a preliminary survey of the stellar zoo in an attempt to identify the best candidate objects for testing the theory. Brown dwarfs and Cepheid stars are found to be particularly sensitive objects and we discuss the possibility of using both to test the theory.

  4. Seismic Progressive Collapse: Qualitative Point of View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Wibowo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive collapse is a catastrophic structural phenomenon that can occur because of human-made and natural hazards. In progressive collapse mechanism, a single local failure may cause a significant deformation which then may lead to collapse of a structure. The current practices in progressive collapse analysis and design method generally focus on preventing progressive collapse due to abnormal gravity and blast loads. Progressive collapse behaviour of structures due to earthquake loads has not received as much attention. This paper presents a brief overview of the current state-of-knowledge, insights, and issues related to progressive collapse behaviour of structures caused by earthquake loading.

  5. Collapse in Self-gravitating Turbulent Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Murray, Daniel W; Pittman, John

    2015-01-01

    We perform simulations of star formation in self-gravitating turbulently driven gas. We find that star formation is not a self-similar process; two length scales enter, the radius of the rotationally supported disk $r_d$, and the radius $r_*$ of the sphere of influence of the nascent star, where the enclosed gas mass exceeds the stellar mass. The character of the flow changes at these two scales. We do not see any examples of inside-out collapse. Rather, the accretion of mass starts at large scales where we see large infall velocities $|u_r(r)| \\approx (1/3) v_{ff} \\sim (1/3)\\sqrt{GM(r)/r}\\gtrsim c_s$ out to $r \\sim 1 \\, \\rm{pc}$ hundreds of thousands of years before a star forms. The density evolves to a fixed attractor, $\\rho(r,t ) \\rightarrow \\rho(r)$, for $r_dr_d$ and rotational support becomes important for $r

  6. PREFACE: A Stellar Journey A Stellar Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asplund, M.

    2008-10-01

    The conference A Stellar Journey was held in Uppsala, Sweden, 23 27June 2008, in honour of Professor Bengt Gustafsson's 65th birthday. The choice of Uppsala as the location for this event was obvious given Bengt's long-standing association with the city stemming back to his school days. With the exception of a two-year postdoc stint in Copenhagen, five years as professor at Stockholm University and two years as director of the Sigtuna foundation, Bengt has forged his illustrious professional career at Uppsala University. The symposium venue was Museum Gustavianum, once the main building of the oldest university in Scandinavia. The title of the symposium is a paraphrasing of Bengt's popular astronomy book Kosmisk Resa (in English: Cosmic Journey) written in the early eighties. I think this aptly symbolizes his career that has been an astronomical voyage from near to far, from the distant past to the present. The original book title was modified slightly to reflect that most of his work to date has dealt with stars in one way or another. In addition it also gives credit to Bengt's important role as a guiding light for a very large number of students, colleagues and collaborators, indeed for several generations of astronomers. For me personally, the book Kosmisk Resa bears particular significance as it has shaped my life rather profoundly. Although I had already decided to become an astronomer, when I first read the book as a 14-year-old I made up my mind then and there that I would study under Bengt Gustafsson and work on stars. Indeed I have remained true to this somewhat audacious resolution. I suspect that a great number of us have similar stories how Bengt has had a major influence on our lives, whether on the professional or personal level. Perhaps Bengt's most outstanding characteristic is his enthralling enthusiasm. This is equally true whether he is pondering some scientific conundrum, supervising students or performing in front of an audience, be it an

  7. Stellar magnetic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stellar emission in the chromospheric Ca II H+K lines is compared with the coronal soft X-ray emission, measuring the effects of non-radiative heating in the outer atmosphere at temperatures differing two orders of magnitude. The comparison of stellar flux densities in Ca II H+K and X-rays is extended to fluxes from the transition-region and the high-temperature chromosphere. The stellar magnetic field is probably generated in the differentially rotating convective envelope. The relation between rotation rate and the stellar level of activity measured in chromospheric, transition-region, and coronal radiative diagnostics is discovered. X-ray observations of the binary λ Andromedae are discussed. The departure of M-type dwarfs from the main relations, and the implications for the structure of the chromospheres of these stars are discussed. Variations of the average surface flux densities of the Sun during the 11-year activity cycle agree with flux-flux relations derived for other cool stars, suggesting that the interpretation of the stellar relations may be furthered by studying the solar analogue in more detail. (Auth.)

  8. The Fourier-Kelvin Stellar Interferometer (FKSI): A Discovery Class TPF/DARWIN Pathfinder Mission Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danchi, W. C.; Allen, R. J.; Benford, D. J.; Deming, D.; Gezan, D. Y.; Kuchner, M.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Linfield, R.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Monnier, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    The Fourier-Kelvin Stellar Interferometer (FKSI) is a mission concept for an imaging and nulling interferometer for the mid-infrared spectral region (5-30 microns). FKSI is conceived as a scientific and technological pathfinder to TPF/DARWIN as well as SPIRIT, SPECS, and SAFIR. It will also be a high angular resolution system complementary to NGST. The scientific emphasis of the mission is on the evolution of protostellar systems, from just after the collapse of the precursor molecular cloud core, through the formation of the disk surrounding the protostar, the formation of planets in the disk, and eventual dispersal of the disk material. FKSI will also search for brown dwarfs and Jupiter mass and smaller planets, and could also play a very powerful role in the investigation of the structure of active galactic nuclei and extra-galactic star formation. We have been studying alternative interferometer architectures and beam combination techniques, and evaluating the relevant science and technology tradeoffs. Some of the technical challenges include the development of the cryocooler systems necessary for the telescopes and focal plane array, light and stiff but well-damped truss systems to support the telescopes, and lightweight and coolable optical telescopes. We present results of detailed design studies of the FKSI starting with a design consisting of five one meter diameter telescopes arranged along a truss structure in a linear non-redundant array, cooled to 35 K. A maximum baseline of 20 meters gives a nominal resolution of 26 mas at 5 microns. Using a Fizeau beam combination technique, a simple focal plane camera could be used to obtain both Fourier and spectral data simultaneously for a given orientation of the array. The spacecraft will be rotated to give sufficient Fourier data to reconstruct complex images of a broad range of astrophysical sources. Alternative and simpler three and two telescope designs emphasizing nulling and spectroscopy also have been

  9. Astrophysical Applications of Fractional Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislavsky, Aleksander A.

    The paradigm of fractional calculus occupies an important place for the macroscopic description of subdiffusion. Its advance in theoretical astrophysics is expected to be very attractive too. In this report we discuss a recent development of the idea to some astrophysical problems. One of them is connected with a random migration of bright points associated with magnetic fields at the solar photosphere. The transport of the bright points has subdiffusive features that require the fractional generalization of the Leighton's model. Another problem is related to the angular distribution of radio beams, being propagated through a medium with random inhomogeneities. The peculiarity of this medium is that radio beams are trapped because of random wave localization. This idea can be useful for the diagnostics of interplanetary and interstellar turbulent media.

  10. Focusing Telescopes in Nuclear Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Ballmoos, Peter von

    2007-01-01

    This volume is the first of its kind on focusing gamma-ray telescopes. Forty-eight refereed papers provide a comprehensive overview of the scientific potential and technical challenges of this nascent tool for nuclear astrophysics. The book features articles dealing with pivotal technologies such as grazing incident mirrors, multilayer coatings, Laue- and Fresnel-lenses - and even an optic using the curvature of space-time. The volume also presents an overview of detectors matching the ambitious objectives of gamma ray optics, and facilities for operating such systems on the ground and in space. The extraordinary scientific potential of focusing gamma-ray telescopes for the study of the most powerful sources and the most violent events in the Universe is emphasized in a series of introductory articles. Practicing professionals, and students interested in experimental high-energy astrophysics, will find this book a useful reference

  11. Lecture notes: Astrophysical fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ogilvie, Gordon I

    2016-01-01

    These lecture notes and example problems are based on a course given at the University of Cambridge in Part III of the Mathematical Tripos. Fluid dynamics is involved in a very wide range of astrophysical phenomena, such as the formation and internal dynamics of stars and giant planets, the workings of jets and accretion discs around stars and black holes, and the dynamics of the expanding Universe. Effects that can be important in astrophysical fluids include compressibility, self-gravitation and the dynamical influence of the magnetic field that is 'frozen in' to a highly conducting plasma. The basic models introduced and applied in this course are Newtonian gas dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) for an ideal compressible fluid. The mathematical structure of the governing equations and the associated conservation laws are explored in some detail because of their importance for both analytical and numerical methods of solution, as well as for physical interpretation. Linear and nonlinear waves, includin...

  12. Large Eddy Simulations in Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    In this review, the methodology of large eddy simulations (LES) is introduced and applications in astrophysics are discussed. As theoretical framework, the scale decomposition of the dynamical equations for neutral fluids by means of spatial filtering is explained. For cosmological applications, the filtered equations in comoving coordinates are also presented. To obtain a closed set of equations that can be evolved in LES, several subgrid scale models for the interactions between numerically resolved and unresolved scales are discussed, in particular the subgrid scale turbulence energy equation model. It is then shown how model coefficients can be calculated, either by dynamical procedures or, a priori, from high-resolution data. For astrophysical applications, adaptive mesh refinement is often indispensable. It is shown that the subgrid scale turbulence energy model allows for a particularly elegant and physically well motivated way of preserving momentum and energy conservation in AMR simulations. Moreover...

  13. Particle Acceleration in Astrophysical Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Amato, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Astrophysical sources are extremely efficient accelerators. Some sources emit photons up to multi-TeV energies, a signature of the presence, within them, of particles with energies much higher than those achievable with the largest accelerators on Earth. Even more compelling evidence comes from the study of Cosmic Rays, charged relativistic particles that reach the Earth with incredibly high energies: at the highest energy end of their spectrum, these subatomic particles are carrying a macroscopic energy, up to a few Joules. Here I will address the best candidate sources and mechanisms as cosmic particle accelerators. I will mainly focus on Galactic sources such as Supernova Remnants and Pulsar Wind Nebulae, which being close and bright, are the best studied among astrophysical accelerators. These sources are held responsible for most of the energy that is put in relativistic particles in the Universe, but they are not thought to accelerate particles up to the highest individual energies, $\\approx 10^{20}$ eV...

  14. "Special Case" Stellar Blast Teaching Astronomers New Lessons About Cosmic Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    A powerful thermonuclear explosion on a dense white-dwarf star last February has given astronomers their best look yet at the early stages of such explosions, called novae, and also is giving them tantalizing new clues about the workings of bigger explosions, called supernovae, that are used to measure the Universe. RS Ophiuchi Expansion RS Ophiuchi Expansion CREDIT: Rupen, Mioduszewski & Sokoloski, NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for full-sized image and detailed caption) Using the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) and other telescopes, "We have seen structure in the blast earlier than in any other stellar explosion," said Tim O'Brien of the University of Manchester's Jodrell Bank Observatory in the U.K. "We see evidence that the explosion may be ejecting material in jets, contrary to theoretical models that assumed a spherical shell of ejected material," O'Brien added. The explosion occurred in a star system called RS Ophiuchi, in the constellation Ophiuchus. RS Ophiuchi consists of a dense white dwarf star with a red giant companion whose prolific stellar wind dumps material onto the surface of the white dwarf. When enough of this material has accumulated, theorists say, a gigantic thermonuclear explosion, similar to a hydrogen bomb but much larger, occurs. Systems such as RS Ophiuchi may eventually produce a vastly more powerful explosion -- a supernova -- when the white dwarf accumulates enough mass to cause it to collapse and explode violently. Because such supernova explosions (called Type 1a supernovae by astronomers) all are triggered as the white dwarf reaches the same mass, they are thought to be identical in their intrinsic brightness. This makes them extremely valuable as "standard candles" for measuring distances in the Universe. "We think the white dwarf in RS Ophiuchi is about as massive as a white dwarf can get, and so is close to the point when it will become a supernova," said Jennifer Sokoloski, of the Harvard

  15. Astrophysical Mechanisms for Pulsar Spindown

    OpenAIRE

    Addison, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Pulsars are astrophysical sources of pulsed electromagnetic radiation. The pulses have a variety of shapes in the time-domain, and the pulse energy generally peaks in the radio spectrum. The accepted models theorize that pulsars are rapidly rotating neutron stars with strong dipolar magnetic fields. Current models predict that rotational kinetic energy is extracted from the pulsar in the form of electromagnetic and gravitational radiation, causing it to slowly lose rotational speed, or “spin ...

  16. Astrophysical aspects of Weyl gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the astrophysical implications and applications of Weyl gravity, which is the theory resulting from the unique action allowed under the principle of local scale invariance in Einstein gravity. These applications include galactic dynamics, the mass-radius relation, the cosmological constant, and the 'Modified Newtonian Dynamics' proposed by Milgrom (1983). The relation of Weyl gravity to other scale-invariant theories is addressed.

  17. Core-Collapse Supernova Rate Synthesis Within 11 Mpc

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Lin

    2015-01-01

    The 11 Mpc H-alpha and Ultraviolet Galaxy (11HUGS) Survey traces the star formation activity of nearby galaxies. In addition within this volume the detection completeness of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) is high therefore by comparing these observed stellar births and deaths we can make a sensitive test of our understanding of how stars live and die. In this paper, we use the results of the Binary Population and Spectral Synthesis (BPASS) code to simulate the 11HUGS galaxies H-alpha and far-ultraviolet (FUV) star formation rate indicators (SFRIs) and simultaneously match the core-collapse supernova (CCSN) rate. We find that stellar population including interacting binary stars makes little difference to the total CCSN rate but increases the H-alpha and FUV fluxes for a constant number of stars being formed. In addition they significantly increase the predicted rate of type Ibc supernovae (SNe) relative to type II SNe to the level observed in the 11HUGS galaxies. We also find that instead of assuming a cons...

  18. High energy astrophysics an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Courvoisier, Thierry J -L

    2013-01-01

    High-energy astrophysics has unveiled a Universe very different from that only known from optical observations. It has revealed many types of objects in which typical variability timescales are as short as years, months, days, and hours (in quasars, X-ray binaries, and other objects), and even down to milli-seconds in gamma ray bursts. The sources of energy that are encountered are only very seldom nuclear fusion, and most of the time gravitation, a paradox when one thinks that gravitation is, by many orders of magnitude, the weakest of the fundamental interactions. The understanding of these objects' physical conditions and the processes revealed by high-energy astrophysics in the last decades is nowadays part of astrophysicists' culture, even of those active in other domains of astronomy. This book evolved from lectures given to master and PhD students at the University of Geneva since the early 1990s. It aims at providing astronomers and physicists intending to be active in high-energy astrophysics a broad...

  19. Gravitational collapse and naked singularities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tomohiro Harada

    2004-10-01

    Gravitational collapse is one of the most striking phenomena in gravitational physics. The cosmic censorship conjecture has provided strong motivation for research in this field. In the absence of a general proof for censorship, many examples have been proposed, in which naked singularity is the outcome of gravitational collapse. Recent developments have revealed that there are examples of naked singularity formation in the collapse of physically reasonable matter fields, although the stability of these examples is still uncertain. We propose the concept of `effective naked singularities', which will be quite helpful because general relativity has limitation in its application at the high-energy end. The appearance of naked singularities is not detestable but can open a window for the new physics of strongly curved space-times.

  20. Thermal Duality and Gravitational Collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Hewitt, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Thermal duality is a relationship between the behaviour of heterotic string models of the $E(8)x E(8)$ or $SO(32)$ types at inversely related temperatures, a variant of T duality in the Euclidean regime. This duality would have consequences for the nature of the Hagedon transition in these string models. We propose that the vacuum admits a family of deformations in situations where there are closed surfaces of constant area but high radial acceleration (a string regularized version of a Penrose trapped surface), such as would be formed in situations of extreme gravitational collapse. This would allow a radical resolution of the firewall paradox by allowing quantum effects to significantly modify the spacetime geometry around a collapsed object. A string bremsstrahlung process would convert the kinetic energy of infalling matter in extreme gravitational collapse to form a region of the deformed vacuum, which would be equivalent to forming a high temperature string phase. This process might have observable cons...

  1. Stellar libraries for Gaia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaia will observe up to a billion stellar sources. Automated algorithms are under development to derive the atmospheric parameters of all observed spectra, from low resolution optical spectra alone or in synergy with high resolution spectra in the near-IR Ca II triplet region. To do so, a large database of state-of-the-art stellar libraries has been produced for the Gaia community, computed using different codes optimized for specific purposes. The choice to use different spectral codes in different regions of the H-R diagram raises the problem of the coherence of the different spectra, specifically in the transition zones. We present a comparison between the libraries from the point of view of spectra simulations for training the Gaia algorithms. We also present the implementation of these libraries into a Simple Stellar Population code.

  2. Ekpyrotic collapse with multiple fields

    CERN Document Server

    Koyama, K; Koyama, Kazuya; Wands, David

    2007-01-01

    A scale invariant spectrum of isocurvature perturbations is generated during collapse in the scaling solution in models where two or more fields have steep negative exponential potentials. The scale invariance of the spectrum is realised by a tachyonic instability in the isocurvature field. We show that this instability is due to the fact that the scaling solution is a saddle point in the phase space. The late time attractor is identified with a single field dominated ekpyrotic collapse in which a steep blue spectrum for isocurvature perturbations is found. Although quantum fluctuations do not necessarily to disrupt the classical solution, an additional preceding stage is required to establish classical homogeneity.

  3. Moduli destabilization via gravitational collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examine the interplay between gravitational collapse and moduli stability in the context of black hole formation. We perform numerical simulations of the collapse using the double null formalism and show that the very dense regions one expects to find in the process of black hole formation are able to destabilize the volume modulus. We establish that the effects of the destabilization will be visible to an observer at infinity, opening up a window to a region in spacetime where standard model's couplings and masses can differ significantly from their background values.

  4. Moduli destabilization via gravitational collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Dong-il [Sogang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Center for Quantum Spacetime; Pedro, Francisco G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Yeom, Dong-han [Sogang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Center for Quantum Spacetime; Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Yukawa Inst. for Theoretical Physics

    2013-06-15

    We examine the interplay between gravitational collapse and moduli stability in the context of black hole formation. We perform numerical simulations of the collapse using the double null formalism and show that the very dense regions one expects to find in the process of black hole formation are able to destabilize the volume modulus. We establish that the effects of the destabilization will be visible to an observer at infinity, opening up a window to a region in spacetime where standard model's couplings and masses can differ significantly from their background values.

  5. Protostellar Collapse Induced by Compression

    OpenAIRE

    Hennebelle, P.; Whitworth, A. P.; Gladwin, P. P.; Andre, Ph.

    2002-01-01

    We present numerical simulations of the evolution of low-mass, isothermal, molecular cores which are subjected to an increase in external pressure $P\\xt$. If $P\\xt$ increases very slowly, the core approaches instability quite quasistatically. However, for larger (but still quite modest) $dP\\xt/dt$ a compression wave is driven into the core, thereby triggering collapse from the outside in. If collapse of a core is induced by increasing $P\\xt$, this has a number of interesting consequences. (i)...

  6. Gravitational Lensing & Stellar Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Koopmans, L V E

    2005-01-01

    Strong gravitational lensing and stellar dynamics provide two complementary and orthogonal constraints on the density profiles of galaxies. Based on spherically symmetric, scale-free, mass models, it is shown that the combination of both techniques is powerful in breaking the mass-sheet and mass-anisotropy degeneracies. Second, observational results are presented from the Lenses Structure & Dynamics (LSD) Survey and the Sloan Lens ACS (SLACS) Survey collaborations to illustrate this new methodology in constraining the dark and stellar density profiles, and mass structure, of early-type galaxies to redshifts of unity.

  7. Sparse field stellar photometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, N.

    The past few years have seen substantial developments in the capability of high speed measuring machines in the field of automated stellar photometry. In this review, after describing some of the limitations on photometric precision, empirical results are used to demonstrate the sort of accuracies that are possible with the UK Schmidt plate plus COSMOS/APM images-scan combination. The astronomical results obtained to date from these machines are discussed, and some consideration is given to the future role of measuring machines in stellar astronomy.

  8. Asteroseismology of Stellar Populations in the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Eggenberger, Patrick; Girardi, Léo; Montalbán, Josefina

    2015-01-01

    The detection of radial and non-radial solar-like oscillations in thousands of G-K giants with CoRoT and Kepler is paving the road for detailed studies of stellar populations in the Galaxy. The available average seismic constraints allow largely model-independent determination of stellar radii and masses, and can be used to determine the position and age of thousands of stars in different regions of the Milky Way, and of giants belonging to open clusters. Such a close connection between stellar evolution, Galactic evolution, and asteroseismology opens a new very promising gate in our understanding of stars and galaxies.  This book represents a natural progression from the collection of review papers presented in the book 'Red Giants as Probes of the Structure and Evolution of the Milky Way', which appeared in the  Astrophysics and Space Science Proceedings series in 2012. This sequel volume contains review papers on spectroscopy, seismology of red giants, open questions in Galactic astrophysics, and discu...

  9. Ion Chemistry in Atmospheric and Astrophysical Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgarno, A.; Fox, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    There are many differences and also remarkable similarities between the ion chemistry and physics of planetary ionospheres and the ion chemistry and physics of astronomical environments beyond the solar system. In the early Universe, an expanded cooling gas of hydrogen and helium was embedded in the cosmic background radiation field and ionized by it. As the Universe cooled by adiabatic expansion, recombination occurred and molecular formation was driven by catalytic reactions involving the relict electrons and protons. Similar chemical processes are effective in the ionized zones of gaseous and planetary nebulae and in stellar winds where the ionization is due to radiation from the central stars, in the envelopes of supernovae where the ionization is initiated by the deposition of gamma-rays, in dissociative shocks where the ionization arises from electron impacts in a hot gas and in quasar broad-line region clouds where the quasar is responsible for the ionization. At high altitudes in the atmospheres of the Jovian planets, the main constituents are hydrogen and helium and the ion chemistry and physics is determined by the same processes, the source of the ionization being solar ultraviolet radiation and cosmic rays. After the collapse of the first distinct astronomical entities to emerge from the uniform flow, heavy elements were created by nuclear burning in the cores of the collapsed objects and distributed throughout the Universe by winds and explosions. The chemistry and physics became more complicated. Over 90 distinct molecular species have been identified in interstellar clouds where they are ionized globally by cosmic ray impacts and locally by radiation and shocks associated with star formation and evolution. Complex molecules have also been found in circumstellar shells of evolved stars. At intermediate and low altitudes in the Jovian atmospheres, the ion chemistry is complicated by the increasing abundance of heavy elements such as carbon, and an

  10. Physical effects of gas envelopes with different extension on the collapse of a gas core

    CERN Document Server

    Arreaga-Garcia, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we study the gravitational collapse of a molecular hydrogen gas cloud composed of a core plus a gas envelope surrounding the core. We numerically simulate the collapse of four cloud models to take a glimpse to the time evolution of several dynamic variables, such as the angular momentum and the $aem$ ratio, as well as the ratios between the thermal and rotational energies with respect to the potential gravitational energy, denoted as $\\alpha$ and $\\beta$, respectively, among others. We re-take those models introduced by Arreaga et.al (Astronomy and Astrophysics, {\\bf Vol. 509}, (2010), pag. A96.) in the present paper in order to produce different outcomes of the collapsing cloud characterized in terms of the aforementioned dynamical variables. Such characterization was missing in the paper by Arreaga et.al (Astronomy and Astrophysics, {\\bf Vol. 509}, (2010), pag. A96.), and here we show that the gas envelope extension effects on the collapsing core can be quantitatively compared.

  11. PREFACE: A Stellar Journey A Stellar Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asplund, M.

    2008-10-01

    The conference A Stellar Journey was held in Uppsala, Sweden, 23 27June 2008, in honour of Professor Bengt Gustafsson's 65th birthday. The choice of Uppsala as the location for this event was obvious given Bengt's long-standing association with the city stemming back to his school days. With the exception of a two-year postdoc stint in Copenhagen, five years as professor at Stockholm University and two years as director of the Sigtuna foundation, Bengt has forged his illustrious professional career at Uppsala University. The symposium venue was Museum Gustavianum, once the main building of the oldest university in Scandinavia. The title of the symposium is a paraphrasing of Bengt's popular astronomy book Kosmisk Resa (in English: Cosmic Journey) written in the early eighties. I think this aptly symbolizes his career that has been an astronomical voyage from near to far, from the distant past to the present. The original book title was modified slightly to reflect that most of his work to date has dealt with stars in one way or another. In addition it also gives credit to Bengt's important role as a guiding light for a very large number of students, colleagues and collaborators, indeed for several generations of astronomers. For me personally, the book Kosmisk Resa bears particular significance as it has shaped my life rather profoundly. Although I had already decided to become an astronomer, when I first read the book as a 14-year-old I made up my mind then and there that I would study under Bengt Gustafsson and work on stars. Indeed I have remained true to this somewhat audacious resolution. I suspect that a great number of us have similar stories how Bengt has had a major influence on our lives, whether on the professional or personal level. Perhaps Bengt's most outstanding characteristic is his enthralling enthusiasm. This is equally true whether he is pondering some scientific conundrum, supervising students or performing in front of an audience, be it an

  12. Stellar Archaeology: New Science with Old Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frebel, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The early chemical evolution of the Galaxy and the Universe is vital to our understanding of a host of astrophysical phenomena. Since the most metal-poor Galactic stars are relics from the high-redshift Universe, they probe the chemical and dynamical conditions as the Milky Way began to form, the origin and evolution of the elements, and the physics of nucleosynthesis. They also provide constraints on the nature of the first stars, their associated supernovae and initial mass function, and early star and galaxy formation. I will present exemplary metal-poor stars with which these different topics can be addressed. Those are the most metal-poor stars in the Galaxy ([Fe/H] thorium, which can be used to radioactively date the stars to be 13 Gyr old. I will then transition to recent discoveries of metal-poor ([Fe/H] -3.0) stars in the least luminous dwarf satellites orbiting the Milky Way. Their stellar chemical signatures support the concept that small systems, analogous to the surviving dwarf galaxies, were the building blocks of the Milky Way's low-metallicity halo. This opens a new window for studying galaxy formation through stellar chemistry.

  13. Observing stellar mass and supermassive black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherepashchuk, A. M.

    2016-07-01

    During the last 50 years, great progress has been made in observing stellar-mass black holes (BHs) in binary systems and supermassive BHs in galactic nuclei. In 1964, Zeldovich and Salpeter showed that in the case of nonspherical accretion of matter onto a BH, huge energy releases occur. The theory of disk accretion of matter onto BHs was developed in 1972-1973 by Shakura and Sunyaev, Pringle and Rees, and Novikov and Thorne. Up to now, 100 years after the creation of Albert Einstein's General Theory of Relativity, which predicts the existence of BHs, the masses of tens of stellar-mass BHs ( M_BH=(4-35) M_ȯ) and many hundreds of supermassive BHs ( M_BH=(10^6-1010) M_ȯ) have been determined. A new field of astrophysics, so-called BH demography, is developing. The recent discovery of gravitational waves from BH mergers in binary systems opens a new era in BH studies.

  14. The Kepler Catalog of Stellar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Davenport, James R A

    2016-01-01

    A homogeneous search for stellar flares has been performed using every available Kepler light curve. An iterative light curve de-trending approach was used to filter out both astrophysical and systematic variability to detect flares. The flare recovery completeness has also been computed throughout each light curve using artificial flare injection tests, and the tools for this work have been made publicly available. The final sample contains 851,168 candidate flare events recovered above the 68% completeness threshold, which were detected from 4041 stars, or 1.9% of the stars in the Kepler database. The average flare energy detected is ~$10^{35}$ erg. The net fraction of flare stars increases with $g-i$ color, or decreasing stellar mass. For stars in this sample with previously measured rotation periods, the total relative flare luminosity is compared to the Rossby number. A tentative detection of flare activity saturation for low-mass stars with rapid rotation below a Rossby number of ~0.03 is found. A power...

  15. The Kepler Catalog of Stellar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, James R. A.

    2016-09-01

    A homogeneous search for stellar flares has been performed using every available Kepler light curve. An iterative light curve de-trending approach was used to filter out both astrophysical and systematic variability to detect flares. The flare recovery completeness has also been computed throughout each light curve using artificial flare injection tests, and the tools for this work have been made publicly available. The final sample contains 851,168 candidate flare events recovered above the 68% completeness threshold, which were detected from 4041 stars, or 1.9% of the stars in the Kepler database. The average flare energy detected is ˜1035 erg. The net fraction of flare stars increases with g - i color, or decreasing stellar mass. For stars in this sample with previously measured rotation periods, the total relative flare luminosity is compared to the Rossby number. A tentative detection of flare activity saturation for low-mass stars with rapid rotation below a Rossby number of ˜0.03 is found. A power-law decay in flare activity with Rossby number is found with a slope of -1, shallower than typical measurements for X-ray activity decay with Rossby number.

  16. Astrophysical Sources of Statistical Uncertainty in Precision Radial Velocities and Their Approximations

    CERN Document Server

    Beatty, Thomas G

    2015-01-01

    We investigate astrophysical contributions to the statistical uncertainty of precision radial velocity measurements of stellar spectra. We analytically determine the uncertainty in centroiding isolated spectral lines broadened by Gaussian, Lorentzian, Voigt, and rotational profiles, finding that for all cases and assuming weak lines, the uncertainty is the line centroid is $\\sigma_V\\approx C\\,\\Theta^{3/2}/(W I_0^{1/2})$, where $\\Theta$ is the full-width at half-maximum of the line, $W$ is the equivalent width, and $I_0$ is the continuum signal-to-noise ratio, with $C$ a constant of order unity that depends on the specific line profile. We use this result to motivate approximate analytic expressions to the total radial velocity uncertainty for a stellar spectrum with a given photon noise, resolution, wavelength, effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, macroturbulence, and stellar rotation. We use these relations to determine the dominant contributions to the statistical uncertainties in precision ...

  17. Naked singularity explosion in higher-dimensional dust collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimano, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Umpei

    2014-02-01

    In the context of the large extra dimensions or TeV-scale gravity, it has been argued that an effective naked singularity, called the visible border of spacetime, would be generated by high-energy particle collisions. Motivated by this interesting possibility, we investigate a particle creation by a naked singularity in general dimensions, adopting a spherically symmetric self-similar dust collapse as the simple model of a naked singularity formation. The power and energy of the particle emission behave in two distinct ways depending on a parameter in the model. In a generic case, the emission power is proportional to the quadratic inverse of the remaining time to the Cauchy horizon, which has been known for the four-dimensional case in the literature. On the other hand, in a degenerate case the emission power is proportional to the quartic inverse of the remaining time to the Cauchy horizon, and depends on the total mass of a dust fluid in spite that the central region of the collapse is scale-free due to the self-similarity. In the both cases, within a test-field approximation the energy radiated before any quantum gravitational effect dominates amounts to TeV. This suggests that a backreaction is not ignorable in the TeV-scale gravity context, in contrast to the similar phenomena in stellar collapse.

  18. Opacity of stellar matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, F J

    1998-09-17

    New efforts to calculate opacity have produced significant improvements in the quality of stellar models. The most dramatic effect has been large opacity enhancements for stars subject to large amplitude pulsations. Significant improvement in helioseismic modeling has also been obtained. A description and comparisons of the new opacity efforts are give

  19. THE ADVANCED STELLAR COMPASS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif; Liebe, Carl Christian

    1997-01-01

    this demand the Advanced Stellar Compass (ASC), a fully autonomous miniature star tracker, was developed. This ASC is capable of both solving the "lost in space" problem and determine the attitude with arcseconds precision. The development, principles of operation and instrument autonomy of the ASC...

  20. Advanced Stellar Compass FMECA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif; Betto, Maurizio; Kilsgaard, Søren;

    1998-01-01

    This documents describes the Advanced Stellar Compass (ASC) failure modes, effects and criticality analyses (FMECA).The objectives of the FMECA are:1)To identify the possible failure;2)To identify the effects of the possible failures including the identification of potential hazards to determine...

  1. Stellarator theory: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses progress in the following areas: The propagator method; ripple transport in tokamaks; self-consistent bounce-averaged numerical transport; computations: The bootstrap current; comparisons of stellarator ripple transport calculations; and plasma transport in IMS using a 1D fluid transport code

  2. Stellar Structure and Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Kippenhahn, Rudolf; Weiss, Achim

    2013-01-01

    This long-awaited second edition of the classical textbook on Stellar Structure and Evolution by Kippenhahn and Weigert is a thoroughly revised version of the original text. Taking into account modern observational constraints as well as additional physical effects such as mass loss and diffusion, Achim Weiss and Rudolf Kippenhahn have succeeded in bringing the book up to the state-of-the-art with respect to both the presentation of stellar physics and the presentation and interpretation of current sophisticated stellar models. The well-received and proven pedagogical approach of the first edition has been retained. The book provides a comprehensive treatment of the physics of the stellar interior and the underlying fundamental processes and parameters. The models developed to explain the stability, dynamics and evolution of the stars are presented and great care is taken to detail the various stages in a star’s life. Just as the first edition, which remained a standard work for more than 20 years after its...

  3. 8. stellarator workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical reports in this collection of papers were presented at the 8th International Workshop on Stellarators, and International Atomic Energy Agency Technical Committee Meeting. They include presentations on transport, magnetic configurations, fluctuations, equilibrium, stability, edge plasma and wall aspects, heating, diagnostics, new concepts and reactor studies. Refs, figs and tabs

  4. Stellar magnetic cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliunas, S. L.

    2004-05-01

    Is hope for understanding the solar magnetic cycle to be found in stars? Observations of stars with significant sub-surface convective zones -- masses smaller than about 1.5 solar masses on the lower main sequence and many types of cool, post-main-sequence stars -- indicate the presence of surface and atmospheric inhomogeneities analogous to solar magnetic features, making stellar magnetic activity a cosmically widespread phenomenon. Observations have been made primarily in visible wavelengths, and important information has also been derived from the ultraviolet and x-ray spectrum regions. Interannual to interdecadal variability of spectrum indicators of stellar magnetic features is common, and in some cases similar in appearance to the 11-year sunspot cycle. Successful models of the physical processes responsible for stellar magnetic cycles, typically cast as a magnetohydrodynamic dynamo, require advances in understanding not only convection but also the magnetic field's interaction with it. The observed facts that underpin the hope for models will be summarized. Properties of stellar magnetic cycles will be compared and contrasted with those of the sun, including inferences from paleo-environmental reservoirs that contain information on solar century- to millennial-scale magnetic variability. Partial support of this research came from NASA NAG5-7635, NRC COBASE, CRDF 322, MIT-MSG 5710001241, JPL 1236821, AF 49620-02-1-0194, Richard Lounsberry Foundation, Langley-Abbot, Rollins, Scholarly Studies and James Arthur Funds (Smithsonian Institution) and several generous individuals.

  5. Progress Toward Attractive Stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quasi-axisymmetric stellarator (QAS) concept offers a promising path to a more compact stellarator reactor, closer in linear dimensions to tokamak reactors than previous stellarator designs. Concept improvements are needed, however, to make it more maintainable and more compatible with high plant availability. Using the ARIES-CS design as a starting point, compact stellarator designs with improved maintenance characteristics have been developed. While the ARIES-CS features a through-the-port maintenance scheme, we have investigated configuration changes to enable a sector-maintenance approach, as envisioned for example in ARIES AT. Three approaches are reported. The first is to make tradeoffs within the QAS design space, giving greater emphasis to maintainability criteria. The second approach is to improve the optimization tools to more accurately and efficiently target the physics properties of importance. The third is to employ a hybrid coil topology, so that the plasma shaping functions of the main coils are shared more optimally, either with passive conductors made of high-temperature superconductor or with local compensation coils, allowing the main coils to become simpler. Optimization tools are being improved to test these approaches.

  6. Critical Effects in Gravitational Collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The models of gravitational collapse of a dynamical system are investigated by means of the Einstein equations. Different types conjunctions to gravitational field are analyzed and it is shown that in the case of week scalar field (low energy density) the system evaluated to flat space while in the case of strong field (high energy density) to black hole

  7. Scaling Laws in Gravitational Collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Rong-Gen

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents two interesting scaling laws, which relate some critical exponents in the critical behavior of spherically symmetric gravitational collapses. These scaling laws are independent of the details of gravity theory under consideration and share similar forms as those in thermodynamic and geometrical phase transitions in condensed matter system. The properties of the scaling laws are discussed and some numerical checks are given.

  8. Critical behavior of collapsing surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Kasper; Sourdis, C.

    2009-01-01

    We consider the mean curvature evolution of rotationally symmetric surfaces. Using numerical methods, we detect critical behavior at the threshold of singularity formation resembling that of gravitational collapse. In particular, the mean curvature simulation of a one-parameter family of initial...

  9. Trends of stellar entropy along stellar evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is devoted to discussing the difference in the thermodynamic entropy budget per baryon in each type of stellar object found in the Universe. We track and discuss the actual decrease of the stored baryonic thermodynamic entropy from the most primitive molecular cloud up to the final fate of matter in black holes, passing through evolved states of matter as found in white dwarfs and neutron stars. We then discuss the case of actual stars with different masses throughout their evolution, clarifying the role of the virial equilibrium condition for the decrease in entropy and related issues. Finally, we discuss the role of gravity in driving the composition and the structural changes of stars with different Main Sequence masses during their evolution up to the final product. Particularly, we discuss the entropy of a black hole in this context arguing that the dramatic increase in its entropy, differently from the other cases, is due to the gravitational field itself. (paper)

  10. 25 Years of Self-Organized Criticality: Solar and Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Aschwanden, Markus J; Dimitropoulou, Michaila; Georgoulis, Manolis; Hergarten, Stefan; MdAteer, James; Milovanov, Alexander V; Mineshige, Shin; Morales, Laura; Nishizuka, Naoto; Pruessner, Gunnar; Sanchez, Raul; Sharma, Surja; Strugarek, Antoine; Uritsky, Vadim

    2014-01-01

    Shortly after the seminal paper {\\sl "Self-Organized Criticality: An explanation of 1/f noise"} by Bak, Tang, and Wiesenfeld (1987), the idea has been applied to solar physics, in {\\sl "Avalanches and the Distribution of Solar Flares"} by Lu and Hamilton (1991). In the following years, an inspiring cross-fertilization from complexity theory to solar and astrophysics took place, where the SOC concept was initially applied to solar flares, stellar flares, and magnetospheric substorms, and later extended to the radiation belt, the heliosphere, lunar craters, the asteroid belt, the Saturn ring, pulsar glitches, soft X-ray repeaters, blazars, black-hole objects, cosmic rays, and boson clouds. The application of SOC concepts has been performed by numerical cellular automaton simulations, by analytical calculations of statistical (powerlaw-like) distributions based on physical scaling laws, and by observational tests of theoretically predicted size distributions and waiting time distributions. Attempts have been und...

  11. Scale-covariant theory of gravitation and astrophysical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuto, V.; Adams, P. J.; Hsieh, S.-H.; Tsiang, E.

    1977-01-01

    A scale-covariant theory of gravitation is presented which is characterized by a set of equations that are complete only after a choice of the scale function is made. Special attention is given to gauge conditions and units which allow gravitational phenomena to be described in atomic units. The generalized gravitational-field equations are derived by performing a direct scale transformation, by extending Riemannian geometry to Weyl geometry through the introduction of the notion of cotensors, and from a variation principle. Modified conservation laws are provided, a set of dynamical equations is obtained, and astrophysical consequences are considered. The theory is applied to examine certain homogeneous cosmological solutions, perihelion shifts, light deflections, secular variations of planetary orbital elements, stellar structure equations for a star in quasi-static equilibrium, and the past thermal history of earth. The possible relation of the scale-covariant theory to gauge field theories and their predictions of cosmological constants is discussed.

  12. Ionization Modeling Astrophysical Gaseous Structures. I. The Optically Thin Regime

    CERN Document Server

    Churchill, Christopher W; Medina, Amber; Vliet, Jacob R Vander

    2014-01-01

    We present a code for modelling the ionization conditions of optically thin astrophysical gas structures. Given the gas hydrogen density, equilibrium temperature, elemental abundances, and the ionizing spectrum, the code solves the equilibrium ionization fractions and number densities for all ions from hydrogen to zinc. The included processes are photoionization, Auger ionization, direct collisional ionization, excitation auto-ionization, charge exchange ionization, two-body radiative recombination, dielectronic recombination, and charge exchange recombination. The ionizing spectrum can be generalized to include the ultraviolet background (UVB) and/or Starburst99 stellar populations of various masses, ages, metallicities, and distances. The ultimate goal with the code is to provide fast computation of the ionization conditions of gas in N-body + hydrodynamics cosmological simulations, in particular adaptive mesh refinement codes, in order to facilitate absorption line analysis of the simulated gas for compari...

  13. The Theoretical Astrophysical Observatory: Cloud-Based Mock Galaxy Catalogues

    CERN Document Server

    Bernyk, Maksym; Tonini, Chiara; Hodkinson, Luke; Hassan, Amr H; Garel, Thibault; Duffy, Alan R; Mutch, Simon J; Poole, Gregory B

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the Theoretical Astrophysical Observatory (TAO), an online virtual laboratory that houses mock observations of galaxy survey data. Such mocks have become an integral part of the modern analysis pipeline. However, building them requires an expert knowledge of galaxy modelling and simulation techniques, significant investment in software development, and access to high performance computing. These requirements make it difficult for a small research team or individual to quickly build a mock catalogue suited to their needs. To address this TAO offers access to multiple cosmological simulations and semi-analytic galaxy formation models from an intuitive and clean web interface. Results can be funnelled through science modules and sent to a dedicated supercomputer for further processing and manipulation. These modules include the ability to (1) construct custom observer light-cones from the simulation data cubes; (2) generate the stellar emission from star formation histories, apply dust extinction, a...

  14. Progress of Jinping Underground laboratory for Nuclear Astrophysics (JUNA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, WeiPing; Li, ZhiHong; He, JiangJun; Tang, XiaoDong; Lian, Gang; An, Zhu; Chang, JianJun; Chen, Han; Chen, QingHao; Chen, XiongJun; Chen, ZhiJun; Cui, BaoQun; Du, XianChao; Fu, ChangBo; Gan, Lin; Guo, Bing; He, GuoZhu; Heger, Alexander; Hou, SuQing; Huang, HanXiong; Huang, Ning; Jia, BaoLu; Jiang, LiYang; Kubono, Shigeru; Li, JianMin; Li, KuoAng; Li, Tao; Li, YunJu; Lugaro, Maria; Luo, XiaoBing; Ma, HongYi; Ma, ShaoBo; Mei, DongMing; Qian, YongZhong; Qin, JiuChang; Ren, Jie; Shen, YangPing; Su, Jun; Sun, LiangTing; Tan, WanPeng; Tanihata, Isao; Wang, Shuo; Wang, Peng; Wang, YouBao; Wu, Qi; Xu, ShiWei; Yan, ShengQuan; Yang, LiTao; Yang, Yao; Yu, XiangQing; Yue, Qian; Zeng, Sheng; Zhang, HuanYu; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, LiYong; Zhang, NingTao; Zhang, QiWei; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, XiaoPeng; Zhang, XueZhen; Zhang, ZiMing; Zhao, Wei; Zhao, Zuo; Zhou, Chao

    2016-04-01

    Jinping Underground laboratory for Nuclear Astrophysics (JUNA) will take the advantage of the ultra-low background of CJPL lab and high current accelerator based on an ECR source and a highly sensitive detector to directly study for the first time a number of crucial reactions occurring at their relevant stellar energies during the evolution of hydrostatic stars. In its first phase, JUNA aims at the direct measurements of 25Mg(p, γ)26Al, 19F(p, α)16O, 13C(α, n)16O and 12C(α, γ)16O reactions. The experimental setup, which includes an accelerator system with high stability and high intensity, a detector system, and a shielding material with low background, will be established during the above research. The current progress of JUNA will be given.

  15. Bellechester, Minnesota, USA, lagoon collapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, E. C.; Broberg, J. S.; Kehren, A. R.; Graziani, M. M.; Turri, W. L.

    1993-12-01

    Bellechester, Minnesota, is a small community of approximately 155 residents located on the county line between Goodhue and Wabasha counties in southeast Minnesota's karst region. Bellechester is served by a 21-year-old wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) consisting of three waste-stabilization ponds. On 28 April 1992 six sinkholes were discovered to have drained cell 2 of the WWTF resulting in the loss of approximately 8.7×106 1 of partially treated effluent and about 600 m3 of soil into previously undetected subsurface voids of unknown dimensions. In the week following the collapse, approximately 200 water wells located within a 5-km radius of the WWTF were sampled in an after-the-fact, emergency sampling program. Twelve samples with elevated fecal coliform levels, 18 samples with nitrate-nitrogen greater than the 10 mg/1 standard, and no samples with elevated chlorides were found. However, the elevated levels could not be unambiguously attributed to the WWTF collapse. This is the third WWTF to fail by sinkhole collapse in southeast Minnesota since 1974. All three collapsed lagoons have been located in similar geomorphic and stratigraphic settings. However, at least two lagoons have collapsed in the adjacent area in northeast Iowa, and these lagoons are located at different stratigraphic positions. Twenty-two WWTFs constructed in southeast Minnesota's karst region in the last 25 years have been identified as subject to potential sinkhole collapse. An unknown but significant number of manure storage lagoons, flood control structures, etc., have also been constructed in the karst region and are at risk. Public agencies are beginning to develop plans to deal with the risk associated with existing and future waste lagoons in this environment. The critical hydrogeologic parameters that can be used to prioritize the risk of collapse at existing facilities include: (1) the lithology of the first bedrock beneath each lagoon, (2) the thickness of surficial materials

  16. Hair of astrophysical black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2012-01-01

    The "no hair" theorem is not applicable to black holes formed from collapse of a rotating neutron star. Rotating neutron stars can self-produce particles via vacuum breakdown forming a highly conducting plasma magnetosphere such that magnetic field lines are effectively "frozen-in" the star both before and during collapse. In the limit of no resistivity, this introduces a topological constraint which prohibits the magnetic field from sliding off the newly-formed event horizon. As a result, during collapse of a neutron star into a black hole, the latter conserves the number of magnetic flux tubes N_B = e \\Phi_\\infty /(\\pi c \\hbar), where \\Phi_\\infty is the initial magnetic flux through the hemispheres of the progenitor and out to infinity. The black hole's magnetosphere subsequently relaxes to the split monopole magnetic field geometry with self-generated currents outside the event horizon. The dissipation of the resulting equatorial current sheet leads to a slow loss of the anchored flux tubes, a process that...

  17. The spatial structure of young stellar clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Michael A.

    Star formation is an extremely active area of astronomical research, and young stellar clusters in our Galaxy offer a useful laboratory where star-formation processes can be studied. Young stars form from the the gravitational collapse of molecular clouds that have a hierarchical spatial structure. This leads to stars forming in clustered environments, often with thousands of other young stars in environments that are strongly affected by feedback from massive O-type stars. The environments in these massive star-forming regions (MSFR) can affect how stars form and whether the young stellar clusters remain bound after star formation ends, both of which are questions that have received considerable attention from researchers. Studies of stellar populations in Galactic MSFRs are made difficult due to large numbers of fields stars in the Galactic Plane, large areas of the sky that must be surveyed, high optical extinction from dust, and nebulosity in the the optical and infrared. The Massive Young Star-Forming Complex Study in Infrared and X-ray (MYStIX) uses multiwavelength observations to overcome some of these difficulties, providing some of the most complete, clean membership lists for 20 MSFRs within 3.6 kpc of the Sun. I described X-ray catalogs and mid-infrared catalogs that were used in this survey. The spatial distribution of young stars in 17 MYStIX regions are used to probe the origin and dynamics of the young stellar clusters. Intrinsic stellar surface-density maps are made for each region, which reveal complex structures with dense subclusters. I examine in detail one of the nearest MYStIX young stellar clusters, W 40 (d = 500 pc), which has properties similar to many of the subclusters in more massive and more distant star-forming regions. The cluster in W 40 has a simple structure with mass segregation, indicating that it has undergone dynamical evolution, even though its young age (~0.8 Myr) is insufficient for relaxation from two-body interactions

  18. Atomic and Molecular Data for Optical Stellar Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Heiter, U; Asplund, M; Barklem, P S; Bergemann, M; Magrini, L; Masseron, T; Mikolaitis, Š; Pickering, J C; Ruffoni, M P

    2015-01-01

    High-precision spectroscopy of large stellar samples plays a crucial role for several topical issues in astrophysics. Examples include studying the chemical structure and evolution of the Milky Way galaxy, tracing the origin of chemical elements, and characterizing planetary host stars. Data are accumulating from instruments that obtain high-quality spectra of stars in the ultraviolet, optical and infrared wavelength regions on a routine basis. These instruments are located at ground-based 2- to 10-m class telescopes around the world, in addition to the spectrographs with unique capabilities available at the Hubble Space Telescope. The interpretation of these spectra requires high-quality transition data for numerous species, in particular neutral and singly ionized atoms, and di- or triatomic molecules. We rely heavily on the continuous efforts of laboratory astrophysics groups that produce and improve the relevant experimental and theoretical atomic and molecular data. The compilation of the best available ...

  19. Annual Report: Hydrodynamics and Radiative Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Paul Drake

    2005-12-01

    We report the ongoing work of our group in hydrodynamics and radiative hydrodynamics with astrophysical applications. During the period of the existing grant, we have carried out two types of experiments at the Omega laser. One set of experiments has studied radiatively collapsing shocks, obtaining high-quality scaling data using a backlit pinhole and obtaining the first (ever, anywhere) Thomson-scattering data from a radiative shock. Other experiments have studied the deeply nonlinear development of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability from complex initial conditions, obtaining the first (ever, anywhere) dual-axis radiographic data using backlit pinholes and ungated detectors. All these experiments have applications to astrophysics, discussed in the corresponding papers either in print or in preparation. We also have obtained preliminary radiographs of experimental targets using our x-ray source. The targets for the experiments have been assembled at Michigan, where we also prepare many of the simple components. The above activities, in addition to a variety of data analysis and design projects, provide good experience for graduate and undergraduates students. In the process of doing this research we have built a research group that uses such work to train junior scientists.

  20. UNIFYING THE ZOO OF JET-DRIVEN STELLAR EXPLOSIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazzati, Davide; Blackwell, Christopher H. [Department of Physics, NC State University, 2401 Stinson Drive, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States); Morsony, Brian J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2535 Sterling Hall, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison WI 53706-1582 (United States); Begelman, Mitchell C. [JILA, University of Colorado, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States)

    2012-05-01

    We present a set of numerical simulations of stellar explosions induced by relativistic jets emanating from a central engine sitting at the center of compact, dying stars. We explore a wide range of durations of the central engine activity, two candidate stellar progenitors, and two possible values of the total energy release. We find that even if the jets are narrowly collimated, their interaction with the star unbinds the stellar material, producing a stellar explosion. We also find that the outcome of the explosion can be very different depending on the duration of the engine activity. Only the longest-lasting engines result in successful gamma-ray bursts. Engines that power jets only for a short time result in relativistic supernova (SN) explosions, akin to observed engine-driven SNe such as SN2009bb. Engines with intermediate durations produce weak gamma-ray bursts, with properties similar to nearby bursts such as GRB 980425. Finally, we find that the engines with the shortest durations, if they exist in nature, produce stellar explosions that lack sizable amounts of relativistic ejecta and are therefore dynamically indistinguishable from ordinary core-collapse SNe.

  1. UNIFYING THE ZOO OF JET-DRIVEN STELLAR EXPLOSIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a set of numerical simulations of stellar explosions induced by relativistic jets emanating from a central engine sitting at the center of compact, dying stars. We explore a wide range of durations of the central engine activity, two candidate stellar progenitors, and two possible values of the total energy release. We find that even if the jets are narrowly collimated, their interaction with the star unbinds the stellar material, producing a stellar explosion. We also find that the outcome of the explosion can be very different depending on the duration of the engine activity. Only the longest-lasting engines result in successful gamma-ray bursts. Engines that power jets only for a short time result in relativistic supernova (SN) explosions, akin to observed engine-driven SNe such as SN2009bb. Engines with intermediate durations produce weak gamma-ray bursts, with properties similar to nearby bursts such as GRB 980425. Finally, we find that the engines with the shortest durations, if they exist in nature, produce stellar explosions that lack sizable amounts of relativistic ejecta and are therefore dynamically indistinguishable from ordinary core-collapse SNe.

  2. Sh2-205: II. Its quiescent stellar formation activity

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, G A

    2009-01-01

    We present a study of active stellar forming regions in the environs of the HII region Sh2-205. The analysis is based on data obtained from point source catalogues and images extracted from 2MASS, MSX, and IRAS surveys. Complementary data are taken from CO survey. The identification of primary candidates to stellar formation activity is made following colour criteria and the correlation with molecular gas emission. A number of stellar formation tracer candidates are projected on two substructures of the HII region: SH148.83-0.67 and SH149.25-0.00. However, the lack of molecular gas related to these structures casts doubts on the nature of the sources. Additional infrared sources may be associated with the HI shell centered at (l,b) = (149\\degr 0\\arcmin, -1\\degr 30\\arcmin). The most striking active area was found in connection to the HII region LBN 148.11-0.45, where stellar formation candidates are projected onto molecular gas. The analytical model to the "collect and collapse" process shows that stellar form...

  3. Stellar Pulsations and Stellar Evolution: Conflict, Cohabitation, or Symbiosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Achim

    While the analysis of stellar pulsations allows the determination of current properties of a star, stellar evolution models connect it with its previous history. In many cases results from both methods do not agree. In this review some classical and current cases of disagreement are presented. In some cases these conflicts led to an improvement of the theory of stellar evolution, while in others they still remain unsolved. Some well-known problems of stellar physics are pointed out as well, for which it is hoped that seismology—or in general the analysis of stellar pulsations—will help to resolve them. The limits of this symbiosis will be discussed as well.

  4. Stellar Imager (SI) - Observing the Universe in High Definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Karovska, M.; Schrijver, C. J.; SI Development Team

    2009-01-01

    Stellar Imager (http://hires.gsfc.nasa.gov/si/) is a space-based, UV/Optical Interferometer (UVOI) with over 200x HST's resolution. It will enable 0.1 milli-arcsec spectral imaging of stellar surfaces and the Universe in general and open an enormous new "discovery space" for Astrophysics with its combination of high angular resolution, dynamic imaging, and spectral energy resolution. SI's goal is to study the role of magnetism in the Universe and revolutionize our understanding of: 1) Solar/Stellar Magnetic Activity and their impact on Space Weather, Planetary Climates, and Life, 2) Magnetic and Accretion Processes and their roles in the Origin and Evolution of Structure and in the Transport of Matter throughout the Universe, 3) the close-in structure of Active Galactic Nuclei, and 4) Exo-Solar Planet Transits and Disks. The SI mission is targeted for the mid 2020's - thus significant technology development in the upcoming decade is critical to enabling it and future space-based sparse aperture telescope and distributed spacecraft missions. The key technology needs include: 1) precision formation flying of many spacecraft, 2) precision metrology over km-scales, 3) closed-loop control of many-element, sparse optical arrays, 4) staged-control systems with very high dynamic ranges (nm to km-scale). It is critical that the importance of timely development of these capabilities is called out in the upcoming Astrophysics and Heliophysics Decadal Surveys, to enable the flight of such missions in the following decade. SI is a "Landmark/Discovery Mission" in the 2005 Heliophysics Roadmap and a candidate UVOI in the 2006 Astrophysics Strategic Plan. It is a NASA Vision Mission ("NASA Space Science Vision Missions" (2008), ed. M. Allen) and has also been recommended for further study in the 2008 NRC interim report on missions potentially enabled or enhanced by an Ares V launch, although an incrementally-deployed version could be launched using smaller rockets.

  5. Astrophysics Source Code Library Enhancements

    CERN Document Server

    Hanisch, Robert J; Berriman, G Bruce; DuPrie, Kimberly; Mink, Jessica; Nemiroff, Robert J; Schmidt, Judy; Shamir, Lior; Shortridge, Keith; Taylor, Mark; Teuben, Peter J; Wallin, John

    2014-01-01

    The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL; ascl.net) is a free online registry of codes used in astronomy research; it currently contains over 900 codes and is indexed by ADS. The ASCL has recently moved a new infrastructure into production. The new site provides a true database for the code entries and integrates the WordPress news and information pages and the discussion forum into one site. Previous capabilities are retained and permalinks to ascl.net continue to work. This improvement offers more functionality and flexibility than the previous site, is easier to maintain, and offers new possibilities for collaboration. This presentation covers these recent changes to the ASCL.

  6. Laboratory Studies of Astrophysical Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Ciardi, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Jets and outflows produced during star-formation are observed on many scales: from the "micro-jets" extending a few hundred Astronomical Units to the "super-jets" propagating to parsecs distances. Recently, a new "class" of short-lived (hundreds of nano-seconds) centimetre-long jets has emerged in the laboratory as a complementary tool to study these complex astrophysical flows. Here I will discuss and review the recent work done on "simulating" protostellar jets in the laboratory using z-pinch machines.

  7. Astrophysics and Cosmology: International Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandford, Roger

    2016-03-01

    Most large projects in astrophysics and cosmology are international. This raises many challenges including: --Aligning the sequence of: proposal, planning, selection, funding, construction, deployment, operation, data mining in different countries --Managing to minimize cost growth through reconciling different practices --Communicating at all levels to ensure a successful outcome --Stabilizing long term career opportunities. There has been considerable progress in confronting these challenges. Lessons learned from past collaborations are influencing current facilities but much remains to be done if we are to optimize the scientific and public return on the expenditure of financial and human resources.

  8. Astrophysical constraints on dark energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chiu Man; Hsu, Stephen D. H.

    2016-02-01

    Dark energy (i.e., a cosmological constant) leads, in the Newtonian approximation, to a repulsive force which grows linearly with distance and which can have astrophysical consequences. For example, the dark energy force overcomes the gravitational attraction from an isolated object (e.g., dwarf galaxy) of mass 107M⊙ at a distance of 23 kpc. Observable velocities of bound satellites (rotation curves) could be significantly affected, and therefore used to measure or constrain the dark energy density. Here, isolated means that the gravitational effect of large nearby galaxies (specifically, of their dark matter halos) is negligible; examples of isolated dwarf galaxies include Antlia or DDO 190.

  9. Solar astrophysics. 3. rev. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foukal, Peter V. [CRI, Nahant, MA (United States)

    2013-06-01

    This third, revised edition describes our current understanding of the sun - from its deepest interior, via the layers of the directly observable atmosphere to the solar wind, right up to its farthest extension into interstellar space. It includes a comprehensive account of the history of solar astrophysics, and the evolution of solar instruments. This account now includes the most up- to-date implementation of modern solar instruments in facilities on the ground and in space. The revised book now also provides an overview of recent results on ''space weather'' and on sun-climate relations, both of which are fields of increasing societal importance.

  10. Multimessenger Astronomy and Astrophysics Synergies

    CERN Document Server

    van Putten, Maurice H P M

    2012-01-01

    A budget neutral strategy is proposed for NSF to lead the implementation of multimessenger astronomy and astrophysics, as outlined in the Astro2010 Decadal Survey. The emerging capabilities for simultaneous measurements of physical and astronomical data through the different windows of electromagnetic, hadronic and gravitational radiation processes call for a vigorous pursuit of new synergies. The proposed approach is aimed at the formation of new collaborations and multimessenger data-analysis, to transcend the scientific inquiries made within a single window of observations. In view of budgetary constraints, we propose to include the multimessenger dimension in the ranking of proposals submitted under existing NSF programs.

  11. Gravitational Collapse in Repulsive $R+\\mu^4/R$ Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Fathi, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we work out collapsing conditions for a spherical star in the weak field limit of the $R+\\mu^4/R$ gravity and discuss the importance of the parameter $\\mu$ to generate different criteria in the theory. Such criteria are proved to be resulting in a variety of different fates for the evolution of the outer shells of stars. Furthermore, we investigate the special case of violating the first junction condition and point out corresponding contradictions to the normal cases. These results show that the consistency of the $R+\\mu^4/R$ theory of gravity with the common astrophysical predictions relies highly on the adoption of the parameter $\\mu$ and satisfaction/violation of the first junction condition. For those anomalous results, further observational attempts are mandatory.

  12. QCD deconfinement phase transitions and collapsing quark stars

    CERN Document Server

    Bednarek, I; Manka, R; Bednarek, Ilona; Biesiada, Marek; Manka, Ryszard

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the QCD phase-transitions in the nontopological soliton model of quark confinement and explore possible astrophysical consequences. Our key idea is to look at quark stars (which are believed to exist since the quark matter is energetically preferred over the ordinary matter) from the point of view of soliton model. We propose that the phase transition taking place during the core collapse of massive evolved star may provide a new physical effect not taken into account in modeling the supernova explosions. We also point out the possibility that merging quark stars may produce gamma-ray bursts energetic enough to be at cosmological distances. Our idea based on the finite-temperature nontopologiocal soliton model overcomes major difficulties present in neutron star merger scenario --- the baryon loading problem and nonthermal spectra of the bursts.

  13. Astrophysical Observations: Lensing and Eclipsing Einstein's Theories

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2005-01-01

    Albert Einstein postulated the equivalence of energy and mass, developed the theory of special relativity, explained the photoelectric effect, and described Brownian motion in five papers, all published in 1905, 100 years ago. With these papers, Einstein provided the framework for understanding modern astrophysical phenomena. Conversely, astrophysical observations provide one of the most effective means for testing Einstein's theories. Here, I review astrophysical advances precipitated by Ein...

  14. Hierarchical gravitational fragmentation. I. Collapsing cores within collapsing clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, Raúl Naranjo; Loughnane, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the Hierarchical Gravitational Fragmentation scenario through numerical simulations of the prestellar stages of the collapse of a marginally gravitationally unstable isothermal sphere immersed in a strongly gravitationally unstable, uniform background medium. The core developes a Bonnor-Ebert (BE)-like density profile, while at the time of singularity (the protostar) formation the envelope approaches a singular-isothermal-sphere (SIS)-like $r^-2$ density profile. However, these structures are never hydrostatic. In this case, the central flat region is characterized by an infall speed, while the envelope is characterized by a uniform speed. This implies that the hydrostatic SIS initial condition leading to Shu's classical inside-out solution is not expected to occur, and therefore neither should the inside-out solution. Instead, the solution collapses from the outside-in, naturally explaining the observation of extended infall velocities. The core, defined by the radius at which it merges with t...

  15. Progresses of Laboratory Astrophysics in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Gang; ZHANG Jie

    2011-01-01

    The exciting discoveries in astronomy such as the accelerating expansion of the universe, the atmospheric composition of exoplanets, and the abundance trends of various types of stars rely upon advances in laboratory astrophysics. These new discoveries have occurred along with dramatic improvements in measurements by ground- based and space-based instruments of astrophysical processes under extreme physical conditions. Laboratory astrophysics is an exciting and rapidly growing field emerging since the beginning of this century, which covers a wide range of scientific areas such as astrophysics,

  16. High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) is the primary archive for NASA missions dealing with extremely energetic phenomena, from...

  17. High-Energy Astrophysics: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2007-01-01

    High-energy astrophysics is the study of objects and phenomena in space with energy densities much greater than that found in normal stars and galaxies. These include black holes, neutron stars, cosmic rays, hypernovae and gamma-ray bursts. A history and an overview of high-energy astrophysics will be presented, including a description of the objects that are observed. Observing techniques, space-borne missions in high-energy astrophysics and some recent discoveries will also be described. Several entirely new types of astronomy are being employed in high-energy astrophysics. These will be briefly described, along with some NASA missions currently under development.

  18. Fine-grid calculations for stellar electron and positron capture rates on Fe isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un, E-mail: jameel@giki.edu.pk [Ghulam Ishaq Khan Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Faculty of Engineering Sciences (Pakistan); Tawfik, Abdel Nasser, E-mail: a.tawfik@eng.mti.edu.eg [MTI University, Egyptian Center for Theoretical Physics (ECTP) (Egypt)

    2013-03-15

    The acquisition of precise and reliable nuclear data is a prerequisite to success for stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis studies. Core-collapse simulators find it challenging to generate an explosion from the collapse of the core of massive stars. It is believed that a better understanding of the microphysics of core-collapse can lead to successful results. The weak interaction processes are able to trigger the collapse and control the lepton-to-baryon ratio (Y{sub e}) of the corematerial. It is suggested that the temporal variation of Y{sub e} within the core of a massive star has a pivotal role to play in the stellar evolution and a fine-tuning of this parameter at various stages of presupernova evolution is the key to generate an explosion. During the presupernova evolution of massive stars, isotopes of iron, mainly {sup 54-56}Fe, are considered to be key players in controlling Y{sub e} ratio via electron capture on these nuclides. Recently an improved microscopic calculation of weak-interaction-mediated rates for iron isotopes was introduced using the proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase-approximation (pn-QRPA) theory. The pn-QRPA theory allows a microscopic state-by-state calculation of stellar capture rates which greatly increases the reliability of calculated rates. The results were suggestive of some fine-tuning of the Y{sub e} ratio during various phases of stellar evolution. Here we present for the first time the fine-grid calculation of the electron and positron capture rates on {sup 54-56}Fe. The sensitivity of the pn-QRPA calculated capture rates to the deformation parameter is also studied in this work. Core-collapse simulators may find this calculation suitable for interpolation purposes and for necessary incorporation in the stellar evolution codes.

  19. Gravitational waves from 3D MHD core-collapse supernova simulations with neutrino transport

    OpenAIRE

    Scheidegger, Simon Urs

    2011-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are among the most energetic explosions in the universe, liberating the prodigious amount of ~ 1053 erg, the binding energy of their compact remnants, neutron stars or stellar mass black holes. While 99% of this energy is emitted in neutrinos, 1% goes into the internal and asymptotic kinetic energy of the ejecta, and it is reasonable to assume that a tiny fraction is radiated in gravitational waves (GWs). Ever since the first experimental efforts to detect GWs...

  20. Estimating stellar parameters and interstellar extinction from evolutionary tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sichevsky, S.; Malkov, O.

    Developing methods for analyzing and extracting information from modern sky surveys is a challenging task in astrophysical studies. We study possibilities of parameterizing stars and interstellar medium from multicolor photometry performed in three modern photometric surveys: GALEX, SDSS, and 2MASS. For this purpose, we have developed a method to estimate stellar radius from effective temperature and gravity with the help of evolutionary tracks and model stellar atmospheres. In accordance with the evolution rate at every point of the evolutionary track, star formation rate, and initial mass function, a weight is assigned to the resulting value of radius that allows us to estimate the radius more accurately. The method is verified for the most populated areas of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram: main-sequence stars and red giants, and it was found to be rather precise (for main-sequence stars, the average relative error of radius and its standard deviation are 0.03% and 3.87%, respectively).

  1. Simulations of Dense Stellar Systems with the AMUSE Software Toolkit

    CERN Document Server

    McMillan, Stephen; van Elteren, Arjen; Whitehead, Alfred

    2011-01-01

    We describe AMUSE, the Astrophysical Multipurpose Software Environment, a programming framework designed to manage multi-scale, multi-physics simulations in a hierarchical, extensible, and internally consistent way. Constructed as a collection of individual modules, AMUSE allows computational tools for different physical domains to be easily combined into a single task. It facilitates the coupling of modules written in different languages by providing inter-language tools and a standard programming interface that represents a balance between generality and computational efficiency. The framework currently incorporates the domains of stellar dynamics, stellar evolution, gas dynamics, and radiative transfer. We present some applications of the framework and outline plans for future development of the package.

  2. Young stellar clusters and star formation throughout the Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Feigelson, Eric; Allen, Lori; Bergin, Edwin; Bally, John; Balog, Zoltan; Bourke, Tyler; Brogan, Crystal; Chu, You-Hua; Churchwell, Edward; Gagne, Marc; Getman, Konstantin; Hunter, Todd; Morgan, Larry; Massey, Philip; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Mamajek, Eric; Megeath, S Thomas; O'Dell, C Robert; Rathborne, Jill; Rebull, Luisa; Stahler, Steven; Townsley, Leisa; Wang, Junfeng; Williams, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    Most stars are born in rich young stellar clusters (YSCs) embedded in giant molecular clouds. The most massive stars live out their short lives there, profoundly influencing their natal environments by ionizing HII regions, inflating wind-blown bubbles, and soon exploding as supernovae. Thousands of lower-mass pre-main sequence stars accompany the massive stars, and the expanding HII regions paradoxically trigger new star formation as they destroy their natal clouds. While this schematic picture is established, our understanding of the complex astrophysical processes involved in clustered star formation have only just begun to be elucidated. The technologies are challenging, requiring both high spatial resolution and wide fields at wavelengths that penetrate obscuring molecular material and remove contaminating Galactic field stars. We outline several important projects for the coming decade: the IMFs and structures of YSCs; triggered star formation around YSC; the fate of OB winds; the stellar populations of...

  3. Stellar populations in star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Chengyuan; Deng, Licai

    2016-01-01

    Stellar populations contain the most important information about star clus- ter formation and evolution. Until several decades ago, star clusters were believed to be ideal laboratories for studies of simple stellar populations (SSPs). However, discoveries of multiple stellar populations in Galactic globular clusters have expanded our view on stellar populations in star clusters. They have simultaneously generated a number of controversies, particularly as to whether young star clusters may have the same origin as old globular clusters. In addition, extensive studies have revealed that the SSP scenario does not seem to hold for some intermediate-age and young star clusters either, thus making the origin of multiple stellar populations in star clusters even more complicated. Stellar population anomalies in numerous star clusters are well-documented, implying that the notion of star clusters as true SSPs faces serious challenges. In this review, we focus on stellar populations in massive clusters with different ...

  4. Long gamma-ray bursts and core-collapse supernovae have differentenvironments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fruchter, A.S.; Levan, A.J.; Strolger, L.; Vreeswijk, P.M.; Thorsett, S.E.; Bersier, D.; Burud, I.; Castro Ceren, J.M.; Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Conselice, C.; Dahlen, T.; Ferguson, H.C.; Fynbo,J.P.U.; Garnavich, P.M.; Gibbons, R.A.; Gorosabel, J.; Gull, T.R.; Hjorth, J.; Holland, S.T.; Kouveliotou, C.; Levay, Z.; Livio, M.; Metzger, M.R.; Nugent, P.E.; Petro, L.; Pian, E.; Rhoads, J.E.; Riess,A.G.; Sahu, K.C.; Smette, A.; Tanvir, N.R.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Woosley, S.E.

    2006-05-01

    When massive stars exhaust their fuel they collapse andoften produce the extraordinarily bright explosions known ascore-collapse supernovae. On occasion, this stellar collapse also powersan even more brilliant relativistic explosion known as a long-durationgamma-ray burst. One would then expect that long gamma-ray bursts andcore-collapse supernovae should be found in similar galacticenvironments. Here we show that this expectation is wrong. We find thatthe long gamma-ray bursts are far more concentrated on the very brightestregions of their host galaxies than are the core-collapse supernovae.Furthermore, the host galaxies of the long gamma-ray bursts aresignificantly fainter and more irregular than the hosts of thecore-collapse supernovae. Together theseresults suggest thatlong-duration gamma-ray bursts are associated with the most massive starsand may be restricted to galaxies of limited chemical evolution. Ourresults directly imply that long gamma-ray bursts are relatively rare ingalaxies such as our own MilkyWay.

  5. Spreadsheets and the Financial Collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Croll, Grenville J

    2009-01-01

    We briefly review the well-known risks, weaknesses and limitations of spreadsheets and then introduce some more. We review and slightly extend our previous work on the importance and criticality of spreadsheets in the City of London, introducing the notions of ubiquity, centrality, legality and contagion. We identify the sector of the financial market that we believed in 2005 to be highly dependant on the use of spreadsheets and relate this to its recent catastrophic financial performance. We outline the role of spreadsheets in the collapse of the Jamaican banking system in the late 1990's and then review the UK financial regulator's knowledge of the risks of spreadsheets in the contemporary financial system. We summarise the available evidence and suggest that there is a link between the use of spreadsheets and the recent collapse of the global financial system. We provide governments and regulating authorities with some simple recommendations to reduce the risks of continued overdependence on unreliable spr...

  6. On collapsibilities of Yule's measure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO; Jianhua

    2001-01-01

    [1]Simpson,E.H.,The interpretation of interaction in contingency tables,J.R.Statist.Soc.B,1951,13:238-241.[2]Bishop,Y.M.M.,Effects of collapsing multidimensional contingency tables,Biometrics,1971,27:545-562.[3]Whittemore,A.S.,Collapsibility of multidimensional contingency tables,J.R.Statist.Soc.B,1978,40:328-340.[4]Good,I.J.,Mittal,Y.,The amalgamation and geometry of two-by-two contingency tables,Ann.Statist.,1987,15:694-711.[5]Gail,M.H.,Adjusting for covariates that have the same distribution in exposed and unexposed cohorts,Modern Statistical Methods in Chronic Disease Epidemiology (eds.Moolgavkar,S.H.,Prentice,R.L.),New York:Wiley,1986,3-18.[6]Wermuth,N.,Parametric collapsibility and the lack of moderating effects in contingency tables with a dichotomous response variable,J.R.Statist.Soc.B,1987,49:353-364.[7]Wermuth,N.,Moderating effects of subgroups in linear models,Biometrika,1989,76:81-92.[8]Ducharme,G.R.,Lepage,Y.,Testing collapsibility in contingency tables,J.R.Statist.Soc.B,1986,48:197-205.[9]Geng Zhi,Collapsibility of relative risk in contingency tables with a response variable,J.R.Statist.Soc.B,1992,54:585-593.[10]Guo Jianhua,Geng Zhi,Collapsibility of logistic regression coefficients,J.R.Statist.Soc.B,1995,57:263-267.[11]Rosenbaum,P.,Rubin,D.B.,The central role of the propensity score in observational studies for causal effects,Biometrika,1983,70:41-55.[12]Greenland,S.,Robins,J.M.,Pearl,J.,Confounding and collapsibility in causal inference,Statist.Sci.,1999,14:29-46.[13]Freedman,D.,From association to causation:some remarks on the history of statistics,Statist.Sci.,1999,14:243-258.[14]Geng,Z.,Guo,J.H.,Lau,T.S.et al.,Confounding,consistency and collapsibility for causal effects in epidemiologic studies,To appear in Statist.Sinica,2001.[15]Yule,G.U.,Notes on the theory of association of attributes in statistics,Biometrika,1903,2:121-134.[16]Lancaster,H.O.,The Chi-squared Distribution

  7. Chemical Models of Collapsing Envelopes

    CERN Document Server

    Bergin, E A

    1999-01-01

    We discuss recent models of chemical evolution in the developing and collapsing protostellar envelopes associated with low-mass star formation. In particular, the effects of depletion of gas-phase molecules onto grain surfaces is considered. We show that during the middle to late evolutionary stages, prior to the formation of a protostar, various species selectively deplete from the gas phase. The principal pattern of selective depletions is the depletion of sulfur-bearing molecules relative to nitrogen-bearing species: NH3 and N2H+. This pattern is shown to be insensitive to the details of the dynamics and marginally sensitive to whether the grain mantle is dominated by polar or non-polar molecules. Based on these results we suggest that molecular ions are good tracers of collapsing envelopes. The effects of coupling chemistry and dynamics on the resulting physical evolution are also examined. Particular attention is paid to comparisons between models and observations.

  8. Asteroseismic stellar activity relations

    OpenAIRE

    Bonanno, A.; Corsaro, E.; Karoff, C.

    2014-01-01

    In asteroseismology an important diagnostic of the evolutionary status of a star is the small frequency separation which is sensitive to the gradient of the mean molecular weight in the stellar interior. It is thus interesting to discuss the classical age-activity relations in terms of this quantity. Moreover, as the photospheric magnetic field tends to suppress the amplitudes of acoustic oscillations, it is important to quantify the importance of this effect by considering various activity i...

  9. Galactic Stellar Populations

    CERN Document Server

    Wyse, R F G; Wyse, Rosemary F.G.; Gilmore, Gerard

    2005-01-01

    The history of the formation and evolution of the Milky Way Galaxy is found in the spatial distribution, kinematics, age and chemical abundance distributions of long-lived stars. From this fossil record one can in principle extract the star formation histories of different components, their chemical evolution, the stellar Initial Mass Function, the merging history -- what merged and when did it merge? -- and compare with theoretical models. Observations are driving models, and we live in exciting times.

  10. Galactic Stellar Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Gilmore, Gerard

    2005-01-01

    The history of the formation and evolution of the Milky Way Galaxy is found in the spatial distribution, kinematics, age and chemical abundance distributions of long-lived stars. From this fossil record one can in principle extract the star formation histories of different components, their chemical evolution, the stellar Initial Mass Function, the merging history -- what merged and when did it merge? -- and compare with theoretical models. Observations are driving models, and we live in exci...

  11. DOLPHOT: Stellar photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolphin, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    DOLPHOT is a stellar photometry package that was adapted from HSTphot for general use. It supports two modes; the first is a generic PSF-fitting package, which uses analytic PSF models and can be used for any camera. The second mode uses ACS PSFs and calibrations, and is effectively an ACS adaptation of HSTphot. A number of utility programs are also included with the DOLPHOT distribution, including basic image reduction routines.

  12. A high order Godunov scheme with constrained transport and adaptive mesh refinement for astrophysical magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromang, S.; Hennebelle, P.; Teyssier, R.

    2006-10-01

    Aims. In this paper, we present a new method to perform numerical simulations of astrophysical MHD flows using the Adaptive Mesh Refinement framework and Constrained Transport. Methods: . The algorithm is based on a previous work in which the MUSCL-Hancock scheme was used to evolve the induction equation. In this paper, we detail the extension of this scheme to the full MHD equations and discuss its properties. Results: . Through a series of test problems, we illustrate the performances of this new code using two different MHD Riemann solvers (Lax-Friedrich and Roe) and the need of the Adaptive Mesh Refinement capabilities in some cases. Finally, we show its versatility by applying it to two completely different astrophysical situations well studied in the past years: the growth of the magnetorotational instability in the shearing box and the collapse of magnetized cloud cores. Conclusions: . We have implemented a new Godunov scheme to solve the ideal MHD equations in the AMR code RAMSES. We have shown that it results in a powerful tool that can be applied to a great variety of astrophysical problems, ranging from galaxies formation in the early universe to high resolution studies of molecular cloud collapse in our galaxy.

  13. Bubble-induced cave collapse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshika Girihagama

    Full Text Available Conventional wisdom among cave divers is that submerged caves in aquifers, such as in Florida or the Yucatan, are unstable due to their ever-growing size from limestone dissolution in water. Cave divers occasionally noted partial cave collapses occurring while they were in the cave, attributing this to their unintentional (and frowned upon physical contact with the cave walls or the aforementioned "natural" instability of the cave. Here, we suggest that these cave collapses do not necessarily result from cave instability or contacts with walls, but rather from divers bubbles rising to the ceiling and reducing the buoyancy acting on isolated ceiling rocks. Using familiar theories for the strength of flat and arched (un-cracked beams, we first show that the flat ceiling of a submerged limestone cave can have a horizontal expanse of 63 meters. This is much broader than that of most submerged Florida caves (~ 10 m. Similarly, we show that an arched cave roof can have a still larger expanse of 240 meters, again implying that Florida caves are structurally stable. Using familiar bubble dynamics, fluid dynamics of bubble-induced flows, and accustomed diving practices, we show that a group of 1-3 divers submerged below a loosely connected ceiling rock will quickly trigger it to fall causing a "collapse". We then present a set of qualitative laboratory experiments illustrating such a collapse in a circular laboratory cave (i.e., a cave with a circular cross section, with concave and convex ceilings. In these experiments, a metal ball represented the rock (attached to the cave ceiling with a magnet, and the bubbles were produced using a syringe located at the cave floor.

  14. Oscillations in stellar superflares

    CERN Document Server

    Balona, L A; Kosovichev, A; Nakariakov, V M; Pugh, C E; Van Doorsselaere, T

    2015-01-01

    Two different mechanisms may act to induce quasi-periodic pulsations (QPP) in whole-disk observations of stellar flares. One mechanism may be magneto-hydromagnetic (MHD) forces and other processes acting on flare loops as seen in the Sun. The other mechanism may be forced local acoustic oscillations due to the high-energy particle impulse generated by the flare (known as `sunquakes' in the Sun). We analyze short-cadence Kepler data of 257 flares in 75 stars to search for QPP in the flare decay branch or post-flare oscillations which may be attributed to either of these two mechanisms. About 18 percent of stellar flares show a distinct bump in the flare decay branch of unknown origin. The bump does not seem to be a highly-damped global oscillation because the periods of the bumps derived from wavelet analysis do not correlate with any stellar parameter. We detected damped oscillations covering several cycles (QPP), in seven flares on five stars. The periods of these oscillations also do not correlate with any ...

  15. Primordial Stellar Populations

    CERN Document Server

    Panagia, N

    2002-01-01

    We review the expected properties of the first stellar generations in the Universe. In particular, we consider and discuss the diagnostics, based on the emission from associated HII regions, that permit one to discern bona fide primeval stellar generations from the ones formed after pollution by supernova explosions has occurred. We argue that a proper characterization of truly primeval stellar generations has to be based on spectra that show simultaneously (a) the presence of high intensities and equivalent widths of Hydrogen and Helium emission lines, such as Ly-alpha and HeII 1640A, and (b) the absence of collisionally excited metal lines, mostly from the first heavy elements to be synthetized in large quantities, i.e. C and O. These atomic species are expected to produce emission lines, such as CIII] 1909A, OIII] 1666A, [OIII] 5007A, etc., with intensities above 10% the intensity of H-beta already for metallicities as low as 0.001Z_sun. The expected performance of the NASA/ESA/CSA NGST for the study and t...

  16. Stellar jitter from variable gravitational redshift: implications for RV confirmation of habitable exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Cegla, H M; Marsh, T R; Shelyag, S; Moulds, V; Littlefair, S; Mathioudakis, M; Pollacco, D; Bonfils, X

    2011-01-01

    A variation of gravitational redshift, arising from stellar radius fluctuations, will introduce astrophysical noise into radial velocity measurements by shifting the centroid of the observed spectral lines. Shifting the centroid does not necessarily introduce line asymmetries. This is fundamentally different from other types of stellar jitter so far identified, which do result from line asymmetries. Furthermore, only a very small change in stellar radius, ~0.01%, is necessary to generate a gravitational redshift variation large enough to mask or mimic an Earth-twin. We explore possible mechanisms for stellar radius fluctuations in low-mass stars. Convective inhibition due to varying magnetic field strengths and the Wilson depression of starspots are both found to induce substantial gravitational redshift variations. Finally, we investigate a possible method for monitoring/correcting this newly identified potential source of jitter and comment on its impact for future exoplanet searches.

  17. Collapse models and perceptual processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theories including a collapse mechanism have been presented various years ago. They are based on a modification of standard quantum mechanics in which nonlinear and stochastic terms are added to the evolution equation. Their principal merits derive from the fact that they are mathematically precise schemes accounting, on the basis of a unique universal dynamical principle, both for the quantum behavior of microscopic systems as well as for the reduction associated to measurement processes and for the classical behavior of macroscopic objects. Since such theories qualify themselves not as new interpretations but as modifications of the standard theory they can be, in principle, tested against quantum mechanics. Recently, various investigations identifying possible crucial test have been discussed. In spite of the extreme difficulty to perform such tests it seems that recent technological developments allow at least to put precise limits on the parameters characterizing the modifications of the evolution equation. Here we will simply mention some of the recent investigations in this direction, while we will mainly concentrate our attention to the way in which collapse theories account for definite perceptual process. The differences between the case of reductions induced by perceptions and those related to measurement procedures by means of standard macroscopic devices will be discussed. On this basis, we suggest a precise experimental test of collapse theories involving conscious observers. We make plausible, by discussing in detail a toy model, that the modified dynamics can give rise to quite small but systematic errors in the visual perceptual process.

  18. Seeing a Stellar Explosion in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Astronomers using ESO's Very Large Telescope have for the first time obtained a three-dimensional view of the distribution of the innermost material expelled by a recently exploded star. The original blast was not only powerful, according to the new results. It was also more concentrated in one particular direction. This is a strong indication that the supernova must have been very turbulent, supporting the most recent computer models. Unlike the Sun, which will die rather quietly, massive stars arriving at the end of their brief life explode as supernovae, hurling out a vast quantity of material. In this class, Supernova 1987A (SN 1987A) in the rather nearby Large Magellanic Cloud occupies a very special place. Seen in 1987, it was the first naked-eye supernova to be observed for 383 years (eso8704), and because of its relative closeness, it has made it possible for astronomers to study the explosion of a massive star and its aftermath in more detail than ever before. It is thus no surprise that few events in modern astronomy have been met with such an enthusiastic response by scientists. SN 1987A has been a bonanza for astrophysicists (eso8711 and eso0708). It provided several notable observational 'firsts', like the detection of neutrinos from the collapsing inner stellar core triggering the explosion, the localisation on archival photographic plates of the star before it exploded, the signs of an asymmetric explosion, the direct observation of the radioactive elements produced during the blast, observation of the formation of dust in the supernova, as well as the detection of circumstellar and interstellar material (eso0708). New observations making use of a unique instrument, SINFONI [1], on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) have provided even deeper knowledge of this amazing event, as astronomers have now been able to obtain the first-ever 3D reconstruction of the central parts of the exploding material. This view shows that the explosion was stronger and

  19. Semi-analytic stellar structure in scalar-tensor gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horbatsch, M. W.; Burgess, C. P.

    2011-08-01

    Precision tests of gravity can be used to constrain the properties of hypothetical very light scalar fields, but these tests depend crucially on how macroscopic astrophysical objects couple to the new scalar field. We study the equations of stellar structure using scalar-tensor gravity, with the goal of seeing how stellar properties depend on assumptions made about the scalar coupling at a microscopic level. In order to make the study relatively easy for different assumptions about microscopic couplings, we develop quasi-analytic approximate methods for solving the stellar-structure equations rather than simply integrating them numerically. (The approximation involved assumes the dimensionless scalar coupling at the stellar center is weak, and we compare our results with numerical integration in order to establish its domain of validity.) We illustrate these methods by applying them to Brans-Dicke scalars, and their generalization in which the scalar-matter coupling slowly runs — or `walks' — as a function of the scalar field: a(phi) simeq as+bsphi. (Such couplings can arise in extra-dimensional applications, for instance.) The four observable parameters that characterize the fields external to a spherically symmetric star are the stellar radius, R, mass, M, scalar `charge', Q, and the scalar's asymptotic value, phi∞. These are subject to two relations because of the matching to the interior solution, generalizing the usual mass-radius, M(R), relation of General Relativity. Since phi∞ is common to different stars in a given region (such as a binary pulsar), all quantities can be computed locally in terms of the stellar masses. We identify how these relations depend on the microscopic scalar couplings, agreeing with earlier workers when comparisons are possible. Explicit analytical solutions are obtained for the instructive toy model of constant-density stars, whose properties we compare to more realistic equations of state for neutron star models.

  20. Cold dissipationless collapse of spherical systems - Sensitivity to the initial density law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannizzo, John K.; Hollister, Timothy C.

    1992-01-01

    The collapse of cold, initially spherical systems with varying degrees of central condensation is investigated. The way in which the final shape of a collapsing system depends on the initial density law is examined. For an initial stellar number density rho varies as r exp -n, where n is in the range 0-2.5, the final, nearly prolate shape is given by a/c is approximately equal to 1.28(1 + 0.16 n), where a/c is the ratio of long to short axes of the inertia ellipsoid computed from the moment of inertia tensor of the most tightly bound 80 percent of the mass. The properties associated with the final states in the present computations are also studied. The collapsing systems develop an anisotropic halo dominated by radial orbits surrounding an isotropic core as predicted by Burkert (1990).