WorldWideScience

Sample records for astrophysics gravitational waves

  1. Workshop on gravitational waves and relativistic astrophysics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Patrick Das Gupta

    2004-10-01

    Discussions related to gravitational wave experiments viz. LIGO and LISA as well as to observations of supermassive black holes dominated the workshop sessions on gravitational waves and relativistic astrophysics in the ICGC-2004. A summary of seven papers that were presented in these workshop sessions has been provided in this article.

  2. Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology with Gravitational Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathyaprakash B. S.

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Gravitational wave detectors are already operating at interesting sensitivity levels, and they have an upgrade path that should result in secure detections by 2014. We review the physics of gravitational waves, how they interact with detectors (bars and interferometers, and how these detectors operate. We study the most likely sources of gravitational waves and review the data analysis methods that are used to extract their signals from detector noise. Then we consider the consequences of gravitational wave detections and observations for physics, astrophysics, and cosmology.

  3. The Dawn of Gravitational-Wave Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalogera, Vassiliki; LIGO - Virgo Collaborations

    2016-06-01

    With the detection of GW150914 and its identification as the binary merger of two heavy black holes LIGO has launched the era of gravitational-wave astrophysics. I will review what this implies for our understanding of binary compact object formation and how we can use it to constrain current models.

  4. Environmental Effects for Gravitational-wave Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Barausse, Enrico; Pani, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The upcoming detection of gravitational waves by terrestrial interferometers will usher in the era of gravitational-wave astronomy. This will be particularly true when space-based detectors will come of age and measure the mass and spin of massive black holes with exquisite precision and up to very high redshifts, thus allowing for better understanding of the symbiotic evolution of black holes with galaxies, and for high-precision tests of General Relativity in strong-field, highly-dynamical regimes. Such ambitious goals require that astrophysical environmental pollution of gravitational-wave signals be constrained to negligible levels, so that neither detection nor estimation of the source parameters are significantly affected. Here, we consider the main sources for space-based detectors -the inspiral, merger and ringdown of massive black-hole binaries and extreme mass-ratio inspirals- and account for various effects on their gravitational waveforms, including electromagnetic fields, cosmological evolution, ...

  5. The astrophysical gravitational wave stochastic background

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tania Regimbau

    2011-01-01

    A stochastic background of gravitational waves with astrophysical origins may have resulted from the superposition of a large number of unresolved sources since the beginning of stellar activity.Its detection would put very strong constraints on the physical properties of compact objects, the initial mass function and star formarion history.On the other hand, it could be a ‘noise' that would mask the stochastic background of its cosmological origin.We review the main astrophysical processes which are able to produce a stochastic background and discuss how they may differ from the primordial contribution in terms of statistical properties.Current detection methods are also presented.

  6. Environmental Effects for Gravitational-wave Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barausse, Enrico; Cardoso, Vitor; Pani, Paolo

    2015-05-01

    The upcoming detection of gravitational waves by terrestrial interferometers will usher in the era of gravitational-wave astronomy. This will be particularly true when space-based detectors will come of age and measure the mass and spin of massive black holes with exquisite precision and up to very high redshifts, thus allowing for better understanding of the symbiotic evolution of black holes with galaxies, and for high-precision tests of General Relativity in strong-field, highly dynamical regimes. Such ambitious goals require that astrophysical environmental pollution of gravitational-wave signals be constrained to negligible levels, so that neither detection nor estimation of the source parameters are significantly affected. Here, we consider the main sources for space-based detectors - the inspiral, merger and ringdown of massive black-hole binaries and extreme mass-ratio inspirals - and account for various effects on their gravitational waveforms, including electromagnetic fields, cosmological evolution, accretion disks, dark matter, “firewalls” and possible deviations from General Relativity. We discover that the black-hole quasinormal modes are sharply different in the presence of matter, but the ringdown signal observed by interferometers is typically unaffected. The effect of accretion disks and dark matter depends critically on their geometry and density profile, but is negligible for most sources, except for few special extreme mass-ratio inspirals. Electromagnetic fields and cosmological effects are always negligible. We finally explore the implications of our findings for proposed tests of General Relativity with gravitational waves, and conclude that environmental effects will not prevent the development of precision gravitational-wave astronomy.

  7. Astrophysical Model Selection in Gravitational Wave Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Matthew R.; Cornish, Neil J.; Littenberg, Tyson B.

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical studies in gravitational wave astronomy have mostly focused on the information that can be extracted from individual detections, such as the mass of a binary system and its location in space. Here we consider how the information from multiple detections can be used to constrain astrophysical population models. This seemingly simple problem is made challenging by the high dimensionality and high degree of correlation in the parameter spaces that describe the signals, and by the complexity of the astrophysical models, which can also depend on a large number of parameters, some of which might not be directly constrained by the observations. We present a method for constraining population models using a hierarchical Bayesian modeling approach which simultaneously infers the source parameters and population model and provides the joint probability distributions for both. We illustrate this approach by considering the constraints that can be placed on population models for galactic white dwarf binaries using a future space-based gravitational wave detector. We find that a mission that is able to resolve approximately 5000 of the shortest period binaries will be able to constrain the population model parameters, including the chirp mass distribution and a characteristic galaxy disk radius to within a few percent. This compares favorably to existing bounds, where electromagnetic observations of stars in the galaxy constrain disk radii to within 20%.

  8. Gravitational waves: A challenge to theoretical astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the 20th century, new windows on the Universe have been opened by the advent of radio astronomy and X-ray astronomy and these, together with the great advances in optical astronomy (both from the Earth's surface and from space), have revolutionized our understanding of the Universe and the way in which it works. Now, as we enter the twenty-first century, we await the opening of another new window - that provided by gravitational waves - which will allow us a closer 'view' of black holes and neutron stars, as well as providing a new probe of processes in the very early Universe. This is an exciting prospect but one which poses a serious challenge to theoretical astrophysics. The new generation of detectors (both laser interferometers and resonant detectors) require input from theoreticians regarding the possible mechanisms for generation of gravitational waves by astronomical sources and predictions of the waveforms produced. This input is essential in order both to tune the parameters of the detectors and to provide templates for use in extracting the tiny gravitational-wave signals from the ambient noise. Also, we need to understand how gravitational wave data, when it arrives, could be used in order to obtain information about the nature of the sources and about their dynamical evolution as well as, perhaps, giving deeper insights into some questions of fundamental physics by means of probing the state of matter under the extreme conditions of energy and pressure found in the interior of neutron stars and in the very early universe. This can provide opportunities beyond the capabilities of experiments carried out in terrestrial laboratories. For a week at the beginning of June 2000, 106 scientists from 28 countries came to Trieste for a meeting whose aim was to present a survey of the current status of the response of theoreticians to the challenge described above, as well as including progress reports on the different types of detector. The meeting was a

  9. Gravitational Wave Astrophysics: Opening the New Frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan

    2012-01-01

    A new era in astronomy will begin when the gravitational wave window onto the universe opens in approx. 5 years, as ground-based detectors make the first detections in the high-frequency regime. Since the universe is nearly transparent to gravitational waves, these signals carry direct information about their sources - such as masses, spins, luminosity distances, and orbital parameters - through dense, obscured regions across cosmic time. This talk will explore gravitational waves as cosmic messengers, highlighting key sources and opportunities for multi-messenger astronomy across the gravitational wave spectrum.

  10. The limits of astrophysics with gravitational wave backgrounds

    OpenAIRE

    Callister, Thomas; Sammut, Letizia; Thrane, Eric; Qiu, Shi; Mandel, Ilya

    2016-01-01

    The recent Advanced LIGO detection of gravitational waves from the binary black hole GW150914 suggests there is a large population of merging binary black holes in the Universe. Although most are too distant to be individually resolved by advanced detectors, the superposition of gravitational waves from many unresolvable binaries is expected to create an astrophysical stochastic background. Recent results from the LIGO/Virgo collaboration show that this astrophysical background is within reac...

  11. Gravitational Wave Science: Challenges for Numerical Relativistic Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenrella, Joan

    2005-01-01

    Gravitational wave detectors on earth and in space will open up a new observational window on the universe. The new information about astrophysics and fundamental physics these observations will bring is expected to pose exciting challenges. This talk will provide an overview of this emerging area of gravitational wave science, with a focus on the challenges it will bring for numerical relativistic astrophysics and a look at some recent results.

  12. Astrophysically Triggered Searches for Gravitational Waves: Status and Prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, G; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arain, M A; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Armor, P; Aso, Y; Aston, S; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Ballmer, S; Bantilan, H; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barton, M A; Bastarrika, M; Bayer, K; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Biswas, R; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Bodiya, T P; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brinkmann, M; Brooks, A; Brown, D A; Brunet, G; Bullington, A; Buonanno, A; Burmeister, O; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cao, J; Cardenas, L; Casebolt, T; Castaldi, G; Cepeda, C; Chalkley, E; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Christensen, N; Clark, D; Clark, J; Cokelaer, T; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cutler, R M; Dalrymple, J; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; De Bra, D; Degallaix, J; Degree, M; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Daz, M; Dickson, J; Dietz, A; Donovan, iF; Dooley, K L; Doomes, E E; Drever, R W P; Duke, I; Dumas, J C; Dupuis, R J; Dwyer, J G; Echols, C; Eer, A; Ehrens, P; Espinoza, E; Etzel, T; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Finn, L S; Flasch, K; Fotopoulos, N; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Garofoli, J; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Goda, K; Goetz, E; Goggin, L; González, G; Gossler, S; Gouaty, R; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, aC; Gray, M; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Grimaldi, F; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G; Harstad, E; Hayama, K; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heng, I S; Hennessy, M; Heptonstall, A; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hosken, D; Hough, J; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D; Ito, M; Ivanov, A; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, Peter Ignaz Paul; Kalogera, V; Kamat, S; Kanner, J; Kasprzyk, D; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalili, F Ya; Khan, R; Khazanov, E; Kim, C; King, P; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R K; Kozak, D; Kozhevatov, I; Krishnan, B; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lang, M M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leindecker, N; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lin, H; Lindquist, P; Lockerbie, N A; Lodhia, D; Lormand, M; Lu, P; Lubinski, M; Lucianetti, A; Luck, H; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Mandic, V; Mrka, S; Mrka, Z; Markosyan, A; Markowitz, J; Maros, aaE; Martin, I; Martin, R M; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McHugh, M; McIntyre, G; McIvor, G; McKechan, D; McKenzie, K; Meier, T; Melissinos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C J; Meyers, D; Miller, J; Minelli, J; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Moe, B; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mow Lowry, C; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mukhopadhyay, H; Muller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P; Myers, E; Myers, J; Nash, T; Nelson, J; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Numata, K; O'Dell, J; Ogin, G; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Petrie, T; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H J; Plissi, M V; Postiglione, F; Principe, M; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Rainer, N; Rakhmanov, M; Ramsunder, M; Rehbein, H; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Roddy, S; Rodríguez, A; Rogan, A M; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Route, R; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Sakata, S; Samidi, M; Sanchodela Jordana, L; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Saraf, S; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Savov, P; Schediwy, S W; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sinha, S; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, N D; Somiya, K; Sorazu, B; Stein, L C; Stochino, A; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Strom, D M; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, K X; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Takahashi, H; Tanner, D B; Taylor, R; Taylor, R; Thacker, J; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thüring, A; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D; Ulmen, J; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Van Den Broeck, C; vander Sluys, M; Vass, S; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Veitch, P; Villar, A; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Waldman, S J; Wallace, L; Ward, H; Ward, R; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Wen, S; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, H R; Williams, L; Willke, B; Wilmut, I; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Wu, W; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yan, Z; Yoshida, S; Zanolin, M; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, C; Zotov, N; Zucker, M; Zweizig, J

    2008-01-01

    In gravitational-wave detection, special emphasis is put onto searches that focus on cosmic events detected by other types of astrophysical observatories. The astrophysical triggers, e.g. from gamma-ray and X-ray satellites, optical telescopes and neutrino observatories, provide a trigger time for analyzing gravitational wave data coincident with the event. In certain cases the expected frequency range, source energetics, directional and progenitor information is also available. Beyond allowing the recognition of gravitational waveforms with amplitudes closer to the noise floor of the detector, these triggered searches should also lead to rich science results even before the onset of Advanced LIGO. In this paper we provide a broad review of LIGO's astrophysically triggered searches and the sources they target.

  13. Astrophysical Gravitational Wave Sources Literature Catalog

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Numerically-generated gravitational waveforms for circular inspiral into Kerr black holes. These waveforms were developed using Scott Hughes' black hole...

  14. Astrophysics to z approx. 10 with Gravitational Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Robin; Hughes, Scott; Lang, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    The most useful characterization of a gravitational wave detector's performance is the accuracy with which astrophysical parameters of potential gravitational wave sources can be estimated. One of the most important source types for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is inspiraling binaries of black holes. LISA can measure mass and spin to better than 1% for a wide range of masses, even out to high redshifts. The most difficult parameter to estimate accurately is almost always luminosity distance. Nonetheless, LISA can measure luminosity distance of intermediate-mass black hole binary systems (total mass approx.10(exp 4) solar mass) out to z approx.10 with distance accuracies approaching 25% in many cases. With this performance, LISA will be able to follow the merger history of black holes from the earliest mergers of proto-galaxies to the present. LISA's performance as a function of mass from 1 to 10(exp 7) solar mass and of redshift out to z approx. 30 will be described. The re-formulation of LISA's science requirements based on an instrument sensitivity model and parameter estimation will be described.

  15. Multimessenger astrophysics: When gravitational waves meet high energy neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Palma, Irene, E-mail: Irene.DiPalma@aei.mpg.de

    2014-04-01

    With recent development of experimental techniques that have opened new windows of observation of the cosmic radiation in all its components, multi-messenger astronomy is entering an exciting era. Many astrophysical sources and cataclysmic cosmic events with burst activity can be plausible sources of concomitant gravitational waves (GWs) and high-energy neutrinos (HENs). Such messengers could reveal hidden and new sources that are not observed by conventional photon astronomy, in particular at high energy. Requiring consistency between GW and HEN detection channels enables new searches and a detection would yield significant additional information about the common source. We present the results of the first search for gravitational wave bursts associated with high energy neutrino triggers, detected by the underwater neutrino telescope ANTARES in its 5 line configuration, during the fifth LIGO science run and first Virgo science run. No evidence for coincident events was found. We place a lower limit on the distance to GW sources associated with every HEN trigger. We are able to rule out the existence of coalescing binary neutron star systems and black hole–neutron star systems up to distances that are typically 5 Mpc and 10 Mpc respectively.

  16. Astronomy and astrophysics with gravitational waves in the advanced detector era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the advanced gravitational wave detectors coming on line in the next 5 years, we expect to make the first detections of gravitational waves from astrophysical sources, and study the properties of the waves themselves as tests of general relativity. In addition, these gravitational waves will be powerful tools for the study of their astrophysical sources and source populations. They carry information that is quite complementary to what can be learned from electromagnetic or neutrino observations, probing the central gravitational engines that power the electromagnetic emissions at the outer layers of the source. Preparations are being made to enable near-simultaneous observations of both gravitational wave and electromagnetic observations of transient sources, using low-latency search pipelines and rapid sky localization. We will review the many opportunities for multi-messenger astronomy and astrophysics with gravitational waves enabled by the advanced detectors, and the preparations that are being made to quickly and fully exploit them. (paper)

  17. Astronomy and astrophysics with gravitational waves in the Advanced Detector Era

    CERN Document Server

    Weinstein, Alan J

    2011-01-01

    With the advanced gravitational wave detectors coming on line in the next 5 years, we expect to make the first detections of gravitational waves from astrophysical sources, and study the properties of the waves themselves as tests of General Relativity. In addition, these gravitational waves will be powerful tools for the study of their astrophysical sources and source populations. They carry information that is quite complementary to what can be learned from electromagnetic or neutrino observations, probing the central gravitational engines that power the electromagnetic emissions. Preparations are being made to enable near-simultaneous observations of both gravitational wave and electromagnetic observations of transient sources, using low-latency search pipelines and rapid sky localization. We will review the many opportunities for multi-messenger astronomy and astrophysics with gravitational waves enabled by the advanced detectors, and the preparations that are being made to quickly and fully exploit them.

  18. Astronomy and astrophysics with gravitational waves in the Advanced Detector Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Alan J.; Ligo Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2012-07-01

    With the advanced gravitational wave detectors coming on line in the next 5 years, we expect to make the first detections of gravitational waves from astrophysical sources, and study the properties of the waves themselves as tests of General Relativity. In addition, these gravitational waves will be powerful tools for the study of their astrophysical sources and source populations. They carry information that is quite complementary to what can be learned from electromagnetic or neutrino observations, probing the central gravitational engines that power the electromagnetic emissions. Preparations are being made to enable near-simultaneous observations of both gravitational wave and electromagnetic observations of transient sources, using low-latency search pipelines and rapid sky localization. We will review the many opportunities for multi-messenger astronomy and astrophysics with gravitational waves enabled by the advanced detectors, and the preparations that are being made to quickly and fully exploit them.

  19. Gravitational wave astrophysics, data analysis and multimessenger astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyung Mok; Le Bigot, Eric-Olivier; Du, ZhiHui; Lin, ZhangXi; Guo, XiangYu; Wen, LinQing; Phukon, Khun Sang; Pandey, Vihan; Bose, Sukanta; Fan, Xi-Long; Hendry, Martin

    2015-12-01

    This paper reviews gravitational wave sources and their detection. One of the most exciting potential sources of gravitational waves are coalescing binary black hole systems. They can occur on all mass scales and be formed in numerous ways, many of which are not understood. They are generally invisible in electromagnetic waves, and they provide opportunities for deep investigation of Einstein's general theory of relativity. Sect. 1 of this paper considers ways that binary black holes can be created in the universe, and includes the prediction that binary black hole coalescence events are likely to be the first gravitational wave sources to be detected. The next parts of this paper address the detection of chirp waveforms from coalescence events in noisy data. Such analysis is computationally intensive. Sect. 2 reviews a new and powerful method of signal detection based on the GPUimplemented summed parallel infinite impulse response filters. Such filters are intrinsically real time alorithms, that can be used to rapidly detect and localise signals. Sect. 3 of the paper reviews the use of GPU processors for rapid searching for gravitational wave bursts that can arise from black hole births and coalescences. In sect. 4 the use of GPU processors to enable fast efficient statistical significance testing of gravitational wave event candidates is reviewed. Sect. 5 of this paper addresses the method of multimessenger astronomy where the discovery of electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave events can be used to identify sources, understand their nature and obtain much greater science outcomes from each identified event.

  20. Gravitational wave astrophysics, data analysis and multimessenger astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Hyung Mok; Du, ZhiHui; Lin, ZhangXi; Guo, XiangYu; Wen, LinQing; Phukon, Khun Sang; Pandey, Vihan; Bose, Sukanta; Fan, Xi-Long; Hendry, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews gravitational wave sources and their detection. One of the most exciting potential sources of gravitational waves are coalescing binary black hole systems. They can occur on all mass scales and be formed in numerous ways, many of which are not understood. They are generally invisible in electromagnetic waves, and they provide opportunities for deep investigation of Einstein's general theory of relativity. Sect. 1 of this paper considers ways that binary black holes can be created in the universe, and includes the prediction that binary black hole coalescence events are likely to be the first gravitational wave sources to be detected. The next parts of this paper address the detection of chirp waveforms from coalescence events in noisy data. Such analysis is computationally intensive. Sect. 2 reviews a new and powerful method of signal detection based on the GPU-implemented summed parallel infinite impulse response filters. Such filters are intrinsically real time alorithms, that can be used...

  1. Can environmental effects spoil precision gravitational-wave astrophysics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barausse, Enrico; Cardoso, Vitor; Pani, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    No, within a broad class of scenarios. Gravitational-wave (GW) astronomy will open a new window on compact objects such as neutron stars and black holes (BHs). It is often stated that large signal-to-noise detections of ringdown or inspiral waveforms can provide estimates of the masses and spins of compact objects to within fractions of a percent, as well as tests of general relativity. These expectations usually neglect the realistic astrophysical environments in which compact objects live. With the advent of GW astronomy, environmental effects on the GW signal will eventually have to be quantified. Here we present a wide survey of the corrections due to these effects in two situations of great interest for GW astronomy: the BH ringdown emission and the inspiral of two compact objects (especially BH binaries). We mainly focus on future space-based detectors such as eLISA, but many of our results are also valid for ground-based detectors such as aLIGO, aVirgo, and KAGRA. We take into account various effects such as electric charges, magnetic fields, cosmological evolution, possible deviations from general relativity, firewalls, and the effects related to various forms of matter such as accretion disks and dark matter halos. Our analysis predicts the existence of resonances dictated by the external mass distribution, which dominate the very late-time behavior of merger and ringdown waveforms. The mode structure can drastically differ from the vacuum case, yet the BH response to external perturbations is unchanged at the time scales relevant for detectors. This is because, although the vacuum Schwarzschild resonances are no longer quasinormal modes of the system, they still dominate the response at intermediate times. Our results strongly suggest that both parametrized and ringdown searches should use at least two-mode templates. Our analysis of compact binaries shows that environmental effects are typically negligible for most eLISA sources, with the exception of

  2. Detection regimes of the cosmological gravitational wave background from astrophysical sources

    OpenAIRE

    Coward, David; Regimbau, Tania

    2006-01-01

    Key targets for gravitational wave (GW) observatories, such as LIGO and the next generation interferometric detector, Advanced LIGO, include core-collapse of massive stars and the final stage of coalescence of compact stellar remnants. The combined GW signal from such events occurring throughout the Universe will produce an astrophysical GW background (AGB), one that is fundamentally different from the GW background by very early Universe processes. One can classify contributions to the AGB f...

  3. Binary black hole mergers: astrophysics and implications for space-based gravitational-wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Ryan

    2012-03-01

    Massive black holes (MBHs) can be found at the centers of nearly all galaxies. When galaxies merge, the black holes form a binary, which eventually coalesces due to the emission of gravitational waves. The final merger is a complicated process which can only be understood by numerically integrating Einstein's equations of general relativity. For many years, this was an impossible task; however, breakthroughs in 2005 and 2006 led to the first evolutions of binary black hole spacetimes through the merger process. Far from being esoteric results interesting only to hardcore relativists, these simulations have turned out to be very important for astrophysics. For example, if the gravitational waves are emitted asymmetrically, conservation of momentum implies that the resulting black hole will experience a recoil or ``kick.'' Numerical studies have shown that in some configurations, the kick can reach values as large as ˜5000 km/s. The simulations also allow the final spins of the black holes to be calculated. In the future, astrophysical information about coalescing MBH binaries will be obtained by directly measuring the gravitational waves with space-based detectors. In this case, the inclusion of accurate merger and ringdown waveforms into the signal model allows for significant improvement in measuring system parameters like mass, spin, and luminosity distance.

  4. Detection regimes of the cosmological gravitational wave background from astrophysical sources

    CERN Document Server

    Coward, D; Coward, David; Regimbau, Tania

    2006-01-01

    Key targets for gravitational wave (GW) observatories, such as LIGO and the next generation interferometric detector, Advanced LIGO, include core-collapse of massive stars and the final stage of coalescence of compact stellar remnants. The combined GW signal from such events occurring throughout the Universe will produce an astrophysical GW background (AGB), one that is fundamentally different from the GW background by very early Universe processes. One can classify contributions to the AGB for different classes of sources based on the strength of the GW emissions from the individual sources, their peak emission frequency, emission duration and their event rate density distribution. This article provides an overview of the detectability regimes of the AGB in the context of current and planned gravitational wave observatories. We show that there are two important AGB signal detection regimes, which we define as `continuous' and `popcorn noise'. We describe how the `popcorn noise' AGB regime evolves with observ...

  5. Gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ciufolini, I; Moschella, U; Fre, P

    2001-01-01

    Gravitational waves (GWs) are a hot topic and promise to play a central role in astrophysics, cosmology, and theoretical physics. Technological developments have led us to the brink of their direct observation, which could become a reality in the coming years. The direct observation of GWs will open an entirely new field: GW astronomy. This is expected to bring a revolution in our knowledge of the universe by allowing the observation of previously unseen phenomena, such as the coalescence of compact objects (neutron stars and black holes), the fall of stars into supermassive black holes, stellar core collapses, big-bang relics, and the new and unexpected.With a wide range of contributions by leading scientists in the field, Gravitational Waves covers topics such as the basics of GWs, various advanced topics, GW detectors, astrophysics of GW sources, numerical applications, and several recent theoretical developments. The material is written at a level suitable for postgraduate students entering the field.

  6. Fundamental Theoretical Bias in Gravitational Wave Astrophysics and the Parameterized Post-Einsteinian Framework

    CERN Document Server

    Yunes, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    We consider the concept of fundamental bias in gravitational wave astrophysics as the assumption that general relativity is the correct theory of gravity during the entire wave-generation and propagation regime. Such an assumption is valid in the weak-field, as verified by precision experiments and observations, but it need not hold in the dynamical strong-field regime where tests are lacking. Fundamental bias can cause systematic errors in the detection and parameter estimation of signals, which can lead to a mischaracterization of the universe through incorrect inferences about source event rates and populations. We propose a remedy through the introduction of the parameterized post-Einsteinian framework, which consists of the enhancement of waveform templates via the inclusion of post-Einsteinian parameters. These parameters would ostensibly be designed to interpolate between templates constructed in general relativity and well-motivated alternative theories of gravity, and also include extrapolations that...

  7. Gravitational Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Schutz, Bernard F.

    1990-01-01

    In 1989 four groups around the world proposed the construction of large-scale laser interferometric gravitational wave detectors. The author reviews the design of these detectors, the problems of analysing their data, and the theory of the sources of the gravitational waves that they are designed to detect.

  8. Gravitation in astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject of this volume is the application of relativistic gravity to realistic astronomical phenomena. This volume is divided into two parts. The first is concerned with gravitation in localized systems (including topics such as black hole theory, gravitational radiation theory, and the Newton theory of many-body systems). The second is concerned with gravitation in cosmology (including aspects of inflation, the origin of inhomogeneities and the quantum process of creation of the universe itself. Separate abstracts were prepared for 15 sections of this volume

  9. Multiple imaging by gravitational waves

    OpenAIRE

    Faraoni, Valerio

    1997-01-01

    Gravitational waves act like lenses for the light propagating through them. This phenomenon is described using the vector formalism employed for ordinary gravitational lenses, which was proved to be applicable also to a non-stationary spacetime, with the appropriate modifications. In order to have multiple imaging, an approximate condition analogous to that for ordinary gravitational lenses must be satisfied. Certain astrophysical sources of gravitational waves satisfy this condition, while t...

  10. Gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Thorne, K S

    1995-01-01

    This article reviews current efforts and plans for gravitational-wave detection, the gravitational-wave sources that might be detected, and the information that the detectors might extract from the observed waves. Special attention is paid to (i) the LIGO/VIRGO network of earth-based, kilometer-scale laser interferometers, which is now under construction and will operate in the high-frequency band (1 to 10^4 Hz), and (ii) a proposed 5-million-kilometer-long Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), which would fly in heliocentric orbit and operate in the low-frequency band (10^{-4} to 1 Hz). LISA would extend the LIGO/VIRGO studies of stellar-mass (M\\sim2 to 300 M_\\odot) black holes into the domain of the massive black holes (M\\sim1000 to 10^8M_\\odot) that inhabit galactic nuclei and quasars.

  11. Astrophysical motivation for directed searches for a stochastic gravitational wave background

    CERN Document Server

    Mazumder, Nairwita; Dhurandhar, Sanjeev

    2014-01-01

    The nearby universe is expected to create an anisotropic stochastic gravitational wave background (SGWB). Different algorithms have been developed and implemented to search for isotropic and anisotropic SGWB. The aim of this paper is to quantify the advantage of an optimal anisotropic search, specifically comparing a point source with an isotropic background. Clusters of galaxies appear as point sources to a network of ground based laser interferometric detectors. The optimal search strategy for these sources is a ``directed radiometer search''. We show that the flux of SGWB created by the millisecond pulsars in the Virgo cluster produces a significantly stronger signal than the nearly isotropic background of unresolved sources of the same kind. We compute their strain power spectra for different cosmologies and distribution of population over redshifts. We conclude that a localised source, like the Virgo cluster, can be resolved from the isotropic background with very high significance using the directed sea...

  12. Scalar Gravitational Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottola, Emil

    2016-03-01

    General Relativity receives quantum corrections relevant at macroscopic distance scales and near event horizons. These arise from the conformal scalar degree of freedom in the extended effective field theory (EFT) of gravity generated by the trace anomaly of massless quantum fields in curved space. Linearized around flat space this quantum scalar degree of freedom combines with the conformal part of the metric and predicts the existence of scalar spin-0 ``breather'' propagating gravitational waves in addition to the transverse tensor spin-2 waves of classical General Relativity. Estimates of the expected strength of scalar gravitational radiation from compact astrophysical sources are given.

  13. Prospects for gravitational-wave detection and supermassive black hole astrophysics with pulsar timing arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Ravi, V; Shannon, R M; Hobbs, G

    2014-01-01

    [Abridged] Large-area sky surveys show that massive galaxies undergo at least one major merger in a Hubble time. If all massive galaxies host central supermassive black holes (SMBHs), as is inferred from observations in the local Universe, it is likely that there is a population of binary SMBHs at the centres of galaxy merger remnants. Numerous authors have proposed pulsar timing array (PTA) experiments to measure the gravitational wave (GW) emission from binary SMBHs. In this paper, using the latest observational estimates for a range of galaxy properties and scaling relations, we predict the amplitude of the GW background generated by the binary SMBH population. We also predict counts of individual binary SMBH GW sources. We assume that all binary SMBHs are in circular orbits evolving under GW emission alone, which is likely to be correct for binaries emitting GWs at frequencies >~10^-8 Hz. Our fiducial model results in a characteristic strain amplitude of the GW background of A_yr=1.2(+0.6-0.3)*10^-15 at a...

  14. Searching for Gravitational Waves from the Inspiral of Precessing Binary Systems: Astrophysical Expectations and Detection Efficiency of "Spiky" Templates

    CERN Document Server

    Grandclément, P; Kalogera, V; Belczynski, K; Grandclement, Philippe; Ihm, Mia; Kalogera, Vassiliki; Belczynski, Krystof

    2003-01-01

    Relativistic spin-orbit and spin-spin couplings has been shown to modify the gravitational waveforms expected from inspiraling binaries with a black hole and a neutron star. As a result inspiral signals may be missed due to significant losses in signal-to-noise ratio, if precession effects are ignored in gravitational-wave searches. We examine the sensitivity of the anticipated loss of signal-to-noise ratio on two factors: the accuracy of the precessing waveforms adopted as the true signals and the expected distributions of spin-orbit tilt angles, given the current understanding of their physical origin. We find that the results obtained using signals generated by approximate techniques are in good agreement with the ones obtained by integrating the 2PN equations. This shows that a complete account of all high-order post-Newtonian effects is usually not necessary for the determination of detection efficiencies. Based on our current astrophysical expectations, large tilt angles are not favored and as a result ...

  15. Gravitational Wave Confusion Noise

    OpenAIRE

    Cornish, Neil J.

    2003-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges facing gravitational wave astronomy in the low frequency band is the confusion noise generated by the vast numbers of unresolved galactic and extra galactic binary systems. Estimates of the binary confusion noise suffer from several sources of astrophysical uncertainty, such as the form of the initial mass function and the star formation rate. There is also considerable uncertainty about what defines the confusion limit. Various ad-hoc rules have been proposed, ...

  16. Gravitational-Wave Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    Einstein's General Theory of Relativity is our best classical description of gravity, and informs modern astronomy and astrophysics at all scales: stellar, galactic, and cosmological. Among its surprising predictions is the existence of gravitational waves -- ripples in space-time that carry energy and momentum away from strongly interacting gravitating sources. In my talk, I will give an overview of the properties of this radiation, recent breakthroughs in computational physics allowing us to calculate the waveforms from galactic mergers, and the prospect of direct observation with interferometric detectors such as LIGO and LISA.

  17. Gravitational lensing by gravitational waves

    OpenAIRE

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.; Tsupko, O. Yu.

    2008-01-01

    Gravitational lensing by gravitational wave is considered. We notice that although final and initial direction of photons coincide, displacement between final and initial trajectories occurs. This displacement is calculated analytically for the plane gravitational wave pulse. Estimations for observations are discussed.

  18. Gravitational Waves from Gravitational Collapse

    OpenAIRE

    New Kimberly C.B.

    2002-01-01

    Gravitational wave emission from the gravitational collapse of massive stars has been studied for more than three decades. Current state of the art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non--axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational colla...

  19. Theory-Agnostic Constraints on Black-Hole Dipole Radiation with Multiband Gravitational-Wave Astrophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barausse, Enrico; Yunes, Nicolás; Chamberlain, Katie

    2016-06-17

    The aLIGO detection of the black-hole binary GW150914 opens a new era for probing extreme gravity. Many gravity theories predict the emission of dipole gravitational radiation by binaries. This is excluded to high accuracy in binary pulsars, but entire classes of theories predict this effect predominantly (or only) in binaries involving black holes. Joint observations of GW150914-like systems by aLIGO and eLISA will improve bounds on dipole emission from black-hole binaries by 6 orders of magnitude relative to current constraints, provided that eLISA is not dramatically descoped. PMID:27367380

  20. Gravitational Waves in Effective Quantum Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Calmet, Xavier; Kuntz, Iberê; Mohapatra, Sonali

    2016-01-01

    In this short paper we investigate quantum gravitational effects on Einstein's equations using effective field theory techniques. We consider the leading order quantum gravitational correction to the wave equation. Besides the usual massless mode, we find a pair of modes with complex masses. These massive particles have a width and could thus lead to a damping of gravitational waves if excited in violent astrophysical processes producing gravitational waves such as e.g. black hole mergers. We...

  1. Watching Gravitational Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Moortgat, Joachim

    2001-01-01

    In the vicinity of merging neutron strar binaries or supernova remnants, gravitational waves can interact with the prevailing strong magnetic fields. The resulting partial conversion of gravitational waves into electromagnetic (radio) waves might prove to be an indirect way of detecting gravitational waves from such sources. Another interesting interaction considered in this article is the excitation of magnetosonic plasma waves by a gravitational wave passing through the surrounding plasma. ...

  2. Gravitational Waves from Gravitational Collapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris L. Fryer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gravitational-wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion-induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

  3. Gravitational waves from gravitational collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fryer, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; New, Kimberly C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Gravitational wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

  4. Astrophysical applications of gravitational microlensing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shude Mao

    2012-01-01

    Since the first discovery of microlensing events nearly two decades ago,gravitational microlensing has accumulated tens of TBytes of data and developed into a powerful astrophysical technique with diverse applications.The review starts with a theoretical overview of the field and then proceeds to discuss the scientific highlights.(1) Microlensing observations toward the Magellanic Clouds rule out the Milky Way halo being dominated by MAssive Compact Halo Objects (MACHOs).This confirms most dark matter is non-baryonic,consistent with other observations.(2) Microlensing has discovered about 20 extrasolar planets (16 published),including the first two Jupiter-Saturn like systems and the only five "cold Neptunes" yet detected.They probe a different part of the parameter space and will likely provide the most stringent test of core accretion theory of planet formation.(3) Microlensing provides a unique way to measure the mass of isolated stars,including brown dwarfs and normal stars.Half a dozen or so stellar mass black hole candidates have also been proposed.(4) High-resolution,target-of-opportunity spectra of highly-magnified dwarf stars provide intriguing "age" determinations which may either hint at enhanced helium enrichment or unusual bulge formation theories.(5) Microlensing also measured limb-darkening profiles for close to ten giant stars,which challenges stellar atmosphere models.(6) Data from surveys also provide strong constraints on the geometry and kinematics of the Milky Way bar (through proper motions); the latter indicates predictions from current models appear to be too anisotropic compared with observations.The future of microlensing is bright given the new capabilities of current surveys and forthcoming new telescope networks from the ground and from space.Some open issues in the field are identified and briefly discussed.

  5. Gravitational Waves in Effective Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Calmet, Xavier; Mohapatra, Sonali

    2016-01-01

    In this short paper we investigate quantum gravitational effects on Einstein's equations using effective field theory techniques. We consider the leading order quantum gravitational correction to the wave equation. Besides the usual massless mode, we find a pair of modes with complex masses. These massive particles have a width and could thus lead to a damping of gravitational waves if excited in violent astrophysical processes producing gravitational waves such as e.g. black hole mergers. We discuss the consequences for gravitational wave events such as GW 150914 recently observed by the Advanced LIGO collaboration.

  6. Gravitational Waves in Effective Quantum Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmet, Xavier; Kuntz, Iberê; Mohapatra, Sonali

    2016-08-01

    In this short paper we investigate quantum gravitational effects on Einstein's equations using Effective Field Theory techniques. We consider the leading order quantum gravitational correction to the wave equation. Besides the usual massless mode, we find a pair of modes with complex masses. These massive particles have a width and could thus lead to a damping of gravitational waves if excited in violent astrophysical processes producing gravitational waves such as e.g. black hole mergers. We discuss the consequences for gravitational wave events such as GW 150914 recently observed by the Advanced LIGO collaboration.

  7. Smooth sandwich gravitational waves

    OpenAIRE

    Podolsky, J.

    1998-01-01

    Gravitational waves which are smooth and contain two asymptotically flat regions are constructed from the homogeneous pp-waves vacuum solution. Motion of free test particles is calculated explicitly and the limit to an impulsive wave is also considered.

  8. Using gravitational lenses to detect gravitational waves

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, B.

    1990-01-01

    Gravitational lenses could be used to detect gravitational waves, because a gravitational wave affects the travel-time of a light ray. In a gravitational lens, this effect produces time-delays between the different images. Thus the bending of light, which was the first experimental confirmation of Einstein's theory, can be used to search for gravitational waves, which are the most poorly confirmed aspect of that same theory. Applying this method to the gravitational lens 0957+561 gives new up...

  9. Pulsars and Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, K J; Qiao, G J

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between pulsar-like compact stars and gravitational waves is briefly reviewed. Due to regular spins, pulsars could be useful tools for us to detect ~nano-Hz low-frequency gravitational waves by pulsar-timing array technique; besides, they would also be ~kilo-Hz high-frequency gravitational wave radiators because of their compactness. The wave strain of an isolate pulsar depends on the equation state of cold matter at supra-nuclear densities. Therefore, a real detection of gravitational wave should be very meaningful in gravity physics, micro-theory of elementary strong interaction, and astronomy.

  10. Astrophysical Effects of Extreme Gravitational Lensing Events

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Y; Wang, Yun; Turner, Edwin L.

    1998-01-01

    Every astrophysical object (dark or not) is a gravitational lens, as well as a receiver/observer of the light from sources lensed by other objects in its neighborhood. For a given pair of source and lens, there is a thin on-axis tubelike volume behind the lens in which the radiation flux from the source is greatly increased due to gravitational lensing. Any objects which pass through such a thin tube or beam will experience strong bursts of radiation, i.e., Extreme Gravitational Lensing Events (EGLEs). We have studied the physics and statistics of EGLEs. EGLEs may have interesting astrophysical effects, such as the destruction of dust grains, ignition of masers, etc. Here we illustrate the possible astrophysical effects of EGLEs with one specific example, the destruction of dust grains in globular clusters.

  11. Gravitational waves from compact bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Thorne, K S

    1995-01-01

    A review is given of recent research on gravitational waves from compact bodies and its relevance to the LIGO/VIRGO international network of high-frequency (10 to 10,000 Hz) gravitational-wave detectors, and to the proposed LISA system of low-frequency (0.1 to 0.0001 Hz) detectors. The sources that are reviewed are ordinary binary star systems, binaries made from compact bodies (black holes and neutron stars), the final inspiral and coalescence of compact-body binaries, the inspiral of stars and small black holes into massive black holes, the stellar core collapse that triggers supernovae, and the spin of neutron stars. This paper is adapted from a longer review article entitled ``Gravitational Waves'' (GRP-411) that the author has written for the Proceedings of the Snowmass '94 Summer Study on Particle and Nuclear Astrophysics and Cosmology.

  12. Gravimagnetic shock waves and gravitational-wave experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Ignatyev, Yu. G.

    2011-01-01

    Causes of the unsatisfactory condition of the gravitational-wave experiments are discussed and a new outlook at the detection of gravitational waves of astrophysical origin is proposed. It is shown that there are strong grounds for identifying the so-called giant pulses in the pulsar NP 0532 radiation with gravimagnetic shock waves (GMSW) excited in the neutron star magnetosphere by sporadic gravitational radiation of this pulsar.

  13. Gravitational waves from inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Guzzetti, Maria Chiara; Liguori, Michele; Matarrese, Sabino

    2016-01-01

    The production of a stochastic background of gravitational waves is a fundamental prediction of any cosmological inflationary model. The features of such a signal encode unique information about the physics of the Early Universe and beyond, thus representing an exciting, powerful window on the origin and evolution of the Universe. We review the main mechanisms of gravitational-wave production, ranging from quantum fluctuations of the gravitational field to other mechanisms that can take place during or after inflation. These include e.g. gravitational waves generated as a consequence of extra particle production during inflation, or during the (p)reheating phase. Gravitational waves produced in inflation scenarios based on modified gravity theories and second-order gravitational waves are also considered. For each analyzed case, the expected power-spectrum is given. We discuss the discriminating power among different models, associated with the validity/violation of the standard consistency relation between t...

  14. Those Elusive Gravitational Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    MOSAIC, 1976

    1976-01-01

    The presence of gravitational waves was predicted by Einstein in his theory of General Relativity. Since then, scientists have been attempting to develop a detector sensitive enough to measure these cosmic signals. Once the presence of gravitational waves is confirmed, scientists can directly study star interiors, galaxy cores, or quasars. (MA)

  15. Gravitational waves in preheating

    OpenAIRE

    Tilley, Daniel; Maartens, Roy

    2000-01-01

    We study the evolution of gravitational waves through the preheating era that follows inflation. The oscillating inflaton drives parametric resonant growth of scalar field fluctuations, and although super-Hubble tensor modes are not strongly amplified, they do carry an imprint of preheating. This is clearly seen in the Weyl tensor, which provides a covariant description of gravitational waves.

  16. Theory of Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Tiec, Alexandre Le

    2016-01-01

    The existence of gravitational radiation is a natural prediction of any relativistic description of the gravitational interaction. In this chapter, we focus on gravitational waves, as predicted by Einstein's general theory of relativity. First, we introduce those mathematical concepts that are necessary to properly formulate the physical theory, such as the notions of manifold, vector, tensor, metric, connection and curvature. Second, we motivate, formulate and then discuss Einstein's equation, which relates the geometry of spacetime to its matter content. Gravitational waves are later introduced as solutions of the linearized Einstein equation around flat spacetime. These waves are shown to propagate at the speed of light and to possess two polarization states. Gravitational waves can interact with matter, allowing for their direct detection by means of laser interferometers. Finally, Einstein's quadrupole formulas are derived and used to show that nonspherical compact objects moving at relativistic speeds a...

  17. LIGO: The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory

    OpenAIRE

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; G. Allen; Amin, R; Anderson, S.; Anderson, W.; Arain, M.; Araya, M; Armandula, H.; Armor, P.; Aso, Y; Aston, S

    2007-01-01

    The goal of the Laser Interferometric Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is to detect and study gravitational waves of astrophysical origin. Direct detection of gravitational waves holds the promise of testing general relativity in the strong-field regime, of providing a new probe of exotic objects such as black hole and neutron stars, and of uncovering unanticipated new astrophysics. LIGO, a joint Caltech-MIT project supported by the National Science Foundation, operates three multi-kilom...

  18. Gravitational wave radiometry: Mapping a stochastic gravitational wave background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of the detection and mapping of a stochastic gravitational wave background (SGWB), either cosmological or astrophysical, bears a strong semblance to the analysis of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy and polarization, which too is a stochastic field, statistically described in terms of its correlation properties. An astrophysical gravitational wave background (AGWB) will likely arise from an incoherent superposition of unmodelled and/or unresolved sources and cosmological gravitational wave backgrounds (CGWB) are also predicted in certain scenarios. The basic statistic we use is the cross correlation between the data from a pair of detectors. In order to ''point'' the pair of detectors at different locations one must suitably delay the signal by the amount it takes for the gravitational waves (GW) to travel to both detectors corresponding to a source direction. Then the raw (observed) sky map of the SGWB is the signal convolved with a beam response function that varies with location in the sky. We first present a thorough analytic understanding of the structure of the beam response function using an analytic approach employing the stationary phase approximation. The true sky map is obtained by numerically deconvolving the beam function in the integral (convolution) equation. We adopt the maximum likelihood framework to estimate the true sky map using the conjugate gradient method that has been successfully used in the broadly similar, well-studied CMB map-making problem. We numerically implement and demonstrate the method on signal generated by simulated (unpolarized) SGWB for the GW radiometer consisting of the LIGO pair of detectors at Hanford and Livingston. We include 'realistic' additive Gaussian noise in each data stream based on the LIGO-I noise power spectral density. The extension of the method to multiple baselines and polarized GWB is outlined. In the near future the network of GW detectors, including the Advanced LIGO and Virgo

  19. Spin-1 gravitational waves

    OpenAIRE

    Canfora, F.; Vilasi, G.; Vitale, P.

    2002-01-01

    Gravitational fields invariant for a 2-dimensional Lie algebra of Killing fields [ X,Y] =Y, with Y of light type, are analyzed. The conditions for them to represent gravitational waves are verified and the definition of energy and polarization is addressed; realistic generating sources are described.

  20. Observation of Gravitational Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Gabriela

    2016-06-01

    On September 14 2015, the two LIGO gravitational wave detectors in Hanford, Washington and Livingston, Louisiana registered a nearly simultaneous signal with time-frequency properties consistent with gravitational-wave emission by the merger of two massive compact objects. Further analysis of the signals by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration revealed that the gravitational waves detected by LIGO came from the merger of a binary black hole (BBH) system approximately 420 Mpc distant (z=0.09) with constituent masses of 36 and 29 M_sun. I will describe the details of the observation, the status of ground-based interferometric detectors, and prospects for future observations in the new era of gravitational wave astronomy.

  1. The Gravitational Wave International Committee Roadmap: The future of gravitational wave astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2011-01-01

    Gravitational wave science is on the verge of direct observation of the waves predicted by Einstein's General Theory of Relativity and opening the exciting new field of gravitational wave astronomy. In the coming decades, ultra-sensitive arrays of ground-based instruments and complementary spaced-based instruments will observe the gravitational wave sky, inevitably discovering entirely unexpected phenomena while providing new insight into many of the most profound astrophysical phenomena known. in July 2007 the Gravitational Wave International Committee (GWIC) initiated the development of a strategic roadmap for the field of gravitational wave science with a 30-year horizon. The goal of this roadmap is to serve the international gravitational wave community and its stakeholders as a tool for the development of capabilities and facilities needed to address the exciting scientific opportunities on the intermediate and long-term horizons.

  2. Bayesian Inference on Gravitational Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asad Ali

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Bayesian approach is increasingly becoming popular among the astrophysics data analysis communities. However, the Pakistan statistics communities are unaware of this fertile interaction between the two disciplines. Bayesian methods have been in use to address astronomical problems since the very birth of the Bayes probability in eighteenth century. Today the Bayesian methods for the detection and parameter estimation of gravitational waves have solid theoretical grounds with a strong promise for the realistic applications. This article aims to introduce the Pakistan statistics communities to the applications of Bayesian Monte Carlo methods in the analysis of gravitational wave data with an  overview of the Bayesian signal detection and estimation methods and demonstration by a couple of simplified examples.

  3. The Transient Gravitational-Wave Sky

    CERN Document Server

    Andersson, Nils; Belczynski, Kris; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Berti, Emanuele; Cadonati, Laura; Cerda-Duran, Pablo; Clark, James; Favata, Marc; Finn, Lee Samuel; Fryer, Chris; Giacomazzo, Bruno; Gonzalez, Jose Antonio; Hendry, Martin; Heng, Ik Siong; Hild, Stefan; Johnson-McDaniel, Nathan; Kalmus, Peter; Klimenko, Sergei; Kobayashi, Shiho; Kokkotas, Kostas; Laguna, Pablo; Lehner, Luis; Levin, Janna; Liebling, Steve; MacFadyen, Andrew; Mandel, Ilya; Marka, Szabolcs; Marka, Zsuzsa; Neilsen, David; O'Brien, Paul; Perna, Rosalba; Pfeiffer, Harald; Read, Jocelyn; Reisswig, Christian; Rodriguez, Carl; Ruffert, Max; Schnetter, Erik; Searle, Antony; Shawhan, Peter; Shoemaker, Deirdre; Soderberg, Alicia; Sperhake, Ulrich; Sutton, Patrick; Tanvir, Nial; Was, Michal; Whitcomb, Stan

    2013-01-01

    Interferometric detectors will very soon give us an unprecedented view of the gravitational-wave sky, and in particular of the explosive and transient Universe. Now is the time to challenge our theoretical understanding of short-duration gravitational-wave signatures from cataclysmic events, their connection to more traditional electromagnetic and particle astrophysics, and the data analysis techniques that will make the observations a reality. This paper summarizes the state of the art, future science opportunities, and current challenges in understanding gravitational-wave transients.

  4. Superluminal Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Moffat, J W

    2014-01-01

    The quantum gravity effects of vacuum polarization of gravitons propagating in a curved spacetime cause the quantum vacuum to act as a dispersive medium with a refractive index. Due to this dispersive medium gravitons acquire superluminal velocities. The dispersive medium is produced by higher derivative curvature contributions to the effective gravitational action. It is shown that in a Friedmann-Lema\\^{i}tre-Robertson-Walker spacetime in the early universe near the Planck time $t_{\\rm PL}\\gtrsim 10^{-43}\\,{\\rm sec}$, the speed of gravitational waves $c_g\\gg c_{g0}=c_0$, where $c_{g0}$ and $c_0$ are the speeds of gravitational waves and light today. The large speed of gravitational waves stretches their wavelengths to super-horizon sizes, allowing them to be observed in B-polarization experiments.

  5. Update on gravitational-wave research

    CERN Document Server

    Grishchuk, L P

    2003-01-01

    The recently assembled laser-beam detectors of gravitational waves are approaching the planned level of sensitivity. In the coming 1 - 2 years, we may be observing the rare but powerful events of inspiral and merger of binary stellar-mass black holes. More likely, we will have to wait for a few years longer, until the advanced detectors become operational. Their sensitivity will be sufficient to meet the most cautious evaluations of the strength and event rates of astrophysical sources of gravitational waves. The experimental and theoretical work related to the space-based laser-beam detectors is also actively pursued. The current gravitational wave research is broad and interesting. Experimental innovations, source modelling, methods of data analysis, theoretical issues of principle are being studied and developed at the same time. The race for direct detection of relatively high-frequency waves is accompanied by vigorous efforts to discover the very low-frequency relic gravitational waves through the measur...

  6. Fast Magnetosonic Waves Driven by Gravitational Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Papadopoulos, D.; Stergioulas, N.; Vlahos, L.; Kuijpers, J.

    2001-01-01

    The propagation of a gravitational wave (GW) through a magnetized plasma is considered. In particular, we study the excitation of fast magnetosonic waves (MSW) by a gravitational wave, using the linearized general-relativistic hydromagnetic equations. We derive the dispersion relation for the plasma, treating the gravitational wave as a perturbation in a Minkowski background space-time. We show that the presence of gravitational waves will drive magnetosonic waves in the plasma and discuss th...

  7. Theory-Agnostic Constraints on Black-Hole Dipole Radiation with Multi-Band Gravitational-Wave Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Barausse, Enrico; Chamberlain, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    The aLIGO detection of the black-hole binary GW150914 opened a new era for probing extreme gravity. Many gravity theories predict the emission of dipole gravitational radiation by binaries. This is excluded to high accuracy in binary pulsars, but entire classes of theories predict this effect predominantly (or only) in binaries involving black holes. Joint observations of GW150914-like systems by aLIGO and eLISA will improve bounds on dipole emission from black-hole binaries by five orders of magnitude relative to current constraints, probing extreme gravity with unprecedented accuracy.

  8. Gravitational wave searches using the DSN (Deep Space Network)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Deep Space Network Doppler spacecraft link is currently the only method available for broadband gravitational wave searches in the 0.01 to 0.001 Hz frequency range. The DSN's role in the worldwide search for gravitational waves is described by first summarizing from the literature current theoretical estimates of gravitational wave strengths and time scales from various astrophysical sources. Current and future detection schemes for ground based and space based detectors are then discussed. Past, present, and future planned or proposed gravitational wave experiments using DSN Doppler tracking are described. Lastly, some major technical challenges to improve gravitational wave sensitivities using the DSN are discussed

  9. Gravitational Waves: The Evidence Mounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wick, Gerald L.

    1970-01-01

    Reviews the work of Weber and his colleagues in their attempts at detecting extraterrestial gravitational waves. Coincidence events recorded by special detectors provide the evidence for the existence of gravitational waves. Bibliography. (LC)

  10. LIGO: The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    The goal of the Laser Interferometric Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is to detect and study gravitational waves of astrophysical origin. Direct detection of gravitational waves holds the promise of testing general relativity in the strong-field regime, of providing a new probe of exotic objects such as black hole and neutron stars, and of uncovering unanticipated new astrophysics. LIGO, a joint Caltech-MIT project supported by the National Science Foundation, operates three multi-kilometer interferometers at two widely separated sites in the United States. These detectors are the result of decades of worldwide technology development, design, construction, and commissioning. They are now operating at their design sensitivity, and are sensitive to gravitational wave strains as small as 1 part in 1E21. With this unprecedented sensitivity, the data are being analyzed for gravitational waves from a variety of potential astrophysical sources.

  11. GRAVITATIONAL WAVES AND QUANTUM THEORY

    OpenAIRE

    Trunev A. P.

    2014-01-01

    In this article we consider gravitation theory in multidimensional space. The model of the metric satisfying the basic requirements of quantum theory is proposed. It is shown that gravitational waves are described by the Liouville equation. Schrödinger conjecture about the Schrödinger wave function and gravitational waves has been proved

  12. The gravitational wave experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertotti, B.; Ambrosini, R.; Asmar, S. W.; Brenkle, J. P.; Comoretto, G.; Giampieri, G.; Less, L.; Messeri, A.; Wahlquist, H. D.

    1992-01-01

    Since the optimum size of a gravitational wave detector is the wave length, interplanetary dimensions are needed for the mHz band of interest. Doppler tracking of Ulysses will provide the most sensitive attempt to date at the detection of gravitational waves in the low frequency band. The driving noise source is the fluctuations in the refractive index of interplanetary plasma. This dictates the timing of the experiment to be near solar opposition and sets the target accuracy for the fractional frequency change at 3.0 x 10 exp -14 for integration times of the order of 1000 sec. The instrumentation utilized by the experiment is distributed between the radio systems on the spacecraft and the seven participating ground stations of the Deep Space Network and Medicina. Preliminary analysis is available of the measurements taken during the Ulysses first opposition test.

  13. Connecting Numerical Relativity and Data Analysis of Gravitational Wave Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Shoemaker, Deirdre; London, Lionel; Pekowsky, Larne

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational waves deliver information in exquisite detail about astrophysical phenomena, among them the collision of two black holes, a system completely invisible to the eyes of electromagnetic telescopes. Models that predict gravitational wave signals from likely sources are crucial for the success of this endeavor. Modeling binary black hole sources of gravitational radiation requires solving the Eintein equations of General Relativity using powerful computer hardware and sophisticated numerical algorithms. This proceeding presents where we are in understanding ground-based gravitational waves resulting from the merger of black holes and the implications of these sources for the advent of gravitational-wave astronomy.

  14. Gravitational lenses as long-baseline gravitational-wave detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, B.

    1989-01-01

    Gravitational waves produce a time delay between the different images of a gravitational lens. The measurements of the time delay in the gravitational lens 0957±561 put new limits on the amplitude of low-frequency gravitational waves h

  15. On the gravitational scattering of gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the scattering of weak gravitational waves from a slowly rotating gravitational source, having mass M and angular momentum J-vector . We start considering the dynamics of a massless spin-2 field ϕμν propagating in the weak gravitational field of the source, writing down the Fierz–Pauli in the presence of a slightly curved background. We adopt a semiclassical framework, where the gravitational background is described as a classical external field; meanwhile, the spin-2 field is treated quantum mechanically. In the weak-coupling limit, in which the typical wavelength of ϕμν satisfies λϕ≫Rs (where Rs is the Schwarzschild radius of the source), we obtain the cross-section for the scattering process in the Born approximation. We also discuss helicity asymmetry, showing its relationship with the spin-2 field coupling to the derivatives of the background metric. We finally consider the transition to the case of gravitational wave scattering, showing that—under reasonable assumptions—gravitational waves are expected to follow the same behavior. Our results partly agree with those presented through the years by various authors. The present analysis suggests that the scattering of weak gravitational waves in the field of a macroscopic gravitational source still represents an interesting open issue for further careful investigation. (paper)

  16. Realistic filter cavities for advanced gravitational wave detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, M.; Barsotti, L.; Harms, J.; Kwee, P.; Miao, H.

    2013-01-01

    The ongoing global effort to detect gravitational waves continues to push the limits of precision measurement while aiming to provide a new tool for understanding both astrophysics and fundamental physics. Squeezed states of light offer a proven means of increasing the sensitivity of gravitational wave detectors, potentially increasing the rate at which astrophysical sources are detected by more than 1 order of magnitude. Since radiation pressure noise plays an important role in advanced dete...

  17. Gravitational wave radiometry: Mapping a stochastic gravitational wave background

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, Sanjit; Souradeep, Tarun; Lazzarini, Albert; Mandic, Vuk; Bose, Sukanta; Ballmer, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    The problem of the detection and mapping of a stochastic gravitational wave background (SGWB), either of cosmological or astrophysical origin, bears a strong semblance to the analysis of CMB anisotropy and polarization. The basic statistic we use is the cross-correlation between the data from a pair of detectors. In order to `point' the pair of detectors at different locations one must suitably delay the signal by the amount it takes for the gravitational waves (GW) to travel to both detectors corresponding to a source direction. Then the raw (observed) sky map of the SGWB is the signal convolved with a beam response function that varies with location in the sky. We first present a thorough analytic understanding of the structure of the beam response function using an analytic approach employing the stationary phase approximation. The true sky map is obtained by numerically deconvolving the beam function in the integral (convolution) equation. We adopt the maximum likelihood framework to estimate the true sky...

  18. LCGT and the global network of gravitational wave detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Kanda, Nobuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Gravitational wave is a propagation of space-time distortion, which is predicted by Einstein in general relativity. Strong gravitational waves will come from some drastic astronomical objects, e.g. coalescence of neutron star binaries, black holes, supernovae, rotating pulsars and pulsar glitches. Detection of the gravitational waves from these objects will open a new door of \\textit{`gravitational wave astronomy'}. Gravitational wave will be a probe to study the physics and astrophysics. To search these gravitational waves, large-scale laser interferometers will compose a global network of detectors. Advanced LIGO and advanced Virgo are upgrading from currents detectors. One of LIGO detector is considering to move Australia Site. IndIGO or Einstein Telescope are future plans. LCGT (Large-scale Cryogenic Gravitational wave Telescope) is now constructing in Japan with distinctive characters: cryogenic cooling mirror and underground site. We will present a design and a construction status of LCGT, and brief sta...

  19. Implications of the Gravitational Wave Event GW150914

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, M Coleman

    2016-01-01

    The era of gravitational-wave astronomy began on 14 September 2015, when the LIGO Scientific Collaboration detected the merger of two $\\sim 30 M_\\odot$ black holes at a distance of $\\sim 400$ Mpc. This event has facilitated qualitatively new tests of gravitational theories, and has also produced exciting information about the astrophysical origin of black hole binaries. In this review we discuss the implications of this event for gravitational physics and astrophysics, as well as the expectations for future detections. In brief: (1) because the spins of the black holes could not be measured accurately and because mergers are not well calculated for modified theories of gravity, the current analysis of GW150914 does not place strong constraints on gravity variants that change only the generation of gravitational waves, but (2) it does strongly constrain alterations of the propagation of gravitational waves and alternatives to black holes. Finally, (3) many astrophysical models for the origin of heavy black hol...

  20. Exact Piecewise Flat Gravitational Waves

    OpenAIRE

    van de Meent, Maarten

    2011-01-01

    We generalize our previous linear result [1] in obtaining gravitational waves from our piecewise flat model for gravity in 3+1 dimensions to exact piecewise flat configurations describing exact planar gravitational waves. We show explicitly how to construct a piecewise flat spacetime that describes an impulsive plane wavefront. From these wavefronts more general plane waves may be constructed.

  1. Enabling high confidence detections of gravitational-wave bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Littenberg, Tyson B; Cornish, Neil J; Millhouse, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    With the advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors taking observations the detection of gravitational waves is expected within the next few years. Extracting astrophysical information from gravitational wave detections is a well-posed problem and thoroughly studied when detailed models for the waveforms are available. However, one motivation for the field of gravitational wave astronomy is the potential for new discoveries. Recognizing and characterizing unanticipated signals requires data analysis techniques which do not depend on theoretical predictions for the gravitational waveform. Past searches for short-duration un-modeled gravitational wave signals have been hampered by transient noise artifacts, or "glitches," in the detectors. In some cases, even high signal-to-noise simulated astrophysical signals have proven difficult to distinguish from glitches, so that essentially any plausible signal could be detected with at most 2-3 $\\sigma$ level confidence. We have put forth the BayesWave algorithm to differentiat...

  2. Quantum Emulation of Gravitational Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Ivan Fernandez-Corbaton; Mauro Cirio; Alexander Büse; Lucas Lamata; Enrique Solano; Gabriel Molina-Terriza

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational waves, as predicted by Einstein's general relativity theory, appear as ripples in the fabric of spacetime traveling at the speed of light. We prove that the propagation of small amplitude gravitational waves in a curved spacetime is equivalent to the propagation of a subspace of electromagnetic states. We use this result to propose the use of entangled photons to emulate the evolution of gravitational waves in curved spacetimes by means of experimental electromagnetic setups fea...

  3. Quantum Emulation of Gravitational Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Corbaton, Ivan; Cirio, Mauro; Büse, Alexander; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational waves, as predicted by Einstein's general relativity theory, appear as ripples in the fabric of spacetime traveling at the speed of light. We prove that the propagation of small amplitude gravitational waves in a curved spacetime is equivalent to the propagation of a subspace of electromagnetic states. We use this result to propose the use of entangled photons to emulate the evolution of gravitational waves in curved spacetimes by means of experimental electromagnetic setups featuring metamaterials. PMID:26169801

  4. The Schenberg gravitational wave detector: status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, O.D.; Barroso, J.J; Bessada, D.F.A.; Carvalho, N.C; Castro, P.J.; Montana, C.E. Cedeno; Costa, C.F. da Silva; Araujo, J.C.N de; Evangelista, E.F.D.; Furtado, S.R; Miranda, O.D.; Moraes, P.H.R.S.; Pereira, Eduardo S.; Silveira, P.R.; Stellati, C.; Weber, J. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: The quest for gravitational wave detection has been one of the toughest technological challenges ever faced by experimental physicists and engineers. Despite all difficulties, after four decades of research, the community involved in this area is continuously growing. One of the main reasons for this is because the first gravitational wave detection and the regular observation of gravitational waves are among the most important scientific goals for the beginning of this millennium. They will test one of the foundations of physics, Einstein's theory of general relativity, and will open a new window for the observation of the universe, which certainly will cause a revolution in our knowledge of physics and astrophysics. In this talk we present the status report of the Brazilian Schenberg gravitational wave detector, which started commissioning runs in September 2006 under the full support of FAPESP. We have been upgrading the detector since 2008, installing a dilution refrigerator, a new complete set of transducers, and a new suspension and vibration isolation system for the cabling and microstrip antennas, in order to restart operation with a higher sensitivity. We also have been studying an innovative approach, which could transform Schenberg into a broadband gravitational wave detector by the use of an ultra-high sensitivity non-resonant nanogap transducer, constructed by the application of recent achievements of nanotechnology. A spherical antenna, such as Schenberg or Mini-Grail, could add to this quality the advantage of wave position and polarity determination. (author)

  5. Optimal directed searches for continuous gravitational waves

    OpenAIRE

    Ming, J.; Krishnan, B.; Papa, M.; Aulbert, C.; Fehrmann, H.

    2016-01-01

    Wide parameter space searches for long lived continuous gravitational wave signals are computationally limited. It is therefore critically important that available computational resources are used rationally. In this paper we consider directed searches, i.e. targets for which the sky position is known accurately but the frequency and spindown parameters are completely unknown. Given a list of such potential astrophysical targets, we therefore need to prioritize. On which target(s) should we s...

  6. Gravitational-wave Mission Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcnamara, Paul; Jennrich, Oliver; Stebbins, Robin T.

    2014-01-01

    In November 2013, ESA selected the science theme, the "Gravitational Universe," for its third large mission opportunity, known as L3, under its Cosmic Vision Programme. The planned launch date is 2034. ESA is considering a 20% participation by an international partner, and NASA's Astrophysics Division has indicated an interest in participating. We have studied the design consequences of a NASA contribution, evaluated the science benefits and identified the technology requirements for hardware that could be delivered by NASA. The European community proposed a strawman mission concept, called eLISA, having two measurement arms, derived from the well studied LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) concept. The US community is promoting a mission concept known as SGO Mid (Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatory Mid-sized), a three arm LISA-like concept. If NASA were to partner with ESA, the eLISA concept could be transformed to SGO Mid by the addition of a third arm, augmenting science, reducing risk and reducing non-recurring engineering costs. The characteristics of the mission concepts and the relative science performance of eLISA, SGO Mid and LISA are described. Note that all results are based on models, methods and assumptions used in NASA studies

  7. Fast and Accurate Inference on Gravitational Waves from Precessing Compact Binaries

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Rory; Field, Scott E.; Blackburn, Kent; Haster, Carl-Johan; Pürrer, Michael; Raymond, Vivien; Schmidt, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Inferring astrophysical information from gravitational waves emitted by compact binaries is one of the key science goals of gravitational-wave astronomy. In order to reach the full scientific potential of gravitational-wave experiments we require techniques to mitigate the cost of Bayesian inference, especially as gravitational-wave signal models and analyses become increasingly sophisticated and detailed. Reduced order models (ROMs) of gravitational waveforms can significantly reduce the com...

  8. Geometrical vs wave optics under gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Angélil, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    We present some new derivations of the effect of a plane gravitational wave on a light ray. A simple interpretation of the results is that a gravitational wave causes a phase modulation of electromagnetic waves. We arrive at this picture from two contrasting directions, namely null geodesics and Maxwell's equations, or, geometric and wave optics. Under geometric optics, we express the geodesic equations in Hamiltonian form and solve perturbatively for the effect of gravitational waves. We find that the well-known time-delay formula for light generalizes trivially to massive particles. We also recover, by way of a Hamilton-Jacobi equation, the phase modulation obtained under wave optics. Turning then to wave optics, rather than solving Maxwell's equations directly for the fields, as in most previous approaches, we derive a perturbed wave equation (perturbed by the gravitational wave) for the electromagnetic four-potential. From this wave equation it follows that the four-potential and the electric and magnetic...

  9. Gravitational wave detection and data analysis for pulsar timing arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasteren, Rutger van

    2011-01-01

    Long-term precise timing of Galactic millisecond pulsars holds great promise for measuring long-period (months-to-years) astrophysical gravitational waves. In this work we develop a Bayesian data analysis method for projects called pulsar timing arrays; projects aimed to detect these gravitational w

  10. Numerical Relativity, Black Hole Mergers, and Gravitational Waves: Part III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This series of 3 lectures will present recent developments in numerical relativity, and their applications to simulating black hole mergers and computing the resulting gravitational waveforms. In this third and final lecture, we present applications of the results of numerical relativity simulations to gravitational wave detection and astrophysics.

  11. Implosion of quadrupole gravitational waves

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnor, W. B.; Piper, M. S.

    1996-01-01

    Einstein's vacuum equations are solved up to the second approximation for imploding quadrupole gravitational waves. The implosion generates a black hole singularity irrespective of the strength of the waves.

  12. Gravitational Wave Science in the High School Classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Farr, Benjamin; Trouille, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Gravitational waves have the potential to bring astronomy into the next era by providing an entirely new means of observing astronomical phenomena. By measuring fluctuations down to the sub-attometer scale, scientists are hoping to measure the gravitational effects of extreme cosmic events happening millions of parsecs away. This widely multidisciplinary work encompasses fields ranging from astrophysics to quantum optics. This article discusses the integration of gravitational wave science into a high school astronomy curriculum, where students learn about a variety of topics in the field, with particular focus placed on astrophysical sources, detector technology, and data analysis techniques.

  13. Phonon creation by gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that gravitational waves create phonons in a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). A traveling spacetime distortion produces particle creation resonances that correspond to the dynamical Casimir effect in a BEC phononic field contained in a cavity-type trap. We propose to use this effect to detect gravitational waves. The amplitude of the wave can be estimated applying recently developed relativistic quantum metrology techniques. We provide the optimal precision bound on the estimation of the wave's amplitude. Finally, we show that the parameter regime required to detect gravitational waves with this technique could be, in principle, within experimental reach in a medium-term timescale. (paper)

  14. Phonon creation by gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Sabín, Carlos; Ahmadi, Mehdi; Fuentes, Ivette

    2014-01-01

    We show that gravitational waves create phonons in a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). A traveling spacetime distortion produces particle creation resonances that correspond to the dynamical Casimir effect in a BEC phononic field contained in a cavity-type trap. We propose to use this effect to detect gravitational waves. The amplitude of the wave can be estimated applying recently developed relativistic quantum metrology techniques. We provide the optimal precision bound on the estimation of the wave's amplitude. Finally, we show that the parameter regime required to detect gravitational waves with this technique is within experimental reach.

  15. Gravitational Wave - Gauge Field Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Caldwell, R R; Maksimova, N A

    2016-01-01

    Gravitational waves propagating through a stationary gauge field transform into gauge field waves and back again. When multiple families of flavor-space locked gauge fields are present, the gravitational and gauge field waves exhibit novel dynamics. At high frequencies, the system behaves like coupled oscillators in which the gravitational wave is the central pacemaker. Due to energy conservation and exchange among the oscillators, the wave amplitudes lie on a multi-dimensional sphere, reminiscent of neutrino flavor oscillations. This phenomenon has implications for cosmological scenarios based on flavor-space locked gauge fields.

  16. Space Based Gravitational Wave Observatories (SGOs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livas, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatories (SGOs) will enable the systematic study of the frequency band from 0.0001 - 1 Hz of gravitational waves, where a rich array of astrophysical sources is expected. ESA has selected The Gravitational Universe as the science theme for the L3 mission opportunity with a nominal launch date in 2034. This will be at a minimum 15 years after ground-based detectors and pulsar timing arrays announce their first detections and at least 18 years after the LISA Pathfinder Mission will have demonstrated key technologies in a dedicated space mission. It is therefore important to develop mission concepts that can take advantage of the momentum in the field and the investment in both technology development and a precision measurement community on a more near-term timescale than the L3 opportunity. This talk will discuss a mission concept based on the LISA baseline that resulted from a recent mission architecture study.

  17. Exact piecewise flat gravitational waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Meent, M.

    2011-01-01

    We generalize our previous linear result (van de Meent 2011 Class. Quantum Grav 28 075005) in obtaining gravitational waves from our piecewise flat model for gravity in 3+1 dimensions to exact piecewise flat configurations describing exact planar gravitational waves. We show explicitly how to constr

  18. Momentum Imparted by Gravitational Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Sharif, M.

    2003-01-01

    We calculate momentum imparted by colliding gravitational waves in a closed Friedmann Robertson-Walker background and also by gravitational waves with toroidal wavefronts using an operational procedure. The results obtained for toroidal wavefronts are well behaved and reduce to the spherical wavefronts for a special choice.

  19. Generating Gravitational Waves After Inflation

    OpenAIRE

    Easther, Richard

    2009-01-01

    I review two mechanisms by which gravitational waves can be generated at the end of inflation: preheating, and gravitons Hawking radiated during the decay of very small primordial black holes. These mechanisms are contrasted with the gravitational waves during inflation, and may provide a window into the physical processes that govern the end of the inflationary phase.

  20. Gravitational Wave for a pedestrian

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhuri, A K

    2016-01-01

    The physics of gravitational wave and its detection in the recent experiment by the LIGO collaboration is discussed in simple terms for a general audience. The main article is devoid of any mathematics, but an appendix is included for inquisitive readers where essential mathematics for general theory of relativity and gravitational waves are given.

  1. Stochastic backgrounds of gravitational waves from extragalactic sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astrophysical sources emit gravitational waves in a large variety of processes occurring since the beginning of star and galaxy formation. These waves permeate our high-redshift Universe and form a background which is the result of the superposition of different components, each associated with a specific astrophysical process. Each component has different spectral properties and features that are important to investigate in view of a possible, future detection. In this contribution, we will review recent theoretical predictions for backgrounds produced by extragalactic sources and discuss their detectability with current and future gravitational wave observatories.

  2. The Science of Gravitational Waves with Space Observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, James Ira

    2013-01-01

    After decades of effort, direct detection of gravitational waves from astrophysical sources is on the horizon. Aside from teaching us about gravity itself, gravitational waves hold immense promise as a tool for general astrophysics. In this talk I will provide an overview of the science enabled by a space-based gravitational wave observatory sensitive in the milli-Hertz frequency band including the nature and evolution of massive black holes and their host galaxies, the demographics of stellar remnant compact objects in the Milky Way, and the behavior of gravity in the strong-field regime. I will also summarize the current status of efforts in the US and Europe to implement a space-based gravitational wave observatory.

  3. Anisotropies in the Gravitational-Wave Stochastic Background

    CERN Document Server

    Olmez, S; Siemens, X

    2011-01-01

    We consider anisotropies in the stochastic background of gravitational-waves (SBGW) arising from random fluctuations in the number of gravitational-wave sources. We first develop the general formalism which can be applied to different cosmological or astrophysical scenarios. We then apply this formalism to calculate the anisotropies of SBGW associated with the fluctuations in the number of cosmic string loops, considering both cosmic string cusps and kinks. We calculate the anisotropies as a function of angle and frequency.

  4. Anisotropies in the Gravitational-Wave Stochastic Background

    OpenAIRE

    Olmez, S.; Mandic, V.; Siemens, X.

    2011-01-01

    We consider anisotropies in the stochastic background of gravitational-waves (SBGW) arising from random fluctuations in the number of gravitational-wave sources. We first develop the general formalism which can be applied to different cosmological or astrophysical scenarios. We then apply this formalism to calculate the anisotropies of SBGW associated with the fluctuations in the number of cosmic string loops, considering both cosmic string cusps and kinks. We calculate the anisotropies as a ...

  5. Anisotropies in the gravitational-wave stochastic background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider anisotropies in the stochastic background of gravitational-waves (SBGW) arising from random fluctuations in the number of gravitational-wave sources. We first develop the general formalism which can be applied to different cosmological or astrophysical scenarios. We then apply this formalism to calculate the anisotropies of SBGW associated with the fluctuations in the number of cosmic string loops, considering both cosmic string cusps and kinks. We calculate the anisotropies as a function of angle and frequency

  6. LIGO: the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of the Laser Interferometric Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is to detect and study gravitational waves (GWs) of astrophysical origin. Direct detection of GWs holds the promise of testing general relativity in the strong-field regime, of providing a new probe of exotic objects such as black holes and neutron stars and of uncovering unanticipated new astrophysics. LIGO, a joint Caltech-MIT project supported by the National Science Foundation, operates three multi-kilometer interferometers at two widely separated sites in the United States. These detectors are the result of decades of worldwide technology development, design, construction and commissioning. They are now operating at their design sensitivity, and are sensitive to gravitational wave strains smaller than one part in 1021. With this unprecedented sensitivity, the data are being analyzed to detect or place limits on GWs from a variety of potential astrophysical sources.

  7. Academic Training: Gravitational Waves Astronomy

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    2006-2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 16, 17, 18 October from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Gravitational Waves Astronomy M. LANDRY, LIGO Hanford Observatory, Richland, USA Gravitational wave astronomy is expected to become an observational field within the next decade. First direct detection of gravitational waves is possible with existing terrestrial-based detectors, and highly probable with proposed upgrades. In this three-part lecture series, we give an overview of the field, including material on gravitional wave sources, detection methods, some details of interferometric detectors, data analysis methods, and current results from observational data-taking runs of the LIGO and GEO projects. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply electronically from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www...

  8. Gravitational Renormalization Group Flow, Astrophysics and Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Moffat, J W

    2015-01-01

    A modified gravitational theory is developed in which the gravitational coupling constants $G$ and $Q$ and the effective mass $m_\\phi$ of a repulsive vector field run with momentum scale $k$ or length scale $\\ell =1/k$, according to a renormalization group flow. The theory can explain cosmological early universe data with a dark hidden photon and late time galaxy and cluster dynamics without dark matter. The theory agrees with solar system and binary pulsar observations.

  9. Quantum Opportunities in Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavalvala, Negris (MIT)

    2012-03-14

    Direct observation of gravitational waves should open a new window into the Universe. Gravitational wave detectors are the most sensitive position meters ever constructed. The quantum limit in gravitational wave detectors opens up a whole new field of study. Quantum opportunities in gravitational wave detectors include applications of quantum optics techniques and new tools for quantum measurement on truly macroscopic (human) scales.

  10. Gravitational-wave sensitivity curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are several common conventions in use by the gravitational-wave community to describe the amplitude of sources and the sensitivity of detectors. These are frequently confused. We outline the merits of and differences between the various quantities used for parameterizing noise curves and characterizing gravitational-wave amplitudes. We conclude by producing plots that consistently compare different detectors. Similar figures can be generated on-line for general use at http://rhcole.com/apps/GWplotter. (paper)

  11. Gravitational waves from black-hole mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Baker, John G; Centrella, Joan M; Kelly, Bernard J; McWilliams, Sean T; van Meter, James R

    2007-01-01

    Coalescing black-hole binaries are expected to be the strongest sources of gravitational waves for ground-based interferometers as well as the space-based interferometer LISA. Recent progress in numerical relativity now makes it possible to calculate the waveforms from the strong-field dynamical merger and is revolutionizing our understanding of these systems. We review these dramatic developments, emphasizing applications to issues in gravitational wave observations. These new capabilities also make possible accurate calculations of the recoil or kick imparted to the final remnant black hole when the merging components have unequal masses, or unequal or unaligned spins. We highlight recent work in this area, focusing on results of interest to astrophysics.

  12. Gravitational Wave Astronomy: Needle in a Haystack

    CERN Document Server

    Cornish, Neil J

    2012-01-01

    A world-wide array of highly sensitive interferometers stands poised to usher in a new era in astronomy with the first direct detection of gravitational waves. The data from these instruments will provide a unique perspective on extreme astrophysical phenomena such as neutron stars and black holes, and will allow us to test Einstein's theory of gravity in the strong field, dynamical regime. To fully realize these goals we need to solve some challenging problems in signal processing and inference, such as finding rare and weak signals that are buried in non-stationary and non-Gaussian instrument noise, dealing with high-dimensional model spaces, and locating what are often extremely tight concentrations of posterior mass within the prior volume. Gravitational wave detection using space based detectors and Pulsar Timing Arrays bring with them the additional challenge of having to isolate individual signals that overlap one another in both time and frequency. Promising solutions to these problems will be discuss...

  13. Enhancing gravitational wave astronomy with galaxy catalogues

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Xilong; Heng, Ik Siong

    2014-01-01

    Joint gravitational wave (GW) and electromagnetic (EM) observations, as a key research direction in multi-messenger astronomy, will provide deep insight into the astrophysics of a vast range of astronomical phenomena. Uncertainties in the source sky location estimate from gravitational wave observations mean follow-up observatories must scan large portions of the sky for a potential companion signal. A general frame of joint GW-EM observations is presented by a multi-messenger observational triangle. Using a Bayesian approach to multi-messenger astronomy, we investigate the use of galaxy catalogue and host galaxy information to reduce the sky region over which follow-up observatories must scan, as well as study its use for improving the inclination angle estimates for coalescing binary compact objects. We demonstrate our method using a simulated neutron stars inspiral signal injected into simulated Advanced detectors noise and estimate the injected signal sky location and inclination angle using the Gravitati...

  14. Listening to the universe with gravitational-wave astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory) detectors have just completed their first science run, following many years of planning, research, and development. LIGO is a member of what will be a worldwide network of gravitational-wave observatories, with other members in Europe, Japan, and--hopefully--Australia. Plans are rapidly maturing for a low frequency, space-based gravitational-wave observatory: LISA, the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna, to be launched around 2011. The goal of these instruments is to inaugurate the field of gravitational-wave astronomy: using gravitational waves as a means of listening to highly relativistic dynamical processes in astrophysics. This review discusses the promise of this field, outlining why gravitational waves are worth pursuing, and what they are uniquely suited to teach us about astrophysical phenomena. We review the current state of the field, both theoretical and experimental, and then highlight some aspects of gravitational-wave science that are particularly exciting (at least to this author)

  15. Listening to the low-frequency gravitational-wave band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Scott

    2016-03-01

    Ground-based gravitational-wave detectors are beginning to explore the high-frequency band of roughly 10 to 1000 Hz. These three decades in frequency represent one of several astrophysically important wavebands. In this talk, I will focus on the astrophysics of the low-frequency band, from roughly 30 microhertz to 0.1 Hz. This band is expected to be particularly rich with very loud sources. I will survey what we expect to be important sources of low-frequency gravitational waves, and review the scientific payoff that would come from measuring them.

  16. On the Energy of Rotating Gravitational Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Mashhoon, Bahram; McClune, James C.; Chavez, Enrique; Quevedo, Hernando

    1996-01-01

    A class of solutions of the gravitational field equations describing vacuum spacetimes outside rotating cylindrical sources is presented. A subclass of these solutions corresponds to the exterior gravitational fields of rotating cylindrical systems that emit gravitational radiation. The properties of these rotating gravitational wave spacetimes are investigated. In particular, we discuss the energy density of these waves using the gravitational stress-energy tensor.

  17. Photoproduction of gravitational radiation by some astrophysical objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimates are given for the amounts of gravitational radiation produced in the interaction of photons with the static electromagnetic fields of some astrophysical objects. These are the Sun, Quasar 3C273, Seyfert galaxies NGC 1068 and NGC 4151, the Galactic Center, and neutron stars. (author)

  18. Testing local Lorentz invariance with gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostelecký, V. Alan; Mewes, Matthew

    2016-06-01

    The effects of local Lorentz violation on dispersion and birefringence of gravitational waves are investigated. The covariant dispersion relation for gravitational waves involving gauge-invariant Lorentz-violating operators of arbitrary mass dimension is constructed. The chirp signal from the gravitational-wave event GW150914 is used to place numerous first constraints on gravitational Lorentz violation.

  19. Testing local Lorentz invariance with gravitational waves

    OpenAIRE

    Kostelecky, Alan; Mewes, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The effects of local Lorentz violation on dispersion and birefringence of gravitational waves are investigated. The covariant dispersion relation for gravitational waves involving gauge-invariant Lorentz-violating operators of arbitrary mass dimension is constructed. The chirp signal from the gravitational-wave event GW150914 is used to place numerous first constraints on gravitational Lorentz violation.

  20. High frequency sources of gravitational waves

    OpenAIRE

    Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2003-01-01

    Sources of high frequency gravitational waves are reviewed. Gravitational collapse, rotational instabilities and oscillations of the remnant compact objects are potentially important sources of gravitational waves. Significant and unique information for the various stages of the collapse, the evolution of protoneutron stars and the details of the equations of state of such objects can be drawn from careful study of the gravitational wave signal.

  1. Considerations on Gravitational Wave in Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Ovidiu Racorean

    2002-01-01

    A proposal for a dynamical potential of population displacements (named gravitational potential) between economic regions will be given. For a particular ideal chosen case,the gravitational potential is acting as a wave. An equation of the wave form will be given for gravitational potential-gravitational wave in economics.

  2. Outlook for Detecting Gravitational Waves with Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Though the recent discovery of GW150914 is a thrilling success in the field of gravitational-wave astronomy, LIGO is only one tool the scientific community is using to hunt for these elusive signals. After 10 years of unsuccessful searching, how likely is it that pulsar-timing-array projects will make their own first detection soon?Frequency ranges for gravitational waves produced by different astrophysical sources. Pulsar timing arrays such as the EPTA and IPTA are used to detect low-frequency gravitational waves generated by the stochastic background and supermassive black hole binaries. [Christopher Moore, Robert Cole and Christopher Berry]Supermassive BackgroundGround-based laser interferometers like LIGO are ideal for probing ripples in space-time caused by the merger of stellar-mass black holes; these mergers cause chirps in the frequency range of tens to thousands of hertz. But how do we pick up the extremely low-frequency, nanohertz background signal caused by the orbits of pairs of supermassive black holes? For that, we need pulsar timing arrays.Pulsar timing arrays are sets of pulsars whose signals are analyzed to look for correlations in the pulse arrival time. As the space-time between us and a pulsar is stretched and then compressed by a passing gravitational wave, the pulsars pulses should arrive a little late and then a little early. Comparing these timing residuals in an array of pulsars could theoretically allow for the detection of the gravitational waves causing them.Globally, there are currently four pulsar timing array projects actively searching for this signal, with a fifth planned for the future. Now a team of scientists led by Stephen Taylor (NASA-JPL/Caltech) has estimated the likelihood that these projects will successfully detect gravitational waves in the future.Probability for SuccessExpected detection probability of the gravitational-wave background as a function of observing time, for five different pulsar timing arrays. Optimistic

  3. Gravitational Wave in Lorentz Violating Gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By making use of the weak gravitational field approximation, we obtain a linearized solution of the gravitational vacuum field equation in an anisotropic spacetime. The plane-wave solution and dispersion relation of gravitational wave is presented explicitly. There is possibility that the speed of gravitational wave is larger than the speed of light and the casuality still holds. We show that the energy-momentum of gravitational wave in the ansiotropic spacetime is still well defined and conserved. (general)

  4. Gravitational Waves: new observatories for new astronomy

    OpenAIRE

    Rubbo, Louis J.; Larson, Shane L.; Larson, Michelle B.; Zaleski, Kristina D.

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews the current status of gravitational wave astronomy and explains why astronomers are excited about the new generation of gravitational wave detectors. As part of the review we compare and contrast gravitational radiation to the more familiar electromagnetic radiation. We discuss the current indirect experimental evidence for gravitational waves and how current and future gravitational wave detectors will operate as our newest telescopes are pointed at the skies.

  5. FAST COALESCENCE OF MASSIVE BLACK HOLE BINARIES FROM MERGERS OF GALACTIC NUCLEI: IMPLICATIONS FOR LOW-FREQUENCY GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE ASTROPHYSICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate a purely stellar dynamical solution to the Final Parsec Problem. Galactic nuclei resulting from major mergers are not spherical, but show some degree of triaxiality. With N-body simulations, we show that equal-mass massive black hole binaries (MBHBs) hosted by them will continuously interact with stars on centrophilic orbits and will thus inspiral-in much less than a Hubble time-down to separations at which gravitational-wave (GW) emission is strong enough to drive them to coalescence. Such coalescences will be important sources of GWs for future space-borne detectors such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). Based on our results for equal-mass mergers, and given that the hardening rate of unequal-mass binaries is similar, we expect that LISA will see between ∼10 and ∼ few x 102 such events every year, depending on the particular massive black hole (MBH) seed model as obtained in recent studies of merger trees of galaxy and MBH co-evolution. Orbital eccentricities in the LISA band will be clearly distinguishable from zero with e ∼> 0.001-0.01.

  6. Gravitational Waves, Sources and Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Schutz, B.; Ricci, F

    2001-01-01

    Gravitational waves and their detection are becoming more and more important both for the theoretical physicist and the astrophysicist. In fact, technological developments have enabled the construction such sensitive detectors (bars and interferometers) that the detection of gravitational radiation could become a reality during the next few years. In these lectures we give a brief overview of this interesting and challenging field of modern physics. The topics to be covered are divided into ...

  7. Gravitational waves from hyperbolic encounters

    CERN Document Server

    Capozziello, S; De Paolis, F; Ingrosso, G; Nucita, A

    2008-01-01

    The emission of gravitational waves from a system of massive objects interacting on hyperbolic orbits is studied in the quadrupole approximation. Analytic expressions are derived for the gravitational radiation luminosity, the total energy output and the gravitational radiation amplitude. An estimation of the expected number of events towards different targets (i.e. globular clusters and the center of the Galaxy) is also given. In particular, for a dense stellar cluster at the galactic center, a rate up to one event per year is obtained.

  8. Testing General Relativity with Low-Frequency, Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Baker

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We review the tests of general relativity that will become possible with space-based gravitational-wave detectors operating in the ∼ 10^{-5} – 1 Hz low-frequency band. The fundamental aspects of gravitation that can be tested include the presence of additional gravitational fields other than the metric; the number and tensorial nature of gravitational-wave polarization states; the velocity of propagation of gravitational waves; the binding energy and gravitational-wave radiation of binaries, and therefore the time evolution of binary inspirals; the strength and shape of the waves emitted from binary mergers and ringdowns; the true nature of astrophysical black holes; and much more. The strength of this science alone calls for the swift implementation of a space-based detector; the remarkable richness of astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmology in the low-frequency gravitational-wave band make the case even stronger.

  9. Separating gravitational wave signals from instrument artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Central to the gravitational wave detection problem is the challenge of separating features in the data produced by astrophysical sources from features produced by the detector. Matched filtering provides an optimal solution for Gaussian noise, but in practice, transient noise excursions or ''glitches'' complicate the analysis. Detector diagnostics and coincidence tests can be used to veto many glitches which may otherwise be misinterpreted as gravitational wave signals. The glitches that remain can lead to long tails in the matched filter search statistics and drive up the detection threshold. Here we describe a Bayesian approach that incorporates a more realistic model for the instrument noise allowing for fluctuating noise levels that vary independently across frequency bands, and deterministic glitch fitting using wavelets as glitch templates, the number of which is determined by a transdimensional Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. We demonstrate the method's effectiveness on simulated data containing low amplitude gravitational wave signals from inspiraling binary black-hole systems, and simulated nonstationary and non-Gaussian noise comprised of a Gaussian component with the standard LIGO/Virgo spectrum, and injected glitches of various amplitude, prevalence, and variety. Glitch fitting allows us to detect significantly weaker signals than standard techniques.

  10. Astrometric and timing effects of gravitational waves

    OpenAIRE

    Schutz, B.

    2010-01-01

    Gravitational wave detection can be done by precision timing of millisecond pulsars, and (with less likelihood) by precision astrometry on distant objects whose light or radio waves pass through gravitational waves on their way to our observatories. Underlying both of these is the relatively simple theory of light propagation in spacetimes with gravitational waves, which is also the basis of interferometric gravitational wave detectors. I review this theory and apply it to the timing and astr...

  11. General relativity and gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Weber, J

    2004-01-01

    An internationally famous physicist and electrical engineer, the author of this text was a pioneer in the investigation of gravitational waves. Joseph Weber's General Relativity and Gravitational Waves offers a classic treatment of the subject. Appropriate for upper-level undergraduates and graduate students, this text remains ever relevant. Brief but thorough in its introduction to the foundations of general relativity, it also examines the elements of Riemannian geometry and tensor calculus applicable to this field.Approximately a quarter of the contents explores theoretical and experimenta

  12. Sensitivity Studies for Third-Generation Gravitational Wave Observatories

    CERN Document Server

    Hild, S; Acernese, F; Amaro-Seoane, P; Andersson, N; Arun, K; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsuglia, M; Beker, M; Beveridge, N; Birindelli, S; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Bulik, T; Calloni, E; Cella, G; Mottin, E Chassande; Chelkowski, S; Chincarini, A; Clark, J; Coccia, E; Colacino, C; Colas, J; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Danilishin, S; Danzmann, K; De Salvo, R; Dent, T; De Rosa, R; Di Fiore, L; Di Virgilio, A; Doets, M; Fafone, V; Falferi, P; Flaminio, R; Franc, J; Frasconi, F; Freise, A; Friedrich, D; Fulda, P; Gair, J; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Giazotto, A; Glampedakis, K; Gräf, C; Granata, M; Grote, H; Guidi, G; Gurkovsky, A; Hammond, G; Hannam, M; Harms, J; Heinert, D; Hendry, M; Heng, I; Hennes, E; Hough, J; Husa, S; Huttner, S; Jones, G; Khalili, F; Kokeyama, K; Kokkotas, K; Krishnan, B; Li, T G F; Lorenzini, M; Lück, H; Majorana, E; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mantovani, M; Martin, I; Michel, C; Minenkov, Y; Morgado, N; Mosca, S; Mours, B; Müller-Ebhardt, H; Murray, P; Nawrodt, R; Nelson, J; Oshaughnessy, R; Ott, C D; Palomba, C; Paoli, A; Parguez, G; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Pinard, L; Plastino, W; Poggiani1, R; Popolizio, P; Prato, M; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Rabeling, D; Rapagnani, P; Read, J; Regimbau, T; Rehbein, H; Reid, S; Ricci, F; Richard, F; Rocchi, A; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Santamaría, L; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B; Schnabel, R; Schwarz, C; Seidel, P; Sintes, A; Somiya, K; Speirits, F; Strain, K; Strigin, S; Sutton, P; Tarabrin, S; Thüring, A; Brand, J van den; van Veggel, M; Broeck, C van den; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Vetrano, F; Vicere, A; Vyatchanin, S; Willke, B; Woan, G; Yamamoto, K

    2010-01-01

    Advanced gravitational wave detectors, currently under construction, are expected to directly observe gravitational wave signals of astrophysical origin. The Einstein Telescope, a third-generation gravitational wave detector, has been proposed in order to fully open up the emerging field of gravitational wave astronomy. In this article we describe sensitivity models for the Einstein Telescope and investigate potential limits imposed by fundamental noise sources. A special focus is set on evaluating the frequency band below 10Hz where a complex mixture of seismic, gravity gradient, suspension thermal and radiation pressure noise dominates. We develop the most accurate sensitivity model, referred to as ET-D, for a third-generation detector so far, including the most relevant fundamental noise contributions.

  13. Sensitivity studies for third-generation gravitational wave observatories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hild, S; Abernathy, M; Barr, B; Beveridge, N [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Acernese, F; Barone, F; Calloni, E [INFN, Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Amaro-Seoane, P [Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute) Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Andersson, N [University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Arun, K [LAL, Universite Paris-Sud, IN2P3/CNRS, F-91898 Orsay (France); Barsuglia, M; Mottin, E Chassande [AstroParticule et Cosmologie (APC), CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, Universite Denis Diderot, Paris VII (France); Beker, M [Nikhef, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Birindelli, S [Universite Nice ' Sophia-Antipolis' , CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, F-06304 Nice (France); Bose, S [Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States); Bosi, L [INFN, Sezione di Perugia, I-6123 Perugia (Italy); Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Cella, G [INFN, Sezione di Pisa (Italy); Bulik, T, E-mail: stefan.hild@glasgow.ac.uk [Astronomical Observatory, University of warsaw, Al Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warsaw (Poland)

    2011-05-07

    Advanced gravitational wave detectors, currently under construction, are expected to directly observe gravitational wave signals of astrophysical origin. The Einstein Telescope (ET), a third-generation gravitational wave detector, has been proposed in order to fully open up the emerging field of gravitational wave astronomy. In this paper we describe sensitivity models for ET and investigate potential limits imposed by fundamental noise sources. A special focus is set on evaluating the frequency band below 10 Hz where a complex mixture of seismic, gravity gradient, suspension thermal and radiation pressure noise dominates. We develop the most accurate sensitivity model, referred to as ET-D, for a third-generation detector so far, including the most relevant fundamental noise contributions.

  14. Sensitivity studies for third-generation gravitational wave observatories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced gravitational wave detectors, currently under construction, are expected to directly observe gravitational wave signals of astrophysical origin. The Einstein Telescope (ET), a third-generation gravitational wave detector, has been proposed in order to fully open up the emerging field of gravitational wave astronomy. In this paper we describe sensitivity models for ET and investigate potential limits imposed by fundamental noise sources. A special focus is set on evaluating the frequency band below 10 Hz where a complex mixture of seismic, gravity gradient, suspension thermal and radiation pressure noise dominates. We develop the most accurate sensitivity model, referred to as ET-D, for a third-generation detector so far, including the most relevant fundamental noise contributions.

  15. Incorporating information from source simulations into searches for gravitational-wave bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Brady, P R; Brady, Patrick R; Ray-Majumder, Saikat

    2004-01-01

    The detection of gravitational waves from astrophysical sources of gravitational waves is a realistic goal for the current generation of interferometric gravitational-wave detectors. Short duration bursts of gravitational waves from core-collapse supernovae or mergers of binary black holes may bring a wealth of astronomical and astrophysical information. The weakness of the waves and the rarity of the events urges the development of optimal methods to detect the waves. The waves from these sources are not generally known well enough to use matched filtering however; this drives the need to develop new ways to exploit source simulation information in both detections and information extraction. We present an algorithmic approach to using catalogs of gravitational-wave signals developed through numerical simulation, or otherwise, to enhance our ability to detect these waves. As more detailed simulations become available, it is straightforward to incorporate the new information into the search method. This approa...

  16. Gravitational waves carrying orbital angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialynicki-Birula, Iwo; Bialynicka-Birula, Zofia

    2016-02-01

    Spinorial formalism is used to map every electromagnetic wave into the gravitational wave (within the linearized gravity). In this way we can obtain the gravitational counterparts of Bessel, Laguerre-Gauss, and other light beams carrying orbital angular momentum.

  17. Merging Black Holes and Gravitational Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan

    2009-01-01

    This talk will focus on simulations of binary black hole mergers and the gravitational wave signals they produce. Applications to gravitational wave detection with LISA, and electronagnetic counterparts, will be highlighted.

  18. Gravitational waves carrying orbital angular momentum

    CERN Document Server

    Bialynicki-Birula, Iwo

    2015-01-01

    Spinorial formalism is used to map every electromagnetic wave into the gravitational wave (within the linearized gravity). In this way we can obtain the gravitational counterparts of Bessel, Laguerre-Gauss, and other light beams carrying orbital angular momentum.

  19. Academic Training: Gravitational Waves Astronomy

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    2006-2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 16, 17, 18 October from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Gravitational Waves Astronomy M. LANDRY, LIGO Hanford Observatory, Richland, USA Gravitational wave astronomy is expected to become an observational field within the next decade. First direct detection of gravitational waves is possible with existing terrestrial-based detectors, and highly probable with proposed upgrades. In this three-part lecture series, we give an overview of the field, including material on gravitional wave sources, detection methods, some details of interferometric detectors, data analysis methods, and current results from observational data-taking runs of the LIGO and GEO projects.ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply electronically from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern...

  20. Folding Gravitational-Wave Interferometers

    CERN Document Server

    Sanders, J R

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity of kilometer-scale terrestrial gravitational wave interferometers is limited by mirror coating thermal noise. We explore the effect of folding the arm cavities of such interferometers. While simple folding alone does not reduce the mirror coating thermal noise, it makes the folding mirror the critical mirror, opening up a variety of design and upgrade options.

  1. GRAVITATIONAL WAVES AND SCHRODINGER QUANTUM THEORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trunev A. P.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider gravitation theory in multidimensional space. The model of the metric satisfying the basic requirements of quantum theory is proposed. It is shown that gravitational waves are described by the Liouville equation. Conjecture about the Schrödinger wave function due to gravitational waves was proved. Solutions of the gravitational field equations similar to the de Broglie waves have been constructed.

  2. On the polarization of nonlinear gravitational waves

    OpenAIRE

    Poplawski, Nikodem J.

    2011-01-01

    We derive a relation between the two polarization modes of a plane, linear gravitational wave in the second-order approximation. Since these two polarizations are not independent, an initially monochromatic gravitational wave loses its periodic character due to the nonlinearity of the Einstein field equations. Accordingly, real gravitational waves may differ from solutions of the linearized field equations, which are being assumed in gravitational-wave detectors.

  3. Gravitational waves from smooth hybrid new infation

    OpenAIRE

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Saikawa, Ken'ichi; Takeda, Naoyuki

    2012-01-01

    We calculate the production of the gravitational waves from a double inflation model with lattice simulations. Between the two inflationary stages, gravitational waves with a characteristic frequency are produced by fluctuations of the scalar fields enhanced through parametric resonance. The wavelength of the produced gravitational waves gets extra redshift during the second inflationary stage and it can be in the observable range for the direct gravitational wave detectors. It is found that ...

  4. The Japanese space gravitational wave antenna - DECIGO

    OpenAIRE

    Kawamura, Seiji; Ando, Masaki; Nakamura,Takashi; Tsubono, Kimio; Tanaka, Takahiro; Funaki, Iklkoh; Seto, Naoki; Numata, Kenji; Sato, Shuichi; Ioka, Kunihito; Kanda, Nobuyuki; Takashima, Takeshi; Agatsuma, Kazuhiro; Akutsu, Tomotada; Akutsu, Tomomi

    2008-01-01

    DECi-hertz Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (DECIGO) is the future Japanese space gravitational wave antenna. The goal of DECIGO is to detect gravitational waves from various kinds of sources mainly between 0.1 Hz and 10 Hz and thus to open a new window of observation for gravitational wave astronomy. DECIGO will consist of three drag-free spacecraft, 1000 km apart from each other, whose relative displacements are measured by a Fabry—Perot Michelson interferometer. We plan to lau...

  5. Gravitational waves and electrodynamics: New perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Cabral, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Given the recent direct measurement of gravitational waves (GWs) by the LIGO-VIRGO collaboration, the coupling between electromagnetic fields and GW have a special relevance since it might open new perspectives for future GW detectors and also potentially provide information on the physics of highly energetic GW sources. We explore such couplings using the field equations of electrodynamics on (pseudo) Riemann manifolds and apply it to the background of a GW, seen as a linear perturbation of Minkowski geometry. Electric and magnetic oscillations are induced that propagate as electromagnetic waves and contain information of the GW which generates them. We also show very briefly the generation of charge density fluctuations induced by GW and the implications for astrophysics.

  6. Data analysis techniques for gravitational wave observations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S V Dhurandhar

    2004-10-01

    Astrophysical sources of gravitational waves fall broadly into three categories: (i) transient and bursts, (ii) periodic or continuous wave and (iii) stochastic. Each type of source requires a different type of data analysis strategy. In this talk various data analysis strategies will be reviewed. Optimal filtering is used for extracting binary inspirals; Fourier transforms over Doppler shifted time intervals are computed for long duration periodic sources; optimally weighted cross-correlations for stochastic background. Some recent schemes which efficiently search for inspirals will be described. The performance of some of these techniques on real data obtained will be discussed. Finally, some results on cancellation of systematic noises in laser interferometric space antenna (LISA) will be presented and future directions indicated.

  7. Detecting gravitational waves from accreting neutron stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.L. Watts; B. Krishnan

    2009-01-01

    The gravitational waves emitted by neutron stars carry unique information about their structure and composition. Direct detection of these gravitational waves, however, is a formidable technical challenge. In a recent study we quantified the hurdles facing searches for gravitational waves from the k

  8. Gravitational waves spectrum in squeezed vacuum state

    OpenAIRE

    Malsawmtluangi, N.; Suresh, P. K.

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational waves are placed in the squeezed vacuum state and obtained its spectrum for the expanding flat FLRW universe. The gravitational wave spectrum gets enhanced due to the squeezing effect and is likely to be detected with the Einstein Telescope. The spectral energy density of gravitational waves in the squeezed vacuum state does not exceed the nucleosynthesis upper bound.

  9. The damping of gravitational waves in dust

    CERN Document Server

    Svitek, Otakar

    2008-01-01

    We examine a simple model of interaction of gravitational waves with matter (primarily represented by dust). The aim is to investigate a possible damping effect on the intensity of gravitational wave when passing through media. This might be important for gravitational wave astronomy when the sources are obscured by dust or molecular clouds.

  10. Gravitational wave scintillation by a stellar cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Congedo, G; Longo, P; Nucita, A A; Vetrugno, D

    2006-01-01

    The diffraction effects on gravitational waves propagating through a stellar cluster are analyzed in the relevant approximation of Fresnel diffraction limit. We find that a gravitational wave scintillation effect - similar to the radio source scintillation effect - comes out naturally, implying that the gravitational wave intensity changes in a characteristic way as the observer moves.

  11. Scale-covariant theory of gravitation and astrophysical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuto, V.; Adams, P. J.; Hsieh, S.-H.; Tsiang, E.

    1977-01-01

    A scale-covariant theory of gravitation is presented which is characterized by a set of equations that are complete only after a choice of the scale function is made. Special attention is given to gauge conditions and units which allow gravitational phenomena to be described in atomic units. The generalized gravitational-field equations are derived by performing a direct scale transformation, by extending Riemannian geometry to Weyl geometry through the introduction of the notion of cotensors, and from a variation principle. Modified conservation laws are provided, a set of dynamical equations is obtained, and astrophysical consequences are considered. The theory is applied to examine certain homogeneous cosmological solutions, perihelion shifts, light deflections, secular variations of planetary orbital elements, stellar structure equations for a star in quasi-static equilibrium, and the past thermal history of earth. The possible relation of the scale-covariant theory to gauge field theories and their predictions of cosmological constants is discussed.

  12. Gravitational-wave mediated preheating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, Stephon [Center for Cosmic Origins and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Cormack, Sam, E-mail: samuel.c.cormack.gr@dartmouth.edu [Center for Cosmic Origins and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Marcianò, Antonino [Center for Field Theory and Particle Physics & Department of Physics, Fudan University, 200433 Shanghai (China); Yunes, Nicolás [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2015-04-09

    We propose a new preheating mechanism through the coupling of the gravitational field to both the inflaton and matter fields, without direct inflaton–matter couplings. The inflaton transfers power to the matter fields through interactions with gravitational waves, which are exponentially enhanced due to an inflation–graviton coupling. One such coupling is the product of the inflaton to the Pontryagin density, as in dynamical Chern–Simons gravity. The energy scales involved are constrained by requiring that preheating happens fast during matter domination.

  13. Gravitational-wave mediated preheating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephon Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new preheating mechanism through the coupling of the gravitational field to both the inflaton and matter fields, without direct inflaton–matter couplings. The inflaton transfers power to the matter fields through interactions with gravitational waves, which are exponentially enhanced due to an inflation–graviton coupling. One such coupling is the product of the inflaton to the Pontryagin density, as in dynamical Chern–Simons gravity. The energy scales involved are constrained by requiring that preheating happens fast during matter domination.

  14. Gravitational-wave mediated preheating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a new preheating mechanism through the coupling of the gravitational field to both the inflaton and matter fields, without direct inflaton–matter couplings. The inflaton transfers power to the matter fields through interactions with gravitational waves, which are exponentially enhanced due to an inflation–graviton coupling. One such coupling is the product of the inflaton to the Pontryagin density, as in dynamical Chern–Simons gravity. The energy scales involved are constrained by requiring that preheating happens fast during matter domination

  15. Implications of the gravitational wave event GW150914

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. Coleman

    2016-07-01

    The era of gravitational-wave astronomy began on 14 September 2015, when the LIGO Scientific Collaboration detected the merger of two ˜30 M_⊙ black holes at a distance of {˜ }400 Mpc. This event has facilitated qualitatively new tests of gravitational theories, and has also produced exciting information about the astrophysical origin of black hole binaries. In this review we discuss the implications of this event for gravitational physics and astrophysics, as well as the expectations for future detections. In brief: (1) because the spins of the black holes could not be measured accurately and because mergers are not well calculated for modified theories of gravity, the current analysis of GW150914 does not place strong constraints on gravity variants that change only the generation of gravitational waves, but (2) it does strongly constrain alterations of the propagation of gravitational waves and alternatives to black holes. Finally, (3) many astrophysical models for the origin of heavy black hole binaries such as the GW150914 system are in play, but a reasonably robust conclusion that was reached even prior to the detection is that the environment of such systems needs to have a relatively low abundance of elements heavier than helium.

  16. NANOGrav Constraints on Gravitational Wave Bursts with Memory

    CERN Document Server

    Arzoumanian, Z; Burke-Spolaor, S; Chamberlin, S J; Chatterjee, S; Christy, B; Cordes, J M; Cornish, N J; Demorest, P B; Deng, X; Dolch, T; Ellis, J A; Ferdman, R D; Fonseca, E; Garver-Daniels, N; Jenet, F; Jones, G; Kaspi, V M; Koop, M; Lam, M T; Lazio, T J W; Levin, L; Lommen, A N; Lorimer, D R; Luo, J; Lynch, R S; Madison, D R; McLaughlin, M A; McWilliams, S T; Nice, D J; Palliyaguru, N; Pennucci, T T; Ransom, S M; Siemens, X; Stairs, I H; Stinebring, D R; Stovall, K; Swiggum, J; Vallisneri, M; van Haasteren, R; Wang, Y; Zhu, W W

    2015-01-01

    Among efforts to detect gravitational radiation, pulsar timing arrays are uniquely poised to detect "memory" signatures, permanent perturbations in spacetime from highly energetic astrophysical events such as mergers of supermassive black hole binaries. The North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) observes dozens of the most stable millisecond pulsars using the Arecibo and Green Bank radio telescopes in an effort to study, among other things, gravitational wave memory. We herein present the results of a search for gravitational wave bursts with memory (BWMs) using the first five years of NANOGrav observations. We develop original methods for dramatically speeding up searches for BWM signals. In the directions of the sky where our sensitivity to BWMs is best, we would detect mergers of binaries with reduced masses of $10^9$ $M_\\odot$ out to distances of 30 Mpc; such massive mergers in the Virgo cluster would be marginally detectable. We find no evidence for BWMs. However, with ou...

  17. On the point mass approximation to calculate the gravitational wave signal from white dwarf binaries

    OpenAIRE

    Broek, D. van den; Nelemans, G. A.; Dan, M; Rosswog, S.

    2012-01-01

    Double white dwarf binaries in the Galaxy dominate the gravitational wave sky and would be detectable for an instrument such as LISA. Most studies have calculated the expected gravitational wave signal under the assumption that the binary white dwarf system can be represented by two point masses in orbit. We discuss the accuracy of this approximation for real astrophysical systems. For non-relativistic binaries in circular orbit the gravitational wave signal can easily be calculated. We show ...

  18. The Japanese space gravitational wave antenna - DECIGO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, S.; Ando, M.; Nakamura, T.; Tsubono, K.; Tanaka, T.; Funaki, I.; Seto, N.; Numata, K.; Sato, S.; Ioka, K.; Kanda, N.; Takashima, T.; Agatsuma, K.; Akutsu, T.; Akutsu, T.; Aoyanagi, Koh-Suke; Arai, K.; Arase, Y.; Araya, A.; Asada, H.; Aso, Y.; Chiba, T.; Ebisuzaki, T.; Enoki, M.; Eriguchi, Y.; Fujimoto, M.-K.; Fujita, R.; Fukushima, M.; Futamase, T.; Ganzu, K.; Harada, T.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayama, K.; Hikida, W.; Himemoto, Y.; Hirabayashi, H.; Hiramatsu, T.; Hong, F.-L.; Horisawa, H.; Hosokawa, M.; Ichiki, K.; Ikegami, T.; Inoue, K. T.; Ishidoshiro, K.; Ishihara, H.; Ishikawa, T.; Ishizaki, H.; Ito, H.; Itoh, Y.; Kamagasako, S.; Kawashima, N.; Kawazoe, F.; Kirihara, H.; Kishimoto, N.; Kiuchi, K.; Kobayashi, S.; Kohri, K.; Koizumi, H.; Kojima, Y.; Kokeyama, K.; Kokuyama, W.; Kotake, K.; Kozai, Y.; Kudoh, H.; Kunimori, H.; Kuninaka, H.; Kuroda, K.; Maeda, K.-i.; Matsuhara, H.; Mino, Y.; Miyakawa, O.; Miyoki, S.; Morimoto, M. Y.; Morioka, T.; Morisawa, T.; Moriwaki, S.; Mukohyama, S.; Musha, M.; Nagano, S.; Naito, I.; Nakagawa, N.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, H.; Nakao, K.; Nakasuka, S.; Nakayama, Y.; Nishida, E.; Nishiyama, K.; Nishizawa, A.; Niwa, Y.; Ohashi, M.; Ohishi, N.; Ohkawa, M.; Okutomi, A.; Onozato, K.; Oohara, K.; Sago, N.; Saijo, M.; Sakagami, M.; Sakai, S.-i.; Sakata, S.; Sasaki, M.; Sato, T.; Shibata, M.; Shinkai, H.; Somiya, K.; Sotani, H.; Sugiyama, N.; Suwa, Y.; Tagoshi, H.; Takahashi, K.; Takahashi, K.; Takahashi, T.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, R.; Takahashi, R.; Takamori, A.; Takano, T.; Taniguchi, K.; Taruya, A.; Tashiro, H.; Tokuda, M.; Tokunari, M.; Toyoshima, M.; Tsujikawa, S.; Tsunesada, Y.; Ueda, K.-i.; Utashima, M.; Yamakawa, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamazaki, T.; Yokoyama, J.; Yoo, C.-M.; Yoshida, S.; Yoshino, T.

    2008-07-01

    DECi-hertz Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (DECIGO) is the future Japanese space gravitational wave antenna. The goal of DECIGO is to detect gravitational waves from various kinds of sources mainly between 0.1 Hz and 10 Hz and thus to open a new window of observation for gravitational wave astronomy. DECIGO will consist of three drag-free spacecraft, 1000 km apart from each other, whose relative displacements are measured by a Fabry—Perot Michelson interferometer. We plan to launch DECIGO pathfinder first to demonstrate the technologies required to realize DECIGO and, if possible, to detect gravitational waves from our galaxy or nearby galaxies.

  19. Pulsars revived by gravitational waves

    OpenAIRE

    Lipunov, Vladimir M.; Panchenko, Ivan E.

    1996-01-01

    Binary neutron stars mergers that are expected to be the most powerful source of energy in the Universe definitely exist in nature, as is proven by the observed behavior of the Hulse-Taylor binary radio pulsar. Though most of energy in such events is radiated in gravitational waves, there probably exist several mechanisms giving also electromagnetic radiation. We propose a new one, involving a revival of the radio pulsar several orbital cycles before the merger.

  20. Space-Based Gravitational-wave Mission Concept Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.

    2012-01-01

    The LISA Mission Concept has been under study for over two decades as a spacebased gravitational-wave detector capable of observing astrophysical sources in the 0.0001 to 1 Hz band. The concept has consistently received strong recommendations from various review panels based on the expected science, most recently from the US Astr02010 Decadal Review. Budget constraints have led both the US and European Space agencies to search for lower cost options. We report results from the US effort to explore the tradeoffs between mission cost and science return, and in particular a family of mission concepts referred to as SGO (Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatory).

  1. Accumulative coupling between magnetized tenuous plasma and gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan

    2016-07-01

    We explicitly compute the plasma wave (PW) induced by a plane gravitational wave (GW) traveling through a region of strongly magnetized plasma, governed by force-free electrodynamics. The PW comoves with the GW and absorbs its energy to grow over time, creating an essentially force-free counterpart to the inverse-Gertsenshtein effect. The time-averaged Poynting flux of the induced PW is comparable to the vacuum case, but the associated current may offer a more sensitive alternative to photodetection when designing experiments for detecting/constraining high-frequency gravitational waves. Aside from the exact solutions, we also offer an analysis of the general properties of the GW to PW conversion process, which should find use when evaluating electromagnetic counterparts to astrophysical gravitational waves that are generated directly by the latter as a second-order phenomenon.

  2. Accumulative coupling between magnetized tenuous plasma and gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    We explicitly compute the plasma wave (PW) induced by a plane gravitational wave (GW) travelling through a region of strongly magnetized plasma, governed by force-free electrodynamics. The PW co-moves with the GW and absorbs its energy to grow over time, creating an essentially force-free counterpart to the inverse-Gertsenshtein effect. The time-averaged Poynting flux of the induced PW is comparable to the vacuum case, but the associated current may offer a more sensitive alternative to photodetection when designing experiments for detecting/constraining high frequency gravitational waves. Aside from the exact solutions, we also offer an analysis of the general properties of the GW to PW conversion process, which should find use when evaluating electromagnetic counterparts to astrophysical gravitational waves, that are generated directly by the latter as a second order phenomenon.

  3. Can Gravitational Waves Prevent Inflation?

    CERN Document Server

    Shinkai, H; SHINKAI, Hisa-aki; MAEDA, Kei-ichi

    1993-01-01

    To investigate the cosmic no hair conjecture, we analyze numerically 1-dimensional plane symmetrical inhomogeneities due to gravitational waves in vacuum spacetimes with a positive cosmological constant. Assuming periodic gravitational pulse waves initially, we study the time evolution of those waves and the nature of their collisions. As measures of inhomogeneity on each hypersurface, we use the 3-dimensional Riemann invariant ${\\cal I}\\equiv {}~^{(3)\\!}R_{ijkl}~^{(3)\\!}R^{ijkl}$ and the electric and magnetic parts of the Weyl tensor. We find a temporal growth of the curvature in the waves' collision region, but the overall expansion of the universe later overcomes this effect. No singularity appears and the result is a ``no hair" de Sitter spacetime. The waves we study have amplitudes between $0.020\\Lambda \\leq {\\cal I}^{1/2} \\leq 125.0\\Lambda$ and widths between $0.080l_H \\leq l \\leq 2.5l_H$, where $l_H=(\\Lambda/3)^{-1/2}$, the horizon scale of de Sitter spacetime. This supports the cosmic no hair conjectu...

  4. Gravitational Waves from Neutron Stars: A Review

    CERN Document Server

    Lasky, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    Neutron stars are excellent emitters of gravitational waves. Squeezing matter beyond nuclear densities invites exotic physical processes, many of which violently transfer large amounts of mass at relativistic velocities, disrupting spacetime and generating copious quantities of gravitational radiation. I review mechanisms for generating gravitational waves with neutron stars. This includes gravitational waves from radio and millisecond pulsars, magnetars, accreting systems and newly born neutron stars, with mechanisms including magnetic and thermoelastic deformations, various stellar oscillation modes and core superfluid turbulence. I also focus on what physics can be learnt from a gravitational wave detection, and where additional research is required to fully understand the dominant physical processes at play.

  5. Thermal gravitational waves in accelerating universe

    OpenAIRE

    B Ghayour

    2013-01-01

    Gravitational waves are considered in thermal vacuum state. The amplitude and spectral energy density of gravitational waves are found enhanced in thermal vacuum state compared to its zero temperature counterpart. Therefore, the allowed amount of enhancement depends on the upper bound of WMAP-5 and WMAP-7 for the amplitude and spectral energy density of gravitational waves. The enhancement of amplitude and spectral energy density of the waves in thermal vacuum state is consistent with curren...

  6. Gravitational wave astronomy: needle in a haystack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornish, Neil J

    2013-02-13

    A worldwide array of highly sensitive ground-based interferometers stands poised to usher in a new era in astronomy with the first direct detection of gravitational waves. The data from these instruments will provide a unique perspective on extreme astrophysical objects, such as neutron stars and black holes, and will allow us to test Einstein's theory of gravity in the strong field, dynamical regime. To fully realize these goals, we need to solve some challenging problems in signal processing and inference, such as finding rare and weak signals that are buried in non-stationary and non-Gaussian instrument noise, dealing with high-dimensional model spaces, and locating what are often extremely tight concentrations of posterior mass within the prior volume. Gravitational wave detection using space-based detectors and pulsar timing arrays bring with them the additional challenge of having to isolate individual signals that overlap one another in both time and frequency. Promising solutions to these problems will be discussed, along with some of the challenges that remain. PMID:23277598

  7. Constraining Gravitational and Cosmological Parameters with Astrophysical Data

    CERN Document Server

    Mao, Yi

    2008-01-01

    We use astrophysical data to shed light on fundamental physics by constraining parametrized theoretical cosmological and gravitational models. Gravitational parameters are those constants that parametrize possible departures from Einstein's general theory of relativity. We develop a general framework to describe torsion in the spacetime around the Earth, and show that certain observables of the Gravity Probe B experiment can be computed in this framework. We also search for viable theories of gravity where the Ricci scalar R in the Lagrangian is replaced by an arbitrary function f(R). Making use of the equivalence between such theories and scalar-tensor gravity, we find that models can be made consistent with solar system constraints either by giving the scalar a high mass or by exploiting the so-called Chameleon Effect. Cosmology can successfully describe the evolution of our universe using six or more adjustable cosmological parameters. There is growing interest in using 3-dimensional neutral hydrogen mappi...

  8. Concerning the vacuum velocity of gravitational waves

    OpenAIRE

    Pleitez, Vicente

    1995-01-01

    It is pointed out that if gravitational interactions among ordinary bodies propagate in extra space-time dimensions the velocity of gravitational waves in vacuum could be different from the speed of light $c$.

  9. Electromagnetic waves, gravitational waves and the prophets who predicted them

    OpenAIRE

    Papachristou, Costas J.

    2016-01-01

    Using non-excessively-technical language and written in informal style, this article introduces the reader to the concepts of electromagnetic and gravitational waves and recounts the prediction of existence of these waves by Maxwell and Einstein, respectively. The issue of gravitational radiation is timely in view of the recent announcement of the detection of gravitational waves by the LIGO scientific team.

  10. The rotation of polarization by gravitational waves

    OpenAIRE

    Faraoni, Valerio

    2007-01-01

    There are conflicting statements in the literature about the gravitational Faraday rotation of the plane of polarization of polarized electromagnetic radiation travelling through a gravitational wave. This issue is reconsidered using a simple formalism describing the rotation of the plane of polarization in a gravitational field, in the geometric optics approximation. It is shown that, to first order in the gravitational wave amplitude, the rotation angle is a boundary effect which vanishes f...

  11. The Gravitational Wave Observatory Designer: Sensitivity Limits of Spaceborne Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Barke, Simon; Delgado, Juan Jose Esteban; Tröbs, Michael; Heinzel, Gerhard; Danzmann, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    The most promising concept for low frequency gravitational wave observatories are laser interferometric detectors in space. It is usually assumed that the noise floor for such a detector is dominated by optical shot noise in the signal readout. For this to be true, a careful balance of mission parameters is crucial to keep all other parasitic disturbances below shot noise. We developed a web application that uses over 30 input parameters and considers many important technical noise sources and noise suppression techniques. It optimizes free parameters automatically and generates a detailed report on all individual noise contributions. Thus you can easily explore the entire parameter space and design a realistic gravitational wave observatory. In this document we describe the different parameters, present all underlying calculations, and compare the final observatory's sensitivity with astrophysical sources of gravitational waves. We use as an example parameters currently assumed to be likely applied to a spac...

  12. Gravitational-wave astronomy: Observational results and their impact

    CERN Document Server

    Shawhan, Peter S

    2010-01-01

    The successful construction and operation of highly sensitive gravitational-wave detectors is an achievement to be proud of, but the detection of actual signals is still around the corner. Even so, null results from recent searches have told us some interesting things about the objects that live in our universe, so it can be argued that the era of gravitational-wave astronomy has already begun. In this article I review several of these results and discuss what we have learned from them. I then look into the not-so-distant future and predict some ways in which the detection of gravitational-wave signals will shape our knowledge of astrophysics and transform the field.

  13. Gravitational-wave astronomy: observational results and their impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The successful construction and operation of highly sensitive gravitational-wave detectors is an achievement to be proud of, but the detection of actual signals is still around the corner. Even so, null results from recent searches have told us some interesting things about the objects that live in our universe, so it can be argued that the era of gravitational-wave astronomy has already begun. In this paper I review several of these results and discuss what we have learned from them. I then look into the not-so-distant future and predict some ways in which the detection of gravitational-wave signals will shape our knowledge of astrophysics and transform the field.

  14. LIGO - The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramovici, Alex; Althouse, William E.; Drever, Ronald W. P.; Gursel, Yekta; Kawamura, Seiji; Raab, Frederick J.; Shoemaker, David; Sievers, Lisa; Spero, Robert E.; Thorne, Kip S.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) Project is to detect and study astrophysical gravitational waves and use data from them for research in physics and astronomy. LIGO will support studies concerning the nature and nonlinear dynamics for gravity, the structures of black holes, and the equation of state of nuclear matter. It will also measure the masses, birth rates, collisions, and distributions of black holes and neutron stars in the universe and probe the cores of supernovae and the very early universe. The technology for LIGO has been developed during the past 20 years. Construction will begin in 1992, and under the present schedule, LIGO's gravitational-wave searches will begin in 1998.

  15. A Model of the Stochastic Gravitational-Wave Background due to Core Collapse to Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Crocker, K; Regimbau, T; Belczynski, K; Gladysz, W; Olive, K; Prestegard, T; Vangioni, E

    2015-01-01

    Superposition of gravitational waves generated by astrophysical sources is expected to give rise to the stochastic gravitational-wave background. We focus on the background generated by the ring-down of black holes produced in the stellar core collapse events across the universe. We systematically study the parameter space in this model, including the most recent information about the star formation rate and about the population of black holes as a function of redshift and of metallicity. We investigate the accessibility of this gravitational wave background to the upcoming gravitational-wave detectors, such as Advanced LIGO and Einstein Telescope.

  16. Interaction of light with gravitational waves

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The physical properties of electromagnetic waves in the presence of a gravitational plane wave are analyzed. Formulas for the Stokes parameters describing the polarization of light are obtained in closed form. The particular case of a constant amplitude gravitational wave is worked out explicitly.

  17. Gravitational waves from binary black holes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bala R Iyer

    2011-07-01

    It is almost a century since Einstein predicted the existence of gravitational waves as one of the consequences of his general theory of relativity. A brief historical overview including Chandrasekhar’s contribution to the subject is first presented. The current status of the experimental search for gravitational waves and the attendant theoretical insights into the two-body problem in general relativity arising from computations of gravitational waves from binary black holes are then broadly reviewed.

  18. Einstein and Gravitational Waves 1936-1938

    CERN Document Server

    Weinstein, Galina

    2016-01-01

    Around 1936, Einstein wrote to his close friend Max Born telling him that, together with Nathan Rosen, he had arrived at the interesting result that gravitational waves did not exist, though they had been assumed a certainty to the first approximation. He finally had found a mistake in his 1936 paper with Rosen and believed that gravitational waves do exist. However, in 1938, Einstein again obtained the result that there could be no gravitational waves!

  19. A synthetic model of the gravitational wave background from evolving binary compact objects

    CERN Document Server

    Dvorkin, Irina; Vangioni, Elisabeth; Silk, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Modeling the stochastic gravitational wave background from various astrophysical sources is a key objective in view of upcoming observations with ground- and space-based gravitational wave observatories such as Advanced LIGO, VIRGO, eLISA and PTA. We develop a synthetic model framework that follows the evolution of single and binary compact objects in an astrophysical context. We describe the formation and merger rates of binaries, the evolution of their orbital parameters with time and the spectrum of emitted gravitational waves at different stages of binary evolution. Our approach is modular and allows us to test and constrain different ingredients of the model, including stellar evolution, black hole formation scenarios and the properties of binary systems. We use this framework in the context of a particularly well-motivated astrophysical setup to calculate the gravitational wave background from several types of sources, including inspiraling stellar-mass binary black holes that have not merged during a H...

  20. Measurement of parity violation in the early universe using gravitational-wave detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowder, S.G., E-mail: crowder@physics.umn.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Namba, R., E-mail: namba@physics.umn.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Mandic, V. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Mukohyama, S. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Peloso, M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); INFN Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2013-10-07

    A stochastic gravitational-wave background (SGWB) is expected to arise from the superposition of many independent and unresolved gravitational-wave signals, of either cosmological or astrophysical origin. Some cosmological models (characterized, for instance, by a pseudo-scalar inflaton, or by some modification of gravity) break parity, leading to a polarized isotropic SGWB. We present the first upper limit on this parity violation from direct gravitational-wave measurements by measuring polarization of the SGWB in recent LIGO data and by assuming a generic power-law SGWB spectrum across the LIGO-sensitive frequency region. We also estimate sensitivity to parity violation for future generations of gravitational-wave detectors, both for a power-law spectrum and for a specific model of axion inflation. Since astrophysical sources are not expected to produce a polarized SGWB, measurements of polarization in the SGWB would provide a new way of differentiating between the cosmological and astrophysical SGWB sources.

  1. Gravitational Waves Astronomy: a cornerstone for gravitational theories

    CERN Document Server

    Corda, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Realizing a gravitational wave (GW) astronomy in next years is a great challenge for the scientific community. By giving a significant amount of new information, GWs will be a cornerstone for a better understanding of gravitational physics. In this paper we re-discuss that the GW astronomy will permit to solve a captivating issue of gravitation. In fact, it will be the definitive test for Einstein's general relativity (GR), or, alternatively, a strong endorsement for extended theories of gravity (ETG).

  2. S. Chandrasekhar: White Dwarfs, $H^-$ ion,.., Black holes, Gravitational waves

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Patrick Das

    2011-01-01

    This is a concise review, addressed to undergraduate students, of S. Chandrasekhar's oeuvre in astrophysics, ranging from his early studies on white dwarfs using relativistic quantum statistics to topics as diverse as dynamical friction, negative hydrogen ion, fluid dynamical instabilities, black holes and gravitational waves. The exposition is based on simple physical explanations in the context of observational astronomy. Black holes and their role as central engines of active, compact, hig...

  3. Seismic isolation of Advanced LIGO gravitational waves detectors: Review of strategy, instrumentation, and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Matichard, F; Mittleman, R; Mason, K; Kissel, J; McIver, J; Abbott, B; Abbott, R; Abbott, S; Allwine, E; Barnum, S; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Celerier, C; Clark, D; Coyne, D; DeBra, D; DeRosa, R; Evans, M; Foley, S; Fritschel, P; Giaime, J A; Gray, C; Grabeel, G; Hanson, J; Hardham, C; Hillard, M; Hua, W; Kucharczyk, C; Landry, M; Roux, A Le; Lhuillier, V; Macleod, D; Macinnis, M; Mitchell, R; Reilly, B O; Ottaway, D; Paris, H; Pele, A; Puma, M; Radkins, H; Ramet, C; Robinson, M; Ruet, L; Sarin, P; Shoemaker, D; Stein, A; Thomas, J; Vargas, M; Venkateswara, K; Warner, J; Wen, S

    2015-01-01

    Isolating ground-based interferometric gravitational wave observatories from environmental disturbances is one of the great challenges of the advanced detector era. In order to directly observe gravitational waves, the detector components and test masses must be highly inertially decoupled from the ground motion not only to sense the faint strain of space-time induced by gravitational waves, but also to maintain the resonance of the very sensitive 4 km interferometers. This article presents the seismic isolation instrumentation and strategy developed for Advanced LIGO interferometers. It reviews over a decade of research on active isolation in the context of gravitational wave detection, and presents the performance recently achieved with the Advanced LIGO observatory. Lastly, it discusses prospects for future developments in active seismic isolation and the anticipated benefits to astrophysical gravitational wave searches. Beyond gravitational wave research, the goal of this article is to provide detailed is...

  4. Toward terrestrial detection of millihertz gravitational waves with magnetically assisted torsion pendulums

    CERN Document Server

    Thrane, Eric; Levin, Yuri; Turner, L D

    2015-01-01

    Current terrestrial gravitational-wave detectors operate at frequencies above 10Hz. There is strong astrophysical motivation to construct low-frequency gravitational-wave detectors capable of observing 10-1e4 mHz signals. However, there are numerous technological challenges. In particular, it is difficult to isolate test masses so that they are both seismically isolated and freely falling under the influence of gravity at mHz frequencies. We propose a Magnetically Assisted Gravitational-wave Pendulum Intorsion (MAGPI) suspension design for use in low-frequency gravitational-wave detectors. We construct a noise budget to determine the required specifications. In doing so, we identify what are likely to be a number of limiting noise sources for terrestrial mHz gravitational-wave suspension systems. We conclude that it may be possible to achieve the required seismic isolation and coupling to gravitational waves necessary for mHz detection, though, there are significant experimental challenges.

  5. Strings in plane-fronted gravitational waves

    OpenAIRE

    Duval, C.; Horvath, Z.; Horvathy, P. A.

    2006-01-01

    Brinkmann's plane-fronted gravitational waves with parallel rays --~shortly pp-waves~-- are shown to provide, under suitable conditions, exact string vacua at all orders of the sigma-model perturbation expansion.

  6. An Overview of Gravitational-Wave Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Cutler, C; Cutler, Curt; Thorne, Kip S.

    2002-01-01

    We review current best estimates of the strength and detectability of the gravitational waves from a variety of sources, for both ground-based and space-based detectors, and we describe the information carried by the waves.

  7. Scalar Gravitational Waves in the Effective Theory of Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Mottola, Emil

    2016-01-01

    As a low energy effective field theory, classical General Relativity receives an infrared relevant modification from the conformal trace anomaly of the energy-momentum tensor of massless, or nearly massless, quantum fields. The local form of the effective action associated with the trace anomaly is expressed in terms of a dynamical scalar field that couples to the conformal factor of the spacetime metric, allowing it to propagate over macroscopic distances. Linearized around flat spacetime, this semi-classical EFT admits scalar gravitational wave solutions in addition to the transversely polarized tensor waves of the classical Einstein theory. The amplitude, Hamiltonian, energy flux, and quantization of the scalar wave modes are discussed. Astrophysical sources for scalar gravitational waves are considered, with the excited gluonic condensates in the interiors of neutron stars in merger events with other compact objects likely to provide the strongest burst signals.

  8. Black Hole Mergers and Gravitational Waves: Opening the New Frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan

    2012-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes produces a powerful burst of gravitational waves, emitting more energy than all the stars in the observable universe combined. Since these mergers take place in the regime of strong dynamical gravity, computing the gravitational waveforms requires solving the full Einstein equations of general relativity on a computer. For more than 30 years, scientists tried to simulate these mergers using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes were plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. In the past several years, this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of remarkable breakthroughs. This talk will highlight these breakthroughs and the resulting 'gold rush' of new results that is revealing the dynamics of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wave detection, testing general relativity, and astrophysics.

  9. Black Hole Mergers, Gravitational Waves, and Multi-Messenger Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan M.

    2010-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes is expected to be the strongest source of gravitational waves for both ground-based detectors such as LIGO and VIRGO, as well as the space-based LISA. Since the merger takes place in the regime of strong dynamical gravity, computing the resulting gravitational waveforms requires solving the full Einstein equations of general relativity on a computer. Although numerical codes designed to simulate black hole mergers were plagued for many years by a host of instabilities, recent breakthroughs have conquered these problems and opened up this field dramatically. This talk will focus on the resulting gold rush of new results that is revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wave detection, astrophysics, and testing general relativity.

  10. Adding light to the gravitational waves on the null cone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiuc, Maria

    2014-03-01

    Recent interesting astrophysical observations point towards a multi-messenger, multi-wavelength approach to understanding strong gravitational sources, like compact stars or black hole collisions, supernovae explosions, or even the big bang. Gravitational radiation is properly defined only at future null infinity, but usually is estimated at a finite radius, and then extrapolated. Our group developed a characteristic waveform extraction tool, implemented in an open source code, which computes the gravitational waves infinitely far from their source, in terms of compactified null cones, by numerically solving Einstein equation in Bondi space-time coordinates. The goal is extend the capabilities of the code, by solving Einstein-Maxwell's equations together with the Maxwell's equations, to obtain the energy radiated asymptotically at infinity, both in gravitational and electromagnetic waves. The purpose is to analytically derive and numerically calculate both the gravitational waves and the electromagnetic counterparts at infinity, in this characteristic framework. The method is to treat the source of gravitational and electromagnetic radiation as a black box, and therefore the code will be very flexible, with potentially large applicability.

  11. Decoherence measure by gravitational wave interferometers

    OpenAIRE

    Mino, Yasushi

    2008-01-01

    We consider the possibility to measure the quantum decoherence using gravitational wave interferometers. Gravitational wave interferometers create the superposition state of photons and measure the interference of the photon state. If the decoherence occurs, the interference of the photon state vanishes and it can be measured by the interferometers. As examples of decoherence mechanisms, we consider 1) decoherence by spontaneous localization, 2) gravitational decoherence and 3) decoherence by...

  12. Accelerating the Universe with Gravitational Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, I A; Schrempp, L.; Ananda, K

    2009-01-01

    Inflation generically produces primordial gravitational waves with a red spectral tilt. In this paper we calculate the backreaction produced by these gravitational waves on the expansion of the universe. We find that in radiation domination the backreaction acts as a relativistic fluid, while in matter domination a small dark energy emerges with an equation of state w=-8/9.

  13. Nonlinear gravitational waves and their polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Canfora, F.; Vilasi, G.; Vitale, P.

    2002-01-01

    Vacuum gravitational fields invariant for a non Abelian Lie algebra generated by two Killing fields whose commutator is light-like are analyzed. It is shown that they represent nonlinear gravitational waves obeying to two nonlinear superposition laws. The energy and the polarization of this family of waves are explicitely evaluated.

  14. Spin Angular Momentum Imparted by Gravitational Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Sharif, M.

    2007-01-01

    Following the demonstration that gravitational waves impart linear momentum, it is argued that if they are polarized they should impart angular momentum to appropriately placed 'test rods' in their path. A general formula for this angular momentum is obtained and used to provide expressions for the angular momentum imparted by plane and cylindrical gravitational waves.

  15. Quantized gravitational waves in the Milne universe

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Takahiro; Sasaki, Misao

    1996-01-01

    The quantization of gravitational waves in the Milne universe is discussed. The relation between positive frequency functions of the gravitational waves in the Milne universe and those in the Minkowski universe is clarified. Implications to the one-bubble open inflation scenario are also discussed.

  16. Gravitational Collapse of Prolate Brill Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Rinne, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    It has been conjectured that the gravitational collapse of sufficiently prolate vacuum axisymmetric gravitational waves (Brill waves) may violate cosmic censorship. Improving on earlier work by Garfinkle and Duncan, I present a numerical evolution of such a prolate initial data set that does form an apparent horizon. Related advances in the construction of axisymmetric constrained evolution schemes are also discussed.

  17. Gravitational waves with torsion in 3D

    OpenAIRE

    Blagojević, M.; Cvetković, B.

    2014-01-01

    We study gravitational waves with torsion as exact vacuum solutions of three-dimensional gravity with propagating torsion. The new solutions are a natural generalization of the plane-fronted gravitational waves in general relativity with a cosmological constant, in the presence of matter.

  18. Gravitational Wave Background from Phantom Superinflation

    OpenAIRE

    Piao, Yun-Song

    2006-01-01

    Recently, the early superinflation driven by phantom field has been proposed and studied. The detection of primordial gravitational wave is an important means to know the state of very early universe. In this brief report we discuss in detail the gravitational wave background excited during the phantom superinflation.

  19. Observation of Gravitational Waves in Advanced LIGO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadonati, Laura

    2016-04-01

    One hundred years after Einstein's formulation of General Relativity, LIGO has observed gravitational waves from a binary black hole merger. In this talk I will present this groundbreaking discovery, which took place during the first observing run of Advanced LIGO, and its implications for a new gravitational wave astronomy.

  20. Quantized gravitational waves in the Milne universe

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, T; Tanaka, Takahiro; Sasaki, Misao

    1997-01-01

    The quantization of gravitational waves in the Milne universe is discussed. The relation between positive frequency functions of the gravitational waves in the Milne universe and those in the Minkowski universe is clarified. Implications to the one-bubble open inflation scenario are also discussed.

  1. Probing inflation models with gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Domcke, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    A direct detection of primordial gravitational waves is the ultimate probe for any inflation model. While current CMB bounds predict the generic scale-invariant gravitational wave spectrum from slow-roll inflation to be below the reach of upcoming gravitational wave interferometers, this prospect may dramatically change if the inflaton is a pseudoscalar. In this case, a coupling to any abelian gauge field leads to a tachyonic instability for the latter and hence to a new source of gravitational waves, directly related to the dynamics of inflation. In this contribution we discuss how this setup enables the upcoming gravitational wave interferometers advanced LIGO/VIRGO and eLISA to probe the microphysics of inflation, distinguishing between different universality classes of single-field slow-roll inflation models. We find that the prime candidate for an early detection is a Starobinsky-like model.

  2. Exploring Higher-Order Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Arcos, H; Pereira, J G

    2015-01-01

    In addition to the usual linear gravitational waves in transverse-traceless coordinates, higher-order gravitational field equations, as well as their corresponding solutions, are explicitly obtained. It is found that higher-order waves do not represent corrections to the first-order wave. In contrast, all higher than second-order solutions do represent corrections to the second-order wave, a property that makes the first-order gravitational wave to stand apart from higher-order waves. Furthermore, although the first-order solution is transverse and traceless, all higher-order solutions are not. As a consequence, the whole solution is neither transverse nor traceless, a result that could eventually have important consequences for quantum gravity, and in particular for the definition of graviton itself. Some additional properties and features of these higher-order gravitational waves are explored and discussed.

  3. Fast and Accurate Inference on Gravitational Waves from Precessing Compact Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Rory; Blackburn, Kent; Haster, Carl-Johan; Pürrer, Michael; Raymond, Vivien; Schmidt, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Inferring astrophysical information from gravitational waves emitted by compact binaries is one of the key science goals of gravitational-wave astronomy. In order to reach the full scientific potential of gravitational-wave experiments we require techniques to mitigate the cost of Bayesian inference, especially as gravitational-wave signal models and analyses become increasingly sophisticated and detailed. Reduced order models (ROMs) of gravitational waveforms can significantly reduce the computational cost of inference by removing redundant computations. In this paper we construct the first reduced order models of gravitational-wave signals that include the effects of spin-precession, inspiral, merger, and ringdown in compact object binaries, and which are valid for component masses describing binary neutron star, binary black hole and mixed binary systems. This work utilizes the waveform model known as "IMRPhenomPv2". Our ROM enables the use of a fast \\textit{reduced order quadrature} (ROQ) integration rule...

  4. Nonlocal gravity: damping of linearized gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nonlocal general relativity, linearized gravitational waves are damped as they propagate from the source to the receiver in the Minkowski vacuum. Nonlocal gravity is a generalization of Einstein's theory of gravitation in which nonlocality is due to the gravitational memory of past events. That nonlocal gravity is dissipative is demonstrated in this paper within certain approximation schemes. The gravitational memory drag leads to the decay of the amplitude of gravitational waves given by the exponential damping factor exp (− t/τ), where τ depends on the kernel of nonlocal gravity. The damping time τ is estimated for gravitational waves of current observational interest and is found to be of the order of, or longer than, the age of the universe. (paper)

  5. Ondas gravitacionales y objetos compactos (Gravitational waves and compact objects)

    CERN Document Server

    de Araujo, J C N

    2013-01-01

    It is presented a brief review on gravitational waves (GWs). It is shown how the wave equation is obtained from Einstein's equations and how many and how are the polarization modes of these waves. It is discussed the reasons why GWs sources should be of astrophysical or cosmological origin. Thus, it is discussed what would be the most likely sources of GWs to be detected by the detectors of GWs currently in operation and those that should be operational in the future, emphasizing in particular the sources involving compact objects. The compact objects such as neutron stars, black holes and binary systems involving compact stars can be important sources of GWs. Last but not least, it is discussed the GWs astrophysics that is already possible to do, in particular involving the compact objects.

  6. Thermal gravitational waves in accelerating universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Ghayour

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Gravitational waves are considered in thermal vacuum state. The amplitude and spectral energy density of gravitational waves are found enhanced in thermal vacuum state compared to its zero temperature counterpart. Therefore, the allowed amount of enhancement depends on the upper bound of WMAP-5 and WMAP-7 for the amplitude and spectral energy density of gravitational waves. The enhancement of amplitude and spectral energy density of the waves in thermal vacuum state is consistent with current accelerating phase of the universe. The enhancement feature of amplitude and spectral energy density of the waves is independent of the expansion model of the universe and hence the thermal effect accounts for it. Therefore, existence of thermal gravitational waves is not ruled out

  7. Probing Cosmic Superstrings with Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Sousa, Lara

    2016-01-01

    We compute the stochastic gravitational wave background generated by cosmic superstrings using a semi-analytical velocity-dependent model to describe their dynamics. We show that heavier string types may leave distinctive signatures on the stochastic gravitational wave background spectrum within the reach of present and upcoming gravitational wave detectors. We examine the physically motivated scenario in which the physical size of loops is determined by the gravitational backreaction scale and use NANOGRAV data to derive a conservative constraint of $G\\mu_F<3.2 \\times 10^{-9}$ on the tension of fundamental strings. We demonstrate that approximating the gravitational wave spectrum generated by cosmic superstring networks using the spectrum generated by ordinary cosmic strings with reduced intercommuting probability (which is often done in the literature) leads, in general, to weaker observational constraints on $G\\mu_F$. We show that the inclusion of heavier string types is required for a more accurate cha...

  8. Gravitational Waves in G4v

    CERN Document Server

    Mead, Carver

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational coupling of the propagation four-vectors of matter wave functions is formulated in flat space-time. Coupling at the momentum level rather than at the "force-law" level greatly simplifies many calculations. This locally Lorentz-invariant approach (G4v) treats electromagnetic and gravitational coupling on an equal footing. Classical mechanics emerges from the incoherent aggregation of matter wave functions. The theory reproduces, to first order beyond Newton, the standard GR results for Gravity-Probe B, deflection of light by massive bodies, precession of orbits, gravitational red shift, and total gravitational-wave energy radiated by a circular binary system. Its predictions of total radiated energy from highly eccentric Kepler systems are slightly larger than those of similar GR treatments. G4v predictions differ markedly from those of GR for the gravitational-wave radiation patterns from rotating massive systems, and for the LIGO antenna pattern. The predicted antenna patterns have been shown t...

  9. Detecting continuous gravitational waves with superfluid $^4$He

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, S; Pikovski, I; Schwab, K C

    2016-01-01

    Direct detection of gravitational waves is opening a new window onto our universe. Here, we study the sensitivity to continuous-wave strain fields of a kg-scale optomechanical system formed by the acoustic motion of superfluid helium-4 parametrically coupled to a superconducting microwave cavity. This narrowband detection scheme can operate at very high $Q$-factors, while the resonant frequency is tunable through pressurization of the helium in the 0.1-1.5 kHz range. The detector can therefore be tuned to a variety of astrophysical sources and can remain sensitive to a particular source over a long period of time. For reasonable experimental parameters, we find that strain fields on the order of $h\\sim 10^{-23} /\\sqrt{\\rm Hz}$ are detectable. We show that the proposed system can significantly improve the limits on gravitational wave strain from nearby pulsars within a few months of integration time.

  10. Gravitational collapse of gravitational waves in 3D numerical relativity.

    OpenAIRE

    Alcubierre, M.; Allen, G; Brügmann, B.; Lanfermann, G.; Seidel, E; Suen, W; Tobias, M

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate that evolutions of three-dimensional, strongly non-linear gravitational waves can be followed in numerical relativity, hence allowing many interesting studies of both fundamental and observational consequences. We study the evolution of time-symmetric, axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric Brill waves, including waves so strong that they collapse to form black holes under their own self-gravity. An estimate for the critical amplitude for black hole formation in a particular interpo...

  11. New cylindrical gravitational soliton waves and gravitational Faraday rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Tomizawa, Shinya

    2013-01-01

    In terms of gravitational solitons, we study gravitational non-linear effects of gravitational solitary waves such as Faraday rotation. Applying the Pomeransky's procedure for inverse scattering method, which has been recently used for constructing stationary black hole solutions in five dimensions to a cylindrical spacetime in four dimensions, we construct a new cylindrically symmetric soliton solution. This is the first example to be applied to the cylindrically symmetric case. In particular, we clarify the difference from the Tomimatsu's single soliton solution, which was constructed by the Belinsky-Zakharov's procedure.

  12. Chiral Gravitational Waves from Chiral Fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Anber, Mohamed M

    2016-01-01

    We report on a new mechanism that leads to the generation of primordial chiral gravitational waves, and hence, the violation of the parity symmetry in the Universe. We show that nonperturbative production of fermions with a definite helicity is accompanied by the generation of chiral gravitational waves. This is a generic and model-independent phenomenon that can occur during inflation, reheating and radiation eras, and can leave imprints in the cosmic microwave background polarization and may be observed in future ground- and space-based interferometers. We also discuss a specific model where chiral gravitational waves are generated via the production of light chiral fermions during pseudoscalar inflation.

  13. The Japanese space gravitational wave antenna; DECIGO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, S.; Ando, M.; Nakamura, T.; Tsubono, K.; Tanaka, T.; Funaki, I.; Seto, N.; Numata, K.; Sato, S.; Ioka, K.; Kanda, N.; Takashima, T.; Agatsuma, K.; Akutsu, T.; Akutsu, T.; Aoyanagi, K.-s.; Arai, K.; Arase, Y.; Araya, A.; Asada, H.; Aso, Y.; Chiba, T.; Ebisuzaki, T.; Enoki, M.; Eriguchi, Y.; Fujimoto, M.-K.; Fujita, R.; Fukushima, M.; Futamase, T.; Ganzu, K.; Harada, T.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayama, K.; Hikida, W.; Himemoto, Y.; Hirabayashi, H.; Hiramatsu, T.; Hong, F.-L.; Horisawa, H.; Hosokawa, M.; Ichiki, K.; Ikegami, T.; Inoue, K. T.; Ishidoshiro, K.; Ishihara, H.; Ishikawa, T.; Ishizaki, H.; Ito, H.; Itoh, Y.; Kamagasako, S.; Kawashima, N.; Kawazoe, F.; Kirihara, H.; Kishimoto, N.; Kiuchi, K.; Kobayashi, S.; Kohri, K.; Koizumi, H.; Kojima, Y.; Kokeyama, K.; Kokuyama, W.; Kotake, K.; Kozai, Y.; Kudoh, H.; Kunimori, H.; Kuninaka, H.; Kuroda, K.; Maeda, K.-i.; Matsuhara, H.; Mino, Y.; Miyakawa, O.; Miyoki, S.; Morimoto, M. Y.; Morioka, T.; Morisawa, T.; Moriwaki, S.; Mukohyama, S.; Musha, M.; Nagano, S.; Naito, I.; Nakagawa, N.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, H.; Nakao, K.; Nakasuka, S.; Nakayama, Y.; Nishida, E.; Nishiyama, K.; Nishizawa, A.; Niwa, Y.; Ohashi, M.; Ohishi, N.; Ohkawa, M.; Okutomi, A.; Onozato, K.; Oohara, K.; Sago, N.; Saijo, M.; Sakagami, M.; Sakai, S.-i.; Sakata, S.; Sasaki, M.; Sato, T.; Shibata, M.; Shinkai, H.; Somiya, K.; Sotani, H.; Sugiyama, N.; Suwa, Y.; Tagoshi, H.; Takahashi, K.; Takahashi, K.; Takahashi, T.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, R.; Takahashi, R.; Takamori, A.; Takano, T.; Taniguchi, K.; Taruya, A.; Tashiro, H.; Tokuda, M.; Tokunari, M.; Toyoshima, M.; Tsujikawa, S.; Tsunesada, Y.; Ueda, K.-i.; Utashima, M.; Yamakawa, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamazaki, T.; Yokoyama, J.; Yoo, C.-M.; Yoshida, S.; Yoshino, T.

    2008-07-01

    DECi-hertz Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (DECIGO) is the future Japanese space gravitational wave antenna. DECIGO is expected to open a new window of observation for gravitational wave astronomy especially between 0.1 Hz and 10 Hz, revealing various mysteries of the universe such as dark energy, formation mechanism of supermassive black holes, and inflation of the universe. The pre-conceptual design of DECIGO consists of three drag-free spacecraft, whose relative displacements are measured by a differential Fabry-Perot Michelson interferometer. We plan to launch two missions, DECIGO pathfinder and pre-DECIGO first and finally DECIGO in 2024.

  14. Gravitational waves in geometric scalar gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Toniato, J D

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the description of gravitational waves in the geometric scalar theory of gravity (GSG). The GSG belongs to a class of theories such that gravity is described by a single scalar field and the associated physical metric describing the spacetime is constructed from a disformal transformation of Minkowski geometry. In this theory, gravitational waves have a longitudinal polarization mode, besides others modes that are observer dependent. We examine the orbital variation of a binary system due to the emission of gravitational waves, showing that GSG can also be successful in explaining this phenomena.

  15. NASA's Gravitational - Wave Mission Concept Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Robin; Jennrich, Oliver; McNamara, Paul

    2012-01-01

    With the conclusion of the NASA/ESA partnership on the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) Project, NASA initiated a study to explore mission concepts that will accomplish some or all of the LISA science objectives at lower cost. The Gravitational-Wave Mission Concept Study consisted of a public Request for Information (RFI), a Core Team of NASA engineers and scientists, a Community Science Team, a Science Task Force, and an open workshop. The RFI yielded were 12 mission concepts, 3 instrument concepts and 2 technologies. The responses ranged from concepts that eliminated the drag-free test mass of LISA to concepts that replace the test mass with an atom interferometer. The Core Team reviewed the noise budgets and sensitivity curves, the payload and spacecraft designs and requirements, orbits and trajectories and technical readiness and risk. The Science Task Force assessed the science performance by calculating the horizons. the detection rates and the accuracy of astrophysical parameter estimation for massive black hole mergers, stellar-mass compact objects inspiraling into central engines. and close compact binary systems. Three mission concepts have been studied by Team-X, JPL's concurrent design facility. to define a conceptual design evaluate kt,y performance parameters. assess risk and estimate cost and schedule. The Study results are summarized.

  16. NASA's Gravitational-Wave Mission Concept Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Robin; Jennrich, Oliver; McNamara, Paul

    2012-07-01

    With the conclusion of the NASA/ESA partnership on the Laser interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) Project, NASA initiated a study to explore mission concepts that will accomplish some or all of the LISA science objectives at lower cost. The Gravitational-Wave Mission Concept Study consisted of a public Request for Information (RFI), a Core Team of NASA engineers and scientists, a Community Science Team, a Science Task Force, and an open workshop. The RFI yielded were 12 mission concepts, 3 instrument concepts and 2 technologies. The responses ranged from concepts that eliminated the drag-free test mass of LISA to concepts that replace the test mass with an atom interferometer. The Core Team reviewed the noise budgets and sensitivity curves, the payload and spacecraft designs and requirements, orbits and trajectories and technical readiness and risk. The Science Task Force assessed the science performance by calculating the horizons, the detection rates and the accuracy of astrophysical parameter estimation for massive black hole mergers, stellar-mass compact objects inspiraling into central engines, and close compact binary systems. Three mission concepts have been studied by Team-X, JPL's concurrent design facility, to define a conceptual design, evaluate key performance parameters, assess risk and estimate cost and schedule. The Study results are summarized.

  17. Fast Gravitational Wave Radiometry using Data Folding

    CERN Document Server

    Ain, Anirban; Mitra, Sanjit

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational Waves (GWs) from the early universe and unresolved astrophysical sources are expected to create a stochastic GW background (SGWB). The GW radiometer algorithm is well suited to probe such a background using data from ground based laser interferometric detectors. Radiometer analysis can be performed in different bases, e.g., isotropic, pixel or spherical harmonic. Each of these analyses possesses a common temporal symmetry which we exploit here to fold the whole dataset for every detector pair, typically a few hundred to a thousand days of data, to only one sidereal day, without any compromise in precision. We develop the algebra and a software pipeline needed to fold data, accounting for the effect of overlapping windows and non-stationary noise. We implement this on LIGO's fifth science run data and validate it by performing a standard anisotropic SGWB search on both folded and unfolded data. Folded data not only leads to orders of magnitude reduction in computation cost, but it results in a co...

  18. Gravitational Wave Detection by Interferometry (Ground and Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Pitkin

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been made in recent years on the development of gravitational-wave detectors. Sources such as coalescing compact binary systems, neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries, stellar collapses and pulsars are all possible candidates for detection. The most promising design of gravitational-wave detector uses test masses a long distance apart and freely suspended as pendulums on Earth or in drag-free spacecraft. The main theme of this review is a discussion of the mechanical and optical principles used in the various long baseline systems in operation around the world - LIGO (USA, Virgo (Italy/France, TAMA300 and LCGT (Japan, and GEO600 (Germany/U.K. - and in LISA, a proposed space-borne interferometer. A review of recent science runs from the current generation of ground-based detectors will be discussed, in addition to highlighting the astrophysical results gained thus far. Looking to the future, the major upgrades to LIGO (Advanced LIGO, Virgo (Advanced Virgo, LCGT and GEO600 (GEO-HF will be completed over the coming years, which will create a network of detectors with the significantly improved sensitivity required to detect gravitational waves. Beyond this, the concept and design of possible future "third generation" gravitational-wave detectors, such as the Einstein Telescope (ET, will be discussed.

  19. Sensitivity of the Advanced LIGO detectors at the beginning of gravitational wave astronomy

    OpenAIRE

    Martynov, D. V.; Hall, E. D.; Abbott, B.P.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R. X; Anderson, R A; Anderson, S. B.; Arai, K; Austin, L.; Billingsley, G.; Black, E; Bork, R.; Brooks, A. F.; Coyne, D. C.; Dannenberg, R.

    2016-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) consists of two widely separated 4 km laser interferometers designed to detect gravitational waves from distant astrophysical sources in the frequency range from 10 Hz to 10 kHz. The first observation run of the Advanced LIGO detectors started in September 2015 and ended in January 2016. A strain sensitivity of better than 10^(−23)/√Hz was achieved around 100 Hz. Understanding both the fundamental and the technical noise sources w...

  20. Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory beam tube component and module leak testing

    OpenAIRE

    Carpenter, W. A.; Shaw, P. B.; Jones, L; Weiss, R.

    2000-01-01

    Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is a joint project of the California Institute of Technology and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology funded by the National Science Foundation. The project is designed to detect gravitational waves from astrophysical sources such as supernova and black holes. The LIGO project constructed observatories at two sites in the U.S. Each site includes two beam tubes (each 4 km long) joined to form an "L" shape. The beam tube is a 1.25 ...

  1. Gravitational waves from accreting neutron stars

    OpenAIRE

    Bonazzola, S.; Gourgoulhon, E.

    1996-01-01

    We show that accreting neutron stars in binary systems or in Landau-Thorne-Zytkow objects are good candidates for continuous gravitational wave emission. Their gravitational radiation is strong enough to be detected by the next generation of detectors having a typical noise of 10^{-23} Hz^{-1/2}.

  2. Gravitational wave astronomy: the current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, David; Ju, Li; Zhao, ChunNong; Wen, LinQing; Chu, Qi; Fang, Qi; Cai, RongGen; Gao, JiangRui; Lin, XueChun; Liu, Dong; Wu, Ling-An; Zhu, ZongHong; Reitze, David H.; Arai, Koji; Zhang, Fan; Flaminio, Raffaele; Zhu, XingJiang; Hobbs, George; Manchester, Richard N.; Shannon, Ryan M.; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Gao, Wei; Xu, Peng; Bian, Xing; Cao, ZhouJian; Chang, ZiJing; Dong, Peng; Gong, XueFei; Huang, ShuangLin; Ju, Peng; Luo, ZiRen; Qiang, Li'E.; Tang, WenLin; Wan, XiaoYun; Wang, Yue; Xu, ShengNian; Zang, YunLong; Zhang, HaiPeng; Lau, Yun-Kau; Ni, Wei-Tou

    2015-12-01

    In the centenary year of Einstein's General Theory of Relativity, this paper reviews the current status of gravitational wave astronomy across a spectrum which stretches from attohertz to kilohertz frequencies. Sect. 1 of this paper reviews the historical development of gravitational wave astronomy from Einstein's first prediction to our current understanding the spectrum. It is shown that detection of signals in the audio frequency spectrum can be expected very soon, and that a north-south pair of next generation detectors would provide large scientific benefits. Sect. 2 reviews the theory of gravitational waves and the principles of detection using laser interferometry. The state of the art Advanced LIGO detectors are then described. These detectors have a high chance of detecting the first events in the near future. Sect. 3 reviews the KAGRA detector currently under development in Japan, which will be the first laser interferometer detector to use cryogenic test masses. Sect. 4 of this paper reviews gravitational wave detection in the nanohertz frequency band using the technique of pulsar timing. Sect. 5 reviews the status of gravitational wave detection in the attohertz frequency band, detectable in the polarisation of the cosmic microwave background, and discusses the prospects for detection of primordial waves from the big bang. The techniques described in sects. 1-5 have already placed significant limits on the strength of gravitational wave sources. Sects. 6 and 7 review ambitious plans for future space based gravitational wave detectors in the millihertz frequency band. Sect. 6 presents a roadmap for development of space based gravitational wave detectors by China while sect. 7 discusses a key enabling technology for space interferometry known as time delay interferometry.

  3. Gravitational Waves from Axion Monodromy

    CERN Document Server

    Hebecker, Arthur; Rompineve, Fabrizio; Witkowski, Lukas T

    2016-01-01

    Large field inflation is arguably the simplest and most natural variant of slow-roll inflation. Axion monodromy may be the most promising framework for realising this scenario. As one of its defining features, the long-range polynomial potential possesses short-range, instantonic modulations. These can give rise to a series of local minima in the post-inflationary region of the potential. We show that for certain parameter choices the inflaton populates more than one of these vacua inside a single Hubble patch. This corresponds to a dynamical phase decomposition, analogously to what happens in the course of thermal first-order phase transitions. In the subsequent process of bubble wall collisions, the lowest-lying axionic minimum eventually takes over all space. Our main result is that this violent process sources gravitational waves, very much like in the case of a first-order phase transition. We compute the energy density and peak frequency of the signal, which can lie anywhere in the mHz-GHz range, possib...

  4. Stochastic background of gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    D'Araújo, J C N; Aguiar, O D

    2000-01-01

    A continuous stochastic background of gravitational waves (GWs) for burst sources is produced if the mean time interval between the occurrence of bursts is smaller than the average time duration of a single burst at the emission, i.e., the so called duty cycle must be greater than one. To evaluate the background of GWs produced by an ensemble of sources, during their formation, for example, one needs to know the average energy flux emitted during the formation of a single object and the formation rate of such objects as well. In many cases the energy flux emitted during an event of production of GWs is not known in detail, only characteristic values for the dimensionless amplitude and frequencies are known. Here we present a shortcut to calculate stochastic backgrounds of GWs produced from cosmological sources. For this approach it is not necessary to know in detail the energy flux emitted at each frequency. Knowing the characteristic values for the ``lumped'' dimensionless amplitude and frequency we show tha...

  5. The Gravitational Wave Detector EXPLORER

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %RE5 EXPLORER is a cryogenic resonant-mass gravitational wave (GW) detector. It is in operation at CERN since 1984 and it has been the first cryogenic GW antenna to perform continuous observations (since 1990).\\\\ \\\\EXPLORER is actually part of the international network of resonant-mass detectors which includes ALLEGRO at the Louisiana State University, AURIGA at the INFN Legnaro Laboratories, NAUTILUS at the INFN Frascati Laboratories and NIOBE at the University of Western Australia. The EXPLORER sensitivity, at present of the same order of the other antennas, is 10$^{-20}$ Hz$^{-1/2}$ over a bandwidth of 20 Hz and 6 10$^{-22}$ Hz$^{-1/2}$ with a bandwidth of about 0.5 Hz, corresponding to a sensitivity to short GW bursts of \\textit{h} = 6 10$^{-19}$.\\\\ \\\\This sensitivity should allow the detection of the burst sources in our Galaxy and in the Local Group. No evidence of GW signals has been reported up to now.\\\\ \\\\The principle of operation is based on the assumption that any vibrational mode of a resonant bo...

  6. Gravitational Waves and Time Domain Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan; Nissanke, Samaya; Williams, Roy

    2012-01-01

    The gravitational wave window onto the universe will open in roughly five years, when Advanced LIGO and Virgo achieve the first detections of high frequency gravitational waves, most likely coming from compact binary mergers. Electromagnetic follow-up of these triggers, using radio, optical, and high energy telescopes, promises exciting opportunities in multi-messenger time domain astronomy. In the decade, space-based observations of low frequency gravitational waves from massive black hole mergers, and their electromagnetic counterparts, will open up further vistas for discovery. This two-part workshop featured brief presentations and stimulating discussions on the challenges and opportunities presented by gravitational wave astronomy. Highlights from the workshop, with the emphasis on strategies for electromagnetic follow-up, are presented in this report.

  7. Sources of Gravitational Waves: Theory and Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Buonanno, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Gravitational-wave astronomy will soon become a new tool for observing the Universe. Detecting and interpreting gravitational waves will require deep theoretical insights into astronomical sources. The past three decades have seen remarkable progress in analytical and numerical computations of the source dynamics, development of search algorithms and analysis of data from detectors with unprecedented sensitivity. This Chapter is devoted to examine the advances and future challenges in understanding the dynamics of binary and isolated compact-object systems, expected cosmological sources, their amplitudes and rates, and highlights of results from gravitational-wave observations. All of this is a testament to the readiness of the community to open a new window for observing the cosmos, a century after gravitational waves were first predicted by Albert Einstein.

  8. Hunting for Dark Particles with Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Giudice, Gian F; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    The LIGO observation of gravitational waves from a binary black hole merger has begun a new era in fundamental physics. If new dark sector particles, be they bosons or fermions, can coalesce into exotic compact objects (ECOs) of astronomical size, then the first evidence for such objects, and their underlying microphysical description, may arise in gravitational wave observations. In this work we study how the macroscopic properties of ECOs are related to their microscopic properties, such as dark particle mass and couplings. We then demonstrate the smoking gun exotic signatures that would provide observational evidence for ECOs, and hence new particles, in terrestrial gravitational wave observatories. Finally, we discuss how gravitational waves can test a core concept in general relativity: Hawking's area theorem.

  9. Gravitational Waves: A New Observational Window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Jordan B.

    2010-01-01

    The era of gravitational wave astronomy is rapidly approaching, with a likely start date around the middle of this decade ' Gravitational waves, emitted by accelerated motions of very massive objects, provide detailed information about strong-field gravity and its sources, including black holes and neutron stars, that electromagnetic probes cannot access. In this talk I will discuss the anticipated sources and the status of the extremely sensitive detectors (both ground and space based) that will make gravitational wave detections possible. As ground based detectors are now taking data, I will show some initial science results related to measured upper limits on gravitational wave signals. Finally Z will describe new directions including advanced detectors and joint efforts with other fields of astronomy.

  10. Looking for Lorentz violation with gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Schreck, M

    2016-01-01

    The current letter has been inspired by the recent direct detection of gravitational waves reported by Advanced LIGO. In this context, a particular Lorentz-violating framework for classical, massive particles is on the focus. The latter is characterized by a preferred direction in spacetime comprised of CPT-odd components with mass dimension 1. Curvature effects in spacetime, which are caused by a propagating gravitational wave, are assumed to deform the otherwise constant background field. In accordance with spontaneous Lorentz violation, a particular choice for the vector field is taken, which was proposed elsewhere. The geodesic equations for a particle that is subject to this type of Lorentz violation are obtained. Subsequently, their numerical solutions are computed and discussed. The particular model considered leads to changes in the particle trajectory, which interferometric gravitational-wave experiments could be sensitive for. Since such effects have not been observed in the gravitational-wave event...

  11. Cosmological inference using gravitational wave observations alone

    CERN Document Server

    Del Pozzo, Walter; Messenger, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational waves emitted during the coalescence of binary neutron star systems are self-calibrating signals. As such they can provide a direct measurement of the luminosity distance to a source without the need for a cosmic distance scale ladder. In general, however, the corresponding redshift measurement needs to be obtained electromagnetically since it is totally degenerate with the total mass of the system. Nevertheless, recent Fisher matrix studies has shown that if information about the equation of state of the neutron stars is available, it is indeed possible to extract redshift information from the gravitational wave signal alone. Therefore, measuring the cosmological parameters in pure gravitational wave fashion is possible. Furthermore, the huge number of sources potentially observable by the Einstein Telescope has led to speculations that the gravitational wave measurement is potentially competitive with traditional methods. The Einstein telescope is a conceptual study for a third generation grav...

  12. Gravitational waves from oscillons after inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Antusch, Stefan; Orani, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the production of gravitational waves during preheating after inflation in the common case of field potentials that are asymmetric around the minimum. In particular, we study the impact of oscillons, comparatively long lived and spatially localized regions where a scalar field (e.g. the inflaton) oscillates with large amplitude. Contrary to a previous study, which considered a symmetric potential, we find that oscillons in asymmetric potentials associated with a phase transition can generate a pronounced peak in the spectrum of gravitational waves, that largely exceeds the linear preheating spectrum. We discuss the possible implications of this enhanced amplitude of gravitational waves. For instance, for low scale inflation models, the contribution from the oscillons can strongly enhance the observation prospects at current and future gravitational wave detectors.

  13. Searching for gravitational-wave transients with a qualitative signal model: seedless clustering strategies

    CERN Document Server

    Thrane, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Gravitational-wave bursts are observable as bright clusters of pixels in spectrograms of strain power. Clustering algorithms can be used to identify candidate gravitational-wave events. Clusters are often identified by grouping together seed pixels in which the power exceeds some threshold. If the gravitational-wave signal is long-lived, however, the excess power may be spread out over many pixels, none of which are bright enough to become seeds. Without seeds, the problem of detection through clustering becomes more complicated. In this paper we investigate seedless clustering algorithms in searches for long-lived narrowband gravitational-wave bursts. Using four astrophysically motivated test waveforms, we compare a seedless clustering algorithm to two algorithms using seeds. We find that the seedless algorithm can detect gravitational-wave signals (at fixed false-alarm and false-dismissal rate) at distances between 150-200% greater than those achieved with the seed-based clustering algorithms, corresponding...

  14. Gravitational-wave energy and radiation reaction on quasi-spherical black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Hayward, S A

    2000-01-01

    Gravitational waves are given a local definition in a quasi-spherical approximation, describing roughly spherical but otherwise dynamical astrophysical objects, such as a black hole forming by binary black-hole coalescence. A local effective energy tensor is defined for the gravitational waves, satisfying standard energy conditions. Radiation reaction, such as the back-reaction of the gravitational waves on the black hole, may then be described by including the gravitational-wave energy tensor as a source in the truncated Einstein equations. This can be formulated as a second quasi-spherical approximation, which retains non-linear terms in the fields encoding the gravitational waves. The energy-momentum in a canonical frame is covariantly conserved. The strain to be measured by a distant detector is simply defined.

  15. Enhancing the sensitivity of the LIGO gravitational wave detector by using squeezed states of light

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2013-01-01

    Nearly a century after Einstein first predicted the existence of gravitational waves, a global network of earth-based gravitational wave observatories is seeking to directly detect this faint radiation using precision laser interferometry. Photon shot noise, due to the quantum nature of light, imposes a fundamental limit on the attometer level sensitivity of the kilometer-scale Michelson interferometers deployed for this task. Here we inject squeezed states to improve the performance of one of the detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) beyond the quantum noise limit, most notably in the frequency region down to 150 Hz, critically important for several astrophysical sources, with no deterioration of performance observed at any frequency. With the injection of squeezed states, this LIGO detector demonstrated the best broadband sensitivity to gravitational waves ever achieved, with important implications for observing the gravitational wave Uni- verse with unprecedented sensi...

  16. Constraining the gravitational wave energy density of the Universe using Earth's ring

    CERN Document Server

    Coughlin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The search for gravitational waves is one of today's major scientific endeavors. A gravitational wave can interact with matter by exciting vibrations of elastic bodies. Earth itself is a large elastic body whose so-called normal-mode oscillations ring up when a gravitational wave passes. Therefore, precise measurement of vibration amplitudes can be used to search for the elusive gravitational-wave signals. Earth's free oscillations that can be observed after high-magnitude earthquakes have been studied extensively with gravimeters and low-frequency seismometers over many decades leading to invaluable insight into Earth's structure. Making use of our detailed understanding of Earth's normal modes, numerical models are employed for the first time to accurately calculate Earth's gravitational-wave response, and thereby turn a network of sensors that so far has served to improve our understanding of Earth, into an astrophysical observatory exploring our Universe. In this article, we constrain the energy density o...

  17. What is the Velocity of Gravitational Waves?

    OpenAIRE

    de Freitas, Luciane R.; Novello, M.

    1995-01-01

    We present a new field theory of gravity. It incorporates a great part of General Relativity (GR) and can be interpreted in the standard geometrical way like GR as far as the interaction of matter to gravity is concerned. However, it differs from GR when treating gravity to gravity interaction. The most crucial distinction concerns the velocity of propagation of gravitational waves. Since there is a large expectation that the detection of gravitational waves will occur in the near future the ...

  18. Resonant speed meter for gravitational wave detection

    CERN Document Server

    Nishizawa, Atsushi; Sakagami, Masa-aki

    2008-01-01

    Gravitational-wave detectors have been well developed and operated with high sensitivity. However, they still suffer from mirror displacement noise. In this paper, we propose a resonant speed meter, as a displacement noise-canceled configuration based on a ring-shaped synchronous recycling interferometer. The remarkable feature of this interferometer is that, at certain frequencies, gravitational-wave signals are amplified, while displacement noises are not.

  19. Gravitational waves from black-hole mergers

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, John G.; Boggs, William D.; Centrella, Joan M.; Kelly, Bernard J.; McWilliams, Sean T.; van Meter, James R.

    2007-01-01

    Coalescing black-hole binaries are expected to be the strongest sources of gravitational waves for ground-based interferometers as well as the space-based interferometer LISA. Recent progress in numerical relativity now makes it possible to calculate the waveforms from the strong-field dynamical merger and is revolutionizing our understanding of these systems. We review these dramatic developments, emphasizing applications to issues in gravitational wave observations. These new capabilities a...

  20. Resonant interaction of photons with gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of photons with a low-amplitude gravitational wave propagating in a flat space-time is studied by using an exact model of photon dynamics. The existence of nearly resonant interactions between the photons and the gravitational waves, which can take place over large distances, can lead to a strong photon acceleration. Such a resonant mechanism can eventually be useful to build consistent new models of gamma-ray emitters

  1. The pregalactic cosmic gravitational wave background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzner, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    An outline is given that estimates the expected gravitational wave background, based on plausible pregalactic sources. Some cosmologically significant limits can be put on incoherent gravitational wave background arising from pregalactic cosmic evolution. The spectral region of cosmically generated and cosmically limited radiation is, at long periods, P greater than 1 year, in contrast to more recent cosmological sources, which have P approx. 10 to 10(exp -3).

  2. The pregalactic cosmic gravitational wave background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An outline is given that estimates the expected gravitational wave background, based on plausible pregalactic sources. Some cosmologically significant limits can be put on incoherent gravitational wave background arising from pregalactic cosmic evolution. The spectral region of cosmically generated and cosmically limited radiation is, at long periods, P greater than 1 year, in contrast to more recent cosmological sources, which have P approx. 10 to 10(exp -3)

  3. Status of Japanese gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Large-scale Cryogenic Gravitational wave Telescope (LCGT) is planned as a future Japanese project for gravitational wave detection. A 3 km interferometer will be built in an underground mine at Kamioka. Cryogenic sapphire mirrors are going to be employed for the test masses. For the demonstration of LCGT technologies, two prototype interferometers, TAMA300 and CLIO, are being developed. This paper describes the current status of the LCGT project and the two prototype interferometers.

  4. Hunting for Dark Particles with Gravitational Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Giudice, Gian F.; McCullough, Matthew(Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, U.S.A.); Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    The LIGO observation of gravitational waves from a binary black hole merger has begun a new era in fundamental physics. If new dark sector particles, be they bosons or fermions, can coalesce into exotic compact objects (ECOs) of astronomical size, then the first evidence for such objects, and their underlying microphysical description, may arise in gravitational wave observations. In this work we study how the macroscopic properties of ECOs are related to their microscopic properties, such as...

  5. Accelerated gravitational-wave parameter estimation with reduced order modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Canizares, Priscilla; Gair, Jonathan; Raymond, Vivien; Smith, Rory; Tiglio, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Inferring the astrophysical parameters of coalescing compact binaries is a key science goal of the upcoming advanced LIGO-Virgo gravitational-wave detector network and, more generally, gravitational-wave astronomy. However, current parameter estimation approaches for such scenarios can lead to computationally intractable problems in practice. Therefore there is a pressing need for new, fast and accurate Bayesian inference techniques. In this letter we demonstrate that a reduced order modeling approach enables rapid parameter estimation studies. By implementing a reduced order quadrature scheme within the LIGO Algorithm Library, we show that Bayesian inference on the 9-dimensional parameter space of non-spinning binary neutron star inspirals can be sped up by a factor of 30 for the early advanced detectors' configurations. This speed-up will increase to about $150$ as the detectors improve their low-frequency limit to 10Hz, reducing to hours analyses which would otherwise take months to complete. Although thes...

  6. Geophysical studies with laser-beam detectors of gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Grishchuk, L P; Rudenko, V N; Serdobolski, A V

    2005-01-01

    The existing high technology laser-beam detectors of gravitational waves may find very useful applications in an unexpected area - geophysics. To make possible the detection of weak gravitational waves in the region of high frequencies of astrophysical interest, ~ 30 - 10^3 Hz, control systems of laser interferometers must permanently monitor, record and compensate much larger external interventions that take place in the region of low frequencies of geophysical interest, ~ 10^{-5} - 3 X 10^{-3} Hz. Such phenomena as tidal perturbations of land and gravity, normal mode oscillations of Earth, oscillations of the inner core of Earth, etc. will inevitably affect the performance of the interferometers and, therefore, the information about them will be stored in the data of control systems. We specifically identify the low-frequency information contained in distances between the interferometer mirrors (deformation of Earth) and angles between the mirrors' suspensions (deviations of local gravity vectors and plumb ...

  7. Constraining modified theories of gravity with gravitational wave stochastic background

    CERN Document Server

    Maselli, Andrea; Ferrari, Valeria; Kokkotas, Kostas; Schneider, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    The direct discovery of gravitational waves has finally opened a new observational window on our Universe, suggesting that the population of coalescing binary black holes is larger than previously expected. These sources produce an unresolved background of gravitational waves, potentially observables by ground-based interferometers. In this paper we investigate how modified theories of gravity, modeled using the ppE formalism, affect the expected signal, and analyze the detectability of the resulting stochastic background by current and future ground-based interferometers. We find the constraints that AdLIGO would be able to set on modified theories, showing that they may significantly improve the current bounds obtained from astrophysical observations of binary pulsars.

  8. Component Separation of a Isotropic Gravitational Wave Background

    CERN Document Server

    Parida, Abhishek; Jhingan, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    A Gravitational Wave Background (GWB) is expected in the universe from the superposition of a large number of unresolved astrophysical sources and phenomena in the early universe. Each component of the background (e.g., from primordial metric perturbations, binary neutron stars, milli-second pulsars etc.) has its own spectral shape. Many ongoing experiments aim to probe GWB at a variety of frequency bands. In the last two decades, using data from ground-based laser interferometric gravitational wave (GW) observatories, upper limits on GWB were placed in the frequency range of ~50-1000 Hz, considering one spectral shape at a time. However, one strong component can significantly enhance the estimated strength of another component. Hence, estimation of the amplitudes of the components with different spectral shapes should be done jointly. Here we propose a method for "component separation" of a statistically isotropic background, that can, for the first time, jointly estimate the amplitudes of many components an...

  9. Leveraging waveform complexity for confident detection of gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Kanner, Jonah B; Cornish, Neil; Millhouse, Meg; Xhakaj, Enia; Salemi, Francesco; Drago, Marco; Vedovato, Gabriele; Klimenko, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    The recent completion of Advanced LIGO suggests that gravitational waves (GWs) may soon be directly observed. Past searches for gravitational-wave transients have been impacted by transient noise artifacts, known as glitches, introduced into LIGO data due to instrumental and environmental effects. In this work, we explore how waveform complexity, instead of signal-to-noise ratio, can be used to rank event candidates and distinguish short duration astrophysical signals from glitches. We test this framework using a new hierarchical pipeline that directly compares the Bayesian evidence of explicit signal and glitch models. The hierarchical pipeline is shown to have strong performance, and in particular, allows high-confidence detections of a range of waveforms at realistic signal-to-noise ratio with a two detector network.

  10. Searching for gravitational waves from neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrisy, Ashikuzzaman

    In this dissertation we discuss gravitational waves (GWs) and their neutron star (NS) sources. We begin with a general discussion of the motivation for searching for GWs and the indirect experimental evidence of their existence. Then we discuss the various mechanisms through which NS can emit GWs, paying special attention the r-mode oscillations. Finally we end with discussion of GW detection. In Chapter 2 we describe research into the frequencies of r-mode oscillations. Knowing these frequencies can be useful for guiding and interpreting gravitational wave and electromagnetic observations. The frequencies of slowly rotating, barotropic, and non-magnetic Newtonian stars are well known, but subject to various corrections. After making simple estimates of the relative strengths of these corrections we conclude that relativistic corrections are the most important. For this reason we extend the formalism of K. H. Lockitch, J. L. Friedman, and N. Andersson [Phys. Rev. D 68, 124010 (2003)], who consider relativistic polytropes, to the case of realistic equations of state. This formulation results in perturbation equations which are solved using a spectral method. We find that for realistic equations of state the r-mode frequency ranges from 1.39--1.57 times the spin frequency of the star when the relativistic compactness parameter (M/R) is varied over the astrophysically motivated interval 0.110--0.310. Following a successful r-mode detection our results can help constrain the high density equation of state. In Chapter 3 we present a technical introduction to the data analysis tools used in GW searches. Starting from the plane-wave solutions derived in Chapter 1 we develop the F-statistic used in the matched filtering technique. This technique relies on coherently integrating the GW detector's data stream with a theoretically modeled wave signal. The statistic is used to test the null hypothesis that the data contains no signal. In this chapter we also discuss how to

  11. Detecting transient gravitational waves in non-Gaussian noise with partially redundant analysis methods

    CERN Document Server

    Biswas, Rahul; Burguet-Castell, Jordi; Cannon, Kipp; Clayton, Jessica; Dietz, Alexander; Fotopoulos, Nickolas; Goggin, Lisa M; Keppel, Drew; Pankow, Chris; Price, Larry R; Vaulin, Ruslan

    2012-01-01

    There is a broad class of astrophysical sources that produce detectable, transient, gravitational waves. Some searches for transient gravitational waves are tailored to known features of these sources. Other searches make few assumptions about the sources. Typically events are observable with multiple search techniques. This work describes how to combine the results of searches that are not independent, treating each search as a classifier for a given event. This will be shown to improve the overall sensitivity to gravitational-wave events while directly addressing the problem of consistent interpretation of multiple trials.

  12. An Imitation Game concerning gravitational wave physics

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, Harry

    2016-01-01

    The 'Imitation Game' is a Turing Test played with a human participant instead of a computer. Here the author, a sociologist, who has been immersed in the field of gravitational wave physics since 1972, tried to pass an Imitation Game as a gravitational wave physicist. He already passed such a test in mid-2000s but this test was more elaborate and compared his performance with that of other kinds of physicists and with other sociologists as well as gravitational wave physicists. The test was based on 8 technical questions about gravitational wave physics asked by Professor Sathyprakash of Cardiff University. Collins marks compared well with that of the other gravitational wave physicists and were markedly better than that of other classes of respondent. Collins also marked the test and it can be seen that the way he marked was also much closer to the gravitational wave physicists than other categories. Though Collins's expertise can be shown to have degraded a little in the last ten years it seems not to have ...

  13. Gravitational waves from scalar field accretion

    OpenAIRE

    Núnez, Darío; Degollado, Juan Carlos; Moreno, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Our aim in this work is to outline some physical consequences of the interaction between black holes and scalar field halos in terms of gravitational waves. In doing so, the black hole is taken as a static and spherically symmetric gravitational source, {\\it i. e.} the Schwarzschild black hole, and we work within the test field approximation, considering that the scalar field lives in the curved space-time outside the black hole. We focused on the emission of gravitational waves when the blac...

  14. Gravitational Waves from Collapsing Vacuum Domains

    CERN Document Server

    Gleiser, Marcello; Gleiser, Marcelo; Roberts, Ronald

    1998-01-01

    The breaking of an approximate discrete symmetry, the final stages of a first order phase transition, or a post-inflationary biased probability distribution for scalar fields are possible cosmological scenarios characterized by the presence of unstable domain wall networks. Combining analytical and numerical techniques, we show that the non-spherical collapse of these domains can be a powerful source of gravitational waves. We compute their contribution to the stochastic background of gravitational radiation and explore their observability by present and future gravitational wave detectors.

  15. Assessing the Effectiveness of Gravitational Wave Outreach Video Games in High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Jonathan

    Students and faculty at the Gravitational Wave Group in Birmingham, UK developed a remake of the classic 1972 game of Pong. Black Hole Pong was developed to be used in events such as science fairs as a way to engage children and pique interest in black holes. I present the results of a study which assesses the utility of Black Hole Pong and its successors in raising awareness of gravitational wave research, and in fostering conceptual understanding of astrophysics and gravity. Of particular interest in this study is potential use in high school science classrooms during astrophysics units.

  16. LISA and the Future of Gravitational Wave Physics and Astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gravitational waves offer views of the universe which complement those in electromagnetic waves and neutrinos. Just as different frequencies of the electromagnetic spectrum highlight different astrophysical phenomena, different frequencies of gravitational radiation will highlight different kinds of objects. The NASA/ESA Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), planned for launch in 2010, will detect and measure gravitational radiation from astronomical sources at frequencies 0.0001 Hz to 0.1 Hz (vs. 10-1000 Hz for ground-based detectors like LIGO). LISA will detect continuous signals from: thousands of exotic binary stars in the Milky Way, merging supermassive black holes in the nuclei of merging galaxies at redshifts from 0 to 100, and compact stars scattered into supermassive black holes. The latter will provide precision tests of strong-field predictions of relativity, such as the No-Hair Theorem and energy extraction from rotating black holes. We will conclude with an outline of some of the limitations of, and remarkable possibilities for the future of gravitational wave physics and astronomy.

  17. NANOGrav Constraints on Gravitational Wave Bursts with Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzoumanian, Z.; Brazier, A.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chatterjee, S.; Christy, B.; Cordes, J. M.; Cornish, N. J.; Demorest, P. B.; Deng, X.; Dolch, T.; Ellis, J. A.; Ferdman, R. D.; Fonseca, E.; Garver-Daniels, N.; Jenet, F.; Jones, G.; Kaspi, V. M.; Koop, M.; Lam, M. T.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Levin, L.; Lommen, A. N.; Lorimer, D. R.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R. S.; Madison, D. R.; McLaughlin, M. A.; McWilliams, S. T.; Nice, D. J.; Palliyaguru, N.; Pennucci, T. T.; Ransom, S. M.; Siemens, X.; Stairs, I. H.; Stinebring, D. R.; Stovall, K.; Swiggum, J.; Vallisneri, M.; van Haasteren, R.; Wang, Y.; Zhu, W. W.; NANOGrav Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    Among efforts to detect gravitational radiation, pulsar timing arrays are uniquely poised to detect “memory” signatures, permanent perturbations in spacetime from highly energetic astrophysical events such as mergers of supermassive black hole binaries. The North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) observes dozens of the most stable millisecond pulsars using the Arecibo and Green Bank radio telescopes in an effort to study, among other things, gravitational wave memory. We herein present the results of a search for gravitational wave bursts with memory (BWMs) using the first five years of NANOGrav observations. We develop original methods for dramatically speeding up searches for BWM signals. In the directions of the sky where our sensitivity to BWMs is best, we would detect mergers of binaries with reduced masses of {10}9 {M}⊙ out to distances of 30 Mpc; such massive mergers in the Virgo cluster would be marginally detectable. We find no evidence for BWMs. However, with our non-detection, we set upper limits on the rate at which BWMs of various amplitudes could have occurred during the time spanned by our data—e.g., BWMs with amplitudes greater than 10-13 must encounter the Earth at a rate less than 1.5 yr-1.

  18. Some aspects of gravitational waves in an isotropic background universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gravitational waves are an inescapable consequence of the relativistic theory of gravitation. They are meaningfully comparable with electromagnetic waves. However, they are not conformally invariant. So, to investigate this property for gravitational waves, modified field equations are obtained of which the underlying Lagrangian is based on gravitation only. It gives, if helicity is preserved, amplitude modification, and the wave is represented by Bessel function of zero order. Some aspects of this theory are discussed with reference to gravitational waves only. (author)

  19. Gravitational Waves from a Dark Phase Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaller, Pedro

    2015-10-30

    In this work, we show that a large class of models with a composite dark sector undergo a strong first order phase transition in the early Universe, which could lead to a detectable gravitational wave signal. We summarize the basic conditions for a strong first order phase transition for SU(N) dark sectors with n_{f} flavors, calculate the gravitational wave spectrum and show that, depending on the dark confinement scale, it can be detected at eLISA or in pulsar timing array experiments. The gravitational wave signal provides a unique test of the gravitational interactions of a dark sector, and we discuss the complementarity with conventional searches for new dark sectors. The discussion includes the twin Higgs and strongly interacting massive particle models as well as symmetric and asymmetric composite dark matter scenarios. PMID:26565451

  20. Gravitational wave astronomy: the current status

    CERN Document Server

    Blair, David; Zhao, Chunnong; Wen, Linqing; Chu, Qi; Fang, Qi; Cai, RongGen; Gao, JiangRui; Lin, XueChun; Liu, Dong; Wu, Ling-An; Zhu, ZongHong; Reitze, David H; Arai, Koji; Zhang, Fan; Flaminio, Raffaele; Zhu, Xingjiang; Hobbs, George; Manchester, Richard N; Shannon, Ryan M; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Xu, Peng; Bian, Xing; Cao, Zhoujian; Chang, ZiJing; Dong, Peng; Gong, XueFei; Huang, ShuangLin; Ju, Peng; Luo, ZiRen; Qiang, Li'E; Tang, WenLin; Wan, XiaoYun; Wang, Yue; Xu, ShengNian; Zhang, YunLong; Zhang, HaiPeng; Lau, Yun-Kau; Ni, Wei-Tou

    2016-01-01

    In the centenary year of Einstein's General Theory of Relativity, this paper reviews the current status of gravitational wave astronomy across a spectrum which stretches from attohertz to kilohertz frequencies. Sect. 1 of this paper reviews the historical development of gravitational wave astronomy from Einstein's first prediction to our current understanding the spectrum. It is shown that detection of signals in the audio frequency spectrum can be expected very soon, and that a north-south pair of next generation detectors would provide large scientific benefits. Sect. 2 reviews the theory of gravitational waves and the principles of detection using laser interferometry. The state of the art Advanced LIGO detectors are then described. These detectors have a high chance of detecting the first events in the near future. Sect. 3 reviews the KAGRA detector currently under development in Japan, which will be the first laser interferometer detector to use cryogenic test masses. Sect. 4 of this paper reviews gravit...

  1. Strong gravitational lensing of gravitational waves in Einstein Telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gravitational wave experiments have entered a new stage which gets us closer to the opening a new observational window on the Universe. In particular, the Einstein Telescope (ET) is designed to have a fantastic sensitivity that will provide with tens or hundreds of thousand NS-NS inspiral events per year up to the redshift z = 2. Some of such events should be gravitationally lensed by intervening galaxies. We explore the prospects of observing gravitationally lensed inspiral NS-NS events in the Einstein telescope. Being conservative we consider the lens population of elliptical galaxies. It turns out that depending on the local insipral rate ET should detect from one per decade detection in the pessimistic case to a tens of detections per year for the most optimistic case. The detection of gravitationally lensed source in gravitational wave detectors would be an invaluable source of information concerning cosmography, complementary to standard ones (like supernovae or BAO) independent of the local cosmic distance ladder calibrations

  2. Pulsar Binaries as Gravitational-Wave Sources: Rate predictions

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Chunglee

    2009-01-01

    Pulsar binaries are important targets for ground-based and future space-borne gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. In order for improving detector design and assessing detector performances, it is a prerequisite to understand the astrophysics of GW sources such as the population size or merger rates. Here, we summarize recent results for Galactic merger rates of two known types of pulsar binaries: (a) double-neutron star-system (DNS) and (b) neutron star-white dwarf (NS-WD) binaries. Based on t...

  3. Gravitational-wave phasing for low-eccentricity inspiralling compact binaries to 3PN order

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Blake; Arun, K G; Mishra, Chandra Kant

    2016-01-01

    [abridged] Although gravitational radiation causes inspiralling compact binaries to circularize, a variety of astrophysical scenarios suggest that binaries might have small but nonnegligible orbital eccentricities when they enter the low-frequency bands of ground and space-based gravitational-wave detectors. If not accounted for, even a small orbital eccentricity can cause a potentially significant systematic error in the mass parameters of an inspiralling binary. Gravitational-wave search templates typically rely on the quasi-circular approximation, which provides relatively simple expressions for the gravitational-wave phase to 3.5 post-Newtonian (PN) order. The quasi-Keplerian formalism provides an elegant but complex description of the post-Newtonian corrections to the orbits and waveforms of inspiralling binaries with any eccentricity. Here we specialize the quasi-Keplerian formalism to binaries with low eccentricity. In this limit the non-periodic contribution to the gravitational-wave phasing can be ex...

  4. How to test gravitation theories by means of gravitational-wave measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, K. S.

    1974-01-01

    Gravitational-wave experiments are a potentially powerful tool for testing gravitation theories. Most theories in the literature predict rather different polarization properties for gravitational waves than are predicted by general relativity; and many theories predict anomalies in the propagation speeds of gravitational waves.

  5. Beyond Einstein Gravity A Survey of Gravitational Theories for Cosmology and Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Faraoni, Valerio

    2011-01-01

    Beyond Einstein’s Gravity is a graduate level introduction to extended theories of gravity and cosmology, including variational principles, the weak-field limit, gravitational waves, mathematical tools, exact solutions, as well as cosmological and astrophysical applications. The book provides a critical overview of the research in this area and unifies the existing literature using a consistent notation. Although the results apply in principle to all alternative gravities, a special emphasis is on scalar-tensor and f(R) theories. They were studied by theoretical physicists from early on, and in the 1980s they appeared in attempts to renormalize General Relativity and in models of the early universe. Recently, these theories have seen a new lease of life, in both their metric and metric-affine versions, as models of the present acceleration of the universe without introducing the mysterious and exotic dark energy. The dark matter problem can also be addressed in extended gravity. These applications are contr...

  6. Gravitational Waves and Gravitational Inertial Waves in the General Theory of Relativity: A Theory and Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borissova L.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available This research shows that gravitational waves and gravitational inertial waves are linked to a special structure of the Riemann-Christoffel curvature tensor. Proceeding from this a classification of the waves is given, according to Petrov’s classification of Einstein spaces and gravitational fields located therein. The world-lines deviation equation for two free particles (the Synge equation is deduced and that for two force- interacting particles (the Synge-Weber equation in the terms of chronometric invariants - physical observable quantities in the General Theory of Relativity. The main result drawn from the deduced equations is that in the field of a falling gravitational wave there are not only spatial deviations between the particles but also deviations in the time flow. Therefore an effect from a falling gravitational wave can manifest only if the particles located on the neighbouring world-lines (both geodesics and non- geodesics are in motion at the initial moment of time: gravitational waves can act only on moving neighbouring particles. This effect is purely parametric, not of a resonance kind. Neither free-mass detectors nor solid-body detectors (the Weber pigs used in current experiments can register gravitational waves, because the experimental statement (freezing the pigs etc. forces the particles of which they consist to be at rest. In aiming to detect gravitational waves other devices should be employed, where neighbouring particles are in relative motion at high speeds. Such a device could, for instance, consist of two parallel laser beams.

  7. The Detectability of Relic (Squeezed) Gravitational Waves by Laser Interferometers

    OpenAIRE

    Grishchuk, L. P.

    1998-01-01

    It is shown that the expected amplitudes and specific correlation properties of the relic (squeezed) gravitational wave background may allow the registration of the relic gravitational waves by the first generation of sensitive gravity-wave detectors.

  8. On the Detectability of Relic (Squeezed) Gravitational Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Grishchuk, L. P.

    1999-01-01

    The expected amplitudes and spectral slopes of relic gravitational waves, plus their specific correlation properties associated with the phenomenon of squeezing, may allow the registration of relic (squeezed) gravitational waves by the first generation of sensitive gravity-wave detectors.

  9. The gravitational wave symphony of the Universe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B S Sathyaprakash

    2001-04-01

    The new millennium will see the upcoming of several ground-based interferometric gravitational wave antennas. Within the next decade a space-based antenna may also begin to observe the distant Universe. These gravitational wave detectors will together operate as a network taking data continuously for several years, watching the transient and continuous phenomena occurring in the deep cores of astronomical objects and dense environs of the early Universe where gravity was extremely strong and highly nonlinear. The network will listen to the waves from rapidly spinning non-axisymmetric neutron stars, normal modes of black holes, binary black hole inspiral and merger, phase transitions in the early Universe, quantum fluctuations resulting in a characteristic background in the early Universe. The gravitational wave antennas will open a new window to observe the dark Universe unreachable via other channels of astronomical observations.

  10. Gravitational waves in fourth order gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capozziello, S.; Stabile, A.

    2015-08-01

    In the post-Minkowskian limit approximation, we study gravitational wave solutions for general fourth-order theories of gravity. Specifically, we consider a Lagrangian with a generic function of curvature invariants . It is well known that when dealing with General Relativity such an approach provides massless spin-two waves as propagating degree of freedom of the gravitational field while this theory implies other additional propagating modes in the gravity spectra. We show that, in general, fourth order gravity, besides the standard massless graviton is characterized by two further massive modes with a finite-distance interaction. We find out the most general gravitational wave solutions in terms of Green functions in vacuum and in presence of matter sources. If an electromagnetic source is chosen, only the modes induced by are present, otherwise, for any gravity model, we have the complete analogy with tensor modes of General Relativity. Polarizations and helicity states are classified in the hypothesis of plane wave.

  11. LISA in the gravitational wave decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, John; Cornish, Neil

    2015-04-01

    With the expected direct detection of gravitational waves in the second half of this decade by Advanced LIGO and pulsar timing arrays, and with the launch of LISA Pathfinder in the summer of this year, this can arguably be called the decade of gravitational waves. Low frequency gravitational waves in the mHz range, which can only be observed from space, provide the richest science and complement high frequency observatories on the ground. A space-based observatory will improve our understanding of the formation and growth of massive black holes, create a census of compact binary systems in the Milky Way, test general relativity in extreme conditions, and enable searches for new physics. LISA, by far the most mature concept for detecting gravitational waves from space, has consistently ranked among the nation's top priority large science missions. In 2013, ESA selected the science theme ``The Gravitational Universe'' for its third large mission, L3, under the Cosmic Visions Program, with a planned launch date of 2034. Recently, NASA has decided to join with ESA on the L3 mission as a junior partner. Both agencies formed a committee to advise them on the scientific and technological approaches for a space based gravitational wave observatory. The leading mission design, Evolved LISA or eLISA, is a slightly de-scoped version of the earlier LISA design. This talk will describe activities of the Gravitational Wave Science Interest Group (GWSIG) under the Physics of the Cosmos Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG), focusing on LISA technology development in both the U.S. and Europe, including the LISA Pathfinder mission.

  12. Gravitational wave background from binary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic aspects of the background of gravitational waves and its mathematical characterization are reviewed. The spectral energy density parameter Ω(f), commonly used as a quantifier of the background, is derived for an ensemble of many identical sources emitting at different times and locations. For such an ensemble, Ω(f) is generalized to account for the duration of the signals and of the observation, so that one can distinguish the resolvable and unresolvable parts of the background. The unresolvable part, often called confusion noise or stochastic background, is made by signals that cannot be either individually identified or subtracted out of the data. To account for the resolvability of the background, the overlap function is introduced. This function is a generalization of the duty cycle, which has been commonly used in the literature, in some cases leading to incorrect results. The spectra produced by binary systems (stellar binaries and massive black hole binaries) are presented over the frequencies of all existing and planned detectors. A semi-analytical formula for Ω(f) is derived in the case of stellar binaries (containing white dwarfs, neutron stars or stellar-mass black holes). Besides a realistic expectation of the level of background, upper and lower limits are given, to account for the uncertainties in some astrophysical parameters such as binary coalescence rates. One interesting result concerns all current and planned ground-based detectors (including the Einstein Telescope). In their frequency range, the background of binaries is resolvable and only sporadically present. In other words, there is no stochastic background of binaries for ground-based detectors.

  13. Fast gravitational wave radiometry using data folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ain, Anirban; Dalvi, Prathamesh; Mitra, Sanjit

    2015-07-01

    Gravitational waves (GWs) from the early universe and unresolved astrophysical sources are expected to create a stochastic GW background (SGWB). The GW radiometer algorithm is well suited to probe such a background using data from ground-based laser interferometric detectors. Radiometer analysis can be performed in different bases, e.g., isotropic, pixel or spherical harmonic. Each of these analyses possesses a common temporal symmetry which we exploit here to fold the whole data set for every detector pair, typically a few hundred to a thousand days of data, to only one sidereal day, without any compromise in precision. We develop the algebra and a software pipeline needed to fold data, accounting for the effect of overlapping windows and nonstationary noise. We implement this on LIGO's fifth science run data and validate it by performing a standard anisotropic SGWB search on both folded and unfolded data. Folded data not only leads to orders of magnitude reduction in computation cost, but it results in a conveniently small data volume of few gigabytes, making it possible to perform an actual analysis on a personal computer, as well as easy movement of data. A few important analyses, yet unaccomplished due to computational limitations, will now become feasible. Folded data, being independent of the radiometer basis, will also be useful in reducing processing redundancies in multiple searches and provide a common ground for mutual consistency checks. Most importantly, folded data will allow vast amount of experimentation with existing searches and provide substantial help in developing new strategies to find unknown sources.

  14. Discovering the QCD Axion with Black Holes and Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Huang, Xinlu

    2014-01-01

    Advanced LIGO will be the first experiment to detect gravitational waves. Through superradiance of stellar black holes, it may also be the first experiment to discover the QCD axion with decay constant above the GUT scale. When an axion's Compton wavelength is comparable to the size of a black hole, the axion binds to the black hole, forming a "gravitational atom." Through the superradiance process, the number of axions occupying the bound levels grows exponentially, extracting energy and angular momentum from the black hole. Axions transitioning between levels of the gravitational atom and axions annihilating to gravitons produce observable gravitational wave signals. The signals are long-lasting, monochromatic, and can be distinguished from ordinary astrophysical sources. We estimate O(1) transition events at aLIGO for an axion between 10^-11 and 10^-10 eV and up to 1000 annihilation events for an axion between 10^-13 and 10^-12 eV. Axion annihilations are particularly promising for much lighter masses at f...

  15. MHD waves and instabilities for gravitating, magnetized configurations in motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppens, Rony; Goedbloed, Hans J. P.

    Seismic probing of equilibrium configurations is of course well-known from geophysics, but has also been succesfully used to determine the internal structure of the Sun to an amazing accuracy. The results of helioseismology are quite impressive, although they only exploit an equilibrium structure where inward gravity is balanced by a pressure gradient in a 1D radial fashion. In principle, one can do the same for stationary, gravitating, magnetized plasma equilibria, as needed to perform MHD seismology in astrophysical jets or accretion disks. The introduction of (sheared) differential rotation does require the important switch from diagnosing static to stationary equilibrium configurations. The theory to describe all linear waves and instabilities in ideal MHD, given an exact stationary, gravitating, magnetized plasma equilibrium, in any dimensionality (1D, 2D, 3D) has been known since 1960, and is governed by the Frieman-Rotenberg equation. The full (mathematical) power of spectral theory governing physical eigenmode determination comes into play when using the Frieman-Rotenberg equation for moving equilibria, as applicable to astrophysical jets, accretion disks, but also solar flux ropes with stationary flow patterns. I will review exemplary seismic studies of flowing equilibrium configurations, covering solar to astrophysical configurations in motion. In that case, even essentially 1D configurations require quantification of the spectral web of eigenmodes, organizing the complex eigenfrequency plane.

  16. A comparison between matter wave and light wave interferometers for the detection of gravitational waves

    OpenAIRE

    Delva, Pacôme; Angonin, Marie-Christine; Tourrenc, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    We calculate and compare the response of light wave interferometers and matter wave interferometers to gravitational waves. We find that metric matter wave interferometers will not challenge kilometric light wave interferometers such as Virgo or LIGO, but could be a good candidate for the detection of very low frequency gravitational waves.

  17. Black-Hole Binaries, Gravitational Waves, and Numerical Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Bernard J.; Centrella, Joan; Baker, John G.; Kelly, Bernard J.; vanMeter, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the predictions of general relativity for the dynamical interactions of two black holes has been a long-standing unsolved problem in theoretical physics. Black-hole mergers are monumental astrophysical events ' releasing tremendous amounts of energy in the form of gravitational radiation ' and are key sources for both ground- and spacebased gravitational wave detectors. The black-hole merger dynamics and the resulting gravitational waveforms can only he calculated through numerical simulations of Einstein's equations of general relativity. For many years, numerical relativists attempting to model these mergers encountered a host of problems, causing their codes to crash after just a fraction of a binary orbit cnuld be simulated. Recently ' however, a series of dramatic advances in numerical relativity has ' for the first time, allowed stable / robust black hole merger simulations. We chronicle this remarkable progress in the rapidly maturing field of numerical relativity, and the new understanding of black-hole binary dynamics that is emerging. We also discuss important applications of these fundamental physics results to astrophysics, to gravitationalwave astronomy, and in other areas.

  18. Bigravitons as dark matter and gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Aoki, Katsuki

    2016-01-01

    We consider the possibility that the massive graviton is a viable candidate of dark matter in the context of bimetric gravity. We first derive the energy-momentum tensor of the massive graviton and show that it indeed behaves as that of dark matter fluid. We then discuss a production mechanism and the present abundance of massive gravitons as dark matter. Since the metric to which ordinary matter fields couple is a linear combination of the two mass eigenstates of bigravity, production of massive gravitons, i.e. the dark matter particles, is inevitably accompanied by generation of massless gravitons, i.e. the gravitational waves. Therefore, in this scenario some information about dark matter in our universe is encoded in gravitational waves. For instance, if LIGO detects gravitational waves generated by the preheating after inflation then the massive graviton with the mass of $\\sim 0.01$ GeV is a candidate of the dark matter.

  19. On gravitational waves generated during inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study cosmological gravitational waves generated during inflation under the influence of a decaying cosmological ''constant''. A non-perturbative contribution of the dynamical cosmological ''constant'' to the tensor modes is considered. As applications of the model we study the well-known cases Λ(t) = σH2 and Λ(t) = θH. The spectrum of gravitational waves results scale invariant only for the first case, leaving this to new proposals of the form: Λ(t) = f(H,H2), in order to include inflation in some Λ(t)CDM models. We also found that the non-perturbative contributions of Λ(t), accelerate the decreasing of the amplitude of gravitational waves during a power-law inflationary stage, by an exponential factor

  20. The Japanese space gravitational wave antenna: DECIGO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of the DECi-hertz Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (DECIGO) are to open a new window of observation for gravitational wave astronomy and to obtain insight into significant areas of science, such as verifying and characterizing inflation, determining the thermal history of the universe, characterizing dark energy, describing the formation mechanism of supermassive black holes in the center of galaxies, testing alternative theories of gravity, seeking black hole dark matter, understanding the physics of neutron stars and searching for planets around double neutron stars. DECIGO consists of four clusters of spacecraft in heliocentric orbits; each cluster employs three drag-free spacecraft, 1000 km apart from each other, whose relative displacements are measured by three pairs of differential Fabry-Perot Michelson interferometers. Two milestone missions, DECIGO pathfinder and Pre-DECIGO, will be launched to demonstrate required technologies and possibly to detect gravitational waves.

  1. Gravitational wave asteroseismology with protoneutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Sotani, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    We examine the time evolution of the frequencies of the gravitational wave after the bounce within the framework of relativistic linear perturbation theory using the results of one dimensional numerical simulations of core-collapse supernovae. Protoneutron star models are constructed in such a way that the mass and radius of protoneutron star become equivalent to the results obtained from the numerical simulations. Then, we find that the frequencies of gravitational waves radiating from protoneutron stars strongly depend on the mass and radius of protoneutron stars, but almost independently of the profiles of electron fraction and entropy per baryon inside the star. Additionally, we find that the frequencies of gravitational waves can be characterized by the square root of the average density of protoneutron star irrespectively the progenitor models, which are completely different from the empirical formula for cold neutron stars. The dependence of the spectra on the mass and radius is different from that of ...

  2. Exploring Gravitational Waves in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cominsky, Lynn R.; McLin, Kevin M.; Peruta, Carolyn; Simonnet, Aurore

    2016-04-01

    On September 14, 2015, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) received the first confirmed gravitational wave signals. Now known as GW150914 (for the date on which the signals were received), the event represents the coalescence of two black holes that were previously in mutual orbit. LIGO’s exciting discovery provides direct evidence of what is arguably the last major unconfirmed prediction of Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity. The Education and Public Outreach group at Sonoma State University has created an educator's guide that provides a brief introduction to LIGO and to gravitational waves, along with two simple demonstration activities that can be done in the classroom to engage students in understanding LIGO’s discovery. Additional resources have also been provided to extend student explorations of Einstein’s Universe.

  3. The dawn of gravitational wave astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    On Sep 14 2015, gravitational waves were for the first time detected directly. This observation by the LIGO interferometric detectors marks the dawn of a new era in our observational study of the cosmos as a qualitatively new window to its exploration has been opened. This talk reviews some of the fundamental concepts of gravitational waves and the methodology employed for their observation. The first event, dubbed GW150914, and the properties of its source, as inferred from the observation, will be discussed. The talk concludes with a selected set of the most important topics where we expect gravitational-wave observations to deepen and either challenge or confirm our present understanding of the laws and the history of our universe.

  4. Gravitational waves from scalar field accretion

    CERN Document Server

    Núnez, Darío; Moreno, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Our aim in this work is to outline some physical consequences of the interaction between black holes and scalar field halos in terms of gravitational waves. In doing so, the black hole is taken as a static and spherically symmetric gravitational source, {\\it i. e.} the Schwarzschild black hole, and we work within the test field approximation, considering that the scalar field lives in the curved space-time outside the black hole. We focused on the emission of gravitational waves when the black hole is perturbed by the surrounding scalar field matter. The symmetries of the spacetime and the simplicity of the matter source allow, by means of a spherical harmonic decomposition, to study the problem by means of a one dimensional description. Some properties of such gravitational waves are discussed as a function of the parameters of the infalling scalar field, and allow us to make the conjecture that the gravitational waves carry information on the type of matter that generated them.

  5. Testing Gravity with Gravitational Wave Source Counts

    CERN Document Server

    Calabrese, Erminia; Spergel, David N

    2016-01-01

    We show that the gravitational wave source counts distribution can test how gravitational radiation propagates on cosmological scales. This test does not require obtaining redshifts for the sources. If the signal-to-noise from a gravitational wave source is proportional to the strain then it falls as $R^{-1}$, thus we expect the source counts to follow $dN/dS \\propto S^{-4}$. However, if gravitational waves decay as they propagate or can propagate into other dimensions, then there can be deviations from this generic prediction. We consider the possibility that the signal-to-noise falls as $R^{-\\gamma}$, where $\\gamma=1$ recovers the expected predictions in a Euclidean uniformly-filled universe. We forecast the sensitivity of future observations in constraining gravitational wave physics using this method by simulating sources distributed over a finite range of signal-to-noise. We first consider the case of few objects, 7 sources, with a signal-to-noise from 8 to 24, and impose a lower limit on $\\gamma$, findi...

  6. Possible Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observatory Mission Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    The existence of gravitational waves was established by the discovery of the Binary Pulsar PSR 1913+16 by Hulse and Taylor in 1974, for which they were awarded the 1983 Nobel Prize. However, it is the exploitation of these gravitational waves for the extraction of the astrophysical parameters of the sources that will open the first new astronomical window since the development of gamma ray telescopes in the 1970's and enable a new era of discovery and understanding of the Universe. Direct detection is expected in at least two frequency bands from the ground before the end of the decade with Advanced LIGO and Pulsar Timing Arrays. However, many of the most exciting sources will be continuously observable in the band from 0.1-100 mHz, accessible only from space due to seismic noise and gravity gradients in that band that disturb ground-based observatories. This poster will discuss a possible mission concept, Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatory (SGO-Mid) developed from the original Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) reference mission but updated to reduce risk and cost.

  7. Merging Black Holes, Gravitational Waves, and Numerical Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan M.

    2009-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes will emit more energy than all the stars in the observable universe combined. This energy will come in the form of gravitational waves, which are a key prediction of Einstein's general relativity and a new tool for exploring the universe. Observing these mergers with gravitational wave detectors, such as the ground-based LIGO and the space-based LISA, requires knowledge of the radiation waveforms. Since these mergers take place in regions of extreme gravity, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute black hole mergers using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes were long plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Within the past few years, however, this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of remarkable breakthroughs. This talk will focus on new simulations that are revealing the dynamics and w aefo rms of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wave detection, testing general relativity, and astrophysics.

  8. Upper limit map of a background of gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Agresti, J; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arain, M; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Aston, S; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Ballmer, S; Bantilan, H; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Belczynski, K; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Biswas, R; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Bogenstahl, J; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brinkmann, M; Brooks, A; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burmeister, O; Busby, D; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cantley, C A; Cao, J; Cardenas, L; Casey, M M; Castaldi, G; Cepeda, C; Chalkey, E; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chiadini, F; Chin, D; Chin, E; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Clark, J; Cochrane, P; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C N; Coldwell, R; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coward, D; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Croce, R P; Crooks, D R M; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Dalrymple, J; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; De Bra, D; Degallaix, J; Degree, M; Demma, T; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S V; Díaz, M; Dickson, J; Di Credico, A; Diederichs, G; Dietz, A; Doomes, E E; Drever, R W P; Dumas, J C; Dupuis, R J; Dwyer, J G; Ehrens, P; Espinoza, E; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Fazi, D; Fejer, M M; Finn, L S; Fiumara, V; Fotopoulos, N; Franzen, A; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Galdi, V; Garofoli, J; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Goda, K; Goetz, E; Goggin, L; González, G; Gossler, S; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, M; Greenhalgh, J; Gretarsson, A M; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hammer, D; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G; Harstad, E; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hosken, D; Hough, J; Howell, E; Hoyland, D; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D; Innerhofer, E; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jackrel, D; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, Peter Ignaz Paul; Kalogera, V; Kasprzyk, D; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalili, F Ya; Kim, C; King, P; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R K; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lee, B; Lei, M; Leiner, J; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lindquist, P; Lockerbie, N A; Longo, M; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Malec, M; Mandic, V; Marano, S; Marka, S; Markowitz, J; Maros, E; Martin, I; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Matone, L; Matta, V; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McHugh, M; McKenzie, K; McNabb, J W C; McWilliams, S; Meier, T; Melissinos, A C; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C J; Meyers, D; Mikhailov, E; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mow Lowry, C; Moylan, A; Mudge, D; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Muller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P; Myers, E; Myers, J; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Numata, K; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pierro, V; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H; Plissi, M V; Postiglione, F; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Rabeling, D; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rainer, N; Rakhmanov, M; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Rehbein, H; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ribichini, L; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Roddy, S; Rodríguez, A; Rogan, A M; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Route, R; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Sakata, S; Samidi, M; Sancho de la Jordana, L; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Saraf, S; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Savov, P; Schediwy, S; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Sidles, J A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sinha, S; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Somiya, K; Strain, K A; Strom, D M; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, K X; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Takahashi, H; Tanner, D B; Tarallo, M; Taylor, R; Thacker, J; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thüring, A; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Ungarelli, C; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vallisneri, M; Van Den Broeck, C; Varvella, M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Veitch, P; Villar, A; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Waldman, S J; Wallace, L; Ward, H; Ward, R; Watts, K; Webber, D; Weidner, A; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Wen, S; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitbeck, D M; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, L; Willke, B; Wilmut, I; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wise, S; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Woods, D; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Wu, W; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yan, Z; Yoshida, S; Yunes, N; Zanolin, M; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, C; Zotov, N; Zucker, M; zur Muhlen, H; Zweizig, J; al, et

    2007-01-01

    We searched for an anisotropic background of gravitational waves using data from the LIGO S4 science run and a method that is optimized for point sources. This is appropriate if, for example, the gravitational wave background is dominated by a small number of distinct astrophysical sources. No signal was seen. Upper limit maps were produced assuming two different power laws for the source strain power spectrum. For an f^-3 power law and using the 50 Hz to 1.8 kHz band the upper limits on the source strain power spectrum vary between 1.2e-48 Hz^-1 (100 Hz/f)^3 and 1.2e-47 Hz^-1 (100 Hz /f)^3, depending on the position in the sky. Similarly, in the case of constant strain power spectrum, the upper limits vary between 8.5e-49 Hz^-1 and 6.1e-48 Hz^-1. As a side product a limit on an isotropic background of gravitational waves was also obtained. All limits are at the 90% confidence level. Finally, as an application, we focused on the direction of Sco-X1, the closest low-mass X-ray binary. We compare the upper limi...

  9. Nonlinear interaction and propagation of gravitational and electromagnetic waves in plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Servin, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Gravitational waves and electromagnetic waves are important as carriers of energy and information. This thesis is devoted to the study of the propagation and interaction of these waves in plasmas, with emphasis on nonlinear effects and applications within astrophysics. The physical systems are described by the Einstein-Maxwell-fluid equations or Einstein-Maxwell-Vlasov equations, when a kinetic treatment is required. The small amplitude and high-frequency approximation is employed for the gra...

  10. BOOK REVIEW: Gravitational Waves, Volume 1: Theory and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poisson, Eric

    2008-10-01

    A superficial introduction to gravitational waves can be found in most textbooks on general relativity, but typically, the treatment hardly does justice to a field that has grown tremendously, both in its theoretical and experimental aspects, in the course of the last twenty years. Other than the technical literature, few other sources have been available to the interested reader; exceptions include edited volumes such as [1] and [2], Weber's little book [3] which happily is still in print, and Peter Saulson's text [4] which appears, unfortunately, to be out of print. In addition to these technical references, the story of gravitational waves was famously told by a sociologist of scientific knowledge [5] (focusing mostly on the experimental aspects) and a historian of science [6] (focusing mostly on the theoretical aspects). The book Gravitational Waves, Volume 1, by Michele Maggiore, is a welcome point of departure. This is, as far as I know, the first comprehensive textbook on gravitational waves. It describes the theoretical foundations of the subject, the known (and anticipated) sources, and the principles of detection by resonant masses and laser interferometers. This book is a major accomplishment, and with the promised volume 2 on astrophysical and cosmological aspects of gravitational waves, the community of all scientists interested in this topic will be well served. Part I of the book is devoted to the theoretical aspects of gravitational waves. In chapter 1 the waves are introduced in usual relativist's fashion, in the context of an approximation to general relativity in which they are treated as a small perturbation of the Minkowski metric of flat spacetime. This is an adequate foundation to study how the waves propagate, and how they interact with freely moving masses making up a detector. The waves are presented in the usual traceless-transverse gauge, but the detection aspects are also worked out in the detector's proper rest frame; this dual

  11. Energy-Momentum Distribution of Gravitational Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Sharif; Kanwal Nazir

    2008-01-01

    This paper has been addressed to the well-known problem of energy in gravitational waves.We have investigated the energy of cylindrical gravitational waves in the context of General Relativity and teleparallel theory of gravity.For this purpose,the prescriptions of Einstein,Landau-Lifshitz,Bergmann-Thomson,and Moller are used in both the theories.It is shown that these energy-momentum complexes do not provide equivalent results in the two theories.However,these turn out to be constant for all the prescriptions except Moller in both the theories at large distances.

  12. Thermal inflation and the gravitational wave background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider the impact of thermal inflation—a short, secondary period of inflation that can arise in supersymmetric scenarios—on the stochastic gravitational wave background. We show that while the primordial inflationary gravitational wave background is essentially unchanged at cosmic microwave background scales, it is massively diluted at solar system scales and would be unobservable by a Big Bang Observer (BBO) style experiment. Conversely, bubble collisions at the end of thermal inflation can generate a new stochastic background. We calculate the likely properties of the bubbles created during this phase transition, and show that the expected amplitude and frequency of this signal would fall within the BBO range

  13. Gravitational Waves and Multi-Messenger Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan M.

    2010-01-01

    Gravitational waves are produced by a wide variety of sources throughout the cosmos, including the mergers of black hole and neutron star binaries/compact objects spiraling into central black holes in galactic nuclei, close compact binaries/and phase transitions and quantum fluctuations in the early universe. Observing these signals can bring new, and often very precise, information about their sources across vast stretches of cosmic time. In this talk we will focus on thee opening of this gravitational-wave window on the universe, highlighting new opportunities for discovery and multi-messenger astronomy.

  14. Gravity's shadow the search for gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, Harry

    2004-01-01

    According to the theory of relativity, we are constantly bathed in gravitational radiation. When stars explode or collide, a portion of their mass becomes energy that disturbs the very fabric of the space-time continuum like ripples in a pond. But proving the existence of these waves has been difficult; the cosmic shudders are so weak that only the most sensitive instruments can be expected to observe them directly. Fifteen times during the last thirty years scientists have claimed to have detected gravitational waves, but so far none of those claims have survived the scrutiny of the scie

  15. Gravitational Wave Generation in Rotating Compact Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Endler, Ana Maria; Rodrigues, Hilário; Chiapparini, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    We present a simplified description of a rotating neutron star emitting gravitational waves. We describe the system by an uniformly rotating triaxial homogeneous ellipsoid to catch the main aspects of the evolution. We construct an effective Lagrangian model, in which the kinetic energy associated to the breath mode and rotation are explicitly determined. The rate of gravitational waves radiation is determined in the framework of the weak field limit approximation of Einstein equations. We then solve numerically the equations of motion for the nascent neutron star, incorporating the diffusion of neutrinos in the calculation.

  16. Cosmic Variance in the Nanohertz Gravitational Wave Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roebber, Elinore; Holder, Gilbert; Holz, Daniel E.; Warren, Michael

    2016-03-01

    We use large N-body simulations and empirical scaling relations between dark matter halos, galaxies, and supermassive black holes (SMBBHs) to estimate the formation rates of SMBBH binaries and the resulting low-frequency stochastic gravitational wave background (GWB). We find this GWB to be relatively insensitive (≲ 10%) to cosmological parameters, with only slight variation between wmap5 and Planck cosmologies. We find that uncertainty in the astrophysical scaling relations changes the amplitude of the GWB by a factor of ∼2. Current observational limits are already constraining this predicted range of models. We investigate the Poisson variance in the amplitude of the GWB for randomly generated populations of SMBBHs, finding a scatter of order unity per frequency bin below 10 nHz, and increasing to a factor of ∼10 near 100 nHz. This variance is a result of the rarity of the most massive binaries, which dominate the signal, and acts as a fundamental uncertainty on the amplitude of the underlying power law spectrum. This Poisson uncertainty dominates at ≳ 20 nHz, while at lower frequencies the dominant uncertainty is related to our poor understanding of the astrophysical scaling relations, although very low frequencies may be dominated by uncertainties related to the final parsec problem and the processes which drive binaries to the gravitational wave dominated regime. Cosmological effects are negligible at all frequencies.

  17. Imprints of the nuclear symmetry energy on gravitational waves from deformed pulsars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy is a critical input for understanding many interesting phenomena in astrophysics and cosmology. We report here effects of the nuclear symmetry energy partially constrained by terrestrial laboratory experiments on the strength of gravitational waves (GWs) from deformed pulsars at both low and high rotational frequencies. (author)

  18. Gravitational waves from compact objects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    José Antonio de Freitas Pacheco

    2010-01-01

    Large ground-based laser beam interferometers are presently in operation both in the USA (LIGO) and in Europe (VIRGO) and potential sources that might be detected by these instruments are revisited. The present generation of detectors does not have a sensitivity high enough to probe a significant volume of the universe and,consequently, predicted event rates are very low. The planned advanced generation of interferometers will probably be able to detect, for the first time, a gravitational signal. Advanced LIGO and EGO instruments are expected to detect few (some): binary coalescences consisting of either two neutron stars, two black holes or a neutron star and a black hole. In space, the sensitivity of the planned LISA spacecraft constellation will allow the detection of the gravitational signals, even within a "pessimistic" range of possible signals, produced during the capture of compact objects by supermassive black holes, at a rate of a few tens per year.

  19. Cylindrical Collapse and Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Herrera, L

    2005-01-01

    We study the matching conditions for a collapsing anisotropic cylindrical perfect fluid, and we show that its radial pressure is non zero on the surface of the cylinder and proportional to the time dependent part of the field produced by the collapsing fluid. This result resembles the one that arises for the radiation - though non-gravitational - in the spherically symmetric collapsing dissipative fluid, in the diffusion approximation.

  20. Wave optics and image formation in gravitational lensing

    OpenAIRE

    Yasusada Nambu

    2012-01-01

    We investigate image formations in gravitational lensing systems using wave optics. Applying the Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction formula to waves scattered by a gravitational potential of a lens object, we demonstrate how images of source objects are obtained directly from wave functions without using a lens equation for gravitational lensing. As an example of image formation in gravitational lensing, images of a point source by a point mass gravitational lens are presented. These images reduc...

  1. A First Targeted Search for Gravitational-Wave Bursts from Core-Collapse Supernovae in Data of First-Generation Laser Interferometer Detectors

    CERN Document Server

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Blackburn, J K; Blair, C D; Blair, D G; Blair, R M; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bohe, A; Bojtos, P; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonnand, R; Boom, B A; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bouffanais, Y; Bozzi, A; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brockill, P; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cahillane, C; Bustillo, J Calder'on; Callister, T; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Capocasa, E; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Diaz, J Casanueva; Casentini, C; Caudill, S; Cavagli`a, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C B; Baiardi, L Cerboni; Cerretani, G; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chan, M; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, H Y; Chen, Y; Cheng, C; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; 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Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalaghatgi, C V; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kamaretsos, I; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karki, S; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; K'ef'elian, F; Kehl, M S; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Kennedy, R; Key, J S; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khan, I; Khan, S; Khan, Z; Khazanov, E A; Kijbunchoo, N; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J; Kim, K; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Kleybolte, L; Klimenko, S; Koehlenbeck, S M; Kokeyama, K; Koley, S; Kondrashov, V; Kontos, A; Korobko, M; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Kr'olak, A; Krueger, C; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Lackey, B D; Landry, M; Lange, J; Lantz, B; Lasky, P D; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, K; Lenon, A; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B M; Li, T G F; 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Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Middleton, H; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, A L; Miller, J; Millhouse, M; Minenkov, Y; Ming, J; Mirshekari, S; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moggi, A; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Montani, M; Moore, B C; Moore, C J; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Muir, A W; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D; Mukherjee, S; Mukund, K N; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D J; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Necula, V; Nedkova, K; Nelemans, G; Neri, M; Neunzert, A; Newton, G; Nguyen, T T; Nielsen, A B; Nissanke, S; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E N; Nuttall, L K; Oberling, J; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oliver, M; Oppermann, P; Oram, Richard J; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ott, C D; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pai, A; Pai, S A; Palamos, J R; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pal-Singh, A; Pan, H; Pankow, C; Pannarale, F; Pant, B C; Paoletti, F; Paoli, A; Papa, M A; Paris, H R; Parker, W; Pascucci, D; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patricelli, B; Patrick, Z; Pearlstone, B L; Pedraza, M; Pedurand, R; Pekowsky, L; Pele, A; Penn, S; Pereira, R; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Piccinni, O J; Pichot, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pillant, G; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poggiani, R; Popolizio, P; Post, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Predoi, V; Premachandra, S S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; P"urrer, M; Qi, H; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E A; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rakhmanov, M; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Read, J; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Rei, L; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Rew, H; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robie, R; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Roma, V J; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosi'nska, D; Rowan, S; R"udiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sachdev, S; Sadecki, T; Sadeghian, L; Salconi, L; Saleem, M; Salemi, F; Samajdar, A; Sammut, L; Sanchez, E J; Sandberg, V; Sandeen, B; Sanders, J R; Santamaria, L; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Sauter, O E S; Savage, R L; Sawadsky, A; Schale, P; Schilling, R; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Sch"onbeck, A; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Serna, G; Setyawati, Y; Sevigny, A; Shaddock, D A; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shao, Z; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Sheperd, A; Shoemaker, D H; Shoemaker, D M; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sieniawska, M; Sigg, D; Silva, A D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L P; Singh, A; Singh, R; Singhal, A; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Smith, J R; Smith, N D; Smith, R J E; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Sorrentino, F; Souradeep, T; Srivastava, A K; Staley, A; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steinmeyer, D; Stephens, B C; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Stratta, G; Strauss, N A; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, L; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B L; Szczepa'nczyk, M J; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; T'apai, M; Tarabrin, S P; Taracchini, A; Taylor, R; Theeg, T; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, E G; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, S; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; T"oyr"a, D; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trifir`o, D; Tringali, M C; Trozzo, L; Tse, M; Turconi, M; Tuyenbayev, D; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; Vander-Hyde, D C; van der Schaaf, L; van Heijningen, J V; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Vass, S; Vas'uth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Vicer'e, A; Vinciguerra, S; Vine, D J; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Voss, D V; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L E; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wang, Y; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L -W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Wessels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Wright, J L; Wu, G; Yablon, J; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yap, M J; Yu, H; Yvert, M; zny, A Zadro; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zevin, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhou, Z; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S E; Zweizig, J

    2016-01-01

    We present results from a search for gravitational-wave bursts coincident with a set of two core-collapse supernovae observed between 2007 and 2011. We employ data from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), the Virgo gravitational-wave observatory, and the GEO 600 gravitational-wave observatory. The targeted core-collapse supernovae were selected on the basis of (1) proximity (within approximately 15 Mpc), (2) tightness of observational constraints on the time of core collapse that defines the gravitational-wave search window, and (3) coincident operation of at least two interferometers at the time of core collapse. We find no plausible gravitational-wave candidates. We present the probability of detecting signals from both astrophysically well-motivated and more speculative gravitational-wave emission mechanisms as a function of distance from Earth, and discuss the implications for the detection of gravitational waves from core-collapse supernovae by the upgraded Advanced LIGO and V...

  2. Gravitational waves from cosmic bubble collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosmic bubbles are nucleated through the quantum tunneling process. After nucleation they would expand and undergo collisions with each other. In this paper, we focus in particular on collisions of two equal-sized bubbles and compute gravitational waves emitted from the collisions. First, we study the mechanism of the collisions by means of a real scalar field and its quartic potential. Then, using this model, we compute gravitational waves from the collisions in a straightforward manner. In the quadrupole approximation, time-domain gravitational waveforms are directly obtained by integrating the energy-momentum tensors over the volume of the wave sources, where the energy-momentum tensors are expressed in terms of the scalar field, the local geometry and the potential. We present gravitational waveforms emitted during (i) the initial-to-intermediate stage of strong collisions and (ii) the final stage of weak collisions: the former is obtained numerically, in full General Relativity and the latter analytically, in the flat spacetime approximation. We gain qualitative insights into the time-domain gravitational waveforms from bubble collisions: during (i), the waveforms show the non-linearity of the collisions, characterized by a modulating frequency and cusp-like bumps, whereas during (ii), the waveforms exhibit the linearity of the collisions, featured by smooth monochromatic oscillations. (orig.)

  3. Gravitational waves from cosmic bubble collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong-Hoon [Ewha Womans University, Basic Science Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ewha Womans University, Institute for the Early Universe, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Bum-Hoon [Sogang University, Center for Quantum Spacetime, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sogang University, Department of Physics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Wonwoo [Sogang University, Center for Quantum Spacetime, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Jongmann [Ewha Womans University, Basic Science Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ewha Womans University, Institute for the Early Universe, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ewha Womans University, Department of Physics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yeom, Dong-han [Sogang University, Center for Quantum Spacetime, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kyoto University, Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto (Japan); National Taiwan University, Leung Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics, Taipei (China)

    2015-03-01

    Cosmic bubbles are nucleated through the quantum tunneling process. After nucleation they would expand and undergo collisions with each other. In this paper, we focus in particular on collisions of two equal-sized bubbles and compute gravitational waves emitted from the collisions. First, we study the mechanism of the collisions by means of a real scalar field and its quartic potential. Then, using this model, we compute gravitational waves from the collisions in a straightforward manner. In the quadrupole approximation, time-domain gravitational waveforms are directly obtained by integrating the energy-momentum tensors over the volume of the wave sources, where the energy-momentum tensors are expressed in terms of the scalar field, the local geometry and the potential. We present gravitational waveforms emitted during (i) the initial-to-intermediate stage of strong collisions and (ii) the final stage of weak collisions: the former is obtained numerically, in full General Relativity and the latter analytically, in the flat spacetime approximation. We gain qualitative insights into the time-domain gravitational waveforms from bubble collisions: during (i), the waveforms show the non-linearity of the collisions, characterized by a modulating frequency and cusp-like bumps, whereas during (ii), the waveforms exhibit the linearity of the collisions, featured by smooth monochromatic oscillations. (orig.)

  4. For information: Geneva University - The search for gravitational waves. Physical motivations and experimental perspectives

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    UNIVERSITE DE GENEVE ECOLE DE PHYSIQUE Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet - 1211 GENEVE 4 Tél : (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 11 May PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 - Stückelberg Auditorium The search for gravitational waves. Physical motivations and experimental perspectives by Prof. Michele Maggiore / DPT-UniGe I will give an overview of gravitational-wave physics, addressing two main questions: What are the physical motivations for gravitational-wave research, both from the point of view of astrophysics and of high-energy physics. Present status and future perspectives of gravitational-wave experiments. Information: http://dpnc.unige.ch/seminaire/annonce.html Organizer: A. Cervera Villanueva

  5. Gravitational wave emission and spin-down of young pulsars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rotation frequencies of young pulsars are systematically below their theoretical Kepler limit. r-modes have been suggested as a possible explanation for this observation. With the help of semi-analytic expressions that make it possible to assess the uncertainties of the r-mode scenario due to the impact of uncertainties in underlying microphysics, we perform a quantitative analysis of the spin-down and the emitted gravitational waves of young pulsars. We find that the frequency to which r-modes spin-down a young neutron star (NS) is surprisingly insensitive to both the microscopic details and the saturation amplitude. Comparing our result to astrophysical data, we show that for a range of sufficiently large saturation amplitudes r-modes provide a viable spin-down scenario and that all observed young pulsars are very likely already outside the r-mode instability region. Therefore, the most promising sources for gravitational wave detection are unobserved NSs associated with recent supernovae, and we find that advanced LIGO should be able to see several of them. Our analysis shows that despite the coupling of the spin-down and thermal evolution, a power-law spin-down with an effective braking index n rm ≤ 7 is realized. Because of this, the gravitational wave strain amplitude is completely independent of both the r-mode saturation amplitude and the microphysics and depends on the saturation mechanism only within some tens of percent. However, the gravitational wave frequency depends on the amplitude, and we provide the required expected timing parameter ranges to look for promising sources in future searches.

  6. Gravitational wave emission and spin-down of young pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alford, Mark G.; Schwenzer, Kai [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)

    2014-01-20

    The rotation frequencies of young pulsars are systematically below their theoretical Kepler limit. r-modes have been suggested as a possible explanation for this observation. With the help of semi-analytic expressions that make it possible to assess the uncertainties of the r-mode scenario due to the impact of uncertainties in underlying microphysics, we perform a quantitative analysis of the spin-down and the emitted gravitational waves of young pulsars. We find that the frequency to which r-modes spin-down a young neutron star (NS) is surprisingly insensitive to both the microscopic details and the saturation amplitude. Comparing our result to astrophysical data, we show that for a range of sufficiently large saturation amplitudes r-modes provide a viable spin-down scenario and that all observed young pulsars are very likely already outside the r-mode instability region. Therefore, the most promising sources for gravitational wave detection are unobserved NSs associated with recent supernovae, and we find that advanced LIGO should be able to see several of them. Our analysis shows that despite the coupling of the spin-down and thermal evolution, a power-law spin-down with an effective braking index n {sub rm} ≤ 7 is realized. Because of this, the gravitational wave strain amplitude is completely independent of both the r-mode saturation amplitude and the microphysics and depends on the saturation mechanism only within some tens of percent. However, the gravitational wave frequency depends on the amplitude, and we provide the required expected timing parameter ranges to look for promising sources in future searches.

  7. Gravitational waves in ghost free bimetric gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We obtain a set of exact gravitational wave solutions for the ghost free bimetric theory of gravity. With a flat reference metric, the theory admits the vacuum Brinkmann plane wave solution for suitable choices of the coefficients of different terms in the interaction potential. An exact gravitational wave solution corresponding to a massive scalar mode is also admitted for arbitrary choice of the coefficients with the reference metric being proportional to the spacetime metric. The proportionality factor and the speed of the wave are calculated in terms of the parameters of the theory. We also show that a F(R) extension of the theory admits similar solutions but in general is plagued with ghost instabilities

  8. PREFACE: 8th Edoardo Amaldi Conference on Gravitational Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marka, Zsuzsa; Marka, Szabolcs

    2010-04-01

    (The attached PDF contains select pictures from the Amaldi8 Conference) At Amaldi7 in Sydney in 2007 the Gravitational Wave International Committee (GWIC), which oversees the Amaldi meetings, decided to hold the 8th Edoardo Amaldi Conference on Gravitational Waves at Columbia University in the City of New York. With this decision, Amaldi returned to North America after a decade. The previous two years have seen many advances in the field of gravitational wave detection. By the summer of 2009 the km-scale ground based interferometric detectors in the US and Europe were preparing for a second long-term scientific run as a worldwide detector network. The advanced or second generation detectors had well-developed plans and were ready for the production phase or started construction. The European-American space mission, LISA Pathfinder, was progressing towards deployment in the foreseeable future and it is expected to pave the ground towards gravitational wave detection in the milliHertz regime with LISA. Plans were developed for an additional gravitational wave detector in Australia and in Japan (in this case underground) to extend the worldwide network of detectors for the advanced detector era. Japanese colleagues also presented plans for a space mission, DECIGO, that would bridge the gap between the LISA and ground-based interferometer frequency range. Compared to previous Amaldi meetings, Amaldi8 had new elements representing emerging trends in the field. For example, with the inclusion of pulsar timing collaborations to the GWIC, gravitational wave detection using pulsar timing arrays was recognized as one of the prominent directions in the field and was represented at Amaldi8 as a separate session. By 2009, searches for gravitational waves based on external triggers received from electromagnetic observations were already producing significant scientific results and plans existed for pointing telescopes by utilizing gravitational wave trigger events. Such

  9. Gravitational Waves in Braneworld Scenarios with AdS Background

    OpenAIRE

    de Faria, A. C. Amaro; da Rocha, Roldao; Alves, M. E. S.; de Araujo, J. C. N.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate gravitational waves as metric perturbations around a general warped 5-dimensional background. We find an analytical solution in Randall-Sundrum braneworld model and analyze the implications of braneworld models in the gravitational waves propagation.

  10. Generalised inflation with a gravitational wave background

    OpenAIRE

    Lukash, V. N.; Mikheeva, E. V.; Muller, V.; Malinovsky, A. M.

    2000-01-01

    We propose a Lambda-inflation model which explains a significant part of the COBE signal by primordial cosmic gravitational waves. The primordial density perturbations fulfill both the constraints of large-scale microwave background and galaxy cluster normalization. The model is tested against the galaxy cluster power spectrum and the high-multipole angular CMB anisotropy.

  11. Primordial gravitational waves from conformal gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Myung, Yun Soo; Moon, Taeyoon

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of cosmological perturbations generated during de Sitter inflation in the conformal gravity. Primordial gravitational waves are composed of vector and tensor modes. We obtain the constant vector and tensor power spectra which seems to be correct because the conformal gravity is invariant under conformal transformation like the Maxwell kinetic term.

  12. On the frequency shift of gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    De Sousa, C M G

    2002-01-01

    Considering plane gravitational waves propagating through flat spacetime, it is shown that curvatures experienced both in the starting point and during their arrival at the earth can cause a considerable shift in the frequencies as measured by earth and space-based detectors.

  13. On the frequency shift of gravitational waves

    OpenAIRE

    de Sousa, Claudio M. G.

    2002-01-01

    Considering plane gravitational waves propagating through flat spacetime, it is shown that curvatures experienced both in the starting point and during their arrival at the earth can cause a considerable shift in the frequencies as measured by earth and space-based detectors. Particularly for the case of resonant bar detectors this shift can cause noise-filters to smother the signal.

  14. Gravitons to Photons -- attenuation of gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Preston

    2015-01-01

    In this essay we examine the response of an Unruh-DeWitt detector (a quantum two-level system) to a gravitational wave background. The spectrum of the Unruh-Dewitt detector is of the same form as some scattering processes or three body decays such as muon-electron scattering {\\it i.e.} $\\mu ^- + e^- \\rightarrow \

  15. Gravitational waves from inspiralling binary black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binary black holes are the most promising candidate sources for the first generation of earth-based interferometric gravitational-wave detectors. We summarize and discuss the state-of-the-art analytical techniques developed during the last few years to better describe the late dynamical evolution of binary black holes of comparable masses

  16. Primordial gravitational waves, BICEP2 and beyond

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L Sriramkumar

    2016-02-01

    Observations of the imprints of primordial gravitational waves on the anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background can provide us with unambiguous clues to the physics of the very early Universe. In this brief article, the implications of the detection of such signatures for the inflationary scenario has been discussed.

  17. Gravitational Wave Detection with High Frequency Phonon Trapping Acoustic Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Goryachev, Maxim

    2014-01-01

    There are a number of theoretical predictions for astrophysical and cosmological objects, which emit high frequency ($10^6-10^9$~Hz) Gravitation Waves (GW) or contribute somehow to the stochastic high frequency GW background. Here we propose a new sensitive detector in this frequency band, which is based on existing cryogenic ultra-high quality factor quartz Bulk Acoustic Wave cavity technology, coupled to near-quantum-limited SQUID amplifiers at $20$~mK. We show that spectral strain sensitivities reaching $10^{-22}$ per $\\sqrt{\\text{Hz}}$ per mode is possible, which in principle can cover the frequency range with multiple ($>100$) modes with quality factors varying between $10^6-10^{10}$ allowing wide bandwidth detection. Due to its compactness and well established manufacturing process, the system is easily scalable into arrays and distributed networks that can also impact the overall sensitivity and introduce coincidence analysis to ensure no false detections.

  18. Acceleration of low energy charged particles by gravitational waves

    OpenAIRE

    Voyatzis, G.; Vlahos, L.; Ichtiaroglou, S.; Papadopoulos, D.

    2005-01-01

    The acceleration of charged particles in the presence of a magnetic field and gravitational waves is under consideration. It is shown that the weak gravitational waves can cause the acceleration of low energy particles under appropriate conditions. Such conditions may be satisfied close to the source of the gravitational waves if the magnetized plasma is in a turbulent state.

  19. Gravitational waves generated by laser accelerated relativistic ions

    OpenAIRE

    Gelfer, Evgeny; Kadlecová, Hedvika; Klimo, Ondřej; Weber, Stefan; Korn, Georg

    2015-01-01

    The generation of gravitational waves by laser accelerated relativistic ions is investigated. The piston and light sail models of laser plasma acceleration are considered and analytical expressions for space-time metric perturbation are derived. For both models the dependence of gravitational waves amplitude on the laser and plasma parameters as well as gravitational waves spectrum and angular distribution are examined

  20. Wave optics and image formation in gravitational lensing

    CERN Document Server

    Nambu, Yasusada

    2012-01-01

    We discuss image formation in gravitational lensing systems using wave optics. Applying the Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction formula to waves scattered by a gravitational potential of a lens object, we demonstrate how images of source objects are obtained directly from wave functions without using a lens equation for gravitational lensing.

  1. New window into stochastic gravitational wave background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotti, Aditya; Souradeep, Tarun

    2012-11-30

    A stochastic gravitational wave background (SGWB) would gravitationally lens the cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons. We correct the results provided in existing literature for modifications to the CMB polarization power spectra due to lensing by gravitational waves. Weak lensing by gravitational waves distorts all four CMB power spectra; however, its effect is most striking in the mixing of power between the E mode and B mode of CMB polarization. This suggests the possibility of using measurements of the CMB angular power spectra to constrain the energy density (Ω(GW)) of the SGWB. Using current data sets (QUAD, WMAP, and ACT), we find that the most stringent constraints on the present Ω(GW) come from measurements of the angular power spectra of CMB temperature anisotropies. In the near future, more stringent bounds on Ω(GW) can be expected with improved upper limits on the B modes of CMB polarization. Any detection of B modes of CMB polarization above the expected signal from large scale structure lensing could be a signal for a SGWB. PMID:23368112

  2. Testing gravity with gravitational wave source counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Erminia; Battaglia, Nicholas; Spergel, David N.

    2016-08-01

    We show that the gravitational wave source counts distribution can test how gravitational radiation propagates on cosmological scales. This test does not require obtaining redshifts for the sources. If the signal-to-noise ratio (ρ) from a gravitational wave source is proportional to the strain then it falls as {R}-1, thus we expect the source counts to follow {{d}}{N}/{{d}}ρ \\propto {ρ }-4. However, if gravitational waves decay as they propagate or propagate into other dimensions, then there can be deviations from this generic prediction. We consider the possibility that the strain falls as {R}-γ , where γ =1 recovers the expected predictions in a Euclidean uniformly-filled Universe, and forecast the sensitivity of future observations to deviations from standard General Relativity. We first consider the case of few objects, seven sources, with a signal-to-noise from 8 to 24, and impose a lower limit on γ, finding γ \\gt 0.33 at 95% confidence level. The distribution of our simulated sample is very consistent with the distribution of the trigger events reported by Advanced LIGO. Future measurements will improve these constraints: with 100 events, we estimate that γ can be measured with an uncertainty of 15%. We generalize the formalism to account for a range of chirp masses and the possibility that the signal falls as {exp}(-R/{R}0)/{R}γ .

  3. Gravitational waves from cosmological first order phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Rummukainen, Kari; Weir, David

    2015-01-01

    First order phase transitions in the early Universe generate gravitational waves, which may be observable in future space-based gravitational wave observatiories, e.g. the European eLISA satellite constellation. The gravitational waves provide an unprecedented direct view of the Universe at the time of their creation. We study the generation of the gravitational waves during a first order phase transition using large-scale simulations of a model consisting of relativistic fluid and an order parameter field. We observe that the dominant source of gravitational waves is the sound generated by the transition, resulting in considerably stronger radiation than earlier calculations have indicated.

  4. Pseudospectral method for gravitational wave collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilditch, David; Weyhausen, Andreas; Brügmann, Bernd

    2016-03-01

    We present a new pseudospectral code, bamps, for numerical relativity written with the evolution of collapsing gravitational waves in mind. We employ the first-order generalized harmonic gauge formulation. The relevant theory is reviewed, and the numerical method is critically examined and specialized for the task at hand. In particular, we investigate formulation parameters—gauge- and constraint-preserving boundary conditions well suited to nonvanishing gauge source functions. Different types of axisymmetric twist-free moment-of-time-symmetry gravitational wave initial data are discussed. A treatment of the axisymmetric apparent horizon condition is presented with careful attention to regularity on axis. Our apparent horizon finder is then evaluated in a number of test cases. Moving on to evolutions, we investigate modifications to the generalized harmonic gauge constraint damping scheme to improve conservation in the strong-field regime. We demonstrate strong-scaling of our pseudospectral penalty code. We employ the Cartoon method to efficiently evolve axisymmetric data in our 3 +1 -dimensional code. We perform test evolutions of the Schwarzschild spacetime perturbed by gravitational waves and by gauge pulses, both to demonstrate the use of our black-hole excision scheme and for comparison with earlier results. Finally, numerical evolutions of supercritical Brill waves are presented to demonstrate durability of the excision scheme for the dynamical formation of a black hole.

  5. The basics of gravitational wave theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einstein's special theory of relativity revolutionized physics by teaching us that space and time are not separate entities, but join as 'spacetime'. His general theory of relativity further taught us that spacetime is not just a stage on which dynamics takes place, but is a participant: the field equation of general relativity connects matter dynamics to the curvature of spacetime. Curvature is responsible for gravity, carrying us beyond the Newtonian conception of gravity that had been in place for the previous two and a half centuries. Much research in gravitation since then has explored and clarified the consequences of this revolution; the notion of dynamical spacetime is now firmly established in the toolkit of modern physics. Indeed, this notion is so well established that we may now contemplate using spacetime as a tool for other sciences. One aspect of dynamical spacetime-its radiative character, 'gravitational radiation'-will inaugurate entirely new techniques for observing violent astrophysical processes. Over the next 100 years, much of this subject's excitement will come from learning how to exploit spacetime as a tool for astronomy. This paper is intended as a tutorial in the basics of gravitational radiation physics

  6. An upper limit on the stochastic gravitational-wave background of cosmological origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Acernese, F; Adhikari, R; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, G; Alshourbagy, M; Amin, R S; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Antonucci, F; Aoudia, S; Arain, M A; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Armor, P; Arun, K G; Aso, Y; Aston, S; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Bauer, Th S; Behnke, B; Beker, M; Benacquista, M; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bigotta, S; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birindelli, S; Biswas, R; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Boccara, C; Bodiya, T P; Bogue, L; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brand, J F J van den; Brau, J E; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Van Den Broeck, C; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brummit, A; Brunet, G; Bullington, A; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burmeister, O; Buskulic, D; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campagna, E; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Carbognani, F; Cardenas, L; Caride, S; Castaldi, G; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chalermsongsak, T; Chalkley, E; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Christensen, N; Chung, C T Y; Clark, D; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R C; Corda, C; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Coulon, J-P; Coward, D; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Culter, R M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dari, A; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Davier, M; Davies, G; Daw, E J; Day, R; De Rosa, R; Debra, D; Degallaix, J; Del Prete, M; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; Desalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Paolo Emilio, M; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doomes, E E; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Dueck, J; Duke, I; Dumas, J-C; Dwyer, J G; Echols, C; Edgar, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Ely, G; Espinoza, E; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Faltas, Y; Fan, Y; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Flaminio, R; Flasch, K; Foley, S; Forrest, C; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J-D; Franc, J; Franzen, A; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Galdi, V; Gammaitoni, L; Garofoli, J A; Garufi, F; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Goda, K; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Gobler, S; Gouaty, R; Granata, M; Granata, V; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, M; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grimaldi, F; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guenther, M; Guidi, G; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G D; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Heefner, J; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Hoyland, D; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D R; Isogai, T; Ito, M; Ivanov, A; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Sancho de la Jordana, L; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kanner, J; Kasprzyk, D; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khan, R; Khazanov, E; King, P; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R; Koranda, S; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; La Penna, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Laval, M; Lazzarini, A; Lei, H; Lei, M; Leindecker, N; Leonor, I; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Li, C; Lin, H; Lindquist, P E; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Lodhia, D; Longo, M; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lu, P; Lubinski, M; Lucianetti, A; Lück, H; Machenschalk, B; Macinnis, M; Mackowski, J-M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A; Markowitz, J; Maros, E; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R A; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McHugh, M; McIntyre, G; McKechan, D J A; McKenzie, K; Mehmet, M; Melatos, A; Melissinos, A C; Mendell, G; Menéndez, D F; Menzinger, F; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyer, M S; Michel, C; Milano, L; Miller, J; Minelli, J; Minenkov, Y; Mino, Y; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Moe, B; Mohan, M; Mohanty, S D; Mohapatra, S R P; Moreau, J; Moreno, G; Morgado, N; Morgia, A; Morioka, T; Mors, K; Mosca, S; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mowlowry, C; Mueller, G; Muhammad, D; Mühlen, H Zur; Mukherjee, S; Mukhopadhyay, H; Mullavey, A; Müller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P G; Myers, E; Myers, J; Nash, T; Nelson, J; Neri, I; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Nocera, F; Numata, K; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Ogin, G H; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pagliaroli, G; Palomba, C; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Paoletti, F; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Pardi, S; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Persichetti, G; Pichot, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H J; Plissi, M V; Poggiani, R; Postiglione, F; Principe, M; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Punken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Putten, S van der; Quetschke, V; Raab, F J; Rabaste, O; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raics, Z; Rainer, N; Rakhmanov, M; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Re, V; Reed, C M; Reed, T; Regimbau, T; Rehbein, H; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ricci, F; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Roberts, P; Robertson, N A; Robinet, F; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Rocchi, A; Roddy, S; Rolland, L; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romie, J H; Röver, C; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Sakata, S; Salemi, F; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Santamaría, L; Saraf, S; Sarin, P; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Satterthwaite, M; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Savov, P; Scanlan, M; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schulz, B; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sergeev, A; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sinha, S; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; van der Sluys, M V; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, N D; Somiya, K; Sorazu, B; Stein, A; Stein, L C; Steplewski, S; Stochino, A; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Strigin, S; Stroeer, A; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, K-X; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B L; Szokoly, G P; Talukder, D; Tang, L; Tanner, D B; Tarabrin, S P; Taylor, J R; Taylor, R; Terenzi, R; Thacker, J; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thüring, A; Tokmakov, K V; Toncelli, A; Tonelli, M; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Tournefier, E; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Trummer, J; Ugolini, D; Ulmen, J; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Vallisneri, M; Vass, S; Vaulin, R; Vavoulidis, M; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; van Veggel, A A; Veitch, J; Veitch, P; Veltkamp, C; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Villar, A; Vinet, J-Y; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Waldman, S J; Wallace, L; Ward, H; Ward, R L; Was, M; Weidner, A; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Wen, L; Wen, S; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, H R; Williams, L; Willke, B; Wilmut, I; Winkelmann, L; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Wu, W; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yan, Z; Yoshida, S; Yvert, M; Zanolin, M; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, C; Zotov, N; Zucker, M E; Zweizig, J

    2009-08-20

    A stochastic background of gravitational waves is expected to arise from a superposition of a large number of unresolved gravitational-wave sources of astrophysical and cosmological origin. It should carry unique signatures from the earliest epochs in the evolution of the Universe, inaccessible to standard astrophysical observations. Direct measurements of the amplitude of this background are therefore of fundamental importance for understanding the evolution of the Universe when it was younger than one minute. Here we report limits on the amplitude of the stochastic gravitational-wave background using the data from a two-year science run of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO). Our result constrains the energy density of the stochastic gravitational-wave background normalized by the critical energy density of the Universe, in the frequency band around 100 Hz, to be <6.9 x 10(-6) at 95% confidence. The data rule out models of early Universe evolution with relatively large equation-of-state parameter, as well as cosmic (super)string models with relatively small string tension that are favoured in some string theory models. This search for the stochastic background improves on the indirect limits from Big Bang nucleosynthesis and cosmic microwave background at 100 Hz. PMID:19693079

  7. Gravitational Wave Propagation in Isotropic Cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Hogan, P A

    2002-01-01

    We study the propagation of gravitational waves carrying arbitrary information through isotropic cosmologies. The waves are modelled as small perturbations of the background Robertson-Walker geometry. The perfect fluid matter distribution of the isotropic background is, in general, modified by small anisotropic stresses. For pure gravity waves, in which the perturbed Weyl tensor is radiative (i.e. type N in the Petrov classification), we construct explicit examples for which the presence of the anisotropic stress is shown to be essential and the histories of the wave-fronts in the background Robertson-Walker geometry are shear-free null hypersurfaces. The examples derived in this case are analogous to the Bateman waves of electromagnetic theory.

  8. Strong gravitational lensing of gravitational waves from double compact binaries—perspectives for the Einstein Telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gravitational wave (GW) experiments are entering their advanced stage which should soon open a new observational window on the Universe. Looking into this future, the Einstein Telescope (ET) was designed to have a fantastic sensitivity improving significantly over the advanced GW detectors. One of the most important astrophysical GW sources supposed to be detected by the ET in large numbers are double compact objects (DCO) and some of such events should be gravitationally lensed by intervening galaxies. We explore the prospects of observing gravitationally lensed inspiral DCO events in the ET. This analysis is a significant extension of our previous paper [1]. We are using the intrinsic merger rates of the whole class of DCO (NS-NS,BH-NS,BH-BH) located at different redshifts as calculated by [2] by using StarTrack population synthesis evolutionary code. We discuss in details predictions from each evolutionary scenario. Our general conclusion is that ET would register about 50–100 strongly lensed inspiral events per year. Only the scenario in which nascent BHs receive strong kick gives the predictions of a few events per year. Such lensed events would be dominated by the BH-BH merging binary systems. Our results suggest that during a few years of successful operation ET will provide a considerable catalog of strongly lensed events

  9. Detecting triple systems with gravitational wave observations

    CERN Document Server

    Meiron, Yohai; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) has recently discovered gravitational waves (GWs) emitted by merging black hole binaries. We examine whether future GW detections may identify triple companions of merging binaries. Such a triple companion causes variations in the GW signal due to (1) the varying path length along the line of sight during the orbit around the center of mass, (2) relativistic beaming, Doppler, and gravitational redshift, and (3) the variation of the "light"-travel time in the gravitational field of the triple companion, known respectively as Roemer-, Einstein-, and Shapiro-delays in pulsar binaries. We find that the prospects for detecting the triple companion are the highest for low-mass compact object binaries which spend the longest time in the LIGO frequency band with circular orbits. In particular, for merging neutron star binaries, LIGO may detect a white dwarf or M-dwarf perturber at signal to noise ratio of 8, if it is within 0.4 solar radius distance from ...

  10. Search for electron antineutrinos associated with gravitational wave events GW150914 and GW151226 using KamLAND

    CERN Document Server

    Gando, A; Hachiya, T; Hayashi, A; Hayashida, S; Ikeda, H; Inoue, K; Ishidoshiro, K; Karino, Y; Koga, M; Matsuda, S; Mitsui, T; Nakamura, K; Obara, S; Oura, T; Ozaki, H; Shimizu, I; Shirahata, Y; Shirai, J; Suzuki, A; Takai, T; Tamae, K; Teraoka, Y; Ueshima, K; Watanabe, H; Kozolov, A; Takemoto, Y; Yoshida, S; Fushimi, K; Piepke, A; Banks, T I; Berger, B E; Fujikawa, B K; O'Donnell, T; Learned, J G; Maricic, J; Sakai, M; Winslow, L A; Krupczak, E; Ouellet, J; Efremenko, Y; Karwowski, H J; Markoff, D M; Tornow, W; Detwiler, J A; Enomoto, S; Decowski, M P

    2016-01-01

    We present a search for low energy antineutrino events coincident with the gravitational wave events GW150914 and GW151226, and the candidate event LVT151012 using KamLAND, a kiloton-scale antineutrino detector. We find no inverse beta-decay neutrino events within $\\pm 500$ seconds of either gravitational wave signal. This non-detection is used to constrain the electron antineutrino fluence and the luminosity of the astrophysical sources.

  11. Gravitational waves from Higgs domain walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitajima, Naoya, E-mail: kitajima@tuhep.phys.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Takahashi, Fuminobu, E-mail: fumi@tuhep.phys.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Kavli IPMU, TODIAS, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan)

    2015-05-18

    The effective potential for the Standard Model Higgs field allows two quasi-degenerate vacua; one is our vacuum at the electroweak scale, while the other is at a much higher scale. The latter minimum may be at a scale much smaller than the Planck scale, if the potential is lifted by new physics. This gives rise to a possibility of domain wall formation after inflation. If the high-scale minimum is a local minimum, domain walls are unstable and disappear through violent annihilation processes, producing a significant amount of gravitational waves. We estimate the amount of gravitational waves produced from unstable domain walls in the Higgs potential and discuss detectability with future experiments.

  12. Likelihood smoothing using gravitational wave surrogate models

    CERN Document Server

    Cole, Robert H

    2014-01-01

    Likelihood surfaces in the parameter space of gravitational wave signals can contain many secondary maxima, which can prevent search algorithms from finding the global peak and correctly mapping the distribution. Traditional schemes to mitigate this problem maintain the number of secondary maxima and thus retain the possibility that the global maximum will remain undiscovered. By contrast, the recently proposed technique of likelihood transform can modify the structure of the likelihood surface to reduce its complexity. We present a practical method to carry out a likelihood transform using a Gaussian smoothing kernel, utilising gravitational wave surrogate models to perform the smoothing operation analytically. We demonstrate the approach with Newtonian and post-Newtonian waveform models for an inspiralling circular compact binary.

  13. Silicon mirror suspensions for gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most significant limits to the sensitivity of current, and future, long-baseline interferometric gravitational wave detectors is thermal displacement noise of the test masses and their suspensions. This paper reports results of analytical and experimental studies of the limits to thermal noise performance of cryogenic silicon test mass suspensions set by two constraints on suspension fibre dimensions: the minimum dimensions required to allow conductive cooling for extracting incident laser beam heat deposited in the mirrors; and the minimum dimensions of fibres (set by their tensile strength) which can support test masses of the size envisaged for use in future detectors. We report experimental studies of breaking strength of silicon ribbons, and resulting design implications for the feasibility of suspension designs for future gravitational wave detectors using silicon suspension fibres. We analyse the implication of this study for thermal noise performance of cryogenically cooled silicon suspensions. (paper)

  14. CMB $\\mu$ distortion from primordial gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ota, Atsuhisa; Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Masahide

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new mechanism of generating the $\\mu$ distortion in cosmic microwave background (CMB) originated from primordial gravitational waves. Such $\\mu$ distortion is generated by the damping of the temperature anisotropies through the Compton scattering, even on scales larger than that of the Silk damping. This mechanism is in sharp contrast with that from the primordial curvature (scalar) perturbations, in which the temperature anisotropies are mainly decayed by the Silk damping effects. We estimate the size of the $\\mu$ distortion from the new mechanism, which can be used to constrain the amplitude of primordial gravitational waves on smaller scales independently from the CMB anisotropies, giving more wide-range constraint on their spectral index by combining the amplitude from the CMB anisotropies.

  15. The next detectors for gravitational wave astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Blair, David; Zhao, Chunnong; Wen, Linqing; Miao, Haixing; Cai, Ronggen; Gao, Jiangrui; Lin, Xuechun; Liu, Dong; Wu, Ling-An; Zhu, Zonghong; Hammond, Giles; Paik, Ho Jung; Fafone, Viviana; Rocchi, Alessio; Ma, Yiqiu; Qin, Jiayi; Page, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on the next detectors for gravitational wave astronomy which will be required after the current ground based detectors have completed their initial observations, and probably achieved the first direct detection of gravitational waves. The next detectors will need to have greater sensitivity, while also enabling the world array of detectors to have improved angular resolution to allow localisation of signal sources. Sect. 1 of this paper begins by reviewing proposals for the next ground based detectors, and presents an analysis of the sensitivity of an 8 km armlength detector, which is proposed as a safe and cost-effective means to attain a 4-fold improvement in sensitivity. The scientific benefits of creating a pair of such detectors in China and Australia is emphasised. Sect. 2 of this paper discusses the high performance suspension systems for test masses that will be an essential component for future detectors, while sect. 3 discusses solutions to the problem of Newtonian noise which ari...

  16. Interferometer Techniques for Gravitational-Wave Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Freise

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Several km-scale gravitational-wave detectors have been constructed world wide. These instruments combine a number of advanced technologies to push the limits of precision length measurement. The core devices are laser interferometers of a new kind; developed from the classical Michelson topology these interferometers integrate additional optical elements, which significantly change the properties of the optical system. Much of the design and analysis of these laser interferometers can be performed using well-known classical optical techniques, however, the complex optical layouts provide a new challenge. In this review we give a textbook-style introduction to the optical science required for the understanding of modern gravitational wave detectors, as well as other high-precision laser interferometers. In addition, we provide a number of examples for a freely available interferometer simulation software and encourage the reader to use these examples to gain hands-on experience with the discussed optical methods.

  17. Simultaneous observation of gravitational and electromagnetic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Branchina, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Assuming that the short gamma-ray burst detected by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope about 0.4 seconds after the gravitational waves observed by the LIGO and VIRGO Collaborations originated from the same black hole merger event, we perform a model-independent analysis of different quantum gravity scenarios based on (modified) dispersion relations (typical of quantum gravity models) for the graviton and the photon. We find that only scenarios where at least one of the two particles is luminal (the other being sub- or super-luminal) are allowed, while scenarios where none of the two particles is luminal are ruled out. Moreover, the physical request of having acceptable values for the quantum gravity scale imposes stringent bounds on the difference between the velocities of electromagnetic and gravitational waves, much more stringent than any previously known bound.

  18. Contemporary gravitational waves from primordial black holes

    OpenAIRE

    Dolgov, A. D.

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic background of gravitational waves (GW) generated by the interactions between primordial black holes (PBH) in the early universe and by PBH evaporation is considered. If PBHs dominated in the cosmological energy density prior to their evaporation, GWs from the earlier stages (e.g. inflation) would be noticeably diluted. On the other hand, at the PBH dominance period they could form dense clusters where PBH binary formation might be significant. These binaries would be efficient sour...

  19. Renormalization of Gravity and Gravitational Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Pardy, Miroslav

    2001-01-01

    Strictly respecting the Einstein equations and supposing space-time is a medium, we derive the deformation of this medium by gravity. We derive the deformation in case of infinite plane, Robertson-Walker manifold, Schwarzschild manifold and gravitational waves. Some singularities are removed or changed. We call this procedure renormalization of gravity. We show that some results following from the classical gravity must be modified.

  20. Energy-momentum Density of Gravitational Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Abbassi, Amir M.; Mirshekari, Saeed

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we elaborate the problem of energy-momentum in general relativity by energy-momentum prescriptions theory. Our aim is to calculate energy and momentum densities for the general form of gravitational waves. In this connection, we have extended the previous works by using the prescriptions of Bergmann and Tolman. It is shown that they are finite and reasonable. In addition, using Tolman prescription, exactly, leads to same results that have been obtained by Einstein and Papapetro...

  1. Gravitational wave detectors on the earth

    OpenAIRE

    Rapagnani, Piero

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Since the pioneering work of Joseph Weber, the quest for the detection of gravitational waves has progressed at higher and higher levels of ingenuity and effort. Here we shall briefly outline the historical path followed during the development of the detectors on ground, which have brought us from the resonant bars to the large interferometric antennas of today, and give some perspective on the exciting time that is probable to come, when the large interferometric detectors will h...

  2. Gravitational Waves from Collapsing Vacuum Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Gleiser, Marcelo; Roberts, Ronald

    1998-01-01

    The breaking of an approximate discrete symmetry, the final stages of a first order phase transition, or a post-inflationary biased probability distribution for scalar fields are possible cosmological scenarios characterized by the presence of unstable domain wall networks. Combining analytical and numerical techniques, we show that the non-spherical collapse of these domains can be a powerful source of gravitational waves. We compute their contribution to the stochastic background of gravita...

  3. Compact dark matter objects, asteroseismology, and gravitational waves radiated by sun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solar surface oscillations observed by Crimean Astrophysical Observatory and Solar Helioseismic Observatory are considered to be excited by a small fraction of Dark Matter in form of Compact Dark Matter Objects (CDMO) in the solar structure. Gravitational Waves (GW) radiated by these CDMO are predicted to be the strongest at the Earth and are easily detectable by European Laser Interferometer Space Antenna or by Gravitational-Wave Observatory “Dulkyn” which can solve two the most challenging tasks in the modern physics: direct detection of GW and DM

  4. Compact dark matter objects, asteroseismology, and gravitational waves radiated by sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokrovsky, Yu. E., E-mail: Pokrovskiy-YE@nrcki.ru [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The solar surface oscillations observed by Crimean Astrophysical Observatory and Solar Helioseismic Observatory are considered to be excited by a small fraction of Dark Matter in form of Compact Dark Matter Objects (CDMO) in the solar structure. Gravitational Waves (GW) radiated by these CDMO are predicted to be the strongest at the Earth and are easily detectable by European Laser Interferometer Space Antenna or by Gravitational-Wave Observatory “Dulkyn” which can solve two the most challenging tasks in the modern physics: direct detection of GW and DM.

  5. Testing Gravitational Physics with Space-based Gravitational-wave Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Gravitational wave observations provide exceptional and unique opportunities for precision tests of gravitational physics, as predicted by general relativity (GR). Space-based gravitational wave measurements, with high signal-to-noise ratios and large numbers of observed events may provide the best-suited gravitational-wave observations for testing GR with unprecedented precision. These observations will be especially useful in testing the properties of gravitational waves and strong-field aspects of the theory which are less relevant in other observations. We review the proposed GR test based on observations of massive black hole mergers, extreme mass ratio inspirals, and galactic binary systems.

  6. Relic gravitational waves and the generalized second law

    OpenAIRE

    Izquierdo, German; Pavon, Diego

    2005-01-01

    The generalized second law of gravitational thermodynamics is applied to the present era of accelerated expansion of the Universe. In spite of the fact that the entropy of matter and relic gravitational waves inside the event horizon diminish, the mentioned law is fulfilled provided that the expression for the entropy density of the gravitational waves satisfies a certain condition.

  7. Systematic errors in estimation of gravitational-wave candidate significance

    CERN Document Server

    Capano, Collin; Hu, Yi-Ming; Hendry, Martin; Messenger, Chris; Veitch, John

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the issue in determining the significance of candidate transient gravitational-wave events in a ground-based interferometer network. Given the presence of non-Gaussian noise artefacts in real data, the noise background must be estimated empirically from the data itself. However, the data also potentially contains signals, thus the background estimate may be overstated due to contributions from signals. It has been proposed to mitigate possible bias by removing single-detector data samples that pass a multi-detector consistency test from the background estimates. We conduct a high-statistics Mock Data Challenge to evaluate the effects of removing such samples, modelling a range of scenarios with plausible detector noise distributions and with a range of plausible foreground astrophysical signal rates. We consider the the two different modes: one in which coincident samples are removed, and one in which all samples are retained and used. Three algorithms were operated in both modes, show good con...

  8. Search for Gravitational Waves from Intermediate Mass Binary Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Baragoya, J C B; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beck, D; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Belletoile, A; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet-Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglia, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, W; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clark, D E; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Del Pozzo, W; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Diaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endroczi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gaspar, M E; Gemme, G; Geng, R; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; Gonzalez, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, N; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, T; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B; Kim, C; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kranz, O; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Krolak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Leong, J R; Leonor, I; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Li, J; Li, T G F; Liguori, N; Lindquist, P E; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lockerbie, N A; Lodhia, D; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J; Luan, J; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Lundgren, A P; Macdonald, E; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mantovani, M; Marandi, A; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Marka, S; Marka, Z; Markosyan, A; Maros, E; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R A; Mavalvala, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McKechan, D J A; McWilliams, S; Meadors, G D; Mehmet, M; Meier, T; Melatos, A; Melissinos, A C; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyer, M S; Michel, C; Milano, L; Miller, J; Minenkov, Y; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Moe, B; Mohan, M; Mohanty, S D; Mohapatra, S R P; Moreno, G; Morgado, N; Morgia, A; Mori, T; Morriss, S R; Mosca, S; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Muller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murphy, D; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nash, T; Naticchioni, L; Necula, V; Nelson, J; Newton, G; Nguyen, T; Nishizawa, A; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E; Nuttall, L; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Osthelder, C; Ott, C D; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Page, A; Pagliaroli, G; Palladino, L; Palomba, C; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Paoletti, F; Papa, M A; Parisi, M; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Peiris, P; Pekowsky, L; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Persichetti, G; Phelps, M; Pickenpack, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pietka, M; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H J; Plissi, M V; Poggiani, R; Pold, J; Postiglione, F; Prato, M; Predoi, V; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L G; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Quetschke, V; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Racz, I; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Rakhmanov, M; Rankins, B; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Re, V; Redwine, K; Reed, C M; Reed, T; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ricci, F; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robinet, F; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Rocchi, A; Roddy, S; Rodriguez, C; Rodruck, M; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romie, J H; Rosinska, D; Rover, C; Rowan, S; Rudiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sainathan, P; Salemi, F; Sammut, L; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Santamaria, L; Santiago-Prieto, I; Santostasi, G; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R L; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schreiber, E; Schulz, B; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sentenac, D; Sergeev, A; Shaddock, D A; Shaltev, M; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Singer, A; Singer, L; Sintes, A M; Skelton, G R; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, R J E; Smith-Lefebvre, N D; Somiya, K; Sorazu, B; Soto, J; Speirits, F C; Sperandio, L; Stefszky, M; Stein, A J; Stein, L C; Steinert, E; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steplewski, S; Stochino, A; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Strigin, S E; Stroeer, A S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sung, M; Susmithan, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B; Tacca, M; Taffarello, L; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tarabrin, S P; Taylor, J R; Taylor, R; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Thuring, A; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Toncelli, A; Tonelli, M; Torre, O; Torres, C; Torrie, C I; Tournefier, E; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Tseng, K; Ugolini, D; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; van der Putten, S; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vasuth, M; Vaulin, R; Vavoulidis, M; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Veltkamp, C; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Vicere, A; Villar, A E; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vitale, S; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A; Wade, L; Wade, M; Waldman, S J; Wallace, L; Wan, Y; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wang, Z; Wanner, A; Ward, R L; Was, M; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Wen, L; Wessels, P; West, M; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, L; Williams, R; Willke, B; Winkelmann, L; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yamamoto, K; Yamamoto, K; Yancey, C C; Yang, H; Yeaton-Massey, D; Yoshida, S; Yu, P; Yvert, M; Zadrozny, A; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W; Zhao, C; Zotov, N; Zucker, M E; Zweizig, J

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a weakly modeled burst search for gravitational waves from mergers of non-spinning intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in the total mass range 100--450 solar masses and with the component mass ratios between 1:1 and 4:1. The search was conducted on data collected by the LIGO and Virgo detectors between November of 2005 and October of 2007. No plausible signals were observed by the search which constrains the astrophysical rates of the IMBH mergers as a function of the component masses. In the most efficiently detected bin centered on 88+88 solar masses, for non-spinning sources, the rate density upper limit is 0.13 per Mpc^3 per Myr at the 90% confidence level.

  9. Search for Gravitational Waves from Intermediate Mass Binary Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, L.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.; Stroeer, A. S.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a weakly modeled burst search for gravitational waves from mergers of non-spinning intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in the total mass range 100-450 solar Mass and with the component mass ratios between 1:1 and 4:1. The search was conducted on data collected by the LIGO and Virgo detectors between November of 2005 and October of 2007. No plausible signals were observed by the search which constrains the astrophysical rates of the IMBH mergers as a function of the component masses. In the most efficiently detected bin centered on 88 + 88 solar Mass , for non-spinning sources, the rate density upper limit is 0.13 per Mpc(exp 3) per Myr at the 90% confidence level.

  10. Observable spectra of induced gravitational waves from inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measuring the primordial power spectrum on small scales is a powerful tool in inflation model building, yet constraints from Cosmic Microwave Background measurements alone are insufficient to place bounds stringent enough to be appreciably effective. For the very small scale spectrum, those which subtend angles of less than 0.3 degrees on the sky, an upper bound can be extracted from the astrophysical constraints on the possible production of primordial black holes in the early universe. A recently discovered observational by-product of an enhanced power spectrum on small scales, induced gravitational waves, have been shown to be within the range of proposed space based gravitational wave detectors; such as NASA's LISA and BBO detectors, and the Japanese DECIGO detector. In this paper we explore the impact such a detection would have on models of inflation known to lead to an enhanced power spectrum on small scales, namely the Hilltop-type and running mass models. We find that the Hilltop-type model can produce observable induced gravitational waves within the range of BBO and DECIGO for integral and fractional powers of the potential within a reasonable number of e−folds. We also find that the running mass model can produce a spectrum within the range of these detectors, but require that inflation terminates after an unreasonably small number of e−folds. Finally, we argue that if the thermal history of the Universe were to accomodate such a small number of e−folds the Running Mass Model can produce Primordial Black Holes within a mass range compatible with Dark Matter, i.e. within a mass range 1020g∼BH∼27g

  11. Observable Spectra of Induced Gravitational Waves from Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Alabidi, Laila; Sasaki, Misao; Sendouda, Yuuiti

    2012-01-01

    Measuring the primordial power spectrum on small scales is a powerful tool in inflation model building, yet constraints from Cosmic Microwave Background measurements alone are insufficient to place bounds stringent enough to be appreciably effective. For the very small scale spectrum, those which subtend angles of less than 0.3 degrees on the sky, an upper bound can be extracted from the astrophysical constraints on the possible production of primordial black holes in the early universe. A recently discovered observational by-product of an enhanced power spectrum on small scales, induced gravitational waves, have been shown to be within the range of proposed space based gravitational wave detectors; such as NASA's LISA and BBO detectors, and the Japanese DECIGO detector. In this paper we explore the impact such a detection would have on models of inflation known to lead to an enhanced power spectrum on small scales, namely the Hilltop-type and running mass models. We find that the Hilltop-type model can produ...

  12. Fermi GBM Observations of LIGO Gravitational Wave event GW150914

    CERN Document Server

    Connaughton, V; Goldstein, A; Briggs, M S; Zhang, B -B; Hui, C M; Jenke, P; Racusin, J; Wilson-Hodge, C A; Bhat, P N; Cleveland, W; Fitzpatrick, G; Giles, M M; Gibby, M H; Greiner, J; von Kienlin, A; Kippen, R M; McBreen, S; Mailyan, B; Meegan, C A; Paciesas, W S; Preece, R D; Roberts, O; Sparke, L; Stanbro, M; Toelge, K; Veres, P; Yu, H -F; authors, other

    2016-01-01

    With an instantaneous view of 70% of the sky, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is an excellent partner in the search for electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational wave (GW) events. GBM observations at the time of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO)event GW150914 reveal the presence of a weak transient source above 50 keV, 0.4 s after the GW event was detected, with a false alarm probability of 0.0022. This weak transient lasting 1 s does not appear connected with other previously known astrophysical, solar, terrestrial, or magnetospheric activity. Its localization is ill-constrained but consistent with the direction of GW150914. The duration and spectrum of the transient event suggest it is a weak short Gamma-Ray Burst arriving at a large angle to the direction in which Fermi was pointing, where the GBM detector response is not optimal. If the GBM transient is associated with GW150914, this electromagnetic signal from a stellar mass black hole binary merger is unexpected....

  13. Binary Black Hole Mergers, Gravitational Waves, and LISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan; Baker, J.; Boggs, W.; Kelly, B.; McWilliams, S.; van Meter, J.

    2007-12-01

    The final merger of comparable mass binary black holes is expected to be the strongest source of gravitational waves for LISA. Since these mergers take place in regions of extreme gravity, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these waveforms. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute black hole mergers using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Within the past few years, however, this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of remarkable breakthroughs. We will present the results of new simulations of black hole mergers with unequal masses and spins, focusing on the gravitational waves emitted and the accompanying astrophysical "kicks.” The magnitude of these kicks has bearing on the production and growth of supermassive blackholes during the epoch of structure formation, and on the retention of black holes in stellar clusters. This work was supported by NASA grant 06-BEFS06-19, and the simulations were carried out using Project Columbia at the NASA Advanced Supercomputing Division (Ames Research Center) and at the NASA Center for Computational Sciences (Goddard Space Flight Center).

  14. Hearing the echoes of electroweak baryogenesis with gravitational wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fa Peng; Wan, Youping; Wang, Dong-Gang; Cai, Yi-Fu; Zhang, Xinmin

    2016-08-01

    We report on the first joint analysis of observational signatures from the electroweak baryogenesis in both gravitational wave (GW) detectors and particle colliders. With an effective extension of the Higgs sector in terms of the dimension-six operators, we derive a strong first-order phase transition associated with a sizable CP violation to realize a successful electroweak baryogenesis. We calculate the GW spectrum resulting from the bubble nucleation, plasma transportation, and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence of this process that occurred after the big bang and find that it yields GW signals testable with the Evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna, Deci-hertz Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory, and Big Bang Observer. We further identify collider signals from the same mechanism that are observable at the planning Circular Electron Positron Collider. Our analysis bridges astrophysics and cosmology with particle physics by providing significant motivation for searches for GW events peaking at the (1 0-4,1 ) Hz range, which are associated with signals at colliders, and highlights the possibility of an interdisciplinary observational window into baryogenesis. The technique applied in analyzing early Universe phase transitions may enlighten the study of phase transitions in applied science.

  15. Ground-based gravitational-wave detection: now and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past three years, the first generation of large gravitational-wave interferometers has begun operation near their design sensitivities, taking up the mantle from the bar detectors that pioneered the search for the first direct detection of gravitational waves. Even as the current ground-based interferometers were reaching their design sensitivities, plans were being laid for the future. Advances in technology and lessons learned from the first generation devices have pointed the way to an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity, as well as expanded frequency ranges and the capability to tailor the sensitivity band to address particular astrophysical sources. Advanced cryogenic acoustic detectors, the successors to the current bar detectors, are being researched and may play a role in the future, particularly at the higher frequencies. One of the most important trends is the growing international cooperation aimed at building a truly global network. In this paper, I survey the state of the various detectors as of mid-2007, and outline the prospects for the future

  16. Gravitational waves from the remnants of the first stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Tilman; Volonteri, Marta; Bromm, Volker; Klessen, Ralf S.; Barausse, Enrico; Magg, Mattis; Stacy, Athena

    2016-07-01

    Gravitational waves (GWs) provide a revolutionary tool to investigate yet unobserved astrophysical objects. Especially the first stars, which are believed to be more massive than present-day stars, might be indirectly observable via the merger of their compact remnants. We develop a self-consistent, cosmologically representative, semi-analytical model to simulate the formation of the first stars. By extrapolating binary stellar-evolution models at 10 per cent solar metallicity to metal-free stars, we track the individual systems until the coalescence of the compact remnants. We estimate the contribution of primordial stars to the merger rate density and to the detection rate of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (aLIGO). Owing to their higher masses, the remnants of primordial stars produce strong GW signals, even if their contribution in number is relatively small. We find a probability of ≳1 per cent that the current detection GW150914 is of primordial origin. We estimate that aLIGO will detect roughly 1 primordial BH-BH merger per year for the final design sensitivity, although this rate depends sensitively on the primordial initial mass function (IMF). Turning this around, the detection of black hole mergers with a total binary mass of ˜ 300 M⊙ would enable us to constrain the primordial IMF.

  17. Constraint on modified dispersion relations for gravitational waves from gravitational Cherenkov radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Kiyota, Satoshi; YAMAMOTO Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the hypothetical process of gravitational Cherenkov radiation, which may occur in modified gravity theories. We obtain a useful constraint on a modified dispersion relation for propagating modes of gravitational waves, which could be predicted as a consequence of violation of the Lorentz invariance in modified theories of gravity. The constraint from gravitational Cherenkov radiation and that from direct measurements of the gravitational waves emitted by a compact binary system...

  18. Detection of gravitational radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report the main contributions presented at the named symposium are collected. These concern astrophysical sources of gravitational radiation, ultracryogenic gravitational wave experiments, read out and data analysis of gravitational wave antennas, cryogenic aspects of large mass cooling to mK temperatures, and metallurgical and engineering aspects of large Cu structure manufacturing. (HSI)

  19. Detection of gravitational radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holten, J.W. van [ed.

    1994-12-31

    In this report the main contributions presented at the named symposium are collected. These concern astrophysical sources of gravitational radiation, ultracryogenic gravitational wave experiments, read out and data analysis of gravitational wave antennas, cryogenic aspects of large mass cooling to mK temperatures, and metallurgical and engineering aspects of large Cu structure manufacturing. (HSI).

  20. Gravitational waves: Some less discussed intriguing issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaram, C.

    2015-11-01

    Attempts to detect gravitational waves is actively in progress with sophisticated devices like LIGO setup across continents. Despite being predicted almost 100 years ago, there has so far been no direct detection of these waves. In this work, we draw attention to some of the less discussed but subtle aspects arising, for example, from high orbital eccentricities, where emission near periastron could be millions of times more than that in the distant parts of the orbit. The strong field nonlinear effects close to the compact objects can substantially slow down and deflect the waves in the last (few) orbit(s) where much of the intensity is expected. Spin-orbit and other forces could be significant. There would also be plasma like resonant absorption (of kilohertz radiation) during the collapse. Recent observation of supermassive black holes at high redshift implies cluster collapse, where the gravitational wave intensity depends on very high powers of the mass. Any unambiguous claim of detection should perhaps consider several of these effects.

  1. Gravitational waves from the electroweak phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the generation of gravitational waves in the electroweak phase transition. We consider a few extensions of the Standard Model, namely, the addition of scalar singlets, the minimal supersymmetric extension, and the addition of TeV fermions. For each model we consider the complete dynamics of the phase transition. In particular, we estimate the friction force acting on bubble walls, and we take into account the fact that they can propagate either as detonations or as deflagrations preceded by shock fronts, or they can run away. We compute the peak frequency and peak intensity of the gravitational radiation generated by bubble collisions and turbulence. We discuss the detectability by proposed spaceborne detectors. For the models we considered, runaway walls require significant fine tuning of the parameters, and the gravitational wave signal from bubble collisions is generally much weaker than that from turbulence. Although the predicted signal is in most cases rather low for the sensitivity of LISA, models with strongly coupled extra scalars reach this sensitivity for frequencies f ∼ 10−4 Hz, and give intensities as high as h2ΩGW ∼ 10−8

  2. Gravitational-wave astronomy: the high-frequency window

    CERN Document Server

    Andersson, N; Andersson, Nils; Kokkotas, Kostas D

    2004-01-01

    This contribution is divided in two parts. The first part provides a text-book level introduction to gravitational radiation. The key concepts required for a discussion of gravitational-wave physics are introduced. In particular, the quadrupole formula is applied to the anticipated ``bread-and-butter'' source for detectors like LIGO, GEO600, EGO and TAMA300: inspiralling compact binaries. The second part provides a brief review of high frequency gravitational waves. In the frequency range above (say) 100Hz, gravitational collapse, rotational instabilities and oscillations of the remnant compact objects are potentially important sources of gravitational waves. Significant and unique information concerning the various stages of collapse, the evolution of protoneutron stars and the details of the supranuclear equation of state of such objects can be drawn from careful study of the gravitational-wave signal. As the amount of exciting physics one may be able to study via the detections of gravitational waves from ...

  3. Testing Einstein's Equivalence Principle With Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xue-Feng; Wei, Jun-Jie; Fan, Xi-Long; Mészáros, Peter; Zhang, Bing; Dai, Zi-Gao; Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2016-01-01

    A conservative constraint on the Einstein Equivalence Principle (EEP) can be obtained under the assumption that the observed time delay between correlated particles from astronomical sources is dominated by the gravitational fields through which they move. Current limits on the EEP are mainly based on the observed time delays of photons with different energies, and it is highly desirable to develop more accurate tests involving different types of particles. The expected detection by the advanced LIGO/VIRGO systems of gravitational waves (GWs) will provide attractive candidates for constraining the EEP, which would further extend the tested particle species to the gravitons, with potentially higher accuracy. Considering the capabilities of the advanced LIGO/VIRGO network and the source direction uncertainty, we propose that the joint detectioin of GWs and electromagnetic signals could potentially probe the EEP to an accuracy of $10^{-11}$, which is several orders of magnitude tighter than previous limits.

  4. Extraction of Gravitational Waves in Numerical Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, Nigel T

    2016-01-01

    A numerical-relativity calculation yields in general a solution of the Einstein equations including also a radiative part, which is in practice computed in a region of finite extent. Since gravitational radiation is properly defined only at null infinity and in an appropriate coordinate system, the accurate estimation of the emitted gravitational waves represents an old and non-trivial problem in numerical relativity. A number of methods have been developed over the years to "extract" the radiative part of the solution from a numerical simulation and these include: quadrupole formulas, gauge-invariant metric perturbations, Weyl scalars, and characteristic extraction. We review and discuss each method, in terms of both its theoretical background as well as its implementation. Finally, we provide a brief comparison of the various methods in terms of their inherent advantages and disadvantages.

  5. Classification methods for noise transients in advanced gravitational-wave detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Powell, Jade; Cuoco, Elena; Heng, Ik Siong; Cavaglia, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Noise of non-astrophysical origin will contaminate science data taken by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (aLIGO) and Advanced Virgo gravitational-wave detectors. Prompt characterization of instrumental and environmental noise transients will be critical for improving the sensitivity of the advanced detectors in the upcoming science runs. During the science runs of the initial gravitational-wave detectors, noise transients were manually classified by visually examining the time-frequency scan of each event. Here, we present three new algorithms designed for the automatic classification of noise transients in advanced detectors. Two of these algorithms are based on Principal Component Analysis. They are Principal Component Analysis for Transients (PCAT), and an adaptation of LALInference Burst (LIB). The third algorithm is a combination of an event generator called Wavelet Detection Filter (WDF) and machine learning techniques for classification. We test these algorithms on simu...

  6. A Resonant Mode for Gravitational Wave Detectors based on Atom Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, Peter W; Kasevich, Mark A; Rajendran, Surjeet

    2016-01-01

    We describe a new atom interferometric gravitational wave detector design that can operate in a resonant mode for increased sensitivity. By oscillating the positions of the atomic wavepackets, this resonant detection mode allows for coherently enhanced, narrow-band sensitivity at target frequencies. The proposed detector is flexible and can be rapidly switched between broadband and narrow-band detection modes without changing hardware. For instance, a new binary discovered in broadband mode can subsequently be studied further as the inspiral evolves by using a tailored narrow-band detector response. In addition to functioning like a lock-in amplifier for astrophysical events, the enhanced sensitivity of the resonant approach also opens up the possibility of searching for important cosmological signals, including the stochastic gravitational wave background produced by inflation. We give an example of detector parameters which would allow detection of inflationary gravitational waves down to $\\Omega_\\text{GW} ...

  7. Gravitational waves from a curvaton model with blue spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the gravitational wave background induced by the first order scalar perturbations in the curvaton models. We consider the quadratic and axion-like curvaton potential which can generate the blue-tilted power spectrum of curvature perturbations on small scales and derive the maximal amount of gravitational wave background today. We find the power spectrum of the induced gravitational wave background has a characteristic peak at the frequency corresponding to the scale reentering the horizon at the curvaton decay, in the case where the curvaton does not dominate the energy density of the Universe. We also find the enhancement of the amount of the gravitational waves in the case where the curvaton dominates the energy density of the Universe. Such induced gravitational waves would be detectable by the future space-based gravitational wave detectors or pulsar timing observations

  8. Gravitational waves from a curvaton model with blue spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Kitajima, Naoya; Yokoyama, Shuichiro, E-mail: kawasaki@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: nk610@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: shu@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2013-08-01

    We investigate the gravitational wave background induced by the first order scalar perturbations in the curvaton models. We consider the quadratic and axion-like curvaton potential which can generate the blue-tilted power spectrum of curvature perturbations on small scales and derive the maximal amount of gravitational wave background today. We find the power spectrum of the induced gravitational wave background has a characteristic peak at the frequency corresponding to the scale reentering the horizon at the curvaton decay, in the case where the curvaton does not dominate the energy density of the Universe. We also find the enhancement of the amount of the gravitational waves in the case where the curvaton dominates the energy density of the Universe. Such induced gravitational waves would be detectable by the future space-based gravitational wave detectors or pulsar timing observations.

  9. New examples of sandwich gravitational waves and their impulsive limit

    OpenAIRE

    Podolsky, J.; Vesely, K.

    1998-01-01

    Non-standard sandwich gravitational waves are constructed from the homogeneous pp vacuum solution and the motions of free test particles in the space-times are calculated explicitly. They demonstrate the caustic property of sandwich waves. By performing limits to impulsive gravitational wave it is demonstrated that the resulting particle motions are identical regardless of the ''initial'' sandwich.

  10. Spin-1 gravitational waves and their natural sources

    OpenAIRE

    Canfora, F.; Vilasi, G.

    2003-01-01

    Non-vacuum exact gravitational waves invariant for a non Abelian two-dimensional Lie algebra generated by two Killing fields whose commutator is of light type, are described. The polarization of these waves, already known from previous works, is related to the sources. Non vacuum exact gravitational waves admitting only one Killing field of light type are also discussed.

  11. Effects of gravitational waves on the polarization of pulsars

    OpenAIRE

    Hacyan, Shahen

    2015-01-01

    The polarization of electromagnetic waves in the presence of a gravitational wave is analyzed. The rotation of the polarization angle and the Stokes parameters are deduced. A possible application to the detection of stochastic background of gravitational waves is proposed as a complement to the pulsar timing method.

  12. Singularities and horizons in the collisions of gravitational waves

    OpenAIRE

    Yurtsever, Ulvi

    1989-01-01

    It is well known that when gravitational plane waves propagating and colliding in an otherwise flat background interact they produce singularities. In this paper we explore the structure of the singularities produced in the collisions of arbitrarily polarized gravitational plane waves and we consider the problem of whether (or under what conditions) singularities can be produced in the collisions of almost-plane gravitational waves with finite but very large transverse sizes. First we analyze...

  13. Exploring the Sensitivity of Next Generation Gravitational Wave Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, M; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M R; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Altin, P A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C C; Areeda, J S; Arun, K G; Ashton, G; Ast, M; Aston, S M; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Bartlett, J; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Batch, J C; Baune, C; Bell, A S; Berger, B K; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birney, R; Biscans, S; Bisht, A; Biwer, C; Blackburn, J K; Blair, C D; Blair, D G; Blair, R M; Bock, O; Bogan, C; Bohe, A; Bond, C; Bork, R; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brinkmann, M; Brockill, P; Broida, J E; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Brunett, S; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Buonanno, A; Byer, R L; Cabero, M; Cadonati, L; Cahillane, C; Bustillo, J Calder'on; Callister, T; Camp, J B; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavagli`a, M; Cepeda, C B; Chamberlin, S J; Chan, M; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Cheeseboro, B D; Chen, H Y; Chen, Y; Cheng, C; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Collette, C G; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Cowan, E E; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Canton, T Dal; Danilishin, S L; Danzmann, K; Darman, N S; Dasgupta, A; Costa, C F Da Silva; Dave, I; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; De, S; DeBra, D; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Devine, R C; Dhurandhar, S; D'iaz, M C; Di Palma, I; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Dwyer, S E; Edo, T B; Edwards, M C; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H -B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Engels, W; Essick, R C; Etzel, T; Evans, T M; Everett, R; Factourovich, M; Fair, H; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Fenyvesi, E; Ferreira, E C; Fisher, R P; Fletcher, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gabbard, H A G; Gair, J R; Gaonkar, S G; Gaur, G; Gehrels, N; Geng, P; George, J; Gergely, L; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Gill, K; Glaefke, A; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; Gonz'alez, G; Gopakumar, A; Gordon, N A; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S E; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Green, A C; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guo, X; Gupta, A; Gupta, M K; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J J; Hall, B R; Hall, E D; Hammond, G; Haney, M; Hanke, M M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M J; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heintze, M C; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Hennig, J; Henry, J; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Holt, K; Holz, D E; Hopkins, P; Hough, J; Houston, E A; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huang, S; Huerta, E A; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isa, H N; Isi, M; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jang, H; Jani, K; Jawahar, S; Jian, L; Jim'enez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalaghatgi, C V; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kapadia, S J; Karki, S; Karvinen, K S; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kehl, M S; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Kennedy, R; Key, J S; Khalili, F Y; Khan, S; Khan, Z; Khazanov, E A; Kijbunchoo, N; Kim, Chi-Woong; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, W; Kim, Y -M; Kimbrell, S J; King, E J; King, P J; Kissel, J S; Klein, B; Kleybolte, L; Klimenko, S; Koehlenbeck, S M; Kondrashov, V; Kontos, A; Korobko, M; Korth, W Z; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Krueger, C; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, L; Lackey, B D; Landry, M; Lange, J; Lantz, B; Lasky, P D; Laxen, M; Lazzarini, A; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, K; Lenon, A; Leong, J R; Levin, Y; Lewis, J B; Li, T G F; Libson, A; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Lombardi, A L; London, L T; Lord, J E; Lormand, M; Lough, J D; L"uck, H; Lundgren, A P; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magana-Sandoval, F; Zertuche, L Magana; Magee, R M; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mansell, G L; Manske, M; M'arka, S; M'arka, Z; Markosyan, A S; Maros, E; Martin, I W; Martynov, D V; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Massinger, T J; Masso-Reid, M; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McCormick, S; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G

    2016-01-01

    With the development of extremely sensitive ground-based gravitational wave detectors, and the recent detection of gravitational waves by LIGO, extensive theoretical work is going into understanding potential gravitational wave sources. To support this effort, we present here design targets for a new generation of detectors, which will be capable of observing compact binary sources with high signal-to-noise ratio throughout the universe.

  14. Gravitational waves from kinks on infinite cosmic strings

    OpenAIRE

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Koichi; Nakayama, Kazunori(Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Bunkyo-ku, Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan)

    2010-01-01

    Gravitational waves emitted by kinks on infinite strings are investigated using detailed estimations of the kink distribution on infinite strings. We find that gravitational waves from kinks can be detected by future pulsar timing experiments such as SKA for an appropriate value of the the string tension, if the typical size of string loops is much smaller than the horizon at their formation. Moreover, the gravitational wave spectrum depends on the thermal history of the Universe and hence it...

  15. Causal Structure and Gravitational Waves in Brane World Cosmology

    OpenAIRE

    Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Nakamura, Kouji

    2003-01-01

    The causal structure of the flat brane universe of RSII type is re-investigated to clarify the boundary conditions for stochastic gravitational waves. In terms of the Gaussian normal coordinate of the brane, a singularity of the equation for gravitational waves appears in the bulk. We show that this singularity corresponds to the ``seam singularity'' which is a singular subspace on the brane universe. Based upon the causal structure, we discuss the boundary conditions for gravitational waves ...

  16. Imprints of cosmic phase transition in inflationary gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the effects of cosmic phase transition on the spectrum of primordial gravitational waves generated during inflation. The energy density of the scalar condensation responsible for the phase transition may become sizable at the epoch of phase transition, which significantly affects the evolution of the universe. As a result, the amplitudes of the gravitational waves at high frequency modes are suppressed. Thus the gravitational wave spectrum can be a probe of phase transition in the early universe.

  17. Chiral Primordial Gravitational Waves from a Lifshitz Point

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Tomohiro; Soda, Jiro

    2009-01-01

    We study primordial gravitational waves produced during inflation in quantum gravity at a Lifshitz point proposed by Ho${\\rm\\check{r}}$ava. Assuming power-counting renormalizability, foliation preserving diffeomorphism invariance, and the condition of detailed balance, we show that primordial gravitational waves are circularly polarized due to parity violation. The chirality of primordial gravitational waves is a quite robust prediction of quantum gravity at a Lifshitz point which can be test...

  18. Observing gravitational-wave transient GW150914 with minimal assumptions

    OpenAIRE

    Abbott, B.P.; Abbott, R.; Abernathy, M. R.; Adhikari, R. X; Anderson, S. B.; Arai, K; Araya, M. C.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barish, B. C.; Berger, B. K.; Billingsley, G.; Blackburn, J. K.; Bork, R.; Brooks, A. F.; Cahillane, C.

    2016-01-01

    The gravitational-wave signal GW150914 was first identified on September 14, 2015, by searches for short-duration gravitational-wave transients. These searches identify time-correlated transients in multiple detectors with minimal assumptions about the signal morphology, allowing them to be sensitive to gravitational waves emitted by a wide range of sources including binary black hole mergers. Over the observational period from September 12 to October 20, 2015, these transient searches were s...

  19. Gravitational and torsion waves in linearised teleparallel gravity

    OpenAIRE

    de Andrade, L. C. Garcia

    2002-01-01

    Spin-2, spin-1 and spin-0 modes in linearised teleparallelism are obtained where the totally skew-symmetric complex contortion tensor generates scalar torsion waves and the symmetric contortion in the last two indices generates gravitational waves as gravitational perturbations of flat spacetime with contortion tensor. A gedanken experiment with this gravitational-torsion wave hitting a ring of spinless particles is proposed which allows us to estimate the contortion of the Earth by making us...

  20. Classifying glitches and improving data quality of Advanced LIGO gravitational-wave searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaglia, Marco; Powell, Jade; Trifiro, Daniele; Heng, Ik Siong; LIGO Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Noise of non-astrophysical origin contaminates science data taken by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (aLIGO) and Advanced Virgo gravitational-wave detectors. Characterization of instrumental and environmental noise transients has proven critical in identifying false positives in the first aLIGO observing run O1. In this talk, we present three algorithms designed for the automatic classification of non-astrophysical transients in advanced detectors. Principal Component Analysis for Transients (PCAT) and an adaptation of LALInference Burst (LIB) are based on Principal Component Analysis. The third algorithm is a combination of a glitch finder called Wavelet Detection Filter (WDF) and machine learning techniques for classification. PCAT was used in O1 and earlier engineering runs to identify and characterize observed noise transients in aLIGO data. LIB and WDF are expected to join the quest in the upcoming aLIGO-Advanced Virgo observing run O2. NSF PHY-1404139.

  1. Broadband Faraday isolator for gravitational wave detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Parfenov, V A

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the concept and performance of a highly effective broadband Faraday isolator. This device is based on Nd:Fe:B permanent magnets and can be used in interferometric gravitational wave detectors in which lasers oscillating in the visible or near infrared region are used. The degree of optical isolation of 30 dB, provided by the device, is achieved when operating with laser beams of up to 2 mm, and up to 25 dB when the aperture of the magneto-optic element (10 mm) is completely filled.

  2. Searching for gravitational waves from known pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Pitkin, M; Ageev, A; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Asiri, F; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Balasubramanian, R; Ballmer, S; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barnes, M; Barr, B; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Beausoleil, R; Belczynski, K; Bennett, R; Berukoff, S J; Betzwieser, J; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Bland, B; Bochner, B; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burgess, R; Busby, D; Butler, W E; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cantley, C A; Cardenas, L; Carter, K; Casey, M M; Castiglione, J; Chandler, A; Chapsky, J; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chickarmane, V; Chin, D; Christensen, N; Churches, D; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C; Coldwell, R; Coles, M; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crooks, D R M; Csatorday, P; Cusack, B J; Cutler, C; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Daw, E; De Bra, D; Delker, T; Dergachev, V; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S V; Di Credico, A; Díaz, M; Ding, H; Drever, R W P; Dupuis, R J; Edlund, J A; Ehrens, P; Elliffe, E J; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fallnich, C; Farnham, D; Fejer, M M; Findley, T; Fine, M; Finn, L S; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Ganezer, K S; Garofoli, J; Giaime, J A; Gillespie, A; Goda, K; González, G; Goler, S; Grandclément, P; Grant, A; Gray, C; Gretarsson, A M; Grimmett, D; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, E; Gustafson, R; Hamilton, W O; Hammond, M; Hanson, J; Hardham, C; Harms, J; Harry, G; Hartunian, A; Heefner, J; Hefetz, Y; Heinzel, G; Heng, I S; Hennessy, M; Hepler, N; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hindman, N; Hoang, P; Hough, J; Hrynevych, M; Hua, W; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jennrich, O; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Johnston, W R; Jones, D I; Jones, L; Jungwirth, D; Kalogera, V; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kells, W; Kern, J; Khan, A; Killbourn, S; Killow, C J; Kim, C; King, C; King, P; Klimenko, S; Koranda, S; Kotter, K; Kovalik, Yu; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Landry, M; Langdale, J; Lantz, B; Lawrence, R; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Libson, A; Lindquist, P; Liu, S; Logan, J; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Lyons, T T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majid, W; Malec, M; Mann, F; Marin, A; Marka, S; Maros, E; Mason, J; Mason, K; Matherny, O; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McHugh, M; McNabb, J W C; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Miyoki, S; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Murray, P; Myers, J; Nagano, S; Nash, T; Nayak, R; Newton, G; Nocera, F; Noel, J S; Nutzman, P; Olson, T; O'Reilly, B; Ottaway, D J; Ottewill, A; Ouimette, D A; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Parameswariah, C; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pitkin, M; Plissi, M; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rakhmanov, M; Rao, S R; Rawlins, K; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Redding, D; Regehr, M W; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reilly, K T; Reithmaier, K; Reitze, D H; Richman, S; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Rizzi, A; Robertson, D I; Robertson, N A; Robison, L; Roddy, S; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Rong, H; Rose, D; Rotthoff, E; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Salzman, I; Sandberg, V; Sanders, G H; Sannibale, V; Sathyaprakash, B; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Sazonov, A; Schilling, R; Schlaufman, K; Schmidt, V; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Seader, S E; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seel, S; Seifert, F; Sengupta, A S; Shapiro, C A; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Shu, Q Z; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sievers, L; Sigg, D; Sintes, A M; Smith, J R; Smith, M; Smith, M R; Sneddon, P H; Spero, R; Stapfer, G; Steussy, D; Strain, K A; Strom, D; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T; Sumner, M C; Sutton, P J; Sylvestre, J; Takamori, A; Tanner, D B; Tariq, H; Taylor, I; Taylor, R; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Tibbits, M; Tilav, S; Tinto, M; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Ungarelli, C; Vallisneri, M; Van Putten, M H P M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Wallace, L; Walther, H; Ward, H; Ware, B; Watts, K; Webber, D; Weidner, A; Weiland, U; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Welling, H; Wen, L; Wen, S; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Wiley, S; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, P R; Williams, R; Willke, B; Wilson, A; Winjum, B J; Winkler, W; Wise, S; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Wu, W; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yoshida, S; Zaleski, K D; Zanolin, M; Zawischa, I; Abbott, R; Zhang, L; Zhu, R; Zotov, N P; Zucker, M; Zweizig, J; Pitkin, Matthew

    2005-01-01

    We present upper limits on the amplitude of gravitational waves from 28 isolated pulsars using data from the second science run of LIGO. The results are also expressed as a constraint on the pulsars' equatorial ellipticities. We discuss a new way of presenting such ellipticity upper limits that takes account of the uncertainties of the pulsar moment of inertia. We also extend our previous method to search for known pulsars in binary systems, of which there are about 80 in the sensitive frequency range of LIGO and GEO 600.

  3. Towards the bounce inflationary gravitational wave

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hai-Guang; Piao, Yun-Song

    2016-01-01

    In bounce inflation scenario, the inflation is singularity-free, while the advantages of inflation are reserved. We analytically calculate the power spectrum of its primordial gravitational waves (GWs), and show a universal result including the physics of the bounce phase. The spectrum acquires a cutoff at large scale, while the oscillation around the cutoff scale is quite drastic, which is determined by the details of bounce. Our work highlights that the primordial GWs at large scale may encode the physics of the bounce ever happened at about $\\sim 60$ efolds before inflation.

  4. Gravitational Waves in Open de Sitter Space

    CERN Document Server

    Hawking, Stephen William; Turok, N G; Hertog, Thomas; Turok, Neil

    2000-01-01

    We compute the spectrum of primordial gravitational wave perturbations inopen de Sitter spacetime. The background spacetime is taken to be thecontinuation of an O(5) symmetric instanton saddle point of the Euclidean noboundary path integral. The two-point tensor fluctuations are computed directlyfrom the Euclidean path integral. The Euclidean correlator is then analyticallycontinued into the Lorentzian region where it describes the quantum mechanicalvacuum fluctuations of the graviton field. Unlike the results of earlier work,the correlator is shown to be unique and well behaved in the infrared. We showthat the infrared divergence found in previous calculations is due to thecontribution of a discrete gauge mode inadvertently included in the spectrum.

  5. On a nonlinear gravitational wave. Geodesics

    CERN Document Server

    Culetu, Hristu

    2016-01-01

    An exact, plane wave solution of the gravitational field equations is investigated. The source stress tensor is represented by an anisotropic null fluid with energy flux to which the energy density $\\rho$ and the pressure $p_{z}$ are negative but finite throughout the spacetime. They depend on a constant length (taken of the order of the Planck length) and acquire Planck values close to the null surface $t - z = 0$, $Oz$ axis being the direction of propagation. The timelike geodesics of a test particle are contained in a plane whose normal has constant direction and the null trajectories are comoving with a plane of fixed direction.

  6. Detecting Gravitational Waves using Pade Approximants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, E. K.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.

    1998-12-01

    We look at the use of Pade Approximants in defining a metric tensor for the inspiral waveform template manifold. By using this method we investigate the curvature of the template manifold and the number of templates needed to carry out a realistic search for a Gravitational Wave signal. By comparing this method with the normal use of Taylor Approximant waveforms we hope to show that (a) Pade Approximants are a superior method for calculating the inspiral waveform, and (b) the number of search templates needed, and hence computing power, is reduced.

  7. Using Atomic Clocks to Detect Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Loeb, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Atomic clocks have recently reached a fractional timing precision of $<10^{-18}$. We point out that an array of atomic clocks, distributed along the Earth's orbit around the Sun, will have the sensitivity needed to detect the time dilation effect of mHz gravitational waves (GWs), such as those emitted by supermassive black hole binaries at cosmological distances. Simultaneous measurement of clock-rates at different phases of a passing GW provides an attractive alternative to the interferometric detection of temporal variations in distance between test masses separated by less than a GW wavelength, currently envisioned for the eLISA mission.

  8. Noises in Detecting Relic Gravitational Wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEE Zhi-Jun; WAN Zhen-Zhu

    2006-01-01

    We analyse the three basic kinds of noises in detecting the relic gravitational wave (GW), which are the noises caused by the thermal radiation in the detecting cavity and by the scattering of the Gaussian beam in the detecting cavity, and noise in the microwave radiometers. The analysis shows that a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio may be achieved for a detecting device with a suitable geometric structure only when the temperature of the environment is no more than T = 0.6 K, and the power of the radiation of the Gaussian beam is no less than P = 105W.

  9. Multimessenger astronomy with gravitational waves and high-energy neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Ando, S; Bouhou, B; Chassande-Mottin, E; Kouchner, A; Moscoso, L; Van Elewyck, Veronique; Bartos, I; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Corsi, A; Di Palma, I; Papa, M A; Dietz, A; Donzaud, C; Eichler, D; Finley, C; Guetta, D; Halzen, F; Jones, G; Sutton, P J; Kandhasamy, S; Mandic, V; Thrane, E; Kotake, K; Piran, T; Pradier, T; Romero, G E; Waxman, E

    2013-01-01

    Many of the astrophysical sources and violent phenomena observed in our Universe are potential emitters of gravitational waves (GW) and high-energy neutrinos (HEN). Both GWs and HENs may escape very dense media and travel unaffected over cosmological distances, carrying information from the innermost regions of the astrophysical engines. Such messengers could also reveal new, hidden sources that have not been observed by conventional photon-based astronomy. Coincident observation of GWs and HENs may thus play a critical role in multimessenger astronomy. This is particularly true at the present time owing to the advent of a new generation of dedicated detectors: IceCube, ANTARES, VIRGO and LIGO. Given the complexity of the instruments, a successful joint analysis of this data set will be possible only if the expertise and knowledge of the data is shared between the two communities. This review aims at providing an overview of both theoretical and experimental state-of-the-art and perspectives for such a GW+HEN...

  10. A numerical approach to the problem of gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einstein equations have a non-linear nature. An interesting consequence when one linearizes the equations describing the evolution of tiny perturbations is that they become a wave equation. That suggests that the gravitational interaction propagates as a wave with the velocity of light. One of the simplest forms of gravitational waves are the cylindrical waves. Despite their unphysical nature, the study of these waves is interesting because it makes the comprehension of the non-linear interaction easier. (author)

  11. Calibration of the LIGO gravitational wave detectors in the fifth science run

    OpenAIRE

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Abernathy, M; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G; Ceron, E.; Amin, R.; Anderson, S.; Anderson, W.; Arain, M; Araya, M.

    2010-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) is a network of three detectors built to detect local perturbations in the space-time metric from astrophysical sources. These detectors, two in Hanford, WA and one in Livingston, LA, are power-recycled Fabry-Perot Michelson interferometers. In their fifth science run (S5), between November 2005 and October 2007, these detectors accumulated one year of triple coincident data while operating at their designed sensitivity. In this p...

  12. Architectures for a Space-based Gravitational-Wave Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Robin

    2015-04-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) selected the science theme, the ``Gravitational Universe,'' for the third large mission opportunity, known as L3, under its Cosmic Vision Programme. The planned launch date is 2034. ESA is considering a 20% participation by an international partner, and NASA's Astrophysics Division has begun negotiating a NASA role. We have studied the design consequences of a NASA contribution, evaluated the science benefits and identified the technology requirements for hardware that could be delivered by NASA. The European community proposed a strawman mission concept, called eLISA, having two measurement arms, derived from the well studied LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) concept. The US community is promoting a mission concept known as SGO Mid (Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatory Mid-sized), a three arm LISA-like concept. If NASA were to partner with ESA, the eLISA concept could be transformed to SGO Mid by the addition of a third arm, thereby augmenting science, reducing risk and reducing non-recurring engineering costs. The characteristics of the mission concepts and the relative science performance of eLISA, SGO Mid and LISA are described.

  13. Inflationary gravitational waves in collapse scheme models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Mariani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The inflationary paradigm is an important cornerstone of the concordance cosmological model. However, standard inflation cannot fully address the transition from an early homogeneous and isotropic stage, to another one lacking such symmetries corresponding to our present universe. In previous works, a self-induced collapse of the wave function has been suggested as the missing ingredient of inflation. Most of the analysis regarding the collapse hypothesis has been solely focused on the characteristics of the spectrum associated to scalar perturbations, and within a semiclassical gravity framework. In this Letter, working in terms of a joint metric-matter quantization for inflation, we calculate, for the first time, the tensor power spectrum and the tensor-to-scalar ratio corresponding to the amplitude of primordial gravitational waves resulting from considering a generic self-induced collapse.

  14. The next detectors for gravitational wave astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, David; Ju, Li; Zhao, ChunNong; Wen, LinQing; Miao, HaiXing; Cai, RongGen; Gao, JiangRui; Lin, XueChun; Liu, Dong; Wu, Ling-An; Zhu, ZongHong; Hammond, Giles; Paik, Ho Jung; Fafone, Viviana; Rocchi, Alessio; Blair, Carl; Ma, YiQiu; Qin, JiaYi; Page, Michael

    2015-12-01

    This paper focuses on the next detectors for gravitational wave astronomy which will be required after the current ground based detectors have completed their initial observations, and probably achieved the first direct detection of gravitational waves. The next detectors will need to have greater sensitivity, while also enabling the world array of detectors to have improved angular resolution to allow localisation of signal sources. Sect. 1 of this paper begins by reviewing proposals for the next ground based detectors, and presents an analysis of the sensitivity of an 8 km armlength detector, which is proposed as a safe and cost-effective means to attain a 4-fold improvement in sensitivity. The scientific benefits of creating a pair of such detectors in China and Australia is emphasised. Sect. 2 of this paper discusses the high performance suspension systems for test masses that will be an essential component for future detectors, while sect. 3 discusses solutions to the problem of Newtonian noise which arise from fluctuations in gravity gradient forces acting on test masses. Such gravitational perturbations cannot be shielded, and set limits to low frequency sensitivity unless measured and suppressed. Sects. 4 and 5 address critical operational technologies that will be ongoing issues in future detectors. Sect. 4 addresses the design of thermal compensation systems needed in all high optical power interferometers operating at room temperature. Parametric instability control is addressed in sect. 5. Only recently proven to occur in Advanced LIGO, parametric instability phenomenon brings both risks and opportunities for future detectors. The path to future enhancements of detectors will come from quantum measurement technologies. Sect. 6 focuses on the use of optomechanical devices for obtaining enhanced sensitivity, while sect. 7 reviews a range of quantum measurement options.

  15. Avoiding selection bias in gravitational wave astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When searching for gravitational waves in the data from ground-based gravitational wave detectors, it is common to use a detection threshold to reduce the number of background events which are unlikely to be the signals of interest. However, imposing such a threshold will also discard some real signals with low amplitude, which can potentially bias any inferences drawn from the population of detected signals. We show how this selection bias is naturally avoided by using the full information from the search, considering both the selected data and our ignorance of the data that are thrown away, and considering all relevant signal and noise models. This approach produces unbiased estimates of parameters even in the presence of false alarms and incomplete data. This can be seen as an extension of previous methods into the high false rate regime where we are able to show that the quality of parameter inference can be optimized by lowering thresholds and increasing the false alarm rate. (paper)

  16. Gravitational waves from bubble collisions: analytic derivation

    CERN Document Server

    Jinno, Ryusuke

    2016-01-01

    We consider gravitational wave production by bubble collisions during a cosmological first-order phase transition. In the literature, such spectra have been estimated by simulating the bubble dynamics, under so-called thin-wall and envelope approximations in a flat background metric. However, we show that, within these assumptions, the gravitational wave spectrum can be estimated in an analytic way. Our estimation is based on the observation that the two-point correlator of the energy-momentum tensor $\\langle T(x)T(y)\\rangle$ can be expressed analytically under these assumptions. Though the final expressions for the spectrum contain a few integrations that cannot be calculated explicitly, we can easily estimate it numerically. As a result, it is found that the most of the contributions to the spectrum come from single-bubble contribution to the correlator, and in addition the fall-off of the spectrum at high frequencies is found to be proportional to $f^{-1}$. We also provide fitting formulae for the spectrum...

  17. An Atomic Gravitational Wave Interferometric Sensor (AGIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimopoulos, Savas; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Graham, Peter W.; /SLAC; Hogan, Jason M.; Kasevich, Mark A.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Rajendran, Surjeet; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2008-08-01

    We propose two distinct atom interferometer gravitational wave detectors, one terrestrial and another satellite-based, utilizing the core technology of the Stanford 10m atom interferometer presently under construction. Each configuration compares two widely separated atom interferometers run using common lasers. The signal scales with the distance between the interferometers, which can be large since only the light travels over this distance, not the atoms. The terrestrial experiment with baseline {approx} 1 km can operate with strain sensitivity {approx} 10{sup -19}/{radical}Hz in the 1 Hz-10 Hz band, inaccessible to LIGO, and can detect gravitational waves from solar mass binaries out to megaparsec distances. The satellite experiment with baseline {approx} 1000 km can probe the same frequency spectrum as LISA with comparable strain sensitivity {approx} 10{sup -20}/{radical}Hz. The use of ballistic atoms (instead of mirrors) as inertial test masses improves systematics coming from vibrations, acceleration noise, and significantly reduces spacecraft control requirements. We analyze the backgrounds in this configuration and discuss methods for controlling them to the required levels.

  18. GRB beaming and gravitational-wave observations

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Hsin-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Using the observed rate of short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) it is possible to make predictions for the detectable rate of compact binary coalescences in gravitational-wave detectors. These estimates rely crucially on the growing consensus that short gamma-ray bursts are associated with the merger of two neutron stars or a neutron star and a black hole, but otherwise make no assumptions beyond the observed rate of short GRBs. In particular, our results do not assume coincident gravitational wave and electromagnetic observations. We show that the non-detection of mergers in the existing LIGO/Virgo data constrains the progenitor masses and beaming angles of gamma-ray bursts. For future detectors, we find that the first detection of a NS-NS binary coalescence associated with the progenitors of short GRBs is likely to happen within the first 16 months of observation, even in the case of a modest network of observatories (e.g., only LIGO-Hanford and LIGO-Livingston) operating at modest sensitivities (e.g., ad...

  19. Transformations of asymptotic gravitational-wave data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Gravitational-wave data is gauge dependent. While we can restrict the class of gauges in which such data may be expressed, there will still be an infinite-dimensional group of transformations allowed while remaining in this class, and almost as many different—though physically equivalent—waveforms as there are transformations. This paper presents a method for calculating the effects of the most important transformation group, the Bondi-Metzner-Sachs (BMS) group, consisting of rotations, boosts, and supertranslations (which include time and space translations as special cases). To a reasonable approximation, these transformations result in simple coupling between the modes in a spin-weighted spherical-harmonic decomposition of the waveform. It is shown that waveforms from simulated compact binaries in the publicly available SXS waveform catalog contain unmodeled effects due to displacement and drift of the center of mass, accounting for mode mixing at typical levels of 1%. However, these effects can be mitigated by measuring the average motion of the system's center of mass for a portion of the inspiral, and applying the opposite transformation to the waveform data. More generally, controlling the BMS transformations will be necessary to eliminate the gauge ambiguity inherent in gravitational-wave data for both numerical and analytical waveforms. Open-source code implementing BMS transformations of waveforms is supplied along with this paper in the supplemental materials.

  20. A Bayesian approach to multi-messenger astronomy: identification of gravitational-wave host galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a general framework for incorporating astrophysical information into Bayesian parameter estimation techniques used by gravitational wave data analysis to facilitate multi-messenger astronomy. Since the progenitors of transient gravitational wave events, such as compact binary coalescences, are likely to be associated with a host galaxy, improvements to the source sky location estimates through the use of host galaxy information are explored. To demonstrate how host galaxy properties can be included, we simulate a population of compact binary coalescences and show that for ∼8.5% of simulations within 200 Mpc, the top 10 most likely galaxies account for a ∼50% of the total probability of hosting a gravitational wave source. The true gravitational wave source host galaxy is in the top 10 galaxy candidates ∼10% of the time. Furthermore, we show that by including host galaxy information, a better estimate of the inclination angle of a compact binary gravitational wave source can be obtained. We also demonstrate the flexibility of our method by incorporating the use of either the B or K band into our analysis.

  1. Engaging the public in the nascent era of gravitational-wave astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Martin A.

    2015-08-01

    Within the next few years a global network of ground-based laser interferometers will become fully operational. These ultra-sensitive instruments are confidently expected to directly detect gravitational waves from astrophysical sources before the end of the decade. In anticipation of opening this entirely new window on the Universe, the LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory) Scientific Collaboration has recently developed a substantive program of education and public outreach activities that includes exhibitions, documentary films, social media and interactive games - as well as more traditional modes of science communication such as schools and public lectures.As the gravitational wave 'detection era' unfolds over the next decade, it will present exciting challenges for future public engagement by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration and by other gravitational-wave astronomy collaborations around the world. Perhaps the most interesting opportunities will be in the area of citizen science, building upon the infrastructure already being developed through e.g. the LIGO Open Science Center (see arXiv:1410.4839) and the remarkable success of the Einstein@Home project (www.einsteinathome.org).In this presentation I will give an overview of the LSC education and public outreach program, highlighting its goals, major successes and future strategy - particularly in relation to the release of future LIGO and other gravitational wave datasets to the scientific community and to the public, and the opportunities this will present for directly engaging citizen scientists in this exciting new field of observational astronomy.

  2. Gravitational wave asteroseismology in scalar-tensor theory of gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study perturbations of relativistic stars in scalar-tensor theory of gravity and examine the effects of the scalar field on the corresponding oscillation spectrum. We show that the frequency of the emitted gravitational waves is shifted proportionally to the scalar field strength. Scalar waves which might be produced from such oscillations can be a unique probe for the theory, but their detectability is questionable if the radiated energy is small. However we show that there is no need for a direct observation of scalar waves: the shift in the gravitational wave spectrum could unambiguously signal the presence of a scalar field. (authors) Keywords: gravitational waves, neutron stars, alternative theories

  3. Propagation of Gravitational Waves in Generalized TeVeS

    CERN Document Server

    Sagi, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Efforts are underway to improve the design and sensitivity of gravitational waves detectors, with the hope that the next generation of these detectors will observe a gravitational wave signal. Such a signal will not only provide information on dynamics in the strong gravity regime that characterizes potential sources of gravitational waves, but will also serve as a decisive test for alternative theories of gravitation that are consistent with all other current experimental observations. We study the linearized theory of the tensor-vector-scalar theory of gravity (TeVeS) with generalized vector action, an alternative theory of gravitation designed to explain the apparent deficit of visible matter in galaxies and clusters of galaxies without postulating yet undetected dark matter. We find the polarization states and propagation speeds for gravitational waves in vacuum, and show that in addition to the usual transverse-traceless propagation modes, there are two more transverse modes and two trace modes. Addition...

  4. Constraints on Cosmic Strings from the LIGO-Virgo Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B.P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M.R.; Accadia, T.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Adhikari, R.X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O.D.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Ceron, E.A.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S.B.; Blackburn, L.; Camp, J.B.; Gehrels, N.; Graff, P.B.; Kanner, J.B.

    2014-01-01

    Cosmic strings can give rise to a large variety of interesting astrophysical phenomena. Among them, powerful bursts of gravitational waves (GWs) produced by cusps are a promising observational signature. In this Letter we present a search for GWs from cosmic string cusps in data collected by the LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors between 2005 and 2010, with over 625 days of live time. We find no evidence of GW signals from cosmic strings. From this result, we derive new constraints on cosmic string parameters, which complement and improve existing limits from previous searches for a stochastic background of GWs from cosmic microwave background measurements and pulsar timing data. In particular, if the size of loops is given by the gravitational backreaction scale, we place upper limits on the string tension (Newton's Constant x mass per unit length) below 10(exp -8) in some regions of the cosmic string parameter space.

  5. Constraints on cosmic strings from the LIGO-Virgo gravitational-wave detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J; Abadie, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adams, T; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amador Ceron, E; Amariutei, D; Anderson, R A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barker, D; Barnum, S H; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Belopolski, I; Bergmann, G; Berliner, J M; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Bessis, D; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbhade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bowers, J; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brannen, C A; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Calderón Bustillo, J; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P-F; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coulon, J-P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Dal Canton, T; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; Deleeuw, E; Deléglise, S; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Dmitry, K; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J-C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endrőczi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R; Flaminio, R; Foley, E; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J-D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M-K; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hall, B; Hall, E; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Horrom, T; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Hua, Z; Huang, V; Huerta, E A; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Iafrate, J; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasprzack, M; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufman, K; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, W; Kim, Y-M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kremin, A; Kringel, V; Królak, A; Kucharczyk, C; Kudla, S; Kuehn, G; Kumar, A; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kurdyumov, R; Kwee, P; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Larson, S; Lasky, P D; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Le Roux, A; Leaci, P; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C-H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, J; Lee, J; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levine, B; Lewis, J B; Lhuillier, V; Li, T G F; Lin, A C; Littenberg, T B; Litvine, V; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lloyd, D; Lockerbie, N A; Lockett, V; Lodhia, D; Loew, K; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J; Luan, J; Lubinski, M J; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Macarthur, J; Macdonald, E; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magana-Sandoval, F; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Manca, G M; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A; Maros, E; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martinelli, L; Martynov, D; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R A; Mavalvala, N; May, G; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Mehmet, M; Meidam, J; Meier, T; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyer, M S; Miao, H; Michel, C; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, J; Minenkov, Y; Mingarelli, C M F; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moe, B; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Mokler, F; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morgado, N; Mori, T; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nagy, M F; Nanda Kumar, D; Nardecchia, I; Nash, T; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R; Necula, V; Nelemans, G; Neri, I; Neri, M; Newton, G; Nguyen, T; Nishida, E; Nishizawa, A; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E; Nuttall, L K; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oppermann, P; O'Reilly, B; Ortega Larcher, W; O'Shaughnessy, R; Osthelder, C; Ott, C D; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Ou, J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Padilla, C; Pai, A; Palomba, C; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Paoletti, F; Paoletti, R; Papa, M A; Paris, H; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Pedraza, M; Peiris, P; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Pichot, M; Pickenpack, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pinard, L; Pindor, B; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poeld, J; Poggiani, R; Poole, V; Poux, C; Predoi, V; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Rácz, I; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rajalakshmi, G; Rakhmanov, M; Ramet, C; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Re, V; Reed, C M; Reed, T; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ricci, F; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Roddy, S; Rodriguez, C; Rodruck, M; Roever, C; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Salemi, F; Sammut, L; Sandberg, V; Sanders, J; Sannibale, V; Santiago-Prieto, I; Saracco, E; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schulz, B; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sergeev, A; Shaddock, D; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sidery, T L; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L; Sintes, A M; Skelton, G R; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, R J E; Smith-Lefebvre, N D; Soden, K; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Souradeep, T; Sperandio, L; Staley, A; Steinert, E; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steplewski, S; Stevens, D; Stochino, A; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Strigin, S; Stroeer, A S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Susmithan, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B; Szeifert, G; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tang, L; Tanner, D B; Tarabrin, S P; Taylor, R; ter Braack, A P M; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Toncelli, A; Tonelli, M; Torre, O; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Tse, M; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Vallisneri, M; van den Brand, J F J; Van Den Broeck, C; van der Putten, S; van der Sluys, M V; van Heijningen, J; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Verma, S; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vincent-Finley, R; Vinet, J-Y; Vitale, S; Vlcek, B; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vousden, W D; Vrinceanu, D; Vyachanin, S P; Wade, A; Wade, L; Wade, M; Waldman, S J; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Wan, Y; Wang, J; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wanner, A; Ward, R L; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L-W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Wessels, P; West, M; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wibowo, S; Wiesner, K; Wilkinson, C; Williams, L; Williams, R; Williams, T; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M; Winkelmann, L; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yang, H; Yeaton-Massey, D; Yoshida, S; Yum, H; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J-P; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhao, C; Zhu, H; Zhu, X J; Zotov, N; Zucker, M E; Zweizig, J

    2014-04-01

    Cosmic strings can give rise to a large variety of interesting astrophysical phenomena. Among them, powerful bursts of gravitational waves (GWs) produced by cusps are a promising observational signature. In this Letter we present a search for GWs from cosmic string cusps in data collected by the LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors between 2005 and 2010, with over 625 days of live time. We find no evidence of GW signals from cosmic strings. From this result, we derive new constraints on cosmic string parameters, which complement and improve existing limits from previous searches for a stochastic background of GWs from cosmic microwave background measurements and pulsar timing data. In particular, if the size of loops is given by the gravitational backreaction scale, we place upper limits on the string tension Gμ below 10(-8) in some regions of the cosmic string parameter space. PMID:24745400

  6. GRAVITATIONAL WAVES AND STATIONARY STATES OF QUANTUM AND CLASSICAL SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trunev A. P.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider gravitation theory in multidimensional space. The model of the metric satisfying the basic requirements of quantum theory is proposed. It is shown that gravitational waves are described by the Liouville equation and the Schrodinger equation as well. The solutions of the Einstein equations describing the stationary states of arbitrary quantum and classical systems with central symmetry have been obtained. Thus, it is proved that atoms and atomic nuclei can be represented as standing gravitational waves

  7. Gravitational waves, black holes and cosmic strings in cylindrical symmetry

    OpenAIRE

    Hayward, Sean A.

    1999-01-01

    Gravitational waves in cylindrically symmetric Einstein gravity are described by an effective energy tensor with the same form as that of a massless Klein- Gordon field, in terms of a gravitational potential generalizing the Newtonian potential. Energy-momentum vectors for the gravitational waves and matter are defined with respect to a canonical flow of time. The combined energy-momentum is covariantly conserved, the corresponding charge being the modified Thorne energy. Energy conservation ...

  8. Energy Contents of Gravitational Waves in Teleparallel Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Sharif, M.; Taj, Sumaira

    2009-01-01

    The conserved quantities, that are, gravitational energy-momentum and its relevant quantities are investigated for cylindrical and spherical gravitational waves in the framework of teleparallel equivalent of General Relativity using the Hamiltonian approach. For both cylindrical and spherical gravitational waves, we obtain definite energy and constant momentum. The constant momentum shows consistency with the results available in General Relativity and teleparallel gravity. The angular moment...

  9. THE INTERACTION OF LIGHT AND PARTICLES WITH GRAVITATIONAL WAVES

    OpenAIRE

    Trunev A. P.

    2014-01-01

    In this article we consider a model of the structure of matter, in which elementary particles, atoms and molecules are composed of gravitational waves. A model of interaction of light and particle beams with macroscopic gravitational waves has been proposed. The protocols of experiments to test the theory are considered

  10. Optimizing Vetoes for Gravitational-wave Transient Searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essick, R.; Blackburn, Lindy L.; Katsavounidis, E.

    2014-01-01

    Interferometric gravitational-wave detectors like LIGO, GEO600 and Virgo record a surplus of information above and beyond possible gravitational-wave events. These auxiliary channels capture information about the state of the detector and its surroundings which can be used to infer potential terrestrial noise sources of some gravitational-wave-like events. We present an algorithm addressing the ordering (or equivalently optimizing) of such information from auxiliary systems in gravitational-wave detectors to establish veto conditions in searches for gravitational-wave transients. The procedure was used to identify vetoes for searches for unmodelled transients by the LIGO and Virgo collaborations during their science runs from 2005 through 2007. In this work we present the details of the algorithm; we also use a limited amount of data from LIGO's past runs in order to examine the method, compare it with other methods, and identify its potential to characterize the instruments themselves. We examine the dependence of Receiver Operating Characteristic curves on the various parameters of the veto method and the implementation on real data. We find that the method robustly determines important auxiliary channels, ordering them by the apparent strength of their correlations to the gravitational-wave channel. This list can substantially reduce the background of noise events in the gravitational-wave data. In this way it can identify the source of glitches in the detector as well as assist in establishing confidence in the detection of gravitational-wave transients.

  11. Energy and Momentum of a Class of Rotating Gravitational Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Sharif, M.

    2001-01-01

    We calculate energy and momentum for a class of cylindrical rotating gravitational waves using Einstein and Papapetrou's prescriptions. It is shown that the results obtained are reduced to the special case of the cylindrical gravitational waves already available in the literature.

  12. TASI Lectures on Gravitational Waves from the Early Universe

    OpenAIRE

    Buonanno, Alessandra

    2003-01-01

    These lectures discuss how the direct detection of gravitational waves can be used to probe the very early Universe. We review the main cosmological mechanisms which could have produced relic gravitational waves, and compare theoretical predictions with capabilities and time scales of current and upcoming experiments.

  13. Summary of the workshop: Classical general relativity and gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the workshop, classical general relativity and gravitational waves at ICGC-2007, eleven lectures were presented on classical general relativity and nine on gravitational waves. Lectures covered diverse topics in these areas during the three days of parallel sessions. We classify and summarize here the research work and results of the oral presentations made.

  14. Potential Sources of Gravitational Wave Emission and Laser Beam Interferometers

    OpenAIRE

    Pacheco, J. A. de Freitas

    2000-01-01

    The properties of potential gravitational wave sources like neutron stars, black holes and binary systems are reviewed, as well as the different contributions (stochastic and continuous) to the gravitational wave background. The detectability of these sources by the present generation of laser beam interferometers, which will be fully operational around 2002, is also considered.

  15. THE INTERACTION OF LIGHT AND PARTICLES WITH GRAVITATIONAL WAVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trunev A. P.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article we consider a model of the structure of matter, in which elementary particles, atoms and molecules are composed of gravitational waves. A model of interaction of light and particle beams with macroscopic gravitational waves has been proposed. The protocols of experiments to test the theory are considered

  16. Searching for gravitational waves associated with gamma-ray bursts int 2009-2010 LIGO-Virgo data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis we present the results of the search for gravitational wave bursts associated with gamma-ray bursts in the 2009-2010 data from the LIGO-Virgo gravitational wave interferometer network. The study of gamma-ray bursts progenitors, both from the gamma-ray emission and the gravitational wave emission point of view, yields the characteristic of the sought signal: polarization, time delays, etc... This knowledge allows the construction of a data analysis method which includes the astrophysical priors on joint gravitational wave and gamma-ray emission, and moreover which is robust to non-stationary transient noises, which are present in the data. The lack of detection in the analyzed data yields novel observational limits on the gamma-ray burst population. (author)

  17. Topics in the Detection of Gravitational Waves from Compact Binary Inspirals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapadia, Shasvath Jagat

    Orbiting compact binaries - such as binary black holes, binary neutron stars and neutron star-black hole binaries - are among the most promising sources of gravitational waves observable by ground-based interferometric detectors. Despite numerous sophisticated engineering techniques, the gravitational wave signals will be buried deep within noise generated by various instrumental and environmental processes, and need to be extracted via a signal processing technique referred to as matched filtering. Matched filtering requires large banks of signal templates that are faithful representations of the true gravitational waveforms produced by astrophysical binaries. The accurate and efficient production of templates is thus crucial to the success of signal processing and data analysis. To that end, the dissertation presents a numerical technique that calibrates existing analytical (Post-Newtonian) waveforms, which are relatively inexpensive, to more accurate fiducial waveforms that are computationally expensive to generate. The resulting waveform family is significantly more accurate than the analytical waveforms, without incurring additional computational costs of production. Certain kinds of transient background noise artefacts, called "glitches'', can masquerade as gravitational wave signals for short durations and throw-off the matched-filter algorithm. Identifying glitches from true gravitational wave signals is a highly non-trivial exercise in data analysis which has been attempted with varying degrees of success. We present here a machine-learning based approach that exploits the various attributes of glitches and signals within detector data to provide a classification scheme that is a significant improvement over previous methods. The dissertation concludes by investigating the possibility of detecting a non-linear DC imprint, called the Christodoulou memory, produced in the arms of ground-based interferometers by the recently detected gravitational waves. The

  18. How the green light was given for gravitational wave search

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, C Denson

    2016-01-01

    The recent detection of gravitational waves by the LIGO/VIRGO team is an incredibly impressive achievement of experimental physics. It is also a tremendous success of the theory of General Relativity. It confirms the existence of black holes; shows that binary black holes exist; that they may collide and that during the merging process gravitational waves are produced. These are all predictions of General Relativity theory in its fully nonlinear regime. The existence of gravitational waves was predicted by Albert Einstein in 1916 within the framework of linearized Einstein theory. Contrary to common belief, even the very \\emph{definition} of a gravitational wave in the fully nonlinear Einstein theory was provided only after Einstein's death. Actually, Einstein had arguments against the existence of nonlinear gravitational waves (they were erroneous but he did not accept this), which virtually stopped development of the subject until the mid 1950s. This is what we refer to as the \\emph{Red Light} for gravitati...

  19. The North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jenet, F; Lazio, J; Lommen, A; McLaughlin, M; Stairs, I; Stinebring, D; Verbiest, J; Archibald, A; Arzoumanian, Z; Backer, D; Cordes, J; Demorest, P; Ferdman, R; Freire, P; González, M; Kaspi, V; Kondratiev, V; Lorimer, D; Lynch, R; Nice, D; Ransom, S; Shannon, R; Siemens, X

    2009-01-01

    The North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) is a consortium of astronomers whose goal is the creation of a galactic scale gravitational wave observatory sensitive to gravitational waves in the nHz-microHz band. It is just one component of an international collaboration involving similar organizations of European and Australian astronomers who share the same goal. Gravitational waves, a prediction of Einstein's general theory of relativity, are a phenomenon of dynamical space-time generated by the bulk motion of matter, and the dynamics of space-time itself. They are detectable by the small disturbance they cause in the light travel time between some light source and an observer. NANOGrav exploits radio pulsars as both the light (radio) source and the clock against which the light travel time is measured. In an array of radio pulsars gravitational waves manifest themselves as correlated disturbances in the pulse arrival times. The timing precision of today's best measured pulsar...

  20. Extraction of energy from gravitational waves by laser interferometer detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we discuss the energy interaction between gravitational waves and laser interferometer gravitational wave detectors. We show that the widely held view that the laser interferometer gravitational wave detector absorbs no energy from gravitational waves is only valid under the approximation of a frequency-independent optomechanical coupling strength and a pump laser without detuning with respect to the resonance of the interferometer. For a strongly detuned interferometer, the optical-damping dynamics dissipates gravitational wave energy through the interaction between the test masses and the optical field. For a non-detuned interferometer, the frequency-dependence of the optomechanical coupling strength causes a tiny energy dissipation, which is proved to be equivalent to the Doppler friction raised by Braginsky et al. (paper)

  1. Propagation of gravitational waves in the nonperturbative spinor vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The propagation of gravitational waves on the background of a nonperturbative vacuum of a spinor field is considered. It is shown that there are several distinctive features in comparison with the propagation of plane gravitational waves through empty space: there exists a fixed phase difference between the hyy,zz and hyz components of the wave; the phase and group velocities of gravitational waves are not equal to the velocity of light; the group velocity is always less than the velocity of light; under some conditions the gravitational waves are either damped or absent; for given frequency, there exist two waves with different wave vectors. We also discuss the possibility of an experimental verification of the obtained effects as a tool to investigate nonperturbative quantum field theories. (orig.)

  2. The 5D Fully-Covariant Theory of Gravitation and Its Astrophysical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianxi Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we comprehensively review the five-dimensional (5D fully-covariant theory of gravitation developed by Zhang two decades ago and its recent applications in astrophysics and cosmology. This 5D gravity describes not only the fields, but also the matter and its motion in a 5D spacetime. The greatest advantage of this theory is that there does not exist any unknown parameter, so that we can apply it to explain astrophysical and cosmological issues by quantitatively comparing the results obtained from it with observations and to predict new effects that could not be derived from any other gravitational theories. First, the 5D covariant description of matter and its motion enabled Zhang to analytically derive the fifteenth component of the 5D energy-momentum tensor of matter ( T - 44 , which significantly distinguishes this 5D gravity from other 5D gravitational theories that usually assumed a T - 44 with an unknown parameter, called the scalar charge s, and, thus, to split the 5D covariant field equation into (4 + 1 splitting form as the gravitational, electromagnetic, and scalar field equations. The gravitational field equation turns into the 4D Einstein’s field equation of general relativity if the scalar field is equal to unity. Then, Zhang solved the field equations and obtained an exact static spherically-symmetric external solution of the gravitational, electromagnetic and scalar fields, in which all integral constants were completely determined with a perfect set of simple numbers and parameters that only depend on the mass and electric charge of the matter, by comparing with the obtained weak internal solution of the fields at a large radial distance. In the Einstein frame, the exact field solution obtained from the 5D fully-covariant theory of gravitation reduces to the Schwarzschild solution when the matter is electrically neutral and the fields are weak in strength. This guarantees that the four fundamental tests (light

  3. Black Holes, Gravitational Waves, and LISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John

    2009-01-01

    Binary black hole mergers are central to many key science objectives of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). For many systems the strongest part of the signal is only understood by numerical simulations. Gravitational wave emissions are understood by simulations of vacuum General Relativity (GR). I discuss numerical simulation results from the perspective of LISA's needs, with indications of work that remains to be done. Some exciting scientific opportunities associated with LISA observations would be greatly enhanced if prompt electromagnetic signature could be associated. I discuss simulations to explore this possibility. Numerical simulations are important now for clarifying LISA's science potential and planning the mission. We also consider how numerical simulations might be applied at the time of LISA's operation.

  4. Detection relic gravitational waves in thermal case

    CERN Document Server

    Ghayour, Basem

    2016-01-01

    The thermal spectrum of relic gravitational waves causes the new amplitude that called `modified amplitude'. Our analysis shows that, there exist some chances for detection of the thermal spectrum in addition to the usual spectrum by Adv.LIGO and Dml detectors. The behaviour of the inflation and reheating stages are often known as power law expansion like $S(\\eta)\\propto \\eta^{1+\\beta}$, $S(\\eta)\\propto \\eta^{1+\\beta_s}$ respectively. The $\\beta$ and $\\beta_s$ have an unique effect on the shape of the spectrum. We find some upper bounds on the $\\beta$ and $\\beta_s$ by comparison the usual and thermal spectrum with the Adv.LIGO and Dml. As this result gives us more information about the nature of the evolution of inflation and reheating stages.

  5. Measuring the Hubble constant using gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Second-generation ground-based laser interferometers are expected to deliver a wealth of gravitational waves (GW) events from coalescing compact binaries up to a redshift of about 0.3. Being free of the systematics affecting electromagnetic measurements, GW offer the possibility of an independent measurement of H0. This paper presents a method based on Bayesian inference aimed at estimating the value of the cosmological parameters for any GW event. In contrast to earlier work, this framework does not require the precise identification of the putative optical counterpart, but it considers all the potential galaxy hosts consistent with the recovered sky position and distance posterior distributions. When applied to the upcoming network of second generation interferometers, 50 GW events will yield a measurement of H0 with an uncertainty of a few per cents

  6. Gravitational waves in open de Sitter space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawking, S. W.; Hertog, Thomas; Turok, Neil

    2000-09-01

    We compute the spectrum of primordial gravitational wave perturbations in open de Sitter spacetime. The background spacetime is taken to be the continuation of an O(5) symmetric instanton saddle point of the Euclidean no boundary path integral. The two-point tensor fluctuations are computed directly from the Euclidean path integral. The Euclidean correlator is then analytically continued into the Lorentzian region where it describes the quantum mechanical vacuum fluctuations of the graviton field. Unlike the results of earlier work, the correlator is shown to be unique and well behaved in the infrared. We show that the infrared divergence found in previous calculations is due to the contribution of a discrete gauge mode inadvertently included in the spectrum.

  7. Technology for the next gravitational wave detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Mitrofanov, Valery P; Pan, Huang-Wei; Kuo, Ling-Chi; Cole, Garrett; Degallaix, Jerome; Willke, Benno

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews some of the key enabling technologies for advanced and future laser interferometer gravitational wave detectors, which must combine test masses with the lowest possible optical and acoustic losses, with high stability lasers and various techniques for suppressing noise. Sect. 1 of this paper presents a review of the acoustic properties of test masses. Sect. 2 reviews the technology of the amorphous dielectric coatings which are currently universally used for the mirrors in advanced laser interferometers, but for which lower acoustic loss would be very advantageous. In sect. 3 a new generation of crystalline optical coatings that offer a substantial reduction in thermal noise is reviewed. The optical properties of test masses are reviewed in sect. 4, with special focus on the properties of silicon, an important candidate material for future detectors. Sect. 5 of this paper presents the very low noise, high stability laser technology that underpins all advanced and next generation laser inter...

  8. Gravitational wave background from binary systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rosado, Pablo A

    2011-01-01

    Basic aspects of the background of gravitational waves and its mathematical characterization are reviewed. The spectral energy density parameter $\\Omega(f)$, commonly used as a quantifier of the background, is derived for an ensemble of many identical sources emitting at different times and locations. For such an ensemble, $\\Omega(f)$ is generalized to account for the duration of the signals and of the observation, so that one can distinguish the resolvable and unresolvable parts of the background. The unresolvable part, often called confusion noise or stochastic background, is made by signals that cannot be either individually identified or subtracted out of the data. To account for the resolvability of the background, the overlap function is introduced. This function is a generalization of the duty cycle, which has been commonly used in the literature, in some cases leading to incorrect results. The spectra produced by binary systems (stellar binaries and massive black hole binaries) are presented over the ...

  9. Gravitational Wave Signatures of Hyperaccreting Collapsar Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Kotake, Kei; Harikae, Seiji

    2012-01-01

    By performing two-dimensional special relativistic (SR) magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we study possible signatures of gravitational waves (GWs) in the context of the collapsar model for long-duration gamma-ray bursts. In our SR simulations, the central black hole is treated as an absorbing boundary. By doing so, we focus on the GWs generated by asphericities in neutrino emission and matter motions in the vicinity of the hyperaccreting disks. We compute nine models by adding initial angular momenta and magnetic fields parametrically to a precollapse core of a $35 M_{\\odot}$ progenitor star. As for the microphysics, a realistic equation of state is employed and the neutrino cooling is taken into account via a multiflavor neutrino leakage scheme. To accurately estimate GWs produced by anisotropic neutrino emission, we perform a ray-tracing analysis in general relativity by a post-processing procedure. By employing a stress formula that includes contributions both from magnetic fields and special relativistic ...

  10. Constraining the braneworld with gravitational wave observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Sean T

    2010-04-01

    Some braneworld models may have observable consequences that, if detected, would validate a requisite element of string theory. In the infinite Randall-Sundrum model (RS2), the AdS radius of curvature, l, of the extra dimension supports a single bound state of the massless graviton on the brane, thereby reproducing Newtonian gravity in the weak-field limit. However, using the AdS/CFT correspondence, it has been suggested that one possible consequence of RS2 is an enormous increase in Hawking radiation emitted by black holes. We utilize this possibility to derive two novel methods for constraining l via gravitational wave measurements. We show that the EMRI event rate detected by LISA can constrain l at the approximately 1 microm level for optimal cases, while the observation of a single galactic black hole binary with LISA results in an optimal constraint of l < or = 5 microm. PMID:20481929

  11. Fast cooling techniques for gravitational wave antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Furtado, S R

    2002-01-01

    The resonant-mass technique for the detection of gravitational waves may involve, in the near future, the cooling of very large masses (about 100 tons) from room temperature (300 K) to extreme cryogenic temperatures (20 mK). To cool these detectors to cryogenic temperatures an exchange gas (helium) is used, and the heat is removed from the antenna to the cold reservoir by thermal conduction and natural convection. With the current technique, cooling times of about 1 month can be obtained for cylindrical bar antennas of 2.5 tons. Should this same technique be used to cool a 100 ton spherical antenna the cooling time would be about 10 months, making the operation of these antennas impracticable. In this paper, we study the above-mentioned cooling technique and others, such as thermal switching and forced convection from room temperature to liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K) using an aluminium truncated icosahedron of 19 kg weight and 25 cm diameter.

  12. Transformations of asymptotic gravitational-wave data

    CERN Document Server

    Boyle, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational-wave data is gauge dependent. While we can restrict the class of gauges in which such data may be expressed, there will still be an infinite-dimensional group of transformations allowed while remaining in this class, and almost as many different---though physically equivalent---waveforms as there are transformations. This paper presents a method for calculating the effects of the most important transformation group, the Bondi-Metzner-Sachs (BMS) group, consisting of rotations, boosts, and supertranslations (which include time and space translations as special cases). To a reasonable approximation, these transformations result in simple coupling between the modes in a spin-weighted spherical-harmonic decomposition of the waveform. It is shown that waveforms from simulated compact binaries in the publicly available SXS waveform catalog contain unmodeled effects due to displacement and drift of the center of mass, accounting for mode-mixing at typical levels of 1%. However, these effects can be mit...

  13. Gravitational wave triggered searches for failed supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annis, James; Dark Energy Survey Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Stellar core collapses occur to all stars of sufficiently high mass and often result in supernovae. A small fraction of supergiant stars, however, are thought to collapse directly into black holes without producing supernovae. A survey of such ``failed'' supernovae would require monitoring millions of supergiants for several years. That is very challenging even for current surveys. With the start of the Advanced LIGO science run, we investigate the possibility of detecting failed supernovae by looking for missing supergiants associated with gravitational wave triggers. We use the Dark Energy Camera (DECam). Our project is a joint effort between the community and the Dark Energy Survey (DES) collaboration. In this talk we report on our ongoing efforts and discuss prospects for future searches.

  14. Topics in gravitational-wave astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shaughnessy, R.

    2004-09-01

    Both the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) will over the next decade detect gravitational waves emitted by the motion of compact objects (e.g. black hole and neutron star binaries). This thesis presents methods to improve (i)LIGO detector quality, (ii)our knowledge of waveforms for certain LIGO and LISA sources, and (iii)models for the rate of detectability of a particular LISA source. (1)Plunge of compact object into a supermassive black hole: LISA should detect many inspirals of compact objects into supermassive black holes (˜105 107 M⊙ ). Since the inspiral of each compact object terminates shortly after the inspiralling object reaches its last stable orbit, the late-stage inspiral waveform provides insight into the location of the last stable orbit and strong-field relativity. I discovered that while LISA will easily see the overall inspiral (consisting of many cycles before plunge), the present LISA design will just miss detecting the waves emitted from the transition from inspiral to plunge. (2)Scheme to reduce thermoelastic noise in advanced LIGO: After its first upgrade, LIGO will have its sensitivity limited by thermoelastic noise. [Thermoelastic noise occurs because milimeter-scale thermal fluctuations in the mirror bulk expand and contract, causing the mirror surface to shimmer.] The interferometer's sensitivity could be enhanced substantially by reducing thermoelastic noise. In collaboration with Kip Thorne, Erika d'Ambrosio, Sergey Vyatchanin, and Sergey Strigin, I developed a proposal to reduce thermoelastic noise in advanced-LIGO by switching the LIGO cavity optics from simple spherical mirrors to a new, Mexican-hat shape. (3)Geometric-optics-based analysis of stability of symmetric-hyperbolic formulations of Einstein's equations : Einstein's equations must be evolved numerically to predict accurate waveforms for the late stages of binary black hole inspiral and merger. But no

  15. LIMITS ON THE STOCHASTIC GRAVITATIONAL WAVE BACKGROUND FROM THE NORTH AMERICAN NANOHERTZ OBSERVATORY FOR GRAVITATIONAL WAVES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an analysis of high-precision pulsar timing data taken as part of the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) project. We have observed 17 pulsars for a span of roughly five years using the Green Bank and Arecibo radio telescopes. We analyze these data using standard pulsar timing models, with the addition of time-variable dispersion measure and frequency-variable pulse shape terms. Sub-microsecond timing residuals are obtained in nearly all cases, and the best rms timing residuals in this set are ∼30-50 ns. We present methods for analyzing post-fit timing residuals for the presence of a gravitational wave signal with a specified spectral shape. These optimally take into account the timing fluctuation power removed by the model fit, and can be applied to either data from a single pulsar, or to a set of pulsars to detect a correlated signal. We apply these methods to our data set to set an upper limit on the strength of the nHz-frequency stochastic supermassive black hole gravitational wave background of hc (1 yr–1) –15 (95%). This result is dominated by the timing of the two best pulsars in the set, PSRs J1713+0747 and J1909–3744.

  16. Congratulations on the direct detection of gravitational waves

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    This week saw the announcement of an extraordinary physics result: the first direct detection of gravitational waves by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, which includes the GEO team, and the Virgo Collaboration, using the twin Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors located in Livingston, Louisiana, and Hanford, Washington, USA.   Albert Einstein predicted gravitational waves in a paper published 100 years ago in 1916. They are a natural consequence of the theory of general relativity, which describes the workings of gravity and was published a few months earlier. Until now, they have remained elusive. Gravitational waves are tiny ripples in space-time produced by violent gravitational phenomena. Because the fractional change in the space-time geometry can be at the level of 10-21 or smaller, extremely sophisticated, high-sensitivity instruments are needed to detect them. Recently, the Advanced LIGO detector increased its sensitivity by alm...

  17. Probing the Core-Collapse Supernova Mechanism with Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ott, C D

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism of core-collapse supernova explosions must draw on the energy provided by gravitational collapse and transfer the necessary fraction to the kinetic and internal energy of the ejecta. Despite many decades of concerted theoretical effort, the detailed mechanism of core-collapse supernova explosions is still unknown, but indications are strong that multi-D processes lie at its heart. This opens up the possibility of probing the supernova mechanism with gravitational waves, carrying direct dynamical information from the supernova engine deep inside a dying massive star. I present a concise overview of the physics and primary multi-D dynamics in neutrino-driven, magnetorotational, and acoustically-driven core-collapse supernova explosion scenarios. Discussing and contrasting estimates for the gravitational-wave emission characteristics of these mechanisms, I argue that their gravitational-wave signatures are clearly distinct and that the observation (or non-observation) of gravitational waves from a ...

  18. Can the Gravitational Wave Background from Inflation be Detected Locally?

    OpenAIRE

    Liddle, Andrew R.

    1993-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) detection of microwave background anisotropies may contain a component due to gravitational waves generated by inflation. It is shown that the gravitational waves from inflation might be seen using `beam-in-space' detectors, but not the Laser Interferometer Gravity Wave Observatory (LIGO). The central conclusion, dependent only on weak assumptions regarding the physics of inflation, is a surprising one. The larger the component of the COBE signal due to g...

  19. A χ2 veto for continuous gravitational wave searches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    χ2 vetoes are commonly used in searching for gravitational waves, in particular for broadband signals, but they can also be applied to narrowband continuous wave signals, such as those expected from rapidly rotating neutron stars. In this paper, we present a χ2 veto adapted to the Hough transform searches for continuous gravitational wave signals; we characterize the χ2 significance plane for different frequency bands and discuss the expected performance of this veto in LIGO analysis

  20. GRAVITATIONAL WAVE SIGNATURES OF HYPERACCRETING COLLAPSAR DISKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By performing two-dimensional special relativistic (SR) magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we study possible signatures of gravitational waves (GWs) in the context of the collapsar model for long-duration gamma-ray bursts. In our SR simulations, the central black hole is treated as an absorbing boundary. By doing so, we focus on the GWs generated by asphericities in neutrino emission and matter motions in the vicinity of the hyperaccreting disks. We compute nine models by adding initial angular momenta and magnetic fields parametrically to a precollapse core of a 35 M☉ progenitor star. As for the microphysics, a realistic equation of state is employed and the neutrino cooling is taken into account via a multi-flavor neutrino leakage scheme. To accurately estimate GWs produced by anisotropic neutrino emission, we perform a ray-tracing analysis in general relativity by a post-processing procedure. By employing a stress formula that includes contributions from both magnetic fields and SR corrections, we also study the effects of magnetic fields on the gravitational waveforms. We find that the GW amplitudes from anisotropic neutrino emission show a monotonic increase with time, whose amplitudes are much larger than those from matter motions of the accreting material. We show that the increasing trend of the neutrino GWs stems from the excess of neutrino emission in the direction near parallel to the spin axis illuminated from the hyperaccreting disks. We point out that a recently proposed future space-based interferometer like Fabry-Perot-type DECIGO would permit the detection of these GW signals within ≈100 Mpc.

  1. Electromagnetically-tracked free-mass gravitational wave antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response to a gravitational wave of two free masses whose relative motion is monitored with an electromagnetic tracking signal is derived. The results indicate a two-feature signature in one-way data and a three-feature signature in two-way data. The effect is applied to gravitational wave experiments using laser interferometers, spacecraft Doppler tracking, planetary ranging, and pulsar timing analysis. Actual results are presented from spacecraft Doppler experiments and from pulsar timing data analysis, with new upper limits being set on a possible cosmic gravitational wave background via the pulsar data. (Auth.)

  2. Gravitational waves from the axial perturbations of hyperon stars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen De-Hua; Yan Jing; Liu Xue-Mei

    2012-01-01

    The eigen-frequencies of the axial w-mode oscillations of hyperon stars are examined.It is shown that as the appearance of hyperons softens the equation of state of the super-density matter,the frequency of gravitational waves from the axial w-mode of hyperon star becomes smaller than that of a traditional neutron star at the same stellar mass.Moreover,the eigenfrequencies of hyperon stars also have scaling universality.It is shown that the EURO thirdgeneration gravitational-wave detector has the potential to detect the gravitational-wave signal emitted from the axial w-mode oscillations of a hyperon star.

  3. Observable induced gravitational waves from an early matter phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assuming that inflation is succeeded by a phase of matter domination, which corresponds to a low temperature of reheating Tr 9GeV, we evaluate the spectra of gravitational waves induced in the post-inflationary universe. We work with models of hilltop-inflation with an enhanced primordial scalar spectrum on small scales, which can potentially lead to the formation of primordial black holes. We find that a lower reheat temperature leads to the production of gravitational waves with energy densities within the ranges of both space and earth based gravitational wave detectors

  4. Primordial Gravitational Waves Induced by Magnetic Fields in Ekpyrotic Scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, Asuka

    2016-01-01

    Both inflationary and ekpyrotic scenarios can account for the origin of the large scale structure of the universe. It is often said that detecting primordial gravitational waves is the key to distinguish both scenarios. We show that this is not true if the gauge kinetic function is present in the ekpyrotic scenario. In fact, primordial gravitational waves sourced by the gauge field can be produced in an ekpyrotic universe. We also study scalar fluctuations sourced by the gauge field and show that it is negligible compared to primordial gravitational waves. This comes from the fact that the fast roll condition holds in ekpyrotic models.

  5. Sensitivity of the Advanced LIGO detectors at the beginning of gravitational wave astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynov, D. V.; Hall, E. D.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R. X.; Anderson, R. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Arai, K.; Arain, M. A.; Aston, S. M.; Austin, L.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barbet, M.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Batch, J. C.; Bell, A. S.; Belopolski, I.; Bergman, J.; Betzwieser, J.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Biwer, C.; Black, E.; Blair, C. D.; Bogan, C.; Bork, R.; Bridges, D. O.; Brooks, A. F.; Celerier, C.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Cook, D.; Countryman, S. T.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Damjanic, M.; Dannenberg, R.; Danzmann, K.; Costa, C. F. Da Silva; Daw, E. J.; DeBra, D.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Driggers, J. C.; Dwyer, S. E.; Effler, A.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Factourovich, M.; Fair, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Foley, S.; Frede, M.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Galdi, V.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Gleason, J. R.; Goetz, R.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Grote, H.; Guido, C. J.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harry, G. M.; Heefner, J.; Heintze, M. C.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Hoak, D.; Hough, J.; Ivanov, A.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.; Jones, R.; Kandhasamy, S.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Kaufer, S.; Kawabe, K.; Kells, W.; Kijbunchoo, N.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kokeyama, K.; Korth, W. Z.; Kuehn, G.; Kwee, P.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Le Roux, A.; Levine, B. M.; Lewis, J. B.; Lhuillier, V.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lormand, M.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lundgren, A. P.; MacDonald, T.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; Merilh, E. L.; Meyer, M. S.; Meyers, P. M.; Miller, J.; Mittleman, R.; Moreno, G.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; O'Dell, J.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; Osthelder, C.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Palamos, J. R.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Patrick, Z.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Phelps, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I.; Poeld, J.; Principe, M.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Raab, F. J.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Ramet, C. R.; Reed, C. M.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Robertson, N. A.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romie, J. H.; Rowan, S.; Ryan, K.; Sadecki, T.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sannibale, V.; Savage, R. L.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schultz, B.; Schwinberg, P.; Sellers, D.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sigg, D.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Sorazu, B.; Staley, A.; Stein, A. J.; Stochino, A.; Strain, K. A.; Taylor, R.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Torrie, C. I.; Traylor, G.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vargas, M.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Vo, T.; Vorvick, C.; Waldman, S. J.; Walker, M.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Weaver, B.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Weßels, P.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Winkelmann, L.; Wipf, C. C.; Worden, J.; Wu, G.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yu, H.; Zhang, L.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2016-06-01

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) consists of two widely separated 4 km laser interferometers designed to detect gravitational waves from distant astrophysical sources in the frequency range from 10 Hz to 10 kHz. The first observation run of the Advanced LIGO detectors started in September 2015 and ended in January 2016. A strain sensitivity of better than 10-23/√{Hz } was achieved around 100 Hz. Understanding both the fundamental and the technical noise sources was critical for increasing the astrophysical strain sensitivity. The average distance at which coalescing binary black hole systems with individual masses of 30 M⊙ could be detected above a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 8 was 1.3 Gpc, and the range for binary neutron star inspirals was about 75 Mpc. With respect to the initial detectors, the observable volume of the Universe increased by a factor 69 and 43, respectively. These improvements helped Advanced LIGO to detect the gravitational wave signal from the binary black hole coalescence, known as GW150914.

  6. Assessing Pulsar Timing Array Sensitivity to Gravitational Wave Bursts with Memory

    CERN Document Server

    Madison, D R; Chatterjee, S

    2014-01-01

    Highly energetic astrophysical phenomena like supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB) mergers are predicted to emit prodigious amounts of gravitational waves (GWs). An anticipated component of the gravitational waveform known as "memory" is permanent and non-oscillatory. For SMBHB mergers, the memory is created primarily during the most violent moments of the inspiral immediately preceding the final plunge and ring-down when the strongest gravitational fields are at work and the non-linearities of general relativity are most pronounced. The essentially time-domain nature of memory makes it forbiddingly difficult to detect with ground based GW detectors, leaving pulsar timing array (PTA) experiments as the most promising means by which it may be detected and studied. In this paper, we discuss how GW bursts with memory (BWMs) influence pulsar timing experiments and develop methods to assess how sensitive modern timing efforts are to such GW events. We discuss how PTA searches for BWMs can be used to constrain th...

  7. Upper Limits on a Stochastic Background of Gravitational Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Agresti, J.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, J; R. Amin; Anderson, S; Anderson, W.; Araya, M; Armandula, H.; Ashley, M.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S

    2005-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) has performed a third science run with much improved sensitivities of all three interferometers. We present an analysis of approximately 200 hours of data acquired during this run, used to search for a stochastic background of gravitational radiation. We place upper bounds on the energy density stored as gravitational radiation for three different spectral power laws. For the flat spectrum, our limit of Omega_0

  8. Searching for gravitational waves from compact binaries with precessing spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry, Ian; Privitera, Stephen; Bohé, Alejandro; Buonanno, Alessandra

    2016-07-01

    Current searches for gravitational waves from compact-object binaries with the LIGO and Virgo observatories employ waveform models with spins aligned (or antialigned) with the orbital angular momentum. Here, we derive a new statistic to search for compact objects carrying generic (precessing) spins. Applying this statistic, we construct banks of both aligned- and generic-spin templates for binary black holes and neutron star-black hole binaries, and compare the effectualness of these banks towards simulated populations of generic-spin systems. We then use these banks in a pipeline analysis of Gaussian noise to measure the increase in background incurred by using generic- instead of aligned-spin banks. Although the generic-spin banks have roughly a factor of ten more templates than the aligned-spin banks, we find an overall improvement in signal recovery at a fixed false-alarm rate for systems with high-mass ratio and highly precessing spins. This gain in sensitivity comes at a small loss of sensitivity (≲4 %) for systems that are already well covered by aligned-spin templates. Since the observation of even a single binary merger with misaligned spins could provide unique astrophysical insights into the formation of these sources, we recommend that the method described here be developed further to mount a viable search for generic-spin binary mergers in LIGO/Virgo data.

  9. Search templates for stochastic gravitational-wave backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Bose, S

    2005-01-01

    Several earth-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors are actively pursuing the quest for placing observational constraints on models that predict the behavior of a variety of astrophysical and cosmological sources. These sources span a wide gamut, ranging from hydrodynamic instabilities in neutron stars (such as r-modes) to particle production in the early universe. Signals from a subset of these sources are expected to appear in these detectors as stochastic GW backgrounds (SGWBs). The detection of these backgrounds will help us in characterizing their sources. Accounting for such a background will also be required by some detectors, such as the proposed space-based detector LISA, so that they can detect other GW signals. Here, we formulate the problem of constructing a bank of search templates that discretely span the parameter space of a generic SGWB. We apply it to the specific case of a class of cosmological SGWBs, known as the broken power-law models. We derive how the template density varies in their ...

  10. The black hole symphony: probing new physics using gravitational waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gair, Jonathan R

    2008-12-13

    The next decade will very likely see the birth of a new field of astronomy as we become able to directly detect gravitational waves (GWs) for the first time. The existence of GWs is one of the key predictions of Einstein's theory of general relativity, but they have eluded direct detection for the last century. This will change thanks to a new generation of laser interferometers that are already in operation or which are planned for the near future. GW observations will allow us to probe some of the most exotic and energetic events in the Universe, the mergers of black holes. We will obtain information about the systems to a precision unprecedented in astronomy, and this will revolutionize our understanding of compact astrophysical systems. Moreover, if any of the assumptions of relativity theory are incorrect, this will lead to subtle, but potentially detectable, differences in the emitted GWs. Our observations will thus provide very precise verifications of the theory in an as yet untested regime. In this paper, I will discuss what GW observations could tell us about known and (potentially) unknown physics. PMID:18812300

  11. On the Gravitational Wave Background from Black Hole Binaries after the First LIGO Detections

    CERN Document Server

    Cholis, Ilias

    2016-01-01

    The detection of gravitational waves from the merger of binary black holes by the LIGO Collaboration has opened a new window to astrophysics. With the sensitivities of ground based detectors in the coming years we can only detect the local black hole binary mergers. The integrated merger rate can instead be probed by the gravitational-wave background, the incoherent superposition of the released energy in gravitational waves during binary-black-hole coalescence. Through that, the properties of the binary black holes can be studied. In this work we show that by measuring the energy density $\\Omega_{GW}$ (in units of the cosmic critical density) of the gravitational-wave background, we can search for the rare $\\sim 100 M_{\\odot}$ massive black holes formed in the Universe. In addition, we can answer how often the least massive BHs of mass $> 3 M_{\\odot}$ form. Finally, if there are multiple channels for the formation of binary black holes and if any of them predicts a narrow mass range for the black holes, then...

  12. Isentropic 'shock waves' in numerical simulations of astrophysical bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G S

    2016-01-01

    Strong discontinuities in solutions of the gas dynamic equations under isentropic conditions, i.e., with continuity of entropy at the discontinuity, are examined. Solutions for a standard shock wave with continuity of energy at the discontinuity are compared with those for an isentropic 'shock wave'. It is shown that numerical simulation of astrophysical problems in which high-amplitude shock waves are encountered (supernova explosions, modelling of jets) with conservation of entropy, rather than of energy, leads to large errors in the shock calculations. The isentropic equations of gas dynamics can be used only when there are no strong discontinuities in the solution or when the intensity of the shocks is not high and they do not significantly affect the flow.

  13. Gravitational radiation of a vibrating physical string as a model for the gravitational emission of an astrophysical plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, R A

    2014-01-01

    The vibrating string is a source of gravitational waves which requires novel computational techniques, based on the explicit construction of a conserved and renormalized (in a classical sense) energy-momentum tensor. The renormalization is necessary to take into account the effect of external constraints, which affect the emission considerably. Vibrating media offer in general a testing ground for reconciling conflicts between General Relativity and other branches of physics; however, constraints are absent in sources like the Weber bar, for which the standard covariant formalism for elastic bodies can also be applied. Our solution method is based on the linearized Einstein equations, but relaxes other usual assumptions like far-field approximation, spherical or plane wave symmetry, TT gauge and source without internal interference. The string solution is then adapted to give the radiation field of a transversal Alfven wave in a rarefied plasma, where the tension is produced by an external static magnetic fie...

  14. GRAVITATIONAL WAVES AND EMERGENCE PARAMETER OF CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trunev A. P.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It was established that the Fermi-Dirac statistics, Bose-Einstein and Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution can be described by a single equation, which follows from Einstein's equations for systems with central symmetry. Emergence parameter of classical and quantum systems composed by the rays of gravitational waves interacting with gravitational field of the universe has been computed

  15. Numerical Relativity, Black Hole Mergers, and Gravitational Waves: Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This series of 3 lectures will present recent developments in numerical relativity, and their applications to simulating black hole mergers and computing the resulting gravitational waveforms. In this first lecture, we introduce the basic ideas of numerical relativity, highlighting the challenges that arise in simulating gravitational wave sources on a computer.

  16. Gravitational waves generated by laser accelerated relativistic ions

    CERN Document Server

    Gelfer, Evgeny; Klimo, Ondřej; Weber, Stefan; Korn, Georg

    2015-01-01

    The generation of gravitational waves by laser accelerated relativistic ions in the piston model and light sail model is investigated. Analytical expressions are derived for space-time metric perturbation, the energy spectrum and the emitted energy of the gravitational radiation for the two models as function of the laser and plasma parameters.

  17. Generalized plane-fronted gravitational waves in any dimension

    OpenAIRE

    Obukhov, Yuri N.

    2003-01-01

    We study the gravitational waves in spacetimes of arbitrary dimension. They generalize the pp-waves and the Kundt waves, obtained earlier in four dimensions. Explicit solutions of the Einstein and Einstein-Maxwell equations are derived for an arbitrary cosmological constant.

  18. Simulations to Usher in the Era of Gravitational Wave Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven L.

    2013-03-01

    A new era of astronomy is near, in which interferometers on Earth and pulsar timing observations will provide an entirely new view of the universe using gravitational waves. These waves will complement the very different images from electromagnetic waves (such as conventional telescopes) and will illuminate systems from which we detect no electromagnetic emission.

  19. Improved calculation of relic gravitational waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we have improved the calculation of the relic gravitational waves (RGW) in two aspects. First, we investigate the transfer function by taking into consideration the redshift-suppression effect, the accelerating expansion effect, the damping effect of free-streaming relativistic particles, and the damping effect of cosmic phase transition, and give a simple approximate analytic expression, which clearly illustrates the dependence on the cosmological parameters.Second, we develop a numerical method to calculate the primordial power spectrum of RGW in a very wide frequency range, where the observed constraints on ns (the scalar spectral index) and Ps(ko) (the amplitude of primordial scalar spectrum) and the Hamilton-Jacobi equation are used. This method is applied to two kinds of inflationary models,which satisfy the current constraints on ns, α (the running of ns) and r (the tensor-scalar ratio). We plot them in the r - Ωg diagram, where Ωg is the strength of RGW, and study their measurements from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments and laser interferometers.

  20. Improved calculation of relic gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, W

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we improve the calculation of the relic gravitational waves (RGW) in two aspects: First, we investigate the transfer function after considering the redshift-suppression effect, the accelerating expansion effect, the damping effect of free-streaming relativistic particles, and the damping effect of cosmic phase transition, and give a simple approximate analytic expression, which clearly illustrates the dependent relations on the cosmological parameters. Second, we develop a numerical method to calculate the primordial power spectrum of RGW at a very wide frequency range, where the observed constraints on $n_s$ (the scalar spectral index) and $P_S(k_0)$ (the amplitude of primordial scalar spectrum) and the Hamilton-Jacobi equation are used. This method is applied to two kinds of inflationary models, which all satisfy the current constraints on $n_s$, $\\alpha$ (the running of $n_s$) and $r$ (the tensor-scalar ratio). We plot them in the $r-\\Omega_g$ diagram, where $\\Omega_g$ is the strength of RGW...

  1. Gravitational wave astronomy with the SKA

    CERN Document Server

    Janssen, G H; McLaughlin, M; Bassa, C G; Deller, A T; Kramer, M; Lee, K J; Mingarelli, C M F; Rosado, P A; Sanidas, S; Sesana, A; Shao, L; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; Verbiest, J P W

    2015-01-01

    On a time scale of years to decades, gravitational wave (GW) astronomy will become a reality. Low frequency (nanoHz) GWs are detectable through long-term timing observations of the most stable pulsars. Radio observatories worldwide are currently carrying out observing programmes to detect GWs, with data sets being shared through the International Pulsar Timing Array project. One of the most likely sources of low frequency GWs are supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs), detectable as a background due to a large number of binaries, or as continuous or burst emission from individual sources. No GW signal has yet been detected, but stringent constraints are already being placed on galaxy evolution models. The SKA will bring this research to fruition. In this chapter, we describe how timing observations using SKA1 will contribute to detecting GWs, or can confirm a detection if a first signal already has been identified when SKA1 commences observations. We describe how SKA observations will identify the source(s...

  2. The String Soundscape at Gravitational Wave Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, Isabel Garcia; March-Russell, John

    2016-01-01

    We argue that gravitational wave (GW) signals due to collisions of ultra-relativistic bubble walls may be common in string theory. This occurs due to a process of post-inflationary vacuum decay via quantum tunnelling within (Randall-Sundrum-like) warped throats. Though a specific example is studied in the context of type IIB string theory, we argue that our conclusions are likely more general. Many such transitions could have occurred in the post-inflationary Universe, as a large number of throats with exponentially different IR scales can be present in the string landscape, potentially leading to several signals of widely different frequencies -- a soundscape connected to the landscape of vacua. Detectors such as eLISA and AEGIS, and observations with BBO, SKA and EPTA (pulsar timing) have the sensitivity to detect such signals, while at higher frequency aLIGO is not yet at the required sensitivity. A distribution of primordial black holes is also a likely consequence, though reliable estimates of masses and...

  3. Gravitational Waves from Q-ball Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Chiba, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Masahide

    2009-01-01

    We study the detectability of the gravitational waves (GWs) from the Q-ball formation associated with the Affleck-Dine (AD) mechanism, taking into account both of the dilution effect due to Q-ball domination and of finite temperature effects. The AD mechanism predicts the formation of non-topological solitons, Q-balls, from which GWs are generated. Q-balls with large conserved charge $Q$ can produce a large amount of GWs. On the other hand, the decay rate of such Q-balls is so small that they may dominate the energy density of the universe, which implies that GWs are significantly diluted and that their frequencies are redshifted during Q-ball dominated era. Thus, the detectability of the GWs associated with the formation of Q-balls is determined by these two competing effects. We find that there is a finite but small parameter region where such GWs may be detected by future detectors such as DECIGO or BBO, only in the case when the thermal logarithmic potential dominates the potential of the AD field. Otherw...

  4. Gravitational wave background from reheating after hybrid inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reheating of the Universe after hybrid inflation proceeds through the nucleation and subsequent collision of large concentrations of energy density in the form of bubblelike structures moving at relativistic speeds. This generates a significant fraction of energy in the form of a stochastic background of gravitational waves, whose time evolution is determined by the successive stages of reheating: First, tachyonic preheating makes the amplitude of gravity waves grow exponentially fast. Second, bubble collisions add a new burst of gravitational radiation. Third, turbulent motions finally sets the end of gravitational waves production. From then on, these waves propagate unimpeded to us. We find that the fraction of energy density today in these primordial gravitational waves could be significant for grand unified theory (GUT)-scale models of inflation, although well beyond the frequency range sensitivity of gravitational wave observatories like LIGO, LISA, or BBO. However, low-scale models could still produce a detectable signal at frequencies accessible to BBO or DECIGO. For comparison, we have also computed the analogous gravitational wave background from some chaotic inflation models and obtained results similar to those found by other groups. The discovery of such a background would open a new observational window into the very early universe, where the details of the process of reheating, i.e. the big bang, could be explored. Moreover, it could also serve in the future as a new experimental tool for testing the inflationary paradigm

  5. Black-hole kicks as new gravitational-wave observables

    CERN Document Server

    Gerosa, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Generic black-hole binaries radiate gravitational waves anisotropically, imparting a recoil, or kick velocity to the merger remnant. If a component of the kick along the line-of-sight is present, gravitational waves emitted during the final orbits and merger will be gradually Doppler-shifted as the kick builds up. We develop a simple prescription to capture this effect in existing waveform models, showing that future gravitational-wave experiments will be able to perform direct measurements, not only of the black-hole kick velocity, but also of its accumulation profile. In particular, the eLISA space mission will measure supermassive black-hole kick velocities as low as ~500 km/s, which are expected to be a common outcome of black-hole binary coalescence following galaxy mergers. Black-hole kicks thus constitute a promising new observable in the growing field of gravitational-wave astronomy.

  6. A Gravitational Wave Detector Based on an Atom Interferometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Gravitational waves are tiny perturbations in the curvature of space-time that arise from accelerating masses – according to Einstein’s general...

  7. The Einstein Telescope: a third-generation gravitational wave observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced gravitational wave interferometers, currently under realization, will soon permit the detection of gravitational waves from astronomical sources. To open the era of precision gravitational wave astronomy, a further substantial improvement in sensitivity is required. The future space-based Laser Interferometer Space Antenna and the third-generation ground-based observatory Einstein Telescope (ET) promise to achieve the required sensitivity improvements in frequency ranges. The vastly improved sensitivity of the third generation of gravitational wave observatories could permit detailed measurements of the sources' physical parameters and could complement, in a multi-messenger approach, the observation of signals emitted by cosmological sources obtained through other kinds of telescopes. This paper describes the progress of the ET project which is currently in its design study phase.

  8. The Einstein Telescope: a third-generation gravitational wave observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punturo, M; Bosi, L [INFN, Sezione di Perugia, I-6123 Perugia (Italy); Abernathy, M; Barr, B; Beveridge, N [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Acernese, F; Barone, F; Calloni, E [INFN, Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Allen, B [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Andersson, N [University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Arun, K [LAL, Universite Paris-Sud, IN2P3/CNRS, F-91898 Orsay (France); Barsuglia, M; Mottin, E Chassande [AstroParticule et Cosmologie (APC), CNRS, Observatoire de Paris-Universite Denis Diderot-Paris VII (France); Beker, M [VU University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1081, 1081 HV, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Birindelli, S [Universite Nice ' Sophia-Antipolis' , CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, F-06304 Nice (France); Bose, S [Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States); Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Cella, G [INFN, Sezione di Pisa (Italy); Bulik, T, E-mail: michele.punturo@pg.infn.i [Astro. Obs. Warsaw Univ. 00-478, CAMK-PAM 00-716 Warsaw, Bialystok Univ. 15-424, IPJ 05-400 Swierk-Otwock, Inst. of Astronomy 65-265 Zielona Gora (Poland)

    2010-10-07

    Advanced gravitational wave interferometers, currently under realization, will soon permit the detection of gravitational waves from astronomical sources. To open the era of precision gravitational wave astronomy, a further substantial improvement in sensitivity is required. The future space-based Laser Interferometer Space Antenna and the third-generation ground-based observatory Einstein Telescope (ET) promise to achieve the required sensitivity improvements in frequency ranges. The vastly improved sensitivity of the third generation of gravitational wave observatories could permit detailed measurements of the sources' physical parameters and could complement, in a multi-messenger approach, the observation of signals emitted by cosmological sources obtained through other kinds of telescopes. This paper describes the progress of the ET project which is currently in its design study phase.

  9. The North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    McLaughlin, Maura

    2013-01-01

    The North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) is a collaboration of researchers who are actively engaged in using North American radio telescopes to detect and study gravitational waves via pulsar timing. To achieve this goal, we regularly observe millisecond pulsars (MSPs) with the Arecibo and Green Bank Telescopes and develop and implement new instrumentation and algorithms for searching for and observing pulsars, calculating arrival times, understanding and correcting for propagation delays and sources of noise in our data, and detecting and characterizing a variety of gravitational wave sources. We collaborate on these activities with colleagues in the International Pulsar Timing Array (IPTA). We also educate students of all levels and the public about the detection and study of gravitational waves via pulsar timing.

  10. Searches for Gravitational Waves Associated with Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoak, Daniel; LIGO Scientific Collaboration, Virgo Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The central engines of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are expected to be bright sources of gravitational waves. Over the past decade, coherent analysis techniques have been applied to search for gravitational-wave signals associated with GRBs, using data from the first generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors. In these searches, no detection candidates were found, but upper limits were placed on the emission of gravitational waves from the GRB progenitors. The advanced LIGO and Virgo instruments are expected to begin operation in the next few years, and an extrapolation of upper limits from the first generation indicates that joint observations between gamma-ray satellites and gravitational-wave detectors is possible for certain progenitor models and event rates.

  11. Hunting Gravitational Waves with Multi-Messenger Counterparts: Australia's Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, E. J.; Rowlinson, A.; Coward, D. M.; Lasky, P. D.; Kaplan, D. L.; Thrane, E.; Rowell, G.; Galloway, D. K.; Yuan, Fang; Dodson, R.; Murphy, T.; Hill, G. C.; Andreoni, I.; Spitler, L.; Horton, A.

    2015-12-01

    The first observations by a worldwide network of advanced interferometric gravitational wave detectors offer a unique opportunity for the astronomical community. At design sensitivity, these facilities will be able to detect coalescing binary neutron stars to distances approaching 400 Mpc, and neutron star-black hole systems to 1 Gpc. Both of these sources are associated with gamma-ray bursts which are known to emit across the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Gravitational wave detections provide the opportunity for `multi-messenger' observations, combining gravitational wave with electromagnetic, cosmic ray, or neutrino observations. This review provides an overview of how Australian astronomical facilities and collaborations with the gravitational wave community can contribute to this new era of discovery, via contemporaneous follow-up observations from the radio to the optical and high energy. We discuss some of the frontier discoveries that will be made possible when this new window to the Universe is opened.

  12. Hunting Gravitational Waves with Multi-Messenger Counterparts: Australia's Role

    CERN Document Server

    Howell, E J; Coward, D M; Lasky, P D; Kaplan, D L; Thrane, E; Rowell, G; Galloway, D K; Yuan, Fang; Dodson, R; Murphy, T; Hill, G C; Andreoni, I; Spitler, L; Horton, A

    2015-01-01

    The first observations by a worldwide network of advanced interferometric gravitational wave detectors offer a unique opportunity for the astronomical community. At design sensitivity, these facilities will be able to detect coalescing binary neutron stars to distances approaching 400 Mpc, and neutron star-black hole systems to 1 Gpc. Both of these sources are associated with gamma ray bursts which are known to emit across the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Gravitational wave detections provide the opportunity for "multi-messenger" observations, combining gravitational wave with electromagnetic, cosmic ray or neutrino observations. This review provides an overview of how Australian astronomical facilities and collaborations with the gravitational wave community can contribute to this new era of discovery, via contemporaneous follow-up observations from the radio to the optical and high energy. We discuss some of the frontier discoveries that will be made possible when this new window to the Universe is open...

  13. Einstein's Discovery of Gravitational Waves 1916-1918

    CERN Document Server

    Weinstein, Galina

    2016-01-01

    In his 1916 ground-breaking general relativity paper Einstein had imposed a restrictive coordinate condition, his field equations were valid for coordinate systems which are unimodular. Later, Einstein published a paper on gravitational waves. The solution presented in this paper did not satisfy the above restrictive condition. In his gravitational waves paper, Einstein concluded that gravitational fields propagate at the speed of light. The solution is the Minkowski flat metric plus a small disturbance propagating in a flat spacetime. Einstein calculated the small deviation from Minkowski metric in a manner analogous to that of retarded potentials in electrodynamics. However, in obtaining the above derivation, Einstein made a mathematical error. This error caused him to obtain three different types of waves compatible with his approximate field equations: longitudinal waves, transverse waves and a new type of wave. Einstein added an Addendum in which he suggested that in systems in unimodular coordinates onl...

  14. Gravitational wave stress tensor from the linearised field equations

    CERN Document Server

    Balbus, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    A conserved stress energy tensor for weak field gravitational waves in standard general relativity is derived directly from the linearised wave equation alone, for an arbitrary gauge. The form of the tensor leads directly to the classical expression for the outgoing wave energy in any harmonic gauge. The method described here, however, is a much simpler, shorter, and more physically motivated approach than is the customary procedure, which involves a lengthy and cumbersome second-order (in wave-amplitude) calculation starting with the Einstein tensor. Our method has the added advantage of exhibiting the direct coupling between the outgoing energy flux in gravitational waves and the work done by the gravitational field on the sources. For nonharmonic gauges, the derived wave stress tensor has an index asymmetry. This coordinate artefact may be removed by techniques similar to those used in classical electrodynamics (where this issue also arises), but only by appeal to a more lengthy calculation. For any harmon...

  15. Displacement-Noise-Free Gravitational-Wave Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Kawamura, Seiji; Chen, Yanbei

    2004-01-01

    We present a new idea that allows us to detect gravitational waves without being disturbed by any kind of displacement noise, based on the fact that gravitational waves and test-mass motions affect the propagations of light differently. We demonstrate this idea by analyzing a simple toy model consisting three equally-separated objects on a line. By taking a certain combination of light travel times between these objects, we construct an observable free from the displacement of each object whi...

  16. Gravitational waves from global second order phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global second-order phase transitions are expected to produce scale-invariant gravitational wave spectra. In this manuscript we explore the dynamics of a symmetry-breaking phase transition using lattice simulations. We explicitly calculate the stochastic gravitational wave background produced during the transition and subsequent self-ordering phase. We comment on this signal as it compares to the scale-invariant spectrum produced during inflation

  17. Holographic conformal partial waves as gravitational open Wilson networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatta, Atanu; Raman, Prashanth; Suryanarayana, Nemani V.

    2016-06-01

    We propose a method to holographically compute the conformal partial waves in any decomposition of correlation functions of primary operators in conformal field theories using open Wilson network operators in the holographic gravitational dual. The Wilson operators are the gravitational ones where gravity is written as a gauge theory in the first order Hilbert-Palatini formalism. We apply this method to compute the global conformal blocks and partial waves in 2d CFTs reproducing many of the known results.

  18. Numerical Relativity for Space-Based Gravitational Wave Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John G.

    2011-01-01

    In the next decade, gravitational wave instruments in space may provide high-precision measurements of gravitational-wave signals from strong sources, such as black holes. Currently variations on the original Laser Interferometer Space Antenna mission concepts are under study in the hope of reducing costs. Even the observations of a reduced instrument may place strong demands on numerical relativity capabilities. Possible advances in the coming years may fuel a new generation of codes ready to confront these challenges.

  19. Probing seed black holes using future gravitational-wave detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Gair, Jonathan R.; Mandel, Ilya; Sesana, Alberto; Vecchio, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Identifying the properties of the first generation of seeds of massive black holes is key to understanding the merger history and growth of galaxies. Mergers between ~100 solar mass seed black holes generate gravitational waves in the 0.1-10Hz band that lies between the sensitivity bands of existing ground-based detectors and the planned space-based gravitational wave detector, the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). However, there are proposals for more advanced detectors that will br...

  20. Gravitational wave detectors: New eyes for physics and astronomy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gabriela González

    2004-10-01

    Several interferometric gravitational wave detectors around the world are now starting to achieve better sensitivity to gravitational waves than ever before. We describe the prospects these detectors offer for physics and astronomy and review the rapid progress and the present status of the detectors' sensitivities. We also report the progress made by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration in analysing the data produced by the LIGO and GEO detectors during the Collaboration's Science Runs.

  1. Nanomechanical sensing of gravitational wave-induced Casimir force perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Fabrizio

    2014-06-01

    It is shown by means of the optical medium analogy that the static Casimir force between two conducting plates is modulated by gravitational waves. The magnitude of the resulting force changes within the range of already existing small force metrology. It is suggested to enhance the effects on a Casimir force oscillator by mechanical parametric amplification driven by periodic illumination of interacting semiconducting boundaries. This represents a novel opportunity for the ground-based laboratory detection of gravitational waves on the nanoscale.

  2. Holographic Conformal Partial Waves as Gravitational Open Wilson Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Bhatta, Atanu; Suryanarayana, Nemani V

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method to holographically compute the conformal partial waves in any decomposition of correlation functions of primary operators in conformal field theories using open Wilson network operators in the holographic gravitational dual. The Wilson operators are the gravitational ones where gravity is written as a gauge theory in the first order Hilbert-Palatini formalism. We apply this method to compute the global conformal blocks and partial waves in 2d CFTs reproducing many of the known results.

  3. Gravitational wave detection with optical lattice atomic clocks

    OpenAIRE

    Kolkowitz, Shimon; Pikovski, Igor; Langellier, Nicholas; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Walsworth, Ronald L.; Ye, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We propose a space-based gravitational wave detector consisting of two spatially separated, drag-free satellites sharing ultra-stable optical laser light over a single baseline. Each satellite contains an optical lattice atomic clock, which serves as a sensitive, narrowband detector of the local frequency of the shared laser light. A synchronized two-clock comparison between the satellites will be sensitive to the effective Doppler shifts induced by incident gravitational waves (GWs) at a lev...

  4. Interferometers for Displacement-Noise-Free Gravitational-Wave Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yanbei; Pai, Archana; Somiya, Kentaro; Kawamura, Seiji; Sato, Shuichi; Kokeyama, Keiko; Robert L. Ward; Goda, Keisuke; Mikhalov, Eugeniy E.

    2006-01-01

    We propose a class of displacement- and laser-noise-free gravitational-wave-interferometer configurations, which does not sense nongeodesic mirror motion and laser noise, but provides a nonvanishing gravitational-wave signal. Our interferometers consist of four mirrors and two beam splitters, which form four Mach-Zehnder interferometers. By contrast to previous works, no composite mirrors with multiple reflective surfaces are required. Each mirror in our configuration is sensed redundantly, b...

  5. Interferometers for Displacement-Noise-Free Gravitational-Wave Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Y.; Pai, A.; Somiya, K.; Kawamura, S.; Sato, S.; Kokeyama, K; Ward, R.

    2007-01-01

    We propose a class of displacement- and laser-noise free gravitational-wave-interferometer configurations, which does not sense non-geodesic mirror motions and laser noises, but provides non-vanishing gravitational-wave signal. Our interferometer consists of 4 mirrors and 2 beamsplitters, which form 4 Mach-Zehnder interferometers. By contrast to previous works, no composite mirrors are required. Each mirror in our configuration is sensed redundantly, by at least two pairs of incident and refl...

  6. Relic Gravitational Waves and the Evolution of the Universe

    OpenAIRE

    ZHAO, WEN

    2005-01-01

    In the inflation models, the relic gravitational waves (RGW) generated in the inflation stage, and evolved in the Universe until now. In the different cosmological evolution models, one can get different gravitational waves power spectrum. In this paper, we give a simple formula to estimate this spectrum in a general cosmological model. From this formula, one can easily find the relation between this power spectrum and the cosmological evolution models. The spectrum includes all the informati...

  7. Compressed Sensing for Time-Frequency Gravitational Wave Data Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Addesso, Paolo; Marano, Stefano; Matta, Vincenzo; Principe, Maria; Pinto, Innocenzo M

    2016-01-01

    The potential of compressed sensing for obtaining sparse time-frequency representations for gravitational wave data analysis is illustrated by comparison with existing methods, as regards i) shedding light on the fine structure of noise transients (glitches) in preparation of their classification, and ii) boosting the performance of waveform consistency tests in the detection of unmodeled transient gravitational wave signals using a network of detectors affected by unmodeled noise transient

  8. Testing the Kerr black hole hypothesis: Comparison between the gravitational wave and the iron line approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Avendaño, Alejandro; Jiang, Jiachen; Bambi, Cosimo

    2016-09-01

    The recent announcement of the detection of gravitational waves by the LIGO/Virgo Collaboration has opened a new window to test the nature of astrophysical black holes. Konoplya & Zhidenko have shown how the LIGO data of GW 150914 can constrain possible deviations from the Kerr metric. In this letter, we compare their constraints with those that can be obtained from accreting black holes by fitting their X-ray reflection spectrum, the so-called iron line method. We simulate observations with eXTP, a next generation X-ray mission, finding constraints much stronger than those obtained by Konoplya & Zhidenko. Our results can at least show that, contrary to what is quite commonly believed, it is not obvious that gravitational waves are the most powerful approach to test strong gravity. In the presence of high quality data and with the systematics under control, the iron line method may provide competitive constraints.

  9. Gravitational Waves: Search Results, Data Analysis and Parameter Estimation. Amaldi 10 Parallel Session C2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astone, Pia; Weinstein, Alan; Agathos, Michalis; Bejger, Michal; Christensen, Nelson; Dent, Thomas; Graff, Philip; Klimenko, Sergey; Mazzolo, Giulio; Nishizawa, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    The Amaldi 10 Parallel Session C2 on gravitational wave(GW) search results, data analysis and parameter estimation included three lively sessions of lectures by 13 presenters, and 34 posters. The talks and posters covered a huge range of material, including results and analysis techniques for ground-based GW detectors, targeting anticipated signals from different astrophysical sources: compact binary inspiral, merger and ringdown; GW bursts from intermediate mass binary black hole mergers, cosmic string cusps, core-collapse supernovae, and other unmodeled sources; continuous waves from spinning neutron stars; and a stochastic GW background. There was considerable emphasis on Bayesian techniques for estimating the parameters of coalescing compact binary systems from the gravitational waveforms extracted from the data from the advanced detector network. This included methods to distinguish deviations of the signals from what is expected in the context of General Relativity.

  10. First Searches for Optical Counterparts to Gravitational-Wave Candidate Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amador Ceron, E.; Blackburn, L.; Camp, J. B.; Gehrels, N.; Graff, P. B.; Kanner, J. B.; Cenko, S. B.

    2014-01-01

    During the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory and Virgo joint science runs in 2009-2010, gravitational wave (GW) data from three interferometer detectors were analyzed within minutes to select GW candidate events and infer their apparent sky positions. Target coordinates were transmitted to several telescopes for follow-up observations aimed at the detection of an associated optical transient. Images were obtained for eight such GW candidates. We present the methods used to analyze the image data as well as the transient search results. No optical transient was identified with a convincing association with any of these candidates, and none of the GW triggers showed strong evidence for being astrophysical in nature. We compare the sensitivities of these observations to several model light curves from possible sources of interest, and discuss prospects for future joint GW-optical observations of this type.

  11. Constraining Modified Theories of Gravity with Gravitational-Wave Stochastic Backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maselli, Andrea; Marassi, Stefania; Ferrari, Valeria; Kokkotas, Kostas; Schneider, Raffaella

    2016-08-26

    The direct discovery of gravitational waves has finally opened a new observational window on our Universe, suggesting that the population of coalescing binary black holes is larger than previously expected. These sources produce an unresolved background of gravitational waves, potentially observable by ground-based interferometers. In this Letter we investigate how modified theories of gravity, modeled using the parametrized post-Einsteinian formalism, affect the expected signal, and analyze the detectability of the resulting stochastic background by current and future ground-based interferometers. We find the constraints that Advanced LIGO would be able to set on modified theories, showing that they may significantly improve the current bounds obtained from astrophysical observations of binary pulsars. PMID:27610838

  12. Testing the Kerr black hole hypothesis: comparison between the gravitational wave and the iron line approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Cardenas-Avendano, Alejandro; Bambi, Cosimo

    2016-01-01

    The recent announcement of the detection of gravitational waves by the LIGO/Virgo collaboration has opened a new window to test the nature of astrophysical black holes. Konoplya & Zhidenko have shown how the LIGO data of GW 150914 can constrain possible deviations from the Kerr metric. In this letter, we compare their constraints with those that can be obtained from accreting black holes by fitting their reflected X-ray spectrum, the so-called iron line method. We simulate observations with eXTP, a next generation X-ray mission, finding constraints much stronger than those obtained by Konoplya & Zhidenko. Our results can at least show that, contrary to what is quite commonly believed, it is not obvious that gravitational waves are the most powerful approach to test strong gravity. In the presence of high quality data and with the systematics under control, the iron line method may provide competitive constraints.

  13. Plans for a Next Generation Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observatory (NGO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.; Stebbins, Robin T.; Jennrich, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) is currently in the process of selecting a mission for the Cosmic Visions Program. A space-based gravitational wave observatory in the low-frequency band (0.0001 - 1 Hz) of the gravitational wave spectrum is one of the leading contenders. This low frequency band has a rich spectrum of astrophysical sources, and the LISA concept has been the key mission to cover this science for over twenty years. Tight budgets have recently forced ESA to consider a reformulation of the LISA mission concept that wi" allow the Cosmic Visions Program to proceed on schedule either with the US as a minority participant, or independently of the US altogether. We report on the status of these reformulation efforts.

  14. Telescope Technology Development Results for a Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.; Sankar, Shannon R.

    2016-01-01

    Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatories will enable the systematic study of the low-frequency band (0.0001 - 1 Hz) of gravitational waves, where a rich array of astrophysical sources is expected. Optical telescopes play an important role in these observatories by enabling displacement measurements between pairs of freely falling proof masses. The telescopes deliver laser light efficiently from one sciencecraft to another over million-kilometer scale separations and must transmit and receive light simultaneously. Transmitting and receiving at the same time puts tight constraints on the scattered light performance. In addition, the required displacement measurement accuracy requires ~ 1 pm/√Hz pathlength stability through the telescope in the measurement band. We report preliminary measurements on a prototype telescope.This work was funded in part by NASA SAT grant 11-SAT11-0027.

  15. Audio-Band Frequency-Dependent Squeezing for Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelker, Eric; Isogai, Tomoki; Miller, John; Tse, Maggie; Barsotti, Lisa; Mavalvala, Nergis; Evans, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Quantum vacuum fluctuations impose strict limits on precision displacement measurements, those of interferometric gravitational-wave detectors among them. Introducing squeezed states into an interferometer's readout port can improve the sensitivity of the instrument, leading to richer astrophysical observations. However, optomechanical interactions dictate that the vacuum's squeezed quadrature must rotate by 90° around 50 Hz. Here we use a 2-m-long, high-finesse optical resonator to produce frequency-dependent rotation around 1.2 kHz. This demonstration of audio-band frequency-dependent squeezing uses technology and methods that are scalable to the required rotation frequency and validates previously developed theoretical models, heralding application of the technique in future gravitational-wave detectors.

  16. FIRST SEARCHES FOR OPTICAL COUNTERPARTS TO GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE CANDIDATE EVENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abernathy, M. R.; Adhikari, R. X.; Ajith, P. [LIGO - California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Abbott, T. [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Accadia, T. [Laboratoire d' Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique des Particules (LAPP), Université de Savoie, CNRS/IN2P3, F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Acernese, F. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Adams, C. [LIGO - Livingston Observatory, Livingston, LA 70754 (United States); Adams, T. [Cardiff University, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Affeldt, C.; Allen, B. [Albert-Einstein-Institut, Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Agathos, M. [Nikhef, Science Park, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Aggarwal, N. [LIGO - Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Aguiar, O. D. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, 12227-010 - São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Allocca, A. [INFN, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Amador Ceron, E. [University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Amariutei, D. [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Collaboration: LIGO Scientific Collaboration and the Virgo Collaboration; and others

    2014-03-01

    During the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory and Virgo joint science runs in 2009-2010, gravitational wave (GW) data from three interferometer detectors were analyzed within minutes to select GW candidate events and infer their apparent sky positions. Target coordinates were transmitted to several telescopes for follow-up observations aimed at the detection of an associated optical transient. Images were obtained for eight such GW candidates. We present the methods used to analyze the image data as well as the transient search results. No optical transient was identified with a convincing association with any of these candidates, and none of the GW triggers showed strong evidence for being astrophysical in nature. We compare the sensitivities of these observations to several model light curves from possible sources of interest, and discuss prospects for future joint GW-optical observations of this type.

  17. Physics through the 1990s: Gravitation, cosmology, and cosmic-ray physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews and highlights three areas of astrophysics; gravitation; cosmology; and cosmic-ray physics. Topics such as: gravitational collapse and black holes, gravitational waves, general relativity, nucleosynthesis, and the standard model are among the many topics highlighted

  18. Propagation effect of gravitational wave on detector response

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Zhe; Zhao, Zhi-Chao

    2016-01-01

    The response of a detector to gravitational wave is a function of frequency. When the time a photon moving around in the Fabry-Perot cavities is the same order of the period of a gravitational wave, the phase-difference due to the gravitational wave should be an integral along the path. We present a formula description for detector response to gravitational wave with varied frequencies. The LIGO data for GW150914 and GW 151226 are reexamined in this framework. For GW150924, the traveling time of a photon in the LIGO detector is just a bit larger than a half period of the highest frequency of gravitational wave and the similar result is obtained with LIGO and Virgo collaborations. However, we are not always so luck. In the case of GW151226, the time of a photon traveling in the detector is larger than the period of the highest frequency of gravitational wave and the announced signal cannot match well the template with the initial black hole masses 14.2M$_\\odot$ and 7.5M$_\\odot$.

  19. Maxwellian theory of gravitational waves and their mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a theory in Maxwellian form for gravitational waves in a flat background. This requires us to identify the gravitational analogues of the electric and magnetic fields for light. An important novelty, however, is that our analogues are not vector fields but rather rank-two tensor fields; in place of a three-component vector at each point in space, as in electromagnetism, our fields are three by three symmetric matrices at each point. The resulting Maxwell-like equations lead directly to a Poynting theorem for the local energy density associated with a gravitational wave and to associated local properties including densities of momentum and angular momentum. (paper)

  20. Electromagnetic Waves in a Uniform Gravitational Field and Planck's Postulate

    CERN Document Server

    Acedo, L

    2015-01-01

    The gravitational redshift forms the central part of the majority of the classical tests for the general theory of relativity. It could be successfully checked even in laboratory experiments on the earth's surface. The standard derivation of this effect is based on the distortion of the local structure of spacetime induced by large masses. The resulting gravitational time-dilation near these masses gives rise to a frequency change of any periodic process, including electromagnetic oscillations as the wave propagates across the gravitational field. This phenomenon can be tackled with classical electrodynamics assuming a curved spacetime background and Maxwell's equations in a generally covariant form. In the present paper, we show that in a classical field-theoretical context the gravitational redshift can be interpreted as the propagation of electromagnetic waves in a medium with corresponding conductivity $\\sigma=g/(\\mu_0 c^3)$, where $g$ is the gravitational acceleration and $\\mu_0$ is the vacuum magnetic p...