WorldWideScience

Sample records for astrophysically relevant energies

  1. Relevance of axionlike particles for very-high-energy astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Angelis, Alessandro; Galanti, Giorgio; Roncadelli, Marco

    2011-11-01

    Several extensions of the standard model and, in particular, superstring theories suggest the existence of axionlike particles (ALPs), which are very light spin-zero bosons with a two-photon coupling. As a consequence, photon-ALP oscillations occur in the presence of an external magnetic field, and ALPs can lead to observable effects on the measured photon spectrum of astrophysical sources. An intriguing situation arises when blazars are observed in the very-high-energy (VHE) band—namely, above 100 GeV—as it is the case with the presently operating Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes H.E.S.S, Major Atmospheric Gamma Imaging Cherenkov telescope, Collaboration of Australia and Nippon for a Gamma Ray Observatory in the Outback III, and VERITAS. The extragalactic background light produced by galaxies during cosmic evolution gives rise to a source dimming which becomes important in the VHE band and increases with energy, since hard photons from a blazar scatter off soft extragalactic background light photons thereby disappearing into e+e- pairs. This dimming can be considerably reduced by photon-ALP oscillations, and since they are energy independent the resulting blazar spectra become harder than expected. We consider throughout a scenario first proposed by De Angelis, Roncadelli, and Mansutti in which the above strategy is implemented with photon-ALP oscillations triggered by large-scale magnetic fields, and we systematically investigate its implications for VHE blazars. We find that for ALPs lighter than 5·10-10eV the photon survival probability is larger than predicted by conventional physics above a few hundred GeV. Specifically, a boost factor of 10 can easily occur for sources at large distance and large energy, e.g. at 8 TeV for the blazar 1ES 0347-121 at redshift z=0.188. This is a clear-cut prediction which can be tested with the planned Cherenkov Telescope Array and the High Altitude Water Cherenkov Experiment (HAWC) water Cherenkov

  2. Experimental studies of keV energy neutron-induced reactions relevant to astrophysics and nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shima, T.; Kii, T.; Kikuchi, T.; Okazaki, F.; Kobayashi, T.; Baba, T.; Nagai, Y. [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Faculty of Science; Igashira, M.

    1997-03-01

    Nuclear reactions induced by keV energy neutrons provide a plenty of informations for studies of both astrophysics and nuclear physics. In this paper we will show our experimental studies of neutron- induced reactions of light nuclei in the keV energy region by means of a pulsed keV neutron beam and high-sensitivity detectors. Also we will discuss astrophysical and nuclear-physical consequences by using the obtained results. (author)

  3. Nuclear reactions in AGB nucleosynthesis: the 19F(α, p)22Ne at energies of astrophysical relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agata, G.; Pizzone, R. G.; La Cognata, M.; Indelicato, I.; Spitaleri, C.; Blagus, S.; Cherubini, S.; Figuera, P.; Grassi, L.; Guardo, G. L.; Gulino, M.; Hayakawa, S.; Kshetri, R.; Lamia, L.; Lattuada, M.; Mijatović, T.; Milin, M.; Miljanić, Ð.; Prepolec, L.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Soić, N.; Tokić, V.; Tumino, A.; Uroić, M.

    2018-01-01

    The abundance of 19F in the universe is strictly related to standard and extra-mixing processes taking place inside AGB-stars, that are considered to be the most important sites for its production. Nevertheless the way in which it is destroyed is far from being well understood. For this reason we studied the 19F(α,p)22Ne reaction, that is supposed to be the main destruction channel in the Helium-rich part of the star. In this experiment, the reaction has been studied in the energy range of relevance for astrophysics (0÷1 MeV) via the Trojan Horse Method (THM), using the three-body reaction 6Li(19F,p22Ne)d.

  4. High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Lebedev, Sergey V

    2007-01-01

    During the past decade, research teams around the world have developed astrophysics-relevant research utilizing high energy-density facilities such as intense lasers and z-pinches. Every two years, at the International conference on High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics, scientists interested in this emerging field discuss the progress in topics covering: - Stellar evolution, stellar envelopes, opacities, radiation transport - Planetary Interiors, high-pressure EOS, dense plasma atomic physics - Supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, exploding systems, strong shocks, turbulent mixing - Supernova remnants, shock processing, radiative shocks - Astrophysical jets, high-Mach-number flows, magnetized radiative jets, magnetic reconnection - Compact object accretion disks, x-ray photoionized plasmas - Ultrastrong fields, particle acceleration, collisionless shocks. These proceedings cover many of the invited and contributed papers presented at the 6th International Conference on High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophys...

  5. The 23Na({\\alpha},p) 26Mg reaction rate at astrophysically relevant energies

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, A M; Fynbo, H O U; Kirsebom, O S; Laursen, K L; Diget, C Aa; Hubbard, N J

    2015-01-01

    The production of 26 Al in massive stars is sensitive to the 23 Na(a,p) 26 Mg cross section. Recent experimental data suggest the currently recommended cross sections are underestimated by a factor of 40. We present here differential cross sections for the 23 Na(a,p) 26 Mg reaction measured in the energy range E c.m. = 1.7 - 2.5 MeV. Concurrent measurements of Rutherford scattering provide absolute normalisations which are independent of variations in target properties. Angular distributions were measured for both p 0 and p 1 permitting the determination of total cross sections. The results show no significant deviation from the statistical model calculations upon which the recommended rates are based. We therefore retain the previous recommendation without the increase in cross section and resulting stellar reaction rates of a factor of 40, impacting on the 26 Al yield from massive stars by more than a factor of three.

  6. A Modified activation method for reaction total cross section and yield measurements at low astrophysically relevant energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artemov, S.V., E-mail: artemov@inp.uz [Institute of Nuclear Physics of Uzbekistan Academy of Sciences, Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Igamov, S.B.; Karakhodjaev, A.A.; Radyuk, G.A.; Tojiboyev, O.R.; Salikhbaev, U.S.; Ergashev, F.Kh.; Nam, I.V. [Institute of Nuclear Physics of Uzbekistan Academy of Sciences, Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Aliev, M.K.; Kholbaev, I.; Rumi, R.F.; Khalikov, R.I.; Eshkobilov, Sh.Kh.; Muminov, T.M. [Research Institute of Applied Physics, National University of Uzbekistan, Tashkent (Uzbekistan)

    2016-07-21

    The activation method is proposed for collection of the sufficient statistics during the investigation of the nuclear astrophysical reactions at low energies with the short-living residual nuclei formation. The main feature is a multiple cyclical irradiation of a target by an ion beam and measurement of the radioactivity decay curve. The method was tested by the yield measurement of the {sup 12}C(p,γ){sup 13}N reaction with detecting the annihilation γγ- coincidences from {sup 13}N(β{sup +}ν){sup 13}C decay at the two-arm scintillation spectrometer.

  7. High energy astrophysical techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Poggiani, Rosa

    2017-01-01

    This textbook presents ultraviolet and X-ray astronomy, gamma-ray astronomy, cosmic ray astronomy, neutrino astronomy, and gravitational wave astronomy as distinct research areas, focusing on the astrophysics targets and the requirements with respect to instrumentation and observation methods. The purpose of the book is to bridge the gap between the reference books and the specialized literature. For each type of astronomy, the discussion proceeds from the orders of magnitude for observable quantities. The physical principles of photon and particle detectors are then addressed, and the specific telescopes and combinations of detectors, presented. Finally the instruments and their limits are discussed with a view to assisting readers in the planning and execution of observations. Astronomical observations with high-energy photons and particles represent the newest additions to multimessenger astronomy and this book will be of value to all with an interest in the field.

  8. High energy astrophysics. An introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courvoisier, Thierry J.L. [Geneva Univ., Versoix (Switzerland). ISDC, Data Centre for Astrophysics

    2013-07-01

    Based on observational examples this book reveals and explains high-energy astrophysical processes. Presents the theory of astrophysical processes in a didactic approach by deriving equations step by step. With several attractive astronomical pictures. High-energy astrophysics has unveiled a Universe very different from that only known from optical observations. It has revealed many types of objects in which typical variability timescales are as short as years, months, days, and hours (in quasars, X-ray binaries, and other objects), and even down to milli-seconds in gamma ray bursts. The sources of energy that are encountered are only very seldom nuclear fusion, and most of the time gravitation, a paradox when one thinks that gravitation is, by many orders of magnitude, the weakest of the fundamental interactions. The understanding of these objects' physical conditions and the processes revealed by high-energy astrophysics in the last decades is nowadays part of astrophysicists' culture, even of those active in other domains of astronomy. This book evolved from lectures given to master and PhD students at the University of Geneva since the early 1990s. It aims at providing astronomers and physicists intending to be active in high-energy astrophysics a broad basis on which they should be able to build the more specific knowledge they will need. While in the first part of the book the physical processes are described and derived in detail, the second part studies astrophysical objects in which high-energy astrophysics plays a crucial role. This two-pronged approach will help students recognise physical processes by their observational signatures in contexts that may differ widely from those presented here.

  9. Astrophysically Relevant Instabilities at a Decelerating Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, A. C.; Fryxell, B.; Rosner, R.; Kane, J.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H.; Keiter, P.; Drake, R. P.; Knauer, J.; Dursi, L. J.; Olson, K.; Ricker, P. M.; Timmes, F. X.; Zingale, M.; Tufo, H.; MacNeice, P.

    2000-10-01

    Hydrodynamic instabilities play an important role in many astrophysical phenomena, and modern intense lasers offer the chance to experimentally investigate these instabilities in similar environments in a laboratory. In this poster, we report on experimental and theoretical progress in ongoing research in laser astrophysics. We presents results of simulations of experiments performed using the University of Rochester's Omega laser facility. These experiments involve shock propagation through multi-layer targets, and are designed to replicate the complex hydrodynamic instabilities thought to arise during supernovae explosions. The simulations were performed with the FLASH code, developed by the ASCI/ASAP Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes at the University of Chicago, and we are planning on a study making use of a realistic equation of state. We present results of an experimental study of 2-D vs. 3-D perturbation growth rates also performed at the Omega laser facility. Data from experiments with nominally identical two-layer targets, but 2-D or 3-D perturbations, show clear differences between the evolution of 2-D vs. 3-D perturbations. We also present simulations showing qualitatively similar features for comparison. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy.

  10. High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) is the primary archive for NASA missions dealing with extremely energetic phenomena, from...

  11. LAD Early Career Prize Talk:Laboratory astrophysics experiments investigating the effects of high energy fluxes on Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth relevant to young supernova remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuranz, Carolyn C.; Drake, R. Paul; Park, Hye Sook; Huntington, Channing; Miles, Aaron R.; Remington, Bruce A.; Plewa, Tomek; Trantham, Matt; Shvarts, Dov; Raman, Kumar; MacLaren, Steven; Wan, Wesley; Doss, Forrest; Kline, John; Flippos, Kirk; Malamud, Guy; Handy, Timothy; Prisbey, Shon; Grosskopf, Michael; Krauland, Christine; Klein, Sallee; Harding, Eric; Wallace, Russell; Marion, Donna; Kalantar, Dan

    2017-06-01

    Energy-transport effects can alter the structure that develops as a supernova evolves into a supernova remnant. The Rayleigh Taylor (RT) instability is thought to produce structure at the interface between the stellar ejecta and the circumstellar matter (CSM), based on simple models and hydrodynamic simulations. When a blast wave emerges from an exploding star, it drives a forward shock into the CSM and a reverse shock forms in the expanding stellar ejecta, creating a young supernova remnant (SNR). As mass accumulates in the shocked layers, the interface between these two shocks decelerates, becoming unstable to the RT instability. Simulations predict that RT produces structures at this interface, having a range of spatial scales. When the CSM is dense enough, as in the case of SN 1993J, the hot shocked matter can produce significant radiative fluxes that affect the emission from the SNR. Here we report experimental results from the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to explore how large energy fluxes, which are present in supernovae such as SN 1993J, might affect this structure. The experiment used NIF to create a RT unstable interface subject to a high energy flux by the emergence of a blast wave into lower-density matter, in analogy to the SNR. We also preformed and with a low energy flux to compare the affect of the energy flux on the instability growth. We found that the RT growth was reduced in the experiments with a high energy flux. In analyzing the comparison with SN 1993J, we discovered that the energy fluxes produced by heat conduction appear to be larger than the radiative energy fluxes, and large enough to have dramatic consequences. No reported astrophysical simulations have included radiation and heat conduction self-consistently in modeling SNRs.

  12. Laboratory high-energy astrophysics on lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, W.H.; Liedahl, D.A.; Walling, R.S.; Foord, M.E.; Osterheld, A.L.; Wilson, B.G.

    1994-12-01

    The tremendous range of temperatures and densities spanned by astrophysical plasmas has significant overlap with conditions attainable using high-power laser facilities. These facilities provide an opportunity to create, control, and characterize plasmas in the laboratory that mirror conditions in some of the most important cosmological systems. Moreover, laboratory experiments can enhance astrophysical understanding by focusing on and isolating important physical processes, without necessarily reproducing the exact conditions of the integral system. Basic study of radiative properties, transport phenomena, thermodynamic response and hydrodynamic evolution in plasmas under properly scaled conditions leads both directly and indirectly to improved models of complex astrophysical systems. In this paper, we will discuss opportunities for current and planned highpower lasers to contribute to the study of high-energy astrophysics.

  13. Spontaneous magnetic reconnection. Collisionless reconnection and its potential astrophysical relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treumann, R. A.; Baumjohann, W.

    2015-10-01

    The present review concerns the relevance of collisionless reconnection in the astrophysical context. Emphasis is put on recent developments in theory obtained from collisionless numerical simulations in two and three dimensions. It is stressed that magnetic reconnection is a universal process of particular importance under collisionless conditions, when both collisional and anomalous dissipation are irrelevant. While collisional (resistive) reconnection is a slow, diffusive process, collisionless reconnection is spontaneous. On any astrophysical time scale, it is explosive. It sets on when electric current widths become comparable to the leptonic inertial length in the so-called lepton (electron/positron) "diffusion region", where leptons de-magnetise. Here, the magnetic field contacts its oppositely directed partner and annihilates. Spontaneous reconnection breaks the original magnetic symmetry, violently releases the stored free energy of the electric current, and causes plasma heating and particle acceleration. Ultimately, the released energy is provided by mechanical motion of either the two colliding magnetised plasmas that generate the current sheet or the internal turbulence cascading down to lepton-scale current filaments. Spontaneous reconnection in such extended current sheets that separate two colliding plasmas results in the generation of many reconnection sites (tearing modes) distributed over the current surface, each consisting of lepton exhausts and jets which are separated by plasmoids. Volume-filling factors of reconnection sites are estimated to be as large as {sheet. Lepton currents inside exhausts may be strong enough to excite Buneman and, for large thermal pressure anisotropy, also Weibel instabilities. They bifurcate and break off into many small-scale current filaments and magnetic flux ropes exhibiting turbulent magnetic power spectra of very flat power-law shape W_b∝ k^{-α } in wavenumber k with power becoming as low as α ≈ 2

  14. New sup 22 Ne(. alpha. ,n) sup 25 Mg-resonances at very low energies relevant for the astrophysical s-process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drotleff, H.W.; Denker, A.; Hammer, J.W.; Knee, H.; Kuechler, S.; Streit, D. (Stuttgart Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Strahlenphysik); Rolfs, C.; Trautvetter, H.P. (Bochum Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik 3)

    1991-03-01

    The {sup 22}Ne({alpha}, n){sup 25}Mg reaction is thought to be one of the main neutron sources for the astrophysical s-process. Thus cross section data for this reaction have been obtained from near the threshold (E{sub {alpha}}{approx equal}570 keV) up to E{sub {alpha}}=2100 keV using the 4 MV DYNAMITRON accelertor at Stuttgart, the windowless gastarget system RHINOCEROS and a 4 {pi} neutron detector. Two new resonances have been observed E{sub {alpha}}=623+-6 and 838+-6 keV, which dominate the reaction rate at T{sub 9}<0.3. Possible background reactions are discussed. (orig.).

  15. Current Perspectives in High Energy Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormes, Jonathan F. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    High energy astrophysics is a space-age discipline that has taken a quantum leap forward in the 1990s. The observables are photons and particles that are unable to penetrate the atmosphere and can only be observed from space or very high altitude balloons. The lectures presented as chapters of this book are based on the results from the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) and Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) missions to which the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center made significant hardware contributions. These missions study emissions from very hot plasmas, nuclear processes, and high energy particle interactions in space. Results to be discussed include gamma-ray beaming from active galactic nuclei (AGN), gamma-ray emission from pulsars, radioactive elements in the interstellar medium, X-ray emission from clusters of galaxies, and the progress being made to unravel the gamma-ray burst mystery. The recently launched X-ray Timing Explorer (XTE) and prospects for upcoming Astro-E and Advanced X-ray Astronomy Satellite (AXAF) missions are also discussed.

  16. High energy particles and quanta in astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, F. B. (Editor); Fichtel, C. E.

    1974-01-01

    The various subdisciplines of high-energy astrophysics are surveyed in a series of articles which attempt to give an overall view of the subject as a whole by emphasizing the basic physics common to all fields in which high-energy particles and quanta play a role. Successive chapters cover cosmic ray experimental observations, the abundances of nuclei in the cosmic radiation, cosmic electrons, solar modulation, solar particles (observation, relationship to the sun acceleration, interplanetary medium), radio astronomy, galactic X-ray sources, the cosmic X-ray background, and gamma ray astronomy. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  17. 5th International conference on High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kyrala, G.A

    2005-01-01

    During the past several years, research teams around the world have developed astrophysics-relevant utilizing high energy-density facilities such as intense lasers and z-pinches. Research is underway in many areas, such as compressible hydrodynamic mixing, strong shock phenomena, radiation flow, radiative shocks and jets, complex opacities, equations o fstat, and relativistic plasmas. Beyond this current research and the papers it is producing, plans are being made for the application, to astrophysics-relevant research, of the 2 MJ National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; the 600 kj Ligne d'Intergration Laser (LIL) and the 2 MJ Laser Megajoule (LMJ) in Bordeaux, France; petawatt-range lasers now under construction around the world; and current and future Z pinches. The goal of this conference and these proceedings is to continue focusing and attention on this emerging research area. The conference brought together different scientists interested in this emerging new fi...

  18. Study of the ( p, γ) and ( α, γ) reactions for 96,98,104Ru and 112,114,116Sn at astrophysically relevant energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajpeyi, Awanish; Shukla, A.; Koning, A. J.; Åberg, Sven

    2017-05-01

    Cross section and S factor of the proton- and alpha-induced reactions have been studied for the Ruthenium and tin isotopes in the effective energy range, i.e. Gamow window. These reactions are important for developing the understanding for nucleosynthesis, particularly for the synthesis of p nuclei ( p process). In this work, cross sections and S factor have been calculated through TALYS in Hauser-Feshbach formalism using nuclear densities calculated in relativistic mean field (RMF) formalism. Calculated results of cross sections, S factor and nuclear structure have been compared with existing theoretical as well as experimental results available and are found to be in good agreement.

  19. Studies of High Energy Particle Astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitz, David F [Michigan Technological University; Fick, Brian E [Michigan Technological University

    2014-07-30

    This report covers the progress of the Michigan Technological University particle astrophysics group during the period April 15th, 2011 through April 30th, 2014. The principal investigator is Professor David Nitz. Professor Brian Fick is the Co-PI. The focus of the group is the study of the highest energy cosmic rays using the Pierre Auger Observatory. The major goals of the Pierre Auger Observatory are to discover and understand the source or sources of cosmic rays with energies exceeding 10**19 eV, to identify the particle type(s), and to investigate the interactions of those cosmic particles both in space and in the Earth's atmosphere. The Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina was completed in June 2008 with 1660 surface detector stations and 24 fluorescence telescopes arranged in 4 stations. It has a collecting area of 3,000 square km, yielding an aperture of 7,000 km**2 sr.

  20. New Prospects in High Energy Astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blandford, Roger; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-11-15

    Recent discoveries using TeV, X-ray and radio telescopes as well as Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray arrays are leading to new insights into longstanding puzzles in high energy astrophysics. Many of these insights come from combining observations throughout the electromagnetic and other spectra as well as evidence assembled from different types of source to propose general principles. Issues discussed in this general overview include methods of accelerating relativistic particles, and amplifying magnetic field, the dynamics of relativistic outflows and the nature of the prime movers that power them. Observational approaches to distinguishing hadronic, leptonic and electromagnetic outflows and emission mechanisms are discussed along with probes of the velocity field and the confinement mechanisms. Observations with GLAST promise to be very prescriptive for addressing these problems.

  1. Nuclear and High-Energy Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Fridolin

    2003-10-01

    There has never been a more exciting time in the overlapping areas of nuclear physics, particle physics and relativistic astrophysics than today. Orbiting observatories such as the Hubble Space Telescope, Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), Chandra X-ray satellite, and the X-ray Multi Mirror Mission (XMM) have extended our vision tremendously, allowing us to see vistas with an unprecedented clarity and angular resolution that previously were only imagined, enabling astrophysicists for the first time ever to perform detailed studies of large samples of galactic and extragalactic objects. On the Earth, radio telescopes (e.g., Arecibo, Green Bank, Parkes, VLA) and instruments using adaptive optics and other revolutionary techniques have exceeded previous expectations of what can be accomplished from the ground. The gravitational wave detectors LIGO, LISA VIRGO, and Geo-600 are opening up a window for the detection of gravitational waves emitted from compact stellar objects such as neutron stars and black holes. Together with new experimental forefront facilities like ISAC, ORLAND and RIA, these detectors provide direct, quantitative physical insight into nucleosynthesis, supernova dynamics, accreting compact objects, cosmic-ray acceleration, and pairproduction in high energy sources which reinforce the urgent need for a strong and continuous feedback from nuclear and particle theory and theoretical astrophysics. In my lectures, I shall concentrate on three selected topics, which range from the behavior of superdense stellar matter, to general relativistic stellar models, to strange quark stars and possible signals of quark matter in neutron stars.

  2. Predicting the statistics of high-energy astrophysical backgrounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feyereisen, M.R.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis presents improvements to a methodology for predicting the probability distribution of diffuse isotropic astrophysical backgrounds, applied to high-energy extragalactic gamma rays and neutrinos.

  3. The Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guainazzi, Matteo

    2017-08-01

    Athena (the Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics) is a next generation X-ray observatory currently under study by ESA for launch in 2028. Athena is designed to address the Hot and Energetic Universe science theme, which addresses two key questions: 1) How did ordinary matter evolve into the large scale structures we see today? 2) How do black holes grow and shape the Universe. To address these topics Athena employs an innovative X-ray telescope based on Silicon Pore Optics technology to deliver extremely light weight and high throughput, while retaining excellent angular resolution. The mirror can be adjusted to focus onto one of two focal place instruments: the X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) which provides spatially-resolved, high resolution spectroscopy, and the Wide Field Imager (WFI) which provides spectral imaging over a large field of view, as well as high time resolution and count rate tolerance. Athena is currently in Phase A and the study status will be reviewed, along with the scientific motivations behind the mission.

  4. Dynamics Resonances in Atomic States of Astrophysical Relevance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Since spontaneous fluorescence of excited atoms is probabilistic, the description of the radiating quantized system evolution along with photon energy transfer in a cold atom medium, should include elements of stochastic dynamics. Finally, the chaotic dynamics of a weakly bound Rydberg electron over a grid of the energy ...

  5. Dynamics Resonances in Atomic States of Astrophysical Relevance

    CERN Document Server

    Arefieff, K N; Bezuglov, N N; Dimitrijevic, M S; Klyucharev, A N; Mihajlov, A A; Sreckovic, V A

    2016-01-01

    Ionized geocosmic media parameters in a thermal and a subthermal range of energy have a number of unique features. The photoresonance plasma that is formed by optical excitation of the lowest excited (resonance) atomic states is one example of conversion of radiation energy into electrical one. Since spontaneous fluorescence of excited atoms is probabilistic, the description of the radiating quantized system evolution along with photons energy transfer in a cold atoms medium, should include elements of stochastic dynamics. Finally, the chaotic dynamics of a weakly bound Rydberg electron over a grid of the energy levels diagram of a quasi-molecular Rydberg complex provides an excitation migration of the electron forward to the ionization continuum. This work aims at discussing the specific features of the dynamic resonances formalism in the description of processes involving Rydberg states of an excited atom, including features in the fluorescence spectrum partially caused by the quantum defect control due to ...

  6. CZT drift strip detectors for high energy astrophysics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Caroli, E.

    2010-01-01

    Requirements for X- and gamma ray detectors for future High Energy Astrophysics missions include high detection efficiency and good energy resolution as well as fine position sensitivity even in three dimensions.We report on experimental investigations on the CZT drift detector developed DTU Space...

  7. Nonlocal astrophysics dark matter, dark energy and physical vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Alexeev, Boris V

    2017-01-01

    Non-Local Astrophysics: Dark Matter, Dark Energy and Physical Vacuum highlights the most significant features of non-local theory, a highly effective tool for solving many physical problems in areas where classical local theory runs into difficulties. The book provides the fundamental science behind new non-local astrophysics, discussing non-local kinetic and generalized hydrodynamic equations, non-local parameters in several physical systems, dark matter, dark energy, black holes and gravitational waves. Devoted to the solution of astrophysical problems from the position of non-local physics Provides a solution for dark matter and dark energy Discusses cosmological aspects of the theory of non-local physics Includes a solution for the problem of the Hubble Universe expansion, and of the dependence of the orbital velocity from the center of gravity

  8. High-Energy Spectroscopic Astrophysics Swiss Society for Astrophysics and Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Kahn, Steven M; von Ballmoos, Peter

    2005-01-01

    After three decades of intense research in X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, the time was ripe to summarize basic knowledge on X-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy for interested students and researchers ready to become involved in new high-energy missions. This volume exposes both the scientific basics and modern methods of high-energy spectroscopic astrophysics. The emphasis is on physical principles and observing methods rather than a discussion of particular classes of high-energy objects, but many examples and new results are included in the three chapters as well.

  9. Nuclear astrophysics projects at the low-energy RI beam separator CRIB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Hayakawa, S.; Yang, L.; Shimizu, H.; Sakaguchi, Y.; Abe, K.; Nakao, T.; Suhara, T.; Iwasa, N.; Kim, A.; Kim, D. H.; Cha, S. M.; Kwag, M. S.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, E. J.; Chae, K. Y.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Imai, N.; Kitamura, N.; Lee, P.; Moon, J. Y.; Lee, K. B.; Akers, C.; Jung, H. S.; Duy, N. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Lee, C. S.; Hashimoto, T.; Kubono, S.; Kawabata, T.; Teranishi, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Binh, D. N.

    2018-01-01

    Studies on nuclear reactions relevant for astrophysics have been performed using the radioactive-isotope (RI) beams at the low-energy RI beam separator CRIB, operated by Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), the University of Tokyo. A type of measurement to study astrophysical reactions at CRIB is by the elastic resonant scattering with the thick-target method in inverse kinematics. We introduce the α resonant scattering with 7Be beam, related to the astrophysical 7Be(α, γ) reactions, which is relevant in the hot p-p chain and νp-process in supernovae. Other α resonant scattering measurements with 30S, 10Be, 15O, and 18Ne beams have been performed at CRIB, using the thick-target method.

  10. High Energy Studies of Astrophysical Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, Lia Racquel

    Astrophysical dust---any condensed matter ranging from tens of atoms to micron sized grains---accounts for about one third of the heavy elements produced in stars and disseminated into space. These tiny pollutants are responsible for producing the mottled appearance in the spray of light we call the "Milky Way." However these seemingly inert particles play a strong role in the physics of the interstellar medium, aiding star and planet formation, and perhaps helping to guide galaxy evolution. Most dust grains are transparent to X-ray light, leaving a signature of atomic absorption, but also scattering the light over small angles. Bright X-ray objects serendipitously situated behind large columns of dust and gas provide a unique opportunity to study the dust along the line of sight. I focus primarily on X-ray scattering through dust, which produces a diffuse halo image around a central point source. Such objects have been observed around X-ray bright Galactic binaries and extragalactic objects that happen to shine through the plane of the Milky Way. I use the Chandra X-ray Observatory, a space-based laboratory operated by NASA, which has imaging resolution ideal for studying X-ray scattering halos. I examine several bright X-ray objects with dust-free sight lines to test their viability as templates and develop a parametric model for the Chandra HETG point spread function (PSF). The PSF describes the instrument's imaging response to a point source, an understanding of which is necessary for properly measuring the surface brightness of X-ray scattering halos. I use an HETG observation of Cygnus X-3, one of the brightest objects available in the Chandra archive, to derive a dust grain size distribution. There exist degenerate solutions for the dust scattering halo, but with the aid of Bayesian analytics I am able to apply prior knowledge about the Cyg X-3 sight line to measure the relative abundance of dust in intervening Milky Way spiral arms. I also demonstrate how

  11. A Unified Model of High-Energy Astrophysical phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    De Rújula, Alvaro

    2005-01-01

    I outline a unified model of high-energy astrophysics, in which the gamma background radiation, cluster "cooling flows", gamma-ray bursts, X-ray flashes and cosmic-ray electrons and nuclei of all energies -share a common origin. The mechanism underlying these phenomena is the emission of relativistic "cannonballs" by ordinary supernovae, analogous to the observed ejection of plasmoids by quasars and microquasars. I concentrate on Cosmic Rays: the longest-lasting conundrum in astrophysics. The distribution of Cosmic Rays in the Galaxy, their total "luminosity", the broken power-law spectra with their observed slopes, the position of the knee(s) and ankle(s), and the alleged variations of composition with energy are all explained in terms of simple and "standard" physics. The model is only lacking a satisfactory theoretical understanding of the "cannon" that emits the cannonballs in catastrophic episodes of accretion onto a compact object.

  12. Comprehensive x-ray spectral code for high energy astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liedahl, D A; Fournier, K B; Mauche, C W

    2000-08-18

    The aim of this project has been to develop a spectral analysis tool with a level of quality and completeness commensurate to that expected in data from the current generation of X-ray observatories. The code is called LXSS (Livermore X-Ray Spectral Synthesizer). X-ray-emitting astrophysical plasmas are rarely, if ever, in LTE, so they have adopted the detailed level accounting approach, in which rates for processes that populate or depopulate atomic energy levels are treated explicitly. This entails the generation of a large quantity of atomic data, most of which is calculated using ''in-house'' computer codes. Calculations are benchmarked against laboratory data, and spectral models have been used to provide first-time interpretations of astrophysical X-ray spectra. The design of a versatile graphical user interface that allows access to and manipulation of the atomic database comprises the second major part of the project.

  13. Magnetic turbulence in a table-top laser-plasma relevant to astrophysical scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Gourab; Schoeffler, Kevin M.; Kumar Singh, Prashant; Adak, Amitava; Lad, Amit D.; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, Predhiman; Silva, Luis O.; Das, Amita; Kumar, G. Ravindra

    2017-06-01

    Turbulent magnetic fields abound in nature, pervading astrophysical, solar, terrestrial and laboratory plasmas. Understanding the ubiquity of magnetic turbulence and its role in the universe is an outstanding scientific challenge. Here, we report on the transition of magnetic turbulence from an initially electron-driven regime to one dominated by ion-magnetization in a laboratory plasma produced by an intense, table-top laser. Our observations at the magnetized ion scale of the saturated turbulent spectrum bear a striking resemblance with spacecraft measurements of the solar wind magnetic-field spectrum, including the emergence of a spectral kink. Despite originating from diverse energy injection sources (namely, electrons in the laboratory experiment and ion free-energy sources in the solar wind), the turbulent spectra exhibit remarkable parallels. This demonstrates the independence of turbulent spectral properties from the driving source of the turbulence and highlights the potential of small-scale, table-top laboratory experiments for investigating turbulence in astrophysical environments.

  14. The High-Energy Astrophysics Learning Center, Version 1. [CD-ROM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlock, Laura A.; Allen, Jesse S.; Lochner, James C.

    The High-Energy Astrophysics (HEA) Learning Center gives students, teachers, and the general public a window into the world of high-energy astrophysics. The universe is revealed through x-rays and gamma rays where matter exists under extreme conditions. Information is available on astrophysics at a variety of reading levels, and is illustrated…

  15. Very-high-energy astrophysical neutrinos with IceCube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taboada Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available IceCube is a ≳TeV neutrino observatory operating at the South Pole. Ice-Cube has observed a flux of neutrinos of astrophysical origin, with energies beyond 2 PeV. However the sources of these neutrinos have not yet been identified. A summary of various IceCube observations is presented. The results discussed were obtained through several different analysis methods, which have varying sensitivity to the different neutrino flavors. A discussion of the spectral fit obtained for the various event selections is included, as well as the constraints on the astrophysical neutrino flavor flux ratio. Several attempts by IceCube to identify the sources of these neutrinos are described. These include studies correlating neutrino events with catalogs of sources as well as selfcorrelations among IceCube’s neutrinos. The observations of astrophysical neutrinos are limited by statistics. So an upgrade of IceCube, including a larger detector and a surface veto is planned. This upgrade is briefly discussed.

  16. Traversable geometric dark energy wormholes constrained by astrophysical observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Deng [Nankai University, Theoretical Physics Division, Chern Institute of Mathematics, Tianjin (China); Meng, Xin-he [Nankai University, Department of Physics, Tianjin (China); Institute of Theoretical Physics, CAS, State Key Lab of Theoretical Physics, Beijing (China)

    2016-09-15

    In this paper, we introduce the astrophysical observations into the wormhole research. We investigate the evolution behavior of the dark energy equation of state parameter ω by constraining the dark energy model, so that we can determine in which stage of the universe wormholes can exist by using the condition ω < -1. As a concrete instance, we study the Ricci dark energy (RDE) traversable wormholes constrained by astrophysical observations. Particularly, we find from Fig. 5 of this work, when the effective equation of state parameter ω{sub X} < -1 (or z < 0.109), i.e., the null energy condition (NEC) is violated clearly, the wormholes will exist (open). Subsequently, six specific solutions of statically and spherically symmetric traversable wormhole supported by the RDE fluids are obtained. Except for the case of a constant redshift function, where the solution is not only asymptotically flat but also traversable, the five remaining solutions are all non-asymptotically flat, therefore, the exotic matter from the RDE fluids is spatially distributed in the vicinity of the throat. Furthermore, we analyze the physical characteristics and properties of the RDE traversable wormholes. It is worth noting that, using the astrophysical observations, we obtain the constraints on the parameters of the RDE model, explore the types of exotic RDE fluids in different stages of the universe, limit the number of available models for wormhole research, reduce theoretically the number of the wormholes corresponding to different parameters for the RDE model, and provide a clearer picture for wormhole investigations from the new perspective of observational cosmology. (orig.)

  17. The EXIST Mission for High-Energy Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, G. J.; Grindlay, J. E.; Hong, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST), under study to be the Black Hole Finder Probe in NASA's Beyond Einstein Program, would image the sky every 95min in the energy range 1 OkeV to 600 keV. Although the main scientific objectives of EXIST are the systematic, all-sky survey of heavily obscured AGNs and gamma-ray bursts, there is a substantial capability of EXIST for the observation of transient and persistent hard x-ray lines from several astrophysical sources.

  18. High-Energy-Density, Laboratory-Astrophysics Studies of Jets and Bow Shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, J M; Wilde, B H; Rosen, P A; Perry, T S; Khokhlov, A M; Coker, R F; Frank, A; Keiter, P A; Blue, B E; Drake, R P; Knauer, J P; Williams, R R

    2005-01-24

    Large-scale directional outflows of supersonic plasma, also known as ''jets'', are ubiquitous phenomena in astrophysics [1]. The interaction of such jets with surrounding matter often results in spectacular bow shocks, and intense radiation from radio to gamma-ray wavelengths. The traditional approach to understanding such phenomena is through theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. However, such numerical simulations have limited resolution, often assume axial symmetry, do not include all relevant physical processes, and fail to scale correctly in Reynolds number and perhaps other key dimensionless parameters. Additionally, they are frequently not tested by comparison with laboratory experiments. Recent advances in high-energy-density physics using large inertial-confinement-fusion devices now allow controlled laboratory experiments on macroscopic volumes of plasma of direct relevance relevant to astrophysics [2]. In this Letter we report the first results of experiments designed to study the evolution of supersonic plasma jets and the bow shocks they drive into a surrounding medium. Our experiments reveal both regular and highly complex flow patterns in the bow shock, thus opening a new window--complementary to computer simulations--into understanding the nature of three-dimensional astrophysical jets.

  19. Development of an inertial confinement fusion platform to study charged-particle-producing nuclear reactions relevant to nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Bacher, A.; Brune, C. R.; Casey, D. T.; Forrest, C.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hohenberger, M.; Sayre, D. B.; Bionta, R. M.; Bourgade, J.-L.; Caggiano, J. A.; Cerjan, C.; Craxton, R. S.; Dearborn, D.; Farrell, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Garcia, E. M.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Hale, G.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hohensee, M.; Holunga, D. M.; Hoppe, M.; Janezic, R.; Khan, S. F.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kim, Y. H.; Knauer, J. P.; Kohut, T. R.; Lahmann, B.; Landoas, O.; Li, C. K.; Marshall, F. J.; Masse, L.; McEvoy, A.; McKenty, P.; McNabb, D. P.; Nikroo, A.; Parham, T. G.; Paris, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Pino, J.; Radha, P. B.; Remington, B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Robey, H.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rosse, B.; Rubery, M.; Sangster, T. C.; Sanchez, J.; Schmitt, M.; Schoff, M.; Séguin, F. H.; Seka, W.; Sio, H.; Stoeckl, C.; Tipton, R. E.

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes the development of a platform to study astrophysically relevant nuclear reactions using inertial-confinement fusion implosions on the OMEGA and National Ignition Facility laser facilities, with a particular focus on optimizing the implosions to study charged-particle-producing reactions. Primary requirements on the platform are high yield, for high statistics in the fusion product measurements, combined with low areal density, to allow the charged fusion products to escape. This is optimally achieved with direct-drive exploding pusher implosions using thin-glass-shell capsules. Mitigation strategies to eliminate a possible target sheath potential which would accelerate the emitted ions are discussed. The potential impact of kinetic effects on the implosions is also considered. The platform is initially employed to study the complementary T(t,2n)α, T(3He,np)α and 3He(3He,2p)α reactions. Proof-of-principle results from the first experiments demonstrating the ability to accurately measure the energy and yields of charged particles are presented. Lessons learned from these experiments will be used in studies of other reactions. The goals are to explore thermonuclear reaction rates and fundamental nuclear physics in stellar-like plasma environments, and to push this new frontier of nuclear astrophysics into unique regimes not reachable through existing platforms, with thermal ion velocity distributions, plasma screening, and low reactant energies.

  20. White Paper on Nuclear Astrophysics and Low Energy Nuclear Physics - Part 1. Nuclear Astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcones, Almudena [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Escher, Jutta E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Others, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-04-04

    This white paper informs the nuclear astrophysics community and funding agencies about the scientific directions and priorities of the field and provides input from this community for the 2015 Nuclear Science Long Range Plan. It summarizes the outcome of the nuclear astrophysics town meeting that was held on August 21 - 23, 2014 in College Station at the campus of Texas A&M University in preparation of the NSAC Nuclear Science Long Range Plan. It also reflects the outcome of an earlier town meeting of the nuclear astrophysics community organized by the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA) on October 9 - 10, 2012 Detroit, Michigan, with the purpose of developing a vision for nuclear astrophysics in light of the recent NRC decadal surveys in nuclear physics (NP2010) and astronomy (ASTRO2010). The white paper is furthermore informed by the town meeting of the Association of Research at University Nuclear Accelerators (ARUNA) that took place at the University of Notre Dame on June 12 - 13, 2014. In summary we find that nuclear astrophysics is a modern and vibrant field addressing fundamental science questions at the intersection of nuclear physics and astrophysics. These questions relate to the origin of the elements, the nuclear engines that drive life and death of stars, and the properties of dense matter. A broad range of nuclear accelerator facilities, astronomical observatories, theory efforts, and computational capabilities are needed. With the developments outlined in this white paper, answers to long-standing key questions are well within reach in the coming decade.

  1. High Energy Neutrino Emission from Astrophysical Jets in the Galaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Smponias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We address simulated neutrino emission originated from astrophysical jets of compact objects within the Galaxy. These neutrinos are of high energies (Eν of the order up to a few TeV and for their observation specialized instruments are in operation, both on Earth and in orbit. Furthermore, some next generation telescopes and detector facilities are in the process of design and construction. The jet flow simulations are performed using the modern PLUTO hydrocode in its relativistic magnetohydrodynamic version. One of the main ingredients of the present work is the presence of a toroidal magnetic field that confines the jet flow and furthermore greatly affects the distribution of the high energy neutrinos.

  2. HEASARC - The High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smale, Alan P.

    2011-01-01

    The High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) is NASA's archive for high-energy astrophysics and cosmic microwave background (CMB) data, supporting the broad science goals of NASA's Physics of the Cosmos theme. It provides vital scientific infrastructure to the community by standardizing science data formats and analysis programs, providing open access to NASA resources, and implementing powerful archive interfaces. Over the next five years the HEASARC will ingest observations from up to 12 operating missions, while serving data from these and over 30 archival missions to the community. The HEASARC archive presently contains over 37 TB of data, and will contain over 60 TB by the end of 2014. The HEASARC continues to secure major cost savings for NASA missions, providing a reusable mission-independent framework for reducing, analyzing, and archiving data. This approach was recognized in the NRC Portals to the Universe report (2007) as one of the HEASARC's great strengths. This poster describes the past and current activities of the HEASARC and our anticipated developments in coming years. These include preparations to support upcoming high energy missions (NuSTAR, Astro-H, GEMS) and ground-based and sub-orbital CMB experiments, as well as continued support of missions currently operating (Chandra, Fermi, RXTE, Suzaku, Swift, XMM-Newton and INTEGRAL). In 2012 the HEASARC (which now includes LAMBDA) will support the final nine-year WMAP data release. The HEASARC is also upgrading its archive querying and retrieval software with the new Xamin system in early release - and building on opportunities afforded by the growth of the Virtual Observatory and recent developments in virtual environments and cloud computing.

  3. White paper on nuclear astrophysics and low energy nuclear physics Part 1: Nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcones, Almudena; Bardayan, Dan W.; Beers, Timothy C.; Bernstein, Lee A.; Blackmon, Jeffrey C.; Messer, Bronson; Brown, B. Alex; Brown, Edward F.; Brune, Carl R.; Champagne, Art E.; Chieffi, Alessandro; Couture, Aaron J.; Danielewicz, Pawel; Diehl, Roland; El-Eid, Mounib; Escher, Jutta E.; Fields, Brian D.; Fröhlich, Carla; Herwig, Falk; Hix, William Raphael; Iliadis, Christian; Lynch, William G.; McLaughlin, Gail C.; Meyer, Bradley S.; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Nunes, Filomena; O'Shea, Brian W.; Prakash, Madappa; Pritychenko, Boris; Reddy, Sanjay; Rehm, Ernst; Rogachev, Grigory; Rutledge, Robert E.; Schatz, Hendrik; Smith, Michael S.; Stairs, Ingrid H.; Steiner, Andrew W.; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Timmes, F. X.; Townsley, Dean M.; Wiescher, Michael; Zegers, Remco G. T.; Zingale, Michael

    2017-05-01

    This white paper informs the nuclear astrophysics community and funding agencies about the scientific directions and priorities of the field and provides input from this community for the 2015 Nuclear Science Long Range Plan. It summarizes the outcome of the nuclear astrophysics town meeting that was held on August 21-23, 2014 in College Station at the campus of Texas A&M University in preparation of the NSAC Nuclear Science Long Range Plan. It also reflects the outcome of an earlier town meeting of the nuclear astrophysics community organized by the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA) on October 9-10, 2012 Detroit, Michigan, with the purpose of developing a vision for nuclear astrophysics in light of the recent NRC decadal surveys in nuclear physics (NP2010) and astronomy (ASTRO2010). The white paper is furthermore informed by the town meeting of the Association of Research at University Nuclear Accelerators (ARUNA) that took place at the University of Notre Dame on June 12-13, 2014. In summary we find that nuclear astrophysics is a modern and vibrant field addressing fundamental science questions at the intersection of nuclear physics and astrophysics. These questions relate to the origin of the elements, the nuclear engines that drive life and death of stars, and the properties of dense matter. A broad range of nuclear accelerator facilities, astronomical observatories, theory efforts, and computational capabilities are needed. With the developments outlined in this white paper, answers to long standing key questions are well within reach in the coming decade.

  4. IceCube: Particle Astrophysics with High Energy Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Université de Genève

    2012-01-01

    GENEVA UNIVERSITY École de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 Genève 4 Tél.: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Monday 7 May 2012 17h. - Ecole de Physique, Auditoire Stueckelberg IceCube: Particle Astrophysics with High Energy Neutrinos Prof. Francis Halzen / University of Wisconsin, Madison Construction and commissioning of the cubic-kilometer IceCube neutrino detector and its low energy extension DeepCore have been completed. The instrument detects neutrinos over a wide energy range: from 10 GeV atmospheric neutrinos to 1010 GeV cosmogenic neutrinos. We will discuss initial results based on a subsample of the ~100,000 neutrino events recorded during construction. We will emphasize the first measurement of the high-energy atmospheric neutrino spectrum, the search for the still enigmatic sources of the Galactic and extragalactic cosmic rays and for the particle nature of dark matter. Une ve...

  5. Trojan Horse method and radioactive ion beams: study of $^{18}$F(p,$\\alpha$)$^{15}$O reaction at astrophysical energies

    CERN Document Server

    Gulino, M; Rapisarda, G G; Kubono, S; Lamia, L; La Cognata, M; Yamaguchi, H; Hayakawa, S; Wakabayashi, Y; Iwasa, N; Kato, S; Komatsubara, H; Teranishi, T; Coc, A; De Séréville, N; Hammache, F; Spitaleri, C

    2012-01-01

    The Trojan Horse Method was applied for the first time to a Radioactive Ion Beam induced reaction to study the reaction $^{18}$F(p,$\\alpha$)$^{15}$O via the three body reaction $^{18}$F(d,$\\alpha$ $^{15}$O)n at the low energies relevant for astrophysics. The abundance of $^{18}$F in Nova explosions is an important issue for the understanding of this astrophysical phenomenon. For this reason it is necessary to study the nuclear reactions that produce or destroy $^{18}$F in Novae. $^{18}$F(p,$\\alpha$)$^{15}$O is one of the main $^{18}$F destruction channels. Preliminary results are presented in this paper.

  6. Relevance of β-delayed neutron data for reactor, nuclear physics and astrophysics applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratz, Karl-Ludwig [Fachbereich Chemie, Pharmazie and Geowissenschaften, Universität Mainz, D-55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2015-02-24

    Initially, yields (or abundances) and branching ratios of β-delayed neutrons (βdn) from fission products (P{sub n}-values) have had their main importance in nuclear reactor control. At that time, the six-group mathematical approximation of the time-dependence of βdn-data in terms of the so-called 'Keepin groups' was generally accepted. Later, with the development of high-resolution neutron spectroscopy, βdn data have provided important information on nuclear-structure properties at intermediate excitation energy in nuclei far from stability, as well as in nuclear astrophysics. In this paper, I will present some examples of the βdn-studies performed by the Kernchemie Mainz group during the past three decades. This work has been recognized as an example of 'broad scientific diversity' which has led to my nomination for the 2014 Hans A. Bethe prize.

  7. How unequal fluxes of high energy astrophysical neutrinos and antineutrinos can fake new physics

    OpenAIRE

    Nunokawa, Hiroshi; Panes, Boris; Funchal, Renata Zukanovich

    2016-01-01

    Flavor ratios of very high energy astrophysical neutrinos, which can be studied at the Earth by a neutrino telescope such as IceCube, can serve to diagnose their production mechanism at the astrophysical source. The flavor ratios for neutrinos and antineutrinos can be quite different as we do not know how they are produced in the astrophysical environment. Due to this uncertainty the neutrino and antineutrino flavor ratios at the Earth also could be quite different. Nonetheless, it is general...

  8. Fullerenes, PAHs, Amino Acids and High Energy Astrophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Iglesias-Groth

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We present theoretical, observational and laboratory work on the spectral properties of fullerenes and hydrogenated fullerenes. Fullerenes in its various forms (individual, endohedral, hydrogenated, etc. can contribute to the UV bump in the extinction curves measured in many lines of sight of the Galaxy. They can also produce a large number of absorption features in the optical and near infrared which could be associated with diffuse interstellar bands. We summarise recent laboratory work on the spectral characterisation of fullerenes and hydrogenated fullerenes (for a range of temperatures. The recent detection of mid-IR bands of fullerenes in various astrophysical environments (planetary nebulae, reflection nebulae provide additional evidence for a link between fullerene families and diffuse interstellar bands. We describe recent observational work on near IR bands of C60+ in a protoplanetary nebula which support fullerene formation during the post-AGB phase. We also report on the survival of fullerenes to irradiation by high energy particles and gamma photons and laboratory work to explore the chemical  reactions that take place when fullerenes are exposed to this radiations in the presence of water, ammonia and other molecules as a potential path to form amino acids.

  9. Astrophysical Sources of High-Energy Neutrinos in the IceCube Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mészáros, P.

    2017-10-01

    High-energy neutrino astrophysics has come of age with IceCube's discovery of neutrinos in the TeV to PeV energy range, attributable to extragalactic sources at cosmological distances. At such energies, astrophysical neutrinos must originate in cosmic-ray interactions, providing information about the sources of high-energy cosmic rays, as well as leading to the coproduction of high-energy γ-rays. The intimate link with these two independently observed types of radiation provides important tools for the quest to identify and understand the nature of the astrophysical sources of the neutrinos. These neutrinos can set important constraints on the cosmic-ray acceleration process, and because they travel essentially unimpeded, they can probe our Universe out to the farthest cosmological distances.

  10. Dynamics of magnetic fields in high-energy-density plasmas for fusion and astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lan; Ji, H.; Fox, W.; Hill, K.; Efthimion, P.; Nilson, P.; Igumenshchev, I.; Froula, D.; Betti, R.; Meyerhofer, D.; Fiksel, G.; Blackman, E.; Schneider, M.; Chen, H.; Smalyuk, V.; Li, H.; Casner, A.

    2015-11-01

    An overview of our recent experimental and theoretical work on the dynamics of magnetic fields in high-energy-density plasmas will be presented. This includes: (1) precision mapping of the self-generated magnetic fields in the coronal plasma and the Nernst effect on their evolution, (2) characterizing the strong magnetic field generated by a laser-driven capacitor-coil target using ultrafast proton radiography, and (3) creating MHD turbulence in Rayleigh-Taylor unstable plasmas. The experimental results are compared with resistive MHD simulations providing a stringent test for their predictions. Applications in relevance to ignition target designs in inertial confinement fusion, material strength studies in high-energy-density physics, and astrophysical systems such as plasma dynamos and magnetic reconnection will be discussed. Future experiments proposed on the National Ignition Facility will be described. This material is supported in part by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award No. DE-NA0001944, and the National Laser Users Facility under Grant No. DE-NA0002205.

  11. S-factor of 14N(p,gamma)15O at astrophysical energies

    CERN Document Server

    Imbriani, G; Formicola, A; Vomiero, A; Angulo, C; Bemmerer, D; Bonetti, R; Broggini, C; Confortola, F; Corvisiero, P; Cruz, J; Descouvemont, P; Fülöp, Z; Gervino, G; Guglielmetti, A; Gustavino, C; Gyürky, G; Jesus, A P; Junker, M; Klug, J N; Lemut, A; Menegazzo, R; Prati, P; Roca, V; Rolfs, C; Romano, M; Alvarez, C R; Schumann, F; Schurmann, D; Somorjai, E; Straniero, O; Strieder, F; Terrasi, F; Trautvetter, H P; Fulop, Zs.; Gyurky, Gy.

    2005-01-01

    The astrophysical S-factor of 14N(p,gamma)15O has been measured for effective center-of-mass energies between E_eff = 119 and 367 keV at the LUNA facility using TiN solid targets and Ge detectors. The data are in good agreement with previous and recent work at overlapping energies. R-matrix analysis reveals that due to the complex level structure of 15O the extrapolated S(0) value is model dependent and calls for additional experimental efforts to reduce the present uncertainty in S(0) to a level of a few percent as required by astrophysical calculations.

  12. Nuclear astrophysics from direct reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertulani, C. [Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, Commerce, TX 75429 (United States)]. e-mail: carlos_bertulani@tamu-commerce.edu

    2008-12-15

    Accurate nuclear reaction rates are needed for primordial nucleosynthesis and hydrostatic burning in stars. The relevant reactions are extremely difficult to measure directly in the laboratory at the small astrophysical energies. In recent years direct reactions have been developed and applied to extract low-energy astrophysical S-factors. These methods require a combination of new experimental techniques and theoretical efforts, which are the subject of this presentation. (Author)

  13. US Astronomical Photographic Data Archives: Hidden Treasures and Importance for High-Energy Astrophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Hudec

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We report here on an ongoing investigation of US astronomical plate archives and tests of the suitability of transportable scanning devices for in situ digitization of archival astronomical plates, with emphasis on application in high-energy astrophysics.

  14. Space and Astrophysical Plasmas: High energy universe–Satellite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A variety of satellite missions to observe the high energy universe are currently operating and some more with more versatility and capability are on the anvil. In this paper, after giving a brief introduction to the constituents of the high energy universe and the related plasma physical problems, general as well as specific ...

  15. High energy astrophysical neutrino flux and modified dispersion relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alba, J. L. Bazo; Bustamante, M.; Gago, A. M.

    2009-01-01

    Motivated by the interest in searches for violation of CPT invariance, we study its possible effects in the flavour ratios of high-energy neutrinos coming from cosmic accelerators. In particular, we focus on the effect of an energy independent new physics contribution to the neutrino flavour osci...

  16. Fusion measurements of 12C+12C at energies of astrophysical interest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago-Gonzalez D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cross section of the 12C+12C fusion reaction at low energies is of paramount importance for models of stellar nucleosynthesis in different astrophysical scenarios, such as Type Ia supernovae and Xray superbursts, where this reaction is a primary route for the production of heavier elements. In a series of experiments performed at Argonne National Laboratory, using Gammasphere and an array of Silicon detectors, measurements of the fusion cross section of 12C+12C were successfully carried out with the γ and charged-particle coincidence technique in the center-of-mass energy range of 3-5 MeV. These were the first background-free fusion cross section measurements for 12C+12C at energies of astrophysical interest. Our results are consistent with previous measurements in the high-energy region; however, our lowest energy measurement indicates a fusion cross section slightly lower than those obtained with other techniques.

  17. Advanced Telescope for High Energy Nuclear Astrophysics (ATHENA)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, W. N; Dermer, C; Kroeger, R. A; Kurfess, J. D; Gehrels, N; Grindlay, J; Leising, M. D; Prince, T; Purcell, W; Ryan, J; Tumer, T

    1995-01-01

    We present a space mission concept for a low energy gamma-ray telescope, ATHENA, which is under investigation as the next major advance in gamma-ray spectroscopy following the current COMPTON Gamma...

  18. High-energy-density physics foundation of inertial fusion and experimental astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Drake, R Paul

    2018-01-01

    The raw numbers of high-energy-density physics are amazing: shock waves at hundreds of km/s (approaching a million km per hour), temperatures of millions of degrees, and pressures that exceed 100 million atmospheres. This title surveys the production of high-energy-density conditions, the fundamental plasma and hydrodynamic models that can describe them and the problem of scaling from the laboratory to the cosmos. Connections to astrophysics are discussed throughout. The book is intended to support coursework in high-energy-density physics, to meet the needs of new researchers in this field, and also to serve as a useful reference on the fundamentals. Specifically the book has been designed to enable academics in physics, astrophysics, applied physics and engineering departments to provide in a single-course, an introduction to fluid mechanics and radiative transfer, with dramatic applications in the field of high-energy-density systems. This second edition includes pedagogic improvements to the presentation ...

  19. Testing Special Relativity at High Energies with Astrophysical Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, F. W.

    2007-01-01

    Since the group of Lorentz boosts is unbounded, there is a question as to whether Lorentz invariance (LI) holds to infinitely short distances. However, special and general relativity may break down at the Planck scale. Various quantum gravity scenarios such as loop quantum gravity, as well as some forms of string theory and extra dimension models may imply Lorentz violation (LV) at ultrahigh energies. The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), to be launched in mid-December, will measure the spectra of distant extragalactic sources of high energy gamma-rays, particularly active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts. GLAST can look for energy-dependent gamma-ray propagation effects from such sources as a signal of Lorentz invariance violation. These sources may also exhibit the high energy cutoffs predicted to be the result of intergalactic annihilation interactions with low energy photons having a flux level as determined by various astronomical observations. With LV the threshold for such interactions can be significantly raised, changing the predicted absorption turnover in the observed spectrum of the sources. Stecker and Glashow have shown that the existence such absorption features in the spectra of extragalactic sources puts constraints on LV. Such constraints have important implications for some quantum gravity and large extra dimension models. Future spaceborne detectors dedicated to measuring gamma-ray polarization can look for birefringence effects as a possible signal of loop quantum gravity. A very small LV may also result in the modification or elimination of the GZK effect, thus modifying the spectrum of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. This possibility can be explored with ground-based arrays such as Auger or with a space based detector system such as the proposed OWL satellite mission.

  20. Experiments and models of MHD jets and their relevance to astrophysics and solar physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, Paul

    2017-10-01

    MHD-driven flows exist in both space and lab plasmas because the MHD force-balance equation J × B - ∇ P = 0 can only be satisfied in situations having an unusual degree of symmetry. In the normal situation where such symmetry does not exist, an arbitrary magnetic field B and its associated current J =μ0- 1 ∇ × B provide a magnetic force F = J × B having the character of a torque, i.e., ∇ × F ≠ 0 . Because ∇ × ∇ P = 0 is a mathematical identity, no pressure gradient can balance this torque so a flow is driven. Additionally, since ideal MHD has magnetic flux frozen into the frame of the moving plasma, the flow convects frozen-in magnetic flux. If the flow slows and piles up, both the plasma and the frozen-in magnetic flux will be compressed. This magnetic flux compression amplifies both the frozen-in B and its associated J . Slowing down thus increases certain components of F , in particular the pinch force associated with the electric current in the flow direction. This increased pinching causes the flow to self-collimate if the leading edge of the flow moves slower than the trailing part so there is compression in the flow frame. The result is that the flow self-collimates and forms a narrow jet. Self-collimating jets with embedded electric current and helical magnetic field are analogous to the straight cylindrical approximation of a tokamak, but now with the length of the cylinder continuously increasing and the radius depending on axial position. The flows are directed from axial regions having small radius to axial regions having large radius. The flow velocity is proportional to the axial electric current and is a significant fraction of the Alfvén velocity. Examples of these MHD-driven flows are astrophysical jets, certain solar coronal situations, and the initial plasma produced by the coaxial magnetized plasma guns used for making spheromaks. The above picture has been developed from laboratory measurements, analytic models, and numerical

  1. ASTROPHYSICS. Atom-interferometry constraints on dark energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, P; Jaffe, M; Haslinger, P; Simmons, Q; Müller, H; Khoury, J

    2015-08-21

    If dark energy, which drives the accelerated expansion of the universe, consists of a light scalar field, it might be detectable as a "fifth force" between normal-matter objects, in potential conflict with precision tests of gravity. Chameleon fields and other theories with screening mechanisms, however, can evade these tests by suppressing the forces in regions of high density, such as the laboratory. Using a cesium matter-wave interferometer near a spherical mass in an ultrahigh-vacuum chamber, we reduced the screening mechanism by probing the field with individual atoms rather than with bulk matter. We thereby constrained a wide class of dark energy theories, including a range of chameleon and other theories that reproduce the observed cosmic acceleration. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. Advanced Telescope for High Energy Nuclear Astrophysics (ATHENA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    contributions of supernovae , novae, and massive stars, discover many sites of galactic supernovae in 44Ti (last 1000 yrs) and 26Al (last 106 yrs) and...map interactions of low energy cosmic rays in the interstellar medium and molecular clouds. 2) Detect fresh radioactivity from several extragalactic...Type Ia supernovae per year, determine the nature of Type Ia events, and evaluate their use as a cosmic distance indicator. 3) Test the explosive

  3. How unequal fluxes of high energy astrophysical neutrinos and antineutrinos can fake new physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunokawa, Hiroshi [Departamento de Física, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, C.P. 38071, 22452-970, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Panes, Boris; Funchal, Renata Zukanovich [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, C.P. 66.318, 05315-970 São Paulo (Brazil)

    2016-10-21

    Flavor ratios of very high energy astrophysical neutrinos, which can be studied at the Earth by a neutrino telescope such as IceCube, can serve to diagnose their production mechanism at the astrophysical source. The flavor ratios for neutrinos and antineutrinos can be quite different as we do not know how they are produced in the astrophysical environment. Due to this uncertainty the neutrino and antineutrino flavor ratios at the Earth also could be quite different. Nonetheless, it is generally assumed that flavor ratios for neutrinos and antineutrinos are the same at the Earth, in fitting the high energy astrophysical neutrino data. This is a reasonable assumption for the limited statistics for the data we currently have. However, in the future the fit must be performed allowing for a possible discrepancy in these two fractions in order to be able to disentangle different production mechanisms at the source from new physics in the neutrino sector. To reinforce this issue, in this work we show that a wrong assumption about the distribution of neutrino flavor ratios at the Earth may indeed lead to misleading interpretations of IceCube results.

  4. Towards increased policy relevance in energy modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worrell, Ernst; Ramesohl, Stephan; Boyd, Gale

    2003-07-29

    Historically, most energy models were reasonably equipped to assess the impact of a subsidy or change in taxation, but are often insufficient to assess the impact of more innovative policy instruments. We evaluate the models used to assess future energy use, focusing on industrial energy use. We explore approaches to engineering-economic analysis that could help improve the realism and policy relevance of engineering-economic modeling frameworks. We also explore solutions to strengthen the policy usefulness of engineering-economic analysis that can be built from a framework of multi-disciplinary cooperation. We focus on the so-called ''engineering-economic'' (or ''bottom-up'') models, as they include the amount of detail that is commonly needed to model policy scenarios. We identify research priorities for the modeling framework, technology representation in models, policy evaluation and modeling of decision-making behavior.

  5. General Astrophysics with TPF: Not Just Dark Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchner, Marc

    2006-01-01

    Besides searching for Earth-LIke Planets, TPF can study Jupiters, Neptunes, and all sorts of exotic planets. It can image debris-disks, YSO disks, AGN disks, maybe even AGB disks. And you are probably aware that a large optical space telescope like TPF-C or TPF-O can be a fantastic tool for studying the equation of state of the Dark Energy. I will review some of the future science of TPF-C, TPF-I and TPF-O, focusing on the applications of TPF to the study of objects in our Galaxy: especially circumstellar disks and planets other than exo-Earths.

  6. The Utilization of Classifications in High-Energy Astrophysics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Bill

    2012-03-01

    The history of high-energy gamma observations stretches back several decades. But it was with the launch of the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) in 1991 onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) [1], that the field entered a new era of discovery. At the high-energy end of the electromagnetic spectrum, incoming particles of light, photons, interact with matter mainly by producing electron-positron pairs and this process dominates above an energy of 10-30MeV depending on the material. To a high degree the directionality of the incoming gamma ray is reflected in the e+ and e-, and hence the detection of the trajectories of the e+e- pair can be used to infer the direction of the originating photon. Measuring these high-energy charged particles is the domain of high-energy particle physics and so it should be of little surprise that particle physicists played a significant role in the design and construction of EGRET, as well as the design and implementation of analysis methods for the resulting data. Prior to EGRET, only a handful of sources in the sky were known as high-energy gamma-ray emitters. During EGRET's 9-years mission the final catalog included over 270 sources including new types such as Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). This set the stage for the next-generation mission, the Gamma ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) [2]. Very early in the EGRET mission, the realization that the high-energy gamma-ray sky was extremely interesting led to a competition to develop the next-generation instruments. The technology used in EGRET was frozen in the late 1970s and by 1992, enormous advances had been made in experimental particle physics. In particular the effort to develop solid state detectors, targeted for use at the Super Conducting Super Collider (SSC), had made the technology of silicon strip detectors (SSDs) commercially viable for use in large area arrays. Given the limitations imposed by the space environment (e.g., operate in a vacuum, scarce

  7. Densities and refractive indices of ethane and ethylene at astrophysically relevant temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satorre, M. Á.; Millán, C.; Molpeceres, G.; Luna, R.; Maté, B.; Domingo, M.; Escribano, R.; Santonja, C.

    2017-11-01

    We report the density and refractive index, at 633 nm, of ethane and ethylene ices at temperatures from 13 to 65 K, measured by double laser interferometry and a cryogenic quartz crystal microbalance in a high vacuum chamber. Both quantities rise with the temperature of deposition from 13 K up to a plateau, 40 K for ethane and 22 K for ethylene. An amorphous structure is suggested for temperatures below 40 K for ethane and below 20 K for ethylene. Above these temperatures, 40 K for ethane and 20 K for ethylene, a crystalline structure is proposed. Ethylene results deviate from linear growth between 25 and 35 K, where a metastable structure is reported in the literature. Density values increase from about 0.40 to 0.60 g cm-3 for ethane and from about 0.45 to almost 0.65 g cm-3 for ethylene. The real part of the refractive index changes from about 1.27 to 1.45 for ethane and from about 1.30 to almost 1.48 for ethylene. Results are relevant especially to the outer Solar System, where the presence of these molecules is reported, and for experiments involving them.

  8. Excitation of compound states in the subsystems as indirect tool in nuclear astrophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tribble R.E.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Astrophysical reactions proceeding through compound states represent one of the crucial part of nuclear astrophysics. However, due to the presence of the Coulomb barrier, it is often very difficult or even impossible to obtain the astrophysical S (E factor from measurements in the laboratory at astrophysically relevant energies. The Trojan Horse method (THM provides a unique tool to obtain the information about resonant astrophysical reactions at astrophysically relevant energies. Here the theory and application of the THM for the resonant reactions is addressed.

  9. Identification of Accretion as Grain Growth Mechanism in Astrophysically Relevant Water–Ice Dusty Plasma Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Ryan S.; Chai, Kil-Byoung; Bellan, Paul M. [Applied Physics and Materials Science, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The grain growth process in the Caltech water–ice dusty plasma experiment has been studied using a high-speed camera and a long-distance microscope lens. It is observed that (i) the ice grain number density decreases fourfold as the average grain major axis increases from 20 to 80 μ m, (ii) the major axis length has a log-normal distribution rather than a power-law dependence, and (iii) no collisions between ice grains are apparent. The grains have a large negative charge resulting in strong mutual repulsion and this, combined with the fractal character of the ice grains, prevents them from agglomerating. In order for the grain kinetic energy to be sufficiently small to prevent collisions between ice grains, the volumetric packing factor (i.e., ratio of the actual volume to the volume of a circumscribing ellipsoid) of the ice grains must be less than ∼0.1 depending on the exact relative velocity of the grains in question. Thus, it is concluded that direct accretion of water molecules is very likely to dominate the observed ice grain growth.

  10. Studying astrophysical reactions with low-energy RI beams at CRIB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamaguchi H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies on nuclear astrophysics, nuclear structure, and other interests have been performed using the radioactive-isotope (RI beams at the low-energy RI beam separator CRIB, operated by Center for Nuclear Study (CNS, the University of Tokyo. A typical measurement performed at CRIB is the elastic resonant scattering with the inverse kinematics. One recent experiment was on the α resonant scattering with 7Li and 7Be beams. This study is related to the astrophysical 7Li/7Be(α,γ reactions, important at hot p-p chain and νp-process in supernovae. There have also been measurements based on other experimental methods. The first THM measurement using an RI beam has been performed at CRIB, to study the 18F(p, α15O reaction at astrophysical energies via the three body reaction 2H(18F, α15On. The 18F(p, α 15O reaction rate is crucial to understand the 511-keV γ-ray production in nova explosion phenomena, and we successfully evaluated the reaction cross section at novae temperature and below experimentally for the first time.

  11. Low-energy nuclear astrophysics studies at the Multicharged Ion Research Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febbraro, Michael; Pain, Steven; Bannister, Mark; Deboer, Richard; Chipps, Kelly; Havener, Charles; Peters, Willan; Ummel, Chad; Smith, Michael; Temanson, Eli; Toomey, Rebecca; Walter, David

    2017-09-01

    As low-energy nuclear astrophysics progresses toward measuring reaction cross sections in the stellar burning regimes, a worldwide effort is underway to continue these measurements at underground laboratories to achieve the requisite ultra-low-background environment. These facilities are crucial for providing the required low-background environments to perform such measurements of astrophysical importance. While advances have been made in the use of accelerators underground, of equal importance is the detectors, high-current targets, and techniques required to perform such measurements. With these goals in mind, a newly established astrophysics beamline has been built at the Multicharged Ion Research Facility (MIRF) located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The unique capabilities of MIRF will be demonstrated through two recent low-energy above-ground measurements of the dominant s-process neutron source 13C(α,n)16O and associated beam-induced background source 13C(d,n)14N. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics. Research sponsored by the LDRD Program of ORNL, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. DOE.

  12. Studying astrophysical reactions with low-energy RI beams at CRIB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Hayakawa, S.; Sakaguchi, Y.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Hashimoto, T.; Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Rapisarda, G. G.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Romano, S.; Kubono, S.; Iwasa, N.; Teranishi, T.; Kawabata, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Binh, D. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. N.; Kato, S.; Komatsubara, T.; Coc, A.; De Sereville, N.; Hammache, F.; Kiss, G.; Bishop, S.

    2016-05-01

    Studies on nuclear astrophysics, nuclear structure, and other interests have been performed using the radioactive-isotope (RI) beams at the low-energy RI beam separator CRIB, operated by Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), the University of Tokyo. A typical measurement performed at CRIB is the elastic resonant scattering with the inverse kinematics. One recent experiment was on the α resonant scattering with 7Li and 7Be beams. This study is related to the astrophysical 7Li/7Be(α,γ) reactions, important at hot p-p chain and νp-process in supernovae. There have also been measurements based on other experimental methods. The first THM measurement using an RI beam has been performed at CRIB, to study the 18F(p, α)15O reaction at astrophysical energies via the three body reaction 2H(18F, α15O)n. The 18F(p, α) 15O reaction rate is crucial to understand the 511-keV γ-ray production in nova explosion phenomena, and we successfully evaluated the reaction cross section at novae temperature and below experimentally for the first time.

  13. Extensive Air Showers High Energy Phenomena and Astrophysical Aspects - A Tutorial, Reference Manual and Data Book

    CERN Document Server

    Grieder, Peter K.F

    2010-01-01

    Extensive air showers are a very unique phenomenon. In the more than six decades since their discovery by Auger et al. we have learned a great deal about these extremely energetic events and gained deep insights into high-energy phenomena, particle physics and astrophysics. In this Tutorial, Reference Manual and Data Book Peter K. F. Grieder provides the reader with a comprehensive view of the phenomenology and facts of the various types of interactions and cascades, theoretical background, experimental methods, data evaluation and interpretation, and air shower simulation. He discusses astrophysical aspects of the primary radiation and addresses the questions that continue to puzzle researchers. The book is divided into two parts, each in its own separate volume: Part I in Volume I deals mainly with the basic theoretical framework of the processes that determine an air shower and ends with a summary of ways to extract information on the primary radiation from air shower observations. It also presents a compi...

  14. Superradiance energy extraction, black-hole bombs and implications for astrophysics and particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Brito, Richard; Pani, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    This volume gives a unified picture of the multifaceted subject of superradiance, with a focus on recent developments in the field, ranging from fundamental physics to astrophysics. Superradiance is a radiation enhancement process that involves dissipative systems. With a 60 year-old history, superradiance has played a prominent role in optics, quantum mechanics and especially in relativity and astrophysics. In Einstein's General Relativity, black-hole superradiance is permitted by dissipation at the event horizon, which allows energy extraction from the vacuum, even at the classical level. When confined, this amplified radiation can give rise to strong instabilities known as "blackhole bombs'', which have applications in searches for dark matter, in physics beyond the Standard Model and in analog models of gravity. This book discusses and draws together all these fascinating aspects of superradiance.

  15. Pulsed ion hall accelerator for investigation of reactions between light nuclei in the astrophysical energy range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystritsky, V. M.; Bystritsky, Vit. M.; Dudkin, G. N.; Nechaev, B. A.; Padalko, V. N.

    2017-07-01

    The factors defining the constraints on the current characteristics of the magnetically insulated ion diode (IDM) are considered. The specific current parameters close to the maximum possible ones are obtained for the particular IDM-40 design assigned for acceleration of light ions and investigation of nuclear reactions with small cross sections in the astrophysical energy range (2-40 keV) in the entrance channel. It is experimentally demonstrated that the chosen optimal operation conditions for IDM-40 units provide high stability of the parameters (energy distribution and composition of accelerated particle beams, degree of neutralization) of the accelerated particle flux, which increases during the working pulse.

  16. EMPIRE: A code for nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palumbo, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2013-12-11

    The nuclear reaction code EMPIRE is presented as a useful tool for nuclear astrophysics. EMPIRE combines a variety of the reaction models with a comprehensive library of input parameters providing a diversity of options for the user. With exclusion of the directsemidirect capture all reaction mechanisms relevant to the nuclear astrophysics energy range of interest are implemented in the code. Comparison to experimental data show consistent agreement for all relevant channels.

  17. High-Energy-Density Physics Fundamentals, Inertial Fusion, and Experimental Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Drake, R. Paul; Horie, Yasuyuki

    2006-01-01

    The raw numbers of high-energy-density physics are amazing: shock waves at hundreds of km/s (approaching a million km per hour), temperatures of millions of degrees, and pressures that exceed 100 million atmospheres. This book introduces the reader to the fundamental tools and discoveries of high-energy-density physics. It surveys the production of high-energy-density conditions, the fundamental plasma and hydrodynamic models that can describe them and the problem of scaling from the laboratory to the cosmos. Connections to astrophysics are discussed throughout. The book is intended to support coursework in high-energy-density physics, to meet the needs of new researchers in this field, and also to serve as a useful reference on the fundamentals. Specifically the book has been designed to enable academics in physics, astrophysics, applied physics and engineering departments to provide in a single-course introduction to fluid mechanics and radiative transfer, with dramatic applications in the field of high-ene...

  18. Using Inertial Fusion Implosions to Measure the T+^{3}He Fusion Cross Section at Nucleosynthesis-Relevant Energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylstra, A B; Herrmann, H W; Johnson, M Gatu; Kim, Y H; Frenje, J A; Hale, G; Li, C K; Rubery, M; Paris, M; Bacher, A; Brune, C R; Forrest, C; Glebov, V Yu; Janezic, R; McNabb, D; Nikroo, A; Pino, J; Sangster, T C; Séguin, F H; Seka, W; Sio, H; Stoeckl, C; Petrasso, R D

    2016-07-15

    Light nuclei were created during big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). Standard BBN theory, using rates inferred from accelerator-beam data, cannot explain high levels of ^{6}Li in low-metallicity stars. Using high-energy-density plasmas we measure the T(^{3}He,γ)^{6}Li reaction rate, a candidate for anomalously high ^{6}Li production; we find that the rate is too low to explain the observations, and different than values used in common BBN models. This is the first data directly relevant to BBN, and also the first use of laboratory plasmas, at comparable conditions to astrophysical systems, to address a problem in nuclear astrophysics.

  19. Breakup of radioactive nuclear beams at intermediate energies as indirect method for nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trache, L.; Carstoiu, F.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Tribble, R. E.; Banu, A.

    2008-05-01

    We discuss the use of one-nucleon removal reactions of loosely bound nuclei at intermediate energies as an indirect method in nuclear astrophysics. These breakup reactions are good spectroscopic tools and can be used to study a large number of loosely bound proton- or neutron-rich nuclei over a wide range of beam energies. They are peripheral processes that can be used to extract asymptotic normalization coefficients (ANC) from which direct capture proton reaction rates of astrophysical interest can be calculated parameter free. We emphasize the importance of reaction model calculations and of exclusive measurements to check them. We review several cases: the breakup of 8B, 9C, 15C and 23Al. Firrst we review how we have used the data for the breakup of 8B at energies from 30 to 1000 MeV/nucleon on light and heavy targets to extract the astrophysical factor S17(0) = 18.7+/-1.9 eV.b for the key reaction for solar neutrino production. Glauber model calculations in the eikonal approximation and in the optical limit using different effective NN interactions were found to give consistent, though slightly different results, for both 8B and 9C cases, enabling also us to evaluate the precision of the method. The third case is that of a neutron-rich nucleus and the ANC alone does not lead to unambiguous estimates of the associated (n,γ) capture reaction. The 23Al case is that of an sd-shell nucleus, suspected of halo properties, for which our recent GANIL experiment revealed a complex configuration mixing in its ground state. The method outlined here has the big advantage that it can be used for beams of low quality, such as cocktail beams, and intensities as low as a few pps. As such it is very appropriate for the existing and future radioactive beam facilities. The breakup reactions are therefore complementary or a very good alternative to the use of proton and neutron transfer reactions (the ANC method) which require radioactive nuclear beams of much better purity and

  20. Underground nuclear astrophysics: why and how

    CERN Document Server

    Best, A; Fülöp, Zs; Gyürky, Gy; Laubenstein, M; Napolitani, E; Rigato, V; Roca, V; Szücs, T

    2016-01-01

    The goal of nuclear astrophysics is to measure cross sections of nuclear physics reactions of interest in astrophysics. At stars temperatures, these cross sections are very low due to the suppression of the Coulomb barrier. Cosmic ray induced background can seriously limit the determination of reaction cross sections at energies relevant to astrophysical processes and experimental setups should be arranged in order to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Placing experiments in underground sites, however, reduces this background opening the way towards ultra low cross section determination. LUNA (Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics) was pioneer in this sense. Two accelerators were mounted at the INFN National Laboratories of Gran Sasso (LNGS) allowing to study nuclear reactions close to stellar energies. A summary of the relevant technology used, including accelerators, target production and characterisation, and background treatment is given.

  1. Nuclear astrophysics at DRAGON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hager, U. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado (United States)

    2014-05-02

    The DRAGON recoil separator is located at the ISAC facility at TRIUMF, Vancouver. It is designed to measure radiative alpha and proton capture reactions of astrophysical importance. Over the last years, the DRAGON collaboration has measured several reactions using both radioactive and high-intensity stable beams. For example, the 160(a, g) cross section was recently measured. The reaction plays a role in steady-state helium burning in massive stars, where it follows the 12C(a, g) reaction. At astrophysically relevant energies, the reaction proceeds exclusively via direct capture, resulting in a low rate. In this measurement, the unique capabilities of DRAGON enabled determination not only of the total reaction rates, but also of decay branching ratios. In addition, results from other recent measurements will be presented.

  2. Balloon-Borne, High-Energy Astrophysics: Experiences from the 1960s to the 1980s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2008-01-01

    Observational high-energy astrophysics in the hard-x-ray and gamma-ray regions owes its development and initial successes to the balloon-borne development of detector systems, as well as pioneering observations, primarily in the timeframe from the 1960s to the 1990s. I will describe some of the first observations made by the Rice University balloon group in the 1960s, including the impetus for these observations. The appearance of SN 1987a led to several balloon-flight campaigns, sponsored by NASA, from Alice Springs, Australia in 1987 and 1988. During the 1980s, prototypes of instruments for the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory were flown on many balloon flights, which greatly enhanced the success of that mission.

  3. Observation of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos in three years of IceCube data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aartsen, M G; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Ahrens, M; Altmann, D; Anderson, T; Arguelles, C; Arlen, T C; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Beatty, J J; Becker Tjus, J; Becker, K-H; BenZvi, S; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H-P; Brown, A M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Christy, B; Clark, K; Classen, L; Clevermann, F; Coenders, S; Cowen, D F; Cruz Silva, A H; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; Day, M; de André, J P A M; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de Vries, K D; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Eichmann, B; Eisch, J; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Felde, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gier, D; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grandmont, D T; Grant, D; Gretskov, P; Groh, J C; Groß, A; Ha, C; Haack, C; Haj Ismail, A; Hallen, P; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Hebecker, D; Heereman, D; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hellwig, D; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huang, F; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Jagielski, K; Japaridze, G S; Jero, K; Jlelati, O; Jurkovic, M; Kaminsky, B; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kauer, M; Kelley, J L; Kheirandish, A; Kiryluk, J; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J-H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Koob, A; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kriesten, A; Krings, K; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Larsen, D T; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Leute, J; Lünemann, J; Macías, O; Madsen, J; Maggi, G; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Meli, A; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Middlemas, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Omairat, A; O'Murchadha, A; Palczewski, T; Paul, L; Penek, O; Pepper, J A; Pérez de Los Heros, C; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pinat, E; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Pütz, J; Quinnan, M; Rädel, L; Rameez, M; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Rees, I; Reimann, R; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Robertson, S; Rodrigues, J P; Rongen, M; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Sander, H-G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Shanidze, R; Sheremata, C; Smith, M W E; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stanisha, N A; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Strotjohann, N L; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Terliuk, A; Tešić, G; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Tobin, M N; Tosi, D; Tselengidou, M; Unger, E; Usner, M; Vallecorsa, S; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Wallraff, M; Weaver, Ch; Wellons, M; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Whitehorn, N; Wichary, C; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zierke, S; Zoll, M

    2014-09-05

    A search for high-energy neutrinos interacting within the IceCube detector between 2010 and 2012 provided the first evidence for a high-energy neutrino flux of extraterrestrial origin. Results from an analysis using the same methods with a third year (2012-2013) of data from the complete IceCube detector are consistent with the previously reported astrophysical flux in the 100 TeV-PeV range at the level of 10(-8)  GeV cm-2 s-1 sr-1 per flavor and reject a purely atmospheric explanation for the combined three-year data at 5.7σ. The data are consistent with expectations for equal fluxes of all three neutrino flavors and with isotropic arrival directions, suggesting either numerous or spatially extended sources. The three-year data set, with a live time of 988 days, contains a total of 37 neutrino candidate events with deposited energies ranging from 30 to 2000 TeV. The 2000-TeV event is the highest-energy neutrino interaction ever observed.

  4. Scaling Extreme Astrophysical Phenomena to the Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remington, B A

    2007-11-01

    High-energy-density (HED) physics refers broadly to the study of macroscopic collections of matter under extreme conditions of temperature and density. The experimental facilities most widely used for these studies are high-power lasers and magnetic-pinch generators. The HED physics pursued on these facilities is still in its infancy, yet new regimes of experimental science are emerging. Examples from astrophysics include work relevant to planetary interiors, supernovae, astrophysical jets, and accreting compact objects (such as neutron stars and black holes). In this paper, we review a selection of recent results in this new field of HED laboratory astrophysics and provide a brief look ahead to the coming decade.

  5. Study of the pd reaction in the astrophysical energy region using the Hall accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystritsky, V. M.; Gerasimov, V. V.; Krylov, A. R.; Parzhitskii, S. S.; Dudkin, G. N.; Kaminskii, V. L.; Nechaev, B. A.; Padalko, V. N.; Petrov, A. V.; Mesyats, G. A.; Filipowicz, M.; Wozniak, J.; Bystritskii, Vit. M.

    2008-10-01

    The pd reaction at ultra-low proton deuteron collision energies has been studied using the Hall pulsed ion accelerator and the solid target of heavy water D2O. The experiment on measurement of the astrophysical Spd factor and the pd reaction cross-section was carried out at average pd collision energies 8.28, 9.49, and 10.10 keV. The 5.5-MeV γ rays from the pd reaction were detected by detectors based on plastic scintillators and NaI(Tl) crystals. Parameters of the accelerated hydrogen ion flux were measured and monitored with diagnostic equipment consisting of an energy analyzer, plasma optical radiation detectors, the Rogovsky belt, and collimated Faraday cups. The results obtained agree within the errors with the data of the pd experiments carried out by the LUNA collaboration at the Gran Sasso Laboratory with a target filled with gaseous deuterium. The reported experiment was carried out at the Hall ion accelerator of the Research Institute of Nuclear Physics, Tomsk Polytechnic University.

  6. Constraining the S factor of 15N(p,g)16O at Astrophysical Energies

    CERN Document Server

    LeBlanc, P J; Goerres, J; Junker, M; Azuma, R; Beard, M; Bemmerer, D; Best, A; Broggini, C; Caciolli, A; Corvisiero, P; Costantini, H; Couder, M; deBoer, R; Elekes, Z; Falahat, S; Formicola, A; Fulop, Zs; Gervino, G; Guglielmetti, A; Gustavino, C; Gyurky, Gy; Kaeppeler, F; Kontos, A; Kuntz, R; Leiste, H; Lemut, A; Li, Q; Limata, B; Marta, M; Mazzocchi, C; Menegazzo, R; O'Brien, S; Palumbo, A; Prati, P; Roca, V; Rolfs, C; Alvarez, C Rossi; Somorjai, E; Stech, E; Straniero, O; Strieder, F; Tan, W; Terrasi, F; Trautvetter, H P; Uberseder, E; Wiescher, M

    2010-01-01

    The 15N(p,g)16O reaction represents a break out reaction linking the first and second cycle of the CNO cycles redistributing the carbon and nitrogen abundances into the oxygen range. The reaction is dominated by two broad resonances at Ep = 338 keV and 1028 keV and a Direct Capture contribution to the ground state of 16O. Interference effects between these contributions in both the low energy region (Ep < 338 keV) and in between the two resonances (338 energies of astrophysical interest. To facilitate a reliable extrapolation the 15N(p,g)16O reaction has been remeasured covering the energy range from Ep=1800 keV down to 130 keV. The results have been analyzed in the framework of a multi-level R-matrix theory and a S(0) value of 39.6 keV b has been found.

  7. Before the Ring: synthesis of linear organic molecules in astrophysical ices by low energy electron impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huels, Michael A.; Bass Andrew, D.; Mirsaleh-Kohan, Nasrin; Sanche, Leon

    The question of the origin for the building blocks of life, either synthesized here on earth, or in space [1], has been the subject of much debate, experimental investigation, or astronomical observation, much of it stimulated by the early experiments of Miller [2], and subsequent space radiation related variations thereof [3-5]. And while the precise details of the formation of even the simplest biomolecules that make up life on earth still remain shrouded inmystery, one of the notions that persist throughout the debate is that the building blocks of life, such as amino-acids, or even the cyclic components of RNA and DNA, or other cyclic hydrocarbons (e.g. PHAs), where synthesized via radiolysis [6] either in the earths proto-atmosphere, its early oceans, or in the near interstellar space surrounding the early earth. Here we provide experimental evidence for the hypothesis that interactions of low energy secondary electrons and ions, formed during the radiolysis of matter, with atoms and molecules in the medium, may have played, and may still play an important role in the chemical transformation of astrophysical or planetary surface ices [7], where they lead to the synthesis of more complex chemical species from less complex, naturally occurring components. We report the synthesis and desorption of new chemical species from simple molecular surface ices, containing CH4 / CD4 , C2 D2 , O2 , CO, CO2 , or N2 in various combination mixtures, irradiated by low energy (life's most basic cyclic molecular components in planetary, or astrophysical surface ices that are continuously subjected to the types of space radiations (UV, X-or -ray, or heavy ions) that can generate such low energy secondary electrons. [Funded by NSERC and Canadian Space Agency] [1] P. Ehrenfreund, S. Rasmussen, J. Cleaves, L. Chen, Astrobiology 6 (2006) 490. [2] (a) S.L. Miller, Science 117 (1953) 528; (b) S.L. Miller, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 77 (1955) 2351. [3] (a) M.H. Morre, R.L. Hudson, Icarus 140

  8. First application of the Trojan Horse Method with a Radioactive Ion Beam: study of the $^{18}$F($p,{\\alpha}$)$^{15}$O}} reaction at astrophysical energies

    CERN Document Server

    Cherubini, S; Spitaleri, C; Rapisarda, G G; La Cognata, M; Lamia, L; Pizzone, R G; Romano, S; Kubono, S; Yamaguchi, H; Hayakawa, S; Wakabayashi, Y; Iwasa, N; Kato, S; Komatsubara, T; Teranishi, T; Coc, A; de Séréville, N; Hammache, F; Kiss, G; Bishop, S; Binh, D N

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of nuclear cross sections at astrophysical energies involving unstable species is one of the most challenging tasks in experimental nuclear physics. The use of indirect methods is often unavoidable in this scenario. In this paper the Trojan Horse Method is applied for the first time to a radioactive ion beam induced reaction studying the $^{18}$F($p,{\\alpha}$)$^{15}$O process at low energies relevant to astrophysics via the three body reaction $^{2}$H($^{18}$F,${\\alpha}^{15}$O)n. The knowledge of the $^{18}$F($p, {\\alpha}$)$^{15}$O reaction rate is crucial to understand the nova explosion phenomena. The cross section of this reaction is characterized by the presence of several resonances in $^{19}$Ne and possibly interference effects among them. The results reported in Literature are not satisfactory and new investigations of the $^{18}$F($p,{\\alpha}$)$^{15}$O reaction cross section will be useful. In the present work the spin-parity assignments of relevant levels have been discussed and the astro...

  9. Cognitive Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madore, Barry F.

    2012-09-01

    Cognitive Astrophysics works at the cusp between Cognitive Science and Astrophysics, drawing upon lessons learned in the Philosophy of Science, Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence. We will introduce and illustrate the concept of ``Downward Causation,'' common in philosophical discussions, but either unknown to or disdained by most physicists. A clear example operating on cosmological scales involving the origin of large-scale structure will be given. We will also make the case that on scales exceeding most laboratory experiments, self-gravitating matter can be considered to be in a ``fifth state'', characterized primarily by its negative specific heat, as first recognized by Lynden-Bell and Lynden-Bell (1977, MNRAS, 181, 405). Such systems increase their temperature as they lose energy. Numerous examples will be given and discussed.

  10. High Energy Astrophysics Tests of Lorentz Invariance and Quantum Gravity Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, Floyd W.

    2012-01-01

    High energy astrophysics observations provide the best possibilities to detect a very small violation of Lorentz invariance such as may be related to the structure of space-time near the Planck scale of approx.10(exp -35) m. I will discuss the possible signatures of Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) that can be manifested by observing of the spectra, polarization, and timing of gamma-rays from active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts. Other sensitive tests are provided by observations of the spectra of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays and neutrinos. Using the latest data from the Pierre Auger Observatory one can already derive an upper limit of 4.5 x 10(exp -23) on the fraction of LIV at a Lorentz factor of approx. 2 x 10(exp 11). This result has fundamental implications for quantum gravity models. I will also discuss the possibilities of using more sensitive space-based detection techniques to improve searches for LIV in the future. I will also discuss how the LIV formalism casts doubt on the OPERA superluminal neutrino claim.

  11. Nuclear interactions of high energy heavy ions and applications in astrophysics. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wefel, J.P.; Guzik, T.G.

    1998-06-25

    Projectile fragmentation experiments have been conducted at the LBL Bevalac accelerator, utilizing both the B40 and the HISS facilities, to produce a dataset of 36 beam/energy combinations covering projectiles from {sup 4}He to {sup 58}Ni and various energies from 170--2100 MeV/nucleon. While some runs were subject to beam instabilities, magnet problems or low statistics, there remains a large dataset which is still being analyzed. The results will be used to investigate the physics of the intermediate energy fragmentation process and will find application in the astrophysics of cosmic ray propagation in the galaxy. An overview of the science goals and rationale is followed by presentation of the experimental techniques and apparatus that has been employed. Data analysis, including both detector subsystem and accelerator calibration, is discussed with emphasis on the unique features of the dataset and the analysis problems being addressed. Results from the experiments are presented throughout to illustrate the status of the analysis, e.g., momentum distribution widths. Total, Elemental and Isotopic cross sections from various beam/energy combinations are presented, including the first data on {sup 32}S fragmentation and the complete isotopic fragmentation cross sections for {sup 28}Si interacting in both Carbon and Hydrogen targets. The new results are compared to any existing data and to formulae used to predict unmeasured cross sections. The size and complexity of the dataset and the required detail of the analysis precluded finishing the full analysis under the subject grant. Plans for additional analysis are presented, and these will be carried out in coming years as time and resources permit.

  12. Wide field imager instrument for the Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meidinger, Norbert; Nandra, Kirpal; Plattner, Markus; Porro, Matteo; Rau, Arne; Santangelo, Andrea; Tenzer, Chris; Wilms, Jörn

    2015-01-01

    The Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics (Athena) has been selected for ESA's L2 mission, scheduled for launch in 2028. It will provide the necessary capabilities to achieve the ambitious goals of the science theme "The Hot and Energetic Universe." Athena's x-ray mirrors will be based on silicon pore optics technology with a 12-m focal length. Two complementary focal plane camera systems are foreseen, which can be moved interchangeably to the focus of the mirror system: the actively shielded micro-calorimeter spectrometer X-IFU and the wide field imager (WFI). The WFI camera will provide an unprecedented survey power through its large field of view of 40 arc min with a high count-rate capability (˜1 Crab). It permits a state-of-the-art energy resolution in the energy band of 0.1 to 15 keV during the entire mission lifetime (e.g., full width at half maximum ≤150 eV at 6 keV). This performance is accomplished by a set of depleted P-channel field effect transistor (DEPFET) active pixel sensor matrices with a pixel size well suited to the angular resolution of 5 arc sec (on-axis) of the mirror system. Each DEPFET pixel is a combined detector-amplifier structure with a MOSFET integrated onto a fully depleted 450-μm-thick silicon bulk. This manuscript will summarize the current instrument concept and design, the status of the technology development, and the envisaged baseline performance.

  13. Recent Progresses in Ab-Initio Studies of Low-Energy Few-Nucleon Reactions of Astrophysical Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcucci, Laura E.

    2017-03-01

    We review the most recent theoretical studies of nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest involving few-nucleon systems. In particular, we focus on the radiative capture of protons by deuterons in the energy range of interest for Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. Related to this, we will discuss also the most recent calculation of tritium β -decay. Two frameworks will be considered, the conventional and the chiral effective field theory approach.

  14. Direct capture contribution to the sup 1 sup 1 C(p,gamma) sup 1 sup 2 N reaction at astrophysical energies

    CERN Document Server

    Timofeyuk, N K

    2003-01-01

    The contribution of the direct mechanism to the sup 1 sup 1 C(p,gamma) sup 1 sup 2 N capture reaction at astrophysically relevant energies is calculated using the overlap integral and the p- sup 1 sup 1 C local effective potential obtained within a microscopic approach. This approach is based on the solution of the inhomogeneous differential equation with the source term calculated within the translation-invariant 0 Planck constant omega shell model. The calculations resulted in a zero-energy astrophysical S-factor S(0) equal to 0.149 keV b. This value was obtained with the two-body effective NN potential, which gives the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) for mirror nucleus sup 1 sup 2 B close to the available experimental value. A separate estimation of S(0) based on the ratio of mirror ANCs gave S(0)=0.111 sup + sup 0 sup . sup 0 sup 2 sup 5 sub - sub 0 sub . sub 0 sub 2 sub 0 keV b. This value is about three times larger than the one obtained from the Coulomb breakup of sup 1 sup 2 N.

  15. White paper on nuclear astrophysics and low-energy nuclear physics, Part 2: Low-energy nuclear physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Joe; Carpenter, Michael P.; Casten, Richard; Elster, Charlotte; Fallon, Paul; Gade, Alexandra; Gross, Carl; Hagen, Gaute; Hayes, Anna C.; Higinbotham, Douglas W.; Howell, Calvin R.; Horowitz, Charles J.; Jones, Kate L.; Kondev, Filip G.; Lapi, Suzanne; Macchiavelli, Augusto; McCutchen, Elizabeth A.; Natowitz, Joe; Nazarewicz, Witold; Papenbrock, Thomas; Reddy, Sanjay; Riley, Mark A.; Savage, Martin J.; Savard, Guy; Sherrill, Bradley M.; Sobotka, Lee G.; Stoyer, Mark A.; Betty Tsang, M.; Vetter, Kai; Wiedenhoever, Ingo; Wuosmaa, Alan H.; Yennello, Sherry

    2017-05-01

    Over the last decade, the Low-Energy Nuclear Physics (LENP) and Nuclear Astrophysics (NAP) communities have increasingly organized themselves in order to take a coherent approach to resolving the challenges they face. As a result, there is a high level of optimism in view of the unprecedented opportunities for substantial progress. In preparation of the 2015 US Nuclear Science Long Range Plan (LRP), the two American Physical Society Division of Nuclear Physics town meetings on LENP and NAP were held jointly on August 21-23, 2014, at Texas A&M, College Station, in Texas. These meetings were co-organized to take advantage of the strong synergy between the two fields. The present White Paper attempts to communicate the sense of great anticipation and enthusiasm that came out of these meetings. A unanimously endorsed set of joint resolutions condensed from the individual recommendations of the two town meetings were agreed upon. The present LENP White Paper discusses the above and summarizes in detail for each of the sub-fields within low-energy nuclear physics, the major accomplishments since the last LRP, the compelling near-term and long-term scientific opportunities plus the resources needed to achieve these goals, along with the scientific impact on, and interdisciplinary connections to, other fields.

  16. THE REACTION {sup 8}Li(n,γ){sup 9}Li AT ASTROPHYSICAL ENERGIES AND ITS ROLE IN PRIMORDIAL NUCLEOSYNTHESIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubovichenko, S. B.; Dzhazairov-Kakhramanov, A. V., E-mail: dubovichenko@mail.ru, E-mail: albert-j@yandex.ru [V. G. Fessenkov Astrophysical Institute “NCSRT” NSA RK, 050020, Observatory 23, Kamenskoe plato, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2016-03-01

    The possibility of describing available experimental data for the total cross sections of neutron radiative capture on {sup 8}Li at thermal and astrophysical energies was considered within the framework of the modified potential cluster model with the state classification of nuclear particles according to the Young tableaux. Our approach allows one to transmit available data in the energy range 0.1–1.0 MeV quite well, and predicts the behavior of the total cross sections at super-low energies, down to 25.3 × 10{sup −9} MeV.

  17. Laboratory Astrophysics on High Power Lasers and Pulsed Power Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remington, B A

    2002-02-05

    Over the past decade a new genre of laboratory astrophysics has emerged, made possible by the new high energy density (HED) experimental facilities, such as large lasers, z-pinch generators, and high current particle accelerators. (Remington, 1999; 2000; Drake, 1998; Takabe, 2001) On these facilities, macroscopic collections of matter can be created in astrophysically relevant conditions, and its collective properties measured. Examples of processes and issues that can be experimentally addressed include compressible hydrodynamic mixing, strong shock phenomena, radiative shocks, radiation flow, high Mach-number jets, complex opacities, photoionized plasmas, equations of state of highly compressed matter, and relativistic plasmas. These processes are relevant to a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, such as supernovae and supernova remnants, astrophysical jets, radiatively driven molecular clouds, accreting black holes, planetary interiors, and gamma-ray bursts. These phenomena will be discussed in the context of laboratory astrophysics experiments possible on existing and future HED facilities.

  18. Capture reactions at astrophysically relevant energies: extended gas target experiments and GEANT simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Kölle, V; Braitmayer, S E; Mohr, P J; Wilmes, S; Staudt, G; Hammer, J W; Jäger, M; Knee, H; Kunz, R; Mayer, A

    1999-01-01

    Several resonances of the capture reaction sup 2 sup 0 Ne(alpha, gamma) sup 2 sup 4 Mg were measured using an extended windowless gas target system. Detailed GEANT simulations were performed to derive the strength and the total width of the resonances from the measured yield curve. The crucial experimental parameters, which are mainly the density profile in the gas target and the efficiency of the gamma-ray detector, were analyzed by a comparison between the measured data and the corresponding simulation calculations. The excellent agreement between the experimental data and the simulations gives detailed insight into these parameters. (author)

  19. Front-end ASICs for high-energy astrophysics in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevin, O.; Limousin, O.; Meuris, A.

    2016-07-01

    In most of embedded imaging systems for space applications, high granularity and increasing size of focal planes justify an almost systematic use of integrated circuits. . To fulfill challenging requirements for excellent spatial and energy resolution, integrated circuits must fit the sensors perfectly and interface the system such a way to optimize simultaneously noise, geometry and architecture. Moreover, very low power consumption and radiation tolerance are mandatory to envision a use onboard a payload in space. Consequently, being part of an optimized detection system for space, the integrated circuit is specifically designed for each application and becomes an Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC). The paper focuses on mixed analog and digital signal ASICs for spectro-imaging systems in the keVMeV energy band. The first part of the paper summarizes the main advantages conferred by the use of front-end ASICs for highenergy astrophysics instruments in space mission. Space qualification of ASICs requires the chip to be radiation hard. The paper will shortly describe some of the typical hardening techniques and give some guidelines that an ASIC designer should follow to choose the most efficient technology for his project. The first task of the front-end electronics is to convert the charge coming from the detector into a voltage. For most of the Silicon detectors (CCD, DEPFET, SDD) this is conversion happens in the detector itself. For other sensor materials, charge preamplifiers operate the conversion. The paper shortly describes the different key parameters of charge preamplifiers and the binding parameters for the design. Filtering is generally mandatory in order to increase the signal to noise ratio or to reduce the duration of the signal. After a brief review on the main noise sources, the paper reviews noise-filtering techniques that are commonly used in Integrated circuits designs. The way sensors and ASICs are interconnected together plays a

  20. The H2 + CO ↔ H2CO Reaction: Rate Constants and Relevance to Hot and Dense Astrophysical Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichietti, R. M.; Spada, R. F. K.; da Silva, A. B. F.; Machado, F. B. C.; Haiduke, R. L. A.

    2016-07-01

    A theoretical thermochemical and kinetic investigation of the thermal H2 + CO ↔ H2CO reaction was performed for a temperature range from 200 to 4000 K. Geometries and vibrational frequencies of reactants, product, and transition state (TS) were obtained at CCSD/cc-pVxZ (x = T and Q) levels and scaling factors were employed to consider anharmonicity effects on vibrational frequencies, zero-point energies, and thermal corrections provided by these methodologies. Enthalpies Gibbs energies, and rate constants for this reaction were determined by including a complete basis set extrapolation correction for the electronic properties calculated at CCSD(T)/cc-pVyZ (y = Q and 5) levels. Our study indicates that enthalpy changes for this reaction are highly dependent on temperature. Moreover, forward and reverse (high-pressure limit) rate constants were obtained from variational TS theory with quantum tunneling corrections. Thus, modified Arrhenius’ equations were fitted by means of the best forward and reverse rate constant values, which provide very reliable estimates for these quantities within the temperature range between 700 and 4000 K. To our knowledge, this is the first kinetic study done for the forward H2 + CO \\to H2CO process in a wide temperature range. Finally, these results can be used to explain the formaldehyde abundance in hot and dense interstellar media, possibly providing data about the physical conditions associated with H2CO masers close to massive star-forming regions.

  1. First Experimental Constraint on the Fe59(n ,γ)Fe60 Reaction Cross Section at Astrophysical Energies via the Coulomb Dissociation of Fe60

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uberseder, E.; Adachi, T.; Aumann, T.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Boretzky, K.; Caesar, C.; Dillmann, I.; Ershova, O.; Estrade, A.; Farinon, F.; Hagdahl, J.; Heftrich, T.; Heil, M.; Heine, M.; Holl, M.; Ignatov, A.; Johansson, H. T.; Kalantar, N.; Langer, C.; Le Bleis, T.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Marganiec, J.; Movsesyan, A.; Najafi, M. A.; Nilsson, T.; Nociforo, C.; Panin, V.; Pietri, S.; Plag, R.; Prochazka, A.; Rastrepina, G.; Reifarth, R.; Ricciardi, V.; Rigollet, C.; Rossi, D. M.; Savran, D.; Simon, H.; Sonnabend, K.; Streicher, B.; Terashima, S.; Thies, R.; Togano, Y.; Volkov, V.; Wamers, F.; Weick, H.; Weigand, M.; Wiescher, M.; Wimmer, C.; Winckler, N.; Woods, P. J.

    2014-05-01

    The radionuclide Fe60 has been of great interest to the nuclear astrophysics community for over a decade. An initial discrepancy between the observed and modeled Galactic Fe60/Al26 ratio motivated numerous studies focused on the nucleosynthesis of these two isotopes, though the cross section of the primary astrophysical production reaction, Fe59(n ,γ)Fe60, has remained purely theoretical. The present work offers a first experimental constraint on the Fe59(n ,γ)Fe60 cross section at astrophysical energies, obtained indirectly via Coulomb dissociation, and demonstrates that the theoretical reaction rates used in present stellar models are not highly erroneous.

  2. Experimental astrophysics with high power lasers and Z pinches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remington, B A; Drake, R P; Ryutov, D D

    2004-12-10

    With the advent of high energy density (HED) experimental facilities, such as high-energy lasers and fast Z-pinch, pulsed-power facilities, mm-scale quantities of matter can be placed in extreme states of density, temperature, and/or velocity. This has enabled the emergence of a new class of experimental science, HED laboratory astrophysics, wherein the properties of matter and the processes that occur under extreme astrophysical conditions can be examined in the laboratory. Areas particularly suitable to this class of experimental astrophysics include the study of opacities relevant to stellar interiors; equations of state relevant to planetary interiors; strong shock driven nonlinear hydrodynamics and radiative dynamics, relevant to supernova explosions and subsequent evolution; protostellar jets and high Mach-number flows; radiatively driven molecular clouds and nonlinear photoevaporation front dynamics; and photoionized plasmas relevant to accretion disks around compact objects, such as black holes and neutron stars.

  3. Benchmarking transition energies and emission strengths for X-ray astrophysics with measurements at the Livermore EBITs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hell, Natalie [Friedrich Alexander Univ., Erlangen (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    K-shell transitions in astrophysically abundant metals and L-shell transitions in Fe group elements show characteristic signatures in the soft X-ray spectrum in the energy range 0.1–10 keV. These signatures have great diagnostic value for plasma parameters such as electron and ion temperatures and densities, and can thus help understand the physics controlling the energetic processes in astrophysical sources. This diagnostic power increases with advances in spectral resolution and effective area of the employed X-ray observatories. However, to make optimal use of the diagnostic potential – whether through global spectral modeling or through diagnostics from local modeling of individual lines – the underlying atomic physics has to be complete and well known. With the next generation of soft X-ray observatories featuring micro-calorimeters such as the SXS on Astro- H/Hitomi and the X-IFU on Athena, broadband high-resolution spectroscopy with large effective area will become more commonly available in the next decade. With these spectrometers, the accuracy of the plasma parameters derived from spectral modeling will be limited by the uncertainty of the reference atomic data rather than by instrumental factors, as is sometimes already the case for the high-resolution grating observations with Chandra-HETG and XMM-Newton-RGS. To take full advantage of the measured spectra, assessment of the accuracy of and improvements to the available atomic reference data are therefore important. Dedicated measurements in the laboratory are essential to benchmark the theoretical calculations providing the bulk of the reference data used in astrophysics. Experiments at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory electron beam ion traps (EBIT-I and SuperEBIT) have a long history of providing this service. In this work, I present new measurements of transition energies and absolute electron impact excitation cross sections geared towards currently open atomic physics data needs.

  4. Relaxation dark energy in non-critical string cosmologies and astrophysical data

    CERN Document Server

    Mavromatos, Nikolaos E.; Mavromatos, Nikolaos E.; Mitsou, Vasiliki A.

    2006-01-01

    In this talk we review briefly the basic features of non-critical (dissipative) String Cosmologies, and we confront some of these models with supernova data. We pay particular attention to the off-shell and dilaton contributions to the dynamical evolution equations of the non-critical string Universe, as well as the Boltzmann equation for species abundances. The latter could have important consequences for the modification of astrophysical constraints on physically appealing particle physics models, such as supersymmetry. The data fits show that non-critical string cosmologies may be viable alternatives to LambdaCDM model.

  5. Robotic telescopes for high energy astrophysics in Ondřejov

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nekola, Martin; Hudec, René; Jelínek, M.; Kocka, Matúš; Münz, F.; Kubánek, P.; Polášek, Cyril; Šimon, Vojtěch; Štrobl, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 1 (2010), s. 79-85 ISSN 0922-6435. [400 Years of Astronomical Telescopes: A Review of History , Science and Technology. Noordwijk, 29.09.2008-02.10.2008] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/08/1207 Grant - others:ESA(XE) ESA-PECS project No. 98023 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : robotic telescopes * BART * D50 Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 2.140, year: 2010

  6. Australian Science and Technology with Relevance to Beamed Energy Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froning, H. David

    2008-04-01

    Although Australia has no Beamed Energy Propulsion programs at the present time, it is accomplishing significant scientific and technological activity that is of potential relevance to Beamed Energy Propulsion (BEP). These activities include: continual upgrading and enhancement of the Woomera Test Facility, Which is ideal for development and test of high power laser or microwave systems and the flight vehicles they would propel; collaborative development and test, with the US and UK of hypersonic missiles that embody many features needed by beam-propelled flight vehicles; hypersonic air breathing propulsion systems that embody inlet-engine-nozzle features needed for beam-riding agility by air breathing craft; and research on specially conditioned EM fields that could reduce beamed energy lost during atmospheric propagation.

  7. Astrophysics Decoding the cosmos

    CERN Document Server

    Irwin, Judith A

    2007-01-01

    Astrophysics: Decoding the Cosmos is an accessible introduction to the key principles and theories underlying astrophysics. This text takes a close look at the radiation and particles that we receive from astronomical objects, providing a thorough understanding of what this tells us, drawing the information together using examples to illustrate the process of astrophysics. Chapters dedicated to objects showing complex processes are written in an accessible manner and pull relevant background information together to put the subject firmly into context. The intention of the author is that the book will be a 'tool chest' for undergraduate astronomers wanting to know the how of astrophysics. Students will gain a thorough grasp of the key principles, ensuring that this often-difficult subject becomes more accessible.

  8. Essential astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Kenneth R

    2013-01-01

    Essential Astrophysics is a book to learn or teach from, as well as a fundamental reference volume for anyone interested in astronomy and astrophysics. It presents astrophysics from basic principles without requiring any previous study of astronomy or astrophysics. It serves as a comprehensive introductory text, which takes the student through the field of astrophysics in lecture-sized chapters of basic physical principles applied to the cosmos. This one-semester overview will be enjoyed by undergraduate students with an interest in the physical sciences, such as astronomy, chemistry, engineering or physics, as well as by any curious student interested in learning about our celestial science. The mathematics required for understanding the text is on the level of simple algebra, for that is all that is needed to describe the fundamental principles. The text is of sufficient breadth and depth to prepare the interested student for more advanced specialized courses in the future. Astronomical examples are provide...

  9. First cross-section measurements of the reactions Ag,109107(p ,γ )Cd,110108 at energies relevant to the p process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaliel, A.; Mertzimekis, T. J.; Asimakopoulou, E.-M.; Kanellakopoulos, A.; Lagaki, V.; Psaltis, A.; Psyrra, I.; Mavrommatis, E.

    2017-09-01

    Background: One of the primary objectives of the field of Nuclear Astrophysics is the study of the elemental and isotopic abundances in the universe. Although significant progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms behind the production of a large number of nuclides in the isotopic chart, there are still many open questions regarding a number of neutron-deficient nuclei, the p nuclei. To that end, experimentally deduced nuclear reaction cross sections can provide invaluable input to astrophysical models. Purpose: The reactions Ag,109107(p ,γ )Cd,110108 have been studied at energies inside the astrophysically relevant energy window in an attempt to provide experimental data required for the testing of reaction-rate predictions in terms of the statistical model of Hauser-Feshbach around the p nucleus 108Cd. Methods: The experiments were performed with in-beam γ -ray spectroscopy with proton beams accelerated by the Tandem Van de Graaff Accelerator at NCSR "Demokritos" impinging a target of natural silver. A set of high-purity germanium detectors was employed to record the emitted radiation. Results: A first set of total cross-section measurements in radiative proton-capture reactions involving Ag,109107, producing the p -nucleus 108Cd, inside the astrophysically relevant energy window is reported. The experimental results are compared to theoretical calculations, using talys. An overall good agreement between the data and the theoretical calculations has been found. Conclusions: The results reported in this work add new information to the relatively unexplored p process. The present measurements can serve as a reference point in understanding the nuclear parameters in the related astrophysical environments and for future theoretical modeling and experimental works.

  10. The collective emission of electromagnetic waves from astrophysical jets - Luminosity gaps, BL Lacertae objects, and efficient energy transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. N.; Borovsky, Joseph E.; Benford, Gregory; Eilek, Jean A.

    1988-01-01

    A model of the inner portions of astrophysical jets is constructed in which a relativistic electron beam is injected from the central engine into the jet plasma. This beam drives electrostatic plasma wave turbulence, which leads to the collective emission of electromagnetic waves. The emitted waves are beamed in the direction of the jet axis, so that end-on viewing of the jet yields an extremely bright source (BL Lacertae object). The relativistic electron beam may also drive long-wavelength electromagnetic plasma instabilities (firehose and Kelvin-Helmholtz) that jumble the jet magnetic field lines. After a sufficient distance from the core source, these instabilities will cause the beamed emission to point in random directions and the jet emission can then be observed from any direction relative to the jet axis. This combination of effects may lead to the gap turn-on of astrophysical jets. The collective emission model leads to different estimates for energy transport and the interpretation of radio spectra than the conventional incoherent synchrotron theory.

  11. Benchmarking transition energies and emission strengths for X-ray astrophysics with measurements at the Livermore EBITs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hell, Natalie

    2017-03-01

    K-shell transitions in astrophysically abundant metals and L-shell transitions in Fe group elements show characteristic signatures in the soft X-ray spectrum in the energy range 0.1-10 keV. These signatures have great diagnostic value for plasma parameters such as electron and ion temperatures and densities, and can thus help understand the physics controlling the energetic processes in astrophysical sources. This diagnostic power increases with advances in spectral resolution and effective area of the employed X-ray observatories. However, to make optimal use of the diagnostic potential - whether through global spectral modeling or through diagnostics from local modeling of individual lines - the underlying atomic physics has to be complete and well known. With the next generation of soft X-ray observatories featuring micro-calorimeters such as the SXS on Astro-H /Hitomi and the X-IFU on Athena, broadband high-resolution spectroscopy with large effective area will become more commonly available in the next decade. With these spectrometers, the accuracy of the plasma parameters derived from spectral modeling will be limited by the uncertainty of the reference atomic data rather than by instrumental factors, as is sometimes already the case for the high-resolution grating observations with Chandra-HETG and XMM-Newton-RGS. To take full advantage of the measured spectra, assessment of the accuracy of and improvements to the available atomic reference data are therefore important. Dedicated measurements in the laboratory are essential to benchmark the theoretical calculations providing the bulk of the reference data used in astrophysics. Experiments at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory electron beam ion traps (EBIT-I and SuperEBIT) have a long history of providing this service. In this work, I present new measurements of transition energies and absolute electron impact excitation cross sections geared towards currently open atomic physics data needs. First, I

  12. Nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haxton, W.C.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized.

  13. Nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haxton, W.C.

    1992-12-31

    The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized.

  14. Relativistic astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Demianski, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Relativistic Astrophysics brings together important astronomical discoveries and the significant achievements, as well as the difficulties in the field of relativistic astrophysics. This book is divided into 10 chapters that tackle some aspects of the field, including the gravitational field, stellar equilibrium, black holes, and cosmology. The opening chapters introduce the theories to delineate gravitational field and the elements of relativistic thermodynamics and hydrodynamics. The succeeding chapters deal with the gravitational fields in matter; stellar equilibrium and general relativity

  15. Gamma-Light: High-Energy Astrophysics above 10 MeV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morselli, Aldo; Argan, Andrea; Barbiellini, Guido

    2013-01-01

    The energy range between 10 and 50 MeV is an experimentally very difficult range and remained uncovered since the time of COMPTEL. Here we propose a possible mission to cover this energy range.......The energy range between 10 and 50 MeV is an experimentally very difficult range and remained uncovered since the time of COMPTEL. Here we propose a possible mission to cover this energy range....

  16. Explanation for the low flux of high-energy astrophysical muon neutrinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakvasa, Sandip; Joshipura, Anjan; Mohanty, Subhendra

    2013-04-26

    There has been some concern about the unexpected paucity of cosmic high-energy muon neutrinos in detectors probing the energy region beyond 1 PeV. As a possible solution we consider the possibility that some exotic neutrino property is responsible for reducing the muon neutrino flux at high energies from distant sources; specifically, we consider (i) neutrino decay and (ii) neutrinos being pseudo-Dirac-particles. This would provide a mechanism for the reduction of high-energy muon events in the IceCube detector, for example.

  17. New determination of the {sup 2}H(d,p){sup 3}H and {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reaction rates at astrophysical energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumino, A.; Spartà, R.; Spitaleri, C.; Pizzone, R. G.; La Cognata, M.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud-INFN, Catania (Italy); Mukhamedzhanov, A. M. [Cyclotron Institute Texas A and M University-College Station, Texas (United States); Typel, S. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH-Theorie Darmstadt (Germany); Tognelli, E.; Degl' Innocenti, S.; Prada Moroni, P. G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, and INFN-Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Burjan, V.; Kroha, V.; Hons, Z.; Mrazek, J.; Piskor, S. [Nuclear Physics Institute of ASCR-Rez near Prague (Czech Republic); Lamia, L., E-mail: tumino@lns.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Catania (Italy)

    2014-04-20

    The cross sections of the {sup 2}H(d,p){sup 3}H and {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reactions have been measured via the Trojan Horse method applied to the quasi-free {sup 2}H({sup 3}He,p {sup 3}H){sup 1}H and {sup 2}H({sup 3}He,n {sup 3}He){sup 1}H processes at 18 MeV off the proton in {sup 3}He. For the first time, the bare nucleus S(E) factors have been determined from 1.5 MeV, across the relevant region for standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis, down to the thermal energies of deuterium burning in the pre-main-sequence (PMS) phase of stellar evolution, as well as of future fusion reactors. Both the energy dependence and the absolute value of the S(E) factors deviate by more than 15% from the available direct data and existing fitting curves, with substantial variations in the electron screening by more than 50%. As a consequence, the reaction rates for astrophysics experience relevant changes, with a maximum increase of up to 20% at the temperatures of the PMS phase. From a recent primordial abundance sensitivity study, it turns out that the {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reaction is quite influential on {sup 7}Li, and the present change in the reaction rate leads to a decrease in its abundance by up to 10%. The present reaction rates have also been included in an updated version of the FRANEC evolutionary code to analyze their influence on the central deuterium abundance in PMS stars with different masses. The largest variation of about 10%-15% pertains to young stars (≤1 Myr) with masses ≥1 M {sub ☉}.

  18. Development Of Position-sensitive Cadmium Zinc Telluride Detectors For High-energy X-ray Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Slavis, K R

    2001-01-01

    This dissertation reports on the studies of an orthogonal cross-strip CdZnTe detector for high-energy X-ray (20–250 keV) astrophysics applications. The intrinsic three-dimensional detector response and the effectiveness of using various shielding techniques at balloon altitudes are investigated. This detector has great promise for use as the imaging detector of a large- area, coded-mask instrument in an all-sky high-energy X- ray survey or as the focal-plane detector for an X-ray focusing telescope (Constellation-X) for high throughput, high resolution X-ray spectroscopy (6–40 keV). The most recent hard X-ray all-sky survey was conducted by HEAO-1/A4 in 1978, and one has not been conducted since then due to performance limitations of available X-ray detector technology. The next generation instruments need to have sub-degree angular resolution, good sensitivity in the hard X-ray band (3σ sensitivity to sub- mCrab), and few keV energy resolution. This performance is demonstrated u...

  19. Observation of High-Energy Astrophysical Neutrinos in Three Years of IceCube Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aartsen, M.G.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.

    2014-01-01

    A search for high-energy neutrinos interacting within the IceCube detector between 2010 and 2012 provided the first evidence for a high-energy neutrino flux of extraterrestrial origin. Results from an analysis using the same methods with a third year (2012–2013) of data from the complete IceCube...

  20. Astrophysical Concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Harwit, Martin

    2006-01-01

    This classic text, aimed at senior undergraduates and beginning graduate students in physics and astronomy, presents a wide range of astrophysical concepts in sufficient depth to give the reader a quantitative understanding of the subject. Emphasizing physical concepts, the book outlines cosmic events but does not portray them in detail: it provides a series of astrophysical sketches. For this fourth edition, nearly every part of the text has been reconsidered and rewritten, new sections have been added to cover recent developments, and others have been extensively revised and brought up to date. The book begins with an outline of the scope of modern astrophysics and enumerates some of the outstanding problems faced in the field today. The basic physics needed to tackle these questions are developed in the next few chapters using specific astronomical processes as examples. The second half of the book enlarges on these topics and shows how we can obtain quantitative insight into the structure and evolution of...

  1. Plasma astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, S A; ter Haar, D

    2013-01-01

    Plasma Astrophysics is a translation from the Russian language; the topics discussed are based on lectures given by V.N. Tsytovich at several universities. The book describes the physics of the various phenomena and their mathematical formulation connected with plasma astrophysics. This book also explains the theory of the interaction of fast particles plasma, their radiation activities, as well as the plasma behavior when exposed to a very strong magnetic field. The text describes the nature of collective plasma processes and of plasma turbulence. One author explains the method of elementary

  2. Study of the {sup 3}He(α,γ){sup 7}Be and {sup 3}H(α,γ){sup 7}Li reactions at astrophysical energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadeghi, H.; Ghasemi, R. [Arak University, Arak (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    We have studied the important astrophysical {sup 3}He(α,γ){sup 7}Be and {sup 3}H(α,γ){sup 7}Li reactions in the framework of a potential model. {sup 3}He(α,γ){sup 7}Be and {sup 3}H(α,γ){sup 7}Li processes are key reactions in both big bang nucleosynthesis and the p-p chain of hydrogen-burning in stars. The stellar {sup 3}He(α,γ){sup 7}Be and {sup 3}H(α,γ){sup 7}Li reactions were analyzed at low energies on the basis of a direct radiative capture mechanism. The astrophysical S-factors near zero energy were calculated without using the effective expansion of the S-factor or the asymptotic wave functions. In this paper, {sup 3}He(α,γ){sup 7}Be and {sup 3}H(α,γ){sup 7}Li radiative capture reactions at very low energies are taken as a case study. Using the M3Y potential, we have calculated the astrophysical S-factors for the E1 transition. In comparison with other theoretical methods and available experimental data, excellent agreement is achieved for the astrophysical S-factors of these processes.

  3. THE SZ EFFECT IN THE PLANCK ERA: ASTROPHYSICAL AND COSMOLOGICAL IMPACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Colafrancesco

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Sunyaev–Zel’dovich effect (SZE is a relevant probe for cosmology and particle astrophysics. The Planck Era marks a definite step forward in the use of this probe for astrophysics and cosmology. Astrophysical applications to galaxy clusters, galaxies, radiogalaxies and large-scale structures are discussed. Cosmological relevance for the Dark Energy equation of state, modified Gravity scenarios, Dark Matter search, cosmic magnetism and other cosmological applications is also reviewed. Future directions for the study of the SZE and its polarization are finally outlined.

  4. Nuclear Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Alessandro

    2005-04-01

    The activity of the Italian nuclear physicists community in the field of Nuclear Astrophysics is reported. The researches here described have been performed within the project "Fisica teorica del nucleo e dei sistemi a multi corpi", supported by the Ministero dell'Istruzione, dell'Università e della Ricerca.

  5. Astrophysics today

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, A.G.W.

    1984-01-01

    Examining recent history, current trends, and future possibilities, the author reports the frontiers of research on the solar system, stars, galactic physics, and cosmological physics. The book discusses the great discoveries in astronomy and astrophysics and examines the circumstances in which they occurred. It discusses the physics of white dwarfs, the inflationary universe, the extinction of dinosaurs, black hole, cosmological models, and much more.

  6. Nuclear Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Langanke, K

    1999-01-01

    The manuscript reviews progress achieved in recent years in various aspects of nuclear astrophysics, including stellar nucleosynthesis, nuclear aspects of supernova collapse and explosion, neutrino-induced reactions and their possible role in the supernova mechanism and nucleosynthesis, explosive hydrogen burning in binary systems, and finally the observation of gamma-rays from supernova remnants.

  7. Relativistic astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Price, R H

    1993-01-01

    Work reported in the workshop on relativistic astrophysics spanned a wide varicy of topics. Two specific areas seemed of particular interest. Much attention was focussed on gravitational wave sources, especially on the waveforms they produce, and progress was reported in theoretical and observational aspects of accretion disks.

  8. Astrophysical Processes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Since January 2016, the Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy has moved to Continuous Article Publishing (CAP) mode. This means that each accepted article is being published immediately online with DOI and article citation ID with starting page number 1. Articles are also visible in Web of Science immediately.

  9. IEK-3 report 2011. Climate-relevant energy research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    IEK-3 is one of nine sub-institutes within the Institute of Energy and Climate Research at Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH. IEK-3 aims to conduct research of social, ecological and economic relevance and thus generate groundbreaking results on an international level. This quality of work is achieved through basic research in close coordination with technical development work in relevant scientific and technical fields of expertise. Special significance is attached here to international cooperations with partners from research and industry. By implementing research results in innovative products, procedures and processes in cooperation with industry, IEK-3 hopes to help bridge the gap between science and technology. Cooperation with universities, universities of applied sciences, training departments and training centers is designed to promote opportunities for further education and training. With a staff of approximately 100, IEK-3 concentrates on the basic topics of electrochemistry and process engineering for fuel cells. In an integrated approach, the four key areas worked on in the institute - direct methanol fuel cells, high-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells, solid oxide fuel cells and fuel processing systems - are accompanied by systems analysis and theoretical investigations, basic modeling and simulations, and by experimental and theoretical systems evaluations. The information generated in these areas is used to design and verify functional systems. In addition, particular attention is given to the development, configuration and application of special measuring techniques for the structural analysis of membrane electrode assemblies, for flow simulation and visualization, and for the characterization of stacks. The solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack pictured comprises 36 cells, each with an active cell area of 360 cm{sup 2}. The nominal power at a mean cell voltage of 800 mV is approximately 5.5 kW. The stack is operated on natural gas, which is

  10. A pair spectrometer for nuclear astrophysics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerro, L.; Saltarelli, A.; Tabassam, U. [University of Camerino, Division of Physics, School of Science and Technology, Camerino (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Di Leva, A. [INFN, Napoli (Italy); University of Naples ' ' Federico II' ' , Physics Department, Naples (Italy); Gialanella, L.; De Cesare, N.; D' Onofrio, A.; Terrasi, F. [Second University of Naples, Department of Mathematics and Physics, Caserta (Italy); INFN, Napoli (Italy); Schuermann, D.; Romoli, M. [INFN, Napoli (Italy); Busso, M. [INFN, Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); University of Perugia, Department of Physics, Perugia (Italy)

    2014-11-15

    Non-radiative transitions in nuclear capture reactions between light nuclei play a relevant role in stellar nuclear astrophysics, where nuclear processes occur at typical energies from tens to hundreds of keV. At higher energies, instead, the E0 contributions may be shadowed by more intense transitions. The experimental study of E0 transitions requires a specific detection setup, able to uniquely identify events where an electron-positron pair is produced. A compact ΔE-E charged-particle spectrometer based on two silicon detectors has been designed to be installed in the jet gas target chamber of the recoil mass separator ERNA (European Recoil separator for Nuclear Astrophysics) at the CIRCE laboratory of Caserta, Italy. The detector design, its performances and the first foreseen applications are described. (orig.)

  11. Topics in High-Energy Astrophysics: X-ray Time Lags and Gamma-ray Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, John J.

    2016-03-01

    The Universe is host to a wide variety of high-energy processes that convert gravitational potential energy or rest-mass energy into non-thermal radiation such as bremsstrahlung and synchrotron. Prevailing models of X-ray emission from accreting Black Hole Binaries (BHBs) struggle to simultaneously fit the quiescent X-ray spectrum and the transients which result in the phenomenon known as X-ray time lags. And similarly, classical models of diffusive shock acceleration in pulsar wind nebulae fail to explain the extreme particle acceleration in very short timescales as is inferred from recent gamma-ray flares from the Crab nebula. In this dissertation, I develop new exact analytic models to shed light on these intriguing processes. I take a fresh look at the formation of X-ray time lags in compact sources using a new mathematical approach in which I obtain the exact Green's function solution. The resulting Green's function allows one to explore a variety of injection scenarios, including both monochromatic and broadband (bremsstrahlung) seed photon injection. I obtain the exact solution for the dependence of the time lags on the Fourier frequency, for both homogeneous and inhomogeneous clouds. The model can successfully reproduce both the observed time lags and the quiescent X-ray spectrum using a single set of coronal parameters. I show that the implied coronal radii in the new model are significantly smaller than those obtained in the Monte Carlo simulations, hence greatly reducing the coronal heating problem. Recent bright gamma-ray flares from the Crab nebula observed by AGILE and Fermi reaching GeV energies and lasting several days challenge the contemporary model for particle acceleration in pulsar wind nebulae, specifically the diffusive shock acceleration model. Simulations indicate electron/positron pairs in the Crab nebula pulsar wind must be accelerated up to PeV energies in the presence of ambient magnetic fields with strength B ~100 microG. No

  12. The {sup 7}Li (n,{gamma}){sup 8}Li radiative capture at astrophysical energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubovichenko, S.B. [V. G. Fessenkov Astrophysical Institute ' ' NCSRT' ' NSA RK, 050020, Observatory 23, Kamenskoe plato, Almaty (Kazakstan (Kazakhstan)); Institute of Nuclear Physics NNC RK, 050032, str. Ibragimova 1, Almaty (Kazakstan (Kazakhstan)); Dzhazairov-Kakhramanov, A.V. [Institute of Nuclear Physics NNC RK, 050032, str. Ibragimova 1, Almaty (Kazakstan (Kazakhstan))

    2012-12-15

    The possibility to construct intercluster interaction potentials in continuous and discrete spectra is shown in one-channel cluster model based on the classification of orbital states according to Young schemes. These potentials usually contain Pauli forbidden states, and correctly describe elastic scattering phase shifts taking into account resonance behavior and main characteristics of the bound states of nuclei in the considering cluster channel. The versions of intercluster interaction potentials describing the resonance nature of some phase shifts of the n{sup 7}Li elastic scattering at low energies and the P{sub 2} ground state of {sup 8}Li in the n{sup 7}Li cluster channel have been constructed for the demonstration of this approach. The possibility of describing the total cross sections of {sup 7}Li (n,{gamma}){sup 8}Li within the energies from 5 meV (5 . 10{sup -3} eV) to 1 MeV, including resonance at 0.25 MeV, has been demonstrated for the potentials obtained in the potential cluster model with forbidden states. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Large-area imaging micro-well detectors for high-energy astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Deines-Jones, P; Hunter, S D; Jahoda, K; Owens, S M

    2002-01-01

    Micro-well detectors are pixelized imaging sensors that can be inexpensively fabricated in very large arrays. Owing to their intrinsic gain and operation at room temperature, they can be instrumented at very low power, per unit area, making them valuable for a variety of space-flight applications where wide-angle X-ray imaging or large-area particle tracking is required. For example, micro-well detectors have been chosen as the focal plane imager for Lobster-ISS, a proposed soft X-ray all-sky monitor. We have fabricated detectors which image X-rays with 200 mu m FWHM resolution at 3 keV. In agreement with other groups using similar geometries, we find nominal proportional counter energy resolution (20% at 6 keV in P-10), and stable operation at gas gains up to 30,000.

  14. Sensitivity of the icecube detector to astrophysical sources ofhigh energy muon neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrens, J.; Bahcall, John N.; Bai, X.; Bay, R.C.; Becka, T.; Becker, K.-H.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D.Z.; Blaufuss, E.; Boersma, D.J.; Boser, S.; Bohm, C.; Botner, O.; Bouchta,A.; Bouhali, O.; Burgess, T.; Carithers, W.; Castermans, T.; Cavin, J.; Chinowsky, W.; Chirkin, D.; Collin, B.; Conrad, J.; Cooley, J.; Cowen,D.F.; Davour, A.; De Clercq, C.; DeYoung, T.; Desiati, P.; Ehrlich, R.; Ellsworth, R.W.; Evenson, P.A.; Fazely, A.R.; Feser, T.; Gaisser, T.K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganugapati, R.; Geenen, H.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman,J.A.; Gunasingha, R.M.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hardtke,R.; Hauschildt, T.; Hays, D.

    2004-01-01

    We present the results of a Monte-Carlo study of the sensitivity of the planned IceCube detector to predicted fluxes of muon neutrinos at TeV to PeV energies. A complete simulation of the detector and data analysis is used to study the detector's capability to search for muon neutrinos from sources such as active galaxies and gamma-ray bursts. We study the effective area and the angular resolution of the detector as a function of muon energy and angle of incidence. We present detailed calculations of the sensitivity of the detector to both diffuse and point like neutrino emissions, including an assessment of the sensitivity to neutrinos detected in coincidence with gamma-ray burst observations. After three years of data taking, IceCube will have been able to detect a point source flux of E2*dN/dE = 7*10{sup -9} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}GeV data 5-sigma significance, or, in the absence of a signal, place a 90 percent c.l. limit at a level E2*dN/dE = 2*10{sup -9} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}GeV. A diffuse E-2 flux would be detectable at a minimum strength of E2*dN/dE = 1*10{sup -8}cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}sr{sup -1}GeV. A gamma-ray burst model following the formulation of Waxman and Bahcall would result in a 5-sigma effect after the observation of 200 bursts in coincidence with satellite observations of the gamma-rays.

  15. Observational astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Léna, Pierre; Lebrun, François; Mignard, François; Pelat, Didier

    2012-01-01

    This is the updated, widely revised, restructured and expanded third edition of Léna et al.'s successful work Observational Astrophysics. It presents a synthesis on tools and methods of observational astrophysics of the early 21st century. Written specifically for astrophysicists and graduate students, this textbook focuses on fundamental and sometimes practical limitations on the ultimate performance that an astronomical system may reach, rather than presenting particular systems in detail. In little more than a decade there has been extraordinary progress in imaging and detection technologies, in the fields of adaptive optics, optical interferometry, in the sub-millimetre waveband, observation of neutrinos, discovery of exoplanets, to name but a few examples. The work deals with ground-based and space-based astronomy and their respective fields. And it also presents the ambitious concepts behind space missions aimed for the next decades. Avoiding particulars, it covers the whole of the electromagnetic spec...

  16. astrophysical significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dartois E.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Clathrate hydrates, ice inclusion compounds, are of major importance for the Earth’s permafrost regions and may control the stability of gases in many astrophysical bodies such as the planets, comets and possibly interstellar grains. Their physical behavior may provide a trapping mechanism to modify the absolute and relative composition of icy bodies that could be the source of late-time injection of gaseous species in planetary atmospheres or hot cores. In this study, we provide and discuss laboratory-recorded infrared signatures of clathrate hydrates in the near to mid-infrared and the implications for space-based astrophysical tele-detection in order to constrain their possible presence.

  17. Cross section and astrophysical S-factor for 12 C(p , γ) 13N* reaction with Halo Effective Field Theory at low-energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khansari, M. Mosavi; Khalili, H.; Sadeghi, H.

    2017-11-01

    We considered one of the proton halo nuclei candidates, 13N* nucleus, and calculated the cross section and astrophysical S-factor for 12C(p, γ)13N* reaction using halo effective field theory without pion (hEFT¬π). The halo effective field theory is used to examine the halo nucleus bound state with a large S-wave scattering length. We calculated the radiative proton capture cross section and the astrophysical S-factor from the fields of the core and the valence proton at the Leading-Order (LO). We showed that there is a good agreement among the our results for cross section and astrophysical S-factor of the 12C(p, γ)13N* reaction and the experimental data. The astrophysical S-factor that has been estimated at the zero energy (Ecm=0) by using a theoretical calculation of the cross section for direct radiative capture and an extrapolation of this calculation obtained S(0) = 1.883 ×10-3 MeV-b.

  18. Nuclear Astrophysics in underground laboratories: the LUNA experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    One of the main ingredients of nuclear astrophysics is the knowledge of the thermonuclear reactions responsible for powering the stellar engine and for the synthesis of the chemical elements. At astrophysical energies the cross section of nuclear processes is extremely reduced by the effect of the Coulomb barrier. The low value of cross sections prevents their measurement at stellar energies on Earth surface and often extrapolations are needed. The Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA) is placed under the Gran Sasso mountain and thanks to the cosmic-ray background reduction provided by its position can investigate cross sections at energies close to the Gamow peak in stellar scenarios. Many crucial reactions involved in hydrogen burning has been measured directly at astrophysical energies with both the LUNA-50kV and the LUNA-400kV accelerators, and this intense work will continue with the installation of a MV machine able to explore helium and carbon burnings. Based on this progress, currently there are efforts in several countries to construct new underground accelerators. In this talk, the typical techniques adopted in underground nuclear astrophysics will be described and the most relevant results achieved by LUNA will be reviewed. The exciting science that can be probed with the new facilities will be highlighted.

  19. Studies of Energy-Relevant Materials by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jinfang

    In this thesis, we have used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as a local probe to microscopically study three different families of energy-relevant complex materials, namely the 122 Fe-based superconductors Ca(Fe1-xCox)2As2, GeTe-based thermoelectric tellurides GeTe and detonation nanodiamond. In Chapter 3 and Chapter 4, we investigated the Co substitution effects on static and dynamic magnetic properties of the single-crystalline Ca(Fe 1-xCox)2As2 (x = 0, 0.023, 0.028, 0.033, 0.059) via 75As NMR and resistivity measurements. Robustness of the Fe magnetic moments was evidenced by only slight decreases of Hint, although T N is strongly suppressed with Co substitution in antiferromagnetic (AFM) state. In the paramagnetic (PM) state, the temperature dependence of Knight shift K for all crystals shows similar T-dependence of magnetic susceptibility chi. The spin fluctuations with the q = 0 components are suppressed with Delta/k B. On the other hand, the growth of the stripe-type AFM fluctuations with q = (pi, 0) or (0, pi) upon cooling in the PM state for all samples is evidenced by the T-dependence of (1/ T1Tchi). A pseudogap-like phenomenon, i.e., suppression of the AFM spin fluctuations, was discovered with decreasing temperature below a x-independent characteristic temperature T* ( 100 K) in samples with x ≥ 0.028. In addition, clear evidence for the coexistence and competition of the stripe-type antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic (FM) spin correlations was given by modified Korringa ratio analysis in Chapter 4. In Chapter 5, we have carried out 125Te NMR measurements to study the electronic properties of Ge50Te50, Ag 2Ge48Te50 and Sb2Ge48Te 50. NMR shift K and 1/T1T of Ge50Te50 are nearly temperature independent at T electron correlations, while Korringa ratio increases slightly at high temperature, suggesting the slight enhancement of the electron correlation. In Chapter 6 and Chapter 7, we have used 13C NMR spectral editing technique to accurately analyze the

  20. A Review of Astrophysical Jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James H. Beall

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Astrophysical jets are ubiquitous: this simple statement has become a commonplace over the last three decades and more as a result of observing campaigns using detectors sensitive from radio to gamma-ray energies. During this epoch, theoretical models of these sources have become more complex, moving from assumptions of isotropy that made analytic calculations possible, to fully anisotropic models of emission from the jets and their interactions with the interstellar and intra-cluster medium. Such calculations are only possible because we have extensive computational resources. In addition, the degree of international cooperation required for observing campaigns of these sorts is remarkable, since the instruments include among others the Very Large Array (VLA, the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA, and entire constellations of satellite instruments, often working in concert. In this paper, I discuss some relevant observations from these eorts and the theoretical interpretations they have occasioned.

  1. Astrophysical cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardeen, J. M.

    The last several years have seen a tremendous ferment of activity in astrophysical cosmology. Much of the theoretical impetus has come from particle physics theories of the early universe and candidates for dark matter, but what promise to be even more significant are improved direct observations of high z galaxies and intergalactic matter, deeper and more comprehensive redshift surveys, and the increasing power of computer simulations of the dynamical evolution of large scale structure. Upper limits on the anisotropy of the microwave background radiation are gradually getting tighter and constraining more severely theoretical scenarios for the evolution of the universe.

  2. Astrophysical black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Gorini, Vittorio; Moschella, Ugo; Treves, Aldo; Colpi, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Based on graduate school lectures in contemporary relativity and gravitational physics, this book gives a complete and unified picture of the present status of theoretical and observational properties of astrophysical black holes. The chapters are written by internationally recognized specialists. They cover general theoretical aspects of black hole astrophysics, the theory of accretion and ejection of gas and jets, stellar-sized black holes observed in the Milky Way, the formation and evolution of supermassive black holes in galactic centers and quasars as well as their influence on the dynamics in galactic nuclei. The final chapter addresses analytical relativity of black holes supporting theoretical understanding of the coalescence of black holes as well as being of great relevance in identifying gravitational wave signals. With its introductory chapters the book is aimed at advanced graduate and post-graduate students, but it will also be useful for specialists.

  3. Bioinspired catalytic materials for energy-relevant conversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artero, Vincent

    2017-09-01

    The structure of active sites of enzymes involved in bioenergetic processes can inspire design of active, stable and cost-effective catalysts for renewable-energy technologies. For these materials to reach maturity, the benefits of bioinspired systems must be combined with practical technological requirements.

  4. The B-10((p)over-right-arrow, gamma)C-11 reaction at astrophysically relevant energies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tonchev, AP; Nelson, SO; Sabourov, K; Crowley, BT; Joshi, K; Weller, HR; Kelley, JH; Prior, RM; Spraker, M; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N

    2003-01-01

    The B-10(, gamma)C-11 reaction was studied by detecting the gamma-rays produced when 100, 130-, and 160-keV polarized protons were stopped in a thick B-10 target. Polarized and unpolarized incident beams were used to measure the cross section and vector analyzing power as a function of angle and

  5. Detailed Kinetic Modeling of Processes Relevant To Fusion Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, Marco; Armstrong, Michael; Zaug, Joseph; Crowhurst, Jonathan; Radousky, Harry; Stavrou, Elissaios

    2016-10-01

    Carbon based materials have been proposed as candidates for the fabrication of plasma-facing components in the design of fusion energy devices. Although these components are not supposed to be in direct contact with the core fusion plasma, plasma instabilities and the harsh environment they are exposed to can cause the degradation of plasma-exposed components and the transfer of contaminants into the plasma followed by deposition of byproducts. In order to investigate the chemistry involved in these processes and to assist the development of models suitable to understand the long term consequences of the carbon ablation/deposition cycle, an inductively coupled plasma flow reactor (ICPFR) has been developed. The ICPFR allows the atomization of carbon containing precursors to high temperatures (in the order of 10000K) and the characterization of the gas and solid species formed downsteam from the plasma source through spectroscopic techniques. In parallel to the experimental analysis a comprehensive set of fluid dynamic and detailed kinetic simulations are used to analyze the data. The combination of these two approaches resulted in a validated and comprehensive chemical model for the formation of carbon deposits in carbon contaminated cooling plasmas. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Direct Measurement of the Key Ec .m .=456 keV Resonance in the Astrophysical 19Ne (p ,γ )20Na Reaction and Its Relevance for Explosive Binary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, R.; Lotay, G.; Lennarz, A.; Ruiz, C.; Christian, G.; Akers, C.; Catford, W. N.; Chen, A. A.; Connolly, D.; Davids, B.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Jedrejcic, D.; Laird, A. M.; Martin, L.; McNeice, E.; Riley, J.; Williams, M.

    2017-12-01

    We have performed a direct measurement of the 19Ne (p ,γ )20Na reaction in inverse kinematics using a beam of radioactive 19Ne. The key astrophysical resonance in the 19Ne +p system has been definitely measured for the first time at Ec .m .=456-2+5 keV with an associated strength of 17-5+7 meV . The present results are in agreement with resonance strength upper limits set by previous direct measurements, as well as resonance energies inferred from precision (3He, t) charge exchange reactions. However, both the energy and strength of the 456 keV resonance disagree with a recent indirect study of the 19Ne (d , n )20Na reaction. In particular, the new 19Ne (p ,γ )20Na reaction rate is found to be factors of ˜8 and ˜5 lower than the most recent evaluation over the temperature range of oxygen-neon novae and astrophysical x-ray bursts, respectively. Nevertheless, we find that the 19Ne (p ,γ )20Na reaction is likely to proceed fast enough to significantly reduce the flux of 19F in nova ejecta and does not create a bottleneck in the breakout from the hot CNO cycles into the r p process.

  7. Astrophysical neutrinos and atmospheric leptons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaisser T.K.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available IceCube measurements of the neutrino flux from TeV to PeV show the signal of astrophysical neutrinos standing out at high energy well above the steeply falling foreground of atmospheric neutrinos. The astrophysical signal appears both in measurements of neutrino-induced muons and in the starting event sample, which responds preferentially to electron and tau neutrinos, but which also includes muon neutrinos. Searches for point sources of astrophysical neutrinos have, however, not yet identified a single source or class of sources for the astrophysical component. Some constraints on astrophysical sources implied by the current observations will be described in this talk. Uncertainties in the fluxes of atmospheric leptons resulting from an incomplete knowledge of the primary cosmic-ray spectrum and from a limited understanding of meson production, including charm will also be reviewed. The ultimate goal is to improve the understanding of the astrophysical spectrum in the transition to lower energy where atmospheric neutrinos dominate. The main aspects of this presentation will be included in the author's Review Talk at the end of the Symposium.

  8. Trends in Nuclear Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Schatz, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Astrophysics is a vibrant field at the intersection of nuclear physics and astrophysics that encompasses research in nuclear physics, astrophysics, astronomy, and computational science. This paper is not a review. It is intended to provide an incomplete personal perspective on current trends in nuclear astrophysics and the specific role of nuclear physics in this field.

  9. Application of Dynamic Energy Budget theory for conservation relevant modelling of Bird life histories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teixeira, C.M.G.L.

    2016-01-01

    Teixeira, C.M.G.L. (2016, Januari 13). Application of Dynamic Energy Budget Theory For Conservation Relevant Modelling of Bird Life Histories. Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. Prom./coprom.: prof. dr. S.A.L.M. Kooijman & T. Sousa.

  10. First results of Trojan horse method using radioactive ion beams: {sup 18}F(p,α) at astrophysical energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherubini, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Puglia, S.; Rapisarda, G.; Romano, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania, Italy and INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Gulino, M. [Università KORE, Enna, Italy and INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); La Cognata, M. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Lamia, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania (Italy); Kubono, S.; Wakabayashi, Y. [Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan and present address RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Yamaguchi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Kurihara, Y. [Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Binh, D. [Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan and present address Institute of Physics and Electronics, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Bishop, S. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama, Japan and present address Physik Department E12, Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Coc, A. [Centre de Spectrométrie Nucléaire et de Spectrométrie de masse, IN2P3, Orsay (France); De Séréville, N.; Hammache, F. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, IN2P3, Orsay (France)

    2014-05-02

    The abundance of {sup 18}F in Nova explosions is considered to be an important piece of information for the understanding of this astrophysical phenomenon. It is then necessary to study the nuclear processess that both produce and destroy this isotope in Novae. Among these latter reactions, the {sup 18}F(p,α){sup 15}O is one of the most important {sup 18}F destruction channels. Here we report on an experiment performed using the CRIB apparatus of the Center for Nuclear Study of the University of Tokyo. This was the first experiment that used the Trojan Horse method applied to a Radioactive Ion Beam induced reaction.

  11. The Trojan Horse method for nuclear astrophysics: Recent results on resonance reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cognata, M. La; Pizzone, R. G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Romano, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania, Italy and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Gulino, M.; Tumino, A. [Kore University, Enna, Italy and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Lamia, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania (Italy)

    2014-05-09

    Nuclear astrophysics aims to measure nuclear-reaction cross sections of astrophysical interest to be included into models to study stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis. Low energies, < 1 MeV or even < 10 keV, are requested for this is the window where these processes are more effective. Two effects have prevented to achieve a satisfactory knowledge of the relevant nuclear processes, namely, the Coulomb barrier exponentially suppressing the cross section and the presence of atomic electrons. These difficulties have triggered theoretical and experimental investigations to extend our knowledge down to astrophysical energies. For instance, indirect techniques such as the Trojan Horse Method have been devised yielding new cutting-edge results. In particular, I will focus on the application of this indirect method to resonance reactions. Resonances might dramatically enhance the astrophysical S(E)-factor so, when they occur right at astrophysical energies, their measurement is crucial to pin down the astrophysical scenario. Unknown or unpredicted resonances might introduce large systematic errors in nucleosynthesis models. These considerations apply to low-energy resonances and to sub-threshold resonances as well, as they may produce sizable modifications of the S-factor due to, for instance, destructive interference with another resonance.

  12. Reactor neutrons in nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifarth, René; Glorius, Jan; Göbel, Kathrin; Heftrich, Tanja; Jentschel, Michael; Jurado, Beatriz; Käppeler, Franz; Köster, Ulli; Langer, Christoph; Litvinov, Yuri A.; Weigand, Mario

    2017-09-01

    The huge neutron fluxes offer the possibility to use research reactors to produce isotopes of interest, which can be investigated afterwards. An example is the half-lives of long-lived isotopes like 129I. A direct usage of reactor neutrons in the astrophysical energy regime is only possible, if the corresponding ions are not at rest in the laboratory frame. The combination of an ion storage ring with a reactor and a neutron guide could open the path to direct measurements of neutron-induced cross sections on short-lived radioactive isotopes in the astrophysically interesting energy regime.

  13. Plasma physics of extreme astrophysical environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A; Rightley, Shane

    2014-03-01

    Among the incredibly diverse variety of astrophysical objects, there are some that are characterized by very extreme physical conditions not encountered anywhere else in the Universe. Of special interest are ultra-magnetized systems that possess magnetic fields exceeding the critical quantum field of about 44 TG. There are basically only two classes of such objects: magnetars, whose magnetic activity is manifested, e.g., via their very short but intense gamma-ray flares, and central engines of supernovae (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)--the most powerful explosions in the modern Universe. Figuring out how these complex systems work necessarily requires understanding various plasma processes, both small-scale kinetic and large-scale magnetohydrodynamic (MHD), that govern their behavior. However, the presence of an ultra-strong magnetic field modifies the underlying basic physics to such a great extent that relying on conventional, classical plasma physics is often not justified. Instead, plasma-physical problems relevant to these extreme astrophysical environments call for constructing relativistic quantum plasma (RQP) physics based on quantum electrodynamics (QED). In this review, after briefly describing the astrophysical systems of interest and identifying some of the key plasma-physical problems important to them, we survey the recent progress in the development of such a theory. We first discuss the ways in which the presence of a super-critical field modifies the properties of vacuum and matter and then outline the basic theoretical framework for describing both non-relativistic and RQPs. We then turn to some specific astrophysical applications of relativistic QED plasma physics relevant to magnetar magnetospheres and to central engines of core-collapse SNe and long GRBs. Specifically, we discuss the propagation of light through a magnetar magnetosphere; large-scale MHD processes driving magnetar activity and responsible for jet launching and propagation in

  14. The Astrophysical S-factor for the 2 H (, ) 6 Li Nuclear Reaction at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The astrophysical S-factor for the process 2H(, )6Li has been calculated at the low-energies relevant to big-bang nucleosynthesis and in comparison with laboratory data. On the basis of the model, the alpha radiative capture process is studied by using the two-and three-body electromagnetic currents. The bound and ...

  15. Astrophysical techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Kitchin, CR

    2013-01-01

    DetectorsOptical DetectionRadio and Microwave DetectionX-Ray and Gamma-Ray DetectionCosmic Ray DetectorsNeutrino DetectorsGravitational Radiation Dark Matter and Dark Energy Detection ImagingThe Inverse ProblemPhotographyElectronic ImagingScanningInterferometrySpeckle InterferometryOccultationsRadarElectronic ImagesPhotometryPhotometryPhotometersSpectroscopySpectroscopy SpectroscopesOther TechniquesAstrometryPolarimetrySolar StudiesMagnetometryComputers and The Internet.

  16. Nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.

    2010-08-01

    The International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009) was declared by the 62nd General Assembly of the United Nations and was also endorsed by UNESCO. Investigations in the realms of particle and nuclear physicsmake a large contribution in the development of our ideas of the properties of the Universe. The present article discusses some problems of the evolution of the Universe, nucleosyntheses, and cosmochronology from the point of view of nuclear and particle physics. Processes occurring in the Universe are compared with the mechanisms of the production and decay of nuclei, as well as with the mechanisms of their interaction at high energies. Examples that demonstrate the potential of nuclearphysics methods for studying cosmic objects and the properties of the Universe are given. The results that come from investigations into nuclear reactions induced by beams of radioactive nuclei and which make it possible to take a fresh look at the nucleosynthesis scenario in the range at light nuclei are presented.

  17. Nuclear astrophysics lessons from INTEGRAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Roland

    2013-02-01

    Measurements of high-energy photons from cosmic sources of nuclear radiation through ESA's INTEGRAL mission have advanced our knowledge: new data with high spectral resolution showed that characteristic gamma-ray lines from radioactive decays occur throughout the Galaxy in its interstellar medium. Although the number of detected sources and often the significance of the astrophysical results remain modest, conclusions derived from this unique astronomical window of radiation originating from nuclear processes are important, complementing the widely-employed atomic-line based spectroscopy. We review the results and insights obtained in the past decade from gamma-ray line measurements of cosmic sources in the context of their astrophysical questions.

  18. Theoretical Particle Astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamionkowski, Marc [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2013-08-07

    Abstract: Theoretical Particle Astrophysics. The research carried out under this grant encompassed work on the early Universe, dark matter, and dark energy. We developed CMB probes for primordial baryon inhomogeneities, primordial non-Gaussianity, cosmic birefringence, gravitational lensing by density perturbations and gravitational waves, and departures from statistical isotropy. We studied the detectability of wiggles in the inflation potential in string-inspired inflation models. We studied novel dark-matter candidates and their phenomenology. This work helped advance the DoE's Cosmic Frontier (and also Energy and Intensity Frontiers) by finding synergies between a variety of different experimental efforts, by developing new searches, science targets, and analyses for existing/forthcoming experiments, and by generating ideas for new next-generation experiments.

  19. Free energy option and its relevance to improve domestic energy demands in southern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses Eterigho Emetere

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to seek an energy option that would benefit the growing energy demands. Domestic energy demands in southern Nigeria had increased greatly due to failing power programs and seasonal migrations. The fossil fuel option is gradually fading away due to environmental pollution and recent dynamic cost. The renewable energy option had been celebrated with little success in the coastal area of southern Nigeria. At the moment, the renewable energy option is very expensive with little guarantee on its efficiency with time. The data set used for this study was obtained from the Davis weather installation in Covenant University. The free energy option was considered. The cost and its environmental implication for domestic use were comparatively discussed alongside other energy options — using the Life cycle cost analysis. It was found out that free energy option is more affordable and efficient for domestic use.

  20. Astrophysics a very short introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Binney, James

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysics is the physics of the stars, and more widely the physics of the Universe. It enables us to understand the structure and evolution of planetary systems, stars, galaxies, interstellar gas, and the cosmos as a whole. In this Very Short Introduction, the leading astrophysicist James Binney shows how the field of astrophysics has expanded rapidly in the past century, with vast quantities of data gathered by telescopes exploiting all parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, combined with the rapid advance of computing power, which has allowed increasingly effective mathematical modelling. He illustrates how the application of fundamental principles of physics - the consideration of energy and mass, and momentum - and the two pillars of relativity and quantum mechanics, has provided insights into phenomena ranging from rapidly spinning millisecond pulsars to the collision of giant spiral galaxies. This is a clear, rigorous introduction to astrophysics for those keen to cut their teeth on a conceptual trea...

  1. New measurement of $\\rm S_{bare}(E)$ factor of the d(d,p)t reaction at astrophysical energies via the Trojan-horse method

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Chengbo; Fu, Yuanyong; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Shuhua; Meng, Qiuying; Spitaleri, C; Tumino, A; Pizzone, R G; Lamia, L

    2015-01-01

    The study of d(d,p)t reaction is very important for the nucleosynthesis in both standard Big Bang and stellar evolution, as well as for the future fusion reactor planning of energy production. The d(d,p)t bare nucleus astrophysical S(E) factor has been measured indirectly at energies from about 400 keV down to several keV by means of the Trojan horse method applied to the quasi-free process $\\rm {}^2H({}^6Li,pt){}^4He$ induced at the lithium beam energy of 9.5 MeV, which is closer to the zero quasi-free energy point, in CIAE HI-13 tandem accelerator laboratory. An accurate analysis leads to the determination of the d(d,p)t $\\rm S(E)$ factor $\\rm S_{bare}(0)=56.7 \\pm 2.0 keV*b$ and of the corresponding electron screening potential $\\rm U_e = 13.2 \\pm 4.3 eV$. In addition, this work also gives an updated test for the Trojan horse nucleus invariance comparing with previous indirect investigations using $\\rm {}^3He=(d+p)$ breakup.

  2. Transient Astrophysics Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Jordan

    2017-08-01

    Transient Astrophysics Probe (TAP), selected by NASA for a funded Concept Study, is a wide-field high-energy transient mission proposed for flight starting in the late 2020s. TAP’s main science goals, called out as Frontier Discovery areas in the 2010 Decadal Survey, are time-domain astrophysics and counterparts of gravitational wave (GW) detections. The mission instruments include unique imaging soft X-ray optics that allow ~500 deg2 FoV in each of four separate modules; a high sensitivity, 1 deg2 FoV soft X-ray telescope based on single crystal silicon optics; a passively cooled, 1 deg2 FoV Infrared telescope with bandpass 0.6-3 micron; and a set of ~8 small NaI gamma-ray detectors. TAP will observe many events per year of X-ray transients related to compact objects, including tidal disruptions of stars, supernova shock breakouts, neutron star bursts and superbursts, and high redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts. Perhaps most exciting is TAP’s capability to observe X-ray and IR counterparts of GWs involving stellar mass black holes detected by LIGO/Virgo, and possibly X-ray counterparts of GWs from supermassive black holes, detected by LISA and Pulsar Timing Arrays.

  3. Microphysics in Astrophysical Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Steven J.; Zweibel, Ellen G.; Goldman, Martin

    Although macroscale features dominate astrophysical images and energetics, the physics is controlled through microscale transport processes (conduction, diffusion) that mediate the flow of mass, momentum, energy, and charge. These microphysical processes manifest themselves in key (all) boundary layers and also operate within the body of the plasma. Crucially, most plasmas of interest are rarefied to the extent that classical particle collision length- and time-scales are long. Collective plasma kinetic phenomena then serve to scatter or otherwise modify the particle distribution functions and in so-doing govern the transport at the microscale level. Thus collisionless plasmas are capable of supporting thin shocks, current sheets which may be prone to magnetic reconnection, and the dissipation of turbulence cascades at kinetic scales. This paper lays the foundation for the accompanying collection that explores the current state of knowledge in this subject. The richness of plasma kinetic phenomena brings with it a rich diversity of microphysics that does not always, if ever, simply mimic classical collision-dominated transport. This can couple the macro- and microscale physics in profound ways, and in ways which thus depend on the astrophysical context.

  4. NASA's Physics of the Cosmos and Cosmic Origins programs manage Strategic Astrophysics Technology (SAT) development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Thai; Thronson, Harley; Seery, Bernard; Ganel, Opher

    2016-07-01

    The strategic astrophysics missions of the coming decades will help answer the questions "How did our universe begin and evolve?" "How did galaxies, stars, and planets come to be?" and "Are we alone?" Enabling these missions requires advances in key technologies far beyond the current state of the art. NASA's Physics of the Cosmos2 (PCOS), Cosmic Origins3 (COR), and Exoplanet Exploration Program4 (ExEP) Program Offices manage technology maturation projects funded through the Strategic Astrophysics Technology (SAT) program to accomplish such advances. The PCOS and COR Program Offices, residing at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), were established in 2011, and serve as the implementation arm for the Astrophysics Division at NASA Headquarters. We present an overview of the Programs' technology development activities and the current technology investment portfolio of 23 technology advancements. We discuss the process for addressing community-provided technology gaps and Technology Management Board (TMB)-vetted prioritization and investment recommendations that inform the SAT program. The process improves the transparency and relevance of our technology investments, provides the community a voice in the process, and promotes targeted external technology investments by defining needs and identifying customers. The Programs' priorities are driven by strategic direction from the Astrophysics Division, which is informed by the National Research Council's (NRC) "New Worlds, New Horizons in Astronomy and Astrophysics" (NWNH) 2010 Decadal Survey report [1], the Astrophysics Implementation Plan (AIP) [2] as updated, and the Astrophysics Roadmap "Enduring Quests, Daring Visions" [3]. These priorities include technology development for missions to study dark energy, gravitational waves, X-ray and inflation probe science, and large far-infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV)/optical/IR telescopes to conduct imaging and spectroscopy studies. The SAT program is the

  5. Relevancy of the Massive Open Online Course (MOOC about Sustainable Energy for Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maija Aksela

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable energy is one of the biggest global challenges today. This paper discusses how we can promote adolescents’ learning of sustainable energy with the help of an international massive open online course (MOOC. The aim of this case study is to understand: (i What do the adolescents find relevant in the MOOC course about sustainable energy? and (ii What are the opportunities and challenges of the MOOC for the adolescents to learn sustainable energy? In our study, 80 voluntary adolescents around the world, who were at least 15 year old, took part in two surveys. The themes of our MOOC course were, e.g., sustainable growth, solar power, wind power, biofuel production and smart power generation. This 38 work-hour, free of charge, online course includes an introduction video, interviews of specialists, lecture videos, reading materials of the newest research and multiple choice questions on the topics. Research data was classified by using content analysis. The study indicates that adolescents feel that both the MOOC course and sustainable energy as a subject are relevant to them. Their decision to take part in an online course was mostly influenced by individual relevance and partly influenced by both societal and vocational relevance, according to the relevancy theory used. The MOOC was experienced to be relevant for the three following reasons: (i good content (e.g., energy production and implementation of the course; (ii the course makes it possible to study in a new way; and (iii the course is personally useful. The characteristics of the MOOC, such as being available anywhere and anytime, free access, and online learning, bringing out a flexible, new way of learning and thus promoting Education for Sustainable Development (ESD in the context of sustainable energy at school level around the world. This MOOC provided the school students with choice-based learning and expanded their learning opportunities in understanding sustainable

  6. Application of Bayesian neural networks to energy reconstruction in EAS experiments for ground-based TeV astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Y.; Xu, Y.; Pan, J.; Lan, J. Q.; Gao, W. W.

    2016-07-01

    A toy detector array is designed to detect a shower generated by the interaction between a TeV cosmic ray and the atmosphere. In the present paper, the primary energies of showers detected by the detector array are reconstructed with the algorithm of Bayesian neural networks (BNNs) and a standard method like the LHAASO experiment [1], respectively. Compared to the standard method, the energy resolutions are significantly improved using the BNNs. And the improvement is more obvious for the high energy showers than the low energy ones.

  7. Water Ice Radiolytic O2, H2, and H2O2 Yields for Any Projectile Species, Energy, or Temperature: A Model for Icy Astrophysical Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teolis, B. D.; Plainaki, C.; Cassidy, T. A.; Raut, U.

    2017-10-01

    O2, H2, and H2O2 radiolysis from water ice is pervasive on icy astrophysical bodies, but the lack of a self-consistent, quantitative model of the yields of these water products versus irradiation projectile species and energy has been an obstacle to estimating the radiolytic oxidant sources to the surfaces and exospheres of these objects. A major challenge is the wide variation of O2 radiolysis yields between laboratory experiments, ranging over 4 orders of magnitude from 5 × 10-7 to 5 × 10-3 molecules/eV for different particles and energies. We revisit decades of laboratory data to solve this long-standing puzzle, finding an inverse projectile range dependence in the O2 yields, due to preferential O2 formation from an 30 Å thick oxygenated surface layer. Highly penetrating projectile ions and electrons with ranges ≳30 Å are therefore less efficient at producing O2 than slow/heavy ions and low-energy electrons (≲ 400 eV) which deposit most energy near the surface. Unlike O2, the H2O2 yields from penetrating projectiles fall within a comparatively narrow range of (0.1-6) × 10-3 molecules/eV and do not depend on range, suggesting that H2O2 forms deep in the ice uniformly along the projectile track, e.g., by reactions of OH radicals. We develop an analytical model for O2, H2, and H2O2 yields from pure water ice for electrons and singly charged ions of any mass and energy and apply the model to estimate possible O2 source rates on several icy satellites. The yields are upper limits for icy bodies on which surface impurities may be present.

  8. How accurate is Density Functional Theory in Predicting Reaction Energies Relevant to Phase Stability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautier, Geoffroy; Ong, Shyue Ping; Jain, Anubhav; Moore, Charles J.; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2012-02-01

    Density Functional Theory (DFT) computations can be used to build computational phase diagrams that are used to understand the stability of known phases but also to assess the stability of novel, predicted compounds. The quality and predictive power of those phase diagrams rely on the accuracy of DFT in modeling reaction energies and we will present in this talk the results of a large scale comparison between experimentally measured and DFT computed reaction energies. For starters, we will show that only certain reaction energies are directly relevant to phase stability of multicomponent systems and that very often those reaction energies are not the commonly studied reactions from the elements. Using data from different experimental thermochemical tables and DFT high-throughput computing, we will present the results of a statistical study based on more than 130 reaction energies relevant to phase stability and from binary oxides to ternary oxides. We will show that the typical error are around 30 meV/at and therefore an order of magnitude lower than the errors in reaction energies from the elements. Finally, we will discuss the broad implications of our results on the evaluation of ab initio phase diagrams and on the computational prediction of new solid phases.

  9. Resonance Strength Measurement at Astrophysical Energies: The 17O(p,α14N Reaction Studied via THM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi M.L.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on 17O nuclei, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. We will report on the indirect study of the 17O(p,α14N reaction via the Trojan Horse Method by applying the approach developed for extracting the resonance strength of narrow resonance in the ultralow energy region. The mean value of the strengths obtained in the two measurements was calculated and compared with the direct data available in literature.

  10. Astrophysical Hydrodynamics An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Shore, Steven N

    2007-01-01

    This latest edition of the proven and comprehensive treatment on the topic -- from the bestselling author of ""Tapestry of Modern Astrophysics"" -- has been updated and revised to reflect the newest research results. Suitable for AS0000 and AS0200 courses, as well as advanced astrophysics and astronomy lectures, this is an indispensable theoretical backup for studies on celestial body formation and astrophysics. Includes exercises with solutions.

  11. Development of a Monte Carlo code for the data analysis of the {sup 18}F(p,α){sup 15}O reaction at astrophysical energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caruso, A.; Cherubini, S.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Rapisarda, G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, ML. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Catania, Italy and INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Crucillà, V. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Gulino, M. [Universitá di Enna KORE, Enna, Italy and INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Kubono, S. [Riken, Wako, Tokyo, Japan and Center for Nuclear Study, The University of Tokyo (Japan); Yamaguchi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Wakabayashi, Y. [Center for Nuclear Study, The University of Tokyo (Japan); Iwasa, N. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Kato, S. [Department of Physics, Yamagata University, Yamagata (Japan); Komatsubara, T. [Rare Isotope Science Project, Institute for Basic Science, Yuseong-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of); Teranishi, T. [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Coc, A. [Centre de Spectrométrie Nucléaire et de Spectrométrie de Masse, Orsay (France); Hammache, F. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, IN2P3, Orsay (France); and others

    2015-02-24

    Novae are astrophysical events (violent explosion) occurring in close binary systems consisting of a white dwarf and a main-sequence star or a star in a more advanced stage of evolution. They are called 'narrow systems' because the two components interact with each other: there is a process of mass exchange with resulting in the transfer of matter from the companion star to the white dwarf, leading to the formation of this last of the so-called accretion disk, rich mainly of hydrogen. Over time, more and more material accumulates until the pressure and the temperature reached are sufficient to trigger nuclear fusion reactions, rapidly converting a large part of the hydrogen into heavier elements. The products of 'hot hydrogen burning' are then placed in the interstellar medium as a result of violent explosions. Studies on the element abundances observed in these events can provide important information about the stages of evolution stellar. During the outbursts of novae some radioactive isotopes are synthesized: in particular, the decay of short-lived nuclei such as {sup 13}N and {sup 18}F with subsequent emission of gamma radiation energy below 511 keV. The gamma rays from products electron-positron annihilation of positrons emitted in the decay of {sup 18}F are the most abundant and the first observable as soon as the atmosphere of the nova starts to become transparent to gamma radiation. Hence the importance of the study of nuclear reactions that lead both to the formation and to the destruction of {sup 18}F. Among these, the {sup 18}F(p,α){sup 15}O reaction is one of the main channels of destruction. This reaction was then studied at energies of astrophysical interest. The experiment done at Riken, Japan, has as its objective the study of the {sup 18}F(p,α){sup 15}O reaction, using a beam of {sup 18}F produced at CRIB, to derive important information about the phenomenon of novae. In this paper we present the experimental technique and the

  12. Particle Physics & Astrophysics (PPA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Scientists at SLAC's Particle Physics and Astrophysics develop and utilize unique instruments from underground to outer space to explore the ultimate laws of nature...

  13. Absolute cross sections of the 86Sr(α,n)89Zr reaction at energies of astrophysical interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oprea, Andreea; Glodariu, Tudor; Filipescu, Dan; Gheorghe, Ioana; Mitu, Andreea; Boromiza, Marian; Bucurescu, Dorel; Costache, Cristian; Cata-Danil, Irina; Florea, Nicoleta; Ghita, Dan Gabriel; Ionescu, Alina; Marginean, Nicolae; Marginean, Raluca; Mihai, Constantin; Mihai, Radu; Negret, Alexandru; Nita, Cristina; Olacel, Adina; Pascu, Sorin; Sotty, Cristophe; Suvaila, Rares; Stan, Lucian; Stroe, Lucian; Serban, Andreea; Stiru, Irina; Toma, Sebastian; Turturica, Andrei; Ujeniuc, Sorin

    2017-09-01

    Absolute cross sections for the 86Sr(α,n)89Zr reaction at energies close to the Gamow window are reported. Three thin SrF2 targets were irradiated using the 9 MV Tandem facility in IFIN-HH Bucharest that delivered α beams for the activation process. Two high-purity Germanium detectors were used to measure the induced activity of 89Zr in a low background environment. The experimental results are in very good agreement with Hauser-Feshbach statistical model calculations performed with the TALYS code.

  14. Absolute cross sections of the 86Sr(α,n89Zr reaction at energies of astrophysical interest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oprea Andreea

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Absolute cross sections for the 86Sr(α,n89Zr reaction at energies close to the Gamow window are reported. Three thin SrF2 targets were irradiated using the 9 MV Tandem facility in IFIN-HH Bucharest that delivered α beams for the activation process. Two high-purity Germanium detectors were used to measure the induced activity of 89Zr in a low background environment. The experimental results are in very good agreement with Hauser-Feshbach statistical model calculations performed with the TALYS code.

  15. Breakup of 8B on 58Ni at energies around the Coulomb barrier and the astrophysical S17(0 factor revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales-Rivera J.C.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Calculations of breakup and direct proton transfer for the 8B+58Ni system at energies around the Coulomb barrier (EB,lab=22.95 MeV were performed by the continuum-discretized coupled channels (CDCC method and the coupled-reaction-channels (CRC method, respectively. For the 7Be+58Ni interaction, we used a semimicroscopic optical model potential (OMP that combines microscopic calculations of the mean-field double folding potential and a phenomenological construction of the dynamical polarization potential (DPP. The 7Be angular distribution at Elab=25.75 MeV from the 8B breakup on 58Ni was calculated and the spectroscopic factor for 8B → 7Be+p vertex, Sexpt = 1.10 ± 0.05, was deduced. The astrophysical S17(0 factor was calculated equal to 20.7 ±1.1 eV•b, being in good agreement with the previously reported values.

  16. Constraint of the 13C(α,n) Cross Section Toward Astrophysical Energies for the Main s-Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomey, Rebecca; Febbraro, Michael T.; Pain, Steven D.; Peters, William A.; Cizewski, Jolie A.; Havener, Charles C.; Bannister, Mark E.; Chipps, Kelly A.; Walter, David G.; Ummel, Chad C.; Sims, Harrison

    2017-09-01

    The slow neutron capture process (s-process) typically occurs in relatively low neutron flux environments, such as AGB stars, and is a key mechanism in heavy-element synthesis. The dominant source of neutrons for the main s-process is the 13C(α,n) reaction, which proceeds at stellar temperatures ( 0.1 GK, 200 keV), via reactions well below the Coulomb barrier. Direct measurements of the reaction rate in the Gamow window ( 140- 230 keV) is difficult, complicated by the low yields and high beam currents required. Current measurements have constrained the cross section down to approximately 320 keV - still well above stellar conditions- with significant statistical uncertainties. These uncertainties, and the influence of a near-threshold 1 /2+ state at 6.4 MeV, means that extrapolation of the data into the Gamow window is unreliable. These measurements typically use high-efficiency moderated neutron counter detectors, meaning energy information of the incident neutrons is lost. A quasi-spectroscopic approach has been used to measure the 13C(α,n) reaction rate at energies between 300-350 keV with the aim of reducing uncertainties in current measurements. Work supported in part by U.S. D.O.E., the National Science Foundation and the LDRD Program of ORNL, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC.

  17. Very low energy protons from β-delayed p-decay of proton-rich nuclei for nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, E.; Trache, L.; Banu, A.; Hardy, J. C.; Iacob, V. E.; McCleskey, M.; Roeder, B.; Spiridon, A.; Tribble, R. E.; Davinson, T.; Lotay, G.; Woods, P. J.; Saastamoinen, A.; Aysto, J.

    2009-10-01

    We developed a technique to measure very low energy protons from the beta-delayed proton-decay of proton-rich nuclei produced and separated with the MARS recoil separator at TAMU. A simple setup consisting of a telescope made of a thin double sided Si strip detector (p-detector) backed or sandwiched between two thick Si detectors (β-detectors) was designed. The source nuclei are slowed down from 30-40 MeV/u and implanted in the middle of the thin p-detector. The excited states populated in daughter nucleus above the proton threshold are resonances in the radiative proton capture leading to that nucleus; therefore, beta-decay can be a useful mechanism to study these resonances. In particular, we have studied ^23Al and ^31Cl and got information on the resonances of ^22Na(p,γ)^23Mg and ^30P(p,γ)^31S reactions, both important in novae. We studied different W1 and BB2 p-detectors, 45-140 μm thick, made by MSL, and found that thinner detectors with a small cell size are best to measure proton energies as low as 2-300 keV.

  18. Astronomy and astrophysics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    National Research Council Staff

    1988-01-01

    ... for the Decades 1995 to 2015 Astronomy and Astrophysics Task Group on Astronomy and Astrophysics Space Science Board Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Resources National Research Council NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, D.C. 1988 Copyrightoriginal retained, the be not from cannot book, paper original however, for version formatting, author...

  19. FOREWORD: Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Naftali; Hass, Michael; Paul, Michael

    2012-02-01

    the conference dinner banquet at the Dan hotel. An excursion to the 'Red Canyon' in the Eilat Mountains on Wednesday afternoon was one of the social highlights of the conference. A total number of 140 scientists attended NPA5 and about 30 accompanying persons; about 25% of these were young participants (less than 36 years old). 23 participants were from Israel, and 27 were from outside of Europe (including two from Africa). The subjects covered at the conference in Eilat concentrated mainly on the spirit of the original idea - to probe experimental and theoretical activity in nuclear structure and reactions that is directly related to the physics of the Universe. There were also sessions of general interest in astrophysics, as well as a poster session on Tuesday evening featuring 40 posters. The topics included: Nuclear Structure - Theory and Experiment Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis and Formation of First Stars Stellar Reactions and Solar Neutrinos Explosive Nucleosynthesis, Radioactive Beams and Exotic Nuclei-New Facilities and Future Possibilities for Astrophysics Neutrino Physics - the Low and High-Energy Frontiers Rare events, Dark Matter, Double beta-decay, Symmetries The conference started with an excellent exposé of the progress made in the discovery of super-heavy elements and the study of their properties. The progress in this field is enormous, and this subject should be communicated to more general audiences. The role of the nuclear equation of state and of the precise determination of nuclear masses in nucleosynthesis was emphasized in several talks. The role of neutrinos in astrophysics was discussed extensively in several sessions. One of the highlights of this was the presentation about the IceCube and DeepCore detectors operating deep in the Antarctic ice. These facilities are able to detect cosmogenic neutrinos in a wide energy range, from 10 GeV to 1010 GeV. The subject of solar neutrinos was discussed in a number of talks. Topics related to properties

  20. The gamma-ray spectrometer HORUS and its applications for nuclear astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Netterdon, L; Endres, J; Fransen, C; Hennig, A; Mayer, J; Müller-Gatermann, C; Sauerwein, A; Scholz, P; Spieker, M; Zilges, A

    2014-01-01

    A dedicated setup for the in-beam measurement of absolute cross sections of astrophysically relevant charged-particle induced reactions is presented. These, usually very low, cross sections at energies of astrophysical interest are important to improve the modeling of the nucleosynthesis processes of heavy nuclei. Particular emphasis is put on the production of the $p$ nuclei during the astrophysical $\\gamma$ process. The recently developed setup utilizes the high-efficiency $\\gamma$-ray spectrometer HORUS, which is located at the 10 MV FN tandem ion accelerator of the Institute for Nuclear Physics in Cologne. The design of this setup will be presented and results of the recently measured $^{89}$Y(p,$\\gamma$)$^{90}$Zr reaction will be discussed. The excellent agreement with existing data shows, that the HORUS spectrometer is a powerful tool to determine total and partial cross sections using the in-beam method with high-purity germanium detectors.

  1. Energy for climate in Europe. An assessment of energy policies with climate-relevance. The LinkS Project.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruud, Audun; Knudsen, Joergen K.; Jacobsen, Gerd B.

    2011-07-01

    The LinkS project aims at providing a better linkage between perspectives and projections for global climate policy development and regional energy systems, by linking relevant modelling tools. The present report provides a specific focus on energy policy measures within the EY with climate relevance. The EU has in recent years aimed at reinforcing the linkage between the climate and energy policies, both at strategic and operational levels. The EU has pledged itself to reduce its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions with 8 percent by 2008-12 as compared to the 1990 level, and by 20 percent by 2020 as compared to the as compared to the 2005 level. The EU-27 reduced it GHG emissions with 11,3 percent in 1990-2008. The 2020-target, however, will require stronger efforts and energy is a key sector: The EU has decided that 20 percent of the energy must be renewable, and that the energy usage in 2020 is to be 20 per sent more efficient than in 2005. A number of policy strategies, measures and legislation are formulated to fulfil these targets. In order to highlight the potential of these measures, this report specifically addresses the drivers and limitations given the existing decision-making structures in the EU. The methodology employed is mainly qualitative, based on document analysis and a review of secondary literature. Climate-change mitigation is in principle based on supra-national decision-making, but unanimity among all Eu Member States is still required in critical issues related to the energy sector. In addition, the national follow-up of the targets constitutes a particular challenge. This is here illustrated by the cases of Denmark and Norway. Energy policy is also substantially characterised by several conflicting interests between the Member States, resulting in diverging policy priorities. It is, therefore, an open question whether the EU will succeed in fulfilling its 20/20/20 percent targets by 2020, and will be the actual role of energy within the climate

  2. Relevance of deep-subsurface microbiology for underground gas storage and geothermal energy production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gniese, Claudia; Bombach, Petra; Rakoczy, Jana; Hoth, Nils; Schlömann, Michael; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Krüger, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This chapter gives the reader an introduction into the microbiology of deep geological systems with a special focus on potential geobiotechnological applications and respective risk assessments. It has been known for decades that microbial activity is responsible for the degradation or conversion of hydrocarbons in oil, gas, and coal reservoirs. These processes occur in the absence of oxygen, a typical characteristic of such deep ecosystems. The understanding of the responsible microbial processes and their environmental regulation is not only of great scientific interest. It also has substantial economic and social relevance, inasmuch as these processes directly or indirectly affect the quantity and quality of the stored oil or gas. As outlined in the following chapter, in addition to the conventional hydrocarbons, new interest in such deep subsurface systems is rising for different technological developments. These are introduced together with related geomicrobiological topics. The capture and long-termed storage of large amounts of carbon dioxide, carbon capture and storage (CCS), for example, in depleted oil and gas reservoirs, is considered to be an important options to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and global warming. On the other hand, the increasing contribution of energy from natural and renewable sources, such as wind, solar, geothermal energy, or biogas production leads to an increasing interest in underground storage of renewable energies. Energy carriers, that is, biogas, methane, or hydrogen, are often produced in a nonconstant manner and renewable energy may be produced at some distance from the place where it is needed. Therefore, storing the energy after its conversion to methane or hydrogen in porous reservoirs or salt caverns is extensively discussed. All these developments create new research fields and challenges for microbiologists and geobiotechnologists. As a basis for respective future work, we introduce the three major topics, that is

  3. From EXOSAT to the High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive (HEASARC): X-ray Astronomy Comes of Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Nicholas E.

    2012-01-01

    In May 1983 the European Space Agency launched EXOSAT, its first X-ray astronomy observatory. Even though it lasted only 3 short years, this mission brought not only new capabilities that resulted in unexpected discoveries, but also a pioneering approach to operations and archiving that changed X-ray astronomy from observations led by small instrument teams, to an observatory approach open to the entire community through a guest observer program. The community use of the observatory was supported by a small dedicated team of scientists, the precursor to the data center activities created to support e.g. Chandra and XMM-Newton. The new science capabilities of EX OS AT included a 90 hr highly eccentric high earth orbit that allow unprecedented continuous coverage of sources as well as direct communication with the satellite that allowed real time decisions to respond to unexpected events through targets of opportunity. The advantages of this orbit demonstrated by EXOSAT resulted in Chandra and XMM-Newton selecting similar orbits. The three instruments on board the EXOSAT observatory were complementary, designed to give complete coverage over a wide energy band pass of 0.05-50 keY. An onboard processor could be programmed to give multiple data modes that could be optimized in response to science discoveries: These new capabilities resulted in many new discoveries including the first comprehensive study of AGN variability, new orbital periods in X-ray binaries and cataclysmic variables, new black holes, quasi-periodic oscillations from neutron stars and black holes and broad band X-ray spectroscopy. The EXOSAT team generated a well-organized database accessible worldwide over the nascent internet, allowing remote selection of data products, making samples and undertaking surveys from the data. The HEASARC was established by NASA at Goddard Space Flight Center in 1990 as the repository of NASA X-ray and Gamma-ray data. The proven EXOSAT database system became the core

  4. From EXOSAT to the High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive (HEASARC): X-ray Astronomy Comes of Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Nicholas E.

    2013-01-01

    In May 1983 the European Space Agency launched EXOSAT, its first X-ray astronomy observatory. Even though it lasted only 3 short years, this mission brought not only new capabilities that resulted in unexpected discoveries, but also a pioneering approach to operations and archiving that changed X-ray astronomy from observations led by small instrument teams, to an observatory approach open to the entire community through a guest observer program. The community use of the observatory was supported by a small dedicated team of scientists, the precursor to the data center activities created to support e.g. Chandra and XMM-Newton. The new science capabilities of EXOSAT included a 90 hr highly eccentric high earth orbit that allow unprecedented continuous coverage of sources as well as direct communication with the satellite that allowed real time decisions to respond to unexpected events through targets of opportunity. The advantages of this orbit demonstrated by EXOSAT resulted in Chandra and XMM-Newton selecting similar orbits. The three instruments on board the EXOSAT observatory were complementary, designed to give complete coverage over a wide energy band pass of 0.05-50 keV. An onboard processor could be programed to give multiple data modes that could be optimized in response to science discoveries. These new capabilities resulted in many new discoveries including the first comprehensive study of AGN variability, new orbital periods in X-ray binaries and cataclysmic variables, new black holes, quasi-periodic oscillations from neutron stars and black holes and broad band X-ray spectroscopy. The EXOSAT team generated a well-organized database accessible worldwide over the nascent internet, allowing remote selection of data products, making samples and undertaking surveys from the data. The HEASARC was established by NASA at Goddard Space Flight Center in 1990 as the repository of NASA X-ray and Gamma-ray data. The proven EXOSAT database system became the core of

  5. Focusing Telescopes in Nuclear Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Ballmoos, Peter von

    2007-01-01

    This volume is the first of its kind on focusing gamma-ray telescopes. Forty-eight refereed papers provide a comprehensive overview of the scientific potential and technical challenges of this nascent tool for nuclear astrophysics. The book features articles dealing with pivotal technologies such as grazing incident mirrors, multilayer coatings, Laue- and Fresnel-lenses - and even an optic using the curvature of space-time. The volume also presents an overview of detectors matching the ambitious objectives of gamma ray optics, and facilities for operating such systems on the ground and in space. The extraordinary scientific potential of focusing gamma-ray telescopes for the study of the most powerful sources and the most violent events in the Universe is emphasized in a series of introductory articles. Practicing professionals, and students interested in experimental high-energy astrophysics, will find this book a useful reference

  6. Review of relevant studies of isolated systems[Integration of wind energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, L.H.; Lundsager, P.

    2000-12-01

    The report presents the results of a review of studies relating to integration of wind energy in isolated power supply systems, based on a systematic literature survey. The purpose of the study is to develop a methodology consisting of a set of guidelines for wind energy projects in isolated energy systems and a set of tools and models that are operational on an engineering level. The review is based on a literature search in the ETDE Energy Database with a main search covering the period 7/88 to 6/97 and supplemented by partial update periods. A few newer references have been included in the review, most notably the IEC/PAS 62111 specification. The amount of wind energy literature related to the subject is excessively large, and a complete review in which every relevant abstract is identified and examined is not feasible within the framework of this (or probably any other) study. The review results have been organised according to the following keywords: methods & guides, economics, concept of application, system solutions, case studies, financial programmes, dedicated software tools. None of the found references presents methods or tools that contradict the philosophy of Risoe's methodology as it is described in the report. It is therefore concluded that Risoe's methodology makes a good platform for further development. (au)

  7. Astrophysics of the Interstellar Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Maciel, Walter J

    2013-01-01

    The space between the stars includes a large variety of objects, where physical processes occur that are fundamental for the structure and evolution of galaxies. This book gives the reader some basic knowledge of these processes and at the same time, presents estimates of the main quantities relevant to the study of the interstellar medium. The book could be used as an introductory course on the interstellar medium  by science students or by readers interested in astrophysics with an adequate physics and mathematics background.

  8. Blood lactate concentration after exposure to conducted energy weapons (including TASER® devices): is it clinically relevant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauchem, James R

    2013-09-01

    In previous studies, blood lactate concentration (BLac) consistently increased in anesthetized animals and in human subjects after exposures to TASER(®) conducted energy weapons (CEWs). Some have suggested the increased BLac would have detrimental consequences. In the current review, the following are evaluated: (a) the nature of muscle contractions due to CEWs, (b) general aspects of increased BLac, (c) previous studies of conventional neuromuscular electrical stimulation and CEW exposures, and (d) BLac in disease states. On the basis of these analyses, one can conclude that BLac, per se (independent of acidemia), would not be clinically relevant immediately after short-duration CEW applications, due to the short time course of any increase.

  9. Astrophysics in a nutshell

    CERN Document Server

    Maoz, Dan

    2007-01-01

    A concise but thorough introduction to the observational data and theoretical concepts underlying modern astronomy, Astrophysics in a Nutshell is designed for advanced undergraduate science majors taking a one-semester course. This well-balanced and up-to-date textbook covers the essentials of modern astrophysics--from stars to cosmology--emphasizing the common, familiar physical principles that govern astronomical phenomena, and the interplay between theory and observation. In addition to traditional topics such as stellar remnants, galaxies, and the interstellar medium, Astrophysics in a N

  10. An invitation to astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Padmanabhan, Thanu

    2006-01-01

    This unique book provides a clear and lucid description of several aspects of astrophysics and cosmology in a language understandable to a physicist or beginner in astrophysics. It presents the key topics in all branches of astrophysics and cosmology in a simple and concise language. The emphasis is on currently active research areas and exciting new frontiers rather than on more pedantic topics. Many complicated results are introduced with simple, novel derivations which strengthen the conceptual understanding of the subject. The book also contains over one hundred exercises which will help s

  11. Astrophysical payloads for picosatellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudec, R.

    2017-07-01

    The recent progress in cubesatellite technology allows to consider scientific applications of these minsatellites including astrophysical research. Miniature X-ray and UV-payloads may serve as an example.

  12. Astrophysics Program Overview; Briefing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    This is an overview briefing of the NAS Astrophysics programs. These program should lead the opening scientific frontiers and disseminate new knowledge, as the Hubble Space Telescope and Compton Gamma Ray Observatory are currently doing...

  13. Energy-Water Nexus Relevant to Baseload Electricity Source Including Mini/Micro Hydropower Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, M.; Tanabe, S.; Yamada, M.

    2014-12-01

    Water, food and energy is three sacred treasures that are necessary for human beings. However, recent factors such as population growth and rapid increase in energy consumption have generated conflicting cases between water and energy. For example, there exist conflicts caused by enhanced energy use, such as between hydropower generation and riverine ecosystems and service water, between shale gas and ground water, between geothermal and hot spring water. This study aims to provide quantitative guidelines necessary for capacity building among various stakeholders to minimize water-energy conflicts in enhancing energy use. Among various kinds of renewable energy sources, we target baseload sources, especially focusing on renewable energy of which installation is required socially not only to reduce CO2 and other greenhouse gas emissions but to stimulate local economy. Such renewable energy sources include micro/mini hydropower and geothermal. Three municipalities in Japan, Beppu City, Obama City and Otsuchi Town are selected as primary sites of this study. Based on the calculated potential supply and demand of micro/mini hydropower generation in Beppu City, for example, we estimate the electricity of tens through hundreds of households is covered by installing new micro/mini hydropower generation plants along each river. However, the result is based on the existing infrastructures such as roads and electric lines. This means that more potentials are expected if the local society chooses options that enhance the infrastructures to increase micro/mini hydropower generation plants. In addition, further capacity building in the local society is necessary. In Japan, for example, regulations by the river law and irrigation right restrict new entry by actors to the river. Possible influences to riverine ecosystems in installing new micro/mini hydropower generation plants should also be well taken into account. Deregulation of the existing laws relevant to rivers and

  14. Theoretical physics and astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Ginzburg, Vitalii Lazarevich

    1979-01-01

    The aim of this book is to present, on the one hand various topics in theoretical physics in depth - especially topics related to electrodynamics - and on the other hand to show how these topics find applications in various aspects of astrophysics. The first text on theoretical physics and astrophysical applications, it covers many recent advances including those in X-ray, &ggr;-ray and radio-astronomy, with comprehensive coverage of the literature

  15. Collisionless plasmas in astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Belmont, Gerard; Mottez, Fabrice; Pantellini, Filippo; Pelletier, Guy

    2013-01-01

    Collisionless Plasmas in Astrophysics examines the unique properties of media without collisions in plasma physics. Experts in this field, the authors present the first book to concentrate on collisionless conditions in plasmas, whether close or not to thermal equilibrium. Filling a void in scientific literature, Collisionless Plasmas in Astrophysics explains the possibilities of modeling such plasmas, using a fluid or a kinetic framework. It also addresses common misconceptions that even professionals may possess, on phenomena such as "collisionless (Landau) damping". Abundant illustrations

  16. The scope of environmental impact statements for biofuelled energy plants in Sweden and its environmental relevance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruhn-Tysk, S.

    2001-03-01

    This thesis aims to evaluate how the Swedish environmental impact assessment (EIA) system works in practice and to analyse the environmental relevance of the scoping process during the ElA process. As a case study, environmental impact statements (EISs) for bio fuelled energy plants have been reviewed in order to illustrate the scope of the statements and hence evaluate how the ElA system works and analyses what environmental aspects that are prioritised by ElA actors. Based on the review results, the scope of the EISs indicates that the Swedish ElA system did not work as intended during the studied period since not even the legal requirements were fulfilled in many of the EISs. In addition, international EIA practice does not seem to have influenced the Swedish practice of ElA at that time. The EISs also show that EIA actors apply narrow system boundaries, i.e. they focus only on the activities of the energy plant that are explicitly linked to the energy plant location and its immediate vicinity. Moreover, these narrow system boundaries exclude important aspects of an energy plant, like resource extraction and global and long-term effects. Many of the energy plants have been planned and developed partly due to a Government Bill, in which a development of the Swedish energy system was proposed in order to achieve a sustainable development of Sweden. However, a sustainable development requires that effects on present as well as future generations are focused on as well. Therefore, an ElA process and a decision-making process, which prioritises local and short-term effects, often do not promote the societal goals of sustainable development. In order to promote the goals of sustainable development, the perspectives of ElA actors have to widen to include global and future, long-term effects.

  17. First Experimental Constraint on the Fe-59(n, gamma)Fe-60 Reaction Cross Section at Astrophysical Energies via the Coulomb Dissociation of Fe-60

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uberseder, E.; Adachi, T.; Aumann, T.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Boretzky, K.; Caesar, C.; Dillmann, I.; Ershova, O.; Estrade, A.; Farinon, F.; Hagdahl, J.; Heftrich, T.; Heil, M.; Heine, M.; Holl, M.; Ignatov, A.; Johansson, H. T.; Kalantar, N.; Langer, C.; Le Bleis, T.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Marganiec, J.; Movsesyan, A.; Najafi, M. A.; Nilsson, T.; Nociforo, C.; Panin, V.; Pietri, S.; Plag, R.; Prochazka, A.; Rastrepina, G.; Reifarth, R.; Ricciardi, V.; Rigollet, C.; Rossi, D. M.; Savran, D.; Simon, H.; Sonnabend, K.; Streicher, B.; Terashima, S.; Thies, R.; Togano, Y.; Volkov, V.; Wamers, F.; Weick, H.; Weigand, M.; Wiescher, M.; Wimmer, C.; Winckler, N.; Woods, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    The radionuclide Fe-60 has been of great interest to the nuclear astrophysics community for over a decade. An initial discrepancy between the observed and modeled Galactic Fe-60/Al-26 ratio motivated numerous studies focused on the nucleosynthesis of these two isotopes, though the cross section of

  18. The relevance of rooftops: Analyzing the microscale surface energy balance in the Chicago region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, Radhika

    interior through the roof, and the physical properties of the surface. These results hold particular relevance for urban heat island mitigation strategies. Based on the results of this work, recommendations are proposed for widespread adoption of various techniques that enhance building energy efficiency (particularly targeting rooftops), mitigate the negative impacts of the urban heat island, and overcome the current barriers to transforming the market.

  19. Magnetic processes in astrophysics theory, simulations, experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Rüdiger, Günther; Hollerbach, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    In this work the authors draw upon their expertise in geophysical and astrophysical MHD to explore the motion of electrically conducting fluids, the so-called dynamo effect, and describe the similarities and differences between different magnetized objects. They also explain why magnetic fields are crucial to the formation of the stars, and discuss promising experiments currently being designed to investigate some of the relevant physics in the laboratory. This interdisciplinary approach will appeal to a wide audience in physics, astrophysics and geophysics. This second edition covers such add

  20. Wind‐gust parametrizations at heights relevant for wind energy: a study based on mast observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suomi, I.; Vihma, T.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2013-01-01

    Wind gusts are traditionally observed and reported at the reference height of 10 m and most gust parametrization methods have been developed only for this height. In many practical applications, e.g. in wind energy, the relevant heights are, however, up to a few hundred metres. In this study, mean...... gustiness conditions were studied using observations from two coastal/archipelago weather masts in the Gulf of Finland (northern Europe) with observation heights between 30 and 143 m. Only moderate and strong wind cases were addressed. Both masts were located over relatively flat terrain but the local...... speed, which is parametrized on the basis of the surface friction velocity, the Obukhov length and height and the boundary‐layer height. The new gust parametrization method outperformed the two older methods: the effects of surface roughness, stability and the height above the surface were well...

  1. Structure of proton-rich nuclei of astrophysical interest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeckl, E. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany)

    1998-06-01

    Recent experimental data concerning proton-rich nuclei between A=20 and A=100 are presented and discussed with respect to their relevance to the astrophysical rp process and to the calibration of solar neutrino detectors. (orig.)

  2. Exploring nuclear reactions relevant to Stellar and Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis using High-Energy-Density plasmas at OMEGA and the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatu Johnson, M.

    2017-10-01

    Thermonuclear reaction rates and nuclear processes have been explored traditionally by means of accelerator experiments, which are difficult to execute at conditions relevant to Stellar Nucleosynthesis (SN) and Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN). High-Energy-Density (HED) plasmas closely mimic astrophysical environments and are an excellent complement to accelerator experiments in exploring SN and BBN-relevant nuclear reactions. To date, our work using HED plasmas at OMEGA and NIF has focused on the complementary 3He+3He, T+3He and T +T reactions. First studies of the T +T reaction indicated the significance of the 5He ground-state resonance in the T +T neutron spectrum. Subsequent T +T experiments showed that the strength of this resonance varies with center-of-mass (c-m) energy in the range of 16-50 keV, a variation that is not fundamentally understood. Studies of the 3He+3He and T+3He reactions have also been conducted at OMEGA at c-m energies of 165 keV and 80 keV, respectively, and the results revealed three things. First, a large cross section for the T+3He- γ branch can be ruled out as an explanation for the anomalously high abundance of 6Li in primordial material. Second, the results contrasted to theoretical modeling indicate that the mirror-symmetry assumption is not enough to capture the differences between T +T and 3He+3He reactions. Third, the elliptical spectrum assumed in the analysis of 3He+3He data obtained in accelerator experiments is incorrect. Preliminary data from recent experiments at the NIF exploring the 3He+3He reaction at c-m energies of 60 keV and 100 keV also indicate that the underlying physics changes with c-m energy. In this talk, we describe these findings and future directions for exploring light-ion reactions at OMEGA and the NIF. The work was supported in part by the US DOE, LLE, and LLNL.

  3. Houdini for Astrophysical Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naiman, J. P.; Borkiewicz, Kalina; Christensen, A. J.

    2017-05-01

    The rapid growth in scale and complexity of both computational and observational astrophysics over the past decade necessitates efficient and intuitive methods for examining and visualizing large data sets. Here, we discuss some newly developed tools used to import and manipulate astrophysical data into the three-dimensional visual effects software, Houdini. This software is widely used by visual effects artists, but a recently implemented Python API now allows astronomers to more easily use Houdini as a visualization tool. This paper includes a description of features, workflow, and various example visualizations. The project website, www.ytini.com, is aimed at a scientific audience and contains Houdini tutorials and links to the Python script Bitbucket repository to simplify the process of importing and rendering astrophysical data.

  4. Measurement of the photodissociation of the deuteron at energies relevant to Big Bang nucleosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannaske, Roland

    2016-07-01

    Between 10 and 1000 s after the Big Bang the first light nuclei were produced from protons and neutrons during Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). The primordial abundances of these nuclei depended on the cross sections of the involved nuclear reactions. Comparisons between results of nuclear network calculations and astronomic observations offer a unique probe of the universe at that time. Experimental data for the p(n,γ)d reaction, which is one of the BBN key reactions, are scarce at the relevant energies. Its reaction rate used in network calculations relies on theoretical models constrained by nucleon-nucleon scattering data, by the capture cross section for thermal neutrons, and (via the principle of detailed balance) by experimental data of the d(γ,n)p reaction. The latter reaction, the photodissociation of the deuteron, is also only sparsely measured at BBN energies (T{sub cm}=20-200 keV). Large experimental uncertainties make a comparison of measurements with precise theoretical calculations difficult. In recent years, the d(γ,n)p reaction and especially the M1 contribution to its cross section have been studied using quasi-monochromatic γ rays from Laser-Compton scattering or electrodisintegration. Traditionally, d(γ,n)p cross sections were measured with γ-decay radiation, which is limited to a few discrete energies, or with bremsstrahlung, which requires an accurate photon flux normalization as well as the detection of one of the reaction products and its energy. Because this energy is relatively low in the BBN range, there has not yet been an absolute d(γ,n)p cross section measurement at T{sub cm}<5 MeV that used bremsstrahlung. The objective of this dissertation is such a measurement with a total uncertainty of about 5 % in the energy range relevant to BBN and up to T{sub cm}∼2.5 MeV with pulsed bremsstrahlung at the radiation source ELBE. This superconducting electron accelerator is located at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf and delivered a

  5. Astrophysics in a nutshell

    CERN Document Server

    Maoz, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Winner of the American Astronomical Society's Chambliss Award, Astrophysics in a Nutshell has become the text of choice in astrophysics courses for science majors at top universities in North America and beyond. In this expanded and fully updated second edition, the book gets even better, with a new chapter on extrasolar planets; a greatly expanded chapter on the interstellar medium; fully updated facts and figures on all subjects, from the observed properties of white dwarfs to the latest results from precision cosmology; and additional instructive problem sets. Throughout, the text features the same focused, concise style and emphasis on physics intuition that have made the book a favorite of students and teachers.

  6. Theoretical astrophysics an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Bartelmann, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    A concise yet comprehensive introduction to the central theoretical concepts of modern astrophysics, presenting hydrodynamics, radiation, and stellar dynamics all in one textbook. Adopting a modular structure, the author illustrates a small number of fundamental physical methods and principles, which are sufficient to describe and understand a wide range of seemingly very diverse astrophysical phenomena and processes. For example, the formulae that define the macroscopic behavior of stellar systems are all derived in the same way from the microscopic distribution function. This function it

  7. Powerful sources, extragalactic magnetic fields, astro-particles: astrophysical puzzles seen through ultrahigh energy cosmic ray spectacles; Sources energetiques, champs magnetiques extra-galactiques, astroparticules: enigmes astrophysiques vues par les rayons cosmiques de ultra-haute energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotera, K.

    2009-09-15

    This work explores the relationships between powerful sources in the Universe, extragalactic magnetic fields and secondary cosmos particles (neutrinos and gamma rays), through the study of the propagation of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. In this manuscript, I first review the experimental and theoretical status of the cosmic ray field. I then present a detailed review of the secondary particle emission mechanisms during cosmic ray propagation, and on the current knowledge of the extragalactic magnetic fields. In regards of all the uncertainties on the distribution of those field and the complexity of the existing models, I introduce parametrized semi-analytical and analytical modeling of cosmic ray transport in these fields. These models enables one to take into account key phenomena that are often neglected in the literature (for example the effects of the magnetic enrichment from astrophysical sources or of the small scale turbulence). I also developed a numerical tool that combines and improve existing codes, in order to treat interaction processes during cosmic ray propagation. I make use of these techniques to consider many paramount problems concerning ultrahigh energy cosmic rays, like the effect of the extragalactic magnetic field in the region of the second knee, the interpretation of the anisotropy detected by the Auger Observatory and multi-messenger aspects from sources located in magnetized environments. (author)

  8. Solar, Stellar and Galactic Connections between Particle Physics and Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Carraminana, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    This book collects extended and specialized reviews on topics linking astrophysics and particle physics at a level intermediate between a graduate student and a young researcher. The book includes also three reviews on observational techniques used in forefront astrophysics and short articles on research performed in Latin America. The reviews, updated and written by specialized researchers, describe the state of the art in the related research topics. This book is a valuable complement not only for research but also for lecturers in specialized course of high energy astrophysics, cosmic ray astrophysics and particle physics.

  9. A way forward in the study of the symmetry energy: experiment, theory, and observation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horowitz, Charles; Brown, E F.; Kim, Y; Lynch, W G.; Michaels, Robert; Ono, A; Piekarewicz, Jorge; Tsang, M B.; Wolter, H H.

    2014-07-01

    The symmetry energy describes how the energy of nuclear matter rises as one goes away from equal numbers of neutrons and protons. This is very important to describe neutron rich matter in astrophysics. This article reviews our knowledge of the symmetry energy from theoretical calculations, nuclear structure measurements, heavy ion collisions, and astronomical observations. We then present a roadmap to make progress in areas of relevance to the symmetry energy that promotes collaboration between astrophysics and the nuclear physics communities.

  10. Indirect Study of the (2)H(d,p)(3)H and (2)H(d,n)(3)He Reactions at Astrophysical Energies via the Trojan Horse Method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tumino, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Typel, S.; Aliotta, M.; Burjan, Václav; Del Santo, M. G.; Kiss, G.G.; Kroha, Václav; Hons, Zdeněk; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Mrázek, Jaromír; Pizzone, R. G.; Piskoř, Štěpán; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Sparta, R.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 50, 1-4 (2011), s. 323-325 ISSN 0177-7963. [21st European Conference on Few-Body Problems in Physics Location. Salamanca, 30.08.2010-03092010] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP203/10/0310 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : CROSS-SECTIONS * REACTION-RATES * COMPILATION * D+D Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 1.438, year: 2011

  11. The NASA Astrophysics Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebulum, Ricardo S.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's scientists are enjoying unprecedented access to astronomy data from space, both from missions launched and operated only by NASA, as well as missions led by other space agencies to which NASA contributed instruments or technology. This paper describes the NASA astrophysics program for the next decade, including NASA's response to the ASTRO2010 Decadal Survey.

  12. Astrophysics: An Integrative Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutsche, Graham D.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a one semester course in introductory stellar astrophysics at the advanced undergraduate level. The course aims to integrate all previously learned physics by applying it to the study of stars. After a brief introductory section on basic astronomical measurements, the main topics covered are stellar atmospheres, stellar structure, and…

  13. Current trends in non-accelerator particle physics: 1, Neutrino mass and oscillation. 2, High energy neutrino astrophysics. 3, Detection of dark matter. 4, Search for strange quark matter. 5, Magnetic monopole searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yudong [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-07-01

    This report is a compilation of papers reflecting current trends in non-accelerator particle physics, corresponding to talks that its author was invited to present at the Workshop on Tibet Cosmic Ray Experiment and Related Physics Topics held in Beijing, China, April 4--13, 1995. The papers are entitled `Neutrino Mass and Oscillation`, `High Energy Neutrino Astrophysics`, `Detection of Dark Matter`, `Search for Strange Quark Matter`, and `Magnetic Monopole Searches`. The report is introduced by a survey of the field and a brief description of each of the author`s papers.

  14. Minicourses in Astrophysics, Modular Approach, Vol. II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Univ., Chicago.

    This is the second of a two-volume minicourse in astrophysics. It contains chapters on the following topics: stellar nuclear energy sources and nucleosynthesis; stellar evolution; stellar structure and its determination; and pulsars. Each chapter gives much technical discussion, mathematical treatment, diagrams, and examples. References are…

  15. Astrophysical Probes of New Models of Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurek, Kathryn

    One of the most pressing and relevant cosmological questions is on the nature of the dark matter. I propose a comprehensive program at the boundary of astrophysics and cosmology with particle physics, focused on the question on the nature of the Dark Matter (DM). Research at the boundary of the two fields is critically important as a plethora of experiments in both particle physics and astrophysics, such as direct and indirect detection of Dark Matter (DM) by the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope (FGST), AMS-02, and Cosmic Microwave Background probes such as Planck, come online. At the same time, data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will probe fundamental questions about Electroweak Symmetry Breaking and its implications for astrophysics and cosmology, as concerns especially the nature of the DM and the generation of the baryon asymmetry. Physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) is required to explain the astrophysical observation that DM dominates over ordinary matter by a ratio 5:1, as we learned through WMAP, as well as large scale structure surveys. Despite lacking an understanding of the properties of the DM, its presence is crucial for the formation of structure in the universe. Particle physics provides a framework for understanding what the DM could be. This proposal centers on building new models of DM, as well as studying their signatures both in the galaxy and on earth. While particle physics has provided a few popular candidates for DM (such as the supersymmetric neutralino), whose signatures have been extensively studied in the literature, it is important to consider other theoretically motivated candidates which provide distinct signatures. This proposal focuses on such new models of DM, especially models of DM from hidden sectors. For example, recently, the PAMELA experiment has observed a rise in the ratio of positron to electron flux at high energies. The flux may likely come from astrophysical objects nearby, such as pulsars. An intriguing

  16. Advances IN Explosive Nuclear Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotay, Gavin

    2016-09-01

    Breathtaking results from the Planck satellite mission and Hubble space telescope have highlighted the key role modern Astronomy is playing for our understanding of Big Bang Cosmology. However, not so widely publicized is the similar wealth of observational data now available on explosive stellar phenomena, such as X-ray bursts, novae and Supernovae. These astronomical events are responsible for the synthesis of almost all the chemical elements we find on Earth and observe in our Galaxy, as well as energy generation throughout the cosmos. Regrettably, understanding the latest collection of observational data is severely hindered by the current, large uncertainties in the underlying nuclear physics processes that drive such stellar scenarios. In order to resolve this issue, it is becoming increasingly clear that there is a need to explore the unknown properties and reactions of nuclei away from the line of stability. Consequently, state-of-the-art radioactive beam facilities have become terrestrial laboratories for the reproduction of explosive astrophysical events. In this talk, both direct and indirect methods for studying key astrophysical reactions using radioactive beams will be discussed.

  17. Allen's astrophysical quantities

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This new, fourth, edition of Allen's classic Astrophysical Quantities belongs on every astronomer's bookshelf. It has been thoroughly revised and brought up to date by a team of more than ninety internationally renowned astronomers and astrophysicists. While it follows the basic format of the original, this indispensable reference has grown to more than twice the size of the earlier editions to accommodate the great strides made in astronomy and astrophysics. It includes detailed tables of the most recent data on: - General constants and units - Atoms, molecules, and spectra - Observational astronomy at all wavelengths from radio to gamma-rays, and neutrinos - Planetary astronomy: Earth, planets and satellites, and solar system small bodies - The Sun, normal stars, and stars with special characteristics - Stellar populations - Cataclysmic and symbiotic variables, supernovae - Theoretical stellar evolution - Circumstellar and interstellar material - Star clusters, galaxies, quasars, and active galactic nuclei ...

  18. High Time Resolution Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Phelan, Don; Shearer, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    High Time Resolution Astrophysics (HTRA) is an important new window to the universe and a vital tool in understanding a range of phenomena from diverse objects and radiative processes. This importance is demonstrated in this volume with the description of a number of topics in astrophysics, including quantum optics, cataclysmic variables, pulsars, X-ray binaries and stellar pulsations to name a few. Underlining this science foundation, technological developments in both instrumentation and detectors are described. These instruments and detectors combined cover a wide range of timescales and can measure fluxes, spectra and polarisation. These advances make it possible for HTRA to make a big contribution to our understanding of the Universe in the next decade.

  19. Microphysics of Astrophysical Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursi, L. J.; Zingale, M.; Caceres, A.; Calder, A. C.; Timmes, F. X.; Truran, J. W.; Rosner, R.; Lamb, D. Q.; Brown, E.; Ricker, P.; Fryxell, B.; Olson, K.; Riley, K.; Siegel, A.; Vladimirova, N.

    2003-03-01

    Type Ia supernovae are thought to begin with a deflagration phase, where burning occurs as a subsonic flame which accelerates and possibly undergoes a transition to a supersonic detonation. Both the acceleration and possible transition will depend on the microphysics of astrophysical flames, and their interaction with a turbulent flow in degenerate material. Here we present recent progress in studying the interactions of astrophysical flames and curvature and strain at the FLASH center; in particular, we discuss quantitative measurements of the effects of strain on burning rate of these flames, and implications for instability growth and quenching. This work was supported by the DOE ASCI/Alliances program at the University of Chicago under grant No. B341495 and the Scientific through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program of the DOE, grant number DE-FC02-01ER41176 to the Supernova Science Center/UCSC.

  20. Astrophysics a new approach

    CERN Document Server

    Kundt, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    For a quantitative understanding of the physics of the universe - from the solar system through the milky way to clusters of galaxies all the way to cosmology - these edited lecture notes are perhaps among the most concise and also among the most critical ones: Astrophysics has not yet stood the redundancy test of laboratory physics, hence should be wary of early interpretations. Special chapters are devoted to magnetic and radiation processes, supernovae, disks, black-hole candidacy, bipolar flows, cosmic rays, gamma-ray bursts, image distortions, and special sources. At the same time, planet earth is viewed as the arena for life, with plants and animals having evolved to homo sapiens during cosmic time. -- This text is unique in covering the basic qualitative and quantitative tools, formulae as well as numbers, needed for the precise interpretation of frontline phenomena in astrophysical research. The author compares mainstream interpretations with new and even controversial ones he wishes to emphasize. The...

  1. Neutrino particle astrophysics: status and outlook

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of astrophysical neutrinos at high energy by IceCube raises a host of questions: What are the sources? Is there a Galactic as well as an extragalactic component? How does the astrophysical spectrum continue to lower energy where the dominant signal is from atmospheric neutrinos? Is there a measureable flux of cosmogenic neutrinos at higher energy? What is the connection to cosmic rays? At what level and in what energy region should we expect to see evidence of the π0 decay photons that must accompany the neutrinos at production? Such questions are stimulating much theoretical activity and many multi-wavelength follow-up observations as well as driving plans for new detectors. My goal in this presentation will be to connect the neutrino data and their possible interpretations to ongoing multi-messenger observations and to the design of future detectors.

  2. Astrophysical fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, Gordon I.

    2016-06-01

    > These lecture notes and example problems are based on a course given at the University of Cambridge in Part III of the Mathematical Tripos. Fluid dynamics is involved in a very wide range of astrophysical phenomena, such as the formation and internal dynamics of stars and giant planets, the workings of jets and accretion discs around stars and black holes and the dynamics of the expanding Universe. Effects that can be important in astrophysical fluids include compressibility, self-gravitation and the dynamical influence of the magnetic field that is `frozen in' to a highly conducting plasma. The basic models introduced and applied in this course are Newtonian gas dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) for an ideal compressible fluid. The mathematical structure of the governing equations and the associated conservation laws are explored in some detail because of their importance for both analytical and numerical methods of solution, as well as for physical interpretation. Linear and nonlinear waves, including shocks and other discontinuities, are discussed. The spherical blast wave resulting from a supernova, and involving a strong shock, is a classic problem that can be solved analytically. Steady solutions with spherical or axial symmetry reveal the physics of winds and jets from stars and discs. The linearized equations determine the oscillation modes of astrophysical bodies, as well as their stability and their response to tidal forcing.

  3. 77 FR 2095 - Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee #13883; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-13

    ... Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee 13883; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal... following Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee ( 13883) meeting: Date and Time: February 10-11.... Department of Energy (DOE) on issues within the field of astronomy and astrophysics that are of mutual...

  4. 76 FR 58049 - Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee #13883; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee 13883; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal... following Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee ( 13883) meeting: Date and Time: October 13-14, 2011.... Department of Energy (DOE) on issues within the field of astronomy and astrophysics that are of mutual...

  5. 76 FR 7882 - Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    ... FOUNDATION Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal... following meeting: Name: Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee ( 13883). Date and Time: March 4...) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on issues within the field of astronomy and astrophysics that...

  6. 78 FR 22346 - Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee #13883; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    ... Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee 13883; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal... following meeting: Name: Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee ( 13883). Date and Time: May 2, 2013...) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on issues within the field of astronomy and astrophysics that...

  7. 76 FR 5214 - Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee #13883; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-28

    ... Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee 13883; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal... following Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee ( 13883) meeting: Date and Time: February 22-23... (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on issues within the field of astronomy and astrophysics...

  8. 76 FR 19793 - Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee #13883; Notice of Meeting via Teleconference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-08

    ... Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee 13883; Notice of Meeting via Teleconference In accordance with... announces the following meeting: Name: Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee ( 13883). Date and Time...) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on issues within the field of astronomy and astrophysics that...

  9. 77 FR 8288 - Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory...: Name: Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee ( 13883). Date and Time: March 2, 2012 12 p.m.-5 p... the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on issues within the field of astronomy and astrophysics that are...

  10. 78 FR 11685 - Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee #13883; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ... Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee 13883; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal... following meeting: Name: Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee ( 13883). Date and Time: March 1...) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on issues within the field of astronomy and astrophysics that...

  11. 75 FR 22863 - Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee #13883; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ... Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee 13883; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal... following meeting: Name: Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee ( 13883). Date and Time: May 20, 2010... the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on issues within the field of astronomy and astrophysics that are...

  12. Statistical and Spectral Analysis of Wind Characteristics Relevant to Wind Energy Assessment Using Tower Measurements in Complex Terrain

    OpenAIRE

    Radian Belu; Darko Koracin

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of the study was to investigate spatial and temporal characteristics of the wind speed and direction in complex terrain that are relevant to wind energy assessment and development, as well as to wind energy system operation, management, and grid integration. Wind data from five tall meteorological towers located in Western Nevada, USA, operated from August 2003 to March 2008, used in the analysis. The multiannual average wind speeds did not show significant increased trend ...

  13. Stars in the teaching of astrophysics at grammar schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štefl, V.

    The paper subjects to theoretical analysis the topic "Stars" of the teaching programme of astrophysics at grammar schools. Diagrams express the relations among parameters of stars, sources of energy, structure and evolution of stars.

  14. Studying Nuclear Astrophysics at NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, R; Bernstein, L; Brune, C

    2009-07-01

    The National Ignition Facility's primary goal is to generate fusion energy. But the starlike conditions that it creates will also enable NIF scientists to study astrophysically important nuclear reactions. When scientists at the stadium-sized National Ignition Facility attempt to initiate fusion next year, 192 powerful lasers will direct 1.2 MJ of light energy toward a two-mm-diameter pellet of deuterium ({sup 2}H, or D) and tritium ({sup 3}H, or T). Some of that material will be gaseous, but most will be in a frozen shell. The idea is to initiate 'inertial confinement fusion', in which the two hydrogen isotopes fuse to produce helium-4, a neutron, and 17.6 MeV of energy. The light energy will be delivered to the inside walls of a hohlraum, a heavy-metal, centimeter-sized cylinder that houses the pellet. The container's heated walls will produce x rays that impinge on the pellet and ablate its outer surface. The exiting particles push inward on the pellet and compresses the DT fuel. Ultimately a hot spot develops at the pellet's center, where fusion produces {sup 4}He nuclei that have sufficient energy to propagate outward, trigger successive reactions, and finally react the frozen shell. Ignition should last several tens of picoseconds and generate more than 10 MJ of energy and roughly 10{sup 19} neutrons. The temperature will exceed 10{sup 8} K and fuel will be compressed to a density of several hundred g/cm{sup 3}, both considerably greater than at the center of the Sun. The figure shows a cutaway view of NIF. The extreme conditions that will be produced there simulate those in nuclear weapons and inside stars. For that reason, the facility is an important part of the US stockpile stewardship program, designed to assess the nation's aging nuclear stockpile without doing nuclear tests. In this Quick Study we consider a third application of NIF - using the extraordinary conditions it will produce to perform experiments in basic

  15. Laboratory Astrophysics Division of the AAS (LAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid; Drake, R. P.; Federman, S. R.; Haxton, W. C.; Savin, D. W.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the Laboratory Astrophysics Division (LAD) is to advance our understanding of the Universe through the promotion of fundamental theoretical and experimental research into the underlying processes that drive the Cosmos. LAD represents all areas of astrophysics and planetary sciences. The first new AAS Division in more than 30 years, the LAD traces its history back to the recommendation from the scientific community via the White Paper from the 2006 NASA-sponsored Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop. This recommendation was endorsed by the Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee (AAAC), which advises the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on selected issues within the fields of astronomy and astrophysics that are of mutual interest and concern to the agencies. In January 2007, at the 209th AAS meeting, the AAS Council set up a Steering Committee to formulate Bylaws for a Working Group on Laboratory Astrophysics (WGLA). The AAS Council formally established the WGLA with a five-year mandate in May 2007, at the 210th AAS meeting. From 2008 through 2012, the WGLA annually sponsored Meetings in-a-Meeting at the AAS Summer Meetings. In May 2011, at the 218th AAS meeting, the AAS Council voted to convert the WGLA, at the end of its mandate, into a Division of the AAS and requested draft Bylaws from the Steering Committee. In January 2012, at the 219th AAS Meeting, the AAS Council formally approved the Bylaws and the creation of the LAD. The inaugural gathering and the first business meeting of the LAD were held at the 220th AAS meeting in Anchorage in June 2012. You can learn more about LAD by visiting its website at http://lad.aas.org/ and by subscribing to its mailing list.

  16. Energy data visualisation requires additional approaches to continue to be relevant in a world with greater low-carbon generation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Grant Wilson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The hypothesis described in this article proposes that energy visualisation diagrams commonly used need additional changes to continue to be relevant in a world with greater low-carbon generation. The diagrams that display national energy data are influenced by the properties of the type of energy being displayed, which in most cases has historically meant fossil fuels, nuclear fuels or hydro. As many energy systems throughout the world increase their use of electricity from wind or solar based renewables, a more granular display of energy data in the time domain is required. This article also introduces the shared axes energy diagram that provides a simple and powerful way in which to compare the scale and seasonality of the demands and supplies of an energy system. This aims to complement rather than replace existing diagrams, and has an additional benefit of promoting a whole systems approach to energy systems, as differing energy vectors such as natural gas, transport fuels, and electricity can all be displayed together. This in particular, is useful to both policy makers and to industry, to build a visual foundation for a whole systems narrative, which provides a basis for discussion of the synergies and opportunities across and between different energy vectors and demands. The diagram’s ability to wrap a sense of scale around a whole energy system in a simple way is thought to explain its growing popularity.

  17. Progress of Jinping Underground laboratory for Nuclear Astrophysics (JUNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu WeiPing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Jinping Underground lab for Nuclear Astrophysics (JUNA will take the advantage of the ultralow background in Jinping underground lab, high current accelerator based on an ECR source and highly sensitive detector to study directly a number of crucial reactions to the hydrostatic stellar evolution for the first time at their relevant stellar energies. In its first phase, JUNA aims at the direct measurements of 25Mg(p,γ26Al, 19F(p,α16O, 13C(α,n16O and 12C(α,γ16O. The experimental setup, which include the accelerator system with high stability and high intensity, the detector system, and the shielding material with low background, will be established during the above research. The current progress of JUNA will be given.

  18. Raindrop Kinetic Energy Piezoelectric Harvesters and Relevant Interface Circuits: Review, Issues and Outlooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok Gnee CHUA

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available As an ecological source of renewable energy, the available kinetic energy of rainfall is not trifling, especially in tropical countries at the equators. The research on the use of piezoelectric transducer to harvest raindrop kinetic energy is gaining more and more attention recently. This article reviews the state-of-the-art energy harvesting technology from the conversion of raindrop kinetic energy using piezoelectric transducers as well as its interface circuits for vibration-based energy harvesters. Performance of different types of piezoelectric harvesters in terms of power output, area power density and energy conversion efficiency are compared. Summaries of key problems and suggestions on the optimization of the performance of the piezoelectric harvesters are also provided for future works.

  19. Higher Education Resources from the NASA SMD Astrophysics Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinke, Bonnie K.; Schultz, Gregory R.; Manning, James; Smith, Denise A.; Bianchi, Luciana; Blair, William P.; Fraknoi, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    The NASA Astrophysics Science Education and Public Outreach Forum (SEPOF) coordinates the work of individual NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Astrophysics EPO projects and their teams into a coherent, effective, efficient, and sustainable effort. The Astrophysics Forum assists scientists and educators with becoming involved in SMD E/PO and makes SMD E/PO resources and expertise accessible to the science and education communities. Here we describe how the Astrophysics Forum and the Astrophysics E/PO community have focused efforts to support and engage the higher education community on enhancing awareness of the resources available to them. To ensure Astrophysics higher education efforts are grounded in audience needs, we held informal conversations with instructors of introductory astronomy courses, convened sessions with higher education faculty and E/PO professionals at conferences, and examined existing literature and findings of the SMD Higher Education Working Group. To address the expressed needs, the Astrophysics Forum collaborated with the Astrophysics E/PO community, researchers, and Astronomy 101 instructors to place individual science discoveries and learning resources into context for higher education audiences. Among these resources are two Resource Guides on the topics of cosmology and exoplanets. These fields are ripe with scientific developments that college instructors have told us they find challenging to stay current. Each guide includes a wide variety of sources and is available through the ASP website: http://www.astrosociety.org/education/astronomy-resource-guides/ To complement the resource guides, we are developing a series of slide sets to help Astronomy 101 instructors incorporate new discoveries from individual SMD Astrophysics missions in their classrooms. The “Astro 101 slide sets” are 5-7 slide presentations on a new development or discovery from a NASA SMD Astrophysics mission relevant to an Astronomy 101 topic. We intend for

  20. NIF Laboratory Astrophysics Experiments Investigating The Effects Of A Radiative Shock On Hydrodynamic Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuranz, Carolyn C.; Drake, R. P.; Huntington, C. M.; Klein, S. R.; Trantham, M. R.; Park, H. S.; Remington, B. A.; Miles, A. R.; Raman, K.; Kline, J. L.; Plewa, T.

    2012-05-01

    This paper will describe ongoing laboratory astrophysics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) relevant to the complex radiation hydrodynamics that occurs in red supergiant, and core-collapse supernovae. Experiments on NIF can deliver 300 eV radiative heating that can be utilized uniquely access the regime in which radiation affects the development of hydrodynamic instabilities within an evolving object. This is relevant to the dynamics that occur during the core-collapse explosions of red supergiant stars. These stars have dense circumstellar plasma, producing a strongly radiative shock whose radiation interacts with the hydrodynamic structures produced by instabilities during the explosion. While published astrophysical simulations have not included complex, multidimensional radiation hydrodynamics, such effects are very physical and expected to affect the evolution of early stages of astrophysical objects described above. This presentation will include a summary of the two test shots that we have performed on NIF, including a 0.7 scale, gas-filled hohlraum test shot, and a description of the integrated physics shots scheduled at the facility. This work is funded by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas under grant number DE-FG52-09NA29548 , the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 and Predictive Sciences Academic Alliances Program in NNSA-ASC via grant DEFC52- 08NA28616.

  1. Multiscale Modeling of Astrophysical Jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James H. Beall

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We are developing the capability for a multi-scale code to model the energy deposition rate and momentum transfer rate of an astrophysical jet which generates strong plasma turbulence in its interaction with the ambient medium through which it propagates. We start with a highly parallelized version of the VH-1 Hydrodynamics Code (Coella and Wood 1984, and Saxton et al., 2005. We are also considering the PLUTO code (Mignone et al. 2007 to model the jet in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD and relativistic, magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD regimes. Particle-in-Cell approaches are also being used to benchmark a wave-population models of the two-stream instability and associated plasma processes in order to determine energy deposition and momentum transfer rates for these modes of jet-ambient medium interactions. We show some elements of the modeling of these jets in this paper, including energy loss and heating via plasma processes, and large scale hydrodynamic and relativistic hydrodynamic simulations. A preliminary simulation of a jet from the galactic center region is used to lend credence to the jet as the source of the so-called the Fermi Bubble (see, e.g., Su, M. & Finkbeiner, D. P., 2012*It is with great sorrow that we acknowledge the loss of our colleague and friend of more than thirty years, Dr. John Ural Guillory, to his battle with cancer.

  2. Examination of Terrestrial Nuclear Energy’s Relevance to U.S. National Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    Ibid. 31 46 Jay Hakes, A Declaration of Energy Independence: How Freedom from Foreign Oil Can Improve National Security, Our Economy, and the...transportation sector. This energy is supplied by 94% petroleum, 3% natural gas, and 3% renewable. 52 Frederik Balfour , "China’s First Plug-In Hybrid Car

  3. Cars and Kinetic Energy--Some Simple Physics with Real-World Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2012-01-01

    Understanding energy usage is crucial to understanding modern civilization, as well as many of the challenges it faces. Energy-related issues also offer real-world examples of important physical concepts, and as such have been the focus of several articles in "The Physics Teacher" in the past few decades (e.g., Refs. 1-5, noted further below).…

  4. The Future of Gamma Ray Astrophysics

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, gamma ray astrophysics has entered the astrophysical mainstream. Extremely successful space-borne (GeV) and ground-based (TeV) detectors, combined with a multitude of partner telescopes, have revealed a fascinating “astroscape" of active galactic nuclei, pulsars, gamma ray bursts, supernova remnants, binary stars, star-forming galaxies, novae much more, exhibiting major pathways along which large energy releases can flow. From  a basic physics perspective, exquisitely sensitive measurements have constrained the nature of dark matter, the cosmological origin of magnetic field and the properties of black holes. These advances have motivated the development of new facilities, including HAWC, DAMPE, CTA and SVOM, which will further our understanding of the high energy universe. Topics that will receive special attention include merging neutron star binaries, clusters of galaxies, galactic cosmic rays and putative, TeV dark matter.

  5. Energy absorption buildup factors of human organs and tissues at energies and penetration depths relevant for radiotherapy and diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manohara, S. R.; Hanagodimath, S. M.; Gerward, Leif

    2011-01-01

    . With the proper knowledge of buildup factors of human organs and tissues, energy absorption in the human body can be carefully controlled. The present results will help in estimating safe dose levels for radiotherapy patients and also useful in diagnostics and dosimetry. The tissue-equivalent materials...... of human organs and tissues changes significantly with the change of incident photon energy and effective atomic number, Zeff. These changes are due to the dominance of different photon interaction processes in different energy regions and different chemical compositions of human organs and tissues...

  6. Applications of the Trojan Horse method in nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitaleri, Claudio, E-mail: spitaleri@lns.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania, Italy and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud-INFN, Catania (Italy)

    2015-02-24

    The study of the energy production in stars and related nucleosyntesis processes requires increasingly precise knowledge of the nuclear reaction cross section and reaction rates at interaction energy. In order to overcome the experimental difficulties, arising from small cross-sections involved in charge particle induced reactions at astrophysical energies, and from the presence of electron screening, it was necessary to introduce indirect methods. Trough these methods it is possible to measure cross sections at very small energies and retrieve information on electron screening effect when ultra-low energy direct measurements are available. The Trojan Horse Method (THM) represents the indirect technique to determine the bare nucleus astrophysical S-factor for reactions between charged particles at astrophysical energies. The basic theory of the THM is discussed in the case of non-resonant.

  7. Astrophysical S-factor of the 3He(alpha,gamma)7Be reaction measured at low energy via prompt and delayed gamma detection

    CERN Document Server

    Confortola, F; Costantini, H; Formicola, A; Gyürky, Gy; Bezzon, P; Bonetti, R; Broggini, C; Corvisiero, P; Elekes, Z; Fülöp, Z; Gervino, G; Guglielmetti, A; Gustavino, C; Imbriani, G; Junker, M; Laubenstein, M; Lemut, A; Limata, B; Lozza, V; Marta, M; Menegazzo, R; Prati, P; Roca, V; Rolfs, C; Alvarez, C Rossi; Somorjai, E; Straniero, O; Strieder, F; Terrasi, F; Trautvetter, H P

    2007-01-01

    Solar neutrino fluxes depend both on astrophysical and on nuclear physics inputs, namely on the cross sections of the reactions responsible for neutrino production inside the Solar core. While the flux of solar 8B neutrinos has been recently measured at Superkamiokande with a 3.5% uncertainty and a precise measurement of 7Be neutrino flux is foreseen in the next future, the predicted fluxes are still affected by larger errors. The largest nuclear physics uncertainty to determine the fluxes of 8B and 7Be neutrinos comes from the 3He(alpha,gamma)7Be reaction. The uncertainty on its S-factor is due to an average discrepancy in results obtained using two different experimental approaches: the detection of the delayed gamma rays from 7Be decay and the measurement of the prompt gamma emission. Here we report on a new high precision experiment performed with both techniques at the same time. Thanks to the low background conditions of the Gran Sasso LUNA accelerator facility, the cross section has been measured at Ec...

  8. The Ecological Relevance of Sleep: The Trade-off between Sleep, Memory and Energy Conservation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Timothy C. Roth; Niels C. Rattenborg; Vladimir V. Pravosudov

    2010-01-01

    .... Specifically, we highlight the advantage of using food-caching animals as a system in which a conflict might occur between engaging in sleep for memory/learning and hypothermia/torpor to conserve energy...

  9. Sustainable Energy Resource Buildings: Some Relevant Feautures for Built Environment Needs In Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barka Joseph Kwaji

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Energy has become a critical issue in national and global economic development. Its crucial importance to the nation’s building makes the development of energy resources one of the leading agenda of the present democratic government of Nigeria, towards lifting the nation to the comity of twenty (20 nations with the fastest growing economy in 2020. In achieving this, the building industry and in particular the architectural profession has a leading role to play in adopting education, designs, materials, and technology capable of reducing energy consumption in building within tropic region. This paper, therefore, appraises the important features of energy performance building through the use of sustainable innovative materials and technology that respond to climate condition while being environmentally friendly.

  10. Traversable braneworld wormholes supported by astrophysical observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Deng; Meng, Xin-He

    2018-02-01

    In this study, we investigate the characteristics and properties of a traversable wormhole constrained by the current astrophysical observations in the framework of modified theories of gravity (MOG). As a concrete case, we study traversable wormhole space-time configurations in the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati (DGP) braneworld scenario, which are supported by the effects of the gravity leakage of extra dimensions. We find that the wormhole space-time structure will open in terms of the 2 σ confidence level when we utilize the joint constraints supernovae (SNe) Ia + observational Hubble parameter data (OHD) + Planck + gravitational wave (GW) and z wormholes can be divided into four classes during the evolutionary processes of the universe based on various energy conditions; (ii) we can offer a strict restriction to the local wormhole space-time structure by using the current astrophysical observations; and (iii) we can clearly identify a physical gravitational resource for the wormholes supported by astrophysical observations, namely the dark energy components of the universe or equivalent space-time curvature effects from MOG. Moreover, we find that the strong energy condition is always violated at low redshifts.

  11. Relevance of Clean Coal Technology for India’s Energy Security: A Policy Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Amit; Tiwari, Vineet; Vishwanathan, Saritha

    2017-07-01

    Climate change mitigation regimes are expected to impose constraints on the future use of fossil fuels in order to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In 2015, 41% of total final energy consumption and 64% of power generation in India came from coal. Although almost a sixth of the total coal based thermal power generation is now super critical pulverized coal technology, the average CO2 emissions from the Indian power sector are 0.82 kg-CO2/kWh, mainly driven by coal. India has large domestic coal reserves which give it adequate energy security. There is a need to find options that allow the continued use of coal while considering the need for GHG mitigation. This paper explores options of linking GHG emission mitigation and energy security from 2000 to 2050 using the AIM/Enduse model under Business-as-Usual scenario. Our simulation analysis suggests that advanced clean coal technologies options could provide promising solutions for reducing CO2 emissions by improving energy efficiencies. This paper concludes that integrating climate change security and energy security for India is possible with a large scale deployment of advanced coal combustion technologies in Indian energy systems along with other measures.

  12. CASAS: A tool for composing automatically and semantically astrophysical services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louge, T.; Karray, M. H.; Archimède, B.; Knödlseder, J.

    2017-07-01

    Multiple astronomical datasets are available through internet and the astrophysical Distributed Computing Infrastructure (DCI) called Virtual Observatory (VO). Some scientific workflow technologies exist for retrieving and combining data from those sources. However selection of relevant services, automation of the workflows composition and the lack of user-friendly platforms remain a concern. This paper presents CASAS, a tool for semantic web services composition in astrophysics. This tool proposes automatic composition of astrophysical web services and brings a semantics-based, automatic composition of workflows. It widens the services choice and eases the use of heterogeneous services. Semantic web services composition relies on ontologies for elaborating the services composition; this work is based on Astrophysical Services ONtology (ASON). ASON had its structure mostly inherited from the VO services capacities. Nevertheless, our approach is not limited to the VO and brings VO plus non-VO services together without the need for premade recipes. CASAS is available for use through a simple web interface.

  13. Radiation processes in astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Tucker, Wallace H

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this book is twofold: to provide a brief, simple introduction to the theory of radiation and its application in astrophysics and to serve as a reference manual for researchers. The first part of the book consists of a discussion of the basic formulas and concepts that underlie the classical and quantum descriptions of radiation processes. The rest of the book is concerned with applications. The spirit of the discussion is to present simple derivations that will provide some insight into the basic physics involved and then to state the exact results in a form useful for applications. The reader is referred to the original literature and to reviews for rigorous derivations.The wide range of topics covered is illustrated by the following table of contents: Basic Formulas for Classical Radiation Processes; Basic Formulas for Quantum Radiation Processes; Cyclotron and Synchrotron Radiation; Electron Scattering; Bremsstrahlung and Collision Losses; Radiative Recombination; The Photoelectric Effect; a...

  14. Stellar Astrophysics with Arcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickhouse, Nancy S.; Huenemoerder, David P.; Wolk, Scott; Schulz, Norbert; Foster, Adam; Brenneman, Laura; Poppenhaeger, Katja; Arcus Team

    2018-01-01

    The Arcus mission is now in Phase A of the NASA Medium-Class Explorer competition. We present here the Arcus science case for stellar astrophysics. With spectral resolving power of at least 2500 and effective area greater than 400 cm^2, Arcus will measure new diagnostic lines, e.g. for H- and He-like ions of oxygen and other elements. Weak dielectronic recombination lines will provide sensitive measurements of temperature to test stellar coronal heating models. Arcus will also resolve the coronal and accretion line components in young accreting stars, allowing detailed studies of accretion shocks and their post-shock behavior. Arcus can resolve line shapes and variability in hot star winds to study inhomogeneities and dynamics of wind structure. Such profiles will provide an independent measure of mass loss rates, for which theoretical and observational discrepancies can reach an order of magnitude. Arcus will also study exoplanet atmospheres through X-ray absorption, determing their extent and composition.

  15. Numerical relativity beyond astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfinkle, David

    2017-01-01

    Though the main applications of computer simulations in relativity are to astrophysical systems such as black holes and neutron stars, nonetheless there are important applications of numerical methods to the investigation of general relativity as a fundamental theory of the nature of space and time. This paper gives an overview of some of these applications. In particular we cover (i) investigations of the properties of spacetime singularities such as those that occur in the interior of black holes and in big bang cosmology. (ii) investigations of critical behavior at the threshold of black hole formation in gravitational collapse. (iii) investigations inspired by string theory, in particular analogs of black holes in more than 4 spacetime dimensions and gravitational collapse in spacetimes with a negative cosmological constant.

  16. Black-hole astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, P. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Bloom, E. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Cominsky, L. [Sonoma State Univ., Rohnert Park, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy] [and others

    1995-07-01

    Black-hole astrophysics is not just the investigation of yet another, even if extremely remarkable type of celestial body, but a test of the correctness of the understanding of the very properties of space and time in very strong gravitational fields. Physicists` excitement at this new prospect for testing theories of fundamental processes is matched by that of astronomers at the possibility to discover and study a new and dramatically different kind of astronomical object. Here the authors review the currently known ways that black holes can be identified by their effects on their neighborhood--since, of course, the hole itself does not yield any direct evidence of its existence or information about its properties. The two most important empirical considerations are determination of masses, or lower limits thereof, of unseen companions in binary star systems, and measurement of luminosity fluctuations on very short time scales.

  17. Numerical relativity beyond astrophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfinkle, David

    2017-01-01

    Though the main applications of computer simulations in relativity are to astrophysical systems such as black holes and neutron stars, nonetheless there are important applications of numerical methods to the investigation of general relativity as a fundamental theory of the nature of space and time. This paper gives an overview of some of these applications. In particular we cover (i) investigations of the properties of spacetime singularities such as those that occur in the interior of black holes and in big bang cosmology. (ii) investigations of critical behavior at the threshold of black hole formation in gravitational collapse. (iii) investigations inspired by string theory, in particular analogs of black holes in more than 4 spacetime dimensions and gravitational collapse in spacetimes with a negative cosmological constant.

  18. Exotic nuclei and astrophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penionzhkevich Yu.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, nuclear physics investigations of the laws of the microscopic world contributed significantly to extension of our knowledge of phenomena occurring in the macroscopic world (Universe and made a formidable contribution to the development of astrophysical and cosmological theories. First of all, this concerns the expanding universe model, the evolution of stars, and the abundances of elements, as well as the properties of various stars and cosmic objects, including “cold” and neutron stars, black holes, and pulsars. Without claiming to give a full account of all cosmological problems, we will dwell upon those of them that, in my opinion, have much in common with nuclear-matter properties manifesting themselves in nuclear interactions.

  19. Astrophysics Faces the Millennium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Virginia

    2001-03-01

    The Medieval synthesis of Aristotelian philosophy and church doctrine, due largely to Thomas Aquinas, insisted that the universe outside the earth's atmosphere must be immutable, single-centered, fully inventoried, immaculate or perfect, including perfectly spherical, and much else that sounds strange to modern ears. The beginnings of modern astronomy can be largely described as the overthrow of these various concepts by a combination of new technologies and new ways of thinking, and many current questions in astrophysics can be directly tied to developments of those same concepts. Indeed they probably all can be, but not over time, ending with questions like: Do other stars have spots? What does it mean when quasar jets look like they are moving faster than the speed of light? Is there anything special about our star, our galaxy, our planet, or our universe? How did these all form, and what is their long-term fate?

  20. Astrophysics Unearthed: Measuring the Beam-Induced 13C(d,n) Background in Underground Nuclear Astrophysics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ummel, C. C.; Walter, D.; Corrado, F.; Cizewski, J. A.; Febbraro, M.; Pain, S. D.; Bannister, M. E.; Havener, C. C.; Chipps, K. A.; Temanson, E.; Peters, W. A.

    2017-09-01

    The slow neutron capture process (s-process) is a series of nuclear reactions responsible for the synthesis of approximately half the atomic nuclei heavier than iron. The s-process proceeds via a series of neutron capture and beta decay reactions in the low neutron flux environment of AGB stars. The primary source of neutrons for the s-process is the 13C(α,n)16O reaction. Extrapolation of the 13C(α,n) S-factor into the Gamow window is complicated by the unknown influence of a 1/2+ resonance in 17O near the alpha capture threshold, prompting an international effort to directly measure the cross section at low energies. Measurement of the 13C(α,n) cross section is made difficult by beam-induced background, such as deuterium contamination in the alpha particle beams of most accelerators. At astrophysically relevant energies, the 13C(d,n) cross section is many orders of magnitude higher than that of 13C(α,n). Accordingly, the 13C(d,n) cross section was measured at laboratory energies below 250 keV (corresponding to alpha beam energies of 500 keV and below) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Multicharged Ion Research Facility. Preliminary results and the implications of this work are discussed. This work is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation.

  1. The macro economic relevance of renewable energy sources for Switzerland; Volkswirtschaftliche Bedeutung erneuerbarer Energien fuer die Schweiz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nathani, C.; Schmid, C.; Rieser, A.; Ruetter, H. [Ruetter und Partner, Rueschlikon (Switzerland); Bernath, K.; Felten, N. von [Ernst Basler und Partner, Zollikon (Switzerland); Walz, R.; Marscheider-Weidemann, F. [Fraunhofer Institut fuer System- und Innovationsforschung, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    This study analyses the economic relevance of renewable energy in Switzerland. In 2010 the enterprises in the renewable energy sector generated a gross value added of 4.8 bn CHF (equalling 0.9% of Swiss GDP). Employment in this sector approximated 22,800 fulltime jobs (0.6% of total Swiss employment). Including supply chain companies, 1.5% of Swiss GDP and 1.2% of total employment can be related to the use of renewable energy. Exports of renewable energy related goods and services equalled 3.2 bn CHF. Since 2000 the Swiss renewable energy sector has experienced an above-average annual growth of more than 4%. Its potential development until the year 2020 was studied with two scenarios. In the policy scenario, that assumes additional policy measures for renewable energy promotion, direct value added of the renewable energy sector would amount to 6.4 bn CHF (+33%), direct employment would increase to 29,200 fulltime jobs (+28%, gross effects resp.). In the more conservative baseline scenario, growth would be much weaker, but still slightly stronger than anticipated for the average economy. (authors)

  2. SOPHIA: Simulations Of Photo Hadronic Interactions in Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, A.; Engel, Ralph; Rachen, J. P.; Protheroe, R. J.; Stanev, Todor

    2014-12-01

    SOPHIA (Simulations Of Photo Hadronic Interactions in Astrophysics) solves problems connected to photohadronic processes in astrophysical environments and can also be used for radiation and background studies at high energy colliders such as LEP2 and HERA, as well as for simulations of photon induced air showers. SOPHIA implements well established phenomenological models, symmetries of hadronic interactions in a way that describes correctly the available exclusive and inclusive photohadronic cross section data obtained at fixed target and collider experiments.

  3. Relevance of behavioral and social models to the study of consumer energy decision making and behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, B.A.

    1980-11-01

    This report reviews social and behavioral science models and techniques for their possible use in understanding and predicting consumer energy decision making and behaviors. A number of models and techniques have been developed that address different aspects of the decision process, use different theoretical bases and approaches, and have been aimed at different audiences. Three major areas of discussion were selected: (1) models of adaptation to social change, (2) decision making and choice, and (3) diffusion of innovation. Within these three areas, the contributions of psychologists, sociologists, economists, marketing researchers, and others were reviewed. Five primary components of the models were identified and compared. The components are: (1) situational characteristics, (2) product characteristics, (3) individual characteristics, (4) social influences, and (5) the interaction or decision rules. The explicit use of behavioral and social science models in energy decision-making and behavior studies has been limited. Examples are given of a small number of energy studies which applied and tested existing models in studying the adoption of energy conservation behaviors and technologies, and solar technology.

  4. Renewable energy innovations and sustainability transition : How relevant are spatial spillovers?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noseleit, Florian

    2017-01-01

    In the societal challenge to switch to renewable energy, innovation has become an ever-increasing critical determinant. However, while sustainability transition is a global challenge, diffusion and adoption of innovation tends to be uneven in space and unequal access may cause substantial

  5. What does Astrophysics want to know about (Astrophysical) Reconnection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, R.

    2005-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is commonly invoked as a plasma energization and particle acceleration process in astrophysics, but the levels of detail regarding the underlying physics that are required are generally far demanding than what is typically encountered in laboratory or space plasma physics. Naively, one would therefore expect it to be far easier to answer questions regarding reconnection in the astrophysical context as opposed to the laboratory or space plasma physics contexts. My talk will focus on why this naive expectation is not correct, and will discuss the specifics of such astrophysics-motivated questions, as well as some possible answers.

  6. Some Simple Arguments about Cost Externalization and its Relevance to the Price of Fusion Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budny, R.; Winfree, R.

    1999-09-27

    The primary goal of fusion energy research is to develop a source of energy that is less harmful to the environment than are the present sources. A concern often expressed by critics of fusion research is that fusion energy will never be economically competitive with fossil fuels, which in 1997 provided 75% of the world's energy. And in fact, studies of projected fusion electricity generation generally project fusion costs to be higher than those of conventional methods. Yet it is widely agreed that the environmental costs of fossil fuel use are high. Because these costs aren't included in the market price, and furthermore because many governments subsidize fossil fuel production, fossil fuels seem less expensive than they really are. Here we review some simple arguments about cost externalization which provide a useful background for discussion of energy prices. The collectively self-destructive behavior that is the root of many environmental problems, including fossil fuel use, was termed ''the tragedy of the commons'' by the biologist G. Hardin. Hardin's metaphor is that of a grazing commons that is open to all. Each herdsman, in deciding whether to add a cow to his herd, compares the benefit of doing so, which accrues to him alone, to the cost, which is shared by all the herdsmen using the commons, and therefore adds his cow. In this way individually rational behavior leads to the collective destruction of the shared resource. As Hardin pointed out, pollution is one kind of tragedy of the commons. CO{sub 2} emissions and global warming are in this sense classic tragedies.

  7. Reaction Studies for Explosive Nuclear Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Philip J.

    The paper describes experimental approaches to measuring key nuclear astrophysical reactions involving radioactive isotopes. Specifically the paper considers the utilisation of (d, n) and (d, p) transfer reactions to probe the strengths of key resonances in the hydrogen burning/proton capture reactions 30P(p, γ) and 26Al(p, γ). The use of a radioactive target and silicon strip detector set-ups to study the key 26Al(n, p) and (n, α) destruction reactions relevant to explosive burning conditions in core collapse supernovae is also reported.

  8. Collaborative Astrophysical Research in Aire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianfeng

    The AIRE (Astrophysical Integrated Research Environment) consists of three main parts: a Data Archive Center (DAC) which collects and manages public astrophysical data; a web-based Data Processing Center (DPC) which enables astrophysicists to process the data in a central server at any place and anytime; and a Collaborative Astrophysical Research Project System (CARPS) with which astrophysicists in different fields can pursue a collaborative reserch efficiently. Two research examples QPO study of RXTE data and wavelet analysis of large amount of galaxies are shown here.

  9. Atoms in astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Eissner, W; Hummer, D; Percival, I

    1983-01-01

    It is hard to appreciate but nevertheless true that Michael John Seaton, known internationally for the enthusiasm and skill with which he pursues his research in atomic physics and astrophysics, will be sixty years old on the 16th of January 1983. To mark this occasion some of his colleagues and former students have prepared this volume. It contains articles that de­ scribe some of the topics that have attracted his attention since he first started his research work at University College London so many years ago. Seaton's association with University College London has now stretched over a period of some 37 years, first as an undergraduate student, then as a research student, and then, successively, as Assistant Lecturer, Lecturer, Reader, and Professor. Seaton arrived at University College London in 1946 to become an undergraduate in the Physics Department, having just left the Royal Air Force in which he had served as a navigator in the Pathfinder Force of Bomber Command. There are a number of stories of ho...

  10. Multi-scale Dynamical Processes in Space and Astrophysical Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Vörös, Zoltán; IAFA 2011 - International Astrophysics Forum 2011 : Frontiers in Space Environment Research

    2012-01-01

    Magnetized plasmas in the universe exhibit complex dynamical behavior over a huge range of scales. The fundamental mechanisms of energy transport, redistribution and conversion occur at multiple scales. The driving mechanisms often include energy accumulation, free-energy-excited relaxation processes, dissipation and self-organization. The plasma processes associated with energy conversion, transport and self-organization, such as magnetic reconnection, instabilities, linear and nonlinear waves, wave-particle interactions, dynamo processes, turbulence, heating, diffusion and convection represent fundamental physical effects. They demonstrate similar dynamical behavior in near-Earth space, on the Sun, in the heliosphere and in astrophysical environments. 'Multi-scale Dynamical Processes in Space and Astrophysical Plasmas' presents the proceedings of the International Astrophysics Forum Alpbach 2011. The contributions discuss the latest advances in the exploration of dynamical behavior in space plasmas environm...

  11. Local models of astrophysical discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latter, Henrik N.; Papaloizou, John

    2017-12-01

    Local models of gaseous accretion discs have been successfully employed for decades to describe an assortment of small-scale phenomena, from instabilities and turbulence, to dust dynamics and planet formation. For the most part, they have been derived in a physically motivated but essentially ad hoc fashion, with some of the mathematical assumptions never made explicit nor checked for consistency. This approach is susceptible to error, and it is easy to derive local models that support spurious instabilities or fail to conserve key quantities. In this paper we present rigorous derivations, based on an asympototic ordering, and formulate a hierarchy of local models (incompressible, Boussinesq and compressible), making clear which is best suited for a particular flow or phenomenon, while spelling out explicitly the assumptions and approximations of each. We also discuss the merits of the anelastic approximation, emphasizing that anelastic systems struggle to conserve energy unless strong restrictions are imposed on the flow. The problems encountered by the anelastic approximation are exacerbated by the disc's differential rotation, but also attend non-rotating systems such as stellar interiors. We conclude with a defence of local models and their continued utility in astrophysical research.

  12. Nuclear astrophysics deep underground the case of the 15N(p,γ)16O reaction at LUNA

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzocchi, Chiara

    2010-01-01

    Measuring nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest at the relevant energies is not always possible on the Earth’s surface because of the cosmic-ray background that dominates the spectra. The LUNA collaboration exploits the lowbackground enviroment of Gran Sasso National Laboratory to study these reactions at or close to the Gamow peak. The latest experimental efforts included the measurement of the 15N(p,γ)16O at beam energies between 77 and 350 keV. The status of these measurements is summarised in this contribution.

  13. Fundamental Studies of Charge Migration and Delocalization Relevant to Solar Energy Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael J. Therien

    2012-06-01

    This program aimed to understand the molecular-level principles by which complex chemical systems carry out photochemical charge separation, transport, and storage, and how these insights could impact the design of practical solar energy conversion and storage devices. Towards these goals, this program focused on: (1) carrying out fundamental mechanistic and transient dynamical studies of proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) reactions; (2) characterizing and interrogating via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic methods novel conjugated materials that feature large charge delocalization lengths; and (3) exploring excitation delocalization and migration, as well as polaron transport properties of meso-scale assemblies that are capable of segregating light-harvesting antennae, nanoscale wire-like conduction elements, and distinct oxidizing and reducing environments.

  14. NASA Astrophysics Funds Strategic Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seery, Bernard D.; Ganel, Opher; Pham, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    The COR and PCOS Program Offices (POs) reside at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), serving as the NASA Astrophysics Division's implementation arm for matters relating to the two programs. One aspect of the PO's activities is managing the COR and PCOS Strategic Astrophysics Technology (SAT) program, helping mature technologies to enable and enhance future astrophysics missions. For example, the SAT program is expected to fund key technology developments needed to close gaps identified by Science and Technology Definition Teams (STDTs) planned to study several large mission concept studies in preparation for the 2020 Decadal Survey.The POs are guided by the National Research Council's "New Worlds, New Horizons in Astronomy and Astrophysics" Decadal Survey report, NASA's Astrophysics Implementation Plan, and the visionary Astrophysics Roadmap, "Enduring Quests, Daring Visions." Strategic goals include dark energy, gravitational waves, and X-ray observatories. Future missions pursuing these goals include, e.g., US participation in ESA's Euclid, Athena, and L3 missions; Inflation probe; and a large UV/Optical/IR (LUVOIR) telescope.To date, 65 COR and 71 PCOS SAT proposals have been received, of which 15 COR and 22 PCOS projects were funded. Notable successes include maturation of a new far-IR detector, later adopted by the SOFIA HAWC instrument; maturation of the H4RG near-IR detector, adopted by WFIRST; development of an antenna-coupled transition-edge superconducting bolometer, a technology deployed by BICEP2/BICEP3/Keck to measure polarization in the CMB signal; advanced UV reflective coatings implemented on the optics of GOLD and ICON, two heliophysics Explorers; and finally, the REXIS instrument on OSIRIS-REx is incorporating CCDs with directly deposited optical blocking filters developed by another SAT-funded project.We discuss our technology development process, with community input and strategic prioritization informing calls for SAT proposals and

  15. Frontier Research in Astrophysics - II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this international workshop is to bring together astrophysicists and physicists who are involved in various topics at the forefront of modern astrophysics and particle physics. The workshop will discuss the most recent experimental and theoretical results in order to advance our understanding of the physics governing our Universe. To accomplish the goals of the workshop, we believe it is necessary to use data from ground-based and space-based experiments and results from theoretical developments: work on the forefront of science which has resulted (or promises to result in) high-impact scientific papers. Hence, the main purpose of the workshop is to discuss in a unique and collaborative setting a broad range of topics in modern astrophysics, from the Big Bang to Planets and Exoplanets. We believe that this can provide a suitable framework for each participant who (while obviously not involved in all the topics discussed), will be able to acquire a general view of the main experimental and theoretical results currently obtained. Such an up-to-date view of the current research on cosmic sources can help guide future research projects by the participants, and will encourage collaborative efforts across various topical areas of research. The proceedings will be published in Proceedings of Science (PoS)- SISSA and will provide a powerful resource for all the scientific community and will be especially helpful for PhD students. The following items will be reviewed: Cosmology: Cosmic Background, Dark Matter, Dark Energy, Clusters of Galaxies. Physics of the Diffuse Cosmic Sources. Physics of Cosmic Rays. Physics of Discrete Cosmic Sources. Extragalactic Sources: Active Galaxies, Normal Galaxies, Gamma-Ray Bursts. Galactic Sources: Star Formation, Pre-Main-Sequence and Main- Sequence Stars, the Sun, Cataclysmic Variables and Novae, Supernovae and SNRs, X-Ray Binary Systems, Pulsars, Black Holes, Gamma-Ray Sources, Nucleosynthesis, Asteroseismology

  16. Design and relevant sample calculations for a neutral particle energy diagnostic based on time of flight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecconello, M

    1999-05-01

    Extrap T2 will be equipped with a neutral particles energy diagnostic based on time of flight technique. In this report, the expected neutral fluxes for Extrap T2 are estimated and discussed in order to determine the feasibility and the limits of such diagnostic. These estimates are based on a 1D model of the plasma. The input parameters of such model are the density and temperature radial profiles of electrons and ions and the density of neutrals at the edge and in the centre of the plasma. The atomic processes included in the model are the charge-exchange and the electron-impact ionization processes. The results indicate that the plasma attenuation length varies from a/5 to a, a being the minor radius. Differential neutral fluxes, as well as the estimated power losses due to CX processes (2 % of the input power), are in agreement with experimental results obtained in similar devices. The expected impurity influxes vary from 10{sup 14} to 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The neutral particles detection and acquisition systems are discussed. The maximum detectable energy varies from 1 to 3 keV depending on the flight distances d. The time resolution is 0.5 ms. Output signals from the waveform recorder are foreseen in the range 0-200 mV. An 8-bit waveform recorder having 2 MHz sampling frequency and 100K sample of memory capacity is the minimum requirement for the acquisition system 20 refs, 19 figs.

  17. An introduction to observational astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Gallaway, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Observational Astrophysics follows the general outline of an astrophysics undergraduate curriculum targeting practical observing information to what will be covered at the university level. This includes the basics of optics and coordinate systems to the technical details of CCD imaging, photometry, spectography and radio astronomy.  General enough to be used by students at a variety of institutions and advanced enough to be far more useful than observing guides targeted at amateurs, the author provides a comprehensive and up-to-date treatment of observational astrophysics at undergraduate level to be used with a university’s teaching telescope.  The practical approach takes the reader from basic first year techniques to those required for a final year project. Using this textbook as a resource, students can easily become conversant in the practical aspects of astrophysics in the field as opposed to the classroom.

  18. An introduction to astrophysical hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Shore, Steven N

    1992-01-01

    This book is an introduction to astrophysical hydrodynamics for both astronomy and physics students. It provides a comprehensive and unified view of the general problems associated with fluids in a cosmic context, with a discussion of fluid dynamics and plasma physics. It is the only book on hydrodynamics that addresses the astrophysical context. Researchers and students will find this work to be an exceptional reference. Contents include chapters on irrotational and rotational flows, turbulence, magnetohydrodynamics, and instabilities.

  19. Nuclear Data for Astrophysical Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Pritychenko, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear physics has been playing an important role in modern astrophysics and cosmology. Since the early 1950's it has been successfully applied for the interpretation and prediction of astrophysical phenomena. Nuclear physics models helped to explain the observed elemental and isotopic abundances and star evolution and provided valuable insights on the Big Bang theory. Today, the variety of elements observed in stellar surfaces, solar system and cosmic rays, and isotope abundances are calcul...

  20. Highlights of Spanish Astrophysics VII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirado, J. C.; Lara, L. M.; Quilis, V.; Gorgas, J.

    2013-05-01

    "Highlights of Astronomy and Astrophysics VII" contains the Proceedings of the biannual meeting of the Spanish Astronomical Society held in Valencia from July 9 to 13, 2012. Over 300 astronomer, both national and international researchers, attended to the conference covering a wide variety of astrophysical topics: Galaxies and Cosmology, The Milky Way and Its Components, Planetary Sciences, Solar Physics, Instrumentation and Computation, and Teaching and Outreach of Astronomy.

  1. Nuclear astrophysics with radioactive beams

    CERN Document Server

    Schatz, H

    2002-01-01

    Nuclei far from stability play an important role in our understanding of astrophysical scenarios with extreme temperature and density conditions. Among these are nova explosions, accreting neutron stars, supernovae, and the site of the r-process. I will give a brief review of the important open astrophysical questions in these scenarios and discuss the radioactive beam experiments at ISOL-type and at fragmentation-type facilities that are needed to answer them.

  2. Resonance strength measurement at astrophysical energies: The {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction studied via Trojan Horse Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergi, M. L., E-mail: sergi@lns.infn.it; La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Spitaleri, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli studi di Catania, Catania (Italy); Lamia, L.; Rapisarda, G. G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli studi di Catania, Catania (Italy); Mukhamedzhanov, A. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Irgaziev, B. [GIK Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Topi, Districti Swabi, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (Pakistan); Tang, X. D.; Wiescher, M. [Department of Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame 46556, Indiana (United States); Mrazek, J.; Kroha, V. [Nuclear Physics Institute of ASCR, Rez (Czech Republic)

    2015-10-15

    In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on {sup 17}O nuclei, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. We will report on the indirect study of the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction via the THM by applying the approach developed for extracting the resonance strength of narrow resonance in the ultralow energy region. Two measurements will be described and the experimental THM cross sections will be shown for both experiments.

  3. Survey of Laser Markets Relevant to Inertial Fusion Energy Drivers, information for National Research Council

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayramian, A J; Deri, R J; Erlandson, A C

    2011-02-24

    Development of a new technology for commercial application can be significantly accelerated by leveraging related technologies used in other markets. Synergies across multiple application domains attract research and development (R and D) talent - widening the innovation pipeline - and increases the market demand in common components and subsystems to provide performance improvements and cost reductions. For these reasons, driver development plans for inertial fusion energy (IFE) should consider the non-fusion technology base that can be lveraged for application to IFE. At this time, two laser driver technologies are being proposed for IFE: solid-state lasers (SSLs) and KrF gas (excimer) lasers. This document provides a brief survey of organizations actively engaged in these technologies. This is intended to facilitate comparison of the opportunities for leveraging the larger technical community for IFE laser driver development. They have included tables that summarize the commercial organizations selling solid-state and KrF lasers, and a brief summary of organizations actively engaged in R and D on these technologies.

  4. Oregon OCS seafloor mapping: Selected lease blocks relevant to renewable energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Guy R.; Hemery, Lenaïg G.; Henkel, Sarah K.

    2017-05-23

    In 2014 the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) entered into Intra-agency agreement M13PG00037 to map an area of the Oregon Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) off of Coos Bay, Oregon, under consideration for development of a floating wind energy farm. The BOEM requires seafloor mapping and site characterization studies in order to evaluate the impact of seafloor and sub-seafloor conditions on the installation, operation, and structural integrity of proposed renewable energy projects, as well as to assess the potential effects of construction and operations on archaeological resources. The mission of the USGS is to provide geologic, topographic, and hydrologic information that contributes to the wise management of the Nation's natural resources and that promotes the health, safety, and well being of the people. This information consists of maps, databases, and descriptions and analyses of the water, energy, and mineral resources, land surface, underlying geologic structure, and dynamic processes of the earth.For the Oregon OCS study, the USGS acquired multibeam echo sounder and seafloor video data surrounding the proposed development site, which is 95 km2 in area and 15 miles offshore from Coos Bay. The development site had been surveyed by Solmar Hydro Inc. in 2013 under a contract with WindFloat Pacific. The USGS subsequently produced a bathymetry digital elevation model and a backscatter intensity grid that were merged with existing data collected by the contractor. The merged grids were published along with visual observations of benthic geo-habitat from the video data in an associated USGS data release (Cochrane and others, 2015).This report includes the results of analysis of the video data conducted by Oregon State University and the geo-habitat interpretation of the multibeam echo sounder (MBES) data conducted by the USGS. MBES data was published in Cochrane and others (2015). Interpretive data associated with this

  5. Superresolution of a compact neutron spectrometer at energies relevant for fusion diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reginatto, M.; Zimbal, A.

    2011-03-01

    The ability to achieve resolution that is better than the instrument resolution (i.e., superresolution) is well known in optics, where it has been extensively studied. Unfortunately, there are only a handful of theoretical studies concerning superresolution of particle spectrometers, even though experimentalists are familiar with the enhancement of resolution that is achievable when appropriate methods of data analysis are used, such as maximum entropy and Bayesian methods. Knowledge of the superresolution factor is in many cases important. For example, in applications of neutron spectrometry to fusion diagnostics, the temperature of a burning plasma is an important physical parameter which may be inferred from the width of the peak of the neutron energy spectrum, and the ability to determine this width depends on the superresolution factor. Kosarev has derived an absolute limit for resolution enhancement using arguments based on a well known theorem of Shannon. Most calculations of superresolution factors in the literature, however, are based on the assumption of Gaussian, translationally invariant response functions and therefore not directly applicable to neutron spectrometers which typically have response functions not satisfying these requirements. In this work, we develop a procedure that allows us to overcome these difficulties and we derive estimates of superresolution for liquid scintillator spectrometers of a type commonly used for neutron measurements. Theoretical superresolution factors are compared to experimental results.

  6. Minicourses in Astrophysics, Modular Approach, Vol. I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Univ., Chicago.

    This is the first volume of a two-volume minicourse in astrophysics. It contains chapters on the following topics: planetary atmospheres; X-ray astronomy; radio astrophysics; molecular astrophysics; and gamma-ray astrophysics. Each chapter gives much technical discussion, mathematical treatment, diagrams, and examples. References are included with…

  7. Nanopore Confinement of C-O-H Fluids Relevant to Subsurface Energy Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, D. R.

    2016-12-01

    Complex intermolecular interactions of C-O-H fluids (e.g., H2O, CO2, CH4) result in their unique thermophysical properties, including large deviations in the volumetric properties from ideality, vapor-liquid equilibria, and critical phenomena as these fluids encounter different pressure-temperature-pore network conditions in the crust. Development of a comprehensive understanding of the structures, dynamics, and reactivity at multiple length scales (molecular to macroscopic) over wide ranges of state conditions and composition is foundational to advances in quantifying geochemical processes involving mineral-fluid interfaces. The size, distribution and connectivity of these confined geometries dictate how fluids migrate into and through these micro- and nano-environments, wet and react with the solid. This presentation will provide an overview of the application of state-of-the-art experimental, analytical and computational tools to assess key features of the fluid-matrix interaction. The multidisciplinary approaches highlighted will include neutron scattering and NMR experiments, thermodynamic measurements and molecular-level simulations to quantitatively assess molecular properties of different mixtures of C-O-H fluids in nanpores. Key results include: (1) The addition of a second carbon-bearing phase or water has a profound effect on the competition for sorption sites, phase chemistry and the dynamical properties of all phases present in the pore. (2) Low solubility phases such as methane may exhibit profound increases in concentration in nanopores in the presence of water at elevated pressures and ambient temperature compared to bulk values. (3) Methane permeability through the hydrated pores is strongly dependent on the solid substrate and local properties of confined water, including its structure and, more importantly, evolution of solvation free energy and hydrogen bond structure. (4) Under certain conditions preferential adsorption of the fluids in the

  8. 14th International School of Cosmic Ray Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Stanev, Todor; Wefel, John P; Neutrinos and explosive events in the universe

    2005-01-01

    This volume contains the Lectures and selected participant contributions to the 14th Course of the International School of Cosmic Rays Astrophysics, a NATO Advanced Study Institute. Well known astrophysicists and astronomers discuss different aspects of the generation of high energy signals in powerful astrophysical objects concentrating on the production of neutrinos and gamma rays from high energy particle interactions. Recent results from new experiments and observatories are presented. Topics cover a wide range including the Spitzer infrared observatory, TeV gamma ray observations, dark matter, and neutrino telescopes. The combination of basic knowledge about the production of high energy signals with information about the data analysis of ongoing observations places the book between the usual levels of a textbook and a conference proceedings. It will give the reader a good introduction to the current field of astroparticle physics, and some of the fascinating astrophysics being addressed.

  9. Advancing Astrophysics with the Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    Fender, Rob; Govoni, Federica; Green, Jimi; Hoare, Melvin; Jarvis, Matt; Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie; Keane, Evan; Koopmans, Leon; Kramer, Michael; Maartens, Roy; Macquart, Jean-Pierre; Mellema, Garrelt; Oosterloo, Tom; Prandoni, Isabella; Pritchard, Jonathan; Santos, Mario; Seymour, Nick; Stappers, Ben; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Tian, Wen Wu; Umana, Grazia; Wagg, Jeff; Bourke, Tyler L; AASKA14

    2015-01-01

    In 2014 it was 10 years since the publication of the comprehensive ‘Science with the Square Kilometre Array’ book and 15 years since the first such volume appeared in 1999. In that time numerous and unexpected advances have been made in the fields of astronomy and physics relevant to the capabilities of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). The SKA itself progressed from an idea to a developing reality with a baselined Phase 1 design (SKA1) and construction planned from 2017. To facilitate the publication of a new, updated science book, which will be relevant to the current astrophysical context, the meeting "Advancing Astrophysics with the Square Kilometre Array" was held in Giardina Naxos, Sicily. Articles were solicited from the community for that meeting to document the scientific advances enabled by the first phase of the SKA and those pertaining to future SKA deployments, with expected gains of 5 times the Phase 1 sensitivity below 350 MHz, about 10 times the Phase 1 sensitivity above 350 MHz and with f...

  10. Goddard's Astrophysics Science Divsion Annual Report 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Kimberly (Editor); Reddy, Francis (Editor); Tyler, Pat (Editor)

    2015-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division (ASD, Code 660) is one of the world's largest and most diverse astronomical organizations. Space flight missions are conceived, built and launched to observe the entire range of the electromagnetic spectrum, from gamma rays to centimeter waves. In addition, experiments are flown to gather data on high-energy cosmic rays, and plans are being made to detect gravitational radiation from space-borne missions. To enable these missions, we have vigorous programs of instrument and detector development. Division scientists also carry out preparatory theoretical work and subsequent data analysis and modeling. In addition to space flight missions, we have a vibrant suborbital program with numerous sounding rocket and balloon payloads in development or operation. The ASD is organized into five labs: the Astroparticle Physics Lab, the X-ray Astrophysics Lab, the Gravitational Astrophysics Lab, the Observational Cosmology Lab, and the Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Lab. The High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) is an Office at the Division level. Approximately 400 scientists and engineers work in ASD. Of these, 80 are civil servant scientists, while the rest are resident university-based scientists, contractors, postdoctoral fellows, graduate students, and administrative staff. We currently operate the Swift Explorer mission and the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. In addition, we provide data archiving and operational support for the XMM mission (jointly with ESA) and the Suzaku mission (with JAXA). We are also a partner with Caltech on the NuSTAR mission. The Hubble Space Telescope Project is headquartered at Goddard, and ASD provides Project Scientists to oversee operations at the Space Telescope Science Institute. Projects in development include the Neutron Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) mission, an X-ray timing experiment for the International Space Station; the Transiting Exoplanet Sky Survey (TESS

  11. Particle Astrophysics of Neutrinos

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amol Dighe

    Detection of high energy neutrinos. Detection techniques. Water Cherenkov like IceCube: 1011 eV ≲ E ≲ 1016 eV. Cosmic ray arrays for E ≳ 1017 eV. Radio detection from balloon experiments (Askaryan). Two events at ∼ 1015 eV energies found. First observation of HEν. (2011-12) !!!

  12. Determining the 13C(α, n)16O absolute cross section through the concurrent application of ANC and THM and astrophysical consequences for the s-process in AGB-LMSs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippella, Oscar; La Cognata, Marco

    2018-01-01

    The 13C(α, n)16O reaction is considered to be the most important neutron source for the s-process main component in low-mass asymptotic giant branch stars. No direct experimental data exist at very low energies and measurements performed through direct techniques show inconsistent results, mostly in their absolute values. In this context, we reversed the usual normalization procedure combining two indirect approaches, the asymptotic normalization coefficient and the Trojan Horse Method, to unambiguously determine the absolute value of the 13C(α, n)16O astrophysical S(E)-factor in the most relevant energy-region for astrophysics. Adopting the new reaction rate for the n-source in the NEWTON s-process nucleosynthesis code, astrophysical calculations show only limited variations, less than 1%, for those nuclei whose production is considered to be totally due to slow neutron captures.

  13. Statistical and Spectral Analysis of Wind Characteristics Relevant to Wind Energy Assessment Using Tower Measurements in Complex Terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radian Belu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the study was to investigate spatial and temporal characteristics of the wind speed and direction in complex terrain that are relevant to wind energy assessment and development, as well as to wind energy system operation, management, and grid integration. Wind data from five tall meteorological towers located in Western Nevada, USA, operated from August 2003 to March 2008, used in the analysis. The multiannual average wind speeds did not show significant increased trend with increasing elevation, while the turbulence intensity slowly decreased with an increase were the average wind speed. The wind speed and direction were modeled using the Weibull and the von Mises distribution functions. The correlations show a strong coherence between the wind speed and direction with slowly decreasing amplitude of the multiday periodicity with increasing lag periods. The spectral analysis shows significant annual periodicity with similar characteristics at all locations. The relatively high correlations between the towers and small range of the computed turbulence intensity indicate that wind variability is dominated by the regional synoptic processes. Knowledge and information about daily, seasonal, and annual wind periodicities are very important for wind energy resource assessment, wind power plant operation, management, and grid integration.

  14. Alpha resonant scattering for astrophysical reaction studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Nakao, T. [Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), University of Tokyo, RIKEN campus, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Wakabayashi, Y.; Kubano, S. [The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Hashimoto, T. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, 10-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Hayakawa, S. [Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (INFN-LNS), Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Kawabata, T. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kita-Shirakawa, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Iwasa, N. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Teranishi, T. [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Kwon, Y. K. [Institute for Basic Science, 70, Yuseong-daero 1689-gil, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of); Binh, D. N. [30 MeV Cyclotron Center, Tran Hung Dao Hospital, Hoan Kiem District, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. G. [Institute of Physics, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hong Quoc Viet, Nghia do, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2014-05-02

    Several alpha-induced astrophysical reactions have been studied at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator), which is a low-energy RI beam separator at Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. One of the methods to study them is the α resonant scattering using the thick-target method in inverse kinematics. Among the recent studies at CRIB, the measurement of {sup 7}Be+α resonant scattering is discussed. Based on the result of the experiment, we evaluated the contributions of high-lying resonances for the {sup 7}Be(α,γ) reaction, and proposed a new cluster band in {sup 11}C.

  15. Investigation of astrophysically relevant neutron-rich argon nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    We propose to measure $\\beta$-decay properties especially the half-lives and P$_{n}$-values of the neutron-rich $^{47,48,49}$Ar nuclei. The acquired information will be important for a better understanding of the origin of the $^{48}$Ca/$^{46}$Ca isotopic "FUN" anomalies discovered in several refractory inclusions (in particular EK-1-4-1)of the Allende meteorite.

  16. Dynamics Resonances in Atomic States of Astrophysical Relevance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This research grounded the applicability of quasi-classics in describing the development of dynamic chaos phenomena in a quasi-hydrogen Rydberg alkali atom and showed the difference of the arising pro- cess of 'stochastic diffusion' from multiphoton and tunnel ionizations in a diatomic quasi-molecular complex.

  17. Spatial resolution measurements of the advanced radiographic capability x-ray imaging system at energies relevant to Compton radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, G. N.; Izumi, N.; Landen, O. L.; Tommasini, R.; Holder, J. P.; Hargrove, D.; Bradley, D. K.; Lumbard, A.; Cruz, J. G.; Piston, K.; Lee, J. J.; Romano, E.; Bell, P. M.; Carpenter, A. C.; Palmer, N. E.; Felker, B.; Rekow, V.; Allen, F. V.

    2016-11-01

    Compton radiography provides a means to measure the integrity, ρR and symmetry of the DT fuel in an inertial confinement fusion implosion near peak compression. Upcoming experiments at the National Ignition Facility will use the ARC (Advanced Radiography Capability) laser to drive backlighter sources for Compton radiography experiments and will use the newly commissioned AXIS (ARC X-ray Imaging System) instrument as the detector. AXIS uses a dual-MCP (micro-channel plate) to provide gating and high DQE at the 40-200 keV x-ray range required for Compton radiography, but introduces many effects that contribute to the spatial resolution. Experiments were performed at energies relevant to Compton radiography to begin characterization of the spatial resolution of the AXIS diagnostic.

  18. Spatial resolution measurements of the advanced radiographic capability x-ray imaging system at energies relevant to Compton radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, G. N., E-mail: hall98@llnl.gov; Izumi, N.; Landen, O. L.; Tommasini, R.; Holder, J. P.; Hargrove, D.; Bradley, D. K.; Lumbard, A.; Cruz, J. G.; Piston, K.; Bell, P. M.; Carpenter, A. C.; Palmer, N. E.; Felker, B.; Rekow, V.; Allen, F. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Lee, J. J.; Romano, E. [National Security Technologies LLC, 161 S Vasco Rd., Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Compton radiography provides a means to measure the integrity, ρR and symmetry of the DT fuel in an inertial confinement fusion implosion near peak compression. Upcoming experiments at the National Ignition Facility will use the ARC (Advanced Radiography Capability) laser to drive backlighter sources for Compton radiography experiments and will use the newly commissioned AXIS (ARC X-ray Imaging System) instrument as the detector. AXIS uses a dual-MCP (micro-channel plate) to provide gating and high DQE at the 40–200 keV x-ray range required for Compton radiography, but introduces many effects that contribute to the spatial resolution. Experiments were performed at energies relevant to Compton radiography to begin characterization of the spatial resolution of the AXIS diagnostic.

  19. Hyper-Kamiokande and Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Takatomi; Hyper-Kamiokande proto Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Hyper-Kamiokande (Hyper-K) is a proposed next generation underground large water Cherenkov detector. Recently a new detector design of Hyper-K is presented, as the two cylindrical pure water tanks. In the new design, each detector is surrounded by 40,000 newly developed photos sensors and provids the fiducial volume of 0.187 Mt. In total, the fiducial volume will be 0.37 Mt. Hyper-K will play the important role in several sciene of the next neutrino physics frontier, even in the neutrino astrophysics. The detection with large statistics of astrophysical neutrons, i.e., solar neutrino, supernova burst neutrino and supernova relic neutrino, will be remarkable information for both of particle physics and astrophysics.

  20. Fundamental Questions in Astrophysics: Guidelines for Future UV Observatories

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez de Castro, Ana I

    2006-01-01

    Modern astrophysics is a mature science that has evolved from its early phase of discovery and classification to a physics-oriented discipline focused in finding answers to fundamental problems ranging from cosmology to the origin and diversity of life-sustainable systems in the Universe. For this very reason, progress of modern astrophysics requires the access to the electromagnetic spectrum in the broadest energy range. The Ultraviolet is a fundamental energy domain since it is one of the most powerful tool to study plasmas at temperatures in the 3,000-300,000~K range as well as electronic transitions of the most abundant molecules in the Universe. Moreover, the UV radiation field is a powerful astrochemical and photoionizing agent. This book describes the fundamental problems in modern astrophysics that cannot progress without easy and wide-spread access to modern UV instrumentation.

  1. Distance Measurement Solves Astrophysical Mysteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-01

    distance. "Our measurements showed that the pulsar is about 950 light-years from Earth, essentially the same distance as the supernova remnant," said Steve Thorsett, of the University of California, Santa Cruz. "That means that the two almost certainly were created by the same supernova blast," he added. With that problem solved. the astronomers then turned to studying the pulsar's neutron star itself. Using a variety of data from different telescopes and armed with the new distance measurement, they determined that the neutron star is between 16 and 25 miles in diameter. In such a small size, it packs a mass roughly equal to that of the Sun. The next result of learning the pulsar's actual distance was to provide a possible answer to a longstanding question about cosmic rays. Cosmic rays are subatomic particles or atomic nuclei accelerated to nearly the speed of light. Shock waves in supernova remnants are thought to be responsible for accelerating many of these particles. Scientists can measure the energy of cosmic rays, and had noted an excess of such rays in a specific energy range. Some researchers had suggested that the excess could come from a single supernova remnant about 1000 light-years away whose supernova explosion was about 100,000 years ago. The principal difficulty with this suggestion was that there was no accepted candidate for such a source. "Our measurement now puts PSR B0656+14 and the Monogem Ring at exactly the right place and at exactly the right age to be the source of this excess of cosmic rays," Brisken said. With the ability of the VLBA, one of the telescopes of the NRAO, to make extremely precise position measurements, the astronomers expect to improve the accuracy of their distance determination even more. "This pulsar is becoming a fascinating laboratory for studying astrophysics and nuclear physics," Thorsett said. In addition to Brisken and Thorsett, the team of astronomers includes Aaron Golden of the National University of Ireland, Robert

  2. Advances in astronomy and astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kopal, Zdenek

    1966-01-01

    Advances in Astronomy and Astrophysics, Volume 4 brings together numerous research works on different aspects of astronomy and astrophysics. This volume is composed of five chapters, and starts with a description of objective prism and its application in space observations. The next chapter deals with the possibilities of deriving reliable models of the figure, density distribution, and gravity field of the Moon based on data obtained through Earth-bound telescopes. These topics are followed by a discussion on the ideal partially relativistic, partially degenerate gas in an exact manner. A ch

  3. Advances in astronomy and astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kopal, Zdenek

    1968-01-01

    Advances in Astronomy and Astrophysics, Volume 6 brings together numerous research works on different aspects of astronomy and astrophysics. This volume is composed of five chapters, and starts with the description of improved methods for analyzing and classifying families of periodic orbits in a conservative dynamical system with two degrees of freedom. The next chapter describes the variation of fractional luminosity of distorted components of close binary systems in the course of their revolution, or the accompanying changes in radial velocity. This topic is followed by discussions on vari

  4. Advances in astronomy and astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kopal, Zdenek

    1963-01-01

    Advances in Astronomy and Astrophysics, Volume 2 brings together numerous research works on different aspects of astronomy and astrophysics. This volume is composed of six chapters and begins with a summary of observational record on twilight extensions of the Venus cusps. The next chapter deals with the common and related properties of binary stars, with emphasis on the evaluation of their cataclysmic variables. Cataclysmic variables refer to an object in one of three classes: dwarf nova, nova, or supernova. These topics are followed by discussions on the eclipse phenomena and the eclipses i

  5. Advances in astronomy and astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kopal, Zdenek

    1962-01-01

    Advances in Astronomy and Astrophysics, Volume 1 brings together numerous research works on different aspects of astronomy and astrophysics. This book is divided into five chapters and begins with an observational summary of the shock-wave theory of novae. The subsequent chapter provides the properties and problems of T tauri stars and related objects. These topics are followed by discussions on the structure and origin of meteorites and cosmic dust, as well as the models for evaluation of mass distribution in oblate stellar systems. The final chapter describes the methods of polarization mea

  6. Breakup of loosely bound nuclei at intermediate energies for nuclear astrophysics and the development of a position sensitive microstrip detector system and its readout electronics using ASICs technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertulani, Carlos A. [Texas A & M Univ., Commerce, TX (United States)

    2016-01-12

    The work performed under this grant has led to the development of a detection system that will be used to measure reaction rates for proton or neutron capture reactions at stellar energies on radioactive ions far from stability. The reaction rates are needed to better understand the physics of nucleosynthesis in explosive stellar processes such as supernovae and x-ray burst events. The radioactive ions will be produced at the Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (RIBF) at RIKEN near Tokyo, Japan. During the course of this work, the group involved in this project has expanded by several institutions in Europe and Japan and now involves collaborators from the U.S., Japan, Hungary, Romania, Germany, Spain, Italy, China, and South Korea. As part of the project, a novel design based on large-area silicon detectors has been built and tested. The work has involved mechanical construction of a special purpose vacuum chamber, with a precision mounting system for the silicon detectors, development of a new ASICs readout system that has applications with a wide variety of silicon detector systems, and the development of a data acquisition system that is integrated into the computer system being used at RIBF. The parts noted above that are needed to carry out the research program are completed and ready for installation. Several approved experiments that will use this system will be carried out in the near future. The experimental work has been delayed due to a large increase in the cost and availability of electrical power for RIBF that occurred following the massive earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan in the spring of 2011. Another component of the research carried out with this grant involved developing the theoretical tools that are required to extract the information from the experiments that is needed to determine the stellar reaction rates. The tools developed through this part of the work will be made freely available for general use.

  7. The baseline in bottom-up energy efficiency and saving calculations - A concept for its formalisation and a discussion of relevant options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichl, Johannes [The Energy Institute at the Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Strasse 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Energy efficiency and saving calculations of the European Committee for Standardisation (Austria); Kollmann, Andrea [The Energy Institute at the Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Strasse 69, 4040 Linz (Austria)

    2011-02-15

    One of the central variables in bottom-up energy efficiency and saving calculations is the energy consumption baseline. In the evaluation of energy efficiency measures, developing this baseline is a challenging task, which may involve serious problems, especially if the energy service of the analysed subject has changed while the energy efficiency measure was being implemented. In this paper we present a formalised concept of the process of developing the baseline that is flexible enough to deal with various difficulties, such as changes in the levels of the energy services involved. We also discuss the most relevant options for deriving the necessary variables. (author)

  8. Breakup of loosely bound nuclei at intermediate energies for nuclear astrophysics and the development of a position sensitive microstrip detector system and its readout electronics using ASICs technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tribble, Robert E. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Sobotka, Lee G. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Blackmon, Jeff C. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Bertulani, Carlos A. [Texas A & M Univ., Commerce, TX (United States)

    2015-12-29

    The work performed under this grant has led to the development of a detection system that will be used to measure reaction rates for proton or neutron capture reactions at stellar energies on radioactive ions far from stability. The reaction rates are needed to better understand the physics of nucleosynthesis in explosive stellar processes such as supernovae and x-ray burst events. The radioactive ions will be produced at the Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (RIBF) at RIKEN near Tokyo, Japan. During the course of this work, the group involved in this project has expanded by several institutions in Europe and Japan and now involves collaborators from the U.S., Japan, Hungary, Romania, Germany, Spain, Italy, China, and South Korea. As part of the project, a novel design based on large-area silicon detectors has been built and tested and the performance characterized in a series of tests using particle beams with a variety of atomic numbers at the Cyclotron Institute of Texas A&M University and the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba facility (HIMAC) in Chiba, Japan. The work has involved mechanical construction of a special purpose vacuum chamber, with a precision mounting system for the silicon detectors, development of a new ASICs readout system that has applications with a wide variety of silicon detector systems, and the development of a data acquisition system that is integrated into the computer system being used at RIBF. The parts noted above that are needed to carry out the research program are completed and ready for installation. Several approved experiments that will use this system will be carried out in the near future. The experimental work has been delayed due to a large increase in the cost and availability of electrical power for RIBF that occurred following the massive earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan in the spring of 2011. Another component of the research carried out with this grant involved developing the theoretical tools that are required

  9. Astrophysical Plasmas: Codes, Models, and Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canto, Jorge; Rodriguez, Luis F.

    2000-05-01

    The conference Astrophysical Plasmas: Codes, Models, and Observations was aimed at discussing the most recent advances, arid some of the avenues for future work, in the field of cosmical plasmas. It was held (hiring the week of October 25th to 29th 1999, at the Centro Nacional de las Artes (CNA) in Mexico City, Mexico it modern and impressive center of theaters and schools devoted to the performing arts. This was an excellent setting, for reviewing the present status of observational (both on earth and in space) arid theoretical research. as well as some of the recent advances of laboratory research that are relevant, to astrophysics. The demography of the meeting was impressive: 128 participants from 12 countries in 4 continents, a large fraction of them, 29% were women and most of them were young persons (either recent Ph.Ds. or graduate students). This created it very lively and friendly atmosphere that made it easy to move from the ionization of the Universe and high-redshift absorbers, to Active Galactic Nucleotides (AGN)s and X-rays from galaxies, to the gas in the Magellanic Clouds and our Galaxy, to the evolution of H II regions and Planetary Nebulae (PNe), and to the details of plasmas in the Solar System and the lab. All these topics were well covered with 23 invited talks, 43 contributed talks. and 22 posters. Most of them are contained in these proceedings, in the same order of the presentations.

  10. 78 FR 2450 - Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-11

    ... Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory...: Name: Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee ( 13883). Date and Time: February 12, 2013, 8:30 a... Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on issues within the field of astronomy and...

  11. 75 FR 7295 - Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee #13883; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-18

    ... Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee 13883; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal... following meeting: Name: Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee ( 13883). Date and Time: March 4... Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on issues within the field of astronomy and...

  12. 75 FR 1087 - Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee #13883; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-08

    ... Doc No: 2010-82] NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee 13883...), the National Science Foundation announces the following Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee... Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on issues within the field of astronomy and [[Page...

  13. 77 FR 22614 - Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee #13883; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-16

    ... Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee 13883; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal... following meeting: Name: Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee ( 13883). Date and Time: May 11, 2012... Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on issues within the field of astronomy and...

  14. The Lunar Occultation Observer (LOCO) - A Nuclear Astrophysics All-Sky Survey Mission Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. S.; Bonamente, M.; Burgess, J. M.; Harmon, B. A.; Jenke, P.; Lawrence, D. J.; O'Brien, S.; Orr, M. R.; Paciesas, W. S.; Young, C. A.

    2008-07-01

    The Lunar Occultation Observer (LOCO) is a new lunar-based concept to probe the nuclear astrophysics regime. It will be a pioneering mission in high-energy astrophysics: the first to employ occultation as the principle detection and imaging method.

  15. Spin light of neutrino in astrophysical environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, Alexander; Lokhov, Alexey; Studenikin, Alexander; Ternov, Alexei

    2017-11-01

    The spin light of neutrino (SLν) is a new possible mechanism of electromagnetic radiation by a massive neutrino (with a nonzero magnetic moment) moving in media. Since the prediction of this mechanism, the question has been debated in a number of publications as whether the effect can be of any significance for realistic astrophysical conditions. Although this effect is strongly suppressed due to smallness of neutrino magnetic moment, for ultra-high energy neutrinos (PeV neutrinos recently observed by the IceCube collaboration, for instance) the SLν might be of interest in the case of neutrinos propagating in dense matter. An advanced view on the SLν in matter is given, and several astrophysical settings (a neutron star, supernova, Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB), and relic neutrino background) for which the effect can be realized are considered. Taking into account the threshold condition and also several competing processes, we determine conditions for which the SLν mechanism is possible. We conclude that the most favorable case of the effect manifestation is provided by ultra dense matter of neutron stars and ultrahigh energy of the radiating neutrino, and note that these conditions can be met within galaxy clusters. It is also shown that due to the SLν specific polarization properties this electromagnetic mechanism is of interest in the connection with the observed polarization of GRB emission.

  16. $\\alpha$-cluster ANCs for nuclear astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Avila, M L; Koshchiy, E; Baby, L T; Belarge, J; Kemper, K W; Kuchera, A N; Santiago-Gonzalez, D

    2014-01-01

    Background. Many important $\\alpha$-particle induced reactions for nuclear astrophysics may only be measured using indirect techniques due to small cross sections at the energy of interest. One of such indirect technique, is to determine the Asymptotic Normalization Coefficients (ANC) for near threshold resonances extracted from sub-Coulomb $\\alpha$-transfer reactions. This approach provides a very valuable tool for studies of astrophysically important reaction rates since the results are practically model independent. However, the validity of the method has not been directly verified. Purpose. The aim of this letter is to verify the technique using the $^{16}$O($^6$Li,$d$)$^{20}$Ne reaction as a benchmark. The $^{20}$Ne nucleus has a well known $1^-$ state at excitation energy of 5.79 MeV with a width of 28 eV. Reproducing the known value with this technique is an ideal opportunity to verify the method. Method. The 1$^-$ state at 5.79 MeV is studied using the $\\alpha$-transfer reaction $^{16}$O($^6$Li,$d$)$^...

  17. Time-symmetric integration in astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, David M.; Bertschinger, Edmund

    2018-01-01

    Calculating the long term solution of ordinary differential equations, such as those of the N-body problem, is central to understanding a wide range of dynamics in astrophysics, from galaxy formation to planetary chaos. Because generally no analytic solution exists to these equations, researchers rely on numerical methods which are prone to various errors. In an effort to mitigate these errors, powerful symplectic integrators have been employed. But symplectic integrators can be severely limited because they are not compatible with adaptive stepping and thus they have difficulty accommodating changing time and length scales. A promising alternative is time-reversible integration, which can handle adaptive time stepping, but the errors due to time-reversible integration in astrophysics are less understood. The goal of this work is to study analytically and numerically the errors caused by time-reversible integration, with and without adaptive stepping. We derive the modified differential equations of these integrators to perform the error analysis. As an example, we consider the trapezoidal rule, a reversible non-symplectic integrator, and show it gives secular energy error increase for a pendulum problem and for a Hénon-Heiles orbit. We conclude that using reversible integration does not guarantee good energy conservation and that, when possible, use of symplectic integrators is favored. We also show that time-symmetry and time-reversibility are properties that are distinct for an integrator.

  18. Electric Currents along Astrophysical Jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Contopoulos

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Astrophysical black holes and their surrounding accretion disks are believed to be threaded by grand design helical magnetic fields. There is strong theoretical evidence that the main driver of their winds and jets is the Lorentz force generated by these fields and their associated electric currents. Several researchers have reported direct evidence for large scale electric currents along astrophysical jets. Quite unexpectedly, their directions are not random as would have been the case if the magnetic field were generated by a magnetohydrodynamic dynamo. Instead, in all kpc-scale detections, the inferred electric currents are found to flow away from the galactic nucleus. This unexpected break of symmetry suggests that a battery mechanism is operating around the central black hole. In the present article, we summarize observational evidence for the existence of large scale electric currents and their associated grand design helical magnetic fields in kpc-scale astrophysical jets. We also present recent results of general relativistic radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations which show the action of the Cosmic Battery in the vicinity of astrophysical black holes.

  19. Astrophysics on the Lab Bench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    In this article some basic laboratory bench experiments are described that are useful for teaching high school students some of the basic principles of stellar astrophysics. For example, in one experiment, students slam a plastic water-filled bottle down onto a bench, ejecting water towards the ceiling, illustrating the physics associated with a…

  20. Nuclear astrophysics of light nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fynbo, Hans Otto Uldall

    2013-01-01

    A review of nuclear astrophysics of light nuclei using radioactive beams or techniques developed for radioactive beams is given. We discuss Big Bang nucleosynthesis, with special focus on the lithium problem, aspects of neutrino-physics, helium-burning and finally selected examples of studies...

  1. Neutrinos in astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Rees, Martin J

    1980-01-01

    The amount of 4He synthesised in the "big bang" is sensitive to the early particle content and to the expansion rate. If there was indeed a "big bang", surprisingly strong conclusions can be drawn about the number of species of neutrinos, and about the possibility that such particles have non-zero rest mass. The dynamics of supernovae are sensitive to the det~ils of neutrino physics; such explosions would yield IO L-1053 ergs of -v IO Mev neutrinos, in a burst lasting a few milliseconds. Galactic nuclei, cosmic ray sources and other high energy cosmic phenomena could yield a low background of~ 10 Gev neutrinos.

  2. International Olympiad on Astronomy and Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soonthornthum, B.; Kunjaya, C.

    2011-01-01

    The International Olympiad on Astronomy and Astrophysics, an annual astronomy and astrophysics competition for high school students, is described. Examples of problems and solutions from the competition are also given. (Contains 3 figures.)

  3. Magnetic Field Effects near the launching region of Astrophysical Jets

    OpenAIRE

    Pino, E. M. de Gouveia Dal; Kowal, G.; Kadowaki, L. H. S.; Piovezan, P.; Lazarian, A.

    2010-01-01

    One of the fundamental properties of astrophysical magnetic fields is their ability to change topology through reconnection and in doing so, to release magnetic energy, sometimes violently. In this work, we review recent results on the role of magnetic reconnection and associated heating and particle acceleration in jet/accretion disk systems, namely young stellar objects (YSOs), microquasars, and active galactic nuclei (AGNs).

  4. POEMMA: Probe Of Extreme Multi-Messenger Astrophysics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olinto, A. V.; Adams, J. H.; Aloisio, R.

    2017-01-01

    The Probe Of Extreme Multi-Messenger Astrophysics (POEMMA) mission is being designed to establish charged-particle astronomy with ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) and to observe cosmogenic tau neutrinos (CTNs). The study of UHECRs and CTNs from space will yield orders-of-magnitude increase...

  5. Nuclei in Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.

    2016-06-01

    This work is an attempt to present some problems on the evolution of the Universe: the nucleosynthesis and cosmochronology from the standpoint of physics of particles and nuclei, in particular with the use of the latest results, obtained by means of radioactive nuclear beams. The comparison is made between the processes taking place in the Universe and the mechanisms of formation and decay of nuclei, as well as of their interaction at different energies. Examples are given to show the capabilities of nuclearphysics methods for studying cosmic objects and properties of the Universe. The results of investigations in nuclear reactions, induced by radioactive nuclear beams, make it possible to analyze the nucleosynthesis scenario in the region of light elements in a new manner.

  6. Various Topics in Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahcall, John

    The following sections are included: * Expansion As An Energy Source in Quasi-Stellar Radio Sources * The Lagging-Core Model For Quasi-Stellar Sources * Introduction * Physical Requirements * Emission During Expansion Through A Schwarzschild Radius * Relativistic Treatment of A Core * Pressure-Free Case * Maximal-Pressure Case * Effect of Cosmological Constant * Pulsating Cores * Phenomenological Treatment of Oscillating Solutions * General Distribution * References * Unconventional and Pathological World Models * Doing away with our Singular Past by going beyond General Relativity * Phenumenological Rehabilitation within the Framework of Einsteinian Law * Pathologies * References * Inflationary Cosmogony, Copernican Relevelling and Extended Reality * Copernican relevellings in Inflationary Cosmogony * Classical General Relativity Horizons Stretch the Twin Paradox * Non-overlapping Time-Extensions in "Eternal" Inflation * Transcendant time and Surreality * References * Heuristic Methodology For Horizons In GR and Cosmology * Horizons and Equivalence Principle (local) considerations * Global considerations * Friedmann Cosmology, the de Sitter model and Inflationary Cosmogony * The present picture and problematics * Dedication * References

  7. Astrophysics and neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Harigel, G G

    1997-01-01

    This seminar is primarily intended for CERN guides. The formation of sun-like stars, their life cycle, and their final destiny will be explained in simple terms, appropriate for the majority of our visitors. An overview of the nuclear reaction chains in our sun will presented (Standard Solar Model), with special emphasis on the production of neutrinos and their measurement in underground detectors. These detectors are also able to record high-energy cosmic neutrinos. Since many properties of neutrinos are still unknown, a brief description of table-top and nuclear reactor experiments is included, as well as those using beams from particle accelerators. Measurements with a variety of space telescopes complement the knowledge of our universe, previously limited to the visible range of the electromagnetic spectrum.

  8. New isotopes of interest to astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Davids, C N; Pardo, R C; Parks, L A

    1976-01-01

    The beta decays of the new isotopes /sup 53/Ti and /sup 59/Mn have been studied. These neutron-rich isotopes have half-lives of 32.7+or-0.9 s and 4.75+or-0.14 s, respectively. They were produced via the /sup 48/Ca(/sup 7/Li, pn)/sup 53/Ti and /sup 48/Ca(/sup 13/C, pn) /sup 59/Mn reactions using beams from the Argonne National Laboratory FN Tandem Van de Graaff accelerator. Measurement of gamma singles, gamma - gamma coincidences, and beta - gamma coincidences were facilitated by a pneumatic target-transfer system ('rabbit'). Decay schemes are presented, and the measured masses compared with various predictions. The relevance to astrophysics will be discussed. In addition, a new 8-target multiple rabbit system will be described. (7 refs).

  9. Theoretically Palatable Flavor Combinations of Astrophysical Neutrinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Mauricio; Beacom, John F; Winter, Walter

    2015-10-16

    The flavor composition of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos can reveal the physics governing their production, propagation, and interaction. The IceCube Collaboration has published the first experimental determination of the ratio of the flux in each flavor to the total. We present, as a theoretical counterpart, new results for the allowed ranges of flavor ratios at Earth for arbitrary flavor ratios in the sources. Our results will allow IceCube to more quickly identify when their data imply standard physics, a general class of new physics with arbitrary (incoherent) combinations of mass eigenstates, or new physics that goes beyond that, e.g., with terms that dominate the Hamiltonian at high energy.

  10. Astrophysics and the evolution of the universe

    CERN Document Server

    Kisslinger, Leonard S

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this book is to teach undergraduate college or university students the basic physics concepts needed to understand the mathematics which describes the evolution of the universe, and based on this to teach the astrophysical theories behind evolution from very early times to the present. The book does not require students to have extensive knowledge of mathematics, like calculus, and includes material that explains concepts such as velocity, acceleration, and force. Based on this, fascinating topics such as Dark Matter, measuring Dark Energy via supernovae velocities, and the creation of mass via the Higgs mechanism are explained. All college students with an interest in science, especially astronomy, without extensive mathematical backgrounds should be able to use and learn from this book. Adults interested in topics like dark energy and the Higgs boson, which are in the news, can make use of this book as well.

  11. Relevance of Morning and Evening Energy and Macronutrient Intake during Childhood for Body Composition in Early Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederichs, Tanja; Roßbach, Sarah; Herder, Christian; Alexy, Ute; Buyken, Anette E

    2016-11-10

    (1) Background: This study investigated the relevance of morning and evening energy and macronutrient intake during childhood for body composition in early adolescence; (2) Methods: Analyses were based on data from 372 DONALD (DOrtmund Nutritional and Anthropometric Longitudinally Designed study) participants. Explorative life-course plots were performed to examine whether morning or evening energy and macronutrient intake at 3/4 years, 5/6 years, or 7/8 years is critical for fat mass index (FMI [kg/m²]) and fat free mass index (FFMI [kg/m²]) in early adolescence (10/11 years). Subsequently, exposures in periods identified as consistently critical were examined in depth using adjusted regression models; (3) Results: Life-course plots identified morning fat and carbohydrate (CHO) intake at 3/4 years and 7/8 years as well as changes in these intakes between 3/4 years and 7/8 years as potentially critical for FMI at 10/11 years. Adjusted regression models corroborated higher FMI values at 10/11 years among those who had consumed less fat (p = 0.01) and more CHO (p = 0.01) in the morning at 7/8 years as well as among those who had decreased their morning fat intake (p = 0.02) and increased their morning CHO intake (p = 0.05) between 3/4 years and 7/8 years; (4) Conclusion: During childhood, adherence to a low fat, high CHO intake in the morning may have unfavorable consequences for FMI in early adolescence.

  12. Dynamics and evolution of galactic nuclei (princeton series in astrophysics)

    CERN Document Server

    Merritt, David

    2013-01-01

    Deep within galaxies like the Milky Way, astronomers have found a fascinating legacy of Einstein's general theory of relativity: supermassive black holes. Connected to the evolution of the galaxies that contain these black holes, galactic nuclei are the sites of uniquely energetic events, including quasars, stellar tidal disruptions, and the generation of gravitational waves. This textbook is the first comprehensive introduction to dynamical processes occurring in the vicinity of supermassive black holes in their galactic environment. Filling a critical gap, it is an authoritative resource for astrophysics and physics graduate students, and researchers focusing on galactic nuclei, the astrophysics of massive black holes, galactic dynamics, and gravitational wave detection. It is an ideal text for an advanced graduate-level course on galactic nuclei and as supplementary reading in graduate-level courses on high-energy astrophysics and galactic dynamics. David Merritt summarizes the theoretical work of the las...

  13. Particles and astrophysics a multi-messenger approach

    CERN Document Server

    Spurio, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    This book is an introduction to “multi-messenger” astrophysics. It covers the many different aspects connecting particle physics with astrophysics and cosmology and introduces astrophysics using numerous experimental findings recently obtained through the study of high-energy particles. Taking a systematic approach, it comprehensively presents experimental aspects from the most advanced laboratories and detectors, as well as the theoretical background. The book is aimed at graduate students and post-graduate researchers with a basic understanding of particle and nuclear physics. It will also be of interest to particle physicists working in accelerator/collider physics who are keen to understand the mechanisms of the largest accelerators in the Universe. The book draws on the extensive lecturing experience of Professor Maurizio Spurio from the University of Bologna.

  14. Collisionless momentum transfer in space and astrophysical explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, A. S.; Schaeffer, D. B.; Everson, E. T.; Clark, S. E.; Lee, B. R.; Constantin, C. G.; Vincena, S.; van Compernolle, B.; Tripathi, S. K. P.; Winske, D.; Niemann, C.

    2017-06-01

    The AMPTE (Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers) mission provided in situ measurements of collisionless momentum and energy exchange between an artificial, photo-ionized barium plasma cloud and the streaming, magnetized hydrogen plasma of the solar wind . One of its most significant findings was the unanticipated displacement of the barium ion `comet head’ (and an oppositely directed deflection of the streaming hydrogen ions) transverse to both the solar wind flow and the interplanetary magnetic field, defying the conventional expectation that the barium ions would simply move downwind. While subsequent theoretical and computational efforts to understand the cause of the transverse motion reached differing conclusions, several authors attributed the observations to Larmor coupling, a collisionless momentum exchange mechanism believed to occur in various astrophysical and space-plasma environments and to participate in cosmic magnetized collisionless shock formation. Here we present the detection of Larmor coupling in a reproducible laboratory experiment that combines an explosive laser-produced plasma cloud with preformed, magnetized ambient plasma in a parameter regime relevant to the AMPTE barium releases. In our experiment, time-resolved Doppler spectroscopy reveals ambient ion acceleration transverse to both the laser-produced plasma flow and the background magnetic field. Utilizing a detailed numerical simulation, we demonstrate that the ambient ion velocity distribution corresponding to the measured Doppler-shifted spectrum is qualitatively and quantitatively consistent with Larmor coupling.

  15. CASPAR - Nuclear Astrophysics Underground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senarath, Chamaka; Caspar Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The CASPAR mainly focuses on Stellar Nucleosynthesis, its impact on the production of heavy elements and study the strength of stellar neutron sources that propels the s-process, 13C(α,n)16O and 22Ne(α,n)25Mg. Currently, implementation of a 1MV fully refurbished Van de Graaff accelerator that can provide a high intensity Î+/- beam, is being done at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF). The accelerator is built among a collaboration of South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, University of Notre Dame and Colorado School of Mines. It is understood that cosmic ray neutron background radiation hampers experimental Nucleosynthesis studies, hence the need to go underground in search for a neutron free environment, to study these reactions at low energies is evident. The first beam was produced in the middle of summer 2017. The entire accelerator will be run before the end of this year. A detailed overview of goals of CASPAR will be presented. NFS Grant-1615197.

  16. Highlights of the NASA particle astrophysics program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, William Vernon, E-mail: w.vernon.jones@nasa.gov [Astrophysics Division DH000, Science Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters, Washington DC (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The NASA Particle Astrophysics Program covers Origin of the Elements, Nearest Sources of Cosmic Rays, How Cosmic Particle Accelerators Work, The Nature of Dark Matter, and Neutrino Astrophysics. Progress in each of these topics has come from sophisticated instrumentation flown on long duration balloon (LDB) flights around Antarctica over the past two decades. New opportunities including Super Pressure Balloons (SPB) and International Space Station (ISS) platforms are emerging for the next major step. Stable altitudes and long durations enabled by SPB flights ensure ultra-long duration balloon (ULDB) missions that can open doors to new science opportunities. The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) has been operating on the ISS since May 2011. The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) and Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) experiments are being developed for launch to the Japanese Experiment Module Exposed Facility (JEM-EF) in 2015. And, the Extreme Universe Space Observatory (EUSO) is planned for launch to the ISS JEM-EF after 2017. Collectively, these four complementary ISS missions covering a large portion of the cosmic ray energy spectrum serve as a cosmic ray observatory. (author)

  17. The Nuclear Astrophysics program at n_TOF (CERN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colonna N.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An important experimental program on Nuclear Astrophysics is being carried out at the n_TOF since several years, in order to address the still open issues in stellar and primordial nucleosynthesis. Several neutron capture reactions relevant to s-process nucleosynthesis have been measured so far, some of which on important branching point radioisotopes. Furthermore, the construction of a second experimental area has recently opened the way to challenging measurements of (n, charged particle reactions on isotopes of short half-life. The Nuclear Astrophysics program of the n_TOF Collaboration is here described, with emphasis on recent results relevant for stellar nucleosynthesis, stellar neutron sources and primordial nucleosynthesis.

  18. Astrophysical processes on the sun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, Clare E

    2012-07-13

    Over the past two decades, there have been a series of major solar space missions, namely Yohkoh, SOHO, TRACE, and in the past 5 years, STEREO, Hinode and SDO, studying various aspects of the Sun and providing images and spectroscopic data with amazing temporal, spatial and spectral resolution. Over the same period, the type and nature of numerical models in solar physics have been completely revolutionized as a result of widespread accessibility to parallel computers. These unprecedented advances on both observational and theoretical fronts have led to significant improvements in our understanding of many aspects of the Sun's behaviour and furthered our knowledge of plasma physics processes that govern solar and other astrophysical phenomena. In this Theme Issue, the current perspectives on the main astrophysical processes that shape our Sun are reviewed. In this Introduction, they are discussed briefly to help set the scene.

  19. The Astrophysical Multipurpose Software Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelupessy, F. I.; van Elteren, A.; de Vries, N.; McMillan, S. L. W.; Drost, N.; Portegies Zwart, S. F.

    2013-09-01

    We present the open source Astrophysical Multi-purpose Software Environment (AMUSE), a component library for performing astrophysical simulations involving different physical domains and scales. It couples existing codes within a Python framework based on a communication layer using MPI. The interfaces are standardized for each domain and their implementation based on MPI guarantees that the whole framework is well-suited for distributed computation. It includes facilities for unit handling and data storage. Currently it includes codes for gravitational dynamics, stellar evolution, hydrodynamics and radiative transfer. Within each domain the interfaces to the codes are as similar as possible. We describe the design and implementation of AMUSE, as well as the main components and community codes currently supported and we discuss the code interactions facilitated by the framework. Additionally, we demonstrate how AMUSE can be used to resolve complex astrophysical problems by presenting example applications. http://www.amusecode.org The current version of the code is available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/557/A84

  20. Astrophysics with Microarcsecond Accuracy Astrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, Stephen C.

    2008-01-01

    Space-based astrometry promises to provide a powerful new tool for astrophysics. At a precision level of a few microarcsonds, a wide range of phenomena are opened up for study. In this paper we discuss the capabilities of the SIM Lite mission, the first space-based long-baseline optical interferometer, which will deliver parallaxes to 4 microarcsec. A companion paper in this volume will cover the development and operation of this instrument. At the level that SIM Lite will reach, better than 1 microarcsec in a single measurement, planets as small as one Earth can be detected around many dozen of the nearest stars. Not only can planet masses be definitely measured, but also the full orbital parameters determined, allowing study of system stability in multiple planet systems. This capability to survey our nearby stellar neighbors for terrestrial planets will be a unique contribution to our understanding of the local universe. SIM Lite will be able to tackle a wide range of interesting problems in stellar and Galactic astrophysics. By tracing the motions of stars in dwarf spheroidal galaxies orbiting our Milky Way, SIM Lite will probe the shape of the galactic potential history of the formation of the galaxy, and the nature of dark matter. Because it is flexibly scheduled, the instrument can dwell on faint targets, maintaining its full accuracy on objects as faint as V=19. This paper is a brief survey of the diverse problems in modern astrophysics that SIM Lite will be able to address.

  1. C+C Fusion Cross Sections Measurements for Nuclear Astrophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almaraz-Calderon S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Total fusion cross section of carbon isotopes were obtained using the newly developed MUSIC detector. MUSIC is a highly efficient, active target-detector system designed to measure fusion excitation functions with radioactive beams. The present measurements are relevant for understanding x-ray superbursts. The results of the first MUSIC campaign as well as the astrophysical implications are presented in this work.

  2. General relativity with applications to astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Straumann, Norbert

    2004-01-01

    This text provides a comprehensive and timely introduction to general relativity The foundations of the theory in Part I are thoroughly developed together with the required mathematical background from differential geometry in Part III The six chapters in Part II are devoted to tests of general relativity and to many of its applications Binary pulsars are studied in considerable detail Much space is devoted to the study of compact objects, especially to black holes This includes a detailed derivation of the Kerr solution, Israel's proof of his uniqueness theorem, and derivations of the basic laws of black hole physics The final chapter of this part contains Witten's proof of the positive energy theorem The book addresses undergraduate and graduate students in physics, astrophysics and mathematics It is very well structured and should become a standard text for a modern treatment of gravitational physics The clear presentation of differential geometry makes it also useful for string theory and other fields of ...

  3. Few-body models for nuclear astrophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Descouvemont

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We present applications of microscopic models to nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest, and we essentially focus on few-body systems. The calculation of radiative-capture and transfer cross sections is outlined, and we discuss the corresponding reaction rates. Microscopic theories are briefly presented, and we emphasize on the matrix elements of four-body systems. The microscopic extension of the R-matrix theory to nuclear reactions is described. Applications to the 2H(d, γ4He, 2H(d, p3H and 2H(d, n3He reactions are presented. We show the importance of the tensor force to reproduce the low-energy behaviour of the cross sections.

  4. NIF laboratory astrophysics simulations investigating the effects of a radiative shock on hydrodynamic instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, A. A.; Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Huntington, C. M.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B. A.; Kalantar, D.; MacLaren, S.; Raman, K.; Miles, A.; Trantham, Matthew; Kline, J. L.; Flippo, K.; Doss, F. W.; Shvarts, D.

    2016-10-01

    This poster will describe simulations based on results from ongoing laboratory astrophysics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) relevant to the effects of radiative shock on hydrodynamically unstable surfaces. The experiments performed on NIF uniquely provide the necessary conditions required to emulate radiative shock that occurs in astrophysical systems. The core-collapse explosions of red supergiant stars is such an example wherein the interaction between the supernova ejecta and the circumstellar medium creates a region susceptible to Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instabilities. Radiative and nonradiative experiments were performed to show that R-T growth should be reduced by the effects of the radiative shocks that occur during this core-collapse. Simulations were performed using the radiation hydrodynamics code Hyades using the experimental conditions to find the mean interface acceleration of the instability and then further analyzed in the buoyancy drag model to observe how the material expansion contributes to the mix-layer growth. This work is funded by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas under Grant Number DE-FG52-09NA29548.

  5. Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Dova, M.T.

    2015-05-22

    The origin of the ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) with energies above E > 10 17 eV, is still unknown. The discovery of their sources will reveal the engines of the most energetic astrophysical accelerators in the universe. This is a written version of a series of lectures devoted to UHECR at the 2013 CERN-Latin-American School of High-Energy Physics. We present anintroduction to acceleration mechanisms of charged particles to the highest energies in astrophysical objects, their propagation from the sources to Earth, and the experimental techniques for their detection. We also discuss some of the relevant observational results from Telescope Array and Pierre Auger Observatory. These experiments deal with particle interactions at energies orders of magnitude higher than achieved in terrestrial accelerators.

  6. Simulations of Astrophysical fluid instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, A. C.; Fryxell, B.; Rosner, R.; Dursi, L. J.; Olson, K.; Ricker, P. M.; Timmes, F. X.; Zingale, M.; MacNeice, P.; Tufo, H. M.

    2001-10-01

    We present direct numerical simulations of mixing at Rayleigh-Taylor unstable interfaces performed with the FLASH code, developed at the ASCI/Alliances Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes at the University of Chicago. We present initial results of single-mode studies in two and three dimensions. Our results indicate that three-dimensional instabilities grow significantly faster than two-dimensional instabilities and that grid resolution can have a significant effect on instability growth rates. We also find that unphysical diffusive mixing occurs at the fluid interface, particularly in poorly resolved simulations. .

  7. Compressive Sampling for Efficient Astrophysical Signals Digitizing: From Compressibility Study to Data Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargouri, Yosra; Petit, Hervé; Loumeau, Patrick; Cecconi, Baptiste; Desgreys, Patricia

    2016-03-01

    The design of a new digital radio receiver for radio astronomical observations in outer space is challenged with energy and bandwidth constraints. This paper proposes a new solution to reduce the number of samples acquired under the Shannon-Nyquist limit while retaining the relevant information of the signal. For this, it proposes to exploit the sparsity of the signal by using a compressive sampling process (also called Compressed Sensing (CS)) at the Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) to reduce the amount of data acquired and the energy consumption. As an example of an astrophysical signal, we have analyzed a real Jovian signal within a bandwidth of 40MHz. We have demonstrated that its best sparsity is in the frequency domain with a sparsity level of at least 10% and we have chosen, through a literature review, the Non-Uniform Sampler (NUS) as the receiver architecture. A method for evaluating the reconstruction of the Jovian signal is implemented to assess the impact of CS compression on the relevant information and to calibrate the detection threshold. Through extensive numerical simulations, and by using Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (OMP) as the reconstruction algorithm, we have shown that the Jovian signal could be sensed by taking only 20% of samples at random, while still recovering the relevant information.

  8. Trojan horse particle invariance: The impact on nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizzone, R. G.; La Cognata, M. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - INFN, Catania (Italy); Spitaleri, C. [Universitá di Catania and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - INFN (Italy); Bertulani, C. A. [Texas A and M University, Commerce (United States); Mukhamedzhanov, A. M. [Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas (United States); Blokhintsev, L. D. [Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lamia, L.; Spartá, R. [Universitá di Catania and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - INFN, Catania (Italy); Tumino, A. [Universitá Kore, Enna (Italy)

    2014-05-02

    In the current picture of nuclear astrophysics indirect methods and, in particular, the Trojan Horse Method cover a crucial role for the measurement of charged particle induced reactions cross sections of astrophysical interest, in the energy range required by the astrophysical scenarios. To better understand its cornerstones and its applications to physical cases many tests were performed to verify all its properties and the possible future perspectives. The key to the method is the quasi-free break-up and some of its properties will be investigated in the present work. In particular, the Trojan Horse nucleus invariance will be studied and previous studies will be extended to the cases of the binary d(d, p)t and {sup 6}Li(d,α){sup 4}He reactions, which were tested using different quasi-free break-up's, namely {sup 6}Li and {sup 3}He. The astrophysical S(E)-factor were then extracted with the Trojan Horse formalism applied to the two different break-up schemes and compared with direct data as well as with previous indirect investigations. The very good agreement confirms the independence of binary indirect cross section on the chosen spectator particle also for these reactions.

  9. Sausage and kink oscillations in astrophysical disk configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griv, Evgeny

    2011-05-13

    The development of hydrodynamic oscillations in various rotating astrophysical disks ranging from planetary rings to galaxies is studied analytically. The dispersion relation of wave propagation is derived. Modes of oscillation are examined from this dispersion relation that are suitable for obtaining information not just on oscillations but also on some instability properties of the disk-shaped structure. It is shown that unstable oscillations of different types, sausage compression and kink bending, may be excited effectively due to the Jeans gravitational instability and the kink transverse instability, respectively. The obtained results for the sausage oscillations may be applicable for such phenomena as the appearance of the in-plane spiral and circular structures, while the case for the kink mode is more relevant for the systematic vertical corrugations of astrophysical disks.

  10. Atomic and molecular physics and data activities for astrophysics at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffery, D.J.; Kristic, P.S.; Liu, W.; Schultz, D.R.; Stancil, P.C.

    1998-04-01

    The atomic astrophysics group at ORNL produces, collects, evaluates, and disseminates atomic and molecular data relevant to astrophysics and actively models various astrophysical environments utilizing this information. With the advent of the World Wide Web, these data are also being placed on-line to facilitate their use by end-users. In this brief report, the group`s recent activities in data production and in modeling are highlighted. For example, the authors describe recent calculations of elastic and transport cross sections relevant to ionospheric and heliospheric studies, charge transfer between metal ions and metal atoms and novel supernova nebular spectra modeling, ion-molecule collision data relevant to planetary atmospheres and comets, and data for early universe modeling.

  11. Neutrino Astrophysics in the MeV band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Roopesh; Kadler, Matthias; Mannheim, Karl; Krauss, Felicia; Buson, Sara; Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Photohadronic emission models suggest both neutrinos and gamma-ray photons could be produced by accelerated protons in the relativistic jets of blazars. As the background spectrum falls rapidly with increasing energy, individual events with energies of the order of PeV and above are the best candidates in the search for their astrophysical origin. We present results from our search for possible blazar counterparts to high energy neutrinos detected by IceCube and discuss how such efforts would benefit enormously from observations in the MeV regime.

  12. Astrophysics with small satellites in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Niels

    2003-01-01

    The small-satellites activities in the Scandinavian countries are briefly surveyed with emphasis on astrophysics research. (C) 2002 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.......The small-satellites activities in the Scandinavian countries are briefly surveyed with emphasis on astrophysics research. (C) 2002 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  13. Evaluation of the implementation of the R-matrix formalism with reference to the astrophysically important {sup 18}F(p,α){sup 15}O reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mountford, D.J., E-mail: d.j.mountford86@gmail.com [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Boer, R.J. de [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Descouvemont, P. [Physique Nucléaire Théorique et Physique Mathématique, C.P. 229, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), B 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Murphy, A. St. J. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Uberseder, E.; Wiescher, M. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

    2014-12-11

    Background. The R-Matrix formalism is a crucial tool in the study of nuclear astrophysics reactions, and many codes have been written to implement the relevant mathematics. One such code makes use of Visual Basic macros. A further open-source code, AZURE, written in the FORTRAN programming language is available from the JINA collaboration and a C++ version, AZURE2, has recently become available. Purpose The detailed mathematics and extensive programming required to implement broadly applicable R-Matrix codes make comparisons between different codes highly desirable in order to check for errors. This paper presents a comparison of the three codes based around data and recent results of the astrophysically important {sup 18}F(p,α){sup 15}O reaction. Methods Using the same analysis techniques as in the work of Mountford et al. parameters are extracted from the two JINA codes, and the resulting cross-sections are compared. This includes both refitting data with each code and making low-energy extrapolations. Results All extracted parameters are shown to be broadly consistent between the three codes and the resulting calculations are in good agreement barring a known low-energy problem in the original AZURE code. Conclusion The three codes are shown to be broadly consistent with each other and equally valid in the study of astrophysical reactions, although one must be careful when considering low lying, narrow resonances which can be problematic when integrating.

  14. Student Research in Computational Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondin, J. M.

    1999-12-01

    Computational physics can shorten the long road from freshman physics major to independent research by providing students with powerful tools to deal with the complexities of modern research problems. At North Carolina State University we have introduced dozens of students to astrophysics research using the tools of computational fluid dynamics. We have used several formats for working with students, including the traditional approach of one-on-one mentoring, a more group-oriented format in which several students work together on one or more related projects, and a novel attempt to involve an entire class in a coordinated semester research project. The advantages and disadvantages of these formats will be discussed at length, but the single most important influence has been peer support. Having students work in teams or learn the tools of research together but tackle different problems has led to more positive experiences than a lone student diving into solo research. This work is supported by an NSF CAREER Award.

  15. Astrophysically Interesting Resonances; Another Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Roby; Jenkins, David

    2008-10-01

    R.A.E. Austin, R. Kanungo, A. Campbell, S. Colosimo, S. Reeve Saint Mary's University; D.G. Jenkins, C.Aa.Diget, A. Robinson, University of York, UK; P.J. Woods T. Davinson University of Edinburgh; C.-Y. Wu A. Hurst J.A. Becker Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; G.C. Ball M. Djongolov G. Hackman A.C. Morton, C. Pearson, S.J. Williams TRIUMF; A.A. Phillips, M. Schumaker, University of Guelph H.Boston, A. Grint, D. Oxley, University of Liverpool; D. Cline, A. Hayes, University of Rochester; We describe a prototype experiment to measure resonances of interest in astrophysical reactions. We use the TIGRESS to detect gamma rays in coincidence with charged particles, inelastically scattered in inverse kinematics. The particles are detected with the Bambino detector modified to a δE-E silicon telescope spanning 15-40 degrees in the lab.

  16. Transfer reactions in nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardayan, D. W.

    2016-08-01

    To a high degree many aspects of the large-scale behavior of objects in the Universe are governed by the underlying nuclear physics. In fact the shell structure of nuclear physics is directly imprinted into the chemical abundances of the elements. The tranquility of the night sky is a direct result of the relatively slow rate of nuclear reactions that control and determines a star’s fate. Understanding the nuclear structure and reaction rates between nuclei is vital to understanding our Universe. Nuclear-transfer reactions make accessible a wealth of knowledge from which we can extract much of the required nuclear physics information. A review of transfer reactions for nuclear astrophysics is presented with an emphasis on the experimental challenges and opportunities for future development.

  17. Focusing telescopes in nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Von Ballmoos, P.; Knodlseder, R.; Sazonov, S.; Griffiths, R.; Bastie, P.; Halloin, H.; Pareschi, G.; Ramsey, B.; Jensen, C.; Buis, E.J.; Ulmer, M.; Giommi, P.; Colafrancesco, S.; Comastri, A.; Barret, D.; Leising, M.; Hernanz, M.; Smith, D.; Abrosimov, N.; Smither, B.; Ubertini, P.; Olive, J.F.; Lund, N.; Pisa, A.; Courtois, P.; Roa, D.; Harrison, F.; Pareschi, G.; Frontera, F.; Von Ballmoos, P.; Barriere, N.; Rando, N.; Borde, J.; Hinglais, E.; Cledassou, R.; Duchon, P.; Sghedoni, M.; Huet, B.; Takahashi, T.; Caroli, E.; Quadrinin, L.; Buis, E.J.; Skinner, G.; Krizmanic, J.; Pareschi, G.; Loffredo, G.; Wunderer, C.; Weidenspointner, G.; Wunderer, C.; Koechlin, L.; Bignami, G.; Von Ballmoos, P.; Tueller, J.; Andritschke, T.; Laurens, A.; Evrard, J

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this workshop is to consider the next generation of instrumentation to be required within the domain of nuclear astrophysics. A small, but growing community has been pursuing various techniques for the focusing of hard X-rays and gamma-rays with the aim of achieving a factor of up to 100 improvement in sensitivity over present technologies. Balloon flight tests of both multilayer mirrors and a Laue lens have been performed and ideas abound. At present, implementation scenarios for space missions are being studied at Esa, CNES, and elsewhere. The workshop will provide a first opportunity for this new community to meet, exchange technological know-how, discuss scientific objectives and synergies, and consolidate implementation approaches within National and European Space Science programs. This document gathers the slides of all the presentations.

  18. Axions in astrophysics and cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikivie, P.

    1984-07-01

    Axion models often have a spontaneously broken exact discrete symmetry. In that case, they have discretely degenerate vacua and hence domain walls. The properties of the domain walls, the cosmological catastrophe they produce and the ways in which this catastrophe may be avoided are explained. Cosmology and astrophysics provide arguments that imply the axion decay constant should lie in the range 10/sup 8/ GeV less than or equal to f/sub a/ less than or equal to 10/sup 12/ GeV. Reasons are given why axions are an excellent candidate to constitute the dark matter of galactic halos. Using the coupling of the axions to the electromagnetic field, detectors are described to look for axions floating about in the halo of our galaxy and for axions emitted by the sun. (LEW)

  19. Falling through spacetime: Four studies in neutrino astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Chad T.

    2009-06-01

    For a significant fraction of the history of the universe, neutrinos freely fall through spacetime. While they only weakly interact with matter, neutrinos have a significant impact in astrophysics. Experimental neutrino physics and observational cosmology are amidst an interesting era, where precision measurements in both fields have significantly improved scientific understanding of the standard model of particle physics and of the universe. Experiments in neutrino physics have not only discerned that neutrinos are massive particles, but have also measured their relative masses (but not their absolute masses) and the quantum mechanical mixing matrix that is a consequence of these differing mass scales. Meanwhile, precision cosmological observations have determined the energy content of the universe, which in turn has presented a self-consistent story of the history and evolution of the universe and its contents. The topics discussed in this dissertation are based upon an interplay between these two fields, at times pushing the envelope, but always focused upon the basic physical processes that affect massive neutrinos in an expanding universe. A hearty, pedagogical introduction is presented to highlight the relevant neutrino physics described in this work and an overview of cosmology, strongly biased toward the early universe, the paradigm in which much of the work in this dissertation is based. Sterile neutrinos in different regimes of mass and mixing with active neutrinos are proposed as well as asymmetries between the number density of active neutrinos and antineutrinos in the early universe. The consequences of these two propositions are discussed in terms of observables such as primordial light element abundances and the observables related to a sterile neutrino dark matter candidate. Neutrino emission from high-entropy electron-positron plasmas are introduced, and the effects of this large flux of neutrinos and antineutrinos on hot hydrogen burning are

  20. Manual for best practice for emergency response procedures, part 3: a review of the department of Minerals and Energy guidelines relevant to inrushes, fires, explosions and other emergencies.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Spencer, KC

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available PRACTICE FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROCEDURES PART 3 A REVIEW OF THE DEPARTMENT OF MINERALS AND ENERGY GUIDELINES RELEVANT TO INRUSHES, FIRES, EXPLOSIONS AND OTHER EMERGENCIES Authors: K C Spencer, D M Walters, T P T Page and A G du Plessis. Research.... 12) This comprehensive draft document was drawn up by a tripartite working group. The document also appears to be satisfactory. 3 Conclusions It is our opinion that no further guidelines with respect to emergencies in collieries require...

  1. Detailed investigation of the low energy secondary electron yield of technical Cu and its relevance for the LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Cimino

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The detailed study of the low energy secondary electron yield (LE-SEY of technical Cu for low electron energies (from 0 to 20 eV is very important for electron cloud build up in high intensity accelerators and in many other fields of research. Different devices base their functionalities on the number of electrons produced by a surface when hit by other electrons, namely its SEY, and, in most cases, on its very low energy behavior. However, LE-SEY has been rarely addressed due to the intrinsic experimental complexity to control very low energy electrons. Furthermore, several results published in the past have been recently questioned, allegedly suffering from experimental systematics. Here, we critically review the experimental method used to study LE-SEY and precisely define the energy region in which the experimental data can be considered valid. By analyzing the significantly different behavior of LE-SEY in clean polycrystalline Cu (going toward zero at zero impinging energies and in its as received technical counterpart (maintaining a significant value in the entire region, we solve most, if not all, of the apparent controversy present in the literature, producing important inputs for better understanding the device performances related to their LE-SEY. Simulations are then performed to address the impact of such results on electron cloud predictions in the LHC.

  2. Low-energy electron and positron transport in gases and soft-condensed systems of biological relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R D; Tattersall, W; Boyle, G; Robson, R E; Dujko, S; Petrovic, Z Lj; Bankovic, A; Brunger, M J; Sullivan, J P; Buckman, S J; Garcia, G

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of electron and positron transport in water in both the gaseous and liquid states using a Boltzmann equation analysis and a Monte-Carlo simulation technique. We assess the importance of coherent scattering processes when considering transport of electrons/positrons in dense gases and liquids. We highlight the importance of electron and positron swarm studies and experiments as a test of the accuracy and completeness of cross-sections, as well as a technique for benchmarking Monte-Carlo simulations. The thermalization of low-energy positrons (energy region, and assumptions in the microscopic processes, is considered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A database of synthetic molecular spectra for astrophysical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cami, J.; Markwick-Kemper, A. J.

    We present an online database of molecular template spectra for astrophysical purposes. The initial database contains over 100,000 individual template spectra for 42 molecules totalling 97 isotopomers, and we provide an interface to the calculation of more spectra tailored to users' individual needs. Normalized absorption spectra are calculated in the LTE limit and presented for a wide range of astrophysically relevant temperature and column density regimes. For the same parameters, pure emission spectra are also calculated. The template spectra can be retrieved at different instrumental resolving powers, and can be combined together with different abundances interactively. Users can request additional spectra to be calculated for other parameters, the results of which become part of the database. These template spectra will be useful for identification of molecular absorption and emission bands over a wide range of spectroscopic observations, and allow a first estimate of temperatures and column densities in the regions where the molecular bands are formed. We highlight the different applications for which we believe this database and service to be useful, and offer some examples of how the templates can be used in various astrophysical contexts, and in particular for the analyis of observations with ISO and Spitzer.

  4. Universal main magnetic focus ion source: A new tool for laboratory research of astrophysics and Tokamak microplasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsyannikov, V. P.; Nefiodov, A. V.; Levin, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    A novel room-temperature ion source for the production of atomic ions in electron beam within wide ranges of electron energy and current density is developed. The device can operate both as conventional Electron Beam Ion Source/Trap (EBIS/T) and novel Main Magnetic Focus Ion Source. The ion source is suitable for generation of the low-, medium- and high-density microplasma in steady state, which can be employed for investigation of a wide range of physical problems in ordinary university laboratory, in particular, for microplasma simulations relevant to astrophysics and ITER reactor. For the electron beam characterized by the incident energy Ee = 10 keV, the current density je ˜ 20 kA/cm2 and the number density ne ˜ 2 × 1013 cm-3 were achieved experimentally. For Ee ˜ 60 keV, the value of electron number density ne ˜ 1014 cm-3 is feasible. The efficiency of the novel ion source for laboratory astrophysics significantly exceeds that of other existing warm and superconducting EBITs.

  5. A review of astrophysics experiments on intense lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington, B. A.

    1999-11-01

    Modern, high power laser facilities open new possibilities for simulating astrophysical systems in the laboratory.(S.J. Rose, Laser & Part. Beams 9, 869 (1991); B.H. Ripin et al., Laser & Part. Beams 8, 183 (1990); B.A. Remington et al., Science 284, 1488 (1999); H. Takabe et al., Plasma Phys. Contr. Fusion 41, A75 (1999); R.P. Drake, J. Geophys. Res. 104, 14505 (1999).) Scaled investigations of the hydrodynamics.(J. Kane et al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 2065 (1999); R.P. Drake et al., Ap. J. 500, L157 (1998); D. Ryutov et al., Ap. J. 518, 821 (1999).) and radiative transfer.(J. Wark et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 2004 (1997); P.K. Patel et al., JQSRT 58, 835 (1997).) relevant to supernovae, and opacities relevant to stellar interiors.(F.J. Rogers and C.A. Iglesias, Science 263, 50 (1994); H. Merdji et al., JSQRT 58, 783 (1997).) are now possible with laser experiments. Equations of state relevant to the interiors of giant planets and brown dwarfs are also being experimentally accessed.(G.W. Collins et al., Science 281, 1178 (1998); A. Benuzzi et al., Phys. Rev. E 54, 2162 (1996).) With the construction of the NIF laser in the U.S., and the LIL and LMJ lasers in France, controlled investigations of thermonuclear burn physics will become possible in the next decade. And with existing and future ultra-high intensity short pulse lasers, investigations of relativistic astrophysical plasmas are becoming possible.(M.H. Key et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 1966 (1998); F. Pegoraro et al., Plasma Phys. Contr. Fus. 39, B261 (1997).) A review of laboratory astrophysics experiments using intense lasers will be presented, and the potential for the future will be discussed.

  6. MHD Flows in Compact Astrophysical Objects Accretion, Winds and Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Beskin, Vasily S

    2010-01-01

    Accretion flows, winds and jets of compact astrophysical objects and stars are generally described within the framework of hydrodynamical and magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) flows. Analytical analysis of the problem provides profound physical insights, which are essential for interpreting and understanding the results of numerical simulations. Providing such a physical understanding of MHD Flows in Compact Astrophysical Objects is the main goal of this book, which is an updated translation of a successful Russian graduate textbook. The book provides the first detailed introduction into the method of the Grad-Shafranov equation, describing analytically the very broad class of hydrodynamical and MHD flows. It starts with the classical examples of hydrodynamical accretion onto relativistic and nonrelativistic objects. The force-free limit of the Grad-Shafranov equation allows us to analyze in detail the physics of the magnetospheres of radio pulsars and black holes, including the Blandford-Znajek process of energy e...

  7. On the Quantification of Incertitude in Astrophysical Simulation Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Melissa; Katz, Maximilian P.; Willcox, Donald E.; Ferson, Scott; Swesty, F. Douglas; Calder, Alan

    2017-01-01

    We present a pedagogical study of uncertainty quantification (UQ) due to epistemic uncertainties (incertitude) in astrophysical modeling using the stellar evolution software instrument MESA (Modules and Experiments for Stellar Astrophysics). We present a general methodology for UQ and examine the specific case of stars evolving from the main sequence to carbon/oxygen white dwarfs. Our study considers two epistemic variables: the wind parameters during the Red Giant and Asymptotic Giant branch phases of evolution. We choose uncertainty intervals for each variable, and use these as input to MESA simulations. Treating MESA as a "black box," we apply two UQ techniques, Cauchy deviates and Quadratic Response Surface Models, to obtain bounds for the final white dwarf masses. Our study is a proof of concept applicable to other computational problems to enable a more robust understanding of incertitude. This work was supported in part by the US Department of Energy under grant DE-FG02-87ER40317.

  8. Special relativity in general frames from particles to astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Gourgoulhon, Éric

    2013-01-01

    Special relativity is the basis of many fields in modern physics: particle physics, quantum field theory, high-energy astrophysics, etc. This theory is presented here by adopting a four-dimensional point of view from the start. An outstanding feature of the book is that it doesn’t restrict itself to inertial frames but considers accelerated and rotating observers. It is thus possible to treat physical effects such as the Thomas precession or the Sagnac effect in a simple yet precise manner. In the final chapters, more advanced topics like tensorial fields in spacetime, exterior calculus and relativistic hydrodynamics are addressed. In the last, brief chapter the author gives a preview of gravity and shows where it becomes incompatible with Minkowsky spacetime. Well illustrated and enriched by many historical notes, this book also presents many applications of special relativity, ranging from particle physics (accelerators, particle collisions, quark-gluon plasma) to astrophysics (relativistic jets, active g...

  9. Allocating subsidies to R&D or to market applications of renewable energy? Balance and geographical relevance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koseoglu, N.M.; van den Bergh, J.C.J.M.; Subtil Lacarda, J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses a basic problem in innovation studies, namely the allocation of scarce funds for governmental subsidies to market and R&D support, with the aim to effectively promote a transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy technologies. Although various ideas on this exist, a general

  10. Comprehensive track-structure based evaluation of DNA damage by light ions from radiotherapy-relevant energies down to stopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedland, W.; Schmitt, E.; Kundrát, P.; Dingfelder, M.; Baiocco, G.; Barbieri, S.; Ottolenghi, A.

    2017-01-01

    Track structures and resulting DNA damage in human cells have been simulated for hydrogen, helium, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and neon ions with 0.25–256 MeV/u energy. The needed ion interaction cross sections have been scaled from those of hydrogen; Barkas scaling formula has been refined, extending its applicability down to about 10 keV/u, and validated against established stopping power data. Linear energy transfer (LET) has been scored from energy deposits in a cell nucleus; for very low-energy ions, it has been defined locally within thin slabs. The simulations show that protons and helium ions induce more DNA damage than heavier ions do at the same LET. With increasing LET, less DNA strand breaks are formed per unit dose, but due to their clustering the yields of double-strand breaks (DSB) increase, up to saturation around 300 keV/μm. Also individual DSB tend to cluster; DSB clusters peak around 500 keV/μm, while DSB multiplicities per cluster steadily increase with LET. Remarkably similar to patterns known from cell survival studies, LET-dependencies with pronounced maxima around 100–200 keV/μm occur on nanometre scale for sites that contain one or more DSB, and on micrometre scale for megabasepair-sized DNA fragments. PMID:28345622

  11. Energy white paper 2007: the British strategy to take up the energy challenge; Energy white paper 2007: la strategie britannique pour relever le defi de l'energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    Following the energy policy review published in 2006 by the Department for Trade and Industry (DTI), the Energy White Paper 2007, published on May 23, 2007, gathers all measures preconized in this domain. This document recalls, first, the objectives and priorities of the British government at the international, national, regional and local scales, as already clearly explained in previous DTI publications. This white book announces also some new measures and the launching of new public hearings about other measures in view. All in all, 18 hearings are announced which deal with various topics, from the new nuclear power plants to the reform of renewables obligations, the organization of big energy projects or the dismantling of offshore energy facilities. This document recalls the objective of the government and describes the British international policy in the domain of energy. It presents the measures for the fight against climatic change (energy conservation, development of clean energies, decentralized energy production), for warranting the security of supplies (diversification of offer, improvement of networks, planning of energy projects) and, in particular, the proposals of the government concerning the transportation sector and the fight against energy paucity. It stresses also on the importance of R and D and on the British authority in energy technologies. Finally, it gathers the reactions of the most representative actors of the British energy sector. (J.S.)

  12. Astrophysical Aspects of Neutrino Dynamics in Ultradegenerate Quark Gluon Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souvik Priyam Adhya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The cardinal focus of the present review is to explore the role of neutrinos originating from the ultradense core of neutron stars composed of quark gluon plasma in the astrophysical scenario. The collective excitations of the quarks involving the neutrinos through the different kinematical processes have been studied. The cooling of the neutron stars as well as pulsar kicks due to asymmetric neutrino emission has been discussed in detail. Results involving calculation of relevant physical quantities like neutrino mean free path and emissivity have been presented in the framework of non-Fermi liquid behavior as applicable to ultradegenerate plasma.

  13. Cross section measurements of the sup 1 sup 0 sup 2 Pd(p, gamma) sup 1 sup 0 sup 3 Ag, sup 1 sup 1 sup 6 Sn(p, gamma) sup 1 sup 1 sup 7 Sb, and sup 1 sup 1 sup 2 Sn(alpha, gamma) sup 1 sup 1 sup 6 Te reactions relevant to the astrophysical rp- and gamma-processes

    CERN Document Server

    Oezkan, N; Boyd, R N; Cole, A L; Famiano, M; Gueray, R T; Howard, M; Sahin, L; Zach, J J; Haan, R D; Görres, J; Wiescher, M C; Islam, M S; Rauscher, T

    2002-01-01

    Total cross section measurements for the sup 1 sup 0 sup 2 Pd(p, gamma) sup 1 sup 0 sup 3 Ag and sup 1 sup 1 sup 6 Sn(p, gamma) sup 1 sup 1 sup 7 Sb reactions have been performed in the proton energy range 2.6 to 4.25 MeV, and for the sup 1 sup 1 sup 2 Sn(alpha, gamma) sup 1 sup 1 sup 6 Te reaction over the alpha beam energy range 7.0 to 10.5 MeV. An activation technique was used in which gamma rays from decays of the reaction products were detected off-line by two hyper-pure germanium detectors in a low background environment. Where possible, reaction rates are derived and the results compared to those of calculations generated by the NON-SMOKER and the MOST statistical model codes so as to judge their applicability for describing the cross sections needed for network calculations of nucleosynthesis in explosive astrophysical environments via the gamma- and rp-processes.

  14. Results and prospects in multi-messenger particle astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    In high-energy particle astrophysics the old days were certainly not better than these. Our field has thrived in the past decade with experiments covering thousands of square kilometers to measure the suppression in the flux of the highest energy cosmic rays ever observed, instrumenting a cubic kilometer of Antarctic ice to discover astrophysical neutrinos, and measuring a change in arm length as small as 10-19 m for the ground-breaking direct observation of gravitational waves. Additionally, the current generation of space-borne and ground-based gamma-ray experiments have revealed a plethora of gamma-ray sources, including pulsars, compact binaries, the galactic center, and extragalactic sources such as starburst galaxies and radio galaxies. Before the next generation of instruments bring us yet another order of magnitude in sensitivity, we can combine current observations to probe physics beyond the standard model, and to extend the high-energy frontier well above the energies accessible to laboratory accelerators. One example of this potential is the search for dark-matter annihilation and decay products. To use the multi-messenger approach effectively for probing dark-matter signatures and physics beyond the LHC energy requires understanding the origin (or acceleration mechanism) and the propagation processes. High energy protons and nuclei, neutrinos, gamma-rays, X-rays, and gravitational waves bring new and complementary views of the astrophysical sources. By comparing observations through different windows, we can use the sites of violent phenomena as a laboratory to probe the physical processes under extreme conditions throughout the Universe, and to test the fundamental laws of particle physics and gravitation. As a community we need to engage in a bold synergistic approach to understanding the violent processes that give rise to the high-energy cosmic phenomena in the Universe. In this invited talk, I will present on-going multi-messenger studies to

  15. ϕ decay: A relevant source for K- production at energies available at the GSI Schwerionen-Synchrotron (SIS)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agakishiev, G.; Balanda, A.; Bannier, B.; Bassini, R.; Belver, D.; Belyaev, A. V.; Blanco, A.; Böhmer, M.; Boyard, J. L.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Cabanelas, P.; Castro, E.; Chernenko, S.; Christ, T.; Destefanis, M.; Díaz, J.; Dohrmann, F.; Dybczak, A.; Eberl, T.; Fabbietti, L.; Fateev, O. V.; Finocchiaro, P.; Fonte, P.; Friese, J.; Fröhlich, I.; Galatyuk, T.; Garzón, J. A.; Gernhäuser, R.; Gil, A.; Gilardi, C.; Golubeva, M.; González-Díaz, D.; Guber, F.; Heilmann, M.; Heinz, T.; Hennino, T.; Holzmann, R.; Ierusalimov, A.; Iori, I.; Ivashkin, A.; Jurkovic, M.; Kämpfer, B.; Kanaki, K.; Karavicheva, T.; Kirschner, D.; Koenig, I.; Koenig, W.; Kolb, B. W.; Kotte, R.; Krizek, F.; Krücken, R.; Kühn, W.; Kugler, A.; Kurepin, A.; Lang, S.; Lange, J. S.; Lapidus, K.; Liu, T.; Lopes, L.; Lorenz, M.; Maier, L.; Mangiarotti, A.; Markert, J.; Metag, V.; Michalska, B.; Michel, J.; Mishra, D.; Morinière, E.; Mousa, J.; Müntz, C.; Naumann, L.; Otwinowski, J.; Pachmayer, Y. C.; Palka, M.; Parpottas, Y.; Pechenov, V.; Pechenova, O.; Cavalcanti, T. Pérez; Pietraszko, J.; Przygoda, W.; Ramstein, B.; Reshetin, A.; Roy-Stephan, M.; Rustamov, A.; Sadovsky, A.; Sailer, B.; Salabura, P.; Schmah, A.; Schwab, E.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Ströbele, H.; Stroth, J.; Sturm, C.; Sudol, M.; Tarantola, A.; Teilab, K.; Tlusty, P.; Traxler, M.; Trebacz, R.; Tsertos, H.; Wagner, V.; Weber, M.; Wisniowski, M.; Wojcik, T.; Wüstenfeld, J.; Yurevich, S.; Zanevsky, Y. V.; Zhou, P.; Zumbruch, P.

    2009-08-01

    We present phase space distributions and multiplicities of K+, K-, and ϕ mesons produced in Ar+KCl reactions at a kinetic beam energy of 1.756 GeV/nucleon and measured with the HADES spectrometer. The inverse slope parameters and yields of kaons supplement the systematics of previous measurements. The percentage of K- mesons coming from ϕ decay is found to be 18±7%.

  16. Connections between laser hydrodynamics experiments and astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, R. P.; Robey, H. A.; Remington, B. A.; Ryutov, D. D.; Calder, A.; Rosner, R.; Fryxell, B.; Arnett, D.; Zhang, Y.; Glimm, J.; Knauer, J.

    2002-11-01

    Recent and ongoing experiments have studied mechanisms that affect the evolution of supernovae, supernova remnants, and related systems. These experiments are designed to be well scaled from astrophysical systems to the laboratory. The experiments and some of the astrophysical systems involve time-dependent flows with very large Reynolds number. In contrast, numerical viscosity limits computer simulations of these phenomena to a Reynolds number of order 1000. Using our own experiments and other work in fluid dynamics as a guide, we will explore the implications for astrophysical systems. The key question is whether the astrophysical systems might evolve into a turbulent state that the computer simulations cannot reproduce. The US DOE and NASA supported this work.

  17. Code Validation With Laser Astrophysics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, A. C.; Fryxell, B.; Rosner, R.; Dursi, L. J.; Ricker, P. M.; Timmes, F. X.; Zingale, M.; Kane, J. O.; Remington, B. A.; Drake, R. P.; Olson, K.; MacNeice, P.; Tufo, H. M.

    2001-05-01

    An essential part of numerical modeling is validating simulation codes with laboratory experiments that capture many of the physical processes of interest. Validation is difficult in astrophysics because the problems of interest typically encompass complex physics and involve conditions that are difficult to reproduce in a terrestrial laboratory. Laboratory astrophysics with intense lasers serves as an invaluable validation tool by providing the chance to experimentally probe environments similar to those in which complex astrophysical phenomena occur. We describe the process of validating FLASH, an adaptive mesh astrophysical simulation code for compressible, reactive flows. We present the results of validation simulations, principally simulations of laser experiments involving shock propagation through multi-layer targets performed at the Omega laser facility at the University of Rochester. This work was supported by the DOE ASCI/Alliances program at the University of Chicago under grant No. B341495.

  18. Problem-based learning in astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raine, Derek [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); Collett, James [Department of Physical Sciences, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield (United Kingdom)

    2003-03-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) can be integrated into the curriculum in many different ways. We compare three examples of PBL in undergraduate astrophysics programmes, and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the various approaches.

  19. Transport processes in space physics and astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Zank, Gary P

    2014-01-01

    Transport Processes in Space Physics and Astrophysics' is aimed at graduate level students to provide the necessary mathematical and physics background to understand the transport of gases, charged particle gases, energetic charged particles, turbulence, and radiation in an astrophysical and space physics context. Subjects emphasized in the work include collisional and collisionless processes in gases (neutral or plasma), analogous processes in turbulence fields and radiation fields, and allows for a simplified treatment of the statistical description of the system. A systematic study that addresses the common tools at a graduate level allows students to progress to a point where they can begin their research in a variety of fields within space physics and astrophysics. This book is for graduate students who expect to complete their research in an area of plasma space physics or plasma astrophysics. By providing a broad synthesis in several areas of transport theory and modeling, the work also benefits resear...

  20. High energy physics and very high energy astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lawrence W.

    2017-06-01

    The current research programs at the CERN LHC and at the U.S. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) and other activities are briefly reviewed. The programs which are related to cosmic ray issues and which form a link between the cosmic ray community and the particle accelerator community are noted. The AMS-02 satellite program is also noted.

  1. Astrophysics teaching at Assam University, Silchar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Himadri Sekhar

    The Department of Physics is established in 1996 and since, then, thirteen batches of students have completed their Master’s programmes in the subject. The Department introduced in the year 2001 Astrophysics as one special paper in PG level (in the second year). The syllabus of Astrophysics is designed to include courses from observational Astronomy to Theoretical Astrophysics and Cosmology. There are two theory papers (in third and fourth semesters), one practical paper (in third semester) and one project or dissertation paper (in fourth semester), each one carries 100 marks. The major instruments available in the department for carrying out the experimental work are Meade-16 inch telescope, Celestron-8 inch inches Telescope, Meade refracting telescopes (4 inches, 2 number), SSP-5, SSP-3 photometer, Sivo Fibre-fed Spectrometer, CCD (Meade 416 XT, ST-6), Goniometer, Limb darkening apparatus etc. The practical paper includes study of the variation of sunspots; measurement of the parallax of distant objects, on moon and on planets like Jupiter and Saturn, measurement of the magnitude of different stars, study of the light scattering properties of rough surfaces, analysis of the image by image processing software (IRAF) etc. The project papers are based on research oriented topics which covers latest trends in Astrophysics including solar system studies, Interstellar medium and star formation studies and some problems in gravito-optics. There are altogether 6 scholars who have been awarded PhD and 10 are registered for PhD in Astrophysics. Besides these, 8 scholars have been awarded M. Phil. in Astrophysics. The broad research area of Astrophysics includes light scattering properties of cosmic dust, star formation, gravito optics, polarization study of comets etc. The Astrophysics group is currently doing research in different fields and have very good publications in several peer reviewed journals of international status.

  2. Cosmological and astrophysical neutrino mass measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abazajian, K.N.; Calabrese, E.; Cooray, A.

    2011-01-01

    Cosmological and astrophysical measurements provide powerful constraints on neutrino masses complementary to those from accelerators and reactors. Here we provide a guide to these different probes, for each explaining its physical basis, underlying assumptions, current and future reach.......Cosmological and astrophysical measurements provide powerful constraints on neutrino masses complementary to those from accelerators and reactors. Here we provide a guide to these different probes, for each explaining its physical basis, underlying assumptions, current and future reach....

  3. Dictionary of geophysics, astrophysics, and astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Matzner, Richard A

    2001-01-01

    The Dictionary of Geophysics, Astrophysics, and Astronomy provides a lexicon of terminology covering fields such as astronomy, astrophysics, cosmology, relativity, geophysics, meteorology, Newtonian physics, and oceanography. Authors and editors often assume - incorrectly - that readers are familiar with all the terms in professional literature. With over 4,000 definitions and 50 contributing authors, this unique comprehensive dictionary helps scientists to use terminology correctly and to understand papers, articles, and books in which physics-related terms appear.

  4. Nuclear astrophysics: a new era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiescher, Michael; Aprahamian, Ani [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame (United States); Regan, Paddy [Department of Physics, University of Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2002-02-01

    The latest generation of radioactive-ion-beam facilities promises to shed light on the complex nuclear processes that control the evolution of stars and stellar explosions. The most fundamental question in nature is where do we come from, or, put another way, what are we made of? The late Carl Sagan poetically said that we are all made of stardust, but the origin of the elements has fascinated scientists for thousands of years. Many of the greatest medieval and renaissance scientists dabbled in alchemy, trying to create the elements that make up the cosmos, but we had to wait until the early 20th century to recognize that elements are really defined by the number of protons in the nucleus. According to our current understanding, after the big bang most of the normal or baryonic material in the universe consisted of the lightest two elements, hydrogen and helium, with only trace amounts of lithium and beryllium. All the heavier elements that occur naturally on Earth were created from this original material via a series of nuclear reactions in the cores of stars or in stellar explosions. Over the last decade, ground-based telescopes and satellite-based Observatories have opened new windows on the stars across the electromagnetic spectrum, from infrared to gamma radiation. New technology now makes it possible to observe and analyse short-lived stellar explosions. Indeed, the distribution of elements in 'planetary nebula' and in the ejecta of supernovae and novae give a direct glimpse of individual nucleosynthesis processes. In the February issue of Physics World, Michael Wiescher, Paddy Regan and Ani Aprahamian describe how sate-of-the-art facilities are set to plug many of the gaps in our understanding of nuclear astrophysics. (U.K.)

  5. Astrophysical applications of gravitational microlensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Shude

    2012-08-01

    Since the first discovery of microlensing events nearly two decades ago, gravitational microlensing has accumulated tens of TBytes of data and developed into a powerful astrophysical technique with diverse applications. The review starts with a theoretical overview of the field and then proceeds to discuss the scientific highlights. (1) Microlensing observations toward the Magellanic Clouds rule out the Milky Way halo being dominated by MAssive Compact Halo Objects (MACHOs). This confirms most dark matter is non-baryonic, consistent with other observations. (2) Microlensing has discovered about 20 extrasolar planets (16 published), including the first two Jupiter-Saturn like systems and the only five “cold Neptunes" yet detected. They probe a different part of the parameter space and will likely provide the most stringent test of core accretion theory of planet formation. (3) Microlensing provides a unique way to measure the mass of isolated stars, including brown dwarfs and normal stars. Half a dozen or so stellar mass black hole candidates have also been proposed. (4) High-resolution, target-of-opportunity spectra of highly-magnified dwarf stars provide intriguing “age" determinations which may either hint at enhanced helium enrichment or unusual bulge formation theories. (5) Microlensing also measured limb-darkening profiles for close to ten giant stars, which challenges stellar atmosphere models. (6) Data from surveys also provide strong constraints on the geometry and kinematics of the Milky Way bar (through proper motions); the latter indicates predictions from current models appear to be too anisotropic compared with observations. The future of microlensing is bright given the new capabilities of current surveys and forthcoming new telescope networks from the ground and from space. Some open issues in the field are identified and briefly discussed.

  6. Instrumentation for the observation of atmospheric parameters, relevant for IACTs, for site-search and correction of the energy spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fruck, Christian; Hose, Juergen; Engelhardt, Toni; Mirzoyan, Razmik; Schweizer, Thomas; Teshima, Masahiro [Max Plank Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The atmospheric conditions have impact on the measured data by imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACT). Cherenkov light from air showers traverses 5-25 km distance in the atmosphere before reaching the telescopes. This light becomes attenuated because of absorption by oxigen and ozone as well as because of the Rayleigh and the Mie scatterings. The latter is the variable component in the atmosphere that depends on the momentary distribution of aerosols, their size and types and distribution heights. We have developed a micro-LIDAR system for parametrising these losses and plan to locate it next to the MAGIC telescopes for simultaneous operation. This shall allow us to improve the energy resolution of the telescopes for the data taken at non-ideal weather conditions. Also, we are working on developing diverse instrumentation for paramerising the atmosphere and for the searching proper sites for the CTA project. In our presentation we plan to report about the above-mentioned activities.

  7. A review of the characteristics of dietary fibers relevant to appetite and energy intake outcomes in human intervention trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poutanen, Kaisa S; Dussort, Pierre; Erkner, Alfrun

    2017-01-01

    Background: Many intervention studies have tested the effect of dietary fibers (DFs) on appetite-related outcomes, with inconsistent results. However, DFs comprise a wide range of compounds with diverse properties, and the specific contribution of these to appetite control is not well characterized...... the effects of DF properties on appetite and preclude the development of reliable, predictive, structure-function relations. Improved standards for characterization and reporting of DF sources and DF-containing materials are strongly recommended for future studies on the effects of DF on human physiology.......Objective: The influence of specific DF characteristics [i.e., viscosity, gel-forming capacity, fermentability, or molecular weight (MW)] on appetite-related outcomes was assessed in healthy humans.Design: Controlled human intervention trials that tested the effects of well-characterized DFs on appetite ratings or energy...

  8. Pulsed laser deposition of cluster-assembled films for catalysis and the photocatalysis relevant to energy and the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miotello, A.; Patel, N.

    2013-08-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) catalysts are under intense investigation in the catalysis community due to their exceptional activity and selective nature in catalytic processes as compared to the corresponding bulk counterpart, especially because of their large surface-to-volume atomic ratio, size- and shape-dependent properties, and high concentration of low-coordinated active surface sites. However, there is no general strategy to synthesize NPs of various materials with narrow size distribution, tailored properties, and desired morphologies. The development of a technique able to prepare NPs is thus a goal of great importance to avoid present trial and error approaches. Here we report on selected examples where pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique greatly contributes toward NPs synthesis. Co NPs embedded in B matrix films have been synthesized by PLD technique by taking advantage of the phase explosion process of superheated liquid where a mixture of vapor and liquid droplets leave the irradiated target surface and get deposited on the substrate. The deposited NPs exhibit catalytic properties comparable to that of precious metals in hydrogen production by hydrolysis of NaBH4 and NH3BH3. These NPs, when supported on rough carbon film prepared by PLD, show about 30% increase in catalytic activity for H2 production as compared to unsupported NPs. Co3O4 NPs assembled coating has been produced by reactive PLD in oxygen atmosphere at various substrate temperatures from room temperature to 250 °C. It was proved that the Co3O4 NPs can be obtained in a single step at low temperatures with mixed disordered-nanocrystalline phase that is a relevant feature for catalysis. The Co3O4 NPs assembled thin coating, employed in degradation of methylene blue solution, in water, via photo Fenton reaction in presence of H2O2, exhibits significantly higher activity as compared to the corresponding homogeneous catalyst.

  9. Total energy expenditure assessed by salivary doubly labelled water analysis and its relevance for short-term energy balance in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guidotti, Stefano; Verstappen-Dumoulin, Berthe M. A. A. A.; Jansen, Henk G.; Aerts-Bijma, Anita T.; van Vliet, Andre A.; Scheurink, Antonius J; Meijer, Harro A. J.; van Dijk, Gertjan

    2016-01-01

    RationaleThe doubly labelled water (DLW) method is a stable isotopic technique for measuring total energy expenditure (TEE). Saliva is the easiest sampling fluid for assessing isotopic enrichments, but blood is considered superior because of its rapid exchange with body water. Therefore, we compared

  10. Total energy expenditure assessed by salivary doubly labelled water analysis and its relevance for short-term energy balance in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guidotti, Stefano; Verstappen-Dumoulin, Berthe M. A A A; Jansen, Henk G.; Aerts-Bijma, Anita T.; van Vliet, André A; Scheurink, Anton J. W; Meijer, Harro A. J; van Dijk, Gertjan

    2016-01-01

    RATIONALE: The doubly labelled water (DLW) method is a stable isotopic technique for measuring total energy expenditure (TEE). Saliva is the easiest sampling fluid for assessing isotopic enrichments, but blood is considered superior because of its rapid exchange with body water. Therefore, we

  11. Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Editorial Board. Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy. Chief Editor. Ram Sagar, Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bengaluru. Associate Editor. Annapurni Subramaniam, Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bengaluru T.P. Prabhu, Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bengaluru. Editorial Board. P. Ajith, International Center for ...

  12. Complexity measures and information planes of x-ray astrophysical sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovallo, Michele; Telesca, Luciano

    2011-03-01

    The complex dynamics of x-ray astrophysical sources is investigated by analyzing their daily light curves in four different energy bands by using three information-theoretic measures: Fisher information measure, the Shannon entropy and the disequilibrium. The obtained results suggest a universal complex behavior in the x-ray light, independent of the source and of the energy band.

  13. Neutrino Cross Sections at Supernova Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholberg, Kate

    2017-01-01

    Neutrinos with energies between a few and a few tens of MeV are relevant for a number of physics topics. Notably, this is the energy range corresponding to emission of neutrinos from supernovae. In addition, it is relevant for studies of solar, reactor and atmospheric neutrinos, as well as for physics using accelerator-produced neutrinos from pions or radioactive nuclei decaying at rest. Surprisingly, with the exception of interactions on electrons and protons, the interactions of neutrinos with matter in this energy range are quite poorly understood, both theoretically and experimentally. This talk will describe neutrino physics and astrophysics in the supernova-neutrino energy range, the state of knowledge of cross sections on relevant nuclei, and initiatives for experimental measurements.

  14. The effect of low energy helium ion irradiation on tungsten-tantalum (W-Ta) alloys under fusion relevant conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonderman, S.; Tripathi, J. K.; Novakowski, T. J.; Sizyuk, T.; Hassanein, A.

    2017-08-01

    Currently, tungsten remains the best candidate for plasma-facing components (PFCs) for future fusion devices because of its high melting point, low erosion, and strong mechanical properties. However, continued investigation has shown tungsten to undergo severe morphology changes under fusion-like conditions. These results motivate the study of innovative PFC materials which are resistant to surface morphology evolution. The goal of this work is to examine tungsten-tantalum (W-Ta) alloys, a potential PFC material, and their response to low energy helium ion irradiation. Specifically, W-Ta samples are exposed to 100 eV helium irradiations with a flux of 1.15 × 1021 ions m-2 s-1, at 873 K, 1023 K, and 1173 K for 1 h duration. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals significant changes in surface deterioration due to helium ion irradiation as a function of both temperature and tantalum concentration in W-Ta samples. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) studies show a slight lattice parameter expansion in W-Ta alloy samples compared to pure W samples. The observed lattice parameter expansion in W-Ta alloy samples (proportional to increasing Ta wt.% concentrations) reflect significant differences observed in the evolution of surface morphology, i.e., fuzz development processes for both increasing Ta wt.% concentration and target temperature. These results suggest a correlation between the observed morphology differences and the induced crystal structure change caused by the presence of tantalum. Shifts in the XRD peaks before and after 100 eV helium irradiation with a flux of 1.15 × 1021 ions m-2 s-1, 1023 K, for 1 h showed a significant difference in the magnitude of the shift. This has suggested a possible link between the atomic spacing of the material and the accumulated damage. Ongoing research is needed on W-Ta alloys and other innovative materials for their application as irradiation resistant materials in future fusion or irradiation environments.

  15. Promising lines of investigations in the realms of laboratory astrophysics with the aid of powerful lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaev, V. S., E-mail: belyaev@tsniimash.ru; Batishchev, P. A.; Bolshakov, V. V.; Elkin, K. S.; Karabadzhak, G. F.; Kovkov, D. V.; Matafonov, A. P.; Raykunov, G. G.; Yakhin, R. A. [Russian Space Agency, Central Research Institute of Machine Building (TsNIIMash) (Russian Federation); Pikuz, S. A.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Fortov, V. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences (IVTAN), Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation); Krainov, V. P. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University) (Russian Federation); Rozanov, V. B. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Institute of Physics (Russian Federation)

    2013-04-15

    The results of work on choosing and substantiating promising lines of research in the realms of laboratory astrophysics with the aid of powerful lasers are presented. These lines of research are determined by the possibility of simulating, under laboratory conditions, problematic processes of presentday astrophysics, such as (i) the generation and evolution of electromagnetic fields in cosmic space and the role of magnetic fields there at various spatial scales; (ii) the mechanisms of formation and evolution of cosmic gamma-ray bursts and relativistic jets; (iii) plasma instabilities in cosmic space and astrophysical objects, plasma jets, and shock waves; (iv) supernova explosions and mechanisms of the explosion of supernovae featuring a collapsing core; (v) nuclear processes in astrophysical objects; (vi) cosmic rays and mechanisms of their production and acceleration to high energies; and (vii) astrophysical sources of x-ray radiation. It is shown that the use of existing powerful lasers characterized by an intensity in the range of 10{sup 18}-10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2} and a pulse duration of 0.1 to 1 ps and high-energy lasers characterized by an energy in excess of 1 kJ and a pulse duration of 1 to 10 ns makes it possible to perform investigations in laboratory astrophysics along all of the chosen promising lines. The results obtained by experimentally investigating laser plasma with the aid of the laser facility created at Central Research Institute of Machine Building (TsNIIMash) and characterized by a power level of 10 TW demonstrate the potential of such facilities for performing a number of experiments in the realms of laboratory astrophysics.

  16. Physics and astrophysics a selection of key problems

    CERN Document Server

    Ginzburg, V L

    2013-01-01

    Physics and Astrophysics discusses some major problems concerned with macrophysics. Such topics as the controlled thermonuclear fusion, high- temperature superconductivity, and metallic exciton liquid in semiconductors are covered. The definition and elements related to microphysics are discussed. This section focuses on mass spectrum, quarks and gluons, and the interaction of particles at high and super high energies. The book gives a brief overview of the general theory of relativity. The production and origin of gravitational waves are discussed in detail. Cosmology is the study of space an

  17. A Laboratory Astrophysical Jet to Study Canonical Flux Tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Setthivoine [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2017-12-20

    Understanding the interaction between plasma flows and magnetic fields remains a fundamental problem in plasma physics, with important applications to astrophysics, fusion energy, and advanced space propulsion. For example, flows are of primary importance in astrophysical jets even if it is not fully understood how jets become so long without becoming unstable. Theories for the origin of magnetic fields in the cosmos rely on flowing charged fluids that should generate magnetic fields, yet this remains to be demonstrated experimentally. Fusion energy reactors can be made smaller with flows that improve stability and confinement. Advanced space propulsion could be more efficient with collimated and stable plasma flows through magnetic nozzles but must eventually detach from the nozzle. In all these cases, there appears to be a spontaneous emergence of flowing and/or magnetic structures, suggesting a form of self-organization in plasmas. Beyond satisfying simple intellectual curiosity, understanding plasma self-organization could enable the development of methods to control plasma structures for fusion energy, space propulsion, and other applications. The research project has therefore built a theory and an experiment to investigate the interaction between magnetic fields and plasma flows. The theory is called canonical field theory for short, and the experiment is called Mochi after a rice cake filled with surprising, yet delicious fillings.

  18. Estimation of Surface Soil Moisture in Irrigated Lands by Assimilation of Landsat Vegetation Indices, Surface Energy Balance Products, and Relevance Vector Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso F. Torres-Rua

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Spatial surface soil moisture can be an important indicator of crop conditions on farmland, but its continuous estimation remains challenging due to coarse spatial and temporal resolution of existing remotely-sensed products. Furthermore, while preceding research on soil moisture using remote sensing (surface energy balance, weather parameters, and vegetation indices has demonstrated a relationship between these factors and soil moisture, practical continuous spatial quantification of the latter is still unavailable for use in water and agricultural management. In this study, a methodology is presented to estimate volumetric surface soil moisture by statistical selection from potential predictors that include vegetation indices and energy balance products derived from satellite (Landsat imagery and weather data as identified in scientific literature. This methodology employs a statistical learning machine called a Relevance Vector Machine (RVM to identify and relate the potential predictors to soil moisture by means of stratified cross-validation and forward variable selection. Surface soil moisture measurements from irrigated agricultural fields in Central Utah in the 2012 irrigation season were used, along with weather data, Landsat vegetation indices, and energy balance products. The methodology, data collection, processing, and estimation accuracy are presented and discussed.

  19. Exploring the Digital Universe with Europe's Astrophysical Virtual Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-12-01

    Vast Databanks at the Astronomers' Fingertips Summary A new European initiative called the Astrophysical Virtual Observatory (AVO) is being launched to provide astronomers with a breathtaking potential for new discoveries. It will enable them to seamlessly combine the data from both ground- and space-based telescopes which are making observations of the Universe across the whole range of wavelengths - from high-energy gamma rays through the ultraviolet and visible to the infrared and radio. The aim of the Astrophysical Virtual Observatory (AVO) project, which started on 15 November 2001, is to allow astronomers instant access to the vast databanks now being built up by the world's observatories and which are forming what is, in effect, a "digital sky" . Using the AVO, astronomers will, for example, be able to retrieve the elusive traces of the passage of an asteroid as it passes near the Earth and so enable them to predict its future path and perhaps warn of a possible impact. When a giant star comes to the end of its life in a cataclysmic explosion called a supernova, they will be able to access the digital sky and pinpoint the star shortly before it exploded so adding invaluable data to the study of the evolution of stars. Background information on the Astrophysical Virtual Observatory is available in the Appendix. PR Photo 34a/01 : The Astrophysical Virtual Observatory - an artist's impression. The rapidly accumulating database ESO PR Photo 34a/01 ESO PR Photo 34a/01 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 345 pix - 90k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 689 pix - 656k] [Hi-Res - JPEG: 3000 x 2582 pix - 4.3M] ESO PR Photo 34a/01 shows an artist's impression of the Astrophysical Virtual Observatory . Modern observatories observe the sky continuously and data accumulates remorselessly in the digital archives. The growth rate is impressive and many hundreds of terabytes of data - corresponding to many thousands of billions of pixels - are already available to scientists. The real sky is being

  20. Plasma Astrophysics, Part I Fundamentals and Practice

    CERN Document Server

    Somov, Boris V

    2006-01-01

    This well-illustrated monograph is devoted to classic fundamentals, current practice, and perspectives of modern plasma astrophysics. The first part is unique in covering all the basic principles and practical tools required for understanding and working in plasma astrophysics. The second part presents the physics of magnetic reconnection and flares of electromagnetic origin in space plasmas within the solar system; single and double stars, relativistic objects, accretion disks, and their coronae are also covered. This book is designed mainly for professional researchers in astrophysics. However, it will also be interesting and useful to graduate students in space sciences, geophysics, as well as advanced students in applied physics and mathematics seeking a unified view of plasma physics and fluid mechanics.

  1. Plasma Astrophysics, part II Reconnection and Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Somov, Boris V

    2007-01-01

    This well-illustrated monograph is devoted to classic fundamentals, current practice, and perspectives of modern plasma astrophysics. The first part is unique in covering all the basic principles and practical tools required for understanding and working in plasma astrophysics. The second part presents the physics of magnetic reconnection and flares of electromagnetic origin in space plasmas within the solar system; single and double stars, relativistic objects, accretion disks, and their coronae are also covered. This book is designed mainly for professional researchers in astrophysics. However, it will also be interesting and useful to graduate students in space sciences, geophysics, as well as advanced students in applied physics and mathematics seeking a unified view of plasma physics and fluid mechanics.

  2. Astrophysical disks Collective and Stochastic Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Fridman, Alexei M; Kovalenko, Ilya G

    2006-01-01

    The book deals with collective and stochastic processes in astrophysical discs involving theory, observations, and the results of modelling. Among others, it examines the spiral-vortex structure in galactic and accretion disks , stochastic and ordered structures in the developed turbulence. It also describes sources of turbulence in the accretion disks, internal structure of disk in the vicinity of a black hole, numerical modelling of Be envelopes in binaries, gaseous disks in spiral galaxies with shock waves formation, observation of accretion disks in a binary system and mass distribution of luminous matter in disk galaxies. The editors adaptly brought together collective and stochastic phenomena in the modern field of astrophysical discs, their formation, structure, and evolution involving the methodology to deal with, the results of observation and modelling, thereby advancing the study in this important branch of astrophysics and benefiting Professional Researchers, Lecturers, and Graduate Students.

  3. The Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oegerle, William; Reddy, Francis; Tyler, Pat

    2009-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division (ASD) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is one of the largest and most diverse astrophysical organizations in the world, with activities spanning a broad range of topics in theory, observation, and mission and technology development. Scientific research is carried out over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays to radio wavelengths as well as particle physics and gravitational radiation. Members of ASD also provide the scientific operations for three orbiting astrophysics missions WMAP, RXTE, and Swift, as well as the Science Support Center for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. A number of key technologies for future missions are also under development in the Division, including X-ray mirrors, and new detectors operating at gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, and radio wavelengths. This report includes the Division's activities during 2008.

  4. Review of Astrophysics Experiments on Intense Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remington, B A; Drake, R P; Takabe, H; Arnett, D

    2000-01-19

    Astrophysics has traditionally been pursued at astronomical observatories and on theorists' computers. Observations record images from space, and theoretical models are developed to explain the observations. A component often missing has been the ability to test theories and models in an experimental setting where the initial and final states are well characterized. Intense lasers are now being used to recreate aspects of astrophysical phenomena in the laboratory, allowing the creation of experimental testbeds where theory and modeling can be quantitatively tested against data. We describe here several areas of astrophysics--supernovae, supernova remnants, gamma-ray bursts, and giant planets--where laser experiments are under development to test our understanding of these phenomena.

  5. The Trojan Horse method for nuclear astrophysics: Recent results for direct reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumino, A.; Gulino, M. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania, Italy and Università degli Studi di Enna Kore, Enna (Italy); Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Romano, S. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania, Italy and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania (Italy); Cognata, M. La; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Lamia, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania (Italy)

    2014-05-09

    The Trojan Horse method is a powerful indirect technique to determine the astrophysical factor for binary rearrangement processes A+x→b+B at astrophysical energies by measuring the cross section for the Trojan Horse (TH) reaction A+a→B+b+s in quasi free kinematics. The Trojan Horse Method has been successfully applied to many reactions of astrophysical interest, both direct and resonant. In this paper, we will focus on direct sub-processes. The theory of the THM for direct binary reactions will be shortly presented based on a few-body approach that takes into account the off-energy-shell effects and initial and final state interactions. Examples of recent results will be presented to demonstrate how THM works experimentally.

  6. Preparation and characterisation of isotopically enriched Ta$_2$O$_5$ targets for nuclear astrophysics studies

    CERN Document Server

    Caciolli, A; Di Leva, A; Formicola, A; Aliotta, M; Anders, M; Bellini, A; Bemmerer, D; Broggini, C; Campeggio, M; Corvisiero, P; Depalo, R; Elekes, Z; Fülöp, Zs; Gervino, G; Guglielmetti, A; Gustavino, C; Gyürky, Gy; Imbriani, G; Junker, M; Marta, M; Menegazzo, R; Napolitani, E; Prati, P; Rigato, V; Roca, V; Rolfs, C; Alvarez, C Rossi; Somorjai, E; Salvo, C; Straniero, O; Strieder, F; Szücs, T; Terrasi, F; Trautvetter, H P; Trezzi, D

    2012-01-01

    The direct measurement of reaction cross sections at astrophysical energies often requires the use of solid targets of known thickness, isotopic composition, and stoichiometry that are able to withstand high beam currents for extended periods of time. Here, we report on the production and characterisation of isotopically enriched Ta$_2$O$_5$ targets for the study of proton-induced reactions at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics facility of the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. The targets were prepared by anodisation of tantalum backings in enriched water (up to 66% in $^{17}$O and up to 96% in $^{18}$O). Special care was devoted to minimising the presence of any contaminants that could induce unwanted background reactions with the beam in the energy region of astrophysical interest. Results from target characterisation measurements are reported, and the conclusions for proton capture measurements with these targets are drawn.

  7. Extragalactic Gamma-Ray Astrophysics

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    During the last decades, various classes of radio-loud active galactic nuclei have been established as sources of high-energy radiation extending over a very broad range from soft gamma-rays (photon energies E~MeV) up to very-high-energy gamma-rays (E>100 GeV). These include blazars of different types, as well as young and evolved radio galaxies. The observed gamma-ray emission from such implies efficient particle acceleration processes taking place in highly magnetized and relativistic jets produced by supermassive black holes, processes that have yet to be identified and properly understood. In addition, nearby starforming and starburst galaxies, some of which host radio-quiet Seyfert-type nuclei, have been detected in the gamma-ray range as well. In their cases, the observed gamma-ray emission is due to non-thermal activity in the interstellar medium, possibly including also a contribution from accretion disks and nuclear outflows. Finally, the high-energy emission from clusters of galaxies remains elusive...

  8. Recent progress in astrophysical plasma turbulence from solar wind observations

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, C H K

    2016-01-01

    This paper summarises some of the recent progress that has been made in understanding astrophysical plasma turbulence in the solar wind, from in situ spacecraft observations. At large scales, where the turbulence is predominantly Alfvenic, measurements of critical balance, residual energy, and 3D structure are discussed, along with comparison to recent models of strong Alfvenic turbulence. At these scales, a few percent of the energy is also in compressive fluctuations, and their nature, anisotropy, and relation to the Alfvenic component is described. In the small scale kinetic range, below the ion gyroscale, the turbulence becomes predominantly kinetic Alfven in nature, and measurements of the spectra, anisotropy, and intermittency of this turbulence are discussed with respect to recent cascade models. One of the major remaining questions is how the turbulent energy is dissipated, and some recent work on this question, in addition to future space missions which will help to answer it, are briefly discussed.

  9. The Astrophysics of Emission-Line Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kogure, Tomokazu

    2007-01-01

    Many types of stars show conspicuous emission lines in their optical spectra. These stars are broadly referred to as emission line stars. Emission line stars are attractive to many people because of their spectacular phenomena and their variability. The Astrophysics of Emission Line Stars offers general information on emission line stars, starting from a brief introduction to stellar astrophysics, and then moving toward a broad overview of emission line stars including early and late type stars as well as pre-main sequence stars. Detailed references have been prepared along with an index for further reading.

  10. Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory as Cultural Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Farmanyan, S. V.

    2017-07-01

    NAS RA V. Ambartsumian Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory is presented as a cultural centre for Armenia and the Armenian nation in general. Besides being scientific and educational centre, the Observatory is famous for its unique architectural ensemble, rich botanical garden and world of birds, as well as it is one of the most frequently visited sightseeing of Armenia. In recent years, the Observatory has also taken the initiative of the coordination of the Cultural Astronomy in Armenia and in this field, unites the astronomers, historians, archaeologists, ethnographers, culturologists, literary critics, linguists, art historians and other experts. Keywords: Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory, architecture, botanic garden, tourism, Cultural Astronomy.

  11. On the saturation of astrophysical dynamos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorch, Bertil; Archontis, Vasilis

    2004-01-01

    In the context of astrophysical dynamos we illustrate that the no-cosines flow, with zero mean helicity, can drive fast dynamo action and we study the dynamo's mode of operation during both the linear and non-linear saturation regimes. It turns out that in addition to a high growth rate in the li......In the context of astrophysical dynamos we illustrate that the no-cosines flow, with zero mean helicity, can drive fast dynamo action and we study the dynamo's mode of operation during both the linear and non-linear saturation regimes. It turns out that in addition to a high growth rate...

  12. Advances in astronomy and astrophysics 9

    CERN Document Server

    Kopal, Zdenek

    1972-01-01

    Advances in Astronomy and Astrophysics, Volume 9 covers reviews on the advances in astronomy and astrophysics. The book presents reviews on the Roche model and its applications to close binary systems. The text then describes the part played by lunar eclipses in the evolution of astronomy; the classical theory of lunar eclipses; deviations from geometrical theory; and the methods of photometric observations of eclipses. The problems of other phenomena related in one way or another to lunar eclipses are also considered. The book further tackles the infrared observation on the eclipsed moon, as

  13. Advances in astronomy and astrophysics 7

    CERN Document Server

    Kopal, Zdenek

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Astronomy and Astrophysics, Volume 7 covers reviews about the advances in astronomy and astrophysics. The book presents reviews on the scattering of electrons by diatomic molecules and on Babcock's theory of the 22-year solar cycle and the latitude drift of the sunspot zone. The text then describes reviews on the structures of the terrestrial planets (Earth, Venus, Mars, Mercury) and on type III solar radio bursts. The compact and dispersed cosmic matter is also considered with regard to the search for new cosmic objects and phenomena and on the nature of the ref shift from compact

  14. Astrophysics of Collapsing Axion Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eby, Joshua; Leembruggen, Madelyn; Suranyi, Peter; Wijewardhana, L. C. R.

    2017-01-01

    Axion stars are condensed states of large numbers of axion particles, bound by self-gravitation and quantum self-interactions. The mass of weakly bound axion stars is limited by gravitational stability, with condensates exceeding the maximum mass subject to collapse. During the collapse process, the axion density increases and higher-order self-interactions become increasingly relevant. By taking these terms into account, we provide evidence that in spite of a leading attractive interaction, collapsing axion stars stabilize in a dense state which is larger than its Schwarzschild radius, and so do not form black holes. During the last moments of collapse, number changing processes take place in the axion star with a very large rate, leading to emission of many highly energetic axions which escape from galaxies and galaxy clusters. Finally, if axion stars are a significant fraction of cold dark matter, then frequent collisions with each other or with ordinary stars could catalyze this collapse process as well.

  15. No-hair theorem for black holes in astrophysical environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürlebeck, Norman

    2015-04-17

    According to the no-hair theorem, static black holes are described by a Schwarzschild spacetime provided there are no other sources of the gravitational field. This requirement, however, is in astrophysical realistic scenarios often violated, e.g., if the black hole is part of a binary system or if it is surrounded by an accretion disk. In these cases, the black hole is distorted due to tidal forces. Nonetheless, the subsequent formulation of the no-hair theorem holds: The contribution of the distorted black hole to the multipole moments that describe the gravitational field close to infinity and, thus, all sources is that of a Schwarzschild black hole. It still has no hair. This implies that there is no multipole moment induced in the black hole and that its second Love numbers, which measure some aspects of the distortion, vanish as was already shown in approximations to general relativity. But here we prove this property for astrophysical relevant black holes in full general relativity.

  16. Particle Acceleration in the Heliosphere: Implications for Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisk, L. A.; Gloeckler, G.

    2012-11-01

    There has been a remarkable discovery concerning particles that are accelerated in the solar wind. At low energies, in the region where the particles are being accelerated, the spectrum of the accelerated particles is always the same: when expressed as a distribution function, the spectrum is a power law in particle speed with a spectral index of -5, and a rollover at higher particle speeds that can often be described as exponential. This common spectral shape cannot be accounted for by any conventional acceleration mechanism, such as diffusive shock acceleration or traditional stochastic acceleration. It has thus been necessary to invent a new acceleration mechanism to account for these observations, a pump mechanism in which particles are pumped up in energy through a series of adiabatic compressions and expansions. The conditions under which the pump acceleration is the dominant acceleration mechanism are quite general and are likely to occur in other astrophysical plasmas. In this paper, the most compelling observations of the -5 spectra are reviewed; the governing equation of the pump acceleration mechanism is derived in detail; the pump acceleration mechanism is applied to acceleration at shocks; and, as an illustration of the potential applicability of the pump acceleration mechanism to other astrophysical plasmas, the pump mechanism is applied to the acceleration of galactic cosmic rays in the interstellar medium.

  17. Workshop on gravitational waves and relativistic astrophysics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Discussions related to gravitational wave experiments viz. LIGO and LISA as well as to observations of supermassive black holes dominated the workshop sessions on gravitational waves and relativistic astrophysics in the ICGC-2004. A summary of seven papers that were presented in these workshop sessions has been ...

  18. Nuclear astrophysics and the Trojan Horse Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitaleri, C. [University of Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Catania (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - INFN, Catania (Italy); La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R.G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - INFN, Catania (Italy); Lamia, L. [University of Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Catania (Italy); Mukhamedzhanov, A.M. [Texas A and M University, Cyclotron Institute, College Station, TX (United States)

    2016-04-15

    In this review, we discuss the new recent results of the Trojan Horse Method that is used to determine reaction rates for nuclear processes in several astrophysical scenarios. The theory behind this technique is shortly presented. This is followed by an overview of some new experiments that have been carried out using this indirect approach. (orig.)

  19. Inverse Bremsstrahlung in Astrophysical Plasmas: The Absorption ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The electron–ion inverse Bremsstrahlung is considered here as a factor of the influence on the opacity of the different stellar atmospheres and other astrophysical plasmas. It is shown that this process can be successfully described in the frames of cut-off Coulomb potential model within the regions of the electron densities ...

  20. Astronomical optical interferometry, II: Astrophysical results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jankov S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical interferometry is entering a new age with several ground- based long-baseline observatories now making observations of unprecedented spatial resolution. Based on a great leap forward in the quality and quantity of interferometric data, the astrophysical applications are not limited anymore to classical subjects, such as determination of fundamental properties of stars; namely, their effective temperatures, radii, luminosities and masses, but the present rapid development in this field allowed to move to a situation where optical interferometry is a general tool in studies of many astrophysical phenomena. Particularly, the advent of long-baseline interferometers making use of very large pupils has opened the way to faint objects science and first results on extragalactic objects have made it a reality. The first decade of XXI century is also remarkable for aperture synthesis in the visual and near-infrared wavelength regimes, which provided image reconstructions from stellar surfaces to Active Galactic Nuclei. Here I review the numerous astrophysical results obtained up to date, except for binary and multiple stars milliarcsecond astrometry, which should be a subject of an independent detailed review, taking into account its importance and expected results at microarcsecond precision level. To the results obtained with currently available interferometers, I associate the adopted instrumental settings in order to provide a guide for potential users concerning the appropriate instruments which can be used to obtain the desired astrophysical information.

  1. Astronomical Optical Interferometry. II. Astrophysical Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankov, S.

    2011-12-01

    Optical interferometry is entering a new age with several ground-based long-baseline observatories now making observations of unprecedented spatial resolution. Based on a great leap forward in the quality and quantity of interferometric data, the astrophysical applications are not limited anymore to classical subjects, such as determination of fundamental properties of stars; namely, their effective temperatures, radii, luminosities and masses, but the present rapid development in this field allowed to move to a situation where optical interferometry is a general tool in studies of many astrophysical phenomena. Particularly, the advent of long-baseline interferometers making use of very large pupils has opened the way to faint objects science and first results on extragalactic objects have made it a reality. The first decade of XXI century is also remarkable for aperture synthesis in the visual and near-infrared wavelength regimes, which provided image reconstructions from stellar surfaces to Active Galactic Nuclei. Here I review the numerous astrophysical results obtained up to date, except for binary and multiple stars milli-arcsecond astrometry, which should be a subject of an independent detailed review, taking into account its importance and expected results at micro-arcsecond precision level. To the results obtained with currently available interferometers, I associate the adopted instrumental settings in order to provide a guide for potential users concerning the appropriate instruments which can be used to obtain the desired astrophysical information.

  2. Virtually Lossless Compression of Astrophysical Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Baronti

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe an image compression strategy potentially capable of preserving the scientific quality of astrophysical data, simultaneously allowing a consistent bandwidth reduction to be achieved. Unlike strictly lossless techniques, by which moderate compression ratios are attainable, and conventional lossy techniques, in which the mean square error of the decoded data is globally controlled by users, near-lossless methods are capable of locally constraining the maximum absolute error, based on user's requirements. An advanced lossless/near-lossless differential pulse code modulation (DPCM scheme, recently introduced by the authors and relying on a causal spatial prediction, is adjusted to the specific characteristics of astrophysical image data (high radiometric resolution, generally low noise, etc.. The background noise is preliminarily estimated to drive the quantization stage for high quality, which is the primary concern in most of astrophysical applications. Extensive experimental results of lossless, near-lossless, and lossy compression of astrophysical images acquired by the Hubble space telescope show the advantages of the proposed method compared to standard techniques like JPEG-LS and JPEG2000. Eventually, the rationale of virtually lossless compression, that is, a noise-adjusted lossles/near-lossless compression, is highlighted and found to be in accordance with concepts well established for the astronomers' community.

  3. Evolution and seismic tools for stellar astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Monteiro, Mario JPFG

    2008-01-01

    A collection of articles published by the journal "Astrophysics and Space Science, Volume 316, Number 1-4", August 2008. This work covers 10 evolution codes and 9 oscillation codes. It is suitable for researchers and research students working on the modeling of stars and on the implementation of seismic test of stellar models.

  4. The multi-facet aspects of cell sentience and their relevance for the integrative brain actions: role of membrane protein energy landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnati, Luigi F; Marcoli, Manuela; Maura, Guido; Fuxe, Kjell; Guidolin, Diego

    2016-06-01

    Several ion channels can be randomly and spontaneously in an open state, allowing the exchange of ion fluxes between extracellular and intracellular environments. We propose that the random changes in the state of ion channels could be also due to proteins exploring their energy landscapes. Indeed, proteins can modify their steric conformation under the effects of the physicochemical parameters of the environments with which they are in contact, namely, the extracellular, intramembrane and intracellular environments. In particular, it is proposed that the random walk of proteins in their energy landscape is towards attractors that can favor the open or close condition of the ion channels and/or intrinsic activity of G-protein-coupled receptors. The main aspect of the present proposal is that some relevant physicochemical parameters of the environments (e.g. molecular composition, temperature, electrical fields) with which some signaling-involved plasma membrane proteins are in contact alter their conformations. In turn, these changes can modify their information handling via a modulatory action on their random walk towards suitable attractors of their energy landscape. Thus, spontaneous and/or signal-triggered electrical activities of neurons occur that can have emergent properties capable of influencing the integrative actions of brain networks. Against this background, Cook's hypothesis on 'cell sentience' is developed by proposing that physicochemical parameters of the environments with which the plasma-membrane proteins of complex cellular networks are in contact fulfill a fundamental role in their spontaneous and/or signal-triggered activity. Furthermore, it is proposed that a specialized organelle, the primary cilium, which is present in most cells (also neurons and astrocytes), could be of peculiar importance to pick up chemical signals such as ions and transmitters and to detect physical signals such as pressure waves, thermal gradients, and local field

  5. The Astrophysics Simulation Collaboratory portal: A framework foreffective distributed research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondarescu, Ruxandra; Allen, Gabrielle; Daues, Gregory; Kelly,Ian; Russell, Michael; Seidel, Edward; Shalf, John; Tobias, Malcolm

    2003-03-03

    We describe the motivation, architecture, and implementation of the Astrophysics Simulation Collaboratory (ASC) portal. The ASC project provides a web-based problem solving framework for the astrophysics community that harnesses the capabilities of emerging computational grids.

  6. Hard X-ray/soft gamma-ray telescope designs for future astrophysics missions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Desiree Della Monica; Christensen, Finn Erland; Pivovaroff, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    We present several concept designs of hard X-ray/soft λ-ray focusing telescopes for future astrophysics missions. The designs are based on depth graded multilayer coatings. These have been successfully employed on the NuSTAR mission for energies up to 80 keV. Recent advances in demonstrating...

  7. Tuning laser produced electron-positron jets for lab-astrophysics experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hui [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fiuza, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hazi, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kemp, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Link, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pollock, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Marley, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nagel, S. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Park, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schneider, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shepherd, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tommasini, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wilks, S. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Williams, G. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Barnak, D. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics (LLE); Chang, P-Y. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics (LLE); Fiksel, G. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics (LLE); Glebov, V. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics (LLE); Meyerhofer, D. D. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics (LLE); Myatt, J. F. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics (LLE); Stoeckel, C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics (LLE); Nakai, M. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). ILE; Arikawa, Y. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). ILE; Azechi, H. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). ILE; Fujioka, S. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). ILE; Hosoda, H. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). ILE; Kojima, S. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). ILE; Miyanga, N. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). ILE; Morita, T. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). ILE; Moritaka, T. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). ILE; Nagai, T. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). ILE; Namimoto, T. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). ILE; Nishimura, H. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). ILE; Ozaki, T. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). ILE; Sakawa, Y. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). ILE; Takabe, H. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). ILE; Zhang, Z. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). ILE

    2015-02-23

    This paper reviews the experiments on the laser produced electron-positron jets using large laser facilities worldwide. The goal of the experiments was to optimize the parameter of the pair jets for their potential applications in laboratory-astrophysical experiment. Results on tuning the pair jet’s energy, number, emittance and magnetic collimation will be presented.

  8. Adaptive mesh simulations of astrophysical detonations using the ASCI flash code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryxell, B.; Calder, A. C.; Dursi, L. J.; Lamb, D. Q.; MacNeice, P.; Olson, K.; Ricker, P.; Rosner, R.; Timmes, F. X.; Truran, J. W.; Tufo, H. M.; Zingale, M.

    2001-08-01

    The Flash code was developed at the University of Chicago as part of the Department of Energy's Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI). The code was designed specifically to simulate thermonuclear flashes in compact stars (white dwarfs and neutron stars). This paper will give a brief introduction to the astrophysics problems we wish to address, followed by a description of the current version of the Flash code. Finally, we discuss two simulations of astrophysical detonations that we have carried out with the code. The first is of a helium detonation in an X-ray burst. The other simulation models a carbon detonation in a Type Ia supernova explosion. .

  9. Magneto-hydrodynamics Simulation in Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Bijia

    2011-08-01

    Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) studies the dynamics of an electrically conducting fluid under the influence of a magnetic field. Many astrophysical phenomena are related to MHD, and computer simulations are used to model these dynamics. In this thesis, we conduct MHD simulations of non-radiative black hole accretion as well as fast magnetic reconnection. By performing large scale three dimensional parallel MHD simulations on supercomputers and using a deformed-mesh algorithm, we were able to conduct very high dynamical range simulations of black hole accretion of Sgr A* at the Galactic Center. We find a generic set of solutions, and make specific predictions for currently feasible observations of rotation measure (RM). The magnetized accretion flow is subsonic and lacks outward convection flux, making the accretion rate very small and having a density slope of around -1. There is no tendency for the flows to become rotationally supported, and the slow time variability of th! e RM is a key quantitative signature of this accretion flow. We also provide a constructive numerical example of fast magnetic reconnection in a three-dimensional periodic box. Reconnection is initiated by a strong, localized perturbation to the field lines and the solution is intrinsically three-dimensional. Approximately 30% of the magnetic energy is released in an event which lasts about one Alfvén time, but only after a delay during which the field lines evolve into a critical configuration. In the co-moving frame of the reconnection regions, reconnection occurs through an X-like point, analogous to the Petschek reconnection. The dynamics appear to be driven by global flows rather than local processes. In addition to issues pertaining to physics, we present results on the acceleration of MHD simulations using heterogeneous computing systems te{shan2006heterogeneous}. We have implemented the MHD code on a variety of heterogeneous and multi-core architectures (multi-core x86, Cell, Nvidia and

  10. X-Ray Calorimeter Arrays for Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Caroline A.

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying the evolving universe. The grating spectrometers on the XMM and Chandra satellites started a new era in x-ray astronomy, but there remains a need for instrumentation that can provide higher spectral resolution with high throughput in the Fe-K band (around 6 keV) and can enable imaging spectroscopy of extended sources, such as supernova remnants and galaxy clusters. The instrumentation needed is a broad-band imaging spectrometer - basically an x-ray camera that can distinguish tens of thousands of x-ray colors. The potential benefits to astrophysics of using a low-temperature calorimeter to determine the energy of an incident x-ray photon via measurement of a small change in temperature was first articulated by S. H. Moseley over two decades ago. In the time since, technological progress has been steady, though full realization in an orbiting x-ray telescope is still awaited. A low-temperature calorimeter can be characterized by the type of thermometer it uses, and three types presently dominate the field. The first two types are temperature-sensitive resistors - semiconductors in the metal-insulator transition and superconductors operated in the superconducting-normal transition. The third type uses a paramagnetic thermometer. These types can be considered the three generations of x-ray calorimeters; by now each has demonstrated a resolving power of 2000 at 6 keV, but only a semiconductor calorimeter system has been developed to spaceflight readiness. The Soft X-ray Spectrometer on Astro-H, expected to launch in 2013, will use an array of silicon thermistors with I-IgTe x-ray absorbers that will operate at 50 mK. Both the semiconductor and superconductor calorimeters have been implemented in small arrays, kilo-pixel arrays of the superconducting calorimeters are just now being produced, and it is anticipated that much larger arrays will require the non-dissipative advantage of magnetic thermometers.

  11. Astrophysical neutrinos flavored with beyond the Standard Model physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus W.; Lechner, Lukas; Ackermann, Markus; Kowalski, Marek; Winter, Walter

    2017-10-01

    We systematically study the allowed parameter space for the flavor composition of astrophysical neutrinos measured at Earth, including beyond the Standard Model theories at production, during propagation, and at detection. One motivation is to illustrate the discrimination power of the next-generation neutrino telescopes such as IceCube-Gen2. We identify several examples that lead to potential deviations from the standard neutrino mixing expectation such as significant sterile neutrino production at the source, effective operators modifying the neutrino propagation at high energies, dark matter interactions in neutrino propagation, or nonstandard interactions in Earth matter. IceCube-Gen2 can exclude about 90% of the allowed parameter space in these cases, and hence will allow us to efficiently test and discriminate between models. More detailed information can be obtained from additional observables such as the energy dependence of the effect, fraction of electron antineutrinos at the Glashow resonance, or number of tau neutrino events.

  12. Applications of electrodynamics in theoretical physics and astrophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginzburg, V. L.

    This book, revised from the third Russian edition of "Teoreticheskaya fizika i astrofizika", is translated by Oleg Glebov. The problems dealt with are associated with microscopic and macroscopic electrodynamics and material concerning the theory of transition radiation and transition scattering. Contents: 1. The Hamiltonian approach to electrodynamics. 2. Radiation reaction. 3. Uniformly accelerated charges. 4. Radiation emitted by relativistic and non-relativistic moving particles. 5. Synchrotron radiation. 6. Electrodynamics of a continuous medium. 7. The Čerenkov and Doppler effects. 8. Transition radiation and transition scattering. 9. Superluminal sources of radiation. 10. Reabsorption and transfer of radiation. 11. Electrodynamics of media with spatial dispersion. 12. Permittivity and wave propagation in plasmas. 13. The energy-momentum tensor and forces in macroscopic electrodynamics. Energy and heat liberated in a dispersive absorbing medium. 14. Fluctuations and van der Waals forces. 15. Wave scattering in a medium. 16. Astrophysics of cosmic rays. 17. X-ray astronomy. 18. Gamma-ray astronomy.

  13. 3rd Session of the Sant Cugat Forum on Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Gravitational wave astrophysics

    2015-01-01

    This book offers review chapters written by invited speakers of the 3rd Session of the Sant Cugat Forum on Astrophysics — Gravitational Waves Astrophysics. All chapters have been peer reviewed. The book goes beyond normal conference proceedings in that it provides a wide panorama of the astrophysics of gravitational waves and serves as a reference work for researchers in the field.

  14. Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy. Anjan A. Sen. Articles written in Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy. Volume 37 Issue 4 December 2016 pp 33 Review. Cosmology and Astrophysics using the Post-Reionization HI · Tapomoy Guha Sarkar Anjan A. Sen · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  15. AtomPy: An Open Atomic Data Curation Environment for Astrophysical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Mendoza

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a cloud-computing environment, referred to as AtomPy, based on Google-Drive Sheets and Pandas (Python Data Analysis Library DataFrames to promote community-driven curation of atomic data for astrophysical applications, a stage beyond database development. The atomic model for each ionic species is contained in a multi-sheet workbook, tabulating representative sets of energy levels, A-values and electron impact effective collision strengths from different sources. The relevant issues that AtomPy intends to address are: (i data quality by allowing open access to both data producers and users; (ii comparisons of different datasets to facilitate accuracy assessments; (iii downloading to local data structures (i.e., Pandas DataFrames for further manipulation and analysis by prospective users; and (iv data preservation by avoiding the discard of outdated sets. Data processing workflows are implemented by means of IPython Notebooks, and collaborative software developments are encouraged and managed within the GitHub social network. The facilities of AtomPy are illustrated with the critical assessment of the transition probabilities for ions in the hydrogen and helium isoelectronic sequences with atomic number Z ≤ 10.

  16. Feasibility of low energy radiative capture experiments at the LUNA underground accelerator facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bemmerer, D; Lemut, A; Bonetti, R; Broggini, C; Corvisiero, P; Costantini, H; Cruz, J; Formicola, A; Fülöp, Z; Gervino, G; Guglielmetti, A; Gustavino, C; Gyürky, G; Imbriani, G; Jesus, A P; Junker, M; Limata, B; Menegazzo, R; Prati, P; Roca, V; Rogalla, D; Rolfs, C; Romano, M; Alvarez, C R; Schumann, F; Somorjai, E; Straniero, O; Strieder, F; Terrasi, F; Trautvetter, H P; Vomiero, A; Fulop, Zs.; Gyurky, Gy.

    2005-01-01

    The LUNA (Laboratory Underground for Nuclear Astrophysics) facility has been designed to study nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest. It is located deep underground in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory, Italy. Two electrostatic accelerators, with 50 and 400 kV maximum voltage, in combination with solid and gas target setups allowed to measure the total cross sections of the radiative capture reactions $^2$H(p,$\\gamma$)3He and $^{14}$N(p,$\\gamma$)$^{15}$O within their relevant Gamow peaks. We report on the gamma background in the Gran Sasso laboratory measured by germanium and bismuth germanate detectors, with and without an incident proton beam. A method to localize the sources of beam induced background using the Doppler shift of emitted gamma rays is presented. The feasibility of radiative capture studies at energies of astrophysical interest is discussed for several experimental scenarios.

  17. Introduction to astronomy and astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    IntroductionOverviewScales and DimensionsNight SkyConstellationsEarth, Sun, and the Solar SystemRetrograde Motion of PlanetsSidereal TimeAstronomical Catalogs and SoftwareObservationsElectromagnetic WavesElectromagnetic SpectrumTelescopesRefractor TelescopeReflecting TelescopeObservations at Visible FrequenciesTheoretical Limit on ResolutionSeeingMounting of TelescopeEquatorial MountAzimuthal MountInterferometerObservations at Other WavelengthsAstrometryCoordinate SystemsThe Horizontal SystemEquatorial Coordinate SystemEcliptic SystemGalactic Coordinate SystemSupergalactic Coordinate SystemSpace Velocity and Proper Motion of StarsDoppler EffectParallaxAberrationCoordinate TransformationsTransformation between Equatorial and Ecliptic Coordinate SystemsPrecession of EquinoxesEquatorial Mounting of a TelescopePhotometryIntroductionFlux Density and IntensityBlackbody RadiationEnergy Density in an Isotropic Radiation FieldMagnitude ScaleApparent MagnitudeAbsolute MagnitudeThe Color IndexBolometric MagnitudeStellar...

  18. 78 FR 20356 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-04

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY... Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC... following topics: --Astrophysics Division Update --Report from Astrophysics Roadmap Team --James Webb Space...

  19. 76 FR 66998 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting... Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory... following topic: --Astrophysics Division Update --Results from Acting Astrophysics Division Director...

  20. FIRST KODAI-TRIESTE WORKSHOP ON PLASMA ASTROPHYSICS

    CERN Document Server

    Hasan, S. S; Krishan, V; TURBULENCE, DYNAMOS, ACCRETION DISKS, PULSARS AND COLLECTIVE PLASMA PROCESSES

    2008-01-01

    It is well established and appreciated by now that more than 99% of the baryonic matter in the universe is in the plasma state. Most astrophysical systems could be approximated as conducting fluids in a gravitational field. It is the combined effect of these two that gives rise to the mind boggling variety of configurations in the form of filaments, loops , jets and arches. The plasma structures that cannot last for more than a second or less in a laboratory remain intact for astronomical time and spatial scales in an astrophysical setting. The case in point is the well known extragalactic jets whose collimation and stability has remained an enigma inspite of the efforts of many for many long years. The high energy radiation sources such as the active galactic nuclei again summon the coherent plasma radiation processes for their exceptionally large output from regions of relatively small physical sizes. The generation of magnetic field, anomalous transport of angular momentum with decisive bearing on star for...

  1. Plasma Astrophysics, Part II Reconnection and Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Somov, Boris V

    2013-01-01

    This two-part book is devoted to classic fundamentals and current practices and perspectives of modern plasma astrophysics. This second part discusses the physics of magnetic reconnection and flares of electromagnetic origin in space plasmas in the solar system, single and double stars, relativistic objects, accretion disks and their coronae. More than 25% of the text is updated from the first edition, including the additions of new figures, equations and entire sections on topics such as topological triggers for solar flares and the magnetospheric physics problem. This book is aimed at professional researchers in astrophysics, but it will also be useful to graduate students in space sciences, geophysics, applied physics and mathematics, especially those seeking a unified view of plasma physics and fluid mechanics.

  2. Doppler tomography in fusion plasmas and astrophysics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Geiger, B.; Heidbrink, W. W.

    2015-01-01

    Doppler tomography is a well-known method in astrophysics to image the accretion flow, often in the shape of thin discs, in compact binary stars. As accretion discs rotate, all emitted line radiation is Doppler-shifted. In fast-ion Dα (FIDA) spectroscopy measurements in magnetically confined plasma......, the Dα-photons are likewise Doppler-shifted ultimately due to gyration of the fast ions. In either case, spectra of Doppler-shifted line emission are sensitive to the velocity distribution of the emitters. Astrophysical Doppler tomography has lead to images of accretion discs of binaries revealing bright...... spots, spiral structures and flow patterns. Fusion plasma Doppler tomography has led to an image of the fast-ion velocity distribution function in the tokamak ASDEX Upgrade. This image matched numerical simulations very well. Here we discuss achievements of the Doppler tomography approach, its promise...

  3. Modern fluid dynamics for physics and astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Regev, Oded; Yecko, Philip A

    2016-01-01

    This book grew out of the need to provide students with a solid introduction to modern fluid dynamics. It offers a broad grounding in the underlying principles and techniques used, with some emphasis on applications in astrophysics and planetary science. The book comprehensively covers recent developments, methods and techniques, including, for example, new ideas on transitions to turbulence (via transiently growing stable linear modes), new approaches to turbulence (which remains the enigma of fluid dynamics), and the use of asymptotic approximation methods, which can give analytical or semi-analytical results and complement fully numerical treatments. The authors also briefly discuss some important considerations to be taken into account when developing a numerical code for computer simulation of fluid flows. Although the text is populated throughout with examples and problems from the field of astrophysics and planetary science, the text is eminently suitable as a general introduction to fluid dynamics. It...

  4. Numerical Methods for Radiation Magnetohydrodynamics in Astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, R I; Stone, J M

    2007-11-20

    We describe numerical methods for solving the equations of radiation magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) for astrophysical fluid flow. Such methods are essential for the investigation of the time-dependent and multidimensional dynamics of a variety of astrophysical systems, although our particular interest is motivated by problems in star formation. Over the past few years, the authors have been members of two parallel code development efforts, and this review reflects that organization. In particular, we discuss numerical methods for MHD as implemented in the Athena code, and numerical methods for radiation hydrodynamics as implemented in the Orion code. We discuss the challenges introduced by the use of adaptive mesh refinement in both codes, as well as the most promising directions for future developments.

  5. International Conference on Particle Physics and Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    The International Conference on Particle Physics and Astrophysics (ICPPA-2015) will be held in Moscow, Russia, from October 5 to 10, 2015. The conference is organized by Center of Basic Research and Particle Physics of National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI”. The aim of the Conference is to promote contacts between scientists and development of new ideas in fundamental research. Therefore we will bring together experts and young scientists working on experimental and theoretical aspects of nuclear, particle, astroparticle physics and cosmology. ICPPA-2015, aims to present the most recent results in astrophysics and collider physics and reports from the main experiments currently taking data. The working languages of the conference are English and Russian.

  6. Electrodynamics and spacetime geometry: Astrophysical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Cabral, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    After a brief review of the foundations of (pre-metric) electromagnetism in differential forms, we proceed with the tensor formulation and explore physical consequences of Maxwell's equations in curved spacetime. The generalized Gauss and Maxwell-Amp\\`ere laws, as well as the wave equations, reveal potentially interesting astrophysical applications. The physical implications of these equations are explored and some solutions are obtained. In all cases new electromagnetic couplings and related phenomena are induced by the spacetime curvature. The applications of astrophysical interest considered here correspond essentially to the following geometries: the Schwarzschild spacetime and the spacetime around a rotating spherical mass in the weak field and slow rotation regime. In the latter, we use the Parameterised Post-Newtonian (PPN) formalism. In general, new electromagnetic effects induced by spacetime curvature include the following: Gravitational contributions for the decay of electric and magnetic fields in...

  7. Coulomb dissociation studies for astrophysical thermonuclear reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motobayashi, T. [Dept. of Physics, Rikkyo Univ., Toshima, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-06-01

    The Coulomb dissociation method was applied to several radiative capture processes of astrophysical interest. The method has an advantage of high experimental efficiency, which allow measurements with radioactive nuclear beams. The reactions {sup 13}N(p,{gamma}){sup 14}O and {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B are mainly discussed. They are the key reaction in the hot CNO cycle in massive stars and the one closely related to the solar neutrino problem, respectively. (orig.)

  8. Neutrino masses in astrophysics and cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffelt, G.G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    Astrophysical and cosmological arguments and observations give us the most restrictive constraints on neutrino masses, electromagnetic couplings, and other properties. Conversely, massive neutrinos would contribute to the cosmic dark-matter density and would play an important role for the formation of structure in the universe. Neutrino oscillations may well solve the solar neutrino problem, and can have a significant impact on supernova physics. (author) 14 figs., tabs., 33 refs.

  9. Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics at Kavli Ipmu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Hiroaki

    2013-12-01

    Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli IPMU) currently undertakes two large-scale projects in cosmology and particle astrophysics. One is Subaru Measurement of Images and Redshifts, the Sumire project. It observes images and redshifts of the galaxies using Subaru telescope to study cosmology and astronomy. The other is XMASS experiment aiming to detect the cold dark matter using liquid Xenon. We provide a brief introductory description of these projects.

  10. Color-charged Quark Matter in Astrophysics?

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu, Congxin; Xu, Renxin

    2006-01-01

    Color confinement is only a supposition, which has not been proved in QCD yet. It is proposed here that macroscopic quark gluon plasma in astrophysics could hardly maintain colorless because of causality. The authors expected that the existence of chromatic strange quark stars as well as chromatic strangelets preserved from the QCD phase transition in the early universe could be unavoidable if their colorless correspondents do exist.

  11. FOREWORD: Workshop on "Very Hot Astrophysical Plasmas"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch-Miramond, Lydie; Montemerie, Thierry

    1984-01-01

    A Workshop on "Very Hot Astrophysical Plasmas" was held in Nice, France, on 8-10 November 1982. Dedicated mostly to theoretical, observational, and experimental aspects of X-ray astronomy and related atomic physics, it was the first of its kind to be held in France. The Workshop was "European" in the sense that one of its goals (apart from pure science) was to gather the European astronomical community in view of the forthcoming presentation of the "X-80" project for final selection to be the next scientific satellite of the European Space Agency. We now know that the Infrared Space Observatory has been chosen instead, but the recent successful launch of EXOSAT still keeps X-ray astronomy alive, and should be able to transfer, at least for a time, the leadership in this field from the U.S. to Europe, keeping in mind the competitive level of our Japanese colleagues. (With respect to the selection of ISO, one should also keep in mind that observations in the infrared often bring material relevant to the study of X-ray sources!) On a longer time scale, the Workshop also put emphasis on several interesting projects for the late eighties-early nineties, showing the vitality of the field in Europe. Some proposals have already taken a good start, like XMM, the X-ray Multi-Mirror project, selected by ESA last December for an assessment study in 1983. The present proceedings contain most of the papers that were presented at the Workshop. Only the invited papers were presented orally, contributed papers being presented in the form of posters but summarized orally by rapporteurs. To make up this volume, the written versions of these papers were either cross-reviewed by the Invited Speakers, or refereed by the Rapporteurs (for contributed papers) and edited by us, when necessary. Note, however, that the conclusions of the Workshop, which were kindly presented by Richard McCray, have already appeared in the "News and Views" section of Nature (301, 372, 1983). Altogether, the

  12. On Validating an Astrophysical Simulation Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, A. C.; Fryxell, B.; Plewa, T.; Rosner, R.; Dursi, L. J.; Weirs, V. G.; Dupont, T.; Robey, H. F.; Kane, J. O.; Remington, B. A.; Drake, R. P.; Dimonte, G.; Zingale, M.; Timmes, F. X.; Olson, K.; Ricker, P.; MacNeice, P.; Tufo, H. M.

    2002-11-01

    We present a case study of validating an astrophysical simulation code. Our study focuses on validating FLASH, a parallel, adaptive-mesh hydrodynamics code for studying the compressible, reactive flows found in many astrophysical environments. We describe the astrophysics problems of interest and the challenges associated with simulating these problems. We describe methodology and discuss solutions to difficulties encountered in verification and validation. We describe verification tests regularly administered to the code, present the results of new verification tests, and outline a method for testing general equations of state. We present the results of two validation tests in which we compared simulations to experimental data. The first is of a laser-driven shock propagating through a multilayer target, a configuration subject to both Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities. The second test is a classic Rayleigh-Taylor instability, where a heavy fluid is supported against the force of gravity by a light fluid. Our simulations of the multilayer target experiments showed good agreement with the experimental results, but our simulations of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability did not agree well with the experimental results. We discuss our findings and present results of additional simulations undertaken to further investigate the Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

  13. Goddard's Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Kimberly A. (Editor); Reddy, Francis J. (Editor); Tyler, Patricia A. (Editor)

    2014-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division (ASD) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is one of the largest and most diverse astrophysical organizations in the world, with activities spanning a broad range of topics in theory, observation, and mission and technology development. Scientific research is carried out over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays to radio wavelengths as well as particle physics and gravitational radiation. Members of ASD also provide the scientific operations for two orbiting astrophysics missions Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and Swift as well as the Science Support Center for Fermi. A number of key technologies for future missions are also under development in the Division, including X-ray mirrors, space-based interferometry, high contrast imaging techniques to search for exoplanets, and new detectors operating at gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, and radio wavelengths. The overriding goals of ASD are to carry out cutting-edge scientific research, provide Project Scientist support for spaceflight missions, implement the goals of the NASA Strategic Plan, serve and support the astronomical community, and enable future missions by conceiving new concepts and inventing new technologies.

  14. Goddard's Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan; Reddy, Francis; Tyler, Pat

    2012-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division(ASD) at Goddard Space Flight Center(GSFC)is one of the largest and most diverse astrophysical organizations in the world, with activities spanning a broad range of topics in theory, observation, and mission and technology development. Scientific research is carried out over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays to radiowavelengths as well as particle physics and gravitational radiation. Members of ASD also provide the scientific operations for three orbiting astrophysics missions WMAP, RXTE, and Swift, as well as the Science Support Center for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. A number of key technologies for future missions are also under development in the Division, including X-ray mirrors, space-based interferometry, high contract imaging techniques to serch for exoplanets, and new detectors operating at gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, and radio wavelengths. The overriding goals of ASD are to carry out cutting-edge scientific research, and provide Project Scientist support for spaceflight missions, implement the goals of the NASA Strategic Plan, serve and suppport the astronomical community, and enable future missions by conceiving new conepts and inventing new technologies.

  15. The Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oegerle, William (Editor); Reddy, Francis (Editor); Tyler, Pat (Editor)

    2010-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division (ASD) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is one of the largest and most diverse astrophysical organizations in the world, with activities spanning a broad range of topics in theory, observation, and mission and technology development. Scientific research is carried out over the entire electromagnetic spectrum - from gamma rays to radio wavelengths - as well as particle physics and gravitational radiation. Members of ASD also provide the scientific operations for three orbiting astrophysics missions - WMAP, RXTE, and Swift, as well as the Science Support Center for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. A number of key technologies for future missions are also under development in the Division, including X-ray mirrors, space-based interferometry, high contrast imaging techniques to search for exoplanets, and new detectors operating at gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, and radio wavelengths. The overriding goals of ASD are to carry out cutting-edge scientific research, provide Project Scientist support for spaceflight missions, implement the goals of the NASA Strategic Plan, serve and support the astronomical community, and enable future missions by conceiving new concepts and inventing new technologies.

  16. Experimental physics 4. Nuclear, particle and astrophysics. 5. ed.; Experimentalphysik 4. Kern-, Teilchen- und Astrophysik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demtroeder, Wolfgang

    2017-09-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Structure of atomic nuclei, unstable nuclei and radioactivity, experimental techniques in nuclear and high-energy physics, nuclear forces and nuclear models, nuclear reactions, physics of elementary particles, applications of nuclear and high-energy physics, foundations of experimental astronomy and astrophysics, our solar system, birth, life, and death of stars, the development and present structure of the universe. (HSI)

  17. Magnetic Reconnection, a Key Self-Organization Process in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas : Recent Research Progress(Nonequilibrium Dynamics in Astrophysics and Materials Science)

    OpenAIRE

    MASAAKI, YAMADA; Center of Magnetic Self-Organization, Princeton Plasmas Physics Laboratory, Princeton University

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a phenomenon of nature in which magnetic field lines change their topology and convert magnetic energy to plasma particles by acceleration and heating. The process can stretch out over time or occur quite suddenly. It is one of the most fundamental processes at work in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. Magnetic reconnection occurs everywhere: In solar flares; coronal mass ejections; the earth's magnetosphere; in the star forming galaxies; and in plasma fusion devi...

  18. Nuclear astrophysics: the unfinished quest for the origin of the elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    José, Jordi; Iliadis, Christian

    2011-09-01

    Half a century has passed since the foundation of nuclear astrophysics. Since then, this discipline has reached its maturity. Today, nuclear astrophysics constitutes a multidisciplinary crucible of knowledge that combines the achievements in theoretical astrophysics, observational astronomy, cosmochemistry and nuclear physics. New tools and developments have revolutionized our understanding of the origin of the elements: supercomputers have provided astrophysicists with the required computational capabilities to study the evolution of stars in a multidimensional framework; the emergence of high-energy astrophysics with space-borne observatories has opened new windows to observe the Universe, from a novel panchromatic perspective; cosmochemists have isolated tiny pieces of stardust embedded in primitive meteorites, giving clues on the processes operating in stars as well as on the way matter condenses to form solids; and nuclear physicists have measured reactions near stellar energies, through the combined efforts using stable and radioactive-ion beam facilities. This review provides comprehensive insight into the nuclear history of the Universe and related topics: starting from the Big Bang, when the ashes from the primordial explosion were transformed to hydrogen, helium and a few trace elements, to the rich variety of nucleosynthesis mechanisms and sites in the Universe. Particular attention is paid to the hydrostatic processes governing the evolution of low-mass stars, red giants and asymptotic giant-branch stars, as well as to the explosive nucleosynthesis occurring in core-collapse and thermonuclear supernovae, γ-ray bursts, classical novae, x-ray bursts, superbursts and stellar mergers.

  19. Search for a diffuse flux of astrophysical muon neutrinos with the IceCube 40-string detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J.A.; Ahlers, M.; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S.W.; Bay, R.; Alba, J.L.B.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J.J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J.K.; Becker, K.H.; Benabderrahmane, M.L.; BenZvi, S.; Berdermann, J.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D.Z.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D.J.; Bohm, C.; Bose, D.; Boser, S.; Botner, O.; Brown, A.M.; Buitink, S.; Caballero-Mora, K.S.; Carson, M.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clem, J.; Clevermann, F.; Cohen, S.; Colnard, C.; Cowen, D.F.; D'Agostino, M.V.; Danninger, M.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J.C.; Clercq, C. De; Demirors, L.; Denger, T.; Depaepe, O.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; Vries-Uiterweerd, G. de; DeYoung, T.; Diaz-Velez, J.C.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J.P.; Ehrlich, R.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R.W.; Engdegard, O.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P.A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A.R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feintzeig, J.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Foerster, M.M.; Fox, B.D.; Franckowiak, A.; Franke, R.; Gaisser, T.K.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Glusenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J.A.; Gora, D.; Grant, D.; Griesel, T.; Gross, A.; Grullon, S.; Gurtner, M.; Ha, C.; Hajismail, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Lafebre, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory is a 1 km(3) detector currently taking data at the South Pole. One of the main strategies used to look for astrophysical neutrinos with IceCube is the search for a diffuse flux of high-energy neutrinos from unresolved sources. A hard energy spectrum of neutrinos from

  20. Experimental results of astrophysical collisionless shock experiments from NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye-Sook; Higginson, D.; Huntington, C.; Pollock, B.; Remington, B.; Rinderknecht, H.; Ross, J.; Ryutov, D.; Swadling, G.; Wilks, S.; Fiuza, F.; Sakawa, Y.; Spitkovsky, A.; Petrasso, R.; Li, C.; Zylstra, A.; Lamb, D.; Tzeferacos, P.; Gregori, G.; Meinecke, J.; Manuel, M.

    2017-10-01

    We discuss our laboratory experiments using the Omega and NIF lasers to investigate the dynamics of high Mach number collisionless shock formation in two interpenetrating plasma streams. It is believed that in astrophysical environments such shocks are the sites where seed magnetic fields are generated on a cosmologically fast timescale via the Weibel instability. Particle-in-cell (PIC) numerical simulations generate magnetic fields whose magnitude and scale are consistent with this concept. We will present recent experimental results as well as simulations and theoretical interpretations of these observations. The NIF experiments were able to observe the counter-streaming flow interactions through the transition from collisional to collisionless regimes. The latest proton radiography results will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Effect of New Physics in Astrophysical Neutrino Flavor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüelles, Carlos A; Katori, Teppei; Salvado, Jordi

    2015-10-16

    Astrophysical neutrinos are powerful tools for investigating the fundamental properties of particle physics through their flavor content. In this Letter, we perform the first general new physics study on ultrahigh energy neutrino flavor content by introducing effective operators. We find that, at the current limits on these operators, new physics terms cause maximal effects on the flavor content; however, the flavor content on the Earth is confined to a region related to the assumed initial flavor content. Furthermore, we conclude that a precise measure of the flavor content on the Earth will provide orders of magnitude improvement on new physics bounds. Finally, we discuss the current best fits of flavor content of the IceCube data and their interplay with new physics scenarios.

  2. Horava-Lifshitz Theory and Applications to Cosmology and Astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Anzhong [Baylor Univ., Waco, TX (United States). Department of Physics

    2014-08-14

    This final report describes the activities of the Baylor University Gravity, Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics (GCAP) group on the project: Horava-Lifshitz Theory and Applications to Cosmology and Astrophysics, during the time, August 15, 2010 - August 14, 2014. We are grateful for the financial support provided by the U.S. Department of Energy for this research, which leads to our exceptional success. We are very proud to say that we have achieved all the goals set up in our project and made significant contributions to the understanding of the field. In particular, with this DOE support, we have published 38 articles in the prestigious national/international journals, which have already received about 1000 citations so far.

  3. First Session of the Sant Cugat Forum on Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Rea, Nanda; High-Energy Emission from Pulsars and their Systems

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the inaugural meeting of the Sant Cugat Forum on Astrophysics was to address, in a global context, the current understanding of and challenges in high-energy emissions from isolated and non-isolated neutron stars, and to confront the theoretical picture with observations of both the Fermi satellite and the currently operating ground-based Cherenkov telescopes. Participants have also discussed the prospects for possible observations with planned instruments across the multi-wavelength spectrum (e.g. SKA, LOFAR, E-VLT, IXO, CTA) and how they will impact our theoretical understanding of these systems. In keeping with the goals of the Forum, this book not only represents the proceedings of the meeting, but also a reflection on the state-of-the-art in the topic.

  4. The immediate environment of an astrophysical black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contopoulos, I.

    2018-01-01

    In view of the upcoming observations with the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), we present our thoughts on the immediate environment of an astrophysical black hole. We are concerned that two approximations used in general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations, namely numerical density floors implemented near the base of the black hole jet, and a magnetic field that comes from large distances, may mislead our interpretation of the observations. We predict that three physical processes will manifest themselves in EHT observations, namely dynamic pair formation just above the horizon, electromagnetic energy dissipation along the boundary of the black hole jet, and a region of weak magnetic field separating the black hole jet from the disc wind.

  5. CRKSPH: A new meshfree hydrodynamics method with applications to astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, John Michael; Raskin, Cody; Frontiere, Nicholas

    2018-01-01

    The study of astrophysical phenomena such as supernovae, accretion disks, galaxy formation, and large-scale structure formation requires computational modeling of, at a minimum, hydrodynamics and gravity. Developing numerical methods appropriate for these kinds of problems requires a number of properties: shock-capturing hydrodynamics benefits from rigorous conservation of invariants such as total energy, linear momentum, and mass; lack of obvious symmetries or a simplified spatial geometry to exploit necessitate 3D methods that ideally are Galilean invariant; the dynamic range of mass and spatial scales that need to be resolved can span many orders of magnitude, requiring methods that are highly adaptable in their space and time resolution. We have developed a new Lagrangian meshfree hydrodynamics method called Conservative Reproducing Kernel Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics, or CRKSPH, in order to meet these goals. CRKSPH is a conservative generalization of the meshfree reproducing kernel method, combining the high-order accuracy of reproducing kernels with the explicit conservation of mass, linear momentum, and energy necessary to study shock-driven hydrodynamics in compressible fluids. CRKSPH's Lagrangian, particle-like nature makes it simple to combine with well-known N-body methods for modeling gravitation, similar to the older Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method. Indeed, CRKSPH can be substituted for SPH in existing SPH codes due to these similarities. In comparison to SPH, CRKSPH is able to achieve substantially higher accuracy for a given number of points due to the explicitly consistent (and higher-order) interpolation theory of reproducing kernels, while maintaining the same conservation principles (and therefore applicability) as SPH. There are currently two coded implementations of CRKSPH available: one in the open-source research code Spheral, and the other in the high-performance cosmological code HACC. Using these codes we have applied

  6. Polar Balloon Experiment for Astrophysics Research (Polar BEAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashindzhagyan, G.; Adams, James H., Jr.; Bashindzhagyan, P.; Chilingarian, A.; Donnelly, J.; Drury, L.; Egorov, N.; Golubkov, S.; Grebenyuk, V.; Kalinin, A.; hide

    2001-01-01

    A new balloon experiment is proposed for a long duration flight around the North Pole. The primary objective of the experiment is to measure the elemental energy spectra of high-energy cosmic rays in the region up to 10(exp 15) eV. The proposed instrument involves the combination of a large collecting area (approximately 1 x 1 square m) KLEM (Kinematic Lightweight Energy Meter) device with an ionization calorimeter having a smaller collecting area (approximately 0.5 x 0.5 square m) and integrated beneath the KLEM apparatus. This combination has several important advantages. Due to the large aperture (greater than 2 square m sr) of the KLEM device a large exposure factor can be achieved with a long duration balloon flight (2-4 weeks). The calorimeter will collect about 10% of the events already registered by KLEM and provide effective cross-calibration for both energy measurement methods. Details of the experiment and its astrophysical significance will be presented.

  7. Clinical Relevance of Adipokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Blüher

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of obesity has increased dramatically during recent decades. Obesity increases the risk for metabolic and cardiovascular diseases and may therefore contribute to premature death. With increasing fat mass, secretion of adipose tissue derived bioactive molecules (adipokines changes towards a pro-inflammatory, diabetogenic and atherogenic pattern. Adipokines are involved in the regulation of appetite and satiety, energy expenditure, activity, endothelial function, hemostasis, blood pressure, insulin sensitivity, energy metabolism in insulin sensitive tissues, adipogenesis, fat distribution and insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. Therefore, adipokines are clinically relevant as biomarkers for fat distribution, adipose tissue function, liver fat content, insulin sensitivity, chronic inflammation and have the potential for future pharmacological treatment strategies for obesity and its related diseases. This review focuses on the clinical relevance of selected adipokines as markers or predictors of obesity related diseases and as potential therapeutic tools or targets in metabolic and cardiovascular diseases.

  8. Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Bill; Bildsten, Lars; Dotter, Aaron; Herwig, Falk; Lesaffre, Pierre; Timmes, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Stellar physics and evolution calculations enable a broad range of research in astrophysics. Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) is a suite of open source, robust, efficient, thread-safe libraries for a wide range of applications in computational stellar astrophysics. A one-dimensional stellar evolution module, MESAstar, combines many of the numerical and physics modules for simulations of a wide range of stellar evolution scenarios ranging from very low mass to massive stars, including advanced evolutionary phases. MESAstar solves the fully coupled structure and composition equations simultaneously. It uses adaptive mesh refinement and sophisticated timestep controls, and supports shared memory parallelism based on OpenMP. State-of-the-art modules provide equation of state, opacity, nuclear reaction rates, element diffusion data, and atmosphere boundary conditions. Each module is constructed as a separate Fortran 95 library with its own explicitly defined public interface to facilitate independent development. Several detailed examples indicate the extensive verification and testing that is continuously performed and demonstrate the wide range of capabilities that MESA possesses. These examples include evolutionary tracks of very low mass stars, brown dwarfs, and gas giant planets to very old ages; the complete evolutionary track of a 1 M sun star from the pre-main sequence (PMS) to a cooling white dwarf; the solar sound speed profile; the evolution of intermediate-mass stars through the He-core burning phase and thermal pulses on the He-shell burning asymptotic giant branch phase; the interior structure of slowly pulsating B Stars and Beta Cepheids; the complete evolutionary tracks of massive stars from the PMS to the onset of core collapse; mass transfer from stars undergoing Roche lobe overflow; and the evolution of helium accretion onto a neutron star. MESA can be downloaded from the project Web site (http://mesa.sourceforge.net/).

  9. Bibliometric indicators of young authors in astrophysics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havemann, Frank; Larsen, Birger

    2015-01-01

    their first landmark paper with the distributions of these indicators over a random control group of young authors in astronomy and astrophysics. We find that field and citation-window normalisation substantially improves the predicting power of citation indicators. The sum of citation numbers normalised...... with expected citation numbers is the only indicator which shows differences between later stars and random authors significant on a 1 % level. Indicators of paper output are not very useful to predict later stars. The famous h-index makes no difference at all between later stars and the random control group....

  10. 3D Immersive Visualization with Astrophysical Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Brian R.

    2017-01-01

    We present the refinement of a new 3D immersion technique for astrophysical data visualization.Methodology to create 360 degree spherical panoramas is reviewed. The 3D software package Blender coupled with Python and the Google Spatial Media module are used together to create the final data products. Data can be viewed interactively with a mobile phone or tablet or in a web browser. The technique can apply to different kinds of astronomical data including 3D stellar and galaxy catalogs, images, and planetary maps.

  11. Dimensional analysis and group theory in astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kurth, Rudolf

    2013-01-01

    Dimensional Analysis and Group Theory in Astrophysics describes how dimensional analysis, refined by mathematical regularity hypotheses, can be applied to purely qualitative physical assumptions. The book focuses on the continuous spectral of the stars and the mass-luminosity relationship. The text discusses the technique of dimensional analysis, covering both relativistic phenomena and the stellar systems. The book also explains the fundamental conclusion of dimensional analysis, wherein the unknown functions shall be given certain specified forms. The Wien and Stefan-Boltzmann Laws can be si

  12. Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology with Gravitational Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyaprakash, B S; Schutz, Bernard F

    2009-01-01

    Gravitational wave detectors are already operating at interesting sensitivity levels, and they have an upgrade path that should result in secure detections by 2014. We review the physics of gravitational waves, how they interact with detectors (bars and interferometers), and how these detectors operate. We study the most likely sources of gravitational waves and review the data analysis methods that are used to extract their signals from detector noise. Then we consider the consequences of gravitational wave detections and observations for physics, astrophysics, and cosmology.

  13. ASTROPHYSICS: Neutron Stars Imply Relativity's a Drag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, G

    2000-09-01

    A new finding, based on x-rays from distant neutron stars, could be the first clear evidence of a weird relativistic effect called frame dragging, in which a heavy chunk of spinning matter wrenches the space-time around it like an eggbeater. Using data from NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, three astronomers in Amsterdam found circumstantial evidence for frame dragging in the flickering of three neutron stars in binary systems. They announced their results in the 1 September issue of The Astrophysical Journal.

  14. Light dark matter versus astrophysical constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Cline, James M.; Frey, Andrew R.

    2011-01-01

    Hints of direct dark matter detection coming from the DAMA, CoGeNT experiments point toward light dark matter with isospin-violating and possibly inelastic couplings. However an array of astrophysical constraints are rapidly closing the window on light dark matter. We point out that if the relic density is determined by annihilation into invisible states, these constraints can be evaded. As an example we present a model of quasi-Dirac dark matter, interacting via two U(1) gauge bosons, one of...

  15. Showing Complex Astrophysical Settings Through Virtual Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Joel; Smith, Denise; Smith, Louis Chad; Lawton, Brandon; Lockwood, Alexandra; Jirdeh, Hussein

    2018-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), NASA’s next great observatory launching in spring 2019, will routinely showcase astrophysical concepts that will challenge the public's understanding. Emerging technologies such as virtual reality bring the viewer into the data and the concept in previously unimaginable immersive detail. For example, we imagine a spacefarer inside a protoplanetary disk, seeing the accretion process directly. STScI is pioneering some tools related to JWST for showcasing at AAS, and in local events, which I highlight here. If we develop materials properly tailored to this medium, we can reach more diverse audiences than ever before.

  16. Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology with Gravitational Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathyaprakash B. S.

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Gravitational wave detectors are already operating at interesting sensitivity levels, and they have an upgrade path that should result in secure detections by 2014. We review the physics of gravitational waves, how they interact with detectors (bars and interferometers, and how these detectors operate. We study the most likely sources of gravitational waves and review the data analysis methods that are used to extract their signals from detector noise. Then we consider the consequences of gravitational wave detections and observations for physics, astrophysics, and cosmology.

  17. Final Technical Report for Award DESC0011912, "Trimodal Tapping Mode Atomic Force Microscopy: Simultaneous 4D Mapping of Conservative and Dissipative Probe-Sample Interactions of Energy-Relevant Materials”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solares, Santiago D. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

    2017-09-22

    The final project report covering the period 7/1/14-6/30/17 provides an overview of the technical accomplishments in the areas of (i) fundamental viscoelasticity, (ii) multifrequency atomic force microscopy, and (iii) characterization of energy-relevant materials with atomic force microscopy. A list of publications supported by the project is also provided.

  18. HADES code for numerical simulations of high-mach number astrophysical radiative flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaut, C.; Di Menza, L.; Nguyen, H. C.; Bouquet, S. E.; Mancini, M.

    2017-03-01

    The understanding of astrophysical phenomena requires to deal with robust numerical tools in order to handle realistic scales in terms of energy, characteristic lengths and Mach number that cannot be easily reproduced by means of laboratory experiments. In this paper, we present the 2D numerical code HADES for the simulation of realistic astrophysical phenomena in various contexts, first taking into account radiative losses. The version of HADES including a multigroup modeling of radiative transfer will be presented in a forthcoming study. Validation of HADES is performed using several benchmark tests and some realistic applications are discussed. Optically thin radiative loss is modeled by a cooling function in the conservation law of energy. Numerical methods involve the MUSCL-Hancock finite volume scheme as well as HLLC and HLLE Riemann solvers, coupled with a second-order ODE solver by means of Strang splitting algorithm that handles source terms arising from geometrical or radiative contributions, for cartesian or axisymmetric configurations. A good agreement has been observed for all benchmark tests, either in hydrodynamic cases or in radiative cases. Furthermore, an overview of the main astrophysical studies driven with this code is proposed. First, simulations of radiative shocks in accretion columns and supernova remnant dynamics at large timescales including Vishniac instability have improved the understanding of these phenomena. Finally, astrophysical jets are investigated and the influence of the cooling effect on the jet morphology is numerically demonstrated. It is also found that periodic source enables to recover pulsating jets that mimic the structure of Herbig-Haro objects. HADES code has revealed its robustness, especially for the wall-shock test and for the so-called implosion test which turns out to be a severe one since the hydrodynamic variables are self-similar and become infinite at finite time. The simulations have proved the efficiency of

  19. Electrodynamics and spacetime geometry: Astrophysical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Francisco; Lobo, Francisco S. N.

    2017-07-01

    After a brief review of the foundations of (pre-metric) electromagnetism, we explore some physical consequences of electrodynamics in curved spacetime. In general, new electromagnetic couplings and related phenomena are induced by the spacetime curvature. The applications of astrophysical interest considered here correspond essentially to the following geometries: the Schwarzschild spacetime and the spacetime around a rotating spherical mass in the weak field and slow rotation regime. In the latter, we use the Parameterised Post-Newtonian (PPN) formalism. We also explore the hypothesis that the electric and magnetic properties of vacuum reflect the spacetime isometries. Therefore, the permittivity and permeability tensors should not be considered homogeneous and isotropic a priori. For spherical geometries we consider the effect of relaxing the homogeneity assumption in the constitutive relations between the fields and excitations. This affects the generalized Gauss and Maxwell-Ampère laws, where the electric permittivity and magnetic permeability in vacuum depend on the radial coordinate in accordance with the local isometries of space. For the axially symmetric geometries we relax both the assumptions of homogeneity and isotropy. We explore simple solutions and discuss the physical implications related to different phenomena, such as the decay of electromagnetic fields in the presence of gravity, magnetic terms in Gauss law due to the gravitomagnetism of the spacetime around rotating objects, a frame-dragging effect on electric fields and the possibility of a spatial (radial) variability of the velocity of light in vacuum around spherical astrophysical objects for strong gravitational fields.

  20. Astrophysical Model Selection in Gravitational Wave Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Matthew R.; Cornish, Neil J.; Littenberg, Tyson B.

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical studies in gravitational wave astronomy have mostly focused on the information that can be extracted from individual detections, such as the mass of a binary system and its location in space. Here we consider how the information from multiple detections can be used to constrain astrophysical population models. This seemingly simple problem is made challenging by the high dimensionality and high degree of correlation in the parameter spaces that describe the signals, and by the complexity of the astrophysical models, which can also depend on a large number of parameters, some of which might not be directly constrained by the observations. We present a method for constraining population models using a hierarchical Bayesian modeling approach which simultaneously infers the source parameters and population model and provides the joint probability distributions for both. We illustrate this approach by considering the constraints that can be placed on population models for galactic white dwarf binaries using a future space-based gravitational wave detector. We find that a mission that is able to resolve approximately 5000 of the shortest period binaries will be able to constrain the population model parameters, including the chirp mass distribution and a characteristic galaxy disk radius to within a few percent. This compares favorably to existing bounds, where electromagnetic observations of stars in the galaxy constrain disk radii to within 20%.

  1. The CATS Service: An Astrophysical Research Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O V Verkhodanov

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe the current status of CATS (astrophysical CATalogs Support system, a publicly accessible tool maintained at Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences (SAO RAS (http://cats.sao.ru allowing one to search hundreds of catalogs of astronomical objects discovered all along the electromagnetic spectrum. Our emphasis is mainly on catalogs of radio continuum sources observed from 10 MHz to 245 GHz, and secondly on catalogs of objects such as radio and active stars, X-ray binaries, planetary nebulae, HII regions, supernova remnants, pulsars, nearby and radio galaxies, AGN and quasars. CATS also includes the catalogs from the largest extragalactic surveys with non-radio waves. In 2008 CATS comprised a total of about 109 records from over 400 catalogs in the radio, IR, optical and X-ray windows, including most source catalogs deriving from observations with the Russian radio telescope RATAN-600. CATS offers several search tools through different ways of access, e.g. via Web-interface and e-mail. Since its creation in 1997 CATS has managed about 105requests. Currently CATS is used by external users about 1500 times per day and since its opening to the public in 1997 has received about 4000 requests for its selection and matching tasks.

  2. Black Hole Astrophysics The Engine Paradigm

    CERN Document Server

    Meier, David L

    2012-01-01

    As a result of significant research over the past 20 years, black holes are now linked to some of the most spectacular and exciting phenomena in the Universe, ranging in size from those that have the same mass as stars to the super-massive objects that lie at the heart of most galaxies, including our own Milky Way. This book first introduces the properties of simple isolated holes, then adds in complications like rotation, accretion, radiation, and magnetic fields, finally arriving at a basic understanding of how these immense engines work. Black Hole Astrophysics • reviews our current knowledge of cosmic black holes and how they generate the most powerful observed pheonomena in the Universe; • highlights the latest, most up-to-date theories and discoveries in this very active area of astrophysical research; • demonstrates why we believe that black holes are responsible for important phenomena such as quasars, microquasars and gammaray bursts; • explains to the reader the nature of the violent and spe...

  3. Art as a Vehicle for Nuclear Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilburn, Micha

    2013-04-01

    One aim of the The Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA) is to teach K-12 students concepts and ideas related to nuclear astrophysics. For students who have not yet seen the periodic table, this can be daunting, and we often begin with astronomy concepts. The field of astronomy naturally lends itself to an art connection through its beautiful images. Our Art 2 Science programming adopts a hands-on approach by teaching astronomy through student created art projects. This approach engages the students, through tactile means, visually and spatially. For younger students, we also include physics based craft projects that facilitate the assimilation of problem solving skills. The arts can be useful for aural and kinetic learners as well. Our program also includes singing and dancing to songs with lyrics that teach physics and astronomy concepts. The Art 2 Science programming has been successfully used in after-school programs at schools, community centers, and art studios. We have even expanded the program into a popular week long summer camp. I will discuss our methods, projects, specific goals, and survey results for JINA's Art 2 Science programs.

  4. X-ray monitoring for astrophysical applications on Cubesat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina, L.; Hudec, R.; Inneman, A.; Cerna, D.; Jakubek, J.; Sieger, L.; Dániel, V.; Cash, W.; Mikulickova, L.; Pavlica, R.; Belas, E.; Polak, J.

    2015-05-01

    The primary objective of the project VZLUSAT-1 is the development, manufacturing, qualification and experimental verification of products and technologies in Earth orbit (IOD - In-Orbit Demonstration). This work addresses the issue of X-ray monitoring for astrophysical applications. The proposed wide-field optical system has not been used in space yet. The proposed novel approach is based on the use of 1D "Lobster eye" optics in combination with Timepix X-ray detector in the energy range 3 - 40 keV. The proposed project includes theoretical study and a functional sample of the Timepix X-ray detector with multifoil wide-field X-ray "Lobster eye" optics. Using optics to focus X-rays on a detector is the only solution in cases the intensity of impinging X-ray radiation is below the sensitivity of the detector, e.g. while monitoring astrophysical objects in space, or phenomena in the Earth's atmosphere. On board the functions and features of Radiation Hardened Composite Housing (RHCH), Solar panels based on composite substrate and Hollow Retro Reflector Array based on composite (HRRA) will be verified. To verify the properties of the developed products the satellite is equipped by Health Monitoring system (HM). HM system includes temperature, volatiles, radiation and mechanical properties sensors. The custom ADCS algorithms are being developed within the project. Given the number of IOD experiments and the necessary power the 1U CubeSat is equipped with Composite Deployable Panels (CDP) where HM panels and additional Solar panels are located. Satellite platform is assembled from commercial parts. Mission VZLUSAT-1 is planned for 6 months with launch in 2016.

  5. Microphysical Effects on the Instabilities of Astrophysical Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursi, L. J.; Rosner, R.; Zingale, M.; Calder, A. C.; Fryxell, B.; Timmes, F. X.; Vladimirova, N.; Caceres, A.; Lamb, D. Q.; Olson, K.; Ricker, P. M.; Riley, K.; Siegel, A.; Truran, J. W.

    2003-12-01

    Large-scale simulations of supernovae of Type Ia, which are essential for the ultimate understanding of the supernovae mechanism, need flame physics input at three stages: Ignition and early flame propagation, Large scale burning in a turbulent medium, and a transition to detonation, should one occur. One aspect of our investigation of flame physics has been to examine the behavior of well-known flame instabilities such as Landau-Darrieus in the context of astrophysical flames and degenerate matter. These instabilities can distort and wrinkle the flame surface, increasing the amount of burning and thus the rate of energy input. We have examined both the effects of magnetic fields, and flame curvature and strain in degenerate material, on the growth rate of these instabilities. LJD was supported by the Department of Energy Computational Science Graduate Fellowship Program of the Office of Scientific Computing and Office of Defense Programs in the Department of Energy under contract DE-FG02-97ER25308.

  6. The Response of Model and Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flames to Curvature and Stretch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursi, L. J.; Zingale, M.; Calder, A. C.; Fryxell, B.; Timmes, F. X.; Vladimirova, N.; Rosner, R.; Caceres, A.; Lamb, D. Q.; Olson, K.; Ricker, P. M.; Riley, K.; Siegel, A.; Truran, J. W.

    2003-10-01

    Critically understanding the standard candle-like behavior of Type Ia supernovae requires understanding their explosion mechanism. One family of models for Type Ia supernovae begins with a deflagration in a carbon-oxygen white dwarf that greatly accelerates through wrinkling and flame instabilities. While the planar speed and behavior of astrophysically relevant flames is increasingly well understood, more complex behavior, such as the flame's response to stretch and curvature, has not been extensively explored in the astrophysical literature; this behavior can greatly enhance or suppress instabilities and local flame-wrinkling, which in turn can increase or decrease the bulk burning rate. In this paper, we explore the effects of curvature on both nuclear flames and simpler model flames to understand the effect of curvature on the flame structure and speed.

  7. Astrophysics of magnetically collimated jets generated from laser-produced plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciardi, A; Vinci, T; Fuchs, J; Albertazzi, B; Riconda, C; Pépin, H; Portugall, O

    2013-01-11

    The generation of astrophysically relevant jets, from magnetically collimated, laser-produced plasmas, is investigated through three-dimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We show that for laser intensities I∼10(12)-10(14) W cm(-2), a magnetic field in excess of ∼0.1  MG, can collimate the plasma plume into a prolate cavity bounded by a shock envelope with a standing conical shock at its tip, which recollimates the flow into a supermagnetosonic jet beam. This mechanism is equivalent to astrophysical models of hydrodynamic inertial collimation, where an isotropic wind is focused into a jet by a confining circumstellar toruslike envelope. The results suggest an alternative mechanism for a large-scale magnetic field to produce jets from wide-angle winds.

  8. Proceedings of the 2nd Iberian Nuclear Astrophysics Meeting on Compact Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Pons, J; Albertus, C; 10.1088/1742-6596/342/1/011001

    2012-01-01

    This volume contains most of the links to the presentations delivered at this international workshop. This meeting was the second in the series following the previous I Encuentro Ib\\'erico de Compstar, held at the University of Coimbra, Portugal in 2010. The main purpose of this meeting was to strengthen the scientific collaboration between the participants of the Iberian and the rest of the southern European branches of the European Nuclear Astrophysics network, formerly, COMPSTAR. This ESF (European Science Foundation) supported network has been crucial in helping to make a broader audience for the the most interesting and relevant research lines being developed currently in Nuclear Astrophysics, especially related to the physics of neutron stars. The program of the meeting was tailored to theoretical descriptions of the physics of neutron stars although some input from experimental observers and other condensed matter and optics areas of interest was also included.

  9. Toward a reassessment of the 19F(p, α016O reaction rate at astrophysical temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Lombardo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The 19F(p, α016O reaction at low energies plays an important role in fundamental physics. In particular in nuclear astrophysics it represents, together with the 19F(p, γ20Ne reaction, the crossing point between the CNO and the NeNa cycles in stars. Further, in hydrogen-rich stellar environments, it is the most important fluorine destruction channel. In this paper we report new measurements on the 19F(p, α016O reaction at deeply sub-Coulomb energies (0.2–0.6 MeV, a region where, despite the key role of this reaction, very few and old data are reported. The deduced astrophysical S-factor is ≈1.5–2 times larger than currently adopted extrapolations with possibly important astrophysical consequences.

  10. Observation and characterization of an astrophysical muon neutrino flux from the Northern Hemisphere with IceCube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haack, Christian; Raedel, Leif; Reimann, Rene; Schoenen, Sebastian; Wiebusch, Christopher [3. Physikalisches Institut B, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Collaboration: IceCube-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    IceCube has observed a high-energy astrophysical neutrino flux based on neutrinos of all flavors interacting within the instrumented volume. Here, a complementary measurement based on muon neutrinos where the interaction vertex can be outside the instrumented volume is presented. Due to the large muon range the effective area is significantly larger but the field of view is limited to the Northern Hemisphere. IceCube data from 2009 through 2015 have been analyzed by a likelihood approach with reconstructed muon energy and zenith angle as observables. The analyzed data consist of about 340,000 muon neutrinos with a negligible background of atmospheric muons. The majority of these events are atmospheric neutrinos. However, this analysis finds a significant astrophysical contribution, excluding the atmospheric-only hypothesis at the level of 6 standard deviations. In this talk we present the analysis results including the characterization of the astrophysical flux properties.

  11. Benchmarking Atomic Data for Astrophysics: Be-like Ions between B II and Ne VII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Chen, Zhan Bin; Zhang, Chun Yu; Si, Ran; Jönsson, Per; Hartman, Henrik; Gu, Ming Feng; Chen, Chong Yang; Yan, Jun

    2018-02-01

    Large-scale self-consistent multiconfiguration Dirac–Hartree–Fock and relativistic configuration interaction calculations are reported for the n≤slant 6 levels in Be-like ions from B II to Ne VII. Effects from electron correlation are taken into account by means of large expansions in terms of a basis of configuration state functions, and a complete and accurate data set of excitation energies; lifetimes; wavelengths; electric dipole, magnetic dipole, electric quadrupole, and magnetic quadrupole line strengths; transition rates; and oscillator strengths for these levels is provided for each ion. Comparisons are made with available experimental and theoretical results. The uncertainty of excitation energies is assessed to be 0.01% on average, which makes it possible to find and rule out misidentifications and aid new line identifications involving high-lying levels in astrophysical spectra. The complete data set is also useful for modeling and diagnosing astrophysical plasmas.

  12. Determination of radiative capture cross-section for astrophysics from transfer reaction using radioactive ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Beaumel, D

    2002-01-01

    Thermonuclear reactions are a source of stellar energy and play a crucial role for the nucleosynthesis in astrophysical sites. Among these reactions, the radiative capture process defined as: x + A -> B + gamma is a key reaction involved in all the basic astrophysical processes over the nuclear chart. In the case of the capture of charged particles like (p,gamma) reactions, cross-sections are strongly weakened due to the low incident energies as compared to the Coulomb barrier. Their measurement in laboratories is even more complicate when the capturing nucleus is radioactive, difficult or even impossible to be used as a target. Such radioactive nuclei are involved essentially in 'explosive' environments where capture reactions are fast enough to compete with the beta-decay process. Even in non-explosive situations, unstable nuclei are sometimes important as we shall see for the hydrogen burning in the sun. To circumvent the difficulties of direct measurements with radioactive nuclei, indirect methods have be...

  13. Neutron Capture Reactions on Fe and Ni Isotopes for the Astrophysical s-process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, C.; Giubrone, G.; Massimi, C.; Žugec, P.; Barbagallo, M.; Colonna, N.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Käppeler, F.; Tain, J. L.; Altstadt, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Bécares, V.; Bečvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Boccone, V.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Calviani, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Carrapiço, C.; Cerutti, F.; Chiaveri, E.; Chin, M.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Diakaki, M.; Duran, I.; Dressler, R.; Dzysiuk, N.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Ferrari, A.; Fraval, K.; Ganesan, S.; García, A. R.; Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González-Romero, E.; Griesmayer, E.; Gurusamy, P.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Kivel, N.; Koehler, P.; Kokkoris, M.; Korschinek, G.; Krtička, M.; Kroll, J.; Langer, C.; Leeb, H.; Leong, L. S.; Losito, R.; Manousos, A.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Mastinu, P. F.; Mastromarco, M.; Meaze, M.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Mondelaers, W.; Paradela, C.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Pignatari, M.; Plompen, A.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego, A.; Roman, F.; Rubbia, C.; Sarmento, R.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schumann, D.; Tagliente, G.; Tarrío, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Versaci, R.; Vermeulen, M. J.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Ware, T.; Weigand, M.; Weiß, C.; Wright, T. J.

    2014-06-01

    Neutron capture cross sections in the keV neutron energy region are the key nuclear physics input to study the astrophysical slow neutron capture process. In the past years, a series of neutron capture cross section measurements has been performed at the neutron time-of-flight facility n_TOF at CERN focussing on the Fe/Ni mass region. Recent results and future developments in the neutron time-of-flight technique are discussed.

  14. Neutron Capture Reactions on Fe and Ni Isotopes for the Astrophysical s-process

    CERN Document Server

    Lederer, C; Massimi, C; Žugec, P; Barbagallo, M; Colonna, N; Domingo-Pardo, C; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Käppeler, F; Tain, J L; Altstadt, S; Andrzejewski, J; Audouin, L; Bécares, V; Bečvář, F; Belloni, F; Berthoumieux, E; Billowes, J; Boccone, V; Bosnar, D; Brugger, M; Calviani, M; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Carrapiço, C; Cerutti, F; Chiaveri, E; Chin, M; Cortés, G; Cortés-Giraldo, M A; Diakaki, M; Duran, I; Dressler, R; Dzysiuk, N; Eleftheriadis, C; Ferrari, A; Fraval, K; Ganesan, S; García, A R; Gómez-Hornillos, M B; Gonçalves, I F; González-Romero, E; Griesmayer, E; Gurusamy, P; Jenkins, D G; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; Karadimos, D; Kivel, N; Koehler, P; Kokkoris, M; Korschinek, G; Krtička, M; Kroll, J; Langer, C; Leeb, H; Leong, L S; Losito, R; Manousos, A; Marganiec, J; Martínez, T; Mastinu, P F; Mastromarco, M; Meaze, M; Mendoza, E; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Mingrone, F; Mirea, M; Mondelaers, W; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Perkowski, J; Pignatari, M; Plompen, A; Praena, J; Quesada, J M; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Riego, A; Roman, F; Rubbia, C; Sarmento, R; Schillebeeckx, P; Schmidt, S; Schumann, D; Tagliente, G; Tarrío, D; Tassan-Got, L; Tsinganis, A; Valenta, S; Vannini, G; Variale, V; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Versaci, R; Vermeulen, M J; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Wallner, A; Ware, T; Weigand, M; Weiß, C; Wright, T J

    2014-01-01

    Neutron capture cross sections in the keV neutron energy region are the key nuclear physics input to study the astrophysical slow neutron capture process. In the past years, a series of neutron capture cross section measurements has been performed at the neutron time-of-flight facility n\\_TOF at CERN focussing on the Fe/Ni mass region. Recent results and future developments in the neutron time-of-flight technique are discussed.

  15. Interpretation of astrophysical neutrinos observed by IceCube experiment by setting Galactic and extra-Galactic spectral components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinelli Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The last IceCube catalog of High Energy Starting Events (HESE obtained with a livetime of 1347 days comprises 54 neutrino events equally-distributed between the three families with energies between 25 TeV and few PeVs. Considering the homogeneous flavors distribution (1:1:1 and the spectral features of these neutrinos the IceCube collaboration claims the astrophysical origin of these events with more than 5σ. The spatial distribution of cited events does not show a clear correlation with known astrophysical accelerators leaving opened both the Galactic and the extra-Galactic origin interpretations. Here, we compute the neutrino diffuse emission of our Galaxy on the basis of a recently proposed phenomenological model characterized by radially-dependent cosmic-ray (CR transport properties. We show that the astrophysical spectrum measured by IceCube experiment can be well explained adding to the diffuse Galactic neutrino flux (obtained with this new model a extra-Galactic component derived from the astrophysical muonic neutrinos reconstructed in the Northern hemisphere. A good agreement between the expected astrophysical neutrino flux and the IceCube data is found for the full sky as well as for the Galactic plane region.

  16. 2012 Aspen Winter Conferences on High Energy and Astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, John [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Olivier, Dore [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Fox, Patrick [Aspen Center for Physics, CO (United States); Furic, Ivan [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Halkiadakis, Eva [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Schmidt, Fabian [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Senatore, Leonardo [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Smith, Kendrick M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Whiteson, Daniel [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Aspen Center for Physics Project Summary DE-SC0007313 Budget Period: 1/1/2012 to 12/31/2012 The Hunt for New Particles, from the Alps to the Plains to the Rockies The 2012 Aspen Winter Conference on Particle Physics was held at the Aspen Center for Physics from February 11 to February 17, 2012. Sixty-seven participants from nine countries, and several universities and national labs attended the workshop titled, The Hunt for New Particles, from the Alps to the Plains to the Rockies. There were 53 formal talks, and a considerable number of informal discussions held during the week. The weeks events included a public lecture-Hunting the Dark Universe given by Neal Weiner from New York University) and attended by 237 members of the public, and a physics cafe geared for high schoolers that is a discussion with physicists conducted by Spencer Chang (University of Oregon), Matthew Reece (Harvard University) and Julia Shelton (Yale University) and attended by 67 locals and visitors. While there were no published proceedings, some of the talks are posted online and can be Googled. The workshop was organized by John Campbell (Fermilab), Patrick Fox (Fermilab), Ivan Furic (University of Florida), Eva Halkiadakis (Rutgers University) and Daniel Whiteson (University of California Irvine). Additional information is available at http://indico.cern.ch/conferenceDisplay.py?confId=143360. Inflationary Theory and its Confrontation with Data in the Planck Era The 2012 Aspen Winter Conference on Astroparticle physics held at the Aspen Center for Physics was Inflationary Theory and its Confrontation with Data in the Planck Era. It was held from January 30 to February 4, 2012. The 62 participants came from 7 countries and attended 43 talks over five days. Late mornings through the afternoon are reserved for informal discussions. In feedback received from participants, it is often these unplanned chats that produce the most excitement due to working through problems with fellow physicists from other institutions and countries or due to incipient collaborations. In addition, Shamit Kachru of Stanford University gave a public lecture titled The Small (and Large) Scale Structure of Space-Time.There were 237 members of the general public in attendance. Before the lecture, 65 people attended the physics cafe to discuss the current topic with Matthew Kleban (New York University) and Chao-Lin Kuo (Stanford University). This workshop was organized by Olivier Dore (Jet Propulsion Lab), Fabian Schmidt (Caltech), Leonardo Senatore (Stanford University), and Kendrick Smith (Princeton University).

  17. CELESTE: an atmospheric Cherenkov telescope for high energy gamma astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pare, E.; Balauge, B.; Bazer-Bachi, R.; Bergeret, H.; Berny, F.; Briand, N.; Bruel, P.; Cerutti, M.; Collon, J.; Cordier, A.; Cornebise, P.; Debiais, G.; Dezalay, J.-P.; Dumora, D.; Durand, E.; Eschstruth, P.; Espigat, P.; Fabre, B.; Fleury, P.; Gilly, J.; Gouillaud, J.-C.; Gregory, C.; Herault, N.; Holder, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Incerti, S.; Jouenne, A.; Kalt, L.; LeGallou, R.; Lott, B.; Lodygensky, O.; Manigot, P.; Manseri, H.; Manitaz, H.; Martin, M.; Morano, R.; Morineaud, G.; Muenz, F.; Musquere, A.; Naurois, M. de; Neveu, J.; Noppe, J.-M.; Olive, J.-F.; Palatka, M.; Perez, A.; Quebert, J.; Rebii, A.; Reposeur, T. E-mail: reposeur@in2p3.fr; Rob, L.; Roy, P.; Sans, J.-L.; Sako, T.; Schovanek, P.; Smith, D.A.; Snabre, P.; Villard, G

    2002-09-01

    CELESTE is an atmospheric Cherenkov telescope based on the sampling method which makes use of the de-commissioned THEMIS solar electrical plant in the French Pyrenees. A large (2000 m{sup 2}) mirror surface area from 40 independent heliostats followed by a secondary optic, a trigger system using analog summing techniques and signal digitization with 1 GHz flash ADCs make possible the detection of cosmic {gamma}-rays down to 30 GeV. This paper provides a detailed technical description of the CELESTE installation.

  18. High Energy Astrophysics with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the findings of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the Fermi Observatory. It includes information about the LAT, and the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM), detection of the quiet sun and the moon in gamma rays, Pulsars observed by the observatory, Globular Star Clusters, Active Galactic Nucleus, and Gamma-Ray Bursts, with specific information about GRB 080916C.

  19. 'Let the stars shine in peace!' Niels Bohr and stellar energy, 1929-1934.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragh, Helge

    2017-04-01

    Faced with various anomalies related to nuclear physics in particular, in 1929 Niels Bohr suggested that energy might not be conserved in the atomic nucleus and the processes involving it. By this radical proposal he hoped not only to get rid of the anomalies but also saw a possibility to explain a puzzle in astrophysics, namely the energy generated by stars. Bohr repeated his suggestion of stellar energy arising ex nihilo on several occasions but without ever going into detail. In fact, it is not very clear what he meant or how seriously he took the stellar energy hypothesis. This paper relates Bohr's comments to the period's attempts to find a mechanism for stellar energy and also to the role played by astrophysics at the Copenhagen institute. Moreover, it looks at how Bohr's hypothesis was received not only by physicists but also by astronomers. In this regard the disciplinary status of astrophysics and its contemporary relation to the new quantum mechanics is of relevance. It turns out that, with very few exceptions, the hypothesis was met with silence by astronomers and astrophysicists concerned with the problem of stellar energy production. And yet, for a brief period of time it did have an impact on how physicists thought about the interior of the stars.

  20. Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy. P. Venkatakrishnan. Articles written in Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy. Volume 21 Issue 3-4 September-December 2000 pp 171-172 Session III – Sunspots & Solar Cycle. Is a Sunspot in Static or Dynamic Equilibrium? P. Venkatakrishnan · More Details ...