WorldWideScience

Sample records for astrophysical gamma ray

  1. Extragalactic Gamma-Ray Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    During the last decades, various classes of radio-loud active galactic nuclei have been established as sources of high-energy radiation extending over a very broad range from soft gamma-rays (photon energies E~MeV) up to very-high-energy gamma-rays (E>100 GeV). These include blazars of different types, as well as young and evolved radio galaxies. The observed gamma-ray emission from such implies efficient particle acceleration processes taking place in highly magnetized and relativistic jets produced by supermassive black holes, processes that have yet to be identified and properly understood. In addition, nearby starforming and starburst galaxies, some of which host radio-quiet Seyfert-type nuclei, have been detected in the gamma-ray range as well. In their cases, the observed gamma-ray emission is due to non-thermal activity in the interstellar medium, possibly including also a contribution from accretion disks and nuclear outflows. Finally, the high-energy emission from clusters of galaxies remains elusive...

  2. TeV Gamma-Ray Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Ribó, M

    2008-01-01

    The window of TeV Gamma-Ray Astrophysics was opened less than two decades ago, when the Crab Nebula was detected for the first time. After several years of development, the technique used by imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes like HESS, MAGIC or VERITAS, is now allowing to conduct sensitive observations in the TeV regime. Water Cherenkov instruments like Milagro are also providing the first results after years of integration time. Different types of extragalactic and galactic sources have been detected, showing a variety of interesting phenomena that are boosting theory in very high energy gamma-ray astrophysics. Here I review some of the most interesting results obtained up to now, making special emphasis in the field of X-ray/gamma-ray binaries.

  3. The Future of Gamma Ray Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, gamma ray astrophysics has entered the astrophysical mainstream. Extremely successful space-borne (GeV) and ground-based (TeV) detectors, combined with a multitude of partner telescopes, have revealed a fascinating “astroscape" of active galactic nuclei, pulsars, gamma ray bursts, supernova remnants, binary stars, star-forming galaxies, novae much more, exhibiting major pathways along which large energy releases can flow. From  a basic physics perspective, exquisitely sensitive measurements have constrained the nature of dark matter, the cosmological origin of magnetic field and the properties of black holes. These advances have motivated the development of new facilities, including HAWC, DAMPE, CTA and SVOM, which will further our understanding of the high energy universe. Topics that will receive special attention include merging neutron star binaries, clusters of galaxies, galactic cosmic rays and putative, TeV dark matter.

  4. Gamma-Ray Astrophysics NSSTC Fermi GBM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is not a pointed or imaging instrument. To determine fluxes for known sources, we measure the change in the count rate...

  5. Very high energy gamma ray astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Whipple Observatory High Resolution Camera will be used in a vigorous program of observations to search for new sources of very-high-energy gamma rays. In addition, a search for antimatter using the moon-earth system as an ion spectrometer will be begun. The first phase of GRANITE, the new 37-element 11-m camera, will be concluded with first light scheduled for September, 1991. The two cameras will operate in support of the Gamma Ray Observatory mission in the winter of 1991/2

  6. Very high energy gamma ray astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Whipple Observatory's atmospheric Cerenkov camera has detected TeV radiation from four galactic sources: the Crab Nebula, Cygnus X-3, Hercules X-1, and 4U0115+63. Recent simulations encourage the view that unwanted cosmic-ray background showers may be suppressed by a large factor. Emphasis in the coming year will be on determining optimum selection criteria for enhancing gamma-ray signals and in developing a prototype camera with finer angular resolution as a first step towards implementation of the HERCULES concept

  7. Very high energy gamma ray astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, R.C.; Lewis, D.A.

    1992-02-01

    The second reflector (project GRANITE) is on schedule. At present (January 1992) it and the 10 m reflector are obtaining stereoscopic views of gamma-ray air showers from the Crab Nebula which verify the expected performance of the twin reflector telescopes. With the additional improvements of the upgrade (a pending DOE proposal) the twin reflectors should reach a limiting intensity of 1% that of the Crab. The astonishing early results from the EGRET detector aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory indicate that distant quasars (powered by supermassive black holes) are active at GeV energies. The Whipple instruments are poised to see if such behavior continues above 100 GeV, as well as perform sensitive observations of previously reported GeV (Geminga) and TeV (Hercules X-1, etc.) sources. In addition to observing sources and identifying their location in the sky to one arcminute, experiments are planned to search for WIMPS in the mass range 0.1 to 1 TeV, and to determine the abundance of anti-protons in the cosmic rays. The successful performance of the stereoscopic reflectors demonstrates the feasibility of the concept of arrays of Cherenkov receivers. Design studies for a much larger array (CASITA) are just beginning.

  8. Computational Astrophysics Consortium 3 - Supernovae, Gamma-Ray Bursts and Nucleosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woosley, Stan [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

    2014-08-29

    Final project report for UCSC's participation in the Computational Astrophysics Consortium - Supernovae, Gamma-Ray Bursts and Nucleosynthesis. As an appendix, the report of the entire Consortium is also appended.

  9. Gamma-Ray Lenses for Astrophysics-and the Gamma-Ray Imager Mission GRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wunderer, C. B.; Ballmoos, P. V.; Barriere, N.;

    2009-01-01

    Observations of the gamma-ray sky reveal the most powerful sources and the most violent events in the Universe. While at lower wavebands the observed emission is generally dominated by thermal processes, the gamma-ray sky provides us with a view on the non-thermal Universe. Here particles are acc...

  10. Physics and astrophysics with gamma-ray telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Vandenbroucke, J

    2010-01-01

    In the past few years gamma-ray astronomy has entered a golden age. A modern suite of telescopes is now scanning the sky over both hemispheres and over six orders of magnitude in energy. At $\\sim$TeV energies, only a handful of sources were known a decade ago, but the current generation of ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (H.E.S.S., MAGIC, and VERITAS) has increased this number to nearly one hundred. With a large field of view and duty cycle, the Tibet and Milagro air shower detectors have demonstrated the promise of the direct particle detection technique for TeV gamma rays. At $\\sim$GeV energies, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has increased the number of known sources by nearly an order of magnitude in its first year of operation. New classes of sources that were previously theorized to be gamma-ray emitters have now been confirmed observationally. Moreover, there have been surprise discoveries of GeV gamma-ray emission from source classes for which no theory predicted it was possi...

  11. (Very)-High-Energy Gamma-Ray Astrophysics: the Future

    CERN Document Server

    De Angelis, Alesandro

    2016-01-01

    Several projects planned or proposed can significantly expand our knowledge of the high-energy Universe in gamma rays. Construction of the Cherenkov telescope array CTA is started, and other detectors are planned which will use the reconstruction of extensive air showers. This report explores the near future, and possible evolutions in a longer term.

  12. (Very)-high-energy gamma-ray astrophysics: The future

    OpenAIRE

    Angelis Alessandro De

    2016-01-01

    Several projects planned or proposed can significantly expand our knowledge of the high-energy Universe in gamma rays. Construction of the Cherenkov telescope array CTA is started, and other detectors are planned which will use the reconstruction of extensive air showers. This report explores the near future, and possible evolutions in a longer term.

  13. Milargo in High Energy Gamma-Ray Astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gamma - ray emission from the galaxy as visible from the Northern Hemisphere - Galactic latitude |b| o. and Galactic longitude l - [30o, 216o] - is measured at TeV energies by the Milagro Gamma - Ray Observatory. The Milagro experiment performed a survey of this region of the Galaxy and observed eight sources or source candidates with a pre-trials significance of 4.5 standard deviations above the isotropic background. The contribution of these sources is subtracted from the total emission in the studied Galactic plane region to calculate the diffuse flux near the Galactic equator. The flux and position of the eight excess locations, as well as the diffuse emission profiles will be reported. (author)

  14. Astrophysical and Biological Implications of $\\gamma$-Ray Burst Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Scalo, J M; Scalo, John

    1999-01-01

    Combining results from Schmidt (1999) for the local cosmic rate and mean peakluminosity of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with recent work on the history of thecosmic star formation rate, we provide estimates for the local GRB rate perunit blue luminosity in galaxies. These values are used to examine a number ofphenomena with the following conclusions: 1) The ratio of supernova rate to GRBrate is so large that it is difficult to maintain that more than a smallfraction of neutron star or black hole-forming events produced GRBs, evenallowing for generous collimation; 2) The GRB rate is so small that it isimpossible to use these events to account for the majority of large HI holesobserved in our own and other galaxies; the expected number of holes is muchsmaller than observed; 3) Modeling the GRB events in the Milky Way as a spatialPoisson process and allowing for modest enhancement in the star formation ratedue to birth in a spiral arm, we find that the probability that the solarsystem was exposed to a fluence large e...

  15. Gamma-ray binaries : a bridge between Be stars and high energy astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Lamberts, Astrid

    2014-01-01

    Advances in X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy have opened a new window on our universe and revealed a wide variety of binaries composed of a compact object and a Be star. In Be X-ray binaries, a neutron star accretes the Be disk and truncates it through tidal interactions. Such systems have important X-ray outbursts, some related to the disk structure. In other systems, strong gamma ray emission is observed. In gamma-ray binaries, the neutron star is not accreting but driving a highly relativistic wind. The wind collision region presents similarities to colliding wind binaries composed of massive stars. The high energy emission is coming from particles being accelerated at the relativistic shock. I will review the physics of X-ray and gamma-ray binaries, focusing particularly on the recent developments on gamma-ray binaries. I will describe physical mechanisms such as relativistic hydrodynamics, tidal forces and non thermal emission. I will highlight how high energy astrophysics can shed a new light on Be star ph...

  16. Astrophysical Explosions: From Solar Flares to Cosmic Gamma-ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Wheeler, J Craig

    2011-01-01

    Astrophysical explosions result from the release of magnetic, gravitational, or thermonuclear energy on dynamical timescales, typically the sound-crossing time for the system. These explosions include solar and stellar flares, eruptive phenomena in accretion disks, thermonuclear combustion on the surfaces of white dwarfs and neutron stars, violent magnetic reconnection in neutron stars, thermonuclear and gravitational collapse supernovae and cosmic gamma-ray bursts, each representing a different type and amount of energy release. This paper summarizes the properties of these explosions and describes new research on thermonuclear explosions and explosions in extended circumstellar media. Parallels are drawn between studies of terrestrial and astrophysical explosions, especially the physics of the transition from deflagration to detonation. Keywords: neutron stars, black holes, supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, deflagration, detonation.

  17. The INTErnational Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory: INTEGRAL Highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The INTEGRAL Space Observatory was selected as the second Medium size mission (M2) of the ESAs Horizon 2000 vision programme. INTEGRAL is the first high angular and spectral resolution hard X-ray and soft γ-ray observatory with a wide band spectral response ranging from 3 keV up to 10 MeV energy band. This capability is supplemented by an unprecedented sensitivity enhanced by the 3 days orbit allowing long and uninterrupted observations over very wide field of view (up to ∼1000 squared degrees to zero response) and sub-ms time resolution. Part of the observatory success is due to its capability to link the high energy sky with the lower energy band. The complementarity and synergy with pointing soft X-ray missions such as XMM-Newton and CHANDRA and more recently with NuSTAR is a strategic feature to link the “thermal” and the “non-thermal” Universe observed at higher energies by space missions such as Fermi and AGILE and ground based TeV observatories sensitive to extremely high energies. INTEGRAL was launched on 17 October 2002 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome (Kazakistan) aboard a Proton rocket as part of the Russian contribution to the mission, and has successfully spent almost 11 years in orbit. In view of its successful science outcome the ESA Space Programme Committee haw recently approved its scientific operation till the end of 2016. To date the spacecraft, ground segment and scientific payload are in excellent state-of-health, and INTEGRAL is continuing its scientific operations, originally planned for a 5-year technical design and scientific nominal operation plan. This paper summarizes the current INTEGRAL scientific achievements and future prospects, with particular regard to the high energy domain

  18. The INTErnational Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory: INTEGRAL Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubertini, Pietro, E-mail: pietro.ubertini@iaps.inaf.it; Bazzano, Angela

    2014-04-01

    The INTEGRAL Space Observatory was selected as the second Medium size mission (M2) of the ESAs Horizon 2000 vision programme. INTEGRAL is the first high angular and spectral resolution hard X-ray and soft γ-ray observatory with a wide band spectral response ranging from 3 keV up to 10 MeV energy band. This capability is supplemented by an unprecedented sensitivity enhanced by the 3 days orbit allowing long and uninterrupted observations over very wide field of view (up to ∼1000 squared degrees to zero response) and sub-ms time resolution. Part of the observatory success is due to its capability to link the high energy sky with the lower energy band. The complementarity and synergy with pointing soft X-ray missions such as XMM-Newton and CHANDRA and more recently with NuSTAR is a strategic feature to link the “thermal” and the “non-thermal” Universe observed at higher energies by space missions such as Fermi and AGILE and ground based TeV observatories sensitive to extremely high energies. INTEGRAL was launched on 17 October 2002 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome (Kazakistan) aboard a Proton rocket as part of the Russian contribution to the mission, and has successfully spent almost 11 years in orbit. In view of its successful science outcome the ESA Space Programme Committee haw recently approved its scientific operation till the end of 2016. To date the spacecraft, ground segment and scientific payload are in excellent state-of-health, and INTEGRAL is continuing its scientific operations, originally planned for a 5-year technical design and scientific nominal operation plan. This paper summarizes the current INTEGRAL scientific achievements and future prospects, with particular regard to the high energy domain.

  19. Hard X-ray/soft gamma-ray telescope designs for future astrophysics missions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Desiree Della Monica; Christensen, Finn Erland; Pivovaroff, Michael J.;

    2013-01-01

    We present several concept designs of hard X-ray/soft λ-ray focusing telescopes for future astrophysics missions. The designs are based on depth graded multilayer coatings. These have been successfully employed on the NuSTAR mission for energies up to 80 keV. Recent advances in demonstrating...

  20. Cosmic gamma-ray bursts from primordial stars: A new renaissance in astrophysics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chardonnet, Pascal; Filina, Anastasia; Chechetkin, Valery; Popov, Mikhail; Baranov, Andrey

    2015-10-01

    The cosmic gamma-ray bursts are certainly an enigma in astrophysics. The “standard fireball” scenario developed during many years has provided a possible explanation of this phenomena. The aim of this work is simply to explore a new possible interpretation by developing a coherent scenario inside the global picture of stellar evolution. At the basis of our scenario, is the fact that maybe we have not fully understood how the core of a pair instability supernova explodes. In such way, we have proposed a new paradigm assuming that the core of such massive star, instead of doing a symmetrical explosion, is completely fragmented in hot spots of burning nuclear matter. We have tested our scenario with observational data like GRB spectra, lightcurves, Amati relation and GRB-SN connection, and for each set of data we have proposed a possible physical interpretation. We have also suggested some possible test of this scenario by measurement at high redshifts. If this scenario is correct, it tells us simply that the cosmic gamma-ray bursts are a missing link in stellar evolution, related to an unusual explosion.

  1. Hard x-ray/soft gamma-ray telescope designs for future astrophysics missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Monica Ferreira, Desiree; Christensen, Finn E.; Pivovaroff, Michael J.; Brejnholt, Nicolai; Fernandez-Perea, Monica; Westergaard, Niels Jørgen S.; Jakobsen, Anders C.; Descalle, Marie-Anne; Soufli, Regina; Vogel, Julia K.

    2013-09-01

    We present several concept designs of hard X-ray/soft λ-ray focusing telescopes for future astrophysics missions. The designs are based on depth graded multilayer coatings. These have been successfully employed on the NuSTAR mission for energies up to 80 keV. Recent advances in demonstrating theoretical reflectivities for candidate multilayer material combinations up to 400 keV including effects of incoherent scatter has given an experimental base for extending this type of designs to the soft λ-ray range. At the same time, the calibration of the in-flight performance of the NuSTAR mission has given a solid understanding and modelling of the relevant effects influencing the performance, including optical constants, roughness, scatter, non-uniformities and figure error. This allows for a realistic extension for designs going to much higher energies. Similarly, both thin slumped glass and silicon pore optics has been developed to a prototype stage which promises imaging resolution in the sub 10 arcsecond range. We present designs based on a 20 m and 50 m focal lengths with energy ranges up to 200 keV and 600 keV.

  2. The future of high energy gamma ray astronomy and its potential astrophysical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtel, C. E.

    1982-01-01

    Future satellites should carry instruments having over an order of magnitude greater sensitivity than those flown thus far as well as improved energy and angular resolution. The information to be obtained from these experiments should greatly enhance knowledge of: the very energetic and nuclear processes associated with compact objects; the structure of our galaxy; the origin and dynamic pressure effects of the cosmic rays; the high energy particles and energetic processes in other galaxies; and the degree of matter-antimatter symmetry of the universe. The relevant aspects of extragalactic gamma ray phenomena are emphasized along with the instruments planned. The high energy gamma ray results of forthcoming programs such as GAMMA-1 and the Gamma Ray Observatory should justify even more sophisticated telescopes. These advanced instruments might be placed on the space station currently being considered by NASA.

  3. Application of a Multidimensional Wavelet Denoising Algorithm for the Detection and Characterization of Astrophysical Sources of Gamma Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Digel, S.W.; /SLAC; Zhang, B.; Chiang, J.; /Maryland U.; Fadili, J.M.; /Caen U.; Starck, J.-L.; /Saclay /Stanford U., Statistics Dept.

    2005-12-02

    Zhang, Fadili, & Starck have recently developed a denoising procedure for Poisson data that offers advantages over other methods of intensity estimation in multiple dimensions. Their procedure, which is nonparametric, is based on thresholding wavelet coefficients. The restoration algorithm applied after thresholding provides good conservation of source flux. We present an investigation of the procedure of Zhang et al. for the detection and characterization of astrophysical sources of high-energy gamma rays, using realistic simulated observations with the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The LAT is to be launched in late 2007 on the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope mission. Source detection in the LAT data is complicated by the low fluxes of point sources relative to the diffuse celestial background, the limited angular resolution, and the tremendous variation of that resolution with energy (from tens of degrees at {approx}30 MeV to 0.1{sup o} at 10 GeV). The algorithm is very fast relative to traditional likelihood model fitting, and permits immediate estimation of spectral properties. Astrophysical sources of gamma rays, especially active galaxies, are typically quite variable, and our current work may lead to a reliable method to quickly characterize the flaring properties of newly-detected sources.

  4. Performance of the AMS-02 Experiment for High Energy Gamma Ray Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Natale, Sonia

    2007-01-01

    AMS is a particle detector designed to perform high precision measurements of the cosmic rays fluxes with the main goals of searching for anti-nuclei, as remnants of primordial anti-matter, and of measuring the faintest components of the cosmic flux, anti- protons, positrons and high energy photons. To fulfill the requirements of large acceptance, long exposure time and excellent particle identification needed to achieve the intended results, AMS will operate in space as an attached payload to the International Space Station (ISS), being the first full featured particle physics experiment to operate in the Earth orbit. The AMS-02 accurate measurements of cosmic-ray nuclei, protons, antiprotons, electrons and positrons will be completed by high energy gamma rays detection. The experiment will detect gamma-rays, either by reconstructing e+e− pairs generated by photons converted upstream the tracker (conversion mode), or based on direct identification of electromagnetic showers in ECAL (calorimetric mode). Thi...

  5. Astrophysics of the Soft Gamma Repeaters and Anomalous X-Ray Pulsars

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Christopher

    2000-01-01

    I summarize the recent advances in our understanding of the Soft Gamma Repeaters: in particular their spin behavior, persistent emission and hyper-Eddington outbursts. The giant flares on 5 March 1979 and 27 August 1998 provide compelling physical evidence for magnetic fields stronger than 10 B_{QED} = 4.4 x 10^{14} G, consistent with the rapid spindown detected in two of these sources. The persistent X-ray emission and variable spindown of the 6-12 s Anomalous X-ray Pulsars are compared and ...

  6. Very high energy gamma ray astrophysics. Technical progress report, May 1, 1992--April 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, R C; Lewis, D A

    1993-02-01

    The Crab-Nebula continues to be the standard candle'' of TeV gamma-ray astronomy. The Whipple Collaboration's observations of it are now confirmed by two French groups. Application of the supercuts'' technique, developed on the Crab database, has resulted in the observation of a distant, active galaxy, Markarian 421. Markarian 421 is one of 16 active galactic nuclei (AGN's) observed by the EGRET instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. The EGRET observations and the expected attenuation of TeV photons from very distant AGN's gives added impetus to efforts in upgrading the present steoscopic detection system. The upgrade not only improves the sensitivity of the twin telescopes, but also reduces the energy threshold to 100 GeV, at which energy attenuation effects for distant sources are greatly reduced. During the past year the llm reflector was operated as a 37-pixel camera, with its performance matching design expectations. During the coming year, its camera will be upgraded to 109 pixels, the 10m camera electronics made to conform to the llm electronics, and both systems interfaced to a single, faster computer. Observations of Markarian 421, simultaneous with EGRET, are scheduled for May, 1993.

  7. Astrophysical and Dark Matter Interpretations of Extended Gamma Ray Emission from the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Abazajian, Kevork N; Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Kaplinghat, Manoj

    2014-01-01

    We construct empirical models of the diffuse gamma-ray background toward the Galactic Center. Including all known point sources and a template of emission associated with interactions of cosmic rays with molecular gas, we show that the extended emission observed previously in the Fermi Large Area Telescope data toward the Galactic Center is detected at high significance for all permutations of the diffuse model components. However, we find that the fluxes and spectra of the sources in our model change significantly depending on the background model. In particular, the spectrum of the central Sgr A$^\\ast$ source is less steep than in previous works and the recovered spectrum of the extended emission has large systematic uncertainties, especially at lower energies. If the extended emission is interpreted to be due to dark matter annihilation, we find annihilation into pure $b$-quark and $\\tau$-lepton channels to be statistically equivalent goodness-of-fits. In the case of the pure $b$-quark channel, we find a d...

  8. Statistical gamma-ray emission of gold and its astrophysical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacoppo F.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The properties of the excited states of gold isotopes were investigated at the Oslo Cyclotron Laboratory. This study is important for the understanding of neutron capture rates in astrophysical plasmas relevant for heavy element nucleosynthesys.

  9. Germanium 70: a gamma ray detector for astrophysics; Le germanium 70: un detecteur de rayons gamma en astrophysique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durouchoux, P. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l`Instrumentation Associee

    1994-12-31

    A thorough study concerning the background noise generated from the germanium detectors used in astrophysics spatial experiences, is presented. These detectors, selected for their energy high definition, are sensitive to cosmic radiations that activate some isotopes contained in the natural germanium and induce background noise through a beta+ decay. This noise component may be notably reduced with utilization of {sup 70}Ge isotope enriched detectors, which do not present such interactions. The predictions have been verified through space tests conducted from Australia in 1992. Preliminary results and prospectives for astrophysics application of the Germanium 70 isotope, are discussed. 6 figs., 2 tabs., 3 refs.

  10. Hard-X and gamma-ray imaging detector for astrophysics based on pixelated CdTe semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez, J.-L.; Hernanz, M.; Álvarez, L.; Artigues, B.; Ullán, M.; Lozano, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Cabruja, E.; Martínez, R.; Chmeissani, M.; Puigdengoles, C.

    2016-01-01

    Stellar explosions are astrophysical phenomena of great importance and interest. Instruments with high sensitivities are essential to perform detailed studies of cosmic explosions and cosmic accelerators. In order to achieve the needed performance, a hard-X and gamma-ray imaging detector with mm spatial resolution and large enough efficiency is required. We present a detector module which consists of a single CdTe crystal of 12.5 × 12.5mm 2 and 2mm thick with a planar cathode and with the anode segmented in an 11x11 pixel array with a pixel pitch of 1 mm attached to the readout chip. Two possible detector module configurations are considered: the so-called Planar Transverse Field (PTF) and the Parallel Planar Field (PPF). The combination of several modules in PTF or PPF configuration will achieve the desired performance of the imaging detector. The sum energy resolution of all pixels of the CdTe module measured at 122 keV and 356 keV is 3.8% and 2% respectively, in the following operating conditions: PPF irradiation, bias voltage -500 V and temperature -10̂ C.

  11. A search for gamma-ray imprints of annihilating dark matter in the galaxy, and the astrophysical implications of ultra-light fundamental vector bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standard Model extensions imply new elementary particles that can lead to specific astrophysical signatures. In particular, weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) can constitute the unknown non-luminous cold dark matter, which contributes approximately 84% to the matter content of the Universe. Annihilation or decay of WIMPs may lead to high-energy gamma-rays. In this thesis, new methods of searching for gamma-ray signals from annihilating dark matter are developed and applied. Moreover, astrophysical imprints of new ultra-light hidden U(1) gauge bosons in radio data are investigated. Hierarchical structure formation predicts a variety of smaller bound dark matter sub-halos in Milky-Way-like galactic hosts. It is shown that the Fermi-LAT is sufficiently sensitive for detecting up to a few nearby dark matter subhalos in terms of faint gamma-ray sources with a moderate angular extent. Searches in the first and second Fermi-LAT source catalogs reveal about ten candidate sources each. To discriminate the source candidates from conventional astrophysical objects, an analysis for spectral, spatial, positional, and temporal gamma-ray properties using 3.5 years of Fermi-LAT data is carried out. In addition, a multi-wavelength analysis of archival data or follow-up observations in the radio, infrared, optical, UV, X-ray, high-energy, and very-high energy gamma-ray bands is carried out. The broad-band spectra of all promising candidates are compatible with AGN, in particular high-energy peaked BL-Lac type objects (HBLs). Dark matter annihilation can contribute to the small-scale angular anisotropy spectrum of the diffuse gamma-ray background (DGB). The detection capabilities of currently operating imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes and the planned Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) are studied. With CTA, a relative gamma-ray contribution from annihilating dark matter of 10% to the extragalactic DGB can be resolved via angular anisotropies. In terms of the dark

  12. Investigations in γ-Ray Astrophysics and Astroparticle Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krennrich, Frank [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2016-06-28

    This report describes the status of data analysis efforts, results and publications of research grant DE-SC0009917. The research is focused on TeV gamma-ray studies of astrophysical sources and related particle physics questions.

  13. A search for gamma-ray imprints of annihilating dark matter in the galaxy, and the astrophysical implications of ultra-light fundamental vector bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zechlin, Hannes-Sebastian

    2013-12-15

    Standard Model extensions imply new elementary particles that can lead to specific astrophysical signatures. In particular, weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) can constitute the unknown non-luminous cold dark matter, which contributes approximately 84% to the matter content of the Universe. Annihilation or decay of WIMPs may lead to high-energy gamma-rays. In this thesis, new methods of searching for gamma-ray signals from annihilating dark matter are developed and applied. Moreover, astrophysical imprints of new ultra-light hidden U(1) gauge bosons in radio data are investigated. Hierarchical structure formation predicts a variety of smaller bound dark matter sub-halos in Milky-Way-like galactic hosts. It is shown that the Fermi-LAT is sufficiently sensitive for detecting up to a few nearby dark matter subhalos in terms of faint gamma-ray sources with a moderate angular extent. Searches in the first and second Fermi-LAT source catalogs reveal about ten candidate sources each. To discriminate the source candidates from conventional astrophysical objects, an analysis for spectral, spatial, positional, and temporal gamma-ray properties using 3.5 years of Fermi-LAT data is carried out. In addition, a multi-wavelength analysis of archival data or follow-up observations in the radio, infrared, optical, UV, X-ray, high-energy, and very-high energy gamma-ray bands is carried out. The broad-band spectra of all promising candidates are compatible with AGN, in particular high-energy peaked BL-Lac type objects (HBLs). Dark matter annihilation can contribute to the small-scale angular anisotropy spectrum of the diffuse gamma-ray background (DGB). The detection capabilities of currently operating imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes and the planned Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) are studied. With CTA, a relative gamma-ray contribution from annihilating dark matter of 10% to the extragalactic DGB can be resolved via angular anisotropies. In terms of the dark

  14. The Astrophysics of Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Kotera, Kumiko

    2011-01-01

    The origin of the highest energy cosmic rays is still unknown. The discovery of their sources will reveal the workings of the most energetic astrophysical accelerators in the universe. Current observations show a spectrum consistent with an origin in extragalactic astrophysical sources. Candidate sources range from the birth of compact objects to explosions related to gamma-ray bursts or to events in active galaxies. We discuss the main effects of propagation from cosmologically distant sources including interactions with cosmic background radiation and magnetic fields. We examine possible acceleration mechanisms leading to a survey of candidate sources and their signatures. New questions arise from an observed hint of sky anisotropies and an unexpected evolution of composition indicators. Future observations may reach the necessary sensitivity to achieve charged particle astronomy and to observe ultrahigh energy photons and neutrinos, which will further illuminate the workings of the universe at these extrem...

  15. Exploring the Capabilities of the Anti-Coincidence Shield of the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) Spectrometer to Study Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Gasén, R.; Kiener, J.; Tatischeff, V.; Vilmer, N.; Hamadache, C.; Klein, K.-L.

    2014-05-01

    The International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) is a European Space Agency hard X-ray/ γ-ray observatory for astrophysics, covering photon energies from 15 keV to 10 MeV. It was launched in 2002, and since then the Bismuth Germanate (BGO) detectors of the Anti-Coincidence Shield (ACS) of the Spectrometer on INTEGRAL (SPI) have detected many hard X-ray (HXR) bursts from the Sun, producing light curves at photon energies above ≈ 100 keV. The spacecraft has a highly elliptical orbit, providing long uninterrupted observing (about 90 % of the orbital period) with nearly constant background due to the shorter time needed to cross Earth's radiation belts. However, because of technical constraints, INTEGRAL cannot be pointed at the Sun, and high-energy solar photons are always detected in nonstandard observation conditions. To make the data useable for solar studies, we have undertaken a major effort to specify the observing conditions through Monte Carlo simulations of the response of ACS for several selected flares. We checked the performance of the model employed for the Monte Carlo simulations using the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observations for the same sample of solar flares. We conclude that although INTEGRAL was not designed to perform solar observations, ACS is a useful instrument for solar-flare research. In particular, its relatively large effective area allows determining good-quality HXR/ γ-ray light curves for X- and M-class solar flares and, in some cases, probably also for C-class flares.

  16. Gamma-ray methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulk analysis techniques using gamma radiation are described. The methods include gamma-ray induced reactions, selective gamma-ray scattering and methods which rely on natural radioactivity. The gamma-ray resonance scattering technique can be used for the determination of copper and nickel in bulk samples and drill cores. The application of gamma-gamma methods to iron ore analysis is outlined

  17. An optical readout TPC (O-TPC) for studies in nuclear astrophysics with gamma-ray beams at HI{gamma}S{sup 1}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gai, M; Zimmerman, W R; Kading, T J; Seo, P-N; Young, A H [LNS at Avery Point, University of Connecticut, Groton, CT 06340-6097 (United States); Ahmed, M W; Stave, S C; Henshaw, S S; Martel, P P; Weller, H R [TUNL, Dept. of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Breskin, A; Chechik, R [Dept. of Particle Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel); Bromberger, B; Dangendorf, V; Tittelmeier, K [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Delbar, Th [Universite Catholique de Louvain, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); III, R H France [Georgia College and State University, CBX 82, Milledgeville, GA 31061 (United States); McDonald, J E R, E-mail: moshe.gai@yale.edu [Dept. of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8124 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    We report on the construction, tests, calibrations and commissioning of an Optical Readout Time Projection Chamber (O-TPC) detector operating with a CO{sub 2}(80%) + N{sub 2}(20%) gas mixture at 100 and 150 Torr. It was designed to measure the cross sections of several key nuclear reactions involved in stellar evolution. In particular, a study of the rate of formation of oxygen and carbon during the process of helium burning will be performed by exposing the chamber gas to intense nearly mono-energetic gamma-ray beams at the High Intensity Gamma Source (HI{gamma}S) facility. The O-TPC has a sensitive target-drift volume of 30x30x21 cm{sup 3}. Ionization electrons drift towards a double parallel-grid avalanche multiplier, yielding charge multiplication and light emission. Avalanche-induced photons from N{sub 2} emission are collected, intensified and recorded with a Charge Coupled Device (CCD) camera, providing two-dimensional track images. The event's time projection (third coordinate) and the deposited energy are recorded by photomultipliers and by the TPC charge-signal, respectively. A dedicated VME-based data acquisition system and associated data analysis tools were developed to record and analyze these data. The O-TPC has been tested and calibrated with 3.183 MeV alpha-particles emitted by a {sup 148}Gd source placed within its volume with a measured energy resolution of 3.0%. Tracks of alpha and {sup 12}C particles from the dissociation of {sup 16}O and of three alpha-particles from the dissociation of {sup 12}C have been measured during initial in-beam test experiments performed at the HI{gamma}S facility at Duke University. The full detection system and its performance are described and the results of the preliminary in-beam test experiments are reported.

  18. AGN astrophysics via multi-frequency monitoring of gamma-ray blazars in the Fermi-GST era

    CERN Document Server

    Angelakis, E; Zensus, J A; Nestoras, I; Marchili, N; Krichbaum, T P; Ungerechts, H; Max-Moerbeck, W; Pavlidou, V; Pearson, T J; Readhead, A C S; Richards, J L; Stevenson, M A

    2009-01-01

    The F-GAMMA-project is the coordinated effort of several observatories to understand the AGN phenomenon and specifically blazars via multi-frequency monitoring in collaboration with the {\\sl Fermi}-GST satellite since January 2007. The core observatories are: the Effelsberg 100-m, the IRAM 30-m and the OVRO 40-m telescope covering the range between 2.6 and 270 GHz. Effelsberg and IRAM stations do a monthly monitoring of the cm to sub-mm radio spectra of 60 selected blazars whereas the OVRO telescope is observing roughly 1200 objects at 15 GHz with a dense sampling of 2 points per week. The calibration uncertainty even at high frequencies, is of a few percent. 47% of the Effelsberg/Pico Veleta sample is included in the LBAS list. An update of the monitored sample is currently underway.

  19. Astrophysics: Unexpected X-ray flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, Sergio

    2016-10-01

    Two sources of highly energetic flares have been discovered in archival X-ray data of 70 nearby galaxies. These flares have an undetermined origin and might represent previously unknown astrophysical phenomena. See Letter p.356

  20. Gamma-ray Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Hinton, Jim

    2007-01-01

    The relevance of gamma-ray astronomy to the search for the origin of the galactic and, to a lesser extent, the ultra-high-energy cosmic rays has long been recognised. The current renaissance in the TeV gamma-ray field has resulted in a wealth of new data on galactic and extragalactic particle accelerators, and almost all the new results in this field were presented at the recent International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC). Here I summarise the 175 papers submitted on the topic of gamma-ray astronomy to the 30th ICRC in Merida, Mexico in July 2007.

  1. Gamma-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are presented from an analysis of the celestial gamma-ray fine-scale structure based on over half of the data which may ultimately be available from the COS-B satellite. A catalogue consisting of 25 gamma-ray sources measured at energies above 100 MeV is presented. (Auth.)

  2. Measurements of Cyclotron Features and Pulse Periods in the High-Mass X-Ray Binaries 4U 1538-522 and 4U 1907+09 with the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemphill, Paul B.; Rothschild, Richard E.; Caballero, Isabel; Pottschmidt, Katja; Kuhnel, Matthias; Furst, Felix; Wilms, Jorn

    2013-01-01

    We present a spectral and timing analysis of International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) observations of two high-mass X-ray binaries, 4U 1538-522 and 4U 1907+09. Our timing measurements for 4U 1538-522 find the pulse period to have exhibited a spin-up trend until approximately 2009, after which there is evidence for a torque reversal, with the source beginning to spin down to the most recently measured period of 525.407 plus or minus 0.001 seconds. The most recent INTEGRAL observations of 4U 1907+09 are not found to yield statistically significant pulse periods due to the significantly lower flux from the source compared with 4U 1538-522. A spectral model consisting of a power-law continuum with an exponential cutoff and modified by two cyclotron resonance scattering features is found to fit both sources well, with the cyclotron scattering features detected at approximately 22 and approximately 49 kiloelectronvolts for 4U 1538-522 and at approximately 18 and approximately 36 kiloelectronvolts for 4U 1907+09. The spectral parameters of 4U 1538-522 are generally not found to vary significantly with flux and there is little to no variation across the torque reversal. Examining our results in conjunction with previous work, we find no evidence for a correlation between cyclotron line energy and luminosity for 4U 1538-522. 4U 1907+09 shows evidence for a positive correlation between cyclotron line energy and luminosity, which would make it the fourth, and lowest luminosity, cyclotron line source to exhibit this relationship.

  3. GAMMA-400 gamma-ray observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Topchiev, N P; Bonvicini, V; Adriani, O; Aptekar, R L; Arkhangelskaja, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Bakaldin, A V; Bergstrom, L; Berti, E; Bigongiari, G; Bobkov, S G; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bonechi, L; Bongi, M; Bottai, S; Castellini, G; Cattaneo, P W; Cumani, P; Dalkarov, O D; Dedenko, G L; De Donato, C; Dogiel, V A; Finetti, N; Gascon, D; Gorbunov, M S; Gusakov, Yu V; Hnatyk, B I; Kadilin, V V; Kaplin, V A; Kaplun, A A; Kheymits, M D; Korepanov, V E; Larsson, J; Leonov, A A; Loginov, V A; Longo, F; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P S; Martinez, M; Menshenin, A L; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Moiseev, A A; Mori, N; Moskalenko, I V; Naumov, P Yu; Papini, P; Paredes, J M; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Rappoldi, A; Ricciarini, S; Runtso, M F; Ryde, F; Serdin, O V; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stozhkov, Yu I; Suchkov, S I; Taraskin, A A; Tavani, M; Tiberio, A; Tyurin, E M; Ulanov, M V; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Ward, J E; Yurkin, Yu T; Zampa, N; Zirakashvili, V N; Zverev, V G

    2015-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope with excellent angular and energy resolutions is designed to search for signatures of dark matter in the fluxes of gamma-ray emission and electrons + positrons. Precision investigations of gamma-ray emission from Galactic Center, Crab, Vela, Cygnus, Geminga, and other regions will be performed, as well as diffuse gamma-ray emission, along with measurements of high-energy electron + positron and nuclei fluxes. Furthermore, it will study gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the Sun during periods of solar activity. The energy range of GAMMA-400 is expected to be from ~20 MeV up to TeV energies for gamma rays, up to 20 TeV for electrons + positrons, and up to 10E15 eV for cosmic-ray nuclei. For high-energy gamma rays with energy from 10 to 100 GeV, the GAMMA-400 angular resolution improves from 0.1{\\deg} to ~0.01{\\deg} and energy resolution from 3% to ~1%; the proton rejection factor is ~5x10E5. GAMMA-400 will be installed onboard the Russian space observatory.

  4. Gamma ray camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Mendez, Victor

    1997-01-01

    A gamma ray camera for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array.

  5. SVOM Gamma Ray Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Yongwei; Li, Yanguo; Zhang, Yongjie; Zhang, Shuangnan

    2009-01-01

    The Space-based multi-band astronomical Variable Object Monitor (SVOM) mission is dedicated to the detection, localization and broad-band study of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) and other high-energy transient phenomena. The Gamma Ray Monitor (GRM) onboard is designed to observe the GRBs up to 5 MeV. With this instrument one of the key GRB parameter, Epeak, can be easily measured in the hard x-ray band. It can achieve a detection rate of 100 GRBs per year which ensures the scientific output of SVOM.

  6. SVOM gamma ray monitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The space-based multi-band astronomical Variable Object Monitor(SVOM) mission is dedicated to the detection,localization and broad-band study of gamma-ray bursts(GRBs) and other high-energy transient phenomena.The gamma ray monitor(GRM) onboard is designed to observe GRBs up to 5 MeV.With this instrument,one of the key GRB parameters,Epeak,can be easily measured in the hard X-ray band.It can achieve a detection rate of 100 GRBs per year which ensures the scientific output of SVOM.

  7. Gamma-Ray Bursts: The End Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Don

    1997-11-01

    The nature of gamma-ray bursts has been one of the greatest unsolved mysteries in astrophysics for more than a quarter century. A major reason for this is that no definite counterparts to the bursts could be found at other wavelengths, despite intense efforts spanning more than two decades. Consequently, the study of gamma-ray bursts has been isolated from the rest of astronomy. Scientists studying them have had only the laws of physics and the bursts themselves to guide them in attempting to solve the burst mystery. All of this changed dramatically with the discovery earlier this year of fading X-ray and optical sources in the arcminute-sized positional error boxes of several gamma-ray bursts. For the first time, temporal, as well as spatial, coincidence could be used to associate these X-ray and optical sources with the gamma-ray bursts. As a result, the odds are great that the fading X-ray and optical sources are counterparts of the bursts, and that the study of gamma-ray bursts has finally been connected with the rest of astronomy. In this talk, we describe the dramatic new information about the nature of gamma-ray bursts that the X-ray, optical, and radio observations of the fading sources have provided, and emphasize the implications that this information has for the distance scale to the bursts.

  8. An X-ray perspective on a gamma-ray mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Niels

    2003-01-01

    The most recent astrophysics mission of ESA is INTEGRAL, a mission dedicated to gamma-ray astronomy (Winkler et al. 2003). INTEGRAL carries two gamma-ray instruments: the imager, IBIS, and the spectrometer, SPI, and in addition an optical monitor, OMC, and an X-ray monitor, JEM-X. INTEGRAL...

  9. Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Meszaros, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma-rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day ,last typically lOs of seconds and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this review we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglows.

  10. Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Mészáros, Péter

    2012-08-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, typically last for tens of seconds, and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this Review, we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglow.

  11. Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Gehrels, Neil; 10.1126/science.1216793

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma-rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, last typically 10s of seconds and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this review we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglows.

  12. An Optical Readout TPC (O-TPC) for Studies in Nuclear Astrophysics With Gamma-Ray Beams at HIgS

    CERN Document Server

    Gai, M; Stave, S C; Zimmerman, W R; Breskin, A; Bromberger, B; Chechik, R; Dangendorf, V; Delbar, Th; France, R H; Henshaw, S S; Kading, T J; Martel, P P; McDonald, J E R; Seo, P -N; Tittelmeier, K; Weller, H R; Young, A H; 10.1088/1748-0221/5/12/P12004

    2011-01-01

    We report on the construction, tests, calibrations and commissioning of an Optical Readout Time Projection Chamber (O-TPC) detector operating with a CO2(80%) + N2(20%) gas mixture at 100 and 150 Torr. It was designed to measure the cross sections of several key nuclear reactions involved in stellar evolution. In particular, a study of the rate of formation of oxygen and carbon during the process of helium burning will be performed by exposing the chamber gas to intense nearly mono-energetic gamma-ray beams at the High Intensity Gamma Source (HIgS) facility. The O-TPC has a sensitive target-drift volume of 30x30x21 cm^3. Ionization electrons drift towards a double parallel grid avalanche multiplier, yielding charge multiplication and light emission. Avalanche induced photons from N2 emission are collected, intensified and recorded with a Charge Coupled Device (CCD) camera, providing two-dimensional track images. The event's time projection (third coordinate) and the deposited energy are recorded by photomultip...

  13. New insights from cosmic gamma rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Diehl

    2016-04-01

    The measurement of gamma rays from cosmic sources at ~MeV energies is one of the key tools for nuclear astrophysics, in its study of nuclear reactions and their impacts on objects and phenomena throughout the universe. Gamma rays trace nuclear processes most directly, as they originate from nuclear transitions following radioactive decays or high-energy collisions with excitation of nuclei. Additionally, the unique gamma-ray signature from the annihilation of positrons falls into this astronomical window and is discussed here: Cosmic positrons are often produced from β-decays, thus also of nuclear physics origins. The nuclear reactions leading to radioactive isotopes occur inside stars and stellar explosions, which therefore constitute the main objects of such studies. In recent years, both thermonuclear and core-collapse supernova radioactivities have been measured though 56Ni, 56Co, and 44Ti lines, and a beginning has thus been made to complement conventional supernova observations with such measurements of the prime energy sources of supernova light created in their deep interiors. The diffuse radioactive afterglow of massive-star nucleosynthesis in gamma rays is now being exploited towards astrophysical studies on how massive stars feed back their energy and ejecta into interstellar gas, as part of the cosmic cycle of matter through generations of stars enriching the interstellar gas and stars with metals. Large interstellar cavities and superbubbles have been recognised to be the dominating structures where new massive-star ejecta are injected, from 26Al gamma-ray spectroscopy. Also, constraints on the complex interiors of stars derive from the ratio of 60Fe/26Al gamma rays. Finally, the puzzling bulge-dominated intensity distribution of positron annihilation gamma rays is measured in greater detail, but still not understood; a recent microquasar flare provided evidence that such objects may be prime sources for positrons in interstellar space, rather than

  14. An optical readout TPC (O-TPC) for studies in nuclear astrophysics with gamma-ray beams at HIγS1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the construction, tests, calibrations and commissioning of an Optical Readout Time Projection Chamber (O-TPC) detector operating with a CO2(80%) + N2(20%) gas mixture at 100 and 150 Torr. It was designed to measure the cross sections of several key nuclear reactions involved in stellar evolution. In particular, a study of the rate of formation of oxygen and carbon during the process of helium burning will be performed by exposing the chamber gas to intense nearly mono-energetic gamma-ray beams at the High Intensity Gamma Source (HIγS) facility. The O-TPC has a sensitive target-drift volume of 30x30x21 cm3. Ionization electrons drift towards a double parallel-grid avalanche multiplier, yielding charge multiplication and light emission. Avalanche-induced photons from N2 emission are collected, intensified and recorded with a Charge Coupled Device (CCD) camera, providing two-dimensional track images. The event's time projection (third coordinate) and the deposited energy are recorded by photomultipliers and by the TPC charge-signal, respectively. A dedicated VME-based data acquisition system and associated data analysis tools were developed to record and analyze these data. The O-TPC has been tested and calibrated with 3.183 MeV alpha-particles emitted by a 148Gd source placed within its volume with a measured energy resolution of 3.0%. Tracks of alpha and 12C particles from the dissociation of 16O and of three alpha-particles from the dissociation of 12C have been measured during initial in-beam test experiments performed at the HIγS facility at Duke University. The full detection system and its performance are described and the results of the preliminary in-beam test experiments are reported.

  15. Chemist's gamma-ray table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An edited listing of gamma-ray information has been prepared. Prominent gamma rays originating from nuclides with half lives long enough to be seen in radiochemical experiments are included. Information is ordered by nuclide in one section and by energy in a second section. This shorter listing facilitates identification of nuclides responsible for gamma rays observed in experiments

  16. A directional gamma-ray detector based on scintillator plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanna, D., E-mail: hanna@physics.mcgill.ca; Sagnières, L.; Boyle, P.J.; MacLeod, A.M.L.

    2015-10-11

    A simple device for determining the azimuthal location of a source of gamma radiation, using ideas from astrophysical gamma-ray burst detection, is described. A compact and robust detector built from eight identical modules, each comprising a plate of CsI(Tl) scintillator coupled to a photomultiplier tube, can locate a point source of gamma rays with degree-scale precision by comparing the count rates in the different modules. Sensitivity to uniform environmental background is minimal.

  17. Gamma Ray Bursts and their Optical Counterparts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) have been discovered 38 years ago and still remain one of the most intriguing puzzles of astrophysics. In this paper we remind briefly the history of GRB studies and review the current experimental evidence with the emphasis on GRB optical counterparts. At the end we introduce '' π of the Sky '' project designed to catch prompt optical emission from GRB sources. (author)

  18. New insights from cosmic gamma rays

    CERN Document Server

    Diehl, Roland

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of gamma rays from cosmic sources at MeV energies is one of the key tools for nuclear astrophysics, in its study of nuclear reactions and their impacts on objects and phenomena throughout the universe. Gamma rays trace nuclear processes most directly, as they originate from nuclear transitions following radioactive decays or high-energy collisions with excitation of nuclei. Additionally, the unique gamma-ray signature from the annihilation of positrons falls into this astronomical window and is discussed here: Cosmic positrons are often produced from beta-decays, thus also of nuclear physics origins. The nuclear reactions leading to radioactive isotopes occur inside stars and stellar explosions, which therefore constitute the main objects of such studies. In recent years, both thermonuclear and core-collapse supernova radioactivities have been measured, and complement conventional supernova observations with measurements of their prime energy sources. The diffuse radioactive afterglow of massi...

  19. The Gamma-ray Albedo of the Moon

    OpenAIRE

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; Porter, Troy A.

    2007-01-01

    We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the gamma-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of gamma rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 3-4 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disk) and exhibits a narrow pion-decay line at 67.5 MeV, perhaps unique in astrophysics. Apart from other astrophysical sources, the a...

  20. Gamma-Ray Localization of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes

    CERN Document Server

    Marisaldi, M; Trois, A; Giuliani, A; Tavani, M; Labanti, C; Fuschino, F; Bulgarelli, A; Longo, F; Barbiellini, G; Del Monte, E; Moretti, E; Trifoglio, M; Costa, E; Caraveo, P; Cattaneo, P W; Chen, A; D'Ammando, F; De Paris, G; Di Cocco, G; Di Persio, G; Donnarumma, I; Evangelista, Y; Feroci, M; Ferrari, A; Fiorini, M; Froysland, T; Galli, M; Gianotti, F; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Lipari, P; Mereghetti, S; Morselli, A; Pacciani, L; Pellizzoni, A; Perotti, F; Picozza, P; Piano, G; Pilia, M; Prest, M; Pucella, G; Rapisarda, M; Rappoldi, A; Rubini, A; Sabatini, S; Soffitta, P; Striani, E; Vallazza, E; Vercellone, S; Vittorini, V; Zambra, A; Zanello, D; Antonelli, L A; Colafrancesco, S; Cutini, S; Giommi, P; Lucarelli, F; Pittori, C; Santolamazza, P; Verrecchia, F; Salotti, L; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.128501

    2010-01-01

    Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs) are very short bursts of high energy photons and electrons originating in Earth's atmosphere. We present here a localization study of TGFs carried out at gamma-ray energies above 20 MeV based on an innovative event selection method. We use the AGILE satellite Silicon Tracker data that for the first time have been correlated with TGFs detected by the AGILE Mini-Calorimeter. We detect 8 TGFs with gamma-ray photons of energies above 20 MeV localized by the AGILE gamma-ray imager with an accuracy of 5-10 degrees at 50 MeV. Remarkably, all TGF-associated gamma rays are compatible with a terrestrial production site closer to the sub-satellite point than 400 km. Considering that our gamma rays reach the AGILE satellite at 540 km altitude with limited scattering or attenuation, our measurements provide the first precise direct localization of TGFs from space.

  1. Gamma-Ray Astronomy from the Ground

    CERN Document Server

    Horns, D

    2016-01-01

    The observation of cosmic gamma-rays from the ground is based upon the detection of gamma-ray initiated air showers. At energies between approximately $10^{11}$ eV and $10^{13}$ eV, the imaging air Cherenkov technique is a particularly successful approach to observe gamma-ray sources with energy fluxes as low as $\\approx 10^{-13}$ erg\\,cm$^{-2}\\,$s$^{-1}$. The observations of gamma-rays in this energy band probe particle acceleration in astrophysical plasma conditions and are sensitive to high energy phenomena beyond the standard model of particle physics (e.g., self-annihilating or decaying dark matter, violation of Lorentz invariance, mixing of photons with light pseudo-scalars). The current standing of the field and its major instruments are summarised briefly by presenting selected highlights. A new generation of ground based gamma-ray instruments is currently under development. The perspectives and opportunities of these future facilities will be discussed.

  2. GAMMA-LIGHT: High-Energy Astrophysics above 10 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Morselli, Aldo; Barbiellini, Guido; Bonvicini, Walter; Bulgarelli, Andrea; Cardillo, Martina; Chen, Andrew; Coppi, Paolo; Di Giorgio, Anna Maria; Donnarumma, Immacolata; Del Monte, Ettore; Fioretti, Valentina; Galli, Marcello; Giusti, Manuela; Ferrari, Attilio; Fuschino, Fabio; Giommi, Paolo; Giuliani, Andrea; Labanti, Claudio; Lipari, Paolo; Longo, Francesco; Marisaldi, Martino; Molinari, Sergio; Muñoz, Carlos; Neubert, Torsten; Orleanski, Piotr; Paredes, Josep M; Pérez-García, M Ángeles; Piano, Giovanni; Picozza, Piergiorgio; Pilia, Maura; Pittori, Carlotta; Pucella, Gianluca; Sabatini, Sabina; Striani, Edoardo; Tavani, Marco; Trois, Alessio; Vacchi, Andrea; Vercellone, Stefano; Verrecchia, Francesco; Vittorini, Valerio; Zdziarski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    High-energy phenomena in the cosmos, and in particular processes leading to the emission of gamma- rays in the energy range 10 MeV - 100 GeV, play a very special role in the understanding of our Universe. This energy range is indeed associated with non-thermal phenomena and challenging particle acceleration processes. The technology involved in detecting gamma-rays is challenging and drives our ability to develop improved instruments for a large variety of applications. GAMMA-LIGHT is a Small Mission which aims at an unprecedented advance of our knowledge in many sectors of astrophysical and Earth studies research. The Mission will open a new observational window in the low-energy gamma-ray range 10-50 MeV, and is configured to make substantial advances compared with the previous and current gamma-ray experiments (AGILE and Fermi). The improvement is based on an exquisite angular resolution achieved by GAMMA-LIGHT using state-of-the-art Silicon technology with innovative data acquisition. GAMMA-LIGHT will add...

  3. Astrophysics of Galactic charged cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Castellina, Antonella

    2011-01-01

    A review is given of the main properties of the charged component of galactic cosmic rays, particles detected at Earth with an energy spanning from tens of MeV up to about 10^19 eV. After a short introduction to the topic and an historical overview, the properties of cosmic rays are discussed with respect to different energy ranges. The origin and the propagation of nuclei in the Galaxy are dealt with from a theoretical point of view. The mechanisms leading to the acceleration of nuclei by supernova remnants and to their subsequent diffusion through the inhomogeneities of the galactic magnetic field are discussed and some clue is given on the predictions and observations of fluxes of antimatter, both from astrophysical sources and from dark matter annihilation in the galactic halo. The experimental techniques and instrumentations employed for the detection of cosmic rays at Earth are described. Direct methods are viable up to 10^14 eV, by means of experiments flown on balloons or satellites, while above that ...

  4. X-Ray Calorimeter Arrays for Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Caroline A.

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying the evolving universe. The grating spectrometers on the XMM and Chandra satellites started a new era in x-ray astronomy, but there remains a need for instrumentation that can provide higher spectral resolution with high throughput in the Fe-K band (around 6 keV) and can enable imaging spectroscopy of extended sources, such as supernova remnants and galaxy clusters. The instrumentation needed is a broad-band imaging spectrometer - basically an x-ray camera that can distinguish tens of thousands of x-ray colors. The potential benefits to astrophysics of using a low-temperature calorimeter to determine the energy of an incident x-ray photon via measurement of a small change in temperature was first articulated by S. H. Moseley over two decades ago. In the time since, technological progress has been steady, though full realization in an orbiting x-ray telescope is still awaited. A low-temperature calorimeter can be characterized by the type of thermometer it uses, and three types presently dominate the field. The first two types are temperature-sensitive resistors - semiconductors in the metal-insulator transition and superconductors operated in the superconducting-normal transition. The third type uses a paramagnetic thermometer. These types can be considered the three generations of x-ray calorimeters; by now each has demonstrated a resolving power of 2000 at 6 keV, but only a semiconductor calorimeter system has been developed to spaceflight readiness. The Soft X-ray Spectrometer on Astro-H, expected to launch in 2013, will use an array of silicon thermistors with I-IgTe x-ray absorbers that will operate at 50 mK. Both the semiconductor and superconductor calorimeters have been implemented in small arrays, kilo-pixel arrays of the superconducting calorimeters are just now being produced, and it is anticipated that much larger arrays will require the non-dissipative advantage of magnetic thermometers.

  5. PREFACE: Second School on Cosmic Rays and Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepeda, Arnulfo

    2008-02-01

    The physics of cosmic rays, gamma rays and neutrinos has become nowadays a subject of fast development. On the other hand present and planed experimental facilities installed in the American continent, attract and facilitate the involvement of local young researchers. For these reasons Professor Oscar Saavedra and his team of the high altitude cosmic ray Chacaltaya laboratory and the Universidad Mayor de San Andres in La Paz Bolivia, conceived the idea of organizing the First School on Cosmic Rays and Astrophysics in La Paz 9-20 August 2004. That school was possible, in spite of the scarcity of funds, thanks to the solidary participation of several distinguish lecturers who paid their travel and local expenses. Their lectures were made available on a CD by the local students. It was then decided that a second school be organized for 2006 in Mexico. It was held from 28 August to 15 September 15. Some of the lecturers in this Second School on Cosmic Rays and Astrophysics were too busy to write their lectures, but here we put at the disposal of the interested community the contributions of Roberto Battiston, Karen S Caballero, Edgar Casimiro, David Delepine, Giorgio Giacomelli, Gonzalo Rodríguez and Luis Villaseñor. This School was possible thanks to the financial assistance of CONACyT (Mexico), the Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados (Cinvestav), the University of Torino and the Centro Latino Americano de Fisica. Arnulfo Zepeda The editors of these proceedings are: Rebeca López Rodrigo Pelayo Oscar Saavedra Arnulfo Zepeda

  6. Applied gamma-ray spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Dams, R; Crouthamel, Carl E

    1970-01-01

    Applied Gamma-Ray Spectrometry covers real life application of the gamma-ray and the devices used in their experimental studies. This book is organized into 9 chapters, and starts with discussions of the various decay processes, the possible interaction mechanisms of gamma radiation with matter, and the intrinsic and extrinsic variables, which affect the observed gamma-ray and X-ray spectra. The subsequent chapters deal with the properties and fabrication of scintillation detectors, semiconductor detectors, and proportional gas counters. These chapters present some of the most widely utilized

  7. Optical constants in the hard x-ray/soft gamma-ray range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P.; Brejnholt, Nicolai; Romaine, S.;

    2008-01-01

    Future astrophysics missions operating in the hard X-ray/Soft Gamma ray range is slated to carry novel focusing telescopes based on the use of depth graded multilayer reflectors. Current design studies show that, at the foreseen focal lengths, it should be feasible to focus X-rays at energies as...

  8. Gamma-Rays and Neutrinos from Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Stecker, F. W.

    1996-01-01

    High energy gamma-rays and neutrinos can be produced both by the annihilation and by the possible slow decay of dark matter particles. We discuss the fluxes and spectra of such secondaries produced by dark matter particles in the universe and their observability in competition with other astrophysical gamma-ray signals and with atmospheric neutrinos. To do this, we work within the assumption that the dark matter particles are neutralinos which are the lightest supersymmetric particles (LSPs) ...

  9. Explorer for Transient Astrophysics: an X-ray transient mission for the 2020s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Jordan

    2016-04-01

    Explorer for Transient Astrophysics (ETA) is a wide-field X-ray transient mission proposed for flight starting in 2023. Through its unique imaging X-ray optics that allow a 30 deg by 20 deg FoV in three separate modules, a 1 arc min position resolution and a 10-11 erg/(sec cm2) sensitivity in 2000 sec, ETA will observe numerous events per year of X-ray transients related to compact objects, including: tidal disruptions of stars, supernova shock breakouts, neutron star bursts and superbursts, high redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts, and perhaps most exciting, X-ray counterparts of gravitational wave detections involving stellar mass and possibly supermassive black holes. The mission includes an IR Telescope that allows on-board redshift determination of gamma-ray bursts, and a small gamma-ray burst monitor to be contributed by the Technion (Israel Institute of Technology.)

  10. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovgaard, Jens

    A new method - Noise Adjusted Singular Value Decomposition, NASVD - for processing gamma-ray spectra has been developed as part of a Ph.D. project. By using this technique one is able to decompose a large set of data - for example from airborne gamma-ray surveys - into a few spectral components. ...

  11. A Search for Gamma-Ray Bursts and Pulsars, and the Application of Kalman Filters to Gamma-Ray Reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, B B

    2002-01-01

    Part I describes the analysis of periodic and transient signals in EGRET data. A method to search for the transient flux from gamma-ray bursts independent of triggers from other gamma-ray instruments is developed. Several known gamma-ray bursts were independently detected, and there is evidence for a previously unknown gamma-ray burst candidate. Statistical methods using maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference are developed and implemented to extract periodic signals from gamma-ray sources in the presence of significant astrophysical background radiation. The analysis was performed on six pulsars and three pulsar candidates. The three brightest pulsars, Crab, Vela, and Geminga, were readily identified, and would have been detected independently in the EGRET data without knowledge of the pulse period. No significant pulsation was detected in the three pulsar candidates. Eighteen X-ray binaries were examined. None showed any evidence of periodicity. In addition, methods for calculating the detection threshold...

  12. PoGOLite : The Polarised Gamma-ray Observer

    OpenAIRE

    Marini Bettolo, Cecilia

    2008-01-01

    PoGOLite is a balloon-borne experiment which will study polarised soft gamma-ray emission from astrophysical targets in the 25 keV – 80 keV energy range by applying well-type phoswich detector technology. Polarised gamma-rays are expected from a wide variety of sources including rotation-powered pulsars, accreting black holes and neutron stars, and jet-dominated active galaxies. Polarisation measurements provide a powerful probe of the gamma-ray emission mechanism and the distribution of magn...

  13. Fundamental Physics With Cosmic High-Energy Gamma Rays

    CERN Document Server

    De Angelis, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    High-energy photons (above the MeV) are a powerful probe for astrophysics and for fundamental physics under extreme conditions. During the recent years, our knowledge of the high-energy gamma-ray sky has impressively progressed thanks to the advent of new detectors for cosmic gamma rays, at ground (H.E.S.S., MAGIC, VERITAS, HAWC) and in space (AGILE, Fermi). This presentation reviews the present status of the studies of fundamental physics problems with high-energy gamma rays, and discusses the expected experimental developments.

  14. Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Observations of Gamma-ray Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Parkinson, P M Saz

    2009-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope on the recently launched Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (formerly GLAST), with its large field of view and effective area, combined with its excellent timing capabilities, is poised to revolutionize the field of gamma-ray astrophysics. The large improvement in sensitivity over EGRET is expected to result in the discovery of many new gamma-ray pulsars, which in turn should lead to fundamental advances in our understanding of pulsar physics and the role of neutron stars in the Galaxy. Almost immediately after launch, Fermi clearly detected all previously known gamma-ray pulsars and is producing high precision results on these. An extensive radio and X-ray timing campaign of known (primarily radio) pulsars is being carried out in order to facilitate the discovery of new gamma-ray pulsars. In addition, a highly efficient time-differencing technique is being used to conduct blind searches for radio-quiet pulsars, which has already resulted in new discoveries. I present some recent results...

  15. Planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical composition of a planet can be inferred from the gamma rays escaping from its surface and can be used to study its origin and evolution. The measured intensities of certain gamma rays of specific energies can be used to determine the abundances of a number of elements. The major sources of these gamma-ray lines are the decay of natural radionuclides, reactions induced by energetic galactic-cosmic-ray particles, capture of low energy neutrons, and solar-proton-induced radioactivities. The fluxes of the more intense gamma-ray lines emitted from 30 elements were calculated using current nuclear data and existing models. The source strengths for neutron-capture reactions were modified from those previously used. The fluxes emitted from a surface of average lunar composition are reported for 288 gamma-ray lines. These theoretical fluxes have been used elsewhere to convert the data from the Apollo gamma-ray spectrometers to elemental abundances and can be used with results from future missions to map the concentrations of a number of elements over a planet's surface. Detection sensitivities for these elements are examined and applications of gamma-ray spectroscopy for future orbiters to Mars and other solar-system objects are discussed

  16. Planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reedy, R.C.

    1978-01-01

    The chemical composition of a planet can be inferred from the gamma rays escaping from its surface and can be used to study its origin and evolution. The measured intensities of certain gamma rays of specific energies can be used to determine the abundances of a number of elements. The major sources of these gamma-ray lines are the decay of natural radionuclides, reactions induced by energetic galactic-cosmic-ray particles, capture of low energy neutrons, and solar-proton-induced radioactivities. The fluxes of the more intense gamma-ray lines emitted from 30 elements were calculated using current nuclear data and existing models. The source strengths for neutron-capture reactions were modified from those previously used. The fluxes emitted from a surface of average lunar composition are reported for 288 gamma-ray lines. These theoretical fluxes have been used elsewhere to convert the data from the Apollo gamma-ray spectrometers to elemental abundances and can be used with results from future missions to map the concentrations of a number of elements over a planet's surface. Detection sensitivities for these elements are examined and applications of gamma-ray spectroscopy for future orbiters to Mars and other solar-system objects are discussed.

  17. Gamma-ray Pulsar Revolution

    OpenAIRE

    Caraveo, Patrizia A.

    2013-01-01

    Isolated Neutron Stars (INSs) were the first sources identified in the field of high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. At first, in the 70s, there were only two identified sources, the Crab and Vela pulsars. However, although few in number, these objects were crucial in establishing the very concept of a gamma-ray source. Moreover, they opened up significant discovery space both in the theoretical and phenomenological fronts. The need to explain the copious gamma-ray emission of these pulsars led t...

  18. Cosmic Rays Astrophysics: The Discipline, Its Scope, and Its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghouty, A. F.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation gives an overview of the discipline surrounding cosmic ray astrophysics. It includes information on recent assertions surrounding cosmic rays, exposure levels, and a short history with specific information on the origin, acceleration, transport, and modulation of cosmic rays.

  19. A search for Gamma Ray Burst Neutrinos in AMANDA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duvoort, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    To date, no neutrinos with energies in or above the GeV range have been identified from astrophysical objects. The aim of the two analyses described in this dissertation is to observe high-energy muon neutrinos from Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). GRBs are distant sources, which were discovered by satellit

  20. Design and expected performance of a novel hybrid detector for very-high-energy gamma astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Assis, P; Blanco, A; Conceição, R; Piazzoli, B D'Ettore; De Angelis, A; Doro, M; Fonte, P; Lopes, L; Matthiae, G; Pimenta, M; Shellard, R; Tomé, B

    2016-01-01

    Current detectors for Very-High-Energy $\\gamma$-ray astrophysics are either pointing instruments with a small field of view (Cherenkov telescopes), or large field-of-view instruments with relatively large energy thresholds (extensive air shower detectors). In this article we propose a new hybrid extensive air shower detector sensitive in an energy region starting from about 100 GeV, allowing to detect with a $5\\sigma$ significance a source as faint as 10% of the Crab Nebula in one year, and able to survey half of the sky. The instrument can detect a source with the luminosity of 25 Crab at $3\\sigma$ in 1 minute, making it a very powerful tool to trigger observations of variable sources and to detect transients coupled to gravitational waves and gamma-ray bursts.

  1. Gamma-ray-selected AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giommi, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    The gamma-ray band is the most energetic part of the electromagnetic spectrum. As such it is also where selection effects are most severe, as it can only be reached by the most extreme non-thermal AGN. Blazars, with their emission dominated by non-thermal blue-shifted radiation arising in a relativistic jet pointed in the direction of the observer, naturally satisfy this though requirement. For this reason, albeit these sources are intrisically very rare (orders of magnitude less abundant than radio quiet AGN of the same optical magnitude) they almost completely dominate the extragalactic gamma-ray and very high energy sky. I will discuss the emission of different types of blazars and the selection effects that are at play in the gamma-ray band based on recent results from the current generation of gamma-ray astronomy satellites, ground-based Cherenkov telescopes, and Monte Carlo simulations.

  2. Distribution of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz Rodriguez, Mariangelly; Smith, M.; Tešic, G.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are known to be bright, irregular flashes of gamma rays that typically last just a few seconds, believed to be caused by stellar collapse or the merger of a pair of compact objects. Through previous work, it has been found that GRBs are distributed roughly uniformly over the entire sky, rather than being confined to the relatively narrow band of the Milky Way. Using the Python programming language, we generated a model of GRBs over cosmological distances, based on current empirical GRB distributions. The grbsim python module uses the acceptance-rejection Monte Carlo method to simulate the luminosity and redshift of a large population of GRBs, including cosmological effects such as dark energy and dark matter terms that modify the large-scale structure of space-time. The results of running grbsim are demonstrated to match the distribution of GRBs observed by the Burst Alert Telescope on NASA’s Swift satellite. The grbsim module will subsequently be used to simulate gamma ray and neutrino events for the Astrophysical Multimessenger Observatory Network.

  3. Balloon-borne gamma-ray polarimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Pearce, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The physical processes postulated to explain the high-energy emission mechanisms of compact astrophysical sources often yield polarised soft gamma rays (X-rays). PoGOLite is a balloon-borne polarimeter operating in the 25-80 keV energy band. The polarisation of incident photons is reconstructed using Compton scattering and photoelectric absorption in an array of phoswich detector cells comprising plastic and BGO scintillators, surrounded by a BGO side anticoincidence shield. The polarimeter is aligned to observation targets using a custom attitude control system. The maiden balloon flight is scheduled for summer 2011 from the Esrange Space Centre with the Crab and Cygnus X-1 as the primary observational targets.

  4. Wavelet-based techniques for the gamma-ray sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Samuel D.; Fox, Patrick J.; Cholis, Ilias; Lee, Samuel K.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate how the image analysis technique of wavelet decomposition can be applied to the gamma-ray sky to separate emission on different angular scales. New structures on scales that differ from the scales of the conventional astrophysical foreground and background uncertainties can be robustly extracted, allowing a model-independent characterization with no presumption of exact signal morphology. As a test case, we generate mock gamma-ray data to demonstrate our ability to extract extended signals without assuming a fixed spatial template. For some point source luminosity functions, our technique also allows us to differentiate a diffuse signal in gamma-rays from dark matter annihilation and extended gamma-ray point source populations in a data-driven way.

  5. Wavelet-Based Techniques for the Gamma-Ray Sky

    CERN Document Server

    McDermott, Samuel D; Cholis, Ilias; Lee, Samuel K

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate how the image analysis technique of wavelet decomposition can be applied to the gamma-ray sky to separate emission on different angular scales. New structures on scales that differ from the scales of the conventional astrophysical foreground and background uncertainties can be robustly extracted, allowing a model-independent characterization with no presumption of exact signal morphology. As a test case, we generate mock gamma-ray data to demonstrate our ability to extract extended signals without assuming a fixed spatial template. For some point source luminosity functions, our technique also allows us to differentiate a diffuse signal in gamma-rays from dark matter annihilation and extended gamma-ray point source populations in a data-driven way.

  6. Location and origin of gamma-rays in blazars

    CERN Document Server

    Rani, B; Hodgson, J A; Zensus, J A

    2016-01-01

    One of the most intriguing and challenging quests of current astrophysics is to understand the physical conditions and processes responsible for production of high-energy particles, and emission of \\gamma-rays. A combination of high-resolution Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) images with broadband flux variability measurements is a unique way to probe the emission mechanisms at the bases of jets. Our analysis of \\gamma-ray flux variability observed by the Fermi-LAT (Large Area Telescope) along with the parsec-scale jet kinematics suggests that the $\\gamma$-ray emission in blazar S5 0716+714 has a significant correlation with the mm-VLBI core flux and the orientation of jet outflow on parsec scales. These results indicate that the inner jet morphology has a tight connection with the observed $\\gamma$-ray flares. An overview of our current understanding on high-energy radiation processes, their origin, and location is presented here.

  7. Gamma-ray lines from dark matter decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No known astrophysical process can generate a monoenergetic gamma-ray with energy in the TeV range, resulting in very stringent constraints on the lifetime of dark matter particles which decay producing gamma-ray lines. We derive in this work constraints on the decay width from observations at current IACTs as well as the estimated sensitivity of the projected CTA. We also discuss the implications of these limits for two dark matter models where the dark matter particle decays at tree level producing gamma-ray lines, namely the gravitino in supersymmetric models without R-parity conservation and a vector of a hidden SU(2) gauge group. We also discuss the constraints on scenarios where the gamma-ray line is generated at the one loop level.

  8. Dissecting the Gamma-Ray Background in Search of Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cholis, Ilias; Hooper, Dan; McDermott, Samuel D.

    2014-02-01

    Several classes of astrophysical sources contribute to the approximately isotropic gamma-ray background measured by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. In this paper, we use Fermi's catalog of gamma-ray sources (along with corresponding source catalogs at infrared and radio wavelengths) to build and constrain a model for the contributions to the extragalactic gamma-ray background from astrophysical sources, including radio galaxies, star-forming galaxies, and blazars. We then combine our model with Fermi's measurement of the gamma-ray background to derive constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross section, including contributions from both extragalactic and galactic halos and subhalos. The resulting constraints are competitive with the strongest current constraints from the Galactic Center and dwarf spheroidal galaxies. As Fermi continues to measure the gamma-ray emission from a greater number of astrophysical sources, it will become possible to more tightly constrain the astrophysical contributions to the extragalactic gamma-ray background. We project that with 10 years of data, Fermi's measurement of this background combined with the improved constraints on the astrophysical source contributions will yield a sensitivity to dark matter annihilations that exceeds the strongest current constraints by a factor of ~ 5 - 10.

  9. Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marisaldi, Martino, E-mail: marisaldi@iasfbo.inaf.it [INAF-IASF Bologna, Via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Fuschino, Fabio; Labanti, Claudio [INAF-IASF Bologna, Via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Tavani, Marco [INAF-IASF Roma, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Argan, Andrea [INAF, Viale del Parco Mellini 84, 00136 Roma (Italy); Del Monte, Ettore [INAF-IASF Roma, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Longo, Francesco; Barbiellini, Guido [Dipartimento di Fisica Università di Trieste and INFN Trieste, via A. Valerio 2, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Giuliani, Andrea [INAF-IASF Milano, Via Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Trois, Alessio [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, loc. Poggio dei Pini, strada 54, I-09012 Capoterra (Italy); Bulgarelli, Andrea; Gianotti, Fulvio; Trifoglio, Massimo [INAF-IASF Bologna, Via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy)

    2013-08-21

    Lightning and thunderstorm systems in general have been recently recognized as powerful particle accelerators, capable of producing electrons, positrons, gamma-rays and neutrons with energies as high as several tens of MeV. In fact, these natural systems turn out to be the highest energy and most efficient natural particle accelerators on Earth. Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) are millisecond long, very intense bursts of gamma-rays and are one of the most intriguing manifestation of these natural accelerators. Only three currently operative missions are capable of detecting TGFs from space: the RHESSI, Fermi and AGILE satellites. In this paper we review the characteristics of TGFs, including energy spectrum, timing structure, beam geometry and correlation with lightning, and the basic principles of the associated production models. Then we focus on the recent AGILE discoveries concerning the high energy extension of the TGF spectrum up to 100 MeV, which is difficult to reconcile with current theoretical models.

  10. Zeptosecond $\\gamma$-ray pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Klaiber, Michael; Keitel, Christoph H

    2007-01-01

    High-order harmonic generation (HHG) in the relativistic regime is employed to obtain zeptosecond pulses of $\\gamma$-rays. The harmonics are generated from atomic systems in counterpropagating strong attosecond laser pulse trains of linear polarization. In this setup recollisions of the ionized electrons can be achieved in the highly relativistic regime via a reversal of the commonly deteriorating drift and without instability of the electron dynamics such as in a standing laser wave. As a result, coherent attosecond $\\gamma$-rays in the 10 MeV energy range as well as coherent zeptosecond $\\gamma$-ray pulses of MeV photon energy for time-resolved nuclear spectroscopy become feasible.

  11. Gamma rays in thunderstorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Not only lightning occur in thunderstorms but also luminous flashes that are emitted upwards over the clouds. These flashes have been studied for 20 years. Satellites have detected gamma flashes with an energy of 30 MeV. It was thought that these flashes resulted from collisions between cosmic particles and cloud molecules but recent results from the Italian Agile satellite question this explanation. Gamma flashes with an energy of 100 MeV have been detected which is too high an energy to be explained by collisions with cosmic particles. Another result show the existence of very strong acceleration of electrons in areas where some type of flashes are likely to happen. (A.C.)

  12. Gamma-ray Imaging Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetter, K; Mihailescu, L; Nelson, K; Valentine, J; Wright, D

    2006-10-05

    In this document we discuss specific implementations for gamma-ray imaging instruments including the principle of operation and describe systems which have been built and demonstrated as well as systems currently under development. There are several fundamentally different technologies each with specific operational requirements and performance trade offs. We provide an overview of the different gamma-ray imaging techniques and briefly discuss challenges and limitations associated with each modality (in the appendix we give detailed descriptions of specific implementations for many of these technologies). In Section 3 we summarize the performance and operational aspects in tabular form as an aid for comparing technologies and mapping technologies to potential applications.

  13. Gamma-ray burst spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teegarden, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    A review of recent results in gamma-ray burst spectroscopy is given. Particular attention is paid to the recent discovery of emission and absorption features in the burst spectra. These lines represent the strongest evidence to date that gamma-ray bursts originate on or near neutron stars. Line parameters give information on the temperature, magnetic field and possibly the gravitational potential of the neutron star. The behavior of the continuum spectrum is also discussed. A remarkably good fit to nearly all bursts is obtained with a thermal-bremsstrahlung-like continuum. Significant evolution is observed of both the continuum and line features within most events.

  14. Minicourses in Astrophysics, Modular Approach, Vol. I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Univ., Chicago.

    This is the first volume of a two-volume minicourse in astrophysics. It contains chapters on the following topics: planetary atmospheres; X-ray astronomy; radio astrophysics; molecular astrophysics; and gamma-ray astrophysics. Each chapter gives much technical discussion, mathematical treatment, diagrams, and examples. References are included with…

  15. Neutrinos from Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Mannheim, K

    2000-01-01

    The observed fluxes of cosmic rays and gamma rays are used to infer the maximum allowed high-energy neutrino flux allowed for Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs), following Mannheim, Protheroe, and Rachen (2000). It is shown that if GRBs produce the ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays, they should contribute (a) at least 10% of the extragalactic gamma ray background between 3 MeV and 30 GeV, contrary to their observed energy flux which is only a minute fraction of this flux, and (b) a cumulative neutrino flux a factor of 20 below the AMANDA (Neutrino 2000) limit on isotropic neutrinos. This could have two implications, either GRBs do not produce the ultrahigh energy cosmic rays or that the GRBs are strongly beamed and emit most of their power at energies well above 100 GeV implausibly increasing the energy requirements, but consistent with the marginal detections of a few low-redshift GRBs by MILAGRITO, HEGRA-AIROBICC, and the Tibet-Array. All crucial measurements to test the models will be available in the next few years. Thes...

  16. Novae in gamma-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Hernanz, M

    2013-01-01

    Classical novae produce radioactive nuclei which are emitters of gamma-rays in the MeV range. Some examples are the lines at 478 and 1275 keV (from 7Be and 22Na) and the positron-electron annihilation emission (511 keV line and a continuum below this energy, with a cut-off at 20-30 keV). The analysis of gamma-ray spectra and light curves is a potential unique and powerful tool both to trace the corresponding isotopes and to give insights on the properties of the expanding envelope determining its transparency. Another possible origin of gamma-rays is the acceleration of particles up to very high energies, so that either neutral pions or inverse Compton processes produce gamma-rays of energies larger than 100 MeV. MeV photons during nova explosions have not been detected yet, although several attempts have been made in the last decades; on the other hand, GeV photons from novae have been detected in some particular novae, in symbiotic binaries, where the companion is a red giant with a wind, instead of a main ...

  17. Gamma ray slush hydrogen monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jag J.; Shen, Chih-Peng; Sprinkle, Danny R.

    1992-01-01

    Mass attenuation for 109Cd radiation have been measured in mixtures of phases and in single phases of five chemical compounds. As anticipated, the mass attenuation coefficients are independent of the phases of the test chemicals. It is recommended that a slush hydrogen monitoring system based on low energy gamma ray attenuation be developed for utilization aboard the NASP.

  18. Short duration gamma ray bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Patrick Das Gupta

    2004-10-01

    After a short review of gamma ray bursts (GRBs), we discuss the physical implications of strong statistical correlations seen among some of the parameters of short duration bursts (90 < 2 s). Finally, we conclude with a brief sketch of a new unified model for long and short GRBs.

  19. GAMMA-RAY AND X-RAY EMISSION FROM GAMMA-RAY-LOUD BLAZARS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG XIONG; ZHAO GANG; XIE GUANG-ZHONG; ZHENG GUANG-SHENG; ZHANG LI

    2001-01-01

    We present a strong correlation of the gamma-ray (above 100 MeV) mean spectral indices aγ and X-ray (1 keV)mean spectral indices cX for 34 gamma-ray-loud blazars (16 BL Lac objects and 18 flat spectrum radio quasars). Astrong correlation is also found between the gamma-ray flux densities F-γ and X-ray flux densities Fx in the low state for 47 blazars (17 BL Lac and 30 flat spectrum radio quasars). Possible correlation on the gamma-ray emission mechanism is discussed. We suggest that the main gamma-ray radiation mechanism is probably the synchrotron process. The gamma-ray emission may be somewhat different from that of BL Lac objects and flat spectrum radio quasars.

  20. CELESTE an atmospheric Cherenkov telescope for high energy gamma astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Paré, E; Bazer-Bachi, R; Bergeret, H; Berny, F; Briand, N; Bruel, P; Cerutti, M; Collon, J; Cordier, A; Cornebise, P; Debiais, G; Dezalay, J P; Dumora, D; Durand, E; Eschstruth, P T; Espigat, P; Fabre, B; Fleury, P; Gilly, J; Gouillaud, J C; Gregory, C; Herault, N; Holder, J; Hrabovsky, M; Incerti, S; Jouenne, A; Kalt, L; Legallou, R; Lott, B; Lodygensky, O; Manigot, P; Manseri, H; Manitaz, H; Martin, M; Morano, R; Morineaud, G; Muenz, F; Musquere, A; Naurois, M D; Neveu, J; Noppe, J M; Olive, J F; Palatka, M; Pérez, A; Quebert, J; Rebii, A; Reposeur, T; Rob, L; Roy, P; Sans, J L; Sako, T; Schovanek, P; Smith, D A; Snabre, P; Villard, G

    2002-01-01

    CELESTE is an atmospheric Cherenkov telescope based on the sampling method which makes use of the de-commissioned THEMIS solar electrical plant in the French Pyrenees. A large (2000 m sup 2) mirror surface area from 40 independent heliostats followed by a secondary optic, a trigger system using analog summing techniques and signal digitization with 1 GHz flash ADCs make possible the detection of cosmic gamma-rays down to 30 GeV. This paper provides a detailed technical description of the CELESTE installation.

  1. Towards a common analysis framework for gamma-ray astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Knödlseder, Jürgen; Deil, Christoph; Schulz, Anneli; Grondin, Marie-Hélène; Martin, Pierrick; Brau-Nogué, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    Thanks to the success of current gamma-ray telescopes (Fermi, H.E.S.S., MAGIC, VERITAS), and in view of the prospects of planned observatories such as the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) or the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (HAWC), gamma-ray astronomy is becoming an integral part of modern astrophysical research. Analysis today relies on a large diversity of tools and software frameworks that were specifically and independently developed for each instrument. With the aim of unifying the analysis of gamma-ray data, we are currently developing GammaLib (http://sourceforge.net/projects/gammalib), a C++ library interfaced to Python that provides a framework for an instrument independent analysis of gamma-ray data. On top of GammaLib we have created ctools (http://cta.irap.omp.eu/ctools), a set of analysis executables that is being developed as one of the prototypes for the CTA high-level science analysis framework, but which is equally suited for the analysis of gamma-ray data from the existing Fermi-...

  2. Atomic Data for X-ray Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kallman, T R

    2006-01-01

    We review the available atomic data used for interpreting and modeling X-ray observations. The applications for these data can be divided into several levels of detail, ranging from compilations which can be used with direct inspection of raw data, such as line finding lists, to synthetic spectra which attempt to fit to an entire observed dataset simultaneously. This review covers cosmic sources driven by both electron ionization and photoionization and touches briefly on planetary surfaces and atmospheres. We review all of this, the applications to X-ray astronomy, the available data, recommendations for astronomical users, and attempt to point out the applications where the shortcomings are greatest

  3. Gamma ray tests of Minimal Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirelli, Marco [Institut de Physique Théorique, Université Paris Saclay, CNRS, CEA, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hambye, Thomas [Service de Physique Theórique, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Boulevard du Triomphe, CP225, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Panci, Paolo [Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095 CNRS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 98 bis Boulevard Arago, Paris 75014 (France); Sala, Filippo; Taoso, Marco [Institut de Physique Théorique, Université Paris Saclay, CNRS, CEA, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-10-12

    We reconsider the model of Minimal Dark Matter (a fermionic, hypercharge-less quintuplet of the EW interactions) and compute its gamma ray signatures. We compare them with a number of gamma ray probes: the galactic halo diffuse measurements, the galactic center line searches and recent dwarf galaxies observations. We find that the original minimal model, whose mass is fixed at 9.4 TeV by the relic abundance requirement, is constrained by the line searches from the Galactic Center: it is ruled out if the Milky Way possesses a cuspy profile such as NFW but it is still allowed if it has a cored one. Observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies are also relevant (in particular searches for lines), and ongoing astrophysical progresses on these systems have the potential to eventually rule out the model. We also explore a wider mass range, which applies to the case in which the relic abundance requirement is relaxed. Most of our results can be safely extended to the larger class of multi-TeV WIMP DM annihilating into massive gauge bosons.

  4. New Worlds / New Horizons Science with an X-ray Astrophysics Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Randall K.; Bookbinder, Jay A.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Bandler, Simon; Brandt, W. N.; Hughes, John P.; McCammon, Dan; Matsumoto, Hironori; Mushotzky, Richard; Osten, Rachel A.; Petre, Robert; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Ptak, Andrew; Ramsey, Brian; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Schattenburg, Mark

    2014-01-01

    In 2013 NASA commenced a design study for an X-ray Astrophysics Probe to address the X-ray science goals and program prioritizations of the Decadal Survey New World New Horizons (NWNH) with a cost cap of approximately $1B. Both the NWNH report and 2011 NASA X-ray mission concept study found that high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy performed with an X-ray microcalorimeter would enable the most highly rated NWNH X-ray science. Here we highlight some potential science topics, namely: 1) a direct, strong-field test of General Relativity via the study of accretion onto black holes through relativistic broadened Fe lines and their reverberation in response to changing hard X-ray continuum, 2) understanding the evolution of galaxies and clusters by mapping temperatures, abundances and dynamics in hot gas, 3) revealing the physics of accretion onto stellar-mass black holes from companion stars and the equation of state of neutron stars through timing studies and time-resolved spectroscopy of X-ray binaries and 4) feedback from AGN and star formation shown in galaxy-scale winds and jets. In addition to these high-priority goals, an X-ray astrophysics probe would be a general-purpose observatory that will result in invaluable data for other NWNH topics such as stellar astrophysics, protostars and their impact on protoplanetary systems, X-ray spectroscopy of transient phenomena such as high-z gamma-ray bursts and tidal capture of stars by massive black holes, and searches for dark matter decay.

  5. Possible applications of synchrotron radiation to x-ray astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the instrumentation for observations in high energy astrophysics has grown increasingly sophisticated, so too has the need developed for improved calibration techniques and facilities. Contemporary satellite-borne observatories contain high resolution spectrometers, polarimeters and x-ray image-forming optics focussed on position sensitive detectors. The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, a planned free-flying, shuttle-launched x-ray telescope (1.2 m diameter, 10 m focal length), will provide 0.5 arcsecond imagery over a several arcminute field and spectrometry with E/ΔE > 1000 in the energy range 0.1 to 8 keV. Other telescopes in the planning stage include the possibility of approx. 0.5 arcminute imagery at energies in excess of 100 keV. A few examples from the long list of calibration needs of inidvidual detectors and subsystems are listed as applications of synchrotron radiation

  6. International spring school observing the X-and gamma-ray sky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, J.; Longair, M.; Von Ballmoos, P.; Daigne, F.; Baring, M.; Gudel, M.; King, A.; Dotani, T.; Arnaud, M.; Gudel, M.; Malzac, J.; Servillat, M.; Soldi, S.; Corbel, S.; Beckmann, V.; Rodriguez, J.; Erlund, M.; Bodaghee, A.; Graham, J.; Ruiz, A.; Corbel, S.; Fabian, A.; Tagger, M.; Grenier, I.; Bernard, R.; Jackson, N.; Eckart, A.; Grenier, I.; Belloni, T.; Stella, L.; Vink, J.; KnodLseder, J.; Hermsen, W.; Ferrando, Ph.; Ibragimov, A

    2006-07-01

    This school, dedicated to young researchers, will clarify our present knowledge of the X-ray sky and give the opportunity to learn about the observatories and tools which are available. The contributions have been organized into 3 issues: -) fundamental physics, -) X-ray and Gamma-ray instruments and analysis techniques, and -) astrophysical objects. This document gathers only the slides of the presentations.

  7. International spring school observing the X-and gamma-ray sky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This school, dedicated to young researchers, will clarify our present knowledge of the X-ray sky and give the opportunity to learn about the observatories and tools which are available. The contributions have been organized into 3 issues: -) fundamental physics, -) X-ray and Gamma-ray instruments and analysis techniques, and -) astrophysical objects. This document gathers only the slides of the presentations

  8. X-Ray Observations of Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows

    OpenAIRE

    Frontera, Filippo

    2004-01-01

    The discovery by the BeppoSAX satellite of X-ray afterglow emission from the gamma-ray burst which occurred on 28 February 1997 produced a revolution in our knowledge of the gamma-ray burst phenomenon. Along with the discovery of X-ray afterglows, the optical afterglows of gamma-ray bursts were discovered and the distance issue was settled, at least for long $\\gamma$-ray bursts. The 30 year mystery of the gamma-ray burst phenomenon is now on the way to solution. Here I rewiew the observationa...

  9. Cascaded Gamma Rays as a Probe of Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Kohta

    2014-06-01

    Very-high-energy (VHE) and ultra-high-energy (UHE) gamma rays from extragalactic sources experience electromagnetic cascades during their propagation in intergalactic space. Recent gamma-ray data on TeV blazars and the diffuse gamma-ray background may have hints of the cascade emission, which are especially interesting if it comes from UHE cosmic rays. I show that cosmic-ray-induced cascades can be discriminated from gamma-ray-induced cascades with detailed gamma-ray spectra. I also discuss roles of structured magnetic fields, which suppress inverse-Compton pair halos/echoes but lead to guaranteed signals - synchrotron pair halos/echoes.

  10. High-energy gamma-ray sources of cosmological origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Pierre; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann

    2016-06-01

    The current generation of instruments in gamma-ray astrophysics launched a new era in the search for a dark matter signal in the high-energy sky. Such searches are said indirect, in the sense that the presence of a dark matter particle is inferred from the detection of products of its pair-annihilation or decay. They have recently started to probe the natural domain of existence for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), the favorite dark matter candidates today. In this article, we review the basic framework for indirect searches and we present a status of current limits obtained with gamma-ray observations. We also devote a section to another possible class of cosmological gamma-ray sources, primordial black holes, also considered as a potential constituent of dark matter. xml:lang="fr"

  11. Airborne gamma ray spectrometer surveying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in its role as collector and disseminator of information on nuclear techniques has long had an interest in gamma ray spectrometer methods and has published a number of Technical Reports on various aspects of the subject. At an Advisory Group Meeting held in Vienna in November 1986 to review appropriate activities the IAEA could take following the Chernobyl accident, it was recommended that preparation begin on a new Technical Report on airborne gamma ray spectrometer surveying, taking into account the use of the technique for environmental monitoring as well as for nuclear emergency response requirements. Shortly thereafter the IAEA became the lead organization in the Radioelement Geochemical Mapping section of the International Geological Correlation Programme/United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Project on International Geochemical Mapping. These two factors led to the preparation of the present Technical Report. 18 figs, 4 tabs

  12. Gamma-ray performance of the GAMMA-400 detector

    CERN Document Server

    Cumani, P; Bonvicini, V; Topchiev, N P; Adriani, O; Aptekar, R L; Arkhangelskaja, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Bergstrom, L; Berti, E; Bigongiari, G; Bobkov, S G; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bonechi, S; Bongi, M; Bottai, S; Castellini, G; Cattaneo, P W; Dedenko, G L; De Donato, C; Dogiel, V A; Gorbunov, M S; Gusakov, Yu V; Hnatyk, B I; Kadilin, V V; Kaplin, V A; Kaplun, A A; Kheymits, M D; Korepanov, V E; Larsson, J; Leonov, A A; Loginov, V A; Longo, F; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P S; Menshenin, A L; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Moiseev, A A; Mori, N; Moskalenko, I V; Naumov, P Yu; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Popov, A V; Rappoldi, A; Ricciarini, S; Runtso, M F; Ryde, F; Sarkar, R; Serdin, O V; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Suchkov, S I; Tavani, M; Taraskin, A A; Tiberio, A; Tyurin, E M; Ulanov, M V; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Yurkin, Yu T; Zampa, N; Zirakashvili, V N; Zverev, V G

    2015-01-01

    GAMMA-400 is a new space mission, designed as a dual experiment, capable to study both high energy gamma rays (from $\\sim$100 MeV to few TeV) and cosmic rays (electrons up to 20 TeV and nuclei up to $\\sim$10$^{15}$ eV). The full simulation framework of GAMMA-400 is based on the Geant4 toolkit. The details of the gamma-ray reconstruction pipeline in the three main instruments (Tracker, Imaging Calorimeter, Homogeneous Calorimeter) will be outlined. The performance of GAMMA-400 (PSF, effective area and sensitivity) have been obtained using this framework. The most updated results on them will be shown.

  13. Gamma-ray Astronomy: Implications for Fundamental Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rico, Javier

    2011-01-01

    Gamma-ray Astronomy studies cosmic accelerators through their electromagnetic radiation in the energy range between ~100 MeV and ~100 TeV. The present most sensitive observations in this energy band are performed, from space, by the Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi satellite and, from Earth, by the Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes MAGIC, H.E.S.S. and VERITAS. These instruments have revolutionized the field of Gamma-ray Astronomy, discovering different populations of gamma-ray emitters and studying in detail the non-thermal astrophysical processes producing this high-energy radiation. The scientific objectives of these observatories include also questions of fundamental physics. With gamma-ray instruments we study the origin of Galactic cosmic rays, testing the hypothesis or whether they are mainly produced in supernova explosions. Also, we obtain the most sensitive measurement of the cosmic electron-positron spectrum between 20 GeV and 5 TeV. By observing the gamma-ray emission from sources at cosmologi...

  14. New $^{32}$Cl(p,$\\gamma$)$^{33}$Ar reaction rate for astrophysical rp-process calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Schatz, H; Brown, B A; Clément, R; Sakharuk, A A; Sherrill, B M

    2005-01-01

    The $^{32}$Cl(p,$\\gamma$)$^{33}$Ar reaction rate is of potential importance in the rp-process powering type I X-ray bursts. Recently Clement et al. \\cite{CBB04} presented new data on excitation energies for low lying proton unbound states in $^{33}$Ar obtained with a new method developed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. We use their data, together with a direct capture model and a USD shell model calculation to derive a new reaction rate for use in astrophysical model calculations. In particular, we take into account capture on the first excited state in $^{32}$Cl, and also present a realistic estimate of the remaining uncertainties. We find that the $^{32}$Cl(p,$\\gamma$)$^{33}$Ar reaction rate is dominated entirely by capture on the first excited state in $^{32}$Cl over the whole temperature range relevant in X-ray bursts. In the temperature range from 0.2 to 1 GK the rate is up to a factor of 70 larger than the previously recommended rate based on shell model calculations only. The unce...

  15. Gamma-Ray Interactions for Reachback Analysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Myers, Steven Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-02

    This presentation is a part of the DHS LSS spectroscopy training course and presents an overview of the following concepts: identification and measurement of gamma rays; use of gamma counts and energies in research. Understanding the basic physics of how gamma rays interact with matter can clarify how certain features in a spectrum were produced.

  16. Final report: VHE [very high energy] gamma-ray astronomy at Iowa State University, 1991-2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter-Lewis, D.

    2001-01-30

    A brief summary of the important results and a listing of publications which have resulted from the Iowa State University Very High Energy Gamma-ray Astrophysics Program for the decade 1991-2000 are given.

  17. Physics with gamma-beams and charged particle detectors: I) Nuclear structure II) Nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gai, Moshe [LNS at Avery Point, University of Connecticut, Groton, CT 06340-6097, USA and Wright Lab, Dept. of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8124 and the Charged Particle Working Group (CPWG) of the Technical Design Report (TDR) (United States)

    2015-02-24

    The Charged Particle Working Group (CPWG) is proposing to construct large area Silicon Strip Detector (SSD), a gas Time Projection Chamber detector read by an electronic readout system (eTPC) and a Bubble Chamber (BC) containing superheated high purity water to be used in measurements utilizing intense gamma-ray beams from the newly constructed ELI-NP facility at Magurele, Bucharest in Romania. We intend to use the SSD and eTPC detectors to address essential problems in nuclear structure physics, such as clustering and the many alpha-decay of light nuclei such as {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O. All three detectors (SSD, eTPC and BC) will be used to address central problems in nuclear astrophysics such as the astrophysical cross section factor of the {sup 12}C(α,γ) reaction and other processes central to stellar evolution. The CPWG intends to submit to the ELI-NP facility a Technical Design Report (TDR) for the proposed detectors.

  18. The STACEE Ground-Based Gamma-ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragan, Ken

    2002-04-01

    The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is a ground-based instrument designed to study astrophysical sources of gamma rays in the energy range from 50 to 500 GeV using an array of heliostat mirrors at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in New Mexico. The mirrors collect Cherenkov light generated by gamma-ray air showers and concentrate it onto cameras composed of photomultiplier tubes. The STACEE instrument is now complete, and uses a total of 64 heliostats. Prototype instruments, using smaller numbers of heliostats, have previously detected gamma emission from both the Crab Nebula and the Active Galactic Nucleus Mrk421. The complete instrument has a lower threshold -- approximately 50 GeV -- than those prototypes due to superior triggering and electronics, including flash ADCs for every channel.We will discuss the performance of the complete instrument in its first full season of operation, and present preliminary results of selected observations.

  19. The Agile Alert System For Gamma-Ray Transients

    CERN Document Server

    Bulgarelli, A; Gianotti, F; Tavani, M; Parmiggiani, N; Fioretti, V; Chen, A W; Vercellone, S; Pittori, C; Verrecchia, F; Lucarelli, F; Santolamazza, P; Fanari, G; Giommi, P; Beneventano, D; Argan, A; Trois, A; Scalise, E; Longo, F; Pellizzoni, A; Pucella, G; Colafrancesco, S; Conforti, V; Tempesta, P; Cerone, M; Sabatini, P; Annoni, G; Valentini, G; Salotti, L

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, a new generation of space missions offered great opportunities of discovery in high-energy astrophysics. In this article we focus on the scientific operations of the Gamma-Ray Imaging Detector (GRID) onboard the AGILE space mission. The AGILE-GRID, sensitive in the energy range of 30 MeV-30 GeV, has detected many gamma-ray transients of galactic and extragalactic origins. This work presents the AGILE innovative approach to fast gamma-ray transient detection, which is a challenging task and a crucial part of the AGILE scientific program. The goals are to describe: (1) the AGILE Gamma-Ray Alert System, (2) a new algorithm for blind search identification of transients within a short processing time, (3) the AGILE procedure for gamma-ray transient alert management, and (4) the likelihood of ratio tests that are necessary to evaluate the post-trial statistical significance of the results. Special algorithms and an optimized sequence of tasks are necessary to reach our goal. Data are automatically ...

  20. Experimental study of the astrophysical gamma-process reaction 124Xe(alpha,gamma)128Ba

    CERN Document Server

    Halász, Z; Gyürky, Gy; Elekes, Z; Fülöp, Zs; Szücs, T; Kiss, G G; Szegedi, N; Rauscher, T; Görres, J; Wiescher, M

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of heavy, proton rich isotopes in the astrophysical gamma-process proceeds through photodisintegration reactions. For the improved understanding of the process, the rates of the involved nuclear reactions must be known. The reaction 128Ba(g,a)124Xe was found to affect the abundance of the p nucleus 124Xe. Since the stellar rate for this reaction cannot be determined by a measurement directly, the aim of the present work was to measure the cross section of the inverse 124Xe(a,g)128Ba reaction and to compare the results with statistical model predictions. Of great importance is the fact that data below the (a,n) threshold was obtained. Studying simultaneously the 124Xe(a,n)127Ba reaction channel at higher energy allowed to further identify the source of a discrepancy between data and prediction. The 124Xe + alpha cross sections were measured with the activation method using a thin window 124Xe gas cell. The studied energy range was between E = 11 and 15 MeV close above the astrophysically relevant...

  1. Gamma-Ray Interactions for Reachback Analysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Myers, Steven Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-02

    This presentation is a part of the DHS LSS spectroscopy training course and presents an overview of the following concepts: identification and measurement of gamma rays; use of gamma counts and energies in research.

  2. X-Ray and Gamma-Ray Radiation Detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Disclosed is a semiconductor radiation detector for detecting X-ray and / or gamma-ray radiation. The detector comprises a converter element for converting incident X-ray and gamma-ray photons into electron-hole pairs, at least one cathode, a plurality of detector electrodes arranged with a pitch...

  3. HESS VHE Gamma-Ray Sources Without Identified Counterparts

    CERN Document Server

    Aharonian, F; Barresde Almeida, U; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Behera, B; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bolz, O; Borrel, V; Braun, I; Brion, E; Brown, A M; Buhler, R; Bulik, T; Büsching, I; Boutelier, T; Carrigan, S; Chadwick, P M; Chounet, L M; Clapson, A C; Coignet, G; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Dalton, M; Degrange, B; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ata, A; Domainko, i W; O'Connor-Drury, L; Dubois, F; Dubus, G; Dyks, J; Egberts, K; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Feinstein, F; Fiasson, A; Förster, A; Fontaine, G; Funk, Seb; Fuling, M; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, D; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hoffmann, A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Hoppe, S; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; De Jager, O C; Jung, I; Katarzynski, K; Kendziorra, E; Kerschhaggl, M; Khelifi, B; Keogh, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Lamanna, G; Latham, I J; Lemiere, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J P; Lohse, T; Martin, J M; Martineau-Huynh, O; Marcowith, A; Masterson, C; Maurin, D; Maurin, G; McComb, T J L; Moderski, R; Moulin, E; De Naurois, Mathieu; Nedbal, D; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Olive, J P; de Ona Wilhelmi, E; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Ostrowski, M; Panter, M; Pedaletti, G; Pelletier, G; Petrucci, P O; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Ranchon, S; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Rayner, S M; Renaud, M; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rolland, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Ruppel, J; Sahakian, V V; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schock, F; Schroder, R; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Shalchi, A; Sol, H; Spangler, D; Stawarz, L; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Superina, G; Tam, P H; Tavernet, J P; Terrier, R; Van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vialle, J P; Vincent, P; Vivier, M; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A

    2007-01-01

    The detection of gamma rays in the very-high-energy (VHE) energy range (100 GeV--100 TeV) provides a direct view of the parent population of ultra-relativistic particles found in astrophysical sources. For this reason, VHE gamma rays are useful for understanding the underlying astrophysical processes in non-thermal sources. We investigate unidentified VHE gamma-ray sources that have been discovered with HESS in the most sensitive blind survey of the Galactic plane at VHE energies conducted so far. The HESS array of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs) has a high sensitivity compared with previous instruments(~ 0.01 Crab) in 25 hours observation time for a 5 sigma point-source detection), and with its large field of view, is well suited for scan-based observations. The on-going HESS survey of the inner Galaxy has revealed a large number of new VHE sources, and for each we attempt to associate the VHE emission with multi-wavelength data in the radio through X-ray wavebands. For each of the eight uni...

  4. Gravitational microlensing of gamma-ray blazars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    F. Torres, Diego; E. Romero, Gustavo; F. Eiroa, Ernesto;

    2003-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the effects of gravitational microlensing on compact and distant $\\gamma$-ray blazars. These objects have $\\gamma$-ray emitting regions which are small enough as to be affected by microlensing effects produced by stars lying in intermediate galaxies. We analyze...... the temporal evolution of the gamma-ray magnification for sources moving in a caustic pattern field, where the combined effects of thousands of stars are taken into account using a numerical technique. We propose that some of the unidentified $\\gamma$-ray sources (particularly some of those lying at high...... galactic latitude whose gamma-ray statistical properties are very similar to detected $\\gamma$-ray blazars) are indeed the result of gravitational lensing magnification of background undetected Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs)....

  5. Understanding Doppler Broadening of Gamma Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sullivan, John P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-07-03

    Doppler-broadened gamma ray peaks are observed routinely in the collection and analysis of gamma-ray spectra. If not recognized and understood, the appearance of Doppler broadening can complicate the interpretation of a spectrum and the correct identification of the gamma ray-emitting material. We have conducted a study using a simulation code to demonstrate how Doppler broadening arises and provide a real-world example in which Doppler broadening is found. This report describes that study and its results.

  6. Search for gamma-rays from M31 and other extragalactic objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, M. F.; Fegan, D. J.; Gibbs, K.; Gorham, P. W.; Lamb, R. C.; Liebing, D. F.; Porter, N. A.; Stenger, V. J.; Weeles, T. C.

    1985-01-01

    Although the existence of fluxes of gamma-rays of energies 10 to the 12th power eV is now established for galactic sources, the detection of such gamma-rays from extragalactic sources has yet to be independently confirmed in any case. The detection and confirmation of such energetic photons is of great astrophysical importance in the study of production mechanisms for cosmic rays, and other high energy processes in extragalactic objects. Observations of m31 are discussed. It is reported as a 10 to the 12th power eV gamma-ray source. Flux limits on a number of other extragalactic objects chosen for study are given.

  7. Jitter Suppression Via Reaction Wheel Passive Isolation for the NASA Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergast, Karl J.; Schauwecker, Chris J.

    1998-01-01

    Text: Third in the series of NASA great observatories, the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) is scheduled for launch from the Space Shuttle in September 1998. Following in the path of the Hubble Space Telescope and the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, this telescope will image light at x-ray wavelengths, facilitating the detailed study of such phenomena as supernovae and quasars. The AXAF program is sponsored by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. Due to exacting requirements on the performance of the AXAF optical system, it is necessary to reduce the transmission of reaction wheel jitter disturbances to the observatory. This reduction is accomplished via use of a passive mechanical isolation system which acts as an interface between the reaction wheels and the spacecraft central structure.

  8. The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility high resolution camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Stephen S.; Chappell, Jon H.

    1986-01-01

    The HRC (High Resolution Camera) is a photon counting instrument to be flown on the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). It is a large field of view, high angular resolution, detector for the X-ray telescope. The HRC consists of a CsI coated microchannel plate (MCP) acting as a soft X-ray photocathode, followed by a second MCP for high electronic gain. The MCPs are readout by a crossed grid of resistively coupled wires to provide high spatial resolution along with timing and pulse height data. The instrument will be used in two modes, as a direct imaging detector with a limiting sensitivity of 10 to the -15th ergs/sq cm sec in a 10 to the 5th second exposure, and as a readout for an objective transmission grating providing spectral resolution of several hundreds to thousands.

  9. X-ray monitoring for astrophysical applications on Cubesat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina, L.; Hudec, R.; Inneman, A.; Cerna, D.; Jakubek, J.; Sieger, L.; Dániel, V.; Cash, W.; Mikulickova, L.; Pavlica, R.; Belas, E.; Polak, J.

    2015-05-01

    The primary objective of the project VZLUSAT-1 is the development, manufacturing, qualification and experimental verification of products and technologies in Earth orbit (IOD - In-Orbit Demonstration). This work addresses the issue of X-ray monitoring for astrophysical applications. The proposed wide-field optical system has not been used in space yet. The proposed novel approach is based on the use of 1D "Lobster eye" optics in combination with Timepix X-ray detector in the energy range 3 - 40 keV. The proposed project includes theoretical study and a functional sample of the Timepix X-ray detector with multifoil wide-field X-ray "Lobster eye" optics. Using optics to focus X-rays on a detector is the only solution in cases the intensity of impinging X-ray radiation is below the sensitivity of the detector, e.g. while monitoring astrophysical objects in space, or phenomena in the Earth's atmosphere. On board the functions and features of Radiation Hardened Composite Housing (RHCH), Solar panels based on composite substrate and Hollow Retro Reflector Array based on composite (HRRA) will be verified. To verify the properties of the developed products the satellite is equipped by Health Monitoring system (HM). HM system includes temperature, volatiles, radiation and mechanical properties sensors. The custom ADCS algorithms are being developed within the project. Given the number of IOD experiments and the necessary power the 1U CubeSat is equipped with Composite Deployable Panels (CDP) where HM panels and additional Solar panels are located. Satellite platform is assembled from commercial parts. Mission VZLUSAT-1 is planned for 6 months with launch in 2016.

  10. Modeling gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxham, Amanda

    Discovered serendipitously in the late 1960s, gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are huge explosions of energy that happen at cosmological distances. They provide a grand physical playground to those who study them, from relativistic effects such as beaming, jets, shocks and blastwaves to radiation mechanisms such as synchrotron radiation to galatic and stellar populations and history. Through the Swift and Fermi space telescopes dedicated to observing GRBs over a wide range of energies (from keV to GeV), combined with accurate pinpointing that allows ground based follow-up observations in the optical, infrared and radio, a rich tapestry of GRB observations has emerged. The general picture is of a mysterious central engine (CE) probably composed of a black hole or neutron star that ejects relativistic shells of matter into intense magnetic fields. These shells collide and combine, releasing energy in "internal shocks" accounting for the prompt emission and flaring we see and the "external shock" or plowing of the first blastwave into the ambient surrounding medium has well-explained the afterglow radiation. We have developed a shell model code to address the question of how X-ray flares are produced within the framework of the internal shock model. The shell model creates randomized GRB explosions from a central engine with multiple shells and follows those shells as they collide, merge and spread, producing prompt emission and X-ray flares. We have also included a blastwave model, which can constrain X-ray flares and explain the origin of high energy (GeV) emission seen by the Fermi telescope. Evidence suggests that gamma-ray prompt emission and X-ray flares share a common origin and that at least some flares can only be explained by long-lasting central engine activity. We pay special attention to the time history of central engine activity, internal shocks, and observed flares. We calculate the gamma-ray (Swift/BAT band) and X-ray (Swift/XRT band) lightcurves for arbitrary

  11. White Paper on the Status and Future of Ground-based Gamma-ray Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Krawczynski, H; Byrum, K; Dermer, C; Dingus, B; Falcone, A; Kaaret, Philip; Krennrich, F; Pohl, M; Vasilev, V; Williams, D A

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, ground-based gamma-ray observatories have made a number of important astrophysical discoveries which have attracted the attention of the wider scientific community. The Division of Astrophysics of the American Physical Society has requested the preparation of a white paper on the status and future of ground-based gamma-ray astronomy to define the science goals of the future observatory, to determine the performance specifications, and to identify the areas of necessary technology development. In this contribution we give a brief overview of the activities of the current white paper team and invite the international community to contribute to the white paper.

  12. Gamma-ray emission from thunderstorm discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine features of gamma-ray radiation registered during a thunderstorm at Tien-Shan Mountain Cosmic Ray Station are presented. Long duration (100-600 ms) gamma-ray bursts are found. They are for the first time identified with atmospheric discharges (lighting). Gamma-ray emission lasts all the time of the discharge and is extremely non-uniform consisting of numerous flashes. Its peak intensity in the flashes exceeds the gamma-ray background up to two orders of magnitude. Exclusively strong altitude dependence of gamma radiation is found. The observation of gamma radiation at the height 4-8 km could serve as a new important method of atmospheric discharge processes investigation. - Highlights: → Gamma-radiation bursts always accompany the electric discharges in atmosphere. → The gamma burst fill up the time of an atmospheric discharge completely. → The higher is the discharge electric field change - the higher is gamma intensity. → The temporal distribution of gamma intensity during the burst is non-uniform. → The altitude dependence of the burst gamma intensity is dramatic.

  13. INTEGRAL and XMM-Newton observations of the weak gamma-ray burst GRB 030227

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mereghetti, S.; Gotz, D.; Tiengo, A.;

    2003-01-01

    We present International Gamma-Ray Astrophysical Laboratory ( INTEGRAL) and XMM-Newton observations of the prompt gamma-ray emission and the X-ray afterglow of GRB 030227, the first gamma-ray burst for which the quick localization obtained with the INTEGRAL Burst Alert System has led to the disco......We present International Gamma-Ray Astrophysical Laboratory ( INTEGRAL) and XMM-Newton observations of the prompt gamma-ray emission and the X-ray afterglow of GRB 030227, the first gamma-ray burst for which the quick localization obtained with the INTEGRAL Burst Alert System has led...... to the discovery of X-ray and optical afterglows. GRB 030227 had a duration of about 20 s and a peak flux of similar to1.1 photons cm(-2) s(-1) in the 20-200 keV energy range. The time-averaged spectrum can be fitted by a single power law with photon index similar to2, and we find some evidence for a hard......-to-soft spectral evolution. The X-ray afterglow has been detected starting only 8 hr after the prompt emission, with a 0.2-10 keV flux decreasing as t(-1) from 1.3 x 10(-12) to 5 x 10(-13) ergs cm(-2) s(-1). The afterglow spectrum is well described by a power law with photon index modified by a 1.94 +/- 0...

  14. Prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kern, J. [Fribourg Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. de Physique

    1996-11-01

    The paper deals with a brief description of the principles of prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA), with the detection of gamma-rays, the PGAA project at SINQ and with the expected performances. 8 figs., 3 tabs., 10 refs.

  15. Intercomparison of gamma ray analysis software packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA undertook an intercomparison exercise to review available software for gamma ray spectra analysis. This document describes the methods used in the intercomparison exercise, characterizes the software packages reviewed and presents the results obtained. Only direct results are given without any recommendation for a particular software or method for gamma ray spectra analysis

  16. Handbook on Mobile Gamma-ray Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, Helle Karina; Korsbech, Uffe C C

    2003-01-01

    Basic physics and mathematics for Airborne and Car-borne Gamma-ray Spectrometry supplemented with practical examples and methods for advanced data processing......Basic physics and mathematics for Airborne and Car-borne Gamma-ray Spectrometry supplemented with practical examples and methods for advanced data processing...

  17. Optical constants in the hard X-ray/Soft gamma ray range of selected materials for multilayer reflectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P.; Romaine, S.; Bruni, R.;

    2007-01-01

    Future Astrophysics missions operating in the hard X-ray/Soft Gamma ray range is slated to carry novel focusing telescopes based on the use of depth graded multilayer reflectors. Current design studies show that, at the foreseen focal lengths, it should be feasible to focus X-rays at energies...... Synchrotron Light Source in Brookhaven and compare these to results obtained previously up to 180 keV of some of the same materials at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble....

  18. Gamma-ray pulsars: a gold mine

    CERN Document Server

    Grenier, Isabelle A

    2015-01-01

    The most energetic neutron stars, powered by their rotation, are capable of producing pulsed radiation from the radio up to gamma rays with nearly TeV energies. These pulsars are part of the universe of energetic and powerful particle accelerators, using their uniquely fast rotation and formidable magnetic fields to accelerate particles to ultra-relativistic speed. The extreme properties of these stars provide an excellent testing ground, beyond Earth experience, for nuclear, gravitational, and quantum-electrodynamical physics. A wealth of gamma-ray pulsars has recently been discovered with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. The energetic gamma rays enable us to probe the magnetospheres of neutron stars and particle acceleration in this exotic environment. We review the latest developments in this field, beginning with a brief overview of the properties and mysteries of rotation-powered pulsars, and then discussing gamma-ray observations and magnetospheric models in more detail.

  19. High energy neutrinos from astrophysical accelerators of cosmic ray nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Hooper, Dan; Sarkar, Subir; Taylor, Andrew M.

    2008-02-01

    Ongoing experimental efforts to detect cosmic sources of high energy neutrinos are guided by the expectation that astrophysical accelerators of cosmic ray protons would also generate neutrinos through interactions with ambient matter and/or photons. However, there will be a reduction in the predicted neutrino flux if cosmic ray sources accelerate not only protons but also significant numbers of heavier nuclei, as is indicated by recent air shower data. We consider plausible extragalactic sources such as active galactic nuclei, gamma ray bursts and starburst galaxies and demand consistency with the observed cosmic ray composition and energy spectrum at Earth after allowing for propagation through intergalactic radiation fields. This allows us to calculate the expected neutrino fluxes from the sources, normalized to the observed cosmic ray spectrum. We find that the likely signals are still within reach of next generation neutrino telescopes such as IceCube.PACS95.85.Ry98.70.Rz98.54.Cm98.54.EpReferencesFor a review, see:F.HalzenD.HooperRep. Prog. Phys.6520021025A.AchterbergIceCube CollaborationPhys. Rev. Lett.972006221101A.AchterbergIceCube CollaborationAstropart. Phys.262006282arXiv:astro-ph/0611063arXiv:astro-ph/0702265V.NiessANTARES CollaborationAIP Conf. Proc.8672006217I.KravchenkoPhys. Rev. D732006082002S.W.BarwickANITA CollaborationPhys. Rev. Lett.962006171101V.Van ElewyckPierre Auger CollaborationAIP Conf. Proc.8092006187For a survey of possible sources and event rates in km3 detectors see e.g.,W.BednarekG.F.BurgioT.MontaruliNew Astron. Rev.4920051M.D.KistlerJ.F.BeacomPhys. Rev. D742006063007A. Kappes, J. Hinton, C. Stegmann, F.A. Aharonian, arXiv:astro-ph/0607286.A.LevinsonE.WaxmanPhys. Rev. Lett.872001171101C.DistefanoD.GuettaE.WaxmanA.LevinsonAstrophys. J.5752002378F.A.AharonianL.A.AnchordoquiD.KhangulyanT.MontaruliJ. Phys. Conf. Ser.392006408J.Alvarez-MunizF.HalzenAstrophys. J.5762002L33F.VissaniAstropart. Phys.262006310F.W

  20. Gamma-ray detected radio galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Volker; Soldi, Simona; De Jong, Sandra; Kretschmer, Karsten; Savchenko, Volodymyr

    2016-07-01

    So far 15 radio galaxies have been detected in the gamma-ray domain by CGRO/EGRET and Fermi/LAT, with a few detections also in the VHE range. We search for distinguishing parameters and estimate the total number of gamma-ray emitting radio galaxies that are potentially detectable by Fermi/LAT. We use Fermi/LAT data in comparison with X-ray and hard X-ray data in order to constrain basic parameters such as the total power of the inverse Compton branch and the position of its peak. We search for possible correlations between the radio, UV, X-ray, and gamma-ray domain and derive the number counts distribution. We then compare their properties with those of the radio galaxies in the 3CRR and SMS4 catalogues. The data show no correlation between the peak of the inverse Compton emission and its luminosity. For the gamma-ray detected radio galaxies the luminosities in the various bands are correlated, except for the UV band, but there is no indication of a correlation of peak frequency or luminosity with the spectral slopes in the X-ray or gamma-ray band. The comparison with other bright radio galaxies shows that the gamma-ray detected objects are among those that have the largest X-ray but rather moderate radio fluxes. Their UV and X-ray luminosities are similar, but gamma-ray detected radio galaxies are predominantly of type FR-I, while the 3CRR sample contains mainly FR-II objects. The number counts of the so far gamma-ray detected radio galaxies shows a very shallow slope, indicating that potentially a fraction of radio galaxies has been missed so far or has not been identified as such, although the predicted number of 22 ± 7 is consistent with the observed 15 objects.

  1. Nuclear Deexcitation Gamma Ray Lines from Accelerated Particle Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, R. J.; Kozlovsky, B.; Ramaty, R.

    2001-12-01

    Since the comprehensive treatment of nuclear deexcitation gamma-ray line emission by Ramaty, Kozlovsky and Lingenfelter in 1979, many new laboratory measurements of the cross sections have become available. Such new measurements allow improved theoretical evaluations of cross sections and the addition of more lines in the analyses of gamma-ray data. For example, the inclusion of lines produced by energetic 3He will provide unique information about its abundance. We present these improved cross sections as a function of the projectile energy for proton, alpha and 3He reactions with He, C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca and Fe. We also present calculations of gamma-ray line yields based on these cross sections and show how line ratios depend on the assumed ambient and accelerated-particle abundances and on the accelerated-particle energy spectrum. Such calculations are essential for interpretation of gamma-ray line observations of astrophysical sites that contain significant fluxes of energetic particles such as solar flares, the Earth's atmosphere, planetary atmospheres and surfaces, the interstellar medium and galactic nebulae. Part of the research reported here was supported by NASA DPR S92680F and W19977.

  2. Dark matter annihilation bound from the diffuse gamma ray flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachelriess, M.; /Norwegian U. Sci. Tech.; Serpico, P.D.; /Fermilab

    2007-07-01

    An upper limit on the total annihilation rate of dark matter (DM) has been recently derived from the observed atmospheric neutrino background. It is a very conservative upper bound based on the sole hypothesis that the DM annihilation products are the least detectable final states in the Standard Model (SM), neutrinos. Any other decay channel into SM particles would lead to stronger constraints. We show that comparable bounds are obtained for DM masses around the TeV scale by observations of the diffuse gamma ray flux by EGRET, because electroweak bremsstrahlung leads to non-negligible electromagnetic branching ratios, even if DM particles only couple to neutrinos at tree level. A better mapping and the partial resolution of the diffuse gamma-ray background into astrophysical sources by the GLAST satellite will improve this bound in the near future.

  3. A thick Anger camera for gamma-ray astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, W. R.; Finger, M.; Prince, T. A.

    1985-01-01

    The NaI(Tl) Anger camera is a natural candidate for a position sensitive detector in imaging of astrophysical gamma-ray sources. Here laboratory measurements are presented of the response of a relatively thick (5.1 cm) NaI(Tl) Anger camera designed for coded aperture imaging in the 50 keV to 2 MeV energy range. A position resolution of 10.5 mm FWHM at 122 keV and 6.3 mm FWHM at 662 keV. The energy resolution was 7 percent FWHM at 662 keV. The ability of the detector to resolve the depth of the gamma-ray interaction and the use of this depth resolution to reduce back-incident and internal background is discussed.

  4. Gamma-ray Burst Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, F Y; Liang, E W

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous electromagnetic explosions in the Universe, which emit up to $8.8\\times10^{54}$ erg isotropic equivalent energy in the hard X-ray band. The high luminosity makes them detectable out to the largest distances yet explored in the Universe. GRBs, as bright beacons in the deep Universe, would be the ideal tool to probe the properties of high-redshift universe: including the cosmic expansion and dark energy, star formation rate, the reionization epoch and the metal enrichment history of the Universe. In this article, we review the luminosity correlations of GRBs, and implications for constraining the cosmological parameters and dark energy. Observations show that the progenitors of long GRBs are massive stars. So it is expected that long GRBs are tracers of star formation rate. We also review the high-redshift star formation rate derived from GRBs, and implications for the cosmic reionization history. The afterglows of GRBs generally have broken power-law spectra, so it...

  5. Light speed variation from gamma ray burst GRB 160509A

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Haowei

    2016-01-01

    It is postulated in Einstein's relativity that the speed of light in vacuum is a constant for all observers. However, the effect of quantum gravity could bring an energy dependence of light speed. Even a tiny speed variation, when amplified by the cosmological distance, may be revealed by the observed time lags between photons with different energies from astrophysical sources. From the newly detected long gamma ray burst GRB~160509A, we find evidence to support the prediction for a linear form modification of light speed in cosmological space.

  6. Light speed variation from gamma ray burst GRB 160509A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haowei; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    2016-09-01

    It is postulated in Einstein's relativity that the speed of light in vacuum is a constant for all observers. However, the effect of quantum gravity could bring an energy dependence of light speed. Even a tiny speed variation, when amplified by the cosmological distance, may be revealed by the observed time lags between photons with different energies from astrophysical sources. From the newly detected long gamma ray burst GRB 160509A, we find evidence to support the prediction for a linear form modification of light speed in cosmological space.

  7. Gamma-ray bursts and the sociology of science

    CERN Document Server

    De Rújula, Alvaro

    2003-01-01

    I discuss what we have learned about Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) by studying their `afterglows', and how these are interpreted in the generally-accepted `fireball' model of GRBs, as well as in the generally-unaccepted `cannonball' model of the same phenomena. The interpretation of GRBs is a good example around which to frame a discussion of the different approaches to science found in various fields, such as high-energy physics (HEP), high-energy astrophysics, or even the deciphering of ancient languages. I use this example to draw conclusions on `post-academic' science, and on the current status of European HEP.

  8. Supernova remnants and gamma-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, D F; Dame, T M; Combi, J A; Butt, Y M; Torres, Diego F.; Romero, Gustavo E.; Dame, Thomas M.; Combi, Jorge A.; Butt, Yousaf M.

    2003-01-01

    A review of the possible relationship between $\\gamma$-ray sources and supernova remnants (SNRs) is presented. Particular emphasis is given to the analysis of the observational status of the problem of cosmic ray acceleration at SNR shock fronts. All positional coincidences between SNRs and unidentified $\\gamma$-ray sources listed in the Third EGRET Catalog at low Galactic latitudes are discussed on a case by case basis. For several coincidences of particular interest, new CO(J=1-0) and radio continuum maps are shown, and the mass content of the SNR surroundings is determined. The contribution to the $\\gamma$-ray flux observed that might come from cosmic ray particles (particularly nuclei) locally accelerated at the SNR shock fronts is evaluated. We discuss the prospects for future research in this field and remark on the possibilities for observations with forthcoming $\\gamma$-ray instruments.

  9. Star-forming galaxies as the origin of IceCube neutrinos: Reconciliation with Fermi-LAT gamma rays

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, Sovan

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic ray accelerators like supernova and hypernova remnants in star forming galaxies are one of the most plausible sources of the IceCube observed diffuse astrophysical neutrinos. The neutrino producing hadronic processes will also produce a diffuse gamma ray flux, constrained by the Fermi-LAT bounds. The fact that point sources like blazars also contribute to the diffuse gamma ray flux implies large gamma opacity of the neutrino sources. Indeed, for these high redshift star forming galaxies the gamma absorption during the intergalactic propagation can be significant. In addition, large gamma attenuation inside these extreme source galaxies can reduce the cascade component of the diffuse flux. Under the current astrophysical uncertainties affecting these absorptions processes, we find the associated diffuse gamma ray flux can remain compatible with the current Fermi-LAT bounds.

  10. Software tool for xenon gamma-ray spectrometer control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernysheva, I. V.; Novikov, A. S.; Shustov, A. E.; Dmitrenko, V. V.; Pyae Nyein, Sone; Petrenko, D.; Ulin, S. E.; Uteshev, Z. M.; Vlasik, K. F.

    2016-02-01

    Software tool "Acquisition and processing of gamma-ray spectra" for xenon gamma-ray spectrometers control was developed. It supports the multi-windows interface. Software tool has the possibilities for acquisition of gamma-ray spectra from xenon gamma-ray detector via USB or RS-485 interfaces, directly or via TCP-IP protocol, energy calibration of gamma-ray spectra, saving gamma-ray spectra on a disk.

  11. Gamma-ray lines from radiative dark matter decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decay of dark matter particles which are coupled predominantly to charged leptons has been proposed as a possible origin of excess high-energy positrons and electrons observed by cosmic-ray telescopes PAMELA and Fermi LAT. Even though the dark matter itself is electrically neutral, the tree-level decay of dark matter into charged lepton pairs will generically induce radiative two-body decays of dark matter at the quantum level. Using an effective theory of leptophilic dark matter decay, we calculate the rates of radiative two-body decays for scalar and fermionic dark matter particles. Due to the absence of astrophysical sources of monochromatic gamma rays, the observation of a line in the diffuse gamma-ray spectrum would constitute a strong indication of a particle physics origin of these photons. We estimate the intensity of the gamma-ray line that may be present in the energy range of a few TeV if the dark matter decay interpretation of the leptonic cosmic-ray anomalies is correct and comment on observational prospects of present and future Imaging Cherenkov Telescopes, in particular the CTA

  12. High Energy Radiation from $\\gamma$ Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Dermer, C D; Dermer, Charles D.; Chiang, James

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) engines are probed most intimately during the prompt gamma-ray luminous phase when the expanding blast wave is closest to the explosion center. Using GRBs 990123 and 940217 as guides, we briefly review observations of high-energy emission from GRBs and summarize some problems in GRB physics. \\gamma\\gamma transparency arguments imply relativistic beaming. The parameters that go into the external shock model are stated, and we show numerical simulation results of gamma-ray light curves from relativistic blast waves with different amounts of baryon loading. A distinct component due to the synchrotron self-Compton process produces significant emission at GeV and TeV energies. Predictions for spectral and temporal evolution at these energies are presented for a blast wave expanding into uniform surroundings. Observations of the slow decay of GeV-TeV radiation provide evidence for ultra-high energy cosmic ray acceleration in GRBs.

  13. The e-ASTROGAM gamma-ray space mission

    CERN Document Server

    Tatischeff, V; von Ballmoos, P; Hanlon, L; Oberlack, U; Aboudan, A; Argan, A; Bernard, D; Brogna, A; Bulgarelli, A; Bykov, A; Campana, R; Caraveo, P; Cardillo, M; Coppi, P; De Angelis, A; Diehl, R; Donnarumma, I; Fioretti, V; Giuliani, A; Grenier, I; Grove, J E; Hamadache, C; Hartmann, D; Hernanz, M; Isern, J; Kanbach, G; Kiener, J; Knödlseder, J; Labanti, C; Laurent, P; Limousin, O; Longo, F; Marisaldi, M; McBreen, S; McEnery, J E; Mereghetti, S; Mirabel, F; Morselli, A; Nakazawa, K; Peyré, J; Piano, G; Pittori, C; Sabatini, S; Stawarz, L; Thompson, D J; Ulyanov, A; Walter, R; Wu, X; Zdziarski, A; Zoglauer, A

    2016-01-01

    The e-ASTROGAM is a gamma-ray space mission to be proposed as the M5 Medium-size mission of the European Space Agency. It is dedicated to the observation of the Universe with unprecedented sensitivity in the energy range 0.2 - 100 MeV, extending up to GeV energies, together with a groundbreaking polarization capability. It is designed to substantially improve the COMPTEL and Fermi sensitivities in the MeV-GeV energy range and to open new windows of opportunity for astrophysical and fundamental physics space research. e-ASTROGAM will operate as an open astronomical observatory, with a core science focused on (1) the activity from extreme particle accelerators, including gamma-ray bursts and active galactic nuclei and the link of jet astrophysics to the new astronomy of gravitational waves, neutrinos, ultra-high energy cosmic rays, (2) the high-energy mysteries of the Galactic center and inner Galaxy, including the activity of the supermassive black hole, the Fermi Bubbles, the origin of the Galactic positrons,...

  14. Hybrid Array of Gamma Ray Detectors (HAGRiD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Karl; Grzywacz, R.; Jones, K. L.; Munoz, S.; Baugher, T.; Cizewski, J. A.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Pain, S. D.

    2015-10-01

    Transfer reactions and beta-decay studies are powerful tools to study nuclear structure and to provide insight into astrophysically important reactions that may be difficult to measure directly. Both types of studies are enhanced immensely by measuring a particle-gamma coincidence. For transfer reactions, gamma-ray measurements improve the resolution, aid in channel selection and lifetime measurements. To achieve these coincidences the Hybrid Array of Gamma Ray Detectors (HAGRiD) is being designed and constructed. This array would be coupled with the Oak Ridge Rutgers Barrel Array (ORRUBA) of silicon detectors, the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE) and beta detection scintillators. Detector systems providing a particle-gamma coincidence have previously compromised the charged-particle angular resolution due to compact geometries used to increase the gamma efficiency. HAGRiD will be coupled with ORRUBA such that resolution is not sacrificed, requiring the new array to provide improved resolution and efficiency over NaI and increased portability and flexibility over germanium detectors; therefore, we have chosen to use LaBr3(Ce) crystals. We demonstrate the advantages of a coupled detector system and discuss the current status of the project.

  15. Astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume 5 of the proceedings contains 62 papers of which 61 have been incorporated in INIS. They are divided by subject into several groups: early-type stars, late-type stars, binaries and multiple systems, theoretical considerations, ultraviolet stellar spectra, high energy astrophysics and binary stars. Many papers dealt with variable stars, star development and star models. (M.D.). 200 figs., 38 tabs., 1189 refs

  16. Improved Cosmic-Ray Injection Models and the Galactic Center Gamma-Ray Excess

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, Eric; Profumo, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Fermi-LAT observations of the Galactic Center (GC) have revealed a spherically- symmetric excess of GeV gamma rays extending to at least 10 deg from the dynamical center of the Galaxy. A critical uncertainty in extracting the intensity, spectrum, and morphology of this excess concerns the accuracy of astrophysical diffuse gamma-ray emission models near the GC. Recently, it has been noted that many diffuse emission models utilize a cosmic-ray injection rate far below that predicted based on the observed star formation rate in the Central Molecular Zone. In this study, we add a cosmic-ray injection component which non-linearly traces the Galactic H2 density determined in three-dimensions, and find that the associated gamma-ray emission is degenerate with many properties of the GC gamma-ray excess. In models that utilize a large sideband (40x40 deg surrounding the GC) to normalize the best-fitting diffuse emission models, the intensity of the GC excess decreases by a factor of 2, and the morphology of the excess...

  17. Atmospheric Cherenkov Gamma-ray Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Holder, Jamie

    2015-01-01

    The stereoscopic imaging atmospheric Cherenkov technique, developed in the 1980s and 1990s, is now used by a number of existing and planned gamma-ray observatories around the world. It provides the most sensitive view of the very high energy gamma-ray sky (above 30 GeV), coupled with relatively good angular and spectral resolution over a wide field-of-view. This Chapter summarizes the details of the technique, including descriptions of the telescope optical systems and cameras, as well as the most common approaches to data analysis and gamma-ray reconstruction.

  18. The HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory: Sensitivity to Steady and Transient Sources of Gamma Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiñana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-GarcIa, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sanchez, F E; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2013-01-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory is designed to record air showers produced by cosmic rays and gamma rays between 100 GeV and 100 TeV. Because of its large field of view and high livetime, HAWC is well-suited to measure gamma rays from extended sources, diffuse emission, and transient sources. We describe the sensitivity of HAWC to emission from the extended Cygnus region as well as other types of galactic diffuse emission; searches for flares from gamma-ray bursts and active galactic nuclei; and the first measurement of the Crab Nebula with HAWC-30.

  19. EDGE: Explorer of diffuse emission and gamma-ray burst explosions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piro, L; den Herder, J W; Ohashi, T;

    2009-01-01

    How structures of various scales formed and evolved from the early Universe up to present time is a fundamental question of astrophysical cosmology. EDGE (Piro et al., 2007) will trace the cosmic history of the baryons from the early generations of massive stars by Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) explosion...

  20. EDGE: Explorer of diffuse emission and gamma-ray burst explosions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Den Herder, J.W.; Hermsen, W.; Hoevers, H.;

    2007-01-01

    How structures of various scales formed and evolved from the early Universe up to present time is a fundamental question of astrophysics. EDGE1 will trace the cosmic history of the baryons from the early generations of massive stars by Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) explosions, through the period of galax...

  1. Librarian driven analysis of gamma ray spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a set of a priori given radionuclides extracted from a general nuclide data library, the authors use median estimates of the gamma-peak areas and estimates of their errors to produce a list of possible radionuclides matching gamma ray line(s). The identification of a given radionuclide is obtained by searching for a match with the energy information of a database. This procedure is performed in an interactive graphic mode by markers that superimpose, on the spectral data, the energy information and yields provided by a general gamma ray data library. This library of experimental data includes approximately 17,000 gamma ray energy lines related to 756 known gamma emitter radionuclides listed by the ICRP. (author)

  2. The Most Remote Gamma-Ray Burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-10-01

    ESO Telescopes Observe "Lightning" in the Young Universe Summary Observations with telescopes at the ESO La Silla and Paranal observatories (Chile) have enabled an international team of astronomers [1] to measure the distance of a "gamma-ray burst", an extremely violent, cosmic explosion of still unknown physical origin. It turns out to be the most remote gamma-ray burst ever observed . The exceedingly powerful flash of light from this event was emitted when the Universe was very young, less than about 1,500 million years old, or only 10% of its present age. Travelling with the speed of light (300,000 km/sec) during 11,000 million years or more, the signal finally reached the Earth on January 31, 2000. The brightness of the exploding object was enormous, at least 1,000,000,000,000 times that of our Sun, or thousands of times that of the explosion of a single, heavy star (a "supernova"). The ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) was also involved in trail-blazing observations of another gamma-ray burst in May 1999, cf. ESO PR 08/99. PR Photo 28a/00 : Sky field near GRB 000131 . PR Photo 28b/00 : The fading optical counterpart of GRB 000131 . PR Photo 28c/00 : VLT spectrum of GRB 000131 . What are Gamma-Ray Bursts? One of the currently most active fields of astrophysics is the study of the mysterious events known as "gamma-ray bursts" . They were first detected in the late 1960's by instruments on orbiting satellites. These short flashes of energetic gamma-rays last from less than a second to several minutes. Despite much effort, it is only within the last few years that it has become possible to locate the sites of some of these events (e.g. with the Beppo-Sax satellite ). Since the beginning of 1997, astronomers have identified about twenty optical sources in the sky that are associated with gamma-ray bursts. They have been found to be situated at extremely large (i.e., "cosmological") distances. This implies that the energy release during a gamma-ray burst within a few

  3. INTEGRAL & RXTE View of Gamma-ray Binaries

    OpenAIRE

    Jian LI; Torres, Diego F.; Zhang, Shu; WANG, JIANMIN

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-ray binaries are X-ray binaries with gamma-ray emissions. Their multi-wavelength emissions range from radio, optical, X-ray and to very high energy (TeV). X-ray emissions are crucial to understand the nature of gamma-ray binaries. INTEGRAL and RXTE have covered and monitored most of the gamma-ray binaries in hard and soft X-rays. Here we report the results of several gamma-ray binaries and possible gamma-ray binaries from INTEGRAL and RXTE.

  4. The agile alert system for gamma-ray transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulgarelli, A.; Trifoglio, M.; Gianotti, F.; Fioretti, V. [INAF/IASF-Bologna, Via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Tavani, M.; Argan, A.; Trois, A.; Scalise, E. [INAF/IASF-Roma, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Parmiggiani, N.; Beneventano, D. [University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Science e Metodi dell' Ingegneria (Italy); Chen, A. W. [INAF/IASF-Milano, Via E. Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Vercellone, S. [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg Wits 2050 (South Africa); Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Santolamazza, P.; Fanari, G.; Giommi, P. [INAF/IASF-Palermo, Via U. La Malfa 153, I-90146 Palermo (Italy); Longo, F. [ASI-ASDC, Via G. Galilei, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Pellizzoni, A. [INFN Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); and others

    2014-01-20

    In recent years, a new generation of space missions has offered great opportunities for discovery in high-energy astrophysics. In this article we focus on the scientific operations of the Gamma-Ray Imaging Detector (GRID) on board the AGILE space mission. AGILE-GRID, sensitive in the energy range of 30 MeV-30 GeV, has detected many γ-ray transients of both galactic and extragalactic origin. This work presents the AGILE innovative approach to fast γ-ray transient detection, which is a challenging task and a crucial part of the AGILE scientific program. The goals are to describe (1) the AGILE Gamma-Ray Alert System, (2) a new algorithm for blind search identification of transients within a short processing time, (3) the AGILE procedure for γ-ray transient alert management, and (4) the likelihood of ratio tests that are necessary to evaluate the post-trial statistical significance of the results. Special algorithms and an optimized sequence of tasks are necessary to reach our goal. Data are automatically analyzed at every orbital downlink by an alert pipeline operating on different timescales. As proper flux thresholds are exceeded, alerts are automatically generated and sent as SMS messages to cellular telephones, via e-mail, and via push notifications from an application for smartphones and tablets. These alerts are crosschecked with the results of two pipelines, and a manual analysis is performed. Being a small scientific-class mission, AGILE is characterized by optimization of both scientific analysis and ground-segment resources. The system is capable of generating alerts within two to three hours of a data downlink, an unprecedented reaction time in γ-ray astrophysics.

  5. Precision measurements of gamma-ray intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine relative intensities of gamma rays in the region of 280 to 2750 keV, Ge(Li) detectors were calibrated with standard sources and cascade gamma-ray sources. Decay rates of the standard sources were determined by means of the 4πβ-γ or 4πX-γ coincidence method. Experimental conditions were improved and spectra were carefully analyzed. Relative gamma-ray intensities of 56Co, 88Y, sup(110m)Ag, 133Ba, 134Cs, 152Eu, 154Eu, 192Ir and 207Bi were determined within the accuracy of about 0.5% for strong gamma rays. Intensities per decays were obtained from the relative intensities for most of the nuclides. (author)

  6. Supernovae and gamma-ray bursts connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Massimo Della

    2015-12-01

    I'll review the status of the Supernova/Gamma-Ray Burst connection. Several pieces of evidence suggest that long duration Gamma-ray Bursts are associated with bright SNe-Ic. However recent works suggest that GRBs might be produced in tight binary systems composed of a massive carbon-oxygen cores and a neutron star companion. Current estimates of the SN and GRB rates yield a ratio GRB/SNe-Ibc in the range ˜ 0.4% - 3%.

  7. Compton scattering gamma-ray source optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartemann, Frederic; Wu, Sheldon; Albert, Félicie; Barty, Chris

    2012-10-01

    The interaction of a bright relativistic electron beam with an intense laser pulse via Compton scattering can generate tunable gamma-rays for precision nuclear photonics applications. The properties of the gamma-ray phase space will be outlined, in relation with the 6D electron bunch and 6D laser pulse phase space, along with collimation, nonlinear effects and other sources of spectral broadening. Optimization strategies will be outlines within the context of nuclear photonics applications.

  8. Supernovae and gamma-ray bursts connection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle, Massimo Della [INAF-Napoli, Capodimonte Observatory, Salita Moiariello, 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); International Center for Relativistic Astrophysics Network, Piazzale della Repubblica 10, I-65122, Pescara (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    I’ll review the status of the Supernova/Gamma-Ray Burst connection. Several pieces of evidence suggest that long duration Gamma-ray Bursts are associated with bright SNe-Ic. However recent works suggest that GRBs might be produced in tight binary systems composed of a massive carbon-oxygen cores and a neutron star companion. Current estimates of the SN and GRB rates yield a ratio GRB/SNe-Ibc in the range ∼ 0.4% − 3%.

  9. Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays, The Diffuse High Energy Gamma Ray Background and Anti-protons

    CERN Document Server

    Eichler, David; Gavish, Eyal

    2016-01-01

    Theories for the origin of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECR) may imply a significant diffuse background in secondary $\\gamma$-rays from the pair cascads the UHECR initiate when interacting with background light. It is shown that, because the spectrum of these secondary $\\gamma$-rays is softer than the measured diffuse $\\gamma$-ray background in the 10-1000 GeV range, the addition of a hard component from the decay of TeV dark matter particles, subject to the implied constraints on its parameters, improves the fit. It is further argued that any compact astrophysical source of $\\bar p$s is unlikely to be as strong as decay of TeV dark matter particles, given bounds set by neutrino observations. The diffuse $\\gamma$-ray background presently sets the strongest lower bound on the lifetime of TeV dark matter particles, and hence on attendant anti-proton production, and further identification of other contributors to this background will further tighten these constraints.

  10. Egret observations of the extragalactic gamma-ray emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sreekumar, P.; Bertsch, D.L.; Dingus, B.L.;

    1998-01-01

    The all-sky survey in high-energy gamma rays (E > 30 MeV) carried out by EGRET aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory provides a unique opportunity to examine in detail the diffuse gamma-ray emission. The observed diffuse emission has a Galactic component arising from cosmic-ray interactions...... likely explanation for the origin of this extragalactic high-energy gamma-ray emission is that it arises primarily from unresolved gamma-ray-emitting blazars....

  11. Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility Delivery Delayed

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-01

    TRW Space and Electronics Group, Redondo Beach, CA, has notified NASA that it will be unable to deliver the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) to NASA's Kennedy Space Center, FL, on June 1, 1998, as required by contract, because it has experienced delays in assembly and testing of the facility. TRW is NASA's prime contractor for the observatory. NASA and contractor officials met at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC, this week to discuss the issue. While no new delivery date was agreed upon, the agency has directed TRW to develop a plan of action that would show how the contractor can minimize impact to the June 1 delivery. Although a delay in delivery could delay the launch, currently scheduled for August 1998 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia's STS-93 mission, and could result in additional program costs, the exact impact is not yet known. "The delay in delivery of the observatory is unfortunate," said Fred Wojtalik, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center observatory projects office manager in Huntsville, AL. "However, our first priority is to launch a world-class observatory which has been thoroughly tested and meets all requirements. We will work closely with TRW to ensure that happens." The delay is primarily due to TRW's difficulty in configuring and programming its Integrated Spacecraft Automated Test System to test the observatory before it is delivered to NASA. The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility is expected to play a vital role in answering fundamental questions about the universe, including its age and size, and will probe the nature and amounts of so-called "dark matter," providing unique insight into one of nature's great puzzles. The observatory also will allow scientists to see and measure the details of hot gas clouds in clusters of galaxies; observe X-rays generated when stars are torn apart by the incredibly strong gravity around massive black holes in the centers of galaxies; and provide images that will help understand how exploding stars

  12. The blazar gamma-ray luminosity function and the diffuse extragalactic gamma-ray background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamon, M. H.; Stecker, F. W.

    1994-01-01

    We have used the data from the new EGRET catalog on 'grazars' (blazers which are observed to be high-energy gamma-ray sources), together with radio data, to construct a new relation between radio and gamma-ray luminosity for these sources. Using this relation to construct a grazar gamma-ray luminosity function, we then calculate the contribution of unresolved grazars to the cosmic gamma-ray background radiation. We derive the energy spectrum of this background component above 100 MeV and the angular fluctuations in this background implied by our model.

  13. Cosmic gamma-ray studies at Srinagar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosmic gamma ray studies being carried out at the Nuclear Research Laboratory at Srinagar and Gulmarg are described and some of the results of observation and possible conclusions are mentioned. These studies use ground base techniques which can detect short-time scale gamma ray bursts from supernovae and primordial black hole (PBH) and also high energy gamma rays from various point sources. A large area photomultiplier system is employed to detect pulses of visible fluorescence radiation which is caused by a gamma ray burst of supernovae of PBH origin. However, any signal out a large number of signals recorded at Gulmarg could not be identified as coinciding with any such event observed elsewhere. It shows that the size of the burst source cannot exceed 30 km., which is in agreement with neutron-star source models. An array using plastic scintillator detectors at the corner of a 10 metre square has been set up at Gulmarg to detect air-shower due to high energy gamma rays. Cerenkov light pulses recorded at Gulmarg have been projected on the sidereal map. A significant excess observed in the right ascension range 20 +- 3 h suggests the possible presence of a quasic-periodic source of gamma rays of energy greater than 1014 eV in the general direction of Cygnus X-3. Future programme of studies is mentioned. (K.M.)

  14. Gamma-ray pulsar studies with COMPTEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermsen, W.; Kuiper, L.; Diehl, R.; Lichti, G.; Schoenfelder, V.; Strong, A. W.; Connors, A.; Ryan, J.; Bennett, K.; Busetta, M.; Carraminana, A.; Buccheri, R.; Grenier, I. A.

    1994-06-01

    Since the launch of the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) the number of detected gamma-ray pulsars increased from two to six. COMPTEL, on-board CGRO and sensitive to gamma-rays with energies between approximately 0.7 and 30 MeV, detected three of these unambiguously. The classical Crab and Vela pulsars have been observed on several occasions and detailed pulse patterns and spectral parameters have been derived. The new CGRO gamma-ray pulsar PSR B1509-58 has been detected by COMPTEL at a significance level above 4 sigma, consistently in a timing and spatial analysis. A likely detection of Geminga has been obtained at an approximately 3 sigma level. This indication is found in a phase interval in which COS B data showed the presence of a new variable component, Interpeak 2, exhibiting a very soft spectrum above 50 MeV. The diversities in light-curve sphapes and spectral distributions, the apparent time variabilities, and the significant differences in the fractions of the spin-down power radiated at gamma-ray energies in this small sample of gamma-ray pulsars pose important constraints to pulsar modeling.

  15. GRAPE - A Balloon-Borne Gamma-Ray Polarimeter Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bloser, P F; Macri, J R; McConnell, M L; Narita, T; Ryan, J M

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the development status of GRAPE (the Gamma-Ray Polarimeter Experiment), a hard X-ray Compton Polarimeter. The purpose of GRAPE is to measure the polarization of hard X-rays in the 50-300 keV energy range. We are particularly interested in X-rays that are emitted from solar flares and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), although GRAPE could also be employed in the study of other astrophysical sources. Accurately measuring the polarization of the emitted radiation will lead to a better understating of both emission mechanisms and source geometries. The GRAPE design consists of an array of plastic scintillators surrounding a central high-Z crystal scintillator. The azimuthal distribution of photon scatters from the plastic array into the central calorimeter provides a measure of the polarization fraction and polarization angle of the incident radiation. The design of the detector provides sensitivity over a large field-of-view (>pi steradian). The design facilitates the fabrication of large area arrays w...

  16. Blazars and gamma-ray cosmology: recent and prospective results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biteau, Jonathan; Williams, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Blazars are dazzling gamma-ray beacons shedding light on some of the darkest mysteries of modern-day astroparticle physics. Some of these mysteries include the light content of the universe, including the UV-IR background, the emission of first stars and of organic molecules; large-scale magnetic fields and their potential primordial origin; spacetime structure, with the potential for Lorentz-invariance violations near the Planck scale; and the search for new interaction channels with photons, e.g. in the form of axion-like particles. These crucial scientific topics can be studied through the signatures of billion-year propagation of GeV-TeV gamma rays that reach Earth from astrophysical sources. We discuss how spectral imprints in data from ground-based and satellite experiments are beginning to answer some of the fundamental questions of gamma-ray cosmology. Recent results, obtained with increased datasets and advanced analysis techniques, are opening the path for future observatories. We examine the areas that remain to be explored, in particular by the proposed Cherenkov Telescope Array, CTA.

  17. Studies of Cosmic Rays with GeV Gamma Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Tajima, Hiroyasu; Finazzi, Stefano; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Chiang, James

    2007-01-01

    We describe the role of GeV gamma-ray observations with GLAST-LAT (Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope - Large Area Telescope) in identifying interaction sites of cosmic-ray proton (or hadrons) with interstellar medium (ISM). We expect to detect gamma rays from neutral pion decays in high-density ISM regions in the Galaxy, Large Magellanic Cloud, and other satellite galaxies. These gamma-ray sources have been detected already with EGRET (Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope) as extended sources (eg. LMC and Orion clouds) and GLAST-LAT will detect many more with a higher spatial resolution and in a wider spectral range. We have developed a novel image restoration technique based on the Richardson-Lucy algorithm optimized for GLAST-LAT observation of extended sources. Our algorithm calculates PSF (point spread function) for each event. This step is very important for GLAST-LAT and EGRET image analysis since PSF varies more than one order of magnitude from one gamma ray to another depending on its energy as...

  18. Fermi-LAT Observations of the Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 130427A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burgess, J. Michael; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Chaplin, V.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cleveland, W.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Collazzi, A.; Cominsky, L. R.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; DeKlotz, M.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Desiante, R.; Diekmann, A.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Finke, J.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Gibby, M.; Giglietto, N.; Giles, M.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Godfrey, G.; Granot, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Gruber, D.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Inoue, Y.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, W. N.; Kawano, T.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Paneque, D.; Pelassa, V.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Ritz, S.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sartori, A.; Parkinson, P. M. Saz; Scargle, J. D.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Sonbas, E.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yamazaki, R.; Younes, G.; Yu, H.-F.; Zhu, S. J.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Byrne, D.; Foley, S.; Goldstein, A.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; McBreen, S.; Meegan, C.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R.; Rau, A.; Tierney, D.; van der Horst, A. J.; von Kienlin, A.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Xiong, S.; Cusumano, G.; La Parola, V.; Cummings, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    The observations of the exceptionally bright gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A by the Large Area Telescope aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope provide constraints on the nature of these unique astrophysical sources. GRB 130427A had the largest fluence, highest-energy photon (95 GeV), longest γ-ray duration (20 hours), and one of the largest isotropic energy releases ever observed from a GRB. Temporal and spectral analyses of GRB 130427A challenge the widely accepted model that the nonthermal high-energy emission in the afterglow phase of GRBs is synchrotron emission radiated by electrons accelerated at an external shock.

  19. GRI: the gamma-ray imager mission

    CERN Document Server

    Knödlseder, J

    2006-01-01

    Observations of the gamma-ray sky reveal the most powerful sources and the most violent events in the Universe. While at lower wavebands the observed emission is generally dominated by thermal processes, the gamma-ray sky provides us with a view on the non-thermal Universe. Here particles are accelerated to extreme relativistic energies by mechanisms which are still poorly understood, and nuclear reactions are synthesizing the basic constituents of our world. Cosmic accelerators and cosmic explosions are the major science themes that are addressed in the gamma-ray regime. With the INTEGRAL observatory, ESA has provided a unique tool to the astronomical community revealing hundreds of sources, new classes of objects, extraordinary views of antimatter annihilation in our Galaxy, and fingerprints of recent nucleosynthesis processes. While INTEGRAL provides the global overview over the soft gamma-ray sky, there is a growing need to perform deeper, more focused investigations of gamma-ray sources. In soft X-rays a...

  20. Gamma Ray Bursts in the HAWC Era

    CERN Document Server

    Mészáros, Peter; Murase, Kohta; Fox, Derek; Gao, He; Senno, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts are the most energetic explosions in the Universe, and are among the most promising for detecting multiple non-electromagnetic signals, including cosmic rays, high energy neutrinos and gravitational waves. The multi-GeV to TeV gamma-ray range of GRB could have significant contributions from hadronic interactions, mixed with more conventional leptonic contributions. This energy range is important for probing the source physics, including overall energetics, the shock parameters and the Lorentz factor. We discuss some of the latest observational and theoretical developments in the field.

  1. Gamma ray astronomy and the origin of galactic cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffusive shock acceleration operating at expanding supernova remnant shells is by far the most popular model for the origin of galactic cosmic rays. Despite the general consensus received by the model, an unambiguous and conclusive proof of the supernova remnant hypothesis is still missing. In this context, the recent developments in gamma ray astronomy provide us with precious insights into the problem of the origin of galactic cosmic rays, since production of gamma rays is expected both during the acceleration of cosmic rays at supernova remnant shocks and during their subsequent propagation in the interstellar medium. In particular, the recent detection of a number of supernova remnants at TeV energies nicely fits with the model, but it still does not constitute a conclusive proof of it, mainly due to the difficulty of disentangling the hadronic and leptonic contributions to the observed gamma ray emission. The main goal of my research is to search for an unambiguous and conclusive observational test for proving (or disproving) the idea that supernova remnants are the sources of galactic cosmic rays with energies up to (at least) the cosmic ray knee. Our present comprehension of the mechanisms of particle acceleration at shocks and of the propagation of cosmic rays in turbulent magnetic fields encourages beliefs that such a conclusive test might come from future observations of supernova remnants and of the Galaxy in the almost unexplored domain of multi-TeV gamma rays. (author)

  2. On the difference between gamma-ray-detected and non-gamma-ray-detected pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Rookyard, Simon C; Johnston, Simon; Kerr, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    We compare radio profile widths of young, energetic gamma-ray-detected and non-gamma-ray-detected pulsars. We find that the latter typically have wider radio profiles, with the boundary between the two samples exhibiting a dependence on the rate of rotational energy loss. We also find that within the sample of gamma-ray-detected pulsars, radio profile width is correlated with both the separation of the main gamma-ray peaks and the presence of narrow gamma-ray components. These findings lead us to propose that these pulsars form a single population where the main factors determining gamma ray detectability are the rate of rotational energy loss and the proximity of the line of sight to the rotation axis. The expected magnetic inclination angle distribution will be different for radio pulsars with and without detectable gamma rays, naturally leading to the observed differences. Our results also suggest that the geometry of existing radio and outer-magnetosphere gamma-ray emission models are at least qualitative...

  3. The Infrared-Gamma-Ray Connection: A WISE View of the Extragalactic Gamma-Ray Sky

    CERN Document Server

    Massaro, F

    2016-01-01

    Using data from the WISE all-sky survey we discovered that the non-thermal infrared (IR) emission of blazars, the largest known population of extragalactic gamma-ray sources, has peculiar spectral properties. In this work, we confirm and strengthen our previous analyses using the latest available releases of both the WISE and the Fermi source catalogs. We also show that there is a tight correlation between the mid-IR colors and the gamma-ray spectral index of Fermi blazars. We name this correlation "the infrared--gamma-ray connection". We discuss how this connection links both the emitted powers and the spectral shapes of particles accelerated in jets arising from blazars over ten decades in energy. Based on this evidence, we argue that the infrared--gamma-ray connection is stronger than the well known radio--gamma-ray connection.

  4. Compton imaging of MeV gamma-rays with the Liquid Xenon Gamma-Ray Imaging Telescope (LXeGRIT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Liquid Xenon Gamma-Ray Imaging Telescope (LXeGRIT) is the first realization of a liquid xenon time projection chamber for Compton imaging of MeV γ-ray sources in astrophysics. By measuring the energy deposit and the three spatial coordinates of individual γ-ray scattering points, the location of the source in the sky is inferred with Compton kinematics reconstruction. The angular resolution is determined by the detector's energy and spatial resolutions, as well as by the separation in space between the first and second scattering. The imaging response of LXeGRIT was established with γ-rays from radioactive sources, during calibration and integration at the Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, prior to the 2000 balloon flight mission. In this paper we describe in detail the various steps involved in imaging sources with LXeGRIT and present experimental results on angular resolution and other parameters which characterize its performance as a Compton telescope

  5. A Search for Gamma-Ray Bursts and Pulsars, and the Application of Kalman Filters to Gamma-Ray Reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, B B

    2002-01-01

    Part I describes the analysis of periodic and transient signals in EGRET data. A method to search for the transient flux from gamma-ray bursts independent of triggers from other gamma-ray instruments is developed. Several known gamma-ray bursts were independently detected, and there is evidence for a previously unknown gamma-ray burst candidate. Statistical methods using maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference are developed and implemented to extract periodic signals from gamma-ray sources ...

  6. Status of the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Maryland Univ. College Park

    2001-01-01

    The Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory, located at an altitude of 8,600 feet in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico, is the world's first large-area water Cherenkov detector capable of continuously monitoring the entire sky for sources of TeV gamma rays. It is uniquely capable of searching for transient sources of VHE gamma rays. The core of the detector is a 60m x 80m x 8m pond instrumented with 723 PMTs deployed in two layers. This part of the detector is complete and has operated continuously since Jan. 2000. Initial studies including searches for gamma-ray sources are ongoing, and preliminary results are available. The final stage of construction is under way. We are deploying 170 auxiliary "outrigger" water Cherenkov detectors in an area of 40,000 square-meters surrounding the pond, which will significantly enhance our ability to reject background and more accurately reconstruct the gamma-ray direction and energy. In addition, we are lowering the energy threshold of the detector by using custom processing to en...

  7. Stellar Photon Archaeology with Gamma-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, Floyd W.

    2009-01-01

    Ongoing deep surveys of galaxy luminosity distribution functions, spectral energy distributions and backwards evolution models of star formation rates can be used to calculate the past history of intergalactic photon densities and, from them, the present and past optical depth of the Universe to gamma-rays from pair production interactions with these photons. The energy-redshift dependence of the optical depth of the Universe to gamma-rays has become known as the Fazio-Stecker relation (Fazio & Stecker 1970). Stecker, Malkan & Scully have calculated the densities of intergalactic background light (IBL) photons of energies from 0.03 eV to the Lyman limit at 13.6 eV and for 0$ < z < $6, using deep survey galaxy observations from Spitzer, Hubble and GALEX and have consequently predicted spectral absorption features for extragalactic gamma-ray sources. This procedure can also be reversed. Determining the cutoff energies of gamma-ray sources with known redshifts using the recently launched Fermi gamma-ray space telescope may enable a more precise determination of the IBL photon densities in the past, i.e., the "archaeo-IBL.", and therefore allow a better measure of the past history of the total star formation rate, including that from galaxies too faint to be observed.

  8. ESA's Integral detects closest cosmic gamma-ray burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-01

    should emit similar amounts of gamma-ray energy. The fraction of it detected at Earth should then depend on the 'width' (opening angle) and orientation of the beam as well as on the distance. The energy received should be larger when the beam is narrow or points towards us and smaller when the beam is broad or points away from us. New data collected with ESA's high energy observatories, Integral and XMM-Newton, now show that this picture is not so clear-cut and that the amount of energy emitted by GRBs can vary significantly. "The idea that all GRBs spit out the same amount of gamma rays, or that they are 'standard candles' as we call them, is simply ruled out by the new data," said Dr Sergey Sazonov, from the Space Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russia) and the Max-Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Garching near Munich (Germany). Sazonov and an international team of researchers studied the GRB detected by Integral on 3 December 2003 and given the code-name of GRB 031203. Within a record 18 seconds of the burst, the Integral Burst Alert System had pinpointed the approximate position of GRB 031203 in the sky and sent the information to a network of observatories around the world. A few hours later one of them, ESA's XMM-Newton, determined a much more precise position for GRB 031203 and detected a rapidly fading X-ray source, which was subsequently seen by radio and optical telescopes on the ground. This wealth of data allowed astronomers to determine that GRB 031203 went off in a galaxy less than 1300 million light years away, making it the closest GRB ever observed. Even so, the way in which GRB 031203 dimmed with time and the distribution of its energy were not different from those of distant GRBs. Then, scientists started to realise that the concept of the 'standard candle' may not hold. "Being so close should make GRB 031203 appear very bright, but the amount of gamma-rays measured by Integral is about one thousand times less than what

  9. Gamma-ray emitting supernova remnants as the origin of Galactic cosmic rays?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker Tjus, Julia; Eichmann, Björn; Kroll, Mike; Nierstenhöfer, Nils

    2016-08-01

    The origin of cosmic rays is one of the long-standing mysteries in physics and astrophysics. Simple arguments suggest that a scenario of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Milky Way as the dominant sources for the cosmic ray population below the knee could work: a generic calculation indicates that these objects can provide the energy budget necessary to explain the observed flux of cosmic rays. However, this argument is based on the assumption that all sources behave in the same way, i.e. they all have the same energy budget, spectral behavior and maximum energy. In this paper, we investigate if a realistic population of SNRs is capable of producing the cosmic ray flux as it is observed below the knee. We use 21 SNRs that are well-studied from radio wavelengths up to gamma-ray energies and derive cosmic ray spectra under the assumption of hadronic emission. The cosmic ray spectra show a large variety in their energy budget, spectral behavior and maximum energy. These sources are assumed to be representative for the total class of SNRs, where we assume that about 100-200 cosmic ray emitting SNRs should be present today. Finally, we use these source spectra to simulate the cosmic ray transport from individual SNRs in the Galaxy with the GALPROP code for cosmic ray propagation. We find that the cosmic ray budget can be matched well for these sources. We conclude that gamma-ray emitting SNRs can be a representative sample of cosmic ray emitting sources. In the future, experiments like CTA and HAWC will help to distinguish hadronic from leptonic sources and to further constrain the maximum energy of the sources and contribute to producing a fully representative sample in order to further investigate the possibility of SNRs being the dominant sources of cosmic rays up to the knee.

  10. Observing with a space-borne gamma-ray telescope: selected results from INTEGRAL

    CERN Document Server

    Schanne, S

    2006-01-01

    The International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory, i.e. the INTEGRAL satellite of ESA, in orbit since about 3 years, performs gamma-ray observations of the sky in the 15 keV to 8 MeV energy range. Thanks to its imager IBIS, and in particular the ISGRI detection plane based on 16384 CdTe pixels, it achieves an excellent angular resolution (12 arcmin) for point source studies with good continuum spectrum sensitivity. Thanks to its spectrometer SPI, based on 19 germanium detectors maintained at 85 K by a cryogenic system, located inside an active BGO veto shield, it achieves excellent spectral resolution of about 2 keV for 1 MeV photons, which permits astrophysical gamma-ray line studies with good narrow-line sensitivity. In this paper we review some goals of gamma-ray astronomy from space and present the INTEGRAL satellite, in particular its instruments ISGRI and SPI. Ground and in-flight calibration results from SPI are presented, before presenting some selected astrophysical results from INTEGRAL. In partic...

  11. Planck Lensing and Cosmic Infrared Background Cross-Correlation with Fermi-LAT: Tracing Dark Matter Signals in the $\\gamma$-ray Background

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Chang; Cooray, Asantha; Keating, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The extragalactic $\\gamma$-ray background, and its spatial anisotropy, could potentially contain a signature of dark matter annihilation or particle decay. Astrophysical foregrounds, such as blazars and star-forming galaxies, however, dominate the $\\gamma$-ray background, precluding an easy detection of the signal associated with the dark matter annihilation or decay in the background intensity spectrum. The dark matter imprint on the $\\gamma$-ray background is expected to be correlated with ...

  12. INTEGRAL upper limits on gamma-ray emission associated with the gravitational wave event GW150914

    CERN Document Server

    Savchenko, V; Mereghetti, S; Natalucci, L; Bazzano, A; Bozzo, E; Courvoisier, T J -L; Brandt, S; Hanlon, L; Kuulkers, E; Laurent, P; Lebrun, F; Roques, J P; Ubertini, P; Weidenspointner, G

    2016-01-01

    Using observations of the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL), we put tight upper limits on the gamma-ray and hard X-ray prompt emission associated with the gravitational wave event \\gwevent, discovered by the LIGO/Virgo collaboration. The omni-directional view of the INTEGRAL/SPI-ACS has allowed us to constrain the fraction of energy emitted in the hard X-ray electromagnetic component for the full high-probability sky region of LIGO/Virgo trigger. Our upper limits on the hard X-ray fluence at the time of the event range from $F_{\\gamma}=2 \\times 10^{-8}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ to $F_{\\gamma}=10^{-6}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ in the 75 keV - 2 MeV energy range for typical spectral models. Our results constrain the ratio of the energy promptly released in gamma-rays in the direction of the observer to the gravitational wave energy E$_\\gamma/$E$_{GW}<10^{-6}$. We discuss the implication of gamma-ray limits on the characteristics of the gravitational wave source, based on the available predictions for prom...

  13. Solution To The Gamma Ray Burst Mystery?

    CERN Document Server

    Dar, Arnon

    1996-01-01

    Photoexcitation and ionization of partially ionized heavy atoms in highly relativistic flows by interstellar photons, followed by their reemission in radiative recombination and decay, boost star-light into beamed $\\gamma$ rays along the flow direction. Repeated excitation/decay of highly relativistic baryonic ejecta from merger or accretion induced collapse of neutron stars in dense stellar regions (DSRs), like galactic cores, globular clusters and super star-clusters, can convert enough kinetic energy in such events in distant galaxies into cosmological gamma ray bursts (GRBs). The model predicts remarkably well all the main observed temporal and spectral properties of GRBs. Its success strongly suggests that GRBs are $\\gamma$ ray tomography pictures of DSRs in galaxies at cosmological distances with unprecedented resolution: A time resolution of $dt\\sim 1~ms$ in a GRB can resolve stars at a Hubble distance which are separated by only $D\\sim 10^{10}cm$. This is equivalent to the resolving power of an optica...

  14. Microsecond flares in gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Cohen, Justin; Teegarden, Bonnard J.; Cline, Thomas L.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles A.; Wilson, Robert B.; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Matteson, James L.

    1993-01-01

    It has been suggested that gamma-ray burst light curves may consist of many superposed flares with a duration shorter than 30/microsec. If true, the implications for the interpretation of burst data are enormous. With the launch of the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory, four predictions of Mitrofanov's (1989) suggestion can be tested. Our results which contradict this suggestion are (1) the photon arrival times are not correlated between independent detectors, (2) the spectral hardness and intensity does not depend on the detector area, (3) the bursts seen by detectors which measure photon positions do not see microsecond flares, and (4) burst positions deduced from detectors with different projected areas are close to the positions deduced from time-of-flight differences between separated spacecraft. We conclude, therefore, that gamma-ray bursts are not composed of microsecond flares.

  15. Solar hard X-rays and gamma-rays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAN; Weiqun(甘为群); CHANG; Jin(常进); LI; Youping(李友平); LIN; Chunmei(林春梅)

    2002-01-01

    We briefly introduce our recent work on the spectral evolution of energetic protons, the beam property of accelerated electrons, the gamma-ray flare classification, the temporal features of the annihilation line, the hard X-ray delayed events, the hydrodynamic process, and the continuum emission in solar flares.

  16. Analysis of gamma ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CAT imaging Cherenkov telescope has now been operational for nearly a year, and has collected data on a variety of astrophysical sources. This scanning telescope allows obtaining high quality images of the Cherenkov radiation originating from atmospheric showers. The main advantage of this chamber is its high pixel granularity amounting to 546 phototubes of 11 mm. The telescope is a reflector of Davies-Cotton type for which 90 spherical mirrors of 50 cm diameter and 12 m radius are installed onto a metallic rack. Two methods of data processing are described. The most spectacular results concerning the Crab nebula and active galactic nucleus Markarian 501 are presented. Presently the CAT scanning telescope is operating on a routine-base for source observations. The threshold of the device which is around 250 GeV will be determined in the near future with high accuracy and new point-like and extended sources will be analyzed following the next planned measuring runs

  17. GammaLib and ctools. A software framework for the analysis of astronomical gamma-ray data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knödlseder, J.; Mayer, M.; Deil, C.; Cayrou, J.-B.; Owen, E.; Kelley-Hoskins, N.; Lu, C.-C.; Buehler, R.; Forest, F.; Louge, T.; Siejkowski, H.; Kosack, K.; Gerard, L.; Schulz, A.; Martin, P.; Sanchez, D.; Ohm, S.; Hassan, T.; Brau-Nogué, S.

    2016-08-01

    The field of gamma-ray astronomy has seen important progress during the last decade, yet to date no common software framework has been developed for the scientific analysis of gamma-ray telescope data. We propose to fill this gap by means of the GammaLib software, a generic library that we have developed to support the analysis of gamma-ray event data. GammaLib was written in C++ and all functionality is available in Python through an extension module. Based on this framework we have developed the ctools software package, a suite of software tools that enables flexible workflows to be built for the analysis of Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescope event data. The ctools are inspired by science analysis software available for existing high-energy astronomy instruments, and they follow the modular ftools model developed by the High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center. The ctools were written in Python and C++, and can be either used from the command line via shell scripts or directly from Python. In this paper we present the GammaLib and ctools software versions 1.0 that were released at the end of 2015. GammaLib and ctools are ready for the science analysis of Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescope event data, and also support the analysis of Fermi-LAT data and the exploitation of the COMPTEL legacy data archive. We propose using ctools as the science tools software for the Cherenkov Telescope Array Observatory.

  18. The Multi-Messenger Approach to High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Paredes, Josep M; Torres, Diego F

    2008-01-01

    This book provides a theoretical and observational overview of the state of the art of gamma-ray astrophysics, and their impact and connection with the physics of cosmic rays and neutrinos. With the aim of shedding new and fresh light on the problem of the nature of the gamma-ray sources, particularly those yet unidentified, this book summarizes contributions to a workshop that continues with the series initiated by the meeting held at Tonantzintla in October 2000, and Hong-Kong in May 2004. This books will be of interest for all active researchers in the field of high energy astrophysics and astroparticle physics, as well as for graduate students entering into the subject.

  19. Design and Performance of the GAMMA-400 Gamma-Ray Telescope for the Dark Matter Searches

    CERN Document Server

    Galper, A M; Aptekar, R L; Arkhangelskaja, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Boezio, M; Bonvicini, V; Boyarchuk, K A; Fradkin, M I; Gusakov, Yu V; Kaplin, V A; Kachanov, V A; Kheymits, M D; Leonov, A A; Longo, F; Mazets, E P; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P; Mereminskiy, I A; Mikhailov, V V; Moiseev, A A; Mocchiutti, E; Mori, N; Moskalenko, I V; Naumov, P Yu; Papini, P; Picozza, P; Rodin, V G; Runtso, M F; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Suchkov, S I; Tavani, M; Topchiev, N P; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Yurkin, Yu T; Zampa, N; Zverev, V G; Zirakashvili, V N

    2012-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is designed to measure the fluxes of gamma rays and cosmic-ray electrons + positrons, which can be produced by annihilation or decay of the dark matter particles, as well as to survey the celestial sphere in order to study point and extended sources of gamma rays, measure energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, gamma-ray bursts, and gamma-ray emission from the Sun. The GAMMA-400 covers the energy range from 100 MeV to 3000 GeV. Its angular resolution is ~0.01 deg (E{\\gamma} > 100 GeV), the energy resolution ~1% (E{\\gamma} > 10 GeV), and the proton rejection factor ~10E6. GAMMA-400 will be installed on the Russian space platform Navigator. The beginning of observations is planned for 2018.

  20. Design and Performance of the GAMMA-400 Gamma-Ray Telescope for Dark Matter Searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galper, A. M.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Boyarchuk, K. A.; Fradkin, M. I.; Gusakov, Yu V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kachanov, V. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Leonov, A. A.; Longo, F.; Mazets, E. P.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P.; Mereminskiy, I. A.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu

    2012-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is designed to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons (+) positrons, which can be produced by annihilation or decay of the dark matter particles, as well as to survey the celestial sphere in order to study point and extended sources of gamma-rays, measure energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, gamma-ray bursts, and gamma-ray emission from the Sun. GAMMA-400 covers the energy range from 100 MeV to 3000 GeV. Its angular resolution is approximately 0.01deg (E(sub gamma) greater than 100 GeV), the energy resolution approximately 1% (E(sub gamma) greater than 10 GeV), and the proton rejection factor approximately 10(exp 6). GAMMA-400 will be installed on the Russian space platform Navigator. The beginning of observations is planned for 2018.

  1. Gamma-Ray Bursts: Jets and Energetics

    CERN Document Server

    Frail, D A

    2003-01-01

    The relativistic outflows from gamma-ray bursts are now thought to be narrowly collimated into jets. After correcting for this jet geometry there is a remarkable constancy of both the energy radiated by the burst and the kinetic energy carried by the outflow. Gamma-ray bursts are still the most luminous explosions in the Universe, but they release energies that are comparable to supernovae. The diversity of cosmic explosions appears to be governed by the fraction of energy that is coupled to ultra-relativistic ejecta.

  2. A Shotgun Model for $\\gamma$ Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Heinz, S

    1999-01-01

    We propose that gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are produced by a shower of heavy blobs running into circumstellar material at highly relativistic speeds. The gamma ray emission is produced in the shocks these bullets drive into the surrounding medium. The short term variability seen in GRBs is set by the slowing-down time of the bullets while the overall duration of the burst is set by the lifetime of the central engine. A requirement of this model is that the ambient medium be dense, consistent with a strong stellar wind. In contrast to other external shock scenarios, the efficiency of the shock can be close to unity.

  3. Gamma ray spectrometer for Lunar Scout 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, C. E.; Burt, W. W.; Edwards, B. C.; Martin, R. A.; Nakano, George H.; Reedy, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    We review the current status of the Los Alamos program to develop a high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer for the Lunar Scout-II mission, which is the second of two Space Exploration Initiative robotic precursor missions to study the Moon. This instrument will measure gamma rays in the energy range of approximately 0.1 - 10 MeV to determine the composition of the lunar surface. The instrument is a high-purity germanium crystal surrounded by an CsI anticoincidence shield and cooled by a split Stirling cycle cryocooler. It will provide the abundance of many elements over the entire lunar surface.

  4. Nuclear Forensics using Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, E. B.

    2016-09-01

    Much of George Dracoulis's research career was devoted to utilising gamma-ray spectroscopy in fundamental studies in nuclear physics. This same technology is useful in a wide range of applications in the area of nuclear forensics. Over the last several years, our research group has made use of both high- and low-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers to: identify the first sample of plutonium large enough to be weighed; determine the yield of the Trinity nuclear explosion; measure fission fragment yields as a function of target nucleus and neutron energy; and observe fallout in the U. S. from the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident.

  5. Nuclear forensics using gamma-ray spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Norman, Eric B

    2016-01-01

    Much of George Dracoulis's research career was devoted to utilizing gamma-ray spectroscopy in fundamental studies in nuclear physics. This same technology is useful in a wide range of applications in the area of nuclear forensics. Over the past several years, our research group has made use of both high- and low- resolution gamma ray spectrometers to: identify the first sample of plutonium large enough to be weighed; determine the yield of the Trinity nuclear explosion; measure fission fragment yields as a function of target nucleus and neutron energy; and observe fallout in the U. S. from the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident.

  6. Nuclear Forensics using Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman E. B.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Much of George Dracoulis’s research career was devoted to utilising gamma-ray spectroscopy in fundamental studies in nuclear physics. This same technology is useful in a wide range of applications in the area of nuclear forensics. Over the last several years, our research group has made use of both high- and low-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers to: identify the first sample of plutonium large enough to be weighed; determine the yield of the Trinity nuclear explosion; measure fission fragment yields as a function of target nucleus and neutron energy; and observe fallout in the U. S. from the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident.

  7. Status of the Milagro $\\gamma$ Ray Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, R; Berley, D; Chen, M L; Coyne, D G; Delay, R S; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Evans, D; Falcone, A D; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hoffman, C M; Hugenberger, S; Kelley, L A; Leonor, I; Macri, J R; McConnell, M; McCullough, J F; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Ryan, J M; Schneider, M; Shen, B; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Thompson, T N; Tümer, T O; Wang, K; Wascko, M O; Westerhoff, S; Williams, D A; Yang, T; Yodh, G B

    2001-01-01

    The Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory is the world's first large-area water Cherenkov detector capable of continuously monitoring the sky at TeV energies. Located in northern New Mexico, Milagro will perform an all sky survey of the Northern Hemisphere at energies between ~250 GeV and 50 TeV. With a high duty cycle, large detector area (~5000 square meters), and a wide field-of-view (~1 sr), Milagro is uniquely capable of searching for transient and DC sources of high-energy gamma-ray emission. Milagro has been operating since February, 1999. The current status of the Milagro Observatory and initial results will be discussed.

  8. Supernovae and Gamma Ray Bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Della Valle

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Se revisa el estatus observacional de la conexi on Supernova (SN/Estallido de Rayos-Gamma (GRB. Recientes (y no tan recientes observaciones de GRBs largos sugieren que una fracci on signi cativa de ellos (pero no todos est an asociados con supernovas brillantes del tipo Ib/c. Estimaciones actuales de las tasas de producci on de GRBs y SNs dan una raz on para GRB/SNe-Ibc en el rango 0:4%

  9. Astrophysics at the Highest Energy Frontiers

    OpenAIRE

    Stecker, F. W.

    2002-01-01

    I discuss recent advances being made in the physics and astrophysics of cosmic rays and cosmic gamma-rays at the highest observed energies as well as the related physics and astrophysics of very high energy cosmic neutrinos. I also discuss the connections between these topics.

  10. On TeV Gamma Rays and the Search for Galactic Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Kistler, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    The IceCube neutrino discovery presents an opportunity to answer long-standing questions in high-energy astrophysics. For their own sake and relations to other processes, it is important to understand neutrinos arising from the Milky Way, which should have an accompanying flux of gamma rays. Examining Fermi TeV data, and applying other constraints up to >1 PeV, it appears implausible that the Galactic fraction of the IceCube flux is large, though could be present at some level. We address Sgr A*, where the TeV-PeV neutrinos may outrun gamma rays due to gamma-gamma opacity, and further implications, including dark matter and cosmic-ray electrons.

  11. The HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory: Observations of Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiñana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-GarcIa, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sanchez, F E; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2013-01-01

    We describe measurements of GeV and TeV cosmic rays with the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory, or HAWC. The measurements include the observation of the shadow of the moon; the observation of small-scale and large-scale angular clustering of the TeV cosmic rays; the prospects for measurement of transient solar events with HAWC; and the observation of Forbush decreases with the HAWC engineering array and HAWC-30.

  12. GammaModeler 3-D gamma-ray imaging technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 3-D GammaModelertrademark system was used to survey a portion of the facility and provide 3-D visual and radiation representation of contaminated equipment located within the facility. The 3-D GammaModelertrademark system software was used to deconvolve extended sources into a series of point sources, locate the positions of these sources in space and calculate the 30 cm. dose rates for each of these sources. Localization of the sources in three dimensions provides information on source locations interior to the visual objects and provides a better estimate of the source intensities. The three dimensional representation of the objects can be made transparent in order to visualize sources located within the objects. Positional knowledge of all the sources can be used to calculate a map of the radiation in the canyon. The use of 3-D visual and gamma ray information supports improved planning decision-making, and aids in communications with regulators and stakeholders

  13. Gamma-ray emitting supernova remnants as the origin of Galactic cosmic rays?

    CERN Document Server

    Tjus, Julia Becker; Kroll, Mike; Nierstenhöfer, Nils

    2015-01-01

    The origin of cosmic rays is one of the long-standing mysteries in physics and astrophysics. Simple arguments suggest that a scenario of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Milky Way as the dominant sources for the cosmic ray population below the knee could work: in a generic calculation, it can be shown that these objects can provide the energy budget necessary to explain the observed flux of cosmic rays. However, this argument is based on the assumption that all sources behave in the same way, i.e.\\ they all have the same energy budget, spectral behavior and maximum energy. In this paper, we investigate if a realistic population of SNRs is capable of producing the cosmic ray flux as it is observed below the knee. We use 21 SNRs that are well-studied from radio wavelengths up to gamma-ray energies. It could be shown previously (Mandelartz & Becker Tjus 2015) that the high-energy bump in the energy spectrum of these 21 sources can be dominated by hadronic emission. Here, gamma-rays are produced via $\\pi^{0}-...

  14. THE FERMI GBM GAMMA-RAY BURST CATALOG: THE FIRST TWO YEARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paciesas, William S.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, Michael S.; Burgess, J. Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Connaughton, Valerie; Goldstein, Adam; Guiriec, Sylvain [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Meegan, Charles A.; Van der Horst, Alexander J. [Universities Space Research Association, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Von Kienlin, Andreas; Diehl, Roland; Foley, Suzanne; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Bissaldi, Elisabetta [Institute of Astro and Particle Physics, University Innsbruck, Technikerstrasse 25, 6176 Innsbruck (Austria); Fishman, Gerald J. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Fitzpatrick, Gerard [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Stillorgan Road, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty [Jacobs Technology, Inc., 1525 Perimeter Pkwy NW, Huntsville, AL 35806 (United States); and others

    2012-03-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is designed to enhance the scientific return from Fermi in studying gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In its first two years of operation GBM triggered on 491 GRBs. We summarize the criteria used for triggering and quantify the general characteristics of the triggered GRBs, including their locations, durations, peak flux, and fluence. This catalog is an official product of the Fermi GBM science team, and the data files containing the complete results are available from the High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center.

  15. The Fermi GBM Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog: The First Two Years

    CERN Document Server

    Paciesas, William S; von Kienlin, Andreas; Bhat, P N; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Briggs, Michael S; Burgess, J Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Connaughton, Valerie; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald J; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Foley, Suzanne; Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty; Goldstein, Adam; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David; Guiriec, Sylvain; van der Horst, Alexander J; Kippen, R Marc; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Lichti, Giselher; Lin, Lin; McBreen, Sheila; Preece, Robert D; Rau, Arne; Tierney, Dave; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2012-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is designed to enhance the scientific return from Fermi in studying gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In its first two years of operation GBM triggered on 491 GRBs. We summarize the criteria used for triggering and quantify the general characteristics of the triggered GRBs, including their locations, durations, peak flux, and fluence. This catalog is an official product of the Fermi GBM science team, and the data files containing the complete results are available from the High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC).

  16. The present and the future of cosmology with Gamma Ray Bursts

    OpenAIRE

    Ghirlanda, G.; G. Ghisellini

    2006-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts are among the most powerful astrophysical sources and they release up to 1.e54 erg, if isotropic, in less than few hundred seconds. Their detection in the hard X/gamma ray band (at energies >10 keV) and out to very high redshift (z~6.3) makes them a powerful new cosmological tool (a) to study the reionization epoch, (b) to unveil the properties of the IGM, (c) to study the present universe geometry and (d) to investigate the nature and cosmic evolution of the dark energy. Whi...

  17. Skyshine spectra of gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the spectra of gamma photons back-scattered in vertical direction by infinite air above ground (skyshine) is presented. The source for these measurements is a 650 Ci Cobalt-60 point-source and the skyshine spectra are reported for distances from 150 m to 325 m from the source, measured with a 5 cm x 5 cm NaI(Tl) detector collimated with collimators of 12 mm and 20 mm diameter and 5 cm length. These continuous spectra are unfolded with Gold's iterative technique. The photon-spectra so obtained have a distinct line at 72 keV due to multiply-scattered photons. This is an energy where photoelectric and Compton cross-sections for multiply-scattered photons balance each other. The intensity of the line(I) decreases exponentially with distance (d) from the source obeying a relation of the type I = Isub(o)esup(-μd) where μ is called as ''Multiply-Scatter Coefficient'', a constant of the medium which is air in these measurements. This relationship is explained in terms of a halo around the source comprising of multiply-scattered gamma photons, Isub(0) being the intensity of these scattered photons at the location of cobalt-source. A fraction called as ''Back-scattered Fraction'', the ratio of Isub(0) to the number of original photons from the cobalt-source entering the infinite air, is also calculated. It is shown that with a properly calibrated detector system, this fraction can be used to determine the strength of a large gamma source, viz. a nuclear explosion in air, and for mineral prospecting. These conclusions are general and can be applied to any other infinite medium. Some forward-scatter (transmission) spectra of cobalt-60 source through 10 cm of Pb and 2.5 cm of Al are also reported. (auth.)

  18. Gamma Ray Bursts as Neutrino Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Mészáros, P

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst sources appear to fulfill all the conditions for being efficient cosmic ray accelerators, and being extremely compact, are also expected to produce multi-GeV to PeV neutrinos. I review the basic model predictions for the expected neutrino fluxes in classical GRBs as well as in low luminosity and choked bursts, discussing the recent IceCube observational constraints and implications from the observed diffuse neutrino flux.

  19. Natural background gamma-ray spectrum. List of gamma-rays ordered in energy from natural radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichimiya, Tsutomu [Japan Radioisotope Association, Tokyo (Japan); Narita, Tsutomu; Kitao, Kensuke

    1998-03-01

    A quick index to {gamma}-rays and X-rays from natural radionuclides is presented. In the list, {gamma}-rays are arranged in order of increasing energy. The list also contains {gamma}-rays from radioactive nuclides produced in a germanium detector and its surrounding materials by interaction with cosmic neutrons, as well as direct {gamma}-rays from interaction with the neutrons. Artificial radioactive nuclides emitting {gamma}-rays with same or near energy value as that of the natural {gamma}-rays and X-rays are also listed. In appendix, {gamma}-ray spectra from a rock, uranium ore, thorium, monazite and uraninite and also background spectra obtained with germanium detectors placed in iron or lead shield have been given. The list is designed for use in {gamma}-ray spectroscopy under the conditions of highly natural background, such as in-situ environmental radiation monitoring or low-level activity measurements, with a germanium detector. (author)

  20. Astrophysical objects observed by the MESSENGER X-ray spectrometer during Mercury flybys

    CERN Document Server

    Bannister, N P; Lindsay, S T; Martindale, A; Talboys, D L

    2012-01-01

    The MESSENGER spacecraft conducted its first flyby of Mercury on 14th January 2008, followed by two subsequent encounters on 6th October 2008 and 29th September 2009, prior to Mercury orbit insertion on 18th March 2011. We have reviewed MESSENGER flight telemetry and X-ray Spectrometer observations from the first two encounters, and correlate several prominent features in the data with the presence of astrophysical X-ray sources in the instrument field of view. We find that two X-ray peaks attributed in earlier work to the detection of suprathermal electrons from the Mercury magnetosphere, are likely to contain a significant number of events that are of astrophysical origin. The intensities of these two peaks cannot be explained entirely on the basis of astrophysical sources, and we support the previous suprathermal explanation but suggest that the electron fluxes derived in those studies be revised to correct for a significant astrophysical signal.

  1. Gamma ray bursts as a signature for entangled gravitational systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basini, Giuseppe; Capozziello, Salvatore; Longo, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    Gamma ray bursts (GRBs), due to their features, can be considered not only extremely energetic, but also as the most relativistic astrophysical objects discovered. Their phenomenology is still matter of debate and, till now, no fully satisfactory model has been formulated to explain the nature of their origin. In the framework of a recently developed new theory, where general conservation laws are always and absolutely conserved in nature, we propose an alternative model where an ``entangled'' gravitational system, dynamically constituted by a black holes connected to a white hole through a worm hole, seems capable of explaining most of the properties inferred for the GRB engine. In particular, it leads to a natural explanation of energetics, beaming, polarization, and, very likely, distribution. On the other hand, GRBs can be considered a signature of such entangled gravitational systems.

  2. Gamma-ray burst polarization via Compton scattering process

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Zhe; Jiang, Yunguo

    2014-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation and Compton scattering are widely accepted as the most likely emission mechanisms of some astrophysical phenomena, such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The measurement on polarization of photons provides a useful tool to distinguish different emission mechanisms and structures of the emission region. Based on the differential cross section of a polarized photon scattered by an unpolarized electron of any initial momentum, we derive analytical formula of polarization for beamed photons scattered by isotropic electrons with a power law distribution. Numerical calculations are carried out in four special cases: electrons at rest, Thomson limit, head-on collision and monochromatic electrons. It is found that the maximum polarization can be as high as $100\\%$ for low energy photons, if the electrons are at rest. Although polarization is highly suppressed due to the isotropic electrons, a maximum value of $\\sim 10\\% - 20\\%$ can still be achieved. Compton scatterin...

  3. The new gamma-ray observatory: CTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, John

    2016-07-01

    CTA is the next generation gamma-ray observatory and will have a factor 10 better sensitivity compared to existing facilities, as well as many other superior parameters. Aspects of array layout, performance and sites are presented. The broad range of forefront science which will be studied is described.

  4. Gamma-ray emission from nova outbursts

    CERN Document Server

    Hernanz, M

    2013-01-01

    Classical novae produce radioactive nuclei which are emitters of gamma-rays in the MeV range. Some examples are the lines at 478 and 1275 keV (from 7Be and 22Na) and the positron-electron annihilation emission, with the 511 keV line and a continuum. Gamma-ray spectra and light curves are potential unique tools to trace the corresponding isotopes and to give insights on the properties of the expanding envelope. Another possible origin of gamma-rays is the acceleration of particles up to very high energies, so that either neutral pions or inverse Compton processes produce gamma-rays of energies larger than 100 MeV. MeV photons during nova explosions have not been detected yet, although several attempts have been made in the last decades; on the other hand, GeV photons from novae have been detected with the Fermi satellite in V407 Cyg, a nova in a symbiotic binary, where the companion is a red giant with a wind, instead of a main sequence star as in the cataclysmic variables hosting classical novae. Two more nov...

  5. Gamma-ray Novae: Rare or Nearby?

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, Paul J; Brown, Anthony M; Chadwick, Paula M

    2016-01-01

    Classical Novae were revealed as a surprise source of gamma-rays in Fermi LAT observations. During the first 8 years since the LAT was launched, 6 novae in total have been detected to > 5 sigma in gamma-rays, in contrast to the 69 discovered optically in the same period. We attempt to resolve this discrepancy by assuming all novae are gamma-ray emitters, and assigning peak one-day fluxes based on a flat distribution of the known emitters to a simulated population. To determine optical parameters, the spatial distribution and magnitudes of bulge and disc novae in M31 are scaled to the Milky Way, which we approximate as a disc with a 20 kpc radius and elliptical bulge with semi major axis 3 kpc and axis ratios 2:1 in the xy plane. We approximate Galactic reddening using a double exponential disc with vertical and radial scale heights of r_d = 5 kpc and z_d = 0.2 kpc, and demonstrate that even such a rudimentary model can easily reproduce the observed fraction of gamma-ray novae, implying that these apparently r...

  6. Gamma-Ray Telescope and Uncertainty Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivalingaswamy, T.; Kagali, B. A.

    2012-01-01

    Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle is one of the important basic principles of quantum mechanics. In most of the books on quantum mechanics, this uncertainty principle is generally illustrated with the help of a gamma ray microscope, wherein neither the image formation criterion nor the lens properties are taken into account. Thus a better…

  7. Primary shutter and gamma ray trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the main radiation shutter and gamma ray trap, which will be used at LNLS front-ends that has been designed. The components external to the UHV chamber have been assembled and are undergoing tests. Vacuum requirements for the chamber have been estimated

  8. Gamma-ray bursts at high redshift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A.M.J. Wijers

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are much brighter than supernovae, and could therefore possibly probe the Universe to high redshift. The presently established GRB redshifts range from 0.83 to 5, and quite possibly even beyond that. Since most proposed mechanisms for GRB link them closely to deaths of massive stars

  9. Neutrino Balls and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Holdom, B

    1994-01-01

    We propose a mechanism by which the neutrino emission from a supernova-type explosion can be converted into a gamma-ray burst of total energy $\\sim 10^{50}$ ergs. This occurs naturally if the explosion is situated inside a ball of trapped neutrinos, which in turn may lie at a galactic core. There are possible unique signatures of this scenario.

  10. Constraints on dark matter annihilations from diffuse gamma-ray emission in the Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Tavakoli, Maryam; Evoli, Carmelo; Ullio, Piero

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in gamma-ray cosmic ray, infrared and radio astronomy have allowed us to develop a significantly better understanding of the galactic medium properties in the last few years. In this work using the DRAGON code, that numerically solves the CR propagation equation and calculating gamma-ray emissivities in a 2-dimensional grid enclosing the Galaxy, we study in a self consistent manner models for the galactic diffuse gamma-ray emission. Our models are cross-checked to both the available CR and gamma-ray data. We address the extend to which dark matter annihilations in the Galaxy can contribute to the diffuse gamma-ray flux towards different directions on the sky. Moreover we discuss the impact that astrophysical uncertainties of non DM nature, have on the derived gamma-ray limits. Such uncertainties are related to the diffusion properties on the Galaxy, the interstellar gas and the interstellar radiation field energy densities. Light ~10 GeV dark matter annihilating dominantly to hadrons is more s...

  11. Novel Spectral Features in MeV Gamma Rays from Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Bringmann, Torsten; Hryczuk, Andrzej; Weniger, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical searches for gamma rays are one of the main strategies to probe the annihilation or decay of dark matter particles. We present a new class of distinct sub-GeV spectral features that generically appear in kinematical situations where the available center-of-mass energy in such processes is just above threshold to produce excited meson states. Using a Fisher forecast with realistic astrophysical backgrounds, we demonstrate that for upcoming experiments like e-ASTROGAM and ComPair these signals can turn out to be the smoking gun in the search for particle dark matter.

  12. Gamma-Gamma Absorption in the Broad Line Region Radiation Fields of Gamma-Ray Blazars

    CERN Document Server

    Boettcher, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The expected level of gamma-gamma absorption in the Broad Line Region (BLR) radiation field of gamma-ray loud Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars (FSRQs)is evaluated as a function of the location of the gamma-ray emission region. This is done self-consistently with parameters inferred from the shape of the spectral energy distribution (SED) in a single-zone leptonic EC-BLR model scenario. We take into account all geometrical effects both in the calculation of the gamma-gamma opacity and the normalization of the BLR radiation energy density. As specific examples, we study the FSRQs 3C279 and PKS 1510-089, keeping the BLR radiation energy density at the location of the emission region fixed at the values inferred from the SED. We confirm previous findings that the optical depth due to $\\gamma\\gamma$ absorption in the BLR radiation field exceeds unity for both 3C279 and PKS 1510-089 for locations of the gamma-ray emission region inside the inner boundary of the BLR. It decreases monotonically, with distance from the cen...

  13. Systematic Study of Gamma-ray bright Blazars with Optical Polarization and Gamma-ray Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Itoh, Ryosuke; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Uemura, Makoto; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T; Kawabata, Koji S; Madejski, Grzegorz M; Schinzel, Frank K; Kanda, Yuka; Shiki, Kensei; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Kawabata, Miho; Moritani, Yuki; Nakaoka, Tatsuya; Ohsugi, Takashi; Sasada, Mahito; Takaki, Katsutoshi; Takata, Koji; Ui, Takahiro; Yamanaka, Masayuki; Yoshida, Michitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Blazars are highly variable active galactic nuclei which emit radiation at all wavelengths from radio to gamma-rays. Polarized radiation from blazars is one key piece of evidence for synchrotron radiation at low energies and it also varies dramatically. The polarization of blazars is of interest for understanding the origin, confinement, and propagation of jets. However, even though numerous measurements have been performed, the mechanisms behind jet creation, composition and variability are still debated. We performed simultaneous gamma-ray and optical photopolarimetry observations of 45 blazars between Jul. 2008 and Dec. 2014 to investigate the mechanisms of variability and search for a basic relation between the several subclasses of blazars. We identify a correlation between the maximum degree of optical linear polarization and the gamma-ray luminosity or the ratio of gamma-ray to optical fluxes. Since the maximum polarization degree depends on the condition of the magnetic field (chaotic or ordered), thi...

  14. Gamma-Ray Bursts: A Mystery Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Ann

    2007-01-01

    With the success of the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer currently in orbit, this is quite an exciting time in the history of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). The study of GRBs is a modern astronomical mystery story that began over 30 years ago with the serendipitous discovery of these astronomical events by military satellites in the late 1960's. Until the launch of BATSE on the Compton Gamma-ray Observatory, astronomers had no clue whether GRBs originated at the edge of our solar system, in our own Milky Way Galaxy or incredibly far away near the edge of the observable Universe. Data from BATSE proved that GRBs are distributed isotropically on the sky and thus could not be the related to objects in the disk of our Galaxy. Given the intensity of the gamma-ray emission, an extragalactic origin would require an astounding amount of energy. Without sufficient data to decide the issue, a great debate continued about whether GRBs were located in the halo of our own galaxy or were at extragalactic - even cosmological distances. This debate continued until 1997 when the BeppoSAX mission discovered a fading X-ray afterglow signal in the same location as a GRB. This discovery enabled other telescopes, to observe afterglow emission at optical and radio wavelengths and prove that GRBs were at cosmological distances by measuring large redshifts in the optical spectra. Like BeppoSAX Swift, slews to new GRB locations to measure afterglow emission. In addition to improved GRB sensitivity, a significant advantage of Swift over BeppoSAX and other missions is its ability to slew very quickly, allowing x-ray and optical follow-up measurements to be made as early as a minute after the gamma-ray burst trigger rather than the previous 6-8 hour delay. Swift afterglow measurements along with follow-up ground-based observations, and theoretical work have allowed astronomers to identify two plausible scenarios for the creation of a GRB: either through core collapse of super massive stars or

  15. Disentangling cosmic-ray and dark matter induced gamma-rays in galaxy clusters?

    CERN Document Server

    Maurin, D; Nezri, E; Pointecouteau, E

    2012-01-01

    Galaxy clusters are among the best targets for indirect dark matter detection in gamma-rays, despite the large astrophysical background expected from these objects. Detection is now within reach of current observatories (Fermi-LAT or Cerenkov telescopes), however, assessing the origin of this signal might be difficult. We investigate whether the `number of stacked objects - flux' dependence (log N-log F) could be a signature of the dominant process at stake. We use the CLUMPY code to integrate the signal from decaying/annihilating DM and cosmic rays along the line of sight. We assume the standard NFW profile for the dark matter density and rely on a parametrised emissivity for the cosmic-ray component. In this context, the consequences of stacking are explored using the MCXC meta-catalog of galaxy clusters. The log N-log F power-law behaviour may be a clear signature to disentangle decaying dark matter from cosmic-ray induced gamma-rays (and DM annihilation), contrarily to DM annihilation that has the same sl...

  16. Searching for gravitational waves associated with gamma-ray bursts int 2009-2010 LIGO-Virgo data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis we present the results of the search for gravitational wave bursts associated with gamma-ray bursts in the 2009-2010 data from the LIGO-Virgo gravitational wave interferometer network. The study of gamma-ray bursts progenitors, both from the gamma-ray emission and the gravitational wave emission point of view, yields the characteristic of the sought signal: polarization, time delays, etc... This knowledge allows the construction of a data analysis method which includes the astrophysical priors on joint gravitational wave and gamma-ray emission, and moreover which is robust to non-stationary transient noises, which are present in the data. The lack of detection in the analyzed data yields novel observational limits on the gamma-ray burst population. (author)

  17. Diagnosing ICF gamma-ray physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, Hans W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kim, Y H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Evoy, A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Young, C S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mack, J M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hoffman, N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilson, D C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Langenbrunner, J R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Evans, S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sedillo, T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batha, S H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dauffy, L [LLNL; Stoeffl, W [LLNL; Malone, R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kaufman, M I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cox, B C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tunnel, T W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miller, E K [NSTEC/SB; Ali, Z A [NSREC/LIVERMORE; Horsfield, C J [AWE; Rubery, M [AWE

    2010-01-01

    Gamma rays produced in an ICF environment open up a host of physics opportunities we are just beginning to explore. A branch of the DT fusion reaction, with a branching ratio on the order of 2e-5 {gamma}/n, produces 16.7 MeV {gamma}-rays. These {gamma}-rays provide a direct measure of fusion reaction rate (unlike x-rays) without being compromised by Doppler spreading (unlike neutrons). Reaction-rate history measurements, such as nuclear bang time and burn width, are fundamental quantities that will be used to optimize ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Gas Cherenkov Detectors (GCD) that convert fusion {gamma}-rays to UV/visible Cherenkov photons for collection by fast optical recording systems established their usefulness in illuminating ICF physics in several experimental campaigns at OMEGA. Demonstrated absolute timing calibrations allow bang time measurements with accuracy better than 30 ps. System impulse response better than 95 ps fwhm have been made possible by the combination of low temporal dispersion GCDs, ultra-fast microchannel-plate photomultiplier tubes (PMT), and high-bandwidth Mach Zehnder fiber optic data links and digitizers, resulting in burn width measurement accuracy better than 10ps. Inherent variable energy-thresholding capability allows use of GCDs as {gamma}-ray spectrometers to explore other interesting nuclear processes. Recent measurements of the 4.44 MeV {sup 12}C(n,n{prime}) {gamma}-rays produced as 14.1 MeV DT fusion neutrons pass through plastic capsules is paving the way for a new CH ablator areal density measurement. Insertion of various neutron target materials near target chamber center (TCC) producing secondary, neutron-induced {gamma}y-rays are being used to study other nuclear interactions and as in-situ sources to calibrate detector response and DT branching ratio. NIF Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostics, based on the GCD concept, are now being developed based on optimization of sensitivity, bandwidth

  18. Perspectives of the GAMMA-400 space observatory for high-energy gamma rays and cosmic rays measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topchiev, N. P.; Galper, A. M.; Bonvicini, V.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Bakaldin, A. V.; Bergstrom, L.; Berti, E.; Bigongiari, G.; Bobkov, S. G.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bonechi, S.; Bongi, M.; Bottai, S.; Castellini, G.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cumani, P.; Dalkarov, O. D.; Dedenko, G. L.; De Donato, C.; Dogiel, V. A.; Finetti, N.; Gorbunov, M. S.; Gusakov, Yu V.; Hnatyk, B. I.; Kadilin, V. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kaplun, A. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Korepanov, V. E.; Larsson, J.; Leonov, A. A.; Loginov, V. A.; Longo, F.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Men'shenin, A. L.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Ricciarini, S.; Runtso, M. F.; Ryde, F.; Serdin, O. V.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Yu I.; Suchkov, S. I.; Taraskin, A. A.; Tavani, M.; Tiberio, A.; Tyurin, E. M.; Ulanov, M. V.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Yurkin, Yu T.; Zampa, N.; Zirakashvili, V. N.; Zverev, V. G.

    2016-02-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is intended to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to several TeV. Such measurements concern the following scientific tasks: investigation of point sources of gamma-rays, studies of the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, studies of gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the Sun, as well as high precision measurements of spectra of high-energy electrons and positrons. Also the GAMMA- 400 instrument provides the possibility for protons and nuclei measurements up to knee. But the main goal for the GAMMA-400 mission is to perform a sensitive search for signatures of dark matter particles in high-energy gamma-ray emission. To fulfill these measurements the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope possesses unique physical characteristics in comparison with previous and present experiments. The major advantage of the GAMMA-400 instrument is excellent angular and energy resolution for gamma-rays above 10 GeV. The GAMMA-400 experiment will be installed onboard of the Navigator space platform, manufactured by the NPO Lavochkin Association. The expected orbit will be a highly elliptical orbit (with apogee 300.000 km and perigee 500 km) with 7 days orbital period. An important profit of such an orbit is the fact that the full sky coverage will always be available for gamma ray astronomy.

  19. The future of gamma-ray astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knödlseder, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    The field of gamma-ray astronomy has experienced impressive progress over the last decade. Thanks to the advent of a new generation of imaging air Cherenkov telescopes (H.E.S.S., MAGIC, VERITAS) and thanks to the launch of the Fermi-LAT satellite, several thousand gamma-ray sources are known today, revealing an unexpected ubiquity of particle acceleration processes in the Universe. Major scientific challenges are still ahead, such as the identification of the nature of Dark Matter, the discovery and understanding of the sources of cosmic rays, or the comprehension of the particle acceleration processes that are at work in the various objects. This paper presents some of the instruments and mission concepts that will address these challenges over the next decades. xml:lang="fr"

  20. The future of gamma-ray astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Knödlseder, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The field of gamma-ray astronomy has experienced impressive progress over the last decade. Thanks to the advent of a new generation of imaging air Cherenkov telescopes (H.E.S.S., MAGIC, VERITAS) and thanks to the launch of the Fermi-LAT satellite, several thousand gamma-ray sources are known today, revealing an unexpected ubiquity of particle acceleration processes in the Universe. Major scientific challenges are still ahead, such as the identification of the nature of Dark Matter, the discovery and understanding of the sources of cosmic rays, or the comprehension of the particle acceleration processes that are at work in the various objects. This paper presents some of the instruments and mission concepts that will address these challenges over the next decades.

  1. Interstellar medium structure and content and gamma ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general description of gamma-ray astronomy is presented with special emphasis on the study of diffuse gamma-ray emission. This is followed by a collection of reflections and observations on the structure and the gas and dust content of the local interstellar medium. Results of gamma-ray observations on the local interstellar medium are given. The last part is devoted to the whole of the galactic gamma-ray emission and its interpretation

  2. The nature of the Diffuse Gamma-Ray Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornasa, Mattia; Sánchez-Conde, Miguel A.

    2015-10-01

    We review the current understanding of the Diffuse Gamma-Ray Background (DGRB). The DGRB is what remains of the total measured gamma-ray emission after the subtraction of the resolved sources and of the diffuse Galactic foregrounds. It is interpreted as the cumulative emission of sources that are not bright enough to be detected individually. Yet, its exact composition remains unveiled. Well-established astrophysical source populations (e.g. blazars, misaligned AGNs, star-forming galaxies and millisecond pulsars) all represent guaranteed contributors to the DGRB. More exotic scenarios, such as Dark Matter annihilation or decay, may contribute as well. In this review, we describe how these components have been modeled in the literature and how the DGRB can be used to provide valuable information on each of them. We summarize the observational information currently available on the DGRB, paying particular attention to the most recent measurement of its intensity energy spectrum by the Fermi LAT Collaboration. We also discuss the novel analyses of the auto-correlation angular power spectrum of the DGRB and of its cross-correlation with tracers of the large-scale structure of the Universe. New data sets already (or soon) available are expected to provide further insight on the nature of this emission. By summarizing where we stand on the current knowledge of the DGRB, this review is intended both as a useful reference for those interested in the topic and as a means to trigger new ideas for further research.

  3. AGILE Observations of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes

    CERN Document Server

    Marisaldi, M; Labanti, C; Bulgarelli, A; Gianotti, F; Trifoglio, M; Tavani, M; Argan, A; Del Monte, E; Longo, F; Barbiellini, G; Giuliani, A; Trois, A

    2011-01-01

    The AGILE satellite, operating since mid 2007 and primarily devoted to high-energy astrophysics, is one of the only three currently operating space instruments capable of detecting Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs), together with RHESSI and $Fermi$-GBM. Thanks to the AGILE Mini-Calorimeter instrument energy range extended up to 100MeV and its flexible trigger logic on sub-millisecond time scales, AGILE is detecting more than 10 TGFs/month, adding a wealth of observations which pose severe constrains on production models. The main AGILE discoveries in TGF science during two and a half years of observations are the following: 1) the TGF spectrum extends well above 40 MeV, 2) the high energy tail of the TGF spectrum is harder than expected and cannot be easily explained by previous theoretical models, 3) TGFs can be localized from space using high-energy photons detected by the AGILE gamma-ray imaging detector. In this presentation we will describe the characteristics of the 2.5-years AGILE TGF sample, focusi...

  4. Fourteen Years of Education and Public Outreach for the Swift Gamma-ray Burst Explorer Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Cominsky, Lynn; Simonnet, Aurore

    2014-01-01

    The Sonoma State University (SSU) Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) group leads the Swift Education and Public Outreach program. For Swift, we have previously implemented broad efforts that have contributed to NASA's Science Mission Directorate E/PO portfolio across many outcome areas. Our current focus is on highly-leveraged and demonstrably successful activities, including the wide-reaching Astrophysics Educator Ambassador program, and our popular websites: Epo's Chronicles and the Gamma-ray Burst (GRB) Skymap. We also make major contributions working collaboratively through the Astrophysics Science Education and Public Outreach Forum (SEPOF) on activities such as the on-line educator professional development course NASA's Multiwavelength Universe. Past activities have included the development of many successful education units including the GEMS Invisible Universe guide, the Gamma-ray Burst Educator's guide, and the Newton's Laws Poster set; informal activities including support for the International Ye...

  5. High Energy $\\gamma$ Rays from Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Ray Protons in $\\gamma$ Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Böttcher, M

    1998-01-01

    It has recently been proposed that ultrahigh energy ($\\gtrsim 10^{19}$ eV) cosmic rays (UHECR) are accelerated by the blast waves associated with GRBs. We calculate the observed synchrotron radiation spectrum from protons and energetic leptons formed in the cascades initiated by photopion production, taking into account $\\gamma\\gamma$ attenuation at the source. Normalizing to the emission characteristics of GRB~970508, we predict $\\sim 10$ MeV - 100 GeV fluxes at a level which may have been observed with EGRET from bright GRBs, and could be detected with the proposed GLAST experiment or with ground-based air Cherenkov telescopes having thresholds $\\lesssim $ several hundred GeV. Besides testing the UHECR origin hypothesis, the short wavelength emission and afterglows can be used to probe the level of the diffuse intergalactic infrared radiation fields or constrain redshifts of GRB sources.

  6. Material recognition using fission gamma rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viesti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)], E-mail: giuseppe.viesti@pd.infn.it; Sajo-Bohus, L. [Universidad Simon-Bolivar, Laboratorio Fisica Nuclear, Apartado 8900, 1080 A. Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Fabris, D. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Nebbia, G.; Pesente, S. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2009-07-21

    Material recognition is studied by measuring the transmission spectrum of {sup 252}Cf fission gamma rays in the energy range E{sub {gamma}}=0.1-5.5 MeV for 0.1-MeV-wide energy bins through a number of elementary samples. Each transmitted spectrum is compared with a library of reference spectra for different elements providing the possibility of material identification. In case of elemental samples with known thickness, this procedure allows the identification of the sample Z with uncertainty typically lower than 3 Z-units over a wide range of elements. Applications to composite materials are also reported.

  7. BL Lacertae Objects and the Extragalactic Gamma-Ray Background

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Fan

    2011-01-01

    A tight correlation between gamma-ray and radio emission is found for a sample of BL Lacertae (BL Lac) objects detected by Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) and the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET). The gamma-ray emission of BL Lac objects exhibits strong variability, and the detection rate of gamma-ray BL Lac objects is low, which may be related to the gamma-ray duty cycle of BL Lac objects. We estimate the gamma-ray duty cycle ~ 0.11, for BL Lac objects detected by EGRET and Fermi. Using the empirical relation of gamma-ray emission with radio emission and the estimated gamma-ray duty cycle, we derive the gamma-ray luminosity function (LF) of BL Lac objects from their radio LF. Our derived gamma-ray LF of BL Lac objects can almost reproduce that calculated with the recently released Fermi bright active galactic nuclei (AGN) sample. We find that about 45% of the extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray background (EGRB) is contributed by BL Lac objects. Combining the estimate of the quasar contri...

  8. Prospects of detecting gamma-ray emission from galaxy clusters: cosmic rays and dark matter annihilations

    CERN Document Server

    Pinzke, Anders; Bergstrom, Lars

    2011-01-01

    We study the possibility for detecting gamma-ray emission in galaxy clusters. We consider 1) cosmic ray (CR) induced pion decay which is thought to dominate the astrophysical signal from clusters, 2) different representative benchmark models of supersymmetric dark matter (DM), and 3) leptophilic models of DM annihilation that include a Sommerfeld enhancement (SFE). To model DM annihilation, we consider hadronization of annihilating neutralinos, internal bremsstrahlung, and inverse Compton emission from the cosmic microwave background as well as from a realistic spatial and spectral distribution of dust and stellar light. We predict the Virgo and Fornax clusters to be the brightest DM sources and find a particularly low CR induced background for Fornax. For a minimum substructure mass given by the DM free-streaming scale, we find a substructure boost factor of more than 1000. Since the annihilation flux of substructures is mostly contributed by the regions around the virial radius, the resulting surface bright...

  9. Shielding evaluation by laser compton scattering gamma-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser Compton scattering gamma-ray beam was used for evaluation of gamma ray shield. The gamma source of a NewSUBARU Synchrotron Radiation Facility can generate the quasi-monochromatic gamma ray beam of 0.5-1.7 MeV by combining a carbon dioxide laser and a 0.5-1.0 GeV electron beam. This gamma-ray source has small divergence of 1/γ radian due to the relativistic effect, where γ is relativistic factor of electron. Small diameter test beam of gamma-ray of about 1 mm in diameter is possible to use at the 10 m from the gamma-ray source by combining the small divergence gamma-ray beam with small hole lead collimator. Test sample size used was 2 cm in diameter. Measured shield factor was compared with calculated value using known shield materials such as lead. (author)

  10. Observational astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Robert C

    1995-01-01

    Combining a critical account of observational methods (telescopes and instrumentation) with a lucid description of the Universe, including stars, galaxies and cosmology, Smith provides a comprehensive introduction to the whole of modern astrophysics beyond the solar system. The first half describes the techniques used by astronomers to observe the Universe: optical telescopes and instruments are discussed in detail, but observations at all wavelengths are covered, from radio to gamma-rays. After a short interlude describing the appearance of the sky at all wavelengths, the role of positional astronomy is highlighted. In the second half, a clear description is given of the contents of the Universe, including accounts of stellar evolution and cosmological models. Fully illustrated throughout, with exercises given in each chapter, this textbook provides a thorough introduction to astrophysics for all physics undergraduates, and a valuable background for physics graduates turning to research in astronomy.

  11. Gamma-ray pulsars: A gold mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Isabelle A.; Harding, Alice K.

    2015-08-01

    The most energetic neutron stars, powered by their rotation, are capable of producing pulsed radiation from the radio up to γ rays with nearly TeV energies. These pulsars are part of the universe of energetic and powerful particle accelerators, using their uniquely fast rotation and formidable magnetic fields to accelerate particles to ultra-relativistic speed. The extreme properties of these stars provide an excellent testing ground, beyond Earth experience, for nuclear, gravitational, and quantum-electrodynamical physics. A wealth of γ-ray pulsars has recently been discovered with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. The energetic γ rays enable us to probe the magnetospheres of neutron stars and particle acceleration in this exotic environment. We review the latest developments in this field, beginning with a brief overview of the properties and mysteries of rotation-powered pulsars, and then discussing γ-ray observations and magnetospheric models in more detail. xml:lang="fr"

  12. Critical Test Of Gamma Ray Burst Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, Shlomo

    2016-01-01

    Long and precise follow-up measurements of the X-ray afterglow (AG) of very intense gamma ray bursts (GRBs) provide a critical test of GRB afterglow theories. Here we show that the power-law decline with time of X-ray AG of GRB 130427A, the longest measured X-ray AG of an intense GRB with the Swift, Chandra and XMM Newton satellites, and of all other well measured late-time X-ray afterglow of intense GRBs, is that predicted by the cannonball (CB) model of GRBs from their measured spectral index, while it disagrees with that predicted by the widely accepted fireball (FB) models of GRBs.

  13. Mirror World, Supersymmetric Axion and Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Gianfagna, L; Nesti, F

    2004-01-01

    A modification of the relation between axion mass and the PQ constant permits a relaxation of the astrophysical constraints, considerably enlarging the allowed axion parameter space. We develop this idea in this paper, discussing a model for an {\\it ultramassive} axion, which essentially represents a supersymmetric Weinberg-Wilczek axion of the mirror world. The experimental and astrophysical limits allow a PQ scale $f_a\\sim 10^4-10^6$ GeV and a mass $m_a\\sim$ MeV, which can be accessible for future experiments. On a phenomenological ground, such an {\\it ultramassive} axion turns out to be quite interesting. It can be produced during the gravitational collapse or during the merging of two compact objects, and its subsequent decay into $e^+e^-$ provides an efficient mechanism for the transfer of the gravitational energy of the collapsing system to the electron-positron plasma. This could resolve the energy budget problem in the Gamma Ray Bursts and also help in understanding the SN type II explosion phenomena.

  14. Mirror world, supersymmetric axion and gamma ray bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianfagna, Leonida; Nesti, Fabrizio [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di L' Aquila, I-67010 Coppito AQ (Italy); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, I-67010 Assergi, AQ (Italy); Giannotti, Maurizio [Sezione INFN di Ferrara, I 44100 FE (Italy)]. E-mail: giannotti@fe.infn.it

    2004-10-01

    A modification of the relation between axion mass and the PQ constant permits a relaxation of the astrophysical constraints, considerably enlarging the allowed axion parameter space. We develop this idea in this paper, discussing a model for an ultramassive axion, which essentially represents a supersymmetric Weinberg-Wilczek axion of the mirror world. The experimental and astrophysical limits allow a PQ scale f{sub a} {approx} 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} GeV and a mass m{sub a} {approx} MeV, which can be accessible for future experiments. On a phenomenological ground, such an ultramassive axion turns out to be quite interesting. It can be produced during the gravitational collapse or during the merging of two compact objects, and its subsequent decay into e{sup +}e{sup -} provides an efficient mechanism for the transfer of the gravitational energy of the collapsing system to the electron-positron plasma. This could resolve the energy budget problem in the Gamma Ray Bursts and also help in understanding the SN type-II explosion phenomena. (author)

  15. X-ray and gamma ray transmission densitometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma and x-ray attenuation densitometers are systems in which measurements of the attenuation of one or several radiation beams are used to infer the density of the attenuating material. This report contains discussions of theoretical and practical aspects of densitometer design, operation, and data interpretation

  16. The Haleakala Gamma Ray Observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 10 m2 multi-mirror telescope for observing Cherenkov light signals from atmospheric cascades is now operating at Mount Haleakala, Maui, Hawaii. It differs from other atmospheric Cherenkov detectors in accepting pulses that originate from single photoelectrons, employing two sets of 18 optically independent phototubes in a logic system with nanosecond time resolution to reject ambient light from the night sky. With an angular aperture of 1.3x10-4 sr, cosmic ray showers are observed at a rate of ≅ 0.5 hz at the zenith, with nearly complete rejection of ambient light. This rate for hadronic showers implies an effective threshold near 100 GeV for electromagnetic showers. Two regions of the sky, one centered on the source and the other separated by from it by 3.60 are simultaneously monitored. Examples of observations of episodic and periodic (pulsar) sources are given. (orig.)

  17. On forbidden high-energy electrons as a source of background in X-ray and gamma-ray observations

    CERN Document Server

    Suvorova, Alla V

    2014-01-01

    The study is devoted to a problem of electron-induced contaminant to X-ray and gamma-ray astrophysical measurements on board low-orbiting satellites. We analyzed enhancements of electron fluxes in energy range 100 - 300 keV observed at equatorial and low latitudes by a fleet of NOAA/POES low-orbiting satellites over the time period from 2003 to 2005. It was found that 100-300 keV electron fluxes in the forbidden zone below the inner radiation belt enhanced by several orders of magnitude during geomagnetic storms and/or under strong compressions of the magnetosphere. The enhancements are related to high substorm activity and occurred at any local time. Intense fluxes of the energetic electrons in the forbidden zone can be considered as an essential contaminant to X-ray and gamma-ray measurements at low-latitude and low-altitude orbits.

  18. Gamma-Ray Library and Uncertainty Analysis: Passively Emitted Gamma Rays Used in Safeguards Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, W

    2009-09-18

    Non-destructive gamma-ray analysis is a fundamental part of nuclear safeguards, including nuclear energy safeguards technology. Developing safeguards capabilities for nuclear energy will certainly benefit from the advanced use of gamma-ray spectroscopy as well as the ability to model various reactor scenarios. There is currently a wide variety of nuclear data that could be used in computer modeling and gamma-ray spectroscopy analysis. The data can be discrepant (with varying uncertainties), and it may difficult for a modeler or software developer to determine the best nuclear data set for a particular situation. To use gamma-ray spectroscopy to determine the relative isotopic composition of nuclear materials, the gamma-ray energies and the branching ratios or intensities of the gamma-rays emitted from the nuclides in the material must be well known. A variety of computer simulation codes will be used during the development of the nuclear energy safeguards, and, to compare the results of various codes, it will be essential to have all the {gamma}-ray libraries agree. Assessing our nuclear data needs allows us to create a prioritized list of desired measurements, and provides uncertainties for energies and especially for branching intensities. Of interest are actinides, fission products, and activation products, and most particularly mixtures of all of these radioactive isotopes, including mixtures of actinides and other products. Recent work includes the development of new detectors with increased energy resolution, and studies of gamma-rays and their lines used in simulation codes. Because new detectors are being developed, there is an increased need for well known nuclear data for radioactive isotopes of some elements. Safeguards technology should take advantage of all types of gamma-ray detectors, including new super cooled detectors, germanium detectors and cadmium zinc telluride detectors. Mixed isotopes, particularly mixed actinides found in nuclear reactor

  19. The emission of Gamma Ray Bursts as a test-bed for modified gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Capozziello

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The extreme physical conditions of Gamma Ray Bursts can constitute a useful observational laboratory to test theories of gravity where very high curvature regimes are involved. Here we propose a sort of curvature engine capable, in principle, of explaining the huge energy emission of Gamma Ray Bursts. Specifically, we investigate the emission of radiation by charged particles non-minimally coupled to the gravitational background where higher order curvature invariants are present. The coupling gives rise to an additional force inducing a non-geodesic motion of particles. This fact allows a strong emission of radiation by gravitationally accelerated particles. As we will show with some specific model, the energy emission is of the same order of magnitude of that characterizing the Gamma Ray Burst physics. Alternatively, strong curvature regimes can be considered as a natural mechanism for the generation of highly energetic astrophysical events. Possible applications to cosmology are discussed.

  20. Physics of gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, D. Q.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to the accumulating evidence for the view that gamma-ray bursts come from strongly magnetic neutron stars, discussing the physical properties of the emission region and the radiation processes expected in strong magnetic fields, and emphasizing that the observed burst spectra require that the emission region be optically thin. This entails that the energy of the emitting plasma and/or the plasma itself be continuously replenished during a burst, and that the cooling time scale of the emitting plasma be much shorter than the observed duration of the bursts. This characteristic of the cooling time scale implies that the burst intensity and spectrum can vary on extremely short time scales, and that the burst duration must have a separate explanation. It is emphasized that synchrotron emission is favored as the gamma-ray production mechanism; it is the only mechanism capable of satisfying the optical thinness constraint while producing the observed luminosity.

  1. TeV Gamma Ray Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Cui, Wei

    2009-01-01

    The field of ground-based gamma ray astronomy has enjoyed rapid growth in recent years. As an increasing number of sources are detected at TeV energies, the field has matured and become a viable branch of modern astronomy. Lying at the uppermost end of the electromagnetic rainbow, TeV photons are always preciously few in number but carry essential information about the particle acceleration and radiative processes involved in extreme astronomical settings. Together with observations at longer wavelengths, TeV gamma-ray observations have drastically improved our view of the universe. In this review, we briefly describe recent progress in the field. We will conclude by providing a personal perspective on the future of the field, in particular, on the significant roles that China could play to advance this young but exciting field.

  2. Gamma-ray Constraints on Effective Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cheung, Kingman; Yuan, Tzu-Chiang

    2011-01-01

    Using an effective interaction approach to describe the interactions between the dark matter particle and the light degrees of freedom of the standard model, we calculate the gamma-ray flux due to the annihilation of the dark matter into quarks, followed by fragmentation into neutral pions which subsequently decay into photons. By comparison to the mid-latitude data released from the Fermi-LAT experiment, we obtain useful constraints on the size of the effective interactions and they are found to be comparable to those deduced from collider, gamma-ray line and anti-matter search experiments. However, the two operators induced by scalar and vector exchange among fermionic dark matter and light quarks that contribute to spin-independent cross sections are constrained more stringently by the recent XENON100 data.

  3. Stellar Photon Archaeology with Gamma-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, Floyd W.

    2009-01-01

    Ongoing deep surveys of galaxy luminosity distribution functions, spectral energy distributions and backwards evolution models of star formation rates can be used to calculate the past history of intergalactic photon densities and, from them, the present and past optical depth of the Universe to gamma-rays from pair production interactions with these photons. The energy-redshift dependence of the optical depth of the Universe to gamma-rays has become known as the Fazio-Stecker relation (Fazio & Stecker 1970). Stecker, Malkan & Scully have calculated the densities of intergalactic background light (IBL) photons of energies from 0.03 eV to the Lyman limit at 13.6 eV and for 0$ photon densities in the past, i.e., the "archaeo-IBL.", and therefore allow a better measure of the past history of the total star formation rate, including that from galaxies too faint to be observed.

  4. Real time gamma-ray signature identifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Mark; Gosnell, Tom B.; Ham, Cheryl; Perkins, Dwight; Wong, James

    2012-05-15

    A real time gamma-ray signature/source identification method and system using principal components analysis (PCA) for transforming and substantially reducing one or more comprehensive spectral libraries of nuclear materials types and configurations into a corresponding concise representation/signature(s) representing and indexing each individual predetermined spectrum in principal component (PC) space, wherein an unknown gamma-ray signature may be compared against the representative signature to find a match or at least characterize the unknown signature from among all the entries in the library with a single regression or simple projection into the PC space, so as to substantially reduce processing time and computing resources and enable real-time characterization and/or identification.

  5. Are gamma-ray bursts cosmological?

    CERN Document Server

    Horvath, I

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst sources are distributed with a high level of isotropy, which is compatible with either a cosmological origin or an extended Galactic halo origin. The brightness distribution is another indicator used to characterize the spatial distribution in distance. In this paper the author discusses detailed fits of the BATSE gamma-ray burst peak-flux distributions with Friedmann models taking into account possible density evolution and standard candle luminosity functions. A chi-square analysis is used to estimate the goodness of the fits and the author derives the significance level of limits on the density evolution and luminosity function parameters. Cosmological models provide a good fit over a range of parameter space which is physically reasonable

  6. TeV gamma-ray astronomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Cui

    2009-01-01

    The field of ground-based gamma-ray astronomy has enjoyed rapid growth in recent years. As an increasing number of sources are detected at TeV energies, the field has matured and become a viable branch of modern astronomy. Lying at the uppermost end of the electromagnetic rainbow, TeV photons are always preciously few in number but carry essential information about the particle acceleration and radiative processes involved in extreme astronomical settings. Together with observations at longer wavelengths, TeV gamma-ray observations have drastically improved our view of the universe. In this re-view, we briefly describe recent progress in the field. We will conclude by providing a personal perspective on the future of the field, in particular, on the significant roles that China could play in advancing this young but exciting field.

  7. Environmental Effects of Gamma Ray Bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma rays bursts, coming from very massive stars, are the most powerful explosions in our Universe. Some authors have linked them to some of the climatic changes and consequent biological mass extinctions of the Phanerozoic eon. However, the consequences of their direct impact on primitive Earth, is today a hot topic of debate. On the other hand, it is usually assumed that they were more common in earlier stages of our galaxy. So it is important to evaluate its potential effects on terrestrial paleoenvironments. We outline some simple models to estimate their influence mainly on the primordial atmospheric chemistry of Earth and on the climate in general. To do that, we consider different scenarios where the atmospheric composition diverges substantially from the atmosphere today, and compute the evolution of principal chemical species under the intense radiational stress of a gamma ray burst. Furthermore, the possible impact on the isotopic composition, geochemistry and the biosphere are mentioned in general way

  8. Gamma Ray Bursts Observations and Theoretical Conjectures

    CERN Document Server

    Alagoz, E; Carrillo, C; Golup, G T; Grimes, M; Herrera, Mora C; Gallo, Palomino J L; López, Vega A; Wicht, J

    2008-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are short bursts of very high energy photons which were discovered in the late 1960s. Ever since their discovery, scientists have wondered about their origin. Nowadays it is known that they originate outside the Milky Way because of their high red shift rst measured in the afterglows thanks to the Beppo-SAX satellite and ground-based observations. However, theoreticians still do not agree about the mechanism that generates the bursts, and different competing models are animatedly debated. Current GRB experiments include the Swift satellite and the Pierre Auger Observatory that could detect GRBs with an increase of the background. A forthcoming dedicated experiment is GLAST, a satellite observatory for detecting gamma rays with energies up to 300 GeV, whose launch is scheduled for early 2008.

  9. GammaLib and ctools: A software framework for the analysis of astronomical gamma-ray data

    CERN Document Server

    Knödlseder, J; Deil, C; Cayrou, J -B; Owen, E; Kelley-Hoskins, N; Lu, C -C; Buehler, R; Forest, F; Louge, T; Siejkowski, H; Kosack, K; Gerard, L; Schulz, A; Martin, P; Sanchez, D; Ohm, S; Hassan, T; Brau-Nogué, S

    2016-01-01

    The field of gamma-ray astronomy has seen important progress during the last decade, yet there exists so far no common software framework for the scientific analysis of gamma-ray telescope data. We propose to fill this gap by means of the GammaLib software, a generic library that we have developed to support the analysis of gamma-ray event data. GammaLib has been written in C++ and all functionality is available in Python through an extension module. On top of this framework we have developed the ctools software package, a suite of software tools that enables building of flexible workflows for the analysis of Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescope event data. The ctools are inspired by science analysis software available for existing high-energy astronomy instruments, and they follow the modular ftools model developed by the High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center. The ctools have been written in Python and C++, and can be either used from the command line, via shell scripts, or directly from Python...

  10. Solar gamma-ray lines and interplanetary solar protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshimori, M.

    1985-12-01

    Solar gamma-ray lines and protons were simultaneously observed for six flares on 1 April, 4 April, 27 April, 13 May 1981, 1 February, and 6 June, 1982 by Hinotori and Himawari satellites. The time histories of gamma-ray lines and protons are analyzed. The relationship between the gamma-ray line fluences and peak proton fluxes for these flares does not reveal an apparent correlation between them. The present result implies that the protons producing gamma-ray lines in the flare region and protons observed near the earth do not always belong to the same population, and favor the downward streaming model for the gamma-ray line production.

  11. Cosmic ray electron anisotropies as a tool to discriminate between exotic and astrophysical sources

    CERN Document Server

    Cernuda, Ignacio

    2009-01-01

    Recent results from the PAMELA, ATIC, PPB BETS and Fermi collaborations extend the energy range in the electron flux measurement up to unexplored energies in the hundred GeVs range confirming the bump starting at about 10GeV already suggested by HEAT and AMS01 data . This bump can be explained by annihilating dark matter in the context of exotic physics, or by nearby astrophysical sources e.g. pulsars. In order to discriminate between competing models for primary positron production, the study of anisotropies ,complementary to the spectrum determination, shows up as new tool to look for the origin of the lepton excess. In this letter we calculate the contribution to the electron flux given by the collection of all known gamma ray pulsars (as listed in the ATNF catalogue) and by annihilating dark matter both in case of a clumpy halo or in case the excess can be atributed to a nearby sizeable dark matter clump. We address the problem of the electron anisotropy in both scenarios and estimate the prospect that a ...

  12. GAMMA-RAY BURSTS, NEW COSMOLOGICAL BEACONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Avila-Reese

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs are the brightest electromagnetic explosions in the Universe, associated to the death of massive stars. As such, GRBs are potential tracers of the evolution of the cosmic massive star formation, metallicity, and Initial Mass Function. GRBs also proved to be appealing cosmological distance indicators. This opens a unique opportunity to constrain the cosmic expansion history up to redshifts 5-6. A brief review on both subjects is presented here.

  13. Are Gamma-Ray Bursts Standard Candles?

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Li-Xin

    2007-01-01

    By dividing a sample of 48 long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) into four groups with redshift from low to high and fitting each group with the Amati relation log Eiso = a + b log Epeak, I find that parameters a and b vary with the mean redshift of the GRBs in each group systematically and significantly. The results suggest that GRBs evolve strongly with the cosmic redshift and hence are not standard candles.

  14. Solution To The Gamma Ray Burst Mystery?

    OpenAIRE

    Shaviv, Nir J.; Dar, Arnon

    1996-01-01

    Photoexcitation and ionization of partially ionized heavy atoms in highly relativistic flows by interstellar photons, followed by their reemission in radiative recombination and decay, boost star-light into beamed $\\gamma$ rays along the flow direction. Repeated excitation/decay of highly relativistic baryonic ejecta from merger or accretion induced collapse of neutron stars in dense stellar regions (DSRs), like galactic cores, globular clusters and super star-clusters, can convert enough kin...

  15. Cosmological parametrization of $\\gamma$ ray burst models

    CERN Document Server

    Linder, E V

    1996-01-01

    Using three parametrizations of the gamma ray burst count data comparison is made to cosmological source models. While simple models can fit and faint end slope constraints, the addition of a logarithmic count range variable describing the curvature of the counts shows that models with no evolution or evolution power law in redshift with index less than 10 fail to satisfy simultaneously all three descriptors of the burst data. The cosmological source density that would be required for a fit is illustrated.

  16. Gamma-ray bursts - a critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a short general introduction into the field of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) research, summarizing the past and the present status. We give an general view of the GRBs observations to date, both in the prompt emission phase as well as in the afterglow phase, and a brief primer into the theory, mainly in the frame-work of the fireball model. (authors)

  17. EXIST's Gamma-Ray Burst Sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Band, D. L.; Grindlay, J. E.; Hong, J.; Fishman, G.; Hartmann, D. H.; Garson III, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Barthelmy, S.; Gehrels, N.; Skinner, G.

    2007-01-01

    We use semi-analytic techniques to evaluate the burst sensitivity of designs for the EXIST hard X-ray survey mission. Applying these techniques to the mission design proposed for the Beyond Einstein program, we find that with its very large field-of-view and faint gamma-ray burst detection threshold, EXIST will detect and localize approximately two bursts per day, a large fraction of which may be at high redshift. We estimate that EXIST's maximum sensitivity will be ~4 times greater than that...

  18. Astrophysical and Astrobiological Implications of Gamma-Ray Burst Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Scalo, John; Wheeler, J. Craig

    1999-01-01

    Combining results for the local cosmic rate and mean peak luminosity of GRBs with the cosmic history of the star formation rate, we provide estimates for the local GRB rate per unit blue luminosity in galaxies. We find a typical GRB rate per unit B luminosity of 2.4x10^-17 h_{70}^2/Lsun/yr. The corresponding mean rate in the Milky Way is 5.5x10^-7 h_{70}^2/yr. We conclude: 1) the ratio of supernova rate to isotropic equivalent GRB rate is large: more than 6000 SNIbc per GRB or 30,000 SNII per...

  19. Gamma Rays frim the Galactic Centre

    CERN Document Server

    Erlykin, A D

    2007-01-01

    Recent results from the HESS gamma ray telescope have shown the presence of both a diffuse, extended, flux of gamma rays above ~0.4 TeV and discrete sources in and near the Galactic Centre. Here, we put forward a possible explanation in terms of the diffusion of cosmic ray protons from a succession of supernova remnants (SNR) in the SgrA* region of the Galaxy plus a contribution from SNR in the rest of the Galactic Centre Region, to be called the Galactic Centre Ridge (GCR). Protons are favoured over electrons because the mG magnetic fields in the Region will attenuate energetic electrons severely. Prominent features are the need for 'anomalous diffusion' of the protons in the whole region and the adoption of low efficiency for SNR acceleration in the high density regions. The latter is related by us to the well-known low 'cosmic ray gradient' in the Galaxy. A corroborating feature is the close correlation of inferred cosmic ray intensity with the smoothed intensity of 5 GHZ radio radiation. We attribute this...

  20. Gamma Ray Bursts Cook Book I: Formulation

    CERN Document Server

    Ziaeepour, Houri

    2008-01-01

    Since the suggestion of relativistic shocks as the origin of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in early 90's, the mathematical formulation of this process has stayed at phenomenological level. One of the reasons for the slow development of theoretical works in this domain has been the simple power-law behaviour of the afterglows hours or days after the prompt gamma-ray emission. Nowadays with the launch of the Swift satellite, gamma-ray bursts can be observed in multi-wavelength from a few tens of seconds after trigger onward. These observations have leaded to the discovery of features unexplainable by the simple formulation of the shocks and emission processes used up to now. But "devil is in details" and some of these features may be explained with a more detailed formulation of phenomena and without adhoc addition of new processes. Such a formulation is the goal of this work. We present a consistent formulation of the collision between two spherical relativistic shells. The model can be applied to both internal and ...

  1. Gamma-ray astronomy with underground detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Halzen, Francis

    1995-01-01

    Underground detectors measure the directions of up-coming muons of neutrino origin. They can also observe down-going muons made by gamma rays in the Earth's atmosphere. Although gamma ray showers are muon-poor, they produce a sufficient number of muons to detect the sources observed by GeV and TeV telescopes. With a threshold higher by one hundred and a probability of muon production of about 1\\% for the shallower AMANDA and Lake Baikal detectors, these instruments can, for a typical GRO source, match the detection efficiency of a GeV satellite detector since their effective area is larger by a factor 10^4. The muons must have enough energy for accurate reconstruction of their direction. Very energetic muons on the other hand are rare because they are only produced by higher energy gamma rays whose flux is suppressed by the decreasing flux at the source and by absorption on interstellar light. We show that there is a window of opportunity for muon astronomy in the 100~GeV energy region which nicely matches th...

  2. Gamma ray tracking with the AGATA demonstrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkenbach, Benedikt; Hess, Herbert; Lewandowski, Lars; Reiter, Peter; Steinbach, Tim; Schneiders, David; Vogt, Andreas [IKP, Universitaet zu Koeln (Germany); Collaboration: AGATA-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    The performance of the AGATA demonstrator will be discussed based on data taken from a multi-nucleon transfer experiment at the AGATA PRISMA setup at LNL (INFN, Italy). A primary {sup 136}Xe beam of 1 GeV hitting a {sup 238}U target was used to produce a multitude of nuclei in the vicinity of {sup 136}Xe and corresponding reaction partners in the actinide region. The obtained results for in-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy allow for a critical assessment of the novel gamma ray tracking technique and comparison with standard procedure. High resolution spectroscopy of both reaction products after multi-nucleon transfer reaction in the presence of a high background from excited fission fragments is based on pulse-shape analysis (PSA) and gamma-ray tracking (GRT). The quality of the position information is crucial for the final energy resolution after Doppler correction. The impact of the calculated PSA libraries and the initial detector characterization for the PSA and GRT are summarized. Details of the achieved position and energy resolution, peak-to-background optimization are presented and illustrated with results from the neutron-transfer products in Xe and U-isotopes.

  3. Study of p-wave gamma-ray strength functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma-ray strength functions are important for description of the gamma emission channel in nuclear reactions. The impact of different models- Weisskopf's single particle model, Brink's standard Lorentzian and Kopecky's generalized Lorentzian for gamma ray strength functions on the calculation of neutron capture related experimental quantities such as total radiation widths Γγ cross sections and gamma-ray spectra has been studied

  4. Probing the astrophysical origin of high-energy cosmic-ray electrons with Monte Carlo simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Attallah, Reda

    2016-01-01

    High-energy cosmic-ray electrons reveal some remarkable spectral features, the most noteworthy of which is the rise in the positron fraction above 10 GeV. Due to strong energy loss during propagation, these particles can reach Earth only from nearby sources. Yet, the exact nature of these sources, which most likely manifest themselves in the observed anomalies, remains elusive. The many explanations put forward to resolve this case range from standard astrophysics to exotic physics. In this paper, we discuss the possible astrophysical origin of high-energy cosmic-ray electrons through a fully three-dimensional time-dependent Monte Carlo simulation. This approach takes advantage of the intrinsic random nature of cosmic-ray diffusive propagation. It provides valuable information on the electron-by-electron fluctuations, making it particularly suitable for analyzing in depth the single-source astrophysical scenario.

  5. Ultra-high Energy Cosmic Rays and Neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Bursts, Hypernovae and Galactic Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Mészáros, P

    2014-01-01

    I review gamma-ray burst models (GRBs) and observations, and discuss the possible production of ultra-high energy cosmic rays and neutrinos in both the standard internal shock models and the newer generation of photospheric and hadronic GRB models, in the light of current constraints imposed by IceCube, Auger and TA observations. I then discuss models that have been proposed to explain the recent astrophysical PeV neutrino observations, including star-forming and star-burst galaxies, hypernovae and galaxy accretion and merger shocks.

  6. Light Dawns on Dark Gamma-ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are among the most energetic events in the Universe, but some appear curiously faint in visible light. The biggest study to date of these so-called dark gamma-ray bursts, using the GROND instrument on the 2.2-metre MPG/ESO telescope at La Silla in Chile, has found that these gigantic explosions don't require exotic explanations. Their faintness is now fully explained by a combination of causes, the most important of which is the presence of dust between the Earth and the explosion. Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), fleeting events that last from less than a second to several minutes, are detected by orbiting observatories that can pick up their high energy radiation. Thirteen years ago, however, astronomers discovered a longer-lasting stream of less energetic radiation coming from these violent outbursts, which can last for weeks or even years after the initial explosion. Astronomers call this the burst's afterglow. While all gamma-ray bursts [1] have afterglows that give off X-rays, only about half of them were found to give off visible light, with the rest remaining mysteriously dark. Some astronomers suspected that these dark afterglows could be examples of a whole new class of gamma-ray bursts, while others thought that they might all be at very great distances. Previous studies had suggested that obscuring dust between the burst and us might also explain why they were so dim. "Studying afterglows is vital to further our understanding of the objects that become gamma-ray bursts and what they tell us about star formation in the early Universe," says the study's lead author Jochen Greiner from the Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching bei München, Germany. NASA launched the Swift satellite at the end of 2004. From its orbit above the Earth's atmosphere it can detect gamma-ray bursts and immediately relay their positions to other observatories so that the afterglows could be studied. In the new study, astronomers combined Swift

  7. The solar gamma ray and neutron capabilities of COMPTEL on the Gamma Ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, James M.; Lockwood, John A.

    1989-01-01

    The imaging Compton telescope COMPTEL on the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) has unusual spectroscopic capabilities for measuring solar gamma-ray and neutron emission. The launch of the GRO is scheduled for June 1990 near the peak of the sunspot cycle. With a 30 to 40 percent probability for the Sun being in the COMPTEL field-of-view during the sunlit part of an orbit, a large number of flares will be observed above the 800 keV gamma-ray threshold of the telescope. The telescope energy range extends to 30 MeV with high time resolution burst spectra available from 0.1 to 10 MeV. Strong Compton tail suppression of instrumental gamma-ray interactions will facilitate improved spectral analysis of solar flare emissions. In addition, the high signal to noise ratio for neutron detection and measurement will provide new neutron spectroscopic capabilities. Specifically, a flare similar to that of 3 June 1982 will provide spectroscopic data on greater than 1500 individual neutrons, enough to construct an unambiguous spectrum in the energy range of 20 to 200 MeV. Details of the instrument and its response to solar gamma-rays and neutrons will be presented.

  8. Opening a New Window to Fundamental Physics and Astrophysics: X-ray Polarimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, E; Soffitta, P; Persio, G; Feroci, M; Morelli, E; Muleri, F; Pacciani, L; Rubini, A; Baldini, L; Bitti, F; Brez, A; Cavalca, F; Latronico, L; Massai, M M; Omodei, N; Sgro', C; Spandre, G; Matt, G; Perola, G C; Santangelo, A; Celotti, A; Barret, D; Vilhu, O; Piro, L; Fraser, G; Courvoisier, T J L; Barcons, X

    2006-01-01

    An extensive theoretical literature predicts that X-ray Polarimetry can directly determine relevant physical and geometrical parameters of astrophysical sources, and discriminate between models further than allowed by spectral and timing data only. X-ray Polarimetry can also provide tests of Fundamental Physics. A high sensitivity polarimeter in the focal plane of a New Generation X-ray telescope could open this new window in the High Energy Sky.

  9. INTEGRAL Upper Limits on Gamma-Ray Emission Associated with the Gravitational Wave Event GW150914

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savchenko, V.; Ferrigno, C.; Mereghetti, S.;

    2016-01-01

    Using observations of the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL), we place upper limits on the gamma-ray and hard X-ray prompt emission associated with the gravitational wave event GW150914, which was discovered by the LIGO/Virgo Collaboration. The omnidirectional view of the...... the 75 keV-2 MeV energy range for typical spectral models. Our results constrain the ratio of the energy promptly released in gamma-rays in the direction of the observer to the gravitational wave energy Eγ/EGW <10-6. We discuss the implication of gamma-ray limits for the characteristics of the...... gravitational wave source, based on the available predictions for prompt electromagnetic emission....

  10. The Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Gehrels, N; Burrows, D N; Chincarini, G L; Cominsky, L R; Giommi, P; Hurley, K C; Marshall, F E; Mason, K O; Mészáros, P; Nousek, J A; Roming, P W A; Wells, A A; White, N E; Team, Swift Science

    2004-01-01

    The Swift mission, scheduled for launch in early 2004, is a multiwavelength observatory for gamma-ray burst (GRB) astronomy. It is the first-of-its-kind autonomous rapid-slewing satellite for transient astronomy and pioneers the way for future rapid-reaction and multiwavelength missions. It will be far more powerful than any previous GRB mission, observing more than 100 bursts per year and performing detailed X-ray and UV/optical afterglow observations spanning timescales from 1 minute to several days after the burst. The objectives are to determine the origin of GRBs; classify GRBs and search for new types; study the interaction of the ultra-relativistic outflows of GRBs with their surrounding medium; and use GRBs to study the early universe out to z>10. The mission is being developed by a NASA-led international collaboration. It will carry three instruments: a new-generation wide-field gamma-ray (15-150 keV) detector; a narrow-field X-ray telescope; and a narrow-field UV/optical telescope. Redshift determin...

  11. Is Calvera a Gamma-ray Pulsar?

    CERN Document Server

    Halpern, J P

    2011-01-01

    Originally selected as a neutron star (NS) candidate in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey, 1RXS J141256.0+792204 ("Calvera") was discovered to be a 59 ms X-ray pulsar in a pair of XMM-Newton observations (Zane et al. 2011). Surprisingly, their claimed detection of this pulsar in Fermi gamma-ray data requires no period derivative, severely restricting its dipole magnetic field strength, spin-down luminosity, and distance to small values. This implies that the cooling age of Calvera is much younger than its characteristic spin-down age. If so, it could be a mildly recycled pulsar, or the first "orphaned" central compact object (CCO). Here we show that the published Fermi ephemeris fails to align the pulse phases of the two X-ray observations with each other, which indicates that the Fermi detection is almost certainly spurious. Analysis of additional Fermi data also does not confirm the gamma-ray detection. This leaves the spin-down rate of Calvera less constrained, and its place among the families of NSs uncertain. It ...

  12. Calibration of the Gamma-RAy Polarimeter Experiment (GRAPE) at a Polarized Hard X-Ray Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Bloser, P F; McConnell, M L; Macri, J R; Bancroft, C M; Connor, T P; Ryan, J M

    2008-01-01

    The Gamma-RAy Polarimeter Experiment (GRAPE) is a concept for an astronomical hard X-ray Compton polarimeter operating in the 50 - 500 keV energy band. The instrument has been optimized for wide-field polarization measurements of transient outbursts from energetic astrophysical objects such as gamma-ray bursts and solar flares. The GRAPE instrument is composed of identical modules, each of which consists of an array of scintillator elements read out by a multi-anode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT). Incident photons Compton scatter in plastic scintillator elements and are subsequently absorbed in inorganic scintillator elements; a net polarization signal is revealed by a characteristic asymmetry in the azimuthal scattering angles. We have constructed a prototype GRAPE module containing a single CsI(Na) calorimeter element, at the center of the MAPMT, surrounded by 60 plastic elements. The prototype has been combined with custom readout electronics and software to create a complete "engineering model" of the GRAPE...

  13. High-energy gamma-ray afterglows from low-luminosity gamma-ray bursts

    OpenAIRE

    He, Hao-Ning; WANG, XIANG-YU; Yu, Yun-Wei; Meszaros, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) such as 980425, 031203 and 060218, with luminosities much lower than those of other classic bursts, lead to the definition of a new class of GRBs -- low-luminosity GRBs. The nature of the outflow responsible for them is not clear yet. Two scenarios have been suggested: one is the conventional relativistic outflow with initial Lorentz factor of order of $\\Gamma_0\\ga 10$ and the other is a trans-relativistic outflow with $\\Gamma_0\\simeq 1-2$. Here we ...

  14. GAMMA RAYS FROM STAR FORMATION IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storm, Emma M.; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Profumo, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2012-08-20

    Star formation in galaxies is observed to be associated with gamma-ray emission, presumably from non-thermal processes connected to the acceleration of cosmic-ray nuclei and electrons. The detection of gamma rays from starburst galaxies by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has allowed the determination of a functional relationship between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity. Since star formation is known to scale with total infrared (8-1000 {mu}m) and radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity, the observed infrared and radio emission from a star-forming galaxy can be used to quantitatively infer the galaxy's gamma-ray luminosity. Similarly, star-forming galaxies within galaxy clusters allow us to derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission from clusters, which have not yet been conclusively detected in gamma rays. In this study, we apply the functional relationships between gamma-ray luminosity and radio and IR luminosities of galaxies derived by the Fermi Collaboration to a sample of the best candidate galaxy clusters for detection in gamma rays in order to place lower limits on the gamma-ray emission associated with star formation in galaxy clusters. We find that several clusters have predicted gamma-ray emission from star formation that are within an order of magnitude of the upper limits derived in Ackermann et al. based on non-detection by Fermi-LAT. Given the current gamma-ray limits, star formation likely plays a significant role in the gamma-ray emission in some clusters, especially those with cool cores. We predict that both Fermi-LAT over the course of its lifetime and the future Cerenkov Telescope Array will be able to detect gamma-ray emission from star-forming galaxies in clusters.

  15. Spectra of {gamma} rays feeding superdeformed bands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritsen, T.; Khoo, T.L.; Henry, R.G. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The spectrum of {gamma}rays coincident with SD transitions contains the transitions which populate the SD band. This spectrum can provide information on the feeding mechanism and on the properties (moment of inertia, collectivity) of excited SD states. We used a model we developed to explain the feeding of SD bands, to calculate the spectrum of feeding {gamma}rays. The Monte Carlo simulations take into account the trigger conditions present in our Eurogam experiment. Both experimental and theoretical spectra contain a statistical component and a broad E2 peak (from transitions occurring between excited states in the SD well). There is good resemblance between the measured and calculated spectra although the calculated multiplicity of an E2 bump is low by {approximately}30%. Work is continuing to improve the quality of the fits, which will result in a better understanding of excited SD states. In addition, a model for the last steps, which cool the {gamma} cascade into the SD yrast line, needs to be developed. A strong M1/E2 low-energy component, which we believe is responsible for this cooling, was observed.

  16. Collimatorless imaging of gamma rays with help of gamma-ray tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Marel, J V D

    2001-01-01

    In many gamma-ray detector systems that are built for imaging purposes Compton scattered photons are suppressed as much as possible. However, the information from photons that scattered inside a detector system can be used to reconstruct the tracks of the photons with help of gamma-ray tracking. Estimates of the incident directions of the photons can be made and an image can be created. Examples of potential applications for this technique are the use as a gamma-camera in medical imaging (e.g. SPECT) or as a detector for PET. Due to the omission of collimators, much higher detection efficiencies can be achieved, reducing the doses required for an image. A gamma-ray tracking method, called backtracking, has been developed for nuclear spectroscopy. The method tracks gamma-rays originating from a point source in the center of a spherical detector system consisting of position-sensitive germanium detectors. This method can also be used as a tracking technique for imaging of an unknown source distribution. With he...

  17. INTEGRAL gamma-ray upper limit on the gravitational wave GW150914

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrigno, Carlo; Ubertini, Pietro; Courvoisier, Thierry; Kuulkers, Erik; Lebrun, Francois; Brandt, S.; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Laurent, Philippe; Bozzo, Enrico; Roques, Jean-Pierre; Mereghetti, Sandro; Savchenko, Volodymyr

    2016-07-01

    Using observations of the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL), we put tight upper limits on the gamma-ray and hard X-ray prompt emission associated with the gravitational wave event GW150914, discovered by the LIGO/Virgo collaboration. The omni-directional view of the INTEGRAL/SPI-ACS has allowed us to constrain the fraction of energy emitted in the hard X-ray electromagnetic component for the full high-probability sky region of LIGO/Virgo trigger. Our upper limits on the hard X-ray fluence at the time of the event range from F_{γ}=2 × 10^{-8} erg cm^{-2} to F_{γ}=10^{-6} erg cm^{-2} in the 75 keV - 2 MeV energy range for typical spectral models. Our results constrain the ratio of the energy promptly released in gamma-rays in the direction of the observer to the gravitational wave energy E_γ/E_{GW}<10^{-6}. We discuss the implication of gamma-ray limits on the characteristics of the gravitational wave source, based on the available predictions for prompt electromagnetic emission for this and forthcoming events. Our team has a memorandum of understanding to follow-up possible triggers issued in near real time from the analysis of the gravitational wave teams.

  18. INTEGRAL upper limits on gamma-ray emission associated with the gravitational wave event GW150914

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenko, V.; Ferrigno, C.; Mereghetti, S.; Natalucci, L.; Kuulkers, E.

    2016-06-01

    Using observations of the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL), we put tight upper limits on the gamma-ray and hard X-ray prompt emission associated with the gravitational wave event GW150914, discovered by the LIGO/Virgo collaboration. The omni-directional view of the INTEGRAL/SPI-ACS has allowed us to constrain the fraction of energy emitted in the hard X-ray electromagnetic component for the full high-probability sky region of LIGO/Virgo trigger. Our upper limits on the hard X-ray fluence at the time of the event range from F_{γ}=2 × 10^{-8} erg cm^{-2} to F_{γ}=10^{-6} erg cm^{-2} in the 75 keV - 2 MeV energy range for typical spectral models. Our results constrain the ratio of the energy promptly released in gamma-rays in the direction of the observer to the gravitational wave energy E_γ/E_{GW}<10^{-6}. We discuss the implication of gamma-ray limits on the characteristics of the gravitational wave source, based on the available predictions for prompt electromagnetic emission. This work has been possible thanks to a Memorandum of Understanding with the LIGO-Virgo scientific collaboration and is presented on behalf of a larger collaboration.

  19. Gamma rays as probes of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horns, Dieter; Jacholkowska, Agnieszka

    2016-06-01

    The propagation of γ rays over very large distances provides new insights on the intergalactic medium and on fundamental physics. On their path to the Earth, γ rays can annihilate with diffuse infrared or optical photons of the intergalactic medium, producing e+e- pairs. The density of these photons is poorly determined by direct measurements due to significant galactic foregrounds. Studying the absorption of γ rays from extragalactic sources at different distances allows the density of low-energy diffuse photons to be measured. Gamma-ray propagation may also be affected by new phenomena predicted by extensions of the Standard Model of particle physics. Lorentz Invariance is violated in some models of Quantum Gravity, leading to an energy-dependent speed of light in vacuum. From differential time-of-flight measurements of the most distant γ-ray bursts and of flaring active galactic nuclei, lower bounds have been set on the energy scale of Quantum Gravity. Another effect that may alter γ-ray propagation is predicted by some models of String Theory, namely the mixing of the γ ray with a light fundamental boson called an "axion-like particle", which does not interact with low-energy photons. Such a mixing would make the Universe more transparent to γ rays than what would otherwise be, in a sense it decreases the amount of modification to the spectrum that comes from the extragalactic background light. The present status of the search for all these phenomena in γ-ray astronomy is reviewed. xml:lang="fr"

  20. Radio Galaxies Dominate the High-Energy Diffuse Gamma-Ray Background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, Dan [Fermilab; Linden, Tim [Ohio State U., CCAPP; Lopez, Alejandro [Fermilab

    2016-04-26

    It has been suggested that unresolved radio galaxies and radio quasars (sometimes referred to as misaligned active galactic nuclei) could be responsible for a significant fraction of the observed diffuse gamma-ray background. In this study, we use the latest data from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope to characterize the gamma-ray emission from a sample of 51 radio galaxies. In addition to those sources that had previously been detected using Fermi data, we report here the first statistically significant detection of gamma-ray emission from the radio galaxies 3C 212, 3C 411, and B3 0309+411B. Combining this information with the radio fluxes, radio luminosity function, and redshift distribution of this source class, we find that radio galaxies dominate the diffuse gamma-ray background, generating $77.2^{+25.4}_{-9.4}\\%$ of this emission at energies above $\\sim$1 GeV. We discuss the implications of this result and point out that it provides support for scenarios in which IceCube's high-energy astrophysical neutrinos also originate from the same population of radio galaxies.

  1. Radio Galaxies Dominate the High-Energy Diffuse Gamma-Ray Background

    CERN Document Server

    Hooper, Dan; Lopez, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that unresolved radio galaxies and radio quasars (sometimes referred to as misaligned active galactic nuclei) could be responsible for a significant fraction of the observed diffuse gamma-ray background. In this study, we use the latest data from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope to characterize the gamma-ray emission from a sample of 51 radio galaxies. In addition to those sources that had previously been detected using Fermi data, we report here the first statistically significant detection of gamma-ray emission from the radio galaxies 3C 212, 3C 411, and B3 0309+411B. Combining this information with the radio fluxes, radio luminosity function, and redshift distribution of this source class, we find that radio galaxies dominate the diffuse gamma-ray background, generating 83.3^{+27.4}_{-10.1}% of this emission at energies above ~1 GeV. We discuss the implications of this result and point out that it provides support for scenarios in which IceCube's high-energy astrophysical neutrinos...

  2. The High-Energy Astrophysics Learning Center, Version 1. [CD-ROM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlock, Laura A.; Allen, Jesse S.; Lochner, James C.

    The High-Energy Astrophysics (HEA) Learning Center gives students, teachers, and the general public a window into the world of high-energy astrophysics. The universe is revealed through x-rays and gamma rays where matter exists under extreme conditions. Information is available on astrophysics at a variety of reading levels, and is illustrated…

  3. Gamma rays and supernova explosions. [high temperature radiation measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal radiation associated with the explosion of supernovae is investigated. High temperature is required to produce copious gamma radiation of this sort. It appears that type 11 supernovae do not release much of their energy as gamma ray continuum radiation.

  4. The interplanetary gamma ray burst network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, T.

    The Interplanetary Gamma-Ray Burst Network (IPN) is providing gamma-ray burst (GRB) alerts and localizations at the maximum rate anticipated before the launch of the Swift mission. The arc-minute source precision of the IPN is again permitting searches for GRB afterglows in the radio and optical regimes with delays of only hours up to 2 days. The successful addition of the Mars Odyssey mission has compensated for the loss of the asteroid mission NEAR, to reconstitute a fully long- baseline interplanetary network, with Ulysses at > 5 AU and Konus-Wind and HETE-2 near the Earth. In addition to making unassisted GRB localizations that enable a renewed supply of counterpart observations, the Mars/Ulysses/Wind IPN is confirming and reinforcing GRB source localizations with HETE-2. It has also confirmed and reinforced localizations with the BeppoSAX mission before the BeppoSAX termination in May and has detected and localized both SGRs and an unusual hard x-ray transient that is neither an SGR nor a GRB. This IPN is expected to operate until at least 2004.

  5. $\\gamma$-Ray Bursts the Four Crises

    CERN Document Server

    Tavani, M

    1998-01-01

    We discuss some open problems concerning the origin and the emission mechanism of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in light of recent developments. If GRBs originate at extragalactic distances, we are facing four crises: (1) an energy crisis, models have to account for more than 10^{53} ergs of energy emitted in the gamma-ray energy band; (2) a spectral crisis, emission models have to account for the surprising `smoothness' of GRB broad-band spectra, with no indication of the predicted spectral `distorsions' caused by inverse Compton scattering in large radiation energy density media, and no evidence for beaming; (3) an afterglow crisis, relativistic shock models have to explain the complexity of the afterglow behavior, the longevity of optical transients detectable up to six months after the burst, the erratic behavior of the radio emission, and the lack of evidence for substantial beaming as indicated by recent searches for GRB afterglows in the X-ray band; (4) a population crisis, from data clearly indicating that ...

  6. Cosmic-ray world with gamma-ray astronomy: a wealth on information, an even more open issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardillo Martina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since from their discovery in 1912, Cosmic-Rays (CRs are one of the most debated issues of the high energy astrophysics. Their origin is still a fundamental problem and is the subject of very intense research. Until now, the best candidate sources of Galactic CR component are Supernova Remnants (SNRs but final proof for the origin of CRs up to the knee can only be obtained through two fundamental signatures, the detection of a clear gamma-ray signature of π0 decay in Galactic sources and the identification of sources emitting a photon spectrum up to PeV energies. Both indications are quite difficult to obtain. The two gamma-ray satellites, AGILE and Fermi, together with ground telescopes operating in the TeV energy range (HESS, VERITAS and MAGIC, collected a great amount of data from SNRs. In spite of the recent discovery of the neutral pion spectral signature in the SNR W44 spectrum by AGILE (and confirmed by Fermi-LAT, all gamma-ray data collected at GeV and TeV energies for several young and middle-aged SNRs provide interesting challenges to current theoretical models. The emerging view from gamma-ray and particle detection is intriguing and lead to revisit the CR-SNR paradigm, considering also the contribution of other kind of sources.

  7. Nuclear astrophysics lessons from INTEGRAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Roland

    2013-02-01

    Measurements of high-energy photons from cosmic sources of nuclear radiation through ESA's INTEGRAL mission have advanced our knowledge: new data with high spectral resolution showed that characteristic gamma-ray lines from radioactive decays occur throughout the Galaxy in its interstellar medium. Although the number of detected sources and often the significance of the astrophysical results remain modest, conclusions derived from this unique astronomical window of radiation originating from nuclear processes are important, complementing the widely-employed atomic-line based spectroscopy. We review the results and insights obtained in the past decade from gamma-ray line measurements of cosmic sources in the context of their astrophysical questions.

  8. Improved lead and bismuth (n,{gamma}) cross sections and their astrophysical impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingo-Pardo, C.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Alvarez, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Becvar, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calvino, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapico, C.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Goncalves, I.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Gramegna, F.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Jericha, E.; Kiappeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Koehler, P.; Kossionides, E.; Krticka, M.; Lampoudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marrone, S.; Martinez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P.M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O' Brien, S.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M.T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J.L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M.C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K

    2008-07-01

    A series of (n,{gamma}) neutron capture measurements on the lead isotopes and bismuth have been carried out at the CERN n-TOF installation in the neutron energy range from 1 eV up to 1 MeV. At n-TOF, contaminations due to scattered neutrons were reduced down to a negligible level by using improved {gamma}-ray detectors with very low neutron sensitivity. The background level has been determined precisely from a complementary measurement. Other experimental effects related to the electronic threshold in the detectors and the angular distribution of the prompt {gamma}-rays were investigated via Monte Carlo simulations and could be taken into account in the analysis of the capture data. With this set of measurements the energy differential (n,{gamma}) cross sections of {sup 204,206,207}Pb and {sup 209}Bi have been determined with good accuracy. The information obtained in this work becomes of interest for constraining r-process calculations and in particular for the Th/U cosmo-chronometer. (authors)

  9. The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope characteristics. Angular resolution and electrons/protons separation

    CERN Document Server

    Leonov, A A; Bonvicini, V; Topchiev, N P; Adriani, O; Aptekar, R L; Arkhangelskaja, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Bergstrom, L; Berti, E; Bigongiari, G; Bobkov, S G; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bonechi, S; Bongi, M; Bottai, S; Boyarchuk, K A; Castellini, G; Cattaneo, P W; Cumani, P; Dedenko, G L; De Donato, C; Dogiel, V A; Gorbunov, M S; Gusakov, Yu V; Hnatyk, B I; Kadilin, V V; Kaplin, V A; Kaplun, A A; Kheymits, M D; Korepanov, V E; Larsson, J; Loginov, V A; Longo, F; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P S; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Moiseev, A A; Mori, N; Moskalenko, I V; Naumov, P Yu; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Popov, A V; Rappoldi, A; Ricciarini, S; Runtso, M F; Ryde, F; Serdin, O V; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Suchkov, S I; Tavani, M; Taraskin, A A; Tiberio, A; Tyurin, E M; Ulanov, M V; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Yurkin, Yu T; Zampa, N; Zirakashvili, V N; Zverev, V G

    2014-01-01

    The measurements of gamma-ray fluxes and cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to several TeV, which will be implemented by the specially designed GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope, concern with the following broad range of science topics. Searching for signatures of dark matter, surveying the celestial sphere in order to study gamma-ray point and extended sources, measuring the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, studying gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the Sun, as well as high precision measuring spectra of high-energy electrons and positrons, protons and nuclei up to the knee. To clarify these scientific problems with the new experimental data the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope possesses unique physical characteristics comparing with previous and present experiments. For gamma-ray energies more than 100 GeV GAMMA-400 provides the energy resolution of ~1% and angular resolution better than 0.02 deg. The methods developed to reconstru...

  10. Polarized gamma-rays with laser-Compton backscattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohgaki, H.; Noguchi, T.; Sugiyama, S. [Electrotechnical Lab., Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Polarized gamma-rays were generated through laser-Compton backscattering (LCS) of a conventional Nd:YAG laser with electrons circulating in the electron storage ring TERAS at Electrotechnical Laboratory. We measured the energy, the energy spread, and the yield of the gamma-rays to characterize our gamma-ray source. The gamma-ray energy can be varied by changing the energy of the electrons circulating the storage ring. In our case, the energy of electrons in the storage ring were varied its energy from 200 to 750 MeV. Consequently, we observed gamma-ray energies of 1 to 10 MeV with 1064 run laser photons. Furthermore, the gamma-ray energy was extended to 20 MeV by using the 2nd harmonic of the Nd:YAG laser. This shows a good agreement with theoretical calculation. The gamma-ray energy spread was also measured to be 1% FWHM for -1 MeV gamma-rays and to be 4% FWHM for 10 MeV gamma-rays with a narrow collimator that defined the scattering cone. The gamma-ray yield was 47.2 photons/mA/W/s. This value is consistent with a rough estimation of 59.5 photons/mA/W/s derived from theory. Furthermore, we tried to use these gamma-rays for a nuclear fluorescence experiment. If we use a polarized laser beam, we can easily obtain polarized gamma-rays. Elastically scattered photons from {sup 208} Pb were clearly measured with the linearly polarized gamma-rays, and we could assign the parity of J=1 states in the nucleus. We should emphasize that the polarized gamma-ray from LCS is quit useful in this field, because we can use highly, almost completely, polarized gamma-rays. We also use the LCS gamma-rays to measure the photon absorption coefficients. In near future, we will try to generate a circular polarized gamma-ray. We also have a plan to use an FEL, because it can produce intense laser photons in the same geometric configuration as the LCS facility.

  11. Astrophysical Sources of Cosmic Rays and Related Measurements with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Abraham, J; Aglietta, M; Aguirre, C; Ahn, E J; Allard, D; Allekotte, I; Allen, J; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Ambrosio, M; Anchordoqui, L; Andringa, S; Anzalone, A; Aramo, C; Arganda, E; Argirò, S; Arisaka, K; Arneodo, F; Arqueros, F; Asch, T; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Aublin, J; Ave, M; Avila, G; Bäcker, T; Badagnani, D; Barber, K B; Barbosa-Ademarlaudo, F; Barroso, S L C; Baughman, B; Bauleo, P; Beatty, J J; Beau, T; Becker, B R; Becker, K H; Bellétoile, A; Bellido, J A; BenZvi, S; Bérat, C; Bernardini, P; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blanch-Bigas, O; Blanco, F; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Boháčová, M; Boncioli, D; Bonifazi, C; Bonino, R; Borodai, N; Brack, J; Brogueira, P; Brown, W C; Bruijn, R; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Burton, R E; Busca, N G; Caballero-Mora, K S; Caramete, L; Caruso, R; Carvalho, W; Castellina, A; Catalano, O; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chauvin, J; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Chou, A; Chudoba, J; Chye, J; Clay, R W; Colombo, E; Conceição, R; Connolly, B; Contreras, F; Coppens, J; Cordier, A; Cotti, U; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Creusot, A; Criss, A; Cronin, J; Curutiu, A; Dagoret-Campagne, S; Dallier, R; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; De Domenico, M; De Donato, C; De Jong, S J; De La Vega, G; Junior, W J M de Mello; Neto, J R T de Mello; De Mitri, I; De Souza, V; de Vries, K D; Decerprit, G; Del Peral, L; Deligny, O; Della Selva, A; Fratte, C Delle; Dembinski, H; DiGiulio, C; Diaz, J C; Diep, P N; Dobrigkeit, C; D'Olivo, J C; Dong, P N; Dorofeev, A; Anjos, J C dos; Dova, M T; D'Urso, D; Dutan, I; Duvernois, M A; Engel, R; Erdmann, M; Escobar, C O; Etchegoyen, A; Luis, P Facal San; Falcke, H; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Ferrer, F; Ferrero, A; Fick, B; Filevich, A; Filipčič, A; Fleck, I; Fliescher, S; Fracchiolla, C E; Fraenkel, E D; Fulgione, W; Gamarra, R F; Gambetta, S; García, B; GarcíaGámez, D; Garcia-Pinto, D; Garrido, X; Gelmini, G; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Giaccari, U; Giller, M; Glass, H; Goggin, L M; Gold, M S; Golup, G; Albarracin, F Gomez; Berisso, M Gómez; Gonçalves, P; Amaral, M Gonçalves do; González, D; Gonzalez, J G; Góra, D; Gorgi, A; Gouffon, P; Gozzini, S R; Grashorn, E; Grebe, S; Grigat, M; Grillo, A F; Guardincerri, Y; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Gutiérrez, J; Hague, J D; Halenka, V; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harmsma, S; Harton, J L; Haungs, A; Healy, M D; Hebbeker, T; Hebrero, G; Heck, D; Holmes, V C; Homola, P; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Hrabovský, M; Huege, T; Hussain, M; Iarlori, M; Insolia, A; Ionita, F; Italiano, A; Jiraskova, S; Kaducak, M; Kampert, K H; Karova, T; Kasper, P; Kégl, B; Keilhauer, B; Kemp, E; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Knapik, R; Knapp, J; Koang, D -H; Krieger, A; Krömer, O; Kruppke-Hansen, D; Kühn, F; Kuempel, D; Kulbartz, K; Kunka, N; Kusenko, A; LaRosa, G; Lachaud, C; Lago, B L; Lautridou, P; Leão, M S A B; Lebrun, D; Lebrun, P; Lee, J; de Oliveira, M A Leigui; Lemiere, A; Letessier-Selvon, A A; Leuthold, M; Lhenry-Yvon, I; López, R; Agüera, A Lopez; Louedec, K; Bahilo, J Lozano; Lucero, A; Lyberis, H; Maccarone, M C; Macolino, C; Maldera, S; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Maris, I C; Falcon, H R Marquez; Martello, D; Bravo, O Martínez; Mathes, H J; Matthews, J; Matthews, J A J; Matthiae, G; Maurizio, D; Mazur, P O; McEwen, M; McNeil, R R; Medina-Tanco, G; Melissas, M; Melo, D; Menichetti, E; Menshikov, A; Meyhandan, R; Micheletti, M I; Miele, G; Miller, W; Miramonti, L; Mollerach, S; Monasor, M; Ragaigne, D Monnier; Montanet, F; Morales, B; Morello, C; Moreno, J C; Morris, C; Mostafá, M; Moura, C A; Müller, S; Muller, M A; Mussa, R; Navarra, G; Navarro, J L; Navas, S; Necesal, P; Nellen, L; Newman-Holmes, C; Newton, D; Nhung, P T; Nierstenhoefer, N; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Nožka, L; Nyklicek, M; Oehlschläger, J; Olinto, A; Oliva, P; Olmos-Gilbaja, V M; Ortiz, M; Pacheco, N; Selmi-Dei, D Pakk; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Parente, G; Parizot, E; Parlati, S; Pastor, S; Patel, M; Paul, T; Pavlidou, V; Payet, K; Pech, M; Pȩkala, J; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Pesce, R; Petermann, E; Petrera, S; Petrinca, P; Petrolini, A; Petrov, Y; Petrovic, J; Pfendner, C; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pimenta, M; Pinto, T; Pirronello, V; Pisanti, O; Platino, M; Pochon, J; Ponce, V H; Pontz, M; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Rautenberg, J; Ravel, O; Ravignani, D; Redondo, A; Revenu, B; Rezende, F A S; Rídky, J; Riggi, S; Risse, M; Rivière, C; Rizi, V; Robledo, C; Rodríguez, G; Martino, J Rodriguez; Rojo, J Rodriguez; Rodriguez-Cabo, I; Rodríguez-Frías, M D; Ros, G; Rosado, J; Rossler, T; Roth, M; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Salamida, F; Salazar, H; Salina, G; Sánchez, F; Santander, M; Santo, C E; Santos, E M; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, S; Sato, R; Scharf, N; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schiffer, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, F; Schmidt, T; Scholten, O; Schoorlemmer, H; Schovancova, J; Schovánek, P; Schroeder, F; Schulte, S; Schüssler, F; Schuster, D; Sciutto, S J; Scuderi, M; Segreto, A; Semikoz, D; Settimo, M; Shellard, R C; Sidelnik, I; Siffert, B B; Sigl, G; Śmiałkowski, A; Šmída, R; Smith, B E; Snow, G R; Sommers, P; Sorokin, J; Spinka, H; Squartini, R; Strazzeri, E; Stutz, A; Suárez, F; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Sutherland, M S; Swain, J; Szadkowski, Z; Tamashiro, A; Tamburro, A; Tarutina, T; Taşcuau, O; Tcaciuc, R; Tcherniakhovski, D; Tegolo, D; Thao, N T; Thomas, D; Ticona, R; Tiffenberg, J; Timmermans, C; Tkaczyk, W; Peixoto, C J Todero; Tomé, B; Tonachini, A; Torres, I; Travnicek, P; Tridapalli, D B; Tristram, G; Trovato, E; Tueros, M; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Urban, M; Galicia, J F Valdés; Valiño, I; Valore, L; vandenBerg, A M; Vázquez, J R; Vázquez, R A; Veberič, D; Velarde, A; Venters, T; Verzi, V; Videla, M; Villaseñor, L; Vorobiov, S; Voyvodic, L; Wahlberg, H; Wahrlich, P; Wainberg, O; Warner, D; Watson, A A; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Wieczorek, G; Wiencke, L; Wilczyńska, B; Wilczyński, H; Wileman, C; Winnick, M G; Wu, H; Wundheiler, B; Yamamoto, T; Younk, P; Yuan, G; Yushkov, A; Zas, E; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zaw, I; Zepeda, A; Ziolkowski, M

    2009-01-01

    Studies of the correlations of ultra-high energy cosmic ray directions with extra-Galactic objects, of general anisotropy, of photons and neutrinos, and of other astrophysical effects, with the Pierre Auger Observatory. Contributions to the 31st ICRC, Lodz, Poland, July 2009.

  12. FERMI-LAT OBSERVATIONS OF THE DIFFUSE {gamma}-RAY EMISSION: IMPLICATIONS FOR COSMIC RAYS AND THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, M. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Buehler, R. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Atwood, W. B. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ballet, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Universite Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bastieri, D.; Buson, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bonamente, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Brandt, T. J. [CNRS, IRAP, F-31028 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Brigida, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' M. Merlin' dell' Universita e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Bruel, P., E-mail: tporter@stanford.edu, E-mail: gudlaugu@glast2.stanford.edu, E-mail: aws@mpe.mpg.de [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); and others

    2012-05-01

    The {gamma}-ray sky >100 MeV is dominated by the diffuse emissions from interactions of cosmic rays with the interstellar gas and radiation fields of the Milky Way. Observations of these diffuse emissions provide a tool to study cosmic-ray origin and propagation, and the interstellar medium. We present measurements from the first 21 months of the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) mission and compare with models of the diffuse {gamma}-ray emission generated using the GALPROP code. The models are fitted to cosmic-ray data and incorporate astrophysical input for the distribution of cosmic-ray sources, interstellar gas, and radiation fields. To assess uncertainties associated with the astrophysical input, a grid of models is created by varying within observational limits the distribution of cosmic-ray sources, the size of the cosmic-ray confinement volume (halo), and the distribution of interstellar gas. An all-sky maximum-likelihood fit is used to determine the X{sub CO} factor, the ratio between integrated CO-line intensity and H{sub 2} column density, the fluxes and spectra of the {gamma}-ray point sources from the first Fermi-LAT catalog, and the intensity and spectrum of the isotropic background including residual cosmic rays that were misclassified as {gamma}-rays, all of which have some dependency on the assumed diffuse emission model. The models are compared on the basis of their maximum-likelihood ratios as well as spectra, longitude, and latitude profiles. We also provide residual maps for the data following subtraction of the diffuse emission models. The models are consistent with the data at high and intermediate latitudes but underpredict the data in the inner Galaxy for energies above a few GeV. Possible explanations for this discrepancy are discussed, including the contribution by undetected point-source populations and spectral variations of cosmic rays throughout the Galaxy. In the outer Galaxy, we find that the data prefer models with a flatter

  13. The short gamma-ray burst revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift, a dedicated gamma-ray burst (GRB) satellite with ultrarapid slewing capability, and a suite of ground-based (ESO) telescopes have recently achieved a major breakthrough: detecting the first afterglows of short-duration GRBs. The faintness of these afterglows and the diversity of old and young host galaxies lend support to the emerging 'standard model', in which they are created during the merging of two compact objects. However, the afterglow light-curve properties and possible high-redshift origin of some short bursts suggests that more than one progenitor type may be involved. (orig.)

  14. Gamma ray constraints on decaying dark matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cirelli, M.; Moulin, E.; Panci, P.;

    2012-01-01

    We derive new bounds on decaying dark matter from the gamma ray measurements of (i) the isotropic residual (extragalactic) background by Fermi and (ii) the Fornax galaxy cluster by H.E.S.S. We find that those from (i) are among the most stringent constraints currently available, for a large range...... of dark matter masses and a variety of decay modes, excluding half-lives up to similar to 10(26) to few 10(27) seconds. In particular, they rule out the interpretation in terms of decaying dark matter of the e(+/-) spectral features in PAMELA, Fermi and H.E.S.S., unless very conservative choices...

  15. Two classes of gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, J I

    1995-01-01

    Data from the 3B Catalogue suggest that short and long GRB are the results of different classes of events, rather than different parameter values within a single class: Short bursts have harder spectra in the BATSE bands, but chiefly long bursts are detected at photon energies over 1 MeV, implying that their hard photons are radiated by a process not found in short bursts. The values of \\langle V/V_{max} \\rangle for short and long bursts differ by 4.3 \\sigma, implying different spatial distributions. Only the soft gamma-ray radiation mechanisms are the same in both classes.

  16. SEARCH FOR PROMPT NEUTRINO EMISSION FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS WITH ICECUBE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aartsen, M. G. [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 Australia (Australia); Ackermann, M.; Berghaus, P. [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany); Adams, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Aguilar, J. A. [Université Libre de Bruxelles, Science Faculty CP230, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Ahlers, M.; Arguelles, C.; BenZvi, S. [Department of Physics and Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Ahrens, M. [Oskar Klein Centre and Department of Physics, Stockholm University, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Altmann, D. [Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Anderson, T.; Arlen, T. C. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Auffenberg, J. [Physikalisches Institut, RWTH Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Bai, X. [Physics Department, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD 57701 (United States); Barwick, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Baum, V. [Institute of Physics, University of Mainz, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Bay, R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beatty, J. J. [Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Tjus, J. Becker [Fakultät für Physik and Astronomie, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Becker, K.-H. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); and others

    2015-05-20

    We present constraints derived from a search of four years of IceCube data for a prompt neutrino flux from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). A single low-significance neutrino, compatible with the atmospheric neutrino background, was found in coincidence with one of the 506 observed bursts. Although GRBs have been proposed as candidate sources for ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, our limits on the neutrino flux disfavor much of the parameter space for the latest models. We also find that no more than ∼1% of the recently observed astrophysical neutrino flux consists of prompt emission from GRBs that are potentially observable by existing satellites.

  17. Search for Prompt Neutrino Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with IceCube

    CERN Document Server

    Aartsen, M G; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Ahrens, M; Altmann, D; Anderson, T; Arguelles, C; Arlen, T C; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beatty, J J; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; BenZvi, S; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bos, F; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H -P; Brown, A M; Buzinsky, N; Casey, J; Casier, M; Cheung, E; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Christy, B; Clark, K; Classen, L; Clevermann, F; Coenders, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; Day, M; de André, J P A M; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de Vries, K D; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Ehrhardt, T; Eichmann, B; Eisch, J; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Felde, J; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gaior, R; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gier, D; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grant, D; Gretskov, P; Groh, J C; Groß, A; Ha, C; Haack, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallen, P; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Hebecker, D; Heereman, D; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hellwig, D; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huang, F; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jero, K; Jlelati, O; Jurkovic, M; Kaminsky, B; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kauer, M; Keivani, A; Kelley, J L; Kheirandish, A; Kiryluk, J; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Koob, A; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kriesten, A; Krings, K; Kroll, G; Kroll, M; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lanfranchi, J L; Larsen, D T; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maggi, G; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Maunu, R; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Medici, M; Meli, A; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Middlemas, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Omairat, A; O'Murchadha, A; Palczewski, T; Paul, L; Penek, Ö; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pinat, E; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Pütz, J; Quinnan, M; Rädel, L; Rameez, M; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Rees, I; Reimann, R; Relich, M; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Robertson, S; Rodrigues, J P; Rongen, M; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Sander, H -G; Sandroos, J; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Shanidze, R; Smith, M W E; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stanisha, N A; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Strotjohann, N L; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Terliuk, A; Tešić, G; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Tobin, M N; Tosi, D; Tselengidou, M; Unger, E; Usner, M; Vallecorsa, S; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; van Santen, J; Vanheule, S; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Wallraff, M; Weaver, Ch; Wellons, M; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Whitehorn, N; Wichary, C; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Xu, Y; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zoll, M

    2014-01-01

    We present constraints derived from a search of four years of IceCube data for a prompt neutrino flux from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). A single low-significance neutrino was found in coincidence with one of the 506 observed bursts, consistent with the expectation from atmospheric backgrounds. Although GRBs have been proposed as candidate sources for ultra-high energy cosmic rays, our limits on the neutrino flux disfavor much of the parameter space for the latest models. We also find that no more than $\\sim1\\%$ of the recently observed astrophysical neutrino flux consists of prompt emission from GRBs that are potentially observable by existing satellites.

  18. Stacked search for time shifted high energy neutrinos from gamma ray bursts with the \\ANTARES neutrino telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Adrian-Martínez, S; André, M; Anton, G; Ardid, M; Aubert, J -J; Baret, B; Barrios-Marti, J; Basa, S; Bertin, V; Biagi, S; Bormuth, R; Bouwhuis, M C; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Busto, J; Capone, A; Caramete, L; Carr, J; Chiarusi, T; Circella, M; Coniglione, R; Costantini, H; Coyle, P; Creusot, A; Dekeyser, I; Deschamps, A; De Bonis, G; Distefano, C; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Drouhin, D; Dumas, A; Eberl, T; Elsasser, D; Enzenhofer, A; Fehn, K; Felis, I; Fermani, P; Folger, F; Fusco, L A; Galatà, S; Gay, P; Geisselsoeder, S; Geyer, K; Giordano, V; Gleixner, A; Gracia-Ruiz, R; Graf, K; Hallmann, S; van Haren, H; Heijboer, A J; Hello, Y; Hernàndez-Rey, J J; Hoessl, J; Hofestadt, J; Hugon, C; James, C W; de Jong, M; Kadler, M; Kadler, M; Kalekin, O; Katz, U; Kiessling, D; Kooijman, P; Kouchner, A; Kreter, M; Kreykenbohm, I; Kulikovskiy, V; Lahmann, R; Lefèvre, D; Leonora, E; Marcelin, M; Margiotta, A; Marinelli, A; Martínez-Mora, J A; Mathieu, A; Michael, T; Migliozzi, P; Moussa, A; Muller, C; Nezri, E; Pavalas, G E; Pellegrino, C; Perrina, C; Piattelli, P; Popa, V; Pradier, T; Racca, C; Riccobene, G; Richter, R; Roensch, K; Saldaña, M; Samtleben, D F E; Sánchez-Losa, A; Sanguineti, M; Sapienza, P; Schmid, J; Schnabel, J; Schussler, F; Seitz, T; Sieger, C; Spurio, M; Steijger, J J M; Stolarczyk, Th; Taiuti, M; Tamburini, C; Trovato, A; Tselengidou, M; Tonnis, C; Vallage, B; Vallée, C; Van Elewyck, V; Visser, E; Vivolo, D; Wagner, S; Wilms, J; Zornoza, J D; Zúñiga, J

    2016-01-01

    A search for high-energy neutrino emission correlated with gamma-ray bursts outside the electromagnetic prompt-emission time window is presented. Using a stacking approach of the time delays between reported gamma-ray burst alerts and spatially coincident muon-neutrino signatures, data from the Antares neutrino telescope recorded between 2007 and 2012 are analysed. One year of public data from the IceCube detector between 2008 and 2009 have been also investigated. The respective timing pro?les are scanned for statistically significant accumulations within 40 days of the Gamma Ray Burst, as expected from Lorentz Invariance Violation effects and some astrophysical models. No significant excess over the expected accidental coincidence rate could be found in either of the two data sets. The average strength of the neutrino signal is found to be fainter than one detectable neutrino signal per hundred gamma-ray bursts in the Antares data at 90% confidence level.

  19. Optical telescope BIRT in ORIGIN for gamma ray burst observing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Content, Robert; Sharples, Ray; Page, Mathew J.;

    2012-01-01

    The ORIGIN concept is a space mission with a gamma ray, an X-ray and an optical telescope to observe the gamma ray bursts at large Z to determine the composition and density of the intergalactic matter in the line of sight. It was an answer to the ESA M3 call for proposal. The optical telescope...

  20. Nebulae of young pulsars: emitters of TeV neutrinos and gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-energy neutrinos are expected to be produced in astrophysical objects by the decays of charged pions made in cosmic-ray interactions with surrounding photons and/or matter. As these pions decay, they produce neutrinos with typical energies of 5% compared to those of the cosmic-ray nucleons. These neutrinos can travel long distances undisturbed by either the absorption experienced by high-energy photons or the magnetic deflection experienced by charged particles, making them a unique tracer of cosmic-ray acceleration. Hence neutrinos are considered to be important probes for exploring the high energy Universe, and they may fill the missing link between the TeV gamma-rays and the PeV - EeV cosmic-rays. At the same time, neutrinos produced in cosmic-ray air showers provide information about hadronic physics in kinematic regions that are difficult to probe with terrestrial accelerators

  1. Pioneering New Filters for X-ray Astrophysics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We plan to produce filters with holes so small that longer wavelength photons are unable to propagate through, whereas the shorter wavelength x-ray photons simply...

  2. A separation of electrons and protons in the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Leonov, A A; Bonvicini, V; Topchiev, N P; Adriani, O; Aptekar, R L; Arkhangelskaja, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Bergstrom, L; Berti, E; Bigongiari, G; Bobkov, S G; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bonechi, S; Bongi, M; Bottai, S; Castellini, G; Cattaneo, P W; Cumani, P; Dedenko, G L; De Donato, C; Dogiel, V A; Gorbunov, M S; Gusakov, Yu V; Hnatyk, B I; Kadilin, V V; Kaplin, V A; Kaplun, A A; Kheymits, M D; Korepanov, V E; Larsson, J; Loginov, V A; Longo, F; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P S; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Moiseev, A A; Mori, N; Moskalenko, I V; Naumov, P Yu; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Popov, A V; Rappoldi, A; Ricciarini, S; Runtso, M F; Ryde, F; Serdin, O V; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Suchkov, S I; Tavani, M; Taraskin, A A; Tiberio, A; Tyurin, E M; Ulanov, M V; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Yurkin, Yu T; Zampa, N; Zirakashvili, V N; Zverev, V G

    2015-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is intended to measure the fluxes of gamma rays and cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to several TeV. Such measurements concern with the following scientific goals: search for signatures of dark matter, investigation of gamma-ray point and extended sources, studies of the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, studies of gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the active Sun, as well as high-precision measurements of spectra of high-energy electrons and positrons, protons, and nuclei up to the knee. The main components of cosmic rays are protons and helium nuclei, whereas the part of lepton component in the total flux is ~10E-3 for high energies. In present paper, the capability of the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope to distinguish electrons and positrons from protons in cosmic rays is investigated. The individual contribution to the proton rejection is studied for each detector system of the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray tel...

  3. High Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts - Before GLAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Yi-Zhong; Piran, Tsvi

    2011-11-29

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short and intense emission of soft {gamma}-rays, which have fascinated astronomers and astrophysicists since their unexpected discovery in 1960s. The X-ray/optical/radio afterglow observations confirm the cosmological origin of GRBs, support the fireball model, and imply a long-activity of the central engine. The high-energy {gamma}-ray emission (> 20 MeV) from GRBs is particularly important because they shed some lights on the radiation mechanisms and can help us to constrain the physical processes giving rise to the early afterglows. In this work, we review observational and theoretical studies of the high-energy emission from GRBs. Special attention is given to the expected high-energy emission signatures accompanying the canonical early-time X-ray afterglow that was observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope. We also discuss the detection prospect of the upcoming GLAST satellite and the current ground-based Cerenkov detectors.

  4. High-Energy Astrophysics: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2007-01-01

    High-energy astrophysics is the study of objects and phenomena in space with energy densities much greater than that found in normal stars and galaxies. These include black holes, neutron stars, cosmic rays, hypernovae and gamma-ray bursts. A history and an overview of high-energy astrophysics will be presented, including a description of the objects that are observed. Observing techniques, space-borne missions in high-energy astrophysics and some recent discoveries will also be described. Several entirely new types of astronomy are being employed in high-energy astrophysics. These will be briefly described, along with some NASA missions currently under development.

  5. Improved Gamma-Ray Flux Monitoring at the High Intensity Gamma-Ray Source (HIGS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Robert

    2002-10-01

    An improved gamma-ray beam flux monitor has been built for use at the High Intensity Gamma-Ray Source at the Duke University Free Electron Laser Laboratories. It is important to know precisely the gamma-ray flux of this beam. It is also important to limit beam attenuation to a minimum while making an accurate flux measurement. The improvements from a more accurate gamma-ray intensity monitor will allow for more precise cross-section measurements and will be valuable to many of the experiments conducted at HIGS. The detector consists of a thin scintillator optically coupled to two photomultiplier tubes, a thin foil, and then another thin scintillator attached to two photomultiplier tubes. The front scintillator is used to veto counts from charged particles emitted upstream in the beam-line. The preliminary tests of the monitor show very promising results and after slight adjustments and calibrations, the detector will be ready to acquire accurate beam intensity measurements while contributing very little to beam attenuation.

  6. The Gamma-Ray Burst - Supernova Connection

    CERN Document Server

    Hjorth, Jens

    2011-01-01

    A preponderance of evidence links long-duration, soft-spectrum gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the death of massive stars. The observations of the GRB-supernova (SN) connection present the most direct evidence of this physical link. We summarize 30 GRB-SN associations and focus on five ironclad cases, highlighting the subsequent insight into the progenitors enabled by detailed observations. We also address the SN association (or lack thereof) with several sub-classes of GRBs, finding that the X-ray Flash (XRF) population is likely associated with massive stellar death whereas short-duration events likely arise from an older population not readily capable of producing a SN concurrent with a GRB. Interestingly, a minority population of seemingly long-duration, soft-spectrum GRBs show no evidence for SN-like activity; this may be a natural consequence of the range of Ni-56 production expected in stellar deaths.

  7. Gamma Rays from Top-Mediated Dark Matter Annihilations

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, C.B.(Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019, USA); Servant, Géraldine; Shaughnessy, Gabe; Tim M.P. Tait; Taoso, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Lines in the energy spectrum of gamma rays are a fascinating experimental signal, which are often considered "smoking gun" evidence of dark matter annihilation. The current generation of gamma ray observatories are currently closing in on parameter space of great interest in the context of dark matter which is a thermal relic. We consider theories in which the dark matter's primary connection to the Standard Model is via the top quark, realizing strong gamma ray lines consistent with a therma...

  8. The Space-Based Gamma-Ray Telescope GAMMA-400 and Its Scientific Goals

    CERN Document Server

    Galper, A M; Aptekar, R L; Arkhangelskaja, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Avanesov, G A; Bergstrom, L; Bogomolov, E A; Boezio, M; Bonvicini, V; Boyarchuk, K A; Dogiel, V A; Gusakov, Yu V; Fradkin, M I; Fuglesang, Ch; Hnatyk, B I; Kachanov, V A; Kadilin, V V; Kaplin, V A; Kheymits, M D; Korepanov, V; Larsson, J; Leonov, A A; Longo, F; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Moiseev, A A; Mori, N; Moskalenko, I; Naumov, P Yu; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Runtso, M F; Ryde, F; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Suchkov, S I; Tavani, M; Topchiev, N P; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasiliev, G I; Yurkin, Yu T; Zampa, N; Zarikashvili, V N; Zverev, V G

    2013-01-01

    The design of the new space-based gamma-ray telescope GAMMA-400 is presented. GAMMA-400 is optimized for the energy 100 GeV with the best parameters: the angular resolution ~0.01 deg, the energy resolution ~1%, and the proton rejection factor ~10E6, but is able to measure gamma-ray and electron + positron fluxes in the energy range from 100 MeV to 10 TeV. GAMMA-400 is aimed to a broad range of science topics, such as search for signatures of dark matter, studies of Galactic and extragalactic gamma-ray sources, Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, gamma-ray bursts, as well as high-precision measurements of spectra of cosmic-ray electrons + positrons, and nuclei.

  9. ICF gamma-ray reaction history diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, H W; Young, C S; Mack, J M; Kim, Y H; McEvoy, A; Evans, S; Sedillo, T; Batha, S; Schmitt, M; Wilson, D C; Langenbrunner, J R [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O Box 1663, M/S E526, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Malone, R; Kaufman, M I; Cox, B C; Frogget, B; Tunnell, T W [National Security Technologies, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Miller, E K [National Security Technologies, Special Technologies Laboratory, Santa Barbara, California, 93111 (United States); Ali, Z A [National Security Technologies, Livermore, CA, 94550 (United States); Stoeffl, W [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Horsfield, C J, E-mail: herrmann@lanl.go [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-01

    Reaction history measurements, such as nuclear bang time and burn width, are fundamental components of diagnosing ICF implosions and will be employed to help steer the National Ignition Facility (NIF) towards ignition. Fusion gammas provide a direct measure of nuclear interaction rate (unlike x-rays) without being compromised by Doppler spreading (unlike neutrons). Gas Cherenkov Detectors that convert fusion gamma rays to UV/visible Cherenkov photons for collection by fast optical recording systems have established their usefulness in illuminating ICF physics in several experimental campaigns at OMEGA. In particular, bang time precision better than 25 ps has been demonstrated, well below the 50 ps accuracy requirement defined by the NIF. NIF Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostics are being developed based on optimization of sensitivity, bandwidth, dynamic range, cost, and NIF-specific logistics, requirements and extreme radiation environment. Implementation will occur in two phases. The first phase consists of four channels mounted to the outside of the target chamber at {approx}6 m from target chamber center (GRH-6m) coupled to ultra-fast photo-multiplier tubes (PMT). This system is intended to operate in the 10{sup 13}-10{sup 17} neutron yield range expected during the early THD campaign. It will have high enough bandwidth to provide accurate bang times and burn widths for the expected THD reaction histories (> 80 ps fwhm). Successful operation of the first GRH-6m channel has been demonstrated at OMEGA, allowing a verification of instrument sensitivity, timing and EMI/background suppression. The second phase will consist of several channels located just inside the target bay shield wall at 15 m from target chamber center (GRH-15m) with optical paths leading through the cement shield wall to well-shielded streak cameras and PMTs. This system is intended to operate in the 10{sup 16}-10{sup 20} yield range expected during the DT ignition campaign, providing higher

  10. ICF gamma-ray reaction history diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, H. W.; Young, C. S.; Mack, J. M.; Kim, Y. H.; McEvoy, A.; Evans, S.; Sedillo, T.; Batha, S.; Schmitt, M.; Wilson, D. C.; Langenbrunner, J. R.; Malone, R.; Kaufman, M. I.; Cox, B. C.; Frogget, B.; Miller, E. K.; Ali, Z. A.; Tunnell, T. W.; Stoeffl, W.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M.

    2010-08-01

    Reaction history measurements, such as nuclear bang time and burn width, are fundamental components of diagnosing ICF implosions and will be employed to help steer the National Ignition Facility (NIF) towards ignition. Fusion gammas provide a direct measure of nuclear interaction rate (unlike x-rays) without being compromised by Doppler spreading (unlike neutrons). Gas Cherenkov Detectors that convert fusion gamma rays to UV/visible Cherenkov photons for collection by fast optical recording systems have established their usefulness in illuminating ICF physics in several experimental campaigns at OMEGA. In particular, bang time precision better than 25 ps has been demonstrated, well below the 50 ps accuracy requirement defined by the NIF. NIF Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostics are being developed based on optimization of sensitivity, bandwidth, dynamic range, cost, and NIF-specific logistics, requirements and extreme radiation environment. Implementation will occur in two phases. The first phase consists of four channels mounted to the outside of the target chamber at ~6 m from target chamber center (GRH-6m) coupled to ultra-fast photo-multiplier tubes (PMT). This system is intended to operate in the 1013-1017 neutron yield range expected during the early THD campaign. It will have high enough bandwidth to provide accurate bang times and burn widths for the expected THD reaction histories (> 80 ps fwhm). Successful operation of the first GRH-6m channel has been demonstrated at OMEGA, allowing a verification of instrument sensitivity, timing and EMI/background suppression. The second phase will consist of several channels located just inside the target bay shield wall at 15 m from target chamber center (GRH-15m) with optical paths leading through the cement shield wall to well-shielded streak cameras and PMTs. This system is intended to operate in the 1016-1020 yield range expected during the DT ignition campaign, providing higher temporal resolution for the

  11. Classifying Unidentified Gamma-ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Salvetti, David

    2016-01-01

    During its first 2 years of mission the Fermi-LAT instrument discovered more than 1,800 gamma-ray sources in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range. Despite the application of advanced techniques to identify and associate the Fermi-LAT sources with counterparts at other wavelengths, about 40% of the LAT sources have no a clear identification remaining "unassociated". The purpose of my Ph.D. work has been to pursue a statistical approach to identify the nature of each Fermi-LAT unassociated source. To this aim, we implemented advanced machine learning techniques, such as logistic regression and artificial neural networks, to classify these sources on the basis of all the available gamma-ray information about location, energy spectrum and time variability. These analyses have been used for selecting targets for AGN and pulsar searches and planning multi-wavelength follow-up observations. In particular, we have focused our attention on the search of possible radio-quiet millisecond pulsar (MSP) candidates in the sample of...

  12. Radio flares from gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Kopac, D; Kobayashi, S; Virgili, F J; Harrison, R; Japelj, J; Guidorzi, C; Melandri, A; Gomboc, A

    2015-01-01

    We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parametrization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. (2007) and Melandri et al. (2010) in which the typical frequency of the reverse shock was suggested to lie at radio, rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct reverse-shock radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1 -- 1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later opt...

  13. VERITAS Search for VHE Gamma-ray Emission from Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Acciari, V A; Aune, T; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Boltuch, D; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cannon, A; Cesarini, A; Christiansen, J L; Ciupik, L; Cui, W; Dickherber, R; Duke, C; Finley, J P; Finnegan, G; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Godambe, S; Grube, J; Guenette, R; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Hui, C M; Humensky, T B; Imran, A; Kaaret, P; Karlsson, N; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D; Konopelko, A; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Maier, G; McArthur, S; McCann, A; McCutcheon, M; Moriarty, P; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Pandel, D; Perkins, J S; Pohl, M; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Rose, H J; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Senturk, G Demet; Smith, A W; Steele, D; Swordy, S P; Tešić, G; Theiling, M; Thibadeau, S; Varlotta, A; Vassiliev, V V; Vincent, S; Wagner, R G; Wakely, S P; Ward, J E; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Weisgarber, T; Williams, D A; Wissel, S; Zitzer, B

    2010-01-01

    Indirect dark matter searches with ground-based gamma-ray observatories provide an alternative for identifying the particle nature of dark matter that is complementary to that of direct search or accelerator production experiments. We present the results of observations of the dwarf spheroidal galaxies Draco, Ursa Minor, Bootes 1, and Willman 1 conducted by VERITAS. These galaxies are nearby dark matter dominated objects located at a typical distance of several tens of kiloparsecs for which there are good measurements of the dark matter density profile from stellar velocity measurements. Since the conventional astrophysical background of very high energy gamma rays from these objects appears to be negligible, they are good targets to search for the secondary gamma-ray photons produced by interacting or decaying dark matter particles. No significant gamma-ray flux above 200 GeV was detected from these four dwarf galaxies for a typical exposure of ~20 hours. The 95% confidence upper limits on the integral gamma...

  14. Mercuric Iodide Anticoincidence Shield for Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We utilize a new detector material, polycrystalline mercuric iodide, for background suppression by active anticoincidence shielding in gamma-ray spectrometers. Two...

  15. Mercuric Iodide Anticoincidence Shield for Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to utilize a new detector material, polycrystalline mercuric iodide, for background suppression by active anticoincidence shielding in gamma-ray...

  16. X- and gamma-ray signatures of type Ia supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a Monte Carlo code, the hard X-ray continuum and gamma-ray line emissions of various theoretical models of Type Ia supernova explosions are investigated. The influence of the distributions of velocity, mass, Ni-56, and heavy elements on the spectral and temporal evolution of the radiations (ultimately derived from the positrons and gamma-ray lines of the decay chain) is described. For the first 300-400 days of the explosion, the correspondence between the parameters of an explosion model and its hard photon signatures is derived. The effect of mixing instabilities is also studied, and estimates of the future detectability of the derived hard X- and gamma-ray features are presented. It is found that OSEE on the Gamma-Ray Observatory can detect both gamma-ray lines and the hard X-ray continuum from any Type Ia supernova within 10 Mpc of earth. 52 refs

  17. The Advanced Energetic Pair Telescope (AdEPT}: A Future Medium-Energy Gamma-Ray Balloon (and Explorer?) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Stanley D.

    2011-01-01

    Gamma-ray astrophysics probes the highest energy, exotic phenomena in astrophysics. In the medium-energy regime, 0.1-200 MeV, many astrophysical objects exhibit unique and transitory behavior such as the transition from electron dominated to hadron dominated processes, spectral breaks, bursts, and flares. Medium-energy gamma-ray imaging however, continues to be a major challenge particularly because of high background, low effective area, and low source intensities. The sensitivity and angular resolution required to address these challenges requires a leap in technology. The Advance Energetic Pair Telescope (AdEPT) being developed at GSFC is designed to image gamma rays above 5 MeV via pair production with angular resolution of 1-10 deg. In addition AdEPT will, for the first time, provide high polarization sensitivity in this energy range. This performance is achieved by reducing the effective area in favor of enhanced angular resolution through the use of a low-density gaseous conversion medium. AdEPT is based on the Three-Dimensional Track Imager (3-DTI) technology that combines a large volume Negative Ion Time Projection Chamber (NITPC) with 2-D Micro-Well Detector (MWD) readout. I will review the major science topics addressable with medium-energy gamma-rays and discuss the current status of the AdEPT technology, a proposed balloon instrument, and the design of a future satellite mission.

  18. Activation of wine bentonite with gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The action of gamma rays on wine bentonite as well as influence of its adsorption and technologic qualities on the composition and stability of wines against protein darkening and precipitation has been studied. The experiments were carried out with wine bentonite produced in the firm Bentonite and irradiated with doses of 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 MR. White and red wines have been treated with irradiated bentonite under laboratory conditions at 1.0 g/dm3. All samples are treated at the same conditions. The flocculation rate of the sediment was determined visually. Samples have been taken 24 h later from the cleared wine layers. The following parameters have been determined: clarification, filtration rate, phenolic compounds, calcium, colour intensity, total extracted substances, etc. The volume of the sediment has been determined also. The control samples have been taken from the same unirradiated wines. The results showed better and faster clarification in on the third, the 20th and the 24th hours with using of gamma-irradiated at doses 0.8 and 1.0 MR. The sediment was the most compact and its volume - the smallest compared to the samples treated with bentonite irradiated with doses of 0.6 and 0.4 MR. This ensures a faster clarification and better filtration of treated wines. The bentonite activated with doses of 0.8 and 1.0 MR adsorbs the phenolic compounds and the complex protein-phenolic molecules better. In the same time it adsorbs less extracted substances compared to untreated bentonite and so preserves all organoleptic properties of wine. The irradiated bentonite adsorbs less the monomers of anthocyan compounds which ensures brighter natural colour of wine. The gamma-rays activation consolidates calcium in the crystal lattice of bentonite particles and in this way eliminates the formation of crystal precipitates

  19. IceCube astrophysical neutrinos without a spectral cutoff and (10^15-10^17) eV cosmic gamma radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kalashev, O E

    2014-01-01

    We present a range of unbroken power-law fits to the astrophysical-neutrino spectrum consistent with the most recent published IceCube data at the 68\\% confidence level. Assuming that the neutrinos originate in decays of pi mesons, we estimate accompanying gamma-ray fluxes for various distributions of sources, taking propagation effects into account. We then briefly discuss existing experimental results constraining PeV to EeV diffuse gamma-ray flux and their systematic uncertainties. Several scenarios are marginally consistent both with the KASKADE and CASA-MIA upper limits at (10^15-10^16) eV and with the EAS-MSU tentative detection at ~10^17 eV, given large systematic errors of the measurements. Future searches for the diffuse gamma-ray background at sub-PeV to sub-EeV energies just below present upper limits will give a crucial diagnostic tool for distinguishing between the Galactic and extragalactic models of the origin of the IceCube events.

  20. Studying the WHIM with Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Branchini, E; Corsi, A; Martizzi, D; Amati, L; Herder, J W den; Galeazzi, M; Gendre, B; Kaastra, J; Moscardini, L; Nicastro, F; Ohashi, T; Paerels, F; Piro, L; Roncarelli, M; Takei, Y; Viel, M

    2009-01-01

    We assess the possibility to detect and characterize the physical state of the missing baryons at low redshift by analyzing the X-ray absorption spectra of the Gamma Ray Burst [GRB] afterglows, measured by a micro calorimeters-based detector with 3 eV resolution and 1000 cm2 effective area and capable of fast re-pointing, similar to that on board of the recently proposed X-ray satellites EDGE and XENIA. For this purpose we have analyzed mock absorption spectra extracted from different hydrodynamical simulations used to model the properties of the Warm Hot Intergalactic Medium [WHIM]. These models predict the correct abundance of OVI absorption lines observed in UV and satisfy current X-ray constraints. According to these models space missions like EDGE and XENIA should be able to detect about 60 WHIM absorbers per year through the OVII line. About 45 % of these have at least two more detectable lines in addition to OVII that can be used to determine the density and the temperature of the gas. Systematic error...

  1. Gamma-Ray Bursts: The Afterglow Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galama, Titus J.; Sari, Re'em

    GRBs were discovered with the Vela satellites, whose main purpose was to verify compliance with the 1963 Limited Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. Since their discovery these events, which emit the bulk of their energy in the 0.1 - 1.0 MeV range, and whose durations span milliseconds to tens of minutes, posed one of the great unsolved problems in astrophysics. GRBs are formed in extreme relativistic outflows and provide important information about highly relativistic acceleration mechanisms. Until 1997, no counterparts (quiescent as well as transient) could be found and observations did not provide a direct measurement of their distance. The breakthrough came in early 1997, when the Wide Field Cameras aboard the Italian-Dutch BeppoSAX satellite allowed rapid and accurate localization of GRBs. Follow-up on these positions resulted in the discovery of X-ray, optical and radio afterglows. These observations revealed that GRBs come from 'cosmological' distances, and that they are by far the most luminous photon sources in the Universe, with peak luminosities in γ rays up to 1052 erg/s, and total energy budgets up to several times 1053-54 erg (for assumed isotropic emission). Evidence is accumulating, however, that GRB outflow is collimated in the form of jets and when corrected for the geometry of the outflow the energies of GRBs appear to cluster around 5 x 1050 ergs- very comparable to that of supernovae. GRBs are rare phenomena with an overall rate about 2000 times smaller than that of supernovae. Indirect evidence in the last several years shows that a fraction of GRBs may be related to a peculiar type of supernova explosions. Theoretical work has shown that these supernovae most likely mark the birth events of stellar mass black holes as the final products of the evolution of very massive stars. A fundamental question is whether there are also other processes that can drive such an engine, for example the coalescence of a double neutron-star system. Finally, the

  2. Gamma Ray Bursts and the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope: Notes to the La Plata Lectures

    CERN Document Server

    Dermer, Charles D

    2008-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are a mixed class of sources consisting of, at least, the long duration and short-hard subclasses, the X-ray flashes, and the low-luminosity GRBs. In all cases, the release of enormous amounts of energy on a short timescale makes an energetic, relativistic or mildly relativistic fireball that expands until it reaches a coasting Lorentz factor determined by the amount of baryons mixed into the fireball. Radiation is produced when the blast wave interacts with the surrounding medium at an external shock, or when shell collisions dissipate kinetic energy at internal shocks. This series of notes is organized as follows: (1) The observational situation of GRBs is summarized; (2) Progenitor models of GRBs are described; (3) An overview of the the blast-wave physics used to model leptonic emissions is given; (4) GRB physics is applied to hadronic acceleration and ultra-high energy cosmic ray production; (5) Prospects for GRB physics and gamma-ray astronomy with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Teles...

  3. The First Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flash (TGF) Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Michael; Connaughton, Valerie; Stanbro, Matthew; Zhang, Binbin; Bhat, Narayana; Fishman, Gerald; Roberts, Oliver; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; McBreen, Shelia; Grove, Eric; Chekhtman, Alexandre

    2015-04-01

    We present summary results from the first catalog of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) detected with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on the Fermi Space Telescope. The catalog reports parameters for over 2700 TGFs. Since the launch of Fermi in 2008 the TGF detection sensitivity of GBM has been improved several times, both in the flight software and in ground analysis. Starting in 2010 July individual photons were downloaded for portions of the orbits, enabling an off-line search that found weaker and shorter TGFs. Since 2012 November 26 this telemetry mode has been extended to continuous coverage. The TGF sample is reliable, with cosmic rays rejected using data both from Fermi GBM and from the Large Area Telescope on Fermi. The online catalog include times (UTC and solar), spacecraft geographic positions, durations, count intensities and Bayesian Block durations. The catalog includes separate tables for bright TGFs detected by the flight software and for Terrestrial Electron Beams (TEBs).

  4. Superconducting tunnel junction detectors for soft x-ray astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeve, P.; Hijmering, R. A.; Martin, D. D. E.; Jerjen, I.; Peacock, A.; Venn, R.

    2006-06-01

    The requirement on energy resolution for detectors in future X-ray satelite missions such as XEUS (X-ray Evolving Universe Spectroscopy mission) is 80%. In addition, the requirements for field of view and angular resolution demand a detector array of typically 150x150 micron sized pixels in a 30x30 pixel format. DROIDs (Distributed Read Out Imaging Devices), consisting of a superconducting absorber strip with superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) as read-out devices on either end, can fulfill these requirements. The amplitudes of the two signals from the STJs provide information on the absorption position and the energy of the incoming photon in the absorber. In this paper we present the development status of Ta/Al 1-D DROIDs, as well as the the short term development program that should result in a full size XEUS array.

  5. European team gauges a gamma-ray star

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Italian astrophysicists have pushed the Hubble Space Telescope to the limit of its powers in finding the distance of Geminga, a pointlike object 500 light-years from the Earth. It is the prototype of a novel kind of star, a radio-silent neutron star, which may be much more common in the Universe than previously supposed. Geminga is so weak in visible light that Hubble had to stare at the spot for more than an hour to register it adequately. The object is nevertheless one of the brightest sources of gamma-rays in the sky, and its output of this very energetic form of radiation can now be accurately ganged. Neutron stars, first discovered as radio pulsars in 1967, are fantastic creations of exploding stars, just one step short of a black hole. They are heavier than the Sun yet only about twenty kilometres wide. Made of compressed nuclear matter, they have gravity and magnetic fields many billions of times stronger than on the Earth. With the first direct measurement of the distance of a radio-silent neutron star, astrophysicists can assess Geminga's power and speed of motion. The astronomical task was like judging the width of a one- franc piece in Paris, seen from the distance of Sicily. Geminga's low brightness greatly aggravated the difficulties. Patrizia Caraveo and her colleagues at the Istituto di Fisica Cosmica in Milan arranged for Hubble's wide-field camera (WFPC2) to make its prolonged observations of Geminga three times. Their findings will be published in Astrophysical Journal Letters on 20 April 1996. Caraveo's co-authors are Giovanni Bignami and Roberto Mignani of Milan, and Laurence Taff of Johns Hopkins University, Maryland. The Italians took advantage of the European Space Agency's collaboration with NASA in the Hubble mission, which gives European astronomers privileged access to the Space Telescope. Shifts of millionths of a degree The three sightings of Geminga, made at intervals of six months, revealed small shifts in the position of the faint

  6. The Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oegerle, William; Reddy, Francis; Tyler, Pat

    2009-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division (ASD) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is one of the largest and most diverse astrophysical organizations in the world, with activities spanning a broad range of topics in theory, observation, and mission and technology development. Scientific research is carried out over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays to radio wavelengths as well as particle physics and gravitational radiation. Members of ASD also provide the scientific operations for three orbiting astrophysics missions WMAP, RXTE, and Swift, as well as the Science Support Center for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. A number of key technologies for future missions are also under development in the Division, including X-ray mirrors, and new detectors operating at gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, and radio wavelengths. This report includes the Division's activities during 2008.

  7. VHE gamma-ray observations of Markarian 501

    OpenAIRE

    Whipple Collaboration; Breslin, A. C.; Bond, I. H.; Bradbury, S. M.; J. H. Buckley(Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, USA); Burdett, A. M.; Carson, M. J.; Carter-Lewis, D. A.; Catanese, M.; Cawley, M. F.; Dunlea, S.; D'Vali, M.; Fegan, D. J.; Fegan, S. J.; Finley, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    Markarian 501, a nearby (z=0.033) X-ray selected BL Lacertae object, is a well established source of Very High Energy (VHE, E>=300 GeV) gamma rays. Dramatic variability in its gamma-ray emission on time-scales from years to as short as two hours has been detected. Multiwavelength observations have also revealed evidence that the VHE gamma-ray and hard X-ray fluxes may be correlated. Here we present results of observations made with the Whipple Collaboration's 10 m Atmospheric Cerenkov Imaging...

  8. MIRAX sensitivity for Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacahui, J. R.; Penacchioni, A. V.; Braga, J.; Castro, M. A.; D'Amico, F.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we present the detection capability of the MIRAX (Monitor e Imageador de RAios-X) experiment for Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). MIRAX is an X-ray astronomy mission designed to perform a wide band hard X-ray (10-200 keV) survey of the sky, especially in the Galactic plane. With a total detection area of 169 cm2, large field of view (FoV, 20 ° × 20 °), angular resolution of 1°45‧ and good spectral and time resolution (∼8% at 60 keV, 10 μs), MIRAX will be optimized for the detection and study of transient sources, such as accreting neutron stars (NS), black holes (BH), Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs), and both short and long GRBs. This is especially important because MIRAX is expected to operate in an epoch when probably no other hard X-ray wide-field imager will be active. We have performed detailed simulations of MIRAX GRB observations using the GEANT4 package, including the background spectrum and images of GRB sources in order to provide accurate predictions of the sensitivity for the expected GRB rate to be observed. MIRAX will be capable of detecting ∼44 GRBs per year up to redshifts of ∼4.5. The MIRAX mission will be able to contribute significantly to GRB science by detecting a large number of GRBs per year with wide band spectral response. The observations will contribute mainly to the part of GRB spectra where a thermal emission is predicted by the Fireball model. We also discuss the possibility of detecting GRB afterglows in the X-ray band with MIRAX.

  9. Significance of medium energy gamma ray astronomy in the study of cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Cheung, C. Y.

    1975-01-01

    Medium energy (about 10 to 30 MeV) gamma ray astronomy provides information on the product of the galactic electron cosmic ray intensity and the galactic matter to which the electrons are dynamically coupled by the magnetic field. Because high energy (greater than 100 MeV) gamma ray astronomy provides analogous information for the nucleonic cosmic rays and the relevant matter, a comparison between high energy and medium energy gamma ray intensities provides a direct ratio of the cosmic ray electrons and nucleons throughout the galaxy. A calculation of gamma ray production by electron bremsstrahlung shows that: bremsstrahlung energy loss is probably not negligible over the lifetime of the electrons in the galaxy; and the approximate bremsstrahlung calculation often used previously overestimates the gamma ray intensity by about a factor of two. As a specific example, expected medium energy gamma ray intensities are calculated for the speral arm model.

  10. Central Engine Memory of Gamma-Ray Bursts and Soft Gamma-Ray Repeaters

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Bin-Bin; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) are bursts of $\\gamma$-rays generated from relativistic jets launched from catastrophic events such as massive star core collapse or binary compact star coalescence. Previous studies suggested that GRB emission is erratic, with no noticeable memory in the central engine. Here we report a discovery that similar light curve patterns exist within individual bursts for at least some GRBs. Applying the Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) method, we show that similarity of light curve patterns between pulses of a single burst or between the light curves of a GRB and its X-ray flare can be identified. This suggests that the central engine of at least some GRBs carries "memory" of its activities. We also show that the same technique can identify memory-like emission episodes in the flaring emission in Soft Gamma-Ray Repeaters (SGRs), which are believed to be Galactic, highly magnetized neutron stars named magnetars. Such a phenomenon challenges the standard black hole central engine models for GRBs, an...

  11. The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flash (TGF) Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanbro, M.; Briggs, M. S.; Roberts, O.; McBreen, S.; Bhat, N.; Fitzpatrick, G.

    2015-12-01

    We present results from the catalog of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) detected with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The first release, in January 2015, provided data on 2700 TGFs. Updates are extending the catalog at a rate of ~800 TGFs per year. The TGF sample is reliable, with cosmic rays rejected using data both from Fermi GBM and from the Large Area Telescope on Fermi. The online catalog include times (UTC and solar), spacecraft geographic positions, durations, count intensities and other Bayesian Block durations. The catalog includes separate tables for bright TGFs detected by the flight software and for Terrestrial Electron Beams (TEBs). In January 2016 additional data will be released online from correlating these TGFs with sferics detected by the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN). Maps of sferics in the vicinity of each TGF will be provided, as will the locations and times of sferics found to be associated with TGFs.

  12. Adaptive image ray-tracing for astrophysical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Parkin, E R

    2010-01-01

    A technique is presented for producing synthetic images from numerical simulations whereby the image resolution is adapted around prominent features. In so doing, adaptive image ray-tracing (AIR) improves the efficiency of a calculation by focusing computational effort where it is needed most. The results of test calculations show that a factor of >~ 4 speed-up, and a commensurate reduction in the number of pixels required in the final image, can be achieved compared to an equivalent calculation with a fixed resolution image.

  13. The Diversity and Versatility of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskar, Tanmoy

    2015-11-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most energetic explosions in the Universe, thus providing a unique laboratory for the study of extreme astrophysical processes. In parallel, their large luminosity makes GRBs a premier probe of the early Universe. My thesis has explored and exploited both aspects of GRB science by addressing the following fundamental open questions: 1) what is the nature of the GRB ejecta?, 2) how does the GRB progenitor population evolve with redshift, and 3) how can GRBs be used to probe the high-redshift Universe? To answer these questions, I present the first multi-wavelength detection and modeling of a GRB reverse shock, a comprehensive analysis of the plateau phase of GRB light curves, studies of the evolution of the progenitor population to redshifts, z~9, and demonstrate the use of GRBs as probes of galaxy formation and evolution through the first galaxy mass-metallicity relation at z~3-5. I find support for baryonic ejecta in GRB 130427A, evidence that GRB jets contain a large amount of energy in slow-moving ejecta, and proof that the GRB progenitor population does not evolve to the highest redshifts at which it has yet been observed. Building on the decade of observations by the Swift GRB mission, future observations and modeling of GRBs and their host galaxies will provide clues to these and other open questions in GRB science, allowing for the first statistical studies of their progenitors and host environments to the epoch of reionization and beyond.

  14. Gamma-rays from dark showers with twin Higgs models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freytsis, Marat; Knapen, Simon; Robinson, Dean J.; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2016-05-01

    We consider a twin WIMP scenario whose twin sector contains a full dark copy of the SM hadrons, where the lightest twin particles are twin pions. By analogy to the standard WIMP paradigm, the dark matter (DM) freezes out through twin electroweak interactions, and annihilates into a dark shower of light twin hadrons. These are either stable or decay predominantly to standard model (SM) photons. We show that this `hadrosymmetric' scenario can be consistent with all applicable astrophysical, cosmological and collider constraints. In order to decay the twin hadrons before the big-bang nucleosynthesis epoch, an additional portal between the SM and twin sector is required. In most cases we find this additional mediator is within reach of either the LHC or future intensity frontier experiments. Furthermore, we conduct simulations of the dark shower and consequent photon spectra. We find that fits of these spectra to the claimed galactic center gamma-ray excess seen by Fermi -LAT non-trivially coincide with regions of parameter space that both successfully generate the observed DM abundance and exhibit minimal fine-tuning.

  15. Gamma-Ray Burst Polarization via Compton Scattering Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zhe; Lin, Hai-Nan; Jiang, Yunguo

    2014-03-01

    Synchrotron radiation and Compton scattering are widely accepted as the most likely emission mechanisms of some astrophysical phenomena, such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and active galactic nuclei. The measurement of the polarization of photons provides a useful tool to distinguish different emission mechanisms and structures of the emission region. Based on the differential cross section of a polarized photon scattered by an unpolarized electron of any initial momentum, we derive an analytical formula of polarization for beamed photons scattered by isotropic electrons with a power-law distribution. Numerical calculations are carried out in four special cases: electrons at rest, Thomson limit, head-on collision, and monochromatic electrons. It is found that the maximum polarization can be as high as 100% for low energy photons, if the electrons are at rest. Although polarization is highly suppressed due to the isotropic electrons, a maximum value of ~10%-20% can still be achieved. The Compton scattering process can be used to explain the polarization of GRB 041219A and GRB 100826A.

  16. The nature of the outflow in gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, P; Panaitescu, A; Willingale, R; O'Brien, P; Burrows, D; Cummings, J; Gehrels, N; Holland, S; Pandey, S B; Vanden Berk, D E; Zane, S

    2007-01-01

    The Swift satellite has enabled us to follow the evolution of gamma-ray burst (GRB) fireballs from the prompt gamma-ray emission to the afterglow phase. The early x-ray and optical data obtained by telescopes aboard the Swift satellite show that the source for prompt gamma-ray emission, the emission that heralds these bursts, is short lived and that its source is distinct from that of the ensuing, long-lived afterglow. Using these data, we determine the distance of the gamma-ray source from the center of the explosion. We find this distance to be 1e15-1e16 cm for most bursts and we show that this is within a factor of ten of the radius of the shock-heated circumstellar medium (CSM) producing the x-ray photons. Furthermore, using the early gamma-ray, x-ray and optical data, we show that the prompt gamma-ray emission cannot be produced in internal shocks, nor can it be produced in the external shock; in a more general sense gamma-ray generation mechanisms based on shock physics have problems explaining the GRB ...

  17. 3.9 day orbital modulation in the TeV gamma-ray flux and spectrum from the X-ray binary LS 5039

    CERN Document Server

    Aharonian, F A; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berge, D; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bolz, O; Borrel, V; Braun, I; Brown, A M; Buhler, R; Büsching, I; Carrigan, S; Chadwick, P M; Chounet, L M; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Degrange, B; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ata, A; O'Connor-Drury, L; Dubus, G; Egberts, K; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Espigat, P; Feinstein, F; Ferrero, E; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Funk, Seb; Funk, S; Fussling, M; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, D; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hoffmann, A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; De Jager, O C; Kendziorra, E; Khelifi, B; Komin, N; Konopelko, A; Kosack, K; Latham, I J; Le Gallou, R; Lemiere, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lohse, T; Martin, J M; Martineau-Huynh, O; Marcowith, A; Masterson, C; Maurin, G; McComb, T J L; Moulin, E; De Naurois, Mathieu; Nedbal, D; Nolan, S J; Noutsos, A; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Ouchrif, M; Panter, M; Pelletier, G; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Rayner, S M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rolland, L; Rowell, G; Sahakian, V V; Santangelo, A; Sauge, L; Schlenker, S; Schlickeiser, R; Schroder, R; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Shalchi, A; Sol, H; Spangler, D; Spanier, F; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Superina, G; Tavernet, J P; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Wagner, S J; Ward, M

    2006-01-01

    New observations of LS 5039, a High Mass X-ray Binary comprising a massive star and compact object, were carried out with the High Energy Stereoscopic System of Cherenkov Telescopes (H.E.S.S.) in 2005 at very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray energies. These observations reveal that its flux and energy spectrum are modulated with the 3.9 day orbital period of the binary system. This is the first time in gamma-ray astronomy that orbital modulation has been observed, and periodicity clearly established using ground-based gamma-ray detectors. The VHE gamma-ray emission is largely confined to half of the orbit, peaking around the inferior conjunction epoch of the compact object. For this epoch, there is also a hardening of the energy spectrum in the energy range between 0.2 TeV and a few TeV. The flux vs. orbital phase profile provides the first clear indication of gamma-ray absorption via pair production within an astrophysical source, a process which is expected to occur if the gamma-ray production site is situated w...

  18. Models of X-ray and gamma-ray emission from Seyfert galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Svensson, Roland

    1996-01-01

    X-ray and gamma-ray observations of Seyfert 1 galaxies are briefly reviewed. Both thermal and non-thermal model for X-ray and gamma-ray emission are discussed. Particular attention is given to various disc-corona models including both homogeneous and inhomogeneous (patchy) corona models. Recent work on exact radiative transfer in such geometries are reviewed.

  19. The Supernova -- Gamma-Ray Burst Connection

    CERN Document Server

    Woosley, S E

    2006-01-01

    Observations show that at least some gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) happen simultaneously with core-collapse supernovae (SNe), thus linking by a common thread nature's two grandest explosions. We review here the growing evidence for and theoretical implications of this association, and conclude that most long-duration soft-spectrum GRBs are accompanied by massive stellar explosions (GRB-SNe). The kinetic energy and luminosity of well-studied GRB-SNe appear to be greater than those of ordinary SNe, but evidence exists, even in a limited sample, for considerable diversity. The existing sample also suggests that most of the energy in the explosion is contained in nonrelativistic ejecta (producing the supernova) rather than in the relativistic jets responsible for making the burst and its afterglow. Neither all SNe, nor even all SNe of Type Ibc produce GRBs. The degree of differential rotation in the collapsing iron core of massive stars when they die may be what makes the difference.

  20. Gamma-ray bursts and cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, D Q

    2007-05-15

    I review the current status of the use of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) as probes of the early Universe and cosmology. I describe the promise of long GRBs as probes of the high redshift (z>4) and very high redshift (z>5) Universe, and several key scientific results that have come from observations made possible by accurate, rapid localizations of these bursts by Swift. I then estimate the fraction of long GRBs that lie at very high redshifts and discuss ways in which it may be possible to rapidly identify-and therefore study-a larger number of these bursts. Finally, I discuss the ways in which both long and short GRBs can be made 'standard candles' and used to constrain the properties of dark energy. PMID:17301023

  1. The Gamma Ray Bursts Hubble diagram

    CERN Document Server

    Capozziello, S; Dainotti, M G; De Laurentis, M; Izzo, L; Perillo, M

    2011-01-01

    Thanks to their enormous energy release, Gamma Rays Bursts (GRBs) have recently attracted a lot of interest to probe the Hubble diagram (HD) deep into the matter dominated era and hence complement Type Ia Supernovae (SNeIa). We consider here three different calibration methods based on the use of a fiducial LCDM model, on cosmographic parameters and on the local regression on SNeIa to calibrate the scaling relations proposed as an equivalent to the Phillips law to standardize GRBs finding any significant dependence. We then investigate the evolution of these parameters with the redshift to obtain any statistical improvement. Under this assumption, we then consider possible systematics effects on the HDs introduced by the calibration method, the averaging procedure and the homogeneity of the sample arguing against any significant bias.

  2. Digital Logarithmic Airborne Gamma Ray Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, GuoQiang; Li, Chen; Tan, ChengJun; Ge, LiangQuan; Gu, Yi; Cheng, Feng

    2014-01-01

    A new digital logarithmic airborne gamma ray spectrometer is designed in this study. The spectrometer adopts a high-speed and high-accuracy logarithmic amplifier (LOG114) to amplify the pulse signal logarithmically and to improve the utilization of the ADC dynamic range, because the low-energy pulse signal has a larger gain than the high-energy pulse signal. The spectrometer can clearly distinguish the photopeaks at 239, 352, 583, and 609keV in the low-energy spectral sections after the energy calibration. The photopeak energy resolution of 137Cs improves to 6.75% from the original 7.8%. Furthermore, the energy resolution of three photopeaks, namely, K, U, and Th, is maintained, and the overall stability of the energy spectrum is increased through potassium peak spectrum stabilization. Thus, effectively measuring energy from 20keV to 10MeV is possible.

  3. Hand-held high resolution gamma ray spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fully portable and a semi-portable high resolution gamma spectrometer are described. These instruments have the resolving capabilities that are inherent to germanium spectrometers and have the portability needed for health physics. The instruments are usable as a gamma-ray or x-ray fluorescence spectrometer

  4. Review of GRANAT observations of gamma-ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terekhov, O.; Denissenko, D.; Sunyaev, R.;

    1995-01-01

    The GRANAT observatory was launched into a high apogee orbit on 1 December, 1989. Three instruments onboard GRANAT - PHEBUS, WATCH and SIGMA are able to detect gamma-ray bursts in a very broad energy range from 6 keV up to 100 MeV. Over 250 gamma-ray bursts were detected. We discuss the results o...

  5. Gamma Rays from Star Formation in Clusters of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Storm, Emma; Profumo, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Star formation in galaxies is observed to be associated with gamma-ray emission. The detection of gamma rays from star-forming galaxies by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has allowed the determination of a functional relationship between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity (Ackermann et. al. 2012). Since star formation is known to scale with total infrared (8-1000 micrometers) and radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity, the observed infrared and radio emission from a star-forming galaxy can be used to quantitatively infer the galaxy's gamma-ray luminosity. Similarly, star forming galaxies within galaxy clusters allow us to derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission from clusters, which have not yet been conclusively detected in gamma rays. In this study we apply the relationships between gamma-ray luminosity and radio and IR luminosities derived in Ackermann et. al. 2012 to a sample of galaxy clusters from Ackermann et. al. 2010 in order to place lower limits on the gamma-ray emission associated with sta...

  6. Wolf-Rayet stars as gamma-ray burst progenitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langer, N.; van Marle, A. -J; Yoon, S.C.

    2010-01-01

    It became clear in the last few years that long gamma-ray bursts are associated with the endpoints of massive star evolution. They occur in star forming regions at cosmological distances (Jakobsson et al., 2005), and are associated with supernova-type energies. The collapsar model explains gamma-ray

  7. A new processing technique for airborne gamma-ray data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovgaard, Jens

    1997-01-01

    The mathematical-statistical background for at new technique for processing gamma-ray spectra is presented. The technique - Noise Adjusted Singular Value Decomposition - decomposes at set of gamma-ray spectra into a few basic spectra - the spectral components. The spectral components can be proce...

  8. The Gamma-Ray Luminosity Function of Radio Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfand, David J.

    1998-01-01

    This final report is a study of gamma-ray luminosity function of radio pulsars. The goal is to constrain certain parameters in order to address such diverse issues as the high energy emission mechanism in pulsars and the fraction of the Galaxy's gamma ray emission attributable to these objects.

  9. Very High Energy Gamma Ray Extension of GRO Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weekes, Trevor C.

    1994-01-01

    The membership, progress, and invited talks, publications, and proceedings made by the Whipple Gamma Ray Collaboration is reported for june 1990 through May 1994. Progress was made in the following areas: the May 1994 Markarian Flare at Whipple and EGRET (Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope) energies; AGN's (Active Galactic Nuclei); bursts; supernova remnants; and simulations and energy spectra.

  10. Supernova sheds light on gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    On 29 March the HETE-II satellite detected the most violent explosion in the universe to date - an enormous burst of gamma rays. Observers across the world recorded and studied the event. It appears to prove that gamma ray bursts originate in supernovae (1 page)

  11. The University of Durham Mark 6 $\\gamma$ Ray Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Armstrong, P; Cottle, P J; Dickinson, J E; Dickinson, M R; Dipper, N A; Hilton, S E; Hogg, W R; Holder, J; Kendall, T R; McComb, T J L; Moore, C M; Orford, K J; Rayner, S M; Roberts, I D; Roberts, M D; Robertshaw, M; Shaw, S E; Tindale, K; Tummey, S P; Turver, K E

    1997-01-01

    The design, construction and operation of the University of Durham ground-based gamma ray telescope is discussed. The telescope has been designed to detect gamma rays in the 300 GeV). The telescope was commissioned in 1995 and a description of its design and operation is presented, together with a verification of the telescope's performance

  12. Polarization from Relativistic Astrophysical X-ray Sourses: The PRAXyS Small Explorer Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallman, Timothy R.; Jahoda, Keith; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; The PRAXyS Team

    2016-04-01

    Polarization is a sensitive probe of geometry near compact objects, but remains largely unexplored in the X-ray band. Polarization is expected from cosmic X-ray sources, yielding insight into the geometry of black hole emission, and the origin and nature of X-ray emission in neutron stars and magnetars. Recent progress with detectors capable of imaging the track of a photoelectron generated by a detection of a cosmic X-ray have made sensitive X-ray polarization observatories possible within the constraints of a NASA Small Explorer mission. We report on the observational capabilities and the scientific goals of the "Polarization from Relativistic Astrophysical X-ray Sources" (PRAXyS) Observatory. PRAXyS is a small explorer which has been selected by NASA for a phase A study.

  13. Gamma ray analysis of multi-component material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for analyzing a multi-component material having at least three components using gamma radiation having at least two different energies. Upon irradiation of at least a sample of material, the multi-energy gamma rays which are propagated through the sample are detected. The intensity of the detected gamma rays is measured and the amount of at least one of the components of the material is determined by solving a set of simultaneous equations. (author)

  14. Muon Detection of TeV $\\gamma$ Rays from $\\gamma$ Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez-Muñiz, J

    1999-01-01

    Because of the limited size of the satellite-borne instruments, it has not been possible to observe the flux of gamma ray bursts (GRB) beyond GeV energy. We here show that it is possible to detect the GRB radiation of TeV energy and above, by detecting the muon secondaries produced when the gamma rays shower in the Earth's atmosphere. Observation is made possible by the recent commissioning of underground detectors (AMANDA, the Lake Baikal detector and MILAGRO) which combine a low muon threshold of a few hundred GeV or less, with a large effective area of 10^3 m^2 or more. Observations will not only provide new insights in the origin and characteristics of GRB, they also provide quantitative information on the diffuse infrared background.

  15. Recent results in nuclear astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Coc, Alain; Kiener, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we emphasize the interplay between astrophysical observations, modeling, and nuclear physics laboratory experiments. Several important nuclear cross sections for astrophysics have long been identified e.g. 12C(alpha,gamma)16O for stellar evolution, or 13C(alpha,n)16O and 22Ne(alpha,n)25Mg as neutron sources for the s-process. More recently, observations of lithium abundances in the oldest stars, or of nuclear gamma-ray lines from space, have required new laboratory experiments. New evaluation of thermonuclear reaction rates now includes the associated rate uncertainties that are used in astrophysical models to i) estimate final uncertainties on nucleosynthesis yields and ii) identify those reactions that require further experimental investigation. Sometimes direct cross section measurements are possible, but more generally the use of indirect methods is compulsory in view of the very low cross sections. Non-thermal processes are often overlooked but are also important for nuclear astrophysics,...

  16. Extragalactic Gamma Ray Excess from Coma Supercluster Direction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pantea Davoudifar; S. Jalil Fatemi

    2011-09-01

    The origin of extragalactic diffuse gamma ray is not accurately known, especially because our suggestions are related to many models that need to be considered either to compute the galactic diffuse gamma ray intensity or to consider the contribution of other extragalactic structures while surveying a specific portion of the sky. More precise analysis of EGRET data however, makes it possible to estimate the diffuse gamma ray in Coma supercluster (i.e., Coma\\A1367 supercluster) direction with a value of ( > 30MeV) ≃ 1.9 × 10-6 cm-2 s-1, which is considered to be an upper limit for the diffuse gamma ray due to Coma supercluster. The related total intensity (on average) is calculated to be ∼ 5% of the actual diffuse extragalactic background. The calculated intensity makes it possible to estimate the origin of extragalactic diffuse gamma ray.

  17. Gamma-rays as probes of the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Horns, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    The propagation of $\\gamma$ rays over very large distances provides new insights on the intergalactic medium and on fundamental physics. On their path to the Earth, $\\gamma$ rays can annihilate with diffuse infrared or optical photons of the intergalactic medium, producing $e^+ \\, e^-$ pairs. The density of these photons is poorly determined by direct measurements due to significant galactic foregrounds. Studying the absorption of $\\gamma$ rays from extragalactic sources at different distances allows the density of low-energy diffuse photons to be measured. Gamma-ray propagation may also be affected by new phenomena predicted by extensions of the Standard Model of particle physics. Lorentz Invariance is violated in some models of Quantum Gravity, leading to an energy-dependent speed of light in vacuum. From differential time-of-flight measurements of the most distant $\\gamma$-ray bursts and of flaring active galactic nuclei, lower bounds have been set on the energy scale of Quantum Gravity. Another effect tha...

  18. Gamma-ray Explosion in Multiple Compton Scattering Regime

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Z; Shou, Y R; Qiao, B; Bulanov, S V; Esirkepov, T Zh; Bulanov, S S; Chen, C E; He, X T; Yan, X Q

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-ray explosion from near critical density (NCD) target irradiated by four symmetrical imploding laser pulses is numerically investigated. With peak intensities about $10^{23}$ W/cm$^2$, the laser pulses boost electron energy through direct laser acceleration, while pushing them inward with the ponderomotive force. After backscattering with counter-propagating laser, the accelerated electron will be trapped in the optical lattice or the electromagnetic standing waves (SW) created by the coherent overlapping of the laser pulses, and meanwhile emit gamma-ray photon in Multiple Compton Scattering regime, where electron acts as a medium to transfer energy from laser to gamma-ray. The energy conversion rate from laser pulses to gamma-ray can be as high as around 50\\%. It may become one of the most efficient gamma-ray sources in laboratory.

  19. The supernova-gamma-ray burst-jet connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorth, Jens

    2013-06-13

    The observed association between supernovae and gamma-ray bursts represents a cornerstone in our understanding of the nature of gamma-ray bursts. The collapsar model provides a theoretical framework for this connection. A key element is the launch of a bipolar jet (seen as a gamma-ray burst). The resulting hot cocoon disrupts the star, whereas the (56)Ni produced gives rise to radioactive heating of the ejecta, seen as a supernova. In this discussion paper, I summarize the observational status of the supernova-gamma-ray burst connection in the context of the 'engine' picture of jet-driven supernovae and highlight SN 2012bz/GRB 120422A--with its luminous supernova but intermediate high-energy luminosity--as a possible transition object between low-luminosity and jet gamma-ray bursts. The jet channel for supernova explosions may provide new insights into supernova explosions in general. PMID:23630379

  20. Solar gamma-ray lines and interplanetary solar protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshimori, M.

    1985-03-01

    Solar gamma-ray lines and protons were simultaneously observed for six flares on April 1, 4, and 27, 1981, May 13, 1981, February 1, 1982, and June 6, 1982 by the Hinotori and Himawari satellites. The flare list is presented, and the time histories of gamma-rays and protons are shown. The relationship between the gamma-ray line fluences and peak proton fluxes for these flares does not reveal an apparent correlation between them. The present results imply that the protons producing gamma-ray lines in the flare region, and protons observed near the earth, do not always belong to the same population, and favor the downward streaming model for the gamma-ray line production. 15 references.

  1. Solar gamma-ray lines and interplanetary solar protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimori, M.

    1985-03-01

    Solar gamma-ray lines and protons were simultaneously observed for six flares on April 1, 4, and 27, 1981, May 13, 1981, February 1, 1982, and June 6, 1982 by the Hinotori and Himawari satellites. The flare list is presented, and the time histories of gamma-rays and protons are shown. The relationship between the gamma-ray line fluences and peak proton fluxes for these flares does not reveal an apparent correlation between them. The present results imply that the protons producing gamma-ray lines in the flare region, and protons observed near the earth, do not always belong to the same population, and favor the downward streaming model for the gamma-ray line production.

  2. Effect of Conversion Efficiency on Gamma-Ray Burst Energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Xu; Zi-Gao Dai

    2004-01-01

    Beaming effect makes it possible that gamma-ray bursts have a standard energy,but the gamma-ray energy release is sensitive to some parameters.Our attention is focused on the effect of the gamma ray conversion efficiency(ηγ),which may range between 0.01 and 0.9,and which probably has a random value for different GRBs under certain conditions.Making use of the afterglow data from the literature,we carried out a complete correction to the conical opening angle formula.Within the framework of the conical jet model,we ran a simple Monte Carlo simulation for random values of ηγ,and found that the gamma-ray energy release is narrowly clustered,whether we use a constant value of ηγ or random values for different gamma-ray bursts.

  3. X-ray polarimetry and new prospects in high-energy astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgrò, C.

    2016-07-01

    Polarimetry is universally recognized as one of the new frontiers in X-ray astrophysics. It is a powerful tool to investigate a variety of astrophysical processes, as well as a mean to study fundamental physics in space. A renewed interest is testified by dedicated missions approved for phase A by ESA and NASA. The main advance is the availability of a gas pixel detector that is able to add polarization measurement to imaging and spectroscopy, and can be used at the focus of a conventional X-ray optics. The detector exploits the photoelectric effect in gas and a finely segmented ASIC as a collecting anode. In this work I will describe in detail the experimental technique and the detector concept, and illustrate the scientific prospects of these new missions.

  4. Doppler Boosted Diffusive Shock Acceleration as an Explanation for the Crab Nebula Gamma-Ray Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Peter A.; Dermer, C. D.

    2013-01-01

    The remarkable observations of intense flares of ~GeV gamma-rays from the Crab Nebula in 2009 and 2010 have raised many difficult questions for high-energy astrophysics. There is a consensus that the gamma rays probably represent synchrotron emission from highly relativistic electrons, but the implied energy budget raises severe constraints on the required acceleration mechanism, because at the electron energies implied by the gamma-ray observations, the synchrotron loss timescale is comparable to the gyration timescale in the magnetic field. We explore a hybrid scenario in which the electrons experience diffusive shock acceleration, which raises their energies to within about a factor of ten of the energy required to produce the observed synchrotron gamma-ray emission. The radiating electrons are envisioned to be entrained in a mildly relativistic flow downstream from the oblique shock, and the associated Doppler boost shifts the radiation into the observed range. Variability in the downstream flow causes the Doppler beamed radiation to point towards Earth during the observed flares. This mechanism may help to explain the energetics, spectrum and duration of the flares, as well as their rarity.

  5. Tom Bonner Prize: Gamma-ray energy tracking array GRETINA and its early science results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I.-Yang

    2016-03-01

    Gamma-ray detector with good energy resolution has been one of the essential instruments for the study of nuclear structure. To push these studies toward the exotic nuclei near the particle stability line, we need detectors with higher peak efficiency and good peak-to-total ratio. In addition, radioactive ion beams needed for such studies are often produced by the projectile fragmentation method. They have high velocities, and detectors must provide adequate position resolution for accurate Doppler correction. To fulfill these requirements, the new concept of gamma ray energy tracking array was developed. GRETINA, with 1 π solid angle coverage, is the first implementation of this concept. It uses electrically segmented Ge crystals in a close packed geometry, fast digital electronics, and signal decomposition to determine the position and energy of the individual interaction points. Then the path of a gamma ray can be tracked using the angle-energy relation of the scattering process. GRETINA was completed at LBNL and started physics operation in 2012. It has been used at NSCL at MSU and ATLAS at ANL for a large number of experiments addressing diverse topics from nuclear structure to nuclear astrophysics. In this talk I will describe the concept of gamma-ray energy tracking and the technology developed for GRETINA. A few representative experiments showing the breadth of the science and the power of the instrument will be discussed. Finally the plan toward the full 4 π array GRETA will be presented.

  6. Binary Orbits as the Driver of Gamma-Ray Emission and Mass Ejection in Classical Novae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomiuk, Laura; Linford, Justin D.; Yang, Jun; O'Brien, T. J.; Paragi, Zsolt; Mioduszewski, Amy J.; Beswick, R. J.; Cheung, C. C.; Mukai, Koji; Nelson, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Classical novae are the most common astrophysical thermonuclear explosions, occurring on the surfaces of white dwarf stars accreting gas from companions in binary star systems. Novae typically expel about 10 (sup -4) solar masses of material at velocities exceeding 1,000 kilometers per second.However, the mechanism of mass ejection in novae is poorly understood, and could be dominated by the impulsive flash of thermonuclear energy, prolonged optically thick winds or binary interaction with the nova envelope. Classical novae are now routinely detected at giga-electronvolt gamma-ray wavelengths, suggesting that relativistic particles are accelerated by strong shocks in the ejecta. Here we report high-resolution radio imaging of the gamma-ray-emitting nova V959 Mon. We find that its ejecta were shaped by the motion of the binary system: some gas was expelled rapidly along the poles as a wind from the white dwarf, while denser material drifted out along the equatorial plane, propelled by orbital motion..At the interface between the equatorial and polar regions, we observe synchrotron emission indicative of shocks and relativistic particle acceleration, thereby pinpointing the location of gamma-ray production. Binary shaping of the nova ejecta and associated internal shocks are expected to be widespread among novae, explaining why many novae are gamma-ray emitters.

  7. Search for Gamma-Ray Lines towards Galaxy Clusters with the Fermi-LAT

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, B; Conrad, J; Gustafsson, M; Sánchez-Conde, M; Caputo, R

    2015-01-01

    We report on a search for monochromatic $\\gamma$-ray features in the spectra of galaxy clusters observed by the \\emph{Fermi} Large Area Telescope. Galaxy clusters are the largest structures in the Universe that are bound by dark matter (DM), making them an important testing ground for possible self-interactions or decays of the DM particles. Monochromatic $\\gamma$-ray lines provide a unique signature due to the absence of astrophysical backgrounds and are as such considered a smoking-gun signature for new physics. An unbinned joint likelihood analysis of the sixteen most promising clusters using five years of data at energies between 10 and 400 GeV revealed no significant features. For the case of self-annihilation, we set upper limits on the monochromatic velocity-averaged interaction cross section. These limits are compatible with those obtained from observations of the Galactic Center, albeit weaker due to the larger distance to the studied clusters.

  8. Machine Learning Search for Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows in Optical Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Topinka, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Thanks to the advances in robotic telescopes, the time domain astronomy leads to a large number of transient events detected in images every night. Data mining and machine learning tools used for object classification are presented. The goal is to automatically classify transient events for both further follow-up by a larger telescope and for statistical studies of transient events. A special attention is given to the identification of gamma-ray burst afterglows. Machine learning techniques is used to identify GROND gamma-ray burst afterglow among the astrophysical objects present in the SDSS archival images based on the $g'-r'$, $r'-i'$ and $i'-z'$ colour indices. The performance of the support vector machine, random forest and neural network algorithms is compared. A joint meta-classifier, built on top of the individual classifiers, can identify GRB afterglows with the overall accuracy of $\\gtrsim 90\\%$.

  9. Distributions of peak flux and duration for gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Petrosyan, V; Petrosian, Vahe; Lee, Theodore T

    1995-01-01

    Many of the important conclusions about Gamma-Ray Bursts follow from the distributions of various quantities such as peak flux or duration. We show that for astrophysical transients such as bursts, multiple selection thresholds can lead to various forms of data truncation, which can strongly affect the distributions obtained from the data if not accounted for properly. Thus the data should be considered to form a multivariate distribution. We also caution that if the variables forming the multivariate distribution are not statistically independent of each other, further biases can result. A general method is described to properly account for these effects, and as a specific example we extract the distributions of flux and duration from the BATSE 3B Gamma-Ray Burst data. It is shown that properly accounting for the aforementioned biases tends to increase the slope of the \\log{N}-\\log{S} relation at low values of S, and dramatically increases the number of short duration bursts.

  10. THE FERMI GBM GAMMA-RAY BURST SPECTRAL CATALOG: THE FIRST TWO YEARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, Adam; Burgess, J. Michael; Preece, Robert D.; Briggs, Michael S.; Guiriec, Sylvain; Connaughton, Valerie; Paciesas, William S.; Bhat, P. N.; Chaplin, Vandiver [Physics Department, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Van der Horst, Alexander J.; Meegan, Charles A. [Universities Space Research Association, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Fishman, Gerald J. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Von Kienlin, Andreas; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Diehl, Roland; Foley, Suzanne [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Fitzpatrick, Gerard [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Stillorgan Road, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty [Jacobs Technology, 1500 Perimeter Parkway, Huntsville, AL 35806 (United States); and others

    2012-03-01

    We present systematic spectral analyses of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) during its first two years of operation. This catalog contains two types of spectra extracted from 487 GRBs, and by fitting four different spectral models, this results in a compendium of over 3800 spectra. The models were selected based on their empirical importance to the spectral shape of many GRBs, and the analysis performed was devised to be as thorough and objective as possible. We describe in detail our procedure and criteria for the analyses, and present the bulk results in the form of parameter distributions. This catalog should be considered an official product from the Fermi GBM Science Team, and the data files containing the complete results are available from the High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center.

  11. Possible Emission of Cosmic $X$-- and $\\gamma$--rays by Unstable Particles at Late Times

    CERN Document Server

    Urbanowski, K

    2014-01-01

    Not all astrophysical mechanisms of the emission of electromagnetic radiation including $X$-- and $\\gamma$-- rays coming from the space are clear. We find that charged unstable particles as well as neutral unstable particles with non--zero magnetic moment which live sufficiently long may emit electromagnetic radiation. This new mechanism is connected with the properties of unstable particles at the post exponential time region. Analyzing the transition time region between exponential and non-exponential form of the survival amplitude it is found that the instantaneous energy of the unstable particle can take very large values, much larger than the energy of this state for times from the exponential time region. Basing on the results obtained for the model considered, it is shown that this purely quantum mechanical effect may be responsible for causing unstable particles to emit electromagnetic--, $X$-- or $\\gamma$--rays at some time intervals from the transition time regions.

  12. EPISODIC JETS AS THE CENTRAL ENGINE OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have erratic light curves, which demand that the GRB central engine launches an episodic outflow. Recent Fermi observations of some GRBs indicate a lack of the thermal photosphere component as predicted by the baryonic fireball model, which suggests a magnetic origin of GRBs. Given that powerful episodic jets have been observed along with continuous jets in other astrophysical black hole systems, here we propose an intrinsically episodic, magnetically dominated jet model for the GRB central engine. Accumulation and eruption of free magnetic energy in the corona of a differentially rotating, turbulent accretion flow around a hyperaccreting black hole lead to ejections of episodic, magnetically dominated plasma blobs. These blobs are accelerated magnetically, collide with each other at large radii, trigger rapid magnetic reconnection and turbulence, efficient particle acceleration, and radiation, and power the observed episodic prompt gamma-ray emission from GRBs.

  13. Machine Learning Search for Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows in Optical Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topinka, M.

    2016-06-01

    Thanks to the advances in robotic telescopes, time domain astronomy leads to a large number of transient events detected in images every night. Data mining and machine learning tools used for object classification are presented. The goal is to automatically classify transient events for both further follow-up by a larger telescope and for statistical studies of transient events. Special attention is given to the identification of gamma-ray burst afterglows. Machine learning techniques are used to identify GROND gamma-ray burst afterglow among the astrophysical objects present in the SDSS archival images based on the g'-r', r'-i' and i'-z' color indices. The performance of the support vector machine, random forest and neural network algorithms is compared. A joint meta-classifier, built on top of the individual classifiers, can identify GRB afterglows with the overall accuracy of ≳ 90%.

  14. Search for Sub-TeV Gamma Rays Coincident with BATSE Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Poirier, J; Gress, J; Race, D

    2003-01-01

    Project GRAND is a 100m x 100m air shower array of proportional wire chambers (PWCs). There are 64 stations each with eight 1.29 m^2 PWC planes arranged in four orthogonal pairs placed vertically above one another to geometrically measure the angles of charged secondaries. A steel plate above the bottom pair of PWCs differentiates muons (which pass undeflected through the steel) from non-penetrating particles. FLUKA Monte Carlo studies show that a TeV gamma ray striking the atmosphere at normal incidence produces 0.23 muons which reach ground level where their angles and identities are measured. Thus, paradoxically, secondary muons are used as a signature for gamma ray primaries. The data are examined for possible angular and time coincidences with eight gamma ray bursts (GRBs) detected by BATSE. Seven of the GRBs were selected because of their good acceptance by GRAND and high BATSE Fluence. The eighth GRB was added due to its possible coincident detection by Milagrito. For each of the eight candidate GRBs, ...

  15. Astrophysics at very high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presents three complementary lectures on very-high-energy astrophysics given by worldwide leaders in the field. Reviews the recent advances in and prospects of gamma-ray astrophysics and of multi-messenger astronomy. Prepares readers for using space and ground-based gamma-ray observatories, as well as neutrino and other multi-messenger detectors. With the success of Cherenkov Astronomy and more recently with the launch of NASA's Fermi mission, very-high-energy astrophysics has undergone a revolution in the last years. This book provides three comprehensive and up-to-date reviews of the recent advances in gamma-ray astrophysics and of multi-messenger astronomy. Felix Aharonian and Charles Dermer address our current knowledge on the sources of GeV and TeV photons, gleaned from the precise measurements made by the new instrumentation. Lars Bergstroem presents the challenges and prospects of astro-particle physics with a particular emphasis on the detection of dark matter candidates. The topics covered by the 40th Saas-Fee Course present the capabilities of current instrumentation and the physics at play in sources of very-high-energy radiation to students and researchers alike. This book will encourage and prepare readers for using space and ground-based gamma-ray observatories, as well as neutrino and other multi-messenger detectors.

  16. Recent Progress in Nuclear Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Langanke, K

    1999-01-01

    The manuscript reviews progress achieved in recent years in various aspects of nuclear astrophysics, including stellar nucleosynthesis, nuclear aspects of supernova collapse and explosion, neutrino-induced reactions and their possible role in the supernova mechanism and nucleosynthesis, explosive hydrogen burning in binary systems, and finally the observation of $\\gamma$-rays from supernova remnants.

  17. High-frequency gravitational waves from magnetars and gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Wen, Hao; Li, Jin; Fang, Zhenyun

    2016-01-01

    Extremely powerful astrophysical electromagnetic (EM) system could lead to significant energy-momentum tensor as possible source of high-frequency gravitational waves (HFGWs). Here based on properties of magnetars and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), we address 'Gamma-HFGWs' caused by ultra-strong EM radiations (in the radiation-dominated phase of GRBs fireball) interacting with super-high magnetar surface magnetic fields (10^{11}Tesla). By certain parameters of distance and power, the Gamma-HFGWs would have amplitude of 10^{-41} at 10^{20}Hz, and such very high frequency effectively compensate their weak amplitude and thus would cause perturbed EM waves of 10^{-20}Watt/m^2 in proposed HFGW detection system based on EM response to GWs. Particularly, predicted Gamma-HFGWs can possess distinctive pulse-like envelopes with characteristic shapes, which could be exclusive features helpful to distinguish them from background noise. Results obtained suggest that magnetars could involve in possible astrophysical EM sources o...

  18. Prototyping a Global Soft X-ray Imaging Instrument for Heliophysics, Planetary Science, and Astrophysics Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael R.; Porter, F. Scott; Sibeck, David G.; Carter, Jenny A.; Chiao, Meng P.; Chornay, Dennis J.; Cravens, Thomas; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Keller, John W.; Koutroumpa, Dimitra; Kuntz, Kip; Read, Any M.; Robertson, Ina P.; Sembay, Steve; Snowden, Steven; Thomas, Nick

    2012-01-01

    We describe current progress in the development of a prototype wide field-of-view soft X-ray imager that employs Lobster-eye optics and targets heliophysics, planetary, and astrophysics science. The prototype will provide proof-of-concept for a future flight instrument capable of imaging the entire dayside magnetosheath from outside the magnetosphere. Such an instrument was proposed for the FSA AXIOM mission

  19. Prototyping a Global Soft X-Ray Imaging Instrument for Heliophysics, Planetary Science, and Astrophysics Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, M. R.; Porter, F. S.; Sibeck, D. G.; Carter, J. A.; Chiao, M. P.; Chornay, D. J.; Cravens, T.; Galeazzi, M.; Keller, J. W.; Koutroumpa, D.; Kuntz, K.; Read, A. M.; Robertson, I. P.; Sembay, S.; Snowden, S.; Thomas, N.

    2012-01-01

    We describe current progress in the development of a prototype wide field-of-view soft X-ray imager that employs Lobstereye optics and targets heliophysics, planetary, and astrophysics science. The prototype will provide proof-of-concept for a future flight instrument capable of imaging the entire dayside magnetosheath from outside the magnetosphere. Such an instrument was proposed for the ESA AXIOM mission.

  20. An Artificial Intelligence Classification Tool and Its Application to Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkila, Jon; Haglin, David J.; Roiger, Richard J.; Giblin, Timothy; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Mallozzi, Robert S.

    2004-01-01

    Despite being the most energetic phenomenon in the known universe, the astrophysics of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) has still proven difficult to understand. It has only been within the past five years that the GRB distance scale has been firmly established, on the basis of a few dozen bursts with x-ray, optical, and radio afterglows. The afterglows indicate source redshifts of z=1 to z=5, total energy outputs of roughly 10(exp 52) ergs, and energy confined to the far x-ray to near gamma-ray regime of the electromagnetic spectrum. The multi-wavelength afterglow observations have thus far provided more insight on the nature of the GRB mechanism than the GRB observations; far more papers have been written about the few observed gamma-ray burst afterglows in the past few years than about the thousands of detected gamma-ray bursts. One reason the GRB central engine is still so poorly understood is that GRBs have complex, overlapping characteristics that do not appear to be produced by one homogeneous process. At least two subclasses have been found on the basis of duration, spectral hardness, and fluence (time integrated flux); Class 1 bursts are softer, longer, and brighter than Class 2 bursts (with two second durations indicating a rough division). A third GRB subclass, overlapping the other two, has been identified using statistical clustering techniques; Class 3 bursts are intermediate between Class 1 and Class 2 bursts in brightness and duration, but are softer than Class 1 bursts. We are developing a tool to aid scientists in the study of GRB properties. In the process of developing this tool, we are building a large gamma-ray burst classification database. We are also scientifically analyzing some GRB data as we develop the tool. Tool development thus proceeds in tandem with the dataset for which it is being designed. The tool invokes a modified KDD (Knowledge Discovery in Databases) process, which is described as follows.

  1. Europe's space camera unmasks a cosmic gamma-ray machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-11-01

    The new-found neutron star is the visible counterpart of a pulsating radio source, Pulsar 1055-52. It is a mere 20 kilometres wide. Although the neutron star is very hot, at about a million degrees C, very little of its radiant energy takes the form of visible light. It emits mainly gamma-rays, an extremely energetic form of radiation. By examining it at visible wavelengths, astronomers hope to figure out why Pulsar 1055-52 is the most efficient generator of gamma-rays known so far, anywhere the Universe. The Faint Object Camera found Pulsar 1055-52 in near ultraviolet light at 3400 angstroms, a little shorter in wavelength than the violet light at the extremity of the human visual range. Roberto Mignani, Patrizia Caraveo and Giovanni Bignami of the Istituto di Fisica Cosmica in Milan, Italy, report its optical identification in a forthcoming issue of Astrophysical Journal Letters (1 January 1997). The formal name of the object is PSR 1055-52. Evading the glare of an adjacent star The Italian team had tried since 1988 to spot Pulsar 1055-52 with two of the most powerful ground-based optical telescopes in the Southern Hemisphere. These were the 3.6-metre Telescope and the 3.5-metre New Technology Telescope of the European Southern Observatory at La Silla, Chile. Unfortunately an ordinary star 100,000 times brighter lay in almost the same direction in the sky, separated from the neutron star by only a thousandth of a degree. The Earth's atmosphere defocused the star's light sufficiently to mask the glimmer from Pulsar 1055-52. The astronomers therefore needed an instrument in space. The Faint Object Camera offered the best precision and sensitivity to continue the hunt. Devised by European astronomers to complement the American wide field camera in the Hubble Space Telescope, the Faint Object Camera has a relatively narrow field of view. It intensifies the image of a faint object by repeatedly accelerating electrons from photo-electric films, so as to produce

  2. Blueshifting may explain the gamma ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Krasiński, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that the basic observed properties of the gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are accounted for if one assumes that the GRBs arise by blueshifting the emission radiation of hydrogen and helium generated during the last scattering epoch. The blueshift generator for a single GRB is a Lema\\^{\\i}tre -- Tolman (L--T) region with a nonconstant bang-time function $t_B(r)$ matched into a Friedmann background. Blueshift visible to the observer arises \\textit{only on radial rays} that are emitted in the L--T region. The paper presents three L--T models with different Big Bang profiles, adapted for the highest and the lowest end of the GRB frequency range. The models account for: (1) The observed frequency range of the GRBs; (2) Their limited duration; (3) The afterglows; (4) Their hypothetical collimation into narrow jets; (5) The large distances to their sources; (6) The multitude of the observed GRBs. Properties (2), (3) and (6) are accounted for only qualitatively. With a small correction of the parameters of the mo...

  3. An updated Gamma Ray Bursts Hubble diagram

    CERN Document Server

    Cardone, V F; Dainotti, M G

    2009-01-01

    Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) have recently attracted much attention as a possible way to extend the Hubble diagram to very high redshift. To this aim, the luminosity (or isotropic emitted energy) of a GRB at redshift z must be evaluated from a correlation with a distance independent quantity so that one can then solve for the luminosity distance D_L(z) and hence the distance modulus mu(z). Averaging over five different two parameters correlations and using a fiducial cosmological model to calibrate them, Schaefer (2007) has compiled a sample of 69 GRBs with measured mu(z) which has since then been widely used to constrain cosmological parameters. We update here that sample by many aspects. First, we add a recently found correlation for the X - ray afterglow and use a Bayesian inspired fitting method to calibrate the different GRBs correlations known insofar assuming a fiducial LCDM model in agreement with the recent WMAP5 data. Averaging over six correlations, we end with a new GRBs Hubble diagram comprising 83 ob...

  4. $\\gamma$-Ray Bursts and Related Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Piran, T

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have puzzled astronomers since their accidental discovery in the sixties. The BATSE detector on the COMPTON-GRO satellite has been detecting one burst per day for the last six years. Its findings have revolutionized our ideas about the nature of these objects. They have shown that GRBs are at cosmological distances. This idea was accepted with difficulties at first. However, the recent discovery of an x-ray afterglow by the Italian/Dutch satellite BeppoSAX led to a detection of high red-shift absorption lines in the optical afterglow of GRB970508 and to a confirmation of its cosmological origin. The simplest and practically inevitable interpretation of these observations is that GRBs result from the conversion of the kinetic energy of ultra-relativistic particles flux to radiation in an optically thin region. The "inner engine" that accelerates the particles or generates the Poynting flux is hidden from direct observations. Recent studies suggest the ``internal-external'' model: intern...

  5. The SVOM gamma-ray burst mission

    CERN Document Server

    Cordier, B; Atteia, J -L; Basa, S; Claret, A; Daigne, F; Deng, J; Dong, Y; Godet, O; Goldwurm, A; Götz, D; Han, X; Klotz, A; Lachaud, C; Osborne, J; Qiu, Y; Schanne, S; Wu, B; Wang, J; Wu, C; Xin, L; Zhang, B; Zhang, S -N

    2015-01-01

    We briefly present the science capabilities, the instruments, the operations, and the expected performance of the SVOM mission. SVOM (Space-based multiband astronomical Variable Objects Monitor) is a Chinese-French space mission dedicated to the study of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) in the next decade. The SVOM mission encompasses a satellite carrying four instruments to detect and localize the prompt GRB emission and measure the evolution of the afterglow in the visible band and in X-rays, a VHF communication system enabling the fast transmission of SVOM alerts to the ground, and a ground segment including a wide angle camera and two follow-up telescopes. The pointing strategy of the satellite has been optimized to favor the detection of GRBs located in the night hemisphere. This strategy enables the study of the optical emission in the first minutes after the GRB with robotic observatories and the early spectroscopy of the optical afterglow with large telescopes to measure the redshifts. The study of GRBs in the...

  6. Gamma-Ray Bursts 2012 Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is a pleasure to announce the next combined Fermi/Swift GRB conference covering recent advances in all aspects of gamma-ray burst observations and theory. This conference will be held in Munich, Germany, on 7-11 May 2012, and follows similar previous combined Fermi/Swift meetings in Huntsville (Oct. 2008) and Annapolis (Nov. 2010). Gamma-ray bursts are the most energetic explosions in the Universe and are thought to be the birth signatures of black holes. This is an exciting time in the GRB field as various missions provide a wealth of new data on this still puzzling phenomenon. The Fermi misson provides unprecedented spectral coverage over 7 decades in energy, and among others discovered new spectral components which challenge our standard picture of the prompt emission. The Swift mission continuous to swiftly monitor and locate GRBs in multiple wavebands, providing the basis for all ground-based follow-up observations towards redshift measurements and afterglow and host property investigations. AGILE, INTEGRAL, Suzaku and Konus continue to provide crucial information on GRB properties, and the MAXI mission provides an all sky X-ray monitoring of transients. There is also growing capability for follow-up observations by ground-based telescopes at basically all wavelengths. Besides the classical optical/infrared/radio observations, searches are underway for TeV emission, neutrinos and gravitational waves. Moreover, new experiments are expected to have returned first data, among others POGO on the prompt polarization properties, UFFO on very early optical emission, or ALMA on sub-millimeter properties. And last but not least, the unexpected is bringing us child-like astonishments at least once per year with a "GRB-trigger" which turns out to be not related to GRBs. Complementing all these new observational results, a huge theoretical effort is underway to understand the GRB phenomenon and keep up with the constant new puzzles coming from the data. This conference

  7. Gamma-ray detection efficiency of the microchannel plate installed as an ion detector in the low energy particle instrument onboard the GEOTAIL satellite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Y T; Yoshikawa, I; Yoshioka, K; Terasawa, T; Saito, Y; Mukai, T

    2007-03-01

    A microchannel plate (MCP) assembly has been used as an ion detector in the low energy particle (LEP) instrument onboard the magnetospheric satellite GEOTAIL. Recently the MCP assembly has detected gamma rays emitted from an astronomical object and has been shown to provide unique information of gamma rays if they are intense enough. However, the detection efficiency for gamma rays was not measured before launch, and therefore we could not analyze the LEP data quantitatively. In this article, we report the gamma-ray detection efficiency of the MCP assembly. The measured efficiencies are 1.29%+/-0.71% and 0.21%+/-0.14% for normal incidence 60 and 662 keV gamma rays, respectively. The incident angle dependence is also presented. Our calibration is crucial to study high energy astrophysical phenomena by using the LEP.

  8. Gamma ray production cross sections in proton induced reactions on natural Mg, Si and Fe targets over the proton energy range 30 up to 66 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Yahia-Chérif, W; Kiener, J; Tatischeff, V; Lawrie, E; Lawrie, J J; Belhout, A; Benhabiles, H; Bucher, T D; Chafa, A; Damache, S; Debabi, M; Deloncle, I; Easton, J L; Hamadache, C; Hammache, F; Jones, P; Kheswa, B V; Khumalo, N; Lamula, T; Majola, S T H; Negi, D; Ndayishimye, J; Noncolela, S P; Moussa, D; Nchodu, R; Papka, P; de Sereville, N; Sharpey-Schafer, J F; Shirinda, O; Wiedeking, M; Wyngaardt, S

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray excitation functions have been measured for 30, 42, 54 and 66 MeV proton beams accelerated onto C + O (Mylar), Mg, Si, and Fe targets of astrophysical interest at the separate-sector cyclotron of iThemba LABS in Somerset West (Cape Town, South Africa). A large solid angle, high energy resolution detection system of the Eurogam type was used to record Gamma-ray energy spectra. Derived preliminary results of Gamma-ray line production cross sections for the Mg, Si and Fe target nuclei are reported and discussed. The current cross section data for known, intense Gamma-ray lines from these nuclei consistently extend to higher proton energies previous experimental data measured up to Ep ~ 25 MeV at the Orsay and Washington tandem accelerators. Data for new Gamma-ray lines observed for the first time in this work are also reported.

  9. Exploring Gamma-Ray Bursts, Their Immediate Environment and Host Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Friis, Mette

    2015-01-01

    Lasting anywhere from a few milliseconds to several minutes, GRBs shine hundreds of times brighter than a typical supernova, making them briefly the brightest source of cosmic gamma-ray photons in the observable Universe. This thesis focuses on 3 different aspects of GRBs: (1) The radiative mechanism of GRBs and their afterglows, i.e. the occurrence of thermal emission and the physical parameters we can determine through this emission. (2) Their host galaxies, using results from observations of GRB 121024A as a case study. (3) How they can be used to answer some of the larger astrophysical questions, more specifically in this case, to study interstellar dust and grey extinction.

  10. Gamma-Ray Bursts Trace UV Metrics of Star Formation over 3 < z < 5

    CERN Document Server

    Greiner, Jochen; Schady, Patricia; Krühler, Thomas; Trenti, Michele; Cikota, Aleksandar; Bolmer, Jan; Elliott, Jonathan; Delvaux, Corentin; Perna, Rosalba; Afonso, Paulo; Kann, D Alexander; Klose, Sylvio; Savaglio, Sandra; Schmidl, Sebastian; Schweyer, Tassilo; Tanga, Mohit; Varela, Karla

    2015-01-01

    We present the first uniform treatment of long duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxy detections and upper limits over the redshift range 3-15.6 mag, and with extrapolations of the assumed Schechter-type LF well beyond this range. We review proposed astrophysical and observational biases for our sample, and find they are for the most part minimal. We therefore conclude, as the simplest interpretation of our results, that GRBs successfully trace UV metrics of cosmic star formation over the range 3

  11. Vorticity and Magnetic Field Generation from Initial Anisotropy in Ultrarelativistic Gamma-Ray Burst Blastwaves

    CERN Document Server

    Milosavljevic, Milos; Zhang, Fan

    2007-01-01

    Because conical segments of quasispherical ultrarelativistic blastwaves are causally disconnected on angular scales larger than the blastwave inverse Lorentz factor, astrophysical blastwaves can sustain initial anisotropy, imprinted by the process that drives the explosion, while they remain relativistic. We show that initial angular energy fluctuations in ultrarelativistic blastwaves imply a production of vorticity in the blastwave, and calculate the vortical energy production rate. In gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows, the number of vortical eddy turnovers as the shocked fluid crosses the blastwave shell is about unity for marginally nonlinear anisotropy. Thus the anisotropy must be nonlinear to explain the magnetic energy density inferred in measured GRB spectra.

  12. Summary of existing information on gamma-ray and X-ray attenuation coefficients of solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, K.; Gerward, Leif

    2002-01-01

    Accurate values of X-ray and gamma-ray attenuation coefficients of different chemicals are required in spectrometry as well as in many other scientific, engineering and medical disciplines involving photon radiation. The current state of knowledge of experimental and theoretical gamma-ray and X-r......-ray attenuation coefficients in aqueous solutions of salts is presented and exemplified by recent work. The results presented provide a basis for studying X-ray and gamma-ray photon interactions with ions in solution (hydrated ions) rather than ion compounds in solid form.......Accurate values of X-ray and gamma-ray attenuation coefficients of different chemicals are required in spectrometry as well as in many other scientific, engineering and medical disciplines involving photon radiation. The current state of knowledge of experimental and theoretical gamma-ray and X...

  13. SETI at X-ray Energies - Parasitic Searches from Astrophysical Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Corbet, Robin H D

    2016-01-01

    If a sufficiently advanced civilization can either modulate the emission from an X-ray binary, or make use of the natural high luminosity to power an artificial transmitter, these can serve as good beacons for interstellar communication without involving excessive energy costs to the broadcasting civilization. In addition, the small number of X-ray binaries in the Galaxy considerably reduces the number of targets that must be investigated compared to searches in other energy bands. Low mass X-ray binaries containing neutron stars in particular are considered as prime potential natural and artificial beacons and high time resolution (better than 1ms) observations are encouraged. All sky monitors provide the capability of detecting brief powerful artificial signals from isolated neutron stars. New capabilities of X-ray astronomy satellites developed for astrophysical purposes are enabling SETI in new parameter regimes. For example, the X-ray Timing Explorer satellite provides the capability of exploring the sub...

  14. Gamma-ray astronomy: From Fermi up to the HAWC high-energy {gamma}-ray observatory in Sierra Negra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carraminana, Alberto [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica Luis Enrique Erro 1, Tonantzintla, Puebla 72840 (Mexico); Collaboration: HAWC Collaboration

    2013-06-12

    Gamma-rays represent the most energetic electromagnetic window for the study of the Universe. They are studied both from space at MeV and GeV energies, with instruments like the Fermi{gamma}-ray Space Telescope, and at TeV energies with ground based instruments profiting of particle cascades in the atmosphere and of the Cerenkov radiation of charged particles in the air or in water. The Milagro gamma-ray observatory represented the first instrument to successfully implement the water Cerenkov technique for {gamma}-ray astronomy, opening the ground for the more sensitive HAWC {gamma}-ray observatory, currently under development in the Sierra Negra site and already providing early science results.

  15. Detailed parametrization of neutrino and gamma-ray energy spectra from high energy proton-proton interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supanitsky, A. D.

    2016-02-01

    Gamma rays and neutrinos are produced as a result of proton-proton interactions that occur in different astrophysical contexts. The detection of these two types of messengers is of great importance for the study of different physical phenomena, related to nonthermal processes, taking place in different astrophysical scenarios. Therefore, the knowledge of the energy spectrum of these two types of particles, as a function of the incident proton energy, is essential for the interpretation of the observational data. In this paper, parametrizations of the energy spectra of gamma rays and neutrinos, originated in proton-proton collisions, are presented. The energy range of the incident protons considered extends from 102 to 108 GeV . The parametrizations are based on Monte Carlo simulations of proton-proton interactions performed with the hadronic interaction models QGSJET-II-04 and EPOS-LHC, which have recently been updated with the data taken by the Large Hadron Collider.

  16. Gamma ray lines from a universal extra dimension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertone, Gianfranco; Jackson, C. B.; Shaughnessy, Gabe; Tait, Tim M.P.; Vallinotto, Alberto

    2012-03-01

    Indirect Dark Matter searches are based on the observation of secondary particles produced by the annihilation or decay of Dark Matter. Among them, gamma-rays are perhaps the most promising messengers, as they do not suffer deflection or absorption on Galactic scales, so their observation would directly reveal the position and the energy spectrum of the emitting source. Here, we study the detailed gamma-ray energy spectrum of Kaluza--Klein Dark Matter in a theory with 5 Universal Extra Dimensions. We focus in particular on the two body annihilation of Dark Matter particles into a photon and another particle, which produces monochromatic photons, resulting in a line in the energy spectrum of gamma rays. Previous calculations in the context of the five dimensional UED model have computed the line signal from annihilations into \\gamma \\gamma, but we extend these results to include \\gamma Z and \\gamma H final states. We find that these spectral lines are subdominant compared to the predicted \\gamma \\gamma signal, but they would be important as follow-up signals in the event of the observation of the \\gamma \\gamma line, in order to distinguish the 5d UED model from other theoretical scenarios.

  17. Focusing Telescopes in Nuclear Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Ballmoos, Peter von

    2007-01-01

    This volume is the first of its kind on focusing gamma-ray telescopes. Forty-eight refereed papers provide a comprehensive overview of the scientific potential and technical challenges of this nascent tool for nuclear astrophysics. The book features articles dealing with pivotal technologies such as grazing incident mirrors, multilayer coatings, Laue- and Fresnel-lenses - and even an optic using the curvature of space-time. The volume also presents an overview of detectors matching the ambitious objectives of gamma ray optics, and facilities for operating such systems on the ground and in space. The extraordinary scientific potential of focusing gamma-ray telescopes for the study of the most powerful sources and the most violent events in the Universe is emphasized in a series of introductory articles. Practicing professionals, and students interested in experimental high-energy astrophysics, will find this book a useful reference

  18. Computers in activation analysis and gamma-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, B. S.; D' Agostino, M. D.; Yule, H. P. [eds.

    1979-01-01

    Seventy-three papers are included under the following session headings: analytical and mathematical methods for data analysis; software systems for ..gamma..-ray and x-ray spectrometry; ..gamma..-ray spectra treatment, peak evaluation; least squares; IAEA intercomparison of methods for processing spectra; computer and calculator utilization in spectrometer systems; and applications in safeguards, fuel scanning, and environmental monitoring. Separate abstracts were prepared for 72 of those papers. (DLC)

  19. Science with the new generation high energy gamma- ray experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez, M; Agnetta, G; Alberdi, A; Antonelli, A; Argan, A; Assis, P; Baltz, E A; Bambi, C; Barbiellini, G; Bartko, H; Basset, M; Bastieri, D; Belli, P; Benford, G; Bergström, L; Bernabei, R; Bertone, G; Biland, A; Biondo, B; Bocchino, F; Branchini, E; Brigida, M; Bringmann, T; Brogueira, P; Bulgarelli, A; Caballero, J A; Caliandro, G A; Camarri, P; Cappella, F; Caraveo, P; Carbone, R; Carvajal, M; Casanova, S; Castro-Tirado, A J; Catalano, O; Catena, R; Celi, F; Celotti, A; Cerulli, R; Chen, A; Clay, R; Cocco, V; Conrad, J; Costa, E; Cuoco, A; Cusumano, G; Dai, C J; Dawson, B; De Lotto, B; De Paris, G; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Del Monte, E; Delgado, C; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Cocco, G; Di Falco, S; Di Persio, G; Dingus, B L; Dominguez, A; Donato, F; Donnarumma, I; Doro, M; Edsjö, J; Navas, J M Espino; Santo, M C Espirito; Evangelista, Y; Evoli, C; Fargion, D; Favuzzi, C; Feroci, M; Fiorini, M; Foggetta, L; Fornengo, N; Froysland, T; Frutti, M; Fuschino, F; Gómez, J L; Gómez, M; Gaggero, D; Galante, N; Gallardo, M I; Galli, M; García, J E; Garczarczyk, M; Gargano, F; Gaug, M; Gianotti, F; Giarrusso, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Giuliani, A; Glicenstein, J; Gonçalves, P; Grasso, D; Guerriero, M; He, H L; Incicchitti, A; Kirk, J; Kuang, H H; La Barbera, A; La Rosa, G; Labanti, C; Lamanna, G; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Liberati, S; Liello, F; Lipari, P; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lozano, M; De Sanctis, P G Lucentini; Ma, J M; Maccarone, M C; Maccione, L; Malvezzi, V; Mangano, A; Mariotti, M; Marisaldi, M; Martel, I; Masiero, A; Massaro, E; Mastropietro, M; Mattaini, E; Mauri, F; Mazziotta, M N; Mereghetti, S; Mineo, T; Mizobuchi, S; Moiseev, A; Moles, M; Monte, C; Montecchia, F; Morelli, E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I; Nozzoli, F; Ormes, J F; Peres-Torres, M A; Pacciani, L; Pellizzoni, A; Pérez-Bernal, F; Perotti, F; Picozza, P; Pieri, L; Pietroni, M; Pimenta, M; Pina, A; Pittori, C; Pontoni, C; Porrovecchio, G; Prada, F; Prest, M; Prosperi, D; Protheroe, R; Pucella, G; Quesada, J M; Quintana, J M; Quintero, J R; Rainó, S; Rapisarda, M; Rissi, M; Rodríguez, J; Rossi, E; Rowell, G; Rubini, A; Russo, F; Sanchez-Conde, M; Sacco, B; Scapin, V; Schelke, M; Segreto, A; Sellerholm, A; Sheng, X D; Smith, A; Soffitta, P; Sparvoli, R; Spinelli, P; Stamatescu, V; Stark, L S; Tavani, M; Thornton, G; Titarchuk, L G; Tomé, B; Traci, A; Trifoglio, M; Trois, A; Vallania, P; Vallazza, E; Vercellone, S; Vernetto, S; Vitale, V; Wild, N; Ye, Z P; Zambra, A; Zandanel, F; Zanello, D

    2007-01-01

    This Conference is the fifth of a series of Workshops on High Energy Gamma- ray Experiments, following the Conferences held in Perugia 2003, Bari 2004, Cividale del Friuli 2005, Elba Island 2006. This year the focus was on the use of gamma-ray to study the Dark Matter component of the Universe, the origin and propagation of Cosmic Rays, Extra Large Spatial Dimensions and Tests of Lorentz Invariance.

  20. CENTRAL ENGINE MEMORY OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AND SOFT GAMMA-RAY REPEATERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Bin-Bin; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucá (IAA-CSIC), P.O. Box 03004, E-18080 Granada (Spain); Zhang, Bing, E-mail: zhang.grb@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bursts of γ-rays generated from relativistic jets launched from catastrophic events such as massive star core collapse or binary compact star coalescence. Previous studies suggested that GRB emission is erratic, with no noticeable memory in the central engine. Here we report a discovery that similar light curve patterns exist within individual bursts for at least some GRBs. Applying the Dynamic Time Warping method, we show that similarity of light curve patterns between pulses of a single burst or between the light curves of a GRB and its X-ray flare can be identified. This suggests that the central engine of at least some GRBs carries “memory” of its activities. We also show that the same technique can identify memory-like emission episodes in the flaring emission in soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs), which are believed to be Galactic, highly magnetized neutron stars named magnetars. Such a phenomenon challenges the standard black hole central engine models for GRBs, and suggest a common physical mechanism behind GRBs and SGRs, which points toward a magnetar central engine of GRBs.

  1. Central Engine Memory of Gamma-Ray Bursts and Soft Gamma-Ray Repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin-Bin; Zhang, Bing; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J.

    2016-04-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bursts of γ-rays generated from relativistic jets launched from catastrophic events such as massive star core collapse or binary compact star coalescence. Previous studies suggested that GRB emission is erratic, with no noticeable memory in the central engine. Here we report a discovery that similar light curve patterns exist within individual bursts for at least some GRBs. Applying the Dynamic Time Warping method, we show that similarity of light curve patterns between pulses of a single burst or between the light curves of a GRB and its X-ray flare can be identified. This suggests that the central engine of at least some GRBs carries “memory” of its activities. We also show that the same technique can identify memory-like emission episodes in the flaring emission in soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs), which are believed to be Galactic, highly magnetized neutron stars named magnetars. Such a phenomenon challenges the standard black hole central engine models for GRBs, and suggest a common physical mechanism behind GRBs and SGRs, which points toward a magnetar central engine of GRBs.

  2. Influence of gamma ray irradiation on metakaolin based sodium geopolymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambertin, D., E-mail: david.lambertin@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTCD/SPDE/LP2C, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Boher, C. [CEA, DEN, DTCD/SPDE/LP2C, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Dannoux-Papin, A. [CEA, DEN, DTCD/SPDE/LCFI, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Galliez, K.; Rooses, A.; Frizon, F. [CEA, DEN, DTCD/SPDE/LP2C, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France)

    2013-11-15

    Effects of gamma irradiation on metakaolin based Na-geopolymer have been investigated by external irradiation. The experiments were carried out in a gamma irradiator with {sup 60}Co sources up to 1000 kGy. Various Na-geopolymer with three H{sub 2}O/Na{sub 2}O ratios have been studied in terms of hydrogen radiolytic yield. The results show that hydrogen production increases linearly with water content. Gamma irradiation effects on Na-geopolymer microstructure have been investigated with porosity measurements and X-ray pair distribution function analysis. A change of pore size distribution and a structural relaxation have been found after gamma ray irradiation.

  3. Influence of gamma ray irradiation on metakaolin based sodium geopolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertin, D.; Boher, C.; Dannoux-Papin, A.; Galliez, K.; Rooses, A.; Frizon, F.

    2013-11-01

    Effects of gamma irradiation on metakaolin based Na-geopolymer have been investigated by external irradiation. The experiments were carried out in a gamma irradiator with 60Co sources up to 1000 kGy. Various Na-geopolymer with three H2O/Na2O ratios have been studied in terms of hydrogen radiolytic yield. The results show that hydrogen production increases linearly with water content. Gamma irradiation effects on Na-geopolymer microstructure have been investigated with porosity measurements and X-ray pair distribution function analysis. A change of pore size distribution and a structural relaxation have been found after gamma ray irradiation.

  4. High energy gamma-ray production in nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental techniques used to study high energy gamma-ray production in nuclear reactions are reviewed. High energy photon production in nucleus-nucleus collisions is discussed. Semi-classical descriptions of the nucleus-nucleus gamma reactions are introduced. Nucleon-nucleon gamma cross sections are considered, including theoretical aspects and experimental data. High energy gamma ray production in proton-nucleus reactions is explained. Theoretical explanations of photon emission in nucleus-nucleus collisions are treated. The contribution of charged pion currents to photon production is mentioned

  5. Astrophysical Sources of Cosmic Rays and Related Measurements with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, : J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.

    2009-06-01

    These are presentations to be presented at the 31st International Cosmic Ray Conference, in Lodz, Poland during July 2009. It consists of the following presentations: (1) Correlation of the highest energy cosmic rays with nearby extragalactic objects in Pierre Auger Observatory data; (2) Discriminating potential astrophysical sources of the highest energy cosmic rays with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (3) Intrinsic anisotropy of the UHECR from the Pierre Auger Observatory; (4) Ultra-high energy photon studies with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (5) Limits on the flux of diffuse ultra high energy neutrinos set using the Pierre Auger Observatory; (6) Search for sidereal modulation of the arrival directions of events recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory; (7) Cosmic Ray Solar Modulation Studies in the Pierre Auger Observatory; (8) Investigation of the Displacement Angle of the Highest Energy Cosmic Rays Caused by the Galactic Magnetic Field; (9) Search for coincidences with astrophysical transients in Pierre Auger Observatory data; and (10) An alternative method for determining the energy of hybrid events at the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  6. Guidelines for radioelement mapping using gamma ray spectrometry data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the report is to provide an up-to-date review on the use of gamma ray spectrometry for radioelement mapping and, where appropriate, provide guidelines on the correct application of the method. It is a useful training guide for those new to the method. It gives a broad coverage of all aspects of the gamma ray method and provides a comprehensive list of references. The report gives an overview of the theoretical background to radioactivity and the gamma ray spectrometric method followed by a review of the application of the method to mapping the radiation environment. A brief outline is presented of the principles of radioactivity, the interaction of gamma rays with matter, instrumentation applied to the measurement of gamma rays, and the quantities and units in contemporary use in gamma ray spectrometry. This is followed by a review of the fundamentals of gamma ray spectrometry, and its application to ground and airborne mapping. Covered are also all aspects of the calibration and data processing procedures required for estimating the ground concentrations of the radioelements. The procedures required for the recovery of older survey data are also presented as well as an overview of data presentation and integration for mapping applications

  7. Direct measurements of (p, {gamma}) cross-sections at astrophysical energies using radioactive beams and the Daresbury Recoil Separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardayan, D.W.; Nesaraja, C.D.; Smith, M.S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Physics Division, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chipps, K.A.; Greife, U. [Colorado School of Mines, Department of Physics, Golden, CO (United States); Fitzgerald, R.P.; Champagne, A.E. [University of North Carolina, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Blackmon, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Physics Division, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Louisiana State University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Chae, K.Y.; Moazen, B.H.; Pittman, S.T. [University of Tennessee, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Knoxville, TN (United States); Hatarik, R.; Peters, W.A. [Rutgers University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Kozub, R.L.; Shriner, J.F. [Tennessee Technological University, Physics Department, Cookeville, TN (United States); Matei, C. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pain, S.D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Physics Division, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Rutgers University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    2009-12-15

    There are a number of astrophysical environments in which the path of nucleosynthesis proceeds through proton-rich nuclei. These nuclei have traditionally not been available as beams, and thus proton-capture reactions on these nuclei could only be studied indirectly. At the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF), some of the first direct measurements of (p,{gamma}) cross-sections on radioactive beams have been made. The Daresbury Recoil Separator (DRS) has been used to separate the recoils of interest from the unreacted primary beam and identify them in an isobutane-filled ionization counter. First data from {sup 17}F (p,{gamma}){sup 18}Ne and {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B measurements are presented. (orig.)

  8. Gamma-ray and neutrino fluxes form Heavy Dark Matter in the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Gammaldi, V; de la Cruz-Dombriz, A; Lineros, R A; Maroto, A L

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of the Galactic Center region as a possible source of both secondary gamma-ray and neutrino fluxes from annihilating dark matter. We have studied the gamma-ray flux observed by the High Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) from the J1745-290 Galactic Center source. The data are well fitted as annihilating dark matter in combination with an astrophysical background. The analysis was performed by means of simulated gamma spectra produced by Monte Carlo event generators packages. We analyze the differences in the spectra obtained by the various Monte Carlo codes developed so far in particle physics. We show that, within some uncertainty, the HESS data can be fitted as a signal from a heavy dark matter density distribution peaked at the Galactic Center, with a power-law for the background with a spectral index which is compatible with the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) data from the same region. If this kind of dark matter distribution generates the gamma-ray flux observed by HESS, we also expec...

  9. Hard X-ray irradiation of cosmic silicate analogs: structural evolution and astrophysical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavilan, L.; Jäger, C.; Simionovici, A.; Lemaire, J. L.; Sabri, T.; Foy, E.; Yagoubi, S.; Henning, T.; Salomon, D.; Martinez-Criado, G.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Protoplanetary disks, interstellar clouds, and active galactic nuclei contain X-ray-dominated regions. X-rays interact with the dust and gas present in such environments. While a few laboratory X-ray irradiation experiments have been performed on ices, X-ray irradiation experiments on bare cosmic dust analogs have been scarce up to now. Aims: Our goal is to study the effects of hard X-rays on cosmic dust analogs via in situ X-ray diffraction. By using a hard X-ray synchrotron nanobeam, we seek to simulate cumulative X-ray exposure on dust grains during their lifetime in these astrophysical environments and provide an upper limit on the effect of hard X-rays on dust grain structure. Methods: We prepared enstatite (MgSiO3) nanograins, which are analogs to cosmic silicates, via the melting-quenching technique. These amorphous grains were then annealed to obtain polycrystalline grains. These were characterized via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) before irradiation. Powder samples were prepared in X-ray transparent substrates and were irradiated with hard X-rays nanobeams (29.4 keV) provided by beamline ID16B of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (Grenoble). X-ray diffraction images were recorded in transmission mode, and the ensuing diffractograms were analyzed as a function of the total X-ray exposure time. Results: We detected the amorphization of polycrystalline silicates embedded in an organic matrix after an accumulated X-ray exposure of 6.4 × 1027 eV cm-2. Pure crystalline silicate grains (without resin) do not exhibit amorphization. None of the amorphous silicate samples (pure and embedded in resin) underwent crystallization. We analyze the evolution of the polycrystalline sample embedded in an organic matrix as a function of X-ray exposure. Conclusions: Loss of diffraction peak intensity, peak broadening, and the disappearance of discrete spots and arcs reveal the amorphization

  10. Status of space-based gamma-ray astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Buehler, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray observations give us a direct view into the most extreme environments of the universe. They help us to study astronomical particle accelerators as supernovae remnants, pulsars, active galaxies or gamma-ray bursts and help us to understand the propagation of cosmic rays through our Milky Way. This article summarizes the status of gamma-ray observations from space; it is the write-up of a rapporteur talk given at the 34th ICRC in The Hague, The Netherlands. The primary instrument used in the presented studies is the Large Area Telescope on-board the Fermi Spacecraft, which images the whole gamma-ray sky at photon energies between 20 MeV and 2 TeV. The Fermi mission is currently in its 8th year of observations. This article will review many of the exciting discoveries made in this time, focusing on the most recent ones.

  11. Gamma-rays from pulsar wind nebulae in starburst galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannheim, Karl; Elsässer, Dominik; Tibolla, Omar

    2012-07-01

    Recently, gamma-ray emission at TeV energies has been detected from the starburst galaxies NGC253 (Acero et al., 2009) [1] and M82 (Acciari et al., 2009) [2]. It has been claimed that pion production due to cosmic rays accelerated in supernova remnants interacting with the interstellar gas is responsible for the observed gamma rays. Here, we show that the gamma-ray pulsar wind nebulae left behind by the supernovae contribute to the TeV luminosity in a major way. A single pulsar wind nebula produces about ten times the total luminosity of the Sun at energies above 1 TeV during a lifetime of 105 years. A large number of 3 × 104 pulsar wind nebulae expected in a typical starburst galaxy at a distance of 4 Mpc can readily produce the observed TeV gamma rays.

  12. Detection of gamma rays from a starburst galaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acero, F; Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Anton, G; Barres de Almeida, U; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Becherini, Y; Behera, B; Bernlöhr, K; Bochow, A; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Borrel, V; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bühler, R; Bulik, T; Büsching, I; Boutelier, T; Chadwick, P M; Charbonnier, A; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Chounet, L-M; Clapson, A C; Coignet, G; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubois, F; Dubus, G; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Egberts, K; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fiasson, A; Förster, A; Fontaine, G; Füssling, M; Gabici, S; Gallant, Y A; Gérard, L; Gerbig, D; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Goret, P; Göring, D; Hauser, D; Hauser, M; Heinz, S; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hoffmann, A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Hoppe, S; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; de Jager, O C; Jahn, C; Jung, I; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Kerschhaggl, M; Khangulyan, D; Khélifi, B; Keogh, D; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Kossakowski, R; Lamanna, G; Lenain, J-P; Lohse, T; Marandon, V; Martineau-Huynh, O; Marcowith, A; Masbou, J; Maurin, D; McComb, T J L; Medina, M C; Méhault, J; Moderski, R; Moulin, E; Naumann-Godo, M; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Nekrassov, D; Nicholas, B; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Olive, J-F; de Oña Wilhelmi, E; Orford, K J; Ostrowski, M; Panter, M; Paz Arribas, M; Pedaletti, G; Pelletier, G; Petrucci, P-O; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Rayner, S M; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Rieger, F; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Ruppel, J; Sahakian, V; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schöck, F M; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Shalchi, A; Sikora, M; Skilton, J L; Sol, H; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Superina, G; Szostek, A; Tam, P H; Tavernet, J-P; Terrier, R; Tibolla, O; Tluczykont, M; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Venter, L; Vialle, J P; Vincent, P; Vivier, M; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A

    2009-11-20

    Starburst galaxies exhibit in their central regions a highly increased rate of supernovae, the remnants of which are thought to accelerate energetic cosmic rays up to energies of approximately 10(15) electron volts. We report the detection of gamma rays--tracers of such cosmic rays--from the starburst galaxy NGC 253 using the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) array of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. The gamma-ray flux above 220 billion electron volts is F = (5.5 +/- 1.0(stat) +/- 2.8(sys)) x 10(-13) cm(-2) s(-1), implying a cosmic-ray density about three orders of magnitude larger than that in the center of the Milky Way. The fraction of cosmic-ray energy channeled into gamma rays in this starburst environment is five times as large as that in our Galaxy.

  13. Detection of Gamma Rays From a Starburst Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Acero, F

    2009-01-01

    Starburst galaxies exhibit in their central regions a highly increased rate of supernovae, the remnants of which are thought to accelerate energetic cosmic rays up to energies of ~ 10^15 eV. We report the detection of gamma rays -- tracers of such cosmic rays -- from the starburst galaxy NGC 253 using the H.E.S.S. array of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. The gamma-ray flux above 220 GeV is F = (5.5 +/- 1.0stat +/- 2.8sys) x 10^-13 ph. s-1 cm-2, implying a cosmic-ray density about three orders of magnitude larger than that in the center of the Milky Way. The fraction of cosmic-ray energy channeled into gamma rays in this starburst environment is 5 times larger than that in our Galaxy.

  14. Comprehensive Monitoring of Gamma-ray Bright Blazars. I. Statistical Study of Optical, X-ray, and Gamma-ray Spectral Slopes

    CERN Document Server

    Williamson, Karen E; Marscher, Alan P; Larionov, Valeri M; Smith, Paul S; Agudo, Iván; Arkharov, Arkady A; Blinov, Dmitry A; Casadio, Carolina; Efimova, Natalia V; Gómez, José L; Hagen-Thorn, Vladimir A; Joshi, Manasvita; Konstantinova, Tatiana S; Kopatskaya, Evgenia N; Larionova, Elena G; Larionova, Liudmilla V; Malmrose, Michael P; McHardy, Ian M; Molina, Sol N; Morozova, Daria A; Schmidt, Gary D; Taylor, Brian W; Troitsky, Ivan S

    2014-01-01

    We present $\\gamma$-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared light curves of 33 $\\gamma$-ray bright blazars over four years that we have been monitoring since 2008 August with multiple optical, ground-based telescopes and the Swift satellite, and augmented by data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and other publicly available data from Swift. The sample consists of 21 flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) and 12 BL Lac objects (BL Lacs). We identify quiescent and active states of the sources based on their $\\gamma$-ray behavior. We derive $\\gamma$-ray, X-ray, and optical spectral indices, $\\alpha_\\gamma$, $\\alpha_X$, and $\\alpha_o$, respectively ($F_\

  15. The Relativistic Astrophysics Explorer A New Mission for X-Ray Timing

    CERN Document Server

    Kaaret, P E; Lamb, F K; Morgan, E H; Swank, J H; Zhang, W

    1999-01-01

    The great success of the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) has given us a new probe to study strong gravitational fields and to measure the physical properties of black holes and neutron stars. Here, we describe a "next-generation" x-ray timing mission, the Relativistic Astrophysics Explorer (RAE), designed to fit within the envelope of a "medium-sized" mission. The main instruments will be a narrow-field x-ray detector array with an area of at least ten times that of RXTE, and a wide-field x-ray monitor with good sensitivity and few arcminute position resolution. We describe the design of the instruments and the science which will be possible with a factor of ten increase in collecting area.

  16. Evaluation of effective dose equivalent from environmental gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organ doses and effective dose equivalents for environmental gamma rays were calculated using human phantoms and Monte Carlo methods accounting rigorously the environmental gamma ray fields. It was suggested that body weight is the dominant factor to determine organ doses. The weight function expressing organ doses was introduced. Using this function, the variation in organ doses due to several physical factors were investigated. A detector having gamma-ray response similar to that of human bodies has been developed using a NaI(Tl) scintillator. (author)

  17. The supernova/gamma-ray burst/jet connection

    OpenAIRE

    Hjorth, Jens,

    2013-01-01

    The observed association between supernovae and gamma-ray bursts represents a cornerstone in our understanding of the nature of gamma-ray bursts. The collapsar model provides a theoretical framework for this connection. A key element is the launch of a bi-polar jet (seen as a gamma-ray burst). The resulting hot cocoon disrupts the star while the 56Ni produced gives rise to radioactive heating of the ejecta, seen as a supernova. In this discussion paper I summarise the observational status of ...

  18. The STACEE Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gingrich, D M; Bramel, D; Carson, J; Covault, C E; Fortin, P; Hanna, D S; Hinton, J A; Jarvis, A; Kildea, J; Lindner, T; Müller, C; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Ragan, K; Scalzo, R A; Theoret, C G; Williams, D A; Zweerink, J A

    2005-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) in its complete configuration. STACEE uses the heliostats of a solar energy research facility to collect and focus the Cherenkov photons produced in gamma-ray induced air showers. The light is concentrated onto an array of photomultiplier tubes located near the top of a tower. The large Cherenkov photon collection area of STACEE results in a gamma-ray energy threshold below that of previous ground-based detectors. STACEE is being used to observe pulsars, supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei, and gamma-ray bursts.

  19. Photon energy conversion efficiency in gamma-ray spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Švec, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Photon energy conversion efficiency coefficient is presented as the ratio of total energy registered in the collected spectrum to the emitted photon energy. This parameter is calculated from the conventional gamma-ray histogram and in principle is not affected by coincidence phenomena. This feature makes it particularly useful for calibration and measurement of radionuclide samples at close geometries. It complements the number of efficiency parameters used in gamma-ray spectrometry and can partly change the view as to how the gamma-ray spectra are displayed and processed.

  20. The Multiwavelength View of Gamma-Ray Loud AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venters, Tonia

    2011-01-01

    The gamma-ray sky observed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) encodes much information about the high-energy processes in the universe. Of the extragalactic sources sources resolved by the Fermi-LAT, blazars comprise the class of gamma-ray emitters with the largest number of identified members. Unresolved blazars are expected to contribute significantly to the diffuse extragalactic gamma-ray emission. However, blazars are also broadband emitters (from radio to TeV energies), and as such the multiwavelength study of blazars can provide insight into the high-energy processes of the universe.

  1. The STACEE-32 Ground Based Gamma-ray Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hanna, D S; Boone, L M; Chantell, M C; Conner, Z; Covault, C E; Dragovan, M; Fortin, P; Gregorich, D T; Hinton, J A; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Oser, S; Ragan, K; Scalzo, R A; Schütte, D R; Theoret, C G; Tümer, T O; Williams, D A; Zweerink, J A

    2002-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment detector in its initial configuration (STACEE-32). STACEE is a new ground-based gamma ray detector using the atmospheric Cherenkov technique. In STACEE, the heliostats of a solar energy research array are used to collect and focus the Cherenkov photons produced in gamma-ray induced air showers. The large Cherenkov photon collection area of STACEE results in a gamma-ray energy threshold below that of previous detectors.

  2. Fermi Discovery of Gamma-Ray Emission from NGC 1275

    CERN Document Server

    Abdo, A A; Aller, M F; Kellermann, K I; Kovalev, Y Y; Kovalev, Y A; Lister, M L; Pushkarev, A B

    2009-01-01

    We report the discovery of high-energy (E>100 MeV) gamma-ray emission from NGC 1275, a giant elliptical galaxy lying at the center of the Perseus cluster of galaxies, based on observations made with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) of the Fermi Gamma ray Space Telescope. The positional center of the gamma-ray source is only ~3' away from the NGC 1275 nucleus, well within the 95% LAT error circle of ~5'.The spatial distribution of gamma-ray photons is consistent with a point source. The average flux and power-law photon index measured with the LAT from 2008 August 4 to 2008 December 5 are F_gamma = (2.10+-0.23)x 10^{-7} ph (>100 MeV) cm^{-2} s^{-1} and Gamma = 2.17+-0.05, respectively. The measurements are statistically consistent with constant flux during the four-month LAT observing period.Previous EGRET observations gave an upper limit of F_gamma 100 MeV) cm^{-2} s^{-1} to the gamma-ray flux from NGC 1275. This indicates that the source is variable on timescales of years to decades, and therefore restricts th...

  3. Sensitivity of HAWC to gamma ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboada, Ignacio; HAWC Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    HAWC is a ground based very high-energy gamma ray detector under construction in Mexico at an altitude of 4100 m a.s.l. Higher altitude, improved design and a larger physical size used to reject CR background, make HAWC 10-20 times more sensitive than its predecessor Milagro. HAWC's large field of view, ~2sr, and over 90% duty cycle make it ideal to search for GRBs. We review the sensitivity of HAWC to GRBs with two independent data acquisition systems. We show that some of the brightest GRBs observed by Fermi LAT (e.g. GRB 090510) could result in >5 σ observation by HAWC. The observations (or limits) of GRBs by HAWC will provide information on the high-energy spectra of GRBs. The high-energy spectra will teach us about extra galactic background light, the Lorentz boost factor of the jets tha power GRBs and/or particle acceleration models of GRBs. Finally we present limits on > 10 GeV emission from GRB 111016B, recently studied with HAWC's engineering array VAMOS.

  4. The Nature of Gamma Ray Burst Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Cano, Zach

    2012-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) and Supernovae (SNe) are among the brightest and most energetic physical processes in the universe. It is known that core-collapse SNe arise from the gravitational collapse and subsequent explosion of massive stars (the progen- itors of nearby core-collapse SNe have been imaged and unambiguously identified). It is also believed that the progenitors of long-duration GRBs (L-GRBs) are massive stars, mainly due to the occurrence and detection of very energetic core-collapse su- pernovae that happen both temporally and spatially coincident with most L-GRBs. However many outstanding questions regarding the nature of these events exist: How massive are the progenitors? What evolutionary stage are they at when they explode? Do they exist as single stars or in binary systems (or both, and to what fractions)? The work presented in this thesis attempts to further our understanding at the types of progenitors that give rise to long-duration GRB supernovae (GRB-SNe). This work is based on optical ...

  5. Gamma ray induced mutants in Coleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The germplasm collection of Chinese potato (Coleus parviflorus Benth) contains almost no variation for yield contributing traits. The crop does not produce seeds. Treatment of underground tubers with 1 kR, 2 kR, 3 kR and 4 kR gamma rays resulted in 50 morphologically different mutants which are maintained as mutant clones. In the M1V1 generation, suspected mutant sprouts, were carefully removed and grown separately. The most interesting mutant types are the following: (i) erect mutant with spoon shaped light green leaves, 30 cm long inflorescences against 20 cm in the control, cylindrical tubers measuring ca. 7.0 cm long and 3 cm girth against 4 cm and 2.5 cm in the control (ii) early mutants 1 and 2, one having less leaf serration, the other having light green small leaves and dwarf type (iii) fleshy leaf mutant, dark green, thick and smooth leaves. Control plants spread almost in 1 m2 area and bear tubers from the nodes of branches. In the early mutants tuber formation is mainly restricted to the base of the plant, which makes harvest easier. The crop usually matures within 150 - 160 days, the early mutants are ready for harvest 100 days after planting. As the mutants are less spreading, the yield could be increased by closer spacing

  6. Gamma Ray Bursts Cook Book II: Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Ziaeepour, Houri

    2008-01-01

    In Paper I we presented a detailed formulation of the relativistic shocks and synchrotron emission in the context of Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) physics. To see how well this model reproduces the observed characteristics of the GRBs and their afterglows, here we present the results of some simulations based on this model. They are meant to reproduce the prompt and afterglow emission in some intervals of time during a burst. We show that this goal is achieved for both short and long GRBs and their afterglows, at least for part of the parameter space. Moreover, these results are the evidence of the physical relevance of the two phenomenological models we have suggested in Paper I for the evolution of the "active region", the synchrotron emitting region in a shock. The dynamical active region model seems to reproduce the observed characteristics of prompt emissions better than the quasi-steady model which is more suitable for afterglows. Therefore these simulations confirm the arguments presented in Paper I about the ...

  7. Nucleosynthesis in Gamma Ray Burst Accretion Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Pruet, J; Hoffman, R D; Pruet, Jason

    2003-01-01

    We follow the nuclear reactions that occur in the accretion disks of stellar mass black holes that are accreting at a very high rate, 0.01 to 1 solar masses per second, as is realized in many current models for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The degree of neutronization in the disk is a sensitive function of the accretion rate, black hole mass, Kerr parameter, and disk viscosity. For high accretion rates and low viscosity, material arriving at the black hole will consist predominantly of neutrons. This degree of neutronization will have important implications for the dynamics of the GRB producing jet and perhaps for the synthesis of the r-process. For lower accretion rates and high viscosity, as might be appropriate for the outer disk in the collapsar model, neutron-proton equality persists allowing the possible synthesis of 56Ni in the disk wind. 56Ni must be present to make any optically bright Type Ib supernova, and in particular those associated with GRBs.

  8. Photospheric Emission in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Pe'er, Asaf

    2016-01-01

    A major breakthrough in our understanding of gamma-ray bursts (GRB) prompt emission physics occurred in the last few years, with the realization that a thermal component accompanies the over-all non-thermal prompt spectra. This thermal part is important by itself, as it provides direct probe of the physics in the innermost outflow regions. It further has an indirect importance, as a source of seed photons for inverse-Compton scattering, thereby it contributes to the non-thermal part as well. In this short review, we highlight some key recent developments. Observationally, although so far it was clearly identified only in a minority of bursts, there are indirect evidence that thermal component exists in a very large fraction of GRBs, possibly close to 100%. Theoretically, the existence of thermal component have a large number of implications as a probe of underlying GRB physics. Some surprising implications include its use as a probe of the jet dynamics, geometry and magnetization.

  9. The effect of gamma rays on carrots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of several doses (5-400 Gy) of gamma rays from a 137Cs source were studied on several biological indices in carrots. Doses higher than 50 Gy reduced the wet weight of the cells in the suspension medium whereas the doses of 5 and 10 Gy affected the wet weight positively and to a lesser extent the dry weight. This may be due to higher water absorption of the irradiated cells since their number was less than that of the control. The different doses did not affect the chromosome number of the cells but reduced the cell division rates. At doses higher than 200 Gy no singel cell was recorded as dividing after two days of irradiation. A week later, however, the cells seemed to have recovered some ability for division, but with an increase of prophase stage in mitosis and also in the mitotic division abnormalities. Cells irradiation with 10 Gy caused the cells to differentiate and to form somatic embryos due to halting the effect of 2,4-D hormon. Higher doses, however, prohibited or reduced cells differentiation, probably due to higher mitotic division abnormalities. Nevertheless, it has been possible to attain mature plants from all treatments except for the 400 Gy. The low doses of 5 and 10 Gy, contrary to the higher ones, affected positively the speed of seed germination, increased the plant height, and also increased the root weight. 11 refs. (author)

  10. Hard X-ray irradiation of cosmic silicate analogs: structural evolution and astrophysical implications

    CERN Document Server

    Gavilan, L; Simionovici, A; Lemaire, J L; Sabri, T; Foy, E; Yagoubi, S; Henning, T; Salomon, D; Martinez-Criado, G

    2016-01-01

    Protoplanetary disks, interstellar clouds, and active galactic nuclei, contain X-ray dominated regions. X-rays interact with the dust and gas present in such environments. While a few laboratory X-ray irradiation experiments have been performed on ices, X-ray irradiation experiments on bare cosmic dust analogs have been scarce up to now. Our goal is to study the effects of hard X-rays on cosmic dust analogs via in-situ X-ray diffraction. By using a hard X-ray synchrotron nanobeam, we seek to simulate cumulative X-ray exposure on dust grains during their lifetime in these astrophysical environments, and provide an upper limit on the effect of hard X-rays on dust grain structure. We prepared enstatite nanograins, analogs to cosmic silicates, via the melting-quenching technique. These amorphous grains were then annealed to obtain polycrystalline grains. These were characterized via scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy before irradiation. Powder samples were prepared i...

  11. The TIGRE Instrument for Intermediate-Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, T. J.; Blattacharya, D.; Dixon, D. D.; Kong, V.; Minor, C.; Miyagi, T.; Polsen, M.; Zych, A. D.; Samimi, J.; Akyüz, A.

    2000-10-01

    A prototype of the Tracking and Imaging Gamma-Ray Experiment (TIGRE) is being constructed. TIGRE is a Compton gamma-ray telescope concept for a future space mission in high-energy astrophysics. It is sensitive from 300 keV to 10 MeV, with Compton recoil electron tracking to give unique incident event directions. From 10 to 100 MeV it is also an electron-positron gamma-ray pair telescope. Multi-layers of 10 cm x 10 cm x 300 micron silicon strip detectors serve as the Compton converter with electron tracking between successive layers. A position-sensitive calorimeter is used to detect the scattered gamma ray. When germanium or CdZnTe detectors are used for the calorimeter TIGRE has the best achievable performance, approaching few arc minute and few keV resolutions. These will be used to determine the definition and origin of the diffuse line emissions from the Galactic Center Region and measure the development and decay of nuclear line emissions in supernova explosions. Polarization measurements will be possible for the first time. TIGRE's wide field-of-view (>pi sr.) will allow monitoring of many AGN blazars and pulsars in this critical intermediate energy range. The silicon tracker is currently being used with a CsI(Tl) position-sensitive calorimeter. Laboratory measurements and background-limited sensitivities will be presented. Both atmospheric albedo gamma ray and neutron backgrounds are included. The authors wish to acknowledge the continuing support of NASA Grant NAG5-5116.

  12. Search for neutrino emission of gamma-ray flaring blazars with the ANTARES telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Dornic, D

    2011-01-01

    The ANTARES telescope is well suited to detect neutrinos produced in astrophysical transient sources as it can observe a full hemisphere of the sky at all times with a high duty cycle. The background and point source sensitivity can be drastically reduced by selecting a narrow time window around the assumed neutrino production period. Radio-loud active galactic nuclei with their jets pointing almost directly towards the observer, the so- called blazars, are particularly attractive potential neutrino point sources, since they are among the most likely sources of the observed ultra high energy cosmic rays and therefore, neutrinos and gamma-rays may be produced in hadronic interactions with the surrounding medium. The gamma-ray light curves of blazars measured by the LAT instrument on-board the Fermi satellite reveal important time variability information. A strong correlation between the gamma-ray and the neutrino fluxes is expected in this scenario. An unbinned method based on the minimization of a likelihood ...

  13. Background Modelling in Very-High-Energy gamma-ray Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Berge, D; Hinton, J

    2007-01-01

    Ground based Cherenkov telescope systems measure astrophysical gamma-ray emission against a background of cosmic-ray induced air showers. The subtraction of this background is a major challenge for the extraction of spectra and morphology of gamma-ray sources. The unprecedented sensitivity of the new generation of ground based very-high-energy gamma-ray experiments such as H.E.S.S. has lead to the discovery of many previously unknown extended sources. The analysis of such sources requires a range of different background modelling techniques. Here we describe some of the techniques that have been applied to data from the H.E.S.S. instrument and compare their performance. Each background model is introduced and discussed in terms of suitability for image generation or spectral analysis and possible caveats are mentioned. We show that there is not a single multi-purpose model, different models are appropriate for different tasks. To keep systematic uncertainties under control it is important to apply several mod...

  14. Gamma-Ray and Multiwavelength Emission from Blazars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Meg Urry

    2011-03-01

    Blazars are now well understood as approaching relativistic jets aligned with the line of sight. The long-time uncertainty about the demographics of blazars is starting to become clearer: since the Fermi blazar sample includes a larger fraction of high-frequency peaked blazars (like the typical X-ray-selected blazars in, say, the Einstein Slew Survey sample) than did the higher-flux-limit EGRET blazar sample, these low-luminosity sources must be more common than their higher luminosity, low-frequency-peaked cousins. Blazar spectral energy distributions have a characteristic two-component form, with synchrotron radiation at radio through optical (UV, X-ray) frequencies and gamma-rays from X-ray through GeV (TeV) energies.Multiwavelength monitoring has suggested that gamma-ray flares can result from acceleration of electrons at shocks in the jet, and there appears to be an association between the creation of outflowing superluminal radio components in VLBI maps and the gamma-ray flares. In many cases, the gamma-ray emission is produced by inverse Compton upscattering of ambient optical-UV photons, although the contribution from energetic hadrons cannot be ruled out. The next few years of coordinated gamma-ray, X-ray, UV, optical, infrared and radio monitoring of blazars will be important for characterizing jet content, structure, and total power.

  15. The CALET Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (CGBM)

    CERN Document Server

    Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Sakamoto, Takanori; Takahashi, Ichiro; Hara, Takumi; Yamamoto, Tatsuma; Kawakubo, Yuta; Inoue, Ry ota; Terazawa, Shunsuke; Fujioka, Rie; Senuma, Kazumasa; Nakahira, Satoshi; Tomida, Hiroshi; Ueno, Shiro; Torii, Shoji; Cherry, Michael L; Ricciarini, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    The CALET Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (CGBM) is the secondary scientific instrument of the CALET mission on the International Space Station (ISS), which is scheduled for launch by H-IIB/HTV in 2014. The CGBM provides a broadband energy coverage from 7 keV to 20 MeV, and simultaneous observations with the primary instrument Calorimeter (CAL) in the GeV - TeV gamma-ray range and Advanced Star Camera (ASC) in the optical for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and other X-gamma-ray transients. The CGBM consists of two kinds of scintillators: two LaBr$_3$(Ce) (7 keV - 1 MeV) and one BGO (100 keV - 20 MeV) each read by a single photomultiplier. The LaBr$_3$(Ce) crystal, used in space for the first time here for celestial gamma-ray observations, enables GRB observations over a broad energy range from low energy X-ray emissions to gamma rays. The detector performance and structures have been verified using the bread-board model (BBM) via vibration and thermal vacuum tests. The CALET is currently in the development phase of the prot...

  16. Inspecting the supernova gamma-ray burst connection with high-energy neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Tamborra, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been often considered as the natural evolution of core-collapse supernovae (SNe). While GRBs with relativistic jets emit an electromagnetic signal, GRBs with mildly relativistic jets are opaque to photons and, therefore, could be detectable through neutrinos only. We discuss the possibility that successful GRBs and choked jets belong to the same class of astrophysical transients with different Lorentz factor Gamma_b and study the production of high-energy neutrinos as a function of Gamma_b, by including both proton-photon and proton-proton interactions. By assuming a SN-GRB connection, we find that the diffuse neutrino emission from optically thick jets with intermediate Lorentz factors with respect to the ones of choked and successful GRBs can be one of the main components of the observed IceCube high-energy neutrino flux. Moreover, under the assumption that choked and successful jets belong to the same class of astrophysical transients, we show that the IceCube hig...

  17. Structure and content of the galaxy and galactic gamma rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    The conference included papers on ..gamma..-ray pulsars, galactic diffuse flux and surveys, radio surveys of external galaxies, galactic distribution of pulsars, and galactic gamma emission. Galactic structure drawing on all branches of galactic astronomy is discussed. New and unpublished material is included. (JFP)

  18. Airborne Gamma-ray Measurements in the Chernobyl Plume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grasty, R. L.; Hovgaard, Jens; Multala, J.

    1997-01-01

    On 29 April 1986, the Geological Survey of Finland (GSF) survey aircraft with a gamma ray spectrometer flew through a radioactive plume from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. The aircraft became contaminated and the gamma spectrometer measured radioactivity in the plume as well as radioactivity on ...

  19. Search of gamma-rays Bremsstrahlung mirror reflection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Total external reflection of soft X-rays is widely used in many X-ray optic systems. At the same time in the wavelength range of gamma rays the corresponding total external reflection on macroscopic smooth surface hasn't been surely verified yet. Samarkand microtron MT-22S with 330 meter flying distance was used for a search experiment of detecting gamma-ray total external reflection. Measured slip angles (i.e. angles between incident ray and reflector surface) are negligible and don't exceed tens of micro-radian. And it is a complicated problem to get required characteristics of collimating, reflecting and detecting gamma rays. The experimental setup was described earlier. Here we report experimental results of very small-angle Bremsstrahlung scattering only in comparison with results of computer simulation by Monte-Carlo method. It is continuous energy spectrum of Bremsstrahlung gamma rays (described by Shift formula) that is the first characteristic property of the experiment. And it is air in the way of gamma rays that is the second one. Continuous energy spectrum provides a use of some range of reflector inclinations (but bounded above) that satisfy the conditions of the total reflection for a corresponding part of gamma ray beam. As for air it absorbs gamma rays on their long way to detectors lowering the ratio of searching effect to background. Horizontal belt type Bremsstrahlung beam was collimated for the experiment. So the beam's horizontal acceptance was relatively wide (∼ 34 mrad). A collimator with gap heights of 100, 50 and 20 μ limited the beam in vertical that results in beam vertical divergences of 125, 62 and 25 μrad, correspondingly. The gap height of 100 μ used for positioning procedure, and the ones of 50 and 20 μ used for measurements. No separate peak of reflected gamma rays was observed at the experiment. However when vertical profiles measured at the reflector inclinations of 0 and 40 μrad are compared one can see gamma

  20. Gamma-ray emission from individual classical novae

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez-Gomar, J; José, J; Isern, J

    1997-01-01

    Classical novae are important producers of radioactive nuclei, such as be7, n13, f18, na22 and al26. The disintegration of these nuclei produces positrons (except for be7) that through annihilation with electrons produce photons of energies 511 keV and below. Furthermore, be7 and na22 decay producing photons with energies of 478 keV and 1275 keV, respectively, well in the gamma-ray domain. Therefore, novae are potential sources of gamma-ray emission. The properties of gamma-ray spectra and gamma-ray light curves (for the continuum and for the lines at 511, 478 and 1275 keV) have been analyzed, with a special emphasis on the difference between carbon-oxygen and oxygen-neon novae. Predictions of detectability of individual novae by the future SPI spectrometer on board the INTEGRAL satellite are made.

  1. Secondary gamma-ray data for shielding calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In deep penetration transport calculations, the integral design parameters is determined mainly by secondary particles which are produced by interactions of the primary radiation with materials. The shield thickness and the biological dose rate at a given point of a bulk shield are determined from the contribution from secondary gamma rays. The heat generation and the radiation damage in the structural and shield materials depend strongly on the secondary gamma rays. In this paper, the status of the secondary gamma ray data and its further problems are described from the viewpoint of shield design. The secondary gamma-ray data in ENDF/B-IV and POPOP4 are also discussed based on the test calculations made for several shield assemblies. (author)

  2. Gamma-ray flares from the Crab nebula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A young and energetic pulsar powers the well-known Crab Nebula. Here, we describe two separate gamma-ray (photon energy greater than 100 mega-electron volts) flares from this source detected by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The first flare occurred in February 2009 and lasted approximately 16 days. The second flare was detected in September 2010 and lasted approximately 4 days. During these outbursts, the gamma-ray flux from the nebula increased by factors of four and six, respectively. The brevity of the flares implies that the gamma rays were emitted via synchrotron radiation from peta-electron-volt (1015 electron volts) electrons in a region smaller than 1.4 * 10-2 parsecs. These are the highest-energy particles that can be associated with a discrete astronomical source, and they pose challenges to particle acceleration theory. (authors)

  3. Gamma-ray dosimetry measurements of the Little Boy replica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plassmann, E.A.; Pederson, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    We present the current status of our gamma-ray dosimetry results for the Little Boy replica. Both Geiger-Mueller and thermoluminescent detectors were used in the measurements. Future work is needed to test assumptions made in data analysis.

  4. Radioactive beam experiments with large gamma-ray detector arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Svensson, C E; Ball, G C; Finlay, P; Garrett, P E; Grinyer, G F; Hackman, G S; Osborne, C J; Sarazin, F; Scraggs, H C; Smith, M B; Waddington, J C

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy is one of the most powerful and versatile experimental techniques in low-energy nuclear physics research. With the continuing development of hyper-pure germanium (HPGe) detector technology, including multi-crystal detectors, contact segmentation, and digital signal processing techniques, large gamma-ray detector arrays will continue to play a major role in the experimental programs at existing and future radioactive ion beam facilities. This paper provides an overview of recent progress in, and future plans for, the development of large gamma-ray spectrometers at such facilities, including the recent commissioning of the 8 pi spectrometer at ISAC-I and the proposed TRIUMF-ISAC gamma-ray escape suppressed spectrometer array for the ISAC-II facility.

  5. Gamma ray effects on flash memory cell arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolićanin Edin Ć.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Information stored in flash memories is physically represented by the absence or presence of charge on electrically isolated floating gates. Interaction of gamma rays with the insulators surrounding the floating gate produces effects that degrade the properties of memory cells, possibly leading to the corruption of the stored content. The cumulative nature of these effects is expressed through the total ionizing dose deposited by the gamma rays in the insulators surrounding the floating gate. Relying on both theory and experiment, we examine how the properties of cells in commercially available flash memories affect their sensitivity to gamma rays. Memory samples from several manufacturers, currently available on the market, can be compared with respect to data retention under gamma ray exposure.

  6. The Extragalactic Gamma-ray Sky in the Fermi era

    CERN Document Server

    Massaro, F; Ferrara, E C

    2015-01-01

    The Universe is largely transparent to $\\gamma$ rays in the GeV energy range, making these high-energy photons valuable for exploring energetic processes in the cosmos. After seven years of operation, the Fermi {\\it Gamma-ray Space Telescope} has produced a wealth of information about the high-energy sky. This review focuses on extragalactic $\\gamma$-ray sources: what has been learned about the sources themselves and about how they can be used as cosmological probes. Active galactic nuclei (blazars, radio galaxies, Seyfert galaxies) and star-forming galaxies populate the extragalactic high-energy sky. Fermi observations have demonstrated that these powerful non-thermal sources display substantial diversity in energy spectra and temporal behavior. Coupled with contemporaneous multifrequency observations, the Fermi results are enabling detailed, time-dependent modeling of the energetic particle acceleration and interaction processes that produce the $\\gamma$ rays, as well as providing indirect measurements of t...

  7. Gamma-Ray Imager Polarimeter for Solar Flares Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose here to develop the Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS), the next-generation instrument for high-energy solar observations. GRIPS will...

  8. Gamma-ray lines: a new window to the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Line emission in the gamma-ray band, an emerging branch of astronomy based on balloon and satellite data, probes the physics of nucleosynthesis, the interstellar medium, solar flares, supernovae and neutron stars

  9. Gamma-ray spectroscopy with relativistic exotic heavy-ions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Samit Mandal; J Gerl; H Geissel; K Hauschild; M Hellström; Z Janas; I Kojouharov; Y Kopatch; R C Lemmon; P Mayet; Z Podolyak; P H Regan; H Schaffner; C Schlegel; J Simpson; H J Wollersheim

    2001-07-01

    Feasibility of gamma-ray spectroscopy at relativistic energies with exotic heavy-ions and new generation of germanium detectors (segmented Clover) is discussed. An experiment with such detector array and radioactive is discussed.

  10. Public List of LAT-Detected Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The following is a compilation of all publicly-announced gamma-ray pulsars detected using the Fermi LAT. Each of the detections has been vetted by the LAT team,...

  11. Gamma-ray emission profile measurements during JET ICRH discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, O.N.; Marcus, F.B.; Sadler, G.; Van Belle, P. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Howarth, P.J.A. [Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom); Adams, J.M.; Bond, D.S. [UKAEA Harwell Lab. (United Kingdom). Energy Technology Div.

    1994-07-01

    Gamma-ray emission from plasma-impurity reactions caused by minority ICRH accelerating fuel ions to MeV energies has been measured using the JET neutron profile monitor. A successful data analysis technique has been used to isolate the RF-induced gamma-ray emission that was detected, enabling profiles of gamma-ray emission to be obtained. The 2-d gamma-ray emission profiles show that virtually all the radiation originates from the low field side of the RF resonance layer, as expected from RF-induced pitch angle diffusion. The emission profiles indicate the presence of a small population of resonant {sup 3}He ions that possess orbits lying near the passing-trapped boundary. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Developments in large gamma-ray detector arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, I Y; Vetter, K

    2003-01-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy was revolutionized with the introduction of high energy-resolution semiconductor germanium (Ge) detectors in the early 1960s. This led to the large increase in sensitivity realized by today's arrays of Compton-suppressed Ge detectors. A still larger increase in sensitivity is expected by implementing the new concept of tracking. A tracking array consists of highly segmented Ge detectors (that can cover the full 4 pi solid-angle) in which gamma rays will be identified by measuring and tracking every gamma ray interaction. This article reviews the physics motivation for such detectors and the development of the new technologies involved. The concept of tracking is explained using the example of a proposed array called gamma-ray energy tracking array (GRETA).

  13. Proton and $\\gamma$- partial widths of astrophysically important states of $^{30}$S studied by the $\\beta$-delayed decay of $^{31}$Ar

    CERN Document Server

    Koldste, G T; Borge, M J G; Briz, J A; Carmona-Gallardo, M; Fraile, L M; Fynbo, H O U; Giovinazzo, J; Johansen, J G; Jokinen, A; Jonson, B; Kurturkian-Nieto, T; Kusk, J H; Nilsson, T; Perea, A; Pesudo, V; Picado, E; Riisager, K; Saastamoinen, A; Tengblad, O; Thomas, J -C; Van de Walle, J

    2013-01-01

    Resonances just above the proton threshold in $^{30}$S affect the $^{29}$P(p,$\\gamma$)$^{30}$S reaction under astrophysical conditions. The (p,$\\gamma$)-reaction rate is currently determined indirectly and depends on the properties of the relevant resonances. We present here a method for finding the ratio between the proton and $\\gamma$- partial widths of resonances in $^{30}$S. The widths are determined from the $\\beta$-2p and $\\beta$-p-$\\gamma$- decay of $^{31}$Ar, which is produced at ISOLDE, CERN. Experimental limits on the ratio between the proton and $\\gamma$- partial widths for astrophysical relevant levels in $^{30}$S have been found for the first time. A level at 4689.2(24)keV is identified in the $\\gamma$-spectrum, and an upper limit on the $\\Gamma_{p}/\\Gamma_{\\gamma}$ ratio of 0.26 (95% C.L.) is found. In the two-proton spectrum two levels at 5227(3)keV and 5847(4)keV are identified. These levels were previously seen to $\\gamma$-decay and upper limits on the $\\Gamma_{\\gamma}/\\Gamma_{p}$ ratio of 0....

  14. Neutrons, X rays, and gamma rays: Imaging detectors, material characterization techniques, and applications; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, July 21, 22, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, John M.; Cline, David B.; Lanza, Richard; Mildner, David F. R.

    1993-02-01

    Topics addressed include scintillating fiber technology and applications; materials characterization techniques using gamma-rays, X-rays, and neutrons; survey of principles; systems in operation; new detection systems; and applications and sources of neutrons. Also discussed are a directional fast neutron detector using scintillating fibers and electrooptics; a dark-matter detector, a novel light counter, and the ICARUS project; the major problems of MeV and GeV gamma-ray astrophysics; a compact, tunable source of monochromatic highly-directional X-rays; recent advances in neutron tomography; tailoring neutron spectra for fast neutron spectroscopy; area detectors for neutron protein crystallography; features of microstrip proportional counters; thermal neutron imaging using microchannel plates; an image plate neutron detector; a characterization of an accelerator neutron source based on the Be(d,n) reaction; and tailoring neutron spectra for fast neutron spectroscopy. (No individual items are abstracted in this volume)

  15. Catalogue of gamma rays from radionuclides ordered by nuclide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A catalogue of about 28500 gamma-ray energies from 2338 radionuclides is presented. The nuclides are listed in order of increasing (A,Z) of the daughter nuclide. In addition the gamma-ray intensity per 100 decays of the parent (if known) and the decay half-life are given. All data are from a computer processing of a recent ENSDF (Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File) file. (authors)

  16. System for Gamma an X rays fluorescence spectrometric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system for spectrometry of gamma or fluorescence X rays is presented. It sis composed by a Si(Li) semiconductors detector, a charge sensitive preamplifier, a high voltage power supply, a spectrometric amplifier and a monolithic 1024 channels multichannel analyzers or an IBM compatible 4096 channels add - on- card multichannel analyzer. The system can be configured as a 1024 or 4096 channels gamma or fluorescent X rays spectrometer

  17. Dark matter properties implied by gamma ray interstellar emission models

    OpenAIRE

    Balázs, Csaba; Li, Tong

    2016-01-01

    We infer dark matter properties from gamma ray residuals extracted using eight different interstellar emission scenarios proposed by the Fermi-LAT Collaboration to explain the Galactic Center gamma ray excess. Adopting the most plausible simplified ansatz, we assume that the dark matter particle is a Majorana fermion interacting with standard fermions via a scalar mediator. Using this theoretical hypothesis and the Fermi residuals we calculate Bayesian evidences, including Fermi-LAT exclusion...

  18. Extragalactic Background Light and Gamma-Ray Attenuation

    OpenAIRE

    Primack, Joel R.; Dominguez, Alberto; Gilmore, Rudy C.; Somerville, Rachel S.

    2011-01-01

    Data from (non-) attenuation of gamma rays from active galactic nuclei (AGN) and gamma ray bursts (GRBs) give upper limits on the extragalactic background light (EBL) from the UV to the mid-IR that are only a little above the lower limits from observed galaxies. These upper limits now rule out some EBL models and purported observations, with improved data likely to provide even stronger constraints. We present EBL calculations both based on multiwavelength observations of thousands of galaxie...

  19. TeV gamma rays from PSR 1706-44

    CERN Document Server

    Chadwick, P M; Dipper, N A; Holder, J; Kendall, T R; McComb, T J L; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Rayner, S M; Roberts, I D; Shaw, S E; Turver, K E

    1998-01-01

    Observations made with the University of Durham Mark 6 atmospheric Cerenkov telescope confirm that PSR B1706-44 is a very high energy gamma-ray emitter. There is no indication from our dataset that the very high energy gamma-rays are pulsed, in contrast to the findings at 300 GeV is estimated to be (3.9 +/- 0.7 (statistical)) x 10^-11 cm^-2 s^-1.

  20. The STACEE Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Detector

    OpenAIRE

    STACEE Collaboration; Gingrich, D.M.; Boone, L. M.; Bramel, D.; Carson, J.; Covault, C. E.; Fortin, P.; Hanna, D. S.; Hinton, J. A.; Jarvis, A.; Kildea, J.; Lindner, T.; Mueller, C.; Mukherjee, R.; Ong, R. A.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) in its complete configuration. STACEE uses the heliostats of a solar energy research facility to collect and focus the Cherenkov photons produced in gamma-ray induced air showers. The light is concentrated onto an array of photomultiplier tubes located near the top of a tower. The large Cherenkov photon collection area of STACEE results in a gamma-ray energy threshold below that of previ...

  1. Automatic Quenching of High Energy gamma-ray Sources by Synchrotron Photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stawarz, Lukasz; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.; Kirk, John; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst.

    2007-02-02

    Here we investigate evolution of a magnetized system, in which continuously produced high energy emission undergoes annihilation on a soft photon field, such that the synchrotron radiation of the created electron-positron pairs increases number density of the soft photons. This situation is important in high energy astrophysics, because, for an extremely wide range of magnetic field strengths (nano to mega Gauss), it involves {gamma}-ray photons with energies between 0.3GeV and 30TeV. We derive and analyze the conditions for which the system is unstable to runaway production of soft photons and ultrarelativistic electrons, and for which it can reach a steady state with an optical depth to photon-photon annihilation larger than unity, as well those for which efficient pair loading of the emitting volume takes place. We also discuss the application of our analysis to a realistic situation involving astrophysical sources of a broad-band {gamma}-ray emission and briefly consider the particular case of sources close to active supermassive black holes.

  2. Plasma code for astrophysical charge exchange emission at X-ray wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Liyi; Raassen, A J J

    2016-01-01

    Charge exchange X-ray emission provides unique insights into the interactions between cold and hot astrophysical plasmas. Besides its own profound science, this emission is also technically crucial to all observations in the X-ray band, since charge exchange with the solar wind often contributes a significant foreground component that contaminates the signal of interest. By approximating the cross sections resolved to $n$ and $l$ atomic subshells, and carrying out complete radiative cascade calculation, we create a new spectral code to evaluate the charge exchange emission in the X-ray band. Comparing to collisional thermal emission, charge exchange radiation exhibits enhanced lines from large-$n$ shells to the ground, as well as large forbidden-to-resonance ratios of triplet transitions. Our new model successfully reproduces an observed high-quality spectrum of comet C/2000 WM1 (LINEAR), which emits purely by charge exchange between solar wind ions and cometary neutrals. It demonstrates that a proper charge ...

  3. Research relative to high resolution camera on the advanced X-ray astrophysics facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    The HRC (High Resolution Camera) is a photon counting instrument to be flown on the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). It is a large field of view, high angular resolution, detector for the x-ray telescope. The HRC consists of a CsI coated microchannel plate (MCP) acting as a soft x-ray photocathode, followed by a second MCP for high electronic gain. The MCPs are readout by a crossed grid of resistively coupled wires to provide high spatial resolution along with timing and pulse height data. The instrument will be used in two modes, as a direct imaging detector with a limiting sensitivity of 10 to the -15 ergs sq cm sec in a 10 to the 5th second exposure, and as a readout for an objective transmission grating providing spectral resolution of several hundreds to thousands.

  4. Significance of medium-energy gamma-ray astronomy in the study of cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Cheung, C. Y.

    1976-01-01

    The paper examines the medium-energy (about 10-30 MeV) galactic gamma-ray radiation from primary and secondary electrons and calculates the expected gamma-ray distribution for the specific model of Bignami et al. (1975) on the assumption that the cosmic rays are correlated with the matter on the scale of galactic arms. The energy spectrum typical of regions near the galactic center indicates a dramatic shift from a predominantly cosmic-ray nucleonic mechanism at higher energies to a cosmic-ray electron mechanism at the lower energies. This provides a most important and direct means of probing the cosmic-ray electrons as a function of galactic position by making gamma-ray observations in the few to 40 MeV energy range. Medium-energy gamma-ray astronomy is shown to be a valuable tool in galactic research.

  5. Micro-Slit Collimators for X-ray/Gamma-ray Imaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Mikro Systems, Inc. (MSI) will advance the state-of-the-art in high resolution, high-aspect-ratio x-ray/gamma-ray collimator fabrication into the micro-slit regime...

  6. Localization of Gamma-Ray Bursts using the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Connaughton, V; Goldstein, A; Meegan, C A; Paciesas, W S; Preece, R D; Wilson-Hodge, C A; Gibby, M H; Greiner, J; Gruber, D; Jenke, P; Kippen, R M; Pelassa, V; Xiong, S; Yu, H -F; Bhat, P N; Burgess, J M; Byrne, D; Fitzpatrick, G; Foley, S; Giles, M M; Guiriec, S; van der Horst, A J; von Kienlin, A; McBreen, S; McGlynn, S; Tierney, D; Zhang, B -B

    2014-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in July, 2008. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the InterPlanetary Network (IPN), to analyze the accuracy of GBM GRB localizations. We find that the reported statistical uncertainties on GBM localizations, which can be as small as 1 degree, underestimate the distance of the GBM positions to the true GRB locations and we attribute this to systematic uncertainties. The distribution of systematic uncertainties is well represented (68% confidence level) by a 3.7 degree Gaussian with a non-Gaussian tail that contains about 10% of GBM-detected GRBs and extends to approximately 14 degrees. A more complex model suggests that there is a dependence of the systematic uncertainty on the position of the GRB in spacecraft coordinates, with GRBs in the quadrants on the Y-axis better l...

  7. LOCALIZATION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS USING THE FERMI GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Burgess, J. M. [CSPAR and Physics Department, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Goldstein, A.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A. [Astrophysics Office, ZP12, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Meegan, C. A.; Jenke, P.; Pelassa, V.; Xiong, S.; Bhat, P. N. [CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Paciesas, W. S. [Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL (United States); Preece, R. D. [Department of Space Science, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Gibby, M. H. [Jacobs Technology, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States); Greiner, J.; Yu, H.-F. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Gruber, D. [Planetarium Südtirol, Gummer 5, I-39053 Karneid (Italy); Kippen, R. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM 87545 (United States); Byrne, D.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S., E-mail: valerie@nasa.gov [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Stillorgan Road, Dublin 4 (Ireland); and others

    2015-02-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in 2008 July. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the InterPlanetary Network, to analyze the accuracy of GBM GRB localizations. We find that the reported statistical uncertainties on GBM localizations, which can be as small as 1°, underestimate the distance of the GBM positions to the true GRB locations and we attribute this to systematic uncertainties. The distribution of systematic uncertainties is well represented (68% confidence level) by a 3.°7 Gaussian with a non-Gaussian tail that contains about 10% of GBM-detected GRBs and extends to approximately 14°. A more complex model suggests that there is a dependence of the systematic uncertainty on the position of the GRB in spacecraft coordinates, with GRBs in the quadrants on the Y axis better localized than those on the X axis.

  8. Localization of Gamma-Ray Bursts Using the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Goldstein, A.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Gibby, M. H.; Greiner, J.; Gruber, D.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R. M.; Pelassa, V.; Xiong, S.; Yu, H.-F.; Bhat, P. N.; Burgess, J. M.; Byrne, D.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S.; Giles, M. M.; Guiriec, S.; van der Horst, A. J.; von Kienlin, A.; McBreen, S.; McGlynn, S.; Tierney, D.; Zhang, B.-B.

    2015-02-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in 2008 July. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the InterPlanetary Network, to analyze the accuracy of GBM GRB localizations. We find that the reported statistical uncertainties on GBM localizations, which can be as small as 1°, underestimate the distance of the GBM positions to the true GRB locations and we attribute this to systematic uncertainties. The distribution of systematic uncertainties is well represented (68% confidence level) by a 3.°7 Gaussian with a non-Gaussian tail that contains about 10% of GBM-detected GRBs and extends to approximately 14°. A more complex model suggests that there is a dependence of the systematic uncertainty on the position of the GRB in spacecraft coordinates, with GRBs in the quadrants on the Y axis better localized than those on the X axis.

  9. Inactivation of citrus tristeza virus by gamma ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The total exposure of gamma ray and the intensity of gamma ray per hour for the inactivation of citrus tristeza virus (CTV) and also the effect on citrus tissues are described. The budwoods of Morita navel orange infected with a severe seedling-yellow strain of CTV were irradiated with gamma ray from a 60Co source for 20 -- 52 hours. The buds or small tissue pieces of the irradiated budwoods were subsequently grafted onto Mexcan lime. CTV was easily inactivated by the irradiation from 10 to 18 kR for from 20 to 52 hours. The higher the total exposure, the higher the rate of inactivation. The CTV in the budwoods was almost inactivated after the irradiation with 20 kR. When the total exposure to gamma ray on budwoods was the same, CTV was more efficiently inactivated by the irradiation for long period with low intensity of gamma ray per hour than that for short period with high intensity per hour. Gamma ray irradiation was effective to eliminate CTV from citrus tissues. (Mori, K.)

  10. Spatial distribution of reflected gamma rays by Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear facilities, the reflection of gamma rays of the walls and metals constitutes an unknown origin of radiation. These reflected gamma rays must be estimated and determined. This study concerns reflected gamma rays on metal slabs. We evaluated the spatial distribution of the reflected gamma rays spectra by using the Monte Carlo method. An appropriate estimator for the double differential albedo is used to determine the energy spectra and the angular distribution of reflected gamma rays by slabs of iron and aluminium. We took into the account the principal interactions of gamma rays with matter: photoelectric, coherent scattering (Rayleigh), incoherent scattering (Compton) and pair creation. The Klein-Nishina differential cross section was used to select direction and energy of scattered photons after each Compton scattering. The obtained spectra show peaks at 0.511* MeV for higher source energy. The Results are in good agreement with those obtained by the TRIPOLI code [J.C. Nimal et al., TRIPOLI02: Programme de Monte Carlo Polycinsetique a Trois dimensions, CEA Rapport, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique.

  11. Spatial distribution of reflected gamma rays by Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jehouani, A. [LPTN, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences Semlalia, B.P. 2390, 40000 Marrakech (Morocco)], E-mail: jehouani@ucam.ac.ma; Merzouki, A. [LPTN, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences Semlalia, B.P. 2390, 40000 Marrakech (Morocco); Remote Sensing and Geomatics of the Environment Laboratory, Ottawa-Carleton Geoscience Centre, Marion Hall, 140 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON, KIN 6N5 (Canada); Boutadghart, F.; Ghassoun, J. [LPTN, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences Semlalia, B.P. 2390, 40000 Marrakech (Morocco)

    2007-10-15

    In nuclear facilities, the reflection of gamma rays of the walls and metals constitutes an unknown origin of radiation. These reflected gamma rays must be estimated and determined. This study concerns reflected gamma rays on metal slabs. We evaluated the spatial distribution of the reflected gamma rays spectra by using the Monte Carlo method. An appropriate estimator for the double differential albedo is used to determine the energy spectra and the angular distribution of reflected gamma rays by slabs of iron and aluminium. We took into the account the principal interactions of gamma rays with matter: photoelectric, coherent scattering (Rayleigh), incoherent scattering (Compton) and pair creation. The Klein-Nishina differential cross section was used to select direction and energy of scattered photons after each Compton scattering. The obtained spectra show peaks at 0.511{sup *} MeV for higher source energy. The Results are in good agreement with those obtained by the TRIPOLI code [J.C. Nimal et al., TRIPOLI02: Programme de Monte Carlo Polycinsetique a Trois dimensions, CEA Rapport, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique. ].

  12. Spatial distribution of reflected gamma rays by Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehouani, A.; Merzouki, A.; Boutadghart, F.; Ghassoun, J.

    2007-10-01

    In nuclear facilities, the reflection of gamma rays of the walls and metals constitutes an unknown origin of radiation. These reflected gamma rays must be estimated and determined. This study concerns reflected gamma rays on metal slabs. We evaluated the spatial distribution of the reflected gamma rays spectra by using the Monte Carlo method. An appropriate estimator for the double differential albedo is used to determine the energy spectra and the angular distribution of reflected gamma rays by slabs of iron and aluminium. We took into the account the principal interactions of gamma rays with matter: photoelectric, coherent scattering (Rayleigh), incoherent scattering (Compton) and pair creation. The Klein-Nishina differential cross section was used to select direction and energy of scattered photons after each Compton scattering. The obtained spectra show peaks at 0.511∗ MeV for higher source energy. The Results are in good agreement with those obtained by the TRIPOLI code [J.C. Nimal et al., TRIPOLI02: Programme de Monte Carlo Polycinśetique à Trois dimensions, CEA Rapport, Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique. [1

  13. Physics of radio emission in gamma-ray pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    > Propagation of radio emission in a pulsar magnetosphere is reviewed. The effects of polarization transfer, induced scattering and reprocessing to high energies are analysed with a special emphasis on the implications for the gamma-ray pulsars. The possibilities of the pulsar plasma diagnostics based on the observed radio pulse characteristics are also outlined. As an example, the plasma number density profiles obtained from the polarization data for the Vela and the gamma-ray millisecond pulsars J1446-4701, J1939+2134 and J1744-1134 are presented. The number densities derived tend to be the highest/lowest when the radio pulse leads/lags the gamma-ray peak. In the PSR J1939+2134, the plasma density profiles for the main pulse and interpulse appear to fit exactly the same curve, testifying to the origin of both radio components above the same magnetic pole and their propagation through the same plasma flow in opposite directions. The millisecond radio pulse components exhibiting flat position angle curves are suggested to result from the induced scattering of the main pulse by the same particles that generate gamma rays. This is believed to underlie the wide-sense radio/gamma-ray correlation in the millisecond pulsars. The radio quietness of young gamma-ray pulsars is attributed to resonant absorption, whereas the radio loudness to the radio beam escape through the periphery of the open field line tube.

  14. The Gamma-Ray View of the Extragalactic Background Light

    CERN Document Server

    Finke, Justin D

    2010-01-01

    The Extragalactic Background Light (EBL) from the infrared (IR) through the ultraviolet (UV) is dominated by emission from stars, either directly or through absorption and reradiation by dust. It can thus give information on the star formation history of the universe. However, it is difficult to measure directly due to foreground radiation fields from the Galaxy and solar system. Gamma-rays from extragalactic sources at cosmological distances (blazars and gamma-ray bursts) interact with EBL photons creating electron-positron pairs, absorbing the gamma-rays. Given the intrinsic gamma-ray spectrum of a source and its redshift, the EBL can in principle be measured. However, the intrinsic gamma-ray spectra of blazars and GRBs can vary considerably from source to source and the from the same source over short timescales. A maximum intrinsic spectrum can be assumed from theoretical grounds, to give upper limits on the EBL absorption from blazars at low redshift with very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray observations wit...

  15. Late Time Emission of Prompt Fission Gamma Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Talou, P; Stetcu, I; Lestone, J P; McKigney, E; Chadwick, M B

    2016-01-01

    The emission of prompt fission $\\gamma$ rays within a few nanoseconds to a few microseconds following the scission point is studied in the Hauser-Feshbach formalism applied to the deexcitation of primary excited fission fragments. Neutron and $\\gamma$-ray evaporations from fully accelerated fission fragments are calculated in competition at each stage of the decay, and the role of isomers in the fission products, before $\\beta$-decay, is analyzed. The time evolution of the average total $\\gamma$-ray energy, average total $\\gamma$-ray multiplicity, and fragment-specific $\\gamma$-ray spectra, is presented in the case of neutron-induced fission reactions of $^{235}$U and $^{239}$Pu, as well as spontaneous fission of $^{252}$Cf. The production of specific isomeric states is calculated and compared to available experimental data. About 7% of all prompt fission $\\gamma$ rays are predicted to be emitted between 10 nsec and 5 $\\mu$sec following fission, in the case of $^{235}$U and $^{239}$Pu $(n_{\\rm th},f)$ reactio...

  16. NEW FERMI-LAT EVENT RECONSTRUCTION REVEALS MORE HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA RAYS FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwood, W. B. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Baldini, L. [Universita di Pisa and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bregeon, J.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Sgro, C.; Tinivella, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bruel, P. [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); Chekhtman, A. [Center for Earth Observing and Space Research, College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Cohen-Tanugi, J. [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Universite Montpellier 2, CNRS/IN2P3, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Drlica-Wagner, A.; Omodei, N.; Rochester, L. S.; Usher, T. L. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Granot, J. [Department of Natural Sciences, The Open University of Israel, 1 University Road, P.O. Box 808, Ra' anana 43537 (Israel); Longo, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Razzaque, S. [Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa); Zimmer, S., E-mail: melissa.pesce.rollins@pi.infn.it, E-mail: nicola.omodei@stanford.edu, E-mail: granot@openu.ac.il [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-09-01

    Based on the experience gained during the four and a half years of the mission, the Fermi-LAT Collaboration has undertaken a comprehensive revision of the event-level analysis going under the name of Pass 8. Although it is not yet finalized, we can test the improvements in the new event reconstruction with the special case of the prompt phase of bright gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), where the signal-to-noise ratio is large enough that loose selection cuts are sufficient to identify gamma rays associated with the source. Using the new event reconstruction, we have re-analyzed 10 GRBs previously detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) for which an X-ray/optical follow-up was possible and found four new gamma rays with energies greater than 10 GeV in addition to the seven previously known. Among these four is a 27.4 GeV gamma ray from GRB 080916C, which has a redshift of 4.35, thus making it the gamma ray with the highest intrinsic energy ({approx}147 GeV) detected from a GRB. We present here the salient aspects of the new event reconstruction and discuss the scientific implications of these new high-energy gamma rays, such as constraining extragalactic background light models, Lorentz invariance violation tests, the prompt emission mechanism, and the bulk Lorentz factor of the emitting region.

  17. GRIPS and the Perspective of Next-generation Gamma-ray Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Diehl, Roland

    2011-01-01

    GRIPS is one example of next generation telescopes proposed for astronomy the energy range between hard X-ray mirror instruments such as NuStar and the Fermi telescope. The Compton telescope principle is an advantageous concept in view of background suppression, imaging sensitivity within a large field of view and energy range, and capability to measure polarization. The diversity of astrophysical sources at high energies (diffuse emission from cosmic-ray interactions, nuclear lines from point-like and diffuse sources, accreting binaries, cosmic-ray acceleration sites, novae and supernovae, GRBs) presents a challenge, and in particular emphasizes the need for large fields of view and surveys. We discuss the astrophysical challenges which are expected to remain after the extended INTEGRAL mission, and how such a next-generation survey at low-energy gamma-rays would impact on these. We argue that qualitatively new and more direct insights could be obtained on cosmic high-energy phenomena and their underlying ph...

  18. Gamma-ray luminosity function of gamma-ray bright AGNs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Debbijoy Bhattacharya; P. Sreekumar; R. Mukherjee

    2009-01-01

    Detection of γ-ray emissions from a class of active galactic nuclei (viz blazars),has been one of the important findings from the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO). However, their-γ-ray luminosity function has not been well determined. Few at-tempts have been made in earlier works, where BL Lacs and Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars (FSRQs) have been considered as a single source class. In this paper, we investigated the evolution and γ-ray luminosity function of FSRQs and BL Lacs separately. Our investi-gation indicates no evolution for BL Lacs, however FSRQs show significant evolution. Pure luminosity evolution is assumed for FSRQs and exponential and power law evolu-tion models are examined. Due to the small number of sources, the low luminosity end index of the luminosity function for FSRQs is constrained with an upper limit. BL Lac lu-minosity function shows no signature of break. As a consistency check, the model source distributions derived from these luminosity functions show no significant departure from the observed source distributions.

  19. Lag-luminosity relation in gamma-ray burst X-ray flares

    CERN Document Server

    Margutti, R

    2010-01-01

    In strict analogy to prompt pulses, X-ray flares observed by Swift-XRT in long Gamma-Ray Bursts define a lag-luminosity relation: L_p,iso \\propto t_lag^{-0.95+/-0.23}. The lag-luminosity is proven to be a fundamental law extending 5 decades in time and 5 in energy. This is direct evidence that GRB X-ray flares and prompt gamma-ray pulses are produced by the same mechanism.

  20. Compton scattering in terrestrial gamma-ray flashes detected with the Fermi gamma-ray burst monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Gerard; McBreen, Sheila; Briggs, Michael S; Foley, Suzanne; Tierney, David; Chaplin, Vandiver L; Connaughton, Valerie; Stanbro, Matthew; Xiong, Shaolin; Dwyer, Joseph; Fishman, Gerald J; Roberts, Oliver J; von Kienlin, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are short intense flashes of gamma rays associated with lightning activity in thunderstorms. Using Monte Carlo simulations of the relativistic runaway electron avalanche (RREA) process, theoretical predictions for the temporal and spectral evolution of TGFs are compared to observations made with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Assuming a single source altitude of 15 km, a comparison of simulations to data is performed for a range of empirically chosen source electron variation time scales. The data exhibit a clear softening with increased source distance, in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions. The simulated spectra follow this trend in the data, but tend to underestimate the observed hardness. Such a discrepancy may imply that the basic RREA model is not sufficient. Alternatively, a TGF beam that is tilted with respect to the zenith could produce an evolution with source distance that is compatible with the da...