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Sample records for astrophysical applications spectroscopie

  1. Report on the workshop "Decay spectroscopy at CARIBU: advanced fuel cycle applications, nuclear structure and astrophysics". 14-16 April 2011, Argonne National Laboratory, USA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondev, F.; Carpenter, M.P.; Chowdhury, P.; Clark, J.A.; Lister, C.J.; Nichols, A.L.; Swewryniak, D. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (Univ. of Massachusetts); (Univ. of Surrey)

    2011-10-06

    A workshop on 'Decay Spectroscopy at CARIBU: Advanced Fuel Cycle Applications, Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics' will be held at Argonne National Laboratory on April 14-16, 2011. The aim of the workshop is to discuss opportunities for decay studies at the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the ATLAS facility with emphasis on advanced fuel cycle (AFC) applications, nuclear structure and astrophysics research. The workshop will consist of review and contributed talks. Presentations by members of the local groups, outlining the status of relevant in-house projects and availabile equipment, will also be organized. time will also be set aside to discuss and develop working collaborations for future decay studies at CARIBU. Topics of interest include: (1) Decay data of relevance to AFC applications with emphasis on reactor decay heat; (2) Discrete high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy following radioactive decya and related topics; (3) Calorimetric studies of neutron-rich fission framgents using Total ABsorption Gamma-Ray Spectrometry (TAGS) technique; (4) Beta-delayed neutron emissions and related topics; and (5) Decay data needs for nuclear astrophysics.

  2. [Meson spectroscopy and particle astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LoSecco, J.M.

    1993-07-01

    Progress in the design and construction of a light meson spectroscopy experiment is reported. The experiment will run in 1993. Some non- accelerator, activities and plans for the future are also discussed. Results of a Brookhaven beam test with a subset of the final detector are described. The test has been quite promising both in the speed with which results have been obtained and in the quality of the data itself. The status of the CsI veto is reported The target region, in particular the CsI veto experiment is Notre Dame's primary hardware responsibility on this experiment

  3. Development of a low-level setup for gamma spectroscopy: Application for nuclear astrophysics using reverse kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genard, G.; Nuttens, V.E.; Bouchat, V.; Terwagne, G.

    2010-01-01

    It is more and more necessary to improve the sensitivity of gamma-ray spectroscopy systems, especially in nuclear astrophysics. In the case of radiative proton capture reactions, one means is to avoid the reactions on the target impurities by using reverse kinematics. This technique is possible with the LARN accelerator and can provide very clean cross-section measurements. For that purpose, a hydrogen standard has been carried out by means of ion implantation in silicon. In addition, a low-level setup has been put in place on a new beam line of the accelerator. A high efficiency and high resolution germanium detector is used conjointly with a double shielding. A passive lead castle shielding system is used to reduce the natural radioactivity and an active shielding consisting of an anti-cosmic veto is provided by an anticoincidence between the plastic scintillator and the gamma-ray detector. The setup allows a reduction of 70% of the background interference and provides an approximately 200 fold sensitivity gain of between 600 and 3000 keV. Some other developments have also been carried out to optimize the setup. The entire setup and the reverse kinematics have been validated by measuring the cross-section of the 13 C(p,γ) 14 N and 15 N(p,γ) 16 O reactions that present some astrophysical interest.

  4. Nuclear astrophysics: An application of nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fueloep, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear astrophysics, a fruitful combination of nuclear physics and astrophysics can be viewed as a special application of nuclear physics where the study of nuclei and their reactions are motivated by astrophysical problems. Nuclear astrophysics is also a good example for the state of the art interdisciplinary research. The origin of elements studied by geologists is explored by astrophysicists using nuclear reaction rates provided by the nuclear physics community. Due to the high interest in the field two recent Nuclear Physics Divisional Conferences of the European Physical Society were devoted to nuclear astrophysics and a new conference series entitled 'Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics' has been established. Selected problems of nuclear astrophysics will be presented emphasizing the interplay between nuclear physics and astrophysics. As an example the role of 14 N(p,r) 15 O reaction rate in the determination of the age of globular clusters will be discussed in details

  5. THz Spectroscopy and Spectroscopic Database for Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, John C.; Drouin, Brian J.

    2006-01-01

    Molecule specific astronomical observations rely on precisely determined laboratory molecular data for interpretation. The Herschel Heterodyne Instrument for Far Infrared, a suite of SOFIA instruments, and ALMA are each well placed to expose the limitations of available molecular physics data and spectral line catalogs. Herschel and SOFIA will observe in high spectral resolution over the entire far infrared range. Accurate data to previously unimagined frequencies including infrared ro-vibrational and ro-torsional bands will be required for interpretation of the observations. Planned ALMA observations with a very small beam will reveal weaker emission features requiring accurate knowledge of higher quantum numbers and additional vibrational states. Historically, laboratory spectroscopy has been at the front of submillimeter technology development, but now astronomical receivers have an enormous capability advantage. Additionally, rotational spectroscopy is a relatively mature field attracting little interest from students and funding agencies. Molecular data base maintenance is tedious and difficult to justify as research. This severely limits funding opportunities even though data bases require the same level of expertise as research. We report the application of some relatively new receiver technology into a simple solid state THz spectrometer that has the performance required to collect the laboratory data required by astronomical observations. Further detail on the lack of preparation for upcoming missions by the JPL spectral line catalog is given.

  6. Recent astrophysical applications of the Trojan Horse Method to nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Crucilla, V.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Tumino, A.; Fu, C.; Tribble, R.; Banu, A.; Al-Abdullah, T.; Goldberg, V.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Tabacaru, G.; Trache, L.

    2008-01-01

    The Trojan Horse Method (THM) is an unique indirect technique allowing to measure astrophysical rearrangement reactions down to astrophysical relevant energies. The basic principle and a review of the recent applications of the Trojan Horse Method are presented. The applications aiming to the extraction of the bare astrophysical S b (E) for some two-body processes are discussed

  7. The goals of gamma-ray spectroscopy in high energy astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingenfelter, Richard E.; Higdon, James C.; Leventhal, Marvin; Ramaty, Reuven; Woosley, Stanford E.

    1990-01-01

    The use of high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy in astrophysics is discussed with specific attention given to the application of the Nuclear Astrophysics Explorer (NAE). The gamma-ray lines from nuclear transitions in radionucleic decay and positron annihilation permits the study of current sites, rates and models of nucleosynthesis, and galactic structure. Diffuse galactic emission is discussed, and the high-resolution observations of gamma-ray lines from discrete sites are also described. Interstellar mixing and elemental abundances can also be inferred from high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy of nucleosynthetic products. Compact objects can also be examined by means of gamma-ray emissions, allowing better understanding of neutron stars and the accreting black hole near the galactic center. Solar physics can also be investigated by examining such features as solar-flare particle acceleration and atmospheric abundances.

  8. General relativity with applications to astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Straumann, Norbert

    2004-01-01

    This text provides a comprehensive and timely introduction to general relativity The foundations of the theory in Part I are thoroughly developed together with the required mathematical background from differential geometry in Part III The six chapters in Part II are devoted to tests of general relativity and to many of its applications Binary pulsars are studied in considerable detail Much space is devoted to the study of compact objects, especially to black holes This includes a detailed derivation of the Kerr solution, Israel's proof of his uniqueness theorem, and derivations of the basic laws of black hole physics The final chapter of this part contains Witten's proof of the positive energy theorem The book addresses undergraduate and graduate students in physics, astrophysics and mathematics It is very well structured and should become a standard text for a modern treatment of gravitational physics The clear presentation of differential geometry makes it also useful for string theory and other fields of ...

  9. Decay Spectroscopy for Nuclear Astrophysics: {beta}-delayed Proton Decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trache, L.; Simmons, E.; Spiridon, A.; McCleskey, M.; Roeder, B. T.; Tribble, R. E. [Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77845 (United States); Saastamoinen, A.; Jokinen, A.; Aysto, J. [University of Jyvaskyla, Jyvaskyla (Finland); Davinson, T.; Woods, P. J. [University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Pollacco, E.; Kebbiri, M. [CEA/IRFU Saclay (France); Pascovici, G. [IKP, Universitaet zu Koeln (Germany)

    2011-11-30

    Decay spectroscopy is one of the oldest indirect methods in nuclear astrophysics. We have developed at TAMU techniques to measure beta- and beta-delayed proton decay of sd-shell, proton-rich nuclei. The short-lived radioactive species are produced in-flight, separated, then slowed down (from about 40 MeV/u) and implanted in the middle of very thin Si detectors. These allowed us to measure protons with energies as low as 200 keV from nuclei with lifetimes of 100 ms or less. At the same time we measure gamma-rays up to 8 MeV with high resolution HPGe detectors. We have studied the decay of {sup 23}Al, {sup 27}P, {sup 31}Cl, all important for understanding explosive H-burning in novae. The technique has shown a remarkable selectivity to beta-delayed charged-particle emission and works even at radioactive beam rates of a few pps. The states populated are resonances for the radiative proton capture reactions {sup 22}Na(p,{gamma}){sup 23}Mg(crucial for the depletion of {sup 22}Na in novae), {sup 26m}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 27}Si and {sup 30}P(p,{gamma}){sup 31}S(bottleneck in novae and XRB burning), respectively. More recently we have radically improved the technique using a gas based detector we call AstroBox.

  10. TeraHertz Time Domain Spectroscopy of Astrophysical Analog Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Geoffrey

    The section of the electromagnetic spectrum extending roughly from wavelengths of 3 millimeters to 30 microns is commonly known as the far-infrared or TeraHertz (THz) region. It contains the great majority of the photons emitted by the universe, and THz observations of molecules and dust are able penetrate deeply into molecular clouds, thus revealing the full history of star and planet formation. Accordingly, the successful deployments of the Herschel and SOFIA observatories, and the emerging capabilities of ALMA, are both revolutionizing our understanding of THz astrophysics and placing stringent demands on the generation of accurate laboratory data on the relevant gas phase and solid state materials detected. With APRA support, we have constructed a combined high bandwidth and high spectral resolution femtosecond THz Time Domain Spectroscopy (THz TDS) system and an FT-IR spectrometer, and coupled these instruments to a high vacuum chamber and cryostat and to gas phase cells including a molecular beam system. We have investigated solid materials from room temperature to 10 K, and can examine both refractory matter such as silicates and molecular ices. For the latter, we have demonstrated that the THz bands observed are uniquely sensitive to both the molecular structure of the ice and its thermal history, and thus that THz observations can provide novel insight into the dominant condensable materials in dense, cold regions. In the gas phase we can record doppler-limited data over at least a decade in bandwidth. While quite capable, the high vacuum cryostat can only study thick samples, especially ices, due to the fairly rapid adsorption of gases onto surfaces at low temperature under such conditions. It is therefore not possible to examine highly layered/structured samples or reactive species. We therefore propose here to upgrade the chamber/cryostat to ultrahigh vacuum, and implement additional sample preparation and characterization tools. With such modifications

  11. Study of the hydroxyl radical: Experimental advances in microwave spectroscopy, theoretical model and astrophysical consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Destombes, Jean-Luc

    1978-01-01

    This research thesis mainly addresses the experimental and theoretical study of the hydroxyl radical, and the consequences of the obtained results in astrophysics which are studied with a model of pumping by the far infrared. After a recall of notions related to microwave spectroscopy and to molecular radio-astronomy, the author more particularly discusses different aspects of microwave spectroscopy in the interstellar environment and in laboratory. He also reviews different types of spectrometers for unsteady molecules. In the second part, he addresses issues related to the hydroxyl radical (OH): presentation of spectrometers, study of the reaction environment, study of the radical microwave spectrum, identification of transitions by frequency measurements. In the last parts, the author addresses some aspects of interstellar OH masers, and reports the application of some results to simple models of pumping by the far infra red

  12. Dusty plasmas in application to astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verheest, F.

    1999-01-01

    Highly charged and massive dust grains have much smaller characteristic frequencies than electrons and ions and lead to interesting modifications of existing modes and to exciting new possibilities for modes and instabilities at the lower frequency end of the spectrum. Space observations of planets and comets have shown wave-like behaviour which can only be explained by the presence of charged dust grains. Two typical solar system applications are spokes and braids in the rings of Saturn and the influence of charged dust on the pickup process of ions of cometary origin by the solar wind. As dust is ubiquitous in the universe, the Jeans instability in astrophysics is modified by incorporating plasma and charged dust and treating electromagnetic and self-gravitational aspects together. Besides the usual mechanism based upon thermal agitation, other ways of countering gravitational contraction are via excitation of electrostatic dust-acoustic modes or via Alfven-Jeans instabilities for perpendicular magnetosonic waves. The unstable wavelengths tend to be much larger, due to the dominance of plasma and magnetic pressures in inhibiting gravitational collapse. (author)

  13. International Conference on Recent Advances in Spectroscopy : Theoretical, Experimental, and Astrophysical Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhuri, Rajat K; Raveendran, A. V; Satya Narayanan, A; Recent Advances in Spectroscopy : Theoretical, Astrophysical and Experimental Perspectives

    2010-01-01

    In recent years there have been great advances in the fields of laboratory and astronomical spectroscopy. These have been equally matched by large-scale computations using state-of-the-art theoretical methods. The accurate atomic opacities that are available today play a great role in the field of biomedical research using nanotechnology. The proceedings of the "International Conference on Recent Advances in Spectroscopy: Theoretical, Experimental and Astrophysical Perspectives" contain both invited and contributory papers, which give the most recent results by the peers in the areas of theoretical and experimental atomic physics as well as observational astrophysics.

  14. Detailed Opacity Calculations for Astrophysical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Christophe Pain

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, several opacity codes are able to provide data for stellar structure models, but the computed opacities may show significant differences. In this work, we present state-of-the-art precise spectral opacity calculations, illustrated by stellar applications. The essential role of laboratory experiments to check the quality of the computed data is underlined. We review some X-ray and XUV laser and Z-pinch photo-absorption measurements as well as X-ray emission spectroscopy experiments involving hot dense plasmas produced by ultra-high-intensity laser irradiation. The measured spectra are systematically compared with the fine-structure opacity code SCO-RCG. The focus is on iron, due to its crucial role in understanding asteroseismic observations of β Cephei-type and Slowly Pulsating B stars, as well as of the Sun. For instance, in β Cephei-type stars, the iron-group opacity peak excites acoustic modes through the “kappa-mechanism”. Particular attention is paid to the higher-than-predicted iron opacity measured at the Sandia Z-machine at solar interior conditions. We discuss some theoretical aspects such as density effects, photo-ionization, autoionization or the “filling-the-gap” effect of highly excited states.

  15. Applications of accelerator mass spectrometry to nuclear physics and astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Zhiyu; Zhang Chuan

    2002-01-01

    As an ultra high sensitive analyzing method, accelerator mass spectrometry is playing an important role in the studies of nuclear physics and astrophysics. The accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) applications in searching for violation of Pauli exclusion principle and study on supernovae are discussed as examples

  16. Nuclear Reactions for Astrophysics and Other Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escher, J E; Burke, J T; Dietrich, F S; Scielzo, N D; Ressler, J J

    2011-03-01

    Cross sections for compound-nuclear reactions are required for many applications. The surrogate nuclear reactions method provides an indirect approach for determining cross sections for reactions on unstable isotopes, which are difficult or impossible to measure otherwise. Current implementations of the method provide useful cross sections for (n,f) reactions, but need to be improved upon for applications to capture reactions.

  17. Millimeter and submillimeter wave spectroscopy: molecules of astrophysical interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plummer, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    Species of three general types of molecular ions were studied by means of millimeter-submillimeter (mm/sub-mm) wave spectroscopy. Because of their highly reactive nature, it has been possible to study ionic species in the microwave region for only the past ten is presented here. A new method is presented here for production of such molecular ions in concentrations greater by one to two orders of magnitude than possible with previous techniques, and the subsequent first mm/sub/mm/ detections of two isotopic forms of HCO + , three isotopic forms of ArD + , and the molecular ion H 3 O + . Simple neutral species, which are generally less reactive than ions, are also present in relatively large concentrations in the interstellar medium and in the atmospheres of cool stars themselves. Presented here is the first laboratory microwave detection of two isotopic species of LiH 2 , a solid at normal temperatures and pressures. In addition, a combined analysis of these data, additional data collected on the related species LiD, and existing data on LiD is presented. Finally, a large fraction of the mm/sub/mm/ emissions observed toward the interstellar medium were shown to belong to a small number of relatively heavy, stable, but spectroscopically complicated molecules, many of them internal rotors

  18. A simulation package for soft X-ray and EUV spectroscopy of astrophysical and laboratory plasmas in different environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, G Y; Li, F; Wang, F L; Zhong, J Y; Zhao, G; Wu, Y

    2014-01-01

    Spectroscopic researches in astronomy are significantly dependent on theoretical modelling methods, such as Chianti, Xstar, Cloudy etc. Recently, a different research community - Laboratory Astrophysics tries to benchmark these theoretical models or simulate the astrophysical phenomenon directly in conditions accessed in ground laboratory. Those unavoidable differences between the astrophysical objects and laboratory provide a need for a self-consistent model to make a bridge for the two cases. So we setup a visualized simulation package for soft X-ray and EUV spectroscopy in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas.

  19. Ultrabroadband spectroscopy for security applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrecht, Sunniva; Berge, Luc; Skupin, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Ultrabroadband spectroscopy is a promising novel approach to overcome two major hurdles which have so far limited the application of THz spectroscopy for security applications: the increased bandwidth enables to record several characteristic spectroscopic features and the technique allows...

  20. Cathodoluminescence microscopy and spectroscopy of micro- and nanodiamonds: an implication for laboratory astrophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gucsik, Arnold; Nishido, Hirotsugu; Ninagawa, Kiyotaka; Ott, Ulrich; Tsuchiyama, Akira; Kayama, Masahiro; Simonia, Irakli; Boudou, Jean-Paul

    2012-12-01

    Color centers in selected micro- and nanodiamond samples were investigated by cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy and spectroscopy at 298 K [room temperature (RT)] and 77 K [liquid-nitrogen temperature (LNT)] to assess the value of the technique for astrophysics. Nanodiamonds from meteorites were compared with synthetic diamonds made with different processes involving distinct synthesis mechanisms (chemical vapor deposition, static high pressure high temperature, detonation). A CL emission peak centered at around 540 nm at 77 K was observed in almost all of the selected diamond samples and is assigned to the dislocation defect with nitrogen atoms. Additional peaks were identified at 387 and 452 nm, which are related to the vacancy defect. In general, peak intensity at LNT at the samples was increased in comparison to RT. The results indicate a clear temperature-dependence of the spectroscopic properties of diamond. This suggests the method is a useful tool in laboratory astrophysics.

  1. Magnetohydrodynamic Particle Acceleration Processes: SSX Experiments, Theory and Astrophysical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthaeus, W.; Brown, M.

    2006-01-01

    This is the final technical report for a funded program to provide theoretical support to the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment. We examined mhd relaxation, reconnecton between two spheromaks, particle acceleration by these processes, and collisonless effects, e.g., Hall effect near the reconnection zone,. Throughout the project, applications to space plasma physics and astrophysics were included. Towards the end of the project we were examining a more fully turbulent relaxation associated with unconstrained dynamics in SSX. We employed experimental, spacecraft observations, analytical and numerical methods.

  2. Annual Report: Hydrodynamics and Radiative Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Paul Drake

    2005-12-01

    We report the ongoing work of our group in hydrodynamics and radiative hydrodynamics with astrophysical applications. During the period of the existing grant, we have carried out two types of experiments at the Omega laser. One set of experiments has studied radiatively collapsing shocks, obtaining high-quality scaling data using a backlit pinhole and obtaining the first (ever, anywhere) Thomson-scattering data from a radiative shock. Other experiments have studied the deeply nonlinear development of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability from complex initial conditions, obtaining the first (ever, anywhere) dual-axis radiographic data using backlit pinholes and ungated detectors. All these experiments have applications to astrophysics, discussed in the corresponding papers either in print or in preparation. We also have obtained preliminary radiographs of experimental targets using our x-ray source. The targets for the experiments have been assembled at Michigan, where we also prepare many of the simple components. The above activities, in addition to a variety of data analysis and design projects, provide good experience for graduate and undergraduates students. In the process of doing this research we have built a research group that uses such work to train junior scientists.

  3. Analytical applications of spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creaser, C.S.

    1988-01-01

    This book provides an up to date overview of recent developments in analytical spectroscopy, with a particular emphasis on the common themes of chromatography - spectroscopy combinations, Fourier transform methods, and data handling techniques, which have played an increasingly important part in the development of all spectroscopic techniques. The book contains papers originally presented at a conference entitled 'Spectroscopy Across The Spectrum' held jointly with the first 'International Near Infrared Spectroscopy Conference' at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK, in July 1987, which have been edited and rearranged with some additional material. Each section includes reviews of key areas of current research as well as short reports of new developments. The fields covered are: Near Infrared Spectroscopy; Infrared Spectroscopy; Mass Spectroscopy; NMR Spectroscopy; Atomic and UV/Visible Spectroscopy; Chemometrics and Data Analysis. (author)

  4. Introduction to plasma physics with space, laboratory and astrophysical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gurnett, Donald A

    2017-01-01

    Introducing basic principles of plasma physics and their applications to space, laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, this new edition provides updated material throughout. Topics covered include single-particle motions, kinetic theory, magnetohydrodynamics, small amplitude waves in hot and cold plasmas, and collisional effects. New additions include the ponderomotive force, tearing instabilities in resistive plasmas and the magnetorotational instability in accretion disks, charged particle acceleration by shocks, and a more in-depth look at nonlinear phenomena. A broad range of applications are explored: planetary magnetospheres and radiation belts, the confinement and stability of plasmas in fusion devices, the propagation of discontinuities and shock waves in the solar wind, and analysis of various types of plasma waves and instabilities that can occur in planetary magnetospheres and laboratory plasma devices. With step-by-step derivations and self-contained introductions to mathematical methods, this book...

  5. Relativistic kinetic theory with applications in astrophysics and cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Vereshchagin, Gregory V

    2017-01-01

    Relativistic kinetic theory has widespread application in astrophysics and cosmology. The interest has grown in recent years as experimentalists are now able to make reliable measurements on physical systems where relativistic effects are no longer negligible. This ambitious monograph is divided into three parts. It presents the basic ideas and concepts of this theory, equations and methods, including derivation of kinetic equations from the relativistic BBGKY hierarchy and discussion of the relation between kinetic and hydrodynamic levels of description. The second part introduces elements of computational physics with special emphasis on numerical integration of Boltzmann equations and related approaches, as well as multi-component hydrodynamics. The third part presents an overview of applications ranging from covariant theory of plasma response, thermalization of relativistic plasma, comptonization in static and moving media to kinetics of self-gravitating systems, cosmological structure formation and neut...

  6. Tenth International Colloquium on UV and X-Ray Spectroscopy of Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Eric H.; Kahn, Steven M.

    UV and X-ray spectroscopy of astrophysical and laboratory plasmas draws interest from many disciplines. Contributions from international specialists are collected together in this book from a timely recent conference. In astrophysics, the Hubble Space Telescope, Astro 1 and ROSAT observatories are now providing UV and X-ray spectra and images of cosmic sources in unprecedented detail, while the Yohkoh mission recently collected superb data on the solar corona. In the laboratory, the development of ion-trap facilities and novel laser experiments are providing vital new data on high temperature plasmas. Recent innovations in the technology of spectroscopic instrumentation are discussed. These papers constitute an excellent up-to-date review of developments in short-wavelength spectroscopy and offer a solid introduction to its theoretical and experimental foundations. These proceedings give an up-to-date review of developments in short-wavelength spectroscopy and offer a solid introduction to its theoretical and experimental foundations. Various speakers presented some of the first results from the high resolution spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope, the high sensitivity far ultraviolet and X-ray spectrometers of the ASTRO 1 Observatory, the imaging X-ray spectrometer on the ROSAT Observatory, and the high resolution solar X-ray spectrometer on Yohkoh. The development of ion trap devices had brought about a revolution in laboratory investigations of atomic processes in highly charged atoms. X-ray laser experiments had not only yielded considerable insight into electron ion interactions in hot dense plasmas, but also demonstrated the versatility of laser plasmas as laboratory X-ray sources. Such measurements also motivated and led to refinements in the development of large-scale atomic and molecular codes. On the instrumental side, the design and development of the next series of very powerful short wavelength observatories had generated a large number of

  7. CRKSPH: A new meshfree hydrodynamics method with applications to astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, John Michael; Raskin, Cody; Frontiere, Nicholas

    2018-01-01

    The study of astrophysical phenomena such as supernovae, accretion disks, galaxy formation, and large-scale structure formation requires computational modeling of, at a minimum, hydrodynamics and gravity. Developing numerical methods appropriate for these kinds of problems requires a number of properties: shock-capturing hydrodynamics benefits from rigorous conservation of invariants such as total energy, linear momentum, and mass; lack of obvious symmetries or a simplified spatial geometry to exploit necessitate 3D methods that ideally are Galilean invariant; the dynamic range of mass and spatial scales that need to be resolved can span many orders of magnitude, requiring methods that are highly adaptable in their space and time resolution. We have developed a new Lagrangian meshfree hydrodynamics method called Conservative Reproducing Kernel Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics, or CRKSPH, in order to meet these goals. CRKSPH is a conservative generalization of the meshfree reproducing kernel method, combining the high-order accuracy of reproducing kernels with the explicit conservation of mass, linear momentum, and energy necessary to study shock-driven hydrodynamics in compressible fluids. CRKSPH's Lagrangian, particle-like nature makes it simple to combine with well-known N-body methods for modeling gravitation, similar to the older Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method. Indeed, CRKSPH can be substituted for SPH in existing SPH codes due to these similarities. In comparison to SPH, CRKSPH is able to achieve substantially higher accuracy for a given number of points due to the explicitly consistent (and higher-order) interpolation theory of reproducing kernels, while maintaining the same conservation principles (and therefore applicability) as SPH. There are currently two coded implementations of CRKSPH available: one in the open-source research code Spheral, and the other in the high-performance cosmological code HACC. Using these codes we have applied

  8. Horava-Lifshitz Theory and Applications to Cosmology and Astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Anzhong [Baylor Univ., Waco, TX (United States). Department of Physics

    2014-08-14

    This final report describes the activities of the Baylor University Gravity, Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics (GCAP) group on the project: Horava-Lifshitz Theory and Applications to Cosmology and Astrophysics, during the time, August 15, 2010 - August 14, 2014. We are grateful for the financial support provided by the U.S. Department of Energy for this research, which leads to our exceptional success. We are very proud to say that we have achieved all the goals set up in our project and made significant contributions to the understanding of the field. In particular, with this DOE support, we have published 38 articles in the prestigious national/international journals, which have already received about 1000 citations so far.

  9. Horava-Lifshitz Theory and Applications to Cosmology and Astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Anzhong

    2014-01-01

    This final report describes the activities of the Baylor University Gravity, Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics (GCAP) group on the project: Horava-Lifshitz Theory and Applications to Cosmology and Astrophysics, during the time, August 15, 2010 - August 14, 2014. We are grateful for the financial support provided by the U.S. Department of Energy for this research, which leads to our exceptional success. We are very proud to say that we have achieved all the goals set up in our project and made significant contributions to the understanding of the field. In particular, with this DOE support, we have published 38 articles in the prestigious national/international journals, which have already received about 1000 citations so far.

  10. Development of a cadmium telluride pixel detector for astrophysical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Harrison, Fiona A.; Cook, Walter R.; Mao, Peter H.; Rana, Vikram R.; Ishikawa, Shin-Nosuke; Ushio, Masayoshi; Aono, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Shin; Sato, Goro; Kokubun, Motohide; Takahashi, Tadayuki

    2009-08-01

    We are developing imaging Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) pixel detectors optimized for astrophysical hard X-ray applications. Our hybrid detector consist of a CdTe crystal 1mm thick and 2cm × 2cm in area with segmented anode contacts directly bonded to a custom low-noise application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The CdTe sensor, fabricated by ACRORAD (Okinawa, Japan), has Schottky blocking contacts on a 605 micron pitch in a 32 × 32 array, providing low leakage current and enabling readout of the anode side. The detector is bonded using epoxy-gold stud interconnects to a custom low noise, low power ASIC circuit developed by Caltech's Space Radiation Laboratory. We have achieved very good energy resolution over a wide energy range (0.62keV FWHM @ 60keV, 10.8keV FWHM @ 662keV). We observe polarization effects at room temperature, but they are suppressed if we operate the detector at or below 0°C degree. These detectors have potential application for future missions such as the International X-ray Observatory (IXO).

  11. Trojan Horse Method: recent applications in nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Pizzone, R.G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M.L.; Tumino, A.

    2010-01-01

    The Trojan Horse Method (THM) is a powerful indirect technique to extract the bare nucleus cross section (or equivalently the bare nucleus astrophysical factor) for astrophysically relevant reactions. The theory has been discussed in many works in relation to the different types of reactions studied. Here we present the methodology to select the quasi free mechanism in order to extract this important parameter.

  12. Trojan Horse Method: recent applications in nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Metodologie Chimiche e Fisiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania (Italy); Mukhamedzhanov, A. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas (United States); Pizzone, R.G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M.L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Metodologie Chimiche e Fisiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania (Italy); Tumino, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Enna ' Kore' , Enna (Italy)

    2010-03-01

    The Trojan Horse Method (THM) is a powerful indirect technique to extract the bare nucleus cross section (or equivalently the bare nucleus astrophysical factor) for astrophysically relevant reactions. The theory has been discussed in many works in relation to the different types of reactions studied. Here we present the methodology to select the quasi free mechanism in order to extract this important parameter.

  13. Applications for X-ray detectors in astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remillard, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Position-sensitive X-Ray detectors continue to playa central role in high-energy astrophysics. The current science goals are reviewed with emphasis on requirements in terms of camera performance. Wide-field imaging techniques, including coded mask cameras, are an essential part of space programs because of the transient nature of high-priority targets, e.g. eruptions from black-hole binaries and cosmic explosions such as gamma ray bursts. Pointing X-ray telescopes are being planned with a wide range of photon energies and with collection designs that include both mirrors and coded masks. Requirements for high spectral resolution and high time resolution are driven by diverse types of X-ray sources such as msec pulsars, quasars with emission-line profiles shaped by general relativity, and X-ray binaries that exhibit quasi-periodic oscillations in the range of 40-1300 Hz. Many laboratories and universities are involved in space-qualification of new detector technologies, e.g. CZT cameras, X-ray calorimeters, new types of CCDs, and GEM detectors. Even X-ray interferometry is on the horizon of NASA's science roadmap. The difficulties in advancing new technologies for space science applications require careful coordinations between industry and science groups in order to solve science problems while minimizing risk

  14. Proceedings of the eighth international colloquium on ultraviolet and x-ray spectroscopy of astrophysical and laboratory plasmas (IAU colloquium 86)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This volume represents the Proceedings of the Eighth International Colloquium on Ultraviolet and X-Ray Spectroscopy of Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas. The aim of this series of colloquia has been to bring together workers in the fields of astrophysical spectroscopy, laboratory spectroscopy and atomic physics in order to exchange ideas and results on problems which are common to these different disciplines. In addition to the presented papers there was a poster paper session

  15. Proceedings of the eighth international colloquium on ultraviolet and x-ray spectroscopy of astrophysical and laboratory plasmas (IAU colloquium 86)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    This volume represents the Proceedings of the Eighth International Colloquium on Ultraviolet and X-Ray Spectroscopy of Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas. The aim of this series of colloquia has been to bring together workers in the fields of astrophysical spectroscopy, laboratory spectroscopy and atomic physics in order to exchange ideas and results on problems which are common to these different disciplines. In addition to the presented papers there was a poster paper session. (WRF)

  16. Building better optical model potentials for nuclear astrophysics applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauge, Eric; Dupuis, Marc

    2004-01-01

    In nuclear astrophysics, optical model potentials play an important role, both in the nucleosynthesis models, and in the interpretation of astrophysics related nuclear physics measurements. The challenge of nuclear astrophysics resides in the fact that it involves many nuclei far from the stability line, implying than very few (if any) experimental results are available for these nuclei. The answer to this challenge is a heavy reliance on microscopic optical models with solid microscopic physics foundations that can predict the relevant physical quantities with good accuracy. This use of microscopic information limits the likelihood of the model failing spectacularly (except if some essential physics was omitted in the modeling) when extrapolating away from the stability line, in opposition to phenomenological models which are only suited for interpolation between measured data points and not for extrapolating towards unexplored areas of the chart of the nuclides.We will show how these microscopic optical models are built, how they link to our present knowledge of nuclear structure, and how they affect predictions of nuclear astrophysics models and the interpretation of some key nuclear physics measurements for astrophysics

  17. Experimental study by infrared spectroscopy of irradiation effects in silicates and ices, applied to astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocard, F.

    1986-05-01

    This thesis presents the study of the radiation effects (erosion and synthesis) with ions of low energy (a few KeV/u) in silicates and ices. The erosion of the H 2 O ice is analysed by infrared spectroscopy versus different parameters: ion beam flux, mass and energy of the ions, and the thickness of the samples. The interpretation is that the erosion of the ice comes mainly from the dissociation, along the ion range, of the H 2 O molecules. A study of the synthesis in SiO 2 and H 2 O by carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen implantation leads to the characterization of the synthesized molecules and the determination of the yields. The irradiation of ices mixtures (H 2 O, CO 2 and NH 3 ) leads to the synthesis of a great variety of molecules which are identified. The experimental results are extrapolated to different astrophysical situations in the solar cavity (Moon, satellites of giant planets, comets) and in the interstellar medium (molecular clouds) [fr

  18. Applications of Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Asoka-Kumar , P.; Lynn , K.

    1995-01-01

    We describe the application of Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS) to some selected technologically important systems. The method involves a nondestructive probe to detect low levels of open-volume defects. The discussion shows the application of PAS to a wide range of advanced material systems.

  19. Applications of the Trojan Horse method in nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitaleri, Claudio, E-mail: spitaleri@lns.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania, Italy and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud-INFN, Catania (Italy)

    2015-02-24

    The study of the energy production in stars and related nucleosyntesis processes requires increasingly precise knowledge of the nuclear reaction cross section and reaction rates at interaction energy. In order to overcome the experimental difficulties, arising from small cross-sections involved in charge particle induced reactions at astrophysical energies, and from the presence of electron screening, it was necessary to introduce indirect methods. Trough these methods it is possible to measure cross sections at very small energies and retrieve information on electron screening effect when ultra-low energy direct measurements are available. The Trojan Horse Method (THM) represents the indirect technique to determine the bare nucleus astrophysical S-factor for reactions between charged particles at astrophysical energies. The basic theory of the THM is discussed in the case of non-resonant.

  20. Scale-covariant theory of gravitation and astrophysical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canuto, V.; Hsieh, S.H.; Adams, P.J.

    1977-01-01

    We present generalized Einstein equations, invariant under scale transformations, and study several astrophysical tests. It is assumed that the dynamics of atoms or clocks used as measuring apparatus is given a priori. Connection with gauge fields and broken symmetries is made through the cosmological constant

  1. Cosmic Rays Astrophysics: The Discipline, Its Scope, and Its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghouty, A. F.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation gives an overview of the discipline surrounding cosmic ray astrophysics. It includes information on recent assertions surrounding cosmic rays, exposure levels, and a short history with specific information on the origin, acceleration, transport, and modulation of cosmic rays.

  2. Parametric Model for Astrophysical Proton-Proton Interactions and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Niklas [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Observations of gamma-rays have been made from celestial sources such as active galaxies, gamma-ray bursts and supernova remnants as well as the Galactic ridge. The study of gamma rays can provide information about production mechanisms and cosmic-ray acceleration. In the high-energy regime, one of the dominant mechanisms for gamma-ray production is the decay of neutral pions produced in interactions of ultra-relativistic cosmic-ray nuclei and interstellar matter. Presented here is a parametric model for calculations of inclusive cross sections and transverse momentum distributions for secondary particles--gamma rays, e±, ve, $\\bar{v}$e, vμ and $\\bar{μ}$e--produced in proton-proton interactions. This parametric model is derived on the proton-proton interaction model proposed by Kamae et al.; it includes the diffraction dissociation process, Feynman-scaling violation and the logarithmically rising inelastic proton-proton cross section. To improve fidelity to experimental data for lower energies, two baryon resonance excitation processes were added; one representing the Δ(1232) and the other multiple resonances with masses around 1600 MeV/c2. The model predicts the power-law spectral index for all secondary particle to be about 0.05 lower in absolute value than that of the incident proton and their inclusive cross sections to be larger than those predicted by previous models based on the Feynman-scaling hypothesis. The applications of the presented model in astrophysics are plentiful. It has been implemented into the Galprop code to calculate the contribution due to pion decays in the Galactic plane. The model has also been used to estimate the cosmic-ray flux in the Large Magellanic Cloud based on HI, CO and gamma-ray observations. The transverse momentum distributions enable calculations when the proton distribution is anisotropic. It is shown that the gamma-ray spectrum and flux due to a

  3. Scalar fields and their applications in astrophysics and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mbelek, Jean-Paul

    2003-01-01

    This research thesis reports an analysis of the different existing theoretical contexts of occurrence of scalar fields in unified field theories, astrophysics and cosmology. More particularly, most of unified theories (Grand Unified Theories of GUTs, string theories, and so on) can be reduced, within astrophysical and cosmological conditions, to the form of effective theories such as Kaluza-Klein (multi-dimensional theories) or Brans-Dicke (four-dimensional theories) theories which comprise scalar fields. After a presentation of these theories, the author discusses the concept of scalar fields in field quantum theories and in cosmology. He proposes a stabilised model of the Kaluza-Klein theory in 5D, and several experiments designed to measure G. The thesis is completed by several published articles and contributions [fr

  4. Applications of Java and Vector Graphics to Astrophysical Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edirisinghe, D.; Budiardja, R.; Chae, K.; Edirisinghe, G.; Lingerfelt, E.; Guidry, M.

    2002-12-01

    We describe a series of projects utilizing the portability of Java programming coupled with the compact nature of vector graphics (SVG and SWF formats) for setup and control of calculations, local and collaborative visualization, and interactive 2D and 3D animation presentations in astrophysics. Through a set of examples, we demonstrate how such an approach can allow efficient and user-friendly control of calculations in compiled languages such as Fortran 90 or C++ through portable graphical interfaces written in Java, and how the output of such calculations can be packaged in vector-based animation having interactive controls and extremely high visual quality, but very low bandwidth requirements.

  5. The application of historical records to astrophysical problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zezong, X.

    1982-01-01

    In 1921, a Swedish astronomer noted that the position of supernova recorded in 1054 was very close to that of the Crab Nebula, and suspected that they were related. Soon after that, the calculation from the expansion speed of the Crab Nebula showed that the explosion had taken place 900 years before-it is consistent with the year of explosion of the supernova of 1054. In 1942, it was confirmed that the Crab Nebula was a remnant of the explosion in 1054 and the explosion was one of supernova rather than of nova. The identification of 1054 supernova with the Crab Nebula is an important evidence of the value of historical records to astrophysics and the Crab Nebula is considered the Rosetta stone of astrophysics. Most of what is known about the origin of cosmic rays, synchrotron radiation and heavy elements derives from our knowledge of the Crab Nebula, and much of what can be deduced from observations of the Crab Nebula is aided by the records of supernova explosion in 1054. In addition to this, the historical records of galactic supernovae can give some information on the frequency of such outbursts and on the development of their remnants

  6. H- photodetachment and radiative attachment for astrophysical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, B. M.; Stancil, P. C.; Sadeghpour, H. R.; Forrey, R. C.

    2017-06-01

    We combine R-matrix calculations, asymptotic relations, and comparison to available experimental data to construct an H- photodetachment cross section reliable over a large range of photon energies and take into account the series of auto-detaching shape and Feshbach resonances between 10.92 and 14.35 eV. The accuracy of the cross section is controlled by ensuring that it satisfies all known oscillator strength sum rules, including contributions from the resonances and single-photon double-electron photodetachment. From the resulting recommended cross section, spontaneous and stimulated radiative attachment rate coefficients are obtained. Photodetachment rates are also computed for the standard interstellar radiation field, in diffuse and dense interstellar clouds, for blackbody radiation, and for high redshift distortion photons in the recombination epoch. Implications are investigated for these astrophysical radiation fields and epochs.

  7. Theory of magnetostatic equilibria and applications in astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amari, T.

    1988-04-01

    Magnetohydrostatic equations are used to study the properties of magnetic configurations of astrophysical interest, particularly in solar physics. Results on force-free solutions with singularities (with current sheets) and on solutions which take into account current sheets and gravitational fields are obtained. A general method to construct an infinite class of non-y-symmetric models of protuberances when the magnetic field of the support is assumed to be potential is outlined. The general integral properties of current sheets of arbitrary geometry plunged into a nonlinear force-free magnetic field are established. It is shown that for a given mass, the equilibrium height of the protuberance increases with the shear of the force-free field. The case where the current sheet is reduced to a filament is examined. It is also shown that there exists a critical pressure beyond which no equilibrium is possible [fr

  8. Astrophysical applications of the post-Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glampedakis, Kostas; Pappas, George; Silva, Hector O.; Berti, Emanuele

    2016-08-01

    The bulk properties of spherically symmetric stars in general relativity can be obtained by integrating the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff (TOV) equations. In previous work [K. Glampedakis, G. Pappas, H. O. Silva, and E. Berti, Phys. Rev. D 92, 024056 (2015)], we developed a "post-TOV" formalism—inspired by parametrized post-Newtonian theory—which allows us to classify in a parametrized, phenomenological form all possible perturbative deviations from the structure of compact stars in general relativity that may be induced by modified gravity at second post-Newtonian order. In this paper we extend the formalism to deal with the stellar exterior, and we compute several potential astrophysical observables within the post-TOV formalism: the surface redshift zs, the apparent radius Rapp, the Eddington luminosity at infinity LE∞ and the orbital frequencies. We show that, at leading order, all of these quantities depend on just two post-TOV parameters μ1 and χ , and we discuss the possibility to measure (or set upper bounds on) these parameters.

  9. DIAPHANE: A portable radiation transport library for astrophysical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Darren S.; Dykes, Tim; Cabezón, Rubén; Gheller, Claudio; Mayer, Lucio

    2018-05-01

    One of the most computationally demanding aspects of the hydrodynamical modelingof Astrophysical phenomena is the transport of energy by radiation or relativistic particles. Physical processes involving energy transport are ubiquitous and of capital importance in many scenarios ranging from planet formation to cosmic structure evolution, including explosive events like core collapse supernova or gamma-ray bursts. Moreover, the ability to model and hence understand these processes has often been limited by the approximations and incompleteness in the treatment of radiation and relativistic particles. The DIAPHANE project has focused on developing a portable and scalable library that handles the transport of radiation and particles (in particular neutrinos) independently of the underlying hydrodynamic code. In this work, we present the computational framework and the functionalities of the first version of the DIAPHANE library, which has been successfully ported to three different smoothed-particle hydrodynamic codes, GADGET2, GASOLINE and SPHYNX. We also present validation of different modules solving the equations of radiation and neutrino transport using different numerical schemes.

  10. A directory of computer software applications: astronomy and astrophysics, 1970-May, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-05-01

    Astronomy and astrophysics reports that list computer programs and/or their documentation are cited. These software applications pertain to topics such as solar activity, atmospheric radiative transfer, stellar and galactic structure, lunar and planetary studies, and astrophysical data reduction. The directory contains complete bibliographic data for each report as well as a subject and a corporate author index. The computer software offered by NTIS was created by a variety of Federal agencies to meet their diverse but quite specific objectives. It is provided without installation, support, or maintenance services and sometimes requires customer modifications to run effectively in customer environments

  11. Improved predictions of nuclear reaction rates with the TALYS reaction code for astrophysical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goriely, S.; Hilaire, S.; Koning, A.J

    2008-01-01

    Context. Nuclear reaction rates of astrophysical applications are traditionally determined on the basis of Hauser-Feshbach reaction codes. These codes adopt a number of approximations that have never been tested, such as a simplified width fluctuation correction, the neglect of delayed or multiple-particle emission during the electromagnetic decay cascade, or the absence of the pre-equilibrium contribution at increasing incident energies. Aims. The reaction code TALYS has been recently updated to estimate the Maxwellian-averaged reaction rates that are of astrophysical relevance. These new developments enable the reaction rates to be calculated with increased accuracy and reliability and the approximations of previous codes to be investigated. Methods. The TALYS predictions for the thermonuclear rates of relevance to astrophysics are detailed and compared with those derived by widely-used codes for the same nuclear ingredients. Results. It is shown that TALYS predictions may differ significantly from those of previous codes, in particular for nuclei for which no or little nuclear data is available. The pre-equilibrium process is shown to influence the astrophysics rates of exotic neutron-rich nuclei significantly. For the first time, the Maxwellian- averaged (n, 2n) reaction rate is calculated for all nuclei and its competition with the radiative capture rate is discussed. Conclusions. The TALYS code provides a new tool to estimate all nuclear reaction rates of relevance to astrophysics with improved accuracy and reliability. (authors)

  12. Astrophysics of cataclysmic variables by ESA Gaia and low dispersion spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hudec, René; Šimon, Vojtěch; Hudec, L.; Hudcová, Věra

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 2 (2012), s. 849-853 ISSN 0037-8720. [Workshop on the golden age of cataclysmic variables and related objects /2./. Palermo, 09.09.2013-14.09.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/08/1207 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : stars * variable stars * cataclysmic variables Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  13. Hyperfine structure analysis in magnetic resonance spectroscopy: from astrophysical measurements towards endogenous biosensors in human tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, L.; California Univ., Berkeley, CA; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Berkeley, CA

    2007-01-01

    The hyperfine interaction of two spins is a well studied effect in atomic systems. Magnetic resonance experiments demonstrate that the detectable dipole transitions are determined by the magnetic moments of the constituents and the external magnetic field. Transferring the corresponding quantum mechanics to molecular bound nuclear spins allows for precise prediction of NMR spectra obtained from metabolites in human tissue. This molecular hyperfine structure has been neglected so far in in vivo NMR spectroscopy but contains useful information, especially when studying molecular dynamics. This contribution represents a review of the concept of applying the Breit-Rabi formalism to coupled nuclear spins and discusses the immobilization of different metabolites in anisotropic tissue revealed by 1H NMR spectra of carnosine, phosphocreatine and taurine. Comparison of atomic and molecular spin systems allows for statements on the biological constraints for direct spin-spin interactions. Moreover, the relevance of hyperfine effects on the line shapes of multiplets of indirectly-coupled spin systems with more than two constituents can be predicted by analyzing quantum mechanical parameters. As an example, the superposition of eigenstates of the AMX system of adenosine 5'-triphosphate and its application for better quantification of 31P-NMR spectra will be discussed. (orig.)

  14. [Hyperfine structure analysis in magnetic resonance spectroscopy: from astrophysical measurements towards endogenous biosensors in human tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Leif

    2007-01-01

    The hyperfine interaction of two spins is a well studied effect in atomic systems. Magnetic resonance experiments demonstrate that the detectable dipole transitions are determined by the magnetic moments of the constituents and the external magnetic field. Transferring the corresponding quantum mechanics to molecular bound nuclear spins allows for precise prediction of NMR spectra obtained from metabolites in human tissue. This molecular hyperfine structure has been neglected so far in in vivo NMR spectroscopy but contains useful information, especially when studying molecular dynamics. This contribution represents a review of the concept of applying the Breit-Rabi formalism to coupled nuclear spins and discusses the immobilization of different metabolites in anisotropic tissue revealed by 1H NMR spectra of carnosine, phosphocreatine and taurine. Comparison of atomic and molecular spin systems allows for statements on the biological constraints for direct spin-spin interactions. Moreover, the relevance of hyperfine effects on the line shapes of multiplets of indirectly-coupled spin systems with more than two constituents can be predicted by analyzing quantum mechanical parameters. As an example, the superposition of eigenstates of the A MX system of adenosine 5'-triphosphate and its application for better quantification of 31P-NMR spectra will be discussed.

  15. Improved predictions of nuclear reaction rates for astrophysics applications with the TALYS reaction code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goriely, S.; Hilaire, S.; Koning, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear reaction rates for astrophysics applications are traditionally determined on the basis of Hauser-Feshbach reaction codes, like MOST. These codes use simplified schemes to calculate the capture reaction cross section on a given target nucleus, not only in its ground state but also on the different thermally populated states of the stellar plasma at a given temperature. Such schemes include a number of approximations that have never been tested, such as an approximate width fluctuation correction, the neglect of delayed particle emission during the electromagnetic decay cascade or the absence of the pre-equilibrium contribution at increasing incident energies. New developments have been brought to the reaction code TALYS to estimate the Maxwellian-averaged reaction rates of astrophysics relevance. These new developments give us the possibility to calculate with an improved accuracy the reaction cross sections and the corresponding astrophysics rates. The TALYS predictions for the thermonuclear rates of astrophysics relevance are presented and compared with those obtained with the MOST code on the basis of the same nuclear ingredients for nuclear structure properties, optical model potential, nuclear level densities and γ-ray strength. It is shown that, in particular, the pre-equilibrium process significantly influences the astrophysics rates of exotic neutron-rich nuclei. The reciprocity theorem traditionally used in astrophysics to determine photo-rates is also shown no to be valid for exotic nuclei. The predictions obtained with different nuclear inputs are also analyzed to provide an estimate of the theoretical uncertainties still affecting the reaction rate prediction far away from the experimentally known regions. (authors)

  16. Laser spectroscopy and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radziemski, L.J.; Solarz, R.W.; Paisner, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Laser spectroscopy has applications in diverse fields ranging from combustion studies and trace-sample detection to biological research. At the same time, it has also contributed greatly to the discovery of hundreds of new lasers. This symbiotic relationship has promoted an especially rapid expansion of the field. This book provides a review of the subject. It includes, for example, chapters on laser isotope separation techniques, enabling scientists to compare their relative advantages and drawbacks. This volume also gives numerous tables that summarize important features of lasers, experiments, and parameters for quick reference. In addition, it presents diagrams for visualizing rotational molecular energy levels of high J in order to enhance our understanding of molecular motions and their relationship to molecular energy levels. Offering insights into how experts think this technology will improve, it considers research and development in each topic discussed

  17. Study of the N=28 shell closure by one neutron transfer reaction: astrophysical application and {beta}-{gamma} spectroscopy of neutron rich nuclei around N=32/34 and N=40; Etude de la fermeture de couche N=28 autour du noyau {sub 18}{sup 46}Ar{sub 28} par reaction de transfert d'un neutron: application a l'astrophysique et Spectroscopie {beta}-{gamma} de noyaux riches en neutrons de N=32/34 et N=40

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudefroy, L

    2005-09-15

    The study of the N=28 shell closure has been presented as well as its astrophysical implications. Moreover the structure of neutron rich nuclei around N=32/34 and 40 was studied. The N=28 shell closure has been studied trough the one neutron transfer reaction on {sup 44,46}Ar nuclei. Excitation energies of states in {sup 45,47}Ar nuclei have been obtained, as well as their angular momenta and spectroscopic factors. These results were used to show that N=28 is still a good magic number in the argon isotopic chain. We interpreted the evolution of the spin-orbit partner gaps in terms of the tensor monopolar proton-neutron interaction. Thanks to this latter, we showed it is not necessary to summon up a reduction of the intensity of the spin-orbit force in order to explain this evolution in N=29 isotopes from calcium to argon chains. The neutron capture rates on {sup 44,46}Ar have been determined thanks to the results of the transfer reaction. Their influence on the nucleosynthesis of {sup 46,48}Ca was studied. We proposed stellar conditions to account for the abnormal isotopic ratio observed in the Allende meteorite concerning {sup 46,48}Ca isotopes. The beta decay and gamma spectroscopy of neutron rich nuclei in the scandium to cobalt region has been studied. We showed that beta decay process is dominated by the {nu}f{sub 5/2} {yields} {pi}f{sub 7/2} Gamow-Teller transition. Moreover, we demonstrated that the {nu}g{sub 9/2} hinders this process in the studied nuclei, and influences their structure, by implying the existence of isomers. Our results show that N=34 is not a magic number in the titanium chain and the superior ones. (author)

  18. Topics in Astrophysical X-Ray and Gamma Ray Spectroscopy. Ph.D. Thesis - Maryland Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussard, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    A number of topics relating to astrophysical observations that have already been made or are currently planned of spectral features, mostly emission lines, in the X-ray and gamma ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum are investigated. These topics include: the production of characteristic X-ray and gamma ray lines by nonthermal ions, spectral features induced by processes occurring in strong magnetic fields, and the positron annihilation line at 0.5 MeV. The rate of X-ray production at 6.8 keV by the 2p to 1s transition in fast hydrogen- and helium-like iron ions, following both electron capture to excited levels and collisional excitation is calculated. The cross section for electron-ion Coulomb collisions in strong fields is also calculated.

  19. Scale-covariant theory of gravitation and astrophysical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canuto, V.; Adams, P.J.; Hsieh, S.; Tsiang, E.

    1977-01-01

    By associating the mathematical operation of scale transformation with the physics of using different dynamical systems to measure space-time distances, we formulate a scale-covariant theory of gravitation. Corresponding to each dynamical system of units is a gauge condition which determines the otherwise arbitrary gauge function. For gravitational units, the gauge condition is chosen so that the standard Einstein equations are recovered. Assuming the atomic units, derivable from atomic dynamics, to be distinct from the gravitational units, a different gauge condition must be imposed. It is suggested that Dirac's large-number hypothesis be used for the determination of this condition so that gravitational phenomena can be described in atomic units. The result allows a natural interpretation of the possible variation of the gravitational constant without compromising the validity of general relativity. A geometrical interpretation of the scale-covariant theory is possible if the covariant tensors in Riemannian space are replaced by cocovariant cotensors in an integrable Weyl space. A scale-invariant action principle is constructed from the metrical potentials of the integrable Weyl space. Application of the dynamical equations in atomic units to cosmology yields a family of homogeneous solutions characterized by R approx. t for large cosmological times. Equations of motion in atomic units are solved for spherically symmetric gravitational fields. Expressions for perihelion shift and light deflection are derived. They do not differ from the predictions of general relativity except for secular variations, having the age of the universe as a time scale. Similar variations of periods and radii for planetary orbits are also derived

  20. An Array Library for Microsoft SQL Server with Astrophysical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobos, L.; Szalay, A. S.; Blakeley, J.; Falck, B.; Budavári, T.; Csabai, I.

    2012-09-01

    Today's scientific simulations produce output on the 10-100 TB scale. This unprecedented amount of data requires data handling techniques that are beyond what is used for ordinary files. Relational database systems have been successfully used to store and process scientific data, but the new requirements constantly generate new challenges. Moving terabytes of data among servers on a timely basis is a tough problem, even with the newest high-throughput networks. Thus, moving the computations as close to the data as possible and minimizing the client-server overhead are absolutely necessary. At least data subsetting and preprocessing have to be done inside the server process. Out of the box commercial database systems perform very well in scientific applications from the prospective of data storage optimization, data retrieval, and memory management but lack basic functionality like handling scientific data structures or enabling advanced math inside the database server. The most important gap in Microsoft SQL Server is the lack of a native array data type. Fortunately, the technology exists to extend the database server with custom-written code that enables us to address these problems. We present the prototype of a custom-built extension to Microsoft SQL Server that adds array handling functionality to the database system. With our Array Library, fix-sized arrays of all basic numeric data types can be created and manipulated efficiently. Also, the library is designed to be able to be seamlessly integrated with the most common math libraries, such as BLAS, LAPACK, FFTW, etc. With the help of these libraries, complex operations, such as matrix inversions or Fourier transformations, can be done on-the-fly, from SQL code, inside the database server process. We are currently testing the prototype with two different scientific data sets: The Indra cosmological simulation will use it to store particle and density data from N-body simulations, and the Milky Way Laboratory

  1. X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy: the Potential of Astrophysics-developed Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvis, M.; Allen, B.; Hong, J.; Grindlay, J.; Kraft, R.; Binzel, R. P.; Masterton, R.

    2012-12-01

    X-ray fluorescence from the surface of airless bodies has been studied since the Apollo X-ray fluorescence experiment mapped parts of the lunar surface in 1971-1972. That experiment used a collimated proportional counter with a resolving power of ~1 and a beam size of ~1degree. Filters separated only Mg, Al and SI lines. We review progress in X-ray detectors and imaging for astrophysics and show how these advances enable much more powerful use of X-ray fluorescence for the study of airless bodies. Astrophysics X-ray instrumentation has developed enormously since 1972. Low noise, high quantum efficiency, X-ray CCDs have flown on ASCA, XMM-Newton, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, Swift and Suzaku, and are the workhorses of X-ray astronomy. They normally span 0.5 to ~8 keV with an energy resolution of ~100 eV. New developments in silicon based detectors, especially individual pixel addressable devices, such as CMOS detectors, can withstand many orders of magnitude more radiation than conventional CCDs before degradation. The capability of high read rates provides dynamic range and temporal resolution. Additionally, the rapid read rates minimize shot noise from thermal dark current and optical light. CMOS detectors can therefore run at warmer temperatures and with ultra-thin optical blocking filters. Thin OBFs mean near unity quantum efficiency below 1 keV, thus maximizing response at the C and O lines.such as CMOS detectors, promise advances. X-ray imaging has advanced similarly far. Two types of imager are now available: specular reflection and coded apertures. X-ray mirrors have been flown on the Einstein Observatory, XMM-Newton, Chandra and others. However, as X-ray reflection only occurs at small (~1degree) incidence angles, which then requires long focal lengths (meters), mirrors are not usually practical for planetary missions. Moreover the field of view of X-ray mirrors is comparable to the incident angle, so can only image relatively small regions. More useful

  2. SO3 formation from the X-ray photolysis of SO2 astrophysical ice analogues: FTIR spectroscopy and thermodynamic investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Bonfim, Víctor; Barbosa de Castilho, Roberto; Baptista, Leonardo; Pilling, Sergio

    2017-10-11

    In this combined experimental-theoretical work we focus on the physical and chemical changes induced by soft X-rays on sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) ice at a very low temperature, in an attempt to clarify and quantify its survival and chemical changes in some astrophysical environments. SO 2 is an important constituent of some Jupiter moons and has also been observed in ices around protostars. The measurements were performed at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source (LNLS/CNPEM), in Campinas, Brazil. The SO 2 ice sample (12 K) was exposed to a broadband beam of mainly soft X-rays (6-2000 eV) and in situ analyses were performed by IR spectroscopy. The X-ray photodesorption yield (upper limit) was around 0.25 molecules per photon. The values determined for the effective destruction (SO 2 ) and formation (SO 3 ) cross sections were 2.5 × 10 -18 cm 2 and 2.1 × 10 -18 cm 2 , respectively. The chemical equilibrium (88% of SO 2 and 12% of SO 3 ) was reached after the fluence of 1.6 × 10 18 photons cm -2 . The SO 3 formation channels were studied at the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) level, which showed the three most favorable reaction routes (ΔH < -79 kcal mol -1 ) in simulated SO 2 ice: (i) SO + O 2 → SO 3 , (ii) SO 2 + O → SO 3 , and (iii) SO 2 + O + → SO 3 + + e - → SO 3 . The amorphous solid environment effect decreases the reactivity of intermediate species towards SO 3 formation, and ionic species are even more affected. The experimentally determined effective cross sections and theoretical reaction channels identified in this work allow us to better understand the chemical evolution of certain sulfur-rich astrophysical environments.

  3. AtomPy: A Cloud Atomic-data Service for Astrophysical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Claudio; Boswell, J. S.; Bautista, M.

    2013-06-01

    Apart from our long-term commitment to the computing of accurate atomic data for astrophysical applications, we have also been interested in the problems of data access and dissemination. In this respect, one of us took part in the developments of TIPTOPbase [1, 2, 3], the astrophysical opacity server referred to as OPserver [4, 5], and, more recently, of the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Center [6, 7]. Our present effort is now with the establishment of a cloud atomic data web service, AtomPy, implemented by means of SOAP web services, Google Drive spreadsheets and Python modules. In the present poster we will describe the outline of this ambitious project, illustrated with some prototypes that are already operational.

  4. Nuclear energy and astrophysics applications of ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluated nuclear library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pritychenko, B.

    2012-01-01

    Recently released ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluated nuclear library contains the most up-to-date evaluated neutron cross section and covariance data. These data provide new opportunities for nuclear science and astrophysics application development. The improvements in neutron cross section evaluations and more extensive utilization of covariance files, by the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) collaboration, allowed users to produce neutron thermal cross sections, Westcott factors, resonance integrals, Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates, and provide additional insights on the currently available neutron-induced reaction data. Nuclear reaction calculations using the ENDF/B-VII.1 library and current computer technologies will be discussed and new results will be presented

  5. Raman Spectroscopy and its Application in Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Shu-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Raman Spectroscopy and its Application in Nanostructures is an original and timely contribution to a very active area of physics and materials science research. This book presents the theoretical and experimental phenomena of Raman spectroscopy, with specialized discussions on the physical fundamentals, new developments and main features in low-dimensional systems of Raman spectroscopy. In recent years physicists, materials scientists and chemists have devoted increasing attention to low-dimensional systems and as Raman spectroscopy can be used to study and analyse such materials as carbon nan

  6. Final Report for 'Verification and Validation of Radiation Hydrodynamics for Astrophysical Applications'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zingale, M.; Howell, L.H.

    2010-01-01

    The motivation for this work is to gain experience in the methodology of verification and validation (V and V) of astrophysical radiation hydrodynamics codes. In the first period of this work, we focused on building the infrastructure to test a single astrophysical application code, Castro, developed in collaboration between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). We delivered several hydrodynamic test problems, in the form of coded initial conditions and documentation for verification, routines to perform data analysis, and a generalized regression test suite to allow for continued automated testing. Astrophysical simulation codes aim to model phenomena that elude direct experimentation. Our only direct information about these systems comes from what we observe, and may be transient. Simulation can help further our understanding by allowing virtual experimentation of these systems. However, to have confidence in our simulations requires us to have confidence in the tools we use. Verification and Validation is a process by which we work to build confidence that a simulation code is accurately representing reality. V and V is a multistep process, and is never really complete. Once a single test problem is working as desired (i.e. that problem is verified), one wants to ensure that subsequent code changes do not break that test. At the same time, one must also search for new verification problems that test the code in a new way. It can be rather tedious to manually retest each of the problems, so before going too far with V and V, it is desirable to have an automated test suite. Our project aims to provide these basic tools for astrophysical radiation hydrodynamics codes.

  7. Photoelectron spectroscopy principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hüfner, Stefan

    1995-01-01

    Photoelectron Spectroscopy presents an up-to-date introduction to the field by treating comprehensively the electronic structures of atoms, molecules, solids and surfaces Brief descriptions are given of inverse photoemission, spin-polarized photoemission and photoelectron diffraction Experimental aspects are considered throughout the book, and the results are carefully interpreted by theory A wealth of measured data is presented in the form of tables for easy use by experimentalists

  8. Decay spectroscopy for nuclear astrophysics: β- and β-delayed proton decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trache, L.; Banu, A.; Hardy, J. C.; Iacob, V. E.; McCleskey, M.; Roeder, B. T.; Simmons, E.; Spiridon, A.; Tribble, R. E.; Saastamoinen, A.; Jokinen, A.; Äysto, J.; Davinson, T.; Lotay, G.; Woods, P. J.; Pollacco, E.

    2012-02-01

    In several radiative proton capture reactions important in novae and XRBs, the resonant parts play the capital role. We use decay spectroscopy techniques to find these resonances and study their properties. We have developed techniques to measure beta- and beta-delayed proton decay of sd-shell, proton-rich nuclei produced and separated with the MARS recoil spectrometer of Texas A&M University. The short-lived radioactive species are produced in-flight, separated, then slowed down (from about 40 MeV/u) and implanted in the middle of very thin Si detectors. This allows us to measure protons with energies as low as 200 keV from nuclei with lifetimes of 100 ms or less. At the same time we measure gamma-rays up to 8 MeV with high resolution HPGe detectors. We have studied the decay of 23Al, 27P, 31Cl, all important for understanding explosive H-burning in novae. The technique has shown a remarkable selectivity to beta-delayed charged-particle emission and works even at radioactive beam rates of a few pps. The states populated are resonances for the radiative proton capture reactions 22Na(p,γ)23Mg (crucial for the depletion of 22Na in novae), 26mAl(p,γ)27Si and 30P(p,γ)31S (bottleneck in novae and XRB burning), respectively. Lastly, results with a new detector that allowed us to measure down to about 80 keV proton energy are announced.

  9. Decay spectroscopy for nuclear astrophysics: β- and β-delayed proton decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trache, L; Banu, A; Hardy, J C; Iacob, V E; McCleskey, M; Roeder, B T; Simmons, E; Spiridon, A; Tribble, R E; Saastamoinen, A; Jokinen, A; Äysto, J; Davinson, T; Lotay, G; Woods, P J; Pollacco, E

    2012-01-01

    In several radiative proton capture reactions important in novae and XRBs, the resonant parts play the capital role. We use decay spectroscopy techniques to find these resonances and study their properties. We have developed techniques to measure beta- and beta-delayed proton decay of sd-shell, proton-rich nuclei produced and separated with the MARS recoil spectrometer of Texas A and M University. The short-lived radioactive species are produced in-flight, separated, then slowed down (from about 40 MeV/u) and implanted in the middle of very thin Si detectors. This allows us to measure protons with energies as low as 200 keV from nuclei with lifetimes of 100 ms or less. At the same time we measure gamma-rays up to 8 MeV with high resolution HPGe detectors. We have studied the decay of 23 Al, 27 P, 31 Cl, all important for understanding explosive H-burning in novae. The technique has shown a remarkable selectivity to beta-delayed charged-particle emission and works even at radioactive beam rates of a few pps. The states populated are resonances for the radiative proton capture reactions 22 Na(p,γ) 23 Mg (crucial for the depletion of 22 Na in novae), 26m Al(p,γ) 27 Si and 30 P(p,γ) 31 S (bottleneck in novae and XRB burning), respectively. Lastly, results with a new detector that allowed us to measure down to about 80 keV proton energy are announced.

  10. Applications of core level spectroscopy to adsorbates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, Anders

    2002-01-01

    In the following review different applications of core-level spectroscopy to atomic and molecular adsorbates will be shown. Core-holes are created through core-level ionization and X-ray absorption processes and the core-hole decays by radiant and non-radiant processes. This forms the basis for X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray emission spectroscopy. We will demonstrate how we can use the different methods to obtain information about the chemical state, local geometric structure, nature of chemical bonding and dynamics in electron transfer processes. The adsorption of N 2 and CO on Ni(100) will be used as prototype systems for chemisorption while N 2 on graphite and Ar on Pt for physisorption

  11. Astrophysical applications of Delbrück scattering: Dust scattered gamma radiation from gamma ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunwar, B.; Bhadra, A.; Gupta, S.K. Sen

    2014-01-01

    A preliminary, and perhaps the first, study of astrophysical applications of Delbrück scattering in a gamma-ray emitting celestial object like a gamma-ray burst (GRB) has been made. At energies≥100 MeV the elastic scattering of gamma-ray photons off the molecular dust surrounding the GRB site is dominated by Delbrück scattering. Expressions for Delbrück-scattered gamma-ray flux as a function of time has been obtained for a few selected energies by assuming a simple model of GRB. These are compared with Compton-scattered flux. At certain situations, interestingly, the former is found to exceed the latter for the first few milliseconds of the burst. The issue of detectability of Delbrück-scattered gamma-ray echo from the cloud of a GRB is discussed. Although it is observed that the detection of such an echo is not within the capability of the presently operating gamma-ray missions such as Fermi LAT, a rough estimate shows that one can be optimistic that future generation gamma-ray telescopes might be able to see such photons' contribution to the total flux. - Highlights: ► Astrophysical application of Delbrück scattering in a GRB has been made. ► Initially, the Delbrück scattering may dominate the scattering of GeV γ-rays. ► The issue of detectability of such radiations is discussed

  12. Annual Scientific Report 2006 for Hydrodynamics and Radiation Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R. Paul Drake

    2007-01-01

    We report the ongoing work of our group in hydrodynamics and radiation hydrodynamics with astrophysical applications. During the period of the existing grant, we have carried out two types of experiments at the Omega laser. One set of experiments has studied radiatively collapsing shocks, obtaining data using a backlit pinhole with a 100 ps backlighter and beginning to develop the ability to look into the shock tube with optical or x-ray diagnostics. Other experiments have studied the deeply nonlinear development of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability from complex initial conditions, using dual-axis radiographic data with backlit pinholes and ungated detectors to complete the data set for a Ph.D. student. We lead a team that is developing a proposal for experiments at the National Ignition Facility and are involved in experiments at NIKE and LIL. All these experiments have applications to astrophysics, discussed in the corresponding papers. We assemble the targets for the experiments at Michigan, where we also prepare many of the simple components. We also have several projects underway in our laboratory involving our x-ray source. The above activities, in addition to a variety of data analysis and design projects, provide good experience for graduate and undergraduates students. In the process of doing this research we have built a research group that uses such work to train junior scientists

  13. Annual Report 2006 for Hydrodynamics and Radiation Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Paul Drake

    2007-04-05

    We report the ongoing work of our group in hydrodynamics and radiation hydrodynamics with astrophysical applications. During the period of the existing grant, we have carried out two types of experiments at the Omega laser. One set of experiments has studied radiatively collapsing shocks, obtaining data using a backlit pinhole with a 100 ps backlighter and beginning to develop the ability to look into the shock tube with optical or x-ray diagnostics. Other experiments have studied the deeply nonlinear development of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability from complex initial conditions, using dual-axis radiographic data with backlit pinholes and ungated detectors to complete the data set for a Ph.D. student. We lead a team that is developing a proposal for experiments at the National Ignition Facility and are involved in experiments at NIKE and LIL. All these experiments have applications to astrophysics, discussed in the corresponding papers. We assemble the targets for the experiments at Michigan, where we also prepare many of the simple components. We also have several projects underway in our laboratory involving our x-ray source. The above activities, in addition to a variety of data analysis and design projects, provide good experience for graduate and undergraduates students. In the process of doing this research we have built a research group that uses such work to train junior scientists.

  14. SPHYNX: an accurate density-based SPH method for astrophysical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezón, R. M.; García-Senz, D.; Figueira, J.

    2017-10-01

    Aims: Hydrodynamical instabilities and shocks are ubiquitous in astrophysical scenarios. Therefore, an accurate numerical simulation of these phenomena is mandatory to correctly model and understand many astrophysical events, such as supernovas, stellar collisions, or planetary formation. In this work, we attempt to address many of the problems that a commonly used technique, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), has when dealing with subsonic hydrodynamical instabilities or shocks. To that aim we built a new SPH code named SPHYNX, that includes many of the recent advances in the SPH technique and some other new ones, which we present here. Methods: SPHYNX is of Newtonian type and grounded in the Euler-Lagrange formulation of the smoothed-particle hydrodynamics technique. Its distinctive features are: the use of an integral approach to estimating the gradients; the use of a flexible family of interpolators called sinc kernels, which suppress pairing instability; and the incorporation of a new type of volume element which provides a better partition of the unity. Unlike other modern formulations, which consider volume elements linked to pressure, our volume element choice relies on density. SPHYNX is, therefore, a density-based SPH code. Results: A novel computational hydrodynamic code oriented to Astrophysical applications is described, discussed, and validated in the following pages. The ensuing code conserves mass, linear and angular momentum, energy, entropy, and preserves kernel normalization even in strong shocks. In our proposal, the estimation of gradients is enhanced using an integral approach. Additionally, we introduce a new family of volume elements which reduce the so-called tensile instability. Both features help to suppress the damp which often prevents the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities in regular SPH codes. Conclusions: On the whole, SPHYNX has passed the verification tests described below. For identical particle setting and initial

  15. Raman Spectroscopy for Homeland Security Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Mogilevsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy is an analytical technique with vast applications in the homeland security and defense arenas. The Raman effect is defined by the inelastic interaction of the incident laser with the analyte molecule’s vibrational modes, which can be exploited to detect and identify chemicals in various environments and for the detection of hazards in the field, at checkpoints, or in a forensic laboratory with no contact with the substance. A major source of error that overwhelms the Raman signal is fluorescence caused by the background and the sample matrix. Novel methods are being developed to enhance the Raman signal’s sensitivity and to reduce the effects of fluorescence by altering how the hazard material interacts with its environment and the incident laser. Basic Raman techniques applicable to homeland security applications include conventional (off-resonance Raman spectroscopy, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS, resonance Raman spectroscopy, and spatially or temporally offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS and TORS. Additional emerging Raman techniques, including remote Raman detection, Raman imaging, and Heterodyne imaging, are being developed to further enhance the Raman signal, mitigate fluorescence effects, and monitor hazards at a distance for use in homeland security and defense applications.

  16. Reduced MHD in Astrophysical Applications: Two-dimensional or Three-dimensional?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oughton, S. [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Waikato, Hamilton (New Zealand); Matthaeus, W. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, DE 19716 (United States); Dmitruk, P. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires-Conicet (Argentina)

    2017-04-10

    Originally proposed as an efficient approach to computation of nonlinear dynamics in tokamak fusion research devices, reduced magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD) has subsequently found application in studies of coronal heating, flux tube dynamics, charged particle transport, and, in general, as an approximation to describe plasma turbulence in space physics and astrophysics. Given the diverse set of derivations available in the literature, there has emerged some level of discussion and a lack of consensus regarding the completeness of RMHD as a turbulence model, and its applicability in contexts such as the solar wind. Some of the key issues in this discussion are examined here, emphasizing that RMHD is properly neither 2D nor fully 3D, being rather an incomplete representation that enforces at least one family of extraneous conservation laws.

  17. Applications of Raman spectroscopy in life science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Airton A.; T. Soto, Cláudio A.; Ali, Syed M.; Neto, Lázaro P. M.; Canevari, Renata A.; Pereira, Liliane; Fávero, Priscila P.

    2015-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been applied to the analysis of biological samples for the last 12 years providing detection of changes occurring at the molecular level during the pathological transformation of the tissue. The potential use of this technology in cancer diagnosis has shown encouraging results for the in vivo, real-time and minimally invasive diagnosis. Confocal Raman technics has also been successfully applied in the analysis of skin aging process providing new insights in this field. In this paper it is presented the latest biomedical applications of Raman spectroscopy in our laboratory. It is shown that Raman spectroscopy (RS) has been used for biochemical and molecular characterization of thyroid tissue by micro-Raman spectroscopy and gene expression analysis. This study aimed to improve the discrimination between different thyroid pathologies by Raman analysis. A total of 35 thyroid tissues samples including normal tissue (n=10), goiter (n=10), papillary (n=10) and follicular carcinomas (n=5) were analyzed. The confocal Raman spectroscopy allowed a maximum discrimination of 91.1% between normal and tumor tissues, 84.8% between benign and malignant pathologies and 84.6% among carcinomas analyzed. It will be also report the application of in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy as an important sensor for detecting advanced glycation products (AGEs) on human skin.

  18. Application of Raman spectroscopy for cancer diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnakumar, N.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading causes of death next to heart diseases, Half of all cancer cases occur in developing countries. The conventional histopathology is usually the most trustable gold standard for pre-cancer and cancer diagnosis. However, the applicability of this method is more or less restricted because of the requirement of removing human tissues and the difficulty of real time diagnosis. Recently, there has been increased interest in 'optical biopsy' system using tissue spectroscopy to establish the pathological changes. Among optical based methods, Raman spectroscopy is a unique vibrational spectroscopic technique capable of probing biomolecular structures and conformation of tissues, and has excelled in the early detection of pre-cancer and cancer in the number of organs with high diagnostic specificity. Raman spectroscopy offers certain distinct advantages over than other optical diagnostic techniques such as high spatial resolution, use of less harmful NIR radiation, less or no sample preparation, no influence of water bands which facilitates in vivo/in situ measurements. This makes Raman spectroscopy also very useful for biomedical applications. Several research groups have demonstrated the efficacy of this technique in biomedical applications. The background and principle of these techniques will be discussed with some examples and discussions on how Raman spectroscopy can act as a promising technique for rapid in vivo diagnosis and detection of various cancers at the molecular level. (author)

  19. Final Report. Hydrodynamics by high-energy-density plasma flow and hydrodynamics and radiative hydrodynamics with astrophysical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R Paul Drake

    2004-01-01

    OAK-B135 This is the final report from the project Hydrodynamics by High-Energy-Density Plasma Flow and Hydrodynamics and Radiation Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications. This project supported a group at the University of Michigan in the invention, design, performance, and analysis of experiments using high-energy-density research facilities. The experiments explored compressible nonlinear hydrodynamics, in particular at decelerating interfaces, and the radiation hydrodynamics of strong shock waves. It has application to supernovae, astrophysical jets, shock-cloud interactions, and radiative shock waves

  20. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy Part III. Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, W. D.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the use of the FT-IR spectrometer in analyses that were previously avoided. Examines some of the applications of this spectroscopy with aqueous solutions, circular internal reflection, samples with low transmission, diffuse reflectance, infrared emission, and the infrared microscope. (TW)

  1. Principle and application of ion mobility spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, J.; Arnold, G.; Baumbach, J.I.; Doering, H.R.

    1990-01-01

    An outline is given of the principle and application of ion mobility spectroscopy to the selective measurement of single substances in a substance matrix, including advantages and disadvantages of ion mobility detectors for solving analytical problems in the fields of environment, microelectronics, medicine, and military engineering. (orig.) [de

  2. Nuclear interactions in high energy heavy ions and applications in astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wefel, J.P.; Guzik, T.G.

    1993-01-01

    The overall objective is to study the mechanisms and the energy dependence of heavy ion fragmentation by studying the reactions of heavy ion projectiles (e.g. 4 He, 16 O, 20 Ne, 28 Si, 56 Fe) in a variety of targets (H, He, C, Si, Cu, Pb) and at a number of beam energies exceeding 0.1 GeV/nucleon. The results have application to questions in high-energy nuclear astrophysics. Most of the discussion is on low-energy 16 O, 28 Si data analysis. The description includes analysis procedures and techniques, detector calibrations, data selections and normalizations. Cross section results for the analysis are also presented. 83 figs., 6 tabs., 73 refs

  3. FTIR spectroscopy applications in forensic science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, C.; Maynard, P.; Dawson, M.

    1999-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy, and especially Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, is a well-established technique in analytical chemistry and finds widespread application in qualitative and quantitative analyses. Infrared spectra depend on the nature of the functional groups present in the analyte, and are generally complex with numerous maxima and minima. These features are useful for comparison purposes and, in most cases, the infrared spectrum of an organic compound is considered as a unique functional print of this compound (i e the infrared spectrum constitutes the chemical signature or fingerprint of an organic compound). Many inorganic substances may also be uniquely identified using infrared spectroscopy. Until recently, infrared spectroscopy was of only limited utility in forensic science, despite its high selectivity. This is because infrared spectroscopy suffered from a lack of sensitivity in its early forms. However, with the advance of modern technology this is no longer the case. The widespread use of microscope attachments, along with numerous new sampling accessories, has overcome most of the previous limitations. For example, with an infrared microscope, it is possible to focus the infrared beam, and therefore select relevant areas of the sample as small as 10 x 10 μm and achieve a measurement in situ. Such a configuration enables the rapid generation of high-resolution spectra from samples of 10 ng. Typical forensic applications include the analysis of single textile fibres, minute paint chips or smears, drugs, laser printer and photocopy toners, polymers and miscellaneous unknown substances. Here we will broadly review the most common applications of infrared spectroscopy in forensic science

  4. Refining mass formulas for astrophysical applications: A Bayesian neural network approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utama, R.; Piekarewicz, J.

    2017-10-01

    Background: Exotic nuclei, particularly those near the drip lines, are at the core of one of the fundamental questions driving nuclear structure and astrophysics today: What are the limits of nuclear binding? Exotic nuclei play a critical role in both informing theoretical models as well as in our understanding of the origin of the heavy elements. Purpose: Our aim is to refine existing mass models through the training of an artificial neural network that will mitigate the large model discrepancies far away from stability. Methods: The basic paradigm of our two-pronged approach is an existing mass model that captures as much as possible of the underlying physics followed by the implementation of a Bayesian neural network (BNN) refinement to account for the missing physics. Bayesian inference is employed to determine the parameters of the neural network so that model predictions may be accompanied by theoretical uncertainties. Results: Despite the undeniable quality of the mass models adopted in this work, we observe a significant improvement (of about 40%) after the BNN refinement is implemented. Indeed, in the specific case of the Duflo-Zuker mass formula, we find that the rms deviation relative to experiment is reduced from σrms=0.503 MeV to σrms=0.286 MeV. These newly refined mass tables are used to map the neutron drip lines (or rather "drip bands") and to study a few critical r -process nuclei. Conclusions: The BNN approach is highly successful in refining the predictions of existing mass models. In particular, the large discrepancy displayed by the original "bare" models in regions where experimental data are unavailable is considerably quenched after the BNN refinement. This lends credence to our approach and has motivated us to publish refined mass tables that we trust will be helpful for future astrophysical applications.

  5. FISH: A THREE-DIMENSIONAL PARALLEL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS CODE FOR ASTROPHYSICAL APPLICATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaeppeli, R.; Whitehouse, S. C.; Scheidegger, S.; Liebendoerfer, M.; Pen, U.-L.

    2011-01-01

    FISH is a fast and simple ideal magnetohydrodynamics code that scales to ∼10,000 processes for a Cartesian computational domain of ∼1000 3 cells. The simplicity of FISH has been achieved by the rigorous application of the operator splitting technique, while second-order accuracy is maintained by the symmetric ordering of the operators. Between directional sweeps, the three-dimensional data are rotated in memory so that the sweep is always performed in a cache-efficient way along the direction of contiguous memory. Hence, the code only requires a one-dimensional description of the conservation equations to be solved. This approach also enables an elegant novel parallelization of the code that is based on persistent communications with MPI for cubic domain decomposition on machines with distributed memory. This scheme is then combined with an additional OpenMP parallelization of different sweeps that can take advantage of clusters of shared memory. We document the detailed implementation of a second-order total variation diminishing advection scheme based on flux reconstruction. The magnetic fields are evolved by a constrained transport scheme. We show that the subtraction of a simple estimate of the hydrostatic gradient from the total gradients can significantly reduce the dissipation of the advection scheme in simulations of gravitationally bound hydrostatic objects. Through its simplicity and efficiency, FISH is as well suited for hydrodynamics classes as for large-scale astrophysical simulations on high-performance computer clusters. In preparation for the release of a public version, we demonstrate the performance of FISH in a suite of astrophysically orientated test cases.

  6. Development and applications of quantitative NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Taichi

    2016-01-01

    Recently, quantitative NMR spectroscopy has attracted attention as an analytical method which can easily secure traceability to SI unit system, and discussions about its accuracy and inaccuracy are also started. This paper focuses on the literatures on the advancement of quantitative NMR spectroscopy reported between 2009 and 2016, and introduces both NMR measurement conditions and actual analysis cases in quantitative NMR. The quantitative NMR spectroscopy using an internal reference method enables accurate quantitative analysis with a quick and versatile way in general, and it is possible to obtain the precision sufficiently applicable to the evaluation of pure substances and standard solutions. Since the external reference method can easily prevent contamination to samples and the collection of samples, there are many reported cases related to the quantitative analysis of biologically related samples and highly scarce natural products in which NMR spectra are complicated. In the precision of quantitative NMR spectroscopy, the internal reference method is superior. As the quantitative NMR spectroscopy widely spreads, discussions are also progressing on how to utilize this analytical method as the official methods in various countries around the world. In Japan, this method is listed in the Pharmacopoeia and Japanese Standard of Food Additives, and it is also used as the official method for purity evaluation. In the future, this method will be expected to spread as the general-purpose analysis method that can ensure traceability to SI unit system. (A.O.)

  7. Application of visible spectroscopy in waste sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiga, Philippe; Bourely, Antoine

    2011-10-01

    Today, waste recycling, (bottles, papers...), is a mechanical operation: the waste are crushed, fused and agglomerated in order to obtain new manufactured products (e.g. new bottles, clothes ...). The plastics recycling is the main application in the color sorting process. The colorless plastics recovered are more valuable than the colored plastics. Other emergent applications are in the paper sorting, where the main goal is to sort dyed paper from white papers. Up to now, Pellenc Selective Technologies has manufactured color sorting machines based on RGB cameras. Three dimensions (red, green and blue) are no longer sufficient to detect low quantities of dye in the considered waste. In order to increase the efficiency of the color detection, a new sorting machine, based on visible spectroscopy, has been developed. This paper presents the principles of the two approaches and their difference in terms of sorting performance, making visible spectroscopy a clear winner.

  8. Applications of NMR spectroscopy to xenobiotic metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, T.M.

    1989-01-01

    Recent years have seen high field NMR spectrometers become commonplace in research laboratories. At the same time, major advances in methodology for structural analysis have occurred, particularly notable among these being the development of two-dimensional spectroscopic techniques. Many applications have been made of NMR spectroscopy in the study of xenobiotic metabolic processes. This deals with two specific applications which have been made in the author's laboratory and involve mechanistic studies of the reactions of the carcinogens ethylene dibromide and aflatoxin with DNA

  9. Similarity and self-similarity in high energy density physics: application to laboratory astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falize, E.

    2008-10-01

    The spectacular recent development of powerful facilities allows the astrophysical community to explore, in laboratory, astrophysical phenomena where radiation and matter are strongly coupled. The titles of the nine chapters of the thesis are: from high energy density physics to laboratory astrophysics; Lie groups, invariance and self-similarity; scaling laws and similarity properties in High-Energy-Density physics; the Burgan-Feix-Munier transformation; dynamics of polytropic gases; stationary radiating shocks and the POLAR project; structure, dynamics and stability of optically thin fluids; from young star jets to laboratory jets; modelling and experiences for laboratory jets

  10. The 5D Fully-Covariant Theory of Gravitation and Its Astrophysical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianxi Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we comprehensively review the five-dimensional (5D fully-covariant theory of gravitation developed by Zhang two decades ago and its recent applications in astrophysics and cosmology. This 5D gravity describes not only the fields, but also the matter and its motion in a 5D spacetime. The greatest advantage of this theory is that there does not exist any unknown parameter, so that we can apply it to explain astrophysical and cosmological issues by quantitatively comparing the results obtained from it with observations and to predict new effects that could not be derived from any other gravitational theories. First, the 5D covariant description of matter and its motion enabled Zhang to analytically derive the fifteenth component of the 5D energy-momentum tensor of matter ( T - 44 , which significantly distinguishes this 5D gravity from other 5D gravitational theories that usually assumed a T - 44 with an unknown parameter, called the scalar charge s, and, thus, to split the 5D covariant field equation into (4 + 1 splitting form as the gravitational, electromagnetic, and scalar field equations. The gravitational field equation turns into the 4D Einstein’s field equation of general relativity if the scalar field is equal to unity. Then, Zhang solved the field equations and obtained an exact static spherically-symmetric external solution of the gravitational, electromagnetic and scalar fields, in which all integral constants were completely determined with a perfect set of simple numbers and parameters that only depend on the mass and electric charge of the matter, by comparing with the obtained weak internal solution of the fields at a large radial distance. In the Einstein frame, the exact field solution obtained from the 5D fully-covariant theory of gravitation reduces to the Schwarzschild solution when the matter is electrically neutral and the fields are weak in strength. This guarantees that the four fundamental tests (light

  11. Accurate First-Principles Spectra Predictions for Planetological and Astrophysical Applications at Various T-Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, M.; Nikitin, A. V.; Tyuterev, V.

    2014-06-01

    Knowledge of near infrared intensities of rovibrational transitions of polyatomic molecules is essential for the modeling of various planetary atmospheres, brown dwarfs and for other astrophysical applications 1,2,3. For example, to analyze exoplanets, atmospheric models have been developed, thus making the need to provide accurate spectroscopic data. Consequently, the spectral characterization of such planetary objects relies on the necessity of having adequate and reliable molecular data in extreme conditions (temperature, optical path length, pressure). On the other hand, in the modeling of astrophysical opacities, millions of lines are generally involved and the line-by-line extraction is clearly not feasible in laboratory measurements. It is thus suggested that this large amount of data could be interpreted only by reliable theoretical predictions. There exists essentially two theoretical approaches for the computation and prediction of spectra. The first one is based on empirically-fitted effective spectroscopic models. Another way for computing energies, line positions and intensities is based on global variational calculations using ab initio surfaces. They do not yet reach the spectroscopic accuracy stricto sensu but implicitly account for all intramolecular interactions including resonance couplings in a wide spectral range. The final aim of this work is to provide reliable predictions which could be quantitatively accurate with respect to the precision of available observations and as complete as possible. All this thus requires extensive first-principles quantum mechanical calculations essentially based on three necessary ingredients which are (i) accurate intramolecular potential energy surface and dipole moment surface components well-defined in a large range of vibrational displacements and (ii) efficient computational methods combined with suitable choices of coordinates to account for molecular symmetry properties and to achieve a good numerical

  12. MPI-AMRVAC 2.0 for Solar and Astrophysical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, C.; Teunissen, J.; El Mellah, I.; Chané, E.; Keppens, R.

    2018-02-01

    We report on the development of MPI-AMRVAC version 2.0, which is an open-source framework for parallel, grid-adaptive simulations of hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) astrophysical applications. The framework now supports radial grid stretching in combination with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). The advantages of this combined approach are demonstrated with one-dimensional, two-dimensional, and three-dimensional examples of spherically symmetric Bondi accretion, steady planar Bondi–Hoyle–Lyttleton flows, and wind accretion in supergiant X-ray binaries. Another improvement is support for the generic splitting of any background magnetic field. We present several tests relevant for solar physics applications to demonstrate the advantages of field splitting on accuracy and robustness in extremely low-plasma β environments: a static magnetic flux rope, a magnetic null-point, and magnetic reconnection in a current sheet with either uniform or anomalous resistivity. Our implementation for treating anisotropic thermal conduction in multi-dimensional MHD applications is also described, which generalizes the original slope-limited symmetric scheme from two to three dimensions. We perform ring diffusion tests that demonstrate its accuracy and robustness, and show that it prevents the unphysical thermal flux present in traditional schemes. The improved parallel scaling of the code is demonstrated with three-dimensional AMR simulations of solar coronal rain, which show satisfactory strong scaling up to 2000 cores. Other framework improvements are also reported: the modernization and reorganization into a library, the handling of automatic regression tests, the use of inline/online Doxygen documentation, and a new future-proof data format for input/output.

  13. Nuclear interactions of high energy heavy ions and applications in astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wefel, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    This program was established for the purpose of studying projectile fragmentation; (1) as a function of energy, focusing first on the intermediate energy region, < 1 GeV/nucleon, where there have been few previous measurements and no systematic studies, and (2) as a function of projectile mass, starting with light beams and proceeding to species as heavy as nickel (and possibly beyond). The intermediate energy region is important as the transition between the lower energy data, where the interaction appears to be dominated by collective effects and the decay of excited nuclei, and the highest energy results, where nucleon-nucleon interactions are fundamental, ''limiting fragmentation'' applies, and the nucleus may well break-up before any de-excitation. The mass dependence of projectile fragmentation is largely unknown since most detailed work has involved light ion beams. Nuclear structure effects, for example, may well be quite prominent for heavier beams. Furthermore, the nuclear excitation functions for the production of different fragment isotopes have immediate application to the astrophysical interpretation of existing isotopic datasets obtained from balloon and satellite measurements of galactic cosmic rays

  14. AtomPy: An Open Atomic Data Curation Environment for Astrophysical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Mendoza

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a cloud-computing environment, referred to as AtomPy, based on Google-Drive Sheets and Pandas (Python Data Analysis Library DataFrames to promote community-driven curation of atomic data for astrophysical applications, a stage beyond database development. The atomic model for each ionic species is contained in a multi-sheet workbook, tabulating representative sets of energy levels, A-values and electron impact effective collision strengths from different sources. The relevant issues that AtomPy intends to address are: (i data quality by allowing open access to both data producers and users; (ii comparisons of different datasets to facilitate accuracy assessments; (iii downloading to local data structures (i.e., Pandas DataFrames for further manipulation and analysis by prospective users; and (iv data preservation by avoiding the discard of outdated sets. Data processing workflows are implemented by means of IPython Notebooks, and collaborative software developments are encouraged and managed within the GitHub social network. The facilities of AtomPy are illustrated with the critical assessment of the transition probabilities for ions in the hydrogen and helium isoelectronic sequences with atomic number Z ≤ 10.

  15. Relativistic Shear Flow between Electron–Ion and Electron–Positron Plasmas and Astrophysical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Edison; Fu, Wen [Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Böttcher, Markus [North-West University, Potchefstroom, 2520 (South Africa)

    2017-10-01

    We present particle-in-cell simulation results of relativistic shear boundary layers between electron–ion and electron–positron plasmas and discuss their potential applications to astrophysics. Specifically, we find that in the case of a fast electron–positron spine surrounded by a slow-moving or stationary electron–ion sheath, lepton acceleration proceeds in a highly anisotropic manner due to electromagnetic fields created at the shear interface. While the highest-energy leptons still produce a beaming pattern (as seen in the quasi-stationary frame of the sheath) of order 1/Γ, where Γ is the bulk Lorentz factor of the spine, for lower-energy particles, the beaming is much less pronounced. This is in stark contrast to the case of pure electron–ion shear layers, in which anisotropic particle acceleration leads to significantly narrower beaming patterns than 1/Γ for the highest-energy particles. In either case, shear-layer acceleration is expected to produce strongly angle-dependent lepton (hence, emanating radiation) spectra, with a significantly harder spectrum in the forward direction than viewed from larger off-axis angles, much beyond the regular Doppler boosting effect from a co-moving isotropic lepton distribution. This may solve the problem of the need for high (and apparently arbitrarily chosen) minimum Lorentz factors of radiating electrons, often plaguing current blazar and GRB jet modeling efforts.

  16. Doppler tomography in fusion plasmas and astrophysics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Geiger, B.; Heidbrink, W. W.

    2015-01-01

    Doppler tomography is a well-known method in astrophysics to image the accretion flow, often in the shape of thin discs, in compact binary stars. As accretion discs rotate, all emitted line radiation is Doppler-shifted. In fast-ion Dα (FIDA) spectroscopy measurements in magnetically confined plasma......, the Dα-photons are likewise Doppler-shifted ultimately due to gyration of the fast ions. In either case, spectra of Doppler-shifted line emission are sensitive to the velocity distribution of the emitters. Astrophysical Doppler tomography has lead to images of accretion discs of binaries revealing bright...... and limits, analogies and differences in astrophysical and fusion plasma Doppler tomography and what can be learned by comparison of these applications....

  17. Femtosecond infrared spectroscopy: study, development and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonvalet, Adeline

    1997-01-01

    This work has been devoted to the development and the applications of a new technique of infrared (5-20 μm) spectroscopy allowing a temporal resolution of 100 fs. This technique relies on a source of ultrashort infrared pulses obtained by frequency mixing in a nonlinear material. In particular, the optical rectification of 12-fs visible pulses in gallium arsenide has allowed us to obtain 40-fs infrared pulses with a spectrum extending from 5 pm up to 15 μm. Spectral resolution has been achieved by Fourier transform spectroscopy, using a novel device we have called Diffracting FTIR. These developments allow to study inter-subband transitions in quantum-well structures. The inter-subband relaxation time has been measured by a pump-probe experiment, in which the sample was excited with a visible pulse, and the variations of inter-subband absorption probed with an infrared pulse. Besides, we have developed a method of coherent emission spectroscopy allowing to monitor the electric field emitted by coherent charge oscillations in quantum wells. The decay of the oscillations due to the loss of coherence between excited levels yields a direct measurement of the dephasing time between these levels. Other applications include biological macromolecules like reaction centers of photosynthetic bacteria. We have shown that we were able to monitor variations of infrared absorption of about 10 -4 optical densities with a temporal resolution of 100 fs. This would constitute a relevant tool to study the role of molecular vibrations during the primary steps of biological processes. (author) [fr

  18. Nuclear interactions of high energy heavy ions and applications in astrophysics. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wefel, J.P.; Guzik, T.G.

    1998-01-01

    Projectile fragmentation experiments have been conducted at the LBL Bevalac accelerator, utilizing both the B40 and the HISS facilities, to produce a dataset of 36 beam/energy combinations covering projectiles from 4 He to 58 Ni and various energies from 170--2100 MeV/nucleon. While some runs were subject to beam instabilities, magnet problems or low statistics, there remains a large dataset which is still being analyzed. The results will be used to investigate the physics of the intermediate energy fragmentation process and will find application in the astrophysics of cosmic ray propagation in the galaxy. An overview of the science goals and rationale is followed by presentation of the experimental techniques and apparatus that has been employed. Data analysis, including both detector subsystem and accelerator calibration, is discussed with emphasis on the unique features of the dataset and the analysis problems being addressed. Results from the experiments are presented throughout to illustrate the status of the analysis, e.g., momentum distribution widths. Total, Elemental and Isotopic cross sections from various beam/energy combinations are presented, including the first data on 32 S fragmentation and the complete isotopic fragmentation cross sections for 28 Si interacting in both Carbon and Hydrogen targets. The new results are compared to any existing data and to formulae used to predict unmeasured cross sections. The size and complexity of the dataset and the required detail of the analysis precluded finishing the full analysis under the subject grant. Plans for additional analysis are presented, and these will be carried out in coming years as time and resources permit

  19. Application of principal component and factor analyses in electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siuda, R.; Balcerowska, G.

    1998-01-01

    Fundamentals of two methods, taken from multivariate analysis and known as principal component analysis (PCA) and factor analysis (FA), are presented. Both methods are well known in chemometrics. Since 1979, when application of the methods to electron spectroscopy was reported for the first time, they became to be more and more popular in different branches of electron spectroscopy. The paper presents examples of standard applications of the method of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Advantages one can take from application of the methods, their potentialities as well as their limitations are pointed out. (author)

  20. R-matrix calculations for electron impact excitation and their application in astrophysical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, G Y; Badnell, N R; Zhao, G; Del Zanna, G; Mason, H E; Storey, P J

    2012-01-01

    The large number of high-resolution spectra routinely recorded in the astrophysical and fusion communities leads to the need for an extensive set of accurate baseline atomic data. The advantages of the intermediate-coupling frame transformation (ICFT) R-matrix method make it feasible to provide excitation data along iso-electronic sequences (Z ≤ 36) at the high level of accuracy afforded by the R-matrix method. The resultant data helps to overcome the longstanding shortcomings in X-ray and EUV astronomy. This is one of the key goals of the UK Atomic Processes for Astrophysical Plasmas (APAP) network.

  1. Emerging technology: applications of Raman spectroscopy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, Rachel E; Tucker, Stephanie C; Killian, Kevin; Trexler, Micaela; Honn, Kenneth V; Auner, Gregory W

    2014-09-01

    There is a need in prostate cancer diagnostics and research for a label-free imaging methodology that is nondestructive, rapid, objective, and uninfluenced by water. Raman spectroscopy provides a molecular signature, which can be scaled from micron-level regions of interest in cells to macroscopic areas of tissue. It can be used for applications ranging from in vivo or in vitro diagnostics to basic science laboratory testing. This work describes the fundamentals of Raman spectroscopy and complementary techniques including surface enhanced Raman scattering, resonance Raman spectroscopy, coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, confocal Raman spectroscopy, stimulated Raman scattering, and spatially offset Raman spectroscopy. Clinical applications of Raman spectroscopy to prostate cancer will be discussed, including screening, biopsy, margin assessment, and monitoring of treatment efficacy. Laboratory applications including cell identification, culture monitoring, therapeutics development, and live imaging of cellular processes are discussed. Potential future avenues of research are described, with emphasis on multiplexing Raman spectroscopy with other modalities.

  2. Relativistic Astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Font, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    The relativistic astrophysics is the field of astrophysics employing the theory of relativity Einstein as physical-mathematical model is to study the universe. This discipline analyzes astronomical contexts in which the laws of classical mechanics of Newton's law of gravitation are not valid. (Author)

  3. Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, S

    1976-01-01

    The three volumes of Spectroscopy constitute the one comprehensive text available on the principles, practice and applications of spectroscopy. By giving full accounts of those spectroscopic techniques only recently introduced into student courses - such as Mössbauer spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy - in addition to those techniques long recognised as being essential in chemistry teaching - sucha as e.s.r. and infrared spectroscopy - the book caters for the complete requirements of undergraduate students and at the same time provides a sound introduction to special topics for graduate students.

  4. Essential astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Kenneth R

    2013-01-01

    Essential Astrophysics is a book to learn or teach from, as well as a fundamental reference volume for anyone interested in astronomy and astrophysics. It presents astrophysics from basic principles without requiring any previous study of astronomy or astrophysics. It serves as a comprehensive introductory text, which takes the student through the field of astrophysics in lecture-sized chapters of basic physical principles applied to the cosmos. This one-semester overview will be enjoyed by undergraduate students with an interest in the physical sciences, such as astronomy, chemistry, engineering or physics, as well as by any curious student interested in learning about our celestial science. The mathematics required for understanding the text is on the level of simple algebra, for that is all that is needed to describe the fundamental principles. The text is of sufficient breadth and depth to prepare the interested student for more advanced specialized courses in the future. Astronomical examples are provide...

  5. Digital signal processing application in nuclear spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Zeynalova

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Digital signal processing algorithms for nuclear particle spectroscopy are described along with a digital pile-up elimination method applicable to equidistantly sampled detector signals pre-processed by a charge-sensitive preamplifier. The signal processing algorithms provided as recursive one- or multi-step procedures which can be easily programmed using modern computer programming languages. The influence of the number of bits of the sampling analogue-to-digital converter to the final signal-to-noise ratio of the spectrometer considered. Algorithms for a digital shaping-filter amplifier, for a digital pile-up elimination scheme and for ballistic deficit correction were investigated using a high purity germanium detector. The pile-up elimination method was originally developed for fission fragment spectroscopy using a Frisch-grid back-to-back double ionisation chamber and was mainly intended for pile-up elimination in case of high alpha-radioactivity of the fissile target. The developed pile-up elimination method affects only the electronic noise generated by the preamplifier. Therefore, the influence of the pile-up elimination scheme on the final resolution of the spectrometer investigated in terms of the distance between piled-up pulses. The efficiency of developed algorithms compared with other signal processing schemes published in literature.

  6. A small electron beam ion trap/source facility for electron/neutral–ion collisional spectroscopy in astrophysical plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Gui-Yun; Wei, Hui-Gang; Yuan, Da-Wei; Wang, Fei-Lu; Peng, Ji-Min; Zhong, Jia-Yong; Zhu, Xiao-Long; Schmidt, Mike; Zschornack, Günter; Ma, Xin-Wen; Zhao, Gang

    2018-01-01

    Spectra are fundamental observation data used for astronomical research, but understanding them strongly depends on theoretical models with many fundamental parameters from theoretical calculations. Different models give different insights for understanding a specific object. Hence, laboratory benchmarks for these theoretical models become necessary. An electron beam ion trap is an ideal facility for spectroscopic benchmarks due to its similar conditions of electron density and temperature compared to astrophysical plasmas in stellar coronae, supernova remnants and so on. In this paper, we will describe the performance of a small electron beam ion trap/source facility installed at National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences.We present some preliminary experimental results on X-ray emission, ion production, the ionization process of trapped ions as well as the effects of charge exchange on the ionization.

  7. Extending applicability of terahertz spectroscopy for biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, Ramakrishnan

    Terahertz (THz) vibrational resonance spectroscopy has recently emerged as a promising technique for fingerprinting biological molecules. Absorption spectra in this frequency range (0.1-10 THz) reflect molecular internal vibrations involving the weakest hydrogen bonds and/or non-bonded interactions, which are species specific. Of prime importance is improving detection sensitivity of molecules with low absorption characteristics in the THz gap. Also of importance is the characterization of biological molecules in the THz gap (10-25 cm-1) by physical parameters (refractive index and absorption coefficient) rather than sample dependent parameters (transmission, reflection) and extending spectroscopy to the low THz range where remote sensing is most viable. To address the sensitivity issue, it is shown that periodic arrays of rectangular slots with subwavelength width provide for local electromagnetic field enhancements due to edge effects in the low frequency range of interest, 10-25 cm-1 (300-750 GHz). Periodic structures of Au, doped Si and InSb were studied. InSb is confirmed to offer the highest results with the local power enhancements on the order of 1100 at frequency 14 cm -1. InSb and Si have large skin depths in the frequency range of interest and so the analysis of their structures was done through the Fourier expansion method of field diffracted from gratings. Au however has small skin depths at these frequencies compared to the thickness. Surface impedance boundary conditions were employed to model the Au structure, for which the Fourier expansion method was unsuitable owing to the huge magnitude of Au permittivity. The applications possibly include development of novel bio-sensors, with the strongly enhanced local electromagnetic fields leading to increased detection sensitivity, and monitoring biophysical processes such as DNA denaturation. Transmission and reflection data from parallel, independent experiments are utilized in the Interference

  8. Medical Applications of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathak, A K; Rai, N K; Singh, Ankita; Rai, A K; Rai, Pradeep K; Rai, Pramod K

    2014-01-01

    Sedentary lifestyle of human beings has resulted in various diseases and in turn we require a potential tool that can be used to address various issues related to human health. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is one such potential optical analytical tool that has become quite popular because of its distinctive features that include applicability to any type/phase of samples with almost no sample preparation. Several reports are available that discusses the capabilities of LIBS, suitable for various applications in different branches of science which cannot be addressed by traditional analytical methods but only few reports are available for the medical applications of LIBS. In the present work, LIBS has been implemented to understand the role of various elements in the formation of gallstones (formed under the empyema and mucocele state of gallbladder) samples along with patient history that were collected from Purvancal region of Uttar Pradesh, India. The occurrence statistics of gallstones under the present study reveal higher occurrence of gallstones in female patients. The gallstone occurrence was found more prevalent for those male patients who were having the habit of either tobacco chewing, smoking or drinking alcohols. This work further reports in-situ LIBS study of deciduous tooth and in-vivo LIBS study of human nail

  9. Astrophysical Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, James E.; King, Andrew

    2003-07-01

    Almost all conventional matter in the Universe is fluid, and fluid dynamics plays a crucial role in astrophysics. This new graduate textbook provides a basic understanding of the fluid dynamical processes relevant to astrophysics. The mathematics used to describe these processes is simplified to bring out the underlying physics. The authors cover many topics, including wave propagation, shocks, spherical flows, stellar oscillations, the instabilities caused by effects such as magnetic fields, thermal driving, gravity, shear flows, and the basic concepts of compressible fluid dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics. The authors are Directors of the UK Astrophysical Fluids Facility (UKAFF) at the University of Leicester, and editors of the Cambridge Astrophysics Series. This book has been developed from a course in astrophysical fluid dynamics taught at the University of Cambridge. It is suitable for graduate students in astrophysics, physics and applied mathematics, and requires only a basic familiarity with fluid dynamics.• Provides coverage of the fundamental fluid dynamical processes an astrophysical theorist needs to know • Introduces new mathematical theory and techniques in a straightforward manner • Includes end-of-chapter problems to illustrate the course and introduce additional ideas

  10. The Trojan Horse Method for nuclear astrophysics and its recent applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.; Mazzocco, M.; Boiano, A.; Boiano, C.; Broggini, C.; Caciolli, A.; Depalo, R.; Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; Galtarossa, F.; Guardo, G. L.; Gulino, M.; Hayakawa, S.; Kubono, S.; La Cognata, M.; La Commara, M.; La Rana, G.; Lattuada, M.; Menegazzo, R.; Pakou, A.; Parascandolo, C.; Piatti, D.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Romano, S.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Sanchez-Benitez, A. M.; Sergi, M. L.; Sgouros, O.; Silva, H.; Soramel, F.; Soukeras, V.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Trippella, O.; Tumino, A.; Yamaguchi, H.; Villante, F. L.; Zhang, G. L.

    2018-01-01

    The Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been applied extensively for the last 25 years to measure nuclear reaction cross sections of interest for astrophysics. Although it has been mainly applied for charged particle-induced reactions, recently it has been found to have also a relevant role for neutron-induced reactions. Here, some advantages of THM will be discussed and the preliminary results of the cosmological relevant 7Be(n,α)4He cross section measurement are discussed.

  11. Nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haxton, W.C.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized

  12. Relativistic astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Demianski, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Relativistic Astrophysics brings together important astronomical discoveries and the significant achievements, as well as the difficulties in the field of relativistic astrophysics. This book is divided into 10 chapters that tackle some aspects of the field, including the gravitational field, stellar equilibrium, black holes, and cosmology. The opening chapters introduce the theories to delineate gravitational field and the elements of relativistic thermodynamics and hydrodynamics. The succeeding chapters deal with the gravitational fields in matter; stellar equilibrium and general relativity

  13. Synchrotron radiation spectroscopy including X-ray absorption spectroscopy and industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    Recent trends of synchrotron radiation spectroscopy, especially X-ray absorption spectroscopy for industrial applications are introduced based on our latest results for energy efficient devices such as magnetic RAM, LSI and organic FET, power generation devices such as fuel cells, and energy storage devices such as Li ion batteries. Furthermore, future prospects of spectroscopy with higher energy resolution, higher spatial resolution, higher temporal resolution and operando spectroscopy taking advantage of much brighter synchrotron radiation beam at low emittance SR rings are discussed from the view point of practical applications. (author)

  14. Nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehoucq, Roland; Klotz, Gregory

    2015-11-01

    Astronomy deals with the position and observation of the objects in our Universe, from planets to galaxies. It is the oldest of the sciences. Astrophysics is the study of the physical properties of these objects. It dates from the start of the 20. century. Nuclear astrophysics is the marriage of nuclear physics, a laboratory science concerned with the infinitely small, and astrophysics, the science of what is far away and infinitely large. Its aim is to explain the origin, evolution and abundance of the elements in the Universe. It was born in 1938 with the work of Hans Bethe, an American physicist who won the Nobel Prize for physics in 1967, on the nuclear reactions that can occur at the center of stars. It explains where the incredible energy of the stars and the Sun comes from and enables us to understand how they are born, live and die. The matter all around us and from which we are made, is made up of ninety-two chemical elements that can be found in every corner of the Universe. Nuclear astrophysics explains the origin of these chemical elements by nucleosynthesis, which is the synthesis of atomic nuclei in different astrophysical environments such as stars. Nuclear astrophysics provides answers to fundamental questions: - Our Sun and the stars in general shine because nuclear reactions are taking place within them. - The stars follow a sequence of nuclear reaction cycles. Nucleosynthesis in the stars enables us to explain the origin and abundance of elements essential to life, such as carbon, oxygen, nitrogen and iron. - Star explosions, in the form of supernovae, disperse the nuclei formed by nucleosynthesis into space and explain the formation of the heaviest chemical elements such as gold, platinum and lead. Nuclear astrophysics is still a growing area of science. (authors)

  15. Biochemical applications of FT-IR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pistorius, A.M.A.

    1996-01-01

    This thesis describes the use of (FT-)IR spectroscopy in general biochemical research. In chapter 3, IR spectroscopy is used in the quantitation of residual detergent after reconstitution of an integral membrane protein in a pre-defined lipid matrix. This chapter discusses the choice of the

  16. A space Fresnel imager concept assessment study led by CNES for astrophysical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinglais, Emmanuel

    2011-06-01

    In 2009, the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) carried out an assessment study on a "Fresnel telescope" concept based on a two-spacecraftformation flying configuration. This concept uses a binary Fresnel zone plate, and the principle of diffraction focusing, which allows high resolution optical imaging for astrophysics. In addition to CNES, the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Toulouse Tarbes (LATT) was deeply involved at two levels: through Research & Technology (R&T) studies to simulate and validate on a test bench the Fresnel concept performance, and through active participation in the CNES team for the optical aspects and to define the astrophysical fields of Fresnel-based space missions. The study was conducted within the technical limitations that resulted from a compromise between the R&T state of the art and the potential scientific domains of interest. The main technical limitations are linked to the size of the primary Fresnel array and to its usable spectral bandwidth. In this framework, the study covers ambitious architectures, correlating the technology readiness of the main critical components with the time-scale and programmatic horizons. The possible scientific topics arise from this range of missions. In this paper, I present a mission launched by a Soyuz, dedicated to astrophysics in the Ultra Violet (UV) band: 120 to 300 nm using a 4-m Fresnel array. It could be competitive in the next fifteen years, whereas a 10-m aperture mission in different bands; UV, visible or Infra Red (IR) (up to 6 μm) could be achievable in the future. Larger missions, using a primary array larger than 20 m, request technologies not yet available but that will probably be based on new inflatable structures with membranes, as already tested in the USA for other ends.

  17. Recent applications of the the Trojan Horse method to nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitaleri, Claudio [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Catania University (Italy) and INFN-Laboratoti Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy)

    2012-11-20

    Light elements lithium, beryllium and boron (LiBeB) have been used in the last years as possible probes for stellar structure. They are mainly destroyed by (p,a) reactions and cross section measurements for such channels are then needed. The Trojan Horse Method (THM) allows one to extract the astrophysical S(E)-factor without the experience of tunneling through the Coulomb barrier. In this work a resume of the recent new results about the {sup 11}B(p,{alpha}{sub 0}){sup 8}Be and {sup 7}Li(p,{alpha}){sup 4}He reactions are shown.

  18. Bloch–Siegert shift in application to the astrophysical determination of the fundamental constants variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solovyev, Dmitry

    2013-01-01

    We have evaluated the Bloch–Siegert shift for the different values of magnetic field's strengths defined at astrophysical conditions, i.e. when the stars with the strong surface magnetic fields are taken as a powerful pumping source of radiation. It is found that the additional shift of resonant frequency should be taken into account in the search for the time variation of the fundamental constants. The main conclusion is that the influence of the electromagnetic field should be considered carefully in each special case of the corresponding frequency determination

  19. Properties of thermometric NbSi thin films and application to detection in astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrache-Kikuchi, C.A. [CSNSM, CNRS-IN2P3, Bat 108, 91405 Orsay Campus (France)]. E-mail: kikuchi@csnsm.in2p3.fr; Berge, L. [CSNSM, CNRS-IN2P3, Bat 108, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); Collin, S. [CSNSM, CNRS-IN2P3, Bat 108, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); Dobrea, C. [CSNSM, CNRS-IN2P3, Bat 108, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); Dumoulin, L. [CSNSM, CNRS-IN2P3, Bat 108, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); Juillard, A. [CSNSM, CNRS-IN2P3, Bat 108, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); Marnieros, S. [CSNSM, CNRS-IN2P3, Bat 108, 91405 Orsay Campus (France)

    2006-04-15

    We report the low-temperature study of very thin Nb{sub x}Si{sub 1-x} films that are used in various systems for astrophysical detection with bolometers. We have decreased the thin film thicknesses from 60nm down to 12.5nm and shown that the sensitivity gain due to lowering the heat capacity is not to the detriment of the electron-phonon coupling or to noise characteristics. On the superconducting side, we show that, at small thicknesses, the critical temperature and the normal resistance can be adjusted by tuning the thickness and the composition of the films.

  20. Astrophysical Concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Harwit, Martin

    2006-01-01

    This classic text, aimed at senior undergraduates and beginning graduate students in physics and astronomy, presents a wide range of astrophysical concepts in sufficient depth to give the reader a quantitative understanding of the subject. Emphasizing physical concepts, the book outlines cosmic events but does not portray them in detail: it provides a series of astrophysical sketches. For this fourth edition, nearly every part of the text has been reconsidered and rewritten, new sections have been added to cover recent developments, and others have been extensively revised and brought up to date. The book begins with an outline of the scope of modern astrophysics and enumerates some of the outstanding problems faced in the field today. The basic physics needed to tackle these questions are developed in the next few chapters using specific astronomical processes as examples. The second half of the book enlarges on these topics and shows how we can obtain quantitative insight into the structure and evolution of...

  1. Nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnould, M.; Takahashi, K.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear astrophysics is that branch of astrophysics which helps understanding of the Universe, or at least some of its many faces, through the knowledge of the microcosm of the atomic nucleus. It attempts to find as many nuclear physics imprints as possible in the macrocosm, and to decipher what those messages are telling us about the varied constituent objects in the Universe at present and in the past. In the last decades much advance has been made in nuclear astrophysics thanks to the sometimes spectacular progress made in the modelling of the structure and evolution of the stars, in the quality and diversity of the astronomical observations, as well as in the experimental and theoretical understanding of the atomic nucleus and of its spontaneous or induced transformations. Developments in other subfields of physics and chemistry have also contributed to that advance. Notwithstanding the accomplishment, many long-standing problems remain to be solved, and the theoretical understanding of a large variety of observational facts needs to be put on safer grounds. In addition, new questions are continuously emerging, and new facts endangering old ideas. This review shows that astrophysics has been, and still is, highly demanding to nuclear physics in both its experimental and theoretical components. On top of the fact that large varieties of nuclei have to be dealt with, these nuclei are immersed in highly unusual environments which may have a significant impact on their static properties, the diversity of their transmutation modes, and on the probabilities of these modes. In order to have a chance of solving some of the problems nuclear astrophysics is facing, the astrophysicists and nuclear physicists are obviously bound to put their competence in common, and have sometimes to benefit from the help of other fields of physics, like particle physics, plasma physics or solid-state physics. Given the highly varied and complex aspects, we pick here some specific nuclear

  2. Atomic spectroscopy and radiative processes

    CERN Document Server

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the basic physical principles of atomic spectroscopy and the absorption and emission of radiation in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. It summarizes the basics of electromagnetism and thermodynamics and then describes in detail the theory of atomic spectra for complex atoms, with emphasis on astrophysical applications. Both equilibrium and non-equilibrium phenomena in plasmas are considered. The interaction between radiation and matter is described, together with various types of radiation (e.g., cyclotron, synchrotron, bremsstrahlung, Compton). The basic theory of polarization is explained, as is the theory of radiative transfer for astrophysical applications. Atomic Spectroscopy and Radiative Processes bridges the gap between basic books on atomic spectroscopy and the very specialized publications for the advanced researcher: it will provide under- and postgraduates with a clear in-depth description of theoretical aspects, supported by practical examples of applications.

  3. Plasma astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, S A; ter Haar, D

    2013-01-01

    Plasma Astrophysics is a translation from the Russian language; the topics discussed are based on lectures given by V.N. Tsytovich at several universities. The book describes the physics of the various phenomena and their mathematical formulation connected with plasma astrophysics. This book also explains the theory of the interaction of fast particles plasma, their radiation activities, as well as the plasma behavior when exposed to a very strong magnetic field. The text describes the nature of collective plasma processes and of plasma turbulence. One author explains the method of elementary

  4. Neutrino astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roulet, E.

    2001-01-01

    A general overview of neutrino physics and astrophysics is given, starting with a historical account of the development of our understanding of neutrinos and how they helped to unravel the structure of the Standard Model. We discuss why it is so important to establish if neutrinos are massive and introduce the main scenarios to provide them a mass. The present bounds and the positive indications in favor of non-zero neutrino masses are discussed, including the recent results on atmospheric and solar neutrinos. The major role that neutrinos play in astrophysics and cosmology is illustrated. (author)

  5. Applications of Nonlinear Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (NLEIS)

    KAUST Repository

    Adler, S. B.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the use of nonlinear electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (NLEIS) in the analysis of SOFC electrode reactions. By combining EIS and NLEIS, as well as other independent information about an electrode material, it becomes possible

  6. Ultrafast Laser-Based Spectroscopy and Sensing: Applications in LIBS, CARS, and THz Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy-Hoppa, Megan R.; Miragliotta, Joseph; Osiander, Robert; Burnett, Jennifer; Dikmelik, Yamac; McEnnis, Caroline; Spicer, James B.

    2010-01-01

    Ultrafast pulsed lasers find application in a range of spectroscopy and sensing techniques including laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), coherent Raman spectroscopy, and terahertz (THz) spectroscopy. Whether based on absorption or emission processes, the characteristics of these techniques are heavily influenced by the use of ultrafast pulses in the signal generation process. Depending on the energy of the pulses used, the essential laser interaction process can primarily involve lattice vibrations, molecular rotations, or a combination of excited states produced by laser heating. While some of these techniques are currently confined to sensing at close ranges, others can be implemented for remote spectroscopic sensing owing principally to the laser pulse duration. We present a review of ultrafast laser-based spectroscopy techniques and discuss the use of these techniques to current and potential chemical and environmental sensing applications. PMID:22399883

  7. Ultrafast Laser-Based Spectroscopy and Sensing: Applications in LIBS, CARS, and THz Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan R. Leahy-Hoppa

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast pulsed lasers find application in a range of spectroscopy and sensing techniques including laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS, coherent Raman spectroscopy, and terahertz (THz spectroscopy. Whether based on absorption or emission processes, the characteristics of these techniques are heavily influenced by the use of ultrafast pulses in the signal generation process. Depending on the energy of the pulses used, the essential laser interaction process can primarily involve lattice vibrations, molecular rotations, or a combination of excited states produced by laser heating. While some of these techniques are currently confined to sensing at close ranges, others can be implemented for remote spectroscopic sensing owing principally to the laser pulse duration. We present a review of ultrafast laser-based spectroscopy techniques and discuss the use of these techniques to current and potential chemical and environmental sensing applications.

  8. Relativistic astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Price, R H

    1993-01-01

    Work reported in the workshop on relativistic astrophysics spanned a wide varicy of topics. Two specific areas seemed of particular interest. Much attention was focussed on gravitational wave sources, especially on the waveforms they produce, and progress was reported in theoretical and observational aspects of accretion disks.

  9. Astrophysics today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, A.G.W.

    1984-01-01

    Examining recent history, current trends, and future possibilities, the author reports the frontiers of research on the solar system, stars, galactic physics, and cosmological physics. The book discusses the great discoveries in astronomy and astrophysics and examines the circumstances in which they occurred. It discusses the physics of white dwarfs, the inflationary universe, the extinction of dinosaurs, black hole, cosmological models, and much more

  10. Laboratory oscillator strengths of Sc i in the near-infrared region for astrophysical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehlivan, A.; Nilsson, H.; Hartman, H.

    2015-10-01

    Context. Atomic data is crucial for astrophysical investigations. To understand the formation and evolution of stars, we need to analyse their observed spectra. Analysing a spectrum of a star requires information about the properties of atomic lines, such as wavelengths and oscillator strengths. However, atomic data of some elements are scarce, particularly in the infrared region, and this paper is part of an effort to improve the situation on near-IR atomic data. Aims: This paper investigates the spectrum of neutral scandium, Sc I, from laboratory measurements and improves the atomic data of Sc I lines in the infrared region covering lines in R, I, J, and K bands. Especially, we focus on measuring oscillator strengths for Sc I lines connecting the levels with 4p and 4s configurations. Methods: We combined experimental branching fractions with radiative lifetimes from the literature to derive oscillator strengths (f-values). Intensity-calibrated spectra with high spectral resolution were recorded with Fourier transform spectrometer from a hollow cathode discharge lamp. The spectra were used to derive accurate oscillator strengths and wavelengths for Sc I lines, with emphasis on the infrared region. Results: This project provides the first set of experimental Sc I lines in the near-infrared region for accurate spectral analysis of astronomical objects. We derived 63 log(gf) values for the lines between 5300 Å and 24 300 Å. The uncertainties in the f-values vary from 5% to 20%. The small uncertainties in our values allow for an increased accuracy in astrophysical abundance determinations.

  11. Principles and applications of force spectroscopy using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Kyu; Kim, Woong; Park, Joon Won [Dept. of Chemistry, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy is a powerful technique for addressing single molecules. Unseen structures and dynamics of molecules have been elucidated using force spectroscopy. Atomic force microscope (AFM)-based force spectroscopy studies have provided picoNewton force resolution, subnanometer spatial resolution, stiffness of substrates, elasticity of polymers, and thermodynamics and kinetics of single-molecular interactions. In addition, AFM has enabled mapping the distribution of individual molecules in situ, and the quantification of single molecules has been made possible without modification or labeling. In this review, we describe the basic principles, sample preparation, data analysis, and applications of AFM-based force spectroscopy and its future.

  12. CO2-, He- and H2-broadening coefficients of SO2 for ν1 band and ground state transitions for astrophysical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceselin, Giorgia; Tasinato, Nicola; Puzzarini, Cristina; Pietropolli Charmet, Andrea; Stoppa, Paolo; Giorgianni, Santi

    2017-12-01

    The discovery of the Universe and of the interstellar medium (ISM) is based on the knowledge of the molecules that are present in those places. Most of our understanding about the composition of the ISM and planetary atmospheres has been made possible almost entirely thanks to spectroscopic observations. Sulfur dioxide, SO2, is one of the about 200 molecules that have been detected in the ISM or circumstellar shells. In addition to its astrophysical relevance, SO2 has a proved role in the Earth's atmosphere. It origins from biomass burning and volcanic eruptions and directly enters in the sulfur cycle. In this work high-resolution tunable diode laser (TDL) infrared (IR) spectroscopy and mm-/sub-mm wave spectroscopy are exploited to retrieve the broadening parameters of sulfur dioxide perturbed by H2, He and CO2. IR measurements are carried out for ν1 band transitions around 9 μm by using He and CO2 as damping gases. As far as the vibrational ground state is concerned, about 20 rotational transitions are analyzed by means of the speed dependent Voigt profile to retrieve H2- and He-broadening coefficients. From the experimental results some conclusions about the quantum number dependence of the H2-, CO2- and He-collisional cross sections are drawn. Both IR and MW experiments highlight a very weak dependence of He broadening parameters on the Ka and J rotational quantum numbers. In a similar way, also SO2-H2 broadening coefficients show a negligible dependence on the rotational quantum numbers. Conversely, when CO2 is employed as perturbing species, the observed collisional cross sections tend to decrease with increasing Ka values and to increase against J, at least over the range of quantum numbers considered. The present results provide the first systematic determination of line-by-line SO2-CO2 broadening coefficients and they are of relevance to increase the potential use of spectroscopic databases for astronomical applications.

  13. Clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    The advantages and present limitations of the clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy are reviewed in outline, with passing references to skeletal muscular studies, in particular a group of children with advanced Duchenne dystrophy, and the applications to the study of cerebral metabolism of neonates, excised kidneys, biopsy studies of breast and axillary lymph node samples, and NMR spectroscopy performed during chemotherapy of a secondary rhabdomyosarcoma in the skin. (U.K.)

  14. Clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, R.J. (Glasgow Western Infirmary (UK))

    1984-09-01

    The advantages and present limitations of the clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy are reviewed in outline, with passing references to skeletal muscular studies, in particular a group of children with advanced Duchenne dystrophy, and the applications to the study of cerebral metabolism of neonates, excised kidneys, biopsy studies of breast and axillary lymph node samples, and NMR spectroscopy performed during chemotherapy of a secondary rhabdomyosarcoma in the skin.

  15. Numerical simulation in astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyama, Shoken

    1985-01-01

    There have been many numerical simulations of hydrodynamical problems in astrophysics, e.g. processes of star formation, supernova explosion and formation of neutron stars, and general relativistic collapse of star to form black hole. The codes are made to be suitable for computing such problems. In astrophysical hydrodynamical problems, there are the characteristics: problems of self-gravity or external gravity acting, objects of scales very large or very short, objects changing by short period or long time scale, problems of magnetic force and/or centrifugal force acting. In this paper, we present one of methods of numerical simulations which may satisfy these requirements, so-called smoothed particle methods. We then introduce the methods briefly. Then, we show one of the applications of the methods to astrophysical problem (fragmentation and collapse of rotating isothermal cloud). (Mori, K.)

  16. Applications of spectroscopy with multiwavelength sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hänsel, A.

    2018-01-01

    Spectroscopy is a powerful tool to investigate the physical properties of complex systems. The interaction of light with matter allows to get insights into the structure of it. Chapter 1 is dedicated to introduce this topic and to show the developments of the technologies that paved the way to its

  17. Computation of Collision-Induced Absorption by Simple Molecular Complexes, for Astrophysical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Martin; Frommhold, Lothar; Li, Xiaoping; Hunt, Katharine L. C.

    2012-06-01

    The interaction-induced absorption by collisional pairs of H{_2} molecules is an important opacity source in the atmospheres of various types of planets and cool stars, such as late stars, low-mass stars, brown dwarfs, cool white dwarf stars, the ambers of the smaller, burnt out main sequence stars, exoplanets, etc., and therefore of special astronomical interest The emission spectra of cool white dwarf stars differ significantly in the infrared from the expected blackbody spectra of their cores, which is largely due to absorption by collisional H{_2}-H{_2}, H{_2}-He, and H{_2}-H complexes in the stellar atmospheres. Using quantum-chemical methods we compute the atmospheric absorption from hundreds to thousands of kelvin. Laboratory measurements of interaction-induced absorption spectra by H{_2} pairs exist only at room temperature and below. We show that our results reproduce these measurements closely, so that our computational data permit reliable modeling of stellar atmosphere opacities even for the higher temperatures. First results for H_2-He complexes have already been applied to astrophysical models have shown great improvements in these models. L. Frommhold, Collision-Induced Absorption in Gases, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, New York, 1993 and 2006 X. Li, K. L. C. Hunt, F. Wang, M. Abel, and L. Frommhold, Collision-Induced Infrared Absorption by Molecular Hydrogen Pairs at Thousands of Kelvin, Int. J. of Spect., vol. 2010, Article ID 371201, 11 pages, 2010. doi: 10.1155/2010/371201 M. Abel, L. Frommhold, X. Li, and K. L. C. Hunt, Collision-induced absorption by H{_2} pairs: From hundreds to thousands of Kelvin, J. Phys. Chem. A, 115, 6805-6812, 2011} L. Frommhold, M. Abel, F. Wang, M. Gustafsson, X. Li, and K. L. C. Hunt, "Infrared atmospheric emission and absorption by simple molecular complexes, from first principles", Mol. Phys. 108, 2265, 2010 M. Abel, L. Frommhold, X. Li, and K. L. C. Hunt, Infrared absorption by collisional H_2-He complexes

  18. Modelization, fabrication and evaluation avalanche photodiodes polarized in Geiger mode for the single photon in astrophysics applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellion, D.

    2008-12-01

    The genesis of the work presented in this this is in the field of very high energy astrophysics. One century ago, scientists identified a new type of messenger coming from space: cosmic rays. This radiation consists of particles (photons or other) of very high energy which bombard the Earth permanently. The passage of cosmic radiations in the Earth's atmosphere results in the creation of briefs luminous flashes (5 ns) of very low intensity (1 pW), a Cherenkov flash, and then becomes visible on the ground. In the current state of the art the best detector of light today is the Photomultiplier tube (PMT), thanks to its characteristics of sensitivity and speed. But there are some drawbacks: low quantum efficiency, cost, weight etc. We present in this thesis a new alternative technology: silicon photon counters, made of photodiodes polarized in Geiger mode. This operating mode makes it possible to obtain an effect of multiplication comparable to that of the PMT. A physical and electrical model was developed to reproduce the behaviour of this detector. We then present in this thesis work an original technological process allowing the realization of these devices in the Center of Technology of LAAS-CNRS, with the simulation of each operation of the process. We developed a scheme for the electric characterization of the device, from the static mode to the dynamic mode, in order to check conformity with SILVACO simulations and to the initial model. Results are already excellent, given this is only a first prototype step, and comparable with the results published in the literature. These silicon devices can intervene in all the applications where there is a photomultiplier and replace it. The applications are thus very numerous and the growth of the market of these detectors is very fast. We present a first astrophysical experiment installed at the 'Pic du Midi' site which has detected Cherenkov flashes from cosmic rays with this new semiconductor technology. (author)

  19. Observational astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Léna, Pierre; Lebrun, François; Mignard, François; Pelat, Didier

    2012-01-01

    This is the updated, widely revised, restructured and expanded third edition of Léna et al.'s successful work Observational Astrophysics. It presents a synthesis on tools and methods of observational astrophysics of the early 21st century. Written specifically for astrophysicists and graduate students, this textbook focuses on fundamental and sometimes practical limitations on the ultimate performance that an astronomical system may reach, rather than presenting particular systems in detail. In little more than a decade there has been extraordinary progress in imaging and detection technologies, in the fields of adaptive optics, optical interferometry, in the sub-millimetre waveband, observation of neutrinos, discovery of exoplanets, to name but a few examples. The work deals with ground-based and space-based astronomy and their respective fields. And it also presents the ambitious concepts behind space missions aimed for the next decades. Avoiding particulars, it covers the whole of the electromagnetic spec...

  20. astrophysical significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dartois E.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Clathrate hydrates, ice inclusion compounds, are of major importance for the Earth’s permafrost regions and may control the stability of gases in many astrophysical bodies such as the planets, comets and possibly interstellar grains. Their physical behavior may provide a trapping mechanism to modify the absolute and relative composition of icy bodies that could be the source of late-time injection of gaseous species in planetary atmospheres or hot cores. In this study, we provide and discuss laboratory-recorded infrared signatures of clathrate hydrates in the near to mid-infrared and the implications for space-based astrophysical tele-detection in order to constrain their possible presence.

  1. Observational astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Robert C

    1995-01-01

    Combining a critical account of observational methods (telescopes and instrumentation) with a lucid description of the Universe, including stars, galaxies and cosmology, Smith provides a comprehensive introduction to the whole of modern astrophysics beyond the solar system. The first half describes the techniques used by astronomers to observe the Universe: optical telescopes and instruments are discussed in detail, but observations at all wavelengths are covered, from radio to gamma-rays. After a short interlude describing the appearance of the sky at all wavelengths, the role of positional astronomy is highlighted. In the second half, a clear description is given of the contents of the Universe, including accounts of stellar evolution and cosmological models. Fully illustrated throughout, with exercises given in each chapter, this textbook provides a thorough introduction to astrophysics for all physics undergraduates, and a valuable background for physics graduates turning to research in astronomy.

  2. Stellar astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    A number of studies in the field of steller astrophysics were undertaken by the South African Astronomical Observatory in 1986. These studies included; evolutionary effects on the surface abundances of an early-type supergiant; hydrogen deficient stars; t tauri stars; rotational modulation and flares on RS CVn and BY Dra stars; carbon and heavy element stars, and slow variability and circumstellar shells of red variable stars. 4 figs

  3. Application of Geodetic VLBI Data to Obtaining Long-Term Light Curves for Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijima, Masachika

    2010-01-01

    The long-term light curve is important to research on binary black holes and disk instability in AGNs. The light curves have been drawn mainly using single dish data provided by the University of Michigan Radio Observatory and the Metsahovi Radio Observatory. Hence, thus far, we have to research on limited sources. I attempt to draw light curves using VLBI data for those sources that have not been monitored by any observatories with single dish. I developed software, analyzed all geodetic VLBI data available at the IVS Data Centers, and drew the light curves at 8 GHz. In this report, I show the tentative results for two AGNs. I compared two light curves of 4C39.25, which were drawn based on single dish data and on VLBI data. I confirmed that the two light curves were consistent. Furthermore, I succeeded in drawing the light curve of 0454-234 with VLBI data, which has not been monitored by any observatory with single dish. In this report, I suggest that the geodetic VLBI archive data is useful to obtain the long-term light curves at radio bands for astrophysics.

  4. Applications of Raman spectroscopy to gemology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersani, Danilo; Lottici, Pier Paolo

    2010-08-01

    Being nondestructive and requiring short measurement times, a low amount of material, and no sample preparation, Raman spectroscopy is used for routine investigation in the study of gemstone inclusions and treatments and for the characterization of mounted gems. In this work, a review of the use of laboratory Raman and micro-Raman spectrometers and of portable Raman systems in the gemology field is given, focusing on gem identification and on the evaluation of the composition, provenance, and genesis of gems. Many examples are shown of the use of Raman spectroscopy as a tool for the identification of imitations, synthetic gems, and enhancement treatments in natural gemstones. Some recent developments are described, with particular attention being given to the semiprecious stone jade and to two important organic materials used in jewelry, i.e., pearls and corals.

  5. Applications of Nonlinear Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (NLEIS)

    KAUST Repository

    Adler, S. B.

    2013-08-31

    This paper reviews the use of nonlinear electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (NLEIS) in the analysis of SOFC electrode reactions. By combining EIS and NLEIS, as well as other independent information about an electrode material, it becomes possible to establish quantitative links between electrochemical kinetics and materials properties, even when systems are unstable with time. After a brief review of the method, this paper summarizes recent results analyzing the effects of Sr segregation in thin-film LSC electrodes. © The Electrochemical Society.

  6. Applications of chiroptical spectroscopy to coordination compounds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wu, Tao; You, X. Z.; Bouř, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 284, SI (2015), s. 1-18 ISSN 0010-8545 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-03978S; GA ČR GAP208/11/0105 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) M200550902 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : chirality * coordination compounds * chiroptical spectroscopy * new materials Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 12.994, year: 2015

  7. Application of Moessbauer spectroscopy to study corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramshesh, V.; Ravichandran, K.; Venkateswarlu, K.S.

    1976-01-01

    The system components in a nuclear power station include steel, stainless steel and various alloys such as Monel, Inconel, Stellite etc. Usually water/heavy water used as the coolant flows at high temperatures and pressures. Under such conditions the interaction of system components with the coolant produces a host of corrosion products. The deposition of such products is essential. This report attempts to review the salient features of identification of such corrosion products using Moessbauer spectroscopy. (author)

  8. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy: clinical application in neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penev, L.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) provides a non-invasive method of studying metabolism in vivo. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) defines neuro chemistry on a regional basis by acquiring a radiofrequency signal with chemical shift from one or many voxels or volumes previously selected on MRI. The tissue's chemical environment determines the frequency of a metabolite peak in an MRS spectrum. Candidates for MRS include: 1 H, 31 P, 13 C, 23 Na, 7 Li, 19 F, 14 N, 15 N, 17 O, 39 K The most commonly studied nuclei are 1 H and 31 P. This lecture is focused on Proton ( 1 H) Spectroscopy. Proton MRS can be added on to conventional MR imaging protocols. It can be used to serially monitor biochemical changes in tumors, stroke, epilepsy, metabolic disorders, infections, and neurodegenerative diseases.The MR spectra do not come labeled with diagnoses. They require interpretation and should always be correlated with the MR images before making a final diagnosis. As a general rule, the single voxel, short TE technique is used to make the initial diagnosis, because the signal-to-noise is high and all metabolites are represented. Multi-voxel, long TE techniques are used to further characterize different regions of a mass and to assess brain parenchyma around or adjacent to the mass. Multi-voxel, long TE techniques are also used to assess response to therapy and to search for tumor recurrence. Each metabolite appears at a specific ppm, and each one reflects specific cellular and biochemical processes

  9. DFB laser diodes for sensing applications using photoacoustic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeth, J; Fischer, M; Legge, M; Seufert, J; Roessner, K; Groninga, H

    2010-01-01

    We present typical device characteristics of novel DFB laser diodes which are employed in various sensing applications including high resolution photoacoustic spectroscopy. The laser diodes discussed are based on a genuine fabrication technology which allows for the production of ultra stable devices within a broad spectral range from 760 nm up to 3000 nm wavelength. The devices exhibit narrow linewidths down to <1 MHz which makes them ideally suited for all photoacoustic sensing applications where a high spectral purity is required. As an example we will focus on a typical medical application where these diodes are used for breath analysis using photoacoustic spectroscopy.

  10. Electrochemical surface plasmon spectroscopy-Recent developments and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Nan; Schweiss, Ruediger; Zong, Yun; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    A survey is given on recent developments and applications of electrochemical techniques combined with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. Surface plasmon spectroscopy (SPS) and optical waveguide mode spectroscopy make use of evanescent waves on metal-dielectric interfaces and can be conveniently combined with electrochemical methods. Selected examples of applications of high-pressure surface electrochemical plasmon resonance spectroscopy to study supramolecular architectures such as layer-by-layer films of conducting polymers or thin composite films will be presented. Then a combination of SPS with the electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) will be introduced and illustrated with a study on doping/de-doping process of a conducting polymer. This combination allows for simultaneous electrochemical, optical and microgravimetric characterization of interfaces. Finally, new technical developments including integration of SPS into microfluidic devices using a grating coupler and surface plasmon enhanced diffraction will be discussed

  11. Application of cascaded frequency multiplication to molecular spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drouin, Brian J.; Maiwald, Frank W.; Pearson, John C.

    2005-01-01

    Laboratory molecular spectroscopy provides the basis for interpretation of atmospheric, planetary, and astrophysical data gathered by remote sensing. Laboratory studies of atomic and molecular signatures across the electromagnetic spectrum provide high-precision, quantitative data used to interpret the observed environment from remote measurements. Historically, the region of the spectrum above 500 GHz has been relatively unexplored due to atmospheric absorption and technical difficulties generating and detecting radiation. Laboratory spectroscopy at these frequencies has traditionally involved measurement of one or two absorption features and relied on fitting of models to the limited data. We report a new spectrometer built around a computer-controlled commercial synthesizer and millimeter-wave module driving a series of amplifiers followed by a series of wide-bandwidth frequency doublers and triplers. The spectrometer provides the ability to rapidly measure large pieces of frequency space with higher resolution, accuracy, and sensitivity than with Fourier transform infrared techniques. The approach is simple, modular, and requires no custom-built electronics or high voltage and facilitates the use of infrared data analysis techniques on complex submillimeter spectra

  12. Astrophysical cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardeen, J. M.

    The last several years have seen a tremendous ferment of activity in astrophysical cosmology. Much of the theoretical impetus has come from particle physics theories of the early universe and candidates for dark matter, but what promise to be even more significant are improved direct observations of high z galaxies and intergalactic matter, deeper and more comprehensive redshift surveys, and the increasing power of computer simulations of the dynamical evolution of large scale structure. Upper limits on the anisotropy of the microwave background radiation are gradually getting tighter and constraining more severely theoretical scenarios for the evolution of the universe.

  13. Astrophysical cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardeen, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The last several years have seen a tremendous ferment of activity in astrophysical cosmology. Much of the theoretical impetus has come from particle physics theories of the early universe and candidates for dark matter, but what promise to be even more significant are improved direct observations of high z galaxies and intergalactic matter, deeper and more comprehensive redshift surveys, and the increasing power of computer simulations of the dynamical evolution of large scale structure. Upper limits on the anisotropy of the microwave background radiation are gradually getting tighter and constraining more severely theoretical scenarios for the evolution of the universe. 47 refs

  14. Atomic and molecular spectroscopy basic concepts and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kakkar, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopy is the study of electromagnetic radiation and its interaction with solid, liquid, gas and plasma. It is one of the widely used analytical techniques to study the structure of atoms and molecules. The technique is also employed to obtain information about atoms and molecules as a result of their distinctive spectra. The fast-spreading field of spectroscopic applications has made a noteworthy influence on many disciplines, including energy research, chemical processing, environmental protection and medicine. This book aims to introduce students to the topic of spectroscopy. The author has avoided the mathematical aspects of the subject as far as possible; they appear in the text only when inevitable. Including topics such as time-dependent perturbation theory, laser action and applications of Group Theory in interpretation of spectra, the book offers a detailed coverage of the basic concepts and applications of spectroscopy.

  15. Application of near infrared spectroscopy in biomedicine

    CERN Document Server

    Jue, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This volume balances the need for physical science/mathematics formalism with a demand for biomedical perspectives. It details current instrumentation and techniques as well as illustrates current applications in addressing complex biology questions.

  16. Field Imaging Spectroscopy. Applications in Earthquake Geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragona, D.; Minster, B.; Rockwell, T. K.; Fialko, Y.; Jussila, J.; Blom, R.

    2005-12-01

    Field Imaging Spectroscopy in the visible and infrared sections of the spectrum can be used as a technique to assist paleoseismological studies. Submeter range hyperspectral images of paleoseismic excavations can assist the analyisis and interpretation of the earthquake history of a site. They also provide an excellent platform for storage of the stratigraphic and structural information collected from such a site. At the present, most field data are collected descriptively. This greatly enhances the range of information that can be recorded in the field. The descriptions are documented on hand drawn field logs and/or photomosaics constructed from individual photographs. Recently developed portable hyperspectral sensors acquire high-quality spectroscopic information at high spatial resolution (pixel size ~ 0.5 mm at 50 cm) over frequencies ranging from the visible band to short wave infrared. The new data collection and interpretation methodology that we are developing (Field Imaging Spectroscopy) makes available, for the first time, a tool to quantitatively analyze paleoseismic and stratigraphic information. The reflectance spectra of each sub-millimeter portion of the material are stored in a 3-D matrix (hyperspectral cube) that can be analyzed by visual inspection, or by using a large variety of algorithms. The reflectance spectrum is related to the chemical composition and physical properties of the surface therefore hyperspectral images are capable of revealing subtle changes in texture, composition and weathering. For paleoseismic studies, we are primarily interested in distinguishing changes between layers at a given site (spectral stratigraphy) rather than the precise composition of the layers, although this is an added benefit. We have experimented with push-broom (panoramic) portable scanners, and acquired data form portions of fault exposures and cores. These images were processed using well-known imaging processing algorithms, and the results have being

  17. Astrophysical techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Kitchin, CR

    2013-01-01

    DetectorsOptical DetectionRadio and Microwave DetectionX-Ray and Gamma-Ray DetectionCosmic Ray DetectorsNeutrino DetectorsGravitational Radiation Dark Matter and Dark Energy Detection ImagingThe Inverse ProblemPhotographyElectronic ImagingScanningInterferometrySpeckle InterferometryOccultationsRadarElectronic ImagesPhotometryPhotometryPhotometersSpectroscopySpectroscopy SpectroscopesOther TechniquesAstrometryPolarimetrySolar StudiesMagnetometryComputers and The Internet.

  18. Application of impedance spectroscopy to SOFC research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, G.; Mason, T.O. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Pederson, L.R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    With the resurgence of interest in solid oxide fuel cells and other solid state electrochemical devices, techniques originally developed for characterizing aqueous systems are being adapted and applied to solid state systems. One of these techniques, three-electrode impedance spectroscopy, is particularly powerful as it allows characterization of subcomponent and interfacial properties. Obtaining accurate impedance spectra, however, is difficult as reference electrode impedance is usually non-negligible and solid electrolytes typically have much lower conductance than aqueous solutions. Faidi et al and Chechirlian et al have both identified problems associated with low conductivity media. Other sources of error are still being uncovered. Ford et al identified resistive contacts with large time constants as a possibility, while Me et al showed that the small contact capacitance of the reference electrode was at fault. Still others show that instrument limitations play a role. Using the voltage divider concept, a simplified model that demonstrates the interplay of these various factors, predicts the form of possible distortions, and offers means to minimize errors is presented.

  19. Graphene oxide reduction recipes, spectroscopy, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on a group of new materials labeled ""graphene oxides."" It provides a comprehensive overview of graphene oxide-based nanomaterials in terms of their synthesis, structures, properties, and extensive applications in catalysis, separation, filtration, energy storage and conversion. The book also covers emerging research on graphite oxides and the impact of the research on fundamental and applied sciences.

  20. Effective applications of auger electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golnabi, H.

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this study is to explore different aspects of the AES process and to present the new techniques which can be used effectively for analytical purposes. More emphasis is given to AES data acquisition, sensitivity factor and Auger intensity. The experimental details of a typical scanning Auger microprobe (SAM) is also presented. Applications of AES to selected systems such as microelectronic devices, superconductors, an in metallurgy are described

  1. Towards a Unified Quark-Hadron-Matter Equation of State for Applications in Astrophysics and Heavy-Ion Collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels-Uwe F. Bastian

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available We outline an approach to a unified equation of state for quark-hadron matter on the basis of a Φ − derivable approach to the generalized Beth-Uhlenbeck equation of state for a cluster decomposition of thermodynamic quantities like the density. To this end we summarize the cluster virial expansion for nuclear matter and demonstrate the equivalence of the Green’s function approach and the Φ − derivable formulation. As an example, the formation and dissociation of deuterons in nuclear matter is discussed. We formulate the cluster Φ − derivable approach to quark-hadron matter which allows to take into account the specifics of chiral symmetry restoration and deconfinement in triggering the Mott-dissociation of hadrons. This approach unifies the description of a strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma with that of a medium-modified hadron resonance gas description which are contained as limiting cases. The developed formalism shall replace the common two-phase approach to the description of the deconfinement and chiral phase transition that requires a phase transition construction between separately developed equations of state for hadronic and quark matter phases. Applications to the phenomenology of heavy-ion collisions and astrophysics are outlined.

  2. Comments on pulses of characteristic energy produced in solar flare detonations and its possible application to other astrophysical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, P.

    1977-01-01

    A qualitative discussion of physical conditions at neutral sheets was developed in an attempt to explain the repetitive pulsed energy-production mechanism, which has been suggested for solar flares. A characteristic energy per pulse appears to depend critically on the magnetic field strength and dipole length applied to a high temperature plasma, and seem to be regulated by discrete characteristic relative changes in the magnetic moment, following Syrovatskii's model. Discrete energy pulses are produced when neutral sheet thickness approaches to critical values, proportional to the characteristic relative changes in the magnetic moment. Repetition of pulses may occur in multi-sheet configurations as magnetically complex active centres, or at a single sheet where the total system energy change exceeds the critical conditions. The time-scale of the pulsed energy release may be explained by the tearing mode instability, and the repetition time-scale might be understood by the Sweet mechanism in limit conditions. The mechanism might have attractive applications in other high temperature astrophysical plasmas. An empirical relation is derived for pulses' energy prediction, in orders of magnitude, and some possible tests were suggested. An attempt was made to interpret soft γ-ray events of cosmic origin. (Auth.)

  3. Comments on pulses of characteristic energy produced in solar flare detonations and its possible application to other astrophysical plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufmann, P [Universidade Mackenzie, Sao Paulo (Brazil). Centro de Radio-Astronomia e Astrofisica

    1977-06-01

    A qualitative discussion of physical conditions at neutral sheets was developed in an attempt to explain the repetitive pulsed energy-production mechanism, which has been suggested for solar flares. A characteristic energy per pulse appears to depend critically on the magnetic field strength and dipole length applied to a high temperature plasma, and seem to be regulated by discrete characteristic relative changes in the magnetic moment, following Syrovatskii's model. Discrete energy pulses are produced when neutral sheet thickness approaches to critical values, proportional to the characteristic relative changes in the magnetic moment. Repetition of pulses may occur in multi-sheet configurations as magnetically complex active centres, or at a single sheet where the total system energy change exceeds the critical conditions. The time-scale of the pulsed energy release may be explained by the tearing mode instability, and the repetition time-scale might be understood by the Sweet mechanism in limit conditions. The mechanism might have attractive applications in other high temperature astrophysical plasmas. An empirical relation is derived for pulses' energy prediction, in orders of magnitude, and some possible tests were suggested. An attempt was made to interpret soft ..gamma..-ray events of cosmic origin.

  4. Nuclear astrophysics lessons from INTEGRAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Roland

    2013-02-01

    Measurements of high-energy photons from cosmic sources of nuclear radiation through ESA's INTEGRAL mission have advanced our knowledge: new data with high spectral resolution showed that characteristic gamma-ray lines from radioactive decays occur throughout the Galaxy in its interstellar medium. Although the number of detected sources and often the significance of the astrophysical results remain modest, conclusions derived from this unique astronomical window of radiation originating from nuclear processes are important, complementing the widely-employed atomic-line based spectroscopy. We review the results and insights obtained in the past decade from gamma-ray line measurements of cosmic sources in the context of their astrophysical questions.

  5. Applications of positron annihilation spectroscopy in materials research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS) has emerged as a powerful technique for research in condensed matter. It has been used extensively in the study of metals, ionic crystals, glasses and polymers. The present review concentrates on applications of positron lifetime measurements for elucidation of the physicochemical structure of polymers. 10 references

  6. Applications of positron annihilation spectroscopy in materials research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jag J.

    1988-01-01

    Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS) has emerged as a powerful technique for research in condensed matter. It has been used extensively in the study of metals, ionic crystals, glasses and polymers. The present review concentrates on applications of positron lifetime measurements for elucidation of the physicochemical structure of polymers.

  7. Overview of applications of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremers, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a method of performing elemental analyses of solids, liquids, and gases using the microplasma produced by a focused laser pulse. Because the microplasma is formed by optical radiation, LIBS has some important advantages compared to conventional laboratory based analytical methods. Three applications are discussed which use the LIBS method. 6 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Surface analysis by electron spectroscopy. General concepts and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feliu, S.

    1993-01-01

    An introduction is made to the techniques of electron spectroscopy (XPS and AES) used in the study of surface phenomena. Their theoretical principles, the singular information supplied by these techniques and their basic instrumentation (vacuum systems, excitation sources and electron analysers) are described. A revision of their applications to the Materials Science and the Corrosion Sciences is also made. Author. 44 refs

  9. Forensic applications of microscopical infrared internal reflection spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tungol, Mary W.; Bartick, Edward G.; Reffner, John A.

    1994-01-01

    Applications of microscopical infrared internal reflection spectroscopy in forensic science are discussed. Internal reflection spectra of single fibers, hairs, paint chips, vehicle rubber bumpers, photocopy toners, carbon copies, writing ink on paper, lipstick on tissue, black electrical tape, and other types of forensic evidence have been obtained. The technique is convenient, non-destructive, and may permit smeared materials to be analyzed in situ.

  10. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Perini, Umberto

    2014-01-01

    This book deals with the Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), a widely used atomic emission spectroscopy technique for elemental analysis of materials. It is based on the use of a high-power, short pulse laser excitation. The book is divided into two main sections: the first one concerning theoretical aspects of the technique, the second one describing the state of the art in applications of the technique in different scientific/technological areas. Numerous examples of state of the art applications provide the readers an almost complete scenario of the LIBS technique. The LIBS theoretical aspects are reviewed. The book helps the readers who are less familiar with the technique to understand the basic principles. Numerous examples of state of the art applications give an almost complete scenario of the LIBS technique potentiality. These examples of applications may have a strong impact on future industrial utilization. The authors made important contributions to the development of this field.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in food applications: a critical appraisal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divakar, S.

    1998-01-01

    Usefulness of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in food applications is presented in this review. Some of the basic concepts of NMR pertaining to one-dimensional and two-dimensional techniques, solid-state NMR and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are discussed. Food applications dealt with encompass such diverse areas like nature and state of water in foods, detection and quantitation of important constituents of foods, intact food systems and NMR related to food biology. (author)

  12. Application of infrared spectroscopy for diagnosis of kidney tumor tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Bandzevičiūtė, Rimantė

    2016-01-01

    Application of Infrared Spectroscopy for Diagnosis of Kidney Tumor Tissue It is possible to apply the technique of an attenuated total reflection of infrared radiation (ATR IR) for the characterisation of the removed tissues during the surgery. Application of this method for interstitium of the removed tissue does not require any specific sample preparation. For this reason ATR IR technique applied for the interstitium allows to get information about tissues immediately after surgical operati...

  13. Surface enhanced raman spectroscopy analytical, biophysical and life science applications

    CERN Document Server

    Schlücker, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Covering everything from the basic theoretical and practical knowledge to new exciting developments in the field with a focus on analytical and life science applications, this monograph shows how to apply surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for solving real world problems. From the contents: * Theory and practice of SERS * Analytical applications * SERS combined with other analytical techniques * Biophysical applications * Life science applications including various microscopies Aimed at analytical, surface and medicinal chemists, spectroscopists, biophysicists and materials scientists. Includes a Foreword by the renowned Raman spectroscopist Professor Wolfgang Kiefer, the former Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Raman Spectroscopy.

  14. Study of aluminum emission spectra in astrophysical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Zhan; Zhang Jie

    2001-01-01

    High temperature, high density and strong magnetic fields in plasmas produced by ultra-high intensity and ultrashort laser pulses are similar to the main characteristics of astrophysical plasmas. This makes it possible to simulate come astrophysical processes at laboratories. The author presents the theoretic simulation of aluminum emission spectra in astrophysical plasmas. It can be concluded that using laser produced plasmas, the authors can obtain rich information on astrophysical spectroscopy, which is unobservable for astronomer

  15. Optimization of a coherent synchrotron radiation source in the Tera-hertz range for high-resolution spectroscopy of molecules of astrophysical interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros, J.

    2012-01-01

    Fourier Transform spectroscopy is the most used multiplex tool for high-resolution measurements in the infrared range. Its extension to the Tera-hertz domain is of great interest for spectroscopic studies of interstellar molecules. This application is however hampered by the lack of dedicated, broadband sources with a sufficient intensity and stability. In this work, Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) was used as a source for molecular spectroscopy at high resolution on the AILES infrared and Tera-hertz beamline of SOLEIL synchrotron. The beamline being optimized for far-infrared, we could characterize the properties of CSR and compare them to the incoherent synchrotron radiation. A double detection system allowed to correct the effect of the source-related instabilities, hence to significantly increase the signal-to-noise ratio. Pure rotational spectra were measured using these developments. The case of the propynal molecule, for which a refined set of rotational and centrifugal distortion constants was calculated, proves the complementarity between CSR and the classical microwave or infrared sources. (author)

  16. Astrophysics of Red Supergiants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Emily M.

    2017-12-01

    'Astrophysics of Red Supergiants' is the first book of its kind devoted to our current knowledge of red supergiant stars, a key evolutionary phase that is critical to our larger understanding of massive stars. It provides a comprehensive overview of the fundamental physical properties of red supergiants, their evolution, and their extragalactic and cosmological applications. It serves as a reference for researchers from a broad range of fields (including stellar astrophysics, supernovae, and high-redshift galaxies) who are interested in red supergiants as extreme stages of stellar evolution, dust producers, supernova progenitors, extragalactic metallicity indicators, members of massive binaries and mergers, or simply as compelling objects in their own right. The book is accessible to a range of experience levels, from graduate students up to senior researchers.

  17. Applications of positron annihilation spectroscopy to polymeric and biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jean, Y.C.; Chen, Hongmin; Liu, Guang; Chakka, Lakshmi; Gadzia, Joseph E.

    2007-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is a novel radio-analytical technique which uses the positron (anti-electron) and is capable of probing the atomic and molecular scale (0.2-2 nm) free-volume and hole properties in polymeric and biological materials. Recently, we developed positron annihilation lifetime and Doppler broadening of energy spectroscopies coupled with a variable mono-energetic positron beam to measure the free-volume depth profile from the surface, interfaces, and to the bulk. This paper presents applications of PAS to determine multi-layer structures, glass transition temperatures in nano-scale polymeric films and to detect cancer in the human skin. (author)

  18. Determination of Peukert's Constant Using Impedance Spectroscopy: Application to Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Edmund Martin; Kim, Sangtae

    2016-12-15

    Peukert's equation is widely used to model the rate dependence of battery capacity, and has recently attracted attention for application to supercapacitors. Here we present a newly developed method to readily determine Peukert's constant using impedance spectroscopy. Impedance spectroscopy is ideal for this purpose as it has the capability of probing electrical performance of a device over a wide range of time-scales within a single measurement. We demonstrate that the new method yields consistent results with conventional galvanostatic measurements through applying it to commercially available supercapacitors. Additionally, the novel method is much simpler and more precise, making it an attractive alternative for the determination of Peukert's constant.

  19. Linearly Polarized IR Spectroscopy Theory and Applications for Structural Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Kolev, Tsonko

    2011-01-01

    A technique that is useful in the study of pharmaceutical products and biological molecules, polarization IR spectroscopy has undergone continuous development since it first emerged almost 100 years ago. Capturing the state of the science as it exists today, "Linearly Polarized IR Spectroscopy: Theory and Applications for Structural Analysis" demonstrates how the technique can be properly utilized to obtain important information about the structure and spectral properties of oriented compounds. The book starts with the theoretical basis of linear-dichroic infrared (IR-LD) spectroscop

  20. A primer on complex systems with applications to astrophysical and laboratory plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez, Raúl

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to illustrate the fundamental concepts of complexity and complex behavior and the best methods to characterize this behavior by means of their applications to some current research topics from within the fields of fusion, earth and solar plasmas. In this sense, it is a departure from the many books already available that discuss general features of complexity. The book is divided in two parts. In the first part the most important properties and features of complex systems are introduced, discussed and illustrated. The second part discusses several instances of possible complex phenomena in magnetized plasmas and some of the analysis tools that were introduced in the first part are used to characterize the dynamics in these systems. A list of problems is proposed at the end of each chapter. This book is intended for graduate and post-graduate students with a solid college background in mathematics and classical physics, who intend to work in the field of plasma physics and, in parti...

  1. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy in pediatric neuroradiology: clinical and research applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panigrahy, Ashok; Nelson, Marvin D.; Blueml, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) offers a unique, noninvasive approach to assess pediatric neurological abnormalities at microscopic levels by quantifying cellular metabolites. The most widely available MRS method, proton ( 1 H; hydrogen) spectroscopy, is FDA approved for general use and can be ordered by clinicians for pediatric neuroimaging studies if indicated. There are a multitude of both acquisition and post-processing methods that can be used in the implementation of MR spectroscopy. MRS in pediatric neuroimaging is challenging to interpret because of dramatic normal developmental changes that occur in metabolites, particularly in the first year of life. Still, MRS has been proven to provide additional clinically relevant information for several pediatric neurological disease processes such as brain tumors, infectious processes, white matter disorders, and neonatal injury. MRS can also be used as a powerful quantitative research tool. In this article, specific research applications using MRS will be demonstrated in relation to neonatal brain injury and pediatric brain tumor imaging. (orig.)

  2. The physics of wave-particle interactions with applications to astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karimabadi, H.

    1988-01-01

    The physics of electromagnetic wave-particle interactions in the limit of a strong static magnetic field is investigated using Hamiltonian and multiple time-scale techniques. For sufficiently small wave amplitude, the system is integrable and the motion in phase space is regular. For amplitudes exceeding a threshold value, the system become nonintegrable and the particle motion in phase space becomes stochastic. The stochasticity is caused by the overlapping of the adjacent resonances. The particle dynamics in various limits is discussed using a novel graphical technique for analyzing the particle motion. It is found that for ncosα > 1, the constant Hamiltonian surfaces are topologically closed and the maximum attainable particle energy is severely limited (n is the index of refraction and α is the wave propagation angle). For ncosα ≤ 1, however, the constant Hamiltonian surfaces are open due to relativistic correlations and the particles can gain large energies. A diffusion equation analogous to the Fokker-Planck equation is derived and used to examine the effect of the wave on an ensemble of particles. The model is applied to two different space applications. (i) It is shown that electrons can be accelerated by interacting with fundamental or second harmonic of an obliquely propagating cyclotron wave. This acceleration mechanism can explain the observed high energy electrons in solar type III bursts. (ii). The Kennel and Coroniti (1984) model of the Crab nebula is reexamined including the wave effects. A new model for the Crab nebula which accounts for the presence of radio electrons is proposed and its predictions compared to observations

  3. Astrophysical techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitchin, C R

    1984-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: detectors (optical and infrared detection; radio and microwave detection; X-ray and gamma-ray detection; cosmic ray detectors; neutrino detectors; gravitational radiation); imaging (photography; electronic imaging; scanning; interferometry; speckle interferometry; occultations; radar); photometry and photometers; spectroscopy and spectroscopes; other techniques (astrometry; polarimetry; solar studies; magnetometry). Appendices: magnitudes and spectral types of bright stars; north polar sequence; standard stars for the UBV photometric system; standard stars for the UVBY photometric system; standard stars for MK spectral types; standard stars for polarimetry; Julian date; catalogues; answers to the exercises.

  4. Applications of laser-induced gratings to spectroscopy and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohlfing, E.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program has traditionally emphasized two principal areas of research. The first is the spectroscopic characterization of large-amplitude motion on the ground-state potential surface of small, transient molecules. The second is the reactivity of carbonaceous clusters and its relevance to soot and fullerene formation in combustion. Motivated initially by the desire to find improved methods of obtaining stimulated emission pumping (SEP) spectra of transients, most of our recent work has centered on the use of laser-induced gratings or resonant four-wave mixing in free-jet expansions. These techniques show great promise for several chemical applications, including molecular spectroscopy and photodissociation dynamics. The author describes recent applications of two-color laser-induced grating spectroscopy (LIGS) to obtain background-free SEP spectra of transients and double resonance spectra of nonfluorescing species, and the use of photofragment transient gratings to probe photodissociation dynamics.

  5. Imagery spectroscopy application for Super Fund mining waste monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, William E.

    2001-06-01

    Image spectroscopy was used to evaluate iron oxide acid mine drainage contamination at two U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Super Fund sites located in Colorado and New Mexico. The AVIRIS hyper-spectral remote sensing system developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory was used to collect the imagery data used in the analysis. The paper presents an overview of mining methods used in the area of the study, the environmental risks of acid mine drainage and the AVIRIS hyper-spectral sensing system. The two sites evaluated are located in Leadville, Colorado and the Ray Mine site in New Mexico. Imagery spectroscopy was evaluated at these two sites for identifying potential mineral pollutants and mapping their location for cleanup planning and monitoring applications. Results indicate the technology can be a very useful tool for this type of application and location.

  6. Application of Moessbauer spectroscopy in investigating Egyptian archaeology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eissa, N.A.; Sallam, H.A.

    1988-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of applications of the Moessbauer spectroscopy to investigate Ancient Egyptian pottery from the periods: Ancient Egyptian (3200-525 B.C.), Greek-Roman (320 B.C.-640 A.C.) and Early Islamic (800-1000 A.C.). Many objective informations deduced about: provinance, manufacturing techniques for different domestic purposes, civilization transfer between the Arab countries, methods of colouration and applying decorating glazes, and finally dating of ancient pottery. (orig.)

  7. High-resolution spectroscopy of gases for industrial applications

    OpenAIRE

    Fateev, Alexander; Clausen, Sønnik

    2012-01-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy of gases is a powerful technique which has various fundamental and practical applications: in situ simultaneous measurements of gas temperature and gas composition, radiative transfer modeling, validation of existing and developing of new databases and etc. Existing databases (e.g. HITRAN, HITEMP or CDSD) can normally be used for absorption spectra calculations at limited temperature/pressure ranges. Therefore experimental measurements of absorption/transmission s...

  8. Recent applications of hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiland, Conan; Woicik, Joseph C., E-mail: Joseph.Woicik@NIST.gov [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Rumaiz, Abdul K. [National Synchrotron Light Source II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Pianetta, Piero [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Recent applications of hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) demonstrate its many capabilities in addition to several of its limitations. Examples are given, including measurement of buried interfaces and materials under in situ or in operando conditions, as well as measurements under x-ray standing-wave and resonant excitation. Physical considerations that differentiate HAXPES from photoemission measurements utilizing soft x-ray and ultraviolet photon sources are also presented.

  9. Medical applications of atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Samjin; Jung, Gyeong Bok; Kim, Kyung Sook; Lee, Gi-Ja; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent research and application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy techniques, which are considered the multi-functional and powerful toolkits for probing the nanostructural, biomechanical and physicochemical properties of biomedical samples in medical science. We introduce briefly the basic principles of AFM and Raman spectroscopy, followed by diagnostic assessments of some selected diseases in biomedical applications using them, including mitochondria isolated from normal and ischemic hearts, hair fibers, individual cells, and human cortical bone. Finally, AFM and Raman spectroscopy applications to investigate the effects of pharmacotherapy, surgery, and medical device therapy in various medicines from cells to soft and hard tissues are discussed, including pharmacotherapy--paclitaxel on Ishikawa and HeLa cells, telmisartan on angiotensin II, mitomycin C on strabismus surgery and eye whitening surgery, and fluoride on primary teeth--and medical device therapy--collagen cross-linking treatment for the management of progressive keratoconus, radiofrequency treatment for skin rejuvenation, physical extracorporeal shockwave therapy for healing of Achilles tendinitis, orthodontic treatment, and toothbrushing time to minimize the loss of teeth after exposure to acidic drinks.

  10. Applications of Infrared and Raman Spectroscopies to Probiotic Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Mauricio I.; Gerbino, Esteban; Tymczyszyn, Elizabeth; Gomez-Zavaglia, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we overview the most important contributions of vibrational spectroscopy based techniques in the study of probiotics and lactic acid bacteria. First, we briefly introduce the fundamentals of these techniques, together with the main multivariate analytical tools used for spectral interpretation. Then, four main groups of applications are reported: (a) bacterial taxonomy (Subsection 4.1); (b) bacterial preservation (Subsection 4.2); (c) monitoring processes involving lactic acid bacteria and probiotics (Subsection 4.3); (d) imaging-based applications (Subsection 4.4). A final conclusion, underlying the potentialities of these techniques, is presented. PMID:28231205

  11. Applications of Infrared and Raman Spectroscopies to Probiotic Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio I. Santos

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we overview the most important contributions of vibrational spectroscopy based techniques in the study of probiotics and lactic acid bacteria. First, we briefly introduce the fundamentals of these techniques, together with the main multivariate analytical tools used for spectral interpretation. Then, four main groups of applications are reported: (a bacterial taxonomy (Subsection 4.1; (b bacterial preservation (Subsection 4.2; (c monitoring processes involving lactic acid bacteria and probiotics (Subsection 4.3; (d imaging-based applications (Subsection 4.4. A final conclusion, underlying the potentialities of these techniques, is presented.

  12. Raman spectroscopy and imaging: applications in human breast cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozek-Pluska, Beata; Musial, Jacek; Kordek, Radzislaw; Bailo, Elena; Dieing, Thomas; Abramczyk, Halina

    2012-08-21

    The applications of spectroscopic methods in cancer detection open new possibilities in early stage diagnostics. Raman spectroscopy and Raman imaging represent novel and rapidly developing tools in cancer diagnosis. In the study described in this paper Raman spectroscopy has been employed to examine noncancerous and cancerous human breast tissues of the same patient. The most significant differences between noncancerous and cancerous tissues were found in regions characteristic for the vibrations of carotenoids, lipids and proteins. Particular attention was paid to the role played by unsaturated fatty acids in the differentiation between the noncancerous and the cancerous tissues. Comparison of Raman spectra of the noncancerous and the cancerous tissues with the spectra of oleic, linoleic, α-linolenic, γ-linolenic, docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acids has been presented. The role of sample preparation in the determination of cancer markers is also discussed in this study.

  13. Single molecule force spectroscopy: methods and applications in biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Yi; Hu Jun

    2012-01-01

    Single molecule measurements have transformed our view of biomolecules. Owing to the ability of monitoring the activity of individual molecules, we now see them as uniquely structured, fluctuating molecules that stochastically transition between frequently many substrates, as two molecules do not follow precisely the same trajectory. Indeed, it is this discovery of critical yet short-lived substrates that were often missed in ensemble measurements that has perhaps contributed most to the better understanding of biomolecular functioning resulting from single molecule experiments. In this paper, we give a review on the three major techniques of single molecule force spectroscopy, and their applications especially in biology. The single molecular study of biotin-streptavidin interactions is introduced as a successful example. The problems and prospects of the single molecule force spectroscopy are discussed, too. (authors)

  14. Radiation processes in astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Tucker, Wallace H

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this book is twofold: to provide a brief, simple introduction to the theory of radiation and its application in astrophysics and to serve as a reference manual for researchers. The first part of the book consists of a discussion of the basic formulas and concepts that underlie the classical and quantum descriptions of radiation processes. The rest of the book is concerned with applications. The spirit of the discussion is to present simple derivations that will provide some insight into the basic physics involved and then to state the exact results in a form useful for applications. The reader is referred to the original literature and to reviews for rigorous derivations.The wide range of topics covered is illustrated by the following table of contents: Basic Formulas for Classical Radiation Processes; Basic Formulas for Quantum Radiation Processes; Cyclotron and Synchrotron Radiation; Electron Scattering; Bremsstrahlung and Collision Losses; Radiative Recombination; The Photoelectric Effect; a...

  15. Numerical relativity beyond astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfinkle, David

    2017-01-01

    Though the main applications of computer simulations in relativity are to astrophysical systems such as black holes and neutron stars, nonetheless there are important applications of numerical methods to the investigation of general relativity as a fundamental theory of the nature of space and time. This paper gives an overview of some of these applications. In particular we cover (i) investigations of the properties of spacetime singularities such as those that occur in the interior of black holes and in big bang cosmology. (ii) investigations of critical behavior at the threshold of black hole formation in gravitational collapse. (iii) investigations inspired by string theory, in particular analogs of black holes in more than 4 spacetime dimensions and gravitational collapse in spacetimes with a negative cosmological constant.

  16. Numerical relativity beyond astrophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfinkle, David

    2017-01-01

    Though the main applications of computer simulations in relativity are to astrophysical systems such as black holes and neutron stars, nonetheless there are important applications of numerical methods to the investigation of general relativity as a fundamental theory of the nature of space and time. This paper gives an overview of some of these applications. In particular we cover (i) investigations of the properties of spacetime singularities such as those that occur in the interior of black holes and in big bang cosmology. (ii) investigations of critical behavior at the threshold of black hole formation in gravitational collapse. (iii) investigations inspired by string theory, in particular analogs of black holes in more than 4 spacetime dimensions and gravitational collapse in spacetimes with a negative cosmological constant.

  17. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Noll, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive source of the fundamentals, process parameters, instrumental components and applications of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The effect of multiple pulses on material ablation, plasma dynamics and plasma emission is presented. A heuristic plasma modeling allows to simulate complex experimental plasma spectra. These methods and findings form the basis for a variety of applications to perform quantitative multi-element analysis with LIBS. These application potentials of LIBS have really boosted in the last years ranging from bulk analysis of metallic alloys and non-conducting materials, via spatially resolved analysis and depth profiling covering measuring objects in all physical states: gaseous, liquid and solid. Dedicated chapters present LIBS investigations for these tasks with special emphasis on the methodical and instrumental concepts as well as the optimization strategies for a quantitative analysis. Requirements, concepts, design and characteristic features of LI...

  18. Reactor cell assembly for use in spectroscopy and microscopy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindstaff, Quirinus; Stowe, Ashley Clinton; Smyrl, Norm; Powell, Louis; McLane, Sam

    2015-08-04

    The present disclosure provides a reactor cell assembly that utilizes a novel design and that is wholly or partially manufactured from Aluminum, such that reactions involving Hydrogen, for example, including solid-gas reactions and thermal decomposition reactions, are not affected by any degree of Hydrogen outgassing. This reactor cell assembly can be utilized in a wide range of optical and laser spectroscopy applications, as well as optical microscopy applications, including high-temperature and high-pressure applications. The result is that the elucidation of the role of Hydrogen in the reactions studied can be achieved. Various window assemblies can be utilized, such that high temperatures and high pressures can be accommodated and the signals obtained can be optimized.

  19. Applications of T-ray spectroscopy in the petroleum field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Douseri, Fatemah M.

    2005-11-01

    Because of heavy usage of petroleum products, which are the main source of energy in daily life and industry, a fast, reliable, and portable analysis system is needed to complement traditional techniques. Terahertz (THz) radiation, or T-rays, is electromagnetic radiation in the 0.1 to 10 THz frequency range. One unique attribute of T-rays is their ability to sensitively measure the induced molecular dipole moments in non-polar liquids such as aromatics, which make up the majority of the contents of many petroleum products. This information can lead to several applications in petroleum analysis. The application of T-rays to petroleum product analysis has the potential to make a significant impact in the petroleum field. In this dissertation, I show the first use of T-ray time-domain spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy techniques for petroleum product analysis. I report on the feasibility of analyzing selected petroleum products, including gasoline, diesel, lubricating oil, and selected compounds of toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX). With the use of a T-ray time-domain spectrometer. I demonstrate that gasolines with different octane numbers and diesel all show specific absorption coefficients and refractive indexes in the spectral range from 0.5 to 2.0 THz. Furthermore, I report the qualitative and quantitative analysis of selected BTEX components in gasoline and diesel using FTIR spectroscopy in the 50 to 650 cm-1 region. I distinguish gasolines with different octane numbers from diesel and lubricating oil according to their different spectral features. I also determine the concentration of (o, m, p) xylene isomers in gasoline according to their specific absorption bands. The experimental results in this thesis, imply that linking between the knowledge of petroleum products and the development of T-ray spectrometer with the cooperation of industry might translate the T-ray spectroscopic system into a real world application in

  20. Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1968-01-01

    This booklet discusses spectroscopy, the study of absorption of radiation by matter, including X-ray, gamma-ray, microwave, mass spectroscopy, as well as others. Spectroscopy has produced more fundamental information to the study of the detailed structure of matter than any other tools.

  1. Clinical applications of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laubenberger, J.; Bayer, S.; Thiel, T.; Hennig, J.; Langer, M.

    1998-01-01

    In spite of all the scientific advances of the past few years, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the brain has not attained the status of a routine examination technique with clinically accepted indications. The method should be considered as an additional option to MR imaging for inherited and acquired encephalopathic changes as well as, in future, for localization diagnosis of epilepsies. A proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic investigation without a prior intensive clinical and imaging investigation is not useful. Above all, factors influencing metabolite distribution such as for example, serum osmolability must be known. Methodological prerequisites for the clinical application of proton resonance spectroscopy are, first of all, a high stability of the chosen technique as well as a sufficiently certain quantification of metabolites and the availability of a reference group. The use of short echo times is necessary for the quantification of glutamine and the osmolyte myo-inositol. Indications for individual cases in which clinical investigations and MR topography cannot provide sufficient certainty and spectroscopy can furnish additional information are, in addition to uses in neuropediatrics, the suspicion of Alzheimer's dementia, HIV encephalopathy in early manifestations, and unclarified depressions of consciousness accompanying liver cirrhosis. (orig.) [de

  2. New methods and applications in emission spectroscopy (1960)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudin, G.

    1960-01-01

    Emission spectroscopy, are already well-established instrumental analytical technique, has in recent years known important developments. Two mains factors are responsible; firstly the demands of metallurgy for purer and purer materials or alloys which are increasingly complex and difficult to analyse by chemical means; secondly, progress in optics, especially in the production of gratings, and in electronics in the field of photomultiplier tubes. We will not here catalogue all the new applications and methods, but we will consider a few amongst the most representative outside the conventional field. (author) [fr

  3. Application of fluorescent and vibration spectroscopy for septic serum human albumin structure deformation during pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyubin, A.; Konstantinova, E.; Slezhkin, V.; Matveeva, K.; Samusev, I.; Bryukhanov, V.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper we perform results of conformational analysis of septic human serum albumin (HSA) carried out by Raman spectroscopy (RS), infrared (IR) spectroscopy and fluorescent spectroscopy. The main vibrational groups were identified and analyzed for septic HSA and its health control. Comparison between Raman and IR results were done. Fluorescent spectral changes of Trp-214 group were analyzed. Application of Raman, IR spectroscopy, fluorescent spectroscopy for conformational changes study of HSA during pathology were shown.

  4. Advances in astronomy and astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kopal, Zdenek

    1966-01-01

    Advances in Astronomy and Astrophysics, Volume 4 brings together numerous research works on different aspects of astronomy and astrophysics. This volume is composed of five chapters, and starts with a description of objective prism and its application in space observations. The next chapter deals with the possibilities of deriving reliable models of the figure, density distribution, and gravity field of the Moon based on data obtained through Earth-bound telescopes. These topics are followed by a discussion on the ideal partially relativistic, partially degenerate gas in an exact manner. A ch

  5. Astrophysics a very short introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Binney, James

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysics is the physics of the stars, and more widely the physics of the Universe. It enables us to understand the structure and evolution of planetary systems, stars, galaxies, interstellar gas, and the cosmos as a whole. In this Very Short Introduction, the leading astrophysicist James Binney shows how the field of astrophysics has expanded rapidly in the past century, with vast quantities of data gathered by telescopes exploiting all parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, combined with the rapid advance of computing power, which has allowed increasingly effective mathematical modelling. He illustrates how the application of fundamental principles of physics - the consideration of energy and mass, and momentum - and the two pillars of relativity and quantum mechanics, has provided insights into phenomena ranging from rapidly spinning millisecond pulsars to the collision of giant spiral galaxies. This is a clear, rigorous introduction to astrophysics for those keen to cut their teeth on a conceptual trea...

  6. Moessbauer spectroscopy and transition metal chemistry. Fundamentals and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guetlich, Philipp; Trautwein, Alfred X.

    2011-01-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy is a profound analytical method which has nevertheless continued to develop. The authors now present a state-of-the art book which consists of two parts. The first part details the fundamentals of Moessbauer spectroscopy and is based on a book published in 1978 in the Springer series 'Inorganic Chemistry Concepts' by P. Guetlich, R. Link and A.X. Trautwein. The second part covers useful practical aspects of measurements, and the application of the techniques to many problems of materials characterization. The update includes the use of synchroton radiation and many instructive and illustrative examples in fields such as solid state chemistry, biology and physics, materials and the geosciences, as well as industrial applications. Special chapters on magnetic relaxation phenomena (S. Morup) and computation of hyperfine interaction parameters (F. Neese) are also included. An attached CD-ROM with more than 400 full-color PowerPoint images provides self-explanatory examples. The book concentrates on teaching the technique using theory as much as needed and as little as possible. The reader will learn the fundamentals of the technique and how to apply it to many problems of materials characterization. Transition metal chemistry, studied on the basis of the most widely used Moessbauer isotopes, is in the foreground. (orig.)

  7. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy bioanalytical, biomolecular and medical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Procházka, Marek

    2016-01-01

    This book gives an overview of recent developments in RS and SERS for sensing and biosensing considering also limitations, possibilities and prospects of this technique. Raman scattering (RS) is a widely used vibrational technique providing highly specific molecular spectral patterns. A severe limitation for the application of this spectroscopic technique lies in the low cross section of RS. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy overcomes this problem by 6-11 orders of magnitude enhancement compared with the standard RS for molecules in the close vicinity of certain rough metal surfaces. Thus, SERS combines molecular fingerprint specificity with potential single-molecule sensitivity. Due to the recent development of new SERS-active substrates, labeling and derivatization chemistry as well as new instrumentations, SERS became a very promising tool for many varied applications, including bioanalytical studies and sensing. Both intrinsic and extrinsic SERS biosensing schemes have been employed to...

  8. [Application of near-infrared spectroscopy in golf turfgrass management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu-Ying; Han, Jian-Guo

    2008-07-01

    The management of golf course is different from other turfs. Its particularity lies in its higher and more precise requirement during maintenance compare with other turfs. In case something happened to turf of golf course, more effective and higher speed detecting and resolution are required. Only the data about turf growth and environment were mastered precisely in time, the friendly environmental and scientific management goal could be completed effectively and economically. The near infrared spectroscopy is a new kind of effective, convenient and non-destructive analytical method in the turfgrass management of golf course in recent years. Many factors of turf-soil system in golf course could be determined by near infrared spectroscopy at the same time. In this paper, the existing literature that use of near infrared spectroscopy to study turfgrass and soil nutrient content, soil hygroscopic moisture, feasible fertilizer application time and rate, to fix the time and volume of irrigation, turfgrass visual quality evaluation, turfgrass disease prediction and prevention were reviewed. Most researchers considered the nutrition condition of turf impacted the visual and playing quality of golf course directly and then indirectly influenced most of assistant cultivation such as fertilization, mowing and irrigation and so on. The using of NIRS can detect the nutrient content of turfgrass effectively and estimate the nutrient is excessive or deficient quickly. And then the feasible time and rate of fertilizers can be decided. Comparing with the common judgment ways based on the season fertilization and visual estimation, the using of NIRS can reduce the application of fertilizers on the base of keeping the same turf quality simultaneously. NIRS can analysis many items of soil such as moisture, elements concentration, textures on the spot by the thousands. This method can get lots of cover-all data non-destructively. What's more, NIRS can analysis soil betimes quickly

  9. THz spectroscopy of liquids – applications and future challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter Uhd; Cooke, David; Møller, Uffe

    2009-01-01

    transmission spectroscopy of pressed pellets for the investigation of powder materials and wafer-like samples for spectroscopy of bulk and nanostructured semiconductor materials. Reflection-type spectroscopy is applied using plane interfaces for the study of liquids [1,2,3]. However, quantitative spectroscopy...

  10. UV-Vis spectroscopy of tyrosine side-groups in studies of protein structure. Part 2: selected applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosiewicz, Jan M; Shugar, David

    2016-06-01

    In Part 2 we discuss application of several different types of UV-Vis spectroscopy, such as normal, difference, and second-derivative UV absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, linear and circular dichroism spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, of the side-chain of tyrosine residues in different molecular environments. We review the ways these spectroscopies can be used to probe complex protein structures.

  11. Occultations of Astrophysical Radio Sources as Probes of Planetary Environments: A Case Study of Jupiter and Possible Applications to Exoplanets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Withers, Paul [Astronomy Department, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Vogt, Marissa F. [Center for Space Physics, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2017-02-10

    Properties of planetary atmospheres, ionospheres, and magnetospheres are difficult to measure from Earth. Radio occultations are a common method for measuring these properties, but they traditionally rely on radio transmissions from a spacecraft near the planet. Here, we explore whether occultations of radio emissions from a distant astrophysical radio source can be used to measure magnetic field strength, plasma density, and neutral density around planets. In a theoretical case study of Jupiter, we find that significant changes in polarization angle due to Faraday rotation occur for radio signals that pass within 10 Jupiter radii of the planet and that significant changes in frequency and power occur from radio signals that pass through the neutral atmosphere. There are sufficient candidate radio sources, such as pulsars, active galactic nuclei, and masers, that occultations are likely to occur at least once per year. For pulsars, time delays in the arrival of their emitted pulses can be used to measure plasma density. Exoplanets, whose physical properties are very challenging to observe, may also occult distant astrophysical radio sources, such as their parent stars.

  12. New methods and applications in emission spectroscopy (1960); Methodes et applications nouvelles en spectroscopie d'emission (1960)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudin, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-07-01

    Emission spectroscopy, are already well-established instrumental analytical technique, has in recent years known important developments. Two mains factors are responsible; firstly the demands of metallurgy for purer and purer materials or alloys which are increasingly complex and difficult to analyse by chemical means; secondly, progress in optics, especially in the production of gratings, and in electronics in the field of photomultiplier tubes. We will not here catalogue all the new applications and methods, but we will consider a few amongst the most representative outside the conventional field. (author) [French] La spectroscopie d'emission, technique analytique instrumentale deja ancienne, a pris, depuis quelques annees, une extension notable. Deux facteurs principaux ont contribue a ce succes: d'une part, l'exigence de la metallurgie en materiaux de plus en plus pur ou en alliages de plus en plus complexes, difficiles a analyser chimiquement, d'autre part, les progres realises en optique, principalement dans la fabrication des reseaux, et en electronique dans le domaine des tubes photomultiplicateurs. Nous ne ferons pas ici le recensement de toutes les applications ou methodes nouvelles, mais nous en choisirons quelques unes des plus representatives hors du domaine classique. (auteur)

  13. Infrared Spectroscopy of Carbonaceous-chondrite Inclusions in the Kapoeta Meteorite: Discovery of Nanodiamonds with New Spectral Features and Astrophysical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdu, Yassir A.; Hawthorne, Frank C.; Varela, Maria E.

    2018-03-01

    We report the finding of nanodiamonds, coexisting with amorphous carbon, in carbonaceous-chondrite (CC) material from the Kapoeta achondritic meteorite by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. In the C–H stretching region (3100–2600 cm‑1), the FTIR spectrum of the Kapoeta CC material (KBr pellet) shows bands attributable to aliphatic CH2 and CH3 groups, and is very similar to IR spectra of organic matter in carbonaceous chondrites and the diffuse interstellar medium. Nanodiamonds, as evidenced by micro-Raman spectroscopy, were found in a dark region (∼400 μm in size) in the KBr pellet. Micro-FTIR spectra collected from this region are dramatically different from the KBr-pellet spectrum, and their C–H stretching region is dominated by a strong and broad absorption band centered at ∼2886 cm‑1 (3.47 μm), very similar to that observed in IR absorption spectra of hydrocarbon dust in dense interstellar clouds. Micro-FTIR spectroscopy also indicates the presence of an aldehyde and a nitrile, and both of the molecules are ubiquitous in dense interstellar clouds. In addition, IR peaks in the 1500–800 cm‑1 region are also observed, which may be attributed to different levels of nitrogen aggregation in diamonds. This is the first evidence for the presence of the 3.47 μm interstellar IR band in meteorites. Our results further support the assignment of this band to tertiary CH groups on the surfaces of nanodiamonds. The presence of the above interstellar bands and the absence of shock features in the Kapoeta nanodiamonds, as indicated by Raman spectroscopy, suggest formation by a nebular-condensation process similar to chemical-vapor deposition.

  14. Novel applications of photoacoustic spectroscopy in life sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolik, S.

    2004-10-01

    The Photoacoustic Spectroscopy, based on the generation of acoustic waves following the absorption of the modulated light by an enclosed material, was discovered in 1880 by Alexander Graham Bell. There are a lot of remarkable achievements in this topic since those days. It has been intended to present a relatively new tool to the researchers in biological areas and, simultaneously, to propose new fields of investigation to those who have been attracted by physics. The application of Photoacoustic trace gas detection to the determination of ethylene content in mice exhalation is described as a biomarker of free radicals production. It has been demonstrated the feasibility of studying the lipid peroxidation in vivo by this technique. Specifically, the results of δ-aminolevulinic acid administration in mice are presented. This drug has been used to induce Protoporphyrin IX production and ultimately to apply the Photodynamic Therapy, a recent method in cancer treatment. A kinetic study of Protoporphyrin IX production in mice skin and blood after δ-aminolevulinic acid administration in different doses is also shown. This study was performed using Photoacoustic Spectroscopy in solids.

  15. Application of spectroscopy and super-resolution microscopy: Excited state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, Ujjal [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-02-19

    Photophysics of inorganic materials and organic molecules in complex systems have been extensively studied with absorption and emission spectroscopy.1-4 Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence studies are commonly carried out to characterize excited-state properties of fluorophores. Although steady-state fluorescence measurements are widely used for analytical applications, time-resolved fluorescence measurements provide more detailed information about excited-state properties and the environment in the vicinity of the fluorophore. Many photophysical processes, such as photoinduced electron transfer (PET), rotational reorientation, solvent relaxation, and energy transfer, occur on a nanosecond (10-9 s) timescale, thus affecting the lifetime of the fluorophores. Moreover, time-resolved microscopy methods, such as lifetimeimaging, combine the benefits of the microscopic measurement and information-rich, timeresolved data. Thus, time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy combined with microscopy can be used to quantify these processes and to obtain a deeper understanding of the chemical surroundings of the fluorophore in a small area under investigation. This thesis discusses various photophysical and super-resolution microscopic studies of organic and inorganic materials, which have been outlined below.

  16. Calculation of the nuclear vertex constant for the virtual decay 6LI→α + d in the three- body model and its astrophysical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blokhintsev, L.D.; Igamov, S.B.; Nishonov, MM; Yarmukhamedov, R; Kamimura, M.

    2003-01-01

    The d(α, γ) 6 Li reaction is one of the sources of 6 Li production in the Big-Bang nuclear synthesis. At present extremely large uncertainties exist on this prediction mainly due to the absence of reliable directly measured cross section (or astrophysical S-factor, S(E)) at astrophysical relevant energies E, including E=0. As far theoretical calculation of the S(E) that have rather large spread. On the other hand, the d(α, γ) 6 Li reaction is predominantly of peripheral character at extremely low energies. Therefore the calculated S(E) at extremely low energies is mainly determined by the nuclear vertex constant (NVC) (or respective asymptotic normalization constant (ANC)) for the virtual decay 6 Li→α + d. Taking into account this circumstance we develop a method of calculation of the NVC for the virtual decay 6 Li→α + d for the subsequent application of the calculated one to the direct radiative capture d(α, γ) 6 Li cross - section (or astrophysical S-factor) calculation at extremely low energies E, including E=0. The developed method is based on the three-body Faddeev approach which is applied for the α-d scattering by using different forms of the NN- and αN-potentials. As a result the values of NVC and respective ANC for 6 Li→α + d virtual decay are obtained using two forms both for NN- and for αN-potential. They are the separable potentials with Yamaguchi type form factor and Paris potential with PEST 16 form factor for the NN- potential and Yamaguchi type form factor and Sack-Biedenharn-Breit potential for the αN- potential. A noticeable sensitivity to used forms of the NN- and αN- potential occurs both for the calculated NVC (or ANC) and astrophysical S- factor S(E) of the direct radiative capture d(α, γ) 6 Li reaction at extremely low energies E (≤100 keV), including the value E=0. The calculated S(E) have been obtained using the information about the NVC values. The obtained values of NVC and S(E) are compared with those of obtained

  17. Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy. N. Kameswara Rao. Articles written in Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy. Volume 26 Issue 2-3 June-September 2005 pp 331-338. High Resolution Stellar Spectroscopy with VBT Echelle Spectrometer · N. Kameswara Rao S. Sriram K. Jayakumar F. Gabriel.

  18. High-resolution spectroscopy of gases for industrial applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fateev, Alexander; Clausen, Sønnik

    High-resolution spectroscopy of gases is a powerful technique which has various fundamental and practical applications: in situ simultaneous measurements of gas temperature and gas composition, radiative transfer modeling, validation of existing and developing of new databases and etc. Existing...... databases (e.g. HITRAN, HITEMP or CDSD) can normally be used for absorption spectra calculations at limited temperature/pressure ranges. Therefore experimental measurements of absorption/transmission spectra gases (e.g. CO2, H2O or SO2) at high-resolution and elevated temperatures are essential both...... for analysis of complex experimental data and further development of the databases. High-temperature gas cell facilities available at DTU Chemical Engineering are presented and described. The gas cells and high-resolution spectrometers allow us to perform high-quality reference measurements of gases relevant...

  19. Emerging biomedical applications of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Szmacinski, Henryk; Koen, Peter A.

    1994-07-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy is presently regarded as a research tool in biochemistry, biophysics, and chemical physics. Advances in laser technology, the development of long-wavelength probes, and the use of lifetime-based methods are resulting in the rapid migration of time-resolved fluorescence to the clinical chemistry lab, to the patient's bedside, to flow cytometers, to the doctor's office, and even to home health care. Additionally, time-resolved imaging is now a reality in fluorescence microscopy, and will provide chemical imaging of a variety of intracellular analytes and/or cellular phenomena. In this overview paper we attempt to describe some of the opportunities available using chemical sensing based on fluorescence lifetimes, and to predict those applications of lifetime-based sensing which are most likely in the near future.

  20. Astrophysical Hydrodynamics An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Shore, Steven N

    2007-01-01

    This latest edition of the proven and comprehensive treatment on the topic -- from the bestselling author of ""Tapestry of Modern Astrophysics"" -- has been updated and revised to reflect the newest research results. Suitable for AS0000 and AS0200 courses, as well as advanced astrophysics and astronomy lectures, this is an indispensable theoretical backup for studies on celestial body formation and astrophysics. Includes exercises with solutions.

  1. Gravity, particles and astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesson, P.S.

    1980-01-01

    The author deals with the relationship between gravitation and elementary particle physics, and the implications of these subjects for astrophysics. The text is split up into two parts. The first part represents a relatively non-technical overview of the subject, while the second part represents a technical examination of the most important aspects of non-Einsteinian gravitational theory and its relation to astrophysics. Relevant references from the fields of gravitation, elementary particle theory and astrophysics are included. (Auth.)

  2. Particle Physics & Astrophysics (PPA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Scientists at SLAC's Particle Physics and Astrophysics develop and utilize unique instruments from underground to outer space to explore the ultimate laws of nature...

  3. Rounding Up the Astrophysical Weeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, James P.

    2016-09-01

    New instruments used for astronomy such as ALMA, Herschel, and SOFIA have greatly increased the quality of available astrophysical data. These improved data contain spectral lines and features which are not accounted for in the quantum mechanical (QM) catalogs. A class of molecules has been identified as being particularly problematic, the so-called "weeds". These molecules have numerous transitions, of non-trivial intensity, which are difficult to model due to highly perturbed low lying vibrational states. The inability to properly describe the complete contribution of these weeds to the astrophysical data has led directly to the misidentification of other target molecules. Ohio State's Microwave Laboratory has developed an alternative approach to this problem. Rather than relying on complex QM calculations, we have developed a temperature dependent approach to laboratory based terahertz spectroscopy. We have developed a set of simple packages, in addition to traditional line list catalogs, that enable astronomers to successfully remove the weed signals from their data. This dissertation will detail my laboratory work and analysis of three keys weeds: methanol, methyl formate and methyl cyanide. Also, discussed will be the analytical technique I used to apply these laboratory results to astrophysical data.

  4. Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules.......This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules....

  5. Hertzian spectroscopy application to excited states in accelerated ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaillard, M L

    1974-01-01

    Accelerated ion beams enables the application of optical hertzian spectrometry methods to be extended to research on the excited states of free ionic systems. The photon beat method has proved especially simple to apply in beam foil geometry because of the unidirectional beam velocity while the beam gas device is suitable for experiments of the energy level crossing type. Only the resonance technique involving direct application of high-frequency magnetic fields poses serious problems because of the high HF powers necessary. So far structure intervals have been measured in ions carrying up to three charges (seven in the special case of Lamb shift measurements) with a precision of a few percent. Study of hydrogen-like or helium-like ions of high Z allows the fundamental calculations of quantum electrodynamics to be checked with regard to the Lamb shift or the spontaneous emission theory. In more complex electronic systems, optical spectroscopy of accelerated ion beams gives wavelengths with a resolution reaching 10/sup -5/, lifetimes with an accuracy better than 10% when the cascade effects are properly studied, and Lande factors with a precision of several % under present technical conditions. The photon beat method concerns hyperfine nuclear effects in light atoms of Z < = 20. (FR)

  6. The resonant detector and its application to epithermal neutron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorini, G.; Perelli-Cippo, E.; Tardocchi, M.; Andreani, C.; D'Angelo, A.; Pietropaolo, A.; Senesi, R.; Imberti, S.; Bracco, A.; Previtali, E.; Pessina, G.; Rhodes, N.J.; Schooneveld, E.M.

    2004-01-01

    New perspectives for epithermal neutron spectroscopy are being opened by the development of the resonant detector (RD) and its use on inverse geometry time of flight spectrometers at spallation sources. The RD was first proposed in the 1980s and was recently brought to a performance level exceeding conventional neutron-sensitive Li-glass scintillator detectors. It features a photon counter coupled to a neutron analyzer foil. Resonant neutron absorption in the foil results in the emission of prompt gamma rays that are detected in the photon counter. The dimensions of the RD set the spatial resolution that can be achieved, ranging from a fraction of a cm to several cm. It can thus be tailored to the construction of detector arrays of different geometry. The main results of the research on this kind of detector are reported leading to the present optimized RD design based on a combination of YAP scintillation photon counter and uranium or gold analyzer foils. This detector has already been selected for application in the upgrade of the VESUVIO spectrometer on ISIS. A special application is the Very Low Angle Detector (VLAD) bank, which will extend the kinematical region for neutron scattering to low momentum transfer ( -1 ) whilst still keeping energy transfer >1 eV, thus allowing new experimental studies in condensed matter systems. The first results of tests made with prototype VLAD detectors are presented, confirming the usefulness of the RD for measurements at scattering angles as low as 2-5 deg

  7. Astrophysics days and MHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falgarone, Edith; Rieutord, Michel; Richard, Denis; Zahn, Jean-Paul; Dauchot, Olivier; Daviaud, Francois; Dubrulle, Berengere; Laval, Jean-Philippe; Noullez, Alain; Bourgoin, Mickael; Odier, Philippe; Pinton, Jean-Francois; Leveque, Emmanuel; Chainais, Pierre; Abry, Patrice; Mordant, Nicolas; Michel, Olivier; Marie, Louis; Chiffaudel, Arnaud; Daviaud, Francois; Petrelis, Francois; Fauve, Stephan; Nore, C.; Brachet, M.-E.; Politano, H.; Pouquet, A.; Leorat, Jacques; Grapin, Roland; Brun, Sacha; Delour, Jean; Arneodo, Alain; Muzy, Jean-Francois; Magnaudet, Jacques; Braza, Marianna; Boree, Jacques; Maurel, S.; Ben, L.; Moreau, J.; Bazile, R.; Charnay, G.; Lewandowski, Roger; Laveder, Dimitri; Bouchet, Freddy; Sommeria, Joel; Le Gal, P.; Eloy, C.; Le Dizes, S.; Schneider, Kai; Farge, Marie; Bottausci, Frederic; Petitjeans, Philippe; Maurel, Agnes; Carlier, Johan; Anselmet, Fabien

    2001-05-01

    This publication gathers extended summaries of presentations proposed during two days on astrophysics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). The first session addressed astrophysics and MHD: The cold interstellar medium, a low ionized turbulent plasma; Turbulent convection in stars; Turbulence in differential rotation; Protoplanetary disks and washing machines; gravitational instability and large structures; MHD turbulence in the sodium von Karman flow; Numerical study of the dynamo effect in the Taylor-Green eddy geometry; Solar turbulent convection under the influence of rotation and of the magnetic field. The second session addressed the description of turbulence: Should we give up cascade models to describe the spatial complexity of the velocity field in a developed turbulence?; What do we learn with RDT about the turbulence at the vicinity of a plane surface?; Qualitative explanation of intermittency; Reduced model of Navier-Stokes equations: quickly extinguished energy cascade; Some mathematical properties of turbulent closure models. The third session addressed turbulence and coherent structures: Alfven wave filamentation and formation of coherent structures in dispersive MHD; Statistical mechanics for quasi-geo-strophic turbulence: applications to Jupiter's coherent structures; Elliptic instabilities; Physics and modelling of turbulent detached unsteady flows in aerodynamics and fluid-structure interaction; Intermittency and coherent structures in a washing machine: a wavelet analysis of joint pressure/velocity measurements; CVS filtering of 3D turbulent mixing layer using orthogonal wavelets. The last session addressed experimental methods: Lagrangian velocity measurements; Energy dissipation and instabilities within a locally stretched vortex; Study by laser imagery of the generation and breakage of a compressed eddy flow; Study of coherent structures of turbulent boundary layer at high Reynolds number

  8. Astrophysical Institute, Potsdam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Built upon a tradition of almost 300 years, the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam (AIP) is in an historical sense the successor of one of the oldest astronomical observatories in Germany. It is the first institute in the world which incorporated the term `astrophysical' in its name, and is connected with distinguished scientists such as Karl Schwarzschild and Albert Einstein. The AIP constitutes on...

  9. Black hole astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blandford, R.D.; Thorne, K.S.

    1979-01-01

    Following an introductory section, the subject is discussed under the headings: on the character of research in black hole astrophysics; isolated holes produced by collapse of normal stars; black holes in binary systems; black holes in globular clusters; black holes in quasars and active galactic nuclei; primordial black holes; concluding remarks on the present state of research in black hole astrophysics. (U.K.)

  10. Plasma in astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulsrud, R.M.

    1982-10-01

    Two examples of plasma phenomena of importance to astrophysics are reviewed. These are examples where astrophysical understanding hinges on further progress in plasma physics understanding. The two examples are magnetic reconnection and the collisionless interaction between a population of energetic particles and a cooler gas or plasma, in particular the interaction between galactic cosmic rays and the interstellar medium

  11. Experimental investigation of the formation and propagation of plasma jets created by a power laser: application to laboratory astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loupias, B.

    2008-10-01

    Plasma jets are often observed in the polar regions of Young Stellar Objects (YSO). For a better understanding of the whole processes at the origin of their formation and evolution, this research thesis aims at demonstrating the feasibility of a plasma jet generation by a power laser, and at investigating its characteristics. After a detailed description of Young Stellar Objects jets and an overview of theoretical models, the author describes some experiments performed with gas guns, pulsed machines and power lasers. He describes means of generation of a jet by laser interaction via strong shock propagation. He reports experimental work, describing the target, laser operating conditions and the determination of jet parameters: speed, temperature, density. Then, he introduces results obtained for plasma jet propagation in vacuum, describes their evolution with respect to initial conditions (target type, laser operating conditions), and identifies optimal conditions for generating a jet similar to that in astrophysical conditions. He considers their propagation in ambient medium like for YSO jets in interstellar medium. Two distinct cases are investigated: collision of two successive shocks in a gaseous medium, and propagation of a plasma jet in a gas jet

  12. Application of resonance ionisation spectroscopy in atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluge, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    Resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) and resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS) techniques have proved to be a powerful tool in atomic spectroscopy and trace analysis. Detailed atomic spectroscopy can be performed on samples containing less than 10 12 atoms. This sensitivity is especially important for investigating atomic properties of transuranium elements. RIMS is especially suitable for ultra trace determination of long lived radioactive isotopes. The extremely low detection limits allow analysis of samples in the sub-femtogram regime. High elemental and isotopic selectivity can be obtained. To produce isobarically pure ion beams, a RIS based laser ion source can be used

  13. spectroscopy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    2015-10-14

    Oct 14, 2015 ... characterized by using phenotypic, API and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy methods. One hundred and fifty-seven (157) strains were isolated from 13 cheese samples, and identification test was performed for 83 strains. At the end of the study, a total of 22 Lactococcus sp., 36 Enterecoccus ...

  14. The application of near infrared spectroscopy in nutritional intervention studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippa A Jackson

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Functional near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS is a non-invasive optical imaging technique used to monitor cerebral blood flow (CBF and by proxy neuronal activation. The use of NIRS in nutritional intervention studies is a relatively novel application of this technique, with only a small, but growing, number of trials published to date. These trials—in which the effects on CBF following administration of dietary components such as caffeine, polyphenols and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are assessed—have successfully demonstrated NIRS as a sensitive measure of change in haemodynamic response during cognitive tasks in both acute and chronic treatment intervention paradigms. The existent research in this area has been limited by the constraints of the technique itself however advancements in the measurement technology, paired with studies endeavouring increased sophistication in number and locations of channels over the head should render the use of NIRS in nutritional interventions particularly valuable in advancing our understanding of the effects of nutrients and dietary components on the brain.

  15. Ultrasound spectroscopy: application on MMC and PMC materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Ricardo B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vuorinen, Jyki [TAMPERE UNIV TECHNOLOGY; Kuokkala, Veli - Tapani [TAMPERE UNIV TECHNOLOGY

    2010-01-01

    Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS) is a simple technique for measuring the second-order elastic constants and ultrasonic attenuation of solids. The technique is based on measuring the spectrum of mechanical resonances for a sample of known shape (usually a sphere, cylinder, or parallelepiped). This spectrum cannot be deconvoluted to deduce the elastic constants. Instead, an approximate spectrum is calculated from the known sample dimensions, its mass, and a set of 'guessed' elastic constants. A multidimensional minimization of the rms difference between the measured and calculated spectra enables us to deduce all the elastic constants of the solid from a single frequency scan. Currently, the technique can be applied to crystals of orthorhombic symmetry (9 elastic constants) or higher using desktop computers and software developed for this purpose. Composite materials, especially fiber composites, can take full advantage of the RUS technique as they typically have low symmetry. In this paper we summarize the RUS technique and provide examples of its application to the elastic characterization of both fiber reinforced MMC's, and fiber reinforced PMC's.

  16. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. Applications for chemists and biochemists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croasmun, W.R.; Carlson, R.M.K.

    1987-01-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (2-D NMR) has become a very powerful class of experiments (in the hands of an adept scientist) with broad adaptability to new situations. It is the product of a happy marriage between modern pulse FT-NMR technology, with its large memory and high-speed computers, and the physicists and chemists who love to manipulate spin systems. Basic 2-D experiments are now a standard capability of modern NMR spectrometers, and this timely book intends to make 2-D NMR users of those who are familiar with normal 1-D NMR. The 2-D NMR goal is correlation of the lines of the observed NMR spectrum with other properties of the system. This book deals with applications to high-resolution spectrum analysis, utilizing either coupling between the NMR-active nuclei or chemical exchange to perform the correlation. The coupling can be scalar (through bonds) or direct through space (within 5 A). The coupling may be homonuclear (between like nuclei) or heteronuclear

  17. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in industrial and security applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Yoo, Jong H.; Liu Chunyi; Plumer, John R.; Russo, Richard E.

    2010-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) offers rapid, localized chemical analysis of solid or liquid materials with high spatial resolution in lateral and depth profiling, without the need for sample preparation. Principal component analysis and partial least squares algorithms were applied to identify a variety of complex organic and inorganic samples. This work illustrates how LIBS analyzers can answer a multitude of real-world needs for rapid analysis, such as determination of lead in paint and children's toys, analysis of electronic and solder materials, quality control of fiberglass panels, discrimination of coffee beans from different vendors, and identification of generic versus brand-name drugs. Lateral and depth profiling was performed on children's toys and paint layers. Traditional one-element calibration or multivariate chemometric procedures were applied for elemental quantification, from single laser shot determination of metal traces at ∼10 μg/g to determination of halogens at 90 μg/g using 50-shot spectral accumulation. The effectiveness of LIBS for security applications was demonstrated in the field by testing the 50-m standoff LIBS rasterizing detector.

  18. [Laser Raman Spectroscopy and Its Application in Gas Hydrate Studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Juan; Wu, Neng-you; Lu, Hai-long; Wu, Dai-dai; Su, Qiu-cheng

    2015-11-01

    Gas hydrates are important potential energy resources. Microstructural characterization of gas hydrate can provide information to study the mechanism of gas hydrate formation and to support the exploitation and application of gas hydrate technology. This article systemly introduces the basic principle of laser Raman spectroscopy and summarizes its application in gas hydrate studies. Based on Raman results, not only can the information about gas composition and structural type be deduced, but also the occupancies of large and small cages and even hydration number can be calculated from the relative intensities of Raman peaks. By using the in-situ analytical technology, laser Raman specstropy can be applied to characterize the formation and decomposition processes of gas hydrate at microscale, for example the enclathration and leaving of gas molecules into/from its cages, to monitor the changes in gas concentration and gas solubility during hydrate formation and decomposition, and to identify phase changes in the study system. Laser Raman in-situ analytical technology has also been used in determination of hydrate structure and understanding its changing process under the conditions of ultra high pressure. Deep-sea in-situ Raman spectrometer can be employed for the in-situ analysis of the structures of natural gas hydrate and their formation environment. Raman imaging technology can be applied to specify the characteristics of crystallization and gas distribution over hydrate surface. With the development of laser Raman technology and its combination with other instruments, it will become more powerful and play a more significant role in the microscopic study of gas hydrate.

  19. Reflectometer end station for synchrotron calibrations of Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility flight optics and for spectrometric research applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graessle, D.E.; Fitch, J.J.; Ingram, R.; Zhang Juda, J.; Blake, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    Preparations have been underway to construct and test a facility for grazing incidence reflectance calibrations of flat mirrors at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The purpose is to conduct calibrations on witness flats to the coating process of the flight mirrors for NASA's Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). The x-ray energy range required is 50 eV--12 keV. Three monochromatic beamlines (X8C, X8A, U3A) will provide energy tunability over this entire range. The goal is to calibrate the AXAF flight mirrors with uncertainties approaching 1%. A portable end station with a precision-positioning reflectometer has been developed for this work. We have resolved the vacuum cleanliness requirements to preserve the coating integrity of the flats with the strict grazing-angle certainty requirements placed on the rotational control system of the reflectometer. A precision positioning table permits alignment of the system to the synchrotron beam to within 10 arcsec; the reflectometer's rotational control system can then produce grazing angle accuracy to within less than 2 arcsec, provided that the electron orbit is stable. At 10--12 keV, this degree of angular accuracy is necessary to achieve the calibration accuracy required for AXAF. However the most important energy regions for the synchrotron calibration are in the 2000--3200 eV range, where the M-edge absorption features of the coating element, iridium, appear, and the 300--700 eV range of the Ir N edges. The detail versus energy exhibited in these features cannot be traced adequately without a tunable energy source, which necessitates a synchrotron for this work. We present the mechanical designs, motion control systems, detection and measurement capabilities, and selected procedures for our measurements, as well as reflectance data

  20. Astrophysics in a nutshell

    CERN Document Server

    Maoz, Dan

    2007-01-01

    A concise but thorough introduction to the observational data and theoretical concepts underlying modern astronomy, Astrophysics in a Nutshell is designed for advanced undergraduate science majors taking a one-semester course. This well-balanced and up-to-date textbook covers the essentials of modern astrophysics--from stars to cosmology--emphasizing the common, familiar physical principles that govern astronomical phenomena, and the interplay between theory and observation. In addition to traditional topics such as stellar remnants, galaxies, and the interstellar medium, Astrophysics in a N

  1. An invitation to astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Padmanabhan, Thanu

    2006-01-01

    This unique book provides a clear and lucid description of several aspects of astrophysics and cosmology in a language understandable to a physicist or beginner in astrophysics. It presents the key topics in all branches of astrophysics and cosmology in a simple and concise language. The emphasis is on currently active research areas and exciting new frontiers rather than on more pedantic topics. Many complicated results are introduced with simple, novel derivations which strengthen the conceptual understanding of the subject. The book also contains over one hundred exercises which will help s

  2. Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse - CSNSM/Centre for nuclear and mass spectroscopy, Activity Report 1985-1986-1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The Centre for nuclear and mass spectroscopy (CSNSM) is a CNRS (National Centre for Scientific Research) laboratory affiliated with Paris-Sud University. The CSNSM is involved in pluri-disciplinary activities covering various scientific domains: Nuclear Structure (SNO), Nuclear Astrophysics (AN), Solid State Astrophysics (AS), Solid State Physics (PS) and Chemical Physics of Irradiation. This document presents the activity of the Centre during the 1985-1986-1987 years: 1 - Teams presentation; 2 - Abstracts: On the borderline of spectroscopy; Atomic spectroscopy and low-energy low-spin nuclear structure; high-energy high-spin nuclear structure; Theories and models; Nuclear astrophysics; Accelerator-based mass spectroscopy; Solid State Physics; Study of charged particles irradiation effects in astrophysics, geophysics and material sciences; Technical developments for the RF mass spectrometer and for Obelix; Technical developments for ion beams; Technical developments in electronics and their applications; CNSM's Computer Department; Developments in cryogenics; 3 - Staff and publications

  3. Molecular Laser Spectroscopy as a Tool for Gas Analysis Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javis Anyangwe Nwaboh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have used the traceable infrared laser spectrometric amount fraction measurement (TILSAM method to perform absolute concentration measurements of molecular species using three laser spectroscopic techniques. We report results performed by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS, quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS, and cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS, all based on the TILSAM methodology. The measured results of the different spectroscopic techniques are in agreement with respective gravimetric values, showing that the TILSAM method is feasible with all different techniques. We emphasize the data quality objectives given by traceability issues and uncertainty analyses.

  4. Two-dimensional fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy. 2. Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kunihiko; Tahara, Tahei

    2013-10-03

    In the preceding article, we introduced the theoretical framework of two-dimensional fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy (2D FLCS). In this article, we report the experimental implementation of 2D FLCS. In this method, two-dimensional emission-delay correlation maps are constructed from the photon data obtained with the time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC), and then they are converted to 2D lifetime correlation maps by the inverse Laplace transform. We develop a numerical method to realize reliable transformation, employing the maximum entropy method (MEM). We apply the developed actual 2D FLCS to two real systems, a dye mixture and a DNA hairpin. For the dye mixture, we show that 2D FLCS is experimentally feasible and that it can identify different species in an inhomogeneous sample without any prior knowledge. The application to the DNA hairpin demonstrates that 2D FLCS can disclose microsecond spontaneous dynamics of biological molecules in a visually comprehensible manner, through identifying species as unique lifetime distributions. A FRET pair is attached to the both ends of the DNA hairpin, and the different structures of the DNA hairpin are distinguished as different fluorescence lifetimes in 2D FLCS. By constructing the 2D correlation maps of the fluorescence lifetime of the FRET donor, the equilibrium dynamics between the open and the closed forms of the DNA hairpin is clearly observed as the appearance of the cross peaks between the corresponding fluorescence lifetimes. This equilibrium dynamics of the DNA hairpin is clearly separated from the acceptor-missing DNA that appears as an isolated diagonal peak in the 2D maps. The present study clearly shows that newly developed 2D FLCS can disclose spontaneous structural dynamics of biological molecules with microsecond time resolution.

  5. Applications and advances of positron beam spectroscopy: appendix a

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, R. H., LLNL

    1997-11-05

    Over 50 scientists from DOE-DP, DOE-ER, the national laboratories, academia and industry attended a workshop held on November 5-7, 1997 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory jointly sponsored by the DOE-Division of Materials Science, The Materials Research Institute at LLNL and the University of California Presidents Office. Workshop participants were charged to address two questions: Is there a need for a national center for materials analysis using positron techniques and can the capabilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory serve this need. To demonstrate the need for a national center the workshop participants discussed the technical advantages enabled by high positron currents and advanced measurement techniques, the role that these techniques will play in materials analysis and the demand for the data. There were general discussions lead by review talks on positron analysis techniques, and their applications to problems in semiconductors, polymers and composites, metals and engineering materials, surface analysis and advanced techniques. These were followed by focus sessions on positron analysis opportunities in these same areas. Livermore now leads the world in materials analysis capabilities by positrons due to developments in response to demands of science based stockpile stewardship. There was a detailed discussion of the LLNL capabilities and a tour of the facilities. The Livermore facilities now include the worlds highest current beam of keV positrons, a scanning pulsed positron microprobe under development capable of three dimensional maps of defect size and concentration, an MeV positron beam for defect analysis of large samples, and electron momentum spectroscopy by positrons. This document is a supplement to the written summary report. It contains a complete schedule, list of attendees and the vuegraphs for the presentations in the review and focus sessions.

  6. High energy astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, A.R.

    1979-01-01

    High energy astrophysical research carried out at the Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London is reviewed. Work considered includes cosmic ray particle detection, x-ray astronomy, gamma-ray astronomy, gamma and x-ray bursts. (U.K.)

  7. 2004 ASTRONOMY & ASTROPHYSICS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    user

    This publication of the Academy on Astronomy and Astrophysics is unique in ... bring out position papers on societal issues where science plays a major ..... funding agencies, the Astronomical Society of ..... orbit very close to the parent star.

  8. Topics in Nuclear Astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, K.C.

    1982-01-01

    Some topics in nuclear astrophysics are discussed, e.g.: highly evolved stellar cores, stellar evolution (through the temperature analysis of stellar surface), nucleosynthesis and finally the solar neutrino problem. (L.C.) [pt

  9. Astrophysics Decoding the cosmos

    CERN Document Server

    Irwin, Judith A

    2007-01-01

    Astrophysics: Decoding the Cosmos is an accessible introduction to the key principles and theories underlying astrophysics. This text takes a close look at the radiation and particles that we receive from astronomical objects, providing a thorough understanding of what this tells us, drawing the information together using examples to illustrate the process of astrophysics. Chapters dedicated to objects showing complex processes are written in an accessible manner and pull relevant background information together to put the subject firmly into context. The intention of the author is that the book will be a 'tool chest' for undergraduate astronomers wanting to know the how of astrophysics. Students will gain a thorough grasp of the key principles, ensuring that this often-difficult subject becomes more accessible.

  10. Applications of magnetic resonance spectroscopy for noninvasive assessment of hepatic steatosis

    OpenAIRE

    van Werven, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    MR spectroscopy is a noninvasive technique to quantify hepatic steatosis. MR spectroscopy provides information about the chemical composition of tissues in a spectrum. Hepatic steatosis is characterized by accumulation of fat in the liver. The prevalence of hepatic steatosis is increasing due to its relation with obesity and insulin resistance in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. This thesis describes the applications of MR spectroscopy (primarily on 3T) for noninvasive assessment of hepatic...

  11. Hydrodynamic Instability, Integrated Code, Laboratory Astrophysics, and Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takabe, Hideaki

    2016-10-01

    This is an article for the memorial lecture of Edward Teller Medal and is presented as memorial lecture at the IFSA03 conference held on September 12th, 2003, at Monterey, CA. The author focuses on his main contributions to fusion science and its extension to astrophysics in the field of theory and computation by picking up five topics. The first one is the anomalous resisitivity to hot electrons penetrating over-dense region through the ion wave turbulence driven by the return current compensating the current flow by the hot electrons. It is concluded that almost the same value of potential as the average kinetic energy of the hot electrons is realized to prevent the penetration of the hot electrons. The second is the ablative stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability at ablation front and its dispersion relation so-called Takabe formula. This formula gave a principal guideline for stable target design. The author has developed an integrated code ILESTA (ID & 2D) for analyses and design of laser produced plasma including implosion dynamics. It is also applied to design high gain targets. The third is the development of the integrated code ILESTA. The forth is on Laboratory Astrophysics with intense lasers. This consists of two parts; one is review on its historical background and the other is on how we relate laser plasma to wide-ranging astrophysics and the purposes for promoting such research. In relation to one purpose, I gave a comment on anomalous transport of relativistic electrons in Fast Ignition laser fusion scheme. Finally, I briefly summarize recent activity in relation to application of the author's experience to the development of an integrated code for studying extreme phenomena in astrophysics.

  12. Collisionless plasmas in astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Belmont, Gerard; Mottez, Fabrice; Pantellini, Filippo; Pelletier, Guy

    2013-01-01

    Collisionless Plasmas in Astrophysics examines the unique properties of media without collisions in plasma physics. Experts in this field, the authors present the first book to concentrate on collisionless conditions in plasmas, whether close or not to thermal equilibrium. Filling a void in scientific literature, Collisionless Plasmas in Astrophysics explains the possibilities of modeling such plasmas, using a fluid or a kinetic framework. It also addresses common misconceptions that even professionals may possess, on phenomena such as "collisionless (Landau) damping". Abundant illustrations

  13. Nonlinear dynamics and astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallejo, J. C.; Sanjuan, M. A. F.

    2000-01-01

    Concepts and techniques from Nonlinear Dynamics, also known as Chaos Theory, have been applied successfully to several astrophysical fields such as orbital motion, time series analysis or galactic dynamics, providing answers to old questions but also opening a few new ones. Some of these topics are described in this review article, showing the basis of Nonlinear Dynamics, and how it is applied in Astrophysics. (Author)

  14. Fluorescence Lifetime Correlation Spectroscopy (FLCS): Concepts, Applications and Outlook

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kapusta, Peter; Macháň, Radek; Benda, A.; Hof, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 10 (2012), s. 12890-12910 E-ISSN 1422-0067 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) * time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) * fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS) Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.464, year: 2012

  15. Data catalog series for space science and applications flight missions. Volume 5A: Descriptions of astronomy, astrophysics, and solar physics spacecraft and investigations. Volume 5B: Descriptions of data sets from astronomy, astrophysics, and solar physics spacecraft and investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang J. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The main purpose of the data catalog series is to provide descriptive references to data generated by space science flight missions. The data sets described include all of the actual holdings of the Space Science Data Center (NSSDC), all data sets for which direct contact information is available, and some data collections held and serviced by foreign investigators, NASA and other U.S. government agencies. This volume contains narrative descriptions of data sets of astronomy, astrophysics, solar physics spacecraft and investigations. The following spacecraft series are included: Mariner, Pioneer, Pioneer Venus, Venera, Viking, Voyager, and Helios. Separate indexes to the planetary and interplanetary missions are also provided.

  16. Ultrasonic spectroscopy applications in condensed matter physics and materials science

    CERN Document Server

    Leisure, Robert G

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasonic spectroscopy is a technique widely used in solid-state physics, materials science, and geology that utilizes acoustic waves to determine fundamental physical properties of materials, such as their elasticity and mechanical energy dissipation. This book provides complete coverage of the main issues relevant to the design, analysis, and interpretation of ultrasonic experiments. Topics including elasticity, acoustic waves in solids, ultrasonic loss, and the relation of elastic constants to thermodynamic potentials are covered in depth. Modern techniques and experimental methods including resonant ultrasound spectroscopy, digital pulse-echo, and picosecond ultrasound are also introduced and reviewed. This self-contained book includes extensive background theory and is accessible to students new to the field of ultrasonic spectroscopy, as well as to graduate students and researchers in physics, engineering, materials science, and geophysics.

  17. Application of Raman spectroscopy to forensic fibre cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepot, L; De Wael, K; Gason, F; Gilbert, B

    2008-09-01

    Five forensic fibre cases in which Raman spectroscopy proved to be a good complementary method for microspectrophotometry (MSP) are described. Absorption spectra in the visible range are indeed sometimes characteristic ofa certain dye but this one can be subsequently identified unambiguously by Raman spectroscopy using a spectral library. In other cases the comparison of Raman spectra of reference fibres and suspect fibres led to an improvement of the discrimination power. The Raman measurements have been performed directly on mounted fibres and the spectra showed only little interference from the mounting resin and glass. Raman spectroscopy is therefore a powerful method that can be applied in routine fibre analysis following optical microscopy and MSP measurements.

  18. Application of Computer-Assisted Learning Methods in the Teaching of Chemical Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayscough, P. B.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the application of computer-assisted learning methods to the interpretation of infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectra; and outlines extensions into the area of integrated spectroscopy. (Author/CMV)

  19. Application of Raman Spectroscopy and Infrared Spectroscopy in the Identification of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depciuch, Joanna; Kaznowska, Ewa; Zawlik, Izabela; Wojnarowska, Renata; Cholewa, Marian; Heraud, Philip; Cebulski, Józef

    2016-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy and infrared (IR) spectroscopy are both techniques that allow for the investigation of vibrating chemical particles. These techniques provide information not only about chemical particles through the identification of functional groups and spectral analysis of so-called "fingerprints", these methods allow for the qualitative and quantitative analyses of chemical substances in the sample. Both of these spectral techniques are frequently being used in biology and medicine in diagnosing illnesses and monitoring methods of therapy. The type of breast cancer found in woman is often a malignant tumor, causing 1.38 million new cases of breast cancer and 458 000 deaths in the world in 2013. The most important risk factors for breast cancer development are: sex, age, family history, specific benign breast conditions in the breast, ionizing radiation, and lifestyle. The main purpose of breast cancer screening tests is to establish early diagnostics and to apply proper treatment. Diagnoses of breast cancer are based on: (1) physical techniques (e.g., ultrasonography, mammography, elastography, magnetic resonance, positron emission tomography [PET]); (2) histopathological techniques; (3) biological techniques; and (4) optical techniques (e.g., photo acoustic imaging, fluorescence tomography). However, none of these techniques provides unique or especially revealing answers. The aim of our study is comparative spectroscopic measurements on patients with the following: normal non-cancerous breast tissue; breast cancer tissues before chemotherapy; breast cancer tissues after chemotherapy; and normal breast tissues received around the cancerous breast region. Spectra collected from breast cancer patients shows changes in amounts of carotenoids and fats. We also observed changes in carbohydrate and protein levels (e.g., lack of amino acids, changes in the concentration of amino acids, structural changes) in comparison with normal breast tissues. This fact

  20. High resolution applications of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for environmental and forensic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Madhavi Z.; Labbe, Nicole; Andre, Nicolas; Harris, Ronny; Ebinger, Michael; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Vass, Arpad A.

    2007-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used in the elemental analysis for a variety of environmental samples and as a proof of concept for a host of forensic applications. In the first application, LIBS was used for the rapid detection of carbon from a number of different soil types. In this application, a major breakthrough was achieved by using a multivariate analytical approach that has brought us closer towards a 'universal calibration curve'. In a second application, it has been demonstrated that LIBS in combination with multivariate analysis can be employed to analyze the chemical composition of annual tree growth rings and correlate them to external parameters such as changes in climate, forest fires, and disturbances involving human activity. The objectives of using this technology in fire scar determinations are: 1) To determine the characteristic spectra of wood exposed to forest fires and 2) To examine the viability of this technique for detecting fire occurrences in stems that did not develop fire scars. These examples demonstrate that LIBS-based techniques are inherently well suited for diverse environmental applications. LIBS was also applied to a variety of proof of concept forensic applications such as the analysis of cremains (human cremation remains) and elemental composition analysis of prosthetic implants

  1. Power quality considerations for nuclear spectroscopy applications: Grounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Hernández, J. M.; Ramírez-Jiménez, F. J.; Mondragón-Contreras, L.; López-Callejas, R.; Torres-Bribiesca, M. A.; Peña-Eguiluz, R.

    2013-11-01

    Traditionally the electrical installations are designed for supplying power and to assure the personnel safety. In nuclear analysis laboratories, additional issues about grounding also must be considered for proper operation of high resolution nuclear spectroscopy systems. This paper shows the traditional ways of grounding nuclear spectroscopy systems and through different scenarios, it shows the effects on the more sensitive parameter of these systems: the energy resolution, it also proposes the constant monitoring of a power quality parameter as a way to preserve or to improve the resolution of the systems, avoiding the influence of excessive extrinsic noise.

  2. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Topics covered by the conference include: fast beam spectroscopy; astrophysical and other spectra; highly ionized spectroscopy; complex spectra; rydberg levels; fine structure, hyperfine structure and isotope shift; lineshapes; lifetimes, oscillator strengths and Einstein coefficients; and spectroscopy with lasers. Abstracts of the conference papers are presented. (GHT)

  3. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Topics covered by the conference include: fast beam spectroscopy; astrophysical and other spectra; highly ionized spectroscopy; complex spectra; rydberg levels; fine structure, hyperfine structure and isotope shift; lineshapes; lifetimes, oscillator strengths and Einstein coefficients; and spectroscopy with lasers. Abstracts of the conference papers are presented

  4. Accurate Theoretical Methane Line Lists in the Infrared up to 3000 K and Quasi-continuum Absorption/Emission Modeling for Astrophysical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Michael; Nikitin, Andrei V.; Tyuterev, Vladimir G.

    2017-10-01

    Modeling atmospheres of hot exoplanets and brown dwarfs requires high-T databases that include methane as the major hydrocarbon. We report a complete theoretical line list of 12CH4 in the infrared range 0-13,400 cm-1 up to T max = 3000 K computed via a full quantum-mechanical method from ab initio potential energy and dipole moment surfaces. Over 150 billion transitions were generated with the lower rovibrational energy cutoff 33,000 cm-1 and intensity cutoff down to 10-33 cm/molecule to ensure convergent opacity predictions. Empirical corrections for 3.7 million of the strongest transitions permitted line position accuracies of 0.001-0.01 cm-1. Full data are partitioned into two sets. “Light lists” contain strong and medium transitions necessary for an accurate description of sharp features in absorption/emission spectra. For a fast and efficient modeling of quasi-continuum cross sections, billions of tiny lines are compressed in “super-line” libraries according to Rey et al. These combined data will be freely accessible via the TheoReTS information system (http://theorets.univ-reims.fr, http://theorets.tsu.ru), which provides a user-friendly interface for simulations of absorption coefficients, cross-sectional transmittance, and radiance. Comparisons with cold, room, and high-T experimental data show that the data reported here represent the first global theoretical methane lists suitable for high-resolution astrophysical applications.

  5. Non-traditional applications of the Mössbauer spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lančok, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 4 (2016), s. 345-346 ISSN 1211-5894. [Struktura 2016, Colloquium of the Czech and Slovak Crystallographic Association. 12.09.2016-15.09.2016, Tábor] Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Mössbauer spectroscopy Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry http://www. xray .cz/ms/bul2016-4.htm

  6. The Clinical Application of Raman Spectroscopy for Breast Cancer Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pin Gao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy has been widely used as an important clinical tool for real-time in vivo cancer diagnosis. Raman information can be obtained from whole organisms and tissues, at the cellular level and at the biomolecular level. The aim of this paper is to review the newest developments of Raman spectroscopy in the field of breast cancer diagnosis and treatment. Raman spectroscopy can distinguish malignant tissues from noncancerous/normal tissues and can assess tumor margins or sentinel lymph nodes during an operation. At the cellular level, Raman spectra can be used to monitor the intracellular processes occurring in blood circulation. At the biomolecular level, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy techniques may help detect the biomarker on the tumor surface as well as evaluate the efficacy of anticancer drugs. Furthermore, Raman images reveal an inhomogeneous distribution of different compounds, especially proteins, lipids, microcalcifications, and their metabolic products, in cancerous breast tissues. Information about these compounds may further our understanding of the mechanisms of breast cancer.

  7. Instrumentation for Reflectance Spectroscopy and Microspectroscopy with Application to Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouroulis, Pantazis; Blaney, Diana L.; Green, Robert O.

    2008-01-01

    We present instrument concepts for in-situ reflectance spectroscopy over a spatial resolution range from several meters to tens of micrometers. These have been adapted to the low mass and power requirements of rover or similar platforms. Described are a miniaturized imaging spectrometer for rover mast, a combined mast and arm point spectrometer, and an imaging microspectrometer for the rover arm.

  8. Laboratory Astrophysics Prize: Laboratory Astrophysics with Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiescher, Michael

    2018-06-01

    Nuclear astrophysics is concerned with nuclear reaction and decay processes from the Big Bang to the present star generation controlling the chemical evolution of our universe. Such nuclear reactions maintain stellar life, determine stellar evolution, and finally drive stellar explosion in the circle of stellar life. Laboratory nuclear astrophysics seeks to simulate and understand the underlying processes using a broad portfolio of nuclear instrumentation, from reactor to accelerator from stable to radioactive beams to map the broad spectrum of nucleosynthesis processes. This talk focuses on only two aspects of the broad field, the need of deep underground accelerator facilities in cosmic ray free environments in order to understand the nucleosynthesis in stars, and the need for high intensity radioactive beam facilities to recreate the conditions found in stellar explosions. Both concepts represent the two main frontiers of the field, which are being pursued in the US with the CASPAR accelerator at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota and the FRIB facility at Michigan State University.

  9. Toward observational neutrino astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshiba, M.

    1988-01-01

    It is true that: (1) The first observation of the neutrino burst from the supernova SN1987a by Kamiokande-II which was immediately confirmed by IBM; and (2) the first real-time, directional, and spectral observation of solar 8 B neutrinos also by Kamiokande-II could perhaps be considered as signalling the birth of observational astrophysics. The field, however, is still in its infancy and is crying out for tender loving care. Namely, while the construction of astronomy requires the time and the direction of the signal and that of astrophysics requires, in addition to the spectral information, the observations of (1) could not give the directional information and the results of both (1) and (2) are still suffering from the meager statistics. How do we remedy this situation to let this new born science of observational neutrino astrophysics grow healthy. This is what the author addresses in this talk. 15 refs., 8 figs

  10. Nuclear reactions in astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnould, M.; Rayet, M.

    1990-01-01

    At all times and at all astrophysical scales, nuclear reactions have played and continue to play a key role. This concerns the energetics as well as the production of nuclides (nucleosynthesis). After a brief review of the observed composition of various objects in the universe, and especially of the solar system, the basic ingredients that are required in order to build up models for the chemical evolution of galaxies are sketched. Special attention is paid to the evaluation of the stellar yields through an overview of the important burning episodes and nucleosynthetic processes that can develop in non-exploding or exploding stars. Emphasis is put on the remaining astrophysical and nuclear physics uncertainties that hamper a clear understanding of the observed characteristics, and especially compositions, of a large variety of astrophysical objects

  11. The new astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longair, M.

    1989-01-01

    The author offers a review of advances in astrophysics since 1945 when astronomers started to explore the universe beyond the bounds of the optical wavelength of the electromagnetic spectrum, especially in the fields of radio, x ray and gamma ray, cosmic ray, ultraviolet and infrared astronomies, as well as neutral hydrogen and molecular line studies. Theoretical and technological advances have also kept pace. An overview of the new astrophysics is offered focusing on the large-scale distribution of matter and the background microwave radiation, galaxies, stellar evolution and the interstellar media (dust, gas and high energy particles). Nucleosynthesis in stars is mentioned in a broader discussion of stellar evolution, and dead stars including supernovae. Active galaxies and quasars are discussed. After considering what should be included in astrophysical cosmology, the author looks to the future of the science. (U.K.)

  12. A method of simulation of large air showers of cosmic radiation. Application to High Energy Physics and to Astrophysics (10"1"3 - 10"2"1 eV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capdevielle, Jean-Noel

    1972-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the study of large air showers and the field of high energy physics and of astrophysics. The author discusses fluctuations undergone by large showers, and reports the development of a simulation method which is used for the determination of the morphology of these large air showers, that is their longitudinal and lateral development. Simulation results are compared with experimental results, and the influence of fluctuations is discussed. The author reports the application of the simulation method to high energy physics and to astrophysics, notably through an example of use of the simulation method in application to the Kiel Group experiment performed at the Pic du Midi. Possible developments are then discussed [fr

  13. Astrophysics Update 2

    CERN Document Server

    Mason, John W

    2006-01-01

    "Astrophysics Updates" is intended to serve the information needs of professional astronomers and postgraduate students about areas of astronomy, astrophysics and cosmology that are rich and active research spheres. Observational methods and the latest results of astronomical research are presented as well as their theoretical foundations and interrelations. The contributed commissioned articles are written by leading exponents in a format that will appeal to professional astronomers and astrophysicists who are interested in topics outside their own specific areas of research. This collection of timely reviews may also attract the interest of advanced amateur astronomers seeking scientifically rigorous coverage.

  14. Astrophysical opacity library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebner, W.F.; Merts, A.L.; Magee, N.H. Jr.; Argo, M.F.

    1977-08-01

    The astrophysical elements opacity library includes equation of state data, various mean opacities, and 2000 values of the frequency-dependent extinction coefficients in equally spaced intervals u identical with hν/kT from 0 to 20 for 41 degeneracy parameters eta from -28 (nondegenerate) to 500 and 46 temperatures kT from 1 eV to 100 keV. Among available auxiliary quantities are the free electron density, mass density, and plasma cutoff frequency. A library-associated program can produce opacities for mixtures with up to 20 astrophysically abundant constituent elements at 4 levels of utility for the user

  15. Theoretical astrophysics an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Bartelmann, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    A concise yet comprehensive introduction to the central theoretical concepts of modern astrophysics, presenting hydrodynamics, radiation, and stellar dynamics all in one textbook. Adopting a modular structure, the author illustrates a small number of fundamental physical methods and principles, which are sufficient to describe and understand a wide range of seemingly very diverse astrophysical phenomena and processes. For example, the formulae that define the macroscopic behavior of stellar systems are all derived in the same way from the microscopic distribution function. This function it

  16. Astrophysics in a nutshell

    CERN Document Server

    Maoz, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Winner of the American Astronomical Society's Chambliss Award, Astrophysics in a Nutshell has become the text of choice in astrophysics courses for science majors at top universities in North America and beyond. In this expanded and fully updated second edition, the book gets even better, with a new chapter on extrasolar planets; a greatly expanded chapter on the interstellar medium; fully updated facts and figures on all subjects, from the observed properties of white dwarfs to the latest results from precision cosmology; and additional instructive problem sets. Throughout, the text features the same focused, concise style and emphasis on physics intuition that have made the book a favorite of students and teachers.

  17. Introduction to Nuclear Astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliadis, Christian

    2010-01-01

    In the first lecture of this volume, we will present the basic fundamental ideas regarding nuclear processes occurring in stars. We start from stellar observations, will then elaborate on some important quantum-mechanical phenomena governing nuclear reactions, continue with how nuclear reactions proceed in a hot stellar plasma and, finally, we will provide an overview of stellar burning stages. At the end, the current knowledge regarding the origin of the elements is briefly summarized. This lecture is directed towards the student of nuclear astrophysics. Our intention is to present seemingly unrelated phenomena of nuclear physics and astrophysics in a coherent framework.

  18. Raman Plus X: Biomedical Applications of Multimodal Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Nandan K; Dai, Yichuan; Liu, Peng; Hu, Chuanzhen; Tong, Lieshu; Chen, Xiaoya; Smith, Zachary J

    2017-07-07

    Raman spectroscopy is a label-free method of obtaining detailed chemical information about samples. Its compatibility with living tissue makes it an attractive choice for biomedical analysis, yet its translation from a research tool to a clinical tool has been slow, hampered by fundamental Raman scattering issues such as long integration times and limited penetration depth. In this review we detail the how combining Raman spectroscopy with other techniques yields multimodal instruments that can help to surmount the translational barriers faced by Raman alone. We review Raman combined with several optical and non-optical methods, including fluorescence, elastic scattering, OCT, phase imaging, and mass spectrometry. In each section we highlight the power of each combination along with a brief history and presentation of representative results. Finally, we conclude with a perspective detailing both benefits and challenges for multimodal Raman measurements, and give thoughts on future directions in the field.

  19. Emerging applications of fluorescence spectroscopy in medical microbiology field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Aamir; Köhler, Gottfried; Knapp, Martin; Gaubitzer, Erwin; Puchinger, Martin; Edetsberger, Michael

    2009-11-26

    There are many diagnostic techniques and methods available for diagnosis of medically important microorganisms like bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites. But, almost all these techniques and methods have some limitations or inconvenience. Most of these techniques are laborious, time consuming and with chances of false positive or false negative results. It warrants the need of a diagnostic technique which can overcome these limitations and problems. At present, there is emerging trend to use Fluorescence spectroscopy as a diagnostic as well as research tool in many fields of medical sciences. Here, we will critically discuss research studies which propose that Fluorescence spectroscopy may be an excellent diagnostic as well as excellent research tool in medical microbiology field with high sensitivity and specificity.

  20. Emerging applications of fluorescence spectroscopy in medical microbiology field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaubitzer Erwin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There are many diagnostic techniques and methods available for diagnosis of medically important microorganisms like bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites. But, almost all these techniques and methods have some limitations or inconvenience. Most of these techniques are laborious, time consuming and with chances of false positive or false negative results. It warrants the need of a diagnostic technique which can overcome these limitations and problems. At present, there is emerging trend to use Fluorescence spectroscopy as a diagnostic as well as research tool in many fields of medical sciences. Here, we will critically discuss research studies which propose that Fluorescence spectroscopy may be an excellent diagnostic as well as excellent research tool in medical microbiology field with high sensitivity and specificity.

  1. Supplemental Report: Application of Emission Spectroscopy to Monitoring Technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, W.A.

    2000-01-01

    This report provides supplemental information to an earlier report BNF-98-003-0199, ''Evaluation of Emission Spectroscopy for the On-Line Analysis of Technetium''. In this report data is included from real Hanford samples as well as for solutions spiked with technetium. This supplemental work confirms the ability of ICP-ES to monitor technetium as it breaks through an ion exchange process

  2. Application of gamma-ray spectroscopy in environmental monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbs, B.B.; Kanipe, L.G.; Clayton, W.R.; Belvin, E.A.

    1976-01-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy is used as the primary analytical method in the Tennessee Valley Authority's environmental radiation monitoring program. Routine sample screening is done by means of least-squares analysis of spectra from NaI(Tl) detectors. Nonroutine or suspicious samples are analyzed by means of Ge(Li) spectral analysis. A laboratory quality control program provides internal and external checks on the reliability of analyses

  3. Covariance J-resolved spectroscopy: Theory and application in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Zohaib; Verma, Gaurav; Kumar, Anand; Thomas, M Albert

    2017-08-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a powerful tool capable of investigating the metabolic status of several tissues in vivo. In particular, single-voxel-based 1 H spectroscopy provides invaluable biochemical information from a volume of interest (VOI) and has therefore been used in a variety of studies. Unfortunately, typical one-dimensional MRS data suffer from severe signal overlap and thus important metabolites are difficult to distinguish. One method that is used to disentangle overlapping resonances is the two-dimensional J-resolved spectroscopy (JPRESS) experiment. Due to the long acquisition duration of the JPRESS experiment, a limited number of points are acquired in the indirect dimension, leading to poor spectral resolution along this dimension. Poor spectral resolution is problematic because proper peak assignment may be hindered, which is why the zero-filling method is often used to improve resolution as a post-processing step. However, zero-filling leads to spectral artifacts, which may affect visualization and quantitation of spectra. A novel method utilizing a covariance transformation, called covariance J-resolved spectroscopy (CovJ), was developed in order to improve spectral resolution along the indirect dimension (F 1 ). Comparison of simulated data demonstrates that peak structures remain qualitatively similar between JPRESS and the novel method along the diagonal region (F 1 = 0 Hz), whereas differences arise in the cross-peak (F 1 ≠0 Hz) regions. In addition, quantitative results of in vivo JPRESS data acquired on a 3T scanner show significant correlations (r 2 >0.86, pCOVariance Spectral Evaluation of 1 H Acquisitions using Representative prior knowledge' (Cov-SEHAR), was developed in order to quantify γ-aminobutyric acid and glutamate from the CovJ spectra. These preliminary findings indicate that the CovJ method may be used to improve spectral resolution without hindering metabolite quantitation for J-resolved spectra

  4. Astrophysical Russian Dolls

    OpenAIRE

    Loeb, Abraham; Imara, Nia

    2017-01-01

    Are there examples of "astrophysical Russian dolls," and what could we learn from their similarities? In this article, we list a few such examples, including disks, filaments, and clusters. We suggest that forging connections across disciplinary borders enhances our perception of beauty, while simultaneously leading to a more comprehensive understanding of the Universe.

  5. High energy astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shklorsky, I.S.

    1979-01-01

    A selected list of articles of accessible recent review articles and conference reports, wherein up-to-date summaries of various topics in the field of high energy astrophysics can be found, is presented. A special report outlines work done in the Soviet Union in this area. (Auth.)

  6. The NASA Astrophysics Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebulum, Ricardo S.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's scientists are enjoying unprecedented access to astronomy data from space, both from missions launched and operated only by NASA, as well as missions led by other space agencies to which NASA contributed instruments or technology. This paper describes the NASA astrophysics program for the next decade, including NASA's response to the ASTRO2010 Decadal Survey.

  7. Statistical learning methods in high-energy and astrophysics analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Zentrallabor fuer Elektronik, 52425 Juelich (Germany) and Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Munich (Germany)]. E-mail: zimmerm@mppmu.mpg.de; Kiesling, C. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Munich (Germany)

    2004-11-21

    We discuss several popular statistical learning methods used in high-energy- and astro-physics analysis. After a short motivation for statistical learning we present the most popular algorithms and discuss several examples from current research in particle- and astro-physics. The statistical learning methods are compared with each other and with standard methods for the respective application.

  8. Statistical learning methods in high-energy and astrophysics analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, J.; Kiesling, C.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss several popular statistical learning methods used in high-energy- and astro-physics analysis. After a short motivation for statistical learning we present the most popular algorithms and discuss several examples from current research in particle- and astro-physics. The statistical learning methods are compared with each other and with standard methods for the respective application

  9. Applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to certifiable food colors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmion, D.M.

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was found suitable for the identification of individual colours, for distinguishing individual colours from colour mixtures, for the identification and semi-quantitative determination of the individual colours in mixtures and for proofs of the adulteration of certified colours adding noncertified colours. The method is well suited for observing the purity of colours and may also be used as the control method in the manufacture of colours and in assessing their stability and their resistance to increased temperature and light. (M.K.)

  10. Deuterated scintillators and their application to neutron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Febbraro, M.; Lawrence, C.C.; Zhu, H.; Pierson, B.; Torres-Isea, R.O; Becchetti, F.D.; Kolata, J.J.; Riggins, J.

    2015-01-01

    Deuterated scintillators have been used as a tool for neutron spectroscopy without Neutron Time-of-Flight (n-ToF) for more than 30 years. This article will provide a brief historical overview of the technique and current uses of deuterated scintillators in the UM-DSA and DESCANT arrays. Pulse-shape discrimination and spectrum unfolding with the maximum-likelihood expectation maximization algorithm will be discussed. Experimental unfolding and cross section results from measurements of (d,n), ( 3 He,n) and (α,n) reactions are shown

  11. High-temperature spectroscopy for nuclear waste applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, P.M.; Robouch, P.; Torres, R.A.; Silva, R.J.

    1991-10-01

    Instrumentation has been developed to perform uv-vis-nir absorbance measurements remotely and at elevated temperatures and pressures. Fiber-optic spectroscopy permits the interrogation of radioactive species within a glovebox enclosure at temperatures ranging from ambient to >100 degree C. Spectral shifts as a function of metal- ligand coordination are used to compute thermodynamic free energies of reaction by matrix regression analysis. Pr 3+ serves as a convenient analog for trivalent actinides without attendant radioactivity hazards, and recent results obtained from 20 degree--95 degree C with the Pr-acetate complexation system are presented. Preliminary experimentation on Am(3) hydrolysis is also described. 16 refs., 1 tab

  12. Accurate Theoretical Methane Line Lists in the Infrared up to 3000 K and Quasi-continuum Absorption/Emission Modeling for Astrophysical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rey, Michael; Tyuterev, Vladimir G. [Groupe de Spectrométrie Moléculaire et Atmosphérique, UMR CNRS 7331, BP 1039, F-51687, Reims Cedex 2 (France); Nikitin, Andrei V., E-mail: michael.rey@univ-reims.fr [Laboratory of Theoretical Spectroscopy, Institute of Atmospheric Optics, SB RAS, 634055 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2017-10-01

    Modeling atmospheres of hot exoplanets and brown dwarfs requires high- T databases that include methane as the major hydrocarbon. We report a complete theoretical line list of {sup 12}CH{sub 4} in the infrared range 0–13,400 cm{sup −1} up to T {sub max} = 3000 K computed via a full quantum-mechanical method from ab initio potential energy and dipole moment surfaces. Over 150 billion transitions were generated with the lower rovibrational energy cutoff 33,000 cm{sup −1} and intensity cutoff down to 10{sup −33} cm/molecule to ensure convergent opacity predictions. Empirical corrections for 3.7 million of the strongest transitions permitted line position accuracies of 0.001–0.01 cm{sup −1}. Full data are partitioned into two sets. “Light lists” contain strong and medium transitions necessary for an accurate description of sharp features in absorption/emission spectra. For a fast and efficient modeling of quasi-continuum cross sections, billions of tiny lines are compressed in “super-line” libraries according to Rey et al. These combined data will be freely accessible via the TheoReTS information system (http://theorets.univ-reims.fr, http://theorets.tsu.ru), which provides a user-friendly interface for simulations of absorption coefficients, cross-sectional transmittance, and radiance. Comparisons with cold, room, and high- T experimental data show that the data reported here represent the first global theoretical methane lists suitable for high-resolution astrophysical applications.

  13. Application of X-ray spectroscopy in nondestructive photon activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weise, H.-P.; Segebade, Chr.

    1977-01-01

    The use of X-ray spectroscopy for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of samples activated by 30 MeV bremsstrahlung from an electron linear accelerator. Detection limits are calculated from the measured X-ray spectra and compared with those for γ-ray spectroscopy. In general, the detection limits for γ-ray and X-ray spectroscopy are comparable. Higher sensitivities for X-ray spectroscopy are observed when only low intensity γ-rays are emitted by the activation products. X-ray spectroscopy should be applied in three cases: (a) low γ-ray emission probability, (b) extremely complicated γ-ray spectrum, (c) overlapping of γ-ray lines from different elements. γ-ray spectroscopy should be preferred for the analysis of light elements for two reasons: very strong absorption of low energy X-rays (low Z) within the sample, low X-ray emission probability for the activation products of light elements. Therefore no attempt was made to use X-ray spectroscopy for the analysis of elements below Ti. Some practical applications of X-ray spectroscopy in nondestructive multielement analysis are quoted. (T.G.)

  14. Encyclopedia of Astronomy and Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Interstellar medium, Light, Magnetisphere, Matter, Planet Earth, Public Impact, Solar Activity, Solar Heliosphere, Solar Interior, Solar Systems, Space, Stellar Astrophysics, Stellar Populations, Telescopes, Time The Encyclopedia of Astronomy and Astrophysics covers 30 major subject areas, such as Active galaxies, Astrometry, Astrophysical theory, Atmospheres, Binary stars, Biography, Clusters, Coordinates, Cosmology, Earth, Education, Galaxies,

  15. Real-time Detection of Antihydrogen Annihilations and Applications to Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stracka Simone

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A detection scheme based on real-time measurement of antihydrogen annihilations during radiation injection is presented, which allows an efficient use of the trapped atoms for laser and microwave spectroscopy. The application of real-time detection of H¯$\\bar H$ annihilations to microwave spectroscopy, which yielded the first evidence of microwave induced spin-flip transitions in trapped antihydrogen [1], is reported.

  16. Validation and application of FTIR spectroscopy in raw milk analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kučević Denis S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate whether FTIR spectroscopy is an accurate and valid technique for the assessment of quality parameters in raw cow's milk: fat, protein, lactose, and total solids. The assessment was based on calibration series and comparison with reference material. Furthermore, it takes into account the results obtained in the inter-laboratory comparisons (proficiency testing. The calibration samples were purchased from the accredited regional reference laboratories. The validation parameters included linearity, accuracy, repeatability, reproducibility, and robustness. The linearity ratio was 0.95%. The biases calculated for the fat, protein, lactose and dry matter were -0.33, 0.31, -0.25, and 0.06 respectively. The F value from the F-test was used to determine the significant differences between two independent sets of the results. The obtained results were as follows: 1.469 for fat, 1.634 for protein, 1.192 for lactose, and 0.528 for dry matter. The intra-laboratory reproducibility calculated as the Horwitz Ratios for all parameters were within the criterion limits (0.5 to 0.8. The data obtained for carry-over were 0.27% for fat, 0.52% for protein, 0.47% for lactose, and 0.47% for dry matter. Based on the obtained results it can be concluded that the FTIR spectroscopy is a reliable instrumental technique for the determination of fat, protein, lactose and total solids in raw cow's milk.

  17. Moessbauer spectroscopy: Methodology and some applications to magnetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundqvist, T.

    1986-01-01

    The development of a new computer program for analysis of Moessbauer spectra that allows the user to make a detailed simulation of a measured spectrum is described. The program includes several novel computational algorithms as well as extensive treatment of experimental side effects. Data collection instrumentation has been improved by the development of computer based data acquisition units. Replacing traditional multichannel analyzers, these computer controlled units provide increased flexibility, improved capacity and ease of data handling. The systems designed range from a simple Apple II interface, to a high performance self contained computer controlled unit. The computerized spectrometers feature two independent channels, allowing for acquisition of the spectrum of interest and of a simultaneous calibration spectra, as well as software controlled frequency of operation. Moessbauer spectroscopy is applied to amorphous Fe based alloys to study the correlations among hyperfine interactions, and to study the crystallization behaviour of these alloys. Special attention has been payed to the quadrupole interaction in the amorphous phases. Careful data analysis, making use of the above mentioned program, is used in an attempt to determine the complex magnetic structures found in various iron phosphides. The usefulness of the Ni-61 isotope for Moessbauer spectroscopy has been investigated. (author)

  18. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for applications in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suri, B.M.

    2010-01-01

    There are several analytical techniques employing laser spectroscopy - each with its own distinctive potential. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is one such technique which is attractive in view of its relative compactness and simplicity (in configuration), remote and online analysis (with no sample handling requirement) and high spatial resolution allowing compositional map or homogeneity analysis. In this technique, a high power pulsed (mostly nanosecond) laser is employed to irradiate the sample causing spark emission, characteristics of the sample composition, which is collected using suitable optics and analysed spectroscopically. Remote and online capability is derived from long distance delivery of laser beams and collection of emitted light by fibres or conventional optics. Since laser can be focused sharply on the target, it can facilitate compositional mapping. Beam Technology Development Group at BARC had initiated work on LIBS of nuclear materials several years ago. Recently the challenge of online monitoring of radioactive waste vitrification plant in a hot cell has been taken up. The theoretical and experimental work done by the group related to instrument development, plasma characterization, quantitative compositional analysis of ternary alloys and uranium vitrified glass samples (comprising more than dozen elements) are described. The future plans for setting up online glass homogeneity monitoring facility are also described. This should fulfill an important demand for optimization of vitrification process. Various other demands of nuclear industry are also reviewed

  19. The Trojan Horse Method in nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Del Zoppo, A.; Di Pietrob, A.; Figuerab, P.; Gulino, M.; Lattuadab, M.; Miljanic, Dstroke; Musumarra, A.; Pellegriti, M.G.; Pizzone, R.G.; Rolfs, C.; Romano, S.; Tudisco, S.; Tumino, A.

    2003-01-01

    The basic features of the Trojan Horse Method are discussed together with a review of recent applications, aimed to extract the bare astrophysical S(E)-factor for several two-body processes. In this framework information on electron screening potential U e was obtained from the comparison with direct experiments

  20. Theoretical nuclear structure and astrophysics at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez, Tomás R

    2014-01-01

    Next generation of radioactive ion beam facilities like FAIR will open a bright future for nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics research. In particular, very exotic nuclei (mainly neutron rich) isotopes will be produced and a lot of new exciting experimental data will help to test and improve the current nuclear models. In addition, these data (masses, reaction cross sections, beta decay half-lives, etc.) combined with the development of better theoretical approaches will be used as the nuclear physics input for astrophysical simulations. In this presentation I will review some of the state-of-the-art nuclear structure methods and their applications.

  1. Advances in astronomy and astrophysics 9

    CERN Document Server

    Kopal, Zdenek

    1972-01-01

    Advances in Astronomy and Astrophysics, Volume 9 covers reviews on the advances in astronomy and astrophysics. The book presents reviews on the Roche model and its applications to close binary systems. The text then describes the part played by lunar eclipses in the evolution of astronomy; the classical theory of lunar eclipses; deviations from geometrical theory; and the methods of photometric observations of eclipses. The problems of other phenomena related in one way or another to lunar eclipses are also considered. The book further tackles the infrared observation on the eclipsed moon, as

  2. Excitation of compound states in the subsystems as indirect tool in nuclear astrophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tribble R.E.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Astrophysical reactions proceeding through compound states represent one of the crucial part of nuclear astrophysics. However, due to the presence of the Coulomb barrier, it is often very difficult or even impossible to obtain the astrophysical S (E factor from measurements in the laboratory at astrophysically relevant energies. The Trojan Horse method (THM provides a unique tool to obtain the information about resonant astrophysical reactions at astrophysically relevant energies. Here the theory and application of the THM for the resonant reactions is addressed.

  3. Application of molecular spectroscopy to the determination of organic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leicknam, J.P.

    1976-01-01

    Some brief accounts are presented followed by a discussion about various physico-chemical techniques: Raman spectrometry, infrared spectrometry, resonance Raman spectrometry, conformational analysis and polarized Rayleigh diffusion. Applications of the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance to nucleotide structure in aqueous solution are described as well as some applications of neutron scattering to the study of organic structures [fr

  4. Applications of infrared photo-acoustic spectroscopy for wood samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mon-Lin Kuo; John F. McClelland; Siquan Luo; Po-Liang Chien; R.D. Walker; Chung-Yun Hse

    1988-01-01

    Various infrared (IR) spectroscopic techniques for the analysis of wood samples are briefly discussed. Theories and instrumentation of the newly developed photoacoustic spectroscopic (PAS) technique for measuring absorbance spectra of solids are presented. Some important applications of the PAS technique in wood science research are discussed. The application of the...

  5. [Application of FTIR micro-spectroscopy in the tribology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhi-meng

    2002-10-01

    The wave number of characteristic absorption peak nu asC-O-C of the polyester formed on the frictional process were determined by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Micro-spectroscopy, and the wave number displacement of characteristic absorption peak nu asC-O-C was analyzed based on the conversion mass of polyester formed. The internal relations between anti-wear order rule of hydroxyl fatty acids and vibration absorption peak nu asC-O-C of polyester formed by hydroxyl fatty acids was deduced according to these results, and the anti-wear order of hydroxyl fatty acids was reasonably explained, that is 13, 14-di-hydroxydocosanoic acid > 13 (14)-monohydroxydocosanoic acid = 9,10-dihydroxyoctadecanoic acid > 9,10,12-trihydroxyoctadecanoic acid > 9(10)-monohydroxyoctadecanoic acid. A net polyester film is formed by 13, 14-dihydroxydocosanoic acid and a linear polyester film is formed by 9, (10)-monohydroxyoctadecanoic acid and 13(14)-monohydroxydocosanoic acid.

  6. Application of optical emission spectroscopy to high current proton sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, G; Mazzaglia, M; Nicolosi, D; Mascali, D; Reitano, R; Celona, L; Leonardi, O; Leone, F; Naselli, E; Neri, L; Torrisi, G; Gammino, S; Zaniol, B

    2017-01-01

    Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES) represents a very reliable technique to carry out non-invasive measurements of plasma density and plasma temperature in the range of tens of eV. With respect to other diagnostics, it also can characterize the different populations of neutrals and ionized particles constituting the plasma. At INFN-LNS, OES techniques have been developed and applied to characterize the plasma generated by the Flexible Plasma Trap, an ion source used as 'testbench' of the proton source built for European Spallation Source. This work presents the characterization of the parameters of a hydrogen plasma in different conditions of neutral pressure, microwave power and magnetic field profile, along with perspectives for further upgrades of the OES diagnostics system. (paper)

  7. The application of UV LEDs for differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiko, Pavel P.; Smirnov, Sergey S.; Samokhvalov, Ignatii V.

    2018-04-01

    Modern UV LEDs represent a potentially very advantageous alternative to thermal light sources, in particular xenon arc lamps, which are the most common light sources in trace gas-analyzers. So, the light-emitting diodes are very attractive for use of as light sources for Long Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) measurements of trace gases in the open atmosphere. Recent developments in fibre-coupling telescope technology and the availability of ultraviolet light emitting diodes have now allowed us to construct a portable, long path DOAS instrument for use at remote locations and specifically for measuring degassing from active volcanic systems. First of all, we are talking about the measurement of sulphur dioxide, carbon disulphide and, oxides of chlorine and bromine. The parallel measurements of sulfur dioxide using a certified gas analyzer, were conducted and showed good correlation.

  8. Applications of resonance ionization spectroscopy in neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitaker, T.J.; Hurst, G.S.

    1982-01-01

    Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) is a new analytical technique which is orders of magnitude more sensitive than previous methods of atomic analysis. In this method, lasers are used to selectively excite specific electronic transitions in the element being analyzed. A second laser photon can then ionize the excited atoms. Commercial lasers have sufficient intensity to assure that every atom located in the central portion of the laser beam will be ionized, and therefore can be detected. In this paper the concept of a xenon-containing matrix (XCM) which would release xenon atoms when exposed to neutrons is explored. Accumulated xenon would be measured using RIS to determine total dose. The total dosimeter would consist of an XCM, a radiator, and an encapsulation around both to contain released xenon atoms

  9. Application of Moessbauer spectroscopy on corrosion products of NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dekan, J., E-mail: julius.dekan@stuba.sk; Lipka, J.; Slugen, V. [Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, SUT (Slovakia)

    2013-04-15

    Steam generator (SG) is generally one of the most important components at all nuclear power plants (NPP) with close impact to safe and long-term operation. Material degradation and corrosion/erosion processes are serious risks for long-term reliable operation. Steam generators of four VVER-440 units at nuclear power plants V-1 and V-2 in Jaslovske Bohunice (Slovakia) were gradually changed by new original 'Bohunice' design in period 1994-1998, in order to improve corrosion resistance of SGs. Corrosion processes before and after these design and material changes in Bohunice secondary circuit were studied using Moessbauer spectroscopy during last 25 years. Innovations in the feed water pipeline design as well as material composition improvements were evaluated positively. Moessbauer spectroscopy studies of phase composition of corrosion products were performed on real specimens scrapped from water pipelines or in form of filters deposits. Newest results in our long-term corrosion study confirm good operational experiences and suitable chemical regimes (reduction environment) which results mostly in creation of magnetite (on the level 70 % or higher) and small portions of hematite, goethite or hydrooxides. Regular observation of corrosion/erosion processes is essential for keeping NPP operation on high safety level. The output from performed material analyses influences the optimisation of operating chemical regimes and it can be used in optimisation of regimes at decontamination and passivation of pipelines or secondary circuit components. It can be concluded that a longer passivation time leads more to magnetite fraction in the corrosion products composition.

  10. Application of neuro-fuzzy methods to gamma spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grelle, Austin L.

    Nuclear non-proliferation activities are an essential part of national security activities both domestic and abroad. The safety of the public in densely populated environments such as urban areas or large events can be compromised if devices using special nuclear materials are present. Therefore, the prompt and accurate detection of these materials is an important topic of research, in which the identification of normal conditions is also of importance. With gamma-ray spectroscopy, these conditions are identified as the radiation background, which though being affected by a multitude of factors is ever present. Therefore, in nuclear non-proliferation activities the accurate identification of background is important. With this in mind, a method has been developed to utilize aggregate background data to predict the background of a location through the use of an Artificial Neural Network (ANN). After being trained on background data, the ANN is presented with nearby relevant gamma-ray spectroscopy data---as identified by a Fuzzy Inference System - to create a predicted background spectra to compare to a measured spectra. If a significant deviation exists between the predicted and measured data, the method alerts the user such that a more thorough investigation can take place. Research herein focused on data from an urban setting in which the number of false positives was observed to be 28 out of a total of 987, representing 2.94% error. The method therefore currently shows a high rate of false positives given the current configuration, however there are promising steps that can be taken to further minimize this error. With this in mind, the method stands as a potentially significant tool in urban nuclear nonproliferation activities.

  11. Application of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy under Polar Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, J. L.; Hark, R.; Bol'shakov, A.; Plumer, J.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade our research team has evaluated the use of commercial-off-the-shelf laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for chemical analysis of snow and ice samples under polar conditions. One avenue of research explored LIBS suitability as a detector of paleo-climate proxy indicators (Ca, K, Mg, and Na) in ice as it relates to atmospheric circulation. LIBS results revealed detection of peaks for C and N, consistent with the presence of organic material, as well as major ions (Ca, K, Mg, and Na) and trace metals (Al, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ti). The detection of Ca, K, Mg, and Na confirmed that LIBS has sufficient sensitivity to be used as a tool for characterization of paleo-climate proxy indicators in ice-core samples. Techniques were developed for direct analysis of ice as well as indirect measurements of ice via melting and filtering. Pitfalls and issues of direct ice analysis using several cooling techniques to maintain ice integrity will be discussed. In addition, a new technique, laser ablation molecular isotopic spectroscopy (LAMIS) was applied to detection of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes in ice as isotopic analysis of ice is the main tool in paleoclimatology and glaciology studies. Our results demonstrated that spectra of hydroxyl isotopologues 16OH, 18OH, and 16OD can be recorded with a compact spectrograph to determine hydrogen and oxygen isotopes simultaneously. Quantitative isotopic calibration for ice analysis can be accomplished using multivariate chemometric regression as previously realized for water vapor. Analysis with LIBS and LAMIS required no special sample preparation and was about ten times faster than analysis using ICP-MS. Combination of the two techniques in one portable instrument for in-field analysis appears possible and would eliminate the logistical and cost issues associated with ice core management.

  12. Modelization, fabrication and evaluation avalanche photodiodes polarized in Geiger mode for the single photon in astrophysics applications; Modelisation, fabrication et evaluation des photodiodes a avalanche polarisees en mode Geiger pour la detection du photon unique dans les applications Astrophysiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellion, D

    2008-12-15

    The genesis of the work presented in this this is in the field of very high energy astrophysics. One century ago, scientists identified a new type of messenger coming from space: cosmic rays. This radiation consists of particles (photons or other) of very high energy which bombard the Earth permanently. The passage of cosmic radiations in the Earth's atmosphere results in the creation of briefs luminous flashes (5 ns) of very low intensity (1 pW), a Cherenkov flash, and then becomes visible on the ground. In the current state of the art the best detector of light today is the Photomultiplier tube (PMT), thanks to its characteristics of sensitivity and speed. But there are some drawbacks: low quantum efficiency, cost, weight etc. We present in this thesis a new alternative technology: silicon photon counters, made of photodiodes polarized in Geiger mode. This operating mode makes it possible to obtain an effect of multiplication comparable to that of the PMT. A physical and electrical model was developed to reproduce the behaviour of this detector. We then present in this thesis work an original technological process allowing the realization of these devices in the Center of Technology of LAAS-CNRS, with the simulation of each operation of the process. We developed a scheme for the electric characterization of the device, from the static mode to the dynamic mode, in order to check conformity with SILVACO simulations and to the initial model. Results are already excellent, given this is only a first prototype step, and comparable with the results published in the literature. These silicon devices can intervene in all the applications where there is a photomultiplier and replace it. The applications are thus very numerous and the growth of the market of these detectors is very fast. We present a first astrophysical experiment installed at the 'Pic du Midi' site which has detected Cherenkov flashes from cosmic rays with this new semiconductor technology

  13. Astrophysical Applications of Gravitational Lensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediavilla, Evencio; Muñoz, Jose A.; Garzón, Francisco; Mahoney, Terence J.

    2016-10-01

    Contributors; Participants; Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Lensing basics Sherry H. Suyu; 2. Exoplanet microlensing Andrew Gould; 3. Case studies of microlensing Veronica Motta and Emilio Falco; 4. Microlensing of quasars and AGN Joachim Wambsganss; 5. DM in clusters and large-scale structure Peter Schneider; 6. The future of strong lensing Chris Fassnacht; 7. Methods for strong lens modelling Charles Keeton; 8. Tutorial on inverse ray shooting Jorge Jimenez-Vicente.

  14. Nuclear properties for astrophysical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, P.; Nix, J.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kratz, K.L. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernchemie

    1994-09-23

    We tabulate the ground-state odd-proton and odd-neutron spins, proton and neutron pairing gaps, binding energies, neuton separation energies, quantities related to {beta}-delayed one, two and three neutron emission probabilities, {beta}-decay Q values and half-lives with respect to Gamow-Teller decay, proton separation energies, and {alpha}-decay Q values and half-lives. The starting point of the calculations is a calculation of nuclear ground-states and (information based on the finite-range droplet model and the folded-Yukawa single-particle model published in a previous issue of ATOMIC DATA AND NUCLEAR DATA TABLES. The {beta}-delayed neutron-emission probabilities and Gamow-Teller {beta}-decay rates are obtained from a QRPA model that uses single-particle levels and wave-functions at the calculated nuclear ground-state shape as the starting point.

  15. Indirect techniques in nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhamedzhanov, A.M.; Tribble, R.E.; Blokhintsev, L.D.; Cherubini, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Kroha, V.; Nunes, F.M.

    2005-01-01

    It is very difficult or often impossible to measure in the lab conditions nuclear cross sections at astrophysically relevant energies. That is why different indirect techniques are used to extract astrophysical information. In this talk different experimental possibilities to get astrophysical information using radioactive and stable beams will be addressed. 1. The asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) method. 2. Radiative neutron captures are determined by the spectroscopic factors (SP). A new experimental technique to determine the neutron SPs will be addressed. 3. 'Trojan Horse' is another unique indirect method, which allows one to extract the astrophysical factors for direct and resonant nuclear reactions at astrophysically relevant energies. (author)

  16. Scaling law in laboratory astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Jiangfan; Zhang Jie

    2001-01-01

    The use of state-of-the-art lasers makes it possible to produce, in the laboratory, the extreme conditions similar to those in astrophysical processes. The introduction of astrophysics-relevant ideas in laser-plasma interaction experiments is propitious to the understanding of astrophysical phenomena. However, the great difference between laser-produced plasma and astrophysical objects makes it awkward to model the latter by laser-plasma experiments. The author presents the physical reasons for modeling astrophysical plasmas by laser plasmas, connecting these two kinds of plasmas by scaling laws. This allows the creation of experimental test beds where observation and models can be quantitatively compared with laboratory data

  17. New applications of near infrared spectroscopy in the food industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groenewald, C.A. (Peter Rassloff Instruments and Services, Norwood, South Africa)

    The near infrared spectroscopic method of analysis was initially developed for rapid analyses of protein in wheat. A brief explanation of the theory and history of near infrared spectroscopic analysis will be given. Research was done on the application of near infrared spectroscopic (NIR) in the food industry. Especially exciting was the breakthrough achieved in applying NIR to determine the dry solid content of bread. Such application could revolutionise the baking industry. Results will also be presented of research done on the application of NIR techniques for the determination of protein and fat in bread based on dry matter; hardness in wheat; absorption and sedimentation in pasta products; and use in process control in snack products manufacture. The limitations that were found in the application of NIR analysis will also be covered. The developments in NIR technology may result in these methods becoming standard practice in many food laboratories.

  18. New applications of near infrared spectroscopy in the food industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groenewald, C.A.

    1984-01-01

    The near infrared spectroscopic method of analysis was initially developed for rapid analyses of protein in wheat. A brief explanation of the theory and history of near infrared spectroscopic analysis will be given. Research was done on the application of near infrared spectroscopic (NIR) in the food industry. Especially exciting was the breakthrough achieved in applying NIR to determine the dry solid content of bread. Such application could revolutionise the baking industry. Results will also be presented of research done on the application of NIR techniques for the determination of protein and fat in bread based on dry matter; hardness in wheat; absorption and sedimentation in pasta products; and use in process control in snack products manufacture. The limitations that were found in the application of NIR analysis will also be covered. The developments in NIR technology may result in these methods becoming standard practice in many food laboratories

  19. High Time Resolution Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Phelan, Don; Shearer, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    High Time Resolution Astrophysics (HTRA) is an important new window to the universe and a vital tool in understanding a range of phenomena from diverse objects and radiative processes. This importance is demonstrated in this volume with the description of a number of topics in astrophysics, including quantum optics, cataclysmic variables, pulsars, X-ray binaries and stellar pulsations to name a few. Underlining this science foundation, technological developments in both instrumentation and detectors are described. These instruments and detectors combined cover a wide range of timescales and can measure fluxes, spectra and polarisation. These advances make it possible for HTRA to make a big contribution to our understanding of the Universe in the next decade.

  20. Astrophysics a new approach

    CERN Document Server

    Kundt, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    For a quantitative understanding of the physics of the universe - from the solar system through the milky way to clusters of galaxies all the way to cosmology - these edited lecture notes are perhaps among the most concise and also among the most critical ones: Astrophysics has not yet stood the redundancy test of laboratory physics, hence should be wary of early interpretations. Special chapters are devoted to magnetic and radiation processes, supernovae, disks, black-hole candidacy, bipolar flows, cosmic rays, gamma-ray bursts, image distortions, and special sources. At the same time, planet earth is viewed as the arena for life, with plants and animals having evolved to homo sapiens during cosmic time. -- This text is unique in covering the basic qualitative and quantitative tools, formulae as well as numbers, needed for the precise interpretation of frontline phenomena in astrophysical research. The author compares mainstream interpretations with new and even controversial ones he wishes to emphasize. The...

  1. Astrophysical black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Gorini, Vittorio; Moschella, Ugo; Treves, Aldo; Colpi, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Based on graduate school lectures in contemporary relativity and gravitational physics, this book gives a complete and unified picture of the present status of theoretical and observational properties of astrophysical black holes. The chapters are written by internationally recognized specialists. They cover general theoretical aspects of black hole astrophysics, the theory of accretion and ejection of gas and jets, stellar-sized black holes observed in the Milky Way, the formation and evolution of supermassive black holes in galactic centers and quasars as well as their influence on the dynamics in galactic nuclei. The final chapter addresses analytical relativity of black holes supporting theoretical understanding of the coalescence of black holes as well as being of great relevance in identifying gravitational wave signals. With its introductory chapters the book is aimed at advanced graduate and post-graduate students, but it will also be useful for specialists.

  2. Nuclear astrophysics at DRAGON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hager, U.

    2014-01-01

    The DRAGON recoil separator is located at the ISAC facility at TRIUMF, Vancouver. It is designed to measure radiative alpha and proton capture reactions of astrophysical importance. Over the last years, the DRAGON collaboration has measured several reactions using both radioactive and high-intensity stable beams. For example, the 160(a, g) cross section was recently measured. The reaction plays a role in steady-state helium burning in massive stars, where it follows the 12C(a, g) reaction. At astrophysically relevant energies, the reaction proceeds exclusively via direct capture, resulting in a low rate. In this measurement, the unique capabilities of DRAGON enabled determination not only of the total reaction rates, but also of decay branching ratios. In addition, results from other recent measurements will be presented

  3. Allen's astrophysical quantities

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This new, fourth, edition of Allen's classic Astrophysical Quantities belongs on every astronomer's bookshelf. It has been thoroughly revised and brought up to date by a team of more than ninety internationally renowned astronomers and astrophysicists. While it follows the basic format of the original, this indispensable reference has grown to more than twice the size of the earlier editions to accommodate the great strides made in astronomy and astrophysics. It includes detailed tables of the most recent data on: - General constants and units - Atoms, molecules, and spectra - Observational astronomy at all wavelengths from radio to gamma-rays, and neutrinos - Planetary astronomy: Earth, planets and satellites, and solar system small bodies - The Sun, normal stars, and stars with special characteristics - Stellar populations - Cataclysmic and symbiotic variables, supernovae - Theoretical stellar evolution - Circumstellar and interstellar material - Star clusters, galaxies, quasars, and active galactic nuclei ...

  4. Nuclear reactions in astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas, M.

    1976-01-01

    It is revised the nuclear reactions which present an interest in astrophysics regarding the explanation of some problems such as the relative quantity of the elements, the structure and evolution of the stars. The principal object of the study is the determination of the experimental possibilities in the field of astrophysics, of an accelerator Van de Graaff's 700 KeV type. Two hundred nuclear reactions approximately, were found, and nothing or very little has been done in the intervals of energy which are of interest. Since the bombardment energies and the involved sections are low in some cases, there are real possibilities, for the largest number of stars to obtain important statistical data with the above mentioned accelerator, taking some necessary precautions. (author)

  5. The new astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longair, M.

    1993-01-01

    The various themes developed are: radioastronomy, X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, cosmic ray, ultraviolet, neutral hydrogen and molecular line astronomy, optical and theoretical astronomy; the large scale distribution of matter and radiation in the universe, the galaxies, stars and stellar evolution, the interstellar medium (gas, dust) and star formation, galaxies and clusters of galaxies, active galaxies and quasars, astrophysical cosmology, the astronomy of the future. 86 figs., 60 refs

  6. Astrophysical fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, Gordon I.

    2016-06-01

    > These lecture notes and example problems are based on a course given at the University of Cambridge in Part III of the Mathematical Tripos. Fluid dynamics is involved in a very wide range of astrophysical phenomena, such as the formation and internal dynamics of stars and giant planets, the workings of jets and accretion discs around stars and black holes and the dynamics of the expanding Universe. Effects that can be important in astrophysical fluids include compressibility, self-gravitation and the dynamical influence of the magnetic field that is `frozen in' to a highly conducting plasma. The basic models introduced and applied in this course are Newtonian gas dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) for an ideal compressible fluid. The mathematical structure of the governing equations and the associated conservation laws are explored in some detail because of their importance for both analytical and numerical methods of solution, as well as for physical interpretation. Linear and nonlinear waves, including shocks and other discontinuities, are discussed. The spherical blast wave resulting from a supernova, and involving a strong shock, is a classic problem that can be solved analytically. Steady solutions with spherical or axial symmetry reveal the physics of winds and jets from stars and discs. The linearized equations determine the oscillation modes of astrophysical bodies, as well as their stability and their response to tidal forcing.

  7. Calibration Transfer in LIBS and Raman Spectroscopy for Planetary Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyar, M. D.; Thomas, B. F.; Parente, M.; Gemp, I.; Mullen, T. H.

    2017-12-01

    Planetary scientists rely on spectral libraries and instrument reproducibility to interpret results from missions. Major investments have been made into assembling libraries, but they often naively assume that spectra of single crystals versus powders and from varying instruments will be the same. Calibration transfer (CT) seeks to algorithmically resolve discrepancies among datasets from different instruments or conditions. It offers the ability to align suites of spectra with a small number of common samples, allowing better models to be built with combined data sets. LIBS and Raman data present different challenges for CT. Quantitative geochemical analyses by LIBS spectroscopy are limited by lack of consistency among repeated laser shots and across instruments. Many different factors affect the presence/absence of emission lines and their intensities, such as laser power/plasma temperature, angle of incidence, detector sensitivity/resolution. To overcome these, models in which disparate datasets are projected into a joint low-dimensional subspace where all data can be aligned before quantitative analysis, such as Correlation Analysis for Domain Adaptation (CADA), have proven very effective. They require some overlap between the populations of spectra to be aligned. For example, prediction of SiO2 on 80 samples from two different LIBS labs show errors of ±16-29 wt.% when the training and test sets have no overlap, and ±4.94 wt% SiO2 when CADA is used. Uncorrected Earth-Mars spectral differences are likely to cause errors with the same order of magnitude. As with other types of reflectance spectroscopy, Raman data are plagued by differences among single crystal/powder samples and laser wavelength that affect peak intensities, and by spectral offsets from instruments with varying resolution and wavenumber alignment schemes. These problems persist even within the archetypal RRUFF database. Pre-processing transformation functions such as optimized baseline removal

  8. Mechanical Spectroscopy: Some Applications On Structural Changes And Relaxation Dynamics In Soft Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Xuebang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The general trend in soft matter is to study systems of increasing complexity covering a wide range in time and frequency. Mechanical spectroscopy is a powerful tool for understanding the structure and relaxation dynamics of these materials over a large temperature range and frequency scale. In this work, we collect a few recent applications using low-frequency mechanical spectroscopy for elucidating the structural changes and relaxation dynamics in soft matter, largely based on the author’s group. We illustrate the potential of mechanical spectroscopy with three kinds of soft materials: colloids, polymers and granular systems. Examples include structural changes in colloids, segmental relaxations in amorphous polymers, and resonant dissipation of grain chains in three-dimensional media. The present work shows that mechanical spectroscopy has been applied as a necessary and complementary tool to study the dynamics of such complex systems.

  9. Applicability of FTIR-spectroscopy for characterizing waste organic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smidt, E.

    2001-12-01

    State and development of waste organic matter were characterized by means of FTIR-spectroscopy. Due to the interaction of infrared light with matter energy is absorbed by chemical functional groups. Chemical preparation steps are not necessary and therefore this method offers a more holistic information about the material. The first part of experiments was focussed on spectra of different waste materials representing various stages of decomposition. Due to characteristics in the fingerprint- region the identity of wastes is provable. Heights of significant bands in the spectrum were measured and relative absorbances were calculated. Changes of relative absorbances indicate the development of organic matter during decomposition. Organic matter of waste samples was compared to organic matter originating from natural analogous processes (peat, soil). The second part of experiments concentrated on a composting process for a period of 260 days. Spectral characteristics of the samples were compared to their chemical, physical and biological data. The change of relative absorbances was reflected by conventional parameters. According to the development of the entire sample humic acids underwent a change as well. For practical use the method offers several possibilities: monitoring of a process, comparison of different processes, quality control of products originating from waste materials and the proof of their identity. (author)

  10. Application of Laser Induced Plasma Spectroscopy on Breast Cancer Diagnoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Alfattah, A.; Eldakrouri, A. A.; Emam, H.; Azzouz, I. M.

    2013-03-01

    Worldwide, millions of breast cancer cases appear each year. It ranked as the first malignant tumors in Egypt. Breast cancer patients are at increased risk of developing malignant melanoma and cancers of the ovary, endometrium, colon, thyroid, and salivary glands because of similar hormonal and genetic factors. Therefore, early diagnosis by a quick and accurate method may have a great affect on healing. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of using LIPS as a simple, technique to diagnose breast cancer by measuring the concentration of trace elements in breast tissues. The accuracy of LIPS measurements was confirmed by carrying out another elemental analysis via atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) technique. The results obtained via these two techniques showed that the concentration of Ca, Cu, Fe, Zn and Mn in the malignant tissue cells are significantly enhanced. A voting algorithm was built for instantaneous decision of the diagnostic technique (normal or malignant). This study instigates developing a new diagnostic tool with potential use in vivo.

  11. Application of 31P MR spectroscopy to the brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Dong Ho; Choi, Sun Seob; Oh, Jong Young; Yoon, Seong Kuk; Kang, Myong Jin; Kim, Ki Uk

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical feasibility and obtain useful parameters of 3 1P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) study for making the differential diagnosis of brain tumors. Twenty-eight patients with brain tumorous lesions (22 cases of brain tumor and 6 cases of abscess) and 11 normal volunteers were included. The patients were classified into the astrocytoma group, lymphoma group, metastasis group and the abscess group. We obtained the intracellular pH and the metabolite ratios of phosphomonoesters/phosophodiesters (PME/PDE), PME/inorganic phosphate (Pi), PDE/Pi, PME/adenosine triphosphate (ATP), PDE/ATP, PME/phosphocreatine (PCr), PDE/PCr, PCr/ATP, PCr/Pi, and ATP/Pi, and evaluated the statistical significances. The brain tumors had a tendency of alkalization (pH = 7.28 ± 0.27, p = 0.090), especially the pH of the lymphoma was significantly increased (pH = 7.45 ± 0.32, p = 0.013). The brain tumor group showed increased PME/PDE ratio compared with that in the normal control group (p 0.012). The ratios of PME/PDE, PDE/Pi, PME/PCr and PDE/PCr showed statistically significant differences between each brain lesion groups (p 1 'P MRS, and the pH, PME/PDE, PDE/Pi, PME/PCr, and PDE/PCr ratios are helpful for differentiating among the different types of brain tumors.

  12. Application of Solution NMR Spectroscopy to Study Protein Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Göbl

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in spectroscopic methods allow the identification of minute fluctuations in a protein structure. These dynamic properties have been identified as keys to some biological processes. The consequences of this structural flexibility can be far‑reaching and they add a new dimension to the structure-function relationship of biomolecules. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR spectroscopy allows the study of structure as well as dynamics of biomolecules in a very broad range of timescales at atomic level. A number of new NMR methods have been developed recently to allow the measurements of time scales and spatial fluctuations, which in turn provide the thermodynamics associated with the biological processes. Since NMR parameters reflect ensemble measurements, structural ensemble approaches in analyzing NMR data have also been developed. These new methods in some instances can even highlight previously hidden conformational features of the biomolecules. In this review we describe several solution NMR methods to study protein dynamics and discuss their impact on important biological processes.

  13. Application of FTIR spectroscopy to the characterization of archeological wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traoré, Mohamed; Kaal, Joeri; Martínez Cortizas, Antonio

    2016-01-15

    Two archeological wood samples were studied by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy. They originate from a shipwreck in Ribadeo Bay in the northwest of Spain and from a beam wood of an old nave of the Cathedral of Segovia in the central Spain. Principal component analysis was applied to the transposed data matrix (samples as columns and spectral bands as rows) of 43 recorded spectra (18 in the shipwreck and 25 in the beam wood). The results showed differences between the two samples, with a larger proportion of carbohydrates and smaller proportion of lignin in the beam than in the shipwreck wood. Within the beam wood, lignin content was significantly lower in the recent than the old tree rings (P=0.005). These variations can be attributed to species differences between the two woods (oak and pine respectively), with a mixture of guaiacyl and syringyl in hardwood lignin, whereas softwood lignin consists almost exclusively of guaiacyl moieties. The influence of environmental conditions on the FTIR fingerprint was probably reflected by enhanced oxidation of lignin in aerated conditions (beam wood) and hydrolysis of carbohydrates in submerged-anoxic conditions (shipwreck wood). Molecular characterization by analytical pyrolysis of selected samples from each wood type confirmed the interpretation of the mechanisms behind the variability in wood composition obtained by the FTIR-ATR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Applications of the Raman spectroscopy in the materials characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez S, S.; Escobar A, L.; Camacho L, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    The study field of the science and technology of surfaces and materials have been of primordial importance in the last years due to the impact that they have the knowledge that it generates in diverse areas. For this reason, the Mexican Society of Science and Technology of Surfaces and Materials has focused a good part of their investigation activities toward the materials science and technology development. Inside the investigation fields carried out by members of this Society, are the following: semiconductors, thin films, hard coatings, deposit techniques, plasmas, biomaterials, Ab-initio calculations, characterization techniques, photo-thermal properties, solar cells, nano science, magnetism, superconductivity and related topics. Among the techniques used for this purpose is the Raman Spectroscopy (Rs), which has demonstrated to be a powerful and versatile tool in the materials study. In the last three congresses that the Society has organized, an average of 42 works related with this topic have been presented, what gave the rule to prepare this book whose objective is on one hand diffusing part of the works that carry out different groups integrated with members of the Society that use the Rs like an important tool in its investigation work. A second objective is that it can serve like support to the students that begin to be involved, or that they are already involved, in topics where the Rs can have a decisive paper in the development of its projects. It is also expected that some of the topics included in the book are of utility for professors and researches that already uses the Rs, or that it can be of help for those who are beginning in this technique as alternative or like complementary analysis tool. (Author)

  15. Shape: A 3D Modeling Tool for Astrophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Wolfgang; Koning, Nicholas; Wenger, Stephan; Morisset, Christophe; Magnor, Marcus

    2011-04-01

    We present a flexible interactive 3D morpho-kinematical modeling application for astrophysics. Compared to other systems, our application reduces the restrictions on the physical assumptions, data type, and amount that is required for a reconstruction of an object's morphology. It is one of the first publicly available tools to apply interactive graphics to astrophysical modeling. The tool allows astrophysicists to provide a priori knowledge about the object by interactively defining 3D structural elements. By direct comparison of model prediction with observational data, model parameters can then be automatically optimized to fit the observation. The tool has already been successfully used in a number of astrophysical research projects.

  16. High energy astrophysics in radio-astronomical form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laan, H. van der

    1980-01-01

    The application of high energy astrophysics in observational astronomy, and in particular in radioastronomy, is considered. The current situation of extragalactic HEA, as brought to light by radio-astronomical techniques, is sketched. (C.F.)

  17. Trojin horse method for indirect measurement of astrophysic S factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Yuanyong; Zhou Shuhua; Li Chengbo; Wen Qungang

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear reaction rates in the astrophysical environment are indispensable input parameters in different astrophysics theories, and play important roles in understanding the astrophysical nuclear synthesis and the evolution of the universe. However, at the astrophysical temperature, the nuclear reactions proceed at very low energies. Due to the Coulomb barrier the reaction cross sections are very small, so that the direct measurement is almost impossible. The Trojin horse theory provides a useful method to measure indirectly the low energy two body cross sections by measuring the suitable three body reactions. Some approximations are applied in the theory to get convenient formula. This paper introduces the Trojin horse theory and its application in astrophysics nuclear reactions. (authors)

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of living systems : Applications in comparative physiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanDenThillart, G; VanWaarde, A

    The most attractive feature of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is the noninvasive and nondestructive measurement of chemical compounds in intact tissues. MRS already has many applications in comparative physiology, usually based on observation of P-31, since the levels of phosphorus

  19. Model independent spectroscopic information from an analysis of peripheral direct radiative capture reaction and its application for an extrapolation of an astrophysical S-factor to stellar energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igamov, S.B.; Tursunmuratov, T.M.; Yarmukhamedov, R.

    2003-01-01

    In this work, within the framework of the cluster potential approach we develop a method which can be used an independent source of getting information on the value of the nuclear vertex constant (NVC) (or respective asymptotical normalization coefficient (ANC)) from the analysis of the direct radiative capture cross section σ(E)(or the astrophysical S-factor S(E)) at extremely low energies by a model independent way as possible. The main idea of the proposed method is that at stellar energies peripheral direct radiative capture reaction of astrophysical interest proceeds mainly through the tail of the overlap integral, which is completely determined by the binding energy and the respective ANC (or NVC). The main advantage of the proposed method is that it allows us to determine both the absolute value of NVC (or ANC) and the astrophysical S-factor S(E) at solar energies (0-50 keV) by means of the analysis of the same experimental astrophysical S-factor S exp (E) in a correct self consistent way using the same potential both for the bound state and for scattering state. The method has been applied for an investigation of the direct radiative capture t(α, γ) 7 Li and 3 He(α, γ) 7 Be reactions at extremely low energies. At first, this method was used for analysis of the S exp (E) to determine values of the modulus squared of the NVC's (or the respective ANC's). The values of NVC's are presented. Then, the obtained NVC's are used by us for extrapolation of the S(E) of the reactions considered to stellar energies (E=0-50 keV) for the 3 He(α, γ) 7 Be reaction and for the t(α, γ) 7 Li reaction. The obtained results are compared with those other authors

  20. Research in nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lattimer, J.M.; Yahil, A.

    1989-01-01

    The interaction between nuclear theory and some outstanding problems in astrophysics is examined. We are actively researching both the astrophysics of gravitational collapse, neutron star birth, and the emission of neutrinos from supernovae, on the one hand, and the nuclear physics of the equation of state of hot, dense matter on the other hand. There is close coupling between nuclear theory and the supernova phenomenon; in fact, nuclear matter properties, especially at supernuclear densities, might be best delineated by astrophysical considerations. Our research has also focused on the neutrinos emitted from supernovae, since they are the only available observables of the internal supernova mechanism. The recent observations of neutrinos from SN 1987A proved to be in remarkable agreement with models we pioneered in the one and one half years prior to its explosion in February 1987. We have also developed a novel hydrodynamical code in which shocks are treated via Riemann resolution rather than with artificial viscosity. We propose to modify it to use implicit differencing and to include multi-group neutrino diffusion and General Relativity. In parallel, we are extending calculations of the birth of a neutron star to include convection and mass accretion, by incorporating a hydrodynamic envelope onto a hydrostatic core. In view of the possible recent discovery of a pulsar in SN1987A, we are including the effects of rotation. We are undertaking a detailed comparison of current equations of state, focusing on disagreements regarding the nuclear incompressibly, symmetry energy and specific heat. Especially important is the symmetry energy, which below nuclear density controls free proton fractions and weak interaction rates and above this density critically influences the neutron star maximum mass and binding energy. 60 refs

  1. Experimental studies of nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Jianjun; Zhou Xiaohong; Zhang Yuhu

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear astrophysics is an interdisciplinary subject combining micro-scale nuclear physics and macro-scale astrophysics. Its main aims are to understand the origin and evolution of the elements in the universe, the time scale of stellar evolution, the stellar environment and sites, the energy generation of stars from thermonuclear processes and its impact on stellar evolution and the mechanisms driving astrophysical phenomena, and the structure and property of compact stars. This paper presents the significance and current research status of nuclear astrophysics; we introduce some fundamental concepts, the nuclear physics input parameters required by certain astrophysics models, and some widely-used experimental approaches in nuclear astrophysics research. The potential and feasibility of research in this field using China’s current and planned large-scale scientific facilities are analyzed briefly. Finally, the prospects of the establishing a deep underground science and engineering laboratory in China are envisaged. (authors)

  2. Astrophysics in 1999

    OpenAIRE

    Trimble, V; Aschwanden, MJ

    2000-01-01

    The year 1999 saw the arrival of a star with three planets, a universe with three parameters, and a solar corona that could be heated at least three ways. In addition, there were at least three papers on every question that has ever been asked in astrophysics, from "Will the Universe expand forever?" to "Does mantle convection occur in one or two layers?" The answers generally were, "Yes," "No," and "None of the above," to each of the questions. The authors have done their best to organize th...

  3. Applications of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) in Molten Metal Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Shaymus W.; Craparo, Joseph; De Saro, Robert; Apelian, Diran

    2017-10-01

    In order for metals to meet the demand for critical applications in the automotive, aerospace, and defense industries, tight control over the composition and cleanliness of the metal must be achieved. The use of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for applications in metal processing has generated significant interest for its ability to perform quick analyses in situ. The fundamentals of LIBS, current techniques for deployment on molten metal, demonstrated capabilities, and possible avenues for development are reviewed and discussed.

  4. Broadband terahertz spectroscopy: principles, fundamental research and potential for industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zouaghi, W; Thomson, M D; Rabia, K; Hahn, R; Blank, V; Roskos, H G

    2013-01-01

    Terahertz radiation (also called T-rays) can be employed for spectroscopy and imaging, from the laboratory to industrial applications. In this paper we give an overview of how broadband optoelectronic THz techniques (i.e. using optical lasers to achieve THz generation and detection) can be implemented, and give examples of their unique use in solid-state physics, and in biological and industrial applications. (paper)

  5. Recent advances in the application of transmission Raman spectroscopy to pharmaceutical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Kevin; Matousek, Pavel

    2011-06-25

    This article reviews recent advances in transmission Raman spectroscopy and its applications, from the perspective of pharmaceutical analysis. The emerging concepts enable rapid non-invasive volumetric analysis of pharmaceutical formulations and could lead to many important applications in pharmaceutical settings, including quantitative bulk analysis of intact pharmaceutical tablets and capsules in quality and process control. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Application of NMR Spectroscopy in the Analysis of Petroleum Derivatives and Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parlov Vuković, J.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Complex chemical composition and physical properties of oil and fuel make their complete cha racterization very difficult. Components present in oil and oil products differ in structure, size, po larity and functionality. The presence and structure of specific hydrocarbons in final products depend on the processing procedure and type of the fuel. In order to predict or improve fuel pro perties it is necessary to determine its composition. Thus, new and more sophisticated analytical methods and procedures are constantly being developed. NMR spectroscopy plays a significant role in analysis and identification of complex hydrocarbon mixtures of petroleum and petroleum products. In this review, we describe the application of NMR spectroscopy for analyzing gasoline and diesel fuels. Hence, by using NMR spectroscopy it is possible to determine gasoline composition and presence of benzene and oxygenates, as well as some important physical characteristics of gasoli ne such as the research octane number. An application of different NMR techniques made it pos sible to characterize diesel fuels and middle oil distillates from various refineries. Data so obtained can be used in combination with statistical methods to predict fuel properties and to monitor pro- duction processes in the petroleum industry. NMR spectroscopy has proven useful in analysis of FAME which has recently been used as an ecologically acceptable alternative fuel. Furthermore, techniques such as CP/MAS for characterization of solid state oil-geochemical samples are inclu- ded. Also, possibilities of using NMR spectroscopy in the analysis of polymeric additives are di- scussed.

  7. The application of terahertz spectroscopy and imaging in biomedicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shangjian; Yu Fei; Li Kai; Zhou Jing

    2013-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) science and technology is gaining increasing attention in the biomedical field. Compared with traditional medical diagnosis methods using infrared radiation, nuclear magnetic resonance, X-rays or ultrasound, THz radiation has low energy, high spatial resolution, a broad spectral range, and is a reliable means of imaging for the human body. Terahertz waves have strong penetration and high fingerprint specificity, so they can play an important role in drug detection and identification. This paper reviews the special techniques based on conventional THz time-domain setups in disease detection and drug identification. With regard to the biomedical fields, we focus on the application of THz radiation in studies of skin tissue, gene expression, cells, cancer imaging, the quantitative analysis of drugs, and so on. We also present an overview of the future challenges and prospects of THz research in medicine. (authors)

  8. Spectroscopy for Industrial Applications: High-Temperature Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fateev, Alexander; Grosch, Helge; Clausen, Sønnik

    -dependent spectral absorption features gases of interest fora specic instrument can in principle be calculated by knowing only the gas temperature and pressure in the process under investigation/monitoring. The latest HITRAN-2012 database contains IR/UV spectral data for 47 molecules and it is still growing. However...... use of HITRAN is limited to low-temperature processes (available. Only a few molecules CO2, H2O, CO and NO are those of interest for e.......g. various combustion and astronomical applications are included. In the recent few years, several efforts towards a developmentof hot line lists have been made; those have been implemented in the latest HITRAN-2012 database. High-resolution absorption measurements of NH3 (IR, 0.1 cm-1) and phenol (UV,0...

  9. New Applications of Portable Raman Spectroscopy in Agri-Bio-Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronine, Dmitri; Scully, Rob; Sanders, Virgil

    2014-03-01

    Modern optical techniques based on Raman spectroscopy are being used to monitor and analyze the health of cattle, crops and their natural environment. These optical tools are now available to perform fast, noninvasive analysis of live animals and plants in situ. We will report new applications of a portable handheld Raman spectroscopy to identification and taxonomy of plants. In addition, detection of organic food residues will be demonstrated. Advantages and limitations of current portable instruments will be discussed with suggestions for improved performance by applying enhanced Raman spectroscopic schemes.

  10. Application of impedance spectroscopy method for analysis of benzanol fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamykin A. V.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors have developed a method for express control of three component «gasoline-alcohol-water» fuel mixtures based on the spectral impedance investigation of benzanol mixture in the frequency range of 500 Hz — 10 kHz. A correlation dependence between the dielectric constant and the specific resistance of the fuel mixture on content of ethanol and water in the mixture has been found. On the basis of this dependence a calibration nomogram to quantify the gasoline and water-alcohol components content in the test benzanol fuel in the actual range of concentrations has been formed. The nomogram allows determining the water-alcohol and gasoline parts in the analyzed fuel with an error of no more than 1% vol., while the strength of water-alcohol solution is determined with an error of no more than 0.8% vol. The obtained nomogram can also give information about critical water content in the benzanol fuel to prevent its eventual phase separation. It is shown that the initial component composition of different gasoline brands has no significant effect on the electrical characteristics of the studied benzanol fuels, which makes the evaluation of alcohol and water content in the fuel sufficiently accurate. for practical applications.

  11. Astronomical optical interferometry, II: Astrophysical results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jankov S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical interferometry is entering a new age with several ground- based long-baseline observatories now making observations of unprecedented spatial resolution. Based on a great leap forward in the quality and quantity of interferometric data, the astrophysical applications are not limited anymore to classical subjects, such as determination of fundamental properties of stars; namely, their effective temperatures, radii, luminosities and masses, but the present rapid development in this field allowed to move to a situation where optical interferometry is a general tool in studies of many astrophysical phenomena. Particularly, the advent of long-baseline interferometers making use of very large pupils has opened the way to faint objects science and first results on extragalactic objects have made it a reality. The first decade of XXI century is also remarkable for aperture synthesis in the visual and near-infrared wavelength regimes, which provided image reconstructions from stellar surfaces to Active Galactic Nuclei. Here I review the numerous astrophysical results obtained up to date, except for binary and multiple stars milliarcsecond astrometry, which should be a subject of an independent detailed review, taking into account its importance and expected results at microarcsecond precision level. To the results obtained with currently available interferometers, I associate the adopted instrumental settings in order to provide a guide for potential users concerning the appropriate instruments which can be used to obtain the desired astrophysical information.

  12. [Application of Fourier transform attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy in analysis of pulp and paper industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Cao, Chun-yu; Feng, Wen-ying; Xu, Ming; Su, Zhen-hua; Liu, Xiao-meng; Lü, Wei-jun

    2011-03-01

    As one of the most powerful tools to investigate the compositions of raw materials and the property of pulp and paper, infrared spectroscopy has played an important role in pulp and paper industry. However, the traditional transmission infrared spectroscopy has not met the requirements of the producing processes because of its disadvantages of time consuming and sample destruction. New technique would be needed to be found. Fourier transform attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) is an advanced spectroscopic tool for nondestructive evaluation and could rapidly, accurately estimate the production properties of each process in pulp and paper industry. The present review describes the application of ATR-FTIR in analysis of pulp and paper industry. The analysis processes will include: pulping, papermaking, environmental protecting, special processing and paper identifying.

  13. Selective laser spectroscopy of molecules and ions in solids: a history, fundamentals and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapozhnikov, Michael

    2018-03-01

    A history of the development of selective laser spectroscopy is presented, beginning with a pioneering work by Yu. V. Denisov and V. A. Kizel in 1967, who were the first to demonstrate the possibility of removing the inhomogeneous broadening of luminescence spectra of impurity ions in glasses upon monochromatic resonance excitation. Selective excitation of optical centers can be achieved due to existence of zero-phonon transitions corresponding to narrow homogeneous zero-phonon lines in the spectra of impurity centers in solids, which are hidden in broad inhomogeneous optical bands upon usual nonselective excitation. The fundamentals of zero-phonon transition spectroscopy are considered and the mechanism of removing the inhomogeneous broadening of optical spectra of ions and molecules in crystals and amorphous solids under selective laser excitation of luminescence and persistent hole burning in absorption spectra is presented in detail. Various applications of selective laser spectroscopy for fundamental and applied studies are discussed.

  14. Quantitative application of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy to chemical systems in liquid solutions: typical examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duplatre, G.

    2007-01-01

    The published works refer only to a few, although large, classes of applications. Nevertheless, the potential applications of Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy technique (PALS) are essentially limited by imagination. In the present contribution, the bases of physical particle, positronium (Ps) applications will be illustrated in two cases: first, it will be explained how equilibrium constants can be derived through PALS experiments; next, some more elaborate approaches will be shown to characterize various properties of direct micellar systems as have been developed in recent years in Strasbourg

  15. Hyperfine structure analysis in magnetic resonance spectroscopy: from astrophysical measurements towards endogenous biosensors in human tissue; Hyperfeinstruktur-Analyse in der Magnetresonanzspektroskopie: von astrophysikalischen Messungen zu endogenen Biosensoren in menschlichem Gewebe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, L. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany). Medizinische Physik in der Radiologie; California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2007-07-01

    The hyperfine interaction of two spins is a well studied effect in atomic systems. Magnetic resonance experiments demonstrate that the detectable dipole transitions are determined by the magnetic moments of the constituents and the external magnetic field. Transferring the corresponding quantum mechanics to molecular bound nuclear spins allows for precise prediction of NMR spectra obtained from metabolites in human tissue. This molecular hyperfine structure has been neglected so far in in vivo NMR spectroscopy but contains useful information, especially when studying molecular dynamics. This contribution represents a review of the concept of applying the Breit-Rabi formalism to coupled nuclear spins and discusses the immobilization of different metabolites in anisotropic tissue revealed by 1H NMR spectra of carnosine, phosphocreatine and taurine. Comparison of atomic and molecular spin systems allows for statements on the biological constraints for direct spin-spin interactions. Moreover, the relevance of hyperfine effects on the line shapes of multiplets of indirectly-coupled spin systems with more than two constituents can be predicted by analyzing quantum mechanical parameters. As an example, the superposition of eigenstates of the AMX system of adenosine 5'-triphosphate and its application for better quantification of 31P-NMR spectra will be discussed. (orig.)

  16. Important plasma problems in astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulsrud, R.M.

    1995-01-01

    In astrophysics, plasmas occur under very extreme conditions. For example, there are ultrastrong magnetic fields in neutron stars, relativistic plasmas around black holes and in jets, extremely energetic particles such as cosmic rays in the interstellar medium, extremely dense plasmas in accretion disks, and extremely large magnetic Reynolds numbers in the interstellar medium. These extreme limits for astrophysical plasmas make plasma phenomena much simpler to analyze in astrophysics than in the laboratory. An understanding of such phenomena often results in an interesting way, by simply taking the extreme limiting case of a known plasma theory. The author will describe one of the more exciting examples and will attempt to convey the excitement he felt when he was first exposed to it. However, not all plasma astrophysical phenomena are so simple. There are certain important plasma phenomena in astrophysics that have not been so easily resolved. In fact, a resolution of them is blocking significant progress in astrophysical research. They have not yet yielded to attacks by theoretical astrophysicists nor to extensive numerical simulation. The author will attempt to describe one of the more important of these plasma--astrophysical problems, and discuss why its resolution is so important to astrophysics. This significant example is fast, magnetic reconnection. Another significant example is the large-magnetic-Reynolds number magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) dynamos

  17. Computational Infrastructure for Nuclear Astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Michael S.; Hix, W. Raphael; Bardayan, Daniel W.; Blackmon, Jeffery C.; Lingerfelt, Eric J.; Scott, Jason P.; Nesaraja, Caroline D.; Chae, Kyungyuk; Guidry, Michael W.; Koura, Hiroyuki; Meyer, Richard A.

    2006-01-01

    A Computational Infrastructure for Nuclear Astrophysics has been developed to streamline the inclusion of the latest nuclear physics data in astrophysics simulations. The infrastructure consists of a platform-independent suite of computer codes that is freely available online at nucastrodata.org. Features of, and future plans for, this software suite are given

  18. Cyberinfrastructure for Computational Relativistic Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Ott, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Poster presented at the NSF Office of Cyberinfrastructure CyberBridges CAREER PI workshop. This poster discusses the computational challenges involved in the modeling of complex relativistic astrophysical systems. The Einstein Toolkit is introduced. It is an open-source community infrastructure for numerical relativity and computational astrophysics.

  19. NASA's Astrophysics Data Archives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, H.; Hanisch, R.; Bredekamp, J.

    2000-09-01

    The NASA Office of Space Science has established a series of archival centers where science data acquired through its space science missions is deposited. The availability of high quality data to the general public through these open archives enables the maximization of science return of the flight missions. The Astrophysics Data Centers Coordinating Council, an informal collaboration of archival centers, coordinates data from five archival centers distiguished primarily by the wavelength range of the data deposited there. Data are available in FITS format. An overview of NASA's data centers and services is presented in this paper. A standard front-end modifyer called `Astrowbrowse' is described. Other catalog browsers and tools include WISARD and AMASE supported by the National Space Scince Data Center, as well as ISAIA, a follow on to Astrobrowse.

  20. Black-hole astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, P. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Bloom, E. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Cominsky, L. [Sonoma State Univ., Rohnert Park, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy] [and others

    1995-07-01

    Black-hole astrophysics is not just the investigation of yet another, even if extremely remarkable type of celestial body, but a test of the correctness of the understanding of the very properties of space and time in very strong gravitational fields. Physicists` excitement at this new prospect for testing theories of fundamental processes is matched by that of astronomers at the possibility to discover and study a new and dramatically different kind of astronomical object. Here the authors review the currently known ways that black holes can be identified by their effects on their neighborhood--since, of course, the hole itself does not yield any direct evidence of its existence or information about its properties. The two most important empirical considerations are determination of masses, or lower limits thereof, of unseen companions in binary star systems, and measurement of luminosity fluctuations on very short time scales.

  1. Astrophysics Faces the Millennium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Virginia

    2001-03-01

    The Medieval synthesis of Aristotelian philosophy and church doctrine, due largely to Thomas Aquinas, insisted that the universe outside the earth's atmosphere must be immutable, single-centered, fully inventoried, immaculate or perfect, including perfectly spherical, and much else that sounds strange to modern ears. The beginnings of modern astronomy can be largely described as the overthrow of these various concepts by a combination of new technologies and new ways of thinking, and many current questions in astrophysics can be directly tied to developments of those same concepts. Indeed they probably all can be, but not over time, ending with questions like: Do other stars have spots? What does it mean when quasar jets look like they are moving faster than the speed of light? Is there anything special about our star, our galaxy, our planet, or our universe? How did these all form, and what is their long-term fate?

  2. High energy astrophysical techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Poggiani, Rosa

    2017-01-01

    This textbook presents ultraviolet and X-ray astronomy, gamma-ray astronomy, cosmic ray astronomy, neutrino astronomy, and gravitational wave astronomy as distinct research areas, focusing on the astrophysics targets and the requirements with respect to instrumentation and observation methods. The purpose of the book is to bridge the gap between the reference books and the specialized literature. For each type of astronomy, the discussion proceeds from the orders of magnitude for observable quantities. The physical principles of photon and particle detectors are then addressed, and the specific telescopes and combinations of detectors, presented. Finally the instruments and their limits are discussed with a view to assisting readers in the planning and execution of observations. Astronomical observations with high-energy photons and particles represent the newest additions to multimessenger astronomy and this book will be of value to all with an interest in the field.

  3. Exotic nuclei and astrophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penionzhkevich Yu.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, nuclear physics investigations of the laws of the microscopic world contributed significantly to extension of our knowledge of phenomena occurring in the macroscopic world (Universe and made a formidable contribution to the development of astrophysical and cosmological theories. First of all, this concerns the expanding universe model, the evolution of stars, and the abundances of elements, as well as the properties of various stars and cosmic objects, including “cold” and neutron stars, black holes, and pulsars. Without claiming to give a full account of all cosmological problems, we will dwell upon those of them that, in my opinion, have much in common with nuclear-matter properties manifesting themselves in nuclear interactions.

  4. THz spectroscopy: An emerging technology for pharmaceutical development and pharmaceutical Process Analytical Technology (PAT) applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huiquan; Khan, Mansoor

    2012-08-01

    As an emerging technology, THz spectroscopy has gained increasing attention in the pharmaceutical area during the last decade. This attention is due to the fact that (1) it provides a promising alternative approach for in-depth understanding of both intermolecular interaction among pharmaceutical molecules and pharmaceutical product quality attributes; (2) it provides a promising alternative approach for enhanced process understanding of certain pharmaceutical manufacturing processes; and (3) the FDA pharmaceutical quality initiatives, most noticeably, the Process Analytical Technology (PAT) initiative. In this work, the current status and progress made so far on using THz spectroscopy for pharmaceutical development and pharmaceutical PAT applications are reviewed. In the spirit of demonstrating the utility of first principles modeling approach for addressing model validation challenge and reducing unnecessary model validation "burden" for facilitating THz pharmaceutical PAT applications, two scientific case studies based on published THz spectroscopy measurement results are created and discussed. Furthermore, other technical challenges and opportunities associated with adapting THz spectroscopy as a pharmaceutical PAT tool are highlighted.

  5. Nuclear physics and astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, D.N.; Olinto, A.V.

    1992-09-01

    We have investigated a variety of research topics on the interface of nuclear physics and astrophysics during the past year. We have continued our study of dihyperon states in dense matter and have started to make a connection between their properties in the core of neutron stars with the ongoing experimental searches at Brookhaven National Laboratory. We started to build a scenario for the origin of gamma-ray bursts using the conversion of neutron stars to strange stars close to an active galactic nucleous. We have been reconsidering the constraints due to neutron star cooling rates on the equation of state for high density matter in the light, of recent findings which show that the faster direct Urca cooling process is possible for a range of nuclear compositions. We have developed a model for the formation of primordial magnetic fields due to the dynamics of the quark-hadron phase transition. Encouraged by the most recent observational developments, we have investigated the possible origin of the boron and beryllium abundances. We have greatly improved the calculations of the primordial abundances of these elements I>y augmenting the reaction networks and by updating the most recent experimental nuclear reaction rates. Our calculations have shown that the primordial abundances are much higher than previously thought but that the observed abundances cannot be explained by primordial sources alone. We have also studied the origin of the boron and beryllium abundances due to cosmic ray spallation. Finally, we have continued to address the solar neutrino problem by investigating the impact of astrophysical uncertainties on the MSW solution for a full three-family treatment of MSW mixing

  6. Nuclear physics and astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, D.N.; Olinto, A.V.

    1992-09-01

    We have investigated a variety of research topics on the interface of nuclear physics and astrophysics during the past year. We have continued our study of dihyperon states in dense matter and have started to make a connection between their properties in the core of neutron stars with the ongoing experimental searches at Brookhaven National Laboratory. We started to build a scenario for the origin of gamma-ray bursts using the conversion of neutron stars to strange stars close to an active galactic nucleous. We have been reconsidering the constraints due to neutron star cooling rates on the equation of state for high density matter in the light, of recent findings which show that the faster direct Urca cooling process is possible for a range of nuclear compositions. We have developed a model for the formation of primordial magnetic fields due to the dynamics of the quark-hadron phase transition. Encouraged by the most recent observational developments, we have investigated the possible origin of the boron and beryllium abundances. We have greatly improved the calculations of the primordial abundances of these elements I>y augmenting the reaction networks and by updating the most recent experimental nuclear reaction rates. Our calculations have shown that the primordial abundances are much higher than previously thought but that the observed abundances cannot be explained by primordial sources alone. We have also studied the origin of the boron and beryllium abundances due to cosmic ray spallation. Finally, we have continued to address the solar neutrino problem by investigating the impact of astrophysical uncertainties on the MSW solution for a full three-family treatment of MSW mixing.

  7. Environmental cell assembly for use in for use in spectroscopy and microscopy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowe, Ashley Clinton; Smyrl, Norman; Hallman, Jr., Russell L.

    2014-09-02

    An environmental cell assembly for use in microscopy and spectroscopy applications, including: an environmentally sealed body assembly configured to selectively hold and contain a sample; a plurality of ports manufactured into one or more surfaces of the body assembly for one or more of evacuating the body assembly and injecting a gas into or removing a gas from the body assembly; a port manufactured into a surface of the body assembly for receiving a translating stage configured to move the sample within the body assembly; and a port manufactured into a surface of the body assembly for receiving one or more lenses utilized in a microscopy or spectroscopy application; wherein the one or more lenses are disposed adjacent the sample without intervening structures disposed there between. The cell assembly also includes a port manufactured into a surface of the body assembly for retaining a window and providing visualization of the sample.

  8. Analysis and application of Fourier transform spectroscopy in atmospheric remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis method for Fourier transform spectroscopy is summarized with applications to various types of distortion in atmospheric absorption spectra. This analysis method includes the fast Fourier transform method for simulating the interferometric spectrum and the nonlinear least-squares method for retrieving the information from a measured spectrum. It is shown that spectral distortions can be simulated quite well and that the correct information can be retrieved from a distorted spectrum by this analysis technique.

  9. Electron spectroscopy for surface analysis - the ES300 electron spectrometer and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, J.A.J.; Price, W.B.

    1980-07-01

    The features of the ES300 electron spectrometer are described together with factors which affect the energy spectrum, experimental variables and interpretation of the spectral information. A discussion of five applications illustrates the use of X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS) in the diverse work of the Risley Nuclear Power Development Laboratories (RNL). The analytical results are given for each of the examples and their interpretation discussed in the chemical context of the original problem. (author)

  10. Application of numerical methods in spectroscopy : fitting of the curve of thermoluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RANDRIAMANALINA, S.

    1999-01-01

    The method of non linear least squares is one of the mathematical tools widely employed in spectroscopy, it is used for the determination of parameters of a model. In other hand, the spline function is among fitting functions that introduce the smallest error. It is used for the calculation of the area under the curve. We present an application of these methods, with the details of the corresponding algorithms, to the fitting of the thermoluminescence curve. [fr

  11. Application of fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging in the detection of a photosensitizer in photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Lixin; Zhao, Huimin; Zhang, Zhiguo; Cao, Wenwu

    2017-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is currently an advanced optical technology in medical applications. However, the application of PDT is limited by the detection of photosensitizers. This work focuses on the application of fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging in the detection of an effective photosenzitizer, hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME). Optical properties of HMME were measured and analyzed based on its absorption and fluorescence spectra. The production mechanism of its fluorescence emission was analyzed. The detection device for HMME based on fluorescence spectroscopy was designed. Ratiometric method was applied to eliminate the influence of intensity change of excitation sources, fluctuates of excitation sources and photo detectors, and background emissions. The detection limit of this device is 6 μg/L, and it was successfully applied to the diagnosis of the metabolism of HMME in the esophageal cancer cells. To overcome the limitation of the point measurement using fluorescence spectroscopy, a two-dimensional (2D) fluorescence imaging system was established. The algorithm of the 2D fluorescence imaging system is deduced according to the fluorescence ratiometric method using bandpass filters. The method of multiple pixel point addition (MPPA) was used to eliminate fluctuates of signals. Using the method of MPPA, SNR was improved by about 30 times. The detection limit of this imaging system is 1.9 μg/L. Our systems can be used in the detection of porphyrins to improve the PDT effect.

  12. Nuclear astrophysics with radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertulani, C.A.; Gade, A.

    2010-01-01

    The quest to comprehend how nuclear processes influence astrophysical phenomena is driving experimental and theoretical research programs worldwide. One of the main goals in nuclear astrophysics is to understand how energy is generated in stars, how elements are synthesized in stellar events and what the nature of neutron stars is. New experimental capabilities, the availability of radioactive beams and increased computational power paired with new astronomical observations have advanced the present knowledge. This review summarizes the progress in the field of nuclear astrophysics with a focus on the role of indirect methods and reactions involving beams of rare isotopes.

  13. Nuclear Astrophysics Experiments at CIAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Weiping; Li Zhihong; Bai Xixiang; Lian Gang; Guo Bing; Zeng, Sheng; Yan Shengquan; Wang Baoxiang; Shu Nengchuan; Wu Kaisu; Chen Yongshou

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes nuclear astrophysical studies using the unstable ion beam facility GIRAFFE. We measured the angular distributions for some low energy reactions, such as 7 Be(d, n) 8 B, 11 C(d, n) 12 N, 8 Li(d, n) 9 Be and 8 Li(d, p) 9 Li in inverse kinematics, and indirectly derived the astrophysical S-factors or reaction rates of 7 Be(p, γ) 8 B, 11 C(p, γ) 12 N, 8 Li(n, γ) 9 Li at astrophysically relevant energies

  14. Prospects for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for biomedical applications: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vivek Kumar; Rai, Awadhesh Kumar

    2011-09-01

    We review the different spectroscopic techniques including the most recent laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the characterization of materials in any phase (solid, liquid or gas) including biological materials. A brief history of the laser and its application in bioscience is presented. The development of LIBS, its working principle and its instrumentation (different parts of the experimental set up) are briefly summarized. The generation of laser-induced plasma and detection of light emitted from this plasma are also discussed. The merit and demerits of LIBS are discussed in comparison with other conventional analytical techniques. The work done using the laser in the biomedical field is also summarized. The analysis of different tissues, mineral analysis in different organs of the human body, characterization of different types of stone formed in the human body, analysis of biological aerosols using the LIBS technique are also summarized. The unique abilities of LIBS including detection of molecular species and calibration-free LIBS are compared with those of other conventional techniques including atomic absorption spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy, and X-ray fluorescence.

  15. Critical ionisation velocity effects in astrophysical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raadu, M.A.

    1979-08-01

    Critical ionisation velocity effects are relevant to astrophysical situations where neutral gas moves through a magnetised plasma. The experimental significance of the critical velocity is well established and the physical basis is now becoming clear. The underlying mechanism depends on the combined effects of electron impact ionisation and electron energisation by collective plasma interactions. For low density plasmas a theory based on a circular process involving electron heating through a modified two stream instability has been developed. Several applications of critical velocity effects to astrophysical plasmas have been discussed in the literature. The importance of the effect in any particular case may be determined from a detailed consideration of energy and momentum balance, using appropriate atomic rate coefficients and taking full account of collective plasma processes. (Auth.)

  16. Astrophysical data analysis with information field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enßlin, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Non-parametric imaging and data analysis in astrophysics and cosmology can be addressed by information field theory (IFT), a means of Bayesian, data based inference on spatially distributed signal fields. IFT is a statistical field theory, which permits the construction of optimal signal recovery algorithms. It exploits spatial correlations of the signal fields even for nonlinear and non-Gaussian signal inference problems. The alleviation of a perception threshold for recovering signals of unknown correlation structure by using IFT will be discussed in particular as well as a novel improvement on instrumental self-calibration schemes. IFT can be applied to many areas. Here, applications in in cosmology (cosmic microwave background, large-scale structure) and astrophysics (galactic magnetism, radio interferometry) are presented

  17. Modern fluid dynamics for physics and astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Regev, Oded; Yecko, Philip A

    2016-01-01

    This book grew out of the need to provide students with a solid introduction to modern fluid dynamics. It offers a broad grounding in the underlying principles and techniques used, with some emphasis on applications in astrophysics and planetary science. The book comprehensively covers recent developments, methods and techniques, including, for example, new ideas on transitions to turbulence (via transiently growing stable linear modes), new approaches to turbulence (which remains the enigma of fluid dynamics), and the use of asymptotic approximation methods, which can give analytical or semi-analytical results and complement fully numerical treatments. The authors also briefly discuss some important considerations to be taken into account when developing a numerical code for computer simulation of fluid flows. Although the text is populated throughout with examples and problems from the field of astrophysics and planetary science, the text is eminently suitable as a general introduction to fluid dynamics. It...

  18. Exploring Astrophysical Magnetohydrodynamics in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Mario

    2014-10-01

    Plasma evolution in many astrophysical systems is dominated by magnetohydrodynamics. Specifically of interest to this talk are collimated outflows from accretion systems. Away from the central object, the Euler equations can represent the plasma dynamics well and may be scaled to a laboratory system. We have performed experiments to investigate the effects of a background magnetic field on an otherwise hydrodynamically collimated plasma. Laser-irradiated, cone targets produce hydrodynamically collimated plasma jets and a pulse-powered solenoid provides a constant background magnetic field. The application of this field is shown to completely disrupt the original flow and a new magnetically-collimated, hollow envelope is produced. Results from these experiments and potential implications for their astrophysical analogs will be discussed.

  19. The Trojan horse method in nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliotta, M.; Rolfs, C.; Lattuada, M.; Pellegriti, M.G.; Pizzone, R.G.; Spitaleri, C.; Miljanic, Dj.; Typel, S.; Wolter, H.H.

    2001-01-01

    Because of the Coulomb barrier, reaction cross sections in astrophysics cannot be accessed directly at the relevant Gamow energies, unless very favourable conditions are met (e.g. LUNA--underground experiments). Theoretical extrapolations of available data are then needed to derive the astrophysical S(0)-factor. Various indirect processes have been used in order to obtain additional information on the parameters entering these extrapolations. The Trojan Horse Method is an indirect method which might help to bypass some of the problems typically encountered in direct measurements, namely the presence of the Coulomb barrier and the effect of the electron screening. However, a comparison with direct data in an appropriate energy region (e.g. around the Coulomb barrier) is crucial before extending the method to the relevant Gamow energy. Additionally, experimental and theoretical tests are needed to validate the assumptions underlying the method. The application of the Trojan Horse Method to some cases of interest is discussed

  20. Astrophysical data analysis with information field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enßlin, Torsten

    2014-12-01

    Non-parametric imaging and data analysis in astrophysics and cosmology can be addressed by information field theory (IFT), a means of Bayesian, data based inference on spatially distributed signal fields. IFT is a statistical field theory, which permits the construction of optimal signal recovery algorithms. It exploits spatial correlations of the signal fields even for nonlinear and non-Gaussian signal inference problems. The alleviation of a perception threshold for recovering signals of unknown correlation structure by using IFT will be discussed in particular as well as a novel improvement on instrumental self-calibration schemes. IFT can be applied to many areas. Here, applications in in cosmology (cosmic microwave background, large-scale structure) and astrophysics (galactic magnetism, radio interferometry) are presented.

  1. Astrophysical data analysis with information field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enßlin, Torsten, E-mail: ensslin@mpa-garching.mpg.de [Max Planck Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Straße 1, D-85748 Garching, Germany and Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Geschwister-Scholl-Platz 1, D-80539 München (Germany)

    2014-12-05

    Non-parametric imaging and data analysis in astrophysics and cosmology can be addressed by information field theory (IFT), a means of Bayesian, data based inference on spatially distributed signal fields. IFT is a statistical field theory, which permits the construction of optimal signal recovery algorithms. It exploits spatial correlations of the signal fields even for nonlinear and non-Gaussian signal inference problems. The alleviation of a perception threshold for recovering signals of unknown correlation structure by using IFT will be discussed in particular as well as a novel improvement on instrumental self-calibration schemes. IFT can be applied to many areas. Here, applications in in cosmology (cosmic microwave background, large-scale structure) and astrophysics (galactic magnetism, radio interferometry) are presented.

  2. Molecular spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokh, Eh.; Zonntag, B.

    1981-01-01

    The latest investigation results on molecular spectroscopy with application of synchrotron radiation in the region of vacuum ultraviolet are generalized. Some results on investigation of excited, superexcited and ionized molecule states with the use of adsorption spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, by fluorescent and mass-spectrometric methods are considered [ru

  3. Atoms in astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Eissner, W; Hummer, D; Percival, I

    1983-01-01

    It is hard to appreciate but nevertheless true that Michael John Seaton, known internationally for the enthusiasm and skill with which he pursues his research in atomic physics and astrophysics, will be sixty years old on the 16th of January 1983. To mark this occasion some of his colleagues and former students have prepared this volume. It contains articles that de­ scribe some of the topics that have attracted his attention since he first started his research work at University College London so many years ago. Seaton's association with University College London has now stretched over a period of some 37 years, first as an undergraduate student, then as a research student, and then, successively, as Assistant Lecturer, Lecturer, Reader, and Professor. Seaton arrived at University College London in 1946 to become an undergraduate in the Physics Department, having just left the Royal Air Force in which he had served as a navigator in the Pathfinder Force of Bomber Command. There are a number of stories of ho...

  4. Photonuclear reactions: astrophysical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedorezov, V.G.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Brief review on astrophysical aspects in photonuclear studies is presented. Main attention is paid on the two kind experiments. The first one was performed at ESRF by GRAAL collaboration using the back scattering laser photons technique to study light speed anisotropy with respect to the dipole of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation. This is a modern analog of the Michelson - Morley experiment. The results obtained are not only methologically different from those of the above mentioned experiments but also provide stronger constrains on the light speed anisotropy in CMB frame. Second subject is related to the electron scattering on exotic nuclei which can play significant role in explosive phenomena such as novae, supernovae and neutron stars. Such approach may be considered as the alternative to traditional low energy accelerator experiments. Exotic nuclei for these purposes can be obtained at CSI (ELISe project). The experiment is foreseen to be installed at the New Experimental Storage Ring (NESR) at RAIR where cooled secondary beams of radioactive ions will collide with an intense electron beam circulating in a small electron storage beam

  5. Astrophysical implications of periodicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Two remarkable discoveries of the last decade have profound implications for astrophysics and for geophysics. These are the discovery by Alvarez et al., that certain mass extinctions are caused by the impact on the earth of a large asteroid or comet, and the discovery by Raup and Sepkoski that such extinctions are periodic, with a cycle time of 26 to 30 million years. The validity of both of these discoveries is assumed and the implications are examined. Most of the phenomena described depend not on periodicity, but just on the weaker assumption that the impacts on the earth take place primarily in showers. Proposed explanations for the periodicity include galactic oscillations, the Planet X model, and the possibility of Nemesis, a solar companion star. These hypotheses are critically examined. Results of the search for the solar companion are reported. The Deccan flood basalts of India have been proposed as the impact site for the Cretaceous impact, but this hypotheisis is in contradiction with the conclusion of Courtillot et al., that the magma flow began during a period of normal magnetic field. A possible resolution of this contradiction is proposed

  6. Nuclear physics and astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, D.N.; Olinto, A.V.

    1993-06-01

    The authors report on recent progress of research at the interface of nuclear physics and astrophysics. During the past year, the authors continued to work on Big Bang and stellar nucleosynthesis, the solar neutrino problem, the equation of state for dense matter, the quark-hadron phase transition, and the origin of gamma-ray bursts; and began studying the consequences of nuclear reaction rates in the presence of strong magnetic fields. They have shown that the primordial production of B and Be cannot explain recent detections of these elements in halo stars and have looked at spallation as the likely source of these elements. By looking at nucleosynthesis with inhomogeneous initial conditions, they concluded that the Universe must have been very smooth before nucleosynthesis. They have also constrained neutrino oscillations and primordial magnetic fields by Big Bang nucleosynthesis. On the solar neutrino problem, they have analyzed the implications of the SAGE and GALLEX experiments. They also showed that the presence of dibaryons in neutron stars depends weakly on uncertainties of nuclear equations of state. They have started to investigate the consequences of strong magnetic fields on nuclear reactions and implications for neutron star cooling and supernova nucleosynthesis

  7. General Astrophysics with the HabEx Workhorse Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Daniel; Clarke, John; Gaudi, B. Scott; Kiessling, Alina; Krause, Oliver; Martin, Stefan; Scowen, Paul; Somerville, Rachel; HabEx STDT

    2018-01-01

    The Habitable Exoplanet Imaging Mission (HabEx) concept has been designed to enable an extensive suite of science, broadly put under the rubric of General Astrophysics, in addition to its exoplanet direct imaging science. General astrophysics directly addresses multiple NASA programmatic branches, and HabEx will enable investigations ranging from cosmology, to galaxy evolution, to stellar population studies, to exoplanet transit spectroscopy, to Solar System studies. This poster briefly describes one of the two primary HabEx General Astrophysics instruments, the HabEx Workhorse Camera (HWC). HWC will be a dual-detector UV-to-near-IR imager and multi-object grism spectrometer with a microshutter array and a moderate (3' x 3') field-of-view. We detail some of the key science we expect HWC to undertake, emphasizing unique capabilities enabled by a large-aperture, highly stable space-borne platform at these wavelengths.

  8. Magnetically-coupled microcalorimeter arrays for x-ray astrophysics with sub-eV spectral resolution and large format capability Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — "We propose to develop a revolutionary x-ray camera for astrophysical imaging spectroscopy. High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying the...

  9. Application of positron annihilation induced auger electron spectroscopy to the study of surface chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, A.H.; Yang, G.; Nangia, A.; Kim, J.H.; Fazleev, N.G.

    1996-01-01

    Positron annihilation induced Auger Electron Spectroscopy (PAES), makes use a beam of low energy positrons to excite Auger transitions by annihilating core electrons. This novel mechanism provides PAES with a number of unique features which distinguishes it from other methods of surface analysis. In PAES the very large collisionally induced secondary electron background which is present under the low energy Auger peaks using conventional techniques can be eliminated by using a positron beam whose energy is below the range of Auger electron energies. In addition, PAES is more surface selective than conventional Auger Spectroscopy because the PAES signal originates almost exclusively from the topmost atomic layer due to the fact that the positrons annihilating with the core electrons are trapped in an image correlation well just outside the surface. In this paper, recent applications of Positron Annihilation Induced Auger Electron Spectroscopy (PAES) to the study of surface structure and surface chemistry will be discussed including studies of the growth, alloying and inter-diffusion of ultrathin layers of metals, metals on semiconductors, and semiconductors on semiconductors. In addition, the possibilities for future application of PAES to the study of catalysis and surface chemistry will be outlined. (author)

  10. Fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy in multiple-scattering environments: an application to biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerussi, Albert E.; Gratton, Enrico; Fantini, Sergio

    1999-07-01

    Over the past few years, there has been significant research activity devoted to the application of fluorescence spectroscopy to strongly scattering media, where photons propagate diffusely. Much of this activity focused on fluorescence as a source of contrast enhancement in optical tomography. Our efforts have emphasized the quantitative recovery of fluorescence parameters for spectroscopy. Using a frequency-domain diffusion-based model, we have successfully recovered the lifetime, the absolute quantum yield, the fluorophore concentration, and the emission spectrum of the fluorophore, as well as the absorption and the reduced scattering coefficients at the emission wavelength of the medium in different measurements. In this contribution, we present a sensitive monitor of the binding between ethidium bromide and bovine cells in fresh milk. The spectroscopic contrast was the approximately tenfold increase in the ethidium bromide lifetime upon binding to DNA. The measurement clearly demonstrated that we could quantitatively measure the density of cells in the milk, which is an application vital to the tremendous economic burden of bovine subclinical mastitis detection. Furthermore, we may in principle use the spirit of this technique as a quantitative monitor of the binding of fluorescent drugs inside tissues. This is a first step towards lifetime spectroscopy in tissues.

  11. An introduction to observational astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Gallaway, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Observational Astrophysics follows the general outline of an astrophysics undergraduate curriculum targeting practical observing information to what will be covered at the university level. This includes the basics of optics and coordinate systems to the technical details of CCD imaging, photometry, spectography and radio astronomy.  General enough to be used by students at a variety of institutions and advanced enough to be far more useful than observing guides targeted at amateurs, the author provides a comprehensive and up-to-date treatment of observational astrophysics at undergraduate level to be used with a university’s teaching telescope.  The practical approach takes the reader from basic first year techniques to those required for a final year project. Using this textbook as a resource, students can easily become conversant in the practical aspects of astrophysics in the field as opposed to the classroom.

  12. High-Energy Spectroscopic Astrophysics Swiss Society for Astrophysics and Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Kahn, Steven M; von Ballmoos, Peter

    2005-01-01

    After three decades of intense research in X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, the time was ripe to summarize basic knowledge on X-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy for interested students and researchers ready to become involved in new high-energy missions. This volume exposes both the scientific basics and modern methods of high-energy spectroscopic astrophysics. The emphasis is on physical principles and observing methods rather than a discussion of particular classes of high-energy objects, but many examples and new results are included in the three chapters as well.

  13. Recent progress on astrophysical opacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, F.J.; Iglesias, C.A.

    1992-08-01

    Improvements in the calculation of the opacity of astrophysical plasmas has helped to resolve several long-standing puzzles in the modeling of variable stars. The most significant opacity enhancements over the Los Alamos Astrophysical Library (LAOL) are due to improvements in the equation of state and atomic physics. Comparison with experiment has corroborated the predicted large opacity increases due to transitions in M-shell iron. We give a summary of recent developments

  14. An introduction to astrophysical hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Shore, Steven N

    1992-01-01

    This book is an introduction to astrophysical hydrodynamics for both astronomy and physics students. It provides a comprehensive and unified view of the general problems associated with fluids in a cosmic context, with a discussion of fluid dynamics and plasma physics. It is the only book on hydrodynamics that addresses the astrophysical context. Researchers and students will find this work to be an exceptional reference. Contents include chapters on irrotational and rotational flows, turbulence, magnetohydrodynamics, and instabilities.

  15. [Research progress and application prospect of near infrared spectroscopy in soil nutrition analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hai-quan; Lu, Qi-peng

    2012-01-01

    "Digital agriculture" or "precision agriculture" is an important direction of modern agriculture technique. It is the combination of the modern information technique and traditional agriculture and becomes a hotspot field in international agriculture research in recent years. As a nondestructive, real-time, effective and exact analysis technique, near infrared spectroscopy, by which precision agriculture could be carried out, has vast prospect in agrology and gradually gained the recognition. The present paper intends to review the basic theory of near infrared spectroscopy and its applications in the field of agrology, pointing out that the direction of NIR in agrology should based on portable NIR spectrograph in order to acquire qualitative or quantitative information from real-time measuring in field. In addition, NIRS could be combined with space remote sensing to macroscopically control the way crop is growing and the nutrition crops need, to change the current state of our country's agriculture radically.

  16. Minicourses in Astrophysics, Modular Approach, Vol. I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Univ., Chicago.

    This is the first volume of a two-volume minicourse in astrophysics. It contains chapters on the following topics: planetary atmospheres; X-ray astronomy; radio astrophysics; molecular astrophysics; and gamma-ray astrophysics. Each chapter gives much technical discussion, mathematical treatment, diagrams, and examples. References are included with…

  17. Relativistic astrophysics and theory of gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zel'dovich, Ya.B.

    1982-01-01

    A brief historical review of the development of astrophysical science in the State Astrophysical Institute named after Shternberg (SAISh) has been given in a popular form. The main directions of the SAISh astrophysical investigations have been presented: relativistic theory of gravity, relativistic astrophysics of interplanetary medium and cosmology

  18. Application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy to the analysis of algal biomass for industrial biotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pořízka, P.; Prochazka, D.; Pilát, Z.; Krajcarová, L.; Kaiser, J.; Malina, R.; Novotný, J.; Zemánek, P.; Ježek, J.; Šerý, M.; Bernatová, S.; Krzyžánek, V.; Dobranská, K.; Novotný, K.; Trtílek, M.; Samek, O.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to the determination of elements distinctive in terms of their biological significance (such as potassium, magnesium, calcium, and sodium) and to the monitoring of accumulation of potentially toxic heavy metal ions in living microorganisms (algae), in order to trace e.g. the influence of environmental exposure and other cultivation and biological factors having an impact on them. Algae cells were suspended in liquid media or presented in a form of adherent cell mass on a surface (biofilm) and, consequently, characterized using their spectra. In our feasibility study we used three different experimental arrangements employing double-pulse LIBS technique in order to improve on analytical selectivity and sensitivity for potential industrial biotechnology applications, e.g. for monitoring of mass production of commercial biofuels, utilization in the food industry and control of the removal of heavy metal ions from industrial waste waters. - Highlights: ► We realized laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis of algal biomass. ► We used water jet setup, bulk liquid arrangement and algal biofilms. ► LIBS analysis of macro- and micro-element concentrations in algae was shown. ► LIBS can be of assistance in research of sustainable biofuel generation. ► LIBS can be used in research of algal food applications and bioremediation.

  19. Application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy to the analysis of algal biomass for industrial biotechnology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porizka, P.; Prochazka, D. [X-ray micro CT and nano CT research group, CEITEC-Central European Institute of Technology, Brno University of Technology, Technicka 3058/10, 616 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Pilat, Z. [Institute of Scientific Instruments of the ASCR v.v.i., Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Kralovopolska 147, Brno 61669 (Czech Republic); Krajcarova, L. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, Brno 611 37 (Czech Republic); Kaiser, J., E-mail: kaiser@fme.vutbr.cz [X-ray micro CT and nano CT research group, CEITEC-Central European Institute of Technology, Brno University of Technology, Technicka 3058/10, 616 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Malina, R.; Novotny, J. [X-ray micro CT and nano CT research group, CEITEC-Central European Institute of Technology, Brno University of Technology, Technicka 3058/10, 616 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Zemanek, P.; Jezek, J.; Sery, M.; Bernatova, S.; Krzyzanek, V.; Dobranska, K. [Institute of Scientific Instruments of the ASCR v.v.i., Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Kralovopolska 147, Brno 61669 (Czech Republic); Novotny, K. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, Brno 611 37 (Czech Republic); Trtilek, M. [Photon Systems Instruments, Drasov 470, 664 24 Drasov (Czech Republic); Samek, O. [Institute of Scientific Instruments of the ASCR v.v.i., Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Kralovopolska 147, Brno 61669 (Czech Republic)

    2012-08-15

    We report on the application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to the determination of elements distinctive in terms of their biological significance (such as potassium, magnesium, calcium, and sodium) and to the monitoring of accumulation of potentially toxic heavy metal ions in living microorganisms (algae), in order to trace e.g. the influence of environmental exposure and other cultivation and biological factors having an impact on them. Algae cells were suspended in liquid media or presented in a form of adherent cell mass on a surface (biofilm) and, consequently, characterized using their spectra. In our feasibility study we used three different experimental arrangements employing double-pulse LIBS technique in order to improve on analytical selectivity and sensitivity for potential industrial biotechnology applications, e.g. for monitoring of mass production of commercial biofuels, utilization in the food industry and control of the removal of heavy metal ions from industrial waste waters. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We realized laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis of algal biomass. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We used water jet setup, bulk liquid arrangement and algal biofilms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LIBS analysis of macro- and micro-element concentrations in algae was shown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LIBS can be of assistance in research of sustainable biofuel generation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LIBS can be used in research of algal food applications and bioremediation.

  20. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy in archeometry: A review of its application and future perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spizzichino, Valeria, E-mail: valeria.spizzichino@enea.it; Fantoni, Roberta

    2014-09-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) in the last decades has been more and more applied to the field of Cultural Heritage with great results obtained either alone or in combination with complementary laser techniques. Its ability to analyze, with a minimal loss, different kinds of materials in laboratory, in situ and even in hostile environments has been highly appreciated. The main aim of this paper is to present a review of LIBS applications in the interdisciplinary field of archeometry. The LIBS technique is shortly described both from a theoretical and practical point of view, discussing the instrumental setup, also in comparison with typical features of laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and Raman spectroscopy apparata. The complementary with multivariate analysis, a method that can help in reducing data set dimensions and in pulling out effective information, is stressed. In particular the role of LIBS in Cultural Heritage material characterization, recognition of fakes and indirect dating is described, reporting general considerations and case studies on metal alloys, mural paintings, decorated ceramics, glasses, stones and gems. - Highlights: • Applications of LIBS to archeometry are reviewed. • Complementary among LIBS, LIF, Raman and multivariate analysis is highlighted. • Three major areas of successful LIBS application in archeometry are identified. • Significant results have been presented for several different materials.

  1. Sample presentation, sources of error and future perspectives on the application of vibrational spectroscopy in the wine industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzolino, Daniel

    2015-03-30

    Vibrational spectroscopy encompasses a number of techniques and methods including ultra-violet, visible, Fourier transform infrared or mid infrared, near infrared and Raman spectroscopy. The use and application of spectroscopy generates spectra containing hundreds of variables (absorbances at each wavenumbers or wavelengths), resulting in the production of large data sets representing the chemical and biochemical wine fingerprint. Multivariate data analysis techniques are then required to handle the large amount of data generated in order to interpret the spectra in a meaningful way in order to develop a specific application. This paper focuses on the developments of sample presentation and main sources of error when vibrational spectroscopy methods are applied in wine analysis. Recent and novel applications will be discussed as examples of these developments. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. High energy astrophysics. An introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courvoisier, Thierry J.L. [Geneva Univ., Versoix (Switzerland). ISDC, Data Centre for Astrophysics

    2013-07-01

    Based on observational examples this book reveals and explains high-energy astrophysical processes. Presents the theory of astrophysical processes in a didactic approach by deriving equations step by step. With several attractive astronomical pictures. High-energy astrophysics has unveiled a Universe very different from that only known from optical observations. It has revealed many types of objects in which typical variability timescales are as short as years, months, days, and hours (in quasars, X-ray binaries, and other objects), and even down to milli-seconds in gamma ray bursts. The sources of energy that are encountered are only very seldom nuclear fusion, and most of the time gravitation, a paradox when one thinks that gravitation is, by many orders of magnitude, the weakest of the fundamental interactions. The understanding of these objects' physical conditions and the processes revealed by high-energy astrophysics in the last decades is nowadays part of astrophysicists' culture, even of those active in other domains of astronomy. This book evolved from lectures given to master and PhD students at the University of Geneva since the early 1990s. It aims at providing astronomers and physicists intending to be active in high-energy astrophysics a broad basis on which they should be able to build the more specific knowledge they will need. While in the first part of the book the physical processes are described and derived in detail, the second part studies astrophysical objects in which high-energy astrophysics plays a crucial role. This two-pronged approach will help students recognise physical processes by their observational signatures in contexts that may differ widely from those presented here.

  3. Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS): applications in spectroscopy and chemical dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naik, P.D.; Kumar, Awadhesh; Upadhyaya, Hari; Bajaj, P.N.

    2009-01-01

    Resonance ionization is a photophysical process wherein electromagnetic radiation is used to ionize atoms, molecules, transient species, etc., by exciting them through their quantum states. The number of photons required to ionize depends on the species being investigated and energy of the photon. Once a charged particle is produced, it is easy to detect it with high efficiency. With the advent of narrow band high power pulsed and cw tunable dye lasers, it has blossomed into a powerful spectroscopic and analytical technique, commonly known as resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS)/resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI). The alliance of resonance ionization with mass spectrometry has grown into a still more powerful technique, known as resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS), which has made significant contributions in a variety of frontier areas of research and development, such as spectroscopy, chemical dynamics, analytical chemistry, cluster science, surface science, radiochemistry, nuclear physics, biology, environmental science, material science, etc. In this article, we shall describe the application of resonance ionization mass spectrometry to spectroscopy of uranium and chemical dynamics of polyatomic molecules

  4. [Application of microscopic spectroscopy in quality control of Niuhuang Qingxin pills].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Li-Xing; Zhang, Ye; Zhang, Nan-Ping; Hu, Xiao-Ru; Kang, Shuai; Hou, Jian-Zhong; Dai, Zhong; Ma, Shuang-Cheng

    2016-10-01

    Application of microscopic spectroscopy in quality control of Niuhuang Qingxin pills was discussed. First, microscopic characteristics specified by the statutory standard of Niuhuang Qingxin pills were summarized. Then new identification method was established for Dioscoreae Rhizoma, Saigae Tataricae Cornu, Cinnamomi Cortex and Saposhnikoviae Radix. Finally, microscopic spectroscopy was used for test of Dioscoreae Rhizoma's adulterant Dioscoreae Fordii Rhizoma.It was the first time for this technology being applied in adulteration test of Chinese patent medicine.The results showed that Saigae Tataricae Cornu was not detected in 2 batches of Niuhuang Qingxin pills from 1 manufacturer while Dioscoreae Fordii Rhizoma was detected in 3 batches of samples from 2 manufacturers. The proposed methods were accurate, simple, rapid, objective and economic, which offered a more comprehensive approach for quality control of Niuhuang Qingxin pills. It was indicated that conventional technology such as microscopic spectroscopy could play an important role in identification of traditional Chinese medicine whose index ingredient was deficient or tiny. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  5. Josephson admittance spectroscopy application for frequency analysis of broadband THz antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, O Yu; Divin, Yu Yu; Gubankov, V N; Gundareva, I I; Pavlovskiy, V V

    2010-01-01

    Application of Josephson admittance spectroscopy for the spectral analysis of a broad-band log-periodic superconducting antenna was demonstrated at the frequency range from 50 to 700 GHz. The [001]-tilt YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x bicrystal Josephson junctions, integrated with sinuous log-periodic YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x antennas, were fabricated on NdGaO 3 bicrystal substrates. A real part of the antenna admittance ReY(f) as a function of the frequency f was reconstructed from the modification of the dc current-voltage characteristic of the junction, induced by the antenna. Resonance features were observed in the recovered ReY(f)-spectra with a periodicity in the logarithmic frequency scale, corresponding to log-periodic geometry of the antenna. The ReY(f)-spectra, recovered by Josephson spectroscopy, were compared with the ReY(f)-spectra, obtained by CAD simulation, and both spectra were shown to be similar in their main features. A value of 23 was obtained for an effective permittivity of the NdGaO3 bicrystal substrates by fitting simulated data to those obtained from Josephson spectroscopy.

  6. The Application of Moessbauer Emission Spectroscopy to Industrial Cobalt Based Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loosdrecht, J. van de; Berge, P. J. van; Craje, M. W. J.; Kraan, A. M. van der

    2002-01-01

    The application of Moessbauer emission spectroscopy to study cobalt based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for the gas-to-liquids process was investigated. It was shown that Moessbauer emission spectroscopy could be used to study the oxidation of cobalt as a deactivation mechanism of high loading cobalt based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Oxidation was observed under conditions that are in contradiction with the bulk cobalt phase thermodynamics. This can be explained by oxidation of small cobalt crystallites or by surface oxidation. The formation of re-reducible Co 3+ species was observed as well as the formation of irreducible Co 3+ and Co 2+ species that interact strongly with the alumina support. The formation of the different cobalt species depends on the oxidation conditions. Iron was used as a probe nuclide to investigate the cobalt catalyst preparation procedure. A high-pressure Moessbauer emission spectroscopy cell was designed and constructed, which creates the opportunity to study cobalt based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts under realistic synthesis conditions.

  7. Reconstruction strategy for echo planar spectroscopy and its application to partially undersampled imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, L G; Schaumburg, K; Paulson, O B

    2000-01-01

    The most commonly encountered form of echo planar spectroscopy involves oscillating gradients in one spatial dimension during readout. Data are consequently not sampled on a Cartesian grid. A fast gridding algorithm applicable to this particular situation is presented. The method is optimal, i.......e., it performs as well as the full discrete Fourier transform for band limited signals while allowing for use of the fast Fourier transform. The method is demonstrated for reconstruction of data that are partially undersampled in the time domain. The advantages of undersampling are lower hardware requirements...

  8. Application of 31P MR spectroscopy to the study of skeletal muscles in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajek, M.; Horska, A.; Belan, A.; Taborsky, P.; Grosmanova, A.

    1990-01-01

    The potential of in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy in clinical practice is discussed. The principles of in vivo technique are outlined, the present state is characterized, and a survey of applications of the magnetic resonance of the quiescent skeletal muscle is presented. The phosphocreatine-to-inorganic phosphate signal ratios were evaluated for a cohort of patients with neuromuscular metabolic diseases, a cohort of patients with chronic renal insufficiency, and a control cohort. Statistically significant differences were found between the groups of patients and the control. The difference between the spectra of normal skeletal muscles with benign tumors is also discussed. (author). 5 figs., 6 tabs., 28 refs

  9. Application of electron energy loss spectroscopy for single wall carbon nanotubes (review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittal, N.; Jain, S.; Mittal, J.

    2015-01-01

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is among the few techniques that are available for the characterization of modified single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) having nanometer dimensions (~1-3 nm). CNTs can be modified either by surface functionalization or coating, between bundles of nanotubes by doping, intercalation and fully or partially filling the central core. EELS is an exclusive technique for the identification, composition analysis, and crystallization studies of the chemicals and materials used for the modification of SWCNTs. The present paper serves as a compendium of research work on the application of EELS for the characterization of modified SWCNTs. (authors)

  10. Development of pulsed UV lasers and their application in laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De la Rosa, M I; Perez, C; Gruetzmacher, K; GarcIa, D; Bustillo, A

    2011-01-01

    The application of two-photon laser spectroscopy to plasma diagnostics requires tuneable UV-laser spectrometers providing: some mJ pulse energy at ns time scale with spectral quality close to Fourier Transform Limit, good pulse to pulse reproducibility and tuning linearity. We report about two different systems, a first laser specially optimized for the radiation at 243 nm, which is required for the 1S-2S two photon transition of atomic hydrogen, and a second one generating 205 nm suited for the transition 1S - 3S/3D.

  11. Application of miniaturized near-infrared spectroscopy for quality control of extemporaneous orodispersible films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Wen Chin; Widjaja, Effendi; Khong, Yuet Mei; Gokhale, Rajeev; Chan, Sui Yung

    2018-02-20

    Extemporaneous oral preparations are routinely compounded in the pharmacy due to a lack of suitable formulations for special populations. Such small-scale pharmacy preparations also present an avenue for individualized pharmacotherapy. Orodispersible films (ODF) have increasingly been evaluated as a suitable dosage form for extemporaneous oral preparations. Nevertheless, as with all other extemporaneous preparations, safety and quality remain a concern. Although the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) recommends analytical testing of compounded preparations for quality assurance, pharmaceutical assays are typically not routinely performed for such non-sterile pharmacy preparations, due to the complexity and high cost of conventional assay methods such as high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Spectroscopic methods including Raman, infrared and near-infrared spectroscopy have been successfully applied as quality control tools in the industry. The state-of-art benchtop spectrometers used in those studies have the advantage of superior resolution and performance, but are not suitable for use in a small-scale pharmacy setting. In this study, we investigated the application of a miniaturized near infrared (NIR) spectrometer as a quality control tool for identification and quantification of drug content in extemporaneous ODFs. Miniaturized near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy is suitable for small-scale pharmacy applications in view of its small size, portability, simple user interface, rapid measurement and real-time prediction results. Nevertheless, the challenge with miniaturized NIR spectroscopy is its lower resolution compared to state-of-art benchtop equipment. We have successfully developed NIR spectroscopy calibration models for identification of ODFs containing five different drugs, and quantification of drug content in ODFs containing 2-10mg ondansetron (OND). The qualitative model for drug identification produced 100% prediction accuracy. The quantitative

  12. Theoretical nuclear structure and astrophysics. Progress report for 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidry, M.W.; Nazarewicz, W.; Strayer, M.R.

    1996-01-01

    This research effort is directed toward theoretical support and guidance for the fields of radioactive ion beam physics, gamma ray spectroscopy, computational and nuclear astrophysics, and the interface between these disciplines. The authors report substantial progress in all those areas. One measure of progress is publications and invited material. The research described here has led to more than 43 papers that are published, accepted, or submitted to refereed journals, and to 15 invited presentations at conferences and workshops

  13. Recent results in nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coc, Alain; Kiener, Juergen [CNRS/IN2P3 et Universite Paris Sud 11, UMR 8609, Centre de Sciences Nucleaires et de Sciences de la Matiere (CSNSM), Orsay Campus (France); Hammache, Fairouz [CNRS/IN2P3 et Universite Paris Sud 11, UMR 8608, Institut de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay (IPNO), Orsay Campus (France)

    2015-03-01

    In this review, we emphasize the interplay between astrophysical observations, modeling, and nuclear physics laboratory experiments. Several important nuclear cross sections for astrophysics have long been identified, e.g., {sup 12}C(α, γ){sup 16}O for stellar evolution, or {sup 13}C(α, n){sup 16}O and {sup 22}Ne(α, n){sup 25}Mg as neutron sources for the s-process. More recently, observations of lithium abundances in the oldest stars, or of nuclear gamma-ray lines from space, have required new laboratory experiments. New evaluation of thermonuclear reaction rates now includes the associated rate uncertainties that are used in astrophysical models to i) estimate final uncertainties on nucleosynthesis yields and ii) identify those reactions that require further experimental investigation. Sometimes direct cross section measurements are possible, but more generally the use of indirect methods is compulsory in view of the very low cross sections. Non-thermal processes are often overlooked but are also important for nuclear astrophysics, e.g., in gamma-ray emission from solar flares or in the interaction of cosmic rays with matter, and also motivate laboratory experiments. Finally, we show that beyond the historical motivations of nuclear astrophysics, understanding i) the energy sources that drive stellar evolution and ii) the origin of the elements can also be used to give new insights into physics beyond the standard model. (orig.)

  14. Recent results in nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coc, Alain; Kiener, Juergen; Hammache, Fairouz

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we emphasize the interplay between astrophysical observations, modeling, and nuclear physics laboratory experiments. Several important nuclear cross sections for astrophysics have long been identified, e.g., 12 C(α, γ) 16 O for stellar evolution, or 13 C(α, n) 16 O and 22 Ne(α, n) 25 Mg as neutron sources for the s-process. More recently, observations of lithium abundances in the oldest stars, or of nuclear gamma-ray lines from space, have required new laboratory experiments. New evaluation of thermonuclear reaction rates now includes the associated rate uncertainties that are used in astrophysical models to i) estimate final uncertainties on nucleosynthesis yields and ii) identify those reactions that require further experimental investigation. Sometimes direct cross section measurements are possible, but more generally the use of indirect methods is compulsory in view of the very low cross sections. Non-thermal processes are often overlooked but are also important for nuclear astrophysics, e.g., in gamma-ray emission from solar flares or in the interaction of cosmic rays with matter, and also motivate laboratory experiments. Finally, we show that beyond the historical motivations of nuclear astrophysics, understanding i) the energy sources that drive stellar evolution and ii) the origin of the elements can also be used to give new insights into physics beyond the standard model. (orig.)

  15. Two members of the CERN HPD team present their babies. André Braem (left) holds in his hands a 5-inch glass HPD, while a ceramic HPD for medical applications is shown by Christian Joram. The large detector in the middle is a 10-inch HPD developed for an astrophysics experiment.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    Two members of the CERN HPD team present their babies. André Braem (left) holds in his hands a 5-inch glass HPD, while a ceramic HPD for medical applications is shown by Christian Joram. The large detector in the middle is a 10-inch HPD developed for an astrophysics experiment.

  16. Terahertz spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2009-01-01

    In this presentation I will review methods for spectroscopy in the THz range, with special emphasis on the practical implementation of the technique known ad THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). THz-TDS has revived the old field of far-infrared spectroscopy, and enabled a wealth of new...... activities that promise commercial potential for spectroscopic applications in the THz range. This will be illustrated with examples of spectroscopy of liquids inside their bottles as well as sensitive, quantitative spectroscopy in waveguides....

  17. The applicability of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy in waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smidt, Ena; Meissl, Katharina

    2007-01-01

    State and stability or reactivity of waste materials are important properties that must be determined to obtain information about the future behavior and the emission potential of the materials. Different chemical and biological parameters are used to describe the stage of organic matter in waste materials. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy provides information about the chemistry of waste materials in a general way. Several indicator bands that are referred to functional groups represent components or metabolic products. Their presence and intensity or their absence shed light on the phase of degradation or stabilization. The rapid assessment of the stage of organic matter decomposition is a very important field of application. Therefore, infrared spectroscopy is an appropriate tool for process and quality control, for the assessment of abandoned landfills and for checking of the successful landfill remediation. A wide range of applications are presented in this study for different waste materials. Progressing stages of a typical yard/kitchen waste composting process are shown. The fate of anaerobically 'stabilized' leftovers in a subsequent liquid aerobic process is revealed by spectroscopic characteristics. A compost that underwent the biological stabilization process is distinguished from a 'substrate' that comprises immature biogenic waste mixed with mineral compounds. Infrared spectra of freeze-dried leachate from untreated and aerated landfill material prove the effect of the aerobic treatment during 10 weeks in laboratory-scale experiments

  18. Application of Single Voxel 1H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Hepatic Benign and Malignant Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zifeng; Sun, Shiqiang; Chen, Yuanli; Li, Rui

    2016-12-19

    BACKGROUND To quantify the metabolite changes in hepatic tumors by single-voxel 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) at 3.0 T and explore the application value of 1HMRS in the diagnosis of hepatic benign and malignant lesions. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 45 patients (55 lesions) diagnosed with hepatic lesions by ultrasound and/or computer topography (CT) from November 2006 to March 2007 were included in this study. All patients underwent 3D-dynamic enhanced scan with liver acquisition with acceleration volume acquisition (LAVA) sequence and single-voxel 1HMRS imaging with PRESS (point-resolved spectroscopy) sequence. The metabolite concentrations such as choline (Cho) and lipids (Lip) were measured. RESULTS There was significant difference regarding the occurrence rate of the obvious elevated Cho peaks between benign and malignant tumors (7/27 vs. 21/28, p=0.000). There was statistical significant differences regarding the Cho/Lip ratios in hepatic benign (0.0686±0.0283, 95% CI: 0.0134-0.1245) and malignant (0.1266 ±0.1124, 95% CI: 0.0937-0.2203) lesions (pbenign and malignant lesions. Combined use of 1HMRS and MRI can greatly improve the application value of MRI assessment in the diagnosis of hepatic benign and malignant lesions with a higher sensitivity, negative predictive value, and overall accuracy.

  19. Bio-analytical applications of mid-infrared spectroscopy using silver halide fiber-optic probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heise, H.M.; Kuepper, L.; Butvina, L.N.

    2002-01-01

    Infrared-spectroscopy has proved to be a powerful method for the study of various biomedical samples, in particular for in-vitro analysis in the clinical laboratory and for non-invasive diagnostics. In general, the analysis of biofluids such as whole blood, urine, microdialysates and bioreactor broth media takes advantage of the fact that a multitude of analytes can be quantified simultaneously and rapidly without the need for reagents. Progress in the quality of infrared silver halide fibers enabled us to construct several flexible fiber-optic probes of different geometries, which are particularly suitable for the measurement of small biosamples. Recent trends show that dry film measurements by mid-infrared spectroscopy could revolutionize analytical tools in the clinical chemistry laboratory, and an example is given. Infrared diagnostic tools show a promising potential for patients, and minimal-invasive blood glucose assays or skin tissue pathology in particular cannot be left out using mid-infrared fiber-based probes. Other applications include the measurement of skin samples including penetration studies of vitamins and constituents of cosmetic cream formulations. A further field is the micro-domain analysis of biopsy samples from bog mummified corpses, and recent results on the chemistry of dermis and hair samples are reported. Another field of application, for which results are reported, is food analysis and bio-reactor monitoring

  20. Application of laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy techniques to the monitoring of single cell response to stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, James W.; Liu, Rui; Matthews, Dennis L.

    2012-06-01

    Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) combines optical trapping with micro-Raman spectroscopy to enable label-free biochemical analysis of individual cells and small biological particles in suspension. The integration of the two technologies greatly simplifies the sample preparation and handling of suspension cells for spectroscopic analysis in physiologically meaningful conditions. In our group, LTRS has been used to study the effects of external perturbations, both chemical and mechanical, on the biochemistry of the cell. Single cell dynamics can be studied by performing longitudinal studies to continuously monitor the response of the cell as it interacts with its environment. The ability to carry out these measurements in-vitro makes LTRS an attractive tool for many biomedical applications. Here, we discuss the use of LTRS to study the response of cancer cells to chemotherapeutics and bacteria cells to antibiotics and show that the life cycle and apoptosis of the cells can be detected. These results show the promise of LTRS for drug discovery/screening, antibiotic susceptibility testing, and chemotherapy response monitoring applications. In separate experiments, we study the response of red blood cells to the mechanical forces imposed on the cell by the optical tweezers. A laser power dependent deoxygenation of the red blood cell in the single beam trap is reported. Normal, sickle cell, and fetal red blood cells have a different behavior that enables the discrimination of the cell types based on this mechanochemical response. These results show the potential utility of LTRS for diagnosing and studying red blood cell diseases.

  1. Application of magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy in studying the biological effects of manufactured nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Hao; Wei Li; Liu Maili

    2006-01-01

    With the rapid development of nanoscience and nanotechnology in recent years, growing research interest and efforts have been directed to study the biological effects of manufactured nanoparticles and substances alike. Despite the fact that significant progress has been made, this is still largely an uncharted field. Any advances in this field would certainly require thorough multi-disciplinary collaboration, in which the expertise and tools in nanoscience/nanotechnoloogy, physics, chemistry and biomedicine have to be combined. Due to their wide range of applications in physics, chemistry and biomedicine, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and spectroscopy are among the most important and powerful research tools currently in use, mainly because these techniques can be used in situ and noninvasively to acquire dynamic and real-time information in various samples ranging from protein solution to the human brain. In this paper, the application of MR imaging and spectroscopy in studying the biological effects of manufactured nanoparticles is discussed. It is expected that these techniques will play important roles in 1) detecting the presence of nanoparticles in biological tissues and in vivo, 2) studying the interactions between the nanoparticles and biomolecules and 3) investigating the metabonomic aspect of the biological effects of nanoparticles. (authors)

  2. Infrared fiber optic evanescent wave spectroscopy: applications in biology and medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasyeva, Natalia I.; Bruch, Reinhard F.; Katzir, Abraham

    1999-04-01

    A new powerful and highly sensitive technique for non-invasive biomedical diagnostics in vivo has been developed using Infrared Fiberoptic Evanescent Wave Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (FEW-FTIR). This compact and portable method allows to detect functional chemical groups and bonds via vibrational spectroscopy directly from surfaces including living tissue. Such differences and similarities in molecular structure of tissue and materials can be evaluated online. Operating in the attenuated total reflection (ATR) regime in the middle-infrared (MIR) range, the FEW-FTIR technique provides direct contact between the fiber probe and tissue for non-destructive, non-invasive, fast and remote (few meters) diagnostics and quality control of materials. This method utilizes highly flexible and extremely low loss unclad fibers, for example silver halide fibers. Applications of this method include investigations of normal skin, precancerous and cancerous conditions, monitoring of the process of aging, allergic reactions and radiation damage to the skin. This setup is suitable as well for the detection of the influence of environmental factors (sun, water, pollution, and weather) on skin surfaces. The FEW-FTIR technique is very promising also for fast histological examinations in vitro. In this review, we present recent investigations of skin, breast, lung, stomach, kidney tissues in vivo and ex vivo (during surgery) to define the areas of tumor localization. The main advantages of the FEW-FTIR technique for biomedical, clinical, and environmental applications are discussed.

  3. Application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy to the analysis of algal biomass for industrial biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pořízka, P.; Prochazka, D.; Pilát, Z.; Krajcarová, L.; Kaiser, J.; Malina, R.; Novotný, J.; Zemánek, P.; Ježek, J.; Šerý, M.; Bernatová, S.; Krzyžánek, V.; Dobranská, K.; Novotný, K.; Trtílek, M.; Samek, O.

    2012-08-01

    We report on the application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to the determination of elements distinctive in terms of their biological significance (such as potassium, magnesium, calcium, and sodium) and to the monitoring of accumulation of potentially toxic heavy metal ions in living microorganisms (algae), in order to trace e.g. the influence of environmental exposure and other cultivation and biological factors having an impact on them. Algae cells were suspended in liquid media or presented in a form of adherent cell mass on a surface (biofilm) and, consequently, characterized using their spectra. In our feasibility study we used three different experimental arrangements employing double-pulse LIBS technique in order to improve on analytical selectivity and sensitivity for potential industrial biotechnology applications, e.g. for monitoring of mass production of commercial biofuels, utilization in the food industry and control of the removal of heavy metal ions from industrial waste waters.

  4. X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopy theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lamberti, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    During the last two decades, remarkable and often spectacular progress has been made in the methodological and instrumental aspects of x–ray absorption and emission spectroscopy. This progress includes considerable technological improvements in the design and production of detectors especially with the development and expansion of large-scale synchrotron reactors All this has resulted in improved analytical performance and new applications, as well as in the perspective of a dramatic enhancement in the potential of x–ray based analysis techniques for the near future. This comprehensive two-volume treatise features articles that explain the phenomena and describe examples of X–ray absorption and emission applications in several fields, including chemistry, biochemistry, catalysis, amorphous and liquid systems, synchrotron radiation, and surface phenomena. Contributors explain the underlying theory, how to set up X–ray absorption experiments, and how to analyze the details of the resulting spectra. X-R...

  5. HCP, grid and data infrastructures for astrophysics: an integrated view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasian, F.

    2009-01-01

    Also in the case of astrophysics, the capability of performing Big Science requires the availability of large Hcp facilities. But computational resources alone are far from being enough for the community: as a matter of fact, the whole set of e-infrastructures (network, computing nodes, data repositories, applications) need to work in an inter operable way. This implies the development of common (or at least compatible) user interfaces to computing resources, transparent access to observations and numerical simulations through the Virtual Observatory, integrated data processing pipelines, data mining and semantic web applications. Achieving this inter operability goal is a must to build a real Knowledge Infrastructure in the astrophysical domain.

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic models of astrophysical jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beskin, Vasily S

    2010-01-01

    In this review, analytical results obtained for a wide class of stationary axisymmetric flows in the vicinity of compact astrophysical objects are analyzed, with an emphasis on quantitative predictions for specific sources. Recent years have witnessed a great increase in understanding the formation and properties of astrophysical jets. This is due not only to new observations but also to advances in analytical theory which has produced fairly simple relations, and to what can undoubtedly be called a breakthrough in numerical simulation which has enabled confirmation of theoretical predictions. Of course, we are still very far from fully understanding the physical processes occurring in compact sources. Nevertheless, the progress made raises hopes for near-future test observations that can give insight into the physical processes occurring in active astrophysical objects. (reviews of topical problems)

  7. High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Lebedev, Sergey V

    2007-01-01

    During the past decade, research teams around the world have developed astrophysics-relevant research utilizing high energy-density facilities such as intense lasers and z-pinches. Every two years, at the International conference on High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics, scientists interested in this emerging field discuss the progress in topics covering: - Stellar evolution, stellar envelopes, opacities, radiation transport - Planetary Interiors, high-pressure EOS, dense plasma atomic physics - Supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, exploding systems, strong shocks, turbulent mixing - Supernova remnants, shock processing, radiative shocks - Astrophysical jets, high-Mach-number flows, magnetized radiative jets, magnetic reconnection - Compact object accretion disks, x-ray photoionized plasmas - Ultrastrong fields, particle acceleration, collisionless shocks. These proceedings cover many of the invited and contributed papers presented at the 6th International Conference on High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophys...

  8. Advances in astronomy and astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kopal, Zdenek

    1963-01-01

    Advances in Astronomy and Astrophysics, Volume 2 brings together numerous research works on different aspects of astronomy and astrophysics. This volume is composed of six chapters and begins with a summary of observational record on twilight extensions of the Venus cusps. The next chapter deals with the common and related properties of binary stars, with emphasis on the evaluation of their cataclysmic variables. Cataclysmic variables refer to an object in one of three classes: dwarf nova, nova, or supernova. These topics are followed by discussions on the eclipse phenomena and the eclipses i

  9. Advances in astronomy and astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kopal, Zdenek

    1962-01-01

    Advances in Astronomy and Astrophysics, Volume 1 brings together numerous research works on different aspects of astronomy and astrophysics. This book is divided into five chapters and begins with an observational summary of the shock-wave theory of novae. The subsequent chapter provides the properties and problems of T tauri stars and related objects. These topics are followed by discussions on the structure and origin of meteorites and cosmic dust, as well as the models for evaluation of mass distribution in oblate stellar systems. The final chapter describes the methods of polarization mea

  10. Advanced LIGO: sources and astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creighton, Teviet

    2003-01-01

    Second-generation detectors in LIGO will take us from the discovery phase of gravitational-wave observations to the phase of true gravitational-wave astrophysics, with hundreds or thousands of potential sources. This paper surveys the most likely and interesting potential sources for Advanced LIGO, and the astrophysical processes that each one will probe. I conclude that binary inspiral signals are expected, while continuous signals from pulsars are plausible but not guaranteed. Other sources, such as core-collapse bursts, cosmic strings and primordial stochastic backgrounds, are speculative sources for Advanced LIGO, but also potentially the most interesting, since they push the limits of our theoretical knowledge

  11. Nuclear astrophysics away from stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, G.J.; Howard, W.M.; Takahashi, K.; Ward, R.A.

    1985-08-01

    Explosive astrophysical environments invariably lead to the production of nuclei away from stability. An understanding of the dynamics and nucleosynthesis in such environments is inextricably coupled to an understanding of the properties of the synthesized nuclei. In this talk a review is presented of the basic explosive nucleosynthesis mechanisms (s-process, r-process, n-process, p-process, and rp-process). Specific stellar model calculations are discussed and a summary of the pertinent nuclear data is presented. Possible experiments and nuclear-model calculations are suggested that could facilitate a better understanding of the astrophysical scenarios. 39 refs., 4 figs

  12. White Paper on Nuclear Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Arcones, Almudena; Bardayan, Dan W.; Beers, Timothy C.; Berstein, Lee A.; Blackmon, Jeffrey C.; Messer, Bronson; Brown, B. Alex; Brown, Edward F.; Brune, Carl R.; Champagne, Art E.; Chieffi, Alessandro; Couture, Aaron J.; Danielewicz, Pawel; Diehl, Roland; El-Eid, Mounib

    2016-01-01

    This white paper informs the nuclear astrophysics community and funding agencies about the scientific directions and priorities of the field and provides input from this community for the 2015 Nuclear Science Long Range Plan. It summarizes the outcome of the nuclear astrophysics town meeting that was held on August 21-23, 2014 in College Station at the campus of Texas A&M University in preparation of the NSAC Nuclear Science Long Range Plan. It also reflects the outcome of an earlier town mee...

  13. Advances in astronomy and astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kopal, Zdenek

    1968-01-01

    Advances in Astronomy and Astrophysics, Volume 6 brings together numerous research works on different aspects of astronomy and astrophysics. This volume is composed of five chapters, and starts with the description of improved methods for analyzing and classifying families of periodic orbits in a conservative dynamical system with two degrees of freedom. The next chapter describes the variation of fractional luminosity of distorted components of close binary systems in the course of their revolution, or the accompanying changes in radial velocity. This topic is followed by discussions on vari

  14. Nuclear astrophysics data at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.S.; Blackmon, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    There is a new program of evaluation and dissemination of nuclear data of critical importance for nuclear astrophysics within the Physics Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Recent activities include determining the rates of the important 14 O(α,p) 17 F and 17 F(p,γ) 18 Ne reactions, disseminating the Caughlan and Fowler reaction rate compilation on the World Wide Web, and evaluating the 17 O(p,α) 14 N reaction rate. These projects, which are closely coupled to current ORNL nuclear astrophysics research, are briefly discussed along with future plans

  15. The application of Near Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy (NIRS) for the quantitative analysis of hydrocortisone in primary materials

    OpenAIRE

    A. PITTAS; C. SERGIDES; K. NIKOLICH

    2001-01-01

    Near Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy (NIRS), coupled with fiber optic probes, has been shown to be a quick and reliable analytical tool for quality assurance and quality control in the pharmaceutical industry, both for verifications of raw materials and quantification of the active ingredients in final products. In this paper, a typical pharmaceutical product, hydrocortisone sodium succinate, is used as an example for the application of NIR spectroscopy for quality control. In order to deve...

  16. Improved predictions of nuclear data: A continued challenge in astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goriely, S.

    2001-01-01

    Although important effort has been devoted in the last decades to measure reaction cross sections and decay half-lives of interest in astrophysics, most of the nuclear astrophysics applications still require the use of theoretical predictions to estimate experimentally unknown rates. The nuclear ingredients to the reaction or weak interaction models should preferentially be estimated from microscopic or semi-microscopic global predictions based on sound and reliable nuclear models which, in turn, can compete with more phenomenological highly-parametrized models in the reproduction of experimental data. The latest developments made in deriving the nuclear inputs of relevance in astrophysics applications are reviewed. It mainly concerns nuclear structure properties (atomic masses, deformations, radii, etc...), nuclear level densities, nucleon and α-optical potentials, γ-ray and Gamow-Teller strength functions

  17. Inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy. Part II: applications and fundamentals. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boumans, P.W.J.M.

    1987-01-01

    This is the second part of the two-volume treatise by this well-known and respected author. This volume reviews applications of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), summarizes fundamental studies, and compares ICP-AES methods with other methods of analysis. The first six chapters are devoted to specific fields of application, including the following: metals and other industrial materials, geology, the environment, agriculture and food, biology and clinical analysis, and organic materials. The chapter on the analysis of organic materials also covers the special instrumental considerations required when organic solvents are introduced into an inductively coupled plasma. A chapter on the direct analysis of solids completes the first part of this volume. Each of the applications chapters begins with a summary of the types of samples that are encountered in that field, and the kinds of problems that an elemental analysis can help to solve. This is followed by a tutorial approach covering applicability, advantages, and limitations of the methods. The coverage is thorough, including sample handling, storage, and preparation, acid, and fusion dissolution, avoiding contamination, methods of preconcentration, the types of interferences that can be expected and ways to reduce them, and the types of ICP plasmas that are used. The second half of the volume covers fundamental studies of ICP-AES: basic processes of aerosol generation, plasma modeling and computer simulation, spectroscopic diagnostics, excitation mechanisms, and discharge characteristics. This section introduces the experimental and modeling methods that have been used to obtain fundamental information about ICPs

  18. Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    27

    Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala 2nd Block, Bangalore. 560034, India .... the hydrogen rich thermosphere so significantly that the internal energy of the gas becomes greater than the gravitational potential energy. This leads ... way greenhouse, water vapor would reach the stratosphere where it would.

  19. Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    65

    Northern IMF as simulated by PIC code in parallel with MHD model-Journal of Astrophysics ... The global structure of the collisionless bow shock was inves- tigated by ..... international research community, access to modern space science simulations. ...... LaTeX Font Info: Redeclaring math alphabet \\mathbf on input line 29.

  20. An introduction to nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, E.B.

    1987-09-01

    The role of nuclear reactions in astrophysics is described. Stellar energy generation and heavy element nucleosynthesis is explained in terms of specific sequences of charged-particle and neutron induced reactions. The evolution and final states of stars are examined. 20 refs. 11 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Nuclear astrophysics of light nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fynbo, Hans Otto Uldall

    2013-01-01

    A review of nuclear astrophysics of light nuclei using radioactive beams or techniques developed for radioactive beams is given. We discuss Big Bang nucleosynthesis, with special focus on the lithium problem, aspects of neutrino-physics, helium-burning and finally selected examples of studies...

  2. Astronomy & Astrophysics: an international journal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertout, C.

    2011-07-01

    After a brief historical introduction, we review the scope, editorial process, and production organization of A&A, one of the leading journals worldwide dedicated to publishing the results of astrophysical research. We then briefly discuss the economic model of the Journal and some current issues in scientific publishing.

  3. Compressed Baryonic Matter of Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Yanjun; Xu, Renxin

    2013-01-01

    Baryonic matter in the core of a massive and evolved star is compressed significantly to form a supra-nuclear object, and compressed baryonic matter (CBM) is then produced after supernova. The state of cold matter at a few nuclear density is pedagogically reviewed, with significant attention paid to a possible quark-cluster state conjectured from an astrophysical point of view.

  4. Electric Currents along Astrophysical Jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Contopoulos

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Astrophysical black holes and their surrounding accretion disks are believed to be threaded by grand design helical magnetic fields. There is strong theoretical evidence that the main driver of their winds and jets is the Lorentz force generated by these fields and their associated electric currents. Several researchers have reported direct evidence for large scale electric currents along astrophysical jets. Quite unexpectedly, their directions are not random as would have been the case if the magnetic field were generated by a magnetohydrodynamic dynamo. Instead, in all kpc-scale detections, the inferred electric currents are found to flow away from the galactic nucleus. This unexpected break of symmetry suggests that a battery mechanism is operating around the central black hole. In the present article, we summarize observational evidence for the existence of large scale electric currents and their associated grand design helical magnetic fields in kpc-scale astrophysical jets. We also present recent results of general relativistic radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations which show the action of the Cosmic Battery in the vicinity of astrophysical black holes.

  5. Astrophysics at very high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aharonian, Felix; Bergstroem, Lars; Dermer, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Presents three complementary lectures on very-high-energy astrophysics given by worldwide leaders in the field. Reviews the recent advances in and prospects of gamma-ray astrophysics and of multi-messenger astronomy. Prepares readers for using space and ground-based gamma-ray observatories, as well as neutrino and other multi-messenger detectors. With the success of Cherenkov Astronomy and more recently with the launch of NASA's Fermi mission, very-high-energy astrophysics has undergone a revolution in the last years. This book provides three comprehensive and up-to-date reviews of the recent advances in gamma-ray astrophysics and of multi-messenger astronomy. Felix Aharonian and Charles Dermer address our current knowledge on the sources of GeV and TeV photons, gleaned from the precise measurements made by the new instrumentation. Lars Bergstroem presents the challenges and prospects of astro-particle physics with a particular emphasis on the detection of dark matter candidates. The topics covered by the 40th Saas-Fee Course present the capabilities of current instrumentation and the physics at play in sources of very-high-energy radiation to students and researchers alike. This book will encourage and prepare readers for using space and ground-based gamma-ray observatories, as well as neutrino and other multi-messenger detectors.

  6. Indirect methods in nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertulani, C.A.; Shubhchintak; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Kruppa, A.; Pang, D. Y.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss recent developments in indirect methods used in nuclear astrophysics to determine the capture cross sections and subsequent rates of various stellar burning processes, when it is difficult to perform the corresponding direct measurements. We discuss in brief, the basic concepts of Asymptotic Normalization Coefficients, the Trojan Horse Method, the Coulomb Dissociation Method, (d,p), and charge-exchange reactions. (paper)

  7. Astrophysics on the Lab Bench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    In this article some basic laboratory bench experiments are described that are useful for teaching high school students some of the basic principles of stellar astrophysics. For example, in one experiment, students slam a plastic water-filled bottle down onto a bench, ejecting water towards the ceiling, illustrating the physics associated with a…

  8. International Olympiad on Astronomy and Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soonthornthum, B.; Kunjaya, C.

    2011-01-01

    The International Olympiad on Astronomy and Astrophysics, an annual astronomy and astrophysics competition for high school students, is described. Examples of problems and solutions from the competition are also given. (Contains 3 figures.)

  9. A versatile interaction chamber for laser-based spectroscopic applications, with the emphasis on Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novotný, J.; Brada, M.; Petrilak, M.; Prochazka, D.; Novotný, K.; Hrdička, A.; Kaiser, J.

    2014-01-01

    The technical note describes the interaction chamber developed particularly for the laser spectroscopy technique applications, such as Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), Raman Spectroscopy and Laser-Induced Fluorescence. The chamber was designed in order to provide advanced possibilities for the research in mentioned fields and to facilitate routine research procedures. Parameters and the main benefits of the chamber are described, such as the built-in module for automatic 2D chemical mapping and the possibility to set different ambient gas conditions (pressure value and gas type). Together with the chamber description, selected LIBS application examples benefiting from chamber properties are described. - Highlights: • Development of the interaction chamber for LIBS applications • Example of automated chemical mapping of lead in a chalcopyrite sample • Example of LIBS measurement of fluorine in underpressure • Overview of chamber benefits

  10. Moessbauer Spectroscopy in the Characterization of waste product used like fertilizer in soil. Some Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furet, N. R.; Orihuela, D. L.; Hernandez

    2007-01-01

    At the present time, the use of industrial solid wastes is an important task, because a great effort that have been carried out to preserve the environmental and to obtain the high technologies. In this work, a characterization of a industrial waste product, on base of the monohydrous iron sulphate (FeSO 4 .1H 2 O) with a 15% approximately of free sulphuric acid, used like improvement of soil was carried out by Mossabuer spectroscopy. This waste product was used in a series of the experiences in parcels (where peaches, (Prunus persica), strawberries are cultivated) in the zone of Cartaya (Huelva, Spain). The characterisation of soil from the parcel before application of this product was carried out in order to analyse and compare with the final results by using the methods of the Moessbauer spectroscopy. High contents of Fe, S, and Zn at the studied product are observed . This elements are very important for plants. The pH in soil and Fe, Mn, and Zn contents in soil and leaf were determined. The knowledge of the main chemical-structural properties of this product, used like improvement of soil, will permit the study of the influence to) on the soil properly, b) on the peach leaves and c) on the foodstuff fruit. (Author)

  11. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy in archeometry: A review of its application and future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spizzichino, Valeria; Fantoni, Roberta

    2014-09-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) in the last decades has been more and more applied to the field of Cultural Heritage with great results obtained either alone or in combination with complementary laser techniques. Its ability to analyze, with a minimal loss, different kinds of materials in laboratory, in situ and even in hostile environments has been highly appreciated. The main aim of this paper is to present a review of LIBS applications in the interdisciplinary field of archeometry. The LIBS technique is shortly described both from a theoretical and practical point of view, discussing the instrumental setup, also in comparison with typical features of laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and Raman spectroscopy apparata. The complementary with multivariate analysis, a method that can help in reducing data set dimensions and in pulling out effective information, is stressed. In particular the role of LIBS in Cultural Heritage material characterization, recognition of fakes and indirect dating is described, reporting general considerations and case studies on metal alloys, mural paintings, decorated ceramics, glasses, stones and gems.

  12. Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy: Fundamentals and applications in the characterization of minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, K.M.

    1989-04-01

    The combined use of an energy-loss spectrometer and an analytical electron microscope with fine probe forming capabilities provides a wealth of information about the sample at high spatial resolution. Fundamental principles governing the physics of the interaction between the fast electron and a thin foil sample, to account for the fine structure in the inelastically scattered fast electron distribution (Electron-Energy Loss Spectroscopy, EELS), will be reviewed. General application of EELS is in the area of low atomic number elements (Z < 11) microanalysis, where it significantly complements the more widely used Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDXS). However, a careful analysis of the low loss plasmon oscillations and the fine structure in the core-loss edges, can provide additional information related to the bonding and electronic structure of the sample. An illustration of this is presented from our study of Cδ diamond residue from the Allende carbonaceous chondrite. Combination of EELS with channeling effects can provide specific site occupation/valence information in crystalline materials. Details of this novel crystallographic method will be outlined and illustrated with an example of the study of chromite spinels. Finally, some pertinent experimental details will be discussed. 7 figs

  13. Distance Measurement Solves Astrophysical Mysteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-01

    Location, location, and location. The old real-estate adage about what's really important proved applicable to astrophysics as astronomers used the sharp radio "vision" of the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) to pinpoint the distance to a pulsar. Their accurate distance measurement then resolved a dispute over the pulsar's birthplace, allowed the astronomers to determine the size of its neutron star and possibly solve a mystery about cosmic rays. "Getting an accurate distance to this pulsar gave us a real bonanza," said Walter Brisken, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, NM. Monogem Ring The Monogem Ring, in X-Ray Image by ROSAT satellite CREDIT: Max-Planck Institute, American Astronomical Society (Click on Image for Larger Version) The pulsar, called PSR B0656+14, is in the constellation Gemini, and appears to be near the center of a circular supernova remnant that straddles Gemini and its neighboring constellation, Monoceros, and is thus called the Monogem Ring. Since pulsars are superdense, spinning neutron stars left over when a massive star explodes as a supernova, it was logical to assume that the Monogem Ring, the shell of debris from a supernova explosion, was the remnant of the blast that created the pulsar. However, astronomers using indirect methods of determining the distance to the pulsar had concluded that it was nearly 2500 light-years from Earth. On the other hand, the supernova remnant was determined to be only about 1000 light-years from Earth. It seemed unlikely that the two were related, but instead appeared nearby in the sky purely by a chance juxtaposition. Brisken and his colleagues used the VLBA to make precise measurements of the sky position of PSR B0656+14 from 2000 to 2002. They were able to detect the slight offset in the object's apparent position when viewed from opposite sides of Earth's orbit around the Sun. This effect, called parallax, provides a direct measurement of

  14. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy for rapid screening and live-cell monitoring: application to nanotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, S K; Sacksteder, Colette A; Weber, Thomas J; Riley, Brian J; Addleman, R Shane; Harrer, Bruce J; Peterman, John W

    2013-01-01

    A significant challenge to realize the full potential of nanotechnology for therapeutic and diagnostic applications is to understand and evaluate how live cells interact with an external stimulus, such as a nanosized particle, and the toxicity and broad risk associated with these stimuli. It is difficult to capture the complexity and dynamics of these interactions by following omics-based approaches exclusively, which can be expensive and time-consuming. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is well suited to provide noninvasive live-cell monitoring of cellular responses to potentially toxic nanosized particles or other stimuli. This alternative approach provides the ability to carry out rapid toxicity screenings and nondisruptive monitoring of live-cell cultures. We review the technical basis of the approach, the instrument configuration and interface with the biological media, the various effects that impact the data, subsequent data analysis and toxicity, and present some preliminary results on live-cell monitoring.

  15. Application of the near-infrared spectroscopy in the pharmaceutical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamrógiewicz, Marzena

    2012-07-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy is currently the fastest-growing and the most versatile analytical method not only in the pharmaceutical sciences but also in the industry. This review focuses on recent NIR applications in the pharmaceutical technology. This article covers monitoring, by NIR, of many manufacturing processes, such as granulation, mixing or drying, in order to determine the end-point of these processes. In this paper, apart from basic theoretical information concerning the NIR spectra, there are included determinations of the quality and quantity of pharmaceutical compounds. Some examples of measurements and control of physicochemical parameters of the final medicinal products, such as hardness, porosity, thickness size, compression strength, disintegration time and potential counterfeit are included. Biotechnology and plant drug analysis using NIR is also described. Moreover, some disadvantages of this method are stressed and future perspectives are anticipated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Application of near-infrared spectroscopy for monitoring and control of cell culture and fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cervera Padrell, Albert Emili; Petersen, Nanna; Eliasson Lantz, Anna

    2009-01-01

    of chemometric models built for interpretation of the spectra, thus impairing the analyte concentration predictions. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of necessary conditions and challenges that one has to face when developing a NIR application for monitoring of cell culture or fermentation...... processes. Important practical aspects are introduced, such as sampling, modeling of biomass concentration, influence of microorganism morphology on the spectra, effects of the hydrodynamic conditions in the fermenter, temperature influence, instrument settings, and signal optimization. Several examples......Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy can potentially provide on-line information on substrate, biomass, product, and metabolite concentrations in fermentation processes, which could be useful for improved monitoring or control. However, several factors can negatively influence the quality...

  17. State-of-art application of near infrared spectroscopy for functional diagnostics in neonatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, M.; Paiziev, A.

    2013-01-01

    The present brief review is devoted to application of near infra-red spectroscopy (NIRS) for early diagnostics of human brain injury. The number of commercially accessible NIRS instruments, and accordingly their users, increases but the precision of measurements and their reproducibility from the clinical point of view essentially depend on used algorithms, a kind of the NIRS-instrument, sensors, which frequently leads to the different values of the measurable parameters of blood oxygen saturation (StO 2 ). We present some commercially accessible NIRS instruments for control of an oxygen saturation degree in human blood, first of all in neonatology, on the basis of absorption and scattering of near infra-red light at human tissue chromophores. The results of clinical investigations of different NIRS-spectrometers for measurements of in-vivo new-born child' blood saturation are presented as well. (authors)

  18. Application of 31P-NMR spectroscopy to the study of striated muscle metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.A.; Kushmerick, M.J.; Brown, T.R.

    1982-01-01

    This review presents the principles and limitations of phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance ( 31 P-NMR) spectroscopy as applied to the study of striated muscle metabolism. Application of the techniques discussed include noninvasive measurement of high-energy phosphate, intracellular pH, intracellular free Mg 2+ , and metabolite compartmentation. In perfused cat biceps (fast-twitch) muscles, but not in soleus (slow-twitch), NMR spectra indicate a substantially lower (1 mM) free inorganic phosphate level than when measured chemically (6 mM). In addition, saturation and inversion spin-transfer methods that enable direct measurement of the unidirectional fluxes through creatine kinase are described. In perfused cat biceps muscle, results suggest that this enzyme and its substrates are in simple chemical equilibrium

  19. Spectrally selective molecular doped solids: spectroscopy, photophysics and their application to ultrafast optical pulse processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galaup, Jean-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    The persistent spectral hole-burning (PSHB) phenomenon observed in molecular doped polymers cooled down to liquid helium temperatures allows the engraving of spectral structures in the inhomogeneous absorption profile of the material. This phenomenon known since 1974 has became a fruitful field for the study of the intimacy of complex molecular systems in the solid state, revealing high-resolution spectroscopy, photophysics, photochemistry and dynamics of molecular doped amorphous media, organic as well as inorganic. A PSHB molecular doped solid can be programmed in spectral domain and therefore, it can be converted in an optical processor capable to achieve user-defined optical functions. Some aspects of this field are illustrated in the present paper. An application is presented where a naphthalocyanine doped polymer film is used in a demonstrative experiment to prove that temporal aberration free re-compression of ultra-short light pulses is feasible. Perspectives for the coherent control of light fields or photochemical processes are also evoked

  20. New developments in laser-based photoemission spectroscopy and its scientific applications: a key issues review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xingjiang; He, Shaolong; Liu, Guodong; Zhao, Lin; Yu, Li; Zhang, Wentao

    2018-06-01

    The significant progress in angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) in last three decades has elevated it from a traditional band mapping tool to a precise probe of many-body interactions and dynamics of quasiparticles in complex quantum systems. The recent developments of deep ultraviolet (DUV, including ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet) laser-based ARPES have further pushed this technique to a new level. In this paper, we review some latest developments in DUV laser-based photoemission systems, including the super-high energy and momentum resolution ARPES, the spin-resolved ARPES, the time-of-flight ARPES, and the time-resolved ARPES. We also highlight some scientific applications in the study of electronic structure in unconventional superconductors and topological materials using these state-of-the-art DUV laser-based ARPES. Finally we provide our perspectives on the future directions in the development of laser-based photoemission systems.

  1. Widely tunable Sampled Grating Distributed Bragg Reflector Quantum Cascade laser for gas spectroscopy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diba, Abdou Salam

    Since the advent of semiconductor lasers, the development of tunable laser sources has been subject of many efforts in industry and academia arenas. This interest towards broadly tunable lasers is mainly due to the great promise they have in many applications ranging from telecommunication, to environmental science and homeland security, just to name a few. After the first demonstration of quantum cascade laser (QCL) in the early nineties, QCL has experienced a rapid development, so much so that QCLs are now the most reliable and efficient laser source in the Mid-IR range covering between 3 microm to 30 microm region of the electromagnetic spectrum. QCLs have almost all the desirable characteristics of a laser for spectroscopy applications such as narrow spectral linewidth ideal for high selectivity measurement, high power enabling high sensitivity sensing and more importantly they emit in the finger-print region of most of the trace gases and large molecules. The need for widely tunable QCLs is now more pressing than ever before. A single mode quantum cascade laser (QCL) such as a distributed feedback (DFB) QCL, is an ideal light source for gas sensing in the MIR wavelength range. Despite their performance and reliability, DFB QCLs are limited by their relatively narrow wavelength tuning range determined by the thermal rollover of the laser. An external cavity (EC) QCL, on the other hand, is a widely tunable laser source, and so far is the choice mid-infrared single frequency light sources for detecting multiple species/large molecules. However, EC QCLs can be complex, bulky and expensive. In the quest for finding alternative broadly wavelength tunable sources in the mid-infrared, many monolithic tunable QCLs are recently proposed and fabricated, including SG-DBR, DFB-Arrays, Slot-hole etc. and they are all of potentially of interest as a candidate for multi-gas sensing and monitoring applications, due to their large tuning range (>50 cm-1), and potentially low

  2. In vivo neurochemistry with emission tomography and magnetic resonance spectroscopy: clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sole, Angelo Del; Gambini, Anna; Falini, Andrea; Lecchi, Michela; Lucignani, Giovanni

    2002-01-01

    The assessment of neurochemical processes in vivo has received much attention in the past decade as techniques such as positron or single photon emission tomography (PET and SPET), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) have become more available. With PET and SPET, basic processes, such as blood flow and oxygen or glucose metabolism, can be regionally assessed, along with more specific functions such as the production, release, and reuptake of neurotransmitters and their occupancy of specific receptors. At the same time, MRS can reveal changes in concentration of several hydrogenate compounds in the brain. All these methods have been extensively applied for research in neurology, and some applications have reached the clinical level, namely for the study of degenerative diseases, motor-neuron diseases, movement disorders, cerebrovascular diseases, and epilepsy. This article focuses on the most relevant information that can be obtained with these complementary techniques to help clinicians in the assessment of neurological diseases. (orig.)

  3. In vivo neurochemistry with emission tomography and magnetic resonance spectroscopy: clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sole, Angelo Del [Azienda Ospedaliera San Paolo e Universita di Milano, 20142 Milan (Italy); Gambini, Anna; Falini, Andrea [IRCCS H San Raffaele e Universita Vita e Salute, 20132 Milan (Italy); Lecchi, Michela [Azienda Ospedaliera L. Sacco e Universita di Milano, 20157 Milan (Italy); Lucignani, Giovanni [Azienda Ospedaliera L. Sacco e Universita di Milano, 20157 Milan (Italy); Universita di Milano, Istituto di Scienze Radiologiche, Cattedra di Medicina Nucleare c/o Ospedale L. Sacco, Via G.B. Grassi, 74, 20157 Milan (Italy)

    2002-10-01

    The assessment of neurochemical processes in vivo has received much attention in the past decade as techniques such as positron or single photon emission tomography (PET and SPET), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) have become more available. With PET and SPET, basic processes, such as blood flow and oxygen or glucose metabolism, can be regionally assessed, along with more specific functions such as the production, release, and reuptake of neurotransmitters and their occupancy of specific receptors. At the same time, MRS can reveal changes in concentration of several hydrogenate compounds in the brain. All these methods have been extensively applied for research in neurology, and some applications have reached the clinical level, namely for the study of degenerative diseases, motor-neuron diseases, movement disorders, cerebrovascular diseases, and epilepsy. This article focuses on the most relevant information that can be obtained with these complementary techniques to help clinicians in the assessment of neurological diseases. (orig.)

  4. Towards an Interoperable Field Spectroscopy Metadata Standard with Extended Support for Marine Specific Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara A. Rasaiah

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an approach to developing robust metadata standards for specific applications that serves to ensure a high level of reliability and interoperability for a spectroscopy dataset. The challenges of designing a metadata standard that meets the unique requirements of specific user communities are examined, including in situ measurement of reflectance underwater, using coral as a case in point. Metadata schema mappings from seven existing metadata standards demonstrate that they consistently fail to meet the needs of field spectroscopy scientists for general and specific applications (μ = 22%, σ = 32% conformance with the core metadata requirements and μ = 19%, σ = 18% for the special case of a benthic (e.g., coral reflectance metadataset. Issues such as field measurement methods, instrument calibration, and data representativeness for marine field spectroscopy campaigns are investigated within the context of submerged benthic measurements. The implication of semantics and syntax for a robust and flexible metadata standard are also considered. A hybrid standard that serves as a “best of breed” incorporating useful modules and parameters within the standards is proposed. This paper is Part 3 in a series of papers in this journal, examining the issues central to a metadata standard for field spectroscopy datasets. The results presented in this paper are an important step towards field spectroscopy metadata standards that address the specific needs of field spectroscopy data stakeholders while facilitating dataset documentation, quality assurance, discoverability and data exchange within large-scale information sharing platforms.

  5. The Explorer program for astronomy and astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, B.D.; Becklin, E.E.; Cassinelli, J.P.; Dupree, A.K.; Elliot, J.L.; Hoffmann, W.F.; Hudson, H.S.; Jura, M.; Kurfess, J.; Murray, S.S.

    1986-01-01

    This report was prepared to provide NASA with a strategy for proceeding with Explorer-class programs for research in space astronomy and astrophysics. The role of Explorers in astronomy and astrophysics and their past accomplishments are discussed, as are current and future astronomy and astrophysics Explorers. Specific cost needs for an effective Explorer program are considered

  6. The importance of CNO isotopes in astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audoze, J.

    1977-01-01

    The research into CNO isotopes in astrophysics includes many different subfields of astrophysics such as meteoretical studies, experimental and theoretical nuclear astrophysics, optical astronomy, radio astronomy, etc. The purpose of this paper is to give some overview of the topic and guideline among these different subfields. (G.T.H.)

  7. Application of mid-infrared tuneable diode laser absorption spectroscopy to plasma diagnostics: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roepcke, J; Lombardi, G; Rousseau, A; Davies, P B

    2006-01-01

    Within the last decade mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy over a region from 3 to 17μm and based on tuneable lead salt diode lasers, often called tuneable diode laser absorption spectroscopy or TDLAS, has progressed considerably as a powerful diagnostic technique for in situ studies of the fundamental physics and chemistry in molecular plasmas. The increasing interest in processing plasmas containing hydrocarbons, fluorocarbons, organo-silicon and boron compounds has led to further applications of TDLAS because most of these compounds and their decomposition products are infrared active. TDLAS provides a means of determining the absolute concentrations of the ground states of stable and transient molecular species, which is of particular importance for the investigation of reaction kinetic phenomena. Information about gas temperature and population densities can also be derived from TDLAS measurements. A variety of free radicals and molecular ions have been detected by TDLAS. Since plasmas with molecular feed gases are used in many applications such as thin film deposition, semiconductor processing, surface activation and cleaning, and materials and waste treatment, this has stimulated the adaptation of infrared spectroscopic techniques to industrial requirements. The recent development of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) offers an attractive new option for the monitoring and control of industrial plasma processes. The aim of the present paper is threefold: (i) to review recent achievements in our understanding of molecular phenomena in plasmas (ii) to report on selected studies of the spectroscopic properties and kinetic behaviour of radicals and (iii) to describe the current status of advanced instrumentation for TDLAS in the mid-infrared

  8. Application of near-infrared spectroscopy for monitoring and control of cell culture and fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Albert E; Petersen, Nanna; Lantz, Anna Eliasson; Larsen, Anders; Gernaey, Krist V

    2009-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy can potentially provide on-line information on substrate, biomass, product, and metabolite concentrations in fermentation processes, which could be useful for improved monitoring or control. However, several factors can negatively influence the quality of chemometric models built for interpretation of the spectra, thus impairing the analyte concentration predictions. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of necessary conditions and challenges that one has to face when developing a NIR application for monitoring of cell culture or fermentation processes. Important practical aspects are introduced, such as sampling, modeling of biomass concentration, influence of microorganism morphology on the spectra, effects of the hydrodynamic conditions in the fermenter, temperature influence, instrument settings, and signal optimization. Several examples from the literature are provided, which will hopefully guide the reader interested in the topic. Furthermore, the general procedure used for the development of calibration models is presented, and the influence of microorganism metabolism-potential source of correlation between analytes-is commented. Other important issues such as wavelength selection and evaluation of robustness are shortly introduced. Finally, some examples of potential applications of NIR monitoring are provided, including the implementation of control strategies, the combination with other monitoring tools (the so-called sensor fusion), and the description of process trajectories. On the basis of the review, we conclude that acceptance of NIR spectroscopy as a standard monitoring tool by the fermentation industry will necessitate considerably more on-line studies using industrially relevant-and highly challenging-fermentation conditions (high aeration intensity, high biomass concentration and viscosity, and filamentous production strain). (c) 2009 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2009.

  9. Implementation of neutron-induced gamma-ray spectroscopy in industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abernethy, D. A.; Lim, C. S.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Neutron based analytical techniques are commonly used in a wide variety of industrial applications, with new applications continually being found. As a result, despite popular concerns about the harmful health effects of radiation the number of these analysers is increasing. This is because neutron-induced gamma-ray techniques have the capability of combining elemental sensitivity with significant penetrating power, enabling non-intrusive and non-destructive bulk elemental measurements to be averaged over a large volume of material. Neutron induced gamma ray spectroscopy has been developed by several groups, including CSIRO Minerals, for on-line measurement of elemental composition in a range of industrial applications in vessels, pipes and on conveyor belts. Compared to those typically found in a scientific laboratory, conditions in industrial plants differ substantially in a number of ways, such as environmental variability, operator skill and training, and shielding requirements. As a result of these differences, equipment and techniques which are used as a matter of course in a laboratory often have to undergo major modification to render them suitable for use in an industrial context. This paper will discuss some of the factors that have to be considered when deciding such matters with particular emphasis on the implications of radiation safety requirements

  10. General Astrophysics Science Enabled by the HabEx Ultraviolet Spectrograph (UVS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scowen, Paul; Clarke, John; Gaudi, B. Scott; Kiessling, Alina; Martin, Stefan; Somerville, Rachel; Stern, Daniel; HabEx Science and Technology Definition Team

    2018-01-01

    The Habitable Exoplanet Imaging Mission (HabEx) is one of the four large mission concepts being studied by NASA as input to the upcoming 2020 Decadal Survey. The mission implements two world-class General Astrophysics instruments as part of its complement of instrumentation to enable compelling science using the 4m aperture. The Ultraviolet Spectrograph has been designed to address cutting edge far ultraviolet (FUV) science that has not been possible with the Hubble Space Telescope, and to open up a wide range of capabilities that will advance astrophysics as we look into the 2030s. Our poster discusses some of those science drivers and possible applications, which range from Solar System science, to nearby and more distant studies of star formation, to studies of the circumgalactic and intergalactic mediums where the ecology of mass and energy transfer are vital to understanding stellar and galactic evolution. We discuss the performance features of the instrument that include a large 3’x3’ field of view for multi-object spectroscopy, and some 20 grating modes for a variety of spectral resolution and coverage.

  11. Interactive user's application to Genie 2000 spectroscopy system for automation of hair neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakiev, S.A.; Danilova, E.A.; Kadirova, M.; Kadirov, U.S.; Kist, A.A.; Osinskaya, N.S.; Rakhmanov, J.

    2006-01-01

    reporting. Genie 2000 software is available in several variations and with several layered optional packages. Genie 2000 Basic Spectroscopy and Gamma Analysis Software, which available in RAC permitting us automatically obtain nuclide identification report with all needed parameters. Any applications of Genie 2000 software have not possibility to calculate analyzed elements concentration. For automation this step of INAA by using Canberra Genie 2000 Spectroscopy System we developed user's 'Human hair analysis Application' software for single comparator standard method of hair INAA. The work with the developed Application for GENIE-2000 begins with the menu, which contains four items. 1. Copying of the data. 2. Data input. 3. Viewing, editing and analyzing of the data. 4. EXIT. The item 'Copying of the data' makes copying the entered values of special user parameters from one data source into another. It is very user-friendly. It is enough to him once in one data source to enter values of necessary parameters (nuclides name, γ-lines value, factors of transformation for various times of an irradiation and cooling). Further, with the help of procedure 'Copying of the data' he can transfer them to any other data source. The item 'Data input' is carried out with the help of Graphical Batch Tools function GBT P ARS and specially developed set of Form Design Specification (FDS) files for this function. This developed Application works in interactive environment as a dialogue system with user and allows calculating required nuclides concentration in analyzed samples, separately for long-lived, middle-lived and short-lived nuclides. Using the Nuclide Library Editor and comprehensive standard libraries of Genie package we created three custom libraries: Stdlib.HairL, Stdlib.HairM, Stdlib.HairS, accordingly for long-, middle- and short-lived nuclides. After processing of the next data source the Application returns the user to the menu. From here he can continue data processing

  12. Modern spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hollas, J Michael

    2013-01-01

    The latest edition of this highly acclaimed title introduces the reader to a wide range of spectroscopies, and includes both the background theory and applications to structure determination and chemical analysis.  It covers rotational, vibrational, electronic, photoelectron and Auger spectroscopy, as well as EXAFs and the theory of lasers and laser spectroscopy. A  revised and updated edition of a successful, clearly written book Includes the latest developments in modern laser techniques, such as cavity ring-down spectroscopy and femtosecond lasers Provides numerous worked examples, calculations and questions at the end of chapters.

  13. Relativistic Astrophysics and Cosmology: A Primer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramowicz, Marek A

    2007-01-01

    'Relativistic Astrophysics and Cosmology: A Primer' by Peter Hoyng, was published last year by Springer. The book is based on lectures given by the author at University of Utrecht to advanced undergraduates. This is a short and scholarly book. In about 300 pages, the author has covered the most interesting and important applications of Albert Einstein's general relativity in present-day astrophysics and cosmology: black holes, neutron stars, gravitational waves, and the cosmic microwave background. The book stresses theory, but also discusses several experimental and observational topics, such as the Gravity Probe B mission, interferometer detectors of gravitational waves and the power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background. The coverage is not uniform. Some topics are discussed in depth, others are only briefly mentioned. The book obviously reflects the author's own research interests and his preferences for specific mathematical methods, and the choice of the original artwork that illustrates the book (and appears on its cover) is a very personal one. I consider this personal touch an advantage, even if I do not always agree with the author's choices. For example, I employ Killing vectors as a very useful mathematical tool not only in my research on black holes, but also in my classes. I find that my students prefer it when discussions of particle, photon and fluid motion in the Schwarzschild and Kerr spacetimes are based explicitly and directly on the Killing vectors rather than on coordinate calculations. The latter approach is, of course, the traditional one, and is used in Peter Hoyng's book. Reading the book is a stimulating experience, because the reader can almost feel the author's presence. The author's opinions, his mathematical taste, his research pleasures, and his pedagogical passion are apparent everywhere. Lecturers contemplating a new course on relativistic astrophysics could adopt Hoyng's book as the text. Their students will be in the author

  14. Few-body models for nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Descouvemont, P., E-mail: pdesc@ulb.ac.be [Physique Nucléaire Théorique et Physique Mathématique, C.P. 229, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), B 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Baye, D., E-mail: dbaye@ulb.ac.be [Physique Nucléaire Théorique et Physique Mathématique, C.P. 229, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), B 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Physique Quantique, C.P. 165/82, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), B 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Suzuki, Y., E-mail: suzuki@nt.sc.niigata-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Aoyama, S., E-mail: aoyama@cc.niigata-u.ac.jp [Center for Academic Information Service, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Arai, K., E-mail: arai@nagaoka-ct.ac.jp [Division of General Education, Nagaoka National College of Technology, 888 Nishikatakai, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-8532 (Japan)

    2014-04-15

    We present applications of microscopic models to nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest, and we essentially focus on few-body systems. The calculation of radiative-capture and transfer cross sections is outlined, and we discuss the corresponding reaction rates. Microscopic theories are briefly presented, and we emphasize on the matrix elements of four-body systems. The microscopic extension of the R-matrix theory to nuclear reactions is described. Applications to the {sup 2}H(d, γ){sup 4}He, {sup 2}H(d, p){sup 3}H and {sup 2}H(d, n){sup 3}He reactions are presented. We show the importance of the tensor force to reproduce the low-energy behaviour of the cross sections.

  15. Java 3D Interactive Visualization for Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, K.; Edirisinghe, D.; Lingerfelt, E. J.; Guidry, M. W.

    2003-05-01

    We are developing a series of interactive 3D visualization tools that employ the Java 3D API. We have applied this approach initially to a simple 3-dimensional galaxy collision model (restricted 3-body approximation), with quite satisfactory results. Running either as an applet under Web browser control, or as a Java standalone application, this program permits real-time zooming, panning, and 3-dimensional rotation of the galaxy collision simulation under user mouse and keyboard control. We shall also discuss applications of this technology to 3-dimensional visualization for other problems of astrophysical interest such as neutron star mergers and the time evolution of element/energy production networks in X-ray bursts. *Managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  16. Laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letokhov, V.S.

    1981-01-01

    This article describes recent progress in the application of laser atomic spectroscopy to study parameters of nuclei available in very small quantities; radioactive nuclei, rare isotopes, nuclear isomers, etc, for which study by conventional spectroscopic methods is difficult. (author)

  17. Focusing Telescopes in Nuclear Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Ballmoos, Peter von

    2007-01-01

    This volume is the first of its kind on focusing gamma-ray telescopes. Forty-eight refereed papers provide a comprehensive overview of the scientific potential and technical challenges of this nascent tool for nuclear astrophysics. The book features articles dealing with pivotal technologies such as grazing incident mirrors, multilayer coatings, Laue- and Fresnel-lenses - and even an optic using the curvature of space-time. The volume also presents an overview of detectors matching the ambitious objectives of gamma ray optics, and facilities for operating such systems on the ground and in space. The extraordinary scientific potential of focusing gamma-ray telescopes for the study of the most powerful sources and the most violent events in the Universe is emphasized in a series of introductory articles. Practicing professionals, and students interested in experimental high-energy astrophysics, will find this book a useful reference

  18. Multifragmentation model for astrophysical strangelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, Sayan; De, J.N.; Joarder, Partha S.; Raha, Sibaji; Syam, Debapriyo

    2012-01-01

    A model for the possible size distribution of astrophysical strangelets, that fragment out of the warm strange quark matter ejected during the merger of binary strange stars in the Galaxy, is presented here by invoking the statistical multifragmentation model. A simplified assumption of zero quark mass has been considered to obtain such mass-spectrum for the strangelets. An approximate estimate for the intensity of such strangelets in the galactic cosmic rays is also attempted by using a diffusion approximation.

  19. Ongoing Space Physics - Astrophysics Connections

    OpenAIRE

    Eichler, David

    2005-01-01

    I review several ongoing connections between space physics and astrophysics: a) Measurements of energetic particle spectra have confirmed theoretical prediction of the highest energy to which shocks can accelerate particles, and this has direct bearing on the origin of the highest energy cosmic rays. b) Mass ejection in solar flares may help us understand photon ejection in the giant flares of magnetar outbursts. c) Measurements of electron heat fluxes in the solar wind can help us understand...

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and its application to biomedical research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakazawa, Mikio; Imai, Shoichi

    1988-07-01

    The principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were explained and its application to biomedical research discussed. With /sup 31/P-NMR, it is feasible to conduct a continuous, non-invasive measurement of the contents of myocardial high-energy phosphate compounds and the intracellular pH (determined by monitoring the pH dependent shift of the inorganic phosphate peak relative to that of creatine phosphate), and to correlate them with the mechanical function. The determination of the free magnesium concentration is also possible on a similar principle to that for pH determination (the shift of MgATP peaks relative to ATP is utilized in this case). It is estimated to be 0.3 mM and was found not to be changed during ischemia. Several examples of studies including our own conducted to delineate the ischemic derangements of the myocardial energy metabolism and the effects of various interventions thereupon were illustrated. Finally a brief mention was made of the saturation transfer technique. This is the only method with which one can study the kinetics of the enzyme reactions under in vivo conditions. The application of the method for analysis of the creatine kinase reaction and the ATP synthesis was demonstrated. (author) 49 refs.

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and its application to biomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazawa, Mikio; Imai, Shoichi

    1988-01-01

    The principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were explained and its application to biomedical research discussed. With 31 P-NMR, it is feasible to conduct a continuous, non-invasive measurement of the contents of myocardial high-energy phosphate compounds and the intracellular pH (determined by monitoring the pH dependent shift of the inorganic phosphate peak relative to that of creatine phosphate), and to correlate them with the mechanical function. The determination of the free magnesium concentration is also possible on a similar principle to that for pH determination (the shift of MgATP peaks relative to ATP is utilized in this case). It is estimated to be 0.3 mM and was found not to be changed during ischemia. Several examples of studies including our own conducted to delineate the ischemic derangements of the myocardial energy metabolism and the effects of various interventions thereupon were illustrated. Finally a brief mention was made of the saturation transfer technique. This is the only method with which one can study the kinetics of the enzyme reactions under in vivo conditions. The application of the method for analysis of the creatine kinase reaction and the ATP synthesis was demonstrated. (author) 49 refs

  2. A review of the development of portable laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and its applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakovský, J., E-mail: jozef.rakovsky@jh-inst.cas.cz [J. Heyrovský Institute of Physical Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Dolejškova 3, 18223 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Čermák, P. [Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina F2, 842 48 Bratislava (Slovakia); Musset, O. [Laboratoire interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR CNRS 6303, Université de Bourgogne, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Veis, P. [Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina F2, 842 48 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2014-11-01

    In this review, we present person-transportable laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) devices that have previously been developed and reported in the literature as well as their applications. They are compared with X-ray fluorescent (XRF) devices, which represent their strongest competition. Although LIBS devices have advantages over XRF devices, such as sensitivity to the light elements, high spatial resolution and the possibility to distinguish between different layers of the sample, there are also disadvantages and both are discussed here. Furthermore, the essential portable LIBS instrumentation (laser, spectrograph and detector) is presented, and published results related to new laser sources (diode-pumped solid-state, microchip and fiber lasers) used in LIBS are overviewed. Compared to conventional compact flashlamp pumped solid-state lasers, the new laser sources provide higher repetition rates, higher efficiency (less power consumption) and higher beam quality, resulting in higher fluences, even for lower energies, and could potentially increase the figure of merit of portable LIBS instruments. Compact spectrometers used in portable LIBS devices and their parts (spectrograph, detector) are also discussed. - Highlights: • Overview of portable LIBS devices transportable by a person • Discussion and new trends about portable LIBS instrumentation: laser, spectrograph and detector • Overview of applications of DPSS, microchip and fiber lasers in LIBS.

  3. Application of near-infrared spectroscopy to measurement of hemodynamic signals accompanying stimulated saliva secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroki; Obata, Akiko N; Moda, Ichiro; Ozaki, Kazutaka; Yasuhara, Takaomi; Yamamoto, Yukari; Kiguchi, Masashi; Maki, Atsushi; Kubota, Kisou; Koizumi, Hideaki

    2011-04-01

    We aim to test the feasibility of using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for indirect measurement of human saliva secretion in response to taste stimuli for potential application to organoleptic testing. We use an NIRS system to measure extracranial hemodynamics (Hb-signals around the temples) of healthy participants when taste stimuli are taken in their mouths. First, the Hb-signals and volume of expelled saliva (stimulated by distilled-water or sucrose-solution intake) are simultaneously measured and large Hb-signal changes in response to the taste stimuli (Hb-responses) are found. Statistical analysis show that both the Hb response and saliva volume are larger for the sucrose solution than for the distilled water with a significant correlation between them (r = 0.81). The effects of swallowing on the Hb-signals are investigated. Similar Hb responses, differing from the sucrose solution and distilled water, are obtained even though the participants swallow the mouth contents. Finally, functional magnetic resonance imaging is used to identify possible sources of the Hb signals corresponding to salivation. Statistical analysis indicates similar responses in the extracranial regions, mainly around the middle meningeal artery. In conclusion, the identified correlation between extracranial hemodynamics and the saliva volume suggests that NIRS is applicable to the measurement of hemodynamic signals accompanying stimulated saliva secretion.

  4. Theory and Applications of Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy to Biomembrane Structure and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaolin

    Solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is one of the premiere biophysical methods that can be applied for addressing the structure and dynamics of biomolecules, including proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. It illustrates the general problem of determining the average biomolecular structure, including the motional mean-square amplitudes and rates of the fluctuations. Lineshape and relaxtion studies give us a view into the molecular properties under different environments. To help the understanding of NMR theory, both lineshape and relaxation experiments are conducted with hexamethylbezene (HMB). This chemical compound with a simple structure serves as a perfect test molecule. Because of its highly symmetric structure, its motions are not very difficult to understand. The results for HMB set benchmarks for other more complicated systems like membrane proteins. After accumulating a large data set on HMB, we also proceed to develop a completely new method of data analysis, which yields the spectral densities in a body-fixed frame revealing internal motions of the system. Among the possible applications of solid-state NMR spectroscopy, we study the light activation mechanism of visual rhodopsin in lipid membranes. As a prototype of G-protein-coupled receptors, which are a large class of membrane proteins, the cofactor isomerization is triggered by photon absorption, and the local structural change is then propagated to a large-scale conformational change of the protein. Facilitation of the binding of transducin then passes along the visual signal to downstream effector proteins like transducin. To study this process, we introduce 2H labels into the rhodopsin chromophore retinal and the C-terminal peptide of transducin to probe the local structure and dynamics of these two hotspots of the rhodopsin activation process. In addition to the examination of local sites with solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy, wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) provides us the chance of

  5. High energy astrophysics an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Courvoisier, Thierry J -L

    2013-01-01

    High-energy astrophysics has unveiled a Universe very different from that only known from optical observations. It has revealed many types of objects in which typical variability timescales are as short as years, months, days, and hours (in quasars, X-ray binaries, and other objects), and even down to milli-seconds in gamma ray bursts. The sources of energy that are encountered are only very seldom nuclear fusion, and most of the time gravitation, a paradox when one thinks that gravitation is, by many orders of magnitude, the weakest of the fundamental interactions. The understanding of these objects' physical conditions and the processes revealed by high-energy astrophysics in the last decades is nowadays part of astrophysicists' culture, even of those active in other domains of astronomy. This book evolved from lectures given to master and PhD students at the University of Geneva since the early 1990s. It aims at providing astronomers and physicists intending to be active in high-energy astrophysics a broad...

  6. Raman spectroscopy application in frozen carrot cooked in different ways and the relationship with carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camorani, Paolo; Chiavaro, Emma; Cristofolini, Luigi; Paciulli, Maria; Zaupa, Maria; Visconti, Attilio; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Pellegrini, Nicoletta

    2015-08-30

    Raman spectroscopy, in its confocal micro-Raman variation, has been recently proposed as a spatially resolved method to identify carotenoids in various food matrices, being faster, non-destructive, and avoiding sample extraction, but no data are present in the literature concerning its application to the evaluation of carotenoid pattern changes after thermal treatment of carrots. The effect of three cooking methods (i.e. boiling, steaming and microwaving) was evaluated on frozen carrot, comparing changes on carotenoid profiles measured by means of Raman spectroscopy with their high-performance liquid chromatographic determination and colour. A more pronounced detrimental effect on carotenoids was detected in steamed carrots, in accordance with colour data. Conversely, boiling and, to a lesser extent, microwaving caused an increase in carotenoid concentration. Cooking procedures affected the Raman spectral features of carotenoids, causing a shift of vibration frequencies towards a higher energy, increase in the spectral baseline and peak intensities as well as a broadening of their width, probably in relation to the thermal degradation of longer carotenoids (i.e. the all-trans form) and the isomerization process. In particular, steamed samples showed a significantly higher increase of centre frequency, in accordance with a more pronounced isomerization and changes in colour parameters. This work showed that the evolution of Raman spectral parameters could provide information on carotenoid bioaccessibility for carrots cooked using various methods. This paves the way for a future use of this technique to monitor and optimize cooking processes aimed at maximizing carotenoid bioaccessibility and bioavailability. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Effect of patterns and inhomogeneities on the surface of waveguides used for optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horvath, R.; Voros, J.; Graf, R.

    2001-01-01

    It has been found that patterns acid inhomogeneities on the surface of the waveguide used fur optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy applications can produce broadening and fine structure in the incoupled light peak spectra. During cell spreading on the waveguide, a broadening of the incoupling...

  8. Characterization and Application of DNA-templated Silver Nanoclusters and Polarized Spectroscopy of Self-Assembled Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carro-Temboury, Miguel R.

    In this thesis two different systems are investigated envisioning their potential applications: DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) and ionic self-assembled (ISA) nanostructures based on azo-dyes. Mainly Visible-NIR spectroscopy was used to probe electronic transitions with absorbance a...

  9. Laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Demtröder, Wolfgang

    Keeping abreast of the latest techniques and applications, this new edition of the standard reference and graduate text on laser spectroscopy has been completely revised and expanded. While the general concept is unchanged, the new edition features a broad array of new material, e.g., ultrafast lasers (atto- and femto-second lasers) and parametric oscillators, coherent matter waves, Doppler-free Fourier spectroscopy with optical frequency combs, interference spectroscopy, quantum optics, the interferometric detection of gravitational waves and still more applications in chemical analysis, medical diagnostics, and engineering.

  10. Statistical learning in high energy and astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, J.

    2005-06-16

    This thesis studies the performance of statistical learning methods in high energy and astrophysics where they have become a standard tool in physics analysis. They are used to perform complex classification or regression by intelligent pattern recognition. This kind of artificial intelligence is achieved by the principle ''learning from examples'': The examples describe the relationship between detector events and their classification. The application of statistical learning methods is either motivated by the lack of knowledge about this relationship or by tight time restrictions. In the first case learning from examples is the only possibility since no theory is available which would allow to build an algorithm in the classical way. In the second case a classical algorithm exists but is too slow to cope with the time restrictions. It is therefore replaced by a pattern recognition machine which implements a fast statistical learning method. But even in applications where some kind of classical algorithm had done a good job, statistical learning methods convinced by their remarkable performance. This thesis gives an introduction to statistical learning methods and how they are applied correctly in physics analysis. Their flexibility and high performance will be discussed by showing intriguing results from high energy and astrophysics. These include the development of highly efficient triggers, powerful purification of event samples and exact reconstruction of hidden event parameters. The presented studies also show typical problems in the application of statistical learning methods. They should be only second choice in all cases where an algorithm based on prior knowledge exists. Some examples in physics analyses are found where these methods are not used in the right way leading either to wrong predictions or bad performance. Physicists also often hesitate to profit from these methods because they fear that statistical learning methods cannot

  11. Statistical learning in high energy and astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, J.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis studies the performance of statistical learning methods in high energy and astrophysics where they have become a standard tool in physics analysis. They are used to perform complex classification or regression by intelligent pattern recognition. This kind of artificial intelligence is achieved by the principle ''learning from examples'': The examples describe the relationship between detector events and their classification. The application of statistical learning methods is either motivated by the lack of knowledge about this relationship or by tight time restrictions. In the first case learning from examples is the only possibility since no theory is available which would allow to build an algorithm in the classical way. In the second case a classical algorithm exists but is too slow to cope with the time restrictions. It is therefore replaced by a pattern recognition machine which implements a fast statistical learning method. But even in applications where some kind of classical algorithm had done a good job, statistical learning methods convinced by their remarkable performance. This thesis gives an introduction to statistical learning methods and how they are applied correctly in physics analysis. Their flexibility and high performance will be discussed by showing intriguing results from high energy and astrophysics. These include the development of highly efficient triggers, powerful purification of event samples and exact reconstruction of hidden event parameters. The presented studies also show typical problems in the application of statistical learning methods. They should be only second choice in all cases where an algorithm based on prior knowledge exists. Some examples in physics analyses are found where these methods are not used in the right way leading either to wrong predictions or bad performance. Physicists also often hesitate to profit from these methods because they fear that statistical learning methods cannot be controlled in a

  12. Solar astrophysics: ghettosis from, or symbiosis with, stellar and galactic astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pecker, J C; Thomas, R N [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 75 - Paris (France). Inst. d' Astrophysique

    1976-07-01

    The authors summarize how the solar-stellar symbiotic approach, an astrophysical research method, has led to the modeling of a star as a concentration of matter and energy. The observational aspect of the method is to discover an 'anomalous' feature, in either the Sun, where the feature is small, or in an unusual or exceptional star, where the feature is large. The theoretical aspect of the method is to discover some physical inconsistency in theoretical models of some phenomenon or in theoretical basis for some diagnostic method, and attempt to develop a better approach, guided by the observational application.

  13. Electron energy loss spectroscopy microanalysis and imaging in the transmission electron microscope: example of biological applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diociaiuti, Marco

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports original results obtained in our laboratory over the past few years in the application of both electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopy imaging (ESI) to biological samples, performed in two transmission electron microscopes (TEM) equipped with high-resolution electron filters and spectrometers: a Gatan model 607 single magnetic sector double focusing EEL serial spectrometer attached to a Philips 430 TEM and a Zeiss EM902 Energy Filtering TEM. The primary interest was on the possibility offered by the combined application of these spectroscopic techniques with those offered by the TEM. In particular, the electron beam focusing available in a TEM allowed us to perform EELS and ESI on very small sample volumes, where high-resolution imaging and electron diffraction techniques can provide important structural information. I show that ESI was able to improve TEM performance, due to the reduced chromatic aberration and the possibility of avoiding the sample staining procedure. Finally, the analysis of the oscillating extended energy loss fine structure (EXELFS) beyond the ionization edges characterizing the EELS spectra allowed me, in a manner very similar to the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of the X-ray absorption spectra, to obtain short-range structural information for such light elements of biological interest as O or Fe. The Philips EM430 (250-300 keV) TEM was used to perform EELS microanalysis on Ca, P, O, Fe, Al and Si. The assessment of the detection limits of this method was obtained working with well-characterized samples containing Ca and P, and mimicking the actual cellular matrix. I applied EELS microanalysis to Ca detection in bone tissue during the mineralization process and to P detection in the cellular membrane of erythrocytes treated with an anti-tumoral drug, demonstrating that the cellular membrane is a drug target. I applied EELS microanalysis and selected area electron

  14. Time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy of semiconductors for optical applications beyond the visible spectral range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernikov, Alexey A.

    2011-07-01

    the impact of Coulomb-correlations on the carrier-phonon scattering. The experiments presented in chapter 5 deal with the characterization of recently synthesizedmaterial systems: ZnO/(ZnMg)O heterostructures, GaN quantum wires (QWires), as well as (GaAs)Bi quantum wells (QWs). TRPL spectroscopy is applied to gain insight as well as a better understanding of the respective carrier relaxation and recombination processes crucial for the device operation. The aim of the studies is the systematic investigation of carrier dynamics influenced by disorder. The measurements are supported by kinetic Monte- Carlo simulations, providing a quantitative analysis of carrier localization effects. In chapter 6, optimization and characterization studies of semiconductor lasers, based on the well-studied (GaIn)As material system designed for NIR applications, are performed. The device under investigation is the so-called vertical-external-cavity surface emitting laser (VECSEL). The experiments focus on the study of the thermal properties of a high-power VECSEL. The distribution and removal of the excess heat as well as the optimization of the laser for increased performance are addressed applying different heat-spreading and heat-transfer approaches. Based on these investigations, the possibility for power-scaling is evaluated and the underlying restrictions are analyzed. The latter investigations are performed applying spatially-resolved PL spectroscopy. An experimental setup is designed for monitoring the spatial distribution of heat in the semiconductor structure during laser operation.

  15. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Low Temperature Molecular Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Molecular spectroscopy has achieved rapid and significant progress in recent years, the low temperature techniques in particular having proved very useful for the study of reactive species, phase transitions, molecular clusters and crystals, superconductors and semiconductors, biochemical systems, astrophysical problems, etc. The widening range of applications has been accompanied by significant improvements in experimental methods, and low temperature molecular spectroscopy has been revealed as the best technique, in many cases, to establish the connection between experiment and theoretical calculations. This, in turn, has led to a rapidly increasing ability to predict molecular spectroscopic properties. The combination of an advanced tutorial standpoint with an emphasis on recent advances and new perspectives in both experimental and theoretical molecular spectroscopy contained in this book offers the reader insight into a wide range of techniques, particular emphasis being given to supersonic jet and matri...

  16. APPLICATION OF NEAR INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY AND EXPLORATORY DATA ANALYSIS FOR THE IDENTIFICATION OF WOODS IN THE FURNITURE INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Ferreira Bastos

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper aimed to investigate the application of infrared spectroscopy and exploratory data analysis to distinguish the different types of natural woods, contributing to the control of the origin of the materials used in the furniture industry. The near infrared spectroscopy (NIR was used for the characterization of 44 samples of 19 different types of wood, and the principal component analysis (PCA to discriminate. The proposed methodology was efficient in the separation of some samples, but further studies should be performed for the diffusion of this methodology in the routine of the furniture industry.

  17. Gamma-induced positron annihilation spectroscopy and application to radiation-damaged alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, D.P.; Hunt, A.W.; Tchelidze, L.; Kumar, J.; Smith, K.; Thompson, S.; Selim, F.; Williams, J.; Harmon, J.F.; Maloy, S.; Roy, A.

    2006-01-01

    Radiation damage and other defect studies of materials are limited to thin samples because of inherent limitations of well-established techniques such as diffraction methods and traditional positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) [P. Hautojarvi, et al., Positrons in Solids, Springer, Berlin, 1979, K.G. Lynn, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 47 (1985) 239]. This limitation has greatly hampered industrial and in-situ applications. ISU has developed new methods that use pair-production to produce positrons throughout the volume of thick samples [F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 192 (2002) 197, F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instru. Meth. A 495 (2002) 154, F.A. Selim, et al., J. Rad. Phys. Chem. 68 (2004) 427, F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 241 (2005) 253, A.W. Hunt, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B. 241 (2005) 262]. Unlike prior work at other laboratories that use bremsstrahlung beams to create positron beams (via pair-production) that are then directed at a sample of interest, we produce electron-positron pairs directly in samples of interest, and eliminate the intermediate step of a positron beam and its attendant penetrability limitations. Our methods include accelerator-based bremsstrahlung-induced pair-production in the sample for positron annihilation energy spectroscopy measurements (PAES), coincident proton-capture gamma-rays (where one of the gammas is used for pair-production in the sample) for positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS), or photo-nuclear activation of samples for either type of measurement. The positrons subsequently annihilate with sample electrons, emitting coincident 511 keV gamma-rays [F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 192 (2002) 197, F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instru. Meth. A 495 (2002) 154, F.A. Selim, et al., J. Rad. Phys. Chem. 68 (2004) 427, F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 241 (2005) 253, A.W. Hunt, D

  18. THE SZ EFFECT IN THE PLANCK ERA: ASTROPHYSICAL AND COSMOLOGICAL IMPACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Colafrancesco

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Sunyaev–Zel’dovich effect (SZE is a relevant probe for cosmology and particle astrophysics. The Planck Era marks a definite step forward in the use of this probe for astrophysics and cosmology. Astrophysical applications to galaxy clusters, galaxies, radiogalaxies and large-scale structures are discussed. Cosmological relevance for the Dark Energy equation of state, modified Gravity scenarios, Dark Matter search, cosmic magnetism and other cosmological applications is also reviewed. Future directions for the study of the SZE and its polarization are finally outlined.

  19. Application of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy with chemometrics on postmortem interval estimation based on pericardial fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji; Li, Bing; Wang, Qi; Wei, Xin; Feng, Weibo; Chen, Yijiu; Huang, Ping; Wang, Zhenyuan

    2017-12-21

    Postmortem interval (PMI) evaluation remains a challenge in the forensic community due to the lack of efficient methods. Studies have focused on chemical analysis of biofluids for PMI estimation; however, no reports using spectroscopic methods in pericardial fluid (PF) are available. In this study, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy with attenuated total reflectance (ATR) accessory was applied to collect comprehensive biochemical information from rabbit PF at different PMIs. The PMI-dependent spectral signature was determined by two-dimensional (2D) correlation analysis. The partial least square (PLS) and nu-support vector machine (nu-SVM) models were then established based on the acquired spectral dataset. Spectral variables associated with amide I, amide II, COO - , C-H bending, and C-O or C-OH vibrations arising from proteins, polypeptides, amino acids and carbohydrates, respectively, were susceptible to PMI in 2D correlation analysis. Moreover, the nu-SVM model appeared to achieve a more satisfactory prediction than the PLS model in calibration; the reliability of both models was determined in an external validation set. The study shows the possibility of application of ATR-FTIR methods in postmortem interval estimation using PF samples.

  20. Applications of acoustic reasonance spectroscopy as a safeguards-and-security technology in plutonium management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baiardo, J.P.; Wright, P.V.; Heiple, C.R.

    1995-01-01

    Recent negotiations between the United States and the former Soviet Union have resulted in agreements to aggressively reduce our respective nuclear weapon stockpiles. This is a very long-term activity that involves dismantlement, interim storage, and processing of a variety of components and materials. In addition, the end of the Cold War followed by the abrupt shutdown of a significant portion of the weapons complex in the United States has left tons of excess plutonium in various forms in storage for extended periods of time with resulting serious safety concerns. While long-term storage of plutonium in any form requires monitoring to mitigate safety, security, and nonproliferation concerns, the weapon dismantlement phase also requires monitoring for identification and verification without revealing design information. Clearly, the need for sensitive, noninvasive, and rapid monitoring techniques is highly desirable. Acoustic resonance spectroscopy (ARS) may emerge as one such technique; indeed, ARS has already been proven in a number of applications to date including Chemical Weapons Treaty verification and determination of waste drum pressurization and it is being investigated as a method to detect changes in sealed weapon component containers