WorldWideScience

Sample records for astro research fellowship

  1. Science Academies Summer Research Fellowship

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 11. Science Academies Summer Research Fellowship. Information and Announcements Volume 13 Issue 11 November 2008 pp 1091-1094. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  2. Summer Research Fellowship Programme 2018

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1943 Section: Medicine. Vakil, Rustom Jai M.D. (London), FNA. Date of birth: 17 July 1911. Date of death: 20 November 1974. Specialization: Cardiac Research. YouTube · Twitter · Facebook · Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Associates – 2017. Posted on 30 August 2017.

  3. Research Productivity of Sports Medicine Fellowship Faculty

    OpenAIRE

    Cvetanovich, Gregory L.; Saltzman, Bryan M.; Chalmers, Peter N.; Frank, Rachel M.; Cole, Brian J.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Research productivity is considered an important factor in academic advancement in sports medicine. No study to date has evaluated academic productivity and correlates of academic rank for sports medicine fellowship faculty. Purpose: To describe the academic productivity of American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) fellowship program faculty and to determine the association between academic productivity, fellowship characteristics, and academic rank. Study Design: D...

  4. Research Productivity of Sports Medicine Fellowship Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetanovich, Gregory L; Saltzman, Bryan M; Chalmers, Peter N; Frank, Rachel M; Cole, Brian J; Bach, Bernard R

    2016-12-01

    Research productivity is considered an important factor in academic advancement in sports medicine. No study to date has evaluated academic productivity and correlates of academic rank for sports medicine fellowship faculty. To describe the academic productivity of American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) fellowship program faculty and to determine the association between academic productivity, fellowship characteristics, and academic rank. Descriptive epidemiology study. Characteristics of orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship programs were obtained from the AOSSM and program websites. Metrics of academic productivity (Hirsch index [h index], I-10 index, publications, citations, and number of publications in several journals) were obtained from Scopus. Statistical analyses were conducted to determine whether academic productivity differs with fellowship attributes and academic rank. A total of 90 AOSSM sports medicine fellowship programs with 610 associated faculty members were identified. Faculty were predominantly male (94%), at academic medical centers (74%), members of AOSSM (71%), and sports medicine-fellowship trained (84%). Faculty had a median of 18 (range, 0-684) publications overall, including a median of 3 (range, 0-161) publications since 2012. All measures of academic productivity were significantly higher among faculty employed at academic medical centers compared with those not employed at academic centers (P Sports Medicine and Arthroscopy per faculty member (P sports medicine fellowship faculty. Research productivity was higher among faculty employed at academic centers in the Northeast and Midwest regions and at programs with a larger number of fellows.

  5. Summer Research Fellowship Programme 2018

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Meetings · Mid Year Meetings · Discussion Meetings · Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia. Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1937 Section: Engineering & Technology. Forbes, S G .

  6. Science Academies' Summer Research Fellowship Programme for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 21; Issue 9. Science Academies' Summer Research Fellowship Programme for Students and Teachers - 2017. Information and Announcements Volume 21 Issue 9 September 2016 pp 861-861 ...

  7. Science Academies Summer Research Fellowship Programme for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 10. Science Academies Summer Research Fellowship Programme for Students and Teachers. Information and Announcements Volume 16 Issue 10 October 2011 pp 999-999 ...

  8. Science Academies' Summer Research Fellowship Programme for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 22; Issue 11. Science Academies' Summer Research Fellowship Programme for Students and Teachers - 2018. Information and Announcements Volume 22 Issue 11 November 2017 pp 1100-1100 ...

  9. Science Academies' Summer Research Fellowship Programme for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 9. Science Academies' Summer Research Fellowship Programme for Students and Teachers - 2015. Information and Announcements Volume 19 Issue 9 September 2014 pp 877-877 ...

  10. Research Productivity of Sports Medicine Fellowship Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetanovich, Gregory L.; Saltzman, Bryan M.; Chalmers, Peter N.; Frank, Rachel M.; Cole, Brian J.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Research productivity is considered an important factor in academic advancement in sports medicine. No study to date has evaluated academic productivity and correlates of academic rank for sports medicine fellowship faculty. Purpose: To describe the academic productivity of American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) fellowship program faculty and to determine the association between academic productivity, fellowship characteristics, and academic rank. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: Characteristics of orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship programs were obtained from the AOSSM and program websites. Metrics of academic productivity (Hirsch index [h index], I-10 index, publications, citations, and number of publications in several journals) were obtained from Scopus. Statistical analyses were conducted to determine whether academic productivity differs with fellowship attributes and academic rank. Results: A total of 90 AOSSM sports medicine fellowship programs with 610 associated faculty members were identified. Faculty were predominantly male (94%), at academic medical centers (74%), members of AOSSM (71%), and sports medicine–fellowship trained (84%). Faculty had a median of 18 (range, 0-684) publications overall, including a median of 3 (range, 0-161) publications since 2012. All measures of academic productivity were significantly higher among faculty employed at academic medical centers compared with those not employed at academic centers (P academic rank were higher cumulative h index (1.22; P academic rank. Fellowships with a larger number of fellows had more publications and citations per faculty member, higher faculty cumulative h index, and more publications in the American Journal of Sports Medicine and Arthroscopy per faculty member (P academic rank among AOSSM sports medicine fellowship faculty. Research productivity was higher among faculty employed at academic centers in the Northeast and Midwest

  11. Summer Research Fellowship Programme 2018

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1974 Section: Chemistry. Ramachandra Row, Prof. Lakkaraj D.Sc. (Andhra), FNA. Date of birth: 14 December 1916. Date of death: 22 September 1991. Specialization: Lignans, Terpenes, Alkaloids and Polioxy Steroids Address: Saroja, 10-2-1A, Siripuram, Visakhapatnam 530 003.

  12. Summer Research Fellowship Programme – 2015

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    2014-11-20

    Nov 20, 2014 ... Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research invites applications for its Summer. Research Fellowship Programme – 2015, for motivated and talented Indian students in Science and Engineering. Detailed information and application form can be downloaded from http://www.jncasr.ac.in/fe/srfp.

  13. 2009 African Doctoral Dissertation Research Fellowship

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    1

    2011-01-15

    Jan 15, 2011 ... Title of Thesis. Full time/Part time Study. Name of Supervisors and department or agency affiliation. When will/did the research begin? When do you expect to graduate? PREVIOUS APPLICATIONS TO THE ADDRF PROGRAM. If you have previously applied for a fellowship you must complete the section ...

  14. Science Academies' Summer Research Fellowship Programme for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    2013-11-30

    Nov 30, 2013 ... Science Academies' Summer Research Fellowship Programme for. Students and Teachers – 2014. Sponspored by. Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore. Indian National Science Academy, New Delhi. The National Academy of Sciences, India, Allahabad. The three national science academies offer ...

  15. Swashzone Fellowships: a 6-month research experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raubenheimer, B.

    2011-12-01

    The Swashzone Fellowships funded by the CAREER program were designed to provide sufficient time for undergraduates with little knowledge of ocean processes and minimal prior research experience to participate in observational nearshore oceanographic studies. The fellows learned background material, developed hypotheses, planned field experiments, designed sensor arrays, tested and debugged instrumentation, collected and analyzed data, and communicated the results through oral and written presentations. The program funded 12 undergraduate student fellows (4 male and 8 female), with backgrounds in math (3 students), physics (4), geology (1), and environmental sciences (4). Preference was given to applicants who had not taken oceanography classes and who were unsure of career plans. All the students presented their results at department seminars, and most presented their results at a professional conference (eg, AGU or Ocean Sciences). The results often were incorporated in peer-reviewed manuscripts. Evaluations conducted following the fellowships and again several years after each fellowship indicated that many of the students pursued STEM careers: 5 are pursuing PhD degrees, including bio-mathematics, physics, atmospheric physics, and ocean physics; 2 are employed at environmental engineering and consulting firms; 4 are employed as research technicians at WHOI; and 1 is a lawyer (currently being considered as a clerk for the Supreme Court). Many of the students were excited to learn about the range of oceanographic career options, including engineering and technical staff, as well as science research. The graduating seniors expressed their appreciation for the fellowship opportunity, stating that there were few science positions available to students without significant prior research experience. Several students noted that the fellowships were critical to their later employment and to their decisions to pursue careers in science. In particular, the students noted

  16. Summer Research Fellowship Programme 2018

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Specialization: Cancer Biology, Genomics, Human Genetics Address: Molecular Biology Research & Diagnostic Laboratory, Saroj Gupta Cancer Centre & Research Institute, M.G. Road, Thakurpukur, Kolkata 700 063, W.B.. Contact: Office: (033) 2453 2781-83/2115. Residence: (033) 2358 1528. Mobile: 94331 02986

  17. Summer Research Fellowship Programme 2018

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Good Governance: Contribution of Vigilance · Vigilance Awareness Talk by K Jairaj, Former Additional Chief Secretary, Government of Karnataka. 17 November, 2017, 3:30 PM Auditorium, Raman Research Institute ...

  18. Summer Research Fellowship Programme 2017

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1975 Section: Physics. Divatia, Dr Ajay Shrinivas Ph.D. (Wisconsin), FNA. Date of birth: 17 February 1927. Date of death: 7 January 1993. Specialization: Nuclear Physics and Accelerator Physics Address: INSA Senior Scientist, Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Bombay 400 085.

  19. Summer Research Fellowship Programme 2018

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Specialization: Computational Chemistry, Non-Covalent Interactions, Biomolecular Simulations Address: Senior Principal Scientist, Chemical Laboratory, Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai 600 020, T.N.. Contact: Office: (044) 2441 1630, (044) 2443 7150. Residence: (044) 2238 3031. Mobile: 98402 64151

  20. 76 FR 77505 - Applications for New Awards; Research Fellowships Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-13

    ... rehabilitation research and must have a doctorate, other terminal degree, or comparable academic qualifications... Fellowship grant (during the duration of the Fellowship award performance period). Fellows may, subject to... affected your ability to submit your application by 4:30 p.m., Washington, DC time, on the application...

  1. Science Academies' Summer Research Fellowship Programme for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    2016-09-10

    Sep 10, 2016 ... Programme for Students and Teachers – 2017. Indian Academy of Sciences, Bengaluru,. Indian National Science Academy, New Delhi. The National Academy of Sciences India, Allahabad. The three national science academies offer several two-month Summer Fellowships to enable students/teachers.

  2. Science Academies' Summer Research Fellowship Programme for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    2014-09-10

    Sep 10, 2014 ... Programme for Students and Teachers – 2015. Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore. Indian National Science Academy, New Delhi. The National Academy of Sciences, India, Allahabad. The three national science academies offer several two-month Summer Fellowships to enable students/teachers ...

  3. Science Academies' Summer Research Fellowship Programme for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    2015-09-10

    Sep 10, 2015 ... Programme for Students and Teachers – 2016. Indian Academy of Sciences, Bengaluru. Indian National Science Academy, New Delhi. The National Academy of Sciences, India, Allahabad. The three national science academies offer several two-month Summer Fellowships to enable students/teachers ...

  4. Science Academies' Summer Research Fellowship Programme for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The last date for receipt of applications is 31 December 2011. Information of selection along with concurrence of the guide will be despatched by early March. 2012. The selected students/teachers will be provided appropriate round trip train fare and a monthly fellowship to meet their living expenses at the place of work.

  5. AstroCloud, a Cyber-Infrastructure for Astronomy Research: Data Archiving and Quality Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, B.; Cui, C.; Fan, D.; Li, C.; Xiao, J.; Yu, C.; Wang, C.; Cao, Z.; Chen, J.; Yi, W.; Li, S.; Mi, L.; Yang, S.

    2015-09-01

    AstroCloud is a cyber-Infrastructure for Astronomy Research initiated by Chinese Virtual Observatory (China-VO) under funding support from NDRC (National Development and Reform commission) and CAS (Chinese Academy of Sciences)1(Cui et al. 2014). To archive the astronomical data in China, we present the implementation of the astronomical data archiving system (ADAS). Data archiving and quality control are the infrastructure for the AstroCloud. Throughout the data of the entire life cycle, data archiving system standardized data, transferring data, logging observational data, archiving ambient data, And storing these data and metadata in database. Quality control covers the whole process and all aspects of data archiving.

  6. Health economics and outcomes research fellowship practices reviewed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Kangho; Gabriel, Susan; Adams, Michelle A; Arcona, Steve

    2015-01-01

    The guidelines for health economics and outcomes research (HEOR) fellowship training programs devised by the American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) and the International Society of Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) suggest that continuous improvements are made to ensure that postgraduate training through didactic and professional experiences prepare fellows for HEOR research careers. The HEOR Fellowship Program at Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation was standardized to enhance the fellows' HEOR research understanding and align professional skill sets with the ACCP-ISPOR Fellowship Program Guidelines. Based on feedback from an internal task force comprised of HEOR employees and current and former fellows, the HEOR Fellowship Program was normatively and qualitatively assessed to evaluate the current curricular program. Fellowship program activities were instituted to ensure that the suggested minimum level requirements established by the guidelines were being met. Research opportunities enabling fellows to work hand-in-hand with other fellows and HEOR professionals were emphasized. Curricular enhancements in research methodology and professional training and development, and materials for a structured journal club focusing on specific methodological and HEOR research topics were developed. A seminar series (e.g., creating SMART Goals, StrengthsFinder 2.0) and professional courses (e.g., ISPOR short courses, statistics.com) were included to enhance the fellows' short- and long-term professional experience. Additional program attributes include an online reference library developed to enrich the current research facilities and a Statistical Analysis Software training program. Continuously assessing and updating HEOR fellowship programs keeps programs up-to-date in the latest HEOR concepts and approaches used to evaluate health care, both professionally and educationally. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Impact of fellowship training on research productivity in academic ophthalmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Grace; Fang, Christina H; Lopez, Santiago A; Bhagat, Neelakshi; Langer, Paul D; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2015-01-01

    To assess whether scholarly impact of academic ophthalmologists, as measured using the h-index, is affected by fellowship training status and to further characterize differences in productivity among the various subspecialties and by departmental rank. A descriptive and correlational design was used. In total, 1440 academic ophthalmologists from 99 ophthalmology training programs were analyzed. The h-index data were obtained from the Scopus database. Faculty members were classified by academic rank and grouped into 10 categories based on fellowship training: anterior segment, corneal and external disease, glaucoma, uveitis and ocular immunology, vitreoretinal disease, ophthalmic plastic surgery, pediatric ophthalmology, neuro-ophthalmology, ophthalmic pathology, and "other." A one-way analysis of variance or Student t test using Microsoft Excel and "R" statistical software were used for comparison of continuous variables, with significance set at p academic ophthalmology residency training programs in the United States whose information is stored in the American Medical Association's Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database. Fellowship-trained ophthalmologists had significantly higher research productivity, as measured using the h-index, than non-fellowship-trained ophthalmologists in this study (p Academic ophthalmologists trained in vitreoretinal disease or ophthalmic pathology had the highest scholarly productivity compared with those in other ophthalmology subspecialties (p academic rank from Assistant Professor to Professor (p Academic ophthalmologists with fellowship training have significantly higher scholarly output than non-fellowship-trained ophthalmologists do, as measured using the h-index. Research productivity increases with departmental academic rank from Assistant Professor to Professor. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Impact of fellowship training on research productivity in academic otolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloy, Jean Anderson; Svider, Peter F; Mauro, Kevin M; Setzen, Michael; Baredes, Soly

    2012-12-01

    Assessment of scholarly productivity as measured by research output is a key component of decisions regarding appointment and advancement in academic otolaryngology. An increasing number of graduating residents are pursuing postresidency fellowships, and evaluation of research productivity among these subspecialists is important in determining their role in academic otolaryngology departments. The h-index is a reliable indicator of research productivity, as it takes into account both quantity and relevance of research contributions. Our objective was to evaluate and compare trends in research productivity among the various otolaryngology subspecialties. Analysis of research productivity trends among otolaryngology subspecialties using the h-index. Faculty members from 92 academic otolaryngology departments were organized by subspecialty and academic rank, and their research productivity, as measured by the h-index, was calculated using the Scopus database. Fellowship-trained otolaryngologists in academic programs had higher h-indices than non-fellowship-trained otolaryngologists. Head and neck surgeons and otologists had significantly higher research productivity than their peers in other otolaryngology subspecialties. Analysis of the subspecialties of chairpersons indicated that 62% were either head and neck surgeons or otologists. Fellowship-trained otolaryngologists had higher h-indices, and faculty members trained in the subspecialties with the highest research productivity were disproportionately represented in positions of leadership within academic otolaryngology, probably reflecting the importance of research contributions in the academic advancement process, although other factors, such as educational contributions and clinical performance, may also be important factors. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  9. Postdoctoral Fellowship Program in Educational Research. Final Technical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, William P.

    During his postdoctoral fellowship year, Dr. Morgan took formal course work in computer programing, advanced research design, projective techniques, the physiology of aging, and hypnosis. He also attended weekly seminars in the Institute of Environmental Stress and conducted an investigation entitled "The Alteration of Perceptual and Metabolic…

  10. Methodology and outcomes of a family medicine research fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronholm, Peter F; Straton, Joseph B; Bowman, Marjorie A

    2009-08-01

    There has not been a strong tradition of training researchers to provide the great amount of new evidence needed for the practice of family medicine. Few models for creating successful family medicine researchers have been presented in the literature. The authors report on the methodology and outcomes of a faculty development research fellowship in the University of Pennsylvania's Department of Family Medicine and Community Health. The fellowship focuses on the two domains-intensive research training and academic career development-and frames them with coursework in a content-appropriate master's degree program and clinical practice in an underserved community. Fifteen fellows have completed the program, which began in 1997. Most fellows' research work has been related to primary care and health disparities. Program completers have been the principal investigators on 39 funded studies and coinvestigators on 24 funded studies. They have, at the time this article was written, described their work in 236 publications, 114 of them peer reviewed. All but one program completer hold academic faculty positions, and 12 practice in underserved areas. In a research-intense institution, the fellowship program successfully trained family physicians to be independent clinical researchers and leaders who have substantially contributed to the national effort to mitigate health disparities through practice and research. The authors suggest that the outcomes strongly support the development of similar training opportunities in family medicine departments in other resource- and research-rich institutions.

  11. AstroCloud, a Cyber-Infrastructure for Astronomy Research: Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, J.; Yu, C.; Cui, C.; He, B.; Li, C.; Fan, D.; Hong, Z.; Yin, S.; Wang, C.; Cao, Z.; Fan, Y.; Li, S.; Mi, L.; Wan, W.; Wang, J.; Zhang, H.

    2015-09-01

    AstroCloud is a cyber-Infrastructure for Astronomy Research initiated by Chinese Virtual Observatory (China-VO) under funding support from NDRC (National Development and Reform commission) and CAS (Chinese Academy of Sciences). The ultimate goal of this project is to provide a comprehensive end-to-end astronomy research environment where several independent systems seamlessly collaborate to support the full lifecycle of the modern observational astronomy based on big data, from proposal submission, to data archiving, data release, and to in-situ data analysis and processing. In this paper, the architecture and key designs of the AstroCloud platform are introduced, including data access middleware, access control and security framework, extendible proposal workflow, and system integration mechanism.

  12. Examining Burma's Development: A Research Fellowship Program ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The program's launch takes advantage of recent governance and societal changes in Burma, which have created an encouraging research environment where research can influence public policy. A sufficient supply of researchers with the capacity and means to conduct quality research is essential to exploit these new ...

  13. Examining Burma's Development: A Research Fellowship Program ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The program's launch takes advantage of recent governance and societal changes in Burma, which have created an encouraging research environment where research can influence ... The main objective of this competitive research fund is to support applied research in areas vital to achieving long-term food security.

  14. AstroCloud, a Cyber-Infrastructure for Astronomy Research: Cloud Computing Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C.; Wang, J.; Cui, C.; He, B.; Fan, D.; Yang, Y.; Chen, J.; Zhang, H.; Yu, C.; Xiao, J.; Wang, C.; Cao, Z.; Fan, Y.; Hong, Z.; Li, S.; Mi, L.; Wan, W.; Wang, J.; Yin, S.

    2015-09-01

    AstroCloud is a cyber-Infrastructure for Astronomy Research initiated by Chinese Virtual Observatory (China-VO) under funding support from NDRC (National Development and Reform commission) and CAS (Chinese Academy of Sciences). Based on CloudStack, an open source software, we set up the cloud computing environment for AstroCloud Project. It consists of five distributed nodes across the mainland of China. Users can use and analysis data in this cloud computing environment. Based on GlusterFS, we built a scalable cloud storage system. Each user has a private space, which can be shared among different virtual machines and desktop systems. With this environments, astronomer can access to astronomical data collected by different telescopes and data centers easily, and data producers can archive their datasets safely.

  15. Fellowships Aim to Nurture Research Talent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viadero, Debra

    2008-01-01

    For Kirsten Kainz, a researcher at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, $35,000 buys a lot of time. Time, that is, to pursue her own research passions, to hone methodological skills, and to learn from and collaborate with mentors or other scholars doing similar work. Kainz is among hundreds of education researchers across the country…

  16. Chronic Disease Control Research Fellowship Program (Guatemala ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Program will recruit and mentor research fellows to study policy-relevant issues and translate the resulting knowledge into action. The program will focus initially on tobacco control research (smoking prevention, cessation), in recognition that tobacco use is the leading cause of chronic disease. However, as the program ...

  17. Examining Burma's Development: A Research Fellowship Program ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The program's launch takes advantage of recent governance and societal changes in Burma, which have created an encouraging research environment where ... Internet et les technologies en réseau telles que la téléphonie mobile suscitent des changements économiques et sociaux dans les pays en développement.

  18. A Comparison of Research Productivity Across Plastic Surgery Fellowship Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Karan; Swanson, Edward W; Susarla, Srinivas; Chang, Sarah; Stevens, W Grant; Singh, Devinder P

    2016-06-01

    Objective measures of research productivity depend on how frequently a publication is cited. Metrics such as the Hirsch index (h-index; total number of publications h that have at least h citations) allow for an objective measurement of the scientific impact of an author's publications. The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the h-index among aesthetic plastic surgery fellowship directors to that of fellowship directors in craniofacial surgery and microsurgery. We conducted a cross-sectional study of all fellowship directors in aesthetic surgery, craniofacial surgery, and microsurgery in the United States and Canada. The gathered data were categorized as bibliometric (h-index, i10-index, total number of publications, total number of citations, maximum citations for a single work, and number of self-citations) and demographic (gender, training background). Descriptive statistics were computed. The sample was composed of 30 aesthetic surgeons (93% male), 33 craniofacial surgeons (97% male), and 32 microsurgeons (94% male). The mean h-index was 13.7 for aesthetics, 16.9 for craniofacial, and 12.4 for microsurgery. There were no significant differences for any of the bibliometric measures between the three subspecialties, despite the fact that academic rank and years in practice were significantly different. As measured by the h-index, there is a high level of academic productivity among fellowship directors, regardless of subspecialty area. Unlike other plastic surgery subspecialties however, the h-index of aesthetic plastic surgeons is not correlated to academic rank, revealing a discrepancy between perceptions of aesthetic plastic surgery and its actual academic impact. © 2015 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. The 2003 NASA Faculty Fellowship Program Research Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash-Stevenson, S. K.; Karr, G.; Freeman, L. M.; Bland, J. (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    For the 39th consecutive year, the NASA Faculty Fellowship Program (NFFP) was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center. The program was sponsored by NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC, and operated under contract by The University of Alabama in Huntsville. In addition, promotion and applications are managed by the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) and assessment is completed by Universities Space Research Association (USRA). The nominal starting and finishing dates for the 10-week program were May 27 through August 1, 2003. The primary objectives of the NASA Faculty Fellowship Program are to: (1) Increase the quality and quantity of research collaborations between NASA and the academic community that contribute to NASA s research objectives; (2) provide research opportunities for college and university faculty that serve to enrich their knowledge base; (3) involve students in cutting-edge science and engineering challenges related to NASA s strategic enterprises, while providing exposure to the methods and practices of real-world research; (4) enhance faculty pedagogy and facilitate interdisciplinary networking; (5) encourage collaborative research and technology transfer with other Government agencies and the private sector; and (6) establish an effective education and outreach activity to foster greater awareness of this program.

  20. AstroCloud, a Cyber-Infrastructure for Astronomy Research: Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, C.; Yu, C.; Xiao, J.; He, B.; Li, C.; Fan, D.; Wang, C.; Hong, Z.; Li, S.; Mi, L.; Wan, W.; Cao, Z.; Wang, J.; Yin, S.; Fan, Y.; Wang, J.

    2015-09-01

    AstroCloud is a cyber-Infrastructure for Astronomy Research initiated by Chinese Virtual Observatory (China-VO) under funding support from NDRC (National Development and Reform commission) and CAS (Chinese Academy of Sciences). Tasks such as proposal submission, proposal peer-review, data archiving, data quality control, data release and open access, Cloud based data processing and analyzing, will be all supported on the platform. It will act as a full lifecycle management system for astronomical data and telescopes. Achievements from international Virtual Observatories and Cloud Computing are adopted heavily. In this paper, backgrounds of the project, key features of the system, and latest progresses are introduced.

  1. 34 CFR 356.11 - What types of problems may be researched under the fellowship program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What types of problems may be researched under the... REHABILITATION RESEARCH: RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS What Kinds of Activities Does the Department Support Under This Program? § 356.11 What types of problems may be researched under the fellowship program? Problems...

  2. Trends in research productivity of residents applying for orthopedic sports medicine fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFroda, Steven F; Shah, Kalpit N; Safdar, Omar; Mulcahey, Mary K

    2018-02-01

    Though there are no research requirements to match into an orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship, many applicants are productive in research endeavors during residency. We hypothesize that the number of publications by Orthopaedic sports medicine applicants are increasing. A list of current and recent sports medicine fellows was compiled from publicly accessible information on sports medicine fellowship websites. Articles published while the fellow was a resident were identified via publicly available search engines. The following information was collected: year of fellowship and years of residency, fellowship program, geographic location of fellowship program, total number of publications (noting specifically first and last author publications), number of publications in high impact orthopaedic journals (AJSM, JBJS Am, JSES, or Arthroscopy). Overall, 189 fellowship-matched surgeons from 2010 - 2017 were identified. There were 746 publications (average of 3.95 per fellow), with 218 (29.2%) in high impact orthopaedic journals. Surgeons who completed their fellowship during the 2016-17 academic year, published on average 5.42 publications per fellow. Fellowship applicants in the Northeast region had the highest number of total publications (359 publications, 48.1% of all publications; 6.41 publications per fellow). Applicants were listed most often as middle authors (462 publications, 61.9%). There has been an overall increase in the number of publications among sports medicine fellowship applicants in the last several academic years. Fellowship programs in the northeast United States tended to match applicants with a higher number of publications.

  3. Report from the 2014 Scoliosis Research Society Travelling Fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quraishi, Nasir A; Enercan, Meric; Naresh-Babu, J; Chopin, D

    2015-03-01

    The Scoliosis Research Society traveling fellowship was conceptualized in 1970, repeated in 1972, and, after a pause, restarted in 1993. International traveling fellows visiting North America first commenced in 2000 and have since alternated annually with the North American fellows. Although a senior fellow had always traveled with them, in 2012 the first senior international fellow traveled with the group. This year, the senior fellow was Daniel Chopin from the Neuro-Orthopedic Spine Unit, Lille University Hospital, France, and past Director of the Spine Center, Institut Calot Berck sur Mer (succeeding Dr. Cotrel). The junior fellows were Meric Enercan from the Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul Spine Center, Turkey; J. Naresh-Babu from Mallika Spine Centre, Guntur, Andhra Pradesh, India; and Nasir A. Quraishi from the Centre for Spine Studies and Surgery, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham, UK. The host centers were initially suggested by Dr. Chopin, the senior fellow; after some minor tweaking and extensive planning from the Scoliosis Research Society office, the itinerary was confirmed. The researchers were to visit 7 centers in just over 3 weeks. All of the international fellows were going to have an extraordinary adventure although they had not met each other previously. As it turned out, the trip was indeed sensational-professionally stimulating and socially endearing. The following is a short report on this unforgettable experience. Copyright © 2015 Scoliosis Research Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The 2004 NASA Faculty Fellowship Program Research Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, J. R.; Karr, G.; Freeman, L. M.; Hassan, R.; Day, J. B. (Compiler)

    2005-01-01

    This is the administrative report for the 2004 NASA Faculty Fellowship Program (NFFP) held at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for the 40th consecutive year. The NFFP offers science and engineering faculty at U.S. colleges and universities hands-on exposure to NASA s research challenges through summer research residencies and extended research opportunities at participating NASA research Centers. During this program, fellows work closely with NASA colleagues on research challenges important to NASA's strategic enterprises that are of mutual interest to the fellow and the Center. The nominal starting and .nishing dates for the 10-week program were June 1 through August 6, 2004. The program was sponsored by NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC, and operated under contract by The University of Alabama, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, and Alabama A&M University. In addition, promotion and applications are managed by the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) and assessment is completed by Universities Space Research Association (USRA). The primary objectives of the NFFP are to: Increase the quality and quantity of research collaborations between NASA and the academic community that contribute to the Agency s space aeronautics and space science mission. Engage faculty from colleges, universities, and community colleges in current NASA research and development. Foster a greater public awareness of NASA science and technology, and therefore facilitate academic and workforce literacy in these areas. Strengthen faculty capabilities to enhance the STEM workforce, advance competition, and infuse mission-related research and technology content into classroom teaching. Increase participation of underrepresented and underserved faculty and institutions in NASA science and technology.

  5. Perspectives of anesthesia residents training in Canada on fellowship training, research, and future practice location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, James; Gilbert, Jaclyn; Sharma, Abhinav; LeManach, Yannick; Yee, Doreen

    2015-09-01

    We conducted this study to determine the preferences of anesthesia residents training in Canada for fellowship training, research, and future practice location and to identify the factors that influence those preferences. Using a cross-sectional study design, a survey was sent to all anesthesia residents enrolled at an accredited Canadian anesthesiology residency program (N = 629). Data were collected on demographics and preferences for fellowship training, research, and future practice location. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to determine significant associations. Two hundred forty-four residents (39%) responded to the survey. Seventy percent of residents intended to pursue fellowship training. The top three fellowships they favoured were regional anesthesia, intensive care, and cardiac anesthesia. Male sex was positively associated with the decision to pursue fellowship training, whereas having an additional graduate degree was negatively associated with this choice. Among those pursuing fellowship training, the most influential factors were personal interest, enhancing employability, and an interest in an academic career. Fifty-seven percent of residents preferred to work at an academic hospital. Thirty-four percent of residents intended to incorporate research into their future practice, and personal interest, employability, and colleagues were most influential in their decision. Research activity and publishing in residency were associated with the desire to pursue future research initiatives. The majority of anesthesia residents training in Canada choose to pursue fellowship training and work at an academic hospital. Approximately one-third of residents have an interest in incorporating research into their future careers.

  6. Fellowships in community pharmacy research: Experiences of five schools and colleges of pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Margie E; Frail, Caitlin K; Gernant, Stephanie A; Bacci, Jennifer L; Coley, Kim C; Colip, Lauren M; Ferreri, Stefanie P; Hagemeier, Nicholas E; McGivney, Melissa Somma; Rodis, Jennifer L; Smith, Megan G; Smith, Randall B

    2016-01-01

    To describe common facilitators, challenges, and lessons learned in 5 schools and colleges of pharmacy in establishing community pharmacy research fellowships. Five schools and colleges of pharmacy in the United States. Schools and colleges of pharmacy with existing community partnerships identified a need and ability to develop opportunities for pharmacists to engage in advanced research training. Community pharmacy fellowships, each structured as 2 years long and in combination with graduate coursework, have been established at the University of Pittsburgh, Purdue University, East Tennessee State University, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and The Ohio State University. Program directors from each of the 5 community pharmacy research fellowships identified common themes pertaining to program structure, outcomes, and lessons learned to assist others planning similar programs. Common characteristics across the programs include length of training, prerequisites, graduate coursework, mentoring structure, and immersion into a pharmacist patient care practice. Common facilitators have been the existence of strong community pharmacy partnerships, creating a fellowship advisory team, and networking. A common challenge has been recruitment, with many programs experiencing at least one year without filling the fellowship position. All program graduates (n = 4) have been successful in securing pharmacy faculty positions. Five schools and colleges of pharmacy share similar experiences in implementing community pharmacy research fellowships. Early outcomes show promise for this training pathway in growing future pharmacist-scientists focused on community pharmacy practice. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Annual Report on Awards (1982). Graduate and Postdoctoral Fellowships, Postdoctoral Research Associateships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    Weapons Laboratory: Arthur Guenther Frank D. Hansing , Director of Fellowships Frank J. Seller Research Laboratory: William D. Siuru Edgar F. Seagle...made in clinical, shown above, in stipple; new or renewal awards made to law , education, or business fields, in history or social these applicants are...Graduate Record Examinations (GRE). In the 1982 NSIV Graduate Fellowship Program, the The review of each applicant’s qualifications is carried total

  8. Hunting for the Right Research Fellowship: The Dos and Don′ts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghayur Muhammad

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Every year, thousands and thousands of people from Asia, most of them PhDs, make the ultimate transition in their lives when they travel to the west to take up fellowship positions (in this case a research fellowship position in leading labs in North America and Europe. Many of these people travel with their families, not knowing what is coming their way. In this article, a number of issues have been discussed that might help these potential scientists of the future to plan ahead for such a shift and make their transition as smooth as possible.

  9. Increasing the ranks of academic researchers in mental health: a multisite approach to postdoctoral fellowship training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Ruth; Cassidy-Eagle, Erin L; Beaudreau, Sherry A; Eyler, Lisa T; Gray, Heather L; Giese-Davis, Janine; Hubbard, Jeffrey; Yesavage, Jerome A

    2010-01-01

    This report highlights the use of multisite training for psychiatry and psychology postdoctoral fellows developing careers in academic clinical research in the field of mental health. The objective is to describe a model of training for young investigators to establish independent academic clinical research careers, including (1) program structure and eligibility, (2) program goals and development of a multisite curriculum, (3) use of technology for implementing the program across multiple sites, and (4) advantages and challenges of this multisite approach. In 2000, in collaboration with the Veterans Affairs (VA) Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Centers (MIRECCs), the VA Office of Academic Affiliations launched the Special Fellowship Program in Advanced Psychiatry and Psychology. Each of the 10 currently participating VA sites across the United States is affiliated with a MIRECC and an academic medical institution. In the first five years of this fellowship program, 83 fellows (34 psychiatrists and 49 psychologists) have participated. The success of this multisite approach is evidenced by the 58 fellows who have already graduated from the program: 70% have entered academic clinical research positions, and over 25 have obtained independent extramural grant support from the VA or the National Institutes of Health. Multisite training results in a greater transfer of knowledge and capitalizes on the nationwide availability of experts, creating unique networking and learning opportunities for trainees. The VA's multisite fellowship program plays a valuable role in preparing substantial numbers of psychiatry and psychology trainees for a range of academic clinical research and leadership positions in the field of mental health.

  10. A five-year retrospective evaluation of a faculty research fellowship programme at the medical college of Georgia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wyatt, Tasha R; Braun, Kelli; Evans, Lance; Rossi, Alexis; Wallach, Paul M; Stepleman, Lara M

    2016-01-01

    ... are a commonly used format to foster educational leaders within institutions. In 2010, the Educational Innovation Institute at the Medical College of Georgia created an educational research fellowship to address...

  11. Achieving Procedural Competence during Nephrology Fellowship Training: Current Requirements and Educational Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Edward; Barsuk, Jeffrey H; Karpinski, Jolanta; McQuillan, Rory

    2016-12-07

    Concerns have previously been raised as to whether training programs are ensuring that nephrology fellows achieve competence in the procedural skills required for independent practice. We sought to review the current requirements for procedural training as well as educational research pertaining to achieving competence in the core nephrology procedures of nontunneled (temporary) hemodialysis catheter insertion and percutaneous kidney biopsy. At this time, there is no universal approach to procedural training and assessment during nephrology fellowship. Nonetheless, simulation-based mastery learning programs have been shown to be effective in improving fellows' skills in nontunneled (temporary) hemodialysis catheter insertion and should be provided by all nephrology training programs. For percutaneous kidney biopsy, the development and evaluation of inexpensive simulators are a promising starting point for future study. Current practice with respect to procedural training during nephrology fellowship remains imperfect; however, the ongoing shift toward competency-based evaluation provides opportunities to refocus on improvement. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  12. Astrobites: The Astro-ph Reader's Digest For Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna; Astrobites Team

    2013-04-01

    Astrobites (http://astrobites.com) is a daily blog aimed primarily at undergraduates interested in astrophysical research and written by a team of graduate students located at diverse institutions around the world. Nearly every day we present a journal article recently posted to astro-ph in a brief format that is accessible to anyone with a general background in the physical sciences. In addition to summarizing new work, Astrobites provides valuable context for readers not yet familiar with the astrophysical literature. Special posts offer career guidance for undergraduates (e.g. applying for an NSF graduate fellowship) and describe personal experiences (e.g. attending an astronomy summer school). We will discuss the Astrobites format and recent readership statistics, as well as potential methods for incorporating Astrobites into the classroom.

  13. Updates from Astrobites: The Astro-ph Reader's Digest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montet, Benjamin; Chisari, N.; Donaldson, J.; Dressing, C. D.; Drout, M.; Faesi, C.; Fuchs, J. T.; Kohler, S.; Lovegrove, E.; Mills, E. A.; Nesvold, E.; Newton, E. R.; Olmstead, A.; Vasel, J. A.; Weiss, L. M.; Astrobites Team

    2014-01-01

    Astrobites (http://astrobites.com) is a daily blog aimed at undergraduates interested in astrophysical research and written by a team of graduate students located at diverse institutions across the United States. Primarily, we present journal articles recently posted to astro-ph in a brief format that is accessible to anyone with a general background in the physical sciences, including readers who are not yet familiar with the astrophysical literature. Special posts offer career guidance for undergraduates (e.g. applying for an NSF graduate fellowship) and describe personal experiences (e.g. attending an astronomy summer school). We present recent readership statistics and potential methods for incorporating Astrobites into the classroom. We also discuss the Astrobites format across multiple social media platforms, including the newly launched Astroplots, and highlight our recent work organizing the annual "Communicating Science" workshop for graduate students.

  14. Astrobites: The Astro-ph Reader's Digest For Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Elisabeth R.; Kohler, S.; Gifford, D.; Plunkett, A. L.; Astrobites Team

    2012-01-01

    Astrobites (http://astrobites.com) is a daily blog aimed primarily at undergraduates interested in astrophysical research and written by a team of graduate students from around the country. Every day we present a journal article recently posted to astro-ph in a brief format that is accessible to anyone with a general background in the physical sciences. In addition to summarizing new work, Astrobites provides valuable context for readers not yet familiar with the astrophysical literature. Special posts offer career guidance for undergraduates (e.g. applying for an NSF graduate fellowship) and describe personal experiences (e.g. attending an astronomy summer school). We will discuss the Astrobites format, readership statistics and the results of our October reader survey (117 responses). The Astrobites blog is currently receiving 17000 on-site hits per month with an average of 600 all-time views per post. 17% of our readers are undergraduate students and 34% are graduates, while researchers and astronomy enthusiasts make up the remainder in equal parts. Out of the 60 students surveyed, 75% plan on a career in research in astrophysics. EN and DG acknowledge support from the National Science Foundation through Graduate Research Fellowships.

  15. Impact of Professional Student Mentored Research Fellowship on Medical Education and Academic Medicine Career Path.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areephanthu, Christopher James; Bole, Raevti; Stratton, Terry; Kelly, Thomas H; Starnes, Catherine P; Sawaya, B Peter

    2015-10-01

    This study explores the long-term impact of the Professional Student Mentored Research Fellowship (PSMRF) program at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine (UKCOM) on medical students' research productivity and career paths. Demographic characteristics, academic profiles, number of publications and residency placements from 2007 to 2012 were used to assess 119 PSMRF graduates against a comparison cohort of 898 UKCOM (non-PSMRF) students. PSMRF students had higher MCAT scores at admission (31.5 ± 0.6 vs. 30.6 ± 0.2, p = 0.007) and achieved higher USMLE Step 1 scores (228 ± 4.2 vs. 223 ± 1.5, p = 0.03) than comparison group. PSMRF students were more likely to publish PubMed-indexed papers (36.7% vs. 17.9%, p Periodicals, Inc.

  16. NASA LeRC/Akron University Graduate Cooperative Fellowship Program and Graduate Student Researchers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertis, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    On June 1, 1980, the University of Akron and the NASA Lewis Research Center (LERC) established a Graduate Cooperative Fellowship Program in the specialized areas of Engine Structural Analysis and Dynamics, Computational Mechanics, Mechanics of Composite Materials, and Structural Optimization, in order to promote and develop requisite technologies in these areas of engine technology. The objectives of this program are consistent with those of the NASA Engine Structure Program in which graduate students of the University of Akron participate by conducting research at Lewis. This report is the second on this grant and summarizes the second and third year research effort, which includes the participation of five graduate students where each student selects one of the above areas as his special field of interest. Each student is required to spend 30 percent of his educational training time at the NASA Lewis Research Center and the balance at the University of Akron. His course work is judiciously selected and tailored to prepare him for research work in his field of interest. A research topic is selected for each student while in residence at the NASA Lewis Research Center, which is also approved by the faculty of the University of Akron as his thesis topic for a Master's and/or a Ph.D. degree.

  17. Building a Bright Future. The Hydro Research Foundation's Fellowship Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughn, Brenna [Hydro Research Foundation, Inc., Evergreen, CO (United States); Linke, Deborah M. [Hydro Research Foundation, Inc., Evergreen, CO (United States)

    2015-12-29

    The Hydro Fellowship Program (program) began as an experiment to discover whether the hydropower industry could find mechanisms to attract new entrants through conducting relevant research to benefit the industry. This nationwide, new-to-the-world program was started through funding from the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Office of the Department of Energy (DOE). Between 2010-2015, the Hydro Research Foundation (HRF) designed and implemented a program to conduct valuable research and attract new entrants to the hydro workforce. This historic grant has empowered and engaged industry members from 25 organizations by working with 91 students and advisors at 24 universities in 19 states. The work funded answered pressing research needs in the fields of civil, mechanical, environmental, and electrical engineering, as well as law, energy engineering and materials innovation. In terms of number of individuals touched through funding, 148 individuals were supported by this work through direct research, mentorship, oversight of the work, partnerships and the day-to-day program administration. Based on the program results, it is clear that the funding achieved the hoped-for outcomes and has the capacity to draw universities into the orbit of hydropower and continue the conversation about industry research and development needs. The Foundation has fostered unique partnerships at the host universities and has continued to thrive with the support of the universities, advisors, industry and the DOE. The Foundation has demonstrated industry support through mentorships, partnerships, underwriting the costs and articulating the universities’ support through in-kind cost sharing. The Foundation recommends that future work be continued to nurture these graduate level programs using the initial work and improvements in the successor program, the Research Awards Program, while stimulating engagement of academia at the

  18. Astro-WISE and Grid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Begeman, Kor; Belikov, Andrey N.; Dijkstra, Fokke; Meyer-Zhao, Zheng; Valentijn, Edwin A.; Vriend, Willem-Jan

    The paper reviews the Astro-WISE infrastructure and demonstrates that the Astro-WISE Information System provides a Grid itself. We describe the integration of Astro-WISE with an external Grid infrastructure (BiGGrid). The integration is performed on all infrastructural layers (data storage, metadata

  19. Astro-WISE information system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentijn, E. A.; Belikov, A. N.; Kleijn, G. A. Verdoes; Williams, O.R.; Radziwill, NM; Chiozzi, G

    2012-01-01

    Astro-WISE is the first information system in astronomy which covers all aspects of data processing, storage and visualization. We show the various concepts behind the Astro-WISE, their realization and use, migration of Astro-WISE to other astronomical and non-astronomical information systems.

  20. Research Capacity Strengthening in Low and Middle Income Countries - An Evaluation of the WHO/TDR Career Development Fellowship Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käser, Michael; Maure, Christine; Halpaap, Beatrice M M; Vahedi, Mahnaz; Yamaka, Sara; Launois, Pascal; Casamitjana, Núria

    2016-05-01

    Between August 2012 and April 2013 the Career Development Fellowship programme of the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (World Health Organization) underwent an external evaluation to assess its past performance and determine recommendations for future programme development and continuous performance improvement. The programme provides a year-long training experience for qualified researchers from low and middle income countries at pharmaceutical companies or product development partnerships. Independent evaluators from the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute and the Barcelona Institute for Global Health used a results-based methodology to review the programme. Data were gathered through document review, surveys, and interviews with a range of programme participants. The final evaluation report found the Career Development Fellowship to be relevant to organizers' and programme objectives, efficient in its operations, and effective in its training scheme, which was found to address needs and gaps for both fellows and their home institutions. Evaluators found that the programme has the potential for impact and sustainability beyond the programme period, especially with the successful reintegration of fellows into their home institutions, through which newly-developed skills can be shared at the institutional level. Recommendations included the development of a scheme to support the re-integration of fellows into their home institutions post-fellowship and to seek partnerships to facilitate the scaling-up of the programme. The impact of the Professional Membership Scheme, an online professional development tool launched through the programme, beyond the scope of the Career Development Fellowship programme itself to other applications, has been identified as a positive unintended outcome. The results of this evaluation may be of interest for other efforts in the field of research capacity strengthening in LMICs or, generally, to

  1. AstroGrid: AstroGrid: Powering the virtual universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, N. A.

    2002-02-01

    Nic Walton describes a programme to break down wavelength barriers and empower astronomers, as well as making full use of astronomical archives. The full potential of the data from the major new observational facilities (e.g. VISTA) available to the community will only be realized if inclusive, rich, data access and manipulation mechanisms are provided. Astronomical endeavour will be further leveraged if these mechanisms enable ``science-driven'' research programmes benefiting from access to multiple data sources. I describe here the reasons and resources behind AstroGrid.

  2. The role of gender and distance mentoring in the surgical education research fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, John L; Croteau, Alfred J; Schenarts, Kimberly D

    2015-01-01

    The nature of the mentor-mentee relationship is important in the pursuit of successful research projects. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the mentor-mentee relationships in the Surgical Education Research Fellowship (SERF) based on gender and geographical distances regarding program completion. We hypothesize that there are no differences for SERF program completion rates based on gender pairs and distances between pairs. This was a retrospective study from 2006 to 2011. Mentor-mentee rosters were retrospectively reviewed for program completion, demographics, and PubMeD indexing. Time zone differences and geographic distances between pairs were found with online applications. Chi-square tests were used for categorical variables and nonparametric statistics were carried out using α = 0.05. Of the 82 individuals accepted into the SERF program, 43 (52%) completed the SERF program during the study period. There were no differences in program completion rates based on fellow gender and gender pairing (all p > 0.05). Different-gender pairs that completed the program (n = 17) were indexed more frequently on PubMed than same-gender pairs that completed the program (n = 24) (41% vs 12%, p = 0.04). There were no differences in program completion based on time zone differences (p = 0.20). The median distance between pairs completing the program (n = 35) was greater than that for pairs not completing the program (n = 36) (1741 km [IQR: 895-3117 km] vs 991 km [IQR: 676-2601 km]; p = 0.03). Completion of the SERF program was independent of mentor-mentee gender pairs and time zone differences. There was greater geographical distance separating mentor-mentee pairs that completed the SERF program compared with pairs that did not complete the program. Distance mentoring is a successful and crucial element of the SERF program. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Research jobs for recent college graduates: A comparison between traditional lab technician positions and NIH's postbaccalaureate IRTA fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, J Taylor

    2003-01-01

    The features that distinguish the Postbaccalaureate IRTA experience from a normal lab tech job are the enhanced educational opportunities, greater independence, more organized social outlets and networking opportunities, life in the DC Metro area, and the NIH itself. Also, research experience looks great on a CV when applying for research jobs or graduate schools, and the NIH name and Postbaccalaureate IRTA fellowship are impressive to potential employers and admissions committees. On the other hand, lab tech jobs often require fewer commitments outside of a normal 9-to-5 work day and usually have better pay and benefits than the Postbaccalaureate IRTA fellowship. In addition, working at a specific university often carries the benefit of being closer to one's family, friends, and/or significant others. Someone who does not like cities can choose to work at a university that has ready access to the beach, mountains, or regions of the country that are more personally appealing than the Washington, DC, area. Lab tech jobs also usually require at least a two year commitment, whereas the Postbac IRTA fellowship is generally a one year commitment (possibly two). Regardless of which option you choose, you should be active in searching for a job that lets you fulfill the goals you set for yourself in the years between graduating and starting graduate or medical school. Whether those goals are to publish, get experience, save money, or just enjoy yourself, with careful questioning and circumspection, you should be able to maximize the possibility that you will meet your goals.

  4. Project ASTRO: A Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberger, Lisa

    2001-01-01

    Describes a project that enriches astronomy lessons with hands-on activities facilitated by an astronomer. The project links professional and amateur astronomers with middle-level classroom teachers and informal educators. Families and community organizations are also involved in the project. Provides information on how to join the ASTRO network.…

  5. The Astro-Blaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Richard V.; Long, Kevin R.

    1995-01-01

    Presents the Astro-Blaster as a method of the laws of conservation of momentum and energy during the creation of a supernova. Several elastic balls are aligned for a drop, followed by multiple collisions which result in the top ball reaching tremendous heights relative to the drop height. (JRH)

  6. AstroArts

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paulis, D.

    2014-04-01

    AstroArts is the international, online cultural platform of Astronomers Without Borders (AWB). Cofounded in 2012 by visual artist Daniela de Paulis (IT/NL) and astronomer Thilina Heenatigala (Sri Lanka), AstroArts features creative works inspired by astronomy . AstroArts is an international initiative - lead by professionals working in different fields - and includes the 'guest artist of the month' and the Global Astronomy Month programmes. For the 'guest of the month', we feature one artist through a series of weekly blog posts and a Google Hangout on the last week of each month. The Hangout usually includes guests from several of the AWB ongoing programmes, together with the artist, in order to foster collaboration and interdisciplinary discussion. The 'guest of the month' programme is currently expanding to include a virtual residency initiative, which will allow one artist at the time to develop a project in collaboration with scientists affiliated with the AWB network. The projects developed as part of the virtual residency will foster global participation, making the most of online resources. Global Astronomy Month (GAM) is the most popular project of Astronomers Without Borders: founded in 2009 as a follow up of the International Year of Astronomy, GAM is a global platform for astronomy related events that take place every year in April. During GAM, AstroArts is widely featured through online panel discussions with artists and scientists, live film screenings and live performances, often especially designed for web streaming. More information on AstroArts can be found on: http://astronomerswithoutborders.org/news.htm

  7. National Research Council Research Associateships Program with Methane Hydrates Fellowships Program/National Energy Technology Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basques, Eric O. [National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-03-20

    This report summarizes work carried out over the period from July 5, 2005-January 31, 2014. The work was carried out by the National Research Council Research Associateships Program of the National Academies, under the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) program. This Technical Report consists of a description of activity from 2005 through 2014, broken out within yearly timeframes, for NRC/NETL Associateships researchers at NETL laboratories which includes individual tenure reports from Associates over this time period. The report also includes individual tenure reports from associates over this time period. The report also includes descriptions of program promotion efforts, a breakdown of the review competitions, awards offered, and Associate's activities during their tenure.

  8. Profile and scientific output analysis of physical therapy researchers with research productivity fellowship from the Brazilian National Council for Scientific and Technological Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturmer, Giovani; Viero, Carolina C M; Silveira, Matheus N; Lukrafka, Janice L; Plentz, Rodrigo D M

    2013-01-01

    To describe the profile and the scientific output of physical therapists researchers holding a research productivity fellowship (PQ) from the Brazilian National Council of Scientific and Technological Development (Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico-CNPq). This is a cross-sectional study, which has evaluated the Lattes Curriculum of all PQ physiotherapy researchers registered at CNPq holding a research productivity fellowship in the period of 2010. The variables analyzed were: gender, geographic and institutional distribution, duration since doctorate defense, research productivity fellowship level, scientific output until 2010 and the H index in Scopus(®) and ISI databases. A total of 55 PQ from the CNPq were identified in the area of knowledge of Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy, being 81.8% from the Southeast region of Brazil. They were predominantly female (61.8%), with research productivity fellowship level PQ2 (74.5%), and with average time since doctorate defense of 10.1 (±4.1) years. A total of 2.381 articles were published, with average of 42.5 (±18.9) articles/researcher. The average of articles published after doctorate defense was 39.40 (±18.9) articles/researchers with a mean output of 4.2 (±2.0) articles/year. We found 304 articles indexed in the Scopus(®) database with 2.463 citations, and 222 articles indexed in the Web of Science with 1.805 citations. The articles were published in 481 journals, being 244 (50.7%) of them listed on JCR-web. The researchers presented a median 5 of the H index in the Scopus(®) database, and a median 3 in ISI. The scientific output of the researchers with research productivity fellowship in the field of physical therapy stands out in their indicators, since the figures are very promising for a relatively young area and as it can be observed by the amount of published articles and citations obtained by the national and international research community.

  9. Improving capacity for evidence-based practice in South East Asia: evaluating the role of research fellowships in the SEA-ORCHID Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martis Ruth

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fellowships are a component of many professional education programs. They provide opportunities to develop skills and competencies in an environment where time is protected and resources and technical support are more readily available. The SEA-ORCHID fellowships program aimed to increase capacity for evidence-based practice and research synthesis, and to encourage fellows to become leaders in these areas. Methods Fellows included doctors, nurses, midwives and librarians working in the maternal and neonatal areas of nine hospitals in South East Asia. Fellowships were undertaken in Australia and involved specific outputs related to evidence-based practice or research synthesis. Training and support was tailored according to the type of output and the fellow's experience and expertise. We evaluated the fellowships program quantitatively and qualitatively through written evaluations, interviews and follow-up of fellowship activities. Results During 2006-07, 23 fellows from Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines undertook short-term fellowships (median four weeks in Australia. The main outputs were drafts of Cochrane systematic reviews, clinical practice guidelines and protocols for randomised trials, and training materials to support evidence-based practice. Protocols for Cochrane systematic reviews were more likely to be completed than other outcomes. The fellows identified several components that were critical to the program's overall success; these included protected time, tailored training, and access to technical expertise and resources. On returning home, fellows identified a lack of time and limited access to the internet and evidence-based resources as barriers to completing their outputs. The support of colleagues and senior staff was noted as an important enabler of progress, and research collaborators from other institutions and countries were also important sources of support. Conclusions The SEA

  10. SRS travelling fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl, A L; Dewald, R; O'Brien, M; Arlet, V

    1998-06-15

    A 3-week tour of the Far East was coordinated by Dr. Ronald DeWald, senior travelling fellow appointed by the Scoliosis Research Society. Three junior fellows appointed by the Education Committee of the Scoliosis Research Society accompanied him. The purpose of this fellowship was to develop a comaraderie and exchange ideas, thoughts, and experiences in the field of spinal deformity.

  11. Astro Algebra [CD-ROM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997

    Astro Algebra is one of six titles in the Mighty Math Series from Edmark, a comprehensive line of math software for students from kindergarten through ninth grade. Many of the activities in Astro Algebra contain a unique technology that uses the computer to help students make the connection between concrete and abstract mathematics. This software…

  12. Terra Cognita: Graduate Students in the Archives. A Retrospective on the CLIR Mellon Fellowships for Dissertation Research in Original Sources. CLIR Publication No. 170

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council on Library and Information Resources, 2016

    2016-01-01

    "Terra Cognita" surveys the current landscape of archival research and the experiences of emerging scholars seeking to navigate it. Drawing on data from the Council on Library and Information Resources' (CLIR's) Mellon Fellowships for Dissertation Research in Original Sources, the report takes an in-depth look at how the conditions and…

  13. AstroNet-II International Final Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Masdemont, Josep

    2016-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the "AstroNet-II International Final Conference". This conference was one of the last milestones of the Marie-Curie Research Training Network on Astrodynamics "AstroNet-II", that has been funded by the European Commission under the Seventh Framework Programme. The aim of the conference, and thus this book, is to communicate work on astrodynamics problems to an international and specialised audience. The results are presented by both members of the network and invited specialists. The topics include: trajectory design and control, attitude control, structural flexibility of spacecraft and formation flying. The book addresses a readership across the traditional boundaries between mathematics, engineering and industry by offering an interdisciplinary and multisectorial overview of the field.

  14. The Astro Learning Design Player

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharples, Paul; Wilson, Scott; Popat, Kris; Griffiths, David; Beauvoir, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    Sharples, Paul Wilson, S., Popat, K., Griffiths, D., Beauvoir, P. (2009) The Astro Learning Design Player. This software is distributed under the three clause BSD license, copyright TENCompetence Foundation

  15. AstroCappella: Songs of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, P. T.; Smale, A. P.; Smale, K. M.

    2008-11-01

    The AstroCappella Project is a classroom-ready collection of upbeat pop songs, lesson plans, and background information, all rich in science content. It was developed as a collaboration between working research astronomers, educators, and a contemporary vocal band, The Chromatics. A multimedia music CD, ``AstroCappella 2.0,'' has been produced containing 13 astronomically correct songs with original lyrics and music. Song topics range from the Sun, Moon, planets and small bodies of the Solar System, through the Doppler shift, the nearest stars, and extra-solar planets, to radio and X-ray astronomy. The CD also contains extensive CD-ROM materials including science background information, curriculum notes, lesson plans and activities for each song, images, movies, and slide shows. The songs and accompanying information have been extensively field-tested, and align to the K--12 National Science Education Standards. The AstroCappella materials are in widespread use in classrooms and homes across the U.S., and are supplemented with frequent live performances and teacher workshops.

  16. AstroCom NYC: Expanding the Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglione, Timothy; Ford, Saavik; Agueros, Marcel A.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Robbins, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    AstroCom NYC is an undergraduate mentoring program designed to improve urban minority student access to opportunities in astrophysical research by greatly enhancing partnerships between research astronomers in New York City (City University of New York - an MSI, American Museum of Natural History, and Columbia). AstroCom NYC provides centralized, personalized mentoring as well as financial and academic support, to CUNY undergraduates throughout their studies, plus the resources and opportunities to further CUNY faculty research with students. The goal is that students' residency at AMNH helps them build a sense of belonging in the field, and readies and inspires them for graduate study. AstroCom NYC provides a rigorous Methods of Scientific Research course developed specifically to this purpose, a laptop, research and career mentors, outreach activities, scholarships and stipends, Metrocards, and regular assessment for maximum effectiveness. Stipends in part alleviate the burdens at home typical for CUNY students so they may concentrate on their academic success. AMNH serves as the central hub for our faculty and students, who are otherwise dispersed among all five boroughs of the City. For our second cohort, we dramatically improved the application and screening process, implemented a number of tools to evaluate their potential for grad school, and began growing a network of potential hosts for summer internships around NY State and the US. We review these implementations and outcomes, as well as plans for Year 3, when we expect many of our current students to compete for external summer REUs, and after greatly expanding the program reach through a NASA community college initiative.

  17. How does the outcome of research training fellowships funded via the NHS compare with that from competitively funded fellowships from the MRC and other charities: a cross-sectional retrospective survey of trainees undertaking research training in the West Midlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maybury, Charlotte; Morgan, Matthew David; Smith, Russell

    2018-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to investigate the impact of research training funded via the National Health Service (NHS) on medical trainees compared with traditional clinical research training fellowships (CRTFs). Design, setting and participants Online survey of 221 clinical trainees who had completed a period of research during their clinical training between 2009 and 2015 in the West Midlands. Main outcome measures Research outcomes. Results Overall response rate was 59%, of whom 72 participants were funded by CRTFs and 51 funded by the NHS. Although participants with CRTFs were more likely to be awarded a higher degree compared with those on NHS-administered funding (66/72 CRTFs and 37/51 NHS, P=0.005), similar proportions of NHS-funded and CRTF-funded participants entered clinical lecturer posts on completing initial research training (8/51 NHS and 16/72 CRTF, P=0.37). 77% of participants had three or more publications (CRTF 57 and NHS 39, P=0.72). 57 participants had completed clinical training; similar proportions of CRTF-funded and NHS-funded trainees had research included in their consultant contract (12/22 NHS and 14/26 CRTF, P=0.96) or were appointed to academic posts (3 of 25 NHS funded and 6 of 32 CRTF, P>0.05). 95% of participants would recommend to colleagues and 82% of participants felt the research experience improved their provision of clinical care with no difference between CRTF-funded and NHS-funded participants (P=0.49). Continuing to participate in clinical work during the research reduced reports of trainee difficulty on returning to clinical work (23/108 continued clinical work vs 12/22 no clinical work, P=0.001). Conclusion Research training funded by the NHS provides a quality experience and contributes to the clinical academic capacity within the UK. More needs to be done to support NHS participants to successfully achieve a higher degree. PMID:29362273

  18. The data zoo in Astro-WISE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijn, Gijs A. Verdoes; Belikov, Andrey N.; McFarland, John P.

    In this paper we describe the way the Astro-WISE information system (or simply Astro-WISE) supports the data from a wide range of instruments and combines multiple surveys and their catalogues. Astro-WISE allows ingesting of data from any optical instrument, survey or catalogue, processing of this

  19. An Undergraduate Research Fellowship Program to Prepare Nursing Students for Future Workforce Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Mary Jo; Logan, Bridget; Mudge, Bridget; Secore, Karen; Von Reyn, LInda J.; Maue, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    It is important for nurses today and for those joining the workforce in the future to have familiarity and training with respect to interprofessional research, evidence-based practice, and quality improvement. In an effort to address this need, we describe a 10-week summer research program that immerses undergraduate nursing students in a broad spectrum of clinical and translational research projects as part of their exposure to advanced nursing roles. In doing so, the program increases the ability of the students to participate in research, effectively interact with academic medical center researchers, and incorporate elements of evidence-based practice into future nursing interventions. Their mentors are nurses practicing in roles as nurse researcher, advanced practice nurses involved in evidence-based practice or quality improvement, and clinical trials research nurses. Each student is matched with 3 of these mentors and involved in 3 different projects. Through this exposure, the students benefit from observing multiple nursing roles, taking an active role in research-related activities participating in interdisciplinary learning experiences. Overall, the program provides benefits to the students, who demonstrate measured improvement with respect to the program objectives, and to their mentors and each of the participating organizations. PMID:27964811

  20. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Animal Sciences. John, C C . YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Summer Research Fellowship Programme 2018 · Focus Area Science ...

  1. Graduate trainee fellowships for energy research in Mississippi. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The Mississippi DOE EPSCoR Project has been a program of education and research which has (1) increased the number of trained professionals in the energy sciences and technology, particularly those from groups traditionally under-represented in the field and (2) interfaced with existing networks of universities, industry, federal, and state institutions involved in energy-related activities. Key project activities that have been accomplished are shown below: (1) Statewide conference on energy related research held; (2) HBCU pipeline issue addressed; (3) Research preceptors/problems selected; (4) Trainees screened and accepted; (5) Research initiated; and (6) Practicums organized. Mississippi`s three comprehensive universities -- The University of Mississippi, Mississippi State University, and the University of Southern Mississippi -- and the urban institution, Jackson State University have provided a foundation for the expansion of energy-related education and research in the state. The activities of the Mississippi DOE EPSCoR program have been executed under a management strategy developed to establish statewide coordination of research and education programs, i.e., the Mississippi Research Consortium. The Consortium has served as the steering committee for the DOE EPSCoR Program Consortium.

  2. Research Capacity Strengthening in Low and Middle Income Countries – An Evaluation of the WHO/TDR Career Development Fellowship Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käser, Michael; Maure, Christine; Halpaap, Beatrice M. M.; Vahedi, Mahnaz; Yamaka, Sara; Launois, Pascal; Casamitjana, Núria

    2016-01-01

    Between August 2012 and April 2013 the Career Development Fellowship programme of the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (World Health Organization) underwent an external evaluation to assess its past performance and determine recommendations for future programme development and continuous performance improvement. The programme provides a year-long training experience for qualified researchers from low and middle income countries at pharmaceutical companies or product development partnerships. Independent evaluators from the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute and the Barcelona Institute for Global Health used a results-based methodology to review the programme. Data were gathered through document review, surveys, and interviews with a range of programme participants. The final evaluation report found the Career Development Fellowship to be relevant to organizers’ and programme objectives, efficient in its operations, and effective in its training scheme, which was found to address needs and gaps for both fellows and their home institutions. Evaluators found that the programme has the potential for impact and sustainability beyond the programme period, especially with the successful reintegration of fellows into their home institutions, through which newly-developed skills can be shared at the institutional level. Recommendations included the development of a scheme to support the re-integration of fellows into their home institutions post-fellowship and to seek partnerships to facilitate the scaling-up of the programme. The impact of the Professional Membership Scheme, an online professional development tool launched through the programme, beyond the scope of the Career Development Fellowship programme itself to other applications, has been identified as a positive unintended outcome. The results of this evaluation may be of interest for other efforts in the field of research capacity strengthening in LMICs or, generally, to

  3. 76 FR 93 - Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships (SURF) NIST Gaithersburg and Boulder Programs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ... physical and engineering sciences and, as the lead Federal agency for technology transfer, it provides a..., chemistry, biology, materials science, nanotechnology, neutron research, engineering, mathematics, and..., mathematics, and computer science as described in the Federal Funding Opportunity. Applications for the...

  4. Hand Surgery Fellowship Selection Criteria: A National Fellowship Director Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco M. Egro

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Candidate characteristics for hand surgery fellowship training remains unknown, as very little data is available in the literature. This study aims to provide information on the criteria that are employed to select candidates for the hand surgery fellowship match. Methods A 38-question survey was sent in April 2015 to all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education recognized hand surgery fellowship program directors (n=81 involved in the U.S. match. The survey investigated factors used for the selection of applicants, including medical school, residency training, research experience, fellowship interview, and candidate characteristics. A 5-point Likert scale was used to grade 33 factors from “not at all important” (1 to “essential in making my decision” (5; or for five controversial factors from “very negative impact” (1 to “very positive impact in making my decision” (5. Results A total of 52% (42 out of 81 of responses were received from hand surgery fellowship program directors. The most important influential factors were interactions with faculty during interview and visit (4.6±0.6, interpersonal skills (4.6±0.5, overall interview performance in the selection process (4.6±0.6, professionalism and ethics (4.6±0.7, and letters of recommendation from hand surgeons (4.5±0.7. Factors that have a negative impact on the selection process include visa requirement (2.1±1.2, graduate of non-plastic surgery residency program (2.4±1.3, and graduate of a foreign medical school (2.4±1.1. Conclusions This study provides data on hand surgery fellowship directors’ perception on the criteria important for fellowship applicant selection, and showed that interview-related criteria and letters of recommendation are the important factors.

  5. ACGME core competency training, mentorship, and research in surgical subspecialty fellowship programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francesca Monn, M; Wang, Ming-Hsien; Gilson, Marta M; Chen, Belinda; Kern, David; Gearhart, Susan L

    2013-01-01

    To determine the perceived effectiveness of surgical subspecialty training programs in teaching and assessing the 6 ACGME core competencies including research. Cross-sectional survey. ACGME approved training programs in pediatric urology and colorectal surgery. Program Directors and recent trainees (2007-2009). A total of 39 program directors (60%) and 57 trainees (64%) responded. Both program directors and recent trainees reported a higher degree of training and mentorship (75%) in patient care and medical knowledge than the other core competencies (ptraining were perceived effective to a lesser degree. Specifically, in the areas of teaching residents and medical students and team building, program directors, compared with recent trainees, perceived training to be more effective, (p = 0.004, p = 0.04). Responses to questions assessing training in systems based practice ubiquitously identified a lack of training, particularly in financial matters of running a practice. Although effective training in research was perceived as lacking by recent trainees, 81% reported mentorship in this area. According to program directors and recent trainees, the most effective method of teaching was faculty supervision and feedback. Only 50% or less of the recent trainees reported mentorship in career planning, work-life balance, and job satisfaction. Not all 6 core competencies and research are effectively being taught in surgery subspecialty training programs and mentorship in areas outside of patient care and research is lacking. Emphasis should be placed on faculty supervision and feedback when designing methods to better incorporate all 6 core competencies, research, and mentorship. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Ground-based X-ray calibration of the telescopes onboard Astro-E2 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misaki, Kazutami; Kunieda, Hideyo; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Haba, Yoshito; Itoh, Kei; Mori, Hideyuki; Iizuka, Ryo; Itoh, Akiharu; Inoue, Hirohiko; Okada, Shunsaku; Yokoyama, Yuushi; Ogasaka, Yasushi; Tamura, Keisuke; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Shibata, Ryo; Tanaka, Takeshi; Naitou, Masataka; Ishida, Manabu; Hayakawa, Akira; Inoue, Chiaki; Hayashi, Atsushi; Shimizu, Tomohiro; Serlemitsos, Peter J.; Soong, Yang; Chan, Kai-Wing; Okajima, Takashi; Lehan, John P.

    2004-02-01

    Astro-E2, to be launched in early 2005, will carry five X-ray Telescopes (XRT). The design of the XRT is the same as the previous original mission Astro-E, that is a conical approximation of Wolter Type-I optics, where about 170 thin-foil reflectors are nested confocally. Some modifications from Astro-E are adopted within the severe constraints due to the policy of "re-build" instruments. One of the major changes is the addition of pre-collimators for the stray light protection. Several modifications on the fabrication processes are also made. The replication glass mandrels are screened carefully, which is expected to reduce the figure error of replicated reflectors. We thus expect better performance than Astro-E especially in imaging capability. In order to qualify the performance of the Astro-E2 XRT, we have started ground calibration program of XRT at 30 meter X-ray beam facility of the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS). We have found positive improvements on the telescope performance from the Astro-E, which probably arise from the applied modifications. The on-axis half-power diameter (HPD) has been evaluated to be 1.6-1.7 arcmin, which is improved from the Astro-E (2.0 ~ 2.1 arcmin HPD). The on-axis effective areas of quadrants are larger than the average of Astro-E by about 5%. The on-axis effective areas of the XRT for X-ray Imaging Spectrometers (XIS) are approximately 460, 340, 260, and 190 cm2 at energies of 1.49, 4.51, 8.04, and 9.44 keV, respectively. The present paper describes the recent results of the performance of the first flight assembly of the Astro-E2 XRT.

  7. The Astro-E2/XRS-2 helium insert system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirron, P. J.; DiPirro, M. J.; Panek, J.; Kelley, R.; Mitsuda, K.; Fujimoto, R.; Hirabayashi, M.; McCammon, D.

    2006-04-01

    The X-ray Spectrometer (XRS-2) instrument on the Japanese Space Agency (JAXA) Astro-E2 spacecraft will measure faint X-ray emissions in the energy range of 0.2-10 keV. A square array of 32 X-ray microcalorimeters used will be able to distinguish individual photons to better than 10 eV at 6 keV, with a quantum efficiency near 100%. The detectors are cooled to 60 mK by means of an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR). The ADR rejects heat to a 1.3 K superfluid helium tank, which is surrounded by a 17 K solid neon tank. A Stirling cycle cryocooler precools an outer shield around the neon tank. This system will provide an estimated 3 years of on-orbit lifetime. This paper describes the helium insert, the ADR, the high temperature superconducting leads, and early on-orbit performance.

  8. Predictors of High Motivation Score for Performing Research Initiation Fellowship, Master 1, Research Master 2, and PhD Curricula During Medical Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigerlova, Eva; Oussalah, Abderrahim; Fournier, Jean-Paul; Antonelli, Arnaud; Hadjadj, Samy; Marechaud, Richard; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Roblot, Pascal; Braun, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Translational research plays a crucial role in bridging the gap between fundamental and clinical research. The importance of integrating research training into medical education has been emphasized. Predictive factors that help to identify the most motivated medical students to perform academic research are unknown. In a cross-sectional study on a representative sample of 315 medical students, residents and attending physicians, using a comprehensive structured questionnaire we assessed motivations and obstacles to perform academic research curricula (ie, research initiation fellowship, Master 1, Research Master 2, and PhD). Independent predictive factors associated with high “motivation score” (top quartile on motivation score ranging from 0 to 10) to enroll in academic research curricula were derived using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Independent predictors of high motivation score for performing Master 1 curriculum were: “considering that the integration of translational research in medical curriculum is essential” (OR, 3.79; 95% CI, 1.49–9.59; P = 0.005) and “knowledge of at least 2 research units within the university” (OR, 3.60; 95% CI, 2.01–6.47; P motivation score for performing Research Master 2 curriculum were: “attending physician” (OR, 4.60; 95% CI, 1.86–11.37; P = 0.001); “considering that the integration of translational research in medical curriculum is essential” (OR, 4.12; 95% CI, 1.51–11.23; P = 0.006); “knowledge of at least 2 research units within the university” (OR, 3.51; 95% CI, 1.91–6.46; P = 0.0001); and “male gender” (OR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.02–3.25; P = 0.04). Independent predictors of high motivation score for performing PhD curriculum were: “considering that the integration of translational research in medical curriculum is essential” (OR, 5.94; 95% CI, 2.33–15.19; P = 0.0002) and “knowledge of at least 2 research units within the university

  9. Predictors of High Motivation Score for Performing Research Initiation Fellowship, Master 1, Research Master 2, and PhD Curricula During Medical Studies: A Strobe-Compliant Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigerlova, Eva; Oussalah, Abderrahim; Fournier, Jean-Paul; Antonelli, Arnaud; Hadjadj, Samy; Marechaud, Richard; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Roblot, Pascal; Braun, Marc

    2016-02-01

    Translational research plays a crucial role in bridging the gap between fundamental and clinical research. The importance of integrating research training into medical education has been emphasized. Predictive factors that help to identify the most motivated medical students to perform academic research are unknown. In a cross-sectional study on a representative sample of 315 medical students, residents and attending physicians, using a comprehensive structured questionnaire we assessed motivations and obstacles to perform academic research curricula (ie, research initiation fellowship, Master 1, Research Master 2, and PhD). Independent predictive factors associated with high "motivation score" (top quartile on motivation score ranging from 0 to 10) to enroll in academic research curricula were derived using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Independent predictors of high motivation score for performing Master 1 curriculum were: "considering that the integration of translational research in medical curriculum is essential" (OR, 3.79; 95% CI, 1.49-9.59; P = 0.005) and "knowledge of at least 2 research units within the university" (OR, 3.60; 95% CI, 2.01-6.47; P motivation score for performing Research Master 2 curriculum were: "attending physician" (OR, 4.60; 95% CI, 1.86-11.37; P = 0.001); "considering that the integration of translational research in medical curriculum is essential" (OR, 4.12; 95% CI, 1.51-11.23; P = 0.006); "knowledge of at least 2 research units within the university" (OR, 3.51; 95% CI, 1.91-6.46; P = 0.0001); and "male gender" (OR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.02-3.25; P = 0.04). Independent predictors of high motivation score for performing PhD curriculum were: "considering that the integration of translational research in medical curriculum is essential" (OR, 5.94; 95% CI, 2.33-15.19; P = 0.0002) and "knowledge of at least 2 research units within the university" (OR, 2.63; 95% CI, 1.46-4.77; P = 0.001). This is the

  10. Songs of the Universe - The AstroCappella Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, P. T.; Smale, K. M.; Smale, A. P.

    2004-12-01

    The AstroCappella Project is a classroom-ready collection of upbeat pop songs, lesson plans, and background information, all rich in science content. It was developed as a collaboration between working research astronomers, educators, and a contemporary vocal band. A multimedia music CD ("AstroCappella 2.0") has been produced containing 13 astronomically correct songs with original lyrics and music. Song topics range from the Sun, Moon, planets and small bodies of the Solar System, through the Doppler shift, the nearest stars, and extra-solar planets, to radio astronomy, X-ray astronomy, and the Hubble Space Telescope and Swift astronomy satellites. The CD also contains extensive CD-ROM materials including science background information, curriculum notes, lesson plans and activities for each song, images, movies, and slide shows. The songs and accompanying information have been extensively field-tested, and align to the K-12 National Science Education Standards. The AstroCappella materials are in widespread use in classrooms and homes across the US, and are supplemented with frequent live performances and teacher workshops. We describe here the history, content, and educational strategy behind the AstroCappella Project, and the plans for its future development.

  11. NASA Early Career Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, H. D.

    2012-12-01

    The Early Career Fellowship program was established in 2005 to facilitate the integration of outstanding early career planetary science researchers into established research funding programs by providing tools and experience useful to maintain a successful research program. Executing a successful research program requires a few key elements such as: successful proposal writing; adequate (paid) research time; management of a laboratory; collaboration and networking; frequent and high-quality publications; and adequate start-up equipment funds. These elements may be particularly critical for early career researchers searching for a tenure- track or equivalent position. The Early Career Fellowship program recognizes the importance of these skills and provides extra funding and resources to begin a successful research program. For consideration into The Early Career Fellowship program, the candidate needs to be the P. I. or Science P.I. of a funded research proposal from one of the participating R&A program areas, be within 7 years of earning a PhD, hold a non-tenure track position, and indicate the early career candidacy when submitting the research proposal. If the research proposal is funded and the discipline scientist nominates the candidate as an early career fellow, the candidate is then considered a Fellow and eligible to propose for Step 2. Upon obtaining a tenure-track equivalent position the Fellow submits a Step 2 proposal for up to one hundred thousand dollars in start-up funds. Start-up funds may be used for salary; undergraduate and/or graduate research assistants; supplies and instrument upgrades; travel to conferences, meetings, and advisory groups; time and travel for learning new skills; publication page charges; books and journal subscriptions; computer time and/or specialized software; and other justified research-specific needs. The early career fellowship program provides resources that a more established scientist would have acquired allowing

  12. ASTRO 850: Teaching Teachers about Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barringer, Daniel; Palma, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    The Earth and Space Science Partnership (ESSP) is a collaboration among Penn State scientists, science educators and seven school districts across Pennsylvania. Penn State also offers through its fully online World Campus the opportunity for In-Service science teachers to earn an M.Ed. degree in Earth Science, and we currently offer a required online astronomy course for that program. We have previously presented descriptions of how have incorporated research-based pedagogical practices into ESSP-sponsored workshops for in-service teachers (Palma et al. 2013), a pilot section of introductory astronomy for non-science majors (Palma et al. 2014), and into the design of an online elective course on exoplanets for the M.Ed. in Earth Science (Barringer and Palma, 2016). Here, we present the finished version of that exoplanet course, ASTRO 850. We gratefully acknowledge support from the NSF MSP program award DUE#0962792.

  13. Factors influencing residents' pursuit of urology fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freilich, Drew A; Nguyen, Hiep T; Phillips, John L

    2011-11-01

    To assess the predictors of residents' pursuit of fellowship training by surveying current urology residents and recent graduates. Postgraduate fellowship training of urologists could be an important source of urologic physician-scientists and continued innovation in urologic care. A Web-based survey was electronically mailed to urology residents and recent graduates of urologic residency. Variables concerning sex, marital status, debt load, research and clinical exposure, publications, and postgraduate careers were recorded. Of the 71 respondents, 46 (65%) were married and 45% had children/dependents. Of the 69% who applied for fellowship, the "most important" factors influencing the pursuit of fellowship were intellectual appeal (82%), mentors (79%), the desire for an additional point of view for surgical training (58%), and the desire to pursue a career in academics (52%). Forty of those completing a fellowship (87%) versus two of those completing residency alone (13%) would pursue a career in academics. Residents with a mentor were 20 times more likely to pursue a urology fellowship. A shorter residency (5 years), encouragement by a program director, and manuscript publication during residency were also independent predictors. Mentorship, a shorter residency, and manuscript publication during residency were independent predictors of pursuing fellowship training. Debt load, age, marital status, and a desire to pursue a career in academic medicine were not significant factors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Survey of international regional anesthesia fellowship directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lansdown AK

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Andrew K Lansdown,1,2 Paul G McHardy,1 Sanjiv C Patel,1,3 Catherine M Nix,1 Colin JL McCartney1 1Department of Anesthesia, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3University College Hospital, London, UK Background: The scope of regional anesthesia fellowship programs has not been analyzed but may provide insights that could improve fellowship training and standards. Methods: Regional anesthesia fellowship directors across the world were asked to complete a comprehensive survey that detailed the range of educational and practical experience and attitudes as well as assessment procedures offered in their programs. Results: The survey response rate was 66% (45/68. Overall, the range of activities and the time and resources committed to education during fellowships is encouraging. A wide range of nerve block experience is reported with most programs also offering acute pain management, research, and teaching opportunities. Only two-thirds of fellowships provide formal feedback. This feedback is typically a formative assessment. Conclusion: This is the first survey of regional anesthesia fellowship directors, and it illustrates the international scope and continuing expansion of education and training in the field. The results should be of interest to program directors seeking to benchmark and improve their educational programs and to faculty involved in further curriculum development. Keywords: anesthesia, regional, fellowship, education

  15. Post-doctoral research fellowship as a health policy and systems research capacity development intervention: a case of the CHESAI initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembani, Martina; Teddy, Gina; Molosiwa, Dintle; Hwabamungu, Boroto

    2016-12-20

    Building capacity in health policy and systems research (HPSR), especially in low- and middle-income countries, remains a challenge. Various approaches have been suggested and implemented by scholars and institutions using various forms of capacity building to address challenges regarding HPSR development. The Collaboration for Health Systems Analysis and Innovation (CHESAI) - a collaborative effort between the Universities of Cape Town and the Western Cape Schools of Public Health - has employed a non-research based post-doctoral research fellowship (PDRF) as a way of building African capacity in the field of HPSR by recruiting four post-docs. In this paper, we (the four post-docs) explore whether a PDRF is a useful approach for capacity building for the field of HPSR using our CHESAI PDRF experiences. We used personal reflections of our written narratives providing detailed information regarding our engagement with CHESAI. The narratives were based on a question guide around our experiences through various activities and their impacts on our professional development. The data analysis process was highly iterative in nature, involving repeated meetings among the four post-docs to reflect, discuss and create themes that evolved from the discussions. The CHESAI PDRF provided multiple spaces for our engagement and capacity development in the field of HPSR. These spaces provided us with a wide range of learning experiences, including teaching and research, policy networking, skills for academic writing, engaging practitioners, co-production and community dialogue. Our reflections suggest that institutions providing PDRF such as this are valuable if they provide environments endowed with adequate resources, good leadership and spaces for innovation. Further, the PDRFs need to be grounded in a community of HPSR practice, and provide opportunities for the post-docs to gain an in-depth understanding of the broader theoretical and methodological underpinnings of the field

  16. ASTRO-1 Space Telescope for Hubble-class Space Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Jon A.

    2015-05-01

    The 1.8-meter ASTRO-1 space telescope is designed to provide UV-visible imaging and spectroscopy that will be lost when the Hubble Space Telescope is finally decommissioned, probably early next decade. This privately funded facility will impact a broad range of astronomical research topics, from exoplanets to cosmology. We describe the proposed facility and our plans to involve the amateur astronomy community in the observatory planning and on-orbit observing program.

  17. Craniofacial Surgery Fellowship Websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Agarwal, Divyansh; Taylor, Jesse A

    2016-06-01

    Applicants for craniofacial surgery fellowships utilize Internet-based resources like the San Francisco (SF) Match to manage applications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accessibility and content of craniofacial surgery fellowship websites (CSFWs). A list of available craniofacial surgery fellowships was compiled from directories of the American Society of Craniofacial Surgery (ACSFS) and SF Match. Accessibility of CSFWs was assessed via links from these directories and a Google search. Craniofacial surgery fellowship websites were evaluated on education and recruitment content and compared via program characteristics. Twenty-four of the 28 US-based craniofacial surgery fellowship programs had a CSFW (86%). The ACSFS and SF Match databases had limited CSFW accessibility, but a Google search revealed most CSFWs had the top search result (76%). In total, CSFWs provided an average of 39% of education and recruitment variables. While most programs provided fellowship program descriptions (96%), application links (96%), and faculty listings (83%), relatively few provided rotation schedules (13%), fellow selection process information (13%), or interview dates (8%). CSFW content did not vary by program location, faculty size, accreditation status, or institutional affiliations (P > 0.05). Craniofacial surgery fellowships often lack readily accessible websites from national program lists and have limited information for interested applicants. The consistent lack of online information across programs suggests future opportunities exist to improve these educational resources.

  18. AMS/DOE Fellowship Recipients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Stephanie [American Meteorological Society, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-11-21

    The AMS/DOE graduate fellowships were awarded to three students entering their first year of graduate study. The funds allowed each student to take a full course load during their first of year of graduate study which helps each of them to enter the professional, scientific community at an earlier date. Each recipient is academically outstanding, received glowing references of support and demonstrated their strong desire to perform scientific research. As part of the fellowship, each of the students was invited to attend the AMS Annual Meeting where they got to participate in the AMS student conference, attend scientific sessions and visit the exhibition hall. In addition, a student awards luncheon was held where each of the recipients got to meet their sponsor and receive a certificate.

  19. Interactive Methods for Teaching Action Potentials, an Example of Teaching Innovation from Neuroscience Postdoctoral Fellows in the Fellowships in Research and Science Teaching (FIRST) Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen-Rhinehart, E; Eisen, A; Eaton, D; McCormack, K

    2009-01-01

    Acquiring a faculty position in academia is extremely competitive and now typically requires more than just solid research skills and knowledge of one's field. Recruiting institutions currently desire new faculty that can teach effectively, but few postdoctoral positions provide any training in teaching methods. Fellowships in Research and Science Teaching (FIRST) is a successful postdoctoral training program funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) providing training in both research and teaching methodology. The FIRST program provides fellows with outstanding interdisciplinary biomedical research training in fields such as neuroscience. The postdoctoral research experience is integrated with a teaching program which includes a How to Teach course, instruction in classroom technology and course development and mentored teaching. During their mentored teaching experiences, fellows are encouraged to explore innovative teaching methodologies and to perform science teaching research to improve classroom learning. FIRST fellows teaching neuroscience to undergraduates have observed that many of these students have difficulty with the topic of neuroscience. Therefore, we investigated the effects of interactive teaching methods for this topic. We tested two interactive teaching methodologies to determine if they would improve learning and retention of this information when compared with standard lectures. The interactive methods for teaching action potentials increased understanding and retention. Therefore, FIRST provides excellent teaching training, partly by enhancing the ability of fellows to integrate innovative teaching methods into their instruction. This training in turn provides fellows that matriculate from this program more of the characteristics that hiring institutions desire in their new faculty.

  20. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1940 Section: Medicine. Menon, T Bhaskara. Specialization: Pathology. YouTube · Twitter · Facebook · Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Summer Research Fellowship Programme 2018. Dates Extended To 7 December 2017. Register here · Focus Area Science Technology ...

  1. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1935 Section: Chemistry. Iyer, M P Venkataramana. Date of birth: 1902. Date of death: 27 April 1936. Specialization: Colloid Chemistry. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Summer Research Fellowship Programme 2018 · Focus Area Science Technology ...

  2. Centre for Global Development Visiting Fellowship Program | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Center for Global Development (CGD), located in Washington DC, is a globally preeminent think tank with unique networking and reach. Its Visiting Fellowship Program offers fellowships to scholars from think tanks and academic research institutions in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Over the period from 2012 to2017, ...

  3. Table Summarizing Awards Supported by Fellowships and Awards

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Liliane Castets-Poupart

    developing country university. Support is for doctoral research awards, full study degrees, post-doc fellowships, internships and sabbaticals in sub-Saharan. Africa, Asia and Latin. America and the Caribbean. Variable. Managed by various developing country institutions. Variable. Fellowships · http://www.idrc.ca/awards.

  4. The African Climate Change Fellowship Program Phase III | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    -design and offer fellowships based on four research themes: climate change and water, climate change and gender, climate change and green growth, and economic analysis of adaptation; and, -incorporate the fellowship program into the offerings of the Institute of Resource Assessment at the University of Dar es Salaam ...

  5. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1935 Section: Animal Sciences. Rao, Yelseti Ramachandra M.A.. Date of birth: 11 September 1885. Date of death: 1 June 1972. Specialization: Entomology. YouTube · Twitter · Facebook · Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Summer Research Fellowship Programme 2018.

  6. Crisis Group Fellowship Program | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    In much of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) and West Africa, there is a dearth of research, training and employment opportunities in the social sciences, particularly in the area of research and policy analysis on local conflicts. The Crisis Group has long considered establishing a fellowship program in order to train a ...

  7. 7 CFR 3402.7 - Fellowship appointments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... uninterrupted study or thesis/dissertation research, including time spent pursuing USDA-funded special international study or thesis/dissertation research activities. (ii) Postdoctoral Fellowship appointments may be... prematurely, the institution may use any unexpended monies, within the time remaining on the project grant, to...

  8. ASTRO 101 Labs and the Invasion of the Cognitive Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Stephanie J.

    2015-04-01

    Since the mid 1800's there has been widespread agreement that we should be about the business of engaging students in the practices of scientific research in order to best teach the methods and practices of science. There has been significantly less agreement on precisely how to teach science by mimicking scientific inquiry in a way that can be empirically supported, even with our ``top students.'' Engaging ``ASTRO 101 students'' in scientific inquiry is a task that has left our astronomy education research community more than a little stymied, to the extent that it is difficult to find non-major science students practicing anything other than confirmation exercises in college labs. Researchers at the CAPER Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research have struggled with this problem as well, until in our frustration we had to ask: ``Can research tell us anything about how to get students to do research?'' This talk presents an overview of the cognitive science that we've brought to bear in the ASTRO 101 laboratory setting for non-science majoring undergraduates and future teachers, along with the results of early studies that suggest that a ``backwards faded scaffolding'' approach to instruction in Intro Labs can successfully support large numbers of students in enhancing their understanding of the nature of scientific inquiry. Supported by NSF DUE 1312562.

  9. Fellowships Have Sailed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Kenneth J.

    2010-01-01

    Jose Lopez is an assistant professor of physics at Saint Peter's College, a Catholic school in Jersey City, New Jersey, where he has been on the tenure track since receiving his Ph.D. from Stevens Institute of Technology in 2005. Essential to the completion of his doctoral work was a fellowship from the state designed to increase faculty diversity…

  10. Mastering your Fellowship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This section in the South African Family Practice Journal aims to help registrars prepare for the FCFP(SA) Part A examination. (Fellowship of the College of Family Physicians), and includes examples of the question formats encountered in the written examination, i.e. multiple choice questions (MCQs), modified.

  11. Mastering your Fellowship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This new section in the South African Family Practice Journal aims to help registrars prepare for the FCFP(SA) Part I examination. (Fellowship of the College of Family Physicians), and will provide examples of the question formats encountered in the written examination, i.e. Multiple choice questions. (MCQs), Modified essay ...

  12. Mastering your Fellowship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This section in the South African Family Practice journal is aimed at helping registrars prepare for the FCFP (SA) Part A examination. (Fellowship of the College of Family Physicians) and will provide examples of the question formats encountered in the written examination: Multiple Choice Question (MCQ) and/or Extended.

  13. Mastering your Fellowship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This section in the South African Family Practice Journal is aimed at helping registrars prepare for the FCFP (SA) Final Part A examination (Fellowship of the College of Family Physicians) and will provide examples of the question formats encountered in the written examination: Multiple Choice Question (MCQ) in the form of ...

  14. The future of post-residency fellowship education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welner, A H

    1993-04-01

    Post-residency fellowship education has traditionally been a transitionary phase toward a possible career involving medical research and teaching. The increasing sophistication required for performing medical research, the emphasis on molecular medicine, significant overcrowding in specialty disciplines, high student indebtedness, declining availability of government research grant funding, and the rise or academic-corporate joint ventures facilitating technology transfer to the private sector are causing changes in the traditional approach to and content of fellowship programs. In light of the overall recent economic downturn with the consequent contraction in research budgeting, fewer fellows will probably be trained in the near future. Alternatives in fellowship programming and support are explored.

  15. Astro Talk in Social Media - Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamani, A.; Soegijoko, W.

    2015-03-01

    Social media is a new trend in communicating and connecting to people. It is also a good choice to build awareness of astronomy as issues spread easily and quickly, creating hot topics. This paper will analyze the trend of astro talk in Indonesia and hope to inspire astronomers to use social media in raising awareness.

  16. Image Processing in Amateur Astro-Photography

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 2. Image Processing in Amateur Astro-Photography. Anurag Garg. Classroom Volume 15 Issue 2 February 2010 pp 170-175. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/015/02/0170-0175 ...

  17. Perancangan Corporate Identity Astro Rent Car Surabaya

    OpenAIRE

    Gunardi, Yohanes Calvin; Negara, I Nengah Sudika; Aryanto, Hendro

    2017-01-01

    Corporate Identity merupakan hal yang krusial dalam perkembangan sebuah Perusahaan dalam segi internal maupun eksternal. Dalam membuat perancangan Corporate identity yang efektif, perancangan ini menampilkan segala teori dan ilmu yang berhubungan dengan Corporate identity. Dengan adanya perancangan ini diharapkan para pembaca mengerti betapa pentingnya peran sebuah corporate identity yang tepat dan mengena.Kata kunci: corporate identity, Astro, logo.

  18. The Astro-WISE datacentric information system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Begeman, K.; Belikov, A. N.; Boxhoorn, D. R.; Valentijn, E. A.

    In this paper we present the various concepts behind the Astro-WISE Information System. The concepts form a blueprint for general scientific information systems (WISE) which can satisfy a wide and challenging range of requirements for the data dissemination, storage and processing for various fields

  19. African Climate Change Fellowship | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This grant will foster indigenous capacity to advance and apply scientific knowledge to climate change adaptation by supporting the pilot phase of the African Climate Change Fellowship program. The program will provide about 58 early-to-mid-career African professionals and researchers with policy, doctoral, post-doctoral ...

  20. IAEA Fellowship Program, 1996 report on United States participants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Fellowship Program began in April 1958 as a part of the Agency`s Technical Cooperation (TC) Program. Through the TC Program, the IAEA provides technical assistance to meet the needs of recipient countries and to bring about a substantial transfer of technology. This is done by providing experts, equipment, fellowships, and training courses. This report addresses the US component of the fellowship program. These fellowships provide opportunities for research and training of scientists, engineers and physicians from developing countries in the peaceful application of nuclear energy. The fellowships are awarded to persons who are, or soon will be, trusted with responsibilities that are important to the development of their countries. Fellowship awards are classified into two groups, those financed by the IAEA General Fund or the UNDP Fund (Type 1 Fellowships and Scientific Visits), and those offered by Member States (Type 2 Fellowships). In placing individuals, preference is given to applicants from countries that are signatories to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons or to the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America.

  1. IAEA Fellowship Program, 1997 report on United States participants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Fellowship Program began in April 1958 as a part of the Agency`s Technical Cooperation (TC) Program. Through the TC Program, the IAEA provides technical assistance to meet the needs of recipient countries and to bring about a substantial transfer of technology. This is done by providing experts, equipment, fellowships, and training courses. This report addresses the US component of the fellowship program. These fellowships provide opportunities for research and training of scientists, engineers and physicians from developing countries in the peaceful application of nuclear energy. The fellowships are awarded to persons who are, or soon will be, trusted with responsibilities that are important to the development of their countries. Fellowship awards are classified into two groups, those financed by the IAEA General Fund or the UNDP Fund (Type 1 Fellowships and Scientific Visits), and those offered by Member States (Type 2 Fellowships). In placing individuals, preference is given to applicants from countries that are signatories to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons or to the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America.

  2. AstroCom NYC: Equity, Inclusion, and the Next Generation of Astrophysicists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglione, Timothy; Ford, Saavik; Robbins, Dennis; Agueros, Marcel A.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark

    2017-01-01

    AstroCom NYC is an undergraduate mentoring program designed to improve urban minority student access to opportunities in astrophysical research by greatly enhancing partnerships between research astronomers in New York City (City University of New York - an MSI, American Museum of Natural History, and Columbia). AstroCom NYC provides centralized, personalized mentoring as well as financial and academic support, to CUNY undergraduates throughout their studies, plus the resources and opportunities to further CUNY faculty research with students. The goal is that students’ residency at AMNH helps them build a sense of belonging in the field, and readies and inspires them for graduate study. AstroCom NYC provides a rigorous Methods of Scientific Research course developed specifically to this purpose, a laptop, research and career mentors, outreach activities, scholarships and stipends, Metrocards, and regular assessment for maximum effectiveness. The goal of this support is to remove barriers to access and success. AMNH serves as the central hub for our faculty and students, who are otherwise dispersed among all five boroughs of the City. We welcomed our fourth cohort last year, along with 25 additional students through a NASA community college initiative. Our advanced AstroCom NYC students earned external summer internships at REU sites, and we had our first graduate school acceptance. We review plans for Year 5, when we have a number of graduate school applicants, and our deepening participation and leadership within partner activities.

  3. Alignment monitoring system for ASTRO-H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandmont, Frédéric; Dupont, Fabien; Moreau, Louis; Larouche, Martin; Bibeau, Louis-Philippe; Laplante, Sylvio

    2017-11-01

    High Energy Astrophysics (HEA) encompasses a broad range of astrophysical science, with sources that include stars and stellar clusters, compact objects (black holes, neutron stars, and white dwarfs), supernova remnants, the interstellar medium, galaxies and clusters of galaxies, Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), and gamma ray bursters, as well as a variety of fundamental physical processes. The physics involved includes extremes of gravity, density and magnetic field and is often inaccessible via any other waveband. HEA investigates and answers crucial questions in all fields of contemporary astrophysics. Unlike the focusing of radio and optical light, X-rays are brought to focus through shallow, grazing incident angles. The analogy of skimming a stone across a pond is appropriate in describing how X-rays are focused. The higher the energy of the X-ray photon the shallower the incident angle must be, thereby introducing the requirement of longer focal lengths for focusing high-energy X-rays (E > 10 keV). This technical challenge has hindered scientific advancement in the high-energy regime, while at lower X-ray energies the community has prospered immensely with spectacular data from focusing observatories like XMM-Newton, Chandra, and Suzaku. Now, with ASTRO-H, the community will reap similar rewards from the tremendous improvement in spatial and spectral resolution at high energies. ASTRO-H is a JAXA mission. More information can be found on the ASTRO-H web site [1]. Because of the grazing-angle optics, high-energy X-ray instruments have a long focal length. The Hard X-ray Imager (HXI) of ASTRO-H has its detector housed in a boom that will extend by about 6 m in orbit so that a focal length of 12 m can be achieved for that instrument. This long structure will inevitably oscillate and flex, especially when passing across the orbital day/night boundary. In order to retain the essential imaging resolution, it is important that the boom has a metrology system that

  4. A Postdoctoral Fellowship in Industrial Clinical Pharmacy Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Joseph; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A postdoctoral pharmacy fellowship is described that provides training in industrial clinical pharmacy practice and related tasks associated with the development of new pharmaceuticals, through experience in industrial and hospital settings and in research projects. (MSE) PUBTYPE[141

  5. Administration: Army Congressional Fellowship Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    This printing publishes a new Army Regulation. This regulation presents the policies and procedures under which the Army manages the Army Congressional Fellowship Program and supplements applicable Department...

  6. Analysis of HARPS Astro-Comb Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milakovic, Dinko; Pasquini, L.; Lo Curto, G.; Avila, G.; Manescau, A.; Canto Martins, B. N.; Leão, I. C.; De Medeiros, J. R.; Esposito, M.; González Hernández, J. I.; Rebolo, R.; Probst, R.; Steinmetz, T.; Hänsch, T. W.; Udem, Th.; Holzwarth, R.

    2017-09-01

    "The HARPS astro-comb was repaired in October 2016, and it is under unsupervised operations since. In this poster we show the analysis of the comb data, in particular the presence of a wavelength dependent background continuum. We are able to characterise this background with respect to wavelength and time. We show that its proper evaluation is essential to optimize the performances of the system."

  7. Summer Research Fellowship Programme 2018

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    How to combat infectious diseases: The role of Science Academies · Academy Public Lecture and INSA–Leopoldina Lecture by Prof. Jörg Hacker, President, German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina. 4 December, 2017, 4 PM Faculty Hall, Indian Institute ...

  8. Summer Research Fellowship Programme 2018

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1974 Section: Medicine. Mani, Dr Kalyanasundaram Subra M.D. (Madras). Date of birth: 18 October 1928. Date of death: 28 March 2001. Specialization: Neurology Address: Consultant Neurologist, Neurological Clinic, No.1, Old Veterinary Hospital Road, Basavanagudi, Bengaluru 560 004. YouTube ...

  9. Summer Research Fellowship Programme 2018

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Toggle navigation. Logo of the Indian Academy of Sciences. Indian Academy of Sciences. Home · About IASc · History · Memorandum of Association · Role of the Academy · Statutes · Council · Raman Chair · Jubilee Chair · Academy – Springer Nature chair · Academy Trust · Contact details · Office Staff · Office complaint ...

  10. Summer Research Fellowship Programme 2018

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ph.D. (Wisconsin), FNA, FNASc, FNAE. Date of birth: 11 December 1934. Specialization: Dynamics of Mechanical Systems, Stress Analysis, Tribology, Stability of Vehicles, Tyre Mechanics and Pavement Engineering Address: Apartment 1002, Tower 2, Sunbreeze Apartments, Vaishali, Sector 5, Plot 3, Ghaziabad 201 010, ...

  11. Summer Research Fellowship Programme 2018

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 2 September 1957. Specialization: Cosmic Magnetic Fields, Structure Formation, Cosmology Address: Distinguished Professor & Dean, Visitor Academic Programmes, Inter-University Centre for Astronomy & Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007, Maharashtra Contact: Office: (020) 2560 4101

  12. Summer Research Fellowship Programme 2018

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 7 August 1955. Specialization: Molecular Genetics of Humans & Animals, Gene Expression, Cancer Genomics and Genomics of Endangered Species Address: Professor A, CIRBS, jAMIA Millia Islamia, Jamia Nagar, New Delhi 110 025, U.T.. Contact: Residence: (011) 2674 1139. Mobile: 98180 04632

  13. Simulation in Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Cara B; Kessler, David O; Zuckerbraun, Noel S; Stone, Kimberly P; Reid, Jennifer R; Kennedy, Christopher S; Nypaver, Michele M; Auerbach, Marc A

    2015-07-01

    Graduate medical education faces challenges as programs transition to the next accreditation system. Evidence supports the effectiveness of simulation for training and assessment. This study aims to describe the current use of simulation and barriers to its implementation in pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) fellowship programs. A survey was developed by consensus methods and distributed to PEM program directors via an anonymous online survey. Sixty-nine (95%) fellowship programs responded. Simulation-based training is provided by 97% of PEM fellowship programs; the remainder plan to within 2 years. Thirty-seven percent incorporate >20 simulation hours per year. Barriers include the following: lack of faculty time (49%) and faculty simulation experience (39%); limited support for learner attendance (35%); and lack of established curricula (32%). Of those with written simulation curricula, most focus on resuscitation (71%), procedures (63%), and teamwork/communication (38%). Thirty-seven percent use simulation to evaluate procedural competency and resuscitation management. PEM fellows use simulation to teach (77%) and have conducted simulation-based research (33%). Thirty percent participate in a fellows' "boot camp"; however, finances (27%) and availability (15%) limit attendance. Programs receive simulation funding from hospitals (47%), academic institutions (22%), and PEM revenue (17%), with 22% reporting no direct simulation funding. PEM fellowships have rapidly integrated simulation into their curricula over the past 5 years. Current limitations primarily involve faculty and funding, with equipment and dedicated space less significant than previously reported. Shared curricula and assessment tools, increased faculty and financial support, and regionalization could ameliorate barriers to incorporating simulation into PEM fellowships. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  14. Marshall Space Flight Center Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Six, N. F. (Compiler)

    2015-01-01

    The Faculty Fellowship program was revived in the summer of 2015 at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, following a period of diminished faculty research activity here since 2006 when budget cuts in the Headquarters' Education Office required realignment. Several senior Marshall managers recognized the need to involve the Nation's academic research talent in NASA's missions and projects to the benefit of both entities. These managers invested their funds required to establish the renewed Faculty Fellowship program in 2015, a 10-week residential research involvement of 16 faculty in the laboratories and offices at Marshall. These faculty engineers and scientists worked with NASA collaborators on NASA projects, bringing new perspectives and solutions to bear. This Technical Memorandum is a compilation of the research reports of the 2015 Marshall Faculty Fellowship program, along with the Program Announcement (appendix A) and the Program Description (appendix B). The research touched on seven areas-propulsion, materials, instrumentation, fluid dynamics, human factors, control systems, and astrophysics. The propulsion studies included green propellants, gas bubble dynamics, and simulations of fluid and thermal transients. The materials investigations involved sandwich structures in composites, plug and friction stir welding, and additive manufacturing, including both strength characterization and thermosets curing in space. The instrumentation projects involved spectral interfero- metry, emissivity, and strain sensing in structures. The fluid dynamics project studied the water hammer effect. The human factors project investigated the requirements for close proximity operations in confined spaces. Another team proposed a controls system for small launch vehicles, while in astrophysics, one faculty researcher estimated the practicality of weather modification by blocking the Sun's insolation, and another found evidence in satellite data of the detection of a warm

  15. UC/Los Alamos Entrepreneurial Postdoctoral Fellowship Pilot Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Mariann R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Clow, Shandra Deann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-06

    The UC/Los Alamos Entrepreneurial Postdoctoral Fellowship Pilot Program (Pilot) for existing postdoctoral researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) to gain skills in entrepreneurship and commercializing technology as part of their postdoctoral experience. This program will incorporate training and mentoring during the first 6-month period, culminating in a focused 6-month Fellowship aimed at creating a new business in Northern New Mexico.

  16. AstroSat: From Inception to Realization and Launch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The origin of the idea of AstroSat multi wavelength satellite mission and how it evolved over the next 15 years from a concept to the successful development of instruments for giving concrete shape to this mission, is recounted in this article. AstroSat is the outcome of intense deliberations in the Indian astronomy community ...

  17. IPS guidestar selection for stellar mode (ASTRO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Larry; Wooten, Lewis

    1988-01-01

    This report describes how guide stars are selected for the Optical Sensor Package (OSP) for the Instrument Pointing System (IPS) when it is operating in the stellar mode on the ASTRO missions. It also describes how the objective loads are written and how the various roll angles are related; i.e., the celestial roll or position angle, the objective load roll angles, and the IPS gimbal angles. There is a brief description of how the IPS operates and its various modes of operation; i.e., IDOP, IDIN, and OSPCAL.

  18. AstroGrid: Initial Deployment of the UK's Virtual Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, N. A.; Lawrence, A.; Linde, T.

    2004-07-01

    AstroGrid, a UK eScience project with collaborating groups drawn from the major UK data archive centres, is creating the UK's virtual observatory. AstroGrid has now completed its requirements capture and design stages, and has begun to release software capabilities on a three monthly cycle. It is using the iterative process, with eight iterations, with each successive iteration release building a working system comprising increasing capabilities. AstroGrid's first functional release with it's 'Iteration 2' product, and the capabilities and functionality that this provides, is described. AstroGrid's technical input into joint products in conjunction with the European Astrophysical Virtual Observatory, and the Australian VO, is discussed. The component based AstroGrid architecture and how external projects may be able to deploy components of interest in constructing there 'VO' - for instance the use of MySpace to provide secure intermediate 'grid' user storage areas, is discussed.

  19. A core curriculum for clinical fellowship training in pathology informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, David S; Levy, Bruce P; Lane, William J; Lee, Roy E; Baron, Jason M; Klepeis, Veronica E; Onozato, Maristela L; Kim, Jiyeon; Dighe, Anand S; Beckwith, Bruce A; Kuo, Frank; Black-Schaffer, Stephen; Gilbertson, John R

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, our healthcare system established a clinical fellowship program in Pathology Informatics. In 2010 a core didactic course was implemented to supplement the fellowship research and operational rotations. In 2011, the course was enhanced by a formal, structured core curriculum and reading list. We present and discuss our rationale and development process for the Core Curriculum and the role it plays in our Pathology Informatics Fellowship Training Program. The Core Curriculum for Pathology Informatics was developed, and is maintained, through the combined efforts of our Pathology Informatics Fellows and Faculty. The curriculum was created with a three-tiered structure, consisting of divisions, topics, and subtopics. Primary (required) and suggested readings were selected for each subtopic in the curriculum and incorporated into a curated reading list, which is reviewed and maintained on a regular basis. Our Core Curriculum is composed of four major divisions, 22 topics, and 92 subtopics that cover the wide breadth of Pathology Informatics. The four major divisions include: (1) Information Fundamentals, (2) Information Systems, (3) Workflow and Process, and (4) Governance and Management. A detailed, comprehensive reading list for the curriculum is presented in the Appendix to the manuscript and contains 570 total readings (current as of March 2012). The adoption of a formal, core curriculum in a Pathology Informatics fellowship has significant impacts on both fellowship training and the general field of Pathology Informatics itself. For a fellowship, a core curriculum defines a basic, common scope of knowledge that the fellowship expects all of its graduates will know, while at the same time enhancing and broadening the traditional fellowship experience of research and operational rotations. For the field of Pathology Informatics itself, a core curriculum defines to the outside world, including departments, companies, and health systems considering hiring a

  20. AstroCom NYC: A Partnership Between Astronomers at CUNY, AMNH, and Columbia University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglione, Timothy; Ford, K. S.; Robbins, D.; Mac Low, M.; Agueros, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    AstroCom NYC is a new program designed to improve urban minority student access to opportunities in astrophysical research by greatly enhancing partnerships between research astronomers in New York City. The partners are minority serving institutions of the City University of New York, and the astrophysics research departments of the American Museum of Natural History and Columbia. AstroCom NYC provides centralized, personalized mentoring as well as financial and academic support, to CUNY undergraduates throughout their studies, plus the resources and opportunities to further CUNY faculty research with students. The goal is that students’ residency at AMNH helps them build a sense of belonging in the field, and inspires and prepares them for graduate study. AstroCom NYC prepares students for research with a rigorous Methods of Scientific Research course developed specifically to this purpose, a laptop, a research mentor, career mentor, involvement in Columbia outreach activities, scholarships and stipends, Metrocards, and regular assessment for maximum effectiveness. Stipends in part alleviate the burdens at home typical for CUNY students so they may concentrate on their academic success. AMNH serves as the central hub for our faculty and students, who are otherwise dispersed among all five boroughs of the City. With our first cohort we experienced the expected challenges from their diverse preparedness, but also far greater than anticipated challenges in scheduling, academic advisement, and molding their expectations. We review Year 1 operations and outcomes, as well as plans for Year 2, when our current students progress to be peer mentors.

  1. A suggested core content for education scholarship fellowships in emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarris, Lalena M; Coates, Wendy C; Lin, Michelle; Lind, Karen; Jordan, Jaime; Clarke, Sam; Guth, Todd A; Santen, Sally A; Hamstra, Stanley J

    2012-12-01

    A working group at the 2012 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference on education research in emergency medicine (EM) convened to develop a curriculum for dedicated postgraduate fellowships in EM education scholarship. This fellowship is intended to create future education scholars, equipped with the skills to thrive in academic careers. This proceedings article reports on the consensus of a breakout session subgroup tasked with defining a common core content for education scholarship fellowships. The authors propose that the core content of an EM education scholarship fellowship can be categorized in four distinct areas: career development, theories of learning and teaching methods, education research methods, and educational program administration. This core content can be incorporated into curricula for education scholarship fellowships in EM or other fields and can also be adapted for use in general medical education fellowships. © 2012 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  2. Consortium for Verification Technology Fellowship Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadler, Lorraine E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-06-01

    As one recipient of the Consortium for Verification Technology (CVT) Fellowship, I spent eight days as a visiting scientist at the University of Michigan, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences (NERS). During this time, I participated in multiple department and research group meetings and presentations, met with individual faculty and students, toured multiple laboratories, and taught one-half of a one-unit class on Risk Analysis in Nuclear Arms control (six 1.5 hour lectures). The following report describes some of the interactions that I had during my time as well as a brief discussion of the impact of this fellowship on members of the consortium and on me/my laboratory’s technical knowledge and network.

  3. Fellowship training: a qualitative study of scope and purpose across one department of medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Karpinski

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fellowship training follows certification in a primary specialty or subspecialty and focusses on distinct and advanced clinical and/or academic skills. This phase of medical education is growing in prevalence, but has been an “invisible phase of postgraduate training” lacking standards for education and accreditation, as well as funding. We aimed to explore fellowship programs and examine the reasons to host and participate in fellowship training, seeking to inform the future development of fellowship education. Methods During the 2013–14 academic year, we conducted interviews and focus groups to examine the current status of fellowship training from the perspectives of division heads, fellowship directors and current fellows at the Department of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Canada. Descriptive statistics were used to depict the prevailing status of fellowship training. A process of data reduction, data analysis and conclusions/verifications was performed to analyse the quantitative data. Results We interviewed 16 division heads (94%, 15 fellowship directors (63% and 8 fellows (21%. We identified three distinct types of fellowships. Individualized fellowships focus on the career goals of the trainee and/or the recruitment goals of the division. Clinical fellowships focus on the attainment of clinical expertise over and above the competencies of residency. Research fellowships focus on research productivity. Participants identified a variety of reasons to offer fellowships: improve academic productivity; improve clinical productivity; share/develop enhanced clinical expertise; recruit future faculty members/attain an academic position; enhance the reputation of the division/department/trainee; and enhance the scholarly environment. Conclusions Fellowships serve a variety of purposes which benefit both individual trainees as well as the academic enterprise. Fellowships can be categorized within a distinct taxonomy

  4. Fellowship | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1952 Section: Animal Sciences. Gnanamuthu, Chinnadurai Pittendrigh D.Sc. Date of birth: 29 April 1901. Date of death: 18 March 1969. Specialization: Animal Physiology, Animal Ecology. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  5. Creating a Global Acute Care Surgery Fellowship to Meet International Need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Amina I; Walters, Camila B; Valenzuela, Julie; McQueen, Kelly A; May, Addison K

    Existing Acute Care Surgery (ACS) fellowships are positioned to develop well-trained surgeons with specific skills to facilitate improvements in care delivery in Global ACS. Many resident and fellowship programs offer clinical electives that expose trainees to operative experiences, exposing trainees to the needs in resource-challenged settings. However, most lack a focus on long-term development and research designed to enhance the country's local skills, capability, and capacity. The Global Acute Care Surgery (Global ACS) fellowship produces a surgeon who focuses on capacity building and systems development across the world. At Vanderbilt University, the current American Association for the Surgery of Trauma-Acute Care Surgery (AAST-ACS) fellowship was adapted to create an academic Global Acute Care Surgery (Global ACS) fellowship. This fellowship specifically enhances fellowship trainee's skills in needs assessment and performing research to facilitate the development and implementation of trauma and acute care surgery systems in low- and middle income countries. This research will foster context-appropriate data, collected and based in low- and middle-income countries, to guide practice and policy. Two fellows have completed the Global ACS fellowship at Vanderbilt University. The fellowship requirements, clinical skills, project development and overall goals are outlined within the article. Challenges, funding, and mentorship must also be addressed to develop a comprehensive fellowship. A sample two-year timeline is provided to complete the fellowship track and meet the defined goals. A structured global acute care surgery fellowship enables fellows to reduce the surgical burden of disease and contribute to surgical systems development at both local and international levels by creating meaningful research and developing sustainable change in LMIC countries. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  6. Accredited hand surgery fellowship Web sites: analysis of content and accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehan, Samir K; Morrell, Nathan T; Akelman, Edward

    2015-04-01

    To assess the accessibility and content of accredited hand surgery fellowship Web sites. A list of all accredited hand surgery fellowships was obtained from the online database of the American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH). Fellowship program information on the ASSH Web site was recorded. All fellowship program Web sites were located via Google search. Fellowship program Web sites were analyzed for accessibility and content in 3 domains: program overview, application information/recruitment, and education. At the time of this study, there were 81 accredited hand surgery fellowships with 169 available positions. Thirty of 81 programs (37%) had a functional link on the ASSH online hand surgery fellowship directory; however, Google search identified 78 Web sites. Three programs did not have a Web site. Analysis of content revealed that most Web sites contained contact information, whereas information regarding the anticipated clinical, research, and educational experiences during fellowship was less often present. Furthermore, information regarding past and present fellows, salary, application process/requirements, call responsibilities, and case volume was frequently lacking. Overall, 52 of 81 programs (64%) had the minimal online information required for residents to independently complete the fellowship application process. Hand fellowship program Web sites could be accessed either via the ASSH online directory or Google search, except for 3 programs that did not have Web sites. Although most fellowship program Web sites contained contact information, other content such as application information/recruitment and education, was less frequently present. This study provides comparative data regarding the clinical and educational experiences outlined on hand fellowship program Web sites that are of relevance to residents, fellows, and academic hand surgeons. This study also draws attention to various ways in which the hand surgery fellowship application

  7. The physics and the optimization of the XRS calorimeters on Astro-E

    CERN Document Server

    Stahle, C K; Dutta, S B; Gendreau, K C; Kelley, R L; McCammon, D; McClanahan, R A; Moseley, S H; Mott, D B; Porter, F S; Szymkowiak, A E

    1999-01-01

    The X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) instrument, scheduled to be launched as part of the Japanese X-ray astronomy satellite Astro-E in February 2000, has an array of 32 microcalorimeters at the focal plane. These calorimeters consist of ion-implanted silicon thermistors and HgTe thermalizing X-ray absorbers. These devices provide spectral resolution of 9 eV at 3 keV and 11 eV at 6 keV. The process of determining the detector parameters for this instrument will be discussed. This will include discussion of the array layout, thermal conductance of the link to the heat sink, operating temperature, thermistor size, absorber choice, and means of attaching the absorber to the thermistor bearing element. We consider the XRS calorimeters to be operating in a local optimum, with the absolute optimization yet to be performed, thus we will discuss directions for future development of this sensor technology.

  8. Quantum efficiency of the CCD camera (XIS) for the ASTRO-E mission

    CERN Document Server

    Katayama, H; Kohmura, T; Katayama, K; Yoshita, K; Tsunemi, H; Kitamoto, S; Hayashida, K; Miyata, E; Hashimotodani, K; Koyama, K; Ricker, G; Bautz, M W; Foster, R; Kissel, S

    1999-01-01

    We measured the optical and the X-ray transmission of the optical blocking filters for the X-ray Imaging Spectrometers (XISs) which are the X-ray CCD cameras of the ASTRO-E satellite. We conclude that the oxidation of the aluminum reduces the optical transmission down to approx 60-70% of the theoretical value of the aluminum. We achieved optical transmission below 5x10 sup - sup 5 in the range from 4000 to 9500 A by using aluminum thickness of 1200 A, while the theoretical calculation requires 800 A. The measurement of absolute quantum efficiency of XIS is also performed at several particular energies. We confirmed 20% quantum efficiency at 0.5 keV for the XIS engineering model (XIS EM).

  9. Public psychiatry fellowships: a developing network of public-academic collaborations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Melle, Stephanie; Mangurian, Christina; Ali, Osman M; Giggie, Marisa A; Hadley, Trevor; Lewis, Marshall E; Runnels, Patrick; Sowers, Wesley; Steiner, Jeanne L; Trujillo, Manuel; Ranz, Jules M

    2012-09-01

    In response to the expanding public behavioral health care system, a network of 15 public-community psychiatry fellowships has developed over the past six years. The fellowship directors meet yearly to sustain and develop fellowships to recruit and retain psychiatrists in the public sector. This column describes five types of public-academic collaborations on which the fellowships are based. The collaborations focus on structural and fiscal arrangements; recruitment and retention; program evaluation, program research, and policy; primary care integration; and career development. These collaborations serve to train psychiatrists who will play a key role in the rapidly evolving health care system.

  10. A compact echelle spectrograph for characterization of astro-combs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Rafael A.; Steinmetz, Tilo; Wu, Yuanjie; Grupp, Frank; Udem, Thomas; Holzwarth, Ronald

    2017-03-01

    We present an echelle spectrograph that is optimized for characterization of frequency combs for astronomical applications (astro-combs). In spite of its very compact and cost-efficient design, it allows viewing the spectrum of a frequency comb in nearly the same way as a full-sized high-resolution echelle spectrograph as used at astronomical observatories. This is of great value for testing and characterizing astro-combs during their assembly phase. The spectrograph can further be utilized to effectfully demonstrate the remarkable capabilities of astro-combs.

  11. Telling business stories as fellowship-tales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Robert; Neergaard, Helle

    2015-01-01

    – The research indicates that “fellowship-tales” provide a viable and credible alternative to the fairy-tale rendition common in entrepreneur and business stories. Research limitations/implications – An obvious limitation is that one merely swaps one narrative framework for another, albeit it offers dissenting...... voices a real choice. Practical implications – This study has the potential to be far reaching because at a practical level, it allows disengaged entrepreneurs and significant others the freedom to exercise their individual and collective voices within a framework of nested stories. Originality...

  12. The Sky is the Limit!: The Benefits from Partnering with the Project ASTRO National Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zevin, D.; Walker, C.; Wilson, R.; van der Veen, W.; Moody, T. R.; Fraknoi, A.; Gurton, S.; White, V.; Harvey, J.; Cooper, L.; Regas, D.; Guttman, P.; Smith, R.

    2008-06-01

    Project ASTRO is a national program that partners professional and amateur astronomers with local educators at regional sites around the country. Developed by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, Project ASTRO provides training for astronomer-educator partnerships in hands-on, inquiry-based science activities while emphasizing the importance of student preconceptions as a starting point for learning. During an intensive two-day training workshop, a partnership is forged that blends the teacher's knowledge of instructional methods and classroom management with the astronomer's knowledge of and passion for science and astronomy. The regional sites' directors and coordinators are part of a ``National Network'' whose aims are to foster communication and cooperation among its members and with other science education and research communities. Nationwide, over 500 active astronomer-educator partnerships bring the excitement of astronomy to over 20,000 students annually.

  13. astroABC: Approximate Bayesian Computation Sequential Monte Carlo sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Elise

    2017-05-01

    astroABC is a Python implementation of an Approximate Bayesian Computation Sequential Monte Carlo (ABC SMC) sampler for parameter estimation. astroABC allows for massive parallelization using MPI, a framework that handles spawning of processes across multiple nodes. It has the ability to create MPI groups with different communicators, one for the sampler and several others for the forward model simulation, which speeds up sampling time considerably. For smaller jobs the Python multiprocessing option is also available.

  14. United States Air Force Summer Faculty Research Program 1989. Program Technical Report. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    and the Astronautics Laboratory at Edwards Air Force Base for sponsoring this research effort. The AstroLab provided a truly unique research environment...fundamental research and system evaluation at the AstroLab . The codes selected will then be adapted to the AstroLab computer systems. A mathematical...potential application to the AstroLab 4 cryogenic heat pipe study. Important system specifications include: 1) monodirectional heat transfer, 2

  15. AstroSat: From Inception to Realization and Launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, P. C.

    2017-06-01

    The origin of the idea of AstroSat multi wavelength satellite mission and how it evolved over the next 15 years from a concept to the successful development of instruments for giving concrete shape to this mission, is recounted in this article. AstroSat is the outcome of intense deliberations in the Indian astronomy community leading to a consensus for a multi wavelength Observatory having broad spectral coverage over five decades in energy covering near-UV, far-UV, soft X-ray and hard X-ray bands. The multi wavelength observation capability of AstroSat with a suite of 4 co-aligned instruments and an X-ray sky monitor on a single satellite platform, imparts a unique character to this mission. AstroSat owes its realization to the collaborative efforts of the various ISRO centres, several Indian institutions, and a few institutions abroad which developed the 5 instruments and various sub systems of the satellite. AstroSat was launched on September 28, 2015 from India in a near equatorial 650 km circular orbit. The instruments are by and large working as planned and in the past 14 months more than 200 X-ray and UV sources have been studied with it. The important characteristics of AstroSat satellite and scientific instruments will be highlighted.

  16. Crisis Group Fellowship Program | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    In much of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) and West Africa, there is a dearth of research, training and employment opportunities in the social sciences, particularly in the area of research and policy analysis on local conflicts. The Crisis Group has long considered establishing a fellowship program in order to train a ...

  17. Initial Development and Pilot Study Design of Interactive Lecture Demonstrations for ASTRO 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwortz, Andria C.; French, D. A; Gutierrez, Joseph V; Sanchez, Richard L; Slater, Timothy F.; Tatge, Coty

    2014-06-01

    Interactive lecture demonstrations (ILDs) have repeatedly shown to be effective tools for improving student achievement in the context of learning physics. As a first step toward systematic development of interactive lecture demonstrations in ASTRO 101, the introductory astronomy survey course, a systematic review of education research, describing educational computer simulations (ECSs) reveals that initial development requires a targeted study of how ASTRO 101 students respond to ECSs in the non-science majoring undergraduate lecture setting. In this project we have adopted the process by which ILDs were designed, pilot-tested, and successfully implemented in the context of physics teaching (Sokoloff & Thornton, 1997; Sokoloff & Thornton, 2004). We have designed the initial pilot-test set of ASTRO 101 ILD instructional materials relying heavily on ECSs. Both an instructor’s manual and a preliminary classroom-ready student workbook have been developed, and we are implementing a pilot study to explore their effectiveness in communicating scientific content, and the extent to which they might enhance students’ knowledge of and perception about astronomy and science in general. The study design uses a pre-/post-test quasi-experimental study design measuring students’ normalized gain scores, calculated as per Hake (1998) and Prather (2009), using a slightly modified version of S. Slater’s (2011) Test Of Astronomy STandards TOAST combined with other instruments. The results of this initial study will guide the iterative development of ASTRO 101 ILDs that are intended to both be effective at enhancing student achievement and easy for instructors to successfully implement.

  18. Improving Fellowship Training in Microsurgery: A Threshold Concepts Perspective on the Curricula of Fellowship Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evgeniou, Evgenios; Tsironi, Maria; Riley, David

    2015-10-01

    The theory of "threshold concepts" argues that within every discipline there is knowledge that transforms understanding and leads to a previously inaccessible way of thinking, without which the learner cannot progress. This study investigates the factors influencing the development of the characteristic ways of thinking and practicing as a microsurgeon during a microsurgical fellowship. We analyze the challenges in the development of these characteristics during focused fellowship training in microsurgery, of which some could potentially represent "threshold concepts." A qualitative research methodology was followed. Semistructured interviews with trainers and trainees from microsurgical units in the United Kingdom (UK) and the United States (US) were conducted. Data were analyzed using the Dedoose (Manhattan Beach, CA) qualitative data analysis software and interpreted using the theory of "threshold concepts." Five trainees and four trainers from the UK and the US participated in this research project. Although initially some trainees had particular difficulty in developing their practical microsurgical skills, this improved rapidly with adequate practice. Cognitive skills and especially the ability to expect the unexpected and the ability recognize complications presented as a significant challenge for trainees and transformed their understandings regarding the qualities of a microsurgeon. Microsurgical fellowship curricula can be redesigned using the theory of threshold concepts, creating a dynamic framework that addresses individual trainee needs to develop the practical and cognitive skills necessary for independent practice of microsurgery. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  19. Boren Scholarship and Fellowship Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    fellowship to study writings of a [redacted] and to study [redacted] dialect . Without the skills Boren gave me, it would have taken me much longer to...out training funds, which I was told could be used to sustain my Arabic when I was hired. The NSEP program needs to do a much, much better job in

  20. Fellowship | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1977 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Ganguly, Dr Anil Kumar D.Sc. (Calcutta), FNA. Date of birth: 1 November 1918. Date of death: 17 January 1988. Specialization: Environmental Sciences, Radiation Physics. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  1. Post-Baccalaureate Fellowship Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadbury, Jr., William E.

    The Post-Baccalaureate Fellowship Program provides an opportunity for students who went to college with inferior preparation to supplement their education by studying for 1 year at an academically demanding liberal arts college before entering graduate or professional school. The post-baccalaureate fellows take regular courses in a program that is…

  2. Fellowship | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1951 Section: Animal Sciences. Bhimachar, Bramhanda Srinivasamurthy D.Sc. (Calcutta), FNA. Date of birth: 7 July 1906. Date of death: 11 January 1979. Specialization: Applied Zoology, Fisheries, Aquaculture. YouTube · Twitter · Facebook · Blog ...

  3. Fellowship | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1995 Section: Animal Sciences. Ranganath, Prof. Hassan Annegowda Ph.D. (Mysore), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 16 June 1948. Specialization: Zoology, Genetics and Evolution Address: Centenary Visitors' House, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 012, Karnataka Contact ...

  4. Fellowship | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1974 Section: Animal Sciences. Deodikar, Dr Govind Balakrishna Ph.D. (Bombay), FNA. Date of birth: 15 November 1915. Date of death: 13 March 1986. Specialization: Sericulture, Cytogenetics, Plant Breeding. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  5. Fellowship | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1944 Section: Animal Sciences. Panikkar, Nedumangattu Kesava FNA, FNASc 1962-67; Vice President 1965-67. Date of birth: 17 May 1913. Date of death: 24 June 1977. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  6. Hand Society and Matching Program Web Sites Provide Poor Access to Information Regarding Hand Surgery Fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, Richard M; Klifto, Christopher S; Naik, Amish A; Sapienza, Anthony; Capo, John T

    2016-08-01

    The Internet is a common resource for applicants of hand surgery fellowships, however, the quality and accessibility of fellowship online information is unknown. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the accessibility of hand surgery fellowship Web sites and to assess the quality of information provided via program Web sites. Hand fellowship Web site accessibility was evaluated by reviewing the American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH) on November 16, 2014 and the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) fellowship directories on February 12, 2015, and performing an independent Google search on November 25, 2014. Accessible Web sites were then assessed for quality of the presented information. A total of 81 programs were identified with the ASSH directory featuring direct links to 32% of program Web sites and the NRMP directory directly linking to 0%. A Google search yielded direct links to 86% of program Web sites. The quality of presented information varied greatly among the 72 accessible Web sites. Program description (100%), fellowship application requirements (97%), program contact email address (85%), and research requirements (75%) were the most commonly presented components of fellowship information. Hand fellowship program Web sites can be accessed from the ASSH directory and, to a lesser extent, the NRMP directory. However, a Google search is the most reliable method to access online fellowship information. Of assessable programs, all featured a program description though the quality of the remaining information was variable. Hand surgery fellowship applicants may face some difficulties when attempting to gather program information online. Future efforts should focus on improving the accessibility and content quality on hand surgery fellowship program Web sites.

  7. DOE Theory Graduate Student Fellowship: Gustavo Marques Tavares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmaltz, Martin [Boston Univ., MA (United States). Physics Dept.

    2015-12-30

    Marques Tavares was awarded a fellowship for his proposal “The ttbar asymmetry and beyond” to starting in September 2012. This is the final report summarizing the research activities and accomplishments achieved with this grant support. With support from the DOE graduate fellowship Marques Tavares, Katz and Xu at BU have investigated a new technique for obtaining quantitative results in strongly coupled field theories with broken conformal invariance. Such theories are especially interesting as they may be candidates for physics beyond the standard model with possible applications to strongly coupled electroweak symmetry breaking. However, because of the strong coupling even qualitative results about the spectrum of such theories are not rigorously understood.

  8. A survey of simulation fellowship programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotal, Eric R; Sivertson, Ryan M; Wolfe, Scott P; Lammers, Richard L; Overton, David T

    2015-03-01

    A number of specialized educational programs (i.e., simulation fellowships) have been developed, but their characteristics are not well known. We studied the characteristics of existing simulation fellowship programs. Fellowships were identified and characteristics determined from public sources and direct survey. Seventeen fellowships were identified. The sponsoring academic unit was emergency medicine in 53%, pediatric emergency medicine in 7%, urology in 7%, emergency medicine/anesthesiology in 13%, and interdisciplinary units in 20%. Fifty-nine percent were open to emergency medicine residency graduates, and 12% were open to either anesthesia or emergency medicine graduates, or 12% to physician graduates of any specialty. One fellowship was open to pediatric emergency medicine graduates only and another specifically to surgically trained physicians. Seventy-eight percent indicated that fellows were required to work clinically as part of the fellowship, averaging 19 hours per week. Twenty-seven percent of fellowships were 1 year in length and 13% were 2 years. Common (47%) was the option of a 1- or 2-year fellowship, with those in the 2-year track earning a graduate degree or certificate. Most programs accepted a single fellow each year, and some accepted either one or two. Fellowships reported a high fill rate. The 17 identified fellowship programs differed greatly in length, sponsoring academic unit, and prerequisites. The majority require their fellows to provide clinical service. Fellowships reported a high fill rate, suggesting substantial interest in simulation among current residents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Reno Orthopaedic Trauma Fellowship business curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althausen, Peter L; Bray, Timothy J; Hill, Austin D

    2014-07-01

    The Reno Orthopaedic Center (ROC) Trauma Fellowship business curriculum is designed to provide the fellow with a graduate level business practicum and research experience. The time commitments in a typical 12-month trauma fellowship are significant, rendering a traditional didactic master's in business administration difficult to complete during this short time. An organized, structured, practical business education can provide the trauma leaders of tomorrow with the knowledge and experience required to effectively navigate the convoluted and constantly changing healthcare system. The underlying principle throughout the curriculum is to provide the fellow with the practical knowledge to participate in cost-efficient improvements in healthcare delivery. Through the ROC Trauma Fellowship business curriculum, the fellow will learn that delivering healthcare in a manner that provides better outcomes for equal or lower costs is not only possible but a professional and ethical responsibility. However, instilling these values without providing actionable knowledge and programs would be insufficient and ineffective. For this reason, the core of the curriculum is based on individual teaching sessions with a wide array of hospital and private practice administrators. In addition, each section is equipped with a suggested reading list to maximize the learning experience. Upon completion of the curriculum, the fellow should be able to: (1) Participate in strategic planning at both the hospital and practice level based on analysis of financial and clinical data, (2) Understand the function of healthcare systems at both a macro and micro level, (3) Possess the knowledge and skills to be strong leaders and effective communicators in the business lexicon of healthcare, (4) Be a partner and innovator in the improvement of the delivery of orthopaedic services, (5) Combine scientific and strategic viewpoints to provide an evidence-based strategy for improving quality of care in a

  10. Academic productivity among fellowship associated adult total joint reconstruction surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Adam Z; Kelley, Benjamin V; Patel, Ankur D; McAllister, David R; Leong, Natalie L

    2017-12-01

    The Hirsch index (h-index) is a measure that evaluates both research volume and quality-taking into consideration both publications and citations of a single author. No prior work has evaluated academic productivity and contributions to the literature of adult total joint replacement surgeons. This study uses h-index to benchmark the academic impact and identify characteristics associated with productivity of faculty members at joint replacement fellowships. Adult reconstruction fellowship programs were obtained via the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons website. Via the San Francisco match and program-specific websites, program characteristics (Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education approval, academic affiliation, region, number of fellows, fellow research requirement), associated faculty members, and faculty-specific characteristics (gender, academic title, formal fellowship training, years in practice) were obtained. H-index and total faculty publications served as primary outcome measures. Multivariable linear regression determined statistical significance. Sixty-six adult total joint reconstruction fellowship programs were identified: 30% were Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education approved and 73% had an academic affiliation. At these institutions, 375 adult reconstruction surgeons were identified; 98.1% were men and 85.3% had formal arthroplasty fellowship training. Average number of publications per faculty member was 50.1 (standard deviation 76.8; range 0-588); mean h-index was 12.8 (standard deviation 13.8; range 0-67). Number of fellows, faculty academic title, years in practice, and formal fellowship training had a significant (P < .05) positive correlation with both h-index and total publications. The statistical overview presented in this work can help total joint surgeons quantitatively benchmark their academic performance against that of their peers.

  11. Postdoctoral pharmacy industry fellowships: a descriptive analysis of programs and postgraduate positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melillo, Stephanie; Gangadharan, Amy; Johnson, Hiliary; Schleck, Patrick; Steinberg, Michael; Alexander, James G

    2012-01-01

    Postdoctoral pharmacy industry fellowship programs and the employment of fellowship graduates are described. A list of postgraduate industry fellowships was gathered from the 2009 ASHP Midyear Clinical Meeting. Data regarding program characteristics were collected using the Personnel Placement Service database and program-specific brochures. After data compilation, a standardized survey was sent in January 2010 via e-mail to the point of contact for all programs to confirm the accuracy of the program's characteristics. Only academically affiliated industry fellowship programs were analyzed. Retrospective data were collected regarding the first position of employment for all fellows who graduated from the program between 2005 and 2009 and the position of those same individuals at the time of survey completion. Surveys were sent to 64 postgraduate industry fellowship programs affiliated with a school of pharmacy, 56 (87.5%) of whom responded. The departmental breakdown for positions offered (n = 75) across all academically affiliated industry fellowship programs (including nonresponders) was as follows: medical affairs (38.7%, n = 29), clinical research (32.0%, n = 24), regulatory affairs (9.3%, n = 7), commercial (8.0%, n = 6), health economics and outcomes research (8.0%, n = 6), and pharmacovigilance (4.0%, n = 3). Data from fellows during years 1-5 after completion of the industry fellowship indicated that 90.5% of former fellows remained in the industry (n = 238). The postgraduate industry fellowship programs surveyed indicated that the majority of fellowship graduates continued to hold positions in industry after program completion. The majority of industry fellowships and subsequent job placements occurred in the areas of medical affairs, clinical research, and regulatory affairs.

  12. CAPER Team Innovations in Teaching and Learning in ASTRO 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Timothy F.; Prather, E. E.; Bailey, J. M.; Bardar, E.; Brissenden, G.; Dokter, E. F.; Hudgins, D.; Keller, J.

    2006-12-01

    The Conceptual Astronomy and Physics Education Research (CAPER) Team, based at the University of Arizona but drawing on the collective expertise of astronomy educators around the world, is conducting scholarly research and developing instructional strategies in an effort to support high-quality astronomy teaching. One avenue of research is focused on creating and validating conceptual inventories that instructors can use to measure the effectiveness of their instructional interventions. We have recently completed new inventories in the topic areas of (1) light and spectra; (2) stars and stellar formation; and (3) planetary atmospheres and the greenhouse effect. In addition, we are using results from research on students’ naive beliefs and reasoning difficulties to development instructional strategies that promote a learner centered classroom. Our research into the effectiveness of two such curriculum projects (Lecture-Tutorials for Introductory Astronomy and Ranking Tasks for Introductory Astronomy) show that these curriculum result in statistically significant gains in student understanding across a broad range of topics, much greater than lecture alone. A third avenue of research centers on improving how ASTRO 101 is taught on a national level. Informed by our continual evaluation and fine tuning of different forms of collaborative group learning and peer instruction teaching strategies, we have developed a multi-day series of workshops that are designed to help faculty better implement innovative teaching strategies that promote a learner-centered teaching environment in the ASTO 101 large lecture course. The workshops are being assessed and iteratively improved through formative evaluation approaches aimed at determining to what extent they have a positive impact on classroom practice.

  13. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 4 May 1902. Date of death: 29 March 1970. Specialization: Physical Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Summer Research Fellowship Programme 2018. Dates Extended To 7 December 2017. Register here · Focus Area Science Technology Summer ...

  14. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 2 November 1902. Date of death: 8 December 1988. Specialization: Physical Chemistry, Colloid Science and Surface Films. YouTube · Twitter · Facebook · Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Summer Research Fellowship Programme 2018. Dates Extended To 7 December 2017. Register here · Focus Area ...

  15. “HAVING FELLOWSHIP WITH GOD” ACCORDING TO 1 JOHN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    which and in which fellowship is constituted between God and his children. From the prooemium (1:1-4) of the epistle, which is used as the basic text in this research,. Jesus Christ, the Son of God, has been ... This search was done on the “Google” search engine (Google.com). This num- ber also includes spirituality in other ...

  16. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1985 Section: Physics. Malhotra, Prof. Prince Kumar Ph.D. (Bombay), FNA. Date of birth: 20 April 1935. Date of death: 7 March 1992. Specialization: High Energy Physics and Cosmic Ray Physics Address: Tata Institute of Fundamental, Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Bombay 400 ...

  17. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 11 November 1911. Specialization: Chemistry and Technology of Sugar and Plant Products Address: 2/8-21-33, Pullavari Street, Gandhinagar, Kakinada 533 004. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Summer Research Fellowship Programme 2018 · Focus Area Science Technology ...

  18. A core curriculum for clinical fellowship training in pathology informatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S McClintock

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 2007, our healthcare system established a clinical fellowship program in Pathology Informatics. In 2010 a core didactic course was implemented to supplement the fellowship research and operational rotations. In 2011, the course was enhanced by a formal, structured core curriculum and reading list. We present and discuss our rationale and development process for the Core Curriculum and the role it plays in our Pathology Informatics Fellowship Training Program. Materials and Methods: The Core Curriculum for Pathology Informatics was developed, and is maintained, through the combined efforts of our Pathology Informatics Fellows and Faculty. The curriculum was created with a three-tiered structure, consisting of divisions, topics, and subtopics. Primary (required and suggested readings were selected for each subtopic in the curriculum and incorporated into a curated reading list, which is reviewed and maintained on a regular basis. Results: Our Core Curriculum is composed of four major divisions, 22 topics, and 92 subtopics that cover the wide breadth of Pathology Informatics. The four major divisions include: (1 Information Fundamentals, (2 Information Systems, (3 Workflow and Process, and (4 Governance and Management. A detailed, comprehensive reading list for the curriculum is presented in the Appendix to the manuscript and contains 570 total readings (current as of March 2012. Discussion: The adoption of a formal, core curriculum in a Pathology Informatics fellowship has significant impacts on both fellowship training and the general field of Pathology Informatics itself. For a fellowship, a core curriculum defines a basic, common scope of knowledge that the fellowship expects all of its graduates will know, while at the same time enhancing and broadening the traditional fellowship experience of research and operational rotations. For the field of Pathology Informatics itself, a core curriculum defines to the outside world

  19. Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Act of 1994. Hearing on S. 2104 To Establish within the National Laboratories of the Department of Energy a National Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program, before the Subcommittee on Energy Research and Development of the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources.

    These hearings addressed proposed Bill S. 2104 to create a Department of Energy (DOE) fellowship program for math and science teachers that would provide them opportunities to work at DOE labs in order to enhance coordination and communication among the educational community, the Congress, and the Executive Agencies responsible for developing and…

  20. Graduate School and Fellowship Discussion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrar, Charles Reed [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-25

    This was a presentation presented for the Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School. This is a set of slides about how to prepare for college, specifically graduate school. It gives instructions for succeeding and getting into a good school with financial aid through assistantships and scholarships, specifically applying to engineering backgrounds. Also, there are tips given for applying for fellowships and concludes with some general recommendations for graduate school.

  1. Learning styles in otolaryngology fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, David A Diaz Voss; Malik, Mohammad U; Laeeq, Kulsoom; Pandian, Vinciya; Brown, David J; Weatherly, Robert A; Cummings, Charles W; Bhatti, Nasir I

    2011-12-01

    Previous studies have identified a predominant learning style in trainees from different specialties, more recently in otolaryngology residents. The purpose of our study was to determine a predominant learning style within otolaryngology fellowships and to identify any differences between otolaryngology fellows and residents. We conducted a survey of otolaryngology fellows at 25 otolaryngology fellowship programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. We emailed Kolb's Learning Style Index version 3.1 to 16 pediatric otolaryngology (PO) and 24 otology/neurotology (ON) fellows. This index is a widely used 12-item questionnaire. The participants answered each item in the questionnaire as it applied to their preferred learning style: accommodating, converging, diverging, or assimilating. Results were then analyzed and compared between each subspecialty and the previously reported preferred styles of otolaryngology residents. Ten PO and 20 ON fellows completed the survey, with an overall response rate of 75%. PO and ON fellows (60% of each group) preferred a learning style that was "balanced" across all four styles. For ON fellows, 35% preferred converging and 5% preferred accommodating styles. For PO fellows, converging and accommodating styles accounted for 20% each. It was previously reported that 74.4% of otolaryngology residents prefer either converging or accommodating styles. We believe that the fellowship training environment calls for fellows to use more than one learning style to become proficient physicians, hence the trend toward potentially developing a balanced style when at this level. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  2. The Astro-E/XRS Blocking Filter Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audley, Michael D.; Arnaud, Keith A.; Gendreau, Keith C.; Boyce, Kevin R.; Fleetwood, Charles M.; Kelley, Richard L.; Keski-Kuha, Ritva A.; Porter, F. Scott; Stahle, Caroline K.; Szymkowiak, Andrew E.

    1999-01-01

    We describe the transmission calibration of the Astro-E XRS blocking filters. The XRS instrument has five aluminized polyimide blocking filters. These filters are located at thermal stages ranging from 200 K to 60 mK. They are each about 1000 A thick. XRS will have high energy resolution which will enable it to see some of the extended fine structure around the oxygen and aluminum K edges of these filters. Thus, we are conducting a high spectral resolution calibration of the filters near these energies to resolve out extended flue structure and absorption lines.

  3. Introducing AstroGen: the Astronomy Genealogy Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenn, Joseph S.

    2016-12-01

    The Astronomy Genealogy Project (AstroGen), a project of the Historical Astronomy Division of the American Astronomical Society (AAS), will soon appear on the AAS website. Ultimately, it will list the world's astronomers with their highest degrees, theses for those who wrote them, academic advisors (supervisors), universities, and links to the astronomers or their obituaries, their theses when online, and more. At present the AstroGen team is working on those who earned doctorates with astronomy-related theses. We show what can be learned already, with just ten countries essentially completed.

  4. Mastering your Fellowship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Each of these question types is presented according to a theme. The MCQs will be based on the ten clinical domains of family medicine, the MEQs will be aligned with the five national unit standards and the critical reading section will include evidence based medicine and primary care research methods. We suggest.

  5. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) fellowship program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCleary, D.D. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program administers a Graduate Fellowship Program focused toward helping students who are currently under represented in the nation`s pool of scientists and engineers, enter and complete advanced degree programs. The objectives of the program are to: (1) establish and maintain cooperative linkages between DOE and professors at universities with graduate programs leading toward degrees or with degree options in Materials Science, Materials Engineering, Metallurgical Engineering, and Ceramic Engineering, the disciplines most closely related to the AIM Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); (2) strengthen the capabilities and increase the level of participation of currently under represented groups in master`s degree programs, and (3) offer graduate students an opportunity for practical research experience related to their thesis topic through the three-month research assignment or practicum at ORNL. The program is administered by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE).

  6. Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program Application Period is Open until August 25 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The application period for the NCI Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program (CPFP) is open. Since 1987, CPFP has provided funding support for post-doctoral Fellows to train the next generation of researchers and leaders in the field. |

  7. Dermatology hospital fellowships: present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Natalie Z; Fox, Lindy P

    2017-03-01

    The question of what makes a successful dermatology hospitalist has risen to the forefront due to the rapidly increasing number of these providers. Inpatient dermatology fellowships have formed as a direct consequence. Though mostly in their infancy, these programs have primary or secondary goals to train providers in the dermatologic care of the hospitalized patient. This article presents a brief synopsis of the history of traditional hospitalist fellowships and extrapolates these findings to existing hospitalist dermatology fellowships. As more of these programs arise, these fellowships are poised to revolutionize dermatologic inpatient care from a systems perspective. ©2017 Frontline Medical Communications.

  8. Expert Images for All Audiences: The AstroPix Archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Robert; Llamas, Jacob; Wyatt, Ryan Jason; Christensen, Lars

    2018-01-01

    The AstroPix project provides one-stop-shopping for an extensive collection of the finest astronomical imagery, sourced from some of the world’s most prominent observatories. The archive is made possible by a grassroots effort to tag publicly-released imagery using the Astronomical Visualization Metadata (AVM) standard, which captures rich contextual information for each image. While the site has been in development for many years, it is now supported under NASA’s Universe of Learning collaboration, and AstroPix has been updated and deployed to cloud services. The AVM tags provide many unique features including spectral color assignments, sky context (using AAS WorldWide Telescope APIs), and direct links to the original source material on the web. The 7,000+ assets currently include imagery provided by Chandra, ESO, GALEX, Herschel, Hubble, NuSTAR, Spitzer, and WISE. The assets are also provided for use in the planetarium community by supporting the Data2Dome (D2D) initiative. AstroPix imagery is designed to be used in a variety of unique ways that benefit formal and informal education as well as astronomers and the general public. Observatories can add their own image archives to AstroPix by tagging their assets and providing a simple XML feed, increasing the value of their data to the community at large.

  9. Soft X-ray focusing Telescope aboard AstroSat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, K. P.; Dewangan, G. C.; Chandra, S.

    2017-01-01

    The Soft X-ray focusing Telescope (SXT) is a moderateresolution X-ray imaging spectrometer supplementing the ultraviolet and hard X-ray payloads for broadband studies of cosmic sources with AstroSat. Well suited for observing bright X-ray sources, SXT observations of nearby active galactic nuclei...

  10. Project ASTRO: How-To Manual for Teachers and Astronomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Jessica; Fraknoi, Andrew

    Project ASTRO is an innovative program to support science education by linking teachers and students in grades 4-9 with amateur and professional astronomers with the overall goal being to increase students' interest in astronomy and science in general. This manual was designed for teachers, amateur and professional astronomers, youth group…

  11. Do You Always Need a Textbook to Teach Astro 101?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Alexander L.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing use of interactive learning [IL] strategies in Astro 101 classrooms has led some instructors to consider the usefulness of a textbook in such classes. These strategies provide students a learning modality very different from the traditional lecture supplemented by reading a textbook and homework and raise the question of whether the…

  12. AstroCom NYC: A City Partnership for the Next Generation of Astrophysicists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglione, Timothy; Ford, K. E. Saavik; Robbins, Dennis; Mac Low, Mordecai; Agüeros, Marcel; Anchordoqui, Luis; Acquaviva, Viviana; Bellovary, Jillian; Cruz, Kelle; Liu, Charles; Maller, Ari; McKernan, Barry; Minor, Quinn; O'Dowd, Matthew; Rice, Emily; Sheffield, Allyson

    2018-01-01

    AstroCom NYC is an undergraduate mentoring program designed to improve urban minority student access to opportunities in astrophysical research by greatly enhancing partnerships between research astronomers in New York City (City University of New York – an MSI, American Museum of Natural History, and Columbia). AstroCom NYC also partnered this past year with the Flatiron Institute Center for Computational Astrophysics to provide new and exciting midtown opportunities for students, and foster an expanding mentor network through the city. We provide centralized, personalized mentoring as well as financial and academic support, to CUNY undergraduates throughout their studies, plus the resources and opportunities to further CUNY faculty research with students. The goal is that students’ residency in the unique research environments at AMNH and the CCA helps them build a sense of belonging in the field, and readies and inspires them for graduate study. We welcomed our fifth and largest cohort last year, and had some of our first graduates accepted to grad school and bridge programs.

  13. AstroGrid-D: Grid technology for astronomical science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enke, Harry; Steinmetz, Matthias; Adorf, Hans-Martin; Beck-Ratzka, Alexander; Breitling, Frank; Brüsemeister, Thomas; Carlson, Arthur; Ensslin, Torsten; Högqvist, Mikael; Nickelt, Iliya; Radke, Thomas; Reinefeld, Alexander; Reiser, Angelika; Scholl, Tobias; Spurzem, Rainer; Steinacker, Jürgen; Voges, Wolfgang; Wambsganß, Joachim; White, Steve

    2011-02-01

    We present status and results of AstroGrid-D, a joint effort of astrophysicists and computer scientists to employ grid technology for scientific applications. AstroGrid-D provides access to a network of distributed machines with a set of commands as well as software interfaces. It allows simple use of computer and storage facilities and to schedule or monitor compute tasks and data management. It is based on the Globus Toolkit middleware (GT4). Chapter 1 describes the context which led to the demand for advanced software solutions in Astrophysics, and we state the goals of the project. We then present characteristic astrophysical applications that have been implemented on AstroGrid-D in chapter 2. We describe simulations of different complexity, compute-intensive calculations running on multiple sites (Section 2.1), and advanced applications for specific scientific purposes (Section 2.2), such as a connection to robotic telescopes (Section 2.2.3). We can show from these examples how grid execution improves e.g. the scientific workflow. Chapter 3 explains the software tools and services that we adapted or newly developed. Section 3.1 is focused on the administrative aspects of the infrastructure, to manage users and monitor activity. Section 3.2 characterises the central components of our architecture: The AstroGrid-D information service to collect and store metadata, a file management system, the data management system, and a job manager for automatic submission of compute tasks. We summarise the successfully established infrastructure in chapter 4, concluding with our future plans to establish AstroGrid-D as a platform of modern e-Astronomy.

  14. AstroJazz: Integrating Live Jazz and Astronomy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, C. A.

    2005-12-01

    AstroJazz is an innovative public education program in astronomy that blends stunning imagery with live jazz music and a touch of humor to awaken the cosmic curiosity of both adults and children. The program debuted in February 2005 at the Fiske Planetarium on the campus of the University of Colorado, Boulder with an astronomer-chanteuse (the author), a pianist, bassist, drummer, and technical assistant who created dome effects to compliment the PowerPoint slides associated with each song. This AstroJazz quartet played ten songs, five original tunes (Look Up!, Are We Alone? Andromeda Affaire, StarMan Blues, Star Kissed)), and five standard tunes with lyrical twists toward astronomy & astrobiology (e.g. Stormy Weather - Solar Style and Stardust a la SETI.) The hour-long program also includes educational interludes where the astronomy chanteuse interacts with the audience, providing insights and perspective into the wonders of our universe. The performance program that is handed to all audience members contains additional "gee-whiz" facts and provides leads to websites like Astronomy Picture of the Day and spaceweather.com that provide ongoing points of contact for public interest in astronomy. AstroJazz was very well received in its debut performance and now has several new opportunities to perform. Anecdotal evidence suggests that the AstroJazz program is engaging and educational for a very broad audience, including families with young children, world-class astronomers, and spouses of musicians who had never before been exposed to astronomy. This paper will describe the origins and intended evolution of AstroJazz, and offer a mini-sample of the music and slides used in the program. It will also discuss strategies for how the impact on audiences might be assessed.

  15. Increasing Trends in Orthopedic Fellowships Are Not due to Inadequate Residency Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Almansoori

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthopedic residents have one of the highest fellowship participation rates among medical specialities and there are growing concerns that inadequate residency training may be contributing to this trend. Therefore, a mixed-exploratory research survey was distributed to all 148 graduating Canadian orthopedic residents to investigate their perceptions and attitudes for pursuing fellowships. A response rate of 33% (n=49 was obtained with the majority of residents undertaking one (27% or two (60% fellowships. Surgical-skill development was reported as the most common motivating factor, followed by employment and marketability; malpractice protection and financial reasons were the least relevant. The overwhelming majority of residents (94%, n=46 felt adequately prepared by their residency training for independent general practice, and 84% (n=41 of respondents did not feel that current fellowship trends were due to poor residency training. Three common themes were expressed in their comments: the growing perceived expectation by healthcare professionals and employers to be fellowship-certified, the integration of fellowship training into the surgical education hierarchy, and the failure of residency training curriculums to accommodate for this trend. In conclusion, Canadian orthopedic residents are confident of their residency training and are increasingly pursuing fellowships to primarily develop their surgical skills and expertise.

  16. Adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy after prostatectomy: AUA/ASTRO Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ian M; Valicenti, Richard K; Albertsen, Peter; Davis, Brian J; Goldenberg, S Larry; Hahn, Carol; Klein, Eric; Michalski, Jeff; Roach, Mack; Sartor, Oliver; Wolf, J Stuart; Faraday, Martha M

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this guideline is to provide a clinical framework for the use of radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy as adjuvant or salvage therapy. A systematic literature review using the PubMed®, Embase, and Cochrane databases was conducted to identify peer-reviewed publications relevant to the use of radiotherapy after prostatectomy. The review yielded 294 articles; these publications were used to create the evidence-based guideline statements. Additional guidance is provided as Clinical Principles when insufficient evidence existed. Guideline statements are provided for patient counseling, the use of radiotherapy in the adjuvant and salvage contexts, defining biochemical recurrence, and conducting a re-staging evaluation. Physicians should offer adjuvant radiotherapy to patients with adverse pathologic findings at prostatectomy (i.e., seminal vesicle invasion, positive surgical margins, extraprostatic extension) and should offer salvage radiotherapy to patients with prostatic specific antigen or local recurrence after prostatectomy in whom there is no evidence of distant metastatic disease. The offer of radiotherapy should be made in the context of a thoughtful discussion of possible short- and long-term side effects of radiotherapy as well as the potential benefits of preventing recurrence. The decision to administer radiotherapy should be made by the patient and the multi-disciplinary treatment team with full consideration of the patient's history, values, preferences, quality of life, and functional status. Please visit the ASTRO and AUA websites (http://www.redjournal.org/webfiles/images/journals/rob/RAP%20Guideline.pdf and http://www.auanet.org/education/guidelines/radiation-after-prostatectomy.cfm) to view this guideline in its entirety, including the full literature review. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A national survey of medical education fellowships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Britta M.; Searle, Nancy S.; Gruppen, Larry D.; Hatem, Charles J.; Nelson, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of our study was to determine the prevalence, focus, time commitment, graduation requirements and programme evaluation methods of medical education fellowships throughout the United States. Medical education fellowships are defined as a single cohort of medical teaching faculty who participate in an extended faculty development programme. Methods A 26-item online questionnaire was distributed to all US medical schools (n=127) in 2005 and 2006. The questionnaire asked each school if it had a medical education fellowship and the characteristics of the fellowship programme. Results Almost half (n=55) of the participating schools (n=120, response rate 94.5 %) reported having fellowships. Duration (10–584 hours) and length (teaching skills, scholarly dissemination and curriculum design, and required the completion of a scholarly project. A majority collected participant satisfaction; few used other programme evaluation strategies. Conclusions The number of medical education fellowships increased rapidly during the 1990s and 2000s. Across the US, programmes are similar in participant characteristics and curricular focus but unique in completion requirements. Fellowships collect limited programme evaluation data, indicating a need for better outcome data. These results provide benchmark data for those implementing or revising existing medical education fellowships. PMID:21475643

  18. Perspectives on Canadian core fellowship training in pediatric anesthesia: a survey of graduate fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, James D; Crawford, Mark W

    2015-10-01

    Educators in anesthesia have an obligation to ensure that fellowship programs are training anesthesiologists to meet the highest standards of performance in clinical and academic practice. The objective of this survey was to characterize the perspectives of graduates of Canadian core fellowship programs in pediatric anesthesia (during a ten-year period starting in 2003) on the adequacies and inadequacies of fellowship training. We conducted an electronic survey of graduates from eight departments of pediatric anesthesia in Canada who completed one-year core fellowship training in pediatric anesthesia from 2003 to 2013. A novel survey design was implemented, and the content and structure of the design were tested before distribution. Data were collected on respondents' demographics, details of training and practice settings, perceived self-efficacy in subspecialty practices, research experience, and perspectives on one-year core fellowship training in pediatric anesthesia. Descriptive statistics and 95% confidence intervals were determined. The survey was sent to 132 anesthesiologists who completed core fellowship training in pediatric anesthesia in Canada. Sixty-five (49%) completed and eligible surveys were received. Most of the anesthesiologists surveyed perceived that 12 months of core fellowship training are sufficient to acquire the knowledge and critical skills needed to practice pediatric anesthesia. Subspecialty areas most frequently perceived to require improved training included pediatric cardiac anesthesia, chronic pain medicine, and regional anesthesia. This survey reports perceived deficiencies in domains of pediatric anesthesia fellowship training. These findings should help guide the future development of core and advanced fellowship training programs in pediatric anesthesia.

  19. The development and application of the AstroFit program for complementary dark matter studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Lan Nelly

    2013-02-15

    This doctoral thesis describes the development and application of the AstroFit program. Many studies have shown the existence of dark matter (DM), a mass component that constitutes over eighty percent of the entire matter in the Universe. From historical astrophysical evidence to latest reconstructions with sophisticated methods, the gravitational effect of DM can be shown, but its nature remains unknown. Many theoretical explanations aim at describing DM, for example as weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), within particular frameworks. The majority of these frameworks extend the existing standard model of particle physics (SM), so that new particles are added to the known set of elementary particles. One of these frameworks is the constrained supersymmetric standard model (CMSSM) that naturally introduces a DM candidate in form of the lightest supersymmetric particle(LSP). Searches for DM particles are undertaken in three different ways. First, directly with fixed-target experiments that measure WIMPs coming towards the Earth with nuclei of the target material. Second, indirectly by reconstructing DM signatures in particle spectra of known particles observed with ground-based telescopes, spaceborne satellites or balloon-borne experiments. And third, indirectly via direct production of DM at particle colliders such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and energy reconstructions where missing transverse energy is presumably carried away by the DM particles. Global fit programs used in particle physics, such as Fittino, are designed to fit parameters of theories beyond the SM simultaneously that are in accordance with the experimental and observed data in order to probe models and constrain the parameter space. To explore complementarity in DM research, the AstroFit interface program has been developed to combine all available information from direct and indirect searches for DM as well as collider searches for new physics in such global fits. To demonstrate

  20. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Foundation Research and Fellowship Awards: A 26-Year Review at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard School of Dental Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inverso, Gino; Chuang, Sung-Kiang; Kaban, Leonard B

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to review outcomes of the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (OMS) Foundation's funding awards to members of the OMS department at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) in terms of projects completed, abstracts presented, peer-reviewed publications, and career trajectories of recipients. Data were collected from MGH and OMS Foundation records and interviews with award recipients. Primary outcome variables included 1) number of awards and award types, 2) funding amount, 3) project completion, 4) number of presented abstracts, 5) conversion from abstracts to publications, 6) number of peer-reviewed publications, 7) career trajectories of awardees, and 8) additional extramural funding. Eleven Student Research Training Awards provided $135,000 for 39 projects conducted by 37 students. Of these, 34 (87.2%) were completed. There were 30 student abstracts presented, 21 peer-reviewed publications, and a publication conversion rate of 58.8%. Faculty research awards comprised $1,510,970 for 22 research projects by 12 faculty members and two research fellows. Of the 22 funded projects, 21 (95.5%) were completed. There were 110 faculty and research fellow abstracts presented and 113 peer-reviewed publications, for a publication conversion rate of 93.8%. In the student group, 17 of 37 (45.9%) are enrolled in or are applying for OMS residencies. Of the 10 students who have completed OMS training, 3 (30%) are in full-time academic positions. Of the 12 faculty recipients, 9 (75%) remain in OMS academic practice. During this time period, the department received $9.9 million of extramural foundation or National Institutes of Health funding directly or indirectly related to the OMS Foundation grants. The results of this study indicate that 90.2% of projects funded by the OMS Foundation have been completed. Most projects resulted in abstracts and publications in peer-reviewed journals. These grants encouraged students to pursue OMS careers and aided OMS

  1. The HEASARC in 2013 and Beyond: NuSTAR, Astro-H, NICER..

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Stephen A.; Smale, A. P.; McGlynn, T. A.; Arnaud, K. A.

    2013-04-01

    The High Energy Astrophysics Archival Research Center or HEASARC (http://heasarc.gsfc.nasa.gov/) is in its third decade as the NASA astrophysics discipline node supporting multi-mission cosmic X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy research. It provides a unified archive and software structure aimed both at 'legacy' missions such as Einstein, EXOSAT, ROSAT and RXTE, contemporary missions such as Fermi, Swift, Suzaku, Chandra, etc., and upcoming missions, such as NuSTAR, Astro-H and NICER. The HEASARC's high-energy astronomy archive has grown so that it presently contains 45 TB of data from 28 orbital missions. The HEASARC is the designated archive which supports NASA's Physics of the Cosmos theme (http://pcos.gsfc.nasa.gov/). We discuss some of the upcoming new initiatives and developments for the HEASARC, including the arrival of public data from the hard X-ray imaging NuSTAR mission in the summer of 2013, and the ongoing preparations to support the JAXA/NASA Astro-H mission and the NASA MoO Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER), which are expected to become operational in 2015-2016. We also highlight some of the new software capabilities of the HEASARC, such as Xamin, a next-generation archive interface which will eventually supersede Browse, and the latest update of XSPEC (v 12.8.0).

  2. X-ray telescope onboard Astro-E. III. Guidelines to performance improvements and optimization of the ray-tracing simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misaki, Kazutami; Hidaka, Yasuhiro; Ishida, Manabu; Shibata, Ryo; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Haba, Yoshito; Itoh, Kei; Mori, Hideyuki; Kunieda, Hideyo

    2005-02-20

    We present a detailed study of the performance of the Astro-E x-ray telescope (XRT) onboard the Astro-E satellite. As described in preceding papers the ground-based calibrations of the Astro-E XRT revealed that its image quality and effective area are somewhat worse than that expected from the original design. Conceivable causes for such performance degradation are examined by x-ray and optical microscopic measurements at various levels, such as individual reflectors, sectors, and quadrants of the XRT and their alignments. We can attribute, based on detailed measurements, the degradation of the image quality to a slope error in the individual reflectors and the positioning error of reflectors. As for the deficit of the effective area, the shadowing of x rays within the XRT body is the dominant factor. Error budgets for the performance degradation of the Astro-E XRT are summarized. The ray-tracing simulator, which is needed to construct the response function for arbitrary off-axis angles and spatial distributions of any celestial x-ray sources, has been developed and tuned based on the results of detailed measurements. The ray-tracing simulation provides results that are consistent within 3% with the real measurement except for large off-axis angles and higher energies. We propose, based on knowledge obtained from all the measurements and simulations, several plans for future developments to improve the performance of the nested thin-foil mirrors.

  3. 22 CFR 196.1 - What is the Fellowship Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... FOREIGN AFFAIRS/GRADUATE FOREIGN AFFAIRS FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM § 196.1 What is the Fellowship Program? The Thomas R. Pickering Foreign Affairs/Graduate Foreign Affairs Fellowship Program is designed to attract... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is the Fellowship Program? 196.1 Section...

  4. The ASTRO-H (Hitomi) X-Ray Astronomy Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tadayuki; Kokubun, Motohide; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Kelley, Richard; Ohashi, Takaya; Aharonian, Felix; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Akimoto, Fumie; Allen, Steve; Anabuki, Naohisa; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Hitomi (ASTRO-H) mission is the sixth Japanese X-ray astronomy satellite developed by a large international collaboration, including Japan, USA, Canada, and Europe. The mission aimed to provide the highest energy resolution ever achieved at E greater than 2 keV, using a microcalorimeter instrument, and to cover a wide energy range spanning four decades in energy from soft X-rays to gamma-rays. After a successful launch on 2016 February 17, the spacecraft lost its function on 2016 March 26, but the commissioning phase for about a month provided valuable information on the on-board instruments and the spacecraft system, including astrophysical results obtained from first light observations. The paper describes the Hitomi (ASTRO-H) mission, its capabilities, the initial operation, and the instruments/spacecraft performances confirmed during the commissioning operations for about a month.

  5. AstroBioLab: A Mobile Biotic and Soil Analysis Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bada, J. L.; Zent, A. P.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Quinn, R. C.; Navarro-Gonzalex, R.; Gonez-Silva, B.; McKay, C. P.

    2003-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and NASA Ames Research Center are currently developing a mobile Astrobiology Laboratory (AstroBioLab) for a series of field campaigns using the Chilean Atacama Desert as a Martian surface analog site. The Astrobiology Science and Technology for Exploring Planets (ASTEP) program funded AstroBioLab is designed around the Mars Organic Detector (MOD) instrument and the Mars Oxidant Instrument (MOI) which provide complementary data sets. Using this suite of Mars Instrument Development Program (MIDP) and Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program (PIDDP) derived in situ instruments, which provide state-of-the-art organic compound detection (attomolar sensitivity) and depth profiling of oxidation chemistry, we measure and correlate the interplay of organic compounds, inorganic oxidants, UV irradiation and water abundance. This mobile laboratory studies the proposition that intense UV irradiation coupled with low levels of liquid water generates metastable oxidizing species that can consume moderate amounts of seeded organic compounds. Results from the initial spring 2003 field campaign will be presented.

  6. The Determination and Investigation of Evaluation Habits of The People Playing Football in Astro Pitches on Their Leisure Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin ÖZTÜRK

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study identified astro turf football plays in people's leisure time habits and objective examination is a descriptive study with. Gaziantep carpet in the research groups in the field are a total of 262 people playing football. Personal information form in order to collect data and Pala (2012 to participate in recreational activities developed by the survey type and level is used. The survey consists of three kinds of size i n the preferred leisure activity, leisure time is the influence of leisure activities has left the choice of causes and events. SPSS 16.0 software package was used for the analysis of the study data. Descriptive statistics to analyze the data (Percentage, Frequency, Mean, for t - test and multiple groups for two groups one way ANOVA was used. The significance level in statistical analysis has been accepted as p <0.05. As a result, the carpet in his spare time in the field with the marital status of those in the lower size scale recreational soccer approval of leisure activities was found statistically significant differences between the preferred types, there were no significant relationships with other subscales. Astro turf football approval of those in their spare time learning situations with recreation scale were not statistically significant differences between. Leisure astro turf football approval in those professions in the recreation scal e dimensions of leisure activities was found to be statistically significant difference between the preferred types, there were no significant differences with other subscales.

  7. Deploying the AstroGrid: Science Use Ready

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, N. A.; Harrison, P. A.; Richards, A. M. S.; Hill, M. C.

    2005-12-01

    AstroGrid (see http://www.astrogrid.org), a UK eScience project with collaborating groups drawn from the major UK data archive centres, is creating the UK's Virtual Observatory. In order to ensure rapid user feedback AstroGrid is fully deploying each iteration release, connected to relevant data and application products, in such a fashion as to allow scientific use of that release. The early users are primarily the science advisory group and now the beta tester communities of the project. The scientific functionality of the current (Sep. 2004) deployment is highlighted. This includes access to a sophisticated workflow capability. Its use in allowing image extraction from multiple image datasets, input photometry file creation, redshift determination, and visualisation for the outputs to allow discovery of high redshift objects is described. Further examples show the use of the latest Astrophysical Data Query language standard and how it is being used to enable large data queries of remote databases in searching for low mass objects in the Pleiades with results returned to a virtual ``MySpace'' user storage area, where further visualisation and processing can be performed. We note how the deployed system is being tested by the science community, and how that comment and feedback is vital in informing the project as to future releases including the January 2005 ``AstroGrid Release 1''.

  8. Different tracks for pathology informatics fellowship training: Experiences of and input from trainees in a large multisite fellowship program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce P Levy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pathology Informatics is a new field; a field that is still defining itself even as it begins the formalization, accreditation, and board certification process. At the same time, Pathology itself is changing in a variety of ways that impact informatics, including subspecialization and an increased use of data analysis. In this paper, we examine how these changes impact both the structure of Pathology Informatics fellowship programs and the fellows′ goals within those programs. Materials and Methods: As part of our regular program review process, the fellows evaluated the value and effectiveness of our existing fellowship tracks (Research Informatics, Clinical Two-year Focused Informatics, Clinical One-year Focused Informatics, and Clinical 1 + 1 Subspecialty Pathology and Informatics. They compared their education, informatics background, and anticipated career paths and analyzed them for correlations between those parameters and the fellowship track chosen. All current and past fellows of the program were actively involved with the project. Results: Fellows′ anticipated career paths correlated very well with the specific tracks in the program. A small set of fellows (Clinical - one or two year - Focused Informatics tracks anticipated clinical careers primarily focused in informatics (Director of Informatics. The majority of the fellows, however, anticipated a career practicing in a Pathology subspecialty, using their informatics training to enhance that practice (Clinical 1 + 1 Subspecialty Pathology and Informatics Track. Significantly, all fellows on this track reported they would not have considered a Clinical Two-year Focused Informatics track if it was the only track offered. The Research and the Clinical One-year Focused Informatics tracks each displayed unique value for different situations. Conclusions: It seems a "one size fits all" fellowship structure does not fit the needs of the majority of potential Pathology

  9. Different tracks for pathology informatics fellowship training: Experiences of and input from trainees in a large multisite fellowship program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Bruce P.; McClintock, David S.; Lee, Roy E.; Lane, William J.; Klepeis, Veronica E.; Baron, Jason M.; Onozato, Maristela L.; Kim, JiYeon; Brodsky, Victor; Beckwith, Bruce; Kuo, Frank; Gilbertson, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pathology Informatics is a new field; a field that is still defining itself even as it begins the formalization, accreditation, and board certification process. At the same time, Pathology itself is changing in a variety of ways that impact informatics, including subspecialization and an increased use of data analysis. In this paper, we examine how these changes impact both the structure of Pathology Informatics fellowship programs and the fellows’ goals within those programs. Materials and Methods: As part of our regular program review process, the fellows evaluated the value and effectiveness of our existing fellowship tracks (Research Informatics, Clinical Two-year Focused Informatics, Clinical One-year Focused Informatics, and Clinical 1 + 1 Subspecialty Pathology and Informatics). They compared their education, informatics background, and anticipated career paths and analyzed them for correlations between those parameters and the fellowship track chosen. All current and past fellows of the program were actively involved with the project. Results: Fellows’ anticipated career paths correlated very well with the specific tracks in the program. A small set of fellows (Clinical – one or two year – Focused Informatics tracks) anticipated clinical careers primarily focused in informatics (Director of Informatics). The majority of the fellows, however, anticipated a career practicing in a Pathology subspecialty, using their informatics training to enhance that practice (Clinical 1 + 1 Subspecialty Pathology and Informatics Track). Significantly, all fellows on this track reported they would not have considered a Clinical Two-year Focused Informatics track if it was the only track offered. The Research and the Clinical One-year Focused Informatics tracks each displayed unique value for different situations. Conclusions: It seems a “one size fits all” fellowship structure does not fit the needs of the majority of potential Pathology Informatics

  10. Science Academies Summer Refresher Fellowship Programme for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 17; Issue 10. Science Academies Summer Refresher Fellowship Programme for Students and Teachers - 2012. Information and Announcements Volume 17 Issue 10 October 2012 pp 1015-1018 ...

  11. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education accreditation and influence on perceptions of pediatric otolaryngology fellowship training experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedwell, Joshua R; Choi, Sukgi; Chan, Kenny; Preciado, Diego

    2013-09-01

    The American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology (ASPO) has set a goal of universal accreditation of fellowship programs by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) by 2014. This study offers data comparing trainee experience at accredited vs nonaccredited programs. To evaluate perceptions of pediatric otolaryngology fellowship training experience and to elucidate differences between those who trained in ACGME-accredited fellowships vs those who did not. Web-based survey sent to all members of ASPO, as well as recent fellowship graduate ASPO-eligible physicians. Responses were obtained in an anonymous fashion. The study population comprised 136 ASPO members who recently graduated from pediatric otolaryngology fellowship programs (36 from ACGME-accredited fellowships and 100 from nonaccredited programs). Difference in perceived fellowship experience between graduates of accredited vs nonaccredited programs, specifically, differences in service vs education perceptions. Overall, a majority (64%) of respondents agreed that standardizing the pediatric fellowship curriculum through ACGME accreditation is a worthwhile goal. Those who attended ACGME-accredited fellowships were more likely to favor accreditation vs non-ACGME graduates (83% vs 58%; P = .006). Graduates of ACGME-accredited programs were also more likely to agree that their fellowship provided adequate preparation for a career in academic medicine (100% vs 89%; P = .04), protected time for research (94% vs 60%; P higher primary call frequency (0.8 days per week vs 0.2 days per week; P = .01), and attending physician participation in rounds (71% vs 53%; P = .05). Most respondents were in agreement with universal ACGME accreditation. Those having trained in accredited programs cite increased allowance for research, academic and vacation time, more formal opportunities to evaluate their faculty, and decreased primary call burden.

  12. Office of Naval Research Graduate Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-29

    202)986-8500 0 Fax: (202)265-8504 April 15, 1993 MEMORANDUM To: Bursar’s Office From: Jeffrey P. Jarosz, Program Mananger , Projects Department Subject...Best of luck in your studies and career, and keep in touch! Yours truly, Jeffrey P. Jarosz Program Mananger Projects Department PS One other thing

  13. Science Academies' Summer Research Fellowship Programme for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-11-30

    Nov 30, 2017 ... to work on short-term projects is displayed in the online application. Applications are invited from interested students and teachers from all universities and colleges ... to what the applicant wants to learn and achieve. Student applicants should provide the email id of one of their teachers or HoD familiar with ...

  14. Undergraduate Summer Fellowships in Breast Cancer Research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brooks, Sam

    2004-01-01

    .... The intent of this application is to broaden the number of students that can participate in KCI's undergraduate summer training program by creating a focused program utilizing the established Breast...

  15. Undergraduate Summer Fellowships in Breast Cancer Research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brooks, Samuel

    2003-01-01

    .... The intent of this application is to broaden the number of students that can participate in KCI's undergraduate summer training program by creating a focused program utilizing the established Breast...

  16. Undergraduate Summer Fellowships in Breast Cancer Research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brooks, Samuel C

    2005-01-01

    .... The intent of this program is to broaden the number of students that can participate in KCI's undergraduate summer training endeavor by creating a focused effort utilizing the established Breast...

  17. Global Health Education in Gastroenterology Fellowship: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirapinyo, Pichamol; Hunt, Rachel S; Tabak, Ying P; Proctor, Deborah D; Makrauer, Frederick L

    2016-12-01

    Interest in global health (GH) education is increasing across disciplines. To assess exposure to and perception of GH training among gastroenterology fellows and program directors across the USA. Design: Electronic survey study. The questionnaire was circulated to accredited US gastroenterology fellowship programs, with the assistance of the American Gastroenterological Association. Gastroenterology program directors and fellows. The questionnaire was returned by 127 respondents (47 program directors, 78 fellows) from 55 training programs (36 % of all training programs). 61 % of respondents had prior experience in GH. 17 % of programs offered GH curriculum with international elective (13 %), didactic (9 %), and research activity (7 %) being the most common. Fellows had adequate experience managing hepatitis B (93 %), cholangiocarcinoma (84 %), and intrahepatic duct stones (84 %). 74, 69 and 68 % reported having little to no experience managing hepatitis E, tuberculosis mesenteritis, or epidemic infectious enteritis, respectively. Most fellows would participate in an elective in an underserved area locally (81 %) or a 4-week elective abroad (71 %), if available. 44 % of fellows planned on working or volunteering abroad after fellowship. Barriers to establishing GH curriculum included funding (94 %), scheduling (88 %), and a lack of standardized objectives (78 %). Lack of interest, however, was not a concern. Fellows (49 %), more than faculty (29 %) (χ 2  = 21.9; p = 0.03), believed that GH education should be included in fellowship curriculum. Program directors and trainees recognize the importance of GH education. However, only 17 % of ACGME-approved fellowship programs offer the opportunity. Global health curriculum may enhance gastroenterology training.

  18. The financial impact of orthopaedic fellowship training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskill, Trevor; Cook, Chad; Nunley, James; Mather, R Chad

    2009-07-01

    Previous reports have compared the expected financial return of a medical education with those expected in other professions. However, we know of no published report estimating the financial return of orthopaedic training. The purpose of this study was to estimate the financial incentives that may influence the decision to invest an additional year of training in each of the major orthopaedic fellowships. With survey data from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and using standard financial techniques, we calculated the estimated return on investment of an additional year of orthopaedic training over a working lifetime. The net present value, internal rate of return, and the break-even point were estimated. Eight fellowships were examined and compared with general orthopaedic practice. Investment in an orthopaedic fellowship yields variable returns. Adult spine, shoulder and elbow, sports medicine, hand, and adult arthroplasty may yield positive returns. Trauma yields a neutral return, while pediatrics and foot and ankle have negative net present values. On the basis of mean reported incomes, the break-even point was two years for spine, seven years for hand, eight years for shoulder and elbow, twelve years for adult arthroplasty, thirteen years for sports medicine, and twenty-seven years for trauma. Fellowship-trained pediatric and foot and ankle surgeons did not break even following the initial investment. When working hours were controlled for, the returns for adult arthroplasty and trauma became negative. The financial return of an orthopaedic fellowship varies on the basis of the specialty chosen. While reasons to pursue fellowship training vary widely, and many are not financial, there are positive and negative financial incentives. Therefore, the decision to pursue fellowship training is best if it is not made on the basis of financial incentives. This information may assist policy makers in analyzing medical education economics to ensure the

  19. Astro-WISE : Chaining to the Universe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentijn, Edwin A.; McFarland, John P.; Snigula, Jan; Begeman, Kor G.; Boxhoorn, Danny R.; Rengelink, Roeland; Helmich, Ewout; Heraudeau, Philippe; Kleijn, Gijs Verdoes; Vermeij, Ronald; Vriend, Willem-Jan; Tempelaar, Michiel J.; Deul, Erik; Kuijken, Konrad; Capaccioli, Massimo; Silvotti, Roberto; Bender, Ralf; Neeser, Mark; Saglia, Roberto; Bertin, Emmanuel; Mellier, Yannick; Shaw, RA; Hill, F; Bell, DJ

    2007-01-01

    The recent explosion of recorded digital data and its processed derivatives threatens to overwhelm researchers when analysing their experimental data or looking up data items in archives and file systems. While current hardware developments allow the acquisition, processing and storage of hundreds

  20. Astro-WISE: Chaining to the Universe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentijn, E. A.; Mc Farland, John; Snigula, J.; Begeman, K. G.; Boxhoorn, D. R.; Rengelink, R.; Helmich, E.; Heraudeau, P.; Verdoes Kleijn, G.; Vermeij, R.; Vriend, W.-J.; Tempelaar, M. J.; Deul, E.; Kuijken, K.; Capaccioli, M.; Silvotti, R.; Bender, R.; Neeser, M.; Saglia, R.; Bertin, E.; Mellier, Y.; Shaw, R. A.; Hill, F.; Bell, D. J.

    2007-01-01

    The recent explosion of recorded digital data and its processed derivatives threatens to overwhelm researchers when analysing their experimental data or looking up data items in archives and file systems. While current hardware developments allow the acquisition, processing and storage of hundreds

  1. Conjugate Fabry-Perot cavity pair for improved astro-comb accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chih-Hao; Chang, Guoqing; Glenday, Alexander G; Langellier, Nicholas; Zibrov, Alexander; Phillips, David F; Kärtner, Franz X; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Walsworth, Ronald L

    2012-08-01

    We propose a new astro-comb mode-filtering scheme composed of two Fabry-Perot cavities (coined "conjugate Fabry-Perot cavity pair"). Simulations indicate that this new filtering scheme makes the accuracy of astro-comb spectral lines more robust against systematic errors induced by nonlinear processes associated with power-amplifying and spectral-broadening optical fibers.

  2. An optical survey of the Elais-S2 field : Data reduction with Astro-Wise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Héraudeau, Ph.; Valentijn, E.; Casoli, F.; Contini, T.; Hameury, J.M.; Pagani, L.

    2005-01-01

    We use the ASTRO-WISE system to reduce observations on the ELAIS-S2 field obtained in the B, V, R and I-bands with the Wide-Field Imager at the 2.2m ESO/MPG telescope. We present the main data reduction steps performed by the prototype version of ASTRO-WISE.

  3. DepAstroCCD an original astrometric tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović I.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A complex software for preparation and treatment of astro photographic plates and double-star observations recorded with CCD cameras is developed. The preparation interface contains a catalogue base for the choice of observation objects and an interface for bringing into accordance the telescope and CCD camera performance with the assumptions of the postprocessor interface. The processing is based on the original development of image gradient removing software and classical FFT method and autocorrelation. The software has been tested on several theoretical and real images of double stars.

  4. Selections from 2017: Image Processing with AstroImageJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-12-01

    Editors note:In these last two weeks of 2017, well be looking at a few selections that we havent yet discussed on AAS Nova from among the most-downloaded paperspublished in AAS journals this year. The usual posting schedule will resume in January.AstroImageJ: Image Processing and Photometric Extraction for Ultra-Precise Astronomical Light CurvesPublished January2017The AIJ image display. A wide range of astronomy specific image display options and image analysis tools are available from the menus, quick access icons, and interactive histogram. [Collins et al. 2017]Main takeaway:AstroImageJ is a new integrated software package presented in a publication led byKaren Collins(Vanderbilt University,Fisk University, andUniversity of Louisville). Itenables new users even at the level of undergraduate student, high school student, or amateur astronomer to quickly start processing, modeling, and plotting astronomical image data.Why its interesting:Science doesnt just happen the momenta telescope captures a picture of a distantobject. Instead, astronomical images must firstbe carefully processed to clean up thedata, and this data must then be systematically analyzed to learn about the objects within it. AstroImageJ as a GUI-driven, easily installed, public-domain tool is a uniquelyaccessible tool for thisprocessing and analysis, allowing even non-specialist users to explore and visualizeastronomical data.Some features ofAstroImageJ:(as reported by Astrobites)Image calibration:generate master flat, dark, and bias framesImage arithmetic:combineimages viasubtraction, addition, division, multiplication, etc.Stack editing:easily perform operations on a series of imagesImage stabilization and image alignment featuresPrecise coordinate converters:calculate Heliocentric and Barycentric Julian DatesWCS coordinates:determine precisely where atelescope was pointed for an image by PlateSolving using Astronomy.netMacro and plugin support:write your own macrosMulti-aperture photometry

  5. [Radiotherapy in prostate cancer: data from ASTRO 2008].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coquard, R

    2009-05-01

    The annual convention of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) took place in Boston, MA, 21-25 September 2008. On the occasion of this meeting, in which the past year's main advances in radiation oncology have been highlighted, results from clinical studies that may significantly impact the standard clinical practice were presented, particularly in the fields of locally advanced prostate cancer treated with non surgical approaches, and pT3 and/or R1 prostate cancer managed with radical prostatectomy. Randomized studies that emphasize the role of dose escalation have been updated.

  6. Astro-H Data Analysis, Processing and Archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelini, Lorella; Terada, Yukikatsu; Loewenstein, Michael; Miller, Eric D.; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yaqoob, Tahir; Krimm, Hans; Harrus, Ilana; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; hide

    2016-01-01

    Astro-H (Hitomi) is an X-ray Gamma-ray mission led by Japan with international participation, launched on February 17, 2016. The payload consists of four different instruments (SXS, SXI, HXI and SGD) that operate simultaneously to cover the energy range from 0.3 keV up to 600 keV. This paper presents the analysis software and the data processing pipeline created to calibrate and analyze the Hitomi science data along with the plan for the archive and user support.These activities have been a collaborative effort shared between scientists and software engineers working in several institutes in Japan and USA.

  7. The Astro Edge solar array for the NASA SSTI Clark Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, B. R.

    1995-10-01

    The Astro Edge solar array is a new and innovative reflective low concentrator power generating system which has been selected for the CTA Incorporate/Lockheed Martin Clark spacecraft under the NASA Small Spacecraft Technology Initiative (SSTI) program. In support of this program, Astro Aerospace Corporation has produced one qualification and two flight solar array wings to support a July 1996 launch. The Astro Edge solar array was selected as a new technology to benefit future NASA, military and commercial missions by providing high specific power, high deployed stiffness, low stowed volume, low risk, and cost reduction features which meet the agency's 'better, faster, cheaper' goals. This novel array accounts for five of the thirty-six advanced technologies which the Clark spacecraft will demonstrate. A brief SSTI Astro Edge solar array program overview is presented. Completed qualification and acceptance testing is discussed. Finally, the major discriminators which make the Astro Edge solar array 'better, faster, cheaper' technology are provided.

  8. Lessons Learned through the Development and Publication of AstroImageJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Karen

    2018-01-01

    As lead author of the scientific image processing software package AstroImageJ (AIJ), I will discuss the reasoning behind why we decided to release AIJ to the public, and the lessons we learned related to the development, publication, distribution, and support of AIJ. I will also summarize the AIJ code language selection, code documentation and testing approaches, code distribution, update, and support facilities used, and the code citation and licensing decisions. Since AIJ was initially developed as part of my graduate research and was my first scientific open source software publication, many of my experiences and difficulties encountered may parallel those of others new to scientific software publication. Finally, I will discuss the benefits and disadvantages of releasing scientific software that I now recognize after having AIJ in the public domain for more than five years.

  9. EPO and Astro 101: Shotgun Wedding, Marriage of Convenience, or Meaningful Relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraknoi, A.; Cobabe-Ammann, E.; Prather, E.

    2011-09-01

    Astro 101 touches the widest audiences imaginable - interested generalists, future teachers (whether they know it or not), soon-to-be citizen scientists, and students who will eventually end up heading into STEM careers. NASA's Space Mission Directorate Education and Public Outreach has, as its mandate, all of these audiences as target clients - although we identify them more formally (e.g., informal and formal education, outreach, and higher education). The question on the table is this: should there be a relationship between these two - and is there? Is that relationship taking full advantage of what the other has to offer? Or should it just be left up to the vagaries of individual instructors to find their place in the NASA Science Mission Diretorate (SMD) EPO landscape? Should EPO professionals assume that, within their definitions, they've covered all of the bases? Where do research-based best practices fit into both worlds? Where does the "pipeline" fit into all of this?

  10. ASDS Cosmetic Dermatologic Surgery Fellowship Milestones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Abigail; Arndt, Kenneth A; Avram, Mathew M; Brown, Mariah R; Dover, Jeffrey S; Fabi, Sabrina G; Friedmann, Daniel P; Geronemus, Roy G; Goldberg, David J; Goldman, Mitchel P; Green, Jeremy B; Ibrahimi, Omar A; Jones, Derek H; Kilmer, Suzanne L; McDaniel, David H; Obagi, Suzan; Ortiz, Arisa E; Rohrer, Thomas E; Taylor, Mark B; Torres, Abel; Weinkle, Susan H; Weiss, Margaret A; Weiss, Eduardo T; Weiss, Robert A; Poon, Emily; Alam, Murad

    2016-10-01

    The American Council of Graduate Medical Education, which oversees much of postgraduate medical education in the United States, has championed the concept of "milestones," standard levels of achievement keyed to particular time points, to assess trainee performance during residency. To develop a milestones document for the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery (ASDS) Cosmetic Dermatologic Surgery (CDS) fellowship program. An ad hoc milestone drafting committee was convened that included members of the ASDS Accreditation Work Group and program directors of ASDS-approved Cosmetic Dermatologic Surgery (CDC) fellowship training programs. Draft milestones were circulated through email in multiple rounds until consensus was achieved. Thirteen milestones were developed in the 6 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competency areas, with 8 of these being patient-care milestones. Additional instructions for milestone administration more specific to the CDS fellowship than general ACGME instructions were also approved. Implementation of semiannual milestones was scheduled for the fellowship class entering in July 2018. Milestones are now available for CDS fellowship directors to implement in combination with other tools for fellow evaluation.

  11. Why invest in an educational fellowship program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, Nancy S; Hatem, Charles J; Perkowski, Linda; Wilkerson, LuAnn

    2006-11-01

    Expanding and refining the repertoire of medical school teaching faculty is required by the many current and changing demands of medical education. To meet this challenge academic medical institutions have begun to establish programs--including educational fellowship programs--to improve the teaching toolboxes of faculty and to empower them to assume leadership roles within both institutional and educational arenas. In this article, the authors (1) provide historical background on educational fellowship programs; (2) describe the prevalence and focus of these programs in North American medical schools, based on data from a recent (2005) survey; and (3) give a brief overview of the nine fellowship programs that are discussed fully in other articles in this issue of Academic Medicine. These articles describe very different types of educational fellowships that, nevertheless, share common features: a cohort of faculty members who are selected to participate in a longitudinal set of faculty development activities to improve participants' teaching skills and to build a cadre of educational leaders for the institution. Evaluation of educational fellowships remains a challenging issue, but the authors contend that one way to evaluate the programs' effectiveness is to look at the educational improvements that have been instigated by program graduates. The authors hope that the various program descriptions will help readers to improve their existing programs and/or to initiate new programs.

  12. AstroDance: Teaching Astrophysics Through Dance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel-Storr, Jacob; Campanelli, M.; Bochner, J.; Warfield, T.; Bischof, H.; Zlochower, Y.; Nordhaus, J.; Watkins, G.; NSF CRPA AstroDance Team

    2014-01-01

    Through a collaboration involving scientists, artists and educators, members of the Center for Computational Relativity and Gravitation and the National Technical Institute for the Deaf at the Rochester Institute of Technology we developed a unique project for Communicating Research to Public Audiences. The project used dance and multi-media theater techniques to expose a broad audience, about half of which is comprised of deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals, to an aesthetic, educational performance representing the concepts of gravitational physics in astrophysical settings. Since deaf and hard-of-hearing people rely heavily on visual communication for learning and gaining access to information, dance and multi-media theater provide a kinesthetic and visual experience that is fully accessible to them, as well as hearing audience members, and help facilitate their learning and development of non-linguistic representations of concepts. Here we present the results of our research into the learning outcomes for the diverse audiences of this project in terms of both knowledge and attitudes towards science.

  13. Determining the Most Important Factors Involved in Ranking Orthopaedic Sports Medicine Fellowship Applicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baweja, Rishi; Kraeutler, Matthew J; Mulcahey, Mary K; McCarty, Eric C

    2017-11-01

    Orthopaedic surgery residencies and certain fellowships are becoming increasingly competitive. Several studies have identified important factors to be taken into account when selecting medical students for residency interviews. Similar information for selecting orthopaedic sports medicine fellows does not exist. To determine the most important factors that orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship program directors (PDs) take into account when ranking applicants. Cross-sectional study. A brief survey was distributed electronically to PDs of the 92 orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship programs that are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). Each PD was asked to rank, in order, the 5 most important factors taken into account when ranking applicants based on a total list of 13 factors: the interview, the applicant's residency program, letters of recommendation (LORs), personal connections made through the applicant, research experience, an applicant's geographical ties to the city/town of the fellowship program, United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) scores, Orthopaedic In-Training Examination (OITE) scores, history of being a competitive athlete in college, extracurricular activities/hobbies, volunteer experience, interest in a career in academics, and publications/research/posters. Factors were scored from 1 to 5, with a score of 5 representing the most important factor and 1 representing the fifth-most important factor. Of the 92 PDs contacted, 57 (62%) responded. Thirty-four PDs (37%) listed the interview as the most important factor in ranking fellowship applicants (overall score, 233). LORs (overall score, 196), an applicant's residency program (overall score, 133), publications/research/posters (overall score, 115), and personal connections (overall score, 90) were reported as the second- through fifth-most important factors, respectively. According to orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship PDs, the

  14. STAR Graduate and GRO Undergraduate Fellowship Recipient List

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's STAR graduate fellowship program supports masters and doctoral candidates in environmental studies. Each year, students in the United States compete for STAR fellowships through a rigorous review process.

  15. The Internet as a communication tool for orthopedic spine fellowships in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Guzman, Javier Z; Skovrlj, Branko; Overley, Samuel C; Cho, Samuel K; Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Hecht, Andrew C

    2015-04-01

    Orthopedic residents seeking additional training in spine surgery commonly use the Internet to manage their fellowship applications. Although studies have assessed the accessibility and content of Web sites in other medical specialties, none have looked at orthopedic spine fellowship Web sites (SFWs). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accessibility of information from commonly used databases and assess the content of SFWs. This was a Web site accessibility and content evaluation study. A comprehensive list of available orthopedic spine fellowship programs was compiled by accessing program lists from the SF Match, North American Spine Society, Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database (FREIDA), and Orthopaedicsone.com (Ortho1). These databases were assessed for accessibility of information including viable links to SFWs and responsive program contacts. A Google search was used to identify SFWs not readily available on these national databases. SFWs were evaluated based on online education and recruitment content. Evaluators found 45 SFWs of 63 active programs (71%). Available SFWs were often not readily accessible from national program lists, and no program afforded a direct link to their SFW from SF Match. Approximately half of all programs responded via e-mail. Although many programs described surgical experience (91%) and research requirements (87%) during the fellowship, less than half mentioned didactic instruction (46%), journal clubs (41%), and national meetings or courses attended (28%). Evaluators found an average 45% of fellow recruitment content. Comparison of SFWs by program characteristics revealed three significant differences. Programs with greater than one fellowship position had greater online education content than programs with a single fellow (p=.022). Spine fellowships affiliated with an orthopedic residency program maintained greater education (p=.006) and recruitment (p=.046) content on their SFWs. Most orthopedic

  16. The Benjamin H. Kean Travel Fellowship in Tropical Medicine: Assessment of Impact at 15 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carman, Aubri S; John, Chandy C

    2017-09-01

    The Benjamin H. Kean Fellowship in Tropical Medicine is an American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene initiative that provides medical students with funding for international clinical or research experiences lasting at least 1 month. Of the 175 Kean fellows from 1998 to 2013, 140 had current available e-mails, and 70 of the 140 (50%) responded to a survey about their fellowship experience. Alumni indicated that the Kean Fellowship had a high impact on their career plans with regard to preparation for ( N = 65, 94.2%) and inspiration to pursue ( N = 59, 88.1%) a career in tropical medicine and global health. Continued involvement in tropical medicine and global health was common: 52 alumni (74.3%) were currently working in tropical medicine or global health, 49 (71.0%) had done so in the interim between the Kean fellowship and their current position; and 17 of 19 Kean fellows (89.4%) who had completed all medical training and were now in professional practice continued to work in tropical medicine and global health. Alumni had been highly productive academically, publishing a total of 831 PubMed-indexed manuscripts, almost all on tropical medicine or global health topics, in the period between their fellowship year and 2013. Alumni reported strengths of the fellowship including funding, networking, and flexibility, and suggested that more networking and career mentoring would enhance the program. The Benjamin H. Kean fellowship program has been highly successful at inspiring and fostering ongoing work by trainees in tropical medicine and global health.

  17. Optimization of filtering schemes for broadband astro-combs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Guoqing; Li, Chih-Hao; Phillips, David F; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Walsworth, Ronald L; Kärtner, Franz X

    2012-10-22

    To realize a broadband, large-line-spacing astro-comb, suitable for wavelength calibration of astrophysical spectrographs, from a narrowband, femtosecond laser frequency comb ("source-comb"), one must integrate the source-comb with three additional components: (1) one or more filter cavities to multiply the source-comb's repetition rate and thus line spacing; (2) power amplifiers to boost the power of pulses from the filtered comb; and (3) highly nonlinear optical fiber to spectrally broaden the filtered and amplified narrowband frequency comb. In this paper we analyze the interplay of Fabry-Perot (FP) filter cavities with power amplifiers and nonlinear broadening fiber in the design of astro-combs optimized for radial-velocity (RV) calibration accuracy. We present analytic and numeric models and use them to evaluate a variety of FP filtering schemes (labeled as identical, co-prime, fraction-prime, and conjugate cavities), coupled to chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). We find that even a small nonlinear phase can reduce suppression of filtered comb lines, and increase RV error for spectrograph calibration. In general, filtering with two cavities prior to the CPA fiber amplifier outperforms an amplifier placed between the two cavities. In particular, filtering with conjugate cavities is able to provide 300 nm wavelength coverage. Such superior performance will facilitate the search for and characterization of Earth-like exoplanets, which requires <10 cm/s RV calibration error.

  18. ASTRO-H Soft X-Ray Telescope (SXT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soong, Yang; Serlemitsos Peter J.; Okajima, Takashi; Hahne, Devin

    2011-01-01

    ASTRO-H is an astrophysics satellite dedicated for X-ray spectroscopic study non-dispersively and to carry out survey complementally, which will be borne out of US-Japanese collaborative effort. Among the onboard instruments there are four conically approximated Wolter-I X-ray mirrors, among which two of them are soft X-ray mirrors\\ of which the energy range is from a few hundred eV to 15 keY, currently being fabricated in the X-ray Optics Lab at Goddard Space Flight Center. The focal point instruments will be a calorimeter (SXS) and a CCD camera (SXI), respectively. The reflectors of the mirror are made of heat-formed aluminum substrate of the thickness gauged of 152 micron, 229 micron, and 305 micron of the alloy 5052 H-19, followed by epoxy replication on gold-sputtered smooth Pyrex cylindrical mandrels to acquire the X-ray reflective surface. The epoxy layer is 10 micron nominal and surface gold layer of 0.2 micron. Improvements on angular response over the Astro-El/Suzaku mirrors come from error reduction on the figure, the roundness, and the grazing angle/radius mismatching of the reflecting surface, and tighter specs and mechanical strength on supporting structure to reduce the reflector positioning and the assembly errors. In this paper, we report the results of calibration of the engineering model of SXT (EM), and project the quality of the flight mirrors.

  19. College of Natural Resources doctoral student receives Environmental Protection Agency fellowship

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Christine Bergeron of Old Orchard Beach, Maine, a doctoral student in Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources, received a fellowship from the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) National Center for Environmental Research for her research on the reproductive success of American toads.

  20. 45 CFR 2534.10 - National service fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false National service fellowships. 2534.10 Section 2534.10 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE SPECIAL ACTIVITIES § 2534.10 National service fellowships. The Corporation may award national service fellowships on a competitive...

  1. Postmodern Astro-Theology, Cometary Panspermia, and the Polonnaruwa Meteorite: Derham, Wesley, Whitehead, Griffin and Cobb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Theodore, Jr.

    2013-03-01

    Here is a postmodern astro-theological response to factual evidence supporting cometary panspermia, including evidence of cyanobacteria fossils in meteorites (Hoover 2011) and diatom frustules in the Polonnaruwa meteorite (Wickramasinghe and others 2013). Distinct from William Derham's modern astro-theology, and in accordance with John Wesley's avoidance of factual demonstrations/proofs and Wesley's appreciation of factual exemplifications, postmodern astro-theology appreciates cometary panspermia. Cometary panspermia is a specific-factually correct example of panspermia in general. Generic panspermia is essential to panentheism. Cometary panspermia enriches evolutionary biology.

  2. The Bentley Cropping Systems Fellowship Checklist

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    2014-10-01

    The Bentley Cropping Systems Fellowship. Checklist. Deadline to apply: October 1, 2014. Please note: Only online applications are accepted. HOW TO APPLY. Use the link on the Competitions page to access the online application system and submit a complete application, including ALL requested documents by 4:00 pm ...

  3. 7 2.4 Women in Fellowship

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2006-04-01

    Apr 1, 2006 ... Fellowship, is commensurate with the larger participation by women in these disciplines at all levels. While no one would ever advocate any proportional representation, this is a question worth asking. Surprisingly Mathematics does better than Physics and Chemistry, where the percentage stands at about ...

  4. Palliative Care Enrichment in Geropsychology Fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Gerald; Nelson, Barbara J.

    1996-01-01

    Interviews with 6 of 10 Veterans' Affairs programs offering postdoctoral fellowships in geropsychology indicated that only 30% included palliative care or hospice training, despite the fact that the veteran population is likely to have an increasing need for terminal illness care. (SK)

  5. Writing a successful fellowship or grant application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemayel, Rita; Martin, Seamus J

    2017-11-01

    Writing a competitive grant application is an essential skill for any scientist who wants to embark on an independent career. This instalment of the Words of Advice series provides a comprehensive guide to preparing a successful grant or personal fellowship application. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  6. Winston Churchill Memorial Trust Fellowship Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramsen, Neil

    2014-01-01

    In March and April 2014, the author travelled overseas on a 2013 Churchill Fellowship to study education programs that successfully engage and enthuse primary and middle school students in maths, engineering and science (MES) or science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) learning in schools, universities and institutions in the United…

  7. Global Health Education in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddharthan, Trishul; North, Crystal M; Attia, Engi F; Christiani, David C; Checkley, William; West, T Eoin

    2016-06-01

    A growing number of pulmonary and critical care medicine fellowship programs in the United States offer global health training opportunities. Formal, integrated global health programs within pulmonary and critical care fellowships are relatively new but are built on principles and ideals of global health that focus on the mutually beneficial exchange of knowledge and social justice. Although core competencies consistent with these overarching themes in global health education have not been formalized for pulmonary and critical care trainees, relevant competency areas include clinical knowledge, international research training, cultural competency, and clinical and research capacity building. Existing global health education in U.S. pulmonary and critical care medicine training programs can generally be classified as one of three different models: integrated global health tracks, global health electives, and additional research years. Successful global health education programs foster partnerships and collaborations with international sites that emphasize bidirectional exchange. This bidirectional exchange includes ongoing, equitable commitments to mutual opportunities for training and professional development, including a focus on the particular knowledge and skill sets critical for addressing the unique priorities of individual countries. However, barriers related to the availability of mentorship, funding, and dedicated time exist to expanding global health education in pulmonary and critical care medicine. The implementation of global health training within pulmonary and critical care medicine programs requires continued optimization, but this training is essential to prepare the next generation of physicians to address the global aspects of respiratory disease and critical illness.

  8. NASA Aeronautics Multidisciplinary Analysis and Design Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, B.; Gurdal, Z.; Kapania, R. K.; Mason, W. H.; Schetz, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    This program began as a grant from NASA Headquarters, NGT-10025, which was in effect from 10/l/93 until 10/31/96. The remaining funding for this effort was transferred from NASA Headquarters to NASA Langley and a new grant NGT-1-52155 was issued covering the period II/l/96 to 5/15/99. This report serves as the final report of NGT-1-52155. For a number of years, Virginia Tech had been on the forefront of research in the area of multidisciplinary analysis and design. In June of 1994, faculty members from aerospace and ocean engineering, engineering science and mechanics, mechanical engineering, industrial engineering, mathematics and computer sciences, at Virginia Tech joined together to form the Multidisciplinary Analysis and Design (MAD) Center for Advanced Vehicles. The center was established with the single goal: to perform research that is relevant to the needs of the US industry and to foster collaboration between the university, government and industry. In October of 1994, the center was chosen by NASA headquarters as one of the five university centers to establish a fellowship program to develop a graduate program in multidisciplinary analysis and design. The fellowship program provides full stipend and tuition support for seven U. S. students per year during their graduate studies. The grant is currently being administered by the NMO Branch of NASA Langley. To advise us regarding the problems faced by the industry, an industrial advisory board has been formed consisting of representatives from industry as well as government laboratories. The present membership includes major aerospace companies: Aurora Flight Sciences, Boeing: Philadelphia, Boeing: Long Beach, Boeing: Seattle, Boeing: St. Louis, Cessna, Ford, General Electric, Hughes, Lockheed-Martin: Palo Alto, Northrop-Grumman, Sikorsky, smaller, aerospace software companies: Aerosoft, Phoenix Integration and Proteus Engineering, along with representatives from government agencies, including: NASA Ames

  9. Do You Always Need a Textbook to Teach Astro 101?

    CERN Document Server

    Rudolph, Alexander L

    2013-01-01

    The increasing use of interactive learning strategies in Astro 101 classrooms has led some instructors to consider the usefulness of a textbook in such classes. These strategies provide students a learning modality very different from the traditional lecture supplemented by reading a textbook and homework, and raises the question of whether the learning that takes place during such interactive activities is enough by itself to teach students what we wish them to know about astronomy. To address this question, assessment data is presented from an interactive class, which was first taught with a required textbook, and then with the textbook being optional. Comparison of test scores before and after this change shows no statistical difference in student achievement whether a textbook is required or not. In addition, comparison of test scores of students who purchased the textbook to those who did not, after the textbook became optional, also show no statistical difference between the two groups. The Light and Sp...

  10. What Can a Historian Do with AstroGen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenn, Joseph S.

    2015-01-01

    "Astrogen", the Astronomy Genealogy Project, is in the development stage. Patterned after the Mathematics Genealogy Project at http://genealogy.math.ndsu.nodak.edu, it will eventually include most of the world's astronomers, past and present, and provide information about their years of life, highest degrees, universities, and thesis titles. There will also be links to online theses, home pages, and obituaries when these are available. Although a few details remain to be worked out before it becomes public, it is possible to make some use of what has already been compiled. I will give an example, comparing graduates of Harvard University, the University of California at Berkeley, and the University of Chicago from different decades, with information about their professional careers and publication records. The author welcomes queries about AstroGen and is seeking more participants.

  11. "ASTRO 101" Course Materials 2.0: Next Generation Lecture Tutorials and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Stephanie; Grazier, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Early efforts to create course materials were often local in scale and were based on "gut instinct," and classroom experience and observation. While subsequent efforts were often based on those same instincts and observations of classrooms, they also incorporated the results of many years of education research. These "second generation" course materials, such as lecture tutorials, relied heavily on research indicating that instructors need to actively engage students in the learning process. While imperfect, these curricular innovations, have provided evidence that research-based materials can be constructed, can easily be disseminated to a broad audience, and can provide measureable improvement in student learning across many settings. In order to improve upon this prior work, next generation materials must build upon the strengths of these innovations while engineering in findings from education research, cognitive science, and instructor feedback. A next wave of materials, including a set of next generation lecture tutorials, have been constructed with attention to the body of research on student motivation, and cognitive load; and they are responsive to our body of knowledge on learning difficulties related to specific content in the domain. From instructor feedback, these materials have been constructed to have broader coverage of the materials typically taught in an ASTRO 101 course, to take less class time, and to be more affordable for students. This next generation of lecture tutorials may serve as a template of the ways in which course materials can be reengineered to respond to current instructor and student needs.

  12. Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: AUA/ASTRO/SUO Guideline. Part I: Risk Stratification, Shared Decision Making, and Care Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanda, Martin G; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A; Kirkby, Erin; Chen, Ronald C; Crispino, Tony; Fontanarosa, Joann; Freedland, Stephen J; Greene, Kirsten; Klotz, Laurence H; Makarov, Danil V; Nelson, Joel B; Rodrigues, George; Sandler, Howard M; Taplin, Mary Ellen; Treadwell, Jonathan R

    2017-12-14

    This guideline is structured to provide a clinical framework stratified by cancer severity to facilitate care decisions and guide the specifics of implementing the selected management options. The summary presented represents Part I of the two-part series dedicated to Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: AUA/ASTRO/SUO Guideline discussing risk stratification and care options by cancer severity. The systematic review utilized in the creation of this guideline was completed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and through additional supplementation by ECRI Institute. This review included articles published between January 2007 and March 2014 with an update search conducted through August 2016. When sufficient evidence existed, the body of evidence for a particular treatment was assigned a strength rating of A (high), B (moderate), or C (low) for support of Strong, Moderate, or Conditional Recommendations. Additional information is provided as Clinical Principles and Expert Opinions (table 2 in supplementary unabridged guideline, http://jurology.com/). The AUA (American Urological Association), ASTRO, and SUO (Society of Urologic Oncology) formulated an evidence-based guideline based on a risk-stratified clinical framework for the management of localized prostate cancer. This guideline attempts to improve a clinician's ability to treat patients diagnosed with localized prostate cancer, but higher quality evidence in future trials will be essential to improve the level of care for these patients. In all cases, patient preferences should be considered when choosing a management strategy. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Astro-Wise system: a federated information accumulator for astronomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentijn, Edwin A.; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs

    2007-01-01

    The Astro-Wise consortium has designed a new paradigm, ‘Awe‘, and implemented a fully scalable and distributed information system to overcome the huge information avalanche in wide-field astronomical imaging Surveys.

  14. Clare Soper's Hat: New Education Fellowship Correspondence between Bloomsbury and New Zealand, 1938-1946

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Sue

    2013-01-01

    Broadening horizons beyond nations, transnational histories trace global flows connecting people and places. Historians have studied the New Education Fellowship (NEF) as a global network. Focused within the nation, research on New Zealand's involvement with NEF has emphasised how its activities before the Second World War impacted on the Labour…

  15. Defining a core curriculum for education scholarship fellowships in emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Wendy C; Lin, Michelle; Clarke, Samuel; Jordan, Jaime; Guth, Todd; Santen, Sally A; Yarris, Lalena M

    2012-12-01

    A trained cadre of medical education scholars with a focus on methodologically sound research techniques is needed to ensure development of innovations that can be translated to educational practice, rigorous evaluation of instructional strategies, and progress toward improving patient care outcomes. Most established educational programs are aimed at existing faculty members and focus primarily on the development of teaching and leadership skills. At the 2012 Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference, "Education Research in Emergency Medicine: Opportunities, Challenges, and Strategies for Success," a breakout session was convened to develop training recommendations for postgraduate fellowship programs in medical education scholarship that would enable residency graduates to join academic faculties armed with the skills needed to perform research in medical education. Additionally, these graduates would enjoy the benefits of established mentorships. A group of 23 medical education experts collaborated to address the following objectives: 1) construct a formal needs assessment for fellowship training in medical education scholarship in emergency medicine (EM), 2) compare and contrast current education scholarship programs in both EM and non-EM specialties, and 3) develop a set of core curriculum guidelines for specialized fellowship training in medical education scholarship in EM. Fellowship-trained faculty need to be proficient in learner instruction and assessment, organizational leadership, curriculum development, educational methodology, and conducting generalizable hypothesis-driven research to improve patient care. © 2012 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  16. The Sky is the Limit: Benefits from Partnering with the Project ASTRO National Network!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Constance E.; Zevin, D.; van der Veen, W.; Fraknoi, A.; Wilson, R.; Gurton, S.; White, V.; Clemens, C.; Harvey, J.

    2006-12-01

    As a partner for EPO programs, the Project ASTRO National Network offers access to hundreds of trained educators and astronomer-educator partnerships across the country. This makes the Network extremely suitable for dissemination and/or testing of new science education products, in particular those that benefit from support by scientists and/or (through Family ASTRO) those that target families/communities. For example, the Network is currently being leveraged (through NASA funding) to create and disseminate nationally new hands-on classroom activities on solar physics. Project ASTRO is a national program that partners professional and amateur astronomers with local educators at regional sites around the country. Developed by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, Project ASTRO provides training for astronomer-educator partnerships in hands-on, inquiry-based science activities while emphasizing the importance of student preconceptions as a starting point for learning. During an intensive two-day training workshop, a partnership is forged that blends the teacher's knowledge of instructional methods and classroom management with the astronomer's knowledge of and passion for science and astronomy. Nationwide, over 500 active astronomer-educator partnerships bring the excitement of astronomy to over 20,000 students annually. All Project ASTRO sites follow the same model for partnership training and support and meet annually to discuss common strategies and share new ideas. Many sites also target families/communities through the Family ASTRO sister program. Each site (there are 15 total in the Network) is managed by a Lead Institution supported by a Local Coalition of scientific and educational organizations who help with recruiting of new participants, programming, and fund-raising. This poster will detail why the Project ASTRO National Network is an ideal partner for EPO programs. For more information on various ways your organization can partner with the Project

  17. Creating a Cadre of Fellowship-Trained Medical Educators, Part II: A Formal Needs Assessment to Structure Postgraduate Fellowships in Medical Education Scholarship and Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jaime; Yarris, Lalena M; Santen, Sally A; Guth, Todd A; Rougas, Steven; Runde, Daniel P; Coates, Wendy C

    2017-08-01

    Education leaders at the 2012 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference on education research proposed that dedicated postgraduate education scholarship fellowships (ESFs) might provide an effective model for developing future faculty as scholars. A formal needs assessment was performed to understand the training gap and inform the development of ESFs. A mixed-methods needs assessment was conducted of four emergency medicine national stakeholder groups in 2013: department chairs; faculty education/research leaders; existing education fellowship directors; and current education fellows/graduates. Descriptive statistics were reported for quantitative data. Qualitative data from semistructured interviews and free-text responses were analyzed using a thematic approach. Participants were 11/15 (73%) education fellowship directors, 13/20 (65%) fellows/graduates, 106/239 (44%) faculty education/research leaders, and a convenience sample of 26 department chairs. Department chairs expected new education faculty to design didactics (85%) and teach clinically (96%). Faculty education/research leaders thought new faculty were inadequately prepared for job tasks (83.7%) and that ESFs would improve the overall quality of education research (91.1%). Fellowship directors noted that ESFs provide skills, mentorship, and protected time for graduates to become productive academicians. Current fellows/graduates reported pursing an ESF to develop skills in teaching and research methodology. Stakeholder groups uniformly perceived a need for training in education theory, clinical teaching, and education research. These findings support dedicated, deliberate training in these areas. Establishment of a structure for scholarly pursuits prior to assuming a full-time position will effectively prepare new faculty. These findings may inform the development, implementation, and curricula of ESFs.

  18. A survey of clinical teaching fellowships in UK medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sam; Denison, Alan R; McKenzie, Hamish

    2008-02-01

    Undergraduate medical education in the UK has changed considerably over the last decade. One development has involved the creation of teaching-specific posts for junior doctors by medical schools. These posts are generally termed 'clinical teaching fellowships', but it is not known how many of them exist, or whether they are similar in terms of educational activities, professional development, and research and clinical experience opportunities. Teaching deans in all UK medical schools were sent a questionnaire relating to clinical teaching fellowships, and were asked to distribute a second set of different questionnaires to their clinical teaching fellows, which were to be returned to the authors separately. A total of 28 deans and 46 fellows responded. Fifteen medical schools had clinical teaching fellows and there appeared to be a total of 77 such posts in the UK. There was little uniformity in the activities undertaken within the posts. Deans who employed clinical teaching fellows were unanimously positive regarding the posts. Fellows were generally positive but expressed reservations relating to approval for postgraduate training, career development, deterioration in clinical skills, financial disincentives, credibility within one's own specialty, and provision of training and support. Clinical teaching fellow posts are generally enjoyed by fellows and valued by deans. Fellows carry out differing duties and their training in medical education is variable. The posts can be unstructured and may lack credibility to doctors outside medical education. Providing specific structured training in medical education, recognised at a national level, would help deal with these concerns.

  19. An Investigation on the Use of Different Centroiding Algorithms and Star Catalogs in Astro-Geodetic Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basoglu, Burak; Halicioglu, Kerem; Albayrak, Muge; Ulug, Rasit; Tevfik Ozludemir, M.; Deniz, Rasim

    2017-04-01

    In the last decade, the importance of high-precise geoid determination at local or national level has been pointed out by Turkish National Geodesy Commission. The Commission has also put objective of modernization of national height system of Turkey to the agenda. Meanwhile several projects have been realized in recent years. In Istanbul city, a GNSS/Levelling geoid was defined in 2005 for the metropolitan area of the city with an accuracy of ±3.5cm. In order to achieve a better accuracy in this area, "Local Geoid Determination with Integration of GNSS/Levelling and Astro-Geodetic Data" project has been conducted in Istanbul Technical University and Bogazici University KOERI since January 2016. The project is funded by The Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey. With the scope of the project, modernization studies of Digital Zenith Camera System are being carried on in terms of hardware components and software development. Accentuated subjects are the star catalogues, and centroiding algorithm used to identify the stars on the zenithal star field. During the test observations of Digital Zenith Camera System performed between 2013-2016, final results were calculated using the PSF method for star centroiding, and the second USNO CCD Astrograph Catalogue (UCAC2) for the reference star positions. This study aims to investigate the position accuracy of the star images by comparing different centroiding algorithms and available star catalogs used in astro-geodetic observations conducted with the digital zenith camera system.

  20. Fellowship | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    London), FNAE, FNASc. Date of birth: 5 April 1945. Specialization: Nanostructured Materials, Mechanical Metallurgy, Metal Forming, Plasticity & Superplasticity and Nanotechnology Address: Adviser (Physical Sciences) Research, Aditya Birla S&T ...

  1. Fellowship | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Specialization: Planetary Atmospheres, Ionosphere & Magnetosphere of Mars Address: Sr Professor & Chairman, Planetary Sciences and, Exploration Division, Physical Research Laboratory, navrangpura, Ahmedabad 380 009, Gujarat Contact: Office: (079) 2631 4555. Residence: (079) 2682 5302. Mobile: 96623 27992

  2. Fellowship | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 20 March 1937. Specialization: Sedimentary Geology, Tectonics and Environmental Geology Address: Honorary Professor, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur, Bengaluru 560 064, Karnataka Contact: Office: (080) 2208 2787. Residence: (080) 6562 9285, (080) 4112 0784

  3. Fellowship | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Specialization: Multi-functional Oxides & Related Smart Materials, Nanostructures & Materials for Energy & Environment, Geometrics Phase & Electronics Topology of Materials Address: Theoretical Sciences Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur P.O., Bengaluru 560 064, Karnataka

  4. Autonomous star sensor ASTRO APS: flight experience on Alphasat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, U.; Fiksel, T.; Kwiatkowski, A.; Steinbach, I.; Pradarutti, B.; Michel, K.; Benzi, E.

    2015-06-01

    Jena-Optronik GmbH, located in Jena/Germany, has profound experience in designing and manufacturing star trackers since the early 80s. Today the company has a worldwide leading position in supplying geo-stationary and Earth observation satellites with robust and reliable star tracker systems. In the first decade of the new century Jena-Optronik received a development contract (17317/2003/F/WE) from the European Space Agency to establish the technologically challenging elements for which advanced star tracker technologies as CMOS Active Pixel Sensors were being introduced or were considered strategic. This activity was performed in the frame of the Alphabus large platform pre-development lead by ESA and the industrial Joint Project Team consisting of Astrium (now Airbus Defence and Space), Thales Alenia Space and CNES (Centre national d'études spatiales). The new autonomous star tracker, ASTRO APS (Active Pixel Sensor), extends the Jena-Optronik A stro-series CCD-based star tracker products taken the full benefit of the CMOS APS technology. ASTRO APS is a fully autonomous compact star tracker carrying either the space-qualified radiation hard STAR1000 or the HAS2 APS detectors. The star tracker is one of four Technology Demonstration Payloads (TDP6) carried by Alphasat as hosted payload in the frame of a successful Private Public Partnership between ESA and Inmarsat who owns and operates the satellite as part of its geo-stationary communication satellites fleet. TDP6 supports also directly TDP1, a Laser Communication Terminal, for fine pointing tasks. Alphasat was flawlessly brought in orbit at the end of July 2013 by a European Ariane 5 launcher. Only a few hours after launch the star tracker received its switch ON command and acquired nominally within 6 s the inertial 3-axes attitude. In the following days of the early in-orbit operations of Alphasat the TDP6 unit tracked reliably all the spacecraft maneuvers including the 0.1 and 0.2°/s spin stabilization for

  5. NASA/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, John H. (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    Since 1964, NASA has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. The objectives are to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science members; to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. The study program consists of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the research topics.

  6. Fellowship | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Specialization: Geochemistry, Rock Weathering, Soil/Sediment Genesis and Farmland Geology Address: 1209, Sector A, Pocket B, Vasant ..... Date of birth: 11 July 1931. Specialization: Solar System Physics, Mars Fundamental Research, Earth & Planetary Sciences and Lunar & Meteorite Sample Studies Address: 16931 ...

  7. The ABC Travelling Fellowship 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biant, L C; Rangan, A; Costa, M L; Muir, D C W; Weinrauch, P C L; Clasper, J C; Dix-Peek, S I

    2010-11-01

    The 2010 Fellows undertook a six-week journey through centres of orthopaedic excellence along the East Coast of Canada and the United States. What we learned and gained from the experience and each other is immeasurable, but five areas particularly stand out; education, research, service delivery, financial insights and professional development.

  8. Fellowship | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rengaswamy Ph.D. (Gujarat), FNA, FNASc, FTWAS Council Service: 2016-. Date of birth: 2 June 1956. Specialization: Palaeoclimatology & Climate Modelling, Mass Spectrometry, and Oceanography Address: Senior Professor, Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences, National Institute of Science Education & Research, ...

  9. Fellowship | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 24 July 1953. Specialization: Nanoscience & Nanotechnology, Metal Oxide Thin Films and Heterostructures, Dye Sensitised Solar Cells, Solar Water Splitting for Hydrogen Generation Address: Department of Physics & Centre for Energy Science, Indian Institute of Science Education & Research, Dr Homi ...

  10. Fellowship | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2007 Section: Animal Sciences. Shashidhara, Prof. Lingadahalli Subrahmanya Ph.D. (Cambridge), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 23 March 1963. Specialization: Developmental Biology, Evolution and Genetics Address: Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Dr Homi Bhabha Road, ...

  11. Primary Care Sports Medicine Fellowship: AMSSM Proposed Standards of Excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Irfan M; Stovak, Mark; Ray, Tracy; Weiss-Kelly, Amanda

    2017-05-01

    The American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) recognizes a need to provide direction and continually enhance the quality of sports medicine fellowship training programs. This document was developed to be an educational resource for sports medicine physicians who teach in a 1-year primary care sports medicine fellowship training program. It is meant to provide high standards and targets for fellowship training programs that choose to reassess their curriculum and seek to make improvements.

  12. The Effect of Interactive Instruction in the Astro 101 Classroom: Report on a National Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Alexander L.; Prather, E. E.; Brissenden, G.; Consiglio, D.; Schlingman, W. M.; Gonzaga, V.; Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars CATS

    2011-01-01

    We have conducted a national research study designed to determine the effect of interactive learning strategies on students' conceptual learning in general education astronomy courses (Astro 101). Nearly 4000 students at 31 institutions, (4-year and 2-year) around the country participated in the study. Our results show dramatic improvement in student learning with increased use of interactive learning strategies independent of institution type or class size, and after controlling for individual student characteristics. In addition, we find that the positive effects of interactive learning strategies apply equally to men and women, across ethnicities, for students with all levels of prior mathematical preparation and physical science course experience, independent of GPA, and regardless of primary language. These results powerfully illustrate that all categories of students can benefit from the effective implementation of interactive learning strategies. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Award No. 0715517, a CCLI Phase III Grant for the Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS) Program, and Award No. 0847170, a PAARE grant funding the California-Arizona Minority Partnership for Astronomy Research and Education (CAMPARE). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

  13. The Astro-H Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, F. Scott; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Mitsuda, Kazuhiasa; Ohashi, Takaya; Astro-H/SXS Collaboration

    2009-12-01

    The Soft-X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) is a high spectral resolution, cryogenic x-ray spectrometer that will fly on the Japan/U.S. Astro-H observatory in 2014. The SXS is composed of a 36 pixel, imaging, x-ray calorimeter array that will operate at 0.05 K utilizing a 2-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator and a redundant pre-cooler design using both a 40 liter liquid helium tank and a 1.7 K Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocooler. Additional redundant Stirling cycle coolers provide pre-cooling for the (JT) and cool the outer thermal shields for the JT and the helium tank. The detector system, while similar to that flown on Suzaku, is composed of larger 0.81×0.81mm pixels, but has significantly better performance, currently predicted to be better than 4 eV FWHM at 6 keV with 95% quantum efficiency. This instrument is the result of a close collaboration between many institutions in the U.S. and Japan over the last 25 years. Here we will present an overview of the SXS instrument, the SXS cooling system, and recent laboratory improvements to the detector system.

  14. The Stocker AstroScience Center at Florida International University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, James R.

    2014-01-01

    The new Stocker AstroScience Center located on the MMC campus at Florida International University in Miami Florida represents a unique facility for STEM education that arose from a combination of private, State and university funding. The building, completed in the fall of 2013, contains some unique spaces designed not only to educate, but also to inspire students interested in science and space exploration. The observatory consists of a 4-story building (3 floors) with a 24” ACE automated telescope in an Ash dome, and an observing platform above surrounding buildings. Some of the unique features of the observatory include an entrance/exhibition hall with a 6-ft glass tile floor mural linking the Florida climate to space travel, a state-of-the art telescope control that looks like a starship bridge, and displays such as “Music from the universe”. The observatory will also be the focus of our extensive public outreach program that is entering its 20 year.

  15. The Astro-H Soft X-Ray Mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, David; Okajima, Takashi; Serlemitsos, Peter; Soong, Yang

    2012-01-01

    The Astro-H is led by the Japanese Space Agency (JAXA) in collaboration with many other institutions including the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Goddard's contributions include two soft X-ray telescopes (SXTs). The telescopes have an effective area of 562 square cm at 1 keV and 425 square cm at 6 keV with an image quality requirement of 1.7 arc-minutes half power diameter (HPD). The engineering model has demonstrated 1.1 arc-minutes HPD error. The design of the SXT is based on the successful Suzaku mission mirrors with some enhancements to improve the image quality. Two major enhancements are bonding the X-ray mirror foils to alignment bars instead of allowing the mirrors to float, and fabricating alignment bars with grooves within 5 microns of accuracy. An engineering model SXT was recently built and subjected to several tests including vibration, thermal, and X-ray performance in a beamline. Several lessons were learned during this testing that will be incorporated in the flight design. Test results and optical performance are discussed, along with a description of the design of the SXT.

  16. 76 FR 21001 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request; Fellowship Recruitment for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request; Fellowship Recruitment for... also lists the following information: Title of Proposal: Fellowship Recruitment for the Fellowship...

  17. Academic productivity and contributions to the literature among spine surgery fellowship faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Andrew J; Bhalla, Amandeep; George, Jaiben; Harris, Mitchel B; Bono, Christopher M

    2015-10-01

    No previous study has considered academic productivity and contributions to the literature among the faculty members of spine fellowship programs. We sought to evaluate the total number of publications and measures of academic impact among faculty at spine surgical fellowship programs between 2011 and the present. This study is based on a review of data publicly available on PubMed and Scopus. Physicians listed as faculty at a spine fellowship program in the directory of the North American Spine Society (NASS). The outcome measures were the number of publications between January 1, 2011 and August 31, 2014 and the h-index for 1996 to present (h-tot) and 2011 to present (h-pres) for faculty members. Fellowship programs and their characteristics were obtained from the directory of the NASS. Program-specific features, including academic affiliation, number of participating faculty, location, number of fellowship positions, dedicated research time, and presence of a research requirement for fellows, were abstracted. The number of publications for faculty at each program between January 1, 2011 and August 31, 2014 and the h-tot and h-pres were obtained from Scopus. Multivariable linear regression was used to identify statistically significant factors associated with increased academic productivity. Among 75 fellowship programs, with 282 faculty members, there were 55 (73%) with academic affiliation. The average number of publications per faculty member (2011-2014) was 5.5 (standard deviation, 8.4; range, 0-54). The mean h-tot for programs was 13.6 (8.7, 0-37), and mean h-pres was 3.0 (2.2, 0-8.2). Academic affiliation (regression coefficient, 22.1; 95% confidence interval: 7.2, 37.0), and the number of fellows in a program (7.0, 0.9-13.2) was significantly associated with the total number of publications. Similar findings were encountered for average h-tot and h-pres. The descriptive statistics presented can help surgeons benchmark their performance and that of their

  18. Fluid-loading solutions and plasma volume: Astro-ade and salt tablets with water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Suzanne M.; Seinmann, Laura; Young, Joan A.; Hoskin, Cherylynn N.; Barrows, Linda H.

    1994-01-01

    Fluid loading with salt and water is a countermeasure used after space flight to restore body fluids. However, gastrointestinal side effects have been frequently reported in persons taking similar quantities of salt and water in ground-based studies. The effectiveness of the Shuttle fluid-loading countermeasure (8 gms salt, 0.97 liters of water) was compared to Astro-ade (an isotonic electrolyte solution), to maintain plasma volume (PV) during 4.5 hrs of resting fluid restriction. Three groups of healthy men (n=6) were studied: a Control Group (no drinking), an Astro-ade Group, and a Salt Tablet Group. Changes in PV after drinking were calculated from hematocrit and hemoglobin values. Both the Salt Tablet and Astro-ade Groups maintained PV at 2-3 hours after ingestion compared to the Control Group, which had a 6 percent decline. Side effects (thirst, stomach cramping, and diarrhea) were noted in at least one subject in both the Astro-ade and Salt Tablet Groups. Nausea and vomiting were reported in one subject in the Salt Tablet Group. It was concluded that Astro-ade may be offered as an alternate fluid-loading countermeasure but further work is needed to develop a solution that is more palatable and has fewer side effects.

  19. AstroImageJ: Image Processing and Photometric Extraction for Ultra-precise Astronomical Light Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Karen A.; Kielkopf, John F.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Hessman, Frederic V.

    2017-02-01

    ImageJ is a graphical user interface (GUI) driven, public domain, Java-based, software package for general image processing traditionally used mainly in life sciences fields. The image processing capabilities of ImageJ are useful and extendable to other scientific fields. Here we present AstroImageJ (AIJ), which provides an astronomy specific image display environment and tools for astronomy specific image calibration and data reduction. Although AIJ maintains the general purpose image processing capabilities of ImageJ, AIJ is streamlined for time-series differential photometry, light curve detrending and fitting, and light curve plotting, especially for applications requiring ultra-precise light curves (e.g., exoplanet transits). AIJ reads and writes standard Flexible Image Transport System (FITS) files, as well as other common image formats, provides FITS header viewing and editing, and is World Coordinate System aware, including an automated interface to the astrometry.net web portal for plate solving images. AIJ provides research grade image calibration and analysis tools with a GUI driven approach, and easily installed cross-platform compatibility. It enables new users, even at the level of undergraduate student, high school student, or amateur astronomer, to quickly start processing, modeling, and plotting astronomical image data with one tightly integrated software package.

  20. “HAVING FELLOWSHIP WITH GOD” ACCORDING TO 1 JOHN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For believers to have fellowship (koinwniva) with one another and corporately with. God, is one of the main objectives stated for the proclamation of the gospel by the author of 1 John. This article investigates the intermediation and environment through which and in which fellowship is constituted between God and his ...

  1. The Cunningham Fellowship : three international points of view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flake, D; Verhoeven, A; Robu, I

    The Medical Library Association Cunningham Fellowship Program provides funds for one medical librarian per year from outside the United States or Canada to work and learn in United States or Canadian medical libraries for a period of 4 months. An overview of the Cunningham Fellowship is presented

  2. IISc Young Science Fellowship Programme (YSFP) for Toppers in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    IISc Young Science Fellowship Programme. (YSFP) for Toppers in PUC/12th Standard. Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, invites applications from rank holders (within top 20 ranks or equivalent) in the 12th Standard/PUC Examination for the award of Young Science. Fellowship – 2007. Eligibility Criteria: Students must ...

  3. The Fellowship Council: a decade of impact on surgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Dennis L; Hogle, Nancy J

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this project is to document the history of the Fellowship Council (FC) and report its current impact on surgical training. The need for advanced training in laparoscopic surgery resulted in the rapid development of fellowships for which there was no oversight. Fellowship program directors began meeting in the 1990s and formally created the FC in 2004 to provide that oversight. To obtain information with which to create a narrative of the history of the FC, the authors performed a detailed review of all available minutes from the meetings of the various iterations of the council and its committees between 2001 and 2012. Information about fellowships and meetings of the directors of fellowships prior to 2001 are based on information included in minutes of meetings after 2001. Minimally invasive surgery fellowship program directors in collaboration with surgical societies created the FC to bring order to the application process for residents and program directors. It has evolved into an organization with mature, reliable processes for application, matching, curriculum development, accreditation, and reporting. It now receives applications from more than 30 % of graduating chief residents in general surgery. It has 223 accredited fellowship positions in the following disciplines: Minimally invasive surgery, bariatric/metabolic surgery, Flexible endoscopy, hepato-pancreato-biliary Surgery, colorectal surgery, and Thoracic surgery. The FC provides a reliable, fair process for matching residents with fellowship programs and has successfully expanded its oversight of such programs with mature processes for accreditation, curriculum development, and reporting.

  4. African Climate Change Fellowship Program - Phase II | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ACCFP), 16 policy, 13 doctoral, 13 postdoctoral, and three teaching fellowships were awarded to a total of 45 fellows from 18 African countries. This grant will finance two additional rounds of the ACCFP fellowships (20 policy, 20 postdoctoral and ...

  5. The Astro-H high temperature superconductor lead assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canavan, E. R.; James, B. L.; Hait, T. P.; Oliver, A.; Sullivan, D. F.

    2014-11-01

    The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) instrument, one of several instruments on JAXA's Astro-H mission, will observe diffuse X-ray sources with unparalleled spectral resolution using a microcalorimeter array operating at 50 mK. The array is cooled with a multi-stage Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator mounted on a 40 l helium tank. The tank is at the center of a typical 'shell in shell' cryostat, with the innermost shield cooled by a JT cryocooler, and successive outer shields cooled by stirling-cycle cryocoolers. To achieve a multi-year liquid helium lifetime and to avoid exceeding the limited capacity of the JT cooler, very strict requirements are placed on every source of heat leak into these surfaces from the higher temperature shields. However, each ADR stage draws a maximum of 2 A, and the Wiedemann-Franz Law precludes even an optimized set of normal-metal leads capable of such high current from achieving the required low thermal conductance. Instead, a set of lead assemblies have been developed based on narrow high temperature superconductor (HTS) tapes derived from commercially available coated conductors. Although the HTS tapes are flexible and have high tensile strength, they are extremely sensitive to damage through a number of mechanisms. A robust set of assemblies have been developed that provide mechanical support to the tapes, provide appropriate interfaces at either end, and yet still meet the challenging thermal requirements. An Engineering Model (EM) set of HTS lead assemblies have survived environmental testing, both as individual units and as part of the EM cryostat, and have performed without problem in recent operation of the EM instrument. The Flight Model (FM) HTS lead assemblies are currently nearing completion.

  6. Do Plastic Surgery Programs with Integrated Residencies or Subspecialty Fellowships Have Increased Academic Productivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquette, Stephen P.; Valsangkar, Nakul P.; Sood, Rajiv; Socas, Juan; Zimmers, Teresa A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surgical training pathways on the academic performance of plastic surgical divisions. Methods: Eighty-two academic parameters for 338 plastic surgeons (PS), 1737 general surgeons (GS), and 1689 specialist surgeons (SS) from the top 55 National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded academic departments of surgery were examined using data gathered from websites, SCOPUS, and NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools. Results: The median size of a PS division was 7 faculty members. PS faculty had lower median publications (P)/citations (C) (ie, P/C) than GS and SS (PS: 25/328, GS: 35/607, and SS: 40/713, P < 0.05). Publication and citation differences were observed at all ranks: assistant professor (PS: 11/101, GS: 13/169, and SS: 19/249), associate professor (PS: 33/342, GS: 40/691, and SS: 44/780), and professor (PS: 57/968, GS: 97/2451, and SS: 101/2376). PS had a lower percentage of faculty with current/former NIH funding (PS: 13.5%, GS: 22.8%, and SS: 25.1%, P < 0.05). Academic productivity for PS faculty was improved in integrated programs. P/C for PS faculty from divisions with traditional 3-year fellowships was 19/153, integrated 6-year residency was 25/329, and both traditional and 6-year programs were 27/344, P < 0.05. Craniofacial and hand fellowships increased productivity within the integrated residency programs. P/C for programs with a craniofacial fellowship were 32/364 and for those that additionally had a hand fellowship were 45/536. PS faculty at divisions with integrated training programs also had a higher frequency of NIH funding. Conclusions: PS divisions vary in degree of academic productivity. Dramatically improved scholarly output is observed with integrated residency training programs and advanced specialty fellowships. PMID:27014543

  7. Association of Fellowship Training With Otolaryngology Training Examination Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinboyewa, Ibukun; Cabrera-Muffly, Cristina

    2016-03-01

    No prior studies have evaluated whether residents who pursue fellowship training achieve higher performance on the Otolaryngology Training Examination (OTE) and whether a specific fellowship will demonstrate a correlation with the corresponding specialty-specific OTE score. To determine whether residents pursuing fellowship training achieve higher performance on the OTE and whether fellowship choice is correlated with higher scores on the related subspecialty section of the OTE. This retrospective analysis included 35 residents training in an academic otolaryngology residency program from July 1, 2003, to June 30, 2014. The OTE scores for postgraduate years 2 through 5 and the type of fellowship were collected for all residents meeting inclusion criteria. Data were collected from September 1 to October 15, 2014, and analyzed from October 16 to December 1, 2014. Residents were divided by whether they pursued fellowship training and by the type of fellowship chosen. Outcome measures included comparison of scores between residents who pursued vs those who did not pursue fellowship training and comparison of subspecialty OTE scores between residents who pursued the corresponding fellowship and those who did not. Of the 35 residents who met the inclusion criteria (24 men and 11 women), 17 (49%) pursued fellowship training. The 3 most common fellowship choices were facial plastic and reconstructive surgery, pediatric otolaryngology, and rhinology (4 residents each [24%]). For all residents, mean scores on the OTE improved each subsequent training year, but this difference was only significant between postgraduate years 2 and 3 (from 60.9% to 68.6% correct; P otolaryngology, 72.9% vs 71.3% [P = .79]; and for rhinology, 72.2% vs 71.2% [P = .91]). Residents who pursued fellowship training did not achieve higher scores on the OTE in any examination year compared with residents who did not pursue fellowship training and did not achieve higher scores within the OTE

  8. Family Medicine Global Health Fellowship Competencies: A Modified Delphi Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayess, Fadya El; Filip, Anna; Doubeni, Anna; Wilson, Calvin; Haq, Cynthia; Debay, Marc; Anandarajah, Gowri; Heffron, Warren; Jayasekera, Neil; Larson, Paul; Dahlman, Bruce; Valdman, Olga; Hunt, Vince

    2017-02-01

    Many US medical schools and family medicine departments have responded to a growing interest in global health by developing global health fellowships. However, there are no guidelines or consensus statements outlining competencies for global health fellows. Our objective was to develop a mission and core competencies for Family Medicine Global Health Fellowships. A modified Delphi technique was used to develop consensus on fellowship competencies. A panel, comprised of 13 members with dual expertise in global health and medical education, undertook an iterative consensus process, followed by peer review, from April to December 2014. The panel developed a mission statement and identified six domains for family medicine global health fellowships: patient care, medical knowledge, professionalism, communication and leadership, teaching, and scholarship. Each domain includes a set of core and program-specific competencies. The family medicine global health competencies are intended to serve as an educational framework for the design, implementation, and evaluation of individual family medicine global health fellowship programs.

  9. Postgraduate Emergency Nurse Practitioner Fellowships: Opportunities for Specialty Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudy, Susanna; Wilbeck, Jennifer

    Specialty trained emergency nurse practitioners (ENPs) can meet the demands of an unpredictable emergency care environment within an overburdened health care system. Although existing literature supports fellowship training as a method for bridging academic knowledge with clinical experiences for the novice nurse practitioner, the currently available emergency care postgraduate fellowship programs are inconsistent in approach. Building upon descriptive data provided by the existing 9 postgraduate ENP fellowship programs, a comparison and gap analysis of program content was conducted to identify perceived standards for ENP specialty education and the congruence with published ENP competencies. Standards to curricula, didactics, clinical rotations, and measures of competency were identified in the currently established ENP fellowships. A national ENP fellowship curriculum has the potential to afford consistency among programs, support attainment of competency, and provide clarity to the role and general education of advanced practice registered nurses seeking employment in emergency care.

  10. The Gastroenterology Fellowship Match: A Decade Later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Robert J; Triadafilopoulos, George; Limsui, David

    2017-06-01

    Following a period of uncertainty and disorganization, the gastroenterology (GI) national leadership decided to reinstitute the fellowship match (the Match) under the auspices of the National Residency Matching Program (NRMP) in 2006. Although it has now been a decade since the rebirth of the Match, there have been limited data published regarding progress made. In this piece, we discuss reasons for the original collapse of the GI Match, including most notably a perceived oversupply of GI physicians and a poor job market. We discuss the negative impacts the absence of the Match had on programs and on applicants, as well as the impetus to reorganize the Match under the NRMP. We then utilize data published annually by the NRMP to demonstrate that in the decade since its rebirth, the GI Match has been remarkably successful in terms of attracting the participation of applicants and programs. We show that previous misguided concerns of an oversupply of GI physicians were not realized, and that GI fellowship positions remain highly competitive for internal medicine applicants. Finally, we discuss possible implications of recent changes in the healthcare landscape on the GI Match.

  11. American Society for Engineering Education/NASA Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1982

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J. H. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    A program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators is described. The program involves participation in cooperative research and study. Results of the program evaluation are summarized. The research fellows indicated satisfaction with the program. Benefits of the program cited include: (1) enhancement of professional abilities; (2) contact with professionals in a chosen area of research; (3) familiarity with research facilities; and (4) development of new research techniques and their adaptation to an academic setting. Abstracts of each of the research projects undertaken are presented.

  12. NSF's Career-Life Balance Initiative and the NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajhar, Edward A.

    2013-01-01

    In the fall of 2011, the National Science Foundation (NSF) began the Career-Life Balance Initiative to support graduate students, postdoctoral students, and early-career researchers in STEM fields. NSF is focusing first on its most prestigious programs for early-career scientists---the CAREER program and the postdoctoral programs, including the NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowships (AAPF)---where career-life balance opportunities can help retain a significant fraction of early career talent. Subject to budget constraints, NSF plans to further integrate and enhance career-life balance opportunities over time through other programs, like the Graduate Research Fellowships Program and ADVANCE, and subsequently through the broader portfolio of NSF activities. In addition, to comply with Title IX, NSF has regulations to ensure that educational programs that receive NSF funds are free of gender discrimination and harassment. A primary goal of this presentation is to put facts about NSF into the hands of students, faculty, staff, administrators and other policy makers to benefit the advancement of career-life balance in the astronomical community. The presentation focus areas will (1) address common misconceptions about NSF rules regarding parental leave; (2) discuss benefits already available through the AAPF program, Graduate Research Fellowships, and other programs; and (3) listen to community concerns and issues to bring these back to the foundation for consideration. Did you know that NSF allows paid parental leave under many circumstances? For example, the AAPF program currently allows two months of paid parental leave during the fellow's tenure. What are the rules for NSF Graduate Research Fellowships? Come to the session and find out; the answers to such questions might surprise you.

  13. Graeco-Roman Astro-Architecture: The Temples of Pompeii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiede, Vance R.

    2014-01-01

    Roman architect Marcus Vetruvius Pollio (ca. 75-15 BC) wrote, “[O]ne who professes himself as an architect should be…acquainted with astronomy and the theory of the heavens…. From astronomy we find the east, west, south, and north, as well as the theory of the heavens, the Equinox, Solstice and courses of the Stars.” (De Architectura Libri Decem I:i:3,10). In order to investigate the role of astronomy in temple orientation, the author conducted a preliminary GIS DEM/Satellite Imaging survey of 11 temples at Pompeii, Italy (N 40d 45', E 14d 29'). The GIS survey measured the true azimuth and horizon altitude of each temple’s major axis and was field checked by a Ground Truth survey with theodolite and GPS, 5-18 April 2013. The resulting 3D vector data was analyzed with Program STONEHENGE (Hawkins 1983, 328) to identify the local skyline declinations aligned with the temple major axes. Analysis suggests that the major axes of the temples of Apollo, Jupiter and Venus are equally as likely to have been oriented to Pompeii’s urban grid, itself oriented NW-SE on Mt. Vesuvius’ slope and hydraulic gradient to optimize urban sewer/street drainage (cf. Hodge 1992). However, the remaining nine temples appear to be oriented to astronomical targets on the local horizon associated with Graeco-Roman calendrics and mythology. TEMPLE/ DATE/ MAJOR AXIS ASTRO-TARGET (Skyline Declination in degrees) Public Lares/AD 50/ Cross-Quarter 7 Nov/3 Feb Sun Set, Last Gleam (-16.5) Vespsian/ AD 69-79/ Cross-Quarter 7 Nov/3 Feb Sun Set, LG (-16.2) Fortuna Augusta/ AD 1/ Winter Solstice Sun Set, LG (-22.9) Aesculapius/ 100 BC/ Perseus Rise (β Persei-Algol = +33.0) & Midsummer Moon Major Stand Still Set, LG (-28.1) Isis/ 100 BC/ Midwinter Moon Major Stand Still Rise, Tangent (+28.5) & Equinox Sun Set, Tangent (-0.3) Jupiter/ 150 BC/ Θ Scorpionis-Sargas Rise (-38.0) Apollo/ 550 (rebuilt 70 BC)/ α Columbae-Phact Rise (-37.1) Venus/ 150 BC (rebuilt 70 BC)/ α Columbae-Phact Rise (-37

  14. 34 CFR 1100.1 - What is the Literacy Leader Fellowship Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Literacy Leader Fellowship Program? 1100.1... INSTITUTE FOR LITERACY NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR LITERACY: LITERACY LEADER FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM § 1100.1 What is the Literacy Leader Fellowship Program? (a) Under the Literacy Leader Fellowship Program, the Director...

  15. The hand surgery fellowship application process: expectations, logistics, and costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meals, Clifton; Osterman, Meredith

    2015-04-01

    To investigate expectations, logistics, and costs relevant to the hand surgery fellowship application process. We sought to discover (1) what both applicants and program directors are seeking, (2) what both parties have to offer, (3) how both parties collect information about each other, and (4) the costs incurred in arranging each match. We conducted on-line surveys of hand surgery fellowship applicants for appointment in 2015 and of current fellowship program directors. Sixty-two applicants and 41 program directors completed the survey. Results revealed applicants' demographic characteristics, qualifications, method of ranking hand fellowship programs, costs incurred (both monetary and opportunity) during the application process, ultimate match status, and suggestions for change. Results also revealed program directors' program demographics, rationale for offering interviews and favorably ranking applicants, application-related logistical details, costs incurred (both monetary and opportunity) during the application process, and suggestions for change. Applicants for hand surgery fellowship training are primarily interested in a potential program's academic reputation, emphasis on orthopedic surgery, and location. The typical, successfully matched applicant was a 30-year-old male orthopedic resident with 3 publications to his credit. Applicants rely on peers and Web sites for information about fellowships. Fellowship directors are primarily seeking applicants recommended by other experienced surgeons and with positive personality traits. The typical fellowship director offers a single year of orthopedic-based fellowship training to 2 fellows per year and relies on a common application and in-person interviews to collect information about applicants. Applicants appear to be more concerned than directors about the current state of the match process. Applicants and directors alike incur heavy costs, in both dollars and opportunity, to arrange each match. A nuanced

  16. Effect of minimally invasive surgery fellowship on residents' operative experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, Maria S; Frenkel, Catherine; Scriven, Richard; Thornton, Deborah; Halbert, Caitlin; Talamini, Mark; Telem, Dana A; Pryor, Aurora D

    2017-01-01

    There is an increased need for surgical trainees to acquire advanced laparoscopic skills as laparoscopy becomes the standard of care in many areas of general surgery. Since the introduction of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) fellowships, there has been a continuing debate as to whether these fellowships adversely affect general surgery resident exposure to laparoscopic cases. The aim of our study was to examine whether the introduction of an MIS fellowship negatively impacts general surgery residents' experience at a single academic center. We describe the changes following establishment of MIS fellowship at an academic center. Resident case log system from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education was queried to obtain all PGY 1-5 resident operative case logs. Two-year time period preceding and following the institution of an MIS fellowship at our institution in 2012 was compared. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Following initiation of the MIS fellowship, an MIS service was established. The service comprised of a fellow, midlevel resident, and intern. Operative experience was examined. From 2010-2012 to 2012-2014, residents logged a total of 272 and 585 complex laparoscopic cases, respectively. There were 43 residents from 2010 to 2013 and 44 residents from 2013 to 2014. When the two time periods were compared, a trend of increased numbers for all procedures was noted, except laparoscopic GYN/genito-urinary procedures. Average percent increase in complex general surgery procedures was 249 ± 179.8 %. Following establishment of a MIS fellowship, reported cases by residents were higher or similar to those reported nationally for laparoscopic procedures. Institution of an MIS fellowship had a favorable effect on general surgery resident operative education at a single academic training center. Residents may benefit from the presence of a fellowship at an academic center because they are able to participate in an

  17. The Impact of Fellowship in Dietetics on Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, Terezie Tolar

    2018-02-07

    Medical nutrition therapy (MNT) in pediatric cancer treatment is essential. The Nutrition Department and the International Outreach Program at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, TN have worked together from 2005 to 2013 to develop and implement a training program for international dietitians working with pediatric oncology patients. During that time, St. Jude hosted 15 dietitians from various countries for this 3-week-long program. The curriculum provided experience in nutrition risk screening, nutrition care process, nutrition for cancer prevention, palliative care, and exposure to nutrition support. Monthly online meetings were established through the Cure4Kids website to continue collaboration and training. Learning outcomes were developed, and the impact of the program was evaluated based on changes made by former fellows in clinical practice, research, management, and food service upon return to their country. In addition, the program was evaluated based on recognition by the medical team, professional growth/networking, and personal growth. The survey return rate was 100%: responses revealed that 80% of participants continued working in pediatric oncology, 67% participated in monthly meetings, 47% collaborated on research, 100% advanced their competency in clinical practice, 93% broadened their competency in research, 67% became increasingly competent in management, 60% implemented changes in food service, 100% were recognized for participating in the program, and 100 and 93% noted that participation in the fellowship program helped their professional and personal growth, respectively. The psychological impact of the training on healthcare providers was as important as the impact of the program on patient care.

  18. Creating a Fellowship Curriculum in Patient Safety and Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abookire, Susan A; Gandhi, Tejal K; Kachalia, Allen; Sands, Kenneth; Mort, Elizabeth; Bommarito, Grace; Gagne, Jane; Sato, Luke; Weingart, Saul N

    2016-01-01

    The authors sought to create a curriculum suitable for a newly created clinical fellowship curriculum across Harvard Medical School-affiliated teaching hospitals as part of a newly created 2-year quality and safety fellowship program described in the companion article "Design and Implementation of the Harvard Fellowship in Patient Safety and Quality." The aim of the curriculum development process was to define, coordinate, design, and implement a set of essential skills for future physician-scholars of any specialty to lead operational quality and patient safety efforts. The process of curriculum development and the ultimate content are described in this article. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. 5th International Heidelberg Conference on Dark Matter in Astro- and Particle Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Arnowitt, Richard; DARK 2004; Dark Matter in Astro- and Particle Physics

    2006-01-01

    The search for dark matter in the universe has established itself as one of the most exciting and central fields of astrophysics, particle physics and cosmology. The lectures and talks in this book emphasize the experimental and theoretical status and future perspectives, stressing in particular the interplay between astro- and particle physics.

  20. The Astro-WISE approach to quality control for astronomical data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mc Farland, John; Helmich, Ewout M.; Valentijn, Edwin A.

    We present a novel approach to quality control during the processing of astronomical data. Quality control in the Astro-WISE Information System is integral to all aspects of data handing and provides transparent access to quality estimators for all stages of data reduction from the raw image to the

  1. Astro-WISE Processing of Wide-field Images and Other Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buddelmeijer, H.; Williams, O.R.; McFarland, J. P.; Belikov, A.; Ballester, P.; Egret, D.; Lorente, N.P.F.

    Astro-WISE (Vriend et al. 2012) is the Astronomical Wide-field Imaging System for Europe (Valentijn et al. 2007). It is a scientific information system which consists of hardware and software federated over about a dozen institutes throughout Europe. It has been developed to exploit the ever

  2. Soft X-ray Focusing Telescope Aboard AstroSat: Design ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K. P. Singh

    2017-06-19

    Jun 19, 2017 ... Soft X-ray Focusing Telescope Aboard AstroSat: Design, Characteristics and Performance. K. P. SINGH1,∗ ... Here, we present an overview of its design, mechanical hardware, electronics, data modes, observational ..... products using the SXT pipeline software. The pipeline requires Level-1 data files and ...

  3. Astro Academy: Principia--A Suite of Physical Science Demonstrations Conducted Aboard the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurray, Andy

    Astro Academy: Principia is an education programme developed by the UK National Space Academy for the UK Space Agency (UKSA) and the European Space Agency (ESA). The Academy designed, constructed, flight-qualified and developed experimental procedures for a suite of physics and chemistry demonstration experiments that were conducted by ESA…

  4. Astro Academy: Principia--A Suite of Physical Science Demonstrations Conducted Aboard the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurray, Andy

    2016-01-01

    Astro Academy: Principia is an education programme developed by the UK National Space Academy for the UK Space Agency (UKSA) and the European Space Agency (ESA). The Academy designed, constructed, flight-qualified and developed experimental procedures for a suite of physics and chemistry demonstration experiments that were conducted by ESA…

  5. Integration of the MUSE Software Pipeline into the Astro-WISE System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pizagno, J.; Streicher, O.; Vriend, W.-J.; Ballester, P.; Egret, D.; Lorente, N.P.F.

    We discuss the current state of integrating the Mutli Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (hereafter: MUSE) software pipeline (Weilbacher et al. 2006) into the Astro-WISE system (Valentijn et al. 2007a; Vriend et al. 2012). MUSE is a future integral-field spectrograph for the VLT, consisting of 24 Integral

  6. Scaling Astro-WISE to LOFAR long term archive. From KIDS to LOFAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Begeman, K.; Belikov, A. N.; Boxhoorn, D.; Dijkstra, F.; Holties, H. A.; Renting, G. A.; Vermaas, N.; Vriend, W. -J.

    The Astro-WISE information system was developed to handle data processing for the KIDS survey. In this paper we describe the adaptation of the WISE concept to allow scaling to support archives containing tens of petabytes of stored data and the changes we introduced to accommodate the system for the

  7. Astro-WISE interfaces : Scientific information system brought to the user

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belikov, Andrey N.; Vriend, Willem-Jan; Sikkema, Gert

    From a simple text interface to a graphical user interfaces-Astro-WISE provides the user with a wide range of possibilities to interact with the information system according to the user's tasks and use cases. We describe a general approach to the interfacing of a scientific information system. We

  8. Astro 101 Students' Perceptions of Science: Results from the "Thinking about Science Survey Instrument"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Colin S.; Prather, Edward E.; Mendelsohn, Benjamin M.

    2013-01-01

    What are the underlying worldviews and beliefs about the role of science in society held by students enrolled in a college-level, general education, introductory astronomy course (Astro 101)--and are those beliefs affected by active engagement instruction shown to significantly increase students' conceptual knowledge and reasoning abilities…

  9. Toward a broadband astro-comb: effects of nonlinear spectral broadening in optical fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Guoqing; Li, Chih-Hao; Phillips, David F; Walsworth, Ronald L; Kärtner, Franz X

    2010-06-07

    We propose and analyze a new approach to generate a broadband astro-comb by spectral broadening of a narrowband astro-comb inside a highly nonlinear optical fiber. Numerical modeling shows that cascaded four-wave-mixing dramatically degrades the input comb's side-mode suppression and causes side-mode amplitude asymmetry. These two detrimental effects can systematically shift the center-of-gravity of astro-comb spectral lines as measured by an astrophysical spectrograph with resolution approximately 100,000; and thus lead to wavelength calibration inaccuracy and instability. Our simulations indicate that this performance penalty, as a result of nonlinear spectral broadening, can be compensated by using a filtering cavity configured for double-pass. As an explicit example, we present a design based on an Yb-fiber source comb (with 1 GHz repetition rate) that is filtered by double-passing through a low finesse cavity (finesse = 208), and subsequent spectrally broadened in a 2-cm, SF6-glass photonic crystal fiber. Spanning more than 300 nm with 16 GHz line spacing, the resulting astro-comb is predicted to provide 1 cm/s (approximately 10 kHz) radial velocity calibration accuracy for an astrophysical spectrograph. Such extreme performance will be necessary for the search for and characterization of Earth-like extra-solar planets, and in direct measurements of the change of the rate of cosmological expansion.

  10. SlicerAstro: A 3-D interactive visual analytics tool for HI data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punzo, D.; van der Hulst, J. M.; Roerdink, J. B. T. M.; Fillion-Robin, J. C.; Yu, L.

    2017-04-01

    SKA precursors are capable of detecting hundreds of galaxies in HI in a single 12 h pointing. In deeper surveys one will probe more easily faint HI structures, typically located in the vicinity of galaxies, such as tails, filaments, and extraplanar gas. The importance of interactive visualization in data exploration has been demonstrated by the wide use of tools (e.g. Karma, Casaviewer, VISIONS) that help users to receive immediate feedback when manipulating the data. We have developed SlicerAstro, a 3-D interactive viewer with new analysis capabilities, based on traditional 2-D input/output hardware. These capabilities enhance the data inspection, allowing faster analysis of complex sources than with traditional tools. SlicerAstro is an open-source extension of 3DSlicer, a multi-platform open source software package for visualization and medical image processing. We demonstrate the capabilities of the current stable binary release of SlicerAstro, which offers the following features: (i) handling of FITS files and astronomical coordinate systems; (ii) coupled 2-D/3-D visualization; (iii) interactive filtering; (iv) interactive 3-D masking; (v) and interactive 3-D modeling. In addition, SlicerAstro has been designed with a strong, stable and modular C++ core, and its classes are also accessible via Python scripting, allowing great flexibility for user-customized visualization and analysis tasks.

  11. Soft X-ray Focusing Telescope Aboard AstroSat: Design ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy; Volume 38; Issue 2. Soft X-ray Focusing Telescope Aboard AstroSat: Design, Characteristics and Performance. K. P. Singh G. C. Stewart N. J. Westergaard S. Bhattacharayya S. Chandra V. R. Chitnis G. C. Dewangan A. T. Kothare I. M. Mirza K. Mukerjee V. Navalkar ...

  12. 1994 NASA-HU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, John H. (Compiler); Young, Deborah B. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; (4) To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center.

  13. The 1993 NASA-ODU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N. (Compiler); Young, Deborah B. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives are: to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center.

  14. DOE/PSU Graduate Student Fellowship Program for Hydropower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cimbala, John M. [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States)

    2014-03-30

    The primary objective of this project is to stimulate academic interest in the conventional hydropower field by supplying research support for at least eight individual Master of Science (MS) or Doctoral (PhD) level research projects, each consisting of a graduate student supervised by a faculty member. We have completed many of the individual student research projects: 2 PhD students have finished, and 4 are still working towards their PhD degree. 4 MS students have finished, and 2 are still working towards their MS degree, one of which is due to finish this April. In addition, 4 undergraduate student projects have been completed, and one is to be completed this April. These projects were supervised by 7 faculty members and an Advisory/Review Panel. Our students and faculty have presented their work at national or international conferences and have submitted several journal publications. Three of our graduate students (Keith Martin, Dan Leonard and Hosein Foroutan) have received HRF Fellowships during the course of this project. All of the remaining students are anticipated to be graduated by the end of Fall Semester 2014. All of the tasks for this project will have been completed once all the students have been graduated, although it will be another year or two until all the journal publications have been finalized based on the work performed as part of this DOE Hydropower project.

  15. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1935 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Roy, Sures Chandra FNA. Date of birth: 1 March 1899. Date of death: 9 December 1970. Specialization: Meteorology, Seismology. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  16. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1974 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Varghese, Dr Thundil George M.Sc. Date of birth: 19 August 1928. Date of death: 14 November 1977. Specialization: Seismology. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  17. A Novel Method of Evaluating Key Factors for Success in a Multifaceted Critical Care Fellowship Using Data Envelopment Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vikram; Kumar, Avinash B

    2017-07-21

    The current system of summative multi-rater evaluations and standardized tests to determine readiness to graduate from critical care fellowships has limitations. We sought to pilot the use of data envelopment analysis (DEA) to assess what aspects of the fellowship program contribute the most to an individual fellow's success. DEA is a nonparametric, operations research technique that uses linear programming to determine the technical efficiency of an entity based on its relative usage of resources in producing the outcome. Retrospective cohort study. Critical care fellows (n = 15) in an Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited fellowship at a major academic medical center in the United States. After obtaining institutional review board approval for this retrospective study, we analyzed the data of 15 anesthesiology critical care fellows from academic years 2013-2015. The input-oriented DEA model develops a composite score for each fellow based on multiple inputs and outputs. The inputs included the didactic sessions attended, the ratio of clinical duty works hours to the procedures performed (work intensity index), and the outputs were the Multidisciplinary Critical Care Knowledge Assessment Program (MCCKAP) score and summative evaluations of fellows. A DEA efficiency score that ranged from 0 to 1 was generated for each of the fellows. Five fellows were rated as DEA efficient, and 10 fellows were characterized in the DEA inefficient group. The model was able to forecast the level of effort needed for each inefficient fellow, to achieve similar outputs as their best performing peers. The model also identified the work intensity index as the key element that characterized the best performers in our fellowship. DEA is a feasible method of objectively evaluating peer performance in a critical care fellowship beyond summative evaluations alone and can potentially be a powerful tool to guide individual performance during the fellowship.

  18. The Impact of an Authentic Science Experience on STEM Identity: A Preliminary Analysis of YouthAstroNet and MicroObservatory Telescope Network Participant Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussault, Mary E.; Wright, Erika A.; Sadler, Philip; Sonnert, Gerhard; ITEAMS II Team

    2018-01-01

    Encouraging students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) is a high priority for national K-12 education improvement initiatives in the United States. Many educators have claimed that a promising strategy for nurturing early student interest in STEM is to engage them in authentic inquiry experiences. “Authentic” refers to investigations in which the questions are of genuine interest and importance to students, and the inquiry more closely resembles the way real science is done. Science education researchers and practitioners at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics have put this theory into action with the development of YouthAstroNet, a nationwide online learning community of middle-school aged students, educators, and STEM professionals that features the MicroObservatory Robotic Telescope Network, professional image analysis software, and complementary curricula for use in a variety of learning settings. This preliminary study examines factors that influence YouthAstroNet participants' Science Affinity, STEM Identity, and STEM Career Interest, using the matched pre/post survey results of 261 participants as the data source. The pre/post surveys included some 40 items measuring affinity, identity, knowledge, and career interest. In addition, the post intervention instrument included a number of items in which students reported the instructional strategies they experienced as part of the program. A simple analysis of pre-post changes in affinity and interest revealed very little significant change, and for those items where a small pre-post effect was observed, the average change was most often negative. However, after accounting for students' different program treatment experiences and for their prior attitudes and interests, a predictor of significant student gains in Affinity, STEM Identity, Computer/Math Identity, and STEM Career Interest could be identified. This was the degree to which students reported

  19. Creating and Sustaining a Successful Fellowship Program: Challenges and Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Keith D; Hanna, Tarek N; Khurana, Bharti; Johnson, Jamlik-Omari; Sodickson, Aaron D

    Subspecialty expertise and fellowship training are two of the most desirable attributes in new radiology hires and, not surprisingly, the vast majority of diagnostic radiologists entering the job market today have had fellowship training. Fellowship training imparts not only expertise beyond that which is attainable during residency, but also a unique opportunity for professional maturation. In this article, we offer guidance in planning, building and sustaining a successful fellowship. The key steps in this process include strategic planning, development of a curriculum that can be customized to meet the educational goals of any individual fellow, professional development and trainee preparation for the marketplace, and approaches to ensure program longevity and success through local, regional and national fellow recruitment efforts. While many of the ideas presented are framed from the perspective of their integration into a newly formed fellowship program, they can also be adapted for use by existing fellowship programs as opportunities for program growth and improvement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Evolution of Spacelab Ultraviolet Astronomy Missions from OSS-3 through -7 to Astro-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gull, Theodore

    2018-01-01

    In the 1960s and 1970s, NASA was building towards a robust program in space astronomy. An evolutionary step from ground-based astronomy to space astronomy was human operation of space telescopes as astronomy in general evolved from astronomers directly at the telescope to application of computers and long distance communications to control to operate remote telescopes. Today ground-based telescopes and space observatories from cubesats to the Hubble Space Telescope and soon the James Webb Space Telescope are routinely operated remotely.In response to the Spacelab Announcement of Opportunity in the early 1980s, three ultraviolet experiments – the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope, the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope and the Wisconsin Ultraviolet PhotoPolarimetry Experiment -- all instruments derived from multiple sounding rocket flights--were selected to fly as an integrated payload attached to a space shuttle. The justification for professional astronomers, both as Mission Specialists from the astronaut cadre and Payload Specialists from the instrument teams, was built to ensure key technical skills both of the science and the instruments. Bundled together as OSS-3 through -7 flights focused on Comet Halley, the experiments went through many changes and delays as a pathfinder for an anticipated series of attached astronomy payloads.By 1986, the five-flight mission had evolved into two missions, Astro-1 dedicated primarily to observe Halley’s Comet in early March 1986 and Astro-2 to fly about one year later. Due to the Challenger disaster 35 days before scheduled launch of Astro-1, the mission went through an initial cancellation and then re-scheduling once the instrument complement of Astro-1 was expanded to include Broad Band X-ray Telescope with emphasis on studying SN1987A. Ultimately Astro-1 flew in December 1990 partnered with an X-ray experiment focused on SN1987A.The nine-day mission was mostly successful despite multiple technical issues overcome by the NASA

  1. ACGME Accreditation of Orthopaedic Surgery Subspecialty Fellowship Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Alan H; Grabel, Zachary; DiGiovanni, Christopher W

    2014-06-04

    Orthopaedic surgery training in the United States consists of a five-year-minimum orthopaedic surgery residency program, followed by optional subspecialty fellowship training. There is an increasing trend for trainees to complete at least one fellowship program following residency training, with approximately 90% of current trainees planning to complete a fellowship. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the overall variability of orthopaedic subspecialty fellowships in terms of characteristics, match process, and the tendency to be accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Nine orthopaedic surgery subspecialties were assessed for their fellowship match program, their number of fellowship programs and positions in the match, and the number of programs and positions accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Programs with a Subspecialty Certificate offered by the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery were compared with programs without a Subspecialty Certificate. Comparative statistics utilizing an unpaired t test with a statistical cutoff of p accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education was in orthopaedic sports medicine (93.1%), compared with the lowest percentage in foot and ankle orthopaedics (16.3%). A significantly higher percentage (p accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education were found for subspecialties with American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery Subspecialty Certificates (hand and sports) (87.9%) compared with subspecialties without Subspecialty Certificates (34.3%). There are more orthopaedic subspecialty fellowship positions available annually than there are graduating orthopaedic surgery residents. Three independent matching programs are currently being used by the nine orthopaedic subspecialties. Subspecialties vary in the proportion of programs with Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education accreditation

  2. The LSSTC Data Science Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Adam; Walkowicz, Lucianne; LSSTC DSFP Leadership Council

    2017-01-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope Corporation (LSSTC) Data Science Fellowship Program (DSFP) is a unique professional development program for astronomy graduate students. DSFP students complete a series of six, one-week long training sessions over the course of two years. The sessions are cumulative, each building on the last, to allow an in-depth exploration of the topics covered: data science basics, statistics, image processing, machine learning, scalable software, data visualization, time-series analysis, and science communication. The first session was held in Aug 2016 at Northwestern University, with all materials and lectures publicly available via github and YouTube. Each session focuses on a series of technical problems which are written in iPython notebooks. The initial class of fellows includes 16 students selected from across the globe, while an additional 14 fellows will be added to the program in year 2. Future sessions of the DSFP will be hosted by a rotating cast of LSSTC member institutions. The DSFP is designed to supplement graduate education in astronomy by teaching the essential skills necessary for dealing with big data, serving as a resource for all in the LSST era. The LSSTC DSFP is made possible by the generous support of the LSST Corporation, the Data Science Initiative (DSI) at Northwestern, and CIERA.

  3. Astrobites and GeoSciBites: Using Online Research Digests for Outreach to Undergraduates and the Broader Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, S.; Kohler, S.; Sanders, N.; Morey, S.

    2013-12-01

    Effective science communication is imperative for the sharing of scientific ideas, continued funding and support from policy makers, and education of the public. As future researchers and educators, it is particularly important to engage graduate students in science communication. Astrobites (http://astrobites.org) is an innovative education initiative developed by graduate students in planetary science, astronomy, and astrophysics. Our goal is to help undergraduates make the transition from the classroom to careers in research by introducing them to the astronomical literature in a pedagogical, approachable, and comprehensible way. Every day we select one new journal article posted to the astrophysics preprint server (arXiv.org/astro-ph) and prepare a brief summary describing methods and results, explain jargon, and provide context. We also write regular blog posts containing career advice, such as tips for applying for fellowships or demystifying the publishing process. The articles are written by 30 graduate students in astrophysics from throughout the US and Europe and are read by 1000 daily readers worldwide, including undergraduates, researchers, and interested non-scientists. We describe lessons learned in starting, sustaining, and expanding science outreach blogs like Astrobites. We survey our readership and present analysis summarizing our reader base and impact. We report on the foundation of other ';bites blogs, focusing on the foundation of GeoSciBites, a geophysical sciences outreach blog. We discuss future opportunities for additional outreach initiatives in new disciplines.

  4. Interventional radiology fellowship website content: what is the relevance to potential applicants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalel, Resmi A; Pua, Bradley B; Galla, Naveen; Trehan, Samir K; Madoff, David C

    To assess the accessibility and content of query Interventional Radiology (IR) fellowship program websites and determine the impact of these websites on applicants. All IR fellowship programs were individually evaluated, and all IR fellowship applicants to our institution were surveyed. In 2015, 44.3% of programs had an appropriate functional link to the fellowship website. Most provided a program description and application information. In our survey, applicants reported that website quality was moderately important to their overall impression of a fellowship. The most important aspects were didactics and facilities information. Fellowship website content and quality are important to applicants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. FY 2005 Congressional Earmark: The Environmental Institute Fellowship Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharon Tracey, Co-PI and Richard Taupier, Co-PI

    2007-02-06

    Congressional Earmark Funding was used to create a Postdoctoral Environmental Fellowship Program, interdisciplinary Environmental Working Groups, and special initiatives to create a dialogue around the environment at the University of Massachusetts Amherst to mobilize faculty to work together to respond to emerging environmental needs and to build institutional capacity to launch programmatic environmental activities across campus over time. Developing these networks of expertise will enable the University to more effectively and swiftly respond to emerging environmental needs and assume a leadership role in varied environmental fields. Over the course of the project 20 proposals were submitted to a variety of funding agencies involving faculty teams from 19 academic departments; 4 projects were awarded totaling $950,000; special events were organized including the Environmental Lecture Series which attracted more than 1,000 attendees over the course of the project; 75 University faculty became involved in one or more Working Groups (original three Working Groups plus Phase 2 Working Groups); an expertise database was developed with approximately 275 faculty involved in environmental research and education as part of a campus-wide network of environmental expertise; 12 University centers and partners participated; and the three Environmental Fellows produced 3 publications as well as a number of presentations and papers in progress.

  6. Pathology informatics fellowship training: Focus on molecular pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Mandelker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pathology informatics is both emerging as a distinct subspecialty and simultaneously becoming deeply integrated within the breadth of pathology practice. As specialists, pathology informaticians need a broad skill set, including aptitude with information fundamentals, information systems, workflow and process, and governance and management. Currently, many of those seeking training in pathology informatics additionally choose training in a second subspecialty. Combining pathology informatics training with molecular pathology is a natural extension, as molecular pathology is a subspecialty with high potential for application of modern biomedical informatics techniques. Methods and Results: Pathology informatics and molecular pathology fellows and faculty evaluated the current fellowship program′s core curriculum topics and subtopics for relevance to molecular pathology. By focusing on the overlap between the two disciplines, a structured curriculum consisting of didactics, operational rotations, and research projects was developed for those fellows interested in both pathology informatics and molecular pathology. Conclusions: The scope of molecular diagnostics is expanding dramatically as technology advances and our understanding of disease extends to the genetic level. Here, we highlight many of the informatics challenges facing molecular pathology today, and outline specific informatics principles necessary for the training of future molecular pathologists.

  7. Pathology informatics fellowship training: Focus on molecular pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelker, Diana; Lee, Roy E.; Platt, Mia Y.; Riedlinger, Gregory; Quinn, Andrew; Rao, Luigi K. F.; Klepeis, Veronica E.; Mahowald, Michael; Lane, William J.; Beckwith, Bruce A.; Baron, Jason M.; McClintock, David S.; Kuo, Frank C.; Lebo, Matthew S.; Gilbertson, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pathology informatics is both emerging as a distinct subspecialty and simultaneously becoming deeply integrated within the breadth of pathology practice. As specialists, pathology informaticians need a broad skill set, including aptitude with information fundamentals, information systems, workflow and process, and governance and management. Currently, many of those seeking training in pathology informatics additionally choose training in a second subspecialty. Combining pathology informatics training with molecular pathology is a natural extension, as molecular pathology is a subspecialty with high potential for application of modern biomedical informatics techniques. Methods and Results: Pathology informatics and molecular pathology fellows and faculty evaluated the current fellowship program's core curriculum topics and subtopics for relevance to molecular pathology. By focusing on the overlap between the two disciplines, a structured curriculum consisting of didactics, operational rotations, and research projects was developed for those fellows interested in both pathology informatics and molecular pathology. Conclusions: The scope of molecular diagnostics is expanding dramatically as technology advances and our understanding of disease extends to the genetic level. Here, we highlight many of the informatics challenges facing molecular pathology today, and outline specific informatics principles necessary for the training of future molecular pathologists. PMID:24843823

  8. A mass additive technique for modal testing as applied to the Space Shuttle ASTRO-1 payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, A. D.; Driskill, T. C.; Anderson, J. B.; Brown, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    Traditionally, a fixed base modal test has been performed as a means of verifying the coupled loads math model for Space Shuttle flight payloads. An alternate method, a free-free configured payload using mass loaded boundary conditions, is presented as a means of verifying the coupled loads model of the ASTRO-1 flight payload. This method allows evaluation of the influence of local load paths into the frequency range of the free-free test. The method is cost effective and does not contaminate the modal test results with fixture coupled modes or boundary condition uncertainties. This paper describes the mass additive modal test technique as applied to the Space Shuttle ASTRO-1 flight payload.

  9. ASTRO APEx® and RO-ILS™ are applicable to medical malpractice in radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaorsky, Nicholas G; Ricco, Anthony G; Churilla, Thomas M; Horwitz, Eric M; Den, Robert B

    2016-11-01

    To analyze malpractice trials in radiation oncology and assess how ASTRO APEx® and RO-ILS™ apply to such cases. The Westlaw database was reviewed using PICOS/PRISMA methods. Fisher's exact and Mann-Whitney U tests were used to find factors associated with outcomes. Of 34 cases identified, external beam was used in 26 (77%). The most common factors behind malpractice were excessive toxicity (80%) and lack of informed consent (66%). ASTRO APEx pillars and ROI-LS had applicability to all but one case. Factors favoring the defendant included statute of limitations (odds ratio: 8.1; 95% CI: 1.3-50); those favoring the plaintiff included patient death (odds ratio: 0.7; 95% CI: 0.54-0.94). APEx and RO-ILS are applicable to malpractice trials in radiation oncology.

  10. The 1992 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    This is the administrative report for the 1992 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program which was held at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for the 28th consecutive year. The nominal starting and finishing dates for the ten week program were June 1, 1992 through August 7, 1992. The program was sponsored by NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C., and operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). The program was one of eight such programs at eight NASA centers sponsored and funded by NASA Headquarters. The basic objectives of the program are the following: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities at the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. The major activities of the 1992 program were the following: (1) recruitment, selection, and assignment of faculty fellows; (2) research performed by the participants in collaboration with the MSFC colleague; (3) a seminar and tour program aimed at providing information concerning activities at MSFC; (4) an activities program of a social/non-technical nature aimed at providing the fellows and their families a means of learning about the MSFC/Huntsville area; and (5) preparation of a volume containing the written reports of the details of the research performed by each of the summer faculty. The success of the 1992 program activities in meeting the stated objectives was measured through questionnaires, which were filled out by participants and their MSFC colleagues. The following sections describe the major activities in more detail and the results of the questionnaires are summarized showing that the 1992 program was highly successful. This year's program also included 19 participants in the Summer Teacher Enrichment Program (STEP

  11. Opinion & special articles: a guide from fellowship to faculty: Nietzsche and the academic neurologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, S Thomas

    2012-10-02

    The role of the physician scientist in biomedical research is increasingly threatened. Despite a clear role in clinical advances in translational medicine, the percentage of physicians engaged in research has steadily declined. Several programmatic efforts have been initiated to address this problem by providing time and financial resources to the motivated resident or fellow. However, this decline in physician scientists is due not only to a lack of time and resources but also a reflection of the uncertain path in moving from residency or postdoctoral training toward junior faculty. This article is a practical guide to the milestones and barriers to successful faculty achievement after residency or fellowship training.

  12. astroABC : An Approximate Bayesian Computation Sequential Monte Carlo sampler for cosmological parameter estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, E. [Fermilab; Madigan, M. [Trinity Coll., Dublin

    2017-01-18

    Given the complexity of modern cosmological parameter inference where we arefaced with non-Gaussian data and noise, correlated systematics and multi-probecorrelated data sets, the Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) method is apromising alternative to traditional Markov Chain Monte Carlo approaches in thecase where the Likelihood is intractable or unknown. The ABC method is called"Likelihood free" as it avoids explicit evaluation of the Likelihood by using aforward model simulation of the data which can include systematics. Weintroduce astroABC, an open source ABC Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) sampler forparameter estimation. A key challenge in astrophysics is the efficient use oflarge multi-probe datasets to constrain high dimensional, possibly correlatedparameter spaces. With this in mind astroABC allows for massive parallelizationusing MPI, a framework that handles spawning of jobs across multiple nodes. Akey new feature of astroABC is the ability to create MPI groups with differentcommunicators, one for the sampler and several others for the forward modelsimulation, which speeds up sampling time considerably. For smaller jobs thePython multiprocessing option is also available. Other key features include: aSequential Monte Carlo sampler, a method for iteratively adapting tolerancelevels, local covariance estimate using scikit-learn's KDTree, modules forspecifying optimal covariance matrix for a component-wise or multivariatenormal perturbation kernel, output and restart files are backed up everyiteration, user defined metric and simulation methods, a module for specifyingheterogeneous parameter priors including non-standard prior PDFs, a module forspecifying a constant, linear, log or exponential tolerance level,well-documented examples and sample scripts. This code is hosted online athttps://github.com/EliseJ/astroABC

  13. Early In-orbit Performance of Scanning Sky Monitor Onboard AstroSat

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. C. Ramadevi

    E-mail: ramadevi@isac.gov.in; mc.ramadevi@gmail.com. MS received 23 December 2016; accepted 9 May 2017; published online 19 June 2017. Abstract. We report the in-orbit performance of Scanning Sky Monitor (SSM) onboard AstroSat. The SSM operates in the energy range 2.5 to 10 keV and scans the sky to detect ...

  14. Mapping the Gas Turbulence in the Coma Cluster: Predictions for Astro-H

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZuHone, J. A.; Markevitch, M.; Zhuravleva, I.

    2016-01-01

    Astro-H will be able for the first time to map gas velocities and detect turbulence in galaxy clusters. One of the best targets for turbulence studies is the Coma cluster, due to its proximity, absence of a cool core, and lack of a central active galactic nucleus. To determine what constraints Astro-H will be able to place on the Coma velocity field, we construct simulated maps of the projected gas velocity and compute the second-order structure function, an analog of the velocity power spectrum. We vary the injection scale, dissipation scale, slope, and normalization of the turbulent power spectrum, and apply measurement errors and finite sampling to the velocity field. We find that even with sparse coverage of the cluster, Astro-H will be able to measure the Mach number and the injection scale of the turbulent power spectrum-the quantities determining the energy flux down the turbulent cascade and the diffusion rate for everything that is advected by the gas (metals, cosmic rays, etc.). Astro-H will not be sensitive to the dissipation scale or the slope of the power spectrum in its inertial range, unless they are outside physically motivated intervals. We give the expected confidence intervals for the injection scale and the normalization of the power spectrum for a number of possible pointing configurations, combining the structure function and velocity dispersion data. Importantly, we also determine that measurement errors on the line shift will bias the velocity structure function upward, and show how to correct this bias.

  15. astroABC : An Approximate Bayesian Computation Sequential Monte Carlo sampler for cosmological parameter estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, E.; Madigan, M.

    2017-04-01

    Given the complexity of modern cosmological parameter inference where we are faced with non-Gaussian data and noise, correlated systematics and multi-probe correlated datasets,the Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) method is a promising alternative to traditional Markov Chain Monte Carlo approaches in the case where the Likelihood is intractable or unknown. The ABC method is called ;Likelihood free; as it avoids explicit evaluation of the Likelihood by using a forward model simulation of the data which can include systematics. We introduce astroABC, an open source ABC Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) sampler for parameter estimation. A key challenge in astrophysics is the efficient use of large multi-probe datasets to constrain high dimensional, possibly correlated parameter spaces. With this in mind astroABC allows for massive parallelization using MPI, a framework that handles spawning of processes across multiple nodes. A key new feature of astroABC is the ability to create MPI groups with different communicators, one for the sampler and several others for the forward model simulation, which speeds up sampling time considerably. For smaller jobs the Python multiprocessing option is also available. Other key features of this new sampler include: a Sequential Monte Carlo sampler; a method for iteratively adapting tolerance levels; local covariance estimate using scikit-learn's KDTree; modules for specifying optimal covariance matrix for a component-wise or multivariate normal perturbation kernel and a weighted covariance metric; restart files output frequently so an interrupted sampling run can be resumed at any iteration; output and restart files are backed up at every iteration; user defined distance metric and simulation methods; a module for specifying heterogeneous parameter priors including non-standard prior PDFs; a module for specifying a constant, linear, log or exponential tolerance level; well-documented examples and sample scripts. This code is hosted

  16. Finding a million-star hotel an astro-tourist’s guide to dark sky places

    CERN Document Server

    Mizon, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Finding a Million-Star Hotel explores the modern phenomenon of astro-tourism, the efforts by increasing numbers of people to find nearby and distant locations where they can see the real night sky so often hidden by light pollution. Astronomer Bob Mizon directs readers to dark sky sites in the United Kingdom, the United States, and a few further afield. This is more than just a hotel guide with links for accommodation at or near the locations. There are chapters on choosing telescopes and binoculars, on celestial objects astro-tourists can look for in the night sky, and an investigation into the causes of the skyglow that veils our view of the stars. Most of those who go seeking the stars are not professional astronomers. This book is aimed at those observers with limited knowledge of the night sky who are eager to explore and enjoy it. Even those contemplating setting up astro-themed hotels, campsites, or astronomy events can benefit from reading this book and from the advice included on how to equip such pl...

  17. Using pedagogical discipline representations (PDRs) to enable Astro 101 students to reason about modern astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Colin Scott; Prather, Edward E.; Chambers, Timothy G.; Kamenetzky, Julia R.; Hornstein, Seth D.

    2017-01-01

    Instructors of introductory, college-level, general education astronomy (Astro 101) often want to include topics from the cutting-edge of modern astrophysics in their course. Unfortunately, the teaching of these cutting-edge topics is typically confined to advanced undergraduate or graduate classes, using representations (graphical, mathematical, etc.) that are inaccessible to the vast majority of Astro 101 students. Consequently, many Astro 101 instructors feel that they have no choice but to cover these modern topics at a superficial level. Pedagogical discipline representations (PDRs) are one solution to this problem. Pedagogical discipline representations are representations that are explicitly designed to enhance the teaching and learning of a topic, even though these representations may not typically be found in traditional textbooks or used by experts in the discipline who are engaged in topic-specific discourse. In some cases, PDRs are significantly simplified or altered versions of typical discipline representations (graphs, data tables, etc.); in others they may be novel and highly contextualized representations with unique features that purposefully engage novice learners’ pre-existing mental models and reasoning difficulties, facilitating critical discourse. In this talk, I will discuss important lessons that my colleagues and I have learned while developing PDRs and describe how PDRs can enable students to reason about complex modern astrophysical topics.

  18. The hard X-ray response of the XIS-CCD for Astro-E: qualification of the X-ray CCD detector

    CERN Document Server

    Nishiuchi, M; Awaki, H; Tsuru, T; Sakano, M; Hamaguchi, K; Murakami, H; Tsunemi, H; Hayashida, K; Kitamoto, S; Miyata, E; Dotani, T; Ozaki, M; Bautz, M; Doty, J; Kissel, S; Foster, R; Ricker, G

    1999-01-01

    We report on the hard X-ray response of the CCD detector for the X-ray imaging spectrometer (XIS), to be launched on the next Japanese X-ray Astronomical Satellite, ASTRO-E, in February 2000. XIS is prepared by an international team, comprised of MIT (USA), ISAS, Osaka University and Kyoto University (JAPAN). We have evaluated the X-ray response of the XIS in its high-energy band (1.5-10 keV). Data from the fluorescent line emission of Al, Cl, Ti, Ni, Fe, Zn, Se were used to construct the response function of the CCD detectors. Details of the response function - including the energy-scale, linearity, energy resolution, quantum efficiency -, are given as a function of incident X-ray energy. We find that the tail component of high-energy photopeaks are produced by events with incomplete charge collection. We also conclude that the size of the charge clouds can be estimated using the shapes of the tail components.

  19. Health systems engineering fellowship: curriculum and program development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Bradley V; Shiner, Brian; Cully, Jeffrey A; Gilman, Stuart C; Benneyan, James C; Eisenhauer, William

    2015-01-01

    Industrial engineering and related disciplines have been used widely in improvement efforts in many industries. These approaches have been less commonly attempted in health care. One factor limiting application is the limited workforce resulting from a lack of specific education and professional development in health systems engineering (HSE). The authors describe the development of an HSE fellowship within the United States Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Health Administration (VA). This fellowship includes a novel curriculum based on specifically established competencies for HSE. A 1-year HSE curriculum was developed and delivered to fellows at several VA engineering resource centers over several years. On graduation, a majority of the fellows accepted positions in the health care field. Challenges faced in developing the fellowship are discussed. Advanced educational opportunities in applied HSE have the potential to develop the workforce capacity needed to improve the quality of health care. © 2014 by the American College of Medical Quality.

  20. NASA/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    Since 1964, NASA has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. The objectives are: to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty; to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; to enrich and refresh the research and teachning activities of participants' institutions; and to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lecture and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topic.

  1. 21st Century Power Partnership: September 2016 Fellowship Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reber, Timothy J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Rambau, Prudence [Eskom, Pretoria (South Africa); Mdhluli, Sipho [Eskom, Pretoria (South Africa)

    2017-09-29

    This report details the 21st Century Power Partnership fellowship from September 2016. This Fellowship is a follow-up to the Technical Audit of Eskom's Medium- and Long-term Modelling Capabilities, conducted by U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in April 2016. The prospect and role of variable renewable energy (vRE) in South Africa poses new modelling-related challenges that Eskom is actively working to address by improving the fidelity of PLEXOS LT and ST models.

  2. Infertility Research at the NICHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Trials.gov ID: NCT01044862 . [top] Research on Infertility Outcomes The NICHD also supports research to understand some ... The Program, accredited by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ABOG), sponsors 3-year clinical fellowships, ...

  3. 34 CFR 535.1 - What is the Bilingual Education: Graduate Fellowship Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Bilingual Education: Graduate Fellowship... (Continued) OFFICE OF BILINGUAL EDUCATION AND MINORITY LANGUAGES AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION BILINGUAL EDUCATION: GRADUATE FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM General § 535.1 What is the Bilingual Education: Graduate Fellowship...

  4. 22 CFR 196.2 - How is the Fellowship Program administered?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How is the Fellowship Program administered? 196.2 Section 196.2 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION THOMAS R. PICKERING FOREIGN AFFAIRS/GRADUATE FOREIGN AFFAIRS FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM § 196.2 How is the Fellowship Program...

  5. The Cadmium Zinc Telluride Imager on AstroSat

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Inter University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune 411 007, India. S. R. T. M. University, Nanded, 431 606, India. Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Babha Road, Mumbai 400 005, India. Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Thiruvananthapuram 695 022, India. Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad ...

  6. Summer Research Fellowships for Students and Teachers - 2005

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    should include a recommendation letter from a teacher familiar with their work, in a sealed envelope. Completed proposals should reach the Academy office (The ... The selected students/teachers will be provided appropriate round trip train fare and an honorarium to meet the boarding and lodging expenses at the place of ...

  7. System Design and Implementation of the Detector Assembly of the Astro-H Soft X-Ray Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiao, M. P.; Adams, J.; Goodwin, P.; Hobson, C.W.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; McCammom, D.; McGuinness, D. S.; Moseley, S. J.; Porter, F. S.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The soft x-ray spectrometer (SXS) onboard Astro-H presents to the science community unprecedented capability (less than 7 eV at 6 keV) for high-resolution spectral measurements in the range of 0.5-12 keV to study extended celestial sources. At the heart of this SXS is the x-ray calorimeter spectrometer (XCS) where detectors (calorimeter array and anticoincidence detector) operate at 50 mK, the bias circuit operates at nominal 1.3 K, and the first stage amplifiers operateat 130 K, all within a nominal 20 cm envelope. The design of the detector assembly in this XCS originates from the Astro-E x-ray spectrometer (XRS) and lessons learned from Astro-E and Suzaku. After the production of our engineering model, additional changes were made in order to improve our flight assembly process for better reliability and overall performance. In this poster, we present the final design and implementation of the flight detector assembly, show comparison of parameters and performance to Suzakus XRS, and list susceptibilities to other subsystems as well as our lessons learned.

  8. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1950 Section: Medicine. Rao, Mattegunta Venkata Radhakrishna FNA. Date of birth: 1 November 1903. Date of death: 26 October 1971. Specialization: Pathology, Nutrition. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  9. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1974 Section: General Biology. Jagannathan, Dr Venkataraman Ph.D. (Stanford), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 15 June 1921. Date of death: 2 December 2015. Specialization: Biochemistry and Plant Tissue Culture Last known address: F-1, Kumar Classics, Aundh, Pune 411 007, ...

  10. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1974 Section: General Biology. Ramachandran, Dr Lakshminarayanapuram Krishnaiyer Ph.D. (Madras), FNA. Date of birth: 28 March 1928. Date of death: 11 August 1988. Specialization: Proteins, Antibiotics and Endocrines. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  11. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Mahadevan, Calamur FNA 1949-61. Date of birth: 6 May 1901. Date of death: 8 April 1962. Specialization: Economic Geology, Nuclear Geology, Marine Geology. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  12. A syllabus for fellowship education in palliative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeGrand, Susan B; Walsh, Declan; Nelson, Kristine A; Davis, Mellar P

    2003-01-01

    Recent years have seen significant growth in palliative medicine training programs and positions. There are plans to pursue palliative medicine specialty status with the American Board of Medical Specialties and accreditation of fellowship programs with the American College of Graduate Medical Education. A work group of program directors, supported initially by the Cleveland Clinic and then by the American Board of Hospice and Palliative Medicine, has recently published standards for fellowship training. Despite this, fundamental questions remain about defining the field and delineating the knowledge and skills expected following completion of specialty training. In this article, we describe the first fellowship program in palliative medicine (PMP) in the United States, developed and supported by the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. The program has been implemented as part of the Harry R. Horvitz Center for Palliative Medicine, founded in 1987 as the first comprehensive integrated US program in this field. This training program, in existence since 1989, features a traditional rotational structure with an inpatient primary care service, inpatient consult services, and an outpatient consult/hospice service. This article outlines the syllabus developed for this fellowship, given what we believe to be the essential knowledge base for the field of palliative medicine.

  13. Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program, Annual Report, Class of 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMakin, Andrea H.

    2013-09-23

    This 32-pp annual report/brochure describes the accomplishments of the Class of 2012 of the Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (the last class of this program), which PNNL administers for the National Nuclear Security Administration. The time period covers Sept 2011 through June 2013.

  14. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia. Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1975 Section: Chemistry. Patel, Dr Chunibhai Chhotabhai Ph.D. (Bombay), FNA. Date of birth: 17 March 1920. Date of death: 15 December 1987. Specialization: Inorganic Chemistry, Spectroscopy and Mineral Dressing.

  15. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1974 Section: Engineering & Technology. Pandalai, Prof. Krishnan Aditya Vaman D.Ae.E. (New York). Date of birth: 16 February 1928. Date of death: 20 May 1999. Specialization: Aircraft Structural Mechanics and Composites Address: 77/2, Velachery Road, Madras 600 032.

  16. Perceived Influence of Update Courses on Part One Fellowship ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Update courses in ophthalmology are organized in Nigeria with the aim of improving understanding of the basics of ophthalmology and also enhance chances of pass at the part one fellowship examination. It is assumed that the desired effect should be achieved at the end of the courses. This study was ...

  17. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1940 Section: Plant Sciences. Uppal, Badri Nath Ph.D. (Iowa), FNA. Date of birth: 28 June 1900. Date of death: 22 November 1989. Specialization: Plant Pathology, Microbiology and Agriculture. YouTube · Twitter · Facebook · Blog ...

  18. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1956 Section: Medicine. Patel, Dr Jamnadas Chaturbhai M.D., Ph.D. (London), M.R.C.P.. Date of birth: 2 August 1908. Date of death: 11 May 2003. Specialization: Diabetes, Internal Medicine and Tetanus Last known address: 'Backbay View', 3, New Queens Road, Mumbai 400 ...

  19. The Rahima Dawood Travelling Fellowship of the Association of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Thc Rahima Dawood Travelling Fellowship gave me a unique opportunity to assess the teaching and practice of orthopaedic surgery in four countries,. Zimbabwe, Kenya, Ugancla ancl Mozambique and then to take part in the Annual Conference of the .kssociation of Surgeons of East Africa in Dar es. Salaam ...

  20. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Annual Meetings · Mid Year Meetings · Discussion Meetings · Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Chemistry. Sastry, Sosale Garalapuri. Date of death: 22 September 1955. Specialization: Chemistry of Oils & Soaps.

  1. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1935 Section: Chemistry. Desai, Shirishkant Varjray Ph.D. (London), D.Sc. (London). Date of birth: 1900. Date of death: 1984. Specialization: Biochemistry, Microbiology. YouTube · Twitter · Facebook · Blog ...

  2. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1974 Section: General Biology. Krishna Murti, Dr Coimbatore Ramadorai Ph.D. (Bombay), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 3 March 1923. Date of death: 30 June 1990. Specialization: Nutrition, Biochemical Toxicology and Applied Biochemistry. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  3. Seven Personal Accounts from the 2012 ACTE Fellowship Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strebe, Connie; Mosley, Chaney; Biggerstaff, Patrick; Cox, Lynne Cagle; Williams, Hershel; Lindsley, Dawn; Umehira, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Each year since 2009, the Association for Career and Technical Education (ACTE) has supported the National Leadership Fellowship Program. This program is geared towards individuals with a desire not only to develop their own leadership skills, but also to become advocates for career and technical education (CTE). Responsibilities and expectations…

  4. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Chemistry. Wheeler, Thomas Sherlock FNA 1934-37; Vice President 1934-37. Date of birth: 30 April 1899. Date of death: 13 December 1962. Specialization: Organic Chemistry. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  5. The financial value of fellowship training in otolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Benjamin P; Darrow, David H; Derkay, Craig S

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the financial impact of pursuing a fellowship in otolaryngology. Retrospective financial analysis using American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery survey data. The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery report, entitled Socioeconomic Study among Members April 2011, gives a financial profile of respondents who reported their primary area of specialization as either general otolaryngology or a specific area of subspecialization. Weighted averages were calculated from the reported data. The weighted averages were used to calculate a net present value (NPV) over a 30-year contiguous career. The NPV for general otolaryngology was $4.73 million. The NPV for the following subspecialties in relation to general otolaryngology were (in hundred thousands) as follows: otolaryngologic allergy (-$1153), sleep medicine (-$677), otology/neurotology (-$339), laryngology (-$288), head and neck (-$191), pediatric otolaryngology (-$176), facial plastic surgery (-$139), skull base surgery ($122), rhinology ($285), and allergy and immunology ($350). Ninety-four percent of general otolaryngology respondents were in private practice. Most subspecialists worked in an academic setting. Fellowship training in otolaryngology will affect career earnings of prospective fellows. The overall financial impact of fellowship training, calculating in the delay in receiving a full clinical salary, should be factored into the decision to pursue fellowship training.

  6. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1957 Section: Animal Sciences. Venkataraman, Taracad Venkatakrishna Ph.D. (Madras). Date of birth: 1910. Date of death: 30 November 1981. Specialization: Agricultural Entomology and Biological & Integrated Crop Pests Control. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  7. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Discussion Meetings · Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia. Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Animal Sciences. Iyer, L K Ananthakrishna FNA. Date of birth: 1861. Date of death: 25 February 1937. Specialization: Anthropology, Ethnology. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  8. The African Climate Change Fellowship Program Phase III | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The African Climate Change Fellowship Program Phase III. Climate change and climate variability are significantly impeding development in Africa. The Economic Commission for Africa argues that scientists and policymakers must learn to better manage climate risks and to integrate climate change considerations into ...

  9. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Physics. Paranjpe, Gopal Ramachandra M.Sc. (Bombay), FNA. Date of birth: 30 January 1891. Date of death: 7 March 1981. Specialization: Instrumentation, Raman Effect. YouTube · Twitter · Facebook · Blog ...

  10. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Physics. Ganesan, Angarai Seshiah Ph.D. (London) Council Service:1961. Date of birth: 27 May 1900. Date of death: 2 January 1986. Specialization: Scattering of Light, Raman Effect. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  11. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    REGISTRATIONS CLOSED. Announcement of selected candidates will commence towards the end of February. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF). REGISTRATIONS CLOSED. Announcement of selected candidates will commence towards the end of February. Associates – 2017. Posted on ...

  12. The African Hospitalist Fellowship | Daniels | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The African Paediatric Fellowship Programme is rolling out a training course for newly qualified paediatricians to equip them with the leadership skills to function in complex general paediatric settings. The care of children in Africa carries its own unique demands, from the layering effects of multiple conditions through to ...

  13. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1963 Section: Engineering & Technology. Nayudamma, Yelavarthy Ph.D. (Lehigh), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 10 September 1922. Date of death: 23 June 1985. Specialization: Leather Technology, Chemistry and Biochemistry. YouTube · Twitter · Facebook · Blog ...

  14. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1974 Section: General Biology. Radhakrishnan, Dr Amurtur Narayana Ph.D. (Bombay), FNA. Date of birth: 17 May 1927. Date of death: 17 June 1990. Specialization: Biochemistry, Enzymology and Biomembrane Transport. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  15. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Meetings · Mid Year Meetings · Discussion Meetings · Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia. Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Chemistry. Pandya, Kantilal Chhaganlal. Date of birth: 24 August 1886. Date of death: 14 October 1958. Specialization: Organic Chemistry.

  16. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia. Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1975 Section: Animal Sciences. Nayar, Dr Krishnapillai Karunakaran FNA. Date of birth: 12 June 1920. Date of death: 26 June 1975. Specialization: Endocrinology, Entomology, Co-operative Oncology.

  17. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1939 Section: Plant Sciences. Raghavan, Tupil Srinivasa Ph.D. (London) 1946-49. Date of birth: 29 September 1905. Date of death: 30 January 1986. Specialization: Cytomorphology, Cytogenetics and Cytotaxonomy. YouTube · Twitter · Facebook · Blog ...

  18. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1975 Section: Plant Sciences. Pal, Dr Benjamin Peary Ph.D. (Cantab), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 26 May 1906. Date of death: 14 September 1989. Specialization: Plant Breeding and Genetics. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  19. Latin American Security, Drugs and Democracy (LASDD) Fellowship ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    17 janv. 2012 ... This grant will support a program of fellowships and workshops on the link between security, organized crime, drugs and democracy in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). The program is expected to help civil society and governments understand organized crime and drug trafficking in the region so ...

  20. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Discussion Meetings · Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia. Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Medicine. Sokhey, Sahib Singh 1943-46; Vice President 1943-46. Date of birth: 15 December 1887. Date of death: 23 October 1971. Specialization: Epidemiology.

  1. "World-Mindedness": The Lisle Fellowship and the Cold War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownlee, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    This article will examine a little known but long-standing group, the Lisle Fellowship, that endeavored to open the world to college students and foster international understanding--or "world-mindedness," as the organization's founders called it--ultimately with the goal to contribute to the ideal of world peace. It will also, in…

  2. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1944 Section: Plant Sciences. Majumdar, Girija Prasanna Ph.D., FNA. Date of birth: 18 February 1894. Date of death: 21 November 1959. Specialization: Plant Anatomy. YouTube · Twitter · Facebook · Blog ...

  3. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Plant Sciences. Maheshwari, Panchanan D.Sc., FNA, FNASc 1952-61; Vice President 1952-61. Date of birth: 9 November 1904. Date of death: 18 May 1966. Specialization: Embryology, Plant Anatomy,Economic Botany. YouTube · Twitter · Facebook · Blog ...

  4. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1951 Section: Plant Sciences. Mahabale, Tryambak Sanker Ph.D. (Bombay), FNA. Date of birth: 19 October 1909. Date of death: 3 July 1983. Specialization: Palaeobotany, Pteridophytes and Plant Anatomy. YouTube · Twitter · Facebook · Blog ...

  5. Fellowships: One Bridge Between the Academy and Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Paul T.

    The field of education has recognized that intensive clinical experience constitutes an ideal learning model. Fellowships in education were accompanied by large amounts of money in demonstration projects. Two costly national programs designed to move highly qualified persons into top administrative positions fell short of their goal.…

  6. Personality traits within a pediatric surgery fellowship applicant pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazboun, Rajaie; Rodriguez, Samuel; Thirumoorthi, Arul; Baerg, Joanne; Moores, Donald; Tagge, Edward P

    2017-10-01

    The Big Five framework examines five factors that represent a description of human personality. These factors correlate with success measures and job satisfaction. The Big Five Inventory is a 44-item instrument designed to measure the Big Five framework. Our aim was to document the distribution of Big Five personality traits among Pediatric Surgery fellowship applicants, compare with community norms, surgical residents, between genders, and correlate to the fellowship match results. Forty Pediatric Surgery fellowship applicants at a university hospital completed the Big Five Inventory during the interview process. It was analyzed and compared with general surgery residents' results and community norms. The data were compared regarding gender and match results. Continuous variables were compared by unpaired t-tests and Mann-Whitney tests. A P value surgery residents and community norms, applicants of both genders scored higher on agreeableness (P Pediatric Surgery fellowship applicants expressed higher levels of desirable professional traits compared with general surgery residents and community norms. Male applicants demonstrated higher emotional stability than females. Conscientiousness was higher in matching applicants. This first reported experience with personality testing in Pediatric Surgery fellow selection demonstrated potential utility in applicant matching. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Forestry department seeks applicants for national fellowship in urban forestry

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Lynn

    2006-01-01

    The Garden Club of America has again selected Virginia Tech's forestry department to review and administer its recently established national urban forestry fellowship for qualified U.S. students. Virginia Tech has both undergraduate and graduate programs focusing on the study of urban forestry.

  8. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1970 Section: Plant Sciences. Padmanabhan, Dr Suchindrum Yagnanarayana D.Sc. (Utkal). Date of birth: 11 September 1916. Date of death: 29 January 1985. Specialization: Plant Pathology and Rice Production. YouTube · Twitter · Facebook · Blog ...

  9. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1943 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Rana, Khadag Narsingh Jung Bahadur. YouTube · Twitter · Facebook · Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Associates – 2017. Posted on 30 August 2017. Click here to see the list · 28th Mid Year Meeting. Posted on 26 May 2017. [30 June ...

  10. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1981 Section: General Biology. Sushil Kumar, Prof. Ph.D. (IARI), FNA, FNASc, FNAAS. Date of birth: 14 December 1940. Specialization: Plant-Microbe Interactions, Genetics, Food Crops and Medicinal & Aromatic Plants Address: 4/11, Sarv Priya Vihar, New Delhi 110 016, U.T.

  11. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1963 Section: Physics. Menon, Dr Thanicklal Radhakrishnan Ph.D. (Madras). Date of birth: 14 April 1925. Date of death: 29 May 2001. Specialization: Fibre Science, Textile Physics and Textile Testing Address: 'Lakshmi Nivas', Press Club Road, Thiruvananthapuram 695 039.

  12. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Ramdas, Lakshminarayanapuram Ananthakrishnan Ph.D., FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 3 June 1900. Date of death: 1 January 1979. Specialization: Atmospheric Physics and Meteorology. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  13. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Mathur, Krishna Kumar FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 30 July 1893. Date of death: 18 July 1936. Specialization: Mining. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Associates – 2017. Posted on 30 August 2017. Click here ...

  14. Summer Reserach Fellowships for Students and Teachers–2005

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 12. Summer Reserach Fellowships for Students and Teachers – 2005. Information and Announcements Volume 9 Issue 12 December 2004 pp 86-86. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  15. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Discussion Meetings · Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia. Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1937 Section: Plant Sciences. Randhawa, Mohinder Singh FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 2 February 1909. Date of death: 3 March 1986. Specialization: Horticulture, Floriculture Phycology.

  16. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia. Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Medicine. Tirumurti, Tirunelveli Subbaiyer FNA. Date of birth: 18 November 1885. Date of death: 26 August 1953. Specialization: Hypertension, Liver Cirrhosis. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  17. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Mid Year Meetings · Discussion Meetings · Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia. Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1964 Section: Medicine. Satya Nand, Dev M.B.B.S.. Date of birth: 1 November 1906. Date of death: 28 January 1978. Specialization: Psychiatry and Psychoanalysis.

  18. Fellowship as an Important Factor in Alcoholism Residential Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machell, David F.

    1987-01-01

    Examined client perception of closeness to treatment peers in 200 male adult alcoholics in residential alcoholism treatment program. Found that client-perceived belongingness or fellowship was important factor in successful treatment outcome. Clients with an isolate perception stood much greater chance of early termination of treatment and much…

  19. Program requirements for fellowship education in venous and lymphatic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comerota, Anthony J; Min, Robert J; Rathbun, Suman W; Khilnani, Neil; Rooke, Thom; Wakefield, Thomas W; Carman, Teresa L; Lurie, Fedor; Vedantham, Suresh; Zimmet, Steven E

    2017-08-01

    Background In every field of medicine, comprehensive education should be delivered at the graduate level. Currently, no single specialty routinely provides a standardized comprehensive curriculum in venous and lymphatic disease. Method The American Board of Venous & Lymphatic Medicine formed a task force, made up of experts from the specialties of dermatology, family practice, interventional radiology, interventional cardiology, phlebology, vascular medicine, and vascular surgery, to develop a consensus document describing the program requirements for fellowship medical education in venous and lymphatic medicine. Result The Program Requirements for Fellowship Education in Venous and Lymphatic Medicine identify the knowledge and skills that physicians must master through the course of fellowship training in venous and lymphatic medicine. They also specify the requirements for venous and lymphatic training programs. The document is based on the Core Content for Training in Venous and Lymphatic Medicine and follows the ACGME format that all subspecialties in the United States use to specify the requirements for training program accreditation. The American Board of Venous & Lymphatic Medicine Board of Directors approved this document in May 2016. Conclusion The pathway to a vein practice is diverse, and there is no standardized format available for physician education and training. The Program Requirements for Fellowship Education in Venous and Lymphatic Medicine establishes educational standards for teaching programs in venous and lymphatic medicine and will facilitate graduation of physicians who have had comprehensive training in the field.

  20. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1974 Section: Medicine. Varadarajan, Dr Manakkal Ganesa M.D. (Madras), FAMS, FAIM. Date of birth: 9 November 1917. Date of death: 5 October 2004. Specialization: Radiology Address: 42, Bheemanna Mudali Garden Street, Chennai 600 018. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  1. Constructing a competency-based bariatric surgery fellowship training curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Corrigan L; Rosenthal, Raul J; Brethauer, Stacy; DeMaria, Eric; Kelly, John J; Morton, John M; Lo Menzo, Emanuele; Moore, Rachel; Pomp, Alfons; Nguyen, Ninh T

    2017-03-01

    Bariatric fellowship training after general surgery has historically been time based and competence was determined at completion based on a minimum number of cases during the fellowship. Graduate medical education is moving toward competency-based medical education where learners are evaluated during the course of their training and competence assessment occurs throughout. The Executive Council of the American Society of Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS) at the direction of the American Board of Surgery wanted to transition the bariatric surgery fellowship curriculum from its traditional format to a competency-based curriculum using competency-based medical education principles. The ASMBS Education and Training Committee established a task force of 9 members to create a new curriculum and all of the necessary evaluation tools to support the curriculum, and initiate a pilot program. A competency-based curriculum consisting of 6 modules with cognitive and technical milestones, and the innovative evaluation tools needed to evaluate the learners, was created. A pilot program consisting of 10 programs and 19 fellows has been undertaken for the 2016-2017 academic year. The Education Committee of the ASMBS is leading the charge in curriculum development for competency-based medical education for bariatric fellowship. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1959 Section: Plant Sciences. Rao, Vakkethur Prabhaker D.Sc. (Banaras) 1971-73. Date of birth: 22 August 1910. Date of death: 19 December 1983. Specialization: Entomology and Biological Control. YouTube · Twitter · Facebook · Blog ...

  3. Family Therapy Training in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rait, Douglas Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study describes the current state of family therapy training in a sample of child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship programs. Method: Child and adolescent psychiatry fellows (N = 66) from seven training programs completed a questionnaire assessing demographics, family therapy training experiences, common models of treatment and…

  4. Selective pathology fellowships: diverse, innovative, and valuable subspecialty training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iezzoni, Julia C; Ewton, April; Chévez-Barrios, Patricia; Moore, Stephen; Thorsen, Linda M; Naritoku, Wesley Y

    2014-04-01

    Although selective pathology fellowships have a long-standing history of developing trainees with advanced expertise in specific areas of pathology other than those of the American Board of Pathology-certified subspecialties, the widespread interest in this training continues to grow. To describe the historical background and current status of selective pathology fellowships, and to provide examples of 3 programs. In addition, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited programs and nonaccredited programs in Selective Pathology are compared. ACGME data banks and publicly available online materials were used. Program directors of the fellowships examples in this paper provided program-specific information. Additionally, an online survey of the program directors and program coordinators of ACGME-accredited programs and nonaccredited programs in selective pathology was performed. There are currently 76 ACGME-accredited selective pathology programs. The programs are distributed between 3 major categories: surgical pathology, focused anatomic pathology, and focused clinical pathology. Although the vast majority of programs are concerned that their funding source may be cut in the next 3 years, most programs will not change the number of fellowship positions in their programs. Program requirements devoted specifically and solely to selective pathology have been developed and are in effect. The value of this training is recognized not only by pathologists, but by clinicians as well, in both academia and private practice. Importantly, the diversity and innovation inherent in selective pathology allow these programs to adeptly address new subspecialty areas and technologic advances in the current and evolving practice of pathology.

  5. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1975 Section: Medicine. Ganatra, Dr Ramanik Dhirajlal M.B.B.S. (Bombay). Date of birth: 14 October 1928. Date of death: 2 April 1999. Specialization: Nuclear Medicine Last known address: 604, Kamala Apartments, 8A, Dhobi Galli, Versova Road, Andheri, Bombay 400 058.

  6. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Plant Sciences. Singh, Bhola Nath D.Sc. (London), FNA. Date of birth: 22 September 1898. Date of death: 7 June 1984. Specialization: Plant Physiology, Agronomy. YouTube · Twitter · Facebook · Blog ...

  7. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1935 Section: Plant Sciences. Shri Ranjan, FNA 1943-61. Date of birth: 16 August 1899. Date of death: 8 July 1969. Specialization: Plant Physiology. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Introducing: Summer Schools. Posted on 21 December 2017.

  8. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1975 Section: Animal Sciences. Prasad, Dr Malur Ramaswamyiyengar Narasimha Ph.D. (Mysore and Wisconsin), FNA 1977-79. Date of birth: 1 May 1923. Date of death: 7 October 1987. Specialization: Endocrinology and Physiology of Reproduction. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  9. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1958 Section: Animal Sciences. Prasad, Dr Ramavarma Raghu Ph.D. (Stanford), FNASc. Date of birth: 17 December 1920. Date of death: 20 July 1994. Specialization: Biological Oceanography and Fisheries Address: Ground Floor Flat, Saigeeth Apartments, 21, Thirumurthy Street, ...

  10. Trends in U.S. Pediatric Otolaryngology Fellowship Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinel, Ali; Poley, Marian; Zalzal, George H; Chan, Kenny; Preciado, Diego

    2015-10-01

    Interest in pediatric otolaryngology fellowship training is growing. The workforce implications of this growing interest are unclear and understudied. To analyze trends in pediatric otolaryngology training, determine where fellows who graduated over the past 10 years are currently practicing, and test the hypothesis that graduates from Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)–accredited programs were more likely to have academic tertiary positions with faculty appointments. We conducted a web-based analysis of pediatric otolaryngology fellowship graduates. The names of all 274 applicants who were matched to pediatric otolaryngology fellowships from May 31, 2003, to May 31, 2014, were obtained from the SF Match website. Accreditation status of each program for each match year was obtained from the ACGME website. We then performed an Internet search for the current practice location of each matched applicant. Analysis was conducted from January 1, 2015, to May 1, 2015. Practice setting per year of fellowship match and accreditation status of program. For the 2003 to the 2014 match years, there was an increase from 5 to 22 accredited pediatric otolaryngology fellowship programs overall; simultaneously, the number of yearly matched applicants increased from 14 to 35. More graduates with ACGME accreditation practice at academic settings compared with graduates without ACGME accreditation although the difference was not statistically significant (67.1% vs. 50.7%; P = .15). Graduates from accredited programs, however, were significantly more likely to practice at a hospital-based setting compared with those from nonaccredited programs (81.7% vs. 65.5%; P = .003). Fellows trained in the last 10 years are relatively well distributed across the country. The number of pediatric otolaryngology fellowship applicants as well as total number of matched applicants and ACGME-accredited positions has risen in the last 10 years. It appears that a higher

  11. Charged Particle Monitor on the AstroSat Mission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Mumbai 400 005, India. Inter University Centre for Astronomy & Astrophysics, Pune 411 007, India. Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw 00-716, Poland. Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Thiruvananthapuram 695 022, India. Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad 380 009, ...

  12. Anesthesiology critical care medicine: a fellowship and faculty recruitment program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Steven H; Long, Timothy R; Kor, Daryl J; Onigkeit, James A; Brown, Daniel R

    2011-06-01

    To review national data on anesthesiology critical care medicine (ACCM) fellowship program enrollment and to describe a program that successfully recruited ACCM fellows and faculty at a single academic medical center. An incentive program known as the Mayo Clinic Scholar program, designed to recruit ACCM fellows and faculty, was reviewed. Interviews were conducted to assess the impact of the Mayo Clinic Scholar program. Academic health center. ACCM fellowship program enrollment data were compared with similar data for critical care medicine fellowship programs in internal medicine, pulmonary medicine, pediatrics, and surgery.The results of a program to recruit ACCM fellows and faculty were reviewed. Only 89 of 147 (60.5%) ACCM fellowship positions available nationally were filled during the 2010-2011 academic year, and only 89 of the 896 (9.9%) critical care medicine fellows anticipated to graduate in 2011 were in ACCM programs. The Mayo Clinic ACCM fellowship enrolled 28 fellows from January 1, 2000 through July 1, 2010 (range 0-6 per yr). Ten of the 28 (35.7%) were United States medical graduates (USMGs) and 6 of the 10 (60.0%) USMGs who were graduates of the Mayo Clinic residency were appointed as Mayo Clinic Scholars. All 6 Mayo Clinic Scholars were retained as ACCM faculty. Only two of the 6 (33.3%) Mayo Clinic Scholars would have completed ACCM training without a Mayo Clinic Scholar appointment. All recommend ACCM training to others and plan to continue to practice ACCM. The Mayo Clinic Scholar program effectively recruited ACCM fellows and faculty in a single institution. Incentive-based programs should be considered to support the involvement of anesthesiologists in perioperative medicine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Astro4Girls and Their Families: Sharing Science via Public Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, M.; Smith, D.; Eisenhamer, B.; Ryer, H.; Dussault, M.; Braswell, E.; Cominsky, L.; Apple, N.; Della, T.; Whiffen, P.; Harman, P.; Mitchell, S.; Eyermann, S.; Brandehoff, S.; Dominiak, J.

    2013-04-01

    The “Astro4Girls and Their Families” pilot program offered a variety of informal science events at nine public libraries nationwide in conjunction with Women's History Month (March) 2012. The goals were to engage girls and their families in science, by helping them discover the Universe for themselves and celebrating the contribution of women to astronomy and science. We offered a wide range of activities, from using robotic telescopes for “Do-It-Yourself (DIY) astrophotography” to making edible black holes, to exploring the infrared Universe. Our main target audience was middle-school aged girls, but students of all ages, their families and the public were welcome to participate in many of the activities. Five NASA Science Mission Directorate-funded Astrophysics Education and Public Outreach teams partnered with public libraries in this pilot program; each worked with 1 or 2 libraries to offer a total of about 15 events reaching over 300 people in both urban and rural areas. The American Library Association Public Programs Office identified participating libraries and facilitated their participation through its role in the SMD-funded “Visions of the Universe: Four Centuries of Discovery” traveling exhibit. The NASA Astrophysics Science Education and Public Outreach Forum coordinated the collaboration. The website is: http://www.ala.org/programming/astro4girls. This poster outlines the details of planning and implementing the 2012 pilot program, its successes, and lessons learned. The collaborators would like to engage the EPO community in a discussion of how to sustain Astro4Girls and engage additional public libraries nationwide during future Women's History Months.

  14. AstroCloud: An Agile platform for data visualization and specific analyzes in 2D and 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, F. Z.; Salgado, R.; Bergel, A.; Infante, A.

    2017-07-01

    Nowadays, astronomers commonly run their own tools, or distributed computational packages, for data analysis and then visualizing the results with generic applications. This chain of processes comes at high cost: (a) analyses are manually applied, they are therefore difficult to be automatized, and (b) data have to be serialized, thus increasing the cost of parsing and saving intermediary data. We are developing AstroCloud, an agile visualization multipurpose platform intended for specific analyses of astronomical images (https://astrocloudy.wordpress.com). This platform incorporates domain-specific languages which make it easily extensible. AstroCloud supports customized plug-ins, which translate into time reduction on data analysis. Moreover, it also supports 2D and 3D rendering, including interactive features in real time. AstroCloud is under development, we are currently implementing different choices for data reduction and physical analyzes.

  15. Teaching Your First Astro 101 Course: What They Don't Tell You

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruning, D.

    2014-07-01

    Designing your Astro 101 course should not be about what topics you can omit but should be a thoughtful process that regards your fundamental teaching goals and which topics and skills promote those goals. Establishing goals and assessments that lead to measurable student outcomes enable one to more constructively design a learning experience for students. Just as any good novel has multiple story lines that weave throughout the book, your course has several narratives that wind through different topics and help to tie goals together. Sharing this underlying organizational structure of your course with students helps them to connect ideas and be more successful.

  16. International Outreach: What Is the Responsibility of ASTRO and the Major International Radiation Oncology Societies?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayr, Nina A., E-mail: ninamayr@uw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Hu, Kenneth S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Viswanathan, Akila N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wall, Terry J. [St. Luke' s Cancer Institute, Kansas City, Missouri (United States); Amendola, Beatriz E. [Innovative Cancer Institute, Miami, Florida (United States); Calaguas, Miriam J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke' s Medical Center, Quezon City (Philippines); Palta, Jatinder R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Yue, Ning J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Rengan, Ramesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Williams, Timothy R. [Lynn Cancer Institute, Boca Raton Regional Hospital, Boca Raton, Florida (United States)

    2014-07-01

    In this era of globalization and rapid advances in radiation oncology worldwide, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) is committed to help decrease profound regional disparities through the work of the International Education Subcommittee (IES). The IES has expanded its base, reach, and activities to foster educational advances through a variety of educational methods with broad scope, in addition to committing to the advancement of radiation oncology care for cancer patients around the world, through close collaboration with our sister radiation oncology societies and other educational, governmental, and organizational groups.

  17. An astro-comb calibrated solar telescope to search for the radial velocity signature of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, David F.; Glenday, Alex G.; Dumusque, Xavier; Buchschacher, Nicolas; Cameron, Andrew Collier; Cecconi, Massimo; Charbonneau, David; Cosentino, Rosario; Ghedina, Adriano; Haywood, Raphäelle; Latham, David W.; Li, Chih-Hao; Lodi, Marcello; Lovis, Christophe; Molinari, Emilio; Pepe, Francesco; Sasselov, Dimitar; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Udry, Stephane; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2016-07-01

    We recently demonstrated sub-m/s sensitivity in measuring the radial velocity (RV) between the Earth and Sun using a simple solar telescope feeding the HARPS-N spectrograph at the Italian National Telescope, which is calibrated with a green astro-comb. We are using the solar telescope to characterize the effects of stellar (solar) RV jitter due to activity on the solar surface with the goal of detecting the solar RV signal from Venus, thereby demonstrating the sensitivity of these instruments to detect true Earth-twin exoplanets.

  18. International outreach: what is the responsibility of ASTRO and the major international radiation oncology societies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Nina A; Hu, Kenneth S; Liao, Zhongxing; Viswanathan, Akila N; Wall, Terry J; Amendola, Beatriz E; Calaguas, Miriam J; Palta, Jatinder R; Yue, Ning J; Rengan, Ramesh; Williams, Timothy R

    2014-07-01

    In this era of globalization and rapid advances in radiation oncology worldwide, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) is committed to help decrease profound regional disparities through the work of the International Education Subcommittee (IES). The IES has expanded its base, reach, and activities to foster educational advances through a variety of educational methods with broad scope, in addition to committing to the advancement of radiation oncology care for cancer patients around the world, through close collaboration with our sister radiation oncology societies and other educational, governmental, and organizational groups. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Estudio de caso: estrategias internacionales aplicadas a la empresa Astro Maquinaria Ltda.

    OpenAIRE

    Araujo Peñate, Ana Maria; Piza Mora, Juan David; Velasco Zamora, Maria Ximena

    2013-01-01

    En el estudio de caso se podrá encontrar información relacionada a la empresa ASTRO MAQUINARIA Ltda. la cual lleva más de 20 años en el mercado, generando soluciones a las necesidades de maquinaria y equipos, especialmente en el área de bombeo. Desde el principio la empresa ha estado importando desde Estados Unidos el portafolio de productos que ofrecen, actualmente tienen la representación comercial de la empresa Pentair Pump Group. Este estudio de caso pretende identificar cual es la estrat...

  20. Soft X-ray Focusing Telescope Aboard AstroSat: Design, Characteristics and Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, K; Stewart, G.; Westergaard, Niels Jørgen Stenfeldt

    2017-01-01

    medium resolution X-ray spectroscopy of cosmic X-ray sources of various types. It is the most sensitive X-ray instrument aboard the AstroSat. In its first year of operation, SXT has been used to observe objects ranging from active stars, compact binaries, supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei...... and clusters of galaxies in order to study its performance and quantify its characteriztics. Here, we present an overview of its design, mechanical hardware, electronics, data modes, observational constraints, pipeline processing and its in-orbit performance based on preliminary results from its...

  1. Barriers and facilitators to implementing addiction medicine fellowships: a qualitative study with fellows, medical students, residents and preceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimas, J; Small, W; Ahamad, K; Cullen, W; Mead, A; Rieb, L; Wood, E; McNeil, R

    2017-09-20

    Although progress in science has driven advances in addiction medicine, this subject has not been adequately taught to medical trainees and physicians. As a result, there has been poor integration of evidence-based practices in addiction medicine into physician training which has impeded addiction treatment and care. Recently, a number of training initiatives have emerged internationally, including the addiction medicine fellowships in Vancouver, Canada. This study was undertaken to examine barriers and facilitators of implementing addiction medicine fellowships. We interviewed trainees and faculty from clinical and research training programmes in addiction medicine at St Paul's Hospital in Vancouver, Canada (N = 26) about barriers and facilitators to implementation of physician training in addiction medicine. We included medical students, residents, fellows and supervising physicians from a variety of specialities. We analysed interview transcripts thematically by using NVivo software. We identified six domains relating to training implementation: (1) organisational, (2) structural, (3) teacher, (4) learner, (5) patient and (6) community related variables either hindered or fostered addiction medicine education, depending on context. Human resources, variety of rotations, peer support and mentoring fostered implementation of addiction training. Money, time and space limitations hindered implementation. Participant accounts underscored how faculty and staff facilitated the implementation of both the clinical and the research training. Implementation of addiction medicine fellowships appears feasible, although a number of barriers exist. Research into factors within the local/practice environment that shape delivery of education to ensure consistent and quality education scale-up is a priority.

  2. Report on the American Association of Medical Physics Undergraduate Fellowship Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilowitz, Jennifer B; Avery, Stephen; Gueye, Paul; Sandison, George A

    2013-01-07

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) sponsors two summer undergraduate research programs to attract top performing undergraduate students into graduate studies in medical physics: the Summer Undergraduate Fellowship Program (SUFP) and the Minority Undergraduate Summer Experience (MUSE). Undergraduate research experience (URE) is an effective tool to encourage students to pursue graduate degrees. The SUFP and MUSE are the only medical physics URE programs. From 2001 to 2012, 148 fellowships have been awarded and a total of $608,000 has been dispersed to fellows. This paper reports on the history, participation, and status of the programs. A review of surveys of past fellows is presented. Overall, the fellows and mentors are very satisfied with the program. The efficacy of the programs is assessed by four metrics: entry into a medical physics graduate program, board certification, publications, and AAPM involvement. Sixty-five percent of past fellow respondents decided to pursue a graduate degree in medical physics as a result of their participation in the program. Seventy percent of respondents are currently involved in some educational or professional aspect of medical physics. Suggestions for future enhancements to better track and maintain contact with past fellows, expand funding sources, and potentially combine the programs are presented.

  3. The impact of the NASA Administrator's Fellowship Program on fellows' career choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Eva M.

    Maintaining diversity in the technical workforce and in higher education has been identified as one way to increase the outreach, recruitment and retention of students and other faculty from underrepresented, underserved and minority populations, especially in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) courses of study and careers. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Administrator's Fellowship Program (NAFP) is a professional development program targeting faculty at Minority Serving Institutions and NASA civil servant employees for a two year work-based professional development experience toward increasing the likelihood of retaining them in STEM careers and supporting the recruitment and retention of minority students in STEM courses of study. This evaluation links the activities of the fellowship program to the impact on fellows' career choices as a result of participation through a series of surveys and interviews. Fellows' personal and professional perceptions of themselves and colleagues' and administrators' beliefs about their professional capabilities as a result of selection and participation were also addressed as they related to career outcomes. The findings indicated that while there was no direct impact on fellows' choice of careers, the exposure, direction and focus offered through travel, mentoring, research and teaching had an impact their perceptions of their own capabilities and, their colleagues' and administrators' beliefs about them as professionals and researchers. The career outcomes reported were an increase in the number publications, promotions, change in career and an increased awareness of the culture of science and engineering.

  4. NASA/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, John H. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives of the program are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center.

  5. Starstuff.org - an astro-ph for the public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, J.; Howell, D. A.; Smith, D.

    2000-12-01

    Results are presented from the first months of operation of starstuff.org - the online community bringing together astronomers and the public. This site publishes popular level articles about astronomy written and edited by astronomers. This ensures accuracy and allows astronomers to explain topics in detail that might not be considered newsworthy by journalists. The public can find out the latest astronomical news directly from the people doing the research. Articles are easy to write using the site's automated tools. One simply types text in a form and selects a picture from the library (or uploads one). The picture is resampled and resized, the HTML is generated, and the page is automatically laid out and cross indexed. Once approved by an editor it is published to the web with a click of a button. A daily survey allows astronomers to determine what the public finds exciting. A talkback feature allows readers to comment on articles, ask questions, and even rate the articles. Astronomers, teachers, and science writers are encouraged to communicate their excitement and share their knowledge about astronomy with the rest of the world by contributing an article today. Over 100 articles about recent astronomical discoveries and general astronomical topics have reached an audience of thousands to date. Starstuff.org is partially funded by an IDEAS grant.

  6. Results From Penn State's Interactive, On-line, Scifi Version Of Astro 001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Christopher; Charlton, J. C.; Herrmann, K.; Narayanan, A.; Tr'Ehnl, N.

    2007-12-01

    We present results from a new, fully on-line astronomy course for undergraduate non-science majors at Penn State that was offered for the first time in Spring 2007 to 422 enrolled students. The entire course content is conveyed through an interactive story, capitalizing on the many multimedia astronomy resources publicly available on the Internet. The four units of the course (Basic Astronomy and the Nighttime Sky, Our Solar System, Stars and the Milky Way Galaxy, and Extragalactic Astronomy and Cosmology) deliver the same content as a traditional Astro 001 course. Each unit follows the educational adventure of a different fictional Astro 001 student who has been "abducted" by aliens. The four units are united by a character, the Riddler, who poses riddles about various aspects of astronomy, and whose identity and purpose is revealed gradually as a reward for completion of various subtopics. The initial Spring offering of the course was entirely web-based except for traditional evening in-class exams. We were very successful: it was popular with the students, the exam grades were about 10% higher than usual, and enrollments in Fall 2007 (more than 700 students) and Spring 2008 (almost 200 pre-enrolled to date) are strong. Future plans are underway to broaden the audience to students attending other Penn State campuses and perhaps to adapt the course for presentation as an astronomy unit to middle or high school students. We gratefully acknowledge funding from STScI IDEAS grant HST-ED-90284-01-A

  7. Early In-orbit Performance of Scanning Sky Monitor Onboard AstroSat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadevi, M. C.; Ravishankar, B. T.; Sitaramamurthy, N.; Meena, G.; Singh, Brajpal; Jain, Anand; Yadav, Reena; Agarwal, Anil; Babu, V. Chandra; Kumar; Kushwaha, Ankur; Vaishali, S.; Iyer, Nirmal Kumar; Nandi, Anuj; Girish, V.; Agarwal, Vivek Kumar; Seetha, S.; Bhattacharya, Dipankar; Balaji, K.; Kumar, Manoj; Kulshresta, Prashanth

    2017-06-01

    We report the in-orbit performance of Scanning Sky Monitor (SSM) onboard AstroSat. The SSM operates in the energy range 2.5 to 10 keV and scans the sky to detect and locate transient X-ray sources. This information of any interesting phenomenon in the X-ray sky as observed by SSM is provided to the astronomical community for follow-up observations. Following the launch of AstroSat on 28th September, 2015, SSM was commissioned on October 12th, 2015. The first power ON of the instrument was with the standard X-ray source, Crab in the field-of-view. The first orbit data revealed the basic expected performance of one of the detectors of SSM, SSM1. Following this in the subsequent orbits, the other detectors were also powered ON to find them perform in good health. Quick checks of the data from the first few orbits revealed that the instrument performed with the expected angular resolution of 12' × 2.5° and effective area in the energy range of interest. This paper discusses the instrument aspects along with few on-board results immediately after power ON.

  8. The Quantitative Reasoning for College Science (QuaRCS) Assessment in non-Astro 101 Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkman, Thomas W.; Jensen, Ellen

    2016-06-01

    The innumeracy of American students and adults is a much lamented educational problem. The quantitative reasoning skills of college students may be particularly addressed and improved in "general education" science courses like Astro 101. Demonstrating improvement requires a standardized instrument. Among the non-proprietary instruments the Quantitative Literacy and Reasoning Assessment[1] (QRLA) and the Quantitative Reasoning for College Science (QuaRCS) Assessment[2] stand out.Follette et al. developed the QuaRCS in the context of Astro 101 at University of Arizona. We report on QuaRCS results in different contexts: pre-med physics and pre-nursing microbiology at a liberal arts college. We report on the mismatch between students' contemporaneous report of a question's difficulty and the actual probability of success. We report correlations between QuaRCS and other assessments of overall student performance in the class. We report differences in attitude towards mathematics in these two different but health-related student populations .[1] QLRA, Gaze et al., 2014, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5038/1936-4660.7.2.4[2] QuaRCS, Follette, et al., 2015, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5038/1936-4660.8.2.2

  9. 50 Years of the Astro-Science Workshop at the Adler Planetarium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammergren, Mark; Martynowycz, M. W.; Ratliff, G.

    2014-01-01

    Since 1964, the Adler Planetarium has hosted a program for highly motivated and interested high-school students known as the Astro-Science Workshop (ASW). Created in response to the national “call to arms” for improved science education following the stunning launch of Sputnik, ASW was originally conducted as an extracurricular astronomy class on Saturday mornings throughout the school year, for many years under the leadership of Northwestern University professor J. Allen Hynek. A gradual decline in student interest in the 1990’s led to a redesign of ASW as a summer program featuring hands-on, student-driven investigation and experimentation. Since 2002, ASW has been organized and taught by graduate student “scientist-educators” and funded through a series of grants from the NSF. For the past seven years, students have designed, built, and flown experiments on helium balloons to altitudes of around 30 km (100,000 feet). Here, as we enter its 50th anniversary, we present the history of the Astro-Science Workshop, its context among the small but still vibrant community of post-Sputnik science enrichment programs, and its rich legacy of inspiring generations of astronomers and other explorers.

  10. Re-excision rates after breast conserving surgery following the 2014 SSO-ASTRO guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heelan Gladden, Alicia A; Sams, Sharon; Gleisner, Ana; Finlayson, Christina; Kounalakis, Nicole; Hosokawa, Patrick; Brown, Regina; Chong, Tae; Mathes, David; Murphy, Colleen

    2017-12-01

    In 2014, SSO-ASTRO published guidelines which recommended "no ink on tumor" as adequate margins for patients undergoing breast conservation for invasive breast cancer. In 2016, new SSO-ASTRO-ASCO guidelines recommended 2 mm margins for DCIS. We evaluated whether these guidelines affected re-excision rates at our institution. Patients treated with breast conservation surgery from January 1, 2010-March 1, 2016 were identified. Re-excision rates, tumor characteristics, and presence of residual disease were recorded. The 2016 guidelines were retrospectively applied to the same cohort and expected re-excision rates calculated. Re-excision rates did not significantly decline before and after 2014 guideline adoption (11.9% before, 10.9% after; p = 0.65) or when the 2016 guidelines were retrospectively applied (8.4%; p = 0.10). The 2014 and 2016 guidelines had minimal impact on our re-excision rates, as most re-excisions were done for DCIS and 2016 guidelines supported our prior institutional practices of 2 mm margins for these patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. ASTRO-FOLD 2.0: an Enhanced Framework for Protein Structure Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramani, A; Wei, Y; Floudas, C A

    2012-05-01

    The three-dimensional (3-D) structure prediction of proteins, given their amino acid sequence, is addressed using the first principles-based approach ASTRO-FOLD 2.0. The key features presented are: (1) Secondary structure prediction using a novel optimization-based consensus approach, (2) β-sheet topology prediction using mixed-integer linear optimization (MILP), (3) Residue-to-residue contact prediction using a high-resolution distance-dependent force field and MILP formulation, (4) Tight dihedral angle and distance bound generation for loop residues using dihedral angle clustering and non-linear optimization (NLP), (5) 3-D structure prediction using deterministic global optimization, stochastic conformational space annealing, and the full-atomistic ECEPP/3 potential, (6) Near-native structure selection using a traveling salesman problem-based clustering approach, ICON, and (7) Improved bound generation using chemical shifts of subsets of heavy atoms, generated by SPARTA and CS23D. Computational results of ASTRO-FOLD 2.0 on 47 blind targets of the recently concluded CASP9 experiment are presented.

  12. Seven-Year Outcomes Following Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Stratified by ASTRO Consensus Groupings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawad, Maha S; Shah, Chirag; Wilkinson, J Ben; Wallace, Michelle; Mitchell, Christina K; Wobb, Jessica; Gustafson, Gregory S; Brabbins, Donald S; Grills, Inga S; Chen, Peter Y

    2017-10-01

    Limited long-term data exist regarding outcomes for patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI), particularly, when stratified by American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Consensus Statement (CS) risk groups. The purpose of this analysis is to present 5- and 7-year outcomes following APBI based on CS groupings. A total of 690 patients with early-stage breast cancer underwent APBI from 1993 to 2012, receiving interstitial brachytherapy (n=195), balloon-based brachytherapy (n=290), or 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (n=205) at a single institution. Patients were stratified into suitable, cautionary, and unsuitable groups with 5-year outcomes analyzed. Seven-year outcomes were analyzed for a subset with follow-up of ≥2 years (n=625). Median follow-up was 6.7 years (range, 0.1 to 20.1 y). Patients assigned to cautionary and unsuitable categories were more likely to have high-grade tumors (21% to 25% vs. 9%, P=0.001), receive chemotherapy (15% to 38% vs. 6%, PASTRO CS groupings. Modest increases in distant recurrence were noted in the cautionary and unsuitable groups. These findings suggest that the ASTRO CS groupings stratify more for systemic recurrence and may not appropriately select patients for whole versus partial breast irradiation.

  13. Development of the ASTRO-H Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT): Engineering Model Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okajima, Takashi; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Soong, Y.

    2011-01-01

    The X-ray astronomy satellite ASTRO-H, being developed under the collaboration among JAXA, NASA's GSFC and ESA, will have two Soft X-ray Telescopes (SXTs), among other instuments onboard, with a sensitive energy band below 12 keV. One is for an X-ray micorocalorimeter detector and the other for a X-ray CCD detector. The SXT uses a conically approximated Wolter I grazing incidence optic implemented by thin aluminum foil substrates with thickness of 0.152, 0.229, and 0.305 mm. It is similar to the Suzaku XRT, but with larger diameter (45 cm) and longer focal length (5.6 m). Goal of the angular resolution and effective area are 1 arcmin and 390 cm$A2$ at 6 keV, respectively. We made serveral improvements from Suzaku to ASTRO-H, such as thicker substrates, more forming mandrels, thinner epoxy layer for replication, stiffer housings, precise alignment bars, etc. With all these changes, we have fabricated the engineering test unit of the SXT. In this paper, we will discuss all the changes made, their effects, and report X-ray performance of the SXT test unit. An angular resolution of the test unit was measured at new Goddard X-ray calibration facility (100 m X-ray beamline) and was found to be 1.1 arcmin. We will also discuss further improvements toward the flight unit to be delivered to JAXA in 2012.

  14. Development of "Course Components" for Astro 101 Lectures, Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stage, M. D.; Schneider, S. E.

    2005-12-01

    An estimated quarter-million students take introductory astronomy each year (Fraknoi, A.E.R., 2001). The range in the resources, experience, and interest level of the faculty charged with teaching these classes may be as wide as the range of the science backgrounds of the students. Since each instructor applies his own selection bias as to which topics are key, innovations in astronomical lecturing must be modular and ideally previously vetted if they are to be adopted. Specifically geared to improving learning within the lecture, we present course "components": units which we have pre-tested in the large UMass introductory classes of 300 students. The design is such that a highly experienced professor might use just one for a good new way to cover a single problem topic, or a new professor might incorporate a large number working up a course for the first time. There is no single recipe for "components"; they are developed to suit the particular educational needs of each topic. One might be as simple as a single element of a lecture, or as complex as a 300 student interactive survey, a physical or software demonstration, an instant, in-class assessment via an class-response system (e.g. one of Mazur's "ConcepTests"), and a written or online homework problem. We will show some example components on distance and size scales, mathematics in astronomy, and the properties of supernovae. As this project is ongoing, we are most interested to hear from instructors their perceptions of the topics most difficult to teach, most in need of better demonstrations, and most prone to misconceptions, to help focus our future research ("Part 2").

  15. STS-Astro: Astronomy in the focus of Science, Technology and Society and Case Study in Education Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, O. R.

    2014-02-01

    The dissertation addresses the focus of Astronomy in Science, Technology and Society [STS}, which the author calls the STS-Astro. Observes the International Year of the Astronomy 2009 [IYA 2009] as one of the greatest experiences STS worldwide, causing unprecedented integration between science, technology and humanities, with positive impacts in many sectors of society and are still worthy of study, specially in Brazil due to the implementation of the International Year of Astronomy, Brazil 2009 [IYABrazil-2009}. Astronomy is also investigated in the area of Education, based mainly on theoretical aspects of educational socio-interacionist of Lev Semenovich Vygotsky (Vygotsky, 1991, 2008 and 2012, p. 103-117) and socio-historical cultural of Paulo Reglus Neves Freire (1979, 1982 and 1996), but when necessary and still keeping the field of constructivism, properly taking advantage of the interactionism and transdisciplinarity of Jean William Fritz Piaget (1983). Concerning Distance Education [DE], it is noted significant growth at the graduate and postgraduate courses. New challenges arise, with the establishment of an increasingly accustomed to Information and Communication Technologies [ICT] and the teaching methodologies to be used and developed, with Astronomy becoming an important instrument in the teaching-learning process associated technologies. Using the methodology of action research, we proceeded with a case study involving 26 students of the discipline of Astronomy Topics applied to Education, between November 1 and December 17, 2012, of the postgraduation courses in Distance Education at the Universidade Cruzeiro do Sul [Southern Cross University]. The results obtained permit statistical surveys therefore quantitative, but also qualitative information about the teaching-learning Astronomy by DE. Analyses of performance and progress of each student and set permit a finding interaction among those involved in the mediation of the teacher-tutor who, in turn

  16. The 2016 American Orthopaedic Association-Japanese Orthopaedic Association Traveling Fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Sumon; Cho, Samuel K; Freedman, Brett A; Firoozabadi, Reza

    2017-06-07

    The American Orthopaedic Association-Japanese Orthopaedic Association (AOA-JOA) Traveling Fellowship, which began in 1992 as a collaborative effort between the 2 orthopaedic communities, is aimed at fostering leadership among early-career surgeons through clinical, academic, and cultural exchange. Over 3 weeks, we experienced an extraordinary journey that led us across nearly 800 miles of the picturesque Japanese countryside, with stops at 6 distinguished academic centers. The opportunity to become personally acquainted with orthopaedic leaders in Japan, learn from their experiences, and immerse ourselves in the ancient and storied culture of a beautiful country was one that we will not soon forget. Along the way, we accumulated a wealth of information while enjoying the legendary hospitality of the Japanese people. There is a ubiquitous challenge in delivering cost-effective, accessible health care while maintaining a commitment to education and research. The U.S. orthopaedic community may take solace in the fact that our Japanese colleagues stand with us as partners in this pursuit, and our relationship with them continues to grow stronger through endeavors such as the AOA-JOA Traveling Fellowship. We look forward to honoring our Japanese colleagues in 2017 when we host them in the United States.

  17. [Salvage radiotherapy for patients with PSA relapse after radical prostatectomy: comparisons among ASTRO and Phoenix biochemical failure definitions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quero, L; Mongiat-Artus, P; Ravery, V; Hennequin, V; Maylin, C; Desgrandchamps, F; Hennequin, C

    2009-07-01

    Study about the efficacy of salvage radiotherapy (RT), in terms of biochemical disease free survival (bDFS), according to ASTRO and Phoenix (nadir+2) definitions, for persistent or rising PSA after radical prostatectomy. Retrospective analysis of 59 patients who underwent RT between 1990 and 2003 for PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Patients received a median of 66Gy to the prostate bed with 3D or 2D RT. The main end point was bDFS according to ASTRO and Phoenix (nadir+2) definitions. Different criterion sets were analysed to calculate bDFS and pretreatment factors that might predict biochemical relapse were sought for each. After a 38-month median follow-up, the 3-year bDFS rates were: 60 and 72% for ASTRO and Phoenix (nadir+2 ng/ml) definitions respectively. According to univariate analysis, pre-RT PSA> or =1 ng/ml and seminal vesicle involvement were associated with biochemical relapse. Multivariate analysis retained only pre-RT PSA> or =1 ng/ml as an independent predictor of biochemical relapse for the two definitions. Salvage RT is an effective treatment after radical prostatectomy according to ASTRO or Phoenix definitions. Only pre-RT PSA> or =1 ng/ml predicted relapse.

  18. Robotic surgery in gynecologic oncology: impact on fellowship training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, Anna V; Morgan, Jacqueline M; Lurain, John R; Buttin, Barbara M; Singh, Diljeet K; Schink, Julian C; Lowe, M Patrick

    2009-08-01

    To report the impact of a new robotic surgery program on the surgical training of gynecologic oncology fellows over a 12 month period of time. A robotic surgery program was introduced into the gynecologic oncology fellowship program at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in June 2007. A database of patients undergoing surgical management of endometrial and cervical cancer between July 2007 and July 2008 was collected and analyzed. Changes in fellow surgical training were measured and analyzed. Fellow surgical training for endometrial and cervical cancer underwent a dramatic transition in 12 months. The proportion of patients undergoing minimally invasive surgery increased from 3.3% (4/110 patients) to 43.5% (47/108 patients). Fellow training transitioned from primarily an open approach (94.4%) to a minimally invasive approach (11% laparoscopic, 49% robotic, 40% open) for endometrial cancer stagings, and from an open approach (100%) to an open (50%) and robotic (50%) approach for radical hysterectomies. Fellow participation in robotic procedures increased from 45% in the first 3 months to 72% within 6 months, and 92% by 12 months. The role of the fellow in robotic cases transitioned from bedside assistant to console operator within 3 months. Fellow surgical training underwent a dramatic change with the introduction of a robotic surgery program. The management of endometrial and cervical cancer was impacted the most by robotics. Robotic surgery broadened fellowship surgical training, but balanced surgical training and standardized fellow training modules remain challenges for fellowship programs.

  19. Assessing cultural competency skills in gastroenterology fellowship training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzora, Sophie; Abiri, Benjamin; Wang, Xiao-Jing; McKeever, James; Poles, Michael; Zabar, Sondra; Gillespie, Colleen; Weinshel, Elizabeth

    2015-02-14

    To assess and teach cultural competency skills at the fellowship training level through the use of objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs). We revised four scenarios to infuse a specific focus on cross-cultural care, and to render them appropriate for gastroenterology fellows. Three are discussed here: (1) Poor Health Literacy; (2) Disclosing/Apologizing for a Complication to a Patient Who Mistrusts the Healthcare System; and (3) Breaking Bad News to a Fatalistic Patient. A fourth case emphasizing shared decision-making will be described elsewhere. Four stations were completed by fellows and observed live by four faculty members, and the fellows' performance was assessed. Eleven fellows from four programs participated in the four OSCE. In the "Poor Health Literacy" case, 18% (2/11) of participants recognized that the standardized patient (SP) had below-basic health literacy. None successfully evaluated the SP's reading skills in a culturally-sensitive manner. In "Disclosing/Apologizing for a Complication", 4/11 (36%) personally apologized for the complication. 1/11 recognized the SP's mistrust of the medical system. With "Breaking Bad News", 27% (3/11) explored the patient's values to identify her fatalistic beliefs. OSCEs can be used to assess deficiencies in culturally-competent care at the fellowship level. OSCEs also afford fellowships the opportunity to inform future training curricula.

  20. NASA/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1985. [Space Stations and Their Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilton, R. G. (Editor); Williams, C. E. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The 1985 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Research Program was conducted by Texas A&M University and the Johnson Space Center. The ten week program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). The faculty fellows spent the time at JSC engaged in research projects commensurate with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with NASA/JSC colleagues. This document is a compilation of the final reports of their research during the summer of 1985.

  1. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) summer faculty fellowship program, 1986, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcinnis, Bayliss (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston. The basic objectives of the program are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching objectives of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. Each faculty fellow spent ten weeks at JSC engaged in a research project commensurate with his interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. Volume 1 contains sections 1 through 14.

  2. Pathology informatics fellowship retreats: The use of interactive scenarios and case studies as pathology informatics teaching tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Roy E.; McClintock, David S.; Balis, Ulysses J.; Baron, Jason M.; Becich, Michael J.; Beckwith, Bruce A.; Brodsky, Victor B.; Carter, Alexis B.; Dighe, Anand S.; Haghighi, Mehrvash; Hipp, Jason D.; Henricks, Walter H.; Kim, Jiyeon Y.; Klepseis, Veronica E.; Kuo, Frank C.; Lane, William J.; Levy, Bruce P.; Onozato, Maristela L.; Park, Seung L.; Sinard, John H.; Tuthill, Mark J.; Gilbertson, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Last year, our pathology informatics fellowship added informatics-based interactive case studies to its existing educational platform of operational and research rotations, clinical conferences, a common core curriculum with an accompanying didactic course, and national meetings. Methods: The structure of the informatics case studies was based on the traditional business school case study format. Three different formats were used, varying in length from short, 15-minute scenarios to more formal multiple hour-long case studies. Case studies were presented over the course of three retreats (Fall 2011, Winter 2012, and Spring 2012) and involved both local and visiting faculty and fellows. Results: Both faculty and fellows found the case studies and the retreats educational, valuable, and enjoyable. From this positive feedback, we plan to incorporate the retreats in future academic years as an educational component of our fellowship program. Conclusions: Interactive case studies appear to be valuable in teaching several aspects of pathology informatics that are difficult to teach in more traditional venues (rotations and didactic class sessions). Case studies have become an important component of our fellowship's educational platform. PMID:23248762

  3. Marshall Space Flight Center Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Six, N. F.; Karr, G.

    2017-01-01

    The research projects conducted by the 2016 Faculty Fellows at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center included propulsion studies on propellant issues, and materials investigations involving plasma effects and friction stir welding. Spacecraft Systems research was conducted on wireless systems and 3D printing of avionics. Vehicle Systems studies were performed on controllers and spacecraft instruments. The Science and Technology group investigated additive construction applied to Mars and Lunar regolith, medical uses of 3D printing, and unique instrumentation, while the Test Laboratory measured pressure vessel leakage and crack growth rates.

  4. Different tracks for pathology informatics fellowship training: Experiences of and input from trainees in a large multisite fellowship program

    OpenAIRE

    Levy, Bruce P.; McClintock, David S.; Lee, Roy E.; Lane, William J.; Klepeis, Veronica E.; Baron, Jason M.; Onozato, Maristela L.; Kim, JiYeon; Brodsky, Victor; Beckwith, Bruce; Kuo, Frank; Gilbertson, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pathology Informatics is a new field; a field that is still defining itself even as it begins the formalization, accreditation, and board certification process. At the same time, Pathology itself is changing in a variety of ways that impact informatics, including subspecialization and an increased use of data analysis. In this paper, we examine how these changes impact both the structure of Pathology Informatics fellowship programs and the fellows′ goals within those programs. Mat...

  5. From Stargazing to Science: The Value of Astro's "onomy" in Teaching the Content and Nature of Astronomy and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, A. A.

    1997-12-01

    Students taking my introductory astronomy course have always expressed an interest in learning about the sky. For most of them this means they want to learn to recognize constellations, to learn ``the arrangement of the stars'' the meaning of the Greek roots astro and nemein that became the word astronomy. This interest of students, for many years devalued and ignored, actually provides a perfect opportunity to guide them from casual interest to scientific inquiry in a way similar to the progression of western science from the astronomy of the Greeks through the beginnings of physics with Galileo, Kepler and Newton, to modern astrophysics. I require students to observe and learn the constellations of the season. Initially the constellations are studied as the ``political map'' of the sky. The students learn the names and myths of the characters or objects they represent, and their prominent stars. To build the bridge to science, however, I also require them to perform the time-honored first step of scientific inquiry of accurately sketching what they see in their journal. Also, they must research and learn the ``physical map'' of the sky where each constellation outlines a ``column" of universe filled with stars, perhaps a planet or two, nebulae, galaxies, quasars the CBR, and expanding spacetime. Other observing assignments have students watching the moon wax from new to full with nightly observations, watching the motion of the point of sunset along the western horizon, and watching line from the Big Dipper's Pointer Stars to Polaris sweep out fifteen degrees per hour as Earth rotates on its axis. With each of these they confront the challenge of accurately conveying on two-dimensional paper what they see in the three-dimensional sky, they develop a habit of looking at the sky and noting positions of familiar objects, and they build a foundation of observing experience upon which the models of the universe that astrophysics offers can be built with some stability.

  6. Project ASTRO NOVA brings Standard Based Astronomy to New Jersey Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veen, W.; Vinski, J.; Gallagher, A. C.

    2000-12-01

    Begun in 1998, Project ASTRO NOVA is hosted by the Planetarium at Raritan Valley Community College in Somerville, New Jersey. It is part of a National Network of eleven Project ASTRO sites created by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific with financial support of the National Science Foundation (see other papers at this meeting). Our goal is to bring hands-on inquiry based astronomy into classrooms and help teachers meet the New Jersey Science Standards. New Jersey mandates the teaching of astronomy in grades K-12 and statewide assessment takes place in grades 4 and 8. Capitalizing on New Jersey's record number of amateur astronomers per capita our site has trained 75 astronomers (including 21 professional astronomers) over the last three years. Before the start of each school year a new group of astronomers is trained together with their partner teacher(s) in the use of hands-on and age-appropriate astronomy activities that support the New Jersey Science Standards. Astronomers adopt a classroom and visit the same students at least four times during the year. Currently 53 astronomers are participating during the 2000-2001 school year. The program in New Jersey targets teachers in grades 3-9. A total of 114 teachers have been training at our annual workshops and 75 of them are participating during the 2000-2001 school year. Satisfaction with the program has been high with students, teachers and astronomers. When students meet scientists as role models and experience that doing science can be a lot of fun they become more interested. At the same time teachers are re-energized and gain a better understanding of how to teach science and astronomy. Finally, astronomers have the satisfaction of making a real difference in the lives of thousands of children, gain a better understanding of the issues in K-12 education and learn new teaching strategies for use in their college classes or astronomy clubs. In general we find that students and teachers are becoming better

  7. Preparation for postgraduate fellowship examination and clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    poses challenges of such magnitude that can manifest in conflict of interest as a result of distortion of reality. In addition to training and research, residency training institutions offer clinical services and patient care is therefore of utmost importance. A healthy balance needs to be struck between performing indicated clinical ...

  8. The impact of fellowship training on scholarly productivity in academic dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Ann M; Gupta, Arjun B; John, Elizabeth S; Lopez, Santiago A; Lee, Brian; Lambert, William Clark

    2016-05-01

    An increasing number of dermatology residents are pursuing postresidency fellowships to augment their knowledge in dermatology subspecialties. The purpose of this study was to determine whether fellowship training affects the scholarly impact of academic dermatologists, as measured by the h-index. A secondary objective was to compare scholarly productivity among different dermatology subspecialties. Overall, fellowship training is associated with increased scholarly impact; however, when stratifying for academic rank and years of publication activity, this difference does not exist.

  9. Early Career Experiences of Pediatricians Pursuing or Not Pursuing Fellowship Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Bobbi J; Katakam, Shesha K; Frintner, Mary Pat; Cull, William L

    2015-10-01

    Choosing career paths can be difficult decisions for residents contemplating fellowship training. This study compares the experiences of early career pediatricians who did and did not pursue fellowships. We analyzed national, weighted data from pediatricians 8 to 10 years after residency (n = 842). Work environment, work-life balance, and satisfaction were compared for pediatricians who had pursued fellowship training (fellowship trained) and those who did not pursue fellowship training (generalist trained). Logistic and linear regression examined the independent effects of fellowship training while controlling for demographic differences. A total of 39% of the pediatricians (328/842) pursued fellowship training. The fellowship-trained group was less likely than the generalist-trained group to spend time in direct patient care and more likely to report learning opportunities in their work environment. This group was also more likely to report an income of ≥$150,000, although no difference was found when only full-time pediatricians were examined. Generalist-trained pediatricians were more likely to work work to be rewarding and were satisfied with their lives. Although residents need to consider important life and career differences when contemplating fellowship training and general care, pediatricians in both groups can achieve overall life and career satisfaction. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  10. Impact of fellowship training on clinical practice of orthopaedic sports medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Bob; Gandhi, Jaipal; Limpisvasti, Orr; Mohr, Karen; ElAttrache, Neal S

    2015-03-04

    Approximately 90% of current orthopaedic graduates are engaging in fellowship training, with sports medicine being the most commonly chosen specialty. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of fellowship training on clinical decision-making by fellowship-trained sports medicine surgeons. A survey was designed to assess the importance of fellowship on common clinical decisions made in the nonoperative and surgical treatment of knee, shoulder, and elbow disorders. The survey also included questions for the respondents on their comfort level with a variety of routine and complex surgical procedures. The survey was sent to alumni of 113 orthopaedic sports medicine programs across the United States. Completed surveys were returned by 310 surgeons who had been in practice for an average of 9.0 years. They represented alumni of twenty-nine orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship programs across sixteen states. Fellowship was considered very important for surgical decision-making in the knee and shoulder. For nonoperative treatment, fellowship had a greater impact on shoulder disorders than on knee or elbow disorders. Fellowship was significantly more important than residency (p sports surgeons should consider seeking additional training in the treatment of multi-ligamentous knee injuries, posterior cruciate ligament injuries, shoulder instability with bone loss, and elbow disorders. The current findings were limited by the relatively small respondent pool, which represented only 26% of sports medicine fellowship programs in the United States. Copyright © 2015 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  11. Life after National Science Foundation fellowships: The implications for a graduate student's professional endeavors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obarski, Kelly Josephine

    Each year, hundreds of graduate and undergraduate students, participate as Fellows in National Science Foundation GK-12 Grants throughout the U.S. These Fellowships create opportunities for university students to improve their communication skills, teaching proficiencies, and team-building skills, in addition to expanding their interest in educational endeavors in their respective communities while pursuing their college degrees. STEP (Science and Technology Enhancement Project) is one such project. University faculty, public school teachers, and community leaders collaborated together in order to bring scientists into middle and secondary classrooms to focus on increasing student interest and proficiency in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) skills. Seventeen Fellows, in the previous four years, designed, developed, and implemented innovative, hands-on lessons in seven local schools. The evaluation team collected a tremendous amount of research evidence focused on the effect of the program on the Fellows while they were participants in the study, but there has been very little data collected about the Fellows after leaving the program. This research study, consisting of two-hour interviews, qualitatively explores how the skills learned while participating in the STEP program affected the Fellows' career and educational choices once leaving the project. This data was analyzed along with historical attitude surveys and yearly tracking documents to determine the effect that participation in the program had on their choices post-STEP. An extensive literature review has been conducted focusing on other GK-12 programs throughout the country, K-16 collaboration, Preparing Future Faculty Programs, as well as on teaching and learning literature. These bodies of literature provide the theoretical basis in which the research is framed in order to assess the impact on Fellow educational and professional choices since leaving the STEP program. This

  12. Target and (Astro-)WISE technologies Data federations and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentijn, E. A.; Begeman, K.; Belikov, A.; Boxhoorn, D. R.; Brinchmann, J.; McFarland, J.; Holties, H.; Kuijken, K. H.; Kleijn, G. Verdoes; Vriend, W.-J.; Williams, O. R.; Roerdink, J. B. T. M.; Schomaker, L. R. B.; Swertz, M. A.; Tsyganov, A.; van Dijk, G. J. W.

    2017-06-01

    After its first implementation in 2003 the Astro-WISE technology has been rolled out in several European countries and is used for the production of the KiDS survey data. In the multi-disciplinary Target initiative this technology, nicknamed WISE technology, has been further applied to a large number of projects. Here, we highlight the data handling of other astronomical applications, such as VLT-MUSE and LOFAR, together with some non-astronomical applications such as the medical projects Lifelines and GLIMPS; the MONK handwritten text recognition system; and business applications, by amongst others, the Target Holding. We describe some of the most important lessons learned and describe the application of the data-centric WISE type of approach to the Science Ground Segment of the Euclid satellite.

  13. Investigating the in-flight performance of the UVIT payload on AstroSat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahna, P. T.; Murthy, J.; Safonova, M.; Sutaria, F.; Gudennavar, S. B.; Bubbly, S. G.

    2017-11-01

    We have studied the performance of the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope payload on AstroSat and derived a calibration of the far-ultraviolet (FUV) and near-ultraviolet (NUV) instruments on board. We find that the sensitivity of both the FUV and NUV channels is as expected from ground calibrations, with the FUV effective area about 35 per cent and the NUV effective area about the same as that of GALEX . The point spread function of the instrument is on the order of 1.2-1.6″. We have found that pixel-to-pixel variations in the sensitivity are less than 10 per cent with spacecraft motion compensating for most of the flat-field variations. We derived a distortion correction but recommend that it be applied post-processing as part of an astrometric solution.

  14. On the Availability of ESO Data Papers on arXiv/astro-ph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grothkopf, U.; Bordelon, D.; Meakins, S.; Emsellem, E.

    2017-12-01

    Using the ESO Telescope Bibliography database telbib, we have investigated the percentage of ESO data papers that were submitted to the arXiv/astro-ph e-print server and that are therefore free to read. Our study revealed an availability of up to 96 % of telbib papers on arXiv over the years 2010 to 2017. We also compared the citation counts of arXiv vs. non-arXiv papers and found that on average, papers submitted to arXiv are cited 2.8 times more often than those not on arXiv. While simulations suggest that these findings are statistically significant, we cannot yet draw firm conclusions as to the main cause of these differences.

  15. Large underground, liquid based detectors for astro-particle physics in Europe scientific case and prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Autiero, D; Badertscher, A; Bezrukov, L; Bouchez, J; Bueno, A; Busto, J; Campagne, J -E; Cavata, C; De Bellefon, A; Dumarchez, J; Ebert, J; Enqvist, T; Ereditato, A; Von Feilitzsch, F; Perez, P Fileviez; Goger-Neff, M; Gninenko, S; Gruber, W; Hagner, C; Hess, M; Hochmuth, K A; Kisiel, J; Knecht, L; Kreslo, I; Kudryavtsev, V A; Kuusiniemi, P; Lachenmaier, T; Laffranchi, M; Lefièvre, B; Lightfoot, P K; Lindner, M; Maalampi, J; Maltoni, M; Marchionni, A; Undagoitia, T Marrodan; Meregaglia, A; Messina, M; Mezzetto, M; Mirizzi, A; Mosca, L; Moser, U; Müller, A; Natterer, G; Oberauer, L; Otiougova, P; Patzak, T; Peltoniemi, J; Potzel, W; Pistillo, C; Raffelt, G G; Rondio, E; Roos, M; Rossi, B; Rubbia, André; Savvinov, N; Schwetz, T; Sobczyk, J; Spooner, N J C; Stefan, D; Tonazzo, A; Trzaska, W; Ulbricht, J; Volpe, C; Winter, J; Wurm, M; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zimmermann, R

    2007-01-01

    This document reports on a series of experimental and theoretical studies conducted to assess the astro-particle physics potential of three future large-scale particle detectors proposed in Europe as next generation underground observatories. The proposed apparatus employ three different and, to some extent, complementary detection techniques: GLACIER (liquid Argon TPC), LENA (liquid scintillator) and MEMPHYS (\\WC), based on the use of large mass of liquids as active detection media. The results of these studies are presented along with a critical discussion of the performance attainable by the three proposed approaches coupled to existing or planned underground laboratories, in relation to open and outstanding physics issues such as the search for matter instability, the detection of astrophysical- and geo-neutrinos and to the possible use of these detectors in future high-intensity neutrino beams.

  16. The Hard X-ray Imager (HXI) for the ASTRO-H Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Goro; Kokubun, Motohide; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Enoto, Teruaki; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Harayama, Atsushi; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Kataoka, Jun; Katsuta, Junichiro; Kawaharada, Madoka; Laurent, Philippe; Lebrun, François; Limousin, Olivier; Makishima, Kazuo; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mori, Kunishiro; Nakamori, Takeshi; Noda, Hirofumi; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ohno, Masanori; Ohta, Masayuki; Saito, Shinya; Sato, Rie; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Takeda, Shinichiro; Terada, Yukikatsu; Uchiyama, Hideki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Watanabe, Shin; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yuasa, Takayuki

    2014-07-01

    The 6th Japanese X-ray satellite, ASTRO-H, is scheduled for launch in 2015. The hard X-ray focusing imaging system will observe astronomical objects with the sensitivity for detecting point sources with a brightness of 1/100,000 times fainter than the Crab nebula at > 10 keV. The Hard X-ray Imager (HXI) is a focal plane detector 12 m below the hard X-ray telescope (HXT) covering the energy range from 5 to 80 keV. The HXI is composed of a stacked Si/CdTe semiconductor detector module and surrounding BGO scintillators. The latter work as active shields for efficient reduction of background events caused by cosmic-ray particles, cosmic X-ray background, and in-orbit radiation activation. In this paper, we describe the detector system, and present current status of flight model development, and performance of HXI using an engineering model of HXI.

  17. Cryogen free cooling of ASTRO-H SXS Helium Dewar from 300 K to 4 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanao, Ken'ichi; Yoshida, Seiji; Miyaoka, Mikio; Tsunematsu, Shoji; Otsuka, Kiyomi; Hoshika, Shunji; Narasaki, Katsuhiro; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Yamasaki, Noriko; Takei, Yoh; Fujimoto, Ryuji; Sato, Yoichi; Okamoto, Atsushi; Noda, Hirofumi; DiPirro, Michel J.; Shirron, Peter J.

    2017-12-01

    Soft X-ray Spectrometer instrument (SXS) is one of the primary scientific instruments of ASTRO-H. SXS has a cold detector that is cooled to 50 mK by using a multi-stage Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator (ADR). SXS Dewar containing ADR provides 1.3 K heat sink by using liquid helium in nominal operation. After liquid helium is dried up, 4 K heat sink is provided by using mechanical coolers. Both nominal operation and cryogen free operation were successfully demonstrated. This paper describes the test result of cryogen free operation and cool-down performance from room temperature by using only mechanical coolers without liquid helium. The coolers on the Dewar cooled down cold mass from around 300 K to 4 K with 260 W electric power in 40 days. Cold mass is 35 kg in 4 K area including the helium tank, ADR and detector assembly.

  18. Atomic scattering factor of the ASTRO-H (Hitomi) SXT reflector around the gold's L edges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kikuchi, Naomichi; Kurashima, Sho; Ishida, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    The atomic scattering factor in the energy range of 11.2-15.4 keV for the ASTRO-H Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT) is reported. The large effective area of the SXT makes use of photon spectra above 10 keV viable, unlike most other X-ray satellites with total-reflection mirror optics. Presence of gold's L......-edges in the energy band is a major issue, as it complicates the function of the effective area. In order to model the area, the reflectivity measurements in the 11.2-15.4 keV band with the energy pitch of 0.4-0.7 eV were made in the synchrotron beamline Spring-8 BL01B1. We obtained atomic scattering factors f1 and f...

  19. Astro 001: Interactive, Online, and with a Sci-Fi Storyline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, K. A.; Palma, C.; Charlton, J. C.; Narayanan, A.

    2008-06-01

    We present a new, fully on-line astronomy course for undergraduate non-science majors at Penn State that was offered for the first time in Spring 2007 with an enrollment of 422 students. The entire course content is conveyed through an interactive story, capitalizing on the many multimedia astronomy resources publicly available on the Internet. The four units of the course (Basic Astronomy and the Nighttime Sky, Our Solar System, Stars and the Milky Way Galaxy, and Extragalactic Astronomy and Cosmology) deliver the same content as a traditional Astro 001 course. Each unit follows the educational adventure of a different fictional Astro 001 student who has been ``abducted'' by aliens. The four units are united by a character, the Riddler, who poses riddles about various aspects of astronomy, and whose identity and purpose is revealed gradually as a reward for completion of various subtopics. This initial offering of the course was entirely web-based except for traditional evening in-class exams. Our first offering was very successful: it was very popular with the students, the exam grades were about 10 percent higher than usual, and we expect an even higher enrollment in our second offering in Fall of 2007. This Spring we used the Astronomy Diagnostic Test (ADT), but plan in the Fall to use a different pre- and post-assessment that will benchmark each of the four content units. Our future plans include adapting the course into a shorter form to be delivered in middle schools. We gratefully acknowledge funding from STScI IDEAS grant HST-ED-90284-01-A and a Zaccheus Daniel travel grant.

  20. Concern for overtreatment using the AUA/ASTRO guideline on adjuvant radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jung Hun; Ha, Yun-Sok; Kim, Sung; Yu, Jihyeong; Patel, Neal; Parihar, Jaspreet S; Salmasi, Amirali Hassanzadeh; Kim, Wun-Jae; Kim, Isaac Yi

    2014-04-07

    Recently, three prospective randomized trials have shown that adjuvant radiotherapy (ART) after radical prostatectomy for the patients with pT3 and/or positive margins improves biochemical progression-free survival and local recurrence free survival. But, the optimal management of these patients after radical prostatectomy is an issue which has been debated continuously. The object of this study was to determine the necessity of adjuvant radiotherapy (ART) by reviewing the outcomes of observation without ART after radical prostatectomy (RP) in patients with pathologic indications for ART according to the American Urological Association (AUA)/American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) guideline. From a prospectively maintained database, 163 patients were eligible for inclusion in this study. These men had a pathological stage pT2-3 N0 with undetectable PSA level after RP and met one or more of the three following risk factors: capsular perforation, positive surgical margins, or seminal vesicle invasion. We excluded the patients who had received neoadjuvant hormonal therapy or adjuvant treatment, or had less than 24 months of follow-up. To determine the factors that influenced biochemical recurrence-free (BCR), univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards analyses were performed. Among the 163 patients, median follow-up was 50.5 months (24.0-88.2 months). Of those men under observation, 27 patients had BCR and received salvage radiotherapy (SRT). The multivariate Cox analysis showed that BCR was marginally associated with pre-operative serum PSA (P = 0.082), and the pathologic GS (HR, 4.063; P = 0.001) was an independent predictor of BCR. More importantly, in 87 patients with pre-operative PSA ASTRO guideline, only 27 (16.6%) developed BCR and received SRT. Therefore, using ART following RP using the current recommendation may be an overtreatment in an overwhelming majority of the patients.

  1. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 2012 Workforce Study: the radiation oncologists' and residents' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohar, Surjeet; Fung, Claire Y; Hopkins, Shane; Miller, Robert; Azawi, Samar; Arnone, Anna; Patton, Caroline; Olsen, Christine

    2013-12-01

    The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) conducted the 2012 Radiation Oncology Workforce Survey to obtain an up-to-date picture of the workforce, assess its needs and concerns, and identify quality and safety improvement opportunities. The results pertaining to radiation oncologists (ROs) and residents (RORs) are presented here. The ASTRO Workforce Subcommittee, in collaboration with allied radiation oncology professional societies, conducted a survey study in early 2012. An online survey questionnaire was sent to all segments of the radiation oncology workforce. Respondents who were actively working were included in the analysis. This manuscript describes the data for ROs and RORs. A total of 3618 ROs and 568 RORs were surveyed. The response rate for both groups was 29%, with 1047 RO and 165 ROR responses. Among ROs, the 2 most common racial groups were white (80%) and Asian (15%), and the male-to-female ratio was 2.85 (74% male). The median age of ROs was 51. ROs averaged 253.4 new patient consults in a year and 22.9 on-treatment patients. More than 86% of ROs reported being satisfied or very satisfied overall with their career. Close to half of ROs reported having burnout feelings. There was a trend toward more frequent burnout feelings with increasing numbers of new patient consults. ROs' top concerns were related to documentation, reimbursement, and patients' health insurance coverage. Ninety-five percent of ROs felt confident when implementing new technology. Fifty-one percent of ROs thought that the supply of ROs was balanced with demand, and 33% perceived an oversupply. This study provides a current snapshot of the 2012 radiation oncology physician workforce. There was a predominance of whites and men. Job satisfaction level was high. However a substantial fraction of ROs reported burnout feelings. Perceptions about supply and demand balance were mixed. ROs top concerns reflect areas of attention for the healthcare sector as a whole. Copyright

  2. Outcomes after accelerated partial breast irradiation in patients with ASTRO consensus statement cautionary features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHaffie, Derek R; Patel, Rakesh R; Adkison, Jarrod B; Das, Rupak K; Geye, Heather M; Cannon, George M

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate outcomes among women with American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) consensus statement cautionary features treated with brachytherapy-based accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Between March 2001 and June 2006, 322 consecutive patients were treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) APBI at the University of Wisconsin. A total of 136 patients were identified who met the ASTRO cautionary criteria. Thirty-eight (27.9%) patients possessed multiple cautionary factors. All patients received 32 to 34 Gy in 8 to 10 twice-daily fractions using multicatheter (93.4%) or Mammosite balloon (6.6%) brachytherapy. With a median follow-up of 60 months, there were 5 ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences (IBTR), three local, and two loco-regional. The 5-year actuarial rate of IBTR was 4.8%±4.1%. The 5-year disease-free survival was 89.6%, with a cause-specific survival and overall survival of 97.6% and 95.3%, respectively. There were no IBTRs among 32 patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) vs. 6.1% for patients with invasive carcinoma (p=0.24). Among 104 patients with Stage I or II invasive carcinoma, the IBTR rate for patients considered cautionary because of age alone was 0% vs. 12.7% in those deemed cautionary due to histopathologic factors (p=0.018). Overall, we observed few local recurrences among patients with cautionary features. Women with DCIS and patients 50 to 59 years of age with Stage I/II disease who otherwise meet the criteria for suitability appear to be at a low risk of IBTR. Patients with tumor-related cautionary features will benefit from careful patient selection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Astro-Venture: An Integrated Earth and Space Science Curriculum Supplement Focused on Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Guinn, C. M.; Wilmoth, K. L.; Coe, L. K.

    2005-05-01

    Astro-Venture is an example of a NASA educational product that successfully integrates Earth and space science by engaging students in grades 5-8 in the search for and design of a planet with the necessary characteristics for human habitation. Students study the Earth to understand how it meets human needs for survival in the areas of astronomy, geology, biology and atmospheric sciences. They then extend these ideas in simulated searches and analyses of stellar and planetary data sets to determine whether other planets or moons might be habitable. Astro-Venture uses online multimedia activities and off-line inquiry explorations to engage students in guided inquiry aligned with the 5 E inquiry model. For each core science area, students engage in an online training module in which they isolate variables and observe the affects on Earth. They then draw conclusions about which characteristics allow Earth to remain habitable. Following this experience, students engage in classroom, hands-on activities that teach them core standards-based concepts and focus on why the identified characteristics are vital to human habitability. These concepts include: states of matter, flow of energy, chemical properties, planetary geology, plate tectonics, human health and systems theory. With an understanding of the "whats" and the "whys" students then engage in a mission module in which they simulate the methods scientists would use to go about finding a planet with these characteristics. This helps them to understand the "hows". By meeting education standards, teachers can easily integrate this product into their classroom curriculum. Students apply all that they've learned to design a planet that meets the requirements for human habitability in all areas. Through this process, they learn about the Earth within the context of the solar system and how all parts work as a system in meeting our needs.

  4. The AstroPAL Starter Pack: How to Create a Grad Mentoring Program That Fosters Equity and Inclusion in Your Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    The Astronomy Peer Advising Leaders program (AstroPAL) at Georgia State University is a grassroots effort initiated by one PhD student with no budget, yet has quickly become a successful program that especially impacts students of marginalized identities. AstroPAL provides guidance for incoming grad students and helps them adjust to the workload, stress, and other difficulties that can come with grad school. This talk will cover the AstroPAL goals and accomplishments, its logistical structure, and its longterm sustainability. We will discuss how the program has helped create a bridge between faculty and students as well as the positive effect it has had on our community. I will also provide tools that anyone can use to launch AstroPAL at their home institution.

  5. Robotic surgery training in gynecologic fellowship programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatehchehr, Soorena; Rostaminia, Ghazaleh; Gardner, Michael O; Ramunno, Elisa; Doyle, Nora M

    2014-01-01

    The increasing use and acceptance of robotic platforms calls for the need to train not only established surgeons but also residents and fellow trainees within the context of the traditional residency and fellowship program. Our study aimed to clarify the current status of robotic training in gynecologic fellowship programs in the United States. This was a Web-based survey of four gynecology fellowship programs in the United States from November 2010 to March 2011. Programs were selected based on their geographic areas. A questionnaire with 43 questions inquiring about robotic surgery performance and training was sent to the programs and either a fellow or the fellowship director was asked to complete. Participation was voluntary. We had 102 responders (18% respond rate) with an almost equal response rate from all four gynecologic fellowships, with a median response rate of 25% (range 21-29%). Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) and Gynecologic Oncology (Gyn Onc) fellowships had the highest rate of robotic training in their fellowship curriculum-95% and 83%, respectively. Simulator training was used as a training tool in 74% of Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery (FPMRS); however, just 22% of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility fellowships had simulator training. Eighty-seven percent of Gyn Onc fellows graduate with >50 robotic cases, but this was 0% for Reproductive Endocrinology Infertility fellows. Our study showed that the use of a robotic system was built into fellowship curriculum of >80% of MIS and Gyn Onc fellowship programs that were entered in our study. Simulator training has been used widely in Ob&Gyn fellowship programs as part of their robotic training curriculum.

  6. The 1995 NASA-ODU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N. (Compiler); Young, Deborah B. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. The objectives of this program are: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topics. The lectures and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education, or industry.

  7. NASA/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N. (Compiler)

    1987-01-01

    Since 1964, NASA has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 or 11 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. Program Description: College or university faculty members were appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow devoted approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program consisted of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topic.

  8. NASA/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goglia, G. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. The objectives of this program are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to simulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. College or university faculty members will be appointed as research fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The fellows will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of general interest or that are directly relevant to the fellows' research project. The lecturers and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, the educational community, or industry.

  9. Hampton University/American Society for Engineering Education/NASA Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J. H. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 or 11 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society of Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. Program Description: College or university will be faculty members appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA-Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of general interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research project. The lecturers and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education or industry.

  10. 1996 NASA-Hampton University American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, John H. (Compiler); Young, Deborah B. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    NASA has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. The objectives were: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants institutions; (4) To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Center. Program Description: College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topics. The lectures and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education, or industry.

  11. 1998 NASA-HU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marable, William P. (Compiler); Murray, Deborah B. (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. The program objectives include: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; (4) To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topics. The lecture and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education, and industry.

  12. 1999 NASA - ODU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N. (Compiler); Murray, Deborah B. (Compiler)

    2000-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program or summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; (4) To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. Program Description: College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topics. The lecture and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education, and industry.

  13. 2001 NASA-ODU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N. (Compiler); Murray, Deborah B. (Compiler); Hathaway, Roger A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises these programs. Objectives: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; (4 To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. Program Description: College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellow's research topics. The lecture and seminar leaders wil be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education and industry.

  14. 1997 NASA-ODU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N. (Compiler); Young, Deborah B. (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives of the program are as follows: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members, (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. Program description is as follows: College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topics. The lectures and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education, and industry.

  15. 2000 NASA-HU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marable, William P. (Compiler); Murray, Deborah B. (Compiler); Hathaway, Roger A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend ten weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. The objectives are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend ten weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topics. The lecture and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education, and industry. A list of the abstracts of the presentations is provided.

  16. A Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship Boot Camp improves trainee confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Catherine K; Tannous, Paul; DeWitt, Elizabeth; Farias, Michael; Mansfield, Laura; Ronai, Christina; Schidlow, David; Sanders, Stephen P; Lock, James E; Newburger, Jane W; Brown, David W

    2016-12-01

    Introduction New paediatric cardiology trainees are required to rapidly assimilate knowledge and gain clinical skills to which they have limited or no exposure during residency. The Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship Boot Camp (PCBC) at Boston Children's Hospital was designed to provide incoming fellows with an intensive exposure to congenital cardiac pathology and a broad overview of major areas of paediatric cardiology practice. The PCBC curriculum was designed by core faculty in cardiac pathology, echocardiography, electrophysiology, interventional cardiology, exercise physiology, and cardiac intensive care. Individual faculty contributed learning objectives, which were refined by fellowship directors and used to build a programme of didactics, hands-on/simulation-based activities, and self-guided learning opportunities. A total of 16 incoming fellows participated in the 4-week boot camp, with no concurrent clinical responsibilities, over 2 years. On the basis of pre- and post-PCBC surveys, 80% of trainees strongly agreed that they felt more prepared for clinical responsibilities, and a similar percentage felt that PCBC should be offered to future incoming fellows. Fellows showed significant increase in their confidence in all specific knowledge and skills related to the learning objectives. Fellows rated hands-on learning experiences and simulation-based exercises most highly. We describe a novel 4-week-long boot camp designed to expose incoming paediatric cardiology fellows to the broad spectrum of knowledge and skills required for the practice of paediatric cardiology. The experience increased trainee confidence and sense of preparedness to begin fellowship-related responsibilities. Given that highly interactive activities were rated most highly, boot camps in paediatric cardiology should strongly emphasise these elements.

  17. Endoscopic training in gastroenterology fellowship: adherence to core curriculum guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirapinyo, Pichamol; Imaeda, Avlin B; Thompson, Christopher C

    2015-12-01

    The Gastroenterology Core Curriculum and American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy provide guidelines for endoscopic training. Program adherence to these recommendations is unclear. This study aims to assess endoscopic training experience during fellowship. Questionnaire study. The questionnaire was circulated to US fellowship programs, with the assistance of the American Gastroenterological Association. Graduating third-year fellows. Seventy-three fellows returned the questionnaire. Nearly all fellows met the required numbers for esophagoduodenoscopy (98%) and colonoscopy (100%), with fewer meeting requirements for PEG (73%) and non-variceal hemorrhage (75%). The majority of fellows did not meet minimum numbers for variceal banding (40%), esophageal dilation (43%), capsule endoscopy (42%). Fellows rated training in cognitive aspects of endoscopy as 3.86 [1 (inadequate), 5 (excellent)] and reported greatest emphasis on interpreting endoscopic findings and least on virtual colonography. Quality indicators of endoscopy received little emphasis (rating of 3.04; p = 0.00001), with adenoma detection rate being least emphasized. Fifty-six percent of fellows reported having routine endoscopy conferences. Half of the programs have endoscopic simulators, with 15% of fellows being required to use simulation. Following direct hands-on experience, fellows rated external endoscopy courses (64%) as the next most useful experience. Many fellows do not meet required numbers for several endoscopic procedures, and quality indicators receive little emphasis during training. Most programs do not provide simulation training or hold regular endoscopy conferences. Fellowship programs should perform internal audits and make feasible adjustments. Furthermore, it may be time for professional societies to revisit training guidelines.

  18. Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Annual Report: Class of 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMakin, Andrea H.

    2012-08-20

    Annual report for the Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP), which PNNL administers for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). Features the Class of 2011. The NGFP is a NNSA program with a mission to cultivate future technical and policy leaders in nonproliferation and international security. Through the NGFP, outstanding graduate students with career interests in nonproliferation are appointed to program offices within the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (DNN). During their one-year assignment, Fellows participate in programs designed to detect, prevent, and reverse the proliferation of nuclear weapons.

  19. Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Camilla; Reibel, J; Hietanen, J

    2012-01-01

    as new approaches, treatments and diagnostic possibilities develop. Likewise, the role of the dentist in the community changes and may vary in different countries. As members of the Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine and subject representatives of oral pathology and oral...... medicine, we feel obliged to contribute to the discussion of how the guidelines of the dental curriculum support the highest possible standards of dental education. This article is meant to delineate a reasonable standard of oral pathology and oral medicine in the European dental curriculum and to guide...... subject representatives in curriculum development and planning. We have created an advisory topic list in oral pathology and oral medicine....

  20. From Research to Policy: Linking Climate Change Adaptation to ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    A total of eight research fellowships, including six post-graduate and two postdoctoral fellowships, will be offered at collaborating institutions Expected outputs include scientific publications, an updated database on household vulnerability, policy analysis and advocacy tools, and the promotion of dialogue platforms that will ...

  1. 34 CFR 657.1 - What is the Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowships Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Foreign Language and Area Studies... (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOREIGN LANGUAGE AND AREA STUDIES FELLOWSHIPS PROGRAM General § 657.1 What is the Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowships Program? Under...

  2. 76 FR 20699 - Fellowship Placement Pilot Program Requests for Expressions of Interest To Administer Pilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... local organization with relevant experience; or A volunteer or community driven organization and college... activities affecting housing and urban development'' as well as to ``provide technical assistance and... responsible for two major activities of the fellowship program: 1. Manage and administer the fellowship...

  3. Testing the Double Bind Hypothesis: Faculty Recommendations of Minority Women Fellowship Applicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Shirley Vining

    1995-01-01

    Examines faculty and scientist recommendations of applicants to the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Graduate Fellowship Program, 1976-91. Data from the Cumulative Index on National Science Foundation Fellowships Applicants and Awardees are used. Data analysis supports the double bind hypothesis that minority women are doubly disadvantaged…

  4. Trends in the orthopedic job market and the importance of fellowship subspecialty training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Nathan T; Mercer, Deana M; Moneim, Moheb S

    2012-04-01

    Previous studies have examined possible incentives for pursuing orthopedic fellowship training, but we are unaware of previously published studies reporting the trends in the orthopedic job market since the acceptance of certain criteria for fellowship programs by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) in 1985. We hypothesized that, since the initiation of accredited postresidency fellowship programs, job opportunities for fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons have increased and job opportunities for nonfellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons have decreased. We reviewed the job advertisements printed in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, American Volume, for the years 1984, 1994, 2004, and 2009. We categorized the job opportunities as available for either a general (nonfellowship-trained) orthopedic surgeon or a fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeon. Based on the advertisements posted in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, American Volume, a trend exists in the orthopedic job market toward seeking fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons. In the years 1984, 1994, 2004, and 2009, the percentage of job opportunities seeking fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons was 16.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.1%-20.3%), 40.6% (95% CI, 38.1%-43.1%), 52.2% (95% CI, 48.5%-55.9%), and 68.2% (95% CI, 65.0%-71.4%), respectively. These differences were statistically significant (analysis of variance, P<.05). Fellowship training is thus a worthwhile endeavor. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. 34 CFR 1100.2 - Who is eligible for a fellowship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... fellowship under this program, an individual must be— (1) A citizen or national of the United States, or a permanent resident of the United States, or an individual who is in the United States for other than... LITERACY NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR LITERACY: LITERACY LEADER FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM § 1100.2 Who is eligible for a...

  6. Nutrition education for pediatric gastroenterology, hepatology, and nutrition fellows: Survey of NASPGHAN fellowship training programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of the study was to assess the methodology and content of nutrition education during gastroenterology fellowship training and the variability among the different programs. A survey questionnaire was completed by 43 fellowship training directors of 62 active programs affiliated to the North A...

  7. Current Status of Fellowship Programs for Advanced Practice Registered Nurses in the Nurse Practitioner Role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camal Sanchez, Carlos Alberto

    Students completing an advanced practice RN program for practice as a nurse practitioner may seek options for further advancement. Although postgraduate clinical fellowship programs exist, information about such programs is not readily available. This article offers a resource for faculty to assist graduate students in finding advanced practice RN nurse practitioner fellowship programs in the United States.

  8. The American Orthopaedic Association-Japanese Orthopaedic Association 2010 traveling fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Alpesh A; Cheng, Ivan; Yao, Jeffrey; Huffman, G Russell

    2011-12-21

    We started this journey excited by the prospects of visiting Japan, a country with a proud and historic past. We ended the fellowship accomplishing those goals, and we left with a great deal of admiration for our orthopaedic colleagues halfway around the world for their excellence in education, clinical care, and research. Their hospitality and attention to the details of our visit were exemplary and a lesson to us as we host visiting fellows in the future. Japan reflects its past, but it also offers a preview into our own nation's future: an aging population, a shrinking workforce, a stagnant economy, nationalized health care, and a mushrooming national debt. Of all of these factors, it is the aging population that we, as orthopaedic surgeons, will be most acutely aware of and involved with. The degenerative disorders that affect elderly patients dominate the landscape of surgical care in Japan. Osteoporosis and osteopenia permeate many aspects of care across orthopaedic subspecialties. The surgeons in Japan are developing innovative and cost-effective means of treating the large volume of older patients within the fiscal constraints of a nationalized health-care system. We learned, and will continue to learn more, from Japan about the management of this growing patient population with its unique pathologies and challenges. With the recent natural disaster and ongoing safety concerns in Japan, the character and will of the people of Japan have been on display. Their courage and resolve combined with order and compassion are a testament to the nation's cultural identity. The seeds of the Traveling Fellowship were planted shortly after Japan's last wide-scale reconstruction, and the ties that have bound the JOA and the AOA together are strengthened through this trying time. We strongly urge our colleagues in the U.S. to help support the people, the physicians, and the health-care system of Japan through its most recent tribulations and offer them the same care and

  9. Orthopedic surgery fellowships: the effects of interviewing and how residents establish a rank list.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niesen, Matthew C; Wong, Jeffrey; Ebramzadeh, Edward; Sangiorgio, Sophia; SooHoo, Nelson Fong; Luck, James V; Eckardt, Jeffrey

    2015-03-01

    The Orthopaedic Fellowship Match was established in 2008 to streamline and improve the process of matching residents and fellowships. The purpose of this study was to quantify the factors that affect the application process and to determine how residents establish a rank list. The Orthopaedic Fellowship Match has improved the ability of residents and programs to consider their options more carefully and to focus on finding the best match. However, this process introduces new factors for all parties involved to consider. The costs of the interview process and time away from service for residents may be larger than anticipated. Ultimately, residents value operative experience and staff members at a fellowship more than all other factors when selecting a fellowship. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Critical thinking of registered nurses in a fellowship program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zori, Susan; Kohn, Nina; Gallo, Kathleen; Friedman, M Isabel

    2013-08-01

    Critical thinking is essential to nursing practice. This study examined differences in the critical thinking dispositions of registered nurses (RNs) in a nursing fellowship program. Control and experimental groups were used to compare differences in scores on the California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory (CCTDI) of RNs at three points during a fellowship program: baseline, week 7, and month 5. The control group consisted of RNs who received no education in critical thinking. The experimental group received education in critical thinking using simulated scenarios and reflective journaling. CCTDI scores examined with analysis of variance showed no significant difference within groups over time or between groups. The baseline scores of the experimental group were slightly higher than those of the control group. Chi-square analysis of demographic variables between the two groups showed no significant differences. Critical thinking dispositions are a combination of attitudes, values, and beliefs that make up one's personality based on life experience. Lack of statistical significance using a quantitative approach did not capture the development of the critical thinking dispositions of participants. A secondary qualitative analysis of journal entries is being conducted. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Fellowship Colonoscopy Training and Preparedness for Independent Gastroenterology Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Vilas R; Feuerstein, Joseph D; Sengupta, Neil; Lewandowski, Jeffrey J; Tsao, Roy; Kothari, Darshan; Anastopoulos, Harry T; Doyle, Richard B; Leffler, Daniel A; Sheth, Sunil G

    2016-01-01

    To objectively assess when gastroenterology (GI) fellows achieve technical competency to perform colonoscopy independently. New guidelines to assess the procedural competency of GI fellows in training have been developed. Although comprehensive, they do not account for the quality metrics to which independently practicing gastroenterologists are held. We performed a prospective study examining consecutive colonoscopies performed by GI fellows from November 2013 through March 2014 at an academic medical center. Using a brief postprocedure questionnaire and the online medical record, we measured rates of independent fellow cecal intubation rate (CIR), insertion time to the cecum (cecal IT), and independent polypectomy rate. Our secondary outcomes were adenoma detection rate and polyp detection rate. A total of 898 colonoscopies performed by 10 GI fellows were analyzed. In the multivariate analysis, CIR [odds ratio (OR)=1.29, P=0.012], cecal IT (β-coefficient=0.19, P=0.006), and rates of unassisted independent snare polypectomy (OR=1.36, P90%, cecal IT between 7 and 10 minutes, and independent polypectomy rate of 90% with further improvement in cecal IT to 95% after 700 cases. Current procedural recommendations for fellowship training may underestimate the technical skill necessary for independent GI practice upon completion of fellowship. Technical proficiency in snare polypectomy may lag behind proficiency in cecal intubation.

  12. Education in Nephrology Fellowship: A Survey-Based Needs Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rope, Robert W; Pivert, Kurtis A; Parker, Mark G; Sozio, Stephen M; Merell, Sylvia Bereknyei

    2017-07-01

    Educational needs assessments for nephrology fellowship training are limited. This study assessed fellows' perceptions of current educational needs and interest in novel modalities that may improve their educational experience and quantified educational resources used by programs and fellows. We distributed a seven-question electronic survey to all United States-based fellows receiving complimentary American Society of Nephrology (ASN) membership at the end of the 2015-2016 academic year in conjunction with the ASN Nephrology Fellows Survey. One third (320 of 863; 37%) of fellows in Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited positions responded. Most respondents rated overall quality of teaching in fellowship as either "good" (37%) or "excellent" (44%), and most (55%) second-year fellows felt "fully prepared" for independent practice. Common educational resources used by fellows included UpToDate, Journal of the American Society of Nephrology/Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology , and Nephrology Self-Assessment Program ; others-including ASN's online curricula-were used less often. Fellows indicated interest in additional instruction in several core topics, including home dialysis modalities, ultrasonography, and pathology. Respondents strongly supported interventions to improve pathology instruction and increase time for physiology and clinical review. In conclusion, current nephrology fellows perceive several gaps in training. Innovation in education and training is needed to better prepare future nephrologists for the growing challenges of kidney care. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  13. The 3M National Teaching Fellowship: Findings from a National Questionnaire on the Impact of the Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Arshad; Stockley, Denise; Smith, Ron; Hastings-Truelove, Amber

    2017-01-01

    In 2016 the 3M National Teaching Fellowship reached a milestone in celebrating the 30th anniversary of the first fellowship in 1986. The fellowship is the premier award of the Society for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education and each year up to 10 fellows are announced. Thus far, there has not been a systematic review or evaluation of the…

  14. 34 CFR 657.21 - What criteria does the Secretary use in selecting institutions for an allocation of fellowships?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... other than language, linguistics, and literature are offered in appropriate foreign languages; (3... FOREIGN LANGUAGE AND AREA STUDIES FELLOWSHIPS PROGRAM How Does the Secretary Select an Institution for an... fellowships on the basis of the criteria in this section. (a) Foreign language and area studies fellowships...

  15. Training directors have positive perceptions of a competency-based gastroenterology and transplant hepatology fellowship program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halegoua-De Marzio, Dina L; Herrine, Steven K

    2015-02-01

    In 2012, the American Board of Internal Medicine approved a pilot competency-based transplant hepatology (TH) training program. This program allows gastroenterology (GI) and TH fellowships to be completed in 3 years. We investigated the perceptions and beliefs of GI and TH division and fellowship program directors on the competency-based TH training program. All current GI and TH division and fellowship program directors from the 162 fellowship programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education were invited via e-mail to anonymously complete the online survey. The survey questioned their perceptions of the 3-year combined GI and TH training program. A total of 116 participants completed the survey (∼38% response rate). Most respondents were GI fellowship directors (61%); 15% were GI and hepatology division directors, 19% were TH fellowship directors, 14% were TH division directors, and 5% were GI division directors. Most of the respondents were in favor of the pilot program (85%). Only 63% of all respondents believed that graduates of the pilot program would achieve the same level of competency in GI as those who completed the traditional program. Overall, 71% believed incorporation of the 3-year training model would increase interest and participation in TH fellowships. Most of the academic GI and TH division and fellowship program directors embrace competency-based fellowship education and TH subspecialty training during the designated 3-year GI fellowship. Future studies will be needed to reevaluate these beliefs after several years. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The ASTRO-H SXT Performance to the Large Off-Set Angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Toshiki; Iizuka, Ryo; Mori, Hideyuki; Hayashi, Takayuki; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Ishida, Manabu; Kikuchi, Naomichi; Kurashima, Sho; Nakaniwa, Nozomi; Okajima, Takashi; hide

    2016-01-01

    The X-ray astronomy satellite ASTRO-H, which is the 6th Japanese X-ray astronomy satellite and is renamed Hitomi after launch, is designed to observe celestial X-ray objects in a wide energy band from a few hundred eV to 600 keV. The Soft X-ray Telescopes (SXTs) onboard ASTRO-H play a role of collecting and imaging X-rays up to approximately 12 keV. Although the field of view of the SXT is approximately 15' (FWHM), due to the thin-foil-nested Wolter-I type optics adopted in the SXTs, X-rays out of the field of view can reach the focal plane without experiencing a normal double reflection. This component is referred to as 'stray light'. Owing to investigation of the stray light so far, 'secondary reflection' is now identified as the main component of the stray light, which is composed of X-rays reflected only by secondary reflectors. In order to cut the secondary reflections, a 'pre-collimator' is equipped on top of the SXTs. However, we cannot cut all the stray lights with the pre-collimator in some off-axis angle domain. In this study, we measure the brightness of the stray light of the SXTs at some representative off-axis angles by using the ISAS X-ray beam line. ASTRO-H is equipped with two modules of the SXT; one is for the Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS), an X-ray calorimeter, and the other is for the Soft X-ray Imager (SXI), an X-ray CCD camera. These SXT modules are called SXT-S and SXT-I, respectively. Of the two detector systems, the SXI has a large field of view, a square with 38' on a side. To cope with this, we have made a mosaic mapping of the stray light at a representative off-axis angle of 30' in the X-ray beam line at the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science. The effective area of the brightest secondary reflection is found of order approximately 0.1% of the on-axis effective area at the energy of 1.49 keV. The other components are not so bright (less than 5 x 10(exp -4) times smaller than the on-axis effective area). On the other hand, we

  17. The integration of astro-geodetic data observed with ACSYS to the local geoid models Istanbul-Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halicioglu, Kerem; Ozludemir, M. Tevfik; Deniz, Rasim; Ozener, Haluk; Albayrak, Muge; Ulug, Rasit; Basoglu, Burak

    2017-04-01

    Astro-geodetic deflections of the vertical components provide accurate and valuable information of Earth's gravity filed. Conventional methods require considerable effort and time whereas new methods, namely digital zenith camera systems (DZCS), have been designed to eliminate drawbacks of the conventional methods, such as observer dependent errors, long observation times, and to improve the observation accuracy. The observation principle is based on capturing star images near zenithal direction to determine astronomical coordinates of the station point with the integration of CCD, telescope, tiltmeters, and GNSS devices. In Turkey a new DZCS have been designed and tested on control network located in Istanbul, of which the geoid height differences were known with the accuracy of ±3.5 cm. Astro-geodetic Camera System (ACSYS) was used to determine the deflections of the vertical components with an accuracy of ±0.1 - 0.3 arc seconds, and results were compared with geoid height differences using astronomical levelling procedure. The results have also been compared with the ones calculated from global geopotential models. In this study the recent results of the first digital zenith camera system of Turkey are presented and the future studies are introduced such as the current developments of the system including hardware and software upgrades as well as the new observation strategy of the ACSYS. We also discuss the contribution and integration of the astro-geodetic deflections of the vertical components to the geoid determination studies in the light of information of current ongoing projects being operated in Turkey.

  18. Accelerated partial breast irradiation via brachytherapy: a patterns-of-care analysis with ASTRO consensus statement groupings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Zain A; Mahmood, Usama; Hanlon, Alexandra; Neuner, Geoffrey; Buras, Robert; Tkaczuk, Katherine; Feigenberg, Steven J

    2011-01-01

    The 2002 Food and Drug Administration approval of the MammoSite catheter (Hologic, Inc., Beford, MA) led to a surge of interest in accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Until recently, guidelines as to the optimal candidates for this treatment were unavailable. We performed a patterns-of-care analysis for patients undergoing breast brachytherapy and compared these results with the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) consensus statement. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database was used to examine female breast cancer patients treated with brachytherapy between 2002 and 2007. The patients were then categorized into suitable, cautionary, and unsuitable groups based on the ASTRO guidelines. We identified 4172 female breast cancer patients treated within the stated years. The number of brachytherapy cases increased nearly 10-fold over the time period studied from 163 in 2002 to 1427 in 2007 (pASTRO cautionary or unsuitable groupings. This is the largest patterns-of-care analysis for APBI patients and serves as a baseline for future comparison. Copyright © 2011 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Changes in brachytherapy-based APBI patient selection immediately before and after publication of the ASTRO consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Zain A; Lloyd, Shane; Shah, Chirag; Wilson, Lynn D; Koshy, Matthew; Mahmood, Usama

    2015-01-01

    In July 2009, American Society of Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) released a consensus statement (CS) to guide patient selection for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). The goal of this study was to examine how practice patterns changed following the guideline's release. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database was queried from 2008 to 2010 for females aged ≥20 years receiving breast conservation via brachytherapy. Among the APBI cohort, characteristics and CS grouping ("suitable," "cautionary," or "unsuitable") of patients receiving APBI in the 18 months before (January 2008 to June 2009) and after (July 2009 to December 2010) guideline publication were analyzed. A total of 87,528 patients undergoing breast conservation therapy were identified. Of this, 4,253 patients (4.9%) received brachytherapy-based APBI. Limiting the analysis to patients not missing data that would affect their CS classification rendered 3,828 patients. The proportion of breast conservation patients receiving brachytherapy-based APBI before and after CS release remained the same (4.9% vs. 4.8%, p = 0.36). Among patients receiving brachytherapy-based APBI, the unsuitable category decreased (15.8 vs. 11.1%, p ASTRO CS was associated with a decrease in "unsuitable" patients and an increase in "suitable" patients being treated with brachytherapy-based APBI. This trend began before guideline release and thus cannot be definitively attributed to the ASTRO CS. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Progress report on the Astro-H Soft X-Ray Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Richard L.; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa

    2016-04-01

    We describe the initial in-orbit operations and performance of the Astro-H Soft X-Ray Spectrometer (SXS). Astro-H, JAXA's sixth X-ray observatory, is scheduled for launch on February 12, 2016, from the Tanegashima Space Center in Japan abord an H-IIA rocket. The instrument is based on a 36-pixel array of microcalorimeters designed for high resolution over the 0.3-12 keV energy band at the focus of a high throughput, grazing-incidence x-ray mirror. The instrument is the result of a joint collaboration between the JAXA Institute of Space and Astronautical Science and many partners in Japan, and the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and collaborators in the US. The principal components of the spectrometer are the microcalorimeter detector system, a low-temperature anticoincidence detector, a 3-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) to maintain 50 mK operation under both cryogen and cryogen-free operation, a hybrid liquid helium/cryogen-free dewar with both Stirling and Joule-Thomson coolers, electronics for reading out the array, processing the x-ray data for spectroscopy, and operating the ADR and cryocoolers. The dewar is closed out by an aperture system with five thin-film filters designed to provide high x-ray transmission with low heat loads to the dewar and detector system, and prevent contamination from condensing on the filters. The instrument was designed to have better than 7 eV energy resolution, and was demonstrated to achieve 4-5 eV resolution across the array at the full spacecraft level of integration during extensive ground testing prior to launch. The overall cooling chain has been designed to provide a lifetime of at least 3 years in orbit, and continue to operate without liquid helium to provide redundancy and the longest operational lifetime for the instrument. In this presentation, we will describe the early phases of the SXS instrument in orbit and provide a sense of the astronomical results that can be expected. This presentation is