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Sample records for astro research fellowship

  1. Swashzone Fellowships: a 6-month research experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raubenheimer, B.

    2011-12-01

    The Swashzone Fellowships funded by the CAREER program were designed to provide sufficient time for undergraduates with little knowledge of ocean processes and minimal prior research experience to participate in observational nearshore oceanographic studies. The fellows learned background material, developed hypotheses, planned field experiments, designed sensor arrays, tested and debugged instrumentation, collected and analyzed data, and communicated the results through oral and written presentations. The program funded 12 undergraduate student fellows (4 male and 8 female), with backgrounds in math (3 students), physics (4), geology (1), and environmental sciences (4). Preference was given to applicants who had not taken oceanography classes and who were unsure of career plans. All the students presented their results at department seminars, and most presented their results at a professional conference (eg, AGU or Ocean Sciences). The results often were incorporated in peer-reviewed manuscripts. Evaluations conducted following the fellowships and again several years after each fellowship indicated that many of the students pursued STEM careers: 5 are pursuing PhD degrees, including bio-mathematics, physics, atmospheric physics, and ocean physics; 2 are employed at environmental engineering and consulting firms; 4 are employed as research technicians at WHOI; and 1 is a lawyer (currently being considered as a clerk for the Supreme Court). Many of the students were excited to learn about the range of oceanographic career options, including engineering and technical staff, as well as science research. The graduating seniors expressed their appreciation for the fellowship opportunity, stating that there were few science positions available to students without significant prior research experience. Several students noted that the fellowships were critical to their later employment and to their decisions to pursue careers in science. In particular, the students noted

  2. Undergraduate Research Summer Fellowships Undergo Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgren, Timothy E.

    2000-09-01

    At the 22nd Annual Council Meeting of Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR), held this past June at the College of Wooster, the general council voted to make fundamental changes to the Undergraduate Research Summer Fellowship Program. The most important change is that awards will no longer be made to individual students. Instead, awards will be made to individual faculty member on the basis of applications written by faculty members comprised of a curriculum vitae, a description of the proposed research project, and the role of undergraduate collaborators in the proposed research activities. This change brings the program more in line with the overall CUR objective to support faculty in their efforts to provide research experiences for undergraduate students. Faculty members selected for awards will be asked to designate a student recipient at the time the funds are awarded, a key change to the fellowship program.

  3. UPS fellowships support creative engineering research

    OpenAIRE

    Crumbley, Liz

    2007-01-01

    A new $40,000 grant marks the 11th anniversary of support from the United Parcel Service (UPS) Foundation for doctoral fellowships in the Human Factors and Safety Engineering Graduate Program in the Grado Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISE) in the College of Engineering.

  4. 34 CFR 356.11 - What types of problems may be researched under the fellowship program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... REHABILITATION RESEARCH: RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS What Kinds of Activities Does the Department Support Under This... disabilities, and problems connected with the conduct of disability research may be addressed under...

  5. Research Science and Education: The NSF's Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowship

    CERN Document Server

    Norman, Dara; Brown, Timothy M; Browning, Matthew; Chakrabarti, Sukanya; Cobb, Bethany; Coble, Kim; Conselice, Christopher; Cruz, Kelle; Danly, Laura; Frinchaboy, Peter M; Gawiser, Eric; Gelfand, Joseph; Gonzalez, Anthony; Hoffman, Jennifer L; Huterer, Dragan; Johnson, John; Johnson, Roberta M; Kannappan, Sheila; de Naray, Rachel Kuzio; Lai, David; Leonard, Douglas C; Lystrup, Makenzie; Markoff, Sera; Menendez-Delmestre, Karin; Muchovej, Stephan; McSwain, M Virginia; Rhode, Katherine; Smecker-Hane, Tammy; Smith, Malcolm; Sokoloski, Jennifer; Tran, Kim-Vy

    2009-01-01

    The NSF's Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowship (AAPF) is exceptional among the available postdoctoral awards in Astronomy and Astrophysics. The fellowship is one of the few that allows postdoctoral researchers to pursue an original research program, of their own design, at the U.S. institution of their choice. However, what makes this fellowship truly unique is the ability of Fellows to lead an equally challenging, original educational program simultaneously. The legacy of this singular fellowship has been to encourage and advance leaders in the field who are equally as passionate about their own research as they are about sharing that research and their passion for astronomy with students and the public. In this positional paper we address the importance of fellowships like the AAPF to the astronomical profession by identifying the science and educational contributions that Fellows have made to the community. Further, we recommend that fellowships that encourage leading postdoctoral researchers...

  6. AstroCloud, a Cyber-Infrastructure for Astronomy Research: Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, J.; Yu, C.; Cui, C.; He, B.; Li, C.; Fan, D.; Hong, Z.; Yin, S.; Wang, C.; Cao, Z.; Fan, Y.; Li, S.; Mi, L.; Wan, W.; Wang, J.; Zhang, H.

    2015-09-01

    AstroCloud is a cyber-Infrastructure for Astronomy Research initiated by Chinese Virtual Observatory (China-VO) under funding support from NDRC (National Development and Reform commission) and CAS (Chinese Academy of Sciences). The ultimate goal of this project is to provide a comprehensive end-to-end astronomy research environment where several independent systems seamlessly collaborate to support the full lifecycle of the modern observational astronomy based on big data, from proposal submission, to data archiving, data release, and to in-situ data analysis and processing. In this paper, the architecture and key designs of the AstroCloud platform are introduced, including data access middleware, access control and security framework, extendible proposal workflow, and system integration mechanism.

  7. AstroCloud, a Cyber-Infrastructure for Astronomy Research: Architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Jian; Cui, Chenzhou; He, Boliang; Li, Changhua; Fan, Dongwei; Hong, Zhi; Yin, Shucheng; Wang, Chuanjun; Cao, Zihuang; Fan, Yufeng; Li, Shanshan; Mi, Linying; Wan, Wanghui; Wang, Jianguo; Zhang, Hailong

    2014-01-01

    AstroCloud is a cyber-Infrastructure for Astronomy Research initiated by Chinese Virtual Observatory (China-VO) under funding support from NDRC (National Development and Reform commission) and CAS (Chinese Academy of Sciences). The ultimate goal of this project is to provide a comprehensive end-to-end astronomy research environment where several independent systems seamlessly collaborate to support the full lifecycle of the modern observational astronomy based on big data, from proposal submission, to data archiving, data release, and to in-situ data analysis and processing. In this paper, the architecture and key designs of the AstroCloud platform are introduced, including data access middleware, access control and security framework, extendible proposal workflow, and system integration mechanism.

  8. AstroCloud, a Cyber-Infrastructure for Astronomy Research: Data Archiving and Quality Control

    CERN Document Server

    He, Boliang; Fan, Dongwei; Li, Changhua; Xiao, Jian; Yu, Ce; Wang, Chuanjun; Cao, Zihuang; Chen, Junyi; Yi, Weimin; Li, Shanshan; Mi, Linying; Yang, Sisi

    2014-01-01

    AstroCloud is a cyber-Infrastructure for Astronomy Research initiated by Chinese Virtual Observatory (China-VO) under funding support from NDRC (National Development and Reform commission) and CAS (Chinese Academy of Sciences){\\url{http://astrocloud.china-vo.org}}\\citep{O8-5_Cui_adassxxiv}. To archive the astronomical data in China, we present the implementation of the astronomical data archiving system (ADAS). Data archiving and quality control are the infrastructure for the AstroCloud. Throughout the data of the entire life cycle, data archiving system standardized data, transferring data, logging observational data, archiving ambient data, And storing these data and metadata in database. Quality control covers the whole process and all aspects of data archiving.

  9. Astro research fellowship: low dose radiation to prevent restenosis after angioplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the optimal time to deliver a single dose of external radiation therapy (12 Gy) postoperatively following balloon angioplasty (on same day, day 2 or day 4) to prevent restenosis in a non-stented swine model. To model an endovascular radioactive source for prevention of restenosis in the same animal model. Materials and Methods: Both external iliac arteries in eleven red duroc swine were injured using balloon overdilation (3 inflations, 60 secs. each, 16 psi), and the first five were additionally injured using denudation. One artery in each animal was then irradiated using anteroposterior and posterioranterior fields using Co-60 with 12 Gy prescribed to the midplane, with the other artery serving as a control. Irradiation was delivered on the same day, day 2 or day 4. Animals were sacrificed 3 months following injury, and histomorphometric analysis was performed. Additionally, a prototype endovascular beta source was designed and manufactured for clinical testing, based on Monte Carlo estimations. Results: Neointima formation was noted in both radiated and control arteries. The mean neointimal thickness in the radiated and control arteries was 116 ± 39 μm and 131 ± 47 μm respectively. Time of radiation delivery did not have a significant effect in preventing restenosis. Physical measurements of the endovascular source are in progress using a water based phantom. Animal testing will commence on ten red duroc swine. Conclusion: External radiation at this low dose does not appear to prevent restenosis in an unstented animal model. We hope to begin animal experiments using an endovascular source to prevent restenosis

  10. AstroCloud, a Cyber-Infrastructure for Astronomy Research: Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, C.; Yu, C.; Xiao, J.; He, B.; Li, C.; Fan, D.; Wang, C.; Hong, Z.; Li, S.; Mi, L.; Wan, W.; Cao, Z.; Wang, J.; Yin, S.; Fan, Y.; Wang, J.

    2015-09-01

    AstroCloud is a cyber-Infrastructure for Astronomy Research initiated by Chinese Virtual Observatory (China-VO) under funding support from NDRC (National Development and Reform commission) and CAS (Chinese Academy of Sciences). Tasks such as proposal submission, proposal peer-review, data archiving, data quality control, data release and open access, Cloud based data processing and analyzing, will be all supported on the platform. It will act as a full lifecycle management system for astronomical data and telescopes. Achievements from international Virtual Observatories and Cloud Computing are adopted heavily. In this paper, backgrounds of the project, key features of the system, and latest progresses are introduced.

  11. Linking Research and Practice: The Fellowship Program in Applied Gerontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofland, Brian F.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Describes history and accomplishments of the Gerontological Society of America's (GSA) Fellowship Program in Applied Gerontology, which places postdoctoral academic gerontologists for three months in agencies and organizations that plan to deliver services to older people. Notes this is one way the GSA encourages policymakers and program directors…

  12. 34 CFR 662.1 - What is the Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellowship Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation... DOCTORAL DISSERTATION RESEARCH ABROAD FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM General § 662.1 What is the Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellowship Program? (a) The Fulbright-Hays Doctoral...

  13. Collaborative Aerospace Research and Fellowship Program at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyward, Ann O.; Kankam, Mark D.

    2004-01-01

    During the summer of 2004, a 10-week activity for university faculty entitled the NASA-OAI Collaborative Aerospace Research and Fellowship Program (CFP) was conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center in collaboration with the Ohio Aerospace Institute (OAI). This is a companion program to the highly successful NASA Faculty Fellowship Program and its predecessor, the NASA-ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program that operated for 38 years at Glenn. The objectives of CFP parallel those of its companion, viz., (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty,(2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between teaching participants and employees of NASA, (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants institutions, and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of Glenn. However, CFP, unlike the NASA program, permits faculty to be in residence for more than two summers and does not limit participation to United States citizens. Selected fellows spend 10 weeks at Glenn working on research problems in collaboration with NASA colleagues and participating in related activities of the NASA-ASEE program. This year's program began officially on June 1, 2004 and continued through August 7, 2004. Several fellows had program dates that differed from the official dates because university schedules vary and because some of the summer research projects warranted a time extension beyond the 10 weeks for satisfactory completion of the work. The stipend paid to the fellows was $1200 per week and a relocation allowance of $1000 was paid to those living outside a 50-mile radius of the Center. In post-program surveys from this and previous years, the faculty cited numerous instances where participation in the program has led to new courses, new research projects, new laboratory experiments, and grants from NASA to continue the work initiated during the summer. Many of the fellows mentioned amplifying material, both in

  14. Frederick National Lab and the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network Award Fellowships for KRAS Research | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) recently formed a partnership with the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PanCAN) to award a one-year fellowship to two scientists whose research will help lead to new therapies for pancreatic cancer. The scientists will focus on KRAS, a gene in the RAS family that is mutated in 95 percent of pancreatic cancers, according to the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

  15. Prevalence and Cost of Full-Time Research Fellowships During General Surgery Residency – A National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Charles M.; Klingensmith, Mary E.; Coopersmith, Craig M.

    2009-01-01

    Structured Abstract Objective To quantify the prevalence, outcomes, and cost of surgical resident research. Summary Background Data General surgery is unique among graduate medical education programs because a large percentage of residents interrupt their clinical training to spend 1-3 years performing full-time research. No comprehensive data exists on the scope of this practice. Methods Survey sent to all 239 program directors of general surgery residencies participating in the National Resident Matching Program. Results Response rate was 200/239 (84%). A total of 381 out of 1052 trainees (36%) interrupt residency to pursue full-time research. The mean research fellowship length is 1.7 years, with 72% of trainees performing basic science research. A significant association was found between fellowship length and post-residency activity, with a 14.7% increase in clinical fellowship training and a 15.2% decrease in private practice positions for each year of full-time research (p<0.0001). Program directors at 31% of programs reported increased clinical duties for research fellows as a result of ACGME work hour regulations for clinical residents, while a further 10% of programs are currently considering such changes. It costs $41.5 million to pay the 634 trainees who perform research fellowships each year, the majority of which is paid for by departmental funds (40%) and institutional training grants (24%). Conclusions Interrupting residency to perform a research fellowship is a common and costly practice among general surgery residents. While performing a research fellowship is associated with clinical fellowship training after residency, it is unclear to what extent this practice leads to the development of surgical investigators after post-graduate training. PMID:19106692

  16. The 1984 ASEE-NASA summer faculty fellowship program (aeronautics and research)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dah-Nien, F.; Hodge, J. R.; Emad, F. P.

    1984-01-01

    The 1984 NASA-ASEE Faculty Fellowship Program (SFFP) is reported. The report includes: (1) a list of participants; (2) abstracts of research projects; (3) seminar schedule; (4) evaluation questionnaire; and (5) agenda of visitation by faculty programs committee. Topics discussed include: effects of multiple scattering on laser beam propagation; information management; computer techniques; guidelines for writing user documentation; 30 graphics software; high energy electron and antiproton cosmic rays; high resolution Fourier transform infrared spectrum; average monthly annual zonal and global albedos; laser backscattering from ocean surface; image processing systems; geomorphological mapping; low redshift quasars; application of artificial intelligence to command management systems.

  17. The AstroVR Collaboratory, an On-line Multi-User Environment for Research in Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Buren, D.; Curtis, P.; Nichols, D. A.; Brundage, M.

    We describe our experiment with an on-line collaborative environment where users share the execution of programs and communicate via audio, video, and typed text. Collaborative environments represent the next step in computer-mediated conferencing, combining powerful compute engines, data persistence, shared applications, and teleconferencing tools. As proof of concept, we have implemented a shared image analysis tool, allowing geographically distinct users to analyze FITS images together. We anticipate that \\htmllink{AstroVR}{http://astrovr.ipac.caltech.edu:8888} and similar systems will become an important part of collaborative work in the next decade, including with applications in remote observing, spacecraft operations, on-line meetings, as well as and day-to-day research activities. The technology is generic and promises to find uses in business, medicine, government, and education.

  18. A Summer Research Program of NASA/Faculty Fellowships at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albee, Arden

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Faculty Fellowship Program (NFFP) is designed to give college and university faculty members a rewarding personal as well as enriching professional experience. Fellowships are awarded to engineering and science faculty for work on collaborative research projects of mutual interest to the fellow and his or her JPL host colleague. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have participated in the NASA Faculty Fellowship Program for more than 25 years. Administrative offices are maintained both at the Caltech Campus and at JPL; however, most of the activity takes place at JPL. The Campus handles all fiscal matters. The duration of the program is ten continuous weeks. Fellows are required to conduct their research on-site. To be eligible to participate in the program, fellows must be a U.S. citizen and hold a teaching or research appointment at a U.S. university or college. The American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) contracts with NASA and manages program recruitment. Over the past several years, we have made attempts to increase the diversity of the participants in the NFFP Program. A great deal of attention has been given to candidates from minority-serving institutions. There were approximately 100 applicants for the 34 positions in 2002. JPL was the first-choice location for more than half of them. Faculty from 16 minority-serving institutions participated as well as four women. The summer began with an orientation meeting that included introduction of key program personnel, and introduction of the fellows to each other. During this welcome, the fellows were briefed on their obligations to the program and to their JPL colleagues. They were also given a short historical perspective on JPL and its relationship to Caltech and NASA. All fellows received a package, which included information on administrative procedures, roster of fellows, seminar program, housing questionnaire, directions to JPL, maps of

  19. Updates from Astrobites: The Astro-ph Reader's Digest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montet, Benjamin; Chisari, N.; Donaldson, J.; Dressing, C. D.; Drout, M.; Faesi, C.; Fuchs, J. T.; Kohler, S.; Lovegrove, E.; Mills, E. A.; Nesvold, E.; Newton, E. R.; Olmstead, A.; Vasel, J. A.; Weiss, L. M.; Astrobites Team

    2014-01-01

    Astrobites (http://astrobites.com) is a daily blog aimed at undergraduates interested in astrophysical research and written by a team of graduate students located at diverse institutions across the United States. Primarily, we present journal articles recently posted to astro-ph in a brief format that is accessible to anyone with a general background in the physical sciences, including readers who are not yet familiar with the astrophysical literature. Special posts offer career guidance for undergraduates (e.g. applying for an NSF graduate fellowship) and describe personal experiences (e.g. attending an astronomy summer school). We present recent readership statistics and potential methods for incorporating Astrobites into the classroom. We also discuss the Astrobites format across multiple social media platforms, including the newly launched Astroplots, and highlight our recent work organizing the annual "Communicating Science" workshop for graduate students.

  20. Astrobites: The Astro-ph Reader's Digest For Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna; Astrobites Team

    2013-04-01

    Astrobites (http://astrobites.com) is a daily blog aimed primarily at undergraduates interested in astrophysical research and written by a team of graduate students located at diverse institutions around the world. Nearly every day we present a journal article recently posted to astro-ph in a brief format that is accessible to anyone with a general background in the physical sciences. In addition to summarizing new work, Astrobites provides valuable context for readers not yet familiar with the astrophysical literature. Special posts offer career guidance for undergraduates (e.g. applying for an NSF graduate fellowship) and describe personal experiences (e.g. attending an astronomy summer school). We will discuss the Astrobites format and recent readership statistics, as well as potential methods for incorporating Astrobites into the classroom.

  1. Bursaries, writing grants and fellowships: a strategy to develop research capacity in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farmer Elizabeth A

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background General practitioners and other primary health care professionals are often the first point of contact for patients requiring health care. Identifying, understanding and linking current evidence to best practice can be challenging and requires at least a basic understanding of research principles and methodologies. However, not all primary health care professionals are trained in research or have research experience. With the aim of enhancing research skills and developing a research culture in primary health care, University Departments of General Practice and Rural Health have been supported since 2000 by the Australian Government funded 'Primary Health Care Research Evaluation and Development (PHCRED Strategy'. A small grant funding scheme to support primary health care practitioners was implemented through the PHCRED program at Flinders University in South Australia between 2002 and 2005. The scheme incorporated academic mentors and three types of funding support: bursaries, writing grants and research fellowships. This article describes outcomes of the funding scheme and contributes to the debate surrounding the effectiveness of funding schemes as a means of building research capacity. Methods Funding recipients who had completed their research were invited to participate in a semi-structured 40-minute telephone interview. Feedback was sought on acquisition of research skills, publication outcomes, development of research capacity, confidence and interest in research, and perception of research. Data were also collected on demographics, research topics, and time needed to complete planned activities. Results The funding scheme supported 24 bursaries, 11 writing grants, and three research fellows. Nearly half (47% of all grant recipients were allied health professionals, followed by general practitioners (21%. The majority (70% were novice and early career researchers. Eighty-nine percent of the grant recipients were

  2. Research jobs for recent college graduates: A comparison between traditional lab technician positions and NIH’s postbaccalaureate IRTA fellowship.

    OpenAIRE

    Herbert, J. Taylor

    2003-01-01

    The features that distinguish the Postbaccalaureate IRTA experience from a normal lab tech job are the enhanced educational opportunities, greater independence, more organized social outlets and networking opportunities, life in the DC Metro area, and the NIH itself. Also, research experience looks great on a CV when applying for research jobs or graduate schools, and the NIH name and Postbaccalaureate IRTA fellowship are impressive to potential employers and admissions committees.

  3. Building a Bright Future. The Hydro Research Foundation's Fellowship Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughn, Brenna [Hydro Research Foundation, Inc., Evergreen, CO (United States); Linke, Deborah M. [Hydro Research Foundation, Inc., Evergreen, CO (United States)

    2015-12-29

    The Hydro Fellowship Program (program) began as an experiment to discover whether the hydropower industry could find mechanisms to attract new entrants through conducting relevant research to benefit the industry. This nationwide, new-to-the-world program was started through funding from the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Office of the Department of Energy (DOE). Between 2010-2015, the Hydro Research Foundation (HRF) designed and implemented a program to conduct valuable research and attract new entrants to the hydro workforce. This historic grant has empowered and engaged industry members from 25 organizations by working with 91 students and advisors at 24 universities in 19 states. The work funded answered pressing research needs in the fields of civil, mechanical, environmental, and electrical engineering, as well as law, energy engineering and materials innovation. In terms of number of individuals touched through funding, 148 individuals were supported by this work through direct research, mentorship, oversight of the work, partnerships and the day-to-day program administration. Based on the program results, it is clear that the funding achieved the hoped-for outcomes and has the capacity to draw universities into the orbit of hydropower and continue the conversation about industry research and development needs. The Foundation has fostered unique partnerships at the host universities and has continued to thrive with the support of the universities, advisors, industry and the DOE. The Foundation has demonstrated industry support through mentorships, partnerships, underwriting the costs and articulating the universities’ support through in-kind cost sharing. The Foundation recommends that future work be continued to nurture these graduate level programs using the initial work and improvements in the successor program, the Research Awards Program, while stimulating engagement of academia at the

  4. Research Capacity Strengthening in Low and Middle Income Countries - An Evaluation of the WHO/TDR Career Development Fellowship Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käser, Michael; Maure, Christine; Halpaap, Beatrice M M; Vahedi, Mahnaz; Yamaka, Sara; Launois, Pascal; Casamitjana, Núria

    2016-05-01

    Between August 2012 and April 2013 the Career Development Fellowship programme of the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (World Health Organization) underwent an external evaluation to assess its past performance and determine recommendations for future programme development and continuous performance improvement. The programme provides a year-long training experience for qualified researchers from low and middle income countries at pharmaceutical companies or product development partnerships. Independent evaluators from the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute and the Barcelona Institute for Global Health used a results-based methodology to review the programme. Data were gathered through document review, surveys, and interviews with a range of programme participants. The final evaluation report found the Career Development Fellowship to be relevant to organizers' and programme objectives, efficient in its operations, and effective in its training scheme, which was found to address needs and gaps for both fellows and their home institutions. Evaluators found that the programme has the potential for impact and sustainability beyond the programme period, especially with the successful reintegration of fellows into their home institutions, through which newly-developed skills can be shared at the institutional level. Recommendations included the development of a scheme to support the re-integration of fellows into their home institutions post-fellowship and to seek partnerships to facilitate the scaling-up of the programme. The impact of the Professional Membership Scheme, an online professional development tool launched through the programme, beyond the scope of the Career Development Fellowship programme itself to other applications, has been identified as a positive unintended outcome. The results of this evaluation may be of interest for other efforts in the field of research capacity strengthening in LMICs or, generally, to

  5. An Analysis of Research from Faculty at U.S. Adult Reconstruction Fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formby, Peter M; Pavey, Gabriel J; Van Blarcum, Gregory S; Mack, Andrew W; Newman, Michael T

    2015-12-01

    We reviewed all articles published in three major orthopaedic journals from January 2010 to December 2014. Any article focusing on adult reconstruction of the hip or knee was reviewed for first and last authorship, institution, and level of evidence. Three institutions had authored work from arthroplasty faculty that fell within the top five most published institutions in all three journals, while one institution ranked first in all three journals. 43 of 67 (64.2%) reconstruction fellowships had at least one publication included in this study. The majority of the adult reconstruction literature published by faculty at U.S. reconstruction fellowships stems from a few academic centers with the ten most prolific institutions accounting for 65.9% of all U.S. fellowship publications. PMID:26129853

  6. MO-E-BRF-01: Research Opportunities in Technology for Innovation in Radiation Oncology (Highlight of ASTRO NCI 2013 Workshop)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, S [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Jaffray, D [Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Chetty, I [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Benedict, S [UC Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Radiotherapy is one of the most effective treatments for solid tumors, in large part due to significant technological advances associated with, for instance, the ability to target tumors to very high levels of accuracy (within millimeters). Technological advances have played a central role in the success of radiation therapy as an oncologic treatment option for patients. ASTRO, AAPM and NCI sponsored a workshop “Technology for Innovation in Radiation Oncology” at the NCI campus in Bethesda, MD on June 13–14, 2013. The purpose of this workshop was to bring together expert clinicians and scientists to discuss the role of disruptive technologies in radiation oncology, in particular with regard to how they are being developed and translated to clinical practice in the face of current and future challenges and opportunities. The technologies discussed encompassed imaging and delivery aspects, along with methods to enable/facilitate application of them in the clinic. Measures for assessment of the performance of these technologies, such as techniques to validate quantitative imaging, were reviewed. Novel delivery technologies, incorporating efficient and safe delivery mechanisms enabled by development of tools for process automation and the associated field of oncology informatics formed one of the central themes of the workshop. The discussion on disruptive technologies was grounded in the need for evidence of efficacy. Scientists in the areas of technology assessment and bioinformatics provided expert views on different approaches toward evaluation of technology efficacy. Clinicians well versed in clinical trials incorporating disruptive technologies (e.g. SBRT for early stage lung cancer) discussed the important role of these technologies in significantly improving local tumor control and survival for these cohorts of patients. Recommendations summary focused on the opportunities associated with translating the technologies into the clinic and assessing their

  7. MO-E-BRF-01: Research Opportunities in Technology for Innovation in Radiation Oncology (Highlight of ASTRO NCI 2013 Workshop)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is one of the most effective treatments for solid tumors, in large part due to significant technological advances associated with, for instance, the ability to target tumors to very high levels of accuracy (within millimeters). Technological advances have played a central role in the success of radiation therapy as an oncologic treatment option for patients. ASTRO, AAPM and NCI sponsored a workshop “Technology for Innovation in Radiation Oncology” at the NCI campus in Bethesda, MD on June 13–14, 2013. The purpose of this workshop was to bring together expert clinicians and scientists to discuss the role of disruptive technologies in radiation oncology, in particular with regard to how they are being developed and translated to clinical practice in the face of current and future challenges and opportunities. The technologies discussed encompassed imaging and delivery aspects, along with methods to enable/facilitate application of them in the clinic. Measures for assessment of the performance of these technologies, such as techniques to validate quantitative imaging, were reviewed. Novel delivery technologies, incorporating efficient and safe delivery mechanisms enabled by development of tools for process automation and the associated field of oncology informatics formed one of the central themes of the workshop. The discussion on disruptive technologies was grounded in the need for evidence of efficacy. Scientists in the areas of technology assessment and bioinformatics provided expert views on different approaches toward evaluation of technology efficacy. Clinicians well versed in clinical trials incorporating disruptive technologies (e.g. SBRT for early stage lung cancer) discussed the important role of these technologies in significantly improving local tumor control and survival for these cohorts of patients. Recommendations summary focused on the opportunities associated with translating the technologies into the clinic and assessing their

  8. Research jobs for recent college graduates: A comparison between traditional lab technician positions and NIH's postbaccalaureate IRTA fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, J Taylor

    2003-01-01

    The features that distinguish the Postbaccalaureate IRTA experience from a normal lab tech job are the enhanced educational opportunities, greater independence, more organized social outlets and networking opportunities, life in the DC Metro area, and the NIH itself. Also, research experience looks great on a CV when applying for research jobs or graduate schools, and the NIH name and Postbaccalaureate IRTA fellowship are impressive to potential employers and admissions committees. On the other hand, lab tech jobs often require fewer commitments outside of a normal 9-to-5 work day and usually have better pay and benefits than the Postbaccalaureate IRTA fellowship. In addition, working at a specific university often carries the benefit of being closer to one's family, friends, and/or significant others. Someone who does not like cities can choose to work at a university that has ready access to the beach, mountains, or regions of the country that are more personally appealing than the Washington, DC, area. Lab tech jobs also usually require at least a two year commitment, whereas the Postbac IRTA fellowship is generally a one year commitment (possibly two). Regardless of which option you choose, you should be active in searching for a job that lets you fulfill the goals you set for yourself in the years between graduating and starting graduate or medical school. Whether those goals are to publish, get experience, save money, or just enjoy yourself, with careful questioning and circumspection, you should be able to maximize the possibility that you will meet your goals. PMID:23741203

  9. Capacity development for health research in Africa: experiences managing the African Doctoral Dissertation Research Fellowship Program

    OpenAIRE

    Wambugu Susan W; Izugbara Chimaraoke O; Kabiru Caroline W; Ezeh Alex C

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Africa's progress depends on her capacity to generate, adapt, and use scientific knowledge to meet regional health and development needs. Yet, Africa's higher education institutions that are mandated to foster this capacity lack adequate resources to generate and apply knowledge, raising the need for innovative approaches to enhance research capacity. In this paper, we describe a newly-developed program to support PhD research in health and population sciences at African universities...

  10. Terra Cognita: Graduate Students in the Archives. A Retrospective on the CLIR Mellon Fellowships for Dissertation Research in Original Sources. CLIR Publication No. 170

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council on Library and Information Resources, 2016

    2016-01-01

    "Terra Cognita" surveys the current landscape of archival research and the experiences of emerging scholars seeking to navigate it. Drawing on data from the Council on Library and Information Resources' (CLIR's) Mellon Fellowships for Dissertation Research in Original Sources, the report takes an in-depth look at how the conditions and…

  11. ASTRO-1 Logo

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-35, launched December 2, 1990, was the ASTRO-1 Observatory. Designed for round the clock observation of the celestial sphere in ultraviolet and X-ray astronomy, ASTRO-1 featured a collection of four telescopes: the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT); the Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo- Polarimeter Experiment (WUPPE); the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT); and the Broad Band X-ray Telescope (BBXRT). Ultraviolet telescopes mounted on Spacelab elements in cargo bay were to be operated in shifts by flight crew. Loss of both data display units (used for pointing telescopes and operating experiments) during mission impacted crew-aiming procedures and forced ground teams at Marshall Space Flight Center to aim ultraviolet telescopes with fine-tuning by flight crew. BBXRT, also mounted in cargo bay, was directed from outset by ground-based operators at Goddard Space Flight Center. This is the logo or emblem that was designed to represent the ASTRO-1 payload.

  12. AstroArts

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paulis, D.

    2014-04-01

    AstroArts is the international, online cultural platform of Astronomers Without Borders (AWB). Cofounded in 2012 by visual artist Daniela de Paulis (IT/NL) and astronomer Thilina Heenatigala (Sri Lanka), AstroArts features creative works inspired by astronomy . AstroArts is an international initiative - lead by professionals working in different fields - and includes the 'guest artist of the month' and the Global Astronomy Month programmes. For the 'guest of the month', we feature one artist through a series of weekly blog posts and a Google Hangout on the last week of each month. The Hangout usually includes guests from several of the AWB ongoing programmes, together with the artist, in order to foster collaboration and interdisciplinary discussion. The 'guest of the month' programme is currently expanding to include a virtual residency initiative, which will allow one artist at the time to develop a project in collaboration with scientists affiliated with the AWB network. The projects developed as part of the virtual residency will foster global participation, making the most of online resources. Global Astronomy Month (GAM) is the most popular project of Astronomers Without Borders: founded in 2009 as a follow up of the International Year of Astronomy, GAM is a global platform for astronomy related events that take place every year in April. During GAM, AstroArts is widely featured through online panel discussions with artists and scientists, live film screenings and live performances, often especially designed for web streaming. More information on AstroArts can be found on: http://astronomerswithoutborders.org/news.htm

  13. The effect of p53 variation on radiosensitivity in a mouse prostate cancer model (work performed during ASTRO research fellowship year)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Prostate cancer has become the most common cancer by incidence in U.S. males, responsible for approximately 3% of all male deaths above the age of 55. p53 mutations are known to increase carcinogenic and metastatic potential and are a common genetic abnormality in prostate cancer. Examinations of p53 status in other cell lines and treated tumors have yielded mixed results regarding its effects on radiosensitivity. We have tested the effect of varying p53 status on radiosensitivity in a mouse prostate cancer model. Methods and Materials: Early passage cell lines of different p53 status were derived from an induced mouse prostate cancer model. Additional lines were used with restored wt-p53 or mutant status to examine external manipulation. The radiosensitivity was evaluated by clonogenic assays/survival curve generation and flow cytometry, before and after radiation Results: The presence of wt-p53 corresponded with increased radiosensitivity as mutant-p53 and the presence of mdm2 did with decreased sensitivity. Gene replacement studies with wild type and mutant p53 in p53 null cell lines corroborated the germline cell experiments. Evaluation of the cell lines with flow cytometry did not reveal the expected a significant increase in G1 with p53 replacement after radiation but did result in the expected (post-irradiation) G2 increase Conclusions: Variation and manipulation of wild type p53 status can result in changes in radiosensitivity, increasing with its presence and function, in vitro in the mouse prostate cancer model. This effect can be replicated in vitro with gene replacement therapy. The expected increase in G1 with wt-p53 after radiation was not seen. Further studies should include evaluation of apoptotic versus mitotic cell death, in vitro analysis of wt-p53 replacement and examination of replacement or enhancement therapy with other cycle-modifying cytokines

  14. Project ASTRO - Tucson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C. E.; Jacoby, S. H.

    2001-05-01

    Led by NOAO Educational Outreach, Project ASTRO-Tucson has reached nearly 14,000 2nd - 9th grade students over the last six years by forming ongoing partnerships of teachers and astronomers. To foster and facilitate these partnerships, the Project ASTRO-Tucson website now features activities and resources of interest to astronomers and teachers. Highlights include a video showing frame by frame impact of projectiles in flour from the popular ``Universe at Your Fingertips'' activity, ``Experimenting with Craters'', and a forum for discussing the integration of astronomy, inquiry, writing and art within the framework of Moon Journals. This work is funded by the National Science Foundation and NASA IDEAS Grant #ED-90207.01-99A,

  15. Research Capacity Strengthening in Low and Middle Income Countries – An Evaluation of the WHO/TDR Career Development Fellowship Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käser, Michael; Maure, Christine; Halpaap, Beatrice M. M.; Vahedi, Mahnaz; Yamaka, Sara; Launois, Pascal; Casamitjana, Núria

    2016-01-01

    Between August 2012 and April 2013 the Career Development Fellowship programme of the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (World Health Organization) underwent an external evaluation to assess its past performance and determine recommendations for future programme development and continuous performance improvement. The programme provides a year-long training experience for qualified researchers from low and middle income countries at pharmaceutical companies or product development partnerships. Independent evaluators from the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute and the Barcelona Institute for Global Health used a results-based methodology to review the programme. Data were gathered through document review, surveys, and interviews with a range of programme participants. The final evaluation report found the Career Development Fellowship to be relevant to organizers’ and programme objectives, efficient in its operations, and effective in its training scheme, which was found to address needs and gaps for both fellows and their home institutions. Evaluators found that the programme has the potential for impact and sustainability beyond the programme period, especially with the successful reintegration of fellows into their home institutions, through which newly-developed skills can be shared at the institutional level. Recommendations included the development of a scheme to support the re-integration of fellows into their home institutions post-fellowship and to seek partnerships to facilitate the scaling-up of the programme. The impact of the Professional Membership Scheme, an online professional development tool launched through the programme, beyond the scope of the Career Development Fellowship programme itself to other applications, has been identified as a positive unintended outcome. The results of this evaluation may be of interest for other efforts in the field of research capacity strengthening in LMICs or, generally, to

  16. 76 FR 93 - Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships (SURF) NIST Gaithersburg and Boulder Programs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ... conduct stem cell research adopt the ``National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Human Stem Cell... compliance, NIST will support and conduct research using only human embryonic stem cell lines that have been... previous Executive Orders and Presidential statements regarding the use of human embryonic stem cells...

  17. Graduate trainee fellowships for energy research in Mississippi. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The Mississippi DOE EPSCoR Project has been a program of education and research which has (1) increased the number of trained professionals in the energy sciences and technology, particularly those from groups traditionally under-represented in the field and (2) interfaced with existing networks of universities, industry, federal, and state institutions involved in energy-related activities. Key project activities that have been accomplished are shown below: (1) Statewide conference on energy related research held; (2) HBCU pipeline issue addressed; (3) Research preceptors/problems selected; (4) Trainees screened and accepted; (5) Research initiated; and (6) Practicums organized. Mississippi`s three comprehensive universities -- The University of Mississippi, Mississippi State University, and the University of Southern Mississippi -- and the urban institution, Jackson State University have provided a foundation for the expansion of energy-related education and research in the state. The activities of the Mississippi DOE EPSCoR program have been executed under a management strategy developed to establish statewide coordination of research and education programs, i.e., the Mississippi Research Consortium. The Consortium has served as the steering committee for the DOE EPSCoR Program Consortium.

  18. Calibration of the ASTRO-E XRS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US-Japanese ASTRO-E observatory, is scheduled to be launched in early 2000. ASTRO-E carries four X-ray CCD detectors and a hard X-ray detector. The CCDs are located at the focus of grazing incidence X-ray mirrors and will primarily provide imaging over 0.4-12 keV bandpass. ASTRO-E also carries the XRS microcalorimeter X-ray detector. A platinum X-ray mirror will focus X-rays onto a 32-element array of microcalorimeter pixels for high-throughput, high-resolution spectroscopy with limited spatial resolution. The mean measured energy resolution of the XRS flight model detector is about 12 eV at 6 keV for the nominal operating temperature of 65 mK. We present results from our calibration of the XRS flight model detector. We describe the methods used to determine the spectral redistribution of the detector and the overall detection efficiency

  19. AstroNet-II International Final Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Masdemont, Josep

    2016-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the "AstroNet-II International Final Conference". This conference was one of the last milestones of the Marie-Curie Research Training Network on Astrodynamics "AstroNet-II", that has been funded by the European Commission under the Seventh Framework Programme. The aim of the conference, and thus this book, is to communicate work on astrodynamics problems to an international and specialised audience. The results are presented by both members of the network and invited specialists. The topics include: trajectory design and control, attitude control, structural flexibility of spacecraft and formation flying. The book addresses a readership across the traditional boundaries between mathematics, engineering and industry by offering an interdisciplinary and multisectorial overview of the field.

  20. NASA Early Career Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, H. D.

    2012-12-01

    The Early Career Fellowship program was established in 2005 to facilitate the integration of outstanding early career planetary science researchers into established research funding programs by providing tools and experience useful to maintain a successful research program. Executing a successful research program requires a few key elements such as: successful proposal writing; adequate (paid) research time; management of a laboratory; collaboration and networking; frequent and high-quality publications; and adequate start-up equipment funds. These elements may be particularly critical for early career researchers searching for a tenure- track or equivalent position. The Early Career Fellowship program recognizes the importance of these skills and provides extra funding and resources to begin a successful research program. For consideration into The Early Career Fellowship program, the candidate needs to be the P. I. or Science P.I. of a funded research proposal from one of the participating R&A program areas, be within 7 years of earning a PhD, hold a non-tenure track position, and indicate the early career candidacy when submitting the research proposal. If the research proposal is funded and the discipline scientist nominates the candidate as an early career fellow, the candidate is then considered a Fellow and eligible to propose for Step 2. Upon obtaining a tenure-track equivalent position the Fellow submits a Step 2 proposal for up to one hundred thousand dollars in start-up funds. Start-up funds may be used for salary; undergraduate and/or graduate research assistants; supplies and instrument upgrades; travel to conferences, meetings, and advisory groups; time and travel for learning new skills; publication page charges; books and journal subscriptions; computer time and/or specialized software; and other justified research-specific needs. The early career fellowship program provides resources that a more established scientist would have acquired allowing

  1. Survey of international regional anesthesia fellowship directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lansdown AK

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Andrew K Lansdown,1,2 Paul G McHardy,1 Sanjiv C Patel,1,3 Catherine M Nix,1 Colin JL McCartney1 1Department of Anesthesia, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3University College Hospital, London, UK Background: The scope of regional anesthesia fellowship programs has not been analyzed but may provide insights that could improve fellowship training and standards. Methods: Regional anesthesia fellowship directors across the world were asked to complete a comprehensive survey that detailed the range of educational and practical experience and attitudes as well as assessment procedures offered in their programs. Results: The survey response rate was 66% (45/68. Overall, the range of activities and the time and resources committed to education during fellowships is encouraging. A wide range of nerve block experience is reported with most programs also offering acute pain management, research, and teaching opportunities. Only two-thirds of fellowships provide formal feedback. This feedback is typically a formative assessment. Conclusion: This is the first survey of regional anesthesia fellowship directors, and it illustrates the international scope and continuing expansion of education and training in the field. The results should be of interest to program directors seeking to benchmark and improve their educational programs and to faculty involved in further curriculum development. Keywords: anesthesia, regional, fellowship, education

  2. Astro-Science Workshop: Education and Public Outreach at the Adler Planetarium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodnicki, Lauren R.; Hammergren, M.; Puckett, A.

    2006-12-01

    Astro-Science Workshop, a 43-year-old program, is a unique opportunity for research astronomers at the Adler Planetarium in Chicago to work with gifted area high school students on project-based learning. In its current form, ASW is funded by a fellowship from the NSF and run by a graduate student from the University of Chicago. The immersion program is as much a learning experience for the graduate student as for the high school students who attend the 3-4 week course. Because the graduate student tailors the program to his/her interests, the program varies greatly from year to year. Recent topics include impacts in the solar system and solar astronomy. Last year the course included an extended weekend at the Yerkes Observatory. The students took images of asteroids with the telescopes on site, analyzed the data themselves, and submitted their measurements of the asteroids' positions to the Minor Planet Center, some of which have already been published on the ADS. The plan for Summer 2007 is a 3-week course on the formation of the Solar System, in which students will explore the near-space environment with high-altitude balloon-born instruments that they build themselves. ASW provides a unique opportunity for an informal learning instituion to connect high school students with astronomers and institutions of higher learning. It has provided over a thousand students with college-level instruction and exposure to the cutting edge of astronomical research.

  3. The ASTRO-H Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, Tadayuki; Kelley, Richard; Aharonian, Felix; Akimoto, Fumie; Allen, Steve; Anabuki, Naohisa; Angelini, Lorella; Arnaud, Keith; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Bamba, Aya; Bando, Nobutaka; Bautz, Mark; Blandford, Roger; Boyce, Kevin; Brown, Greg; Chernyakova, Maria; Coppi, Paolo; Costantini, Elisa; Cottam, Jean; Crow, John; de Plaa, Jelle; de Vries, Cor; Herder, Jan-Willem den; DiPirro, Michael; Done, Chris; Dotani, Tadayasu; Ebisawa, Ken; Enoto, Teruaki; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fabian, Andrew; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Funk, Stefan; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Gandhi, Poshak; Gendreau, Keith; Gilmore, Kirk; Haba, Yoshito; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Hatsukade, Isamu; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Hiraga, Junko; Hirose, Kazuyuki; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hughes, John; Hwang, Una; Iizuka, Ryo; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Ishida, Manabu; Ishimura, Kosei; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Isobe, Naoki; Ito, Masayuki; Iwata, Naoko; Kaastra, Jelle; Kallman, Timothy; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Katagiri, Hideaki; Kataoka, Jun; Katsuda, Satoru; Kawaharada, Madoka; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kawasaki, Shigeo; Khangaluyan, Dmitry; Kilbourne, Caroline; Kinugasa, Kenzo; Kitamoto, Shunji; Kitayama, Tetsu; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Kosaka, Tatsuro; Kotani, Taro; Koyama, Katsuji; Kubota, Aya; Kunieda, Hideyo; Laurent, Philippe; Lebrun, Francois; Limousin, Olivier; Loewenstein, Michael; Long, Knox; Madejski, Grzegorz; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Makishima, Kazuo; Markevitch, Maxim; Matsumoto, Hironori; Matsushita, Kyoko; McCammon, Dan; Miller, Jon; Mineshige, Shin; Minesugi, Kenji; Miyazawa, Takuya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mori, Koji; Mori, Hideyuki; Mukai, Koji; Murakami, Hiroshi; Murakami, Toshio; Mushotzky, Richard; Nakagawa, Yujin; Nakagawa, Takao; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakamori, Takeshi; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Namba, Yoshiharu; Nomachi, Masaharu; Dell, Steve O'; Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Mina; Ogi, Keiji; Ohashi, Takaya; Ohno, Masanori; Ohta, Masayuki; Okajima, Takashi; Ota, Naomi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Paerels, Frits; Paltani, Stéphane; Parmer, Arvind; Petre, Robert; Pohl, Martin; Porter, Scott; Ramsey, Brian; Reynolds, Christopher; Sakai, Shin-ichiro; Sambruna, Rita; Sato, Goro; Sato, Yoichi; Serlemitsos, Peter; Shida, Maki; Shimada, Takanobu; Shinozaki, Keisuke; Shirron, Peter; Smith, Randall; Sneiderman, Gary; Soong, Yang; Stawarz, Lukasz; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamura, Takayuki; Tamura, Keisuke; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yasuo; Tanaka, Yasuyuki; Tashiro, Makoto; Tawara, Yuzuru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Terashima, Yuichi; Tombesi, Francesco; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tozuka, Miyako; Tsuboi, Yoko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Takeshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Uchiyama, Hideki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Uno, Shinichiro; Urry, Meg; Watanabe, Shin; White, Nicholas; Yamada, Takahiro; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yamasaki, Noriko; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Yoshida, Atsumasa

    2010-01-01

    The joint JAXA/NASA ASTRO-H mission is the sixth in a series of highly successful X-ray missions initiated by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS). ASTRO-H will investigate the physics of the high-energy universe by performing high-resolution, high-throughput spectroscopy with moderate angular resolution. ASTRO-H covers very wide energy range from 0.3 keV to 600 keV. ASTRO-H allows a combination of wide band X-ray spectroscopy (5-80 keV) provided by multilayer coating, focusing hard X-ray mirrors and hard X-ray imaging detectors, and high energy-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy (0.3-12 keV) provided by thin-foil X-ray optics and a micro-calorimeter array. The mission will also carry an X-ray CCD camera as a focal plane detector for a soft X-ray telescope (0.4-12 keV) and a non-focusing soft gamma-ray detector (40-600 keV) . The micro-calorimeter system is developed by an international collaboration led by ISAS/JAXA and NASA. The simultaneous broad bandpass, coupled with high spectral reso...

  4. Facts about fellowships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellowships are part of the IAEA's technical assistance programme for developing countries. Each year, fellowship nominations are invited from the governments of developing countries, to be submitted to the IAEA through the ministry within the government which is responsible for atomic energy matters. Usually applicants for fellowships are employees of the atomic energy commission within the government, or of the ministry of health, agricultural, or education. Applications from individuals not already employed by the government seldom receive the necessary government endorsement or nomination, which includes a commitment by the government to continue the Fellow's local salary while he is on his fellowship if he is already employed, and to employ him for at least two years after he returns from his fellowship training programme abroad. In applying for a fellowship, the applicant agrees to return to his home country after his training and to work for a period of at least two years in the peaceful uses of atomic energy in his own country. Applications received by the IAEA from the nominating governments undergo a series of evaluations which includes a review by technical experts within the Agency, who recommend suitable technical training for each applicant, including appropriate training institutions and host countries. Whenever suitable, the technical evaluator follows any suggestion by the applicant and his nominating government regarding prospective training institutions and host country. Before a final selection of applicants is made, account is taken of the suitability of training proposed and recommended, the language ability of the applicant relative to the proposed host country, the suitability of the training proposed to the needs of his country's development, and the number of fellowships available to the Agency. Whenever possible, the fellowship is related to a technical assistance project in the developing country, and the training is in conformity with

  5. A core curriculum for clinical fellowship training in pathology informatics

    OpenAIRE

    David S McClintock; Levy, Bruce P.; Lane, William J; Lee, Roy E.; Baron, Jason M.; Klepeis, Veronica E.; Maristela L Onozato; JiYeon Kim; Anand S Dighe; Beckwith, Bruce A; Frank Kuo; Stephen Black-Schaffer; Gilbertson, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In 2007, our healthcare system established a clinical fellowship program in Pathology Informatics. In 2010 a core didactic course was implemented to supplement the fellowship research and operational rotations. In 2011, the course was enhanced by a formal, structured core curriculum and reading list. We present and discuss our rationale and development process for the Core Curriculum and the role it plays in our Pathology Informatics Fellowship Training Program. Materials and Meth...

  6. Update of the China-VO AstroCloud

    CERN Document Server

    Cui, Chenzhou; Xiao, Jian; He, Boliang; Li, Changhua; Fan, Dongwei; Wang, Chuanjun; Hong, Zhi; Li, Shanshan; Mi, Linying; Wan, Wanghui; Cao, Zihuang; Wang, Jiawei; Yin, Shucheng; Fan, Yufeng; Wang, Jianguo; Yang, Sisi; Ling, Yin; Zhang, Hailong; Chen, Junyi; Liu, Liang; Chen, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    As the cyber-infrastructure for Astronomical research from Chinese Virtual Observatory (China-VO) project, AstroCloud has been archived solid progresses during the last one year. Proposal management system and data access system are re-designed. Several new sub-systems are developed, including China-VO PaperData, AstroCloud Statics and Public channel. More data sets and application environments are integrated into the platform. LAMOST DR1, the largest astronomical spectrum archive was released to the public using the platform. The latest progresses will be introduced.

  7. Asianisation of Campus Fellowships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Lydia

    2007-01-01

    Asian American college students are often stereotyped as immersed in math clubs or networking groups for future engineers or doctors. However, the campus groups that Asians most commonly join are actually Christian fellowships, educators say. In fact, Asian membership in the ministries has exploded in recent years and is most striking at the most…

  8. IAEA Fellowship Program, 1996 report on United States participants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Fellowship Program began in April 1958 as a part of the Agency's Technical Cooperation (TC) Program. Through the TC Program, the IAEA provides technical assistance to meet the needs of recipient countries and to bring about a substantial transfer of technology. This is done by providing experts, equipment, fellowships, and training courses. This report addresses the US component of the fellowship program. These fellowships provide opportunities for research and training of scientists, engineers and physicians from developing countries in the peaceful application of nuclear energy. The fellowships are awarded to persons who are, or soon will be, trusted with responsibilities that are important to the development of their countries. Fellowship awards are classified into two groups, those financed by the IAEA General Fund or the UNDP Fund (Type 1 Fellowships and Scientific Visits), and those offered by Member States (Type 2 Fellowships). In placing individuals, preference is given to applicants from countries that are signatories to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons or to the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America

  9. IAEA Fellowship Program, 1996 report on United States participants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Fellowship Program began in April 1958 as a part of the Agency`s Technical Cooperation (TC) Program. Through the TC Program, the IAEA provides technical assistance to meet the needs of recipient countries and to bring about a substantial transfer of technology. This is done by providing experts, equipment, fellowships, and training courses. This report addresses the US component of the fellowship program. These fellowships provide opportunities for research and training of scientists, engineers and physicians from developing countries in the peaceful application of nuclear energy. The fellowships are awarded to persons who are, or soon will be, trusted with responsibilities that are important to the development of their countries. Fellowship awards are classified into two groups, those financed by the IAEA General Fund or the UNDP Fund (Type 1 Fellowships and Scientific Visits), and those offered by Member States (Type 2 Fellowships). In placing individuals, preference is given to applicants from countries that are signatories to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons or to the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America.

  10. IAEA Fellowship Program, 1997 report on United States participants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Fellowship Program began in April 1958 as a part of the Agency's Technical Cooperation (TC) Program. Through the TC Program, the IAEA provides technical assistance to meet the needs of recipient countries and to bring about a substantial transfer of technology. This is done by providing experts, equipment, fellowships, and training courses. This report addresses the US component of the fellowship program. These fellowships provide opportunities for research and training of scientists, engineers and physicians from developing countries in the peaceful application of nuclear energy. The fellowships are awarded to persons who are, or soon will be, trusted with responsibilities that are important to the development of their countries. Fellowship awards are classified into two groups, those financed by the IAEA General Fund or the UNDP Fund (Type 1 Fellowships and Scientific Visits), and those offered by Member States (Type 2 Fellowships). In placing individuals, preference is given to applicants from countries that are signatories to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons or to the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America

  11. IAEA Fellowship Program, 1997 report on United States participants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Fellowship Program began in April 1958 as a part of the Agency`s Technical Cooperation (TC) Program. Through the TC Program, the IAEA provides technical assistance to meet the needs of recipient countries and to bring about a substantial transfer of technology. This is done by providing experts, equipment, fellowships, and training courses. This report addresses the US component of the fellowship program. These fellowships provide opportunities for research and training of scientists, engineers and physicians from developing countries in the peaceful application of nuclear energy. The fellowships are awarded to persons who are, or soon will be, trusted with responsibilities that are important to the development of their countries. Fellowship awards are classified into two groups, those financed by the IAEA General Fund or the UNDP Fund (Type 1 Fellowships and Scientific Visits), and those offered by Member States (Type 2 Fellowships). In placing individuals, preference is given to applicants from countries that are signatories to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons or to the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America.

  12. MESOT Fellowship Program

    OpenAIRE

    Bassam Saeed

    2011-01-01

    MESOT Fellowship Program (MFP) is an initiative aimed at promoting and advancing organ transplantation in under-served areas of the Middle East by helping them to establish local transplantation programs or to improve an existing program. The fel¬lowship program gives a great opportunity to the young physicians and surgeons from this region willing to acquire some particular skills related to various aspects of organ transplantation and provides them with specific and hands-on training opport...

  13. Functional analysis of the RAD50/MRE11 protein complex through targeted disruption of the murine RAD50 genomic locus: implications for DNA double strand break repair. An astro research fellowship presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: The products of the S. cerevisiae genes ScRAD50 and ScMRE11 act in a protein complex and are required for non-homologous end-joining, the predominant mechanism of DNA double strand break (dsb) repair in mammalian cells. Mutation of these genes results in sensitivity to ionizing radiation (IR), a defect in initiation of meiosis, increased and error-prone recombination during mitosis, and overall genomic instability. This resultant phenotype is reminiscent of that seen in mammalian syndromes of genomic instability such as ataxia-telangiectasia and Bloom syndrome, hallmarks of which are radiation sensitivity and predisposition to malignancy. The murine homologues to ScRAD50 and ScMRE11 have recently been identified; both demonstrate impressive primary sequence conservation with their yeast counterparts, and are expected to mediate conserved functions. The roles of muRAD50 in genomic maintenance and in dsb repair will be examined in two parts. The first will include a determination of normal muRAD50 expression patterns. Second, the effects of disruption of the muRAD50 gene will be assessed. A specific targeting event has introduced a conditional murad50 null mutation into the genome of murine embryonic stem (ES) cells. These mutant ES cells are being used to create mutant mice, thus allowing functional characterization of muRAD50 on both the cellular and organismic levels. Such analyses will contribute to the delineation of the mammalian dsb repair pathway and to the cellular response to IR, and will serve as a mammalian model system for genomic instability. Materials and Methods: Wild-type tissue expression patterns and protein-protein interactions were determined by standard biochemical techniques, including immunoprecipitation, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and Western blotting. Molecular cloning techniques were used to create the gene targeting vectors, which were designed to result in either a deletion of exon 1 (equivalent to a null mutation in S. cerevisiae) or an inducible deletion of exons 1 and 2, in conjunction with the positive- and negative- selection markers neo and tk.. In one construct, the mutation was rendered inducible by cre recombinase co-expression through the placement of loxP sites on either side of the desired deletion. Additional cDNA expression vectors containing wild-type or non-null mutant muRAD50 cDNAs have also been constructed. Murine ES cells were transfected by electroporation, followed by G418 selection. Resultant colonies were isolated, expanded, and screened for recombinational integration at the RAD50 locus by Southern blotting. Expression from the mutant allele was confirmed by RT-PCR. Induction of the null mutation was effected by transient expression of cre recombinase, with negative selection by gancyclovir for detection of induced mutants. Mouse blastocysts were injected with transfected cells, with resultant chimeric animals screened for germline transmission of the mutant allele. Results/Conclusions: Murine Rad50 and Mre11 are co-immunoprecipitable from whole cell lysates, implying conservation of the protein complex seen in S. cerevisiae. A 153 kD protein corresponding to muRad50 was detected by anti-Rad50 antiserum in all tissue types examined, but was most prominent in testis, thymus, and large bowel. In addition, two smaller bands of approximately 68 and 72 kD were detected in brain tissue; a 96 kD band was detected in heart and skeletal muscle. Whether these bands represent tissue-specific muRad50 isoforms or other cross-reactive species remains to be determined. Several ES cell lines have been established which include null or inducible-null mutations at one muRAD50 locus. Nullizygous lines, as well as lines carrying non-null murad50 mutations are being made. Phenotypic analyses of null and non-null mutants, to include IR sensitivity by clonogenic cell survival assay, DNA dsb repair capacity by single-cell gel electrophoresis, and recombinational phenotype, will be presented. Finally, initial phenotypic assessment of murad50 mutant mice will be descr

  14. Marshall Space Flight Center Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Six, N. F. (Compiler)

    2015-01-01

    The Faculty Fellowship program was revived in the summer of 2015 at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, following a period of diminished faculty research activity here since 2006 when budget cuts in the Headquarters' Education Office required realignment. Several senior Marshall managers recognized the need to involve the Nation's academic research talent in NASA's missions and projects to the benefit of both entities. These managers invested their funds required to establish the renewed Faculty Fellowship program in 2015, a 10-week residential research involvement of 16 faculty in the laboratories and offices at Marshall. These faculty engineers and scientists worked with NASA collaborators on NASA projects, bringing new perspectives and solutions to bear. This Technical Memorandum is a compilation of the research reports of the 2015 Marshall Faculty Fellowship program, along with the Program Announcement (appendix A) and the Program Description (appendix B). The research touched on seven areas-propulsion, materials, instrumentation, fluid dynamics, human factors, control systems, and astrophysics. The propulsion studies included green propellants, gas bubble dynamics, and simulations of fluid and thermal transients. The materials investigations involved sandwich structures in composites, plug and friction stir welding, and additive manufacturing, including both strength characterization and thermosets curing in space. The instrumentation projects involved spectral interfero- metry, emissivity, and strain sensing in structures. The fluid dynamics project studied the water hammer effect. The human factors project investigated the requirements for close proximity operations in confined spaces. Another team proposed a controls system for small launch vehicles, while in astrophysics, one faculty researcher estimated the practicality of weather modification by blocking the Sun's insolation, and another found evidence in satellite data of the detection of a warm

  15. Recent Results from EBIT-II Using a Spare Astro-E Microcalorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spare NASA/GSFC Astro-E microcalorimeter has been installed, tested, and run successfully on EBIT-II at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A brief overview of results including measurements by the microcalorimeter of absolute excitation cross sections, time dependent spectra, and spectra as a function of Maxwellian temperature are discussed

  16. ASTRO-H Guest Observer Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Koji; Petre, Robert

    2016-04-01

    ASTRO-H is a powerful new X-ray observatory for the community: starting approximately 9 month after launch, the bulk of the observing time will belong to guest observers (GOs) to be allocated via an international Guest Observer program. For US-based observers, the first call for proposals is a part of ROSES-2016, while there are parallel calls for proposals by ESA for European astronomers, and by ISAS/JAXA for the Japanese community and all other researchers not in the US or in an ESA member country.We will present the parameters of the Cycle 1 Call for Proposals, concentrating on US-specific details as appropriate. We will discuss the international division of observing time, the relationship with the on-going performance verification (PV) phase observations, our expectation for the number of US targets to be accepted and the financial support that will be available, and the timeline including the proposal deadline and expected period of Cycle 1 observations

  17. Strengthening the fellowship training experience: findings from a national survey of fellowship trained geriatricians 1990-1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Walpole, Annette; Barker, William H; Katz, Paul R

    2004-04-01

    Geriatric fellowship training has significantly advanced in the past 2 decades in number, organization, and accreditation of formal fellowship programs. A recent survey examined career decision-making, fellowship training, and current professional activities of fellowship trained geriatricians. This paper focuses upon further desired fellowship training identified by these individuals. The responses reflect skills relevant to four aspects of professional performance: administration, management, clinical geriatrics, research, and education. More than half of the respondents documented the need for increased training in administration, including long-term care medical directorship and Medicare/managed care. Regarding clinical training, 66% recommended additional subspecialty training, particularly in psychiatry, neurology, rehabilitation, and hospice/palliative care. Seventeen percent identified a need for training in research methodology, grant writing, and mentorship. Some 6% indicated a need for further training in education, citing teaching skills and program/faculty development. This article provides examples of opportunities to strengthen each of the four defined areas, including formal training in medical administration by the American Medical Director's Association, model strategies for incorporating subspecialties, hospice/palliative care, programs to pursue graduate level training in research at many universities, and faculty development programs such as those offered by Harvard and Stanford. Accredited geriatric fellowship programs as well as fellows should recognize potential gaps in training, and make available opportunities to strengthen these areas critical to preparing for future careers in geriatric medicine. PMID:15066079

  18. Wilderness Fellowship Program 2012 Fellows

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Natural Resources and Conservation Planning Division of the National Wildlife Refuge System established the Wilderness Fellowship Program in 2011. The program...

  19. Characteristics and Core Curricular Elements of Medical Simulation Fellowships in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Rami A; Frey, Jennifer; Gardner, Aimee K; Gordon, James A; Yudkowsky, Rachel; Tekian, Ara

    2016-05-01

    Background In the past few years, there has been rapid growth in the number of simulation fellowships for physicians in the United States and Canada, with the objective of producing faculty with expertise and leadership training in medical simulation. Relatively little is known about the collective content and structure of these new fellowship opportunities. Objective We sought to identify a common set of core curricular elements among existing simulation fellowships and to obtain demographic background information on participants and leadership. Methods We designed a web-based survey and circulated it to simulation fellowship directors in the United States and Canada. The questions explored aspects of the fellowship curriculum. A grounded theory approach was used to qualitatively analyze fellowship goals and objectives. Results Of the 29 program directors surveyed, 23 responded (79%). The most commonly listed goals and objectives were to increase skills in simulation curriculum development, simulation operations and training environment setup, research, educational theory, administration, and debriefing. The majority of the responding fellowship directors (17 of 22, 77%) indicated that a set of consensus national guidelines would benefit their fellowship program. Conclusions Simulation fellowships are experiencing a period of rapid growth. Development of a common set of program guidelines is a widely shared objective among fellowship directors. PMID:27168898

  20. AstroML: "better, faster, cheaper" towards state-of-the-art data mining and machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivezic, Zeljko; Connolly, Andrew J.; Vanderplas, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    We present AstroML, a Python module for machine learning and data mining built on numpy, scipy, scikit-learn, matplotlib, and astropy, and distributed under an open license. AstroML contains a growing library of statistical and machine learning routines for analyzing astronomical data in Python, loaders for several open astronomical datasets (such as SDSS and other recent major surveys), and a large suite of examples of analyzing and visualizing astronomical datasets. AstroML is especially suitable for introducing undergraduate students to numerical research projects and for graduate students to rapidly undertake cutting-edge research. The long-term goal of astroML is to provide a community repository for fast Python implementations of common tools and routines used for statistical data analysis in astronomy and astrophysics (see http://www.astroml.org).

  1. VLBI2010: The Astro-Geo Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcas, Richard

    2010-01-01

    VLBI2010 holds out promise for greatly increased precision in measuring geodetic and Earth rotation parameters. As a by-product there will be a wealth of interesting new astronomical data. At the same time, astronomical knowledge may be needed to disentangle the astronomical and geodetic contributions to the measured delays and phases. This presentation explores this astro-geo link.

  2. The Astro-WISE datacentric information system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentijn, E; Belikov, Andrey; Begeman, Kornelis; Boxhoorn, Danny

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present the various concepts behind the Astro-WISE Information System. The concepts form a blueprint for general scientific information systems (WISE) which can satisfy a wide and challenging range of requirements for the data dissemination, storage and processing for various fields

  3. Vsop2/Astro-G Project

    CERN Document Server

    Tsuboi, Masato

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a new space VLBI project, the Second VLBI Space Observatory Program (VSOP2), following the success of the VLBI Space Observatory Program (VSOP1). VSOP2 has 10 times higher angular resolution, up to about 40 micro arcseconds, 10 times higher frequency up to 43 GHz, and 10 times higher sensitivity compared to VSOP1. Then VSOP2 should become a most powerful tool to observe innermost regions of AGN and astronomical masers. ASTRO-G is a spacecraft for VSOP2 project constructing in ISAS/JAXA since July 2007. ASTRO-G will be launched by JAXA H-IIA rocket in fiscal year 2012. ASTRO-G and ground-based facilities are combined as VSOP2. To achieve the good observation performances, we must realize new technologies. They are large precision antenna, fast-position switching capability, new LNAs, and ultra wide-band down link, etc.. VSOP2 is a huge observation system involving ASTRO-G, ground radio telescopes, tracking stations, and correlators, one institute can not prepare a whole system of VSOP2. Then we mu...

  4. Calorimeters in Astro and Particle physics

    OpenAIRE

    Pretzl, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    In this article an attempt is made to review some of the original works leading to new developments of calorimeters which are so widely and successfully used in astro and particle physics experiments. This report is far from being complete and the author apologizes for omissions and misquotations.

  5. Radio-astro-tools and spectral cube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Adam

    2016-03-01

    SpectralCube is a toolkit for efficiently handling and performing simple analysis of spectral data cubes. It was designed for use with ALMA and JVLA data, but is readily and easily applicable to other data cubes including optical and infrared IFUs. This 5-minute "lightning talk" gives a brief overview and update of spectral_cube & the radio-astro-tools packages.

  6. The Astro-E2 X-ray spectrometer/EBIT microcalorimeter x-ray spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The x-ray spectrometer (XRS) instrument is a revolutionary nondispersive spectrometer that will form the basis for the Astro-E2 observatory to be launched in 2005. We have recently installed a flight spare XRS microcalorimeter spectrometer at the EBIT-I and SuperEBIT facility at LLNL replacing the XRS from the earlier Astro-E mission and providing twice the resolving power. The XRS microcalorimeter is an x-ray detector that senses the heat deposited by the incident photon. It achieves a high energy resolution by operating at 0.06 K and by carefully engineering the heat capacity and thermal conductance. The XRS/EBIT instrument has 32 pixels in a square geometry and achieves an energy resolution of 6 eV at 6 keV, with a bandpass from 0.1 to 12 keV (or more at higher operating temperature). The instrument allows detailed studies of the x-ray line emission of laboratory plasmas. The XRS/EBIT also provides an extensive calibration 'library' for the Astro-E2 observatory

  7. Prospects for X-ray Studies of Galaxy Clusters with Astro-E2/XRS

    CERN Document Server

    Furusho, T; Mitsuda, K; Ohashi, T; Yamasaki, N

    2004-01-01

    The Astro-E2 high resolution X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) is expected to provide a major enhancement in study of clusters of galaxies. Astro-E2 is the fifth Japanese X-ray astronomy observatory, which is scheduled for launch in early 2005. The XRS instrument, developed under a Japan-US collaboration, is an X-ray microcalorimeter with a capability of observing extended objects, and a high energy resolution of about 6 eV at 6 keV. The spectral resolving power is 20 times higher than CCDs over the 0.5--10 keV energy band. We have obtained several new results of clusters with Chandra and XMM, which show that high-resolution imaging spectroscopy can clarify some outstanding questions. New sciences from Astro-E2 include the first clear measurement of gas velocities, determination of ion and electron temperatures, and electron densities based on the resolved line features. We will describe the XRS instrument design, and present simulations of the expected performance.

  8. Astro fellowship project: heat shock proteins and apoptosis in prostate adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: A variety of metabolic stimuli including hyperthermia (HT), oxidative injury, heavy metal exposure, and serum deprivation induce the stress response, an array of cellular activities which include the expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs). HSPs represent one of the most conserved groups of proteins throughout evolution, and have been found in all organisms examined to date including plants and prokaryotes. The biological role of the HSPs is to function as molecular chaperones regulating the functions of other proteins by binding to them and modulating the function, transport, and folding state. In the clinic, HSPs may serve as markers for response to treatment. This study examines the role of heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) in apoptosis using a p53 negative, androgen independent prostate adenocarcinoma cell line (PC-3). Materials and Methods: Prostate adenocarcinoma cells (PC-3) were grown as a monolayer in RPMI medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, glutamine, and penicillin/streptomycin, or as a solid subcutaneous tumor in nude mice. In vitro and in vivo hyperthermia treatments were delivered in a water bath. The ApodirectTM kit was used for TUNEL staining PC-3 cells grown as a monolayer. Following treatment, apoptotic cells detached from the petri dish, and were harvested from the media at several time points. After fixation in 1% paraformaldehyde, the free 3'-hydroxyl ends of internucleosomal DNA laddering fragments were labeled with fluroscein tagged deoxyuridine triphosphate (F-dUTP). Cells were also stained with propidium iodide for DNA content and analysed in a dual parameter flow cytometer. TUNEL staining of paraffin sections from tumors grown in vivo was also performed using biotin conjugated dUTP with avidin-alkaline phosphatase detection. RT-PCR was performed on total RNA extracts using an adaptation of the Perkin Elmer Gene Amp RNA kit. Random hexamer priming was used for cDNA synthesis, and gene specific primers (Stressgen) for three HSP 70 isoforms were used for the PCR protocol. The PCR products were analyzed using 1.5% agarose gel electrophoresis and ethidium bromide staining. Antisense oligonucleotides directed against the HSP 70 ATG site were added to culture medium (60 μM) for PC-3 monolayers with and without heat inactivated serum. Controls included the corresponding sense and antisense oligonucleotides. Following antisense treatment, apoptotic cells were analysed via flowcytometric TUNEL staining as described previously. Results: RT-PCR for the HSP 70 isoforms demonstrated maximal transcription 2 - 4 hours after 43 deg. C, 30 minute HT treatment in vitro and in vivo. Onset of apoptosis (as measured by flow cytometry) following HT occurred at 48 hours, and continued to increase through 96 hours post treatment. Induction of HSPs using a 43 deg. C, 30 minute treatment 24 hours prior to test doses of HT delayed the onset and decreased the magnitude of apoptosis, suggesting a protective role for HSPs. Furthermore, abrogation of HSP 70 synthesis using antisense oligonucleotide to HSP 70 induced apoptosis, while the sense and nonsense treated groups showed no increase in apoptosis. Conclusion: The HSP 70 response may function as a molecular marker predictive for apoptosis and treatment outcome in the clinical setting. Increased HSP 70 synthesis conferred resistance to apoptosis, while abrogation of HSP 70 synthesis using an antisense oligonucleotide to the HSP 70 ATG site induced apoptosis, suggesting that the heat shock protein/molecular chaperone family may play a pivotal role in apoptotic pathway(s). Novel therapeutic strategies targeting heat shock protein synthesis with antisense oligonucleotides or drugs may provide new approaches to tumor cell kill via apoptosis induction

  9. Developing International Research Collaborations among Postdoctoral Fellows: Key Findings from the Evaluation of NSF's International Research Fellowship Program. GS-10F-0086K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Alina; Epstein, Carter; Parsad, Amanda; Whittaker, Karla

    2012-01-01

    Over a decade ago, the National Science Board (NSB) highlighted the importance of international collaboration in its call for increased government commitment to promoting international science and engineering (S&E) research and education. The NSB also identified the National Science Foundation (NSF) as having an important leadership role in…

  10. AstroVis: Visualizing astronomical data cubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finniss, Stephen; Tyler, Robin; Questiaux, Jacques

    2016-08-01

    AstroVis enables rapid visualization of large data files on platforms supporting the OpenGL rendering library. Radio astronomical observations are typically three dimensional and stored as data cubes. AstroVis implements a scalable approach to accessing these files using three components: a File Access Component (FAC) that reduces the impact of reading time, which speeds up access to the data; the Image Processing Component (IPC), which breaks up the data cube into smaller pieces that can be processed locally and gives a representation of the whole file; and Data Visualization, which implements an approach of Overview + Detail to reduces the dimensions of the data being worked with and the amount of memory required to store it. The result is a 3D display paired with a 2D detail display that contains a small subsection of the original file in full resolution without reducing the data in any way.

  11. AstroSat - a multi-wavelength astronomy satellite

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, A R; Bhattacharya, D

    2016-01-01

    AstroSat is a multi-wavelength astronomy satellite, launched on 2015 September 28. It carries a suite of scientific instruments for multi-wavelength observations of astronomical sources. It is a major Indian effort in space astronomy and the context of AstroSat is examined in a historical perspective. The Performance Verification phase of AstroSat has been completed and all instruments are working flawlessly and as planned. Some brief highlights of the scientific results are also given here.

  12. DOE Theory Graduate Student Fellowship: Gustavo Marques Tavares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmaltz, Martin [Boston Univ., MA (United States). Physics Dept.

    2015-12-30

    Marques Tavares was awarded a fellowship for his proposal “The ttbar asymmetry and beyond” to starting in September 2012. This is the final report summarizing the research activities and accomplishments achieved with this grant support. With support from the DOE graduate fellowship Marques Tavares, Katz and Xu at BU have investigated a new technique for obtaining quantitative results in strongly coupled field theories with broken conformal invariance. Such theories are especially interesting as they may be candidates for physics beyond the standard model with possible applications to strongly coupled electroweak symmetry breaking. However, because of the strong coupling even qualitative results about the spectrum of such theories are not rigorously understood.

  13. Telling business stories as fellowship-tales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Robert; Neergaard, Helle

    2015-01-01

    , semiotics and aesthetics. This complementary triage helps us appreciate the complexity of entrepreneur stories while unravelling the nuances of the tale. It also permits triangulation of the data gathered from an in-depth interview of the respondent with newspaper and Internet research. Findings – The...... research indicates that “fellowship-tales” provide a viable and credible alternative to the fairy-tale rendition common in entrepreneur and business stories. Research limitations/implications – An obvious limitation is that one merely swaps one narrative framework for another, albeit it offers dissenting...... key contribution is to challenge the hegemony of a dominant and embedded social construct allowing new understandings to emerge via a novel combination of research methodologies...

  14. NRAO Astronomer Wins Prestigious Guggenheim Fellowship

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Dr. Dale Frail, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, New Mexico, has been awarded a prestigious Guggenheim Fellowship, according to the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. The Guggenheim Foundation describes its fellowships as "mid-career" awards "intended for men and women who have already demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts." Frail, 48, has worked at the NRAO for more than 20 years, first as a postdoctoral fellow, and then as a staff scientist. He received his bachelor's degree in physics from Acadia University in Nova Scotia, and his Ph.D in astronomy from the University of Toronto. Frail is best known for his landmark contributions to the understanding of gamma ray bursts, making critical measurements that provided key insights into the mechanisms of these superenergetic and once-mysterious explosions. He also has made important contributions to the understanding of other astronomical phenomena, including pulsars and their neighborhoods, supernova remnants, and magnetars. In 1992, he was the co-discoverer, with Alex Wolszczan, of the first planets outside our own solar system. "We congratulate Dale on this well-deserved honor that recognizes not only his past achievements but also his potential for exciting scientific work in the future," said Dr. Fred K.Y. Lo, NRAO Director. "We're very proud to see one of our scientists receive such a great honor," Lo added. Frail is one of 180 recipients of this year's Guggenheim Fellowships, chosen from some 3,000 applicants. The fellowships were established in 1925 and past recipients include photographer Ansel Adams, author Saul Bellow, former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, and chemist Linus Pauling. 102 Guggenheim Fellows have subsequently won Nobel Prizes, and others have received Pulitzer Prizes and other honors. As a Guggenheim Fellow, Frail intends to intensify his research in the areas of pulsars

  15. Corporate donor renews chemistry department postdoctoral fellowship fund

    OpenAIRE

    Doss, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    Following 10 years of a highly successful postdoctoral funding program, RJ Reynolds Tobacco Company has renewed a successive program with Virginia Tech's Department of Chemistry. Known as the RJRT-Harold McNair Fellowships in Analytical Chemistry, this program was established to recruit and train new researchers that demonstrate the pursuit of a productive and vigorous career in analytical chemistry.

  16. The X-ray microcalorimeter instruments on the Astro-E2 and Constellation-X X-ray observatories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray microcalorimeter arrays are well suited to address key problems in high-energy astrophysics. The Japan/US Astro-E2 mission will deploy a 32-pixel array of microcalorimeters with 6 eV resolution. This mission is scheduled for launch in 2005. Beyond Astro-E2, NASA is formulating the Constellation-X mission to provide a dramatic increase in collecting area with four separate spacecraft each with large area optics and 1 k-pixel calorimeter arrays providing an energy resolution of 2-4 eV.We will describe the microcalorimeter instrumentation on these missions and mention some of their scientific objectives

  17. A core curriculum for clinical fellowship training in pathology informatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S McClintock

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 2007, our healthcare system established a clinical fellowship program in Pathology Informatics. In 2010 a core didactic course was implemented to supplement the fellowship research and operational rotations. In 2011, the course was enhanced by a formal, structured core curriculum and reading list. We present and discuss our rationale and development process for the Core Curriculum and the role it plays in our Pathology Informatics Fellowship Training Program. Materials and Methods: The Core Curriculum for Pathology Informatics was developed, and is maintained, through the combined efforts of our Pathology Informatics Fellows and Faculty. The curriculum was created with a three-tiered structure, consisting of divisions, topics, and subtopics. Primary (required and suggested readings were selected for each subtopic in the curriculum and incorporated into a curated reading list, which is reviewed and maintained on a regular basis. Results: Our Core Curriculum is composed of four major divisions, 22 topics, and 92 subtopics that cover the wide breadth of Pathology Informatics. The four major divisions include: (1 Information Fundamentals, (2 Information Systems, (3 Workflow and Process, and (4 Governance and Management. A detailed, comprehensive reading list for the curriculum is presented in the Appendix to the manuscript and contains 570 total readings (current as of March 2012. Discussion: The adoption of a formal, core curriculum in a Pathology Informatics fellowship has significant impacts on both fellowship training and the general field of Pathology Informatics itself. For a fellowship, a core curriculum defines a basic, common scope of knowledge that the fellowship expects all of its graduates will know, while at the same time enhancing and broadening the traditional fellowship experience of research and operational rotations. For the field of Pathology Informatics itself, a core curriculum defines to the outside world

  18. Graduate School and Fellowship Discussion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrar, Charles Reed [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-25

    This was a presentation presented for the Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School. This is a set of slides about how to prepare for college, specifically graduate school. It gives instructions for succeeding and getting into a good school with financial aid through assistantships and scholarships, specifically applying to engineering backgrounds. Also, there are tips given for applying for fellowships and concludes with some general recommendations for graduate school.

  19. Augmenting the Funding Sources for Space Science and the ASTRO-1 Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Jon

    2015-08-01

    The BoldlyGo Institute was formed in 2013 to augment the planned space science portfolio through philanthropically funded robotic space missions, similar to how some U.S. medical institutes and ground-based telescopes are funded. I introduce BoldlyGo's two current projects: the SCIM mission to Mars and the ASTRO-1 space telescope. In particular, ASTRO-1 is a 1.8-meter off-axis (unobscured) ultraviolet-visible space observatory to be located in a Lagrange point or heliocentric orbit with a wide-field panchromatic camera, medium- and high-resolution spectrograph, and high-contrast imaging coronagraph and/or an accompanying starshade/occulter. It is intended for the post-Hubble Space Telescope era in the 2020s, enabling unique measurements of a broad range of celestial targets, while providing vital complementary capabilities to other ground- and space-based facilities such as the JWST, ALMA, WFIRST-AFTA, LSST, TESS, Euclid, and PLATO. The ASTRO-1 architecture simultaneously wields great scientific power while being technically viable and affordable. A wide variety of scientific programs can be accomplished, addressing topics across space astronomy, astrophysics, fundamental physics, and solar system science, as well as being technologically informative to future large-aperture programs. ASTRO-1 is intended to be a new-generation research facility serving a broad national and international community, as well as a vessel for impactful public engagement. Traditional institutional partnerships and consortia, such as are common with private ground-based observatories, may play a role in the support and governance of ASTRO-1; we are currently engaging interested international organizations. In addition to our planned open guest observer program and accessible data archive, we intend to provide a mechanism whereby individual scientists can buy in to a fraction of the gauranteed observing time. Our next step in ASTRO-1 development is to form the ASTRO-1 Requirements Team

  20. The Impact of Imaging Informatics Fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Geraldine J; Nagy, Paul G; Cook, Tessa S

    2016-08-01

    Imaging informatics (II) is an area within clinical informatics that is particularly important in the field of radiology. Provider groups have begun employing dedicated radiologist-informaticists to bridge medical, information technology and administrative functions, and academic institutions are meeting this demand through formal II fellowships. However, little is known about how these programs influence graduates' careers and perceptions about professional development. We electronically surveyed 26 graduates from US II fellowships and consensus leaders in the II community-many of whom were subspecialty diagnostic radiologists (68%) employed within academic institutions (48%)-about the perceived impact of II fellowships on career development and advancement. All graduates felt that II fellowship made them more valuable to employers, with the majority of reporting ongoing II roles (78%) and continued used of competencies (61%) and skills (56%) gained during fellowship in their current jobs. Other key benefits included access to mentors, protected time for academic work, networking opportunities, and positive impacts of annual compensation. Of respondents without II fellowship training, all would recommend fellowships to current trainees given the ability to gain a "still rare" but "essential skill set" that is "critical for future leaders in radiology" and "better job opportunities." While some respondents felt that II fellowships needed further formalization and standardization, most (85%) disagreed with requiring a 2-year II fellowship in order to qualify for board certification in clinical informatics. Instead, most believed that fellowships should be integrated with clinical residency or fellowship training while preserving formal didactics and unstructured project time. More work is needed to understand existing variations in II fellowship training structure and identify the optimal format for programs targeted at radiologists. PMID:26831474

  1. Survey of international regional anesthesia fellowship directors

    OpenAIRE

    Lansdown AK; McHardy PG; Patel SC; Nix CM; McCartney CJL

    2013-01-01

    Andrew K Lansdown,1,2 Paul G McHardy,1 Sanjiv C Patel,1,3 Catherine M Nix,1 Colin JL McCartney1 1Department of Anesthesia, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3University College Hospital, London, UK Background: The scope of regional anesthesia fellowship programs has not been analyzed but may provide insights that could improve fellowship training and standards. Methods: Regional anesthesia fellowship ...

  2. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) fellowship program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCleary, D.D. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program administers a Graduate Fellowship Program focused toward helping students who are currently under represented in the nation`s pool of scientists and engineers, enter and complete advanced degree programs. The objectives of the program are to: (1) establish and maintain cooperative linkages between DOE and professors at universities with graduate programs leading toward degrees or with degree options in Materials Science, Materials Engineering, Metallurgical Engineering, and Ceramic Engineering, the disciplines most closely related to the AIM Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); (2) strengthen the capabilities and increase the level of participation of currently under represented groups in master`s degree programs, and (3) offer graduate students an opportunity for practical research experience related to their thesis topic through the three-month research assignment or practicum at ORNL. The program is administered by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE).

  3. Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Act of 1994. Hearing on S. 2104 To Establish within the National Laboratories of the Department of Energy a National Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program, before the Subcommittee on Energy Research and Development of the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources.

    These hearings addressed proposed Bill S. 2104 to create a Department of Energy (DOE) fellowship program for math and science teachers that would provide them opportunities to work at DOE labs in order to enhance coordination and communication among the educational community, the Congress, and the Executive Agencies responsible for developing and…

  4. Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program Application Period is Open until August 25 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The application period for the NCI Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program (CPFP) is open. Since 1987, CPFP has provided funding support for post-doctoral Fellows to train the next generation of researchers and leaders in the field. |

  5. ASTRO-H White Paper - AGN Winds

    CERN Document Server

    Kaastra, J S; Kallman, T; Haba, Y; Costantini, E; Gallo, L; Fukazawa, Y; Tombesi, F; Anabuki, N; Awaki, H; Brown, G; di Gesu, L; Ebisawa, K; Ebrero, J; Eckart, M; Hagino, K; Long, K S; Miller, J; Miyazawa, T; Paltani, S; Reynolds, C; Ricci, C; Sameshima, H; Seta, H; Ueda, Y; Urry, M

    2014-01-01

    In this white paper we describe the prospects for ASTRO-H for the study of outflows from active galactic nuclei. The most important breakthroughs in this field are expected to arise from the high spectral resolution and sensitivity in the Fe-K band, combined with broad-band sensitivity over the full X-ray band and spectral capabilities also at lower energies. The sensitivity in the Fe-K region allows to extend the absorption measure distribution of the outflow out to the highest ionisation states accessible, where observations with current X-ray missions indicate that most of the outflowing gas is to be found. Due to the high-resolution and sensitivity it will also be able to give the definitive proof for the existence of ultra-fast outflows, and if so, characterise their physical properties in great detail. These ultra-fast outflows carry very large amounts of energy and momentum, and are of fundamental importance for feedback studies. We show how the ASTRO-H observations in general can help to constrain num...

  6. Do You Need a Textbook to Teach Astro 101?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Alexander L.; Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars CATS

    2011-01-01

    During educational sessions at astronomy meetings, especially during Center for Astronomy Education (CAE) Teaching Excellence workshops, which I have attended and now help present, one of the questions everyone wants to discuss is which textbook to use to teach Astro 101 classes (general education astronomy courses for non-science majors). Some instructors have a favorite. Others will claim that they are all the same and that it doesn't matter. Increasingly, however, the discussions turn to the question of whether any textbook is needed at all. Some of this discussion has been driven by the increase in the use of interactive learning strategies such as Think-Pair-Share questions, Lecture-Tutorials, and Ranking Tasks. These activities provide students a learning modality very different from the traditional lecture supplemented by homework, and raises the question of whether the learning that takes place during such interactive activities is enough to teach students what we wish them to know about astronomy. I had been teaching an Astro 101 class for almost three years using a full suite of interactive learning strategies, when I decided to teach it without requiring the students to purchase a textbook. Comparison of test scores before and after this change shows that there is no statistical difference in student achievement whether a textbook is required or not. Details on the course and methodology used to reach this conclusion will be presented. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0847170, a PAARE Grant for the Calfornia-Arizona Minority Partnership for Astronomy Research and Education (CAMPARE), and Grant No. 0715517, a CCLI Phase III Grant for the Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

  7. AstroCom NYC: A National Model for Urban Minority Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglione, Timothy; Ford, Saavik; Robbins, Dennis; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Agueros, Marcel A.

    2016-01-01

    AstroCom NYC is an undergraduate mentoring program designed to improve urban minority student access to opportunities in astrophysical research by greatly enhancing partnerships between research astronomers in New York City (City University of New York - an MSI, American Museum of Natural History, and Columbia). AstroCom NYC provides centralized, personalized mentoring as well as financial and academic support, to CUNY undergraduates throughout their studies, plus the resources and opportunities to further CUNY faculty research with students. The goal is that students' residency at AMNH helps them build a sense of belonging in the field, and readies and inspires them for graduate study. AstroCom NYC provides a rigorous Methods of Scientific Research course developed specifically to this purpose, a laptop, research and career mentors, outreach activities, scholarships and stipends, Metrocards, and regular assessment for maximum effectiveness. The goal of this support is to remove barriers to access and success. AMNH serves as the central hub for our faculty and students, who are otherwise dispersed among all five boroughs of the City. We welcomed our third and largest cohort last year, along with 13 additional students through a NASA community college initiative. We review plans for Year 4, when we expect all of our interns to compete for external summer REUs, and our growing participation and leadership within partner activities.

  8. Fellowship in endourology, the job search, and setting up a successful practice: an insider's view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Benjamin I; Matin, Surena F; Ost, Michael C; Winfield, Howard N

    2008-03-01

    The field of endourology, which encompasses genitourinary endoscopy and percutaneous, laparoscopic, and robotic surgery, has advanced rapidly over the past quarter century, causing endourology to be considered a subspecialty of urology. The Endourological Society, which is recognized by the American Urological Association, offers numerous clinical and research fellowship opportunities throughout the world. The decision to seek postresidency fellowship training in endourology is complex as is the process of seeking subsequent employment. We offer guidance on the decision-making process to obtain fellowship training as well as on early steps into subsequent academic or private practice settings. PMID:18307381

  9. The physics and the optimization of the XRS calorimeters on Astro-E

    CERN Document Server

    Stahle, C K; Dutta, S B; Gendreau, K C; Kelley, R L; McCammon, D; McClanahan, R A; Moseley, S H; Mott, D B; Porter, F S; Szymkowiak, A E

    1999-01-01

    The X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) instrument, scheduled to be launched as part of the Japanese X-ray astronomy satellite Astro-E in February 2000, has an array of 32 microcalorimeters at the focal plane. These calorimeters consist of ion-implanted silicon thermistors and HgTe thermalizing X-ray absorbers. These devices provide spectral resolution of 9 eV at 3 keV and 11 eV at 6 keV. The process of determining the detector parameters for this instrument will be discussed. This will include discussion of the array layout, thermal conductance of the link to the heat sink, operating temperature, thermistor size, absorber choice, and means of attaching the absorber to the thermistor bearing element. We consider the XRS calorimeters to be operating in a local optimum, with the absolute optimization yet to be performed, thus we will discuss directions for future development of this sensor technology.

  10. The microcalorimeter spectrometer on the ASTRO-E X-ray observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Astro-E Observatory will employ a high-resolution X-ray spectrometer based on a 32 pixel array of microcalorimeters with an energy resolution of about 12 eV at 6 keV (the Fe-K region). This will provide spectral resolving power 10 times higher than any other non-dispersive X-ray spectrometer. The instrument incorporates a three-stage cooling system capable of maintaining the temperature of the detector stage at 60 mK for about two years in orbit with a 97% duty cycle. The array sits at the focus of a grazing incidence conical mirror. The quantum efficiency of the microcalorimeters and the reflectivity of the X-ray mirror system combine to give high throughput over the 0.3-12 keV energy band. This new capability will enable the study of a wide range of high-energy astrophysical sources with unprecedented spectral sensitivity

  11. The physics and the optimization of the XRS calorimeters on Astro-E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) instrument, scheduled to be launched as part of the Japanese X-ray astronomy satellite Astro-E in February 2000, has an array of 32 microcalorimeters at the focal plane. These calorimeters consist of ion-implanted silicon thermistors and HgTe thermalizing X-ray absorbers. These devices provide spectral resolution of 9 eV at 3 keV and 11 eV at 6 keV. The process of determining the detector parameters for this instrument will be discussed. This will include discussion of the array layout, thermal conductance of the link to the heat sink, operating temperature, thermistor size, absorber choice, and means of attaching the absorber to the thermistor bearing element. We consider the XRS calorimeters to be operating in a local optimum, with the absolute optimization yet to be performed, thus we will discuss directions for future development of this sensor technology

  12. Quantum efficiency of the CCD camera (XIS) for the ASTRO-E mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We measured the optical and the X-ray transmission of the optical blocking filters for the X-ray Imaging Spectrometers (XISs) which are the X-ray CCD cameras of the ASTRO-E satellite. We conclude that the oxidation of the aluminum reduces the optical transmission down to ∼60-70% of the theoretical value of the aluminum. We achieved optical transmission below 5x10-5 in the range from 4000 to 9500 A by using aluminum thickness of 1200 A, while the theoretical calculation requires 800 A. The measurement of absolute quantum efficiency of XIS is also performed at several particular energies. We confirmed 20% quantum efficiency at 0.5 keV for the XIS engineering model (XIS EM)

  13. A national survey of medical education fellowships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta M. Thompson

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of our study was to determine the prevalence, focus, time commitment, graduation requirements and programme evaluation methods of medical education fellowships throughout the United States. Medical education fellowships are defined as a single cohort of medical teaching faculty who participate in an extended faculty development programme. Methods: A 26-item online questionnaire was distributed to all US medical schools (n=127 in 2005 and 2006. The questionnaire asked each school if it had a medical education fellowship and the characteristics of the fellowship programme. Results: Almost half (n=55 of the participating schools (n=120, response rate 94.5 % reported having fellowships. Duration (10–584 hours and length (<1 month–48 months varied; most focused on teaching skills, scholarly dissemination and curriculum design, and required the completion of a scholarly project. A majority collected participant satisfaction; few used other programme evaluation strategies. Conclusions: The number of medical education fellowships increased rapidly during the 1990s and 2000s. Across the US, programmes are similar in participant characteristics and curricular focus but unique in completion requirements. Fellowships collect limited programme evaluation data, indicating a need for better outcome data. These results provide benchmark data for those implementing or revising existing medical education fellowships.

  14. Discovery & Interaction in Astro 101 Laboratory Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Frank Patrick; Maurone, Philip; DeWarf, Laurence E.

    2016-01-01

    The availability of low-cost, high-performance computing hardware and software has transformed the manner by which astronomical concepts can be re-discovered and explored in a laboratory that accompanies an astronomy course for arts students. We report on a strategy, begun in 1992, for allowing each student to understand fundamental scientific principles by interactively confronting astronomical and physical phenomena, through direct observation and by computer simulation. These experiments have evolved as :a) the quality and speed of the hardware has greatly increasedb) the corresponding hardware costs have decreasedc) the students have become computer and Internet literated) the importance of computationally and scientifically literate arts graduates in the workplace has increased.We present the current suite of laboratory experiments, and describe the nature, procedures, and goals in this two-semester laboratory for liberal arts majors at the Astro 101 university level.

  15. Astro particle physics with AMS on the International Space Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battiston, R

    2002-12-01

    We review how AMS will study open issues on Astro Particle physics operating for three years on the International Space Station, in a complementary way to what is being done at underground and accelerators facilities.

  16. ASTROS - A sub-arcsec CCD star tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, R. H.; Alexander, J. W.; Dennison, E. W.; Glavich, T. A.; Salomon, P. M.

    1984-01-01

    The design and application of ASTROS (Advanced Star and Target Reference Optical Sensor) are described, with emphasis on performance test results acquired with a prototype system. The ASTROS tracker provides extremely precise measurements of star image coordinates as inputs to the Image Motion Compensation (IMC) system used to stabilize the science instrument focal planes. Performance levels achieved are dramatic improvements over the levels achieved with image dissector designs with comparable fields of view.

  17. Different tracks for pathology informatics fellowship training: Experiences of and input from trainees in a large multisite fellowship program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce P Levy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pathology Informatics is a new field; a field that is still defining itself even as it begins the formalization, accreditation, and board certification process. At the same time, Pathology itself is changing in a variety of ways that impact informatics, including subspecialization and an increased use of data analysis. In this paper, we examine how these changes impact both the structure of Pathology Informatics fellowship programs and the fellows′ goals within those programs. Materials and Methods: As part of our regular program review process, the fellows evaluated the value and effectiveness of our existing fellowship tracks (Research Informatics, Clinical Two-year Focused Informatics, Clinical One-year Focused Informatics, and Clinical 1 + 1 Subspecialty Pathology and Informatics. They compared their education, informatics background, and anticipated career paths and analyzed them for correlations between those parameters and the fellowship track chosen. All current and past fellows of the program were actively involved with the project. Results: Fellows′ anticipated career paths correlated very well with the specific tracks in the program. A small set of fellows (Clinical - one or two year - Focused Informatics tracks anticipated clinical careers primarily focused in informatics (Director of Informatics. The majority of the fellows, however, anticipated a career practicing in a Pathology subspecialty, using their informatics training to enhance that practice (Clinical 1 + 1 Subspecialty Pathology and Informatics Track. Significantly, all fellows on this track reported they would not have considered a Clinical Two-year Focused Informatics track if it was the only track offered. The Research and the Clinical One-year Focused Informatics tracks each displayed unique value for different situations. Conclusions: It seems a "one size fits all" fellowship structure does not fit the needs of the majority of potential Pathology

  18. Initial Development and Pilot Study Design of Interactive Lecture Demonstrations for ASTRO 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwortz, Andria C.; French, D. A; Gutierrez, Joseph V; Sanchez, Richard L; Slater, Timothy F.; Tatge, Coty

    2014-06-01

    Interactive lecture demonstrations (ILDs) have repeatedly shown to be effective tools for improving student achievement in the context of learning physics. As a first step toward systematic development of interactive lecture demonstrations in ASTRO 101, the introductory astronomy survey course, a systematic review of education research, describing educational computer simulations (ECSs) reveals that initial development requires a targeted study of how ASTRO 101 students respond to ECSs in the non-science majoring undergraduate lecture setting. In this project we have adopted the process by which ILDs were designed, pilot-tested, and successfully implemented in the context of physics teaching (Sokoloff & Thornton, 1997; Sokoloff & Thornton, 2004). We have designed the initial pilot-test set of ASTRO 101 ILD instructional materials relying heavily on ECSs. Both an instructor’s manual and a preliminary classroom-ready student workbook have been developed, and we are implementing a pilot study to explore their effectiveness in communicating scientific content, and the extent to which they might enhance students’ knowledge of and perception about astronomy and science in general. The study design uses a pre-/post-test quasi-experimental study design measuring students’ normalized gain scores, calculated as per Hake (1998) and Prather (2009), using a slightly modified version of S. Slater’s (2011) Test Of Astronomy STandards TOAST combined with other instruments. The results of this initial study will guide the iterative development of ASTRO 101 ILDs that are intended to both be effective at enhancing student achievement and easy for instructors to successfully implement.

  19. AMICA, an astro-mapper for AMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfardini, Alessandro; Trampus, Paolo; Battiston, Roberto; Gargiulo, Corrado

    2006-07-01

    The alpha magnetic spectrograph (AMS) is a composite particle detector to be accommodated on the International Space Station (ISS). AMS is mainly devoted to galactic, charged cosmic rays studies, antimatter and dark matter searches. Besides the main, classical physics goals, capabilities in the field of GeV and multi-GeV gamma astrophysics have been established and are under investigation by a number of groups. Due to the unsteadiness of the ISS platform, a star-mapper device is required in order to fully exploit the intrinsic arc-min angular resolution provided by the silicon tracker. A star-mapper is conceptually an imaging, optical instrument able to autonomously recognize a stellar field and to calculate its own orientation with respect to an inertial reference frame. AMICA (Astro Mapper for Instruments Check of Attitude) on AMS is responsible for providing real-time information that is going to be used off-line for compensating the large uncertainties in the ISS flight attitude and the structural degrees of freedom. In this paper, we describe in detail the AMICA sub-system, the accommodation/integration issues and the in-flight alignment procedure adopting identified galactic (Pulsars) and extra-galactic (AGNs) sources.

  20. ASTRO-H White Paper - AGN Reflection

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, C; Awaki, H; Gallo, L; Gandhi, P; Haba, Y; Kawamuro, T; LaMassa, S; Lohfink, A; Ricci, C; Tazaki, F; Zoghbi, A

    2014-01-01

    X-ray observations provide a powerful tool to probe the central engines of active galactic nuclei (AGN). A hard X-ray continuum is produced from deep within the accretion flow onto the supermassive black hole, and all optically thick structures in the AGN (the dusty torus of AGN unification schemes, broad emission line clouds, and the black hole accretion disk) "light up" in response to irradiation by this continuum. This White Paper describes the prospects for probing AGN physics using observations of these X-ray reflection signatures. High-resolution SXS spectroscopy of the resulting fluorescent iron line in type-2 AGN will give us an unprecedented view of the obscuring torus, allowing us to assess its dynamics (through line broadening) and geometry (through the line profile as well as observations of the "Compton shoulder"). The broad-band view obtained by combining all of the ASTRO-H instruments will fully characterize the shape of the underlying continuum (which may be heavily absorbed) and reflection/sc...

  1. AMICA, an astro-mapper for AMS

    CERN Document Server

    Monfardini, A; Battiston, R; Gargiulo, C

    2005-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrograph (AMS) is a composite particle detector to be accommodated on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2008. AMS is mainly devoted to galactic, charged Cosmic Rays studies, Antimatter and Dark Matter searches. Besides the main, classical physics goals, capabilities in the field of GeV and multi-GeV gamma astrophysics have been established and are under investigation by a number of groups. Due to the unsteadiness of the ISS platform, a star-mapper device is required in order to fully exploit the intrinsic arc-min angular resolution provided by the Silicon Tracker. A star-mapper is conceptually an imaging, optical instrument able to autonomously recognize a stellar field and to calculate its own orientation with respect to an inertial reference frame. AMICA (Astro Mapper for Instruments Check of Attitude) on AMS is responsible for providing real-time information that is going to be used off-line for compensating the large uncertainties in the ISS flight attitude and the structural...

  2. Nurses Christian Fellowship International: Partners in Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The Nurses Christian Fellowship International Quadrennial Conference was held November 5-10, 2012, in Santiago, Chile. The theme, "Partners in Care: Unity in diversity through Christ" brought together nurses from all over the world for Bible teaching, education, networking, and fellowship. Plenary and session abstracts are available as supplemental digital content through the HTML and PDF versions of this article at journalofchristiannursing.com. PMID:23607156

  3. The In-Flight Calibration Program for the XRS on Astro-E2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottam, J.; Kilbourne, C. A.

    2004-01-01

    The X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) will be launched in February 2005 as part of the Astro-E2 mission. It will provide unprecedented throughput and resolving powers particularly at high energies. In this presentation we will describe the in-flight calibration program. The energy scale of the XRS is a complex, non-linear function of the noise and power conditions on the array. It will be calibrated empirically using the bright point sources, Capella and GX301-2. Ground calibration of the line spread function show it to be almost perfectly Gaussian. The in-flight calibration is designed to verify this using the energy scale targets. The effective area curve of the XRS contains discreet edge structure from the mirrors, the optical blocking filters, and the microcalorimeter HgTe absorbers. The effective area Calibration program will simultaneously measure these absorption edges and the global effective area properties using the relatively featureless sources 3C273 and Mrk421. Additional monitoring of any ice build-up on the filters will be conducted using observations of the supernova remnants N132D and E0102.

  4. 香港大学土木工程系香港赛马会滑坡防治研究及资讯中心招聘博士后研究助理%Research Fellowship The Jockey Club Research and Information Centre for Landslip Prevertion and Land Development Department of Civil Engineering The University of HongKong

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@1.INTRODUCTION   The Jockey Club Research and Information Centre for Landslip Prevention and Land Development has been established with a generous donation from the Hong Kong Jockey Charities Trust, with a strong support from the Works Bureau and the Geotechnical Engineering Office of the Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region. It forms and integral part of the Chief Executive's Community Projects initiative funded by the Hong Kong Club Charities Trust. One of the basic objectives of the Centre is to promote the professional service capacity of Hong Kong and Mainland China and gain world recognition in the area of slope safety and geotechnical engineering. According to this basic objective, the Centre has established this Research Fellowship Programme.

  5. Teaching ASTRO 101 Students the Art of Scientific Argumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleigh, Sharon P.; Slater, Stephanie; Slater, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Going beyond asking students to simply memorize facts about the universe, a longstanding challenge in teaching astronomy centers on successfully teaching students about the nature of science. As introductory astronomy survey courses, known widely as ASTRO 101, can sometimes be the last science course non-science majoring undergraduates take, many faculty hope to emphasize the scientific enterprise as a broad field in inquiry making valuable contributions to civilization as a whole, rather than as an isolated study of objects far from Earth. Scholars have long proposed that an understanding of the nature of science as a human endeavor requires explicit instruction. In other words, students successfully learning the facts of astronomy does not in any way ensure that students will learn anything about the nature of how astronomy is done. In a purposeful effort to improve students' understanding about the practices and discourse of astronomy, scholars working with the CAPER Center for Astronomy & Physics Education research are developing a suite of carefully designed instructional sequences—called Scientific Argumentation—focused on teaching students the differences between data and evidence, how to communicate and defend evidence-based conclusions, and how to be informed skeptics of scientific claims. Early results show students moving from naïve understandings of scientific practices to more informed understandings as well as demonstrating enhanced value for science in general as an worthwhile human endeavor with far reaching benefits.

  6. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative University Fellowship Program. Final Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-2011 Final Report for AFCI University Fellowship Program. The goal of this effort was to be supportive of university students and university programs - particularly those students and programs that will help to strengthen the development of nuclear-related fields. The program also supported the stability of the nuclear infrastructure and developed research partnerships that are helping to enlarge the national nuclear science technology base. In this fellowship program, the U.S. Department of Energy sought master's degree students in nuclear, mechanical, or chemical engineering, engineering/applied physics, physics, chemistry, radiochemistry, or fields of science and engineering applicable to the AFCI/Gen IV/GNEP missions in order to meet future U.S. nuclear program needs. The fellowship program identified candidates and selected full time students of high-caliber who were taking nuclear courses as part of their degree programs. The DOE Academic Program Managers encouraged fellows to pursue summer internships at national laboratories and supported the students with appropriate information so that both the fellows and the nation's nuclear energy objectives were successful.

  7. Society News: Society appoints new Librarian; Read 'A&G' on phone or tablet; RAS Research Fellowships; Time to think about thesis prizes; Spread the word around the world; New editor for 'Monthly Notices'; Speakers for schools; Workshops a hit at IAU

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    If you have a smartphone or a tablet, A&G needs your help! The RAS is seeking applicants for two postdoctoral Research Fellowships, to be held in UK institutions. The deadline for nomination for the RAS Michael Penston and Keith Runcorn Prizes is 31 January 2013, for PhD theses examined successfully during 2012. Are you an astronomer interested in supporting the developing world? Are you interested in visiting countries and regions that do not yet have strong astronomy research and education, and supporting astronomy in schools, at universities and for the public?

  8. AstroPAL: A Mentoring Program for Grad Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The Astronomy Peer Advising Leaders program (AstroPAL) provides guidance for incoming grad students from a team of student volunteers who have passed their 2nd year Qualifier Exam. The purpose is to pair first years with a mentor who can help them through some of the stresses or difficulties that come with being a new grad student. AstroPALs and mentees meet privately about once a month in a casual setting to talk about how they're adjusting to the new surroundings, how they're handling the workload, etc. New students can join AstroPAL at any time during their first two years, and can stop receiving guidance once they feel comfortable in the program. Mentees will be assigned an AstroPAL based on preference and availability, and an AstroPAL Liason will always be in place to facilitate mentor reassignments or other issues if necessary. After passing the 2nd year Qualifier Exam, mentees are eligible to serve as mentors to incoming students.

  9. AstroBetter: A Blog and Wiki for Professional Astronomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, Jane

    2011-01-01

    AstroBetter.com is a multi-contributor blog and wiki website designed for information sharing among professional astronomers. The goal of the site is to increase the productivity of astronomers by creating a centralized location for tips and tools of our multifaceted trade. Our content includes topics related to data reduction and analysis, general computing, writing papers and proposals, giving talks, teaching, career planning, productivity, organization, and diversity and equity in science and education. While we have several contributors, the site is intended to be community driven and we encourage everyone to publish to the wiki, submit guest posts, suggest post ideas, and to comment on blog entries. One of our primary goals is to consolidate and reduce the transient nature of the astronomy community's collective knowledge base by having an active wiki. Currently, the most common way to share astro-centric tools and tips that are not appropriate for a published paper, is to put them on an individual's website. However, the average astronomer's website will have at least four different addresses over the course of their career and only the site owner can edit the content. As a result, information on personal websites goes stale very quickly and deal links to such sites abound. It is our hope that community maintained wikis, such as the one hosted on AstroBetter, will gradually replace the personal website. In this poster we introduce the contributors to AstroBetter, show statistics about our current readership, give excerpts of some of our most popular posts and wiki entries, and show how anyone can add or edit content on the wiki. The goal of this poster is to spread the work about AstroBetter and increase our community of readers and wiki editors, because together, we can AstroBetter.

  10. AstroBetter: A Blog and Wiki for Professional Astronomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Kelle L.; Lu, J.; Rigby, J.; Bressert, E.; Robitaille, T.; Huerta, M.; Dhital, S.

    2011-01-01

    AstroBetter.com is a multi-contributor blog and wiki website designed for information sharing among professional astronomers. The goal of the site is to increase the productivity of astronomers by creating a centralized location for tips and tools of our multifaceted trade. Our content includes topics related to data reduction and analysis, general computing, writing papers and proposals, giving talks, teaching, career planning, productivity, organization, and diversity and equity in science and education. While we have several contributors, the site is intended to be community driven and we encourage everyone to publish to the wiki, submit guest posts, suggest post ideas, and to comment on blog entries. One of our primary goals is to consolidate and reduce the transient nature of the astronomy community's collective knowledge base by having an active wiki. Currently, the most common way to share astro-centric tools and tips that are not appropriate for a published paper, is to put them on an individual's website. However, the average astronomer's website will have at least four different addresses over the course of their career and only the site owner can edit the content. As a result, information on personal websites goes stale very quickly and dead links to such sites abound. It is our hope that community maintained wikis, such as the one hosted on AstroBetter, will gradually replace the personal website. In this poster we introduce the contributors to AstroBetter, show statistics about our current readership, give excerpts of some of our most popular posts and wiki entries, and show how anyone can add or edit content on the wiki. The goal of this poster is to spread the word about AstroBetter and increase our community of readers and wiki editors, because together, we can AstroBetter.

  11. AstroGrid: the UK's Virtual Observatory Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Robert G.; Astrogrid Consortium; Lawrence, Andy; Davenhall, Clive; Mann, Bob; McMahon, Richard; Irwin, Mike; Walton, Nic; Rixon, Guy; Watson, Mike; Osborne, Julian; Page, Clive; Allan, Peter; Giaretta, David; Perry, Chris; Pike, Dave; Sherman, John; Murtagh, Fionn; Harra, Louise; Bentley, Bob; Mason, Keith; Garrington, Simon

    AstroGrid is the UK's Virtual Observatory (VO) initiative. It brings together the principal astronomical data centres in the UK, and has been funded to the tune of ˜pounds 5M over the next three years, via PPARC, as part of the UK e--science programme. Its twin goals are the provision of the infrastructure and tools for the federation and exploitation of large astronomical (X-ray to radio), solar and space plasma physics datasets, and the delivery of federations of current datasets for its user communities to exploit using those tools. Whilst AstroGrid's work will be centred on existing and future (e.g. VISTA) UK datasets, it will seek solutions to generic VO problems and will contribute to the developing international virtual observatory framework: AstroGrid is a member of the EU-funded Astrophysical Virtual Observatory project, has close links to a second EU Grid initiative, the European Grid of Solar Observations (EGSO), and will seek an active role in the development of the common standards on which the international virtual observatory will rely. In this paper we shall primarily describe the concrete plans for AstroGrid's one-year Phase A study, which will centre on: (i) the definition of detailed science requirements through community consultation; (ii) the undertaking of a ``functionality market survey" to test the utility of existing technologies for the VO; and (iii) a pilot programme of database federations, each addressing different aspects of the general database federation problem. Further information on AstroGrid can be found at AstroGrid .

  12. A Retrospective Examination of Two Professional Society–Sponsored Fellowships for Predoctoral Microbiology Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy L. Chang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available At the American Society for Microbiology (ASM, fellowships are a key means of providing immersive research opportunities for the student sector. To assess the impact of ASM student activities and inform their planning, the Society commissioned a study of two long-standing initiatives in 2015, namely the ASM Undergraduate Research Fellowship (URF, established in 1993, and the ASM Robert D. Watkins Graduate Research Fellowship (Watkins Program, established in 1980. A mixed-methods approach was used to collect data about the participants’ fellowship experience, track educational and employment status, and determine program impacts from 325 individuals (223 URF and 73 Watkins fellows. Challenges presented by the study include the fact that inherent in fellowships is the provision of financial support that affords participants opportunities that might otherwise be unavailable to them. As a result, participant feelings of indebtedness to the Society may have introduced biased study responses. Some respondents were asked to reflect on experiences from 20 to 30 years ago—a lapse in time that may have challenged their memories. Based on measures such as enrollment in or completion of advanced degree programs, employment in science, and publication and presentation history, project participants show evidence of accomplishment. Participants also reported gains in affective behaviors such as confidence and belonging.

  13. A Retrospective Examination of Two Professional Society-Sponsored Fellowships for Predoctoral Microbiology Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Amy L

    2016-05-01

    At the American Society for Microbiology (ASM), fellowships are a key means of providing immersive research opportunities for the student sector. To assess the impact of ASM student activities and inform their planning, the Society commissioned a study of two long-standing initiatives in 2015, namely the ASM Undergraduate Research Fellowship (URF), established in 1993, and the ASM Robert D. Watkins Graduate Research Fellowship (Watkins) Program, established in 1980. A mixed-methods approach was used to collect data about the participants' fellowship experience, track educational and employment status, and determine program impacts from 325 individuals (223 URF and 73 Watkins fellows). Challenges presented by the study include the fact that inherent in fellowships is the provision of financial support that affords participants opportunities that might otherwise be unavailable to them. As a result, participant feelings of indebtedness to the Society may have introduced biased study responses. In addition, some respondents were asked to reflect on experiences from 20 to 30 years ago-a lapse in time that may have challenged their memories. Based on measures such as enrollment in or completion of advanced degree programs, employment in science, and publication and presentation history, project participants show evidence of accomplishment. Participants also reported gains in affective behaviors such as confidence and belonging. PMID:27158299

  14. A Retrospective Examination of Two Professional Society–Sponsored Fellowships for Predoctoral Microbiology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Amy L.

    2016-01-01

    At the American Society for Microbiology (ASM), fellowships are a key means of providing immersive research opportunities for the student sector. To assess the impact of ASM student activities and inform their planning, the Society commissioned a study of two long-standing initiatives in 2015, namely the ASM Undergraduate Research Fellowship (URF), established in 1993, and the ASM Robert D. Watkins Graduate Research Fellowship (Watkins) Program, established in 1980. A mixed-methods approach was used to collect data about the participants’ fellowship experience, track educational and employment status, and determine program impacts from 325 individuals (223 URF and 73 Watkins fellows). Challenges presented by the study include the fact that inherent in fellowships is the provision of financial support that affords participants opportunities that might otherwise be unavailable to them. As a result, participant feelings of indebtedness to the Society may have introduced biased study responses. In addition, some respondents were asked to reflect on experiences from 20 to 30 years ago—a lapse in time that may have challenged their memories. Based on measures such as enrollment in or completion of advanced degree programs, employment in science, and publication and presentation history, project participants show evidence of accomplishment. Participants also reported gains in affective behaviors such as confidence and belonging. PMID:27158299

  15. The Astro-E/XRS Blocking Filter Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audley, Michael D.; Arnaud, Keith A.; Gendreau, Keith C.; Boyce, Kevin R.; Fleetwood, Charles M.; Kelley, Richard L.; Keski-Kuha, Ritva A.; Porter, F. Scott; Stahle, Caroline K.; Szymkowiak, Andrew E.

    1999-01-01

    We describe the transmission calibration of the Astro-E XRS blocking filters. The XRS instrument has five aluminized polyimide blocking filters. These filters are located at thermal stages ranging from 200 K to 60 mK. They are each about 1000 A thick. XRS will have high energy resolution which will enable it to see some of the extended fine structure around the oxygen and aluminum K edges of these filters. Thus, we are conducting a high spectral resolution calibration of the filters near these energies to resolve out extended flue structure and absorption lines.

  16. The ASTRO-F Mission : Large Area Infrared Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuhara, Hideo; Shibai, Hiroshi; Onaka, Takashi; Usui, Fumihiko

    2005-01-01

    ASTRO-F is the first Japanese satellite mission dedicated for large area surveys in the infrared. The 69cm aperture telescope and scientific instruments are cooled to 6K by liquid Helium and mechanical coolers. During the expected mission life of more than 500 days, ASTRO-F will make the most advanced all-sky survey in the mid- to far-infrared since the Infrared astronomical Satellite (IRAS). The survey will be made in 6 wavebands and will include the first all sky survey at >100-160(mu)m. De...

  17. Acquisition and track algorithms for the Astros star tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalom, E.; Alexander, J. W.; Stanton, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The Astros star tracker has been designed for an employment with the Space Shuttle. An achievement of the performance levels needed has required critical trade-offs between the hardware design and the control algorithms. This paper provides a description of the development of the acquisition and track algorithms. Attention is given to an Astros system overview, a system firmware description, cluster evaluation, guide star selection, exposure time determination, video data input, update interval timing, exposure time sequencing full frame video A/D conversion, analog threshold for acquisition, minimum threshold determination, and the theoretical basis for the track algorithm.

  18. Early experiences of accredited clinical informatics fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, Christopher A; Pageler, Natalie M; Palma, Jonathan P; Finnell, John T; Levy, Bruce P; Yackel, Thomas R; Mohan, Vishnu; Hersh, William R

    2016-07-01

    Since the launch of the clinical informatics subspecialty for physicians in 2013, over 1100 physicians have used the practice and education pathways to become board-certified in clinical informatics. Starting in 2018, only physicians who have completed a 2-year clinical informatics fellowship program accredited by the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education will be eligible to take the board exam. The purpose of this viewpoint piece is to describe the collective experience of the first four programs accredited by the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education and to share lessons learned in developing new fellowship programs in this novel medical subspecialty. PMID:27206458

  19. Magnetic fusion energy technology fellowship: Report on survey of institutional coordinators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1980, the Magnetic Fusion Energy Technology (MFET) Fellowship program was established by the US Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy, to encourage outstanding students interested in fusion energy technology to continue their education at a qualified graduate school. The basic objective of the MFET Fellowship program is to ensure an adequate supply of scientists in this field by supporting graduate study, training, and research in magnetic fusion energy technology. The program also supports the broader objective of advancing fusion toward the realization of commercially viable energy systems through the research by MFET fellows. The MFET Fellowship program is administered by the Science/Engineering Education Division of Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education. Guidance for program administration is provided by an academic advisory committee

  20. Astro-H: science goals, development status, and European contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Fernandez, C.

    2015-07-01

    The joint JAXA/NASA ASTRO-H mission is the sixth X-ray mission initiated by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS). ASTRO-H allows a combination of wide band X-ray spectroscopy (5-80 keV) provided by multilayer coating, focusing hard X-ray mirrors and hard X-ray imaging detectors, and high energy-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy (0.3-12 keV) provided by thin-foil X-ray optics and a micro-calorimeter array. The mission will also carry a X-ray CCD camera as a focal plane detector for a soft X-ray telescope (0.4-12 keV) and a non-focusing soft gamma-ray detector (40-600 keV). ASTRO-H is expected to provide breakthrough results in the studies of the large-scale structure of the Universe and its evolution, the behaviour of matter in the strong gravitational field regime, providing time-resolved spectra from material approaching the event horizon of a black hole, the physical conditions in sites of cosmic-ray acceleration, and the distribution of dark matter in galaxy clusters at different redshifts. ASTRO-H will be launched into low-Earth orbit from the Tanegashima Space Center, Japan, by a JAXA H-IIA rocket.

  1. The role of ASTRO and the radiation oncologist in preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The events on September 11, 2001 were unpredictable and tragic, however it is not inconceivable that a similar terrorist event could occur again, this time involving radiologic or nuclear material. In order to prepare for this American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) convened a task force. Initially the task force worked with the American College of Radiology (ACR)and the American Society of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM)to publish a PRIMER entitled 'Disaster Preparedness for Radiology Professionals'. The PRIMER serve as a quick reference in the event of a radiation disaster and is available on the ASTRO Web site (www.astro.org). The task force has also developed a detailed and extensive training program, in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy's Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS) in Oak Ridge (TN), that will equip radiation oncologists with the necessary expertise to train hospital radiation oncology departments and other healthcare personnel who are responsible for implementing and carrying out hospital planning for disasters involving radioactive materials. This presentation will outline the effort ASTRO has been involved with since September 11, 2001 to prepare the professional community it represent in the event of a radiation/nuclear disaster

  2. The ASTRO-F Mission Large Area Infrared Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuhara, H; Onaka, T; Usui, F; Matsuhara, Hideo; Shibai, Hiroshi; Onaka, Takashi; Usui, Fumihiko

    2005-01-01

    ASTRO-F is the first Japanese satellite mission dedicated for large area surveys in the infrared. The 69cm aperture telescope and scientific instruments are cooled to 6K by liquid Helium and mechanical coolers. During the expected mission life of more than 500 days, ASTRO-F will make the most advanced all-sky survey in the mid- to far-infrared since the Infrared astronomical Satellite (IRAS). The survey will be made in 6 wavebands and will include the first all sky survey at >100-160(mu)m. Deep imaging and spectroscopic surveys with pointed observations will also be carried out in 13 wavelength bands from 2-160(mu)m. ASTRO-F should detect more than a half million galaxies tracing the large-scale structure of the Universe out to redshifts of unity, detecting rare, exotic extraordinarily luminous objects at high redshift, numerous brown dwarfs, Vega-like stars, protostars, and will reveal the large-scale structure of nearby galactic star forming regions. ASTRO-F is a perfect complement to Spitzer Space Telescop...

  3. ASTRO-F/FIS observing simulation including detector characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Woong-Seob; Pak, Soojong; Lee, Hyung Mok; Nakagawa, Takao; Kim, Minjin; Oh, Sang Hoon; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Makiuti, Sin'itirou; Shirahata, Mai; Matsuura, Shuji; Patrashin, Mikhail A.; Pearson, Chris; Shibai, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    We have examined the effects of transients, glitches caused by cosmic ray hits, and the crosstalk of the far-infrared detector arrays on-board ASTRO-F on its survey mode data. We used simple model fits to laboratory measurements for the transients and glitch profiles. We also tested several correction methods, based on these models, to recover the original signal.

  4. Data federations: AstroWise and its applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentijn, Edwin A.

    2015-01-01

    The AstroWise information system is operational for the production of the results of a number astronomical survey programmes with OmegaCAM@VST and MUSE@VLT. In different forms it has also been applied to the Lofar radiotelescope, life science projects and business applications. I will discuss the co

  5. 22 CFR 196.1 - What is the Fellowship Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is the Fellowship Program? 196.1 Section 196.1 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION THOMAS R. PICKERING FOREIGN AFFAIRS/GRADUATE FOREIGN AFFAIRS FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM § 196.1 What is the Fellowship Program?...

  6. ASTRO's 2007 Core Physics Curriculum for Radiation Oncology Residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2004, American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) published a curriculum for physics education. The document described a 54-hour course. In 2006, the committee reconvened to update the curriculum. The committee is composed of physicists and physicians from various residency program teaching institutions. Simultaneously, members have associations with American Association of Physicists in Medicine, ASTRO, Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology, American Board of Radiology, and American College of Radiology. Representatives from the latter two organizations are key to provide feedback between the examining organizations and ASTRO. Subjects are based on Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requirements (particles and hyperthermia), whereas the majority of subjects and appropriated hours/subject were developed by consensus. The new curriculum is 55 hours, containing new subjects, redistribution of subjects with updates, and reorganization of core topics. For each subject, learning objectives are provided, and for each lecture hour, a detailed outline of material to be covered is provided. Some changes include a decrease in basic radiologic physics, addition of informatics as a subject, increase in intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and migration of some brachytherapy hours to radiopharmaceuticals. The new curriculum was approved by the ASTRO board in late 2006. It is hoped that physicists will adopt the curriculum for structuring their didactic teaching program, and simultaneously, American Board of Radiology, for its written examination. American College of Radiology uses the ASTRO curriculum for their training examination topics. In addition to the curriculum, the committee added suggested references, a glossary, and a condensed version of lectures for a Postgraduate Year 2 resident physics orientation. To ensure continued commitment to a current and relevant curriculum, subject matter will be updated again in 2 years

  7. The ground calibration of X-ray CCD cameras (XIS) with front-illuminated chips onboard Astro-E2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the results of the ground calibration of Astro-E2 XIS with front-illuminated (FI) chips. The sensors have basically the same performance as that of Astro-E XIS. However, there are some improved points: (1) A 55Fe radio isotope is equipped on the door and (2) the capability for charge injection (CI) has been added. We measured the gain, energy resolution, and quantum efficiency (QE) of the FI sensors as a function of energy by using characteristic X-rays for each sensor. An energy resolution of 130 eV at 5.9 keV in FWHM and a QE of 52% at 8.6 keV are achieved. After XIS is launched, the charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) will increase due to radiation damage by cosmic rays. Then XIS is equipped with the CI capability to calibrate and compensate for the increase in CTI. We estimate the time variability in the amount of the injected charge

  8. The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) MIDEX Mission: Using Infrared Spectroscopy to Identify Organic Molecules in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, S. A.

    2002-01-01

    The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) mission is one of four selected for Phase A Concept Study in NASA's current call for MIDEX class missions. ABE is a cooled space telescope equipped with spectrographs covering the 2.5-20 micron spectral range. The ABE mission is devoted to the detection and identification of organic and related molecular species in space. ABE is currently under study at NASA's Ames Research Center in collaboration with Ball Aerospace.

  9. Global Health Education in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddharthan, Trishul; North, Crystal M; Attia, Engi F; Christiani, David C; Checkley, William; West, T Eoin

    2016-06-01

    A growing number of pulmonary and critical care medicine fellowship programs in the United States offer global health training opportunities. Formal, integrated global health programs within pulmonary and critical care fellowships are relatively new but are built on principles and ideals of global health that focus on the mutually beneficial exchange of knowledge and social justice. Although core competencies consistent with these overarching themes in global health education have not been formalized for pulmonary and critical care trainees, relevant competency areas include clinical knowledge, international research training, cultural competency, and clinical and research capacity building. Existing global health education in U.S. pulmonary and critical care medicine training programs can generally be classified as one of three different models: integrated global health tracks, global health electives, and additional research years. Successful global health education programs foster partnerships and collaborations with international sites that emphasize bidirectional exchange. This bidirectional exchange includes ongoing, equitable commitments to mutual opportunities for training and professional development, including a focus on the particular knowledge and skill sets critical for addressing the unique priorities of individual countries. However, barriers related to the availability of mentorship, funding, and dedicated time exist to expanding global health education in pulmonary and critical care medicine. The implementation of global health training within pulmonary and critical care medicine programs requires continued optimization, but this training is essential to prepare the next generation of physicians to address the global aspects of respiratory disease and critical illness. PMID:26974557

  10. The development and application of the AstroFit program for complementary dark matter studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Lan Nelly

    2013-02-15

    This doctoral thesis describes the development and application of the AstroFit program. Many studies have shown the existence of dark matter (DM), a mass component that constitutes over eighty percent of the entire matter in the Universe. From historical astrophysical evidence to latest reconstructions with sophisticated methods, the gravitational effect of DM can be shown, but its nature remains unknown. Many theoretical explanations aim at describing DM, for example as weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), within particular frameworks. The majority of these frameworks extend the existing standard model of particle physics (SM), so that new particles are added to the known set of elementary particles. One of these frameworks is the constrained supersymmetric standard model (CMSSM) that naturally introduces a DM candidate in form of the lightest supersymmetric particle(LSP). Searches for DM particles are undertaken in three different ways. First, directly with fixed-target experiments that measure WIMPs coming towards the Earth with nuclei of the target material. Second, indirectly by reconstructing DM signatures in particle spectra of known particles observed with ground-based telescopes, spaceborne satellites or balloon-borne experiments. And third, indirectly via direct production of DM at particle colliders such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and energy reconstructions where missing transverse energy is presumably carried away by the DM particles. Global fit programs used in particle physics, such as Fittino, are designed to fit parameters of theories beyond the SM simultaneously that are in accordance with the experimental and observed data in order to probe models and constrain the parameter space. To explore complementarity in DM research, the AstroFit interface program has been developed to combine all available information from direct and indirect searches for DM as well as collider searches for new physics in such global fits. To demonstrate

  11. The development and application of the AstroFit program for complementary dark matter studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This doctoral thesis describes the development and application of the AstroFit program. Many studies have shown the existence of dark matter (DM), a mass component that constitutes over eighty percent of the entire matter in the Universe. From historical astrophysical evidence to latest reconstructions with sophisticated methods, the gravitational effect of DM can be shown, but its nature remains unknown. Many theoretical explanations aim at describing DM, for example as weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), within particular frameworks. The majority of these frameworks extend the existing standard model of particle physics (SM), so that new particles are added to the known set of elementary particles. One of these frameworks is the constrained supersymmetric standard model (CMSSM) that naturally introduces a DM candidate in form of the lightest supersymmetric particle(LSP). Searches for DM particles are undertaken in three different ways. First, directly with fixed-target experiments that measure WIMPs coming towards the Earth with nuclei of the target material. Second, indirectly by reconstructing DM signatures in particle spectra of known particles observed with ground-based telescopes, spaceborne satellites or balloon-borne experiments. And third, indirectly via direct production of DM at particle colliders such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and energy reconstructions where missing transverse energy is presumably carried away by the DM particles. Global fit programs used in particle physics, such as Fittino, are designed to fit parameters of theories beyond the SM simultaneously that are in accordance with the experimental and observed data in order to probe models and constrain the parameter space. To explore complementarity in DM research, the AstroFit interface program has been developed to combine all available information from direct and indirect searches for DM as well as collider searches for new physics in such global fits. To demonstrate

  12. College of Science graduate student awarded National Institutes of Health fellowship to study disease ecology

    OpenAIRE

    Doss, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Camille Harris of Ridgeland, Miss., a graduate student in biological sciences, has been awarded a prestigious National Institutes of Health (NIH) Graduate Research Fellowship for her study of forest disturbance and its ecological impacts on LaCrosse Virus, a mosquito-borne disease that can cause seizures, coma, paralysis, and permanent brain damage in severe cases.

  13. Introduction to astroML: Machine Learning for Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    VanderPlas, Jacob T; Ivezic, Zeljko; Gray, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Astronomy and astrophysics are witnessing dramatic increases in data volume as detectors, telescopes and computers become ever more powerful. During the last decade, sky surveys across the electromagnetic spectrum have collected hundreds of terabytes of astronomical data for hundreds of millions of sources. Over the next decade, the data volume will enter the petabyte domain, and provide accurate measurements for billions of sources. Astronomy and physics students are not traditionally trained to handle such voluminous and complex data sets. In this paper we describe astroML; an initiative, based on Python and scikit-learn, to develop a compendium of machine learning tools designed to address the statistical needs of the next generation of students and astronomical surveys. We introduce astroML and present a number of example applications that are enabled by this package.

  14. Cure-WISE: HETDEX Data Reduction with Astro-WISE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snigula, J. M.; Drory, N.; Fabricius, M.; Landriau, M.; Montesano, F.; Hill, G. J.; Gebhardt, K.; Cornell, M. E.

    2014-05-01

    The Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX, Hill et al. 2012b) is a blind spectroscopic survey to map the evolution of dark energy using Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies at redshifts 1.9management. It can be used to create various web interfaces for data access and quality control. Astro-WISE allows us to reduce the data from all the IFUs in parallel on a compute cluster. This cluster allows us to reduce the observed data in quasi real time and still have excess capacity for rerunning parts of the reduction. Finally, the Astro-WISE interface will be used to provide access to reduced data products to the general community.

  15. In-orbit performance of AstroSat CZTI

    CERN Document Server

    Vadawale, Santosh V; Bhattacharya, Dipankar; Bhalerao, Varun B; Dewangan, Gulab Chand; Vibute, Ajay M; S., Mithun N P; Chattopadhyay, Tanmoy; Sreekumar, S

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Imager (CZTI) is one of the fi?ve payloads on-board recently launched Indian astronomy satellite AstroSat. CZTI is primarily designed for simultaneous hard X-ray imaging and spectroscopy of celestial X-ray sources. It employs the technique of coded mask imaging for measuring spectra in the energy range of 20 - 150 keV. It was the ?first scientifi?c payload of AstroSat to be switched on after one week of the launch and was made operational during the subsequent week. Here we present preliminary results from the performance verification phase observations and discuss the in-orbit performance of CZTI.

  16. AstroBlend: An Astrophysical Visualization Package for Blender

    CERN Document Server

    Naiman, J P

    2016-01-01

    The rapid growth in scale and complexity of both computational and observational astrophysics over the past decade necessitates efficient and intuitive methods for examining and visualizing large datasets. Here, I present {\\it AstroBlend}, an open-source Python library for use within the three dimensional modeling software, {\\it Blender}. While {\\it Blender} has been a popular open-source software among animators and visual effects artists, in recent years it has also become a tool for visualizing astrophysical datasets. {\\it AstroBlend} combines the three dimensional capabilities of {\\it Blender} with the analysis tools of the widely used astrophysical toolset, {\\it yt}, to afford both computational and observational astrophysicists the ability to simultaneously analyze their data and create informative and appealing visualizations. The introduction of this package includes a description of features, work flow, and various example visualizations. A website - www.astroblend.com - has been developed which incl...

  17. AstroBiology Explorer Mission Concepts (ABE/ASPIRE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, Scott; Ennico, Kimberly A.

    2006-01-01

    The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) and the Astrobiology Space InfraRed Explorer (ASPIRE) Mission Concepts are two missions designed to address the questions (1) Where do we come from? and (2) Are we alone? as outlined in NASA s Origins Program using infrared spectroscopy to explore the identity, abundance, and distribution of molecules of astrobiological importance throughout the Universe. The ABE mission s observational program is focused on six tasks to: (1) Investigate the evolution of ice and organics in dense clouds and star formation regions, and the young stellar/planetary systems that form in them; (2) Measure the evolution of complex organic molecules in stellar outflows; (3) Study the organic composition of a wide variety of solar system objects including asteroids, comets, and the planets and their satellites; (4) Identify organic compounds in the diffuse interstellar medium and determine their distribution , abundance, and change with environment; (5) Detect and identify organic compounds in other galaxies and determine their dependence on galactic type; and (6) Measure deuterium enrichments in interstellar organics and use them as tracers of chemical processes. The ASPIRE mission s observational program expands upon ABE's core mission and adds tasks that (7) Address the role of silicates in interstellar organic chemistry; and (8) Use different resolution spectra to assess the relative roles and abundances of gas- and solid-state materials. ABE (ASPIRE) achieves these goals using a highly sensitive, cryogenically-cooled telescope in an Earth drift-away heliocentric orbit, armed with a suite of infrared spectrometers that cover the 2.5-20(40) micron spectral region at moderate spectral resolution (R>2000). ASPIRE's spectrometer complement also includes a high-resolution (R>25,000) module over the 4-8 micron spectral region. Both missions target lists are chosen to observe a statistically significant sample of a large number of objects of varied types in

  18. Data federations: AstroWise and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentijn, Edwin A.

    2015-12-01

    The AstroWise information system is operational for the production of the results of a number astronomical survey programmes with OmegaCAM@VST and MUSE@VLT. In different forms it has also been applied to the Lofar radiotelescope, life science projects and business applications. I will discuss the common "data federation"aspects of these projects, and the data federation aspects of the Euclid Archive System.

  19. ASTRO's core physics curriculum for radiation oncology residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2002, the Radiation Physics Committee of the American Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) appointed an Ad-hoc Committee on Physics Teaching to Medical Residents. The main initiative of the committee was to develop a core curriculum for physics education. Prior publications that have analyzed physics teaching have pointed to wide discrepancies among teaching programs. The committee was composed of physicists or physicians from various residency program based institutions. Simultaneously, members had associations with the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), ASTRO, Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO), American Board of Radiology (ABR), and the American College of Radiology (ACR). The latter two organizations' representatives were on the physics examination committees, as one of the main agendas was to provide a feedback loop between the examining organizations and ASTRO. The document resulted in a recommended 54-h course. Some of the subjects were based on American College of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requirements (particles, hyperthermia), whereas the majority of the subjects along with the appropriated hours per subject were devised and agreed upon by the committee. For each subject there are learning objectives and for each hour there is a detailed outline of material to be covered. Some of the required subjects/h are being taught in most institutions (i.e., Radiation Measurement and Calibration for 4 h), whereas some may be new subjects (4 h of Imaging for Radiation Oncology). The curriculum was completed and approved by the ASTRO Board in late 2003 and is slated for dissemination to the community in 2004. It is our hope that teaching physicists will adopt the recommended curriculum for their classes, and simultaneously that the ABR for its written physics examination and the ACR for its training examination will use the recommended curriculum as the basis for subject matter and depth of

  20. AstroBlend: An Astrophysical Visualization Package for Blender

    OpenAIRE

    Naiman, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    The rapid growth in scale and complexity of both computational and observational astrophysics over the past decade necessitates efficient and intuitive methods for examining and visualizing large datasets. Here, I present {\\it AstroBlend}, an open-source Python library for use within the three dimensional modeling software, {\\it Blender}. While {\\it Blender} has been a popular open-source software among animators and visual effects artists, in recent years it has also become a tool for visual...

  1. AstroGrid-D: Grid Technology for Astronomical Science

    CERN Document Server

    Enke, Harry; Adorf, Hans-Martin; Beck-Ratzka, Alexander; Breitling, Frank; Bruesemeister, Thomas; Carlson, Arthur; Ensslin, Torsten; Hoegqvist, Mikael; Nickelt, Iliya; Radke, Thomas; Reinefeld, Alexander; Reiser, Angelika; Scholl, Tobias; Spurzem, Rainer; Steinacker, Juergen; Voges, Wolfgang; Wambsganss, Joachim; White, Steve

    2010-01-01

    We present status and results of AstroGrid-D, a joint effort of astrophysicists and computer scientists to employ grid technology for scientific applications. AstroGrid-D provides access to a network of distributed machines with a set of commands as well as software interfaces. It allows simple use of computer and storage facilities and to schedule or monitor compute tasks and data management. It is based on the Globus Toolkit middleware (GT4). Chapter 1 describes the context which led to the demand for advanced software solutions in Astrophysics, and we state the goals of the project. We then present characteristic astrophysical applications that have been implemented on AstroGrid-D in chapter 2. We describe simulations of different complexity, compute-intensive calculations running on multiple sites, and advanced applications for specific scientific purposes, such as a connection to robotic telescopes. We can show from these examples how grid execution improves e.g. the scientific workflow. Chapter 3 explai...

  2. The ASTRO-H X-ray Astronomy Satellite

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, Tadayuki; Kelley, Richard; Aharonian, Felix; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Akimoto, Fumie; Allen, Steve; Anabuki, Naohisa; Angelini, Lorella; Arnaud, Keith; Asai, Makoto; Audard, Marc; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Azzarello, Philipp; Baluta, Chris; Bamba, Aya; Bando, Nobutaka; Bautz, Marshall; Bialas, Thomas; Blandford, Roger; Boyce, Kevin; Brenneman, Laura; Brown, Greg; Cackett, Edward; Canavan, Edgar; Chernyakova, Maria; Chiao, Meng; Coppi, Paolo; Costantini, Elisa; de Plaa, Jelle; Herder, Jan-Willem den; DiPirro, Michael; Done, Chris; Dotani, Tadayasu; Doty, John; Ebisawa, Ken; Eckart, Megan; Enoto, Teruaki; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fabian, Andrew; Ferrigno, Carlo; Foster, Adam; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Funk, Stefan; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Gallo, Luigi; Gandhi, Poshak; Gilmore, Kirk; Guainazzi, Matteo; Haas, Daniel; Haba, Yoshito; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Harayama, Atsushi; Hatsukade, Isamu; Hayashi, Takayuki; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Hiraga, Junko; Hirose, Kazuyuki; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hoshino, Akio; Hughes, John; Hwang, Una; Iizuka, Ryo; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Ishida, Manabu; Ishikawa, Kumi; Ishimura, Kosei; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Ito, Masayuki; Iwata, Naoko; Iyomoto, Naoko; Jewell, Chris; Kaastra, Jelle; Kallman, Timothy; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Kataoka, Jun; Katsuda, Satoru; Katsuta, Junichiro; Kawaharada, Madoka; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kawano, Taro; Kawasaki, Shigeo; Khangulyan, Dmitry; Kilbourne, Caroline; Kimball, Mark; Kimura, Masashi; Kitamoto, Shunji; Kitayama, Tetsu; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Konami, Saori; Kosaka, Tatsuro; Koujelev, Alex; Koyama, Katsuji; Krimm, Hans; Kubota, Aya; Kunieda, Hideyo; LaMassa, Stephanie; Laurent, Philippe; Lebrun, Franccois; Leutenegger, Maurice; Limousin, Olivier; Loewenstein, Michael; Long, Knox; Lumb, David; Madejski, Grzegorz; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Makishima, Kazuo; Markevitch, Maxim; Masters, Candace; Matsumoto, Hironori; Matsushita, Kyoko; McCammon, Dan; Mcguinness, Daniel; McNamara, Brian; Miko, Joseph; Miller, Jon; Miller, Eric; Mineshige, Shin; Minesugi, Kenji; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Miyazawa, Takuya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mori, Koji; Mori, Hideyuki; Moroso, Franco; Muench, Theodore; Mukai, Koji; Murakami, Hiroshi; Murakami, Toshio; Mushotzky, Richard; Nagano, Housei; Nagino, Ryo; Nakagawa, Takao; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakamori, Takeshi; Nakashima, Shinya; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Namba, Yoshiharu; Natsukari, Chikara; Nishioka, Yusuke; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Noda, Hirofumi; Nomachi, Masaharu; Dell, Steve O'; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Mina; Ogi, Keiji; Ohashi, Takaya; Ohno, Masanori; Ohta, Masayuki; Okajima, Takashi; Okamoto, Atsushi; Okazaki, Tsuyoshi; Ota, Naomi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Paerels, Frits; Paltani, St'ephane; Parmar, Arvind; Petre, Robert; Pinto, Ciro; Pohl, Martin; Pontius, James; Porter, F Scott; Pottschmidt, Katja; Ramsey, Brian; Reis, Rubens; Reynolds, Christopher; Ricci, Claudio; Russell, Helen; Safi-Harb, Samar; Saito, Shinya; Sakai, Shin-ichiro; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Sato, Goro; Sato, Yoichi; Sato, Kosuke; Sato, Rie; Sawada, Makoto; Serlemitsos, Peter; Seta, Hiromi; Shibano, Yasuko; Shida, Maki; Shimada, Takanobu; Shinozaki, Keisuke; Shirron, Peter; Simionescu, Aurora; Simmons, Cynthia; Smith, Randall; Sneiderman, Gary; Soong, Yang; Stawarz, Lukasz; Sugawara, Yasuharu; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Sugita, Satoshi; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Takeda, Shin-ichiro; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamura, Takayuki; Tamura, Keisuke; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yasuo; Tanaka, Yasuyuki; Tashiro, Makoto; Tawara, Yuzuru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Terashima, Yuichi; Tombesi, Francesco; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Yohko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Takeshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Uchiyama, Hideki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Ueda, Shutaro; Ueno, Shiro; Uno, Shinichiro; Urry, Meg; Ursino, Eugenio; de Vries, Cor; Wada, Atsushi; Watanabe, Shin; Watanabe, Tomomi; Werner, Norbert; White, Nicholas; Wilkins, Dan; Yamada, Takahiro; Yamada, Shinya; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yamasaki, Noriko; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Yaqoob, Tahir; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Yoshida, Atsumasa; Yuasa, Takayuki; Zhuravleva, Irina; Zoghbi, Abderahmen; ZuHone, John

    2014-01-01

    The joint JAXA/NASA ASTRO-H mission is the sixth in a series of highly successful X-ray missions developed by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), with a planned launch in 2015. The ASTRO-H mission is equipped with a suite of sensitive instruments with the highest energy resolution ever achieved at E > 3 keV and a wide energy range spanning four decades in energy from soft X-rays to gamma-rays. The simultaneous broad band pass, coupled with the high spectral resolution of Delta E < 7 eV of the micro-calorimeter, will enable a wide variety of important science themes to be pursued. ASTRO-H is expected to provide breakthrough results in scientific areas as diverse as the large-scale structure of the Universe and its evolution, the behavior of matter in the gravitational strong field regime, the physical conditions in sites of cosmic-ray acceleration, and the distribution of dark matter in galaxy clusters at different redshifts.

  3. Science Communication Fellowship Program at the Pacific Science Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnett, E. M.; Vukajlovich, D.; Fitzwater, S.; Selvakumar, M.

    2011-12-01

    With funding from an NSF Informal Science Education grant, the Pacific Science Center in Seattle, Washington began the Science Communication Fellowship program in 2009 as part of the Portal to the Public initiative. The purpose of the Science Communication Fellowship program is to train scientists and engineers to communicate more effectively with the general public regarding their research and to assist with the development of hands-on activities that can be used by the scientists and engineers for outreach activities. The program came out of a collaboration to develop a model for effectively communicating current science research at informal science education organizations. The program model has undergone in-depth research and evaluation to assess its effectiveness and impact. To become Science Communication Fellows, researchers participate in four three-hour professional development sessions, where they learn communication techniques through role-playing and hands-on activities. The workshops are supplemented with additional one-on-one meetings with Science Center staff to help the new Fellows develop activities for use at outreach events. These activities are then used by the Fellows at public events that highlight current research taking place in the region. To date over 80 scientists and engineers have gone through the training sessions to become Science Communication Fellows. The Pacific Science Center holds approximately 12 events a year in which Fellows can facilitate their activity. Public programs range from small, monthly programs to large, annual Research Weekends. Funding for this program continues through support from NIH, IMLS, NSF, and NASA grants. For more information, please contact the current program administrator Dana Vukajlovich at DVukajlovich@pacsci.org.

  4. Magnitude calibration of a fixed head star tracker using Astro-1 flight data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakoczy, John M.; West, Mark E.

    1992-01-01

    The Astro-1 UV astronomy mission was hampered by the failures of the automatic star acquisition procedure. The acquisition procedure depended on the Instrument Pointing Subsystem's Fixed Head Star Trackers (FHST) to acquire, track and identify guidestars of known visual magnitude. During the Astro-1 mission it was suspected that the star magnitudes measured by the FHST were much lower than predicted. A postflight investigation of the Astro-1 flight data confirmed and quantified this suspicion. Star magnitude calibration curves computed from the flight data depict the variance from the preflight calibration curves. These results are helping engineers to plan improvements to the acquisition procedure for the upcoming Astro-2 mission.

  5. NASA/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1964, NASA has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. The objectives are to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science members; to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. The study program consists of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the research topics

  6. The fellowship of the saints in contemporary South African society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Floor

    1974-03-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this study is: What does the fellowship of the saints that we practise in the Church, mean to us in the present South African society. The division of the subject is as follows: Firstly an analysis of the concept fellowship of the saints; secondly some remarks about the Church in the present situation; and thirdly a closer look at the meaning the fellowship of the saints can have on our behaviour in society.

  7. Astro-WISE: Chaining to the Universe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentijn, E. A.; Mc Farland, John; Snigula, J.; Begeman, K. G.; Boxhoorn, D. R.; Rengelink, R.; Helmich, E.; Heraudeau, P.; Verdoes Kleijn, G.; Vermeij, R.; Vriend, W.-J.; Tempelaar, M. J.; Deul, E.; Kuijken, K.; Capaccioli, M.; Silvotti, R.; Bender, R.; Neeser, M.; Saglia, R.; Bertin, E.; Mellier, Y.

    2007-01-01

    The recent explosion of recorded digital data and its processed derivatives threatens to overwhelm researchers when analysing their experimental data or looking up data items in archives and file systems. While current hardware developments allow the acquisition, processing and storage of hundreds o

  8. Astro-WISE : Chaining to the Universe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentijn, Edwin A.; McFarland, John P.; Snigula, Jan; Begeman, Kor G.; Boxhoorn, Danny R.; Rengelink, Roeland; Helmich, Ewout; Heraudeau, Philippe; Kleijn, Gijs Verdoes; Vermeij, Ronald; Vriend, Willem-Jan; Tempelaar, Michiel J.; Deul, Erik; Kuijken, Konrad; Capaccioli, Massimo; Silvotti, Roberto; Bender, Ralf; Neeser, Mark; Saglia, Roberto; Bertin, Emmanuel; Mellier, Yannick; Shaw, RA; Hill, F; Bell, DJ

    2007-01-01

    The recent explosion of recorded digital data and its processed derivatives threatens to overwhelm researchers when analysing their experimental data or looking up data items in archives and file systems. While current hardware developments allow the acquisition, processing and storage of hundreds o

  9. 76 FR 38201 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB; Fellowship Recruitment for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB; Fellowship Recruitment... lists the following information: Title of Proposal: Fellowship Recruitment for the Fellowship...

  10. Fellowship of "Fate" and Fellowships of "Faith": Religious Education and Citizenship Education in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roebben, Bert

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the relationship between religious identity and engagement in citizenship is examined from an educational point of view. The Dutch systematic theologian Erik Borgman refers to the development of European citizenship as a project of "fellowship of fate": we will need to rediscover a common vision on humanity for Europe as fellow human…

  11. AstroDance: Teaching Astrophysics Through Dance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel-Storr, Jacob; Campanelli, M.; Bochner, J.; Warfield, T.; Bischof, H.; Zlochower, Y.; Nordhaus, J.; Watkins, G.; NSF CRPA AstroDance Team

    2014-01-01

    Through a collaboration involving scientists, artists and educators, members of the Center for Computational Relativity and Gravitation and the National Technical Institute for the Deaf at the Rochester Institute of Technology we developed a unique project for Communicating Research to Public Audiences. The project used dance and multi-media theater techniques to expose a broad audience, about half of which is comprised of deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals, to an aesthetic, educational performance representing the concepts of gravitational physics in astrophysical settings. Since deaf and hard-of-hearing people rely heavily on visual communication for learning and gaining access to information, dance and multi-media theater provide a kinesthetic and visual experience that is fully accessible to them, as well as hearing audience members, and help facilitate their learning and development of non-linguistic representations of concepts. Here we present the results of our research into the learning outcomes for the diverse audiences of this project in terms of both knowledge and attitudes towards science.

  12. ASTRO-H White Paper - New Spectral Features

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, R K; Audard, M; Brown, G V; Eckart, M E; Ezoe, Y; Foster, A; Galeazzi, M; Hamaguchi, K; Ishibashi, K; Ishikawa, K; Kaastra, J; Katsuda, S; Leutenegger, M; Miller, E; Mitsuishi, I; Nakajima, H; Ogawa, T; Paerels, F; Porter, F S; Sakai, K; Sawada, M; Takei, Y; Tanaka, Y; Tsuboi, Y; Uchida, H; Ursino, E; Watanabe, S; Yamaguchi, H; Yamasaki, N

    2014-01-01

    This white paper addresses selected new (to X-ray astronomy) physics and data analysis issues that will impact ASTRO-H SWG observations as a result of its high-spectral-resolution X-ray microcalorimeter, the focussing hard X-ray optics and corresponding detectors, and the low background soft gamma-ray detector. We concentrate on issues of atomic and nuclear physics, including basic bound-bound and bound-free transitions as well as scattering and radiative transfer. The major topic categories include the physics of charge exchange, solar system X-ray sources, advanced spectral model, radiative transfer, and hard X-ray emission lines and sources.

  13. Astro-WISE: Chaining to the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Valentijn, E A; Snigula, J; Begeman, K G; Boxhoorn, D R; Rengelink, R; Helmich, E; Heraudeau, P; Kleijn, G V; Vermeij, R; Vriend, W J; Tempelaar, M J; Deul, E; Kuijken, K; Capaccioli, M; Silvotti, R; Bender, R; Neeser, M; Saglia, R; Bertin, E; Mellier, Y; Valentijn, Edwin A.; Farland, John P. Mc; Snigula, Jan; Begeman, Kor G.; Boxhoorn, Danny R.; Rengelink, Roeland; Helmich, Ewout; Heraudeau, Philippe; Kleijn, Gijs Verdoes; Vermeij, Ronald; Vriend, Willem-Jan; Tempelaar, Michiel J.; Deul, Erik; Kuijken, Konrad; Capaccioli, Massimo; Silvotti, Roberto; Bender, Ralf; Neeser, Mark; Saglia, Roberto; Bertin, Emmanuel; Mellier, Yannick

    2007-01-01

    The recent explosion of recorded digital data and its processed derivatives threatens to overwhelm researchers when analysing their experimental data or when looking up data items in archives and file systems. While current hardware developments allow to acquire, process and store 100s of terabytes of data at the cost of a modern sports car, the software systems to handle these data are lagging behind. This general problem is recognized and addressed by various scientific communities, e.g., DATAGRID/EGEE federates compute and storage power over the high-energy physical community, while the astronomical community is building an Internet geared Virtual Observatory, connecting archival data. These large projects either focus on a specific distribution aspect or aim to connect many sub-communities and have a relatively long trajectory for setting standards and a common layer. Here, we report "first light" of a very different solution to the problem initiated by a smaller astronomical IT community. It provides the...

  14. Astro-WISE: Chaining to the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentijn, E. A.; McFarland, J. P.; Snigula, J.; Begeman, K. G.; Boxhoorn, D. R.; Rengelink, R.; Helmich, E.; Heraudeau, P.; Verdoes Kleijn, G.; Vermeij, R.; Vriend, W.-J.; Tempelaar, M. J.; Deul, E.; Kuijken, K.; Capaccioli, M.; Silvotti, R.; Bender, R.; Neeser, M.; Saglia, R.; Bertin, E.; Mellier, Y.

    2007-10-01

    The recent explosion of recorded digital data and its processed derivatives threatens to overwhelm researchers when analysing their experimental data or looking up data items in archives and file systems. While current hardware developments allow the acquisition, processing and storage of hundreds of terabytes of data at the cost of a modern sports car, the software systems to handle these data are lagging behind. This problem is very general and is well recognized by various scientific communities; several large projects have been initiated, e.g., DATAGRID/EGEE {http://www.eu-egee.org/} federates compute and storage power over the high-energy physical community, while the international astronomical community is building an Internet geared Virtual Observatory {http://www.euro-vo.org/pub/} (Padovani 2006) connecting archival data. These large projects either focus on a specific distribution aspect or aim to connect many sub-communities and have a relatively long trajectory for setting standards and a common layer. Here, we report first light of a very different solution (Valentijn & Kuijken 2004) to the problem initiated by a smaller astronomical IT community. It provides an abstract scientific information layer which integrates distributed scientific analysis with distributed processing and federated archiving and publishing. By designing new abstractions and mixing in old ones, a Science Information System with fully scalable cornerstones has been achieved, transforming data systems into knowledge systems. This break-through is facilitated by the full end-to-end linking of all dependent data items, which allows full backward chaining from the observer/researcher to the experiment. Key is the notion that information is intrinsic in nature and thus is the data acquired by a scientific experiment. The new abstraction is that software systems guide the user to that intrinsic information by forcing full backward and forward chaining in the data modelling.

  15. Building a Comprehensive Online Homework System for Astro 101 within Sapling Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    What does an effective homework system for Astro 101 look like? We discuss the method of creating a library of questions for Astro 101 as well as the philosophy behind the types of homework questions (and feedback) that are written within the Sapling Learning homework system. We also discuss which topics may require deeper investigations and how they can be addressed using interactive simulations.

  16. EPO and Astro 101: Shotgun Wedding, Marriage of Convenience, or Meaningful Relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraknoi, A.; Cobabe-Ammann, E.; Prather, E.

    2011-09-01

    Astro 101 touches the widest audiences imaginable - interested generalists, future teachers (whether they know it or not), soon-to-be citizen scientists, and students who will eventually end up heading into STEM careers. NASA's Space Mission Directorate Education and Public Outreach has, as its mandate, all of these audiences as target clients - although we identify them more formally (e.g., informal and formal education, outreach, and higher education). The question on the table is this: should there be a relationship between these two - and is there? Is that relationship taking full advantage of what the other has to offer? Or should it just be left up to the vagaries of individual instructors to find their place in the NASA Science Mission Diretorate (SMD) EPO landscape? Should EPO professionals assume that, within their definitions, they've covered all of the bases? Where do research-based best practices fit into both worlds? Where does the "pipeline" fit into all of this?

  17. The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, S. A.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: Infrared spectroscopy in the 2.5- 16 micron range is a principle means by which organic compounds can be detected and identified in space via their vibrational transitions. Ground-based, airborne, and spaceborne IR spectral studies have already demonstrated that a significant fraction of the carbon in the interstellar medium (ISM) resides in the form of complex organic molecular species. Furthermore, the presence of D-enriched organics in meteorites suggests that a portion of these materials survives incorporation into protosolar nebulae. Unfortunately, neither the distribution of these materials in space nor their genetic and evolutionary relationships with each other or their environments are currently well understood. The Astrobiology Explorer (ABE) is a MIDEX mission concept designed to use infrared spectroscopy to address outstanding problems in Astrochemistry which are particularly relevant to Astrobiology and are amenable to astronomical observation. ABE is currently under study at NASA's Ames Research Center in collaboration with Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. ABE was selected for Phase A study during the last MIDEX AO round, but has yet to be selected for flight.

  18. 15 CFR 256.2 - The Research Associate Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FELLOWSHIPS AND RESEARCH ASSOCIATES RESEARCH... competence, and technical supervision for defined scientific or technical research by a Research...

  19. The ASTRO-H X-ray Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, Tadayuki; Kelley, Richard; Aharonian, Henri AartsFelix; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Akimoto, Fumie; Allen, Steve; Anabuki, Naohisa; Angelini, Lorella; Arnaud, Keith; Asai, Makoto; Audard, Marc; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Azzarello, Philipp; Baluta, Chris; Bamba, Aya; Bando, Nobutaka; Bautz, Mark; Blandford, Roger; Boyce, Kevin; Brown, Greg; Cackett, Ed; Chernyakova, Maria; Coppi, Paolo; Costantini, Elisa; de Plaa, Jelle; Herder, Jan-Willem den; DiPirro, Michael; Done, Chris; Dotani, Tadayasu; Doty, John; Ebisawa, Ken; Eckart, Megan; Enoto, Teruaki; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fabian, Andrew; Ferrigno, Carlo; Foster, Adam; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Funk, Stefan; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Gallo, Luigi; Gandhi, Poshak; Gendreau, Keith; Gilmore, Kirk; Haas, Daniel; Haba, Yoshito; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Hatsukade, Isamu; Hayashi, Takayuki; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Hiraga, Junko; Hirose, Kazuyuki; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hoshino, Akio; Hughes, John; Hwang, Una; Iizuka, Ryo; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Ishida, Manabu; Ishimura, Kosei; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Ito, Masayuki; Iwata, Naoko; Iyomoto, Naoko; Kaastra, Jelle; Kallman, Timothy; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Kataoka, Jun; Katsuda, Satoru; Kawahara, Hajime; Kawaharada, Madoka; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kawasaki, Shigeo; Khangaluyan, Dmitry; Kilbourne, Caroline; Kimura, Masashi; Kinugasa, Kenzo; Kitamoto, Shunji; Kitayama, Tetsu; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Kosaka, Tatsuro; Koujelev, Alex; Koyama, Katsuji; Krimm, Hans; Kubota, Aya; Kunieda, Hideyo; LaMassa, Stephanie; Laurent, Philippe; Lebrun, Francois; Leutenegger, Maurice; Limousin, Olivier; Loewenstein, Michael; Long, Knox; Lumb, David; Madejski, Grzegorz; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Makishima, Kazuo; Marchand, Genevieve; Markevitch, Maxim; Matsumoto, Hironori; Matsushita, Kyoko; McCammon, Dan; McNamara, Brian; Miller, Jon; Miller, Eric; Mineshige, Shin; Minesugi, Kenji; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Miyazawa, Takuya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mori, Hideyuki; Mori, Koji; Mukai, Koji; Murakami, Toshio; Murakami, Hiroshi; Mushotzky, Richard; Nagano, Housei; Nagino, Ryo; Nakagawa, Takao; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakamori, Takeshi; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Namba, Yoshiharu; Natsukari, Chikara; Nishioka, Yusuke; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Nomachi, Masaharu; Dell, Steve O'; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Mina; Ogi, Keiji; Ohashi, Takaya; Ohno, Masanori; Ohta, Masayuki; Okajima, Takashi; Okamoto, Atsushi; Okazaki, Tsuyoshi; Ota, Naomi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Paerels, Frits; Paltani, Stephane; Parmar, Arvind; Petre, Robert; Pohl, Martin; Porter, F Scott; Ramsey, Brian; Reis, Rubens; Reynolds, Christopher; Russell, Helen; Safi-Harb, Samar; Sakai, Shin-ichiro; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Sanders, Jeremy; Sato, Goro; Sato, Rie; Sato, Yoichi; Sato, Kosuke; Sawada, Makoto; Serlemitsos, Peter; Seta, Hiromi; Shibano, Yasuko; Shida, Maki; Shimada, Takanobu; Shinozaki, Keisuke; Shirron, Peter; Simionescu, Aurora; Simmons, Cynthia; Smith, Randall; Sneiderman, Gary; Soong, Yang; Stawarz, Lukasz; Sugawara, Yasuharu; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Sugita, Satoshi; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takeda, Shin-ichiro; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamura, Takayuki; Tamura, Keisuke; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yasuo; Tashiro, Makoto; Tawara, Yuzuru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Terashima, Yuichi; Tombesi, Francesco; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Yoko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Takeshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Uchiyama, Hideki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Ueno, Shiro; Uno, Shinichiro; Urry, Meg; Ursino, Eugenio; de Vries, Cor; Wada, Atsushi; Watanabe, Shin; Werner, Norbert; White, Nicholas; Yamada, Takahiro; Yamada, Shinya; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamasaki, Noriko; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Yoshida, Atsumasa; Yuasa, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    The joint JAXA/NASA ASTRO-H mission is the sixth in a series of highly successful X-ray missions initiated by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS). ASTRO-H will investigate the physics of the high-energy universe via a suite of four instruments, covering a very wide energy range, from 0.3 keV to 600 keV. These instruments include a high-resolution, high-throughput spectrometer sensitive over 0.3-2 keV with high spectral resolution of Delta E < 7 eV, enabled by a micro-calorimeter array located in the focal plane of thin-foil X-ray optics; hard X-ray imaging spectrometers covering 5-80 keV, located in the focal plane of multilayer-coated, focusing hard X-ray mirrors; a wide-field imaging spectrometer sensitive over 0.4-12 keV, with an X-ray CCD camera in the focal plane of a soft X-ray telescope; and a non-focusing Compton-camera type soft gamma-ray detector, sensitive in the 40-600 keV band. The simultaneous broad bandpass, coupled with high spectral resolution, will enable the pursuit o...

  20. AstroBlend: An astrophysical visualization package for Blender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naiman, J. P.

    2016-04-01

    The rapid growth in scale and complexity of both computational and observational astrophysics over the past decade necessitates efficient and intuitive methods for examining and visualizing large datasets. Here, I present AstroBlend, an open-source Python library for use within the three dimensional modeling software, Blender. While Blender has been a popular open-source software among animators and visual effects artists, in recent years it has also become a tool for visualizing astrophysical datasets. AstroBlend combines the three dimensional capabilities of Blender with the analysis tools of the widely used astrophysical toolset, yt, to afford both computational and observational astrophysicists the ability to simultaneously analyze their data and create informative and appealing visualizations. The introduction of this package includes a description of features, work flow, and various example visualizations. A website - www.astroblend.com - has been developed which includes tutorials, and a gallery of example images and movies, along with links to downloadable data, three dimensional artistic models, and various other resources.

  1. ASTRO-H Soft X-Ray Telescope (SXT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soong, Yang; Serlemitsos Peter J.; Okajima, Takashi; Hahne, Devin

    2011-01-01

    ASTRO-H is an astrophysics satellite dedicated for X-ray spectroscopic study non-dispersively and to carry out survey complementally, which will be borne out of US-Japanese collaborative effort. Among the onboard instruments there are four conically approximated Wolter-I X-ray mirrors, among which two of them are soft X-ray mirrors\\ of which the energy range is from a few hundred eV to 15 keY, currently being fabricated in the X-ray Optics Lab at Goddard Space Flight Center. The focal point instruments will be a calorimeter (SXS) and a CCD camera (SXI), respectively. The reflectors of the mirror are made of heat-formed aluminum substrate of the thickness gauged of 152 micron, 229 micron, and 305 micron of the alloy 5052 H-19, followed by epoxy replication on gold-sputtered smooth Pyrex cylindrical mandrels to acquire the X-ray reflective surface. The epoxy layer is 10 micron nominal and surface gold layer of 0.2 micron. Improvements on angular response over the Astro-El/Suzaku mirrors come from error reduction on the figure, the roundness, and the grazing angle/radius mismatching of the reflecting surface, and tighter specs and mechanical strength on supporting structure to reduce the reflector positioning and the assembly errors. In this paper, we report the results of calibration of the engineering model of SXT (EM), and project the quality of the flight mirrors.

  2. NSF's Career-Life Balance Initiative and the NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajhar, Edward A.

    2013-01-01

    In the fall of 2011, the National Science Foundation (NSF) began the Career-Life Balance Initiative to support graduate students, postdoctoral students, and early-career researchers in STEM fields. NSF is focusing first on its most prestigious programs for early-career scientists---the CAREER program and the postdoctoral programs, including the NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowships (AAPF)---where career-life balance opportunities can help retain a significant fraction of early career talent. Subject to budget constraints, NSF plans to further integrate and enhance career-life balance opportunities over time through other programs, like the Graduate Research Fellowships Program and ADVANCE, and subsequently through the broader portfolio of NSF activities. In addition, to comply with Title IX, NSF has regulations to ensure that educational programs that receive NSF funds are free of gender discrimination and harassment. A primary goal of this presentation is to put facts about NSF into the hands of students, faculty, staff, administrators and other policy makers to benefit the advancement of career-life balance in the astronomical community. The presentation focus areas will (1) address common misconceptions about NSF rules regarding parental leave; (2) discuss benefits already available through the AAPF program, Graduate Research Fellowships, and other programs; and (3) listen to community concerns and issues to bring these back to the foundation for consideration. Did you know that NSF allows paid parental leave under many circumstances? For example, the AAPF program currently allows two months of paid parental leave during the fellow's tenure. What are the rules for NSF Graduate Research Fellowships? Come to the session and find out; the answers to such questions might surprise you.

  3. Participation in 12-Step-Based Fellowships Among Dually-Diagnosed Persons

    OpenAIRE

    Laudet, Alexandre B.; Magura, Stephen; Vogel, Howard S.; Knight, Edward L.

    2003-01-01

    Twelve-step groups (12SG), a useful recovery resource, are underutilized by dually-diagnosed persons. There has been little empirical research in this area. This study followed members of a dual-focus 12-step-based fellowship (N = 277) over one year to gain a greater understanding of participation in both specialized dual focus and traditional 12SG among dually-diagnosed persons, including reasons for attending, perceived benefits of and obstacles to affiliation, and predictors of affiliation...

  4. [Report on the VDÄPC Fellowship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarantopoulos, E

    2016-04-01

    "Orandum est ut sit mens sana in corpore sano" ("You should pray for a healthy mind in a healthy body"). This phrase is a shortened citation from the satirical work of the Roman poet Juvenal. It highlights the significant role of physical as well as mental health. Aesthetic ideals have existed since the Archaic age, but they are not necessarily the same in different continents. Being familiar with aesthetic ideals in different cultures might help to accommodate patients' needs and wishes in today's globalised world. Therefore, fellowship programs such as the program organised by the Association of German Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons ("VDÄPC") are very important for young plastic surgeons who are interested in improving their surgical skills and experience. After all, aesthetic surgery is a dynamic specialty, which requires aesthetic plastic surgeons to undergo continued medical education. PMID:27096212

  5. Clinical fellowship training in pathology informatics: A program description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R Gilbertson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 2007, our healthcare system established a clinical fellowship program in pathology informatics. In 2011, the program benchmarked its structure and operations against a 2009 white paper "Program requirements for fellowship education in the subspecialty of clinical informatics," endorsed by the Board of the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA that described a proposal for a general clinical informatics fellowship program. Methods: A group of program faculty members and fellows compared each of the proposed requirements in the white paper with the fellowship program′s written charter and operations. The majority of white paper proposals aligned closely with the rules and activities in our program and comparison was straightforward. In some proposals, however, differences in terminology, approach, and philosophy made comparison less direct, and in those cases, the thinking of the group was recorded. After the initial evaluation, the remainder of the faculty reviewed the results and any disagreements were resolved. Results: The most important finding of the study was how closely the white paper proposals for a general clinical informatics fellowship program aligned with the reality of our existing pathology informatics fellowship. The program charter and operations of the program were judged to be concordant with the great majority of specific white paper proposals. However, there were some areas of discrepancy and the reasons for the discrepancies are discussed in the manuscript. Conclusions: After the comparison, we conclude that the existing pathology informatics fellowship could easily meet all substantive proposals put forth in the 2009 clinical informatics program requirements white paper. There was also agreement on a number of philosophical issues, such as the advantages of multiple fellows, the need for core knowledge and skill sets, and the need to maintain clinical skills during informatics training. However

  6. 34 CFR 1100.1 - What is the Literacy Leader Fellowship Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Literacy Leader Fellowship Program? 1100.1... INSTITUTE FOR LITERACY NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR LITERACY: LITERACY LEADER FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM § 1100.1 What is the Literacy Leader Fellowship Program? (a) Under the Literacy Leader Fellowship Program, the...

  7. Postmodern Astro-Theology, Cometary Panspermia, and the Polonnaruwa Meteorite: Derham, Wesley, Whitehead, Griffin and Cobb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Theodore, Jr.

    2013-03-01

    Here is a postmodern astro-theological response to factual evidence supporting cometary panspermia, including evidence of cyanobacteria fossils in meteorites (Hoover 2011) and diatom frustules in the Polonnaruwa meteorite (Wickramasinghe and others 2013). Distinct from William Derham's modern astro-theology, and in accordance with John Wesley's avoidance of factual demonstrations/proofs and Wesley's appreciation of factual exemplifications, postmodern astro-theology appreciates cometary panspermia. Cometary panspermia is a specific-factually correct example of panspermia in general. Generic panspermia is essential to panentheism. Cometary panspermia enriches evolutionary biology.

  8. Bringing Science into Schools through Astronomy. Project ASTRO, Tucson

    CERN Document Server

    Barban, C; Barban, Caroline; Dole, Herve

    2005-01-01

    We report our experience in bringing science into US and French classrooms. We participated in the US scientific educational program Project ASTRO. It is based on a partnership between a school teacher and an astronomer. They together design and realize simple and interesting scientific activities for the children to learn and enjoy science. We present four hands-on activities we realized in a 4th-grade class (10 yr-old kids) in Tucson (USA) in 2002-2003. Among the covered topics were: the Solar System, the Sun (helioseismology) and the Galaxies. We also present a similar experience done in two classrooms in 2005, in Chatenay-Malabry (France) in partnership with an amateur astronomy association (Aphelie). This is a pleasant and rewarding activity, extremely well appreciated by the children and the school teachers. It furthermore promotes already at a young age the excitement of science, and provides concrete examples of the scientific methodology.

  9. Do You Always Need a Textbook to Teach Astro 101?

    CERN Document Server

    Rudolph, Alexander L

    2013-01-01

    The increasing use of interactive learning strategies in Astro 101 classrooms has led some instructors to consider the usefulness of a textbook in such classes. These strategies provide students a learning modality very different from the traditional lecture supplemented by reading a textbook and homework, and raises the question of whether the learning that takes place during such interactive activities is enough by itself to teach students what we wish them to know about astronomy. To address this question, assessment data is presented from an interactive class, which was first taught with a required textbook, and then with the textbook being optional. Comparison of test scores before and after this change shows no statistical difference in student achievement whether a textbook is required or not. In addition, comparison of test scores of students who purchased the textbook to those who did not, after the textbook became optional, also show no statistical difference between the two groups. The Light and Sp...

  10. The Cadmium Zinc Telluride Imager on AstroSat

    CERN Document Server

    Bhalerao, V; Vibhute, A; Pawar, P; Rao, A R; Hingar, M K; Khanna, Rakesh; Kutty, A P K; Malkar, J P; Patil, M H; Arora, Y K; Sinha, S; Priya, P; Samuel, Essy; Sreekumar, S; Vinod, P; Mithun, N P S; Vadawale, S V; Vagshette, N; Navalgund, K H; Sarma, K S; Pandiyan, R; Seetha, S; Subbarao, K

    2016-01-01

    The Cadmium Zinc Telluride Imager (CZTI) is a high energy, wide-field imaging instrument on AstroSat. CZT's namesake Cadmium Zinc Telluride detectors cover an energy range from 20 keV to > 200 keV, with 11% energy resolution at 60 keV. The coded aperture mask attains an angular resolution of 17' over a 4.6 deg x 4.6 deg (FWHM) field of view. CZTI functions as an open detector above 100 keV, continuously sensitive to GRBs and other transients in about 30% of the sky. The pixellated detectors are sensitive to polarisation above ~100 keV, with exciting possibilities for polarisation studies of transients and bright persistent sources. In this paper, we provide details of the complete CZTI instrument, detectors, coded aperture mask, mechanical and electronic configuration, as well as data and products.

  11. Astro. A multimedia System for training of personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ASTRO is an integrated software package used to train system operators and is directly applicable to all types of power-generation plant operator training. The following are its salient characteristics: - Installed in work stations with multimedia capabilities a user-friendly interface - Covers various types of instruction on theory, procedure and maintenance allowing the execution of trainee-customized courses. - Includes all the phases of the teaching-learning task: compilation or creation and adaptation of course design information, execution and evaluation. - Combines the capabilities of traditional teaching tools, focusing basically on theoretical training, with the power of necessary real-time simulators for the assimilation of operation and maintenance procedures. Moreover, it provides the capacity to extract information instantly from the simulated system, without existing the simulation process. - It is run on inexpensive platforms (work stations) as compared to the traditional system of simulator training or training at site. (Author)

  12. ASTRO-F/FIS observing simulation including detector effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, W.; Pak, S.; Lee, H.; Nakagawa, T.; Kim, M.; Oh, S.; Kaneda, H.; Matsuura, S.; Patrashin, M.; Shibai, H.

    Based on the present hardware specifications and configurations of the ASTRO-F/FIS (Far-Infrared Surveyor), we are developing a software that simulates the observations with this instrument. Various kinds of detector effects affect the quality of the signal obtained from the detector. In order to correct the signal exactly, we need to analyze the characteristics of the detector and simulate various detector effects. In this presentation, we will show the simulated data sets based on the experimental data measured in the laboratory. Using the simulator, we will discuss the effects of cosmic-ray hitting, transient, crosstalk and non-uniformity of detectors, and propose an appropriate methods for the data reduction.

  13. Charged Particle Monitor on the AstroSat mission

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, A R; Bhargava, Yash; Khanna, Rakesh; Hingar, M K; Kutty, A P K; Malkar, J P; Basak, Rupal; Sreekumar, S; Samuel, Essy; Priya, P; Vinod, P; Bhattacharya, D; Bhalerao, V; Vadawale, S V; Mithun, N P S; Pandiyan, R; Subbarao, K; Seetha, S; Sarma, K Suryanarayana

    2016-01-01

    Charged Particle Monitor (CPM) on-board the AstroSat satellite is an instrument designed to detect the flux of charged particles at the satellite location. A Cesium Iodide Thallium (CsI(Tl)) crystal is used with a Kapton window to detect protons with energies greater than 1 MeV. The ground calibration of CPM was done using gamma-rays from radioactive sources and protons from particle accelerators. Based on the ground calibration results, energy deposition above 1 MeV are accepted and particle counts are recorded. It is found that CPM counts are steady and the signal for the onset and exit of South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) region are generated in a very reliable and stable manner.

  14. "ASTRO 101" Course Materials 2.0: Next Generation Lecture Tutorials and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Stephanie; Grazier, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Early efforts to create course materials were often local in scale and were based on "gut instinct," and classroom experience and observation. While subsequent efforts were often based on those same instincts and observations of classrooms, they also incorporated the results of many years of education research. These "second generation" course materials, such as lecture tutorials, relied heavily on research indicating that instructors need to actively engage students in the learning process. While imperfect, these curricular innovations, have provided evidence that research-based materials can be constructed, can easily be disseminated to a broad audience, and can provide measureable improvement in student learning across many settings. In order to improve upon this prior work, next generation materials must build upon the strengths of these innovations while engineering in findings from education research, cognitive science, and instructor feedback. A next wave of materials, including a set of next generation lecture tutorials, have been constructed with attention to the body of research on student motivation, and cognitive load; and they are responsive to our body of knowledge on learning difficulties related to specific content in the domain. From instructor feedback, these materials have been constructed to have broader coverage of the materials typically taught in an ASTRO 101 course, to take less class time, and to be more affordable for students. This next generation of lecture tutorials may serve as a template of the ways in which course materials can be reengineered to respond to current instructor and student needs.

  15. DOE/PSU Graduate Student Fellowship Program for Hydropower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cimbala, John M. [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States)

    2014-03-30

    The primary objective of this project is to stimulate academic interest in the conventional hydropower field by supplying research support for at least eight individual Master of Science (MS) or Doctoral (PhD) level research projects, each consisting of a graduate student supervised by a faculty member. We have completed many of the individual student research projects: 2 PhD students have finished, and 4 are still working towards their PhD degree. 4 MS students have finished, and 2 are still working towards their MS degree, one of which is due to finish this April. In addition, 4 undergraduate student projects have been completed, and one is to be completed this April. These projects were supervised by 7 faculty members and an Advisory/Review Panel. Our students and faculty have presented their work at national or international conferences and have submitted several journal publications. Three of our graduate students (Keith Martin, Dan Leonard and Hosein Foroutan) have received HRF Fellowships during the course of this project. All of the remaining students are anticipated to be graduated by the end of Fall Semester 2014. All of the tasks for this project will have been completed once all the students have been graduated, although it will be another year or two until all the journal publications have been finalized based on the work performed as part of this DOE Hydropower project.

  16. Rejoinder to "No Evidence of Dark Energy Metamorphosis", astro-ph/0404468

    CERN Document Server

    Alam, U; Saini, T D; Starobinsky, A A; Alam, Ujjaini; Sahni, Varun; Saini, Tarun Deep

    2004-01-01

    In a recent paper (astro-ph/0311364) Alam et al argued that the SNe data of Tonry et al 2003 and Barris et al 2003 appear to favour DE which evolves in time, provided no other priors are invoked. (The effect of invoking priors such as the age of the Universe, the values of $H_0$ and $\\Omega_m$ and CMB/LSS observations could modify this conclusion, as demonstrated in astro-ph/0403687 and other recent papers.) The approach adopted by Alam et al to reconstruct the properties of DE was severely (and, as we shall show below -- unfairly) criticized by J\\"onsson et al in astro-ph/0404468. In this paper we re-examine the parametrisation used in astro-ph/0311364 and show that, contrary to the claims of J\\"onsson et al, the results obtained from this reconstruction are robust and therefore representative of the true nature of dark energy.

  17. Testing ASTRO-H Measurements of Bulk and Turbulent Gas Motions in Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Ota, Naomi; Lau, Erwin T

    2015-01-01

    Gas motions in galaxy clusters play important roles in determining the properties of the intracluster medium (ICM) and constraining cosmological parameters using X-ray and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect observations of galaxy clusters. The upcoming ASTRO-H mission, equipped with high-resolution X-ray spectrometer, will make the first direct measurements of gas motions in galaxy clusters through measurements of Doppler shifting and broadening of emission lines. However, the physical interpretation of the data will be challenging due to the complex thermal and velocity structures of the ICM. In this work, we investigate how well we can measure bulk and turbulent gas motions in the ICM with ASTRO-H, by analyzing mock ASTRO-H simulations of galaxy clusters extracted from cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. We assess how photon counts, spectral fitting methods, multiphase ICM structure, deprojections, and region selection affect the measurements of gas motions. We show that while ASTRO-H is capable of recovering the...

  18. Astro-E2衛星ベーキングにおけるアウトガス量の測定

    OpenAIRE

    Anabuki, Naohisa; 穴吹 直久

    2005-01-01

    Performance of various instruments on-board a satellite could be degraded by the outgas from the satellite on orbit. In order to prevent such degradation, satellite baking in a vacuum chamber is often employed. It is essential to measure the outgassing rate accurately during the baking to evaluate the reduction of the outgas on orbit. The satellite baking of Astro-E2 was carried out for about 10 days in the spring of 2004. A TQCM was used to measure the outgassing rate, which is described in ...

  19. Soft X-ray transmission of optical blocking filters for the X-ray CCD cameras onboard Astro-E 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamoto, Shunji E-mail: kitamoto@rikkyo.ac.jp; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Yamamoto, Norimasa; Saito, Harue; Takano, Haruko; Suga, Kazuharu; Ozawa, Eiji; Suzuki, Kazuma; Kato, Risa; Tachibana, Yusuke; Tsuji, Yusuke; Koganei, Ken; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Katayama, Haruyoshi; Enoguchi, Hideyuki; Nakashima, Yusuke; Shiroshouji, Takayuki

    2003-06-11

    We measured soft X-ray transmission of Optical Blocking Filters for Charge Coupled Device cameras, which will be launched as focal plane detectors of X-ray telescopes onboard the Japanese fifth X-ray astronomical satellite, Astro-E 2. The filters were made from polyimide coated with Al. The X-ray absorption fine structures at the K edges of C, N, O and Al were measured. The depth of the absorption edge of O was deep, compared to the other elements of polyimide. This is the evidence of the oxidation of Al.

  20. Developing a Pedagogic Approach to Enhance Student Learning Before, During and After International Work Placement: Teaching Fellowship 11

    OpenAIRE

    Cullen, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The report commences with a brief overview of the Fellowship research and provides insight into the benefits of mobility. Erasmus mobility is viewed as a means to promote the Department of Culinary Arts in the international culinary arena via the student’s skills and performance. It is clear from this research that the international internships provide exceptional opportunities for students to integrate and learn in different cultural environments. It is argued that this research addresses ma...

  1. FY 2005 Congressional Earmark: The Environmental Institute Fellowship Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharon Tracey, Co-PI and Richard Taupier, Co-PI

    2007-02-06

    Congressional Earmark Funding was used to create a Postdoctoral Environmental Fellowship Program, interdisciplinary Environmental Working Groups, and special initiatives to create a dialogue around the environment at the University of Massachusetts Amherst to mobilize faculty to work together to respond to emerging environmental needs and to build institutional capacity to launch programmatic environmental activities across campus over time. Developing these networks of expertise will enable the University to more effectively and swiftly respond to emerging environmental needs and assume a leadership role in varied environmental fields. Over the course of the project 20 proposals were submitted to a variety of funding agencies involving faculty teams from 19 academic departments; 4 projects were awarded totaling $950,000; special events were organized including the Environmental Lecture Series which attracted more than 1,000 attendees over the course of the project; 75 University faculty became involved in one or more Working Groups (original three Working Groups plus Phase 2 Working Groups); an expertise database was developed with approximately 275 faculty involved in environmental research and education as part of a campus-wide network of environmental expertise; 12 University centers and partners participated; and the three Environmental Fellows produced 3 publications as well as a number of presentations and papers in progress.

  2. Pathology informatics fellowship training: Focus on molecular pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Mandelker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pathology informatics is both emerging as a distinct subspecialty and simultaneously becoming deeply integrated within the breadth of pathology practice. As specialists, pathology informaticians need a broad skill set, including aptitude with information fundamentals, information systems, workflow and process, and governance and management. Currently, many of those seeking training in pathology informatics additionally choose training in a second subspecialty. Combining pathology informatics training with molecular pathology is a natural extension, as molecular pathology is a subspecialty with high potential for application of modern biomedical informatics techniques. Methods and Results: Pathology informatics and molecular pathology fellows and faculty evaluated the current fellowship program′s core curriculum topics and subtopics for relevance to molecular pathology. By focusing on the overlap between the two disciplines, a structured curriculum consisting of didactics, operational rotations, and research projects was developed for those fellows interested in both pathology informatics and molecular pathology. Conclusions: The scope of molecular diagnostics is expanding dramatically as technology advances and our understanding of disease extends to the genetic level. Here, we highlight many of the informatics challenges facing molecular pathology today, and outline specific informatics principles necessary for the training of future molecular pathologists.

  3. AstroCollation: Building Knowledge Communities In Transient Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Matthew; Djorgovski, S. G.; Drake, A. J.; Donalek, C.; Mahabal, A. A.; Stalzer, M.; Williams, R. D.

    2010-01-01

    First-generation citizen science projects (such as Galaxy Zoo) have proven very successful at utilizing the efforts of volunteers (human computation) to attack specific problem areas, such as certain types of image analysis, where machines are not currently especially effective. However, there has been little or no attempt in these to capture or transfer the domain knowledge from carbon-based to silicon-based systems. AstroCollation is a next generation collaborative science venture that aims to foster a more synergistic relationship between humans and machines around transient astronomy. Data mining algorithms will be applied to transient event data to produce conceptual models describing them. These models will then be presented to citizen scientists for value judgments, deciding which of a set of models provides the best description, as well as providing contextual information to aid the classification process. Finally decisions and information are factored back into the system and consolidated to produce a consensus description of an event. The project is predicated upon semantic technologies - allowing the formal representation of conceptual relations within a particular domain - and will leverage data and infrastructure from the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey and SkyAlert system. It will address such issues as the formal treatment of uncertainty in data, how to map a multistage computational process to a simple and minimal interface or set of interfaces, and how to fold human computation into a workflow process where time criticality can be important.

  4. The Astro-H Soft X-Ray Mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, David; Okajima, Takashi; Serlemitsos, Peter; Soong, Yang

    2012-01-01

    The Astro-H is led by the Japanese Space Agency (JAXA) in collaboration with many other institutions including the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Goddard's contributions include two soft X-ray telescopes (SXTs). The telescopes have an effective area of 562 square cm at 1 keV and 425 square cm at 6 keV with an image quality requirement of 1.7 arc-minutes half power diameter (HPD). The engineering model has demonstrated 1.1 arc-minutes HPD error. The design of the SXT is based on the successful Suzaku mission mirrors with some enhancements to improve the image quality. Two major enhancements are bonding the X-ray mirror foils to alignment bars instead of allowing the mirrors to float, and fabricating alignment bars with grooves within 5 microns of accuracy. An engineering model SXT was recently built and subjected to several tests including vibration, thermal, and X-ray performance in a beamline. Several lessons were learned during this testing that will be incorporated in the flight design. Test results and optical performance are discussed, along with a description of the design of the SXT.

  5. Soft x-ray imager (SXI) onboard ASTRO-H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Dotani, Tadayasu; Hiraga, Junko S.; Anabuki, Naohisa; Bamba, Aya; Hatsukade, Isamu; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Mori, Koji; Murakami, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Yamauchi, Makoto

    2010-07-01

    We are designing an X-ray CCD camera (SXI) for ASTRO-H, including many new items. We have developed the CCD, CCD-NeXT4, that is a P-channel type CCD. It has a thick depletion layer of 200μm with an imaging area of 30mm square. Since it is back-illuminated, it has a good low energy response and is robust against the impact of micro-meteorites. We will employ 4 chips to cover the area of 60mm square. A mechanical rather than peltier cooler will be employed so that we can cool the CCD to -120°C. We will also introduce an analog ASIC that is placed very close to the CCD. It performs well, having a similar noise level to that assembled by using individual parts used on SUZAKU. We also employ a modulated X-ray source (MXS), that improves the accuracy of the calibration. The SXI will have one of the largest SΩ among various satellites.

  6. Astro 001 through an Interactive, Multimedia Science Fiction Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Christopher; Charlton, J. C.; Tr'Ehnl, N.; Herrmann, K. A.; Narayanan, A.

    2006-12-01

    We present a preview of a new, fully on-line astronomy course for undergraduate non-science majors at Penn State, to be offered for the first time in Spring 2007, with an expected enrollment of 300-600 students. The entire course content is conveyed through an interactive story, capitalizing on the many multimedia astronomy resources publically available on the WWW. The four units of the course, basic astronomy and the nighttime sky, our solar system, stars and the Milky Way Galaxy, and extragalactic astronomy and cosmology deliver the same content as a traditional Astro 001 course. The story for our first unit involves a student abducted by aliens and taken to another planet. There the student is confronted with puzzles involving a different stellar system configuration. The final unit involves a student's quest for a career, aided by visits to alien civilizations in which they explain their varied views of life which is shaped by cosmological findings. The four units are united by a character, the Riddler, who poses riddles about various aspects of the course, and whose identity and purpose is revealed gradually as a reward for completion of various subtopics. This initial offering of the course will be entirely web-based except for traditional evening in-class exams. Our own exams and a standardized preand post-assessment will be used to benchmark our students' performance against those from our traditional course. We gratefully acknowledge funding from an STScI IDEAS award.

  7. 76 FR 21001 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request; Fellowship Recruitment for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request; Fellowship Recruitment for... also lists the following information: Title of Proposal: Fellowship Recruitment for the...

  8. The Importance of Being First: Position Dependent Citation Rates on arXiv:astro-ph

    CERN Document Server

    Dietrich, J P

    2007-01-01

    We study the dependence of citation counts of e-prints published on the arXiv:astro-ph server on their position in the daily astro-ph listing. Using the SPIRES literature database we reconstruct the astro-ph listings from July 2002 to December 2005 and determine citation counts for e-prints from their ADS entry. We use Zipf plots to analyze the citation distributions for each astro-ph position. We find that e-prints appearing at or near the top of the astro-ph mailings receive significantly more citations than those further down the list. This difference is significant at the 7 sigma level and on average amounts to two times more citations for papers at the top than those further down the listing. We propose three possible non-exclusive explanations for this positional citation effect and try to test them. We conclude that self-promotion by authors plays a role in the observed effect but cannot exclude that increased visibility at the top of the daily listings contributes to higher citation counts as well. We...

  9. Fluid-loading solutions and plasma volume: Astro-ade and salt tablets with water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Suzanne M.; Seinmann, Laura; Young, Joan A.; Hoskin, Cherylynn N.; Barrows, Linda H.

    1994-01-01

    Fluid loading with salt and water is a countermeasure used after space flight to restore body fluids. However, gastrointestinal side effects have been frequently reported in persons taking similar quantities of salt and water in ground-based studies. The effectiveness of the Shuttle fluid-loading countermeasure (8 gms salt, 0.97 liters of water) was compared to Astro-ade (an isotonic electrolyte solution), to maintain plasma volume (PV) during 4.5 hrs of resting fluid restriction. Three groups of healthy men (n=6) were studied: a Control Group (no drinking), an Astro-ade Group, and a Salt Tablet Group. Changes in PV after drinking were calculated from hematocrit and hemoglobin values. Both the Salt Tablet and Astro-ade Groups maintained PV at 2-3 hours after ingestion compared to the Control Group, which had a 6 percent decline. Side effects (thirst, stomach cramping, and diarrhea) were noted in at least one subject in both the Astro-ade and Salt Tablet Groups. Nausea and vomiting were reported in one subject in the Salt Tablet Group. It was concluded that Astro-ade may be offered as an alternate fluid-loading countermeasure but further work is needed to develop a solution that is more palatable and has fewer side effects.

  10. 22 CFR 196.2 - How is the Fellowship Program administered?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How is the Fellowship Program administered? 196.2 Section 196.2 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION THOMAS R. PICKERING FOREIGN AFFAIRS/GRADUATE FOREIGN AFFAIRS FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM § 196.2 How is the Fellowship...

  11. 34 CFR 662.42 - How may a fellowship be revoked?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How may a fellowship be revoked? 662.42 Section 662.42... Post-award Requirements for Fellows § 662.42 How may a fellowship be revoked? (a) The fellowship may be revoked only by the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board upon the recommendation of...

  12. 34 CFR 663.42 - How may a fellowship be revoked?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How may a fellowship be revoked? 663.42 Section 663.42 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY... Requirements for Fellows § 663.42 How may a fellowship be revoked? (a) The fellowship may be revoked only...

  13. ASTRO-H White Paper - Stars -- Accretion, Shocks, Charge Exchanges and Magnetic Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Tsuboi, Y; Audard, M; Hamaguchi, K; Leutenegger, M A; Maeda, Y; Mori, K; H,; Murakami,; Sugawara, Y; Tsujimoto, M

    2014-01-01

    X-ray emission from stars has origins as diverse as the stars themselves: accretion shocks, shocks generated in wind-wind collisions, or release of magnetic energy. Although the scenarios responsible for X-ray emission are thought to be known, the physical mechanisms operating are in many cases not yet fully understood. Full testing of many of these mechanisms requires high energy resolution, large effective area, and coverage of broad energy bands. The loss of the X-ray calorimeter spectrometer on board ASTRO-E2 was a huge blow to the field; it would have provided a large sample of high resolution spectra of stars with high signal-to-noise ratio. Now, with the advent of the ASTRO-H Soft X-ray Spectrometer and Hard X-ray Imager, we will be able to examine some of the hot topics in stellar astrophysics and solve outstanding mysteries.

  14. Shaping and Shifting Worldviews: An Analysis of What Astro 101 Students Learned About the Role of Science in Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Samantha Lauren; Hirst, Dalton; Barron-Santella, Angelica; Prather, Edward E.; Mendelsohn, Benjamin; Wallace, Colin Scott

    2014-06-01

    A group of graduate and undergraduate students and researchers with the Center for Astronomy Education (CAE) have been analyzing general education introductory astronomy (Astro 101) students’ written responses to questions that probe their ideas about the role and relevance of science in our society and in their lives. At the end of the semester, students were asked several questions to elicit their ideas about the positive and potential negative impacts that science has on our society's prosperity and their quality of life. Students were asked to provide examples and justifications for the most important discoveries in science, advancements in health and medicine and innovations in technology over the past century. Students were also asked to comment on which facet of the course (lecture, homework, in-class writings, Think-Pair-Share questions and/or Lecture-Tutorials) contributed to changing their understanding of their world and society.

  15. Simulating Astro-H Observations of Sloshing Gas Motions in the Cores of Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZuHone, J. A.; Miller, E. D.; Simionescu, A.; Bautz, M. W.

    2016-04-01

    Astro-H will be the first X-ray observatory to employ a high-resolution microcalorimeter, capable of measuring the shift and width of individual spectral lines to the precision necessary for estimating the velocity of the diffuse plasma in galaxy clusters. This new capability is expected to bring significant progress in understanding the dynamics, and therefore the physics, of the intracluster medium. However, because this plasma is optically thin, projection effects will be an important complicating factor in interpreting future Astro-H measurements. To study these effects in detail, we performed an analysis of the velocity field from simulations of a galaxy cluster experiencing gas sloshing and generated synthetic X-ray spectra, convolved with model Astro-H Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) responses. We find that the sloshing motions produce velocity signatures that will be observable by Astro-H in nearby clusters: the shifting of the line centroid produced by the fast-moving cold gas underneath the front surface, and line broadening produced by the smooth variation of this motion along the line of sight. The line shapes arising from inviscid or strongly viscous simulations are very similar, indicating that placing constraints on the gas viscosity from these measurements will be difficult. Our spectroscopic analysis demonstrates that, for adequate exposures, Astro-H will be able to recover the first two moments of the velocity distribution of these motions accurately, and in some cases multiple velocity components may be discerned. The simulations also confirm the importance of accurate treatment of point-spread function scattering in the interpretation of Astro-H/SXS spectra of cluster plasmas.

  16. Enhancing ASTRO101 Student Engagement Using Student-Created ScienceSKETCHES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Timothy F.; Slater, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    As astronomy teaching faculty are changing their teaching strategies from those less desirable approaches that allow students to passively listen to professor-centered, information-lectures to more desirable, active-student engagement classrooms characterized by active learning, ASTRO 101 professors are looking for more ways to help students learn to participate in authentic scientific practices. This is consistent with notion advocated by the NRC that students should practice scientific thinking, scientific discourse, and scientific practices while learning science. Noticing that much informal scientific discussion is mediated by sketches—such as those occasionally lively discussions held after hours during scientific conferences—scholars at the CAPER Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research have been piloting a series of active learning tasks where students are challenged to create scientific drawings to illustrate their understanding of astronomical phenomena or structures. Known informally as ScienceSKETCHES, examples of these tasks challenge students to illustrate: the spectral curve differences between high and low mass stars; the differences among galaxy shapes; the distribution of stars for the Andromeda Galaxy in terms of luminosity versus temperature; old and young planetary surfaces; or the relationships between distances and speeds of orbiting objects. Although our initial testing has focused on predominately on paper and pencil tasks, with the occasional cell phone picture of a ScienceSKETCH being texted to the professor, the electronic-based teaching world is nearly ready to support these sorts of drawing tasks. Already, the ability to complete and submit scientific sketches is becoming commonplace across electronic learning platforms, including shared white-boarding in many desktop videoconferencing systems, and handheld device learning systems for interactive classrooms, like those from Learning Catalytics, among many others. Our

  17. The Design and Performance of the Astro-E/XRS Signal Processing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, K. R.; Baker, R. G.; Dumonthier, J. J.; Kelley, R. L.; Stahle, C. K.; Szymkowiak, A. E.; Winkert, G. E.; Audley, M. D.; Gendreau, K. C.; Fujimoto R.

    1999-01-01

    We describe the signal processing system of the Astro-E XRS instrument. The Calorimeter Analog Processor (CAP) provides bias and power for the detectors and amplifies the detector signals by a factor of 20,000. The Calorimeter Digital Processor (CDP) performs the digital processing of the calorimeter signals, detecting X-ray pulses and analyzing them by optimal filtering. We describe the operation of pulse detection, pulse height analysis, and risetime determination. We also discuss performance, including the three event grades (hi-res, mid-res, and low-res), anticoincidence detection, counting rate dependence, and noise rejection.

  18. Design and Performance of the Astro-E/XRS Signal Processing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Kevin R.; Audley, M. D.; Baker, R. G.; Dumonthier, J. J.; Fujimoto, R.; Gendreau, K. C.; Ishisaki, Y.; Kelley, R. L.; Stahle, C. K.; Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1999-01-01

    We describe the signal processing system of the Astro-E XRS instrument. The Calorimeter Analog Processor (CAP) provides bias and power for the detectors and amplifies the detector signals by a factor of 20,000. The Calorimeter Digital Processor (CDP) performs the digital processing of the calorimeter signals, detecting X-ray pulses and analyzing them by optimal filtering. We describe the operation of pulse detection, Pulse height analysis. and risetime determination. We also discuss performance, including the three event grades (hi-res mid-res, and low-res). anticoincidence detection, counting rate dependence, and noise rejection.

  19. STS-35 Astronomy Laboratory 1 (ASTRO-1) telescopes at KSC processing facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-35 Astronomy Laboratory 1 (ASTRO-1) payload is processed at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) facility. In the foreground, mounted on a two-axis pointing system (TAPS) is the Broad Band X Ray Telescope (BBXRT). Only one of the three ultraviolet telescopes mounted on the instrument pointing system (IPS) is visible - the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT). Above the UIT is a star tracker (AST). ASTRO-1 telescopes on unpressurized pallets (u-pallets) will be inserted in Columbia's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102's, payload bay (PLB). The STS-35 payload is the first horizontal payload flown since late 1985. View provided by KSC with alternate number KSC-90PC-398.

  20. ASTRO-H White Paper - Clusters of Galaxies and Related Science

    CERN Document Server

    Kitayama, T; Markevitch, M; Matsushita, K; Allen, S; Kawaharada, M; McNamara, B; Ota, N; Akamatsu, H; de Plaa, J; Galeazzi, M; Madejski, G; Main, R; Miller, E; Nakazawa, K; Russell, H; Sato, K; Sekiya, N; Simionescu, A; Tamura, T; Uchida, Y; Ursino, E; Werner, N; Zhuravleva, I; ZuHone, J

    2014-01-01

    The next generation X-ray observatory ASTRO-H will open up a new dimension in the study of galaxy clusters by achieving for the first time the spectral resolution required to measure velocities of the intracluster plasma, and extending at the same time the spectral coverage to energies well beyond 10 keV. This white paper provides an overview of the capabilities of ASTRO-H for exploring gas motions in galaxy clusters including their cosmological implications, the physics of AGN feedback, dynamics of cluster mergers as well as associated high-energy processes, chemical enrichment of the intracluster medium, and the nature of missing baryons and unidentified dark matter.

  1. AstroBox2 - Detector for low-energy β-delayed particle detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saastamoinen, A.; Pollacco, E.; Roeder, B. T.; Spiridon, A.; Daq, M.; Trache, L.; Pascovici, G.; De Oliveira, R.; Rodrigues, M. R. D.; Tribble, R. E.

    2016-06-01

    Efficient suppression of β-background is essential for studies of low-energy β-delayed charged particle decays of astrophysical interest. A promising method for such studies has been a micro pattern gas amplifier detector where the sample is implanted into the gas volume and the decays that follow are observed with high gain and signal to noise ratio. An upgraded version of the original AstroBox detector has been built and commissioned at Texas A&M University. Here a description of the new AstroBox2 detector is given, selected results from the commissioning tests are presented, and future perspectives discussed.

  2. Astro-WISE for KiDS survey production and quality control

    OpenAIRE

    Kleijn, Gijs Verdoes; de Jong, Jelte T. A.; Valentijn, E. A.; Kuijken, K.; Collaboration, for the KiDS; Consortiums, for the Astro-WISE

    2011-01-01

    The Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS) is a 1500 square degree optical imaging survey with the recently commissioned OmegaCAM wide-field imager on the VLT Survey Telescope (VST). A suite of data products will be delivered to ESO and the community by the KiDS survey team. Spread over Europe, the KiDS team uses Astro-WISE to collaborate efficiently and pool hardware resources. In Astro-WISE the team shares, calibrates and archives all survey data. The data-centric architectural design realizes a dynamic...

  3. Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program, Annual Report, Class of 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMakin, Andrea H.

    2013-09-23

    This 32-pp annual report/brochure describes the accomplishments of the Class of 2012 of the Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (the last class of this program), which PNNL administers for the National Nuclear Security Administration. The time period covers Sept 2011 through June 2013.

  4. 40 CFR 46.115 - Types of fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., engineering, technology, social science, and specialty areas supporting environmental protection efforts. (b... control and environmental protection in fields such as science, engineering, technology, social science... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Types of fellowships. 46.115 Section...

  5. Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program (CPFP) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Prevention Fellowship provides a strong foundation for scientists and clinicians to train in the field of cancer prevention and control. This structured, multidisciplinary program offers early career scientists from different health disciplines a variety of postdoctoral training opportunities . | Training to form a strong foundation in cancer prevention and control for scientists and clinicians.

  6. A Christian Fellowship's Ban on Gay Leaders Splits 2 Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurtrie, Beth

    2000-01-01

    Reports on conflicts between student religious groups and college nondiscrimination policies concerning homosexuality. Incidents involved the student Christian Fellowship chapters at Tufts University (Massachusetts) and Middlebury College (Vermont). Conflict focuses on freedom of religion versus the institution's right to withhold funding from…

  7. Family Therapy Training in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rait, Douglas Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study describes the current state of family therapy training in a sample of child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship programs. Method: Child and adolescent psychiatry fellows (N = 66) from seven training programs completed a questionnaire assessing demographics, family therapy training experiences, common models of treatment and…

  8. Recent Results from the Low Temperature Spare Astro-E Microcalorimeter Used at the LLNL EBIT-I and EBIT-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past year a spare NASA/GSFC Astro-E microcalorimeter has been installed, tested, and run successfully on the electron beam ions traps EBIT-I and EBIT-II at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The microcalorimeter complements crystal and grating spectrometers already part of the LLNL ebit program making it possible to measure a broad bandwidth (∼0.3-10 keV) with moderate resolution while simultaneously measuring a narrow bandwidth (∼0.7-1.3 keV) with high resolution. An overview of recent work, including measurements by the microcalorimeter of absolute excitation cross is presented. These results continue our effort to provide atomic data of high quality to be used as benchmarks of theoretical calculations and to be included in atomic data bases employed by spectral fitting packages used to interpret spectra obtained by XMM-Newton and the Chandra X-Ray Observatory

  9. Graeco-Roman Astro-Architecture: The Temples of Pompeii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiede, Vance R.

    2014-01-01

    Roman architect Marcus Vetruvius Pollio (ca. 75-15 BC) wrote, “[O]ne who professes himself as an architect should be…acquainted with astronomy and the theory of the heavens…. From astronomy we find the east, west, south, and north, as well as the theory of the heavens, the Equinox, Solstice and courses of the Stars.” (De Architectura Libri Decem I:i:3,10). In order to investigate the role of astronomy in temple orientation, the author conducted a preliminary GIS DEM/Satellite Imaging survey of 11 temples at Pompeii, Italy (N 40d 45', E 14d 29'). The GIS survey measured the true azimuth and horizon altitude of each temple’s major axis and was field checked by a Ground Truth survey with theodolite and GPS, 5-18 April 2013. The resulting 3D vector data was analyzed with Program STONEHENGE (Hawkins 1983, 328) to identify the local skyline declinations aligned with the temple major axes. Analysis suggests that the major axes of the temples of Apollo, Jupiter and Venus are equally as likely to have been oriented to Pompeii’s urban grid, itself oriented NW-SE on Mt. Vesuvius’ slope and hydraulic gradient to optimize urban sewer/street drainage (cf. Hodge 1992). However, the remaining nine temples appear to be oriented to astronomical targets on the local horizon associated with Graeco-Roman calendrics and mythology. TEMPLE/ DATE/ MAJOR AXIS ASTRO-TARGET (Skyline Declination in degrees) Public Lares/AD 50/ Cross-Quarter 7 Nov/3 Feb Sun Set, Last Gleam (-16.5) Vespsian/ AD 69-79/ Cross-Quarter 7 Nov/3 Feb Sun Set, LG (-16.2) Fortuna Augusta/ AD 1/ Winter Solstice Sun Set, LG (-22.9) Aesculapius/ 100 BC/ Perseus Rise (β Persei-Algol = +33.0) & Midsummer Moon Major Stand Still Set, LG (-28.1) Isis/ 100 BC/ Midwinter Moon Major Stand Still Rise, Tangent (+28.5) & Equinox Sun Set, Tangent (-0.3) Jupiter/ 150 BC/ Θ Scorpionis-Sargas Rise (-38.0) Apollo/ 550 (rebuilt 70 BC)/ α Columbae-Phact Rise (-37.1) Venus/ 150 BC (rebuilt 70 BC)/ α Columbae-Phact Rise (-37

  10. Magnetic Fusion Science Fellowship program: Summary of program activities for calendar year 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the 1985-1986 progress of the Magnetic Fusion Science Fellowship program (MFSF). The program was established in January of 1985 by the Office of Fusion Energy (OFE) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to encourage talented undergraduate and first-year graduate students to enter qualified graduate programs in the sciences related to fusion energy development. The program currently has twelve fellows in participating programs. Six new fellows are being appointed during each of the program's next two award cycles. Appointments are for one year and are renewable for two additional years with a three year maximum. The stipend level also continues at a $1000 a month or $12,000 a year. The program pays all tuition and fee expenses for the fellows. Another important aspect of the fellowship program is the practicum. During the practicum fellows receive three month appointments to work at DOE designated fusion science research and development centers. The practicum allows the MFSF fellows to directly participate in on-going DOE research and development programs

  11. Magnetic Fusion Energy Technology Fellowship Program: Summary of program activities for calendar year 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the activities of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Magnetic Fusion Energy Technology Fellowship program (MFETF) for the 1985 calendar year. The MFETF program has continued to support the mission of the Office of Fusion Energy (OFE) and its Division of Development and Technology (DDT) by ensuring the availability of appropriately trained engineering manpower needed to implement the OFE/DDT magnetic fusion energy agenda. This program provides training and research opportunities to highly qualified students at DOE-designated academic, private sector, and government magnetic fusion energy institutions. The objectives of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Technology Fellowship program are: (1) to provide support for graduate study, training, and research in magnetic fusion energy technology; (2) to ensure an adequate supply of appropriately trained manpower to implement the nation's magnetic fusion energy agenda; (3) to raise the visibility of careers in magnetic fusion energy technology and to encourage students to pursue such careers; and (4) to make national magnetic fusion energy facilities available for manpower training

  12. 76 FR 77505 - Applications for New Awards; Research Fellowships Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-13

    ... 15, 2006 (71 FR 8166), can be accessed on the Internet at the following site: http://www2.ed.gov..., figures, and graphs. ] Use a font that is either 12 point or larger or no smaller than 10 pitch... extension until 4:30 p.m., Washington, DC time, the following business day to enable you to transmit...

  13. The Astronomical Roots of Sapling Learning: Building a Comprehensive Online Homework System for Astro 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, A.

    2014-07-01

    I discuss the method of creating a library of questions for Astro 101 within the Sapling Learning homework system, as well as the philosophy behind the types of homework questions (and feedback) that are being written. The system's features were built around meeting five basic goals: flexibility, engaging content, peer instruction, immediate instructional feedback, and exploration.

  14. Mapping the Gas Turbulence in the Coma Cluster: Predictions for Astro-H

    CERN Document Server

    ZuHone, J; Zhuravleva, I

    2015-01-01

    Astro-H will be able for the first time to map gas velocities and detect turbulence in galaxy clusters. One of the best targets for turbulence studies is the Coma cluster, due to its proximity, absence of a cool core, and lack of a central active galactic nucleus. To determine what constraints Astro-H will be able to place on the Coma velocity field, we construct simulated maps of the projected gas velocity and compute the second-order structure function, an analog of the velocity power spectrum. We vary the injection scale, dissipation scale, slope, and normalization of the turbulent power spectrum, and apply measurement errors and finite sampling to the velocity field. We find that even with sparse coverage of the cluster, Astro-H will be able to measure the Mach number and the injection scale of the turbulent power spectrum--the quantities determining the energy flux down the turbulent cascade and the diffusion rate for everything that is advected by the gas (metals, cosmic rays, etc). Astro-H will not be ...

  15. Simulating Astro-H Observations of Sloshing Gas Motions in the Cores of Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    ZuHone, J; Simionescu, A; Bautz, M

    2015-01-01

    Astro-H will be the first X-ray observatory to employ a high-resolution microcalorimeter, capable of measuring the shift and width of individual spectral lines to the precision necessary for estimating the velocity of the diffuse plasma in galaxy clusters. This new capability is expected to bring significant progress in understanding the dynamics, and therefore the physics, of the intracluster medium. However, because this plasma is optically thin, projection effects will be an important complicating factor in interpreting future Astro-H measurements. To study these effects in detail, we performed an analysis of the velocity field from simulations of a galaxy cluster experiencing gas sloshing, and generated synthetic X-ray spectra, convolved with model Astro-H Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) responses. We find that the sloshing motions produce velocity signatures that will be observable by Astro-H in nearby clusters: the shifting of the line centroid produced by the fast-moving cold gas underneath the front sur...

  16. 5th International Heidelberg Conference on Dark Matter in Astro- and Particle Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Arnowitt, Richard; DARK 2004; Dark Matter in Astro- and Particle Physics

    2006-01-01

    The search for dark matter in the universe has established itself as one of the most exciting and central fields of astrophysics, particle physics and cosmology. The lectures and talks in this book emphasize the experimental and theoretical status and future perspectives, stressing in particular the interplay between astro- and particle physics.

  17. Fellowship in nuclear science and technology: Applying the knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past three decades, the combined, co-ordinated efforts of people in dozens of countries have been responsible for the selection, placement, and training of more than 16,000 engineers, scientists, specialists, and technicians under the IAEA's programme for fellowships and scientific visitors. This article reviews the programme, from the standpoint of its historical development, co-operative framework among nominating and host countries, the selection criteria, and plans and expectations for the coming years

  18. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) summer faculty fellowship program, 1986, Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston. The basic objectives of the program are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching objectives of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. Each faculty fellow spent ten weeks at JSC engaged in a research project commensurate with his interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. Volume 1 contains sections 1 through 14

  19. Five Years of Magellanic Clouds Research: A Newsletter Editors' Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Grebel, Eva K.; Chu, You-Hua; Gallagher, John S.; Harbeck, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    We analyze the topical and demographic evolution of Magellanic Clouds research over the past five years based on submissions of abstracts of refereed papers to the electronic Magellanic Clouds Newsletter (http://www.astro.uiuc.edu/projects/mcnews/MCNews.html).

  20. Robotic Surgery Training in Gynecologic Fellowship Programs in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Fatehchehr, Soorena; Rostaminia, Ghazaleh; Gardner, Michael O.; Ramunno, Elisa; Doyle, Nora M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The increasing use and acceptance of robotic platforms calls for the need to train not only established surgeons but also residents and fellow trainees within the context of the traditional residency and fellowship program. Our study aimed to clarify the current status of robotic training in gynecologic fellowship programs in the United States. Methods: This was a Web-based survey of four gynecology fellowship programs in the United States from November 2010 to Marc...

  1. Life after National Science Foundation fellowships: The implications for a graduate student's professional endeavors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obarski, Kelly Josephine

    Each year, hundreds of graduate and undergraduate students, participate as Fellows in National Science Foundation GK-12 Grants throughout the U.S. These Fellowships create opportunities for university students to improve their communication skills, teaching proficiencies, and team-building skills, in addition to expanding their interest in educational endeavors in their respective communities while pursuing their college degrees. STEP (Science and Technology Enhancement Project) is one such project. University faculty, public school teachers, and community leaders collaborated together in order to bring scientists into middle and secondary classrooms to focus on increasing student interest and proficiency in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) skills. Seventeen Fellows, in the previous four years, designed, developed, and implemented innovative, hands-on lessons in seven local schools. The evaluation team collected a tremendous amount of research evidence focused on the effect of the program on the Fellows while they were participants in the study, but there has been very little data collected about the Fellows after leaving the program. This research study, consisting of two-hour interviews, qualitatively explores how the skills learned while participating in the STEP program affected the Fellows' career and educational choices once leaving the project. This data was analyzed along with historical attitude surveys and yearly tracking documents to determine the effect that participation in the program had on their choices post-STEP. An extensive literature review has been conducted focusing on other GK-12 programs throughout the country, K-16 collaboration, Preparing Future Faculty Programs, as well as on teaching and learning literature. These bodies of literature provide the theoretical basis in which the research is framed in order to assess the impact on Fellow educational and professional choices since leaving the STEP program. This

  2. Neutrino nuclear responses for double beta decays and astro neutrinos by charge exchange reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejiri, Hiroyasu

    2014-09-01

    Neutrino nuclear responses are crucial for neutrino studies in nuclei. Charge exchange reactions (CER) are shown to be used to study charged current neutrino nuclear responses associated with double beta decays(DBD)and astro neutrino interactions. CERs to be used are high energy-resolution (He3 ,t) reactions at RCNP, photonuclear reactions via IAR at NewSUBARU and muon capture reactions at MUSIC RCNP and MLF J-PARC. The Gamow Teller (GT) strengths studied by CERs reproduce the observed 2 neutrino DBD matrix elements. The GT and spin dipole (SD) matrix elements are found to be reduced much due to the nucleon spin isospin correlations and the non-nucleonic (delta isobar) nuclear medium effects. Impacts of the reductions on the DBD matrix elements and astro neutrino interactions are discussed.

  3. An AST/RO Survey of CO(4-3) in ultracompact HII regions

    CERN Document Server

    Walsh, W

    2003-01-01

    The Antarctic Submillimeter Telescope and Remote Observatory (AST/RO) has been used to observe 78 of the IRAS point sources identified by Bronfman et al. (1996) as likely ultracompact HII regions. Results for the CO(4-3) line at 461.041GHz are presented. The 74 sources detected are bright and in many cases compact, making them potentially suitable as pointing calibrators for single dish submillimeter telescopes.

  4. Development of Instruments onboard ASTRO-H for Future X-ray Studies of Tori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, H.

    2015-09-01

    The next astronomical X-ray satellite ASTRO-H will be launched by Japan Aerospace eXploration Agency (JAXA) in this Japanese fiscal year. It allows us to combine a simultaneous coverage of the 0.4-600 keV band, and a high energy-resolution spectroscopy in the 0.3-12 keV band with an FWHM energy resolution of coating hard X-ray mirrors, and a non-focusing soft gamma-ray detector covers the 40-600 keV band. The high energy-resolution spectroscopy is realized by the X-ray micro-calorimeter array operated at 50 mK on a focal plane of the soft X-ray telescope. With the unprecedented performances, the ASTRO-H observations of active galactic nuclei are expected to give us important X-ray information about tori including their dynamics, size, ionization state and so on. In the present talk, we introduce the current status of developments of the instruments onboard ASTRO-H, especially focusing on the performance of the X-ray micro-calorimeter derived in the ongoing ground testing and calibration.

  5. Toward a Broadband Astro-comb: Effects of Nonlinear Spectral Broadening in Optical Fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Guoqing; Phillips, David F; Walsworth, Ronald L; Kärtner, Franz X

    2010-01-01

    We propose and analyze a new approach to generate a broadband astro-comb by spectral broadening of a narrowband astro-comb inside a highly nonlinear optical fiber. Numerical modeling shows that cascaded four-wave-mixing dramatically degrades the input comb's side-mode suppression and causes side-mode amplitude asymmetry. These two detrimental effects can systematically shift the center-of-gravity of astro-comb spectral lines as measured by an astrophysical spectrograph with resolution \\approx100,000; and thus lead to wavelength calibration inaccuracy and instability. Our simulations indicate that this performance penalty, as a result of nonlinear spectral broadening, can be compensated by using a filtering cavity configured for double-pass. As an explicit example, we present a design based on an Yb-fiber source comb (with 1 GHz repetition rate) that is filtered by double-passing through a low finesse cavity (finesse = 208), and subsequent spectrally broadened in a 2-cm, SF6-glass photonic crystal fiber. Spann...

  6. IAU astroEDU: an open-access platform for peer-reviewed astronomy education activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heenatigala, Thilina; Russo, Pedro; Strubbe, Linda; Gomez, Edward

    2015-08-01

    astroEDU is an open access platform for peer-reviewed astronomy education activities. It addresses key problems in educational repositories such as variability in quality, not maintained or updated regularly, limited content review, and more. This is achieved through a peer-review process similar to what scholarly articles are based on. Activities submitted are peer-reviewed by an educator and a professional astronomer which gives the credibility to the activities. astroEDU activities are open-access in order to make the activities accessible to educators around the world while letting them discover, review, distribute and remix the activities. The activity submission process allows authors to learn how to apply enquiry-based learning into the activity, identify the process skills required, how to develop core goals and objectives, and how to evaluate the activity to determine the outcome. astroEDU is endorsed by the International Astronomical Union meaning each activity is given an official stamp by the international organisation for professional astronomers.

  7. Finding a million-star hotel an astro-tourist’s guide to dark sky places

    CERN Document Server

    Mizon, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Finding a Million-Star Hotel explores the modern phenomenon of astro-tourism, the efforts by increasing numbers of people to find nearby and distant locations where they can see the real night sky so often hidden by light pollution. Astronomer Bob Mizon directs readers to dark sky sites in the United Kingdom, the United States, and a few further afield. This is more than just a hotel guide with links for accommodation at or near the locations. There are chapters on choosing telescopes and binoculars, on celestial objects astro-tourists can look for in the night sky, and an investigation into the causes of the skyglow that veils our view of the stars. Most of those who go seeking the stars are not professional astronomers. This book is aimed at those observers with limited knowledge of the night sky who are eager to explore and enjoy it. Even those contemplating setting up astro-themed hotels, campsites, or astronomy events can benefit from reading this book and from the advice included on how to equip such pl...

  8. astroABC: An Approximate Bayesian Computation Sequential Monte Carlo sampler for cosmological parameter estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Jennings, Elise

    2016-01-01

    Given the complexity of modern cosmological parameter inference where we are faced with non-Gaussian data and noise, correlated systematics and multi-probe correlated data sets, the Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) method is a promising alternative to traditional Markov Chain Monte Carlo approaches in the case where the Likelihood is intractable or unknown. The ABC method is called "Likelihood free" as it avoids explicit evaluation of the Likelihood by using a forward model simulation of the data which can include systematics. We introduce astroABC, an open source ABC Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) sampler for parameter estimation. A key challenge in astrophysics is the efficient use of large multi-probe datasets to constrain high dimensional, possibly correlated parameter spaces. With this in mind astroABC allows for massive parallelization using MPI, a framework that handles spawning of jobs across multiple nodes. A key new feature of astroABC is the ability to create MPI groups with different communica...

  9. Soft Gamma-ray Detector for the ASTRO-H Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Tajima, Hiroyasu; Enoto, Teruaki; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Gilmore, Kirk; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Kataoka, Jun; Kawaharada, Madoka; Kokubun, Motohide; Laurent, Philippe; Lebrun, Francois; Limousin, Olivier; Madejski, Greg; Makishima, Kazuo; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Ohno, Masanori; Ohta, Masayuki; Sato, Goro; Sato, Rie; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tashiro, Makoto; Terada, Yukikatsu; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Watanabe, Shin; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yonetoku, Daisuke; 10.1117/12.857531

    2010-01-01

    ASTRO-H is the next generation JAXA X-ray satellite, intended to carry instruments with broad energy coverage and exquisite energy resolution. The Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD) is one of ASTRO-H instruments and will feature wide energy band (40-600 keV) at a background level 10 times better than the current instruments on orbit. SGD is complimentary to ASTRO-H's Hard X-ray Imager covering the energy range of 5-80 keV. The SGD achieves low background by combining a Compton camera scheme with a narrow field-of-view active shield where Compton kinematics is utilized to reject backgrounds. The Compton camera in the SGD is realized as a hybrid semiconductor detector system which consists of silicon and CdTe (cadmium telluride) sensors. Good energy resolution is afforded by semiconductor sensors, and it results in good background rejection capability due to better constraints on Compton kinematics. Utilization of Compton kinematics also makes the SGD sensitive to the gamma-ray polarization, opening up a new window ...

  10. Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Annual Report: Class of 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMakin, Andrea H.

    2012-08-20

    Annual report for the Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP), which PNNL administers for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). Features the Class of 2011. The NGFP is a NNSA program with a mission to cultivate future technical and policy leaders in nonproliferation and international security. Through the NGFP, outstanding graduate students with career interests in nonproliferation are appointed to program offices within the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (DNN). During their one-year assignment, Fellows participate in programs designed to detect, prevent, and reverse the proliferation of nuclear weapons.

  11. 34 CFR 535.3 - What financial assistance is available for fellowship recipients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and doctoral program fellowship recipients: (1) Tuition and fees—the usual costs associated with the... expenses, for a participant and his or her dependents, if the participant is— (i) A full-time student in a... assistance on an annual basis to post-doctoral fellowship recipients: (1) A stipend of up to $40,000....

  12. 34 CFR 237.4 - In what amounts are fellowships awarded?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the national average salary of public school teachers in the most recent year for which satisfactory... fellowships in the maximum amount. (b) Minimum award. Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, a fellowship awarded under this part may not be less than half the national average salary of public...

  13. 34 CFR 1100.22 - How does the Director determine the amount of a fellowship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does the Director determine the amount of a fellowship? 1100.22 Section 1100.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education... PROGRAM How Does the Director Award a Fellowship? § 1100.22 How does the Director determine the amount...

  14. Nutrition education for pediatric gastroenterology, hepatology, and nutrition fellows: Survey of NASPGHAN fellowship training programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of the study was to assess the methodology and content of nutrition education during gastroenterology fellowship training and the variability among the different programs. A survey questionnaire was completed by 43 fellowship training directors of 62 active programs affiliated to the North A...

  15. Astro4Girls and Their Families: Sharing Science via Public Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, M.; Smith, D.; Eisenhamer, B.; Ryer, H.; Dussault, M.; Braswell, E.; Cominsky, L.; Apple, N.; Della, T.; Whiffen, P.; Harman, P.; Mitchell, S.; Eyermann, S.; Brandehoff, S.; Dominiak, J.

    2013-04-01

    The “Astro4Girls and Their Families” pilot program offered a variety of informal science events at nine public libraries nationwide in conjunction with Women's History Month (March) 2012. The goals were to engage girls and their families in science, by helping them discover the Universe for themselves and celebrating the contribution of women to astronomy and science. We offered a wide range of activities, from using robotic telescopes for “Do-It-Yourself (DIY) astrophotography” to making edible black holes, to exploring the infrared Universe. Our main target audience was middle-school aged girls, but students of all ages, their families and the public were welcome to participate in many of the activities. Five NASA Science Mission Directorate-funded Astrophysics Education and Public Outreach teams partnered with public libraries in this pilot program; each worked with 1 or 2 libraries to offer a total of about 15 events reaching over 300 people in both urban and rural areas. The American Library Association Public Programs Office identified participating libraries and facilitated their participation through its role in the SMD-funded “Visions of the Universe: Four Centuries of Discovery” traveling exhibit. The NASA Astrophysics Science Education and Public Outreach Forum coordinated the collaboration. The website is: http://www.ala.org/programming/astro4girls. This poster outlines the details of planning and implementing the 2012 pilot program, its successes, and lessons learned. The collaborators would like to engage the EPO community in a discussion of how to sustain Astro4Girls and engage additional public libraries nationwide during future Women's History Months.

  16. International Outreach: What Is the Responsibility of ASTRO and the Major International Radiation Oncology Societies?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayr, Nina A., E-mail: ninamayr@uw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Hu, Kenneth S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Viswanathan, Akila N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wall, Terry J. [St. Luke' s Cancer Institute, Kansas City, Missouri (United States); Amendola, Beatriz E. [Innovative Cancer Institute, Miami, Florida (United States); Calaguas, Miriam J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke' s Medical Center, Quezon City (Philippines); Palta, Jatinder R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Yue, Ning J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Rengan, Ramesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Williams, Timothy R. [Lynn Cancer Institute, Boca Raton Regional Hospital, Boca Raton, Florida (United States)

    2014-07-01

    In this era of globalization and rapid advances in radiation oncology worldwide, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) is committed to help decrease profound regional disparities through the work of the International Education Subcommittee (IES). The IES has expanded its base, reach, and activities to foster educational advances through a variety of educational methods with broad scope, in addition to committing to the advancement of radiation oncology care for cancer patients around the world, through close collaboration with our sister radiation oncology societies and other educational, governmental, and organizational groups.

  17. Ingeniería inversa. Digitalización de la Bultaco Astro

    OpenAIRE

    Rull Folch, Dídac

    2014-01-01

    Este proyecto consiste en aplicar la ingeniería inversa en una motocicleta clásica, la Bultaco Astro Mk9. Es un proyecto realizado por cinco estudiantes universitarios de la Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingeniería Industrial de Barcelona, con un acuerdo entre la universidad y la empresa LGN Tech Design, S.L., actualmente llamada Bultaco Motors. El objetivo principal es conseguir la digitalización en 3D más completa y fiable posible de la motocicleta, dentro de los requerimientos técnicos y ...

  18. Two virtual astro refresher courses on the world-wide-web

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: The Internet offers a novel venue for providing educational material to radiation oncologists. This exhibit demonstrates its utility for providing the complete content of two past ASTRO refresher courses. Materials and Methods: The audio recording, handout and slides from the 1995 ASTRO refresher course entitled 'Radiation Therapy for Pediatric Brain Tumors; Standards of Care, Current Clinical Trials and New Directions' and the 1996 ASTRO refresher course entitled 'Internet-based communications in Radiation Oncology' were digitized and placed on an Internet World-Wide-Web site. The Web address was posted on the refresher course handout and in the meeting book ('http://goldwein 1.xrt.upenn.edu/brain95.html' and 'http://goldwein 1.xrt.upenn.edu/astro96/'). The computer distributing this material is an Intel-based 486 DEC50 personal computer with a 50 Mhz processor running Windows NT 3.51 workstation. Software utilized to distribute the material is in the public domain and includes EWMAC's 'httpd', and Progressive Network's 'RealAudio Server' and 'Encoder'. The University's dedicated Internet connection is used to 'serve' this material. Results: The two approximately 100 minute lectures have been encoded into several 'RealAudio' files totaling 10 Megabytes in size. These files are accessible with moderate to excellent quality and speed utilizing as little as a 14.4k modem connection to the Internet. Use of 'streaming' technology provides a means for playing the audio files over the Internet after downloading only a small portion of the files. The time required to digitize the material has been approximately 40 hours, with most time related to digitizing slides from a Powerpoint presentation. Not all slides have been digitized as of this time. To date, approximately 400 accesses to this resource have been logged on the system. Seven electronic comment forms for the second course have all rated it as 'superior'. Pitfalls include the difficulty

  19. STS-35 Astronomy Laboratory 1 (ASTRO-1) in OV-102's payload bay at KSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-35 Astronomy Laboratory 1 (ASTRO-1) is installed in Columbia's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102's, payload bay (PLB) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF). On the left, in the aft PLB is the Broad Band X Ray Telescope (BBXRT) mounted on the two axis pointing system (TAPS). In the center, the three ultraviolet telescopes - Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo-Polarimeter Experiment (WUPPE), the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT), and the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) - are mounted on the instrument pointing system (IPS) and are in stowed position. At the far right is the Spacelab Pallet System (SPS) igloo. View provided by KSC with alternate number KSSC-90PC-421.

  20. Fibercore AstroGain fiber: multichannel erbium doped fibers for optical space communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Mark; Gray, Rebecca; Hankey, Judith; Gillooly, Andy

    2014-03-01

    Fibercore have developed AstroGainTM fiber optimized for multichannel amplifiers used in optical satellite communications and control. The fiber has been designed to take full advantage of the photo-annealing effect that results from pumping in the 980nm region. The proprietary trivalent structure of the core matrix allows optimum recovery following radiation damage to the fiber, whilst also providing a market leading Erbium Doped Fiber Amplifier (EDFA) efficiency. Direct measurements have been taken of amplifier efficiency in a multichannel assembly, which show an effective photo-annealing recovery of up to 100% of the radiation induced attenuation through excitation of point defects.

  1. International Outreach: What Is the Responsibility of ASTRO and the Major International Radiation Oncology Societies?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this era of globalization and rapid advances in radiation oncology worldwide, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) is committed to help decrease profound regional disparities through the work of the International Education Subcommittee (IES). The IES has expanded its base, reach, and activities to foster educational advances through a variety of educational methods with broad scope, in addition to committing to the advancement of radiation oncology care for cancer patients around the world, through close collaboration with our sister radiation oncology societies and other educational, governmental, and organizational groups

  2. Harnessing the cognitive surplus of the nation: new opportunities for libraries in a time of change. The 2012 Jean Arnot Memorial Fellowship Essay.

    OpenAIRE

    Holley, Rose

    2012-01-01

    This essay is the winner of the 2012 Jean Arnot Memorial Fellowship. The essay draws on Rose Holley's experience of managing innovative library services that engage crowds such as The Australian Newspapers Digitisation Program and Trove, and her ongoing research into library, archive and museum crowdsourcing projects. This experience and knowledge has been put into the context of Jean Arnot’s values and visions for Australian libraries. Jean Arnot, the distinguished Australian librarian, desc...

  3. Determinants of internal medicine residents' choice in the canadian R4 Fellowship Match: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kassam Narmin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is currently a discrepancy between Internal Medicine residents' decisions in the Canadian subspecialty fellowship match (known as the R4 match and societal need. Some studies have been published examining factors that influence career choices. However, these were either demographic factors or factors pre-determined by the authors' opinion as possibly being important to incorporate into a survey. Methods A qualitative study was undertaken to identify factors that determine the residents choice in the subspecialty (R4 fellowship match using focus group discussions involving third and fourth year internal medicine residents Results Based on content analysis of the discussion data, we identified five themes: 1 Practice environment including acuity of practice, ability to do procedures, lifestyle, job prospects and income 2 Exposure in rotations and to role models 3 Interest in subspecialty's patient population and common diseases 4 Prestige and respect of subspecialty 5 Fellowship training environment including fellowship program resources and length of training Conclusions There are a variety of factors that contribute to Internal Medicine residents' fellowship choice in Canada, many of which have been identified in previous survey studies. However, we found additional factors such as the resources available in a fellowship program, the prestige and respect of a subspecialty/career, and the recent trend towards a two-year General Internal Medicine fellowship in our country.

  4. Physical Therapy Residency and Fellowship Education: Reflections on the Past, Present, and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furze, Jennifer A; Tichenor, Carol Jo; Fisher, Beth E; Jensen, Gail M; Rapport, Mary Jane

    2016-07-01

    The physical therapy profession continues to respond to the complex and changing landscape of health care to meet the needs of patients and the demands of patient care. Consistent with this evolution is the rapid development and expansion of residency and fellowship postprofessional programs. With the interested number of applicants exceeding the number of residency and fellowship slots available, a "critical period" in the educational process is emerging. The purposes of this perspective article are: (1) to analyze the state of residency and fellowship education within the profession, (2) to identify best practice elements from other health professions that are applicable to physical therapy residency and fellowship education, and (3) to propose a working framework grounded in common domains of competence to be used as a platform for dialogue, consistency, and quality across all residency and fellowship programs. Seven domains of competence are proposed to theoretically ground residency and fellowship programs and facilitate a more consistent approach to curricular development and assessment. Although the recent proliferation of residency and fellowship programs attempts to meet the demand of physical therapists seeking advanced educational opportunities, it is imperative that these programs are consistently delivering high-quality education with a common focus on delivering health care in the context of societal needs. PMID:26678444

  5. The core content of clinical ultrasonography fellowship training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewiss, Resa E; Tayal, Vivek S; Hoffmann, Beatrice; Kendall, John; Liteplo, Andrew S; Moak, James H; Panebianco, Nova; Noble, Vicki E

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of developing a core content for subspecialty training in clinical ultrasonography (US) is to standardize the education and qualifications required to provide oversight of US training, clinical use, and administration to improve patient care. This core content would be mastered by a fellow as a separate and unique postgraduate training, beyond that obtained during an emergency medicine (EM) residency or during medical school. The core content defines the training parameters, resources, and knowledge of clinical US necessary to direct clinical US divisions within medical specialties. Additionally, it is intended to inform fellowship directors and candidates for certification of the full range of content that might appear in future examinations. This article describes the development of the core content and presents the core content in its entirety. PMID:24730409

  6. Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Camilla; Reibel, Jesper; Hietanen, J;

    2012-01-01

    In Scandinavia, as in many European countries, most patients consult their general dentist once a year or more. This gives the dentist a unique opportunity and an obligation to make an early diagnosis of oral diseases, which is beneficial for both the patient and the society. Thus, the dentist must...... new approaches, treatments and diagnostic possibilities develop. Likewise, the role of the dentist in the community changes and may vary in different countries. As members of the Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine and subject representatives of oral pathology and oral...... medicine, we feel obliged to contribute to the discussion of how the guidelines of the dental curriculum support the highest possible standards of dental education. This article is meant to delineate a reasonable standard of oral pathology and oral medicine in the European dental curriculum and to guide...

  7. Resident interest and factors involved in entering a pediatric pulmonary fellowship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gershan William M

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relatively little is known about interest in pediatric pulmonology among pediatric residents. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to determine at this institution: 1 the level of pediatric resident interest in pursuing a pulmonary fellowship, 2 potential factors involved in development of such interest, 3 whether the presence of a pulmonary fellowship program affects such interest. Methods A questionnaire was distributed to all 52 pediatric residents at this institution in 1992 and to all 59 pediatric residents and 14 combined internal medicine/pediatrics residents in 2002, following development of a pulmonary fellowship program. Results Response rates were 79% in 1992 and 86% in 2002. Eight of the 43 responders in 1992 (19% had considered doing a pulmonary fellowship compared to 7 of 63 (11% in 2002. The highest ranked factors given by the residents who had considered a fellowship included wanting to continue one's education after residency, enjoying caring for pulmonary patients, and liking pulmonary physiology and the pulmonary faculty. Major factors listed by residents who had not considered a pulmonary fellowship included not enjoying the tracheostomy/ventilator population and chronic pulmonary patients in general, and a desire to enter general pediatrics or another fellowship. Most residents during both survey periods believed that they would be in non-academic or academic general pediatrics in 5 years. Only 1 of the 106 responding residents (~1% anticipated becoming a pediatric pulmonologist. Conclusions Although many pediatric residents consider enrolling in a pulmonary fellowship (~10–20% here, few (~1% here will actually pursue a career in pediatric pulmonology. The presence of a pulmonary fellowship program did not significantly alter resident interest, though other confounding factors may be involved.

  8. The courage to change: Patient perceptions of 12-Step fellowships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vederhus John-Kåre

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background From a health services perspective, peer-based resources merit special attention. Participation in self-help fellowships, like the Twelve Step Groups (TSGs, have been shown to improve outcomes of patients with substance use disorder (SUD and they represent a valuable adjunct to the SUD treatment system. This study investigated the relationship between patient perceptions of TSGs and the intent to participate in TSGs after receiving detoxification treatment. Methods We included 139 patients that entered a detoxification unit (detox in Kristiansand, Norway. We analyzed factors associated with the intention to participate in TSGs post-discharge with contingency tables and ordinal regression analysis. Results Forty-eight percent of patients had participated in TSGs before entering detox. Respondents saw more advantages than disadvantages in TSG participation, but only 40% of patients showed high intentions of participating in TSGs post-discharge. A high intention to participate in TSGs was most strongly correlated with the notion that participation in TSGs could instill the courage to change. In a multivariate analysis, the perception that TSGs were beneficial was the strongest factor related to a high intention of TSG participation after treatment. Conclusions Our findings increased the understanding of factors most likely to influence decisions to attend TSGs in SUD treatment contexts with uncommon TSG participation. Our results suggested that the majority of patients may be sufficiently influenced by highlighting the potential gains of TSG participation. Treatment programs that do not focus on self-help group attendance during and after treatment should consider implementing facilitative measures to enhance utilization of these fellowships.

  9. The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) Mission Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, Scott A.

    2004-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy in the 2.5-16 micron range is a principle means by which organic compounds can be detected and identified in space via their vibrational transitions. Ground-based, airborne, and spaceborne IR spectral studies have already demonstrated that a significant fraction of the carbon in the interstellar medium (ISM) resides in the form of complex organic molecular species. Unfortunately, neither the distribution of these materials nor their genetic and evolutionary relationships with each other or their environments are well understood. The Astrobiology Explorer (ABE) is a MIDEX mission concept currently under study by a team of partners: NASA's Ames Research Center, Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. ABE will conduct IR spectroscopic observations to address outstanding important problems in astrobiology, astrochemistry, and astrophysics. The core observational program would make fundamental scientific progress in understanding (1) The evolution of ices and organic matter in dense molecular clouds and young forming stellar systems, (2) The chemical evolution of organic molecules in the ISM as they transition from AGB outflows to planetary nebulae to the general diffuse ISM to HII regions and dense clouds, (3) The distribution of organics in the diffuse ISM, (4) The nature of organics in the Solar System (in comets, asteroids, satellites), and (5) The nature and distribution of organics in local galaxies. The technical considerations of achieving these science objectives in a MIDEX-sized mission will be presented.

  10. Establishing a clinical pharmacology fellowship program for physicians, pharmacists, and pharmacologists: a newly accredited interdisciplinary training program at the Ohio State University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzmiller, Joseph P; Phelps, Mitch A; Neidecker, Marjorie V; Apseloff, Glen

    2014-01-01

    Studying the effect of drugs on humans, clinical pharmacologists play an essential role in many academic medical and research teams, within the pharmaceutical industry and as members of government regulatory entities. Clinical pharmacology fellowship training programs should be multidisciplinary and adaptable, and should combine didactics, applied learning, independent study, and one-on-one instruction. This article describes a recently developed 2 year clinical pharmacology fellowship program - one of only nine accredited by the American Board of Clinical Pharmacology - that is an integrative, multi faceted, adaptable method for training physicians, pharmacists, and scientists for leadership roles in the pharmaceutical industry, in academia, or with regulatory or accreditation agencies. The purpose of this article is to provide information for academic clinicians and researchers interested in designing a similar program, for professionals in the field of clinical pharmacology who are already affiliated with a fellowship program and may benefit from supplemental information, and for clinical researchers interested in clinical pharmacology who may not be aware that such training opportunities exist. This article provides the details of a recently accredited program, including design, implementation, accreditation, trainee success, and future directions. PMID:25018660

  11. Development of "Course Components" for Astro 101 Lectures, Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stage, M. D.; Schneider, S. E.

    2005-12-01

    An estimated quarter-million students take introductory astronomy each year (Fraknoi, A.E.R., 2001). The range in the resources, experience, and interest level of the faculty charged with teaching these classes may be as wide as the range of the science backgrounds of the students. Since each instructor applies his own selection bias as to which topics are key, innovations in astronomical lecturing must be modular and ideally previously vetted if they are to be adopted. Specifically geared to improving learning within the lecture, we present course "components": units which we have pre-tested in the large UMass introductory classes of 300 students. The design is such that a highly experienced professor might use just one for a good new way to cover a single problem topic, or a new professor might incorporate a large number working up a course for the first time. There is no single recipe for "components"; they are developed to suit the particular educational needs of each topic. One might be as simple as a single element of a lecture, or as complex as a 300 student interactive survey, a physical or software demonstration, an instant, in-class assessment via an class-response system (e.g. one of Mazur's "ConcepTests"), and a written or online homework problem. We will show some example components on distance and size scales, mathematics in astronomy, and the properties of supernovae. As this project is ongoing, we are most interested to hear from instructors their perceptions of the topics most difficult to teach, most in need of better demonstrations, and most prone to misconceptions, to help focus our future research ("Part 2").

  12. Establishing a clinical pharmacology fellowship program for physicians, pharmacists, and pharmacologists: a newly accredited interdisciplinary training program at the Ohio State University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitzmiller JP

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Joseph P Kitzmiller,1,4 Mitch A Phelps,2 Marjorie V Neidecker,3 Glen Apseloff41Center for Pharmacogenomics, Colleges of Medicine and of Engineering, The Ohio State University Medical Center, 2Colleges of Pharmacy and Medicine, Pharmacoanalytic Shared Resources Laboratory, The Ohio State University, 3Colleges of Medicine, Nursing, and Pharmacy, The Ohio State University, 4Department of Pharmacology, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH, USAAbstract: Studying the effect of drugs on humans, clinical pharmacologists play an essential role in many academic medical and research teams, within the pharmaceutical industry and as members of government regulatory entities. Clinical pharmacology fellowship training programs should be multidisciplinary and adaptable, and should combine didactics, applied learning, independent study, and one-on-one instruction. This article describes a recently developed 2 year clinical pharmacology fellowship program – one of only nine accredited by the American Board of Clinical Pharmacology – that is an integrative, multi faceted, adaptable method for training physicians, pharmacists, and scientists for leadership roles in the pharmaceutical industry, in academia, or with regulatory or accreditation agencies. The purpose of this article is to provide information for academic clinicians and researchers interested in designing a similar program, for professionals in the field of clinical pharmacology who are already affiliated with a fellowship program and may benefit from supplemental information, and for clinical researchers interested in clinical pharmacology who may not be aware that such training opportunities exist. This article provides the details of a recently accredited program, including design, implementation, accreditation, trainee success, and future directions.Keywords: clinical pharmacology education, clinical pharmacology fellowship

  13. Lab Astro and the Origins of the Chemical Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, James E.

    2010-03-01

    Interpretation of the spectra of metal-poor Galactic halo stars is dependent on AMO laboratory data [1,2]. Metal-poor Galactic halo stars were born when the Milky Way was young and they provide a record of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy. Elements heavier than iron are produced via r(apid)-process and s(low)-process n(eutron)-capture mechanisms. The s-process mechanism, which occurs in certain AGB stars, is relatively well understood. The explosive r-process is not well understood. The r-process n-capture mechanism was dominant early in the Galaxy's history [3]. New large aperture telescopes make it possible to record high-resolution spectra with high signal-to-noise ratios on a growing number of metal-poor stars. In addition to mapping the chemical evolution of the Galaxy, these studies are yielding an increasingly well-defined r-process elemental abundance pattern which constrains models of r-process nucleosynthesis [1]. The next phase of this ongoing research will address challenges in modeling stellar photospheres. Peculiar trends in abundances of specific Fe-group elements as a function of stellar age or metallicity may be due to limitations in traditional one dimensional (1d) local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) models of stellar photospheres or may be due to poorly understood nucleosynthesis [4]. Efforts are now underway to test the Saha or ionization equilibrium in a variety of stellar atmospheres for several Fe-group elements using the best available spectroscopic data for selected transitions. More comprehensive spectroscopic data of improved accuracy and accurate collisional data, especially for inelastic collisions of H atoms with metal atoms and ions, will be needed to fully develop 3d/non-LTE models of photospheres [e.g. 5]. [4pt] [1] C. Sneden, J. E. Lawler, J. J. Cowan, I. I. Ivans, and E. A. Den Hartog, Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 182, 80-96 (2009). [0pt] [2] J. E. Lawler, C. Sneden, J. J. Cowan, I. I. Ivans, and E. A. Den Hartog, Astrophys. J

  14. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) summer faculty fellowship program, 1986, volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The ten week program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). The basic objectives of the program are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. Each faculty fellow spent ten weeks at JSC engaged in a research project commensurate with his interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. The final reports on the research projects are presented. This volume, 2, contains sections 15 through 30

  15. Observations of Gamma-ray Bursts with ASTRO-H and Fermi

    CERN Document Server

    Ohno, M; Tashiro, M S; Ueno, H; Yonetoku, D; Sameshima, H; Takahashi, T; Seta, H; Mushotzky, R; Yamaoka, K

    2015-01-01

    ASTRO-H, the sixth Japanese X-ray observatory, which is scheduled to be launched by the end of Japanese fiscal year 2015 has a capability to observe the prompt emission from Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) utilizing BGO active shields for the soft gamma-ray detector (SGD). The effective area of the SGD shield detectors is very large and its data acquisition system is optimized for short transients such as short GRBs. Thus, we expect to perform more detailed time-resolved spectral analysis with a combination of ASTRO-H and Fermi LAT/GBM to investigate the gamma-ray emission mechanism of short GRBs. In addition, the environment of the GRB progenitor should be a remarkable objective from the point of view of the chemical evolution of high-z universe. If we can maneuver the spacecraft to the GRBs, we can perform a high-resolution spectroscopy of the X-ray afterglow of GRBs utilizing the onboard micro calorimeter and X-ray CCD camera.

  16. The Quantitative Reasoning for College Science (QuaRCS) Assessment in non-Astro 101 Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkman, Thomas W.; Jensen, Ellen

    2016-06-01

    The innumeracy of American students and adults is a much lamented educational problem. The quantitative reasoning skills of college students may be particularly addressed and improved in "general education" science courses like Astro 101. Demonstrating improvement requires a standardized instrument. Among the non-proprietary instruments the Quantitative Literacy and Reasoning Assessment[1] (QRLA) and the Quantitative Reasoning for College Science (QuaRCS) Assessment[2] stand out.Follette et al. developed the QuaRCS in the context of Astro 101 at University of Arizona. We report on QuaRCS results in different contexts: pre-med physics and pre-nursing microbiology at a liberal arts college. We report on the mismatch between students' contemporaneous report of a question's difficulty and the actual probability of success. We report correlations between QuaRCS and other assessments of overall student performance in the class. We report differences in attitude towards mathematics in these two different but health-related student populations .[1] QLRA, Gaze et al., 2014, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5038/1936-4660.7.2.4[2] QuaRCS, Follette, et al., 2015, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5038/1936-4660.8.2.2

  17. ASTRO-F\\/FIS Observing Simulation I. Detection Limits for Point Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Jeong, W S; Lee, H M; Nakagawa, T; Sohn, J; Ahn, I; Yamamura, I; Watanabe, M; Kawada, M K; Shibai, H; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Pak, Soojong; Lee, Hyung Mok; Nakagawa, Takao; Sohn, Jungjoo; Ahn, Insun; Yamamura, Issei; Watanabe, Masaru; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Shibai, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    We describe the observing simulation software FISVI (FIS Virtual Instrument), which was developed for the Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) that will be on the Japanese infrared astronomy mission ASTRO-F. The FISVI has two purposes: one is to check the specifications and performances of the ASTRO-F/FIS as a whole, and the other is to prepare input data sets for the data analysis softwares prior to launch. In the FISVI, a special care was taken by introducing the `Compiled PSF (Point Spread Function)' to optimise inevitable but time-consuming convolution processes. With the Compiled PSF, we reduce the computation time by an order of magnitude. The photon and readout noises are included in the simulations. We estimate the detection limits for point sources from the simulation of virtual patches of the sky mostly consisting of distant galaxies. We studied the importance of the source confusion for simple power-law models for N(>S), the number of sources brighter than S. We found that source confusion plays a dominant ...

  18. Development of the ASTRO-H Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT): Engineering Model Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okajima, Takashi; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Soong, Y.

    2011-01-01

    The X-ray astronomy satellite ASTRO-H, being developed under the collaboration among JAXA, NASA's GSFC and ESA, will have two Soft X-ray Telescopes (SXTs), among other instuments onboard, with a sensitive energy band below 12 keV. One is for an X-ray micorocalorimeter detector and the other for a X-ray CCD detector. The SXT uses a conically approximated Wolter I grazing incidence optic implemented by thin aluminum foil substrates with thickness of 0.152, 0.229, and 0.305 mm. It is similar to the Suzaku XRT, but with larger diameter (45 cm) and longer focal length (5.6 m). Goal of the angular resolution and effective area are 1 arcmin and 390 cm$A2$ at 6 keV, respectively. We made serveral improvements from Suzaku to ASTRO-H, such as thicker substrates, more forming mandrels, thinner epoxy layer for replication, stiffer housings, precise alignment bars, etc. With all these changes, we have fabricated the engineering test unit of the SXT. In this paper, we will discuss all the changes made, their effects, and report X-ray performance of the SXT test unit. An angular resolution of the test unit was measured at new Goddard X-ray calibration facility (100 m X-ray beamline) and was found to be 1.1 arcmin. We will also discuss further improvements toward the flight unit to be delivered to JAXA in 2012.

  19. Results From Penn State's Interactive, On-line, Scifi Version Of Astro 001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Christopher; Charlton, J. C.; Herrmann, K.; Narayanan, A.; Tr'Ehnl, N.

    2007-12-01

    We present results from a new, fully on-line astronomy course for undergraduate non-science majors at Penn State that was offered for the first time in Spring 2007 to 422 enrolled students. The entire course content is conveyed through an interactive story, capitalizing on the many multimedia astronomy resources publicly available on the Internet. The four units of the course (Basic Astronomy and the Nighttime Sky, Our Solar System, Stars and the Milky Way Galaxy, and Extragalactic Astronomy and Cosmology) deliver the same content as a traditional Astro 001 course. Each unit follows the educational adventure of a different fictional Astro 001 student who has been "abducted" by aliens. The four units are united by a character, the Riddler, who poses riddles about various aspects of astronomy, and whose identity and purpose is revealed gradually as a reward for completion of various subtopics. The initial Spring offering of the course was entirely web-based except for traditional evening in-class exams. We were very successful: it was popular with the students, the exam grades were about 10% higher than usual, and enrollments in Fall 2007 (more than 700 students) and Spring 2008 (almost 200 pre-enrolled to date) are strong. Future plans are underway to broaden the audience to students attending other Penn State campuses and perhaps to adapt the course for presentation as an astronomy unit to middle or high school students. We gratefully acknowledge funding from STScI IDEAS grant HST-ED-90284-01-A

  20. AstroSat CZT Imager observations of GRB 151006A: timing, spectroscopy, and polarisation study

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, A R; Hingar, M K; Iyyani, S; Khanna, Rakesh; Kutty, A P K; Malkar, J P; Paul, D; Bhalerao, V B; Bhattacharya, D; Dewangan, G C; Pawar, Pramod; Vibhute, A M; Chattopadhyay, T; Mithun, N P S; Vadawale, S V; Vagshette, N; Basak, R; Pradeep, P; Samuel, Essy; Sreekumar, S; Vinod, P; Navalgund, K H; Pandiyan, R; Sarma, K S; Seetha, S; Subbarao, K

    2016-01-01

    AstroSat is a multi-wavelength satellite launched on 2015 September 28. The CZT Imager of AstroSat on its very first day of operation detected a long duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) namely GRB 151006A. Using the off-axis imaging and spectral response of the instrument, we demonstrate that CZT Imager can localise this GRB correct to about a few degrees and it can provide, in conjunction with Swift, spectral parameters similar to that obtained from Fermi/GBM. Hence CZT Imager would be a useful addition to the currently operating GRB instruments (Swift and Fermi). Specifically, we argue that the CZT Imager will be most useful for the short hard GRBs by providing localisation for those detected by Fermi and spectral information for those detected only by Swift. We also provide preliminary results on a new exciting capability of this instrument: CZT Imager is able to identify Compton scattered events thereby providing polarisation information for bright GRBs. GRB 151006A, in spite of being relatively faint, shows h...

  1. STS-Astro: Astronomy in the focus of Science, Technology and Society and Case Study in Education Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, O. R.

    2014-02-01

    The dissertation addresses the focus of Astronomy in Science, Technology and Society [STS}, which the author calls the STS-Astro. Observes the International Year of the Astronomy 2009 [IYA 2009] as one of the greatest experiences STS worldwide, causing unprecedented integration between science, technology and humanities, with positive impacts in many sectors of society and are still worthy of study, specially in Brazil due to the implementation of the International Year of Astronomy, Brazil 2009 [IYABrazil-2009}. Astronomy is also investigated in the area of Education, based mainly on theoretical aspects of educational socio-interacionist of Lev Semenovich Vygotsky (Vygotsky, 1991, 2008 and 2012, p. 103-117) and socio-historical cultural of Paulo Reglus Neves Freire (1979, 1982 and 1996), but when necessary and still keeping the field of constructivism, properly taking advantage of the interactionism and transdisciplinarity of Jean William Fritz Piaget (1983). Concerning Distance Education [DE], it is noted significant growth at the graduate and postgraduate courses. New challenges arise, with the establishment of an increasingly accustomed to Information and Communication Technologies [ICT] and the teaching methodologies to be used and developed, with Astronomy becoming an important instrument in the teaching-learning process associated technologies. Using the methodology of action research, we proceeded with a case study involving 26 students of the discipline of Astronomy Topics applied to Education, between November 1 and December 17, 2012, of the postgraduation courses in Distance Education at the Universidade Cruzeiro do Sul [Southern Cross University]. The results obtained permit statistical surveys therefore quantitative, but also qualitative information about the teaching-learning Astronomy by DE. Analyses of performance and progress of each student and set permit a finding interaction among those involved in the mediation of the teacher-tutor who, in turn

  2. 34 CFR 662.20 - How is a Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellow selected?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How is a Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research... DISSERTATION RESEARCH ABROAD FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM Selection of Fellows § 662.20 How is a Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellow selected? (a) The Secretary considers applications for fellowships...

  3. Jamika Burge one of 50 worldwide to receive IBM Ph.D. fellowship

    OpenAIRE

    Crumbley, Liz

    2005-01-01

    Jamika Burge of Rome, Ga., a doctoral student in the Virginia Tech College of Engineering's Department of Computer Science, has been selected to receive an IBM Ph.D. Fellowship for the 2005-2006 academic year.

  4. A Pharmaceutical Industry Elective Course on Practice Experience Selection and Fellowship Pursuit by Pharmacy Students

    OpenAIRE

    Hartman, Rhea; Blustein, Leona; Morel, Diane; Davis, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To design and implement 2 pharmaceutical industry elective courses and assess their impact on students’ selection of advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs) and pursuit of pharmaceutical industry fellowships.

  5. A tale of 10 European centres – 2010 APOSSM travelling fellowship review in ACL surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Lee Yee Han; Kuroda Ryosuke; Zhao Jinzhong; Chan Kai

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of ESSKA- APOSSM Travelling fellowship is to better understand the epidemiology, management and surgical techniques for sports across continents. There has been a progressive evolution in ACL reconstruction and there is variation in technique in ACL reconstruction amongst the most experienced surgeons in different continents. During this one month fellowship, we saw various ACL reconstruction techniques using different graft sources, with a variety of graft fixation metho...

  6. Clinical Fellowships in Surgical Training: Analysis of a National Pan-specialty Workforce Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzgerald, J. E. F.; Milburn, J. A.; Khera, G.; Davies, R. S. M.; Hornby, S. T.; Giddings, C. E. B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Fellowship posts are increasingly common and offer targeted opportunities for training and personal development. Despite international demand, there is little objective information quantifying this effect or the motivations behind undertaking such a post. The present study investigated surgical trainees’ fellowship aims and intentions. Methods An electronic, 38-item, self-administered questionnaire survey was distributed in the United Kingdom via national and regional surgical mail...

  7. The Microsurgery Fellowship at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital: Blossom of Caterpillars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abdelrahman, MD

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Against a background of globalization and medical migration, issues have been raised regarding training outside the clinician’s own context. Fellowship was not commonly used as a career step, or a means of migration, but as a process of professional and personal development. Taking Chang Gung Memorial Hospital Microsurgery Fellowship as the case study, I would like to highlight an example of a long-running successful training program in a special field such as plastic surgery.

  8. ASTRO-H White Paper - High Resolution Spectroscopy of Interstellar and Circumgalactic Gas in the Milky Way and Other Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Paerels, F; Anabuki, N; Costantini, E; de Vries, C; Fujimoto, R; Hornschemeier, A; Iizuka, R; Kilbourne, C; Konami, S; LaMassa, S; Loewenstein, M; McCammon, D; Matsushita, K; McNamara, B; Mitsuishi, I; Nagino, R; Nakagawa, T; Porter, S; Sakai, K; Smith, R K; Takei, Y; Tsuru, T; Uchiyama, H; Yamaguchi, H; Yamauchi, S

    2014-01-01

    We describe the potential of high resolution imaging spectroscopy with the SXS on ASTRO-H to advance our understanding of the interstellar- and circumgalactic media of our own Galaxy, and other galaxies. Topics to be addressed range from absorption spectroscopy of dust in the Galactic interstellar medium, to observations to constrain the total mass-, metal-, and energy flow out of starburst galaxies.

  9. Developing Resource Guides for Astro 101 Instructors, as a Higher Education Community Collaboration from the NASA Astrophysics SEPOF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Gregory R.; Fraknoi, A.; Smith, D.; Manning, J.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA/SMD-funded Astrophysics SEPOF (Science Education & Public Outreach Forum) has been organizing EPO "community collaborations” as part of its coordination efforts with missions and EPO programs within NASA Astrophysics. One of the community collaborations that emerged has been focusing on higher education, with a particular emphasis on introductory astronomy courses ("Astro 101"), and how NASA EPO programs and materials can help serve the needs of these courses’ instructors. One of the consequent efforts that has begun is the compiling and development of topical Resource Guides for Astro 101 instructors, with the initial subject tackled being cosmology. This is an area in basic astronomy where rapid progress is being made, older textbooks are quickly out of date, and ideas are challenging for many students, and even instructors! We have had informal conversations so far with about a dozen instructors, divided among universities, liberal-arts colleges, and 2-year community colleges. We have also gathered feedback regarding suggested cosmology resources from the EPO community served by the NASA Astrophysics Forum. And we have undertaken an independent search for Astro 101-suitable curriculum materials, from NASA and other sources, and identified a useful set of such materials, in print and on the Web. Results from this investigation will be shared, along with our project's initial Cosmology Resource Guide, and plans for follow-up guides. Feedback is solicited from Astro 101 instructors, resource developers, and EPO professionals.

  10. Improving Knowledge and Process for International Emergency Medicine Fellowship Applicants: A Call for a Uniform Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle A. Jacquet

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There are currently 34 International Emergency Medicine (IEM fellowship programs. Applicants and programs are increasing in number and diversity. Without a standardized application, applicants have a difficulty approaching programs in an informed and an organized method; a streamlined application system is necessary. Objectives. To measure fellows’ knowledge of their programs’ curricula prior to starting fellowship and to determine what percent of fellows and program directors would support a universal application system. Methods. A focus group of program directors, recent, and current fellows convened to determine the most important features of an IEM fellowship application process. A survey was administered electronically to a convenience sample of 78 participants from 34 programs. Respondents included fellowship directors, fellows, and recent graduates. Results. Most fellows (70% did not know their program’s curriculum prior to starting fellowship. The majority of program directors and fellows support a uniform application service (81% and 67%, resp. and deadline (85% for both. A minority of program directors (35% and fellows (30% support a formal match. Conclusions. Program directors and fellows support a uniform application service and deadline, but not a formalized match. Forums for disseminating IEM fellowship information and for administering a uniform application service and deadline are currently in development to improve the process.

  11. Pathology informatics fellowship retreats: The use of interactive scenarios and case studies as pathology informatics teaching tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy E Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Last year, our pathology informatics fellowship added informatics-based interactive case studies to its existing educational platform of operational and research rotations, clinical conferences, a common core curriculum with an accompanying didactic course, and national meetings. Methods: The structure of the informatics case studies was based on the traditional business school case study format. Three different formats were used, varying in length from short, 15-minute scenarios to more formal multiple hour-long case studies. Case studies were presented over the course of three retreats (Fall 2011, Winter 2012, and Spring 2012 and involved both local and visiting faculty and fellows. Results: Both faculty and fellows found the case studies and the retreats educational, valuable, and enjoyable. From this positive feedback, we plan to incorporate the retreats in future academic years as an educational component of our fellowship program. Conclusions: Interactive case studies appear to be valuable in teaching several aspects of pathology informatics that are difficult to teach in more traditional venues (rotations and didactic class sessions. Case studies have become an important component of our fellowship′s educational platform.

  12. From Stargazing to Science: The Value of Astro's "onomy" in Teaching the Content and Nature of Astronomy and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, A. A.

    1997-12-01

    Students taking my introductory astronomy course have always expressed an interest in learning about the sky. For most of them this means they want to learn to recognize constellations, to learn ``the arrangement of the stars'' the meaning of the Greek roots astro and nemein that became the word astronomy. This interest of students, for many years devalued and ignored, actually provides a perfect opportunity to guide them from casual interest to scientific inquiry in a way similar to the progression of western science from the astronomy of the Greeks through the beginnings of physics with Galileo, Kepler and Newton, to modern astrophysics. I require students to observe and learn the constellations of the season. Initially the constellations are studied as the ``political map'' of the sky. The students learn the names and myths of the characters or objects they represent, and their prominent stars. To build the bridge to science, however, I also require them to perform the time-honored first step of scientific inquiry of accurately sketching what they see in their journal. Also, they must research and learn the ``physical map'' of the sky where each constellation outlines a ``column" of universe filled with stars, perhaps a planet or two, nebulae, galaxies, quasars the CBR, and expanding spacetime. Other observing assignments have students watching the moon wax from new to full with nightly observations, watching the motion of the point of sunset along the western horizon, and watching line from the Big Dipper's Pointer Stars to Polaris sweep out fifteen degrees per hour as Earth rotates on its axis. With each of these they confront the challenge of accurately conveying on two-dimensional paper what they see in the three-dimensional sky, they develop a habit of looking at the sky and noting positions of familiar objects, and they build a foundation of observing experience upon which the models of the universe that astrophysics offers can be built with some stability.

  13. Calibration of the Soft X-ray Telescopes (SXT) Onboard the ASTRO-H Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soong, Yang; Okajima, Takashi; Serlemitsos, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    ASTRO-H is an astrophysics satellite dedicated for non-dispersive X-ray spectroscopic study on selective celestial X-ray sources. Among the onboard instruments there are four Wolter-I X-ray mirrors of their reflectors' figure in conical approximation. Two of the four are soft X-ray mirrors, of which the energy range is from a few hundred eV to 15 keV. The focal point instruments will be a calorimeter (SXS) and a CCD camera (SXI), respectively. The mirrors were in quadrant configuration with photons being reflected consecutively in the primary and secondary stage before landing on the focal plane of 5.6 m away from the interface between the two stages. The reflectors of the mirror are made of heat-formed aluminum substrate of the thickness gauged of 152 m, 229 m, and 305 m of the alloy 5052 H-19, followed by epoxy replication on gold-sputtered smooth Pyrex cylindrical mandrels to acquire the X-ray reflective surface. The epoxy layer is 10 m nominal and surface gold layer of 0.2 m. Improvements on angular response over its predecessors, e.g. Astro-E1/Suzaku mirrors, come from error reduction on the figure, the roundness, and the grazing angle/radius mismatching of the reflecting surface, and tighter specs and mechanical strength on supporting structure to reduce the reflector positioning and the assembly errors. Each soft x-ray telescope (SXT), FM1 or FM2, were integrated from four independent quadrants of mirrors. The stray-light baffles, in quadrant configuration, were mounted onto the integrated mirror. Thermal control units were attached to the perimeter of the integrated mirror to keep the mirror within operating temperature in space. The completed instrument went through a series of optical alignment, thus made the quadrant images confocal and their optical axes in parallel to achieve highest throughput possible. Environmental tests were carried out, and optical quality of the telescopes has been confirmed. The optical and x-ray calibrations also include

  14. Development of signal processing system of avalanche photo diode for space observations by Astro-H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, M., E-mail: ohno@hep01.hepl.hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Physical Sciences, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8516 (Japan); Goto, K.; Hanabata, Y.; Takahashi, H.; Fukazawa, Y. [Department of Physical Sciences, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8516 (Japan); Yoshino, M.; Saito, T.; Nakamori, T.; Kataoka, J. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Sasano, M.; Torii, S.; Uchiyama, H.; Nakazawa, K. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Watanabe, S.; Kokubun, M.; Ohta, M.; Sato, T.; Takahashi, T. [Institute of Space and Astronautial Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5120 (Japan); Tajima, H. [Cosmic-ray Research Facility, Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2013-01-21

    Astro-H is the sixth Japanese X-ray space observatory which will be launched in 2014. Two of onboard instruments of Astro-H, Hard X-ray Imager and Soft Gamma-ray Detector are surrounded by many number of large Bismuth Germanate (Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12}; BGO) scintillators. Optimum readout system of scintillation lights from these BGOs are essential to reduce the background signals and achieve high performance for main detectors because most of gamma-rays from out of field-of-view of main detectors or radio-isotopes produced inside them due to activation can be eliminated by anti-coincidence technique using BGO signals. We apply Avalanche Photo Diode (APD) for light sensor of these BGO detectors since their compactness and high quantum efficiency make it easy to design such large number of BGO detector system. For signal processing from APDs, digital filter and other trigger logics on the Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) is used instead of discrete analog circuits due to limitation of circuit implementation area on spacecraft. For efficient observations, we have to achieve as low threshold of anti-coincidence signal as possible by utilizing the digital filtering. In addition, such anti-coincident signals should be sent to the main detector within 5μs to make it in time to veto the A–D conversion. Considering this requirement and constraint from logic size of FPGA, we adopt two types of filter, 8 delay taps filter with only 2 bit precision coefficient and 16 delay taps filter with 8 bit precision coefficient. The data after former simple filter provides anti-coincidence signal quickly in orbit, and the latter filter is used for detail analysis after the data is down-linked. -- Highlights: ► We develop digital signal processing system of APD for Astro-H. ► We apply two types of digital filter instead of discrete analog circuit. ► By optimization, comparable or better energy threshold to analog shaper is archived. ► Developed digital filter works

  15. Project ASTRO NOVA brings Standard Based Astronomy to New Jersey Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veen, W.; Vinski, J.; Gallagher, A. C.

    2000-12-01

    Begun in 1998, Project ASTRO NOVA is hosted by the Planetarium at Raritan Valley Community College in Somerville, New Jersey. It is part of a National Network of eleven Project ASTRO sites created by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific with financial support of the National Science Foundation (see other papers at this meeting). Our goal is to bring hands-on inquiry based astronomy into classrooms and help teachers meet the New Jersey Science Standards. New Jersey mandates the teaching of astronomy in grades K-12 and statewide assessment takes place in grades 4 and 8. Capitalizing on New Jersey's record number of amateur astronomers per capita our site has trained 75 astronomers (including 21 professional astronomers) over the last three years. Before the start of each school year a new group of astronomers is trained together with their partner teacher(s) in the use of hands-on and age-appropriate astronomy activities that support the New Jersey Science Standards. Astronomers adopt a classroom and visit the same students at least four times during the year. Currently 53 astronomers are participating during the 2000-2001 school year. The program in New Jersey targets teachers in grades 3-9. A total of 114 teachers have been training at our annual workshops and 75 of them are participating during the 2000-2001 school year. Satisfaction with the program has been high with students, teachers and astronomers. When students meet scientists as role models and experience that doing science can be a lot of fun they become more interested. At the same time teachers are re-energized and gain a better understanding of how to teach science and astronomy. Finally, astronomers have the satisfaction of making a real difference in the lives of thousands of children, gain a better understanding of the issues in K-12 education and learn new teaching strategies for use in their college classes or astronomy clubs. In general we find that students and teachers are becoming better

  16. AstroCloud, a Cyber-Infrastructure for Astronomy Research: Data Access and Interoperability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, D.; He, B.; Xiao, J.; Li, S.; Li, C.; Cui, C.; Yu, C.; Hong, Z.; Yin, S.; Wang, C.; Cao, Z.; Fan, Y.; Mi, L.; Wan, W.; Wang, J.

    2015-09-01

    Data access and interoperability module connects the observation proposals, data, virtual machines and software. According to the unique identifier of PI (principal investigator), an email address or an internal ID, data can be collected by PI's proposals, or by the search interfaces, e.g. conesearch. Files associated with the searched results could be easily transported to cloud storages, including the storage with virtual machines, or several commercial platforms like Dropbox. Benefitted from the standards of IVOA (International Observatories Alliance), VOTable formatted searching result could be sent to kinds of VO software. Latter endeavor will try to integrate more data and connect archives and some other astronomical resources.

  17. AstroCloud, a Cyber-Infrastructure for Astronomy Research: Data Access and Interoperability

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Dongwei; Xiao, Jian; Li, Shanshan; Li, Changhua; Cui, Chenzhou; Yu, Ce; Hong, Zhi; Yin, Shucheng; Wang, Chuanjun; Cao, Zihuang; Fan, Yufeng; Mi, Linying; Wan, Wanghui; Wang, Jianguo

    2014-01-01

    Data access and interoperability module connects the observation proposals, data, virtual machines and software. According to the unique identifier of PI (principal investigator), an email address or an internal ID, data can be collected by PI's proposals, or by the search interfaces, e.g. conesearch. Files associated with the searched results could be easily transported to cloud storages, including the storage with virtual machines, or several commercial platforms like Dropbox. Benefitted from the standards of IVOA (International Observatories Alliance), VOTable formatted searching result could be sent to kinds of VO software. Latter endeavor will try to integrate more data and connect archives and some other astronomical resources.

  18. Reconciliation of Statistical Mechanics and Astro-Physical Statistics. The errors of conventional canonical thermostatistics

    CERN Document Server

    Gross, D H E

    2005-01-01

    Conventional thermo-statistics address infinite homogeneous systems within the canonical ensemble. (Only in this case this is equivalent to the fundamental microcanonical ensemble.) However, some 170 years ago the original motivation of thermodynamics was the description of steam engines, i.e. boiling water. Its essential physics is the separation of the gas phase from the liquid. Of course, boiling water is inhomogeneous and as such cannot be treated by conventional thermo-statistics. Then it is not astonishing, that a phase transition of first order is signaled canonically by a Yang-Lee singularity. Thus it is only treated correctly by microcanonical Boltzmann-Planck statistics. It turns out that the Boltzmann-Planck statistics is much richer and gives fundamental insight into statistical mechanics and especially into entropy. This can be done to a far extend rigorously and analytically. As no extensivity, no thermodynamic limit, no concavity, no homogeneity is needed, it also applies to astro-physical syst...

  19. Large underground, liquid based detectors for astro-particle physics in Europe scientific case and prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Autiero, D; Badertscher, A; Bezrukov, L; Bouchez, J; Bueno, A; Busto, J; Campagne, J -E; Cavata, C; De Bellefon, A; Dumarchez, J; Ebert, J; Enqvist, T; Ereditato, A; Von Feilitzsch, F; Perez, P Fileviez; Goger-Neff, M; Gninenko, S; Gruber, W; Hagner, C; Hess, M; Hochmuth, K A; Kisiel, J; Knecht, L; Kreslo, I; Kudryavtsev, V A; Kuusiniemi, P; Lachenmaier, T; Laffranchi, M; Lefièvre, B; Lightfoot, P K; Lindner, M; Maalampi, J; Maltoni, M; Marchionni, A; Undagoitia, T Marrodan; Meregaglia, A; Messina, M; Mezzetto, M; Mirizzi, A; Mosca, L; Moser, U; Müller, A; Natterer, G; Oberauer, L; Otiougova, P; Patzak, T; Peltoniemi, J; Potzel, W; Pistillo, C; Raffelt, G G; Rondio, E; Roos, M; Rossi, B; Rubbia, André; Savvinov, N; Schwetz, T; Sobczyk, J; Spooner, N J C; Stefan, D; Tonazzo, A; Trzaska, W; Ulbricht, J; Volpe, C; Winter, J; Wurm, M; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zimmermann, R

    2007-01-01

    This document reports on a series of experimental and theoretical studies conducted to assess the astro-particle physics potential of three future large-scale particle detectors proposed in Europe as next generation underground observatories. The proposed apparatus employ three different and, to some extent, complementary detection techniques: GLACIER (liquid Argon TPC), LENA (liquid scintillator) and MEMPHYS (\\WC), based on the use of large mass of liquids as active detection media. The results of these studies are presented along with a critical discussion of the performance attainable by the three proposed approaches coupled to existing or planned underground laboratories, in relation to open and outstanding physics issues such as the search for matter instability, the detection of astrophysical- and geo-neutrinos and to the possible use of these detectors in future high-intensity neutrino beams.

  20. Minutes of the 45. meeting of the American society of therapeutic radiology and oncology (Astro)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The forty fifth meeting of the American Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) held at the center of congress in Salt Lake city in october 2003. 542 scientific works have been presented, whom 221 orally. Escalation of radiation doses in prostate cancers have been studied. Fractionation and hormones therapy in prostate cancers are reported. The bladder cancers made the object of information, the bronchi cancer ( non at small cells and at small cells) have been analysed. Cancers of the ORL sphere, mammary gland and brain metastases were presented. The radiotherapy as a palliative treatment of bone metastases made the object of a report. The receptors of the epidermoid growth factor has been shown as an important factor to predict the tumor response to irradiation. (N.C.)

  1. AstroImageJ: Image Processing and Photometric Extraction for Ultra-Precise Astronomical Light Curves

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, Karen A; Stassun, Keivan G

    2016-01-01

    ImageJ is a graphical user interface (GUI) driven, public domain, Java-based, software package for general image processing traditionally used mainly in life sciences fields. The image processing capabilities of ImageJ are useful and extendable to other scientific fields. Here we present AstroImageJ (AIJ), which provides an astronomy specific image display environment and tools for astronomy specific image calibration and data reduction. Although AIJ maintains the general purpose image processing capabilities of ImageJ, AIJ is streamlined for time-series differential photometry, light curve detrending and fitting, and light curve plotting, especially for applications requiring ultra-precise light curves (e.g., exoplanet transits). AIJ reads and writes standard FITS files, as well as other common image formats, provides FITS header viewing and editing, and is World Coordinate System (WCS) aware, including an automated interface to the astrometry.net web portal for plate solving images. Although AIJ provides re...

  2. The USDA CSREES Higher Education Program: Doctoral Fellowships in the National Need Area of Management and Marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Boland, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study is to summarize the HEP graduate fellowship program in the national need area of management and marketing. The fellowships are the most prestigious in the agricultural sciences in the United States and the monetary amount of the fellowship is the highest in the agricultural sciences at $22,000 per year. Almost 40 percent of all graduated fellows are currently employed in academic positions in the United States and are represented on the faculty of 27 universities. ...

  3. Expected radiation damage of reverse-type APDs for the Astro-H mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, J.; Saito, T.; Yoshino, M.; Mizoma, H.; Nakamori, T.; Yatsu, Y.; Ishikawa, Y.; Matsunaga, Y.; Tajima, H.; Kokubun, M.; Edwards, P. G.

    2012-06-01

    Scheduled for launch in 2014, Astro-H is the sixth Japanese X-ray astronomy satellite mission. More than 60 silicon avalanche photodiodes (Si-APDs; hereafter APDs) will be used to read out BGO scintillators, which are implemented to generate a veto signal to reduce background contamination for the hard X-ray imager (HXI) and a soft gamma-ray detector (SGD). To date, however, APDs have rarely been used in space experiments. Moreover, strict environmental tests are necessary to guarantee APD performance for missions expected to extend beyond five years. The radiation hardness of APDs, as for most semiconductors, is particularly crucial, since radiation in the space environment is severe. In this paper, we present the results of radiation tests conducted on reverse-type APDs (provided by Hamamatsu Photonics) irradiated by gamma rays (60Co) and 150 MeV protons. We show that, even under the same 100 Gy dose, high energy protons can cause displacement (bulk) damage in the depletion region and possibly change the activation energy, whereas gamma-ray irradiation is less prone to cause damage, because ionization damage dominates only the surface region. We also present quantitative guidance on how to estimate APD noise deterioration over a range of temperatures and radiation doses. As a practical example, we discuss the expected degradation of the BGO energy threshold for the generation of veto signals, following several years of Astro-H operation in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), and directly compare it to experimental results obtained using a small BGO crystal.

  4. Manufacture of aspherical molding dies for x-ray telescopes after ASTRO-H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namba, Yoshiharu; Beaucamp, Anthony; Matsumoto, Hironori; Tamura, Keisuke; Tawara, Yuzuru; Kunieda, Hideyo; Takahashi, Tadayuki

    2014-07-01

    Producing X-ray imaging space telescopes is a very expensive endeavor, due in great part to the difficulty of fabricating thin mirrors for Wolter type-I optical assemblies. To meet this challenge, replication from optical molding dies (also called mandrels) has become the preferred method, as it is reliable and economical. Several replication methods exist: in the case of the ASTRO-H mission, DC magnetron sputtering was used to deposit Pt/C multilayer coating on glass molding dies. The multilayer coating was then bonded with epoxy to aluminum shells and then separated from the die. Another mirror replication method consists of slumping thin glass sheets over a full (or a section of) revolution molding die under high temperature. This method was demonstrated in the case of the NuSTAR mission. But the challenge of fabricating truly aspheric Wolter type molding dies, which are capable of highly accurate angular resolution (below 5 arcs), remains very expensive and time consuming. In this paper, three methods for producing X-ray optic molding dies are presented. Each method uses a different substrate material and process chain, as follows: electroless nickel plated aluminum (first diamond turned then correctively polished), fused silica (first precision ground then correctively polished), and CVD silicon carbide (which can be finished entirely with a newly developed Shape Adaptive Grinding process). The process chains employed for each method are explained in details, and their relative merits discussed. A way forward for the next generation of X-ray telescopes after ASTRO-H is then drawn out.

  5. Outcomes After Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in Patients With ASTRO Consensus Statement Cautionary Features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate outcomes among women with American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) consensus statement cautionary features treated with brachytherapy-based accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: Between March 2001 and June 2006, 322 consecutive patients were treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) APBI at the University of Wisconsin. A total of 136 patients were identified who met the ASTRO cautionary criteria. Thirty-eight (27.9%) patients possessed multiple cautionary factors. All patients received 32 to 34 Gy in 8 to 10 twice-daily fractions using multicatheter (93.4%) or Mammosite balloon (6.6%) brachytherapy. Results: With a median follow-up of 60 months, there were 5 ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences (IBTR), three local, and two loco-regional. The 5-year actuarial rate of IBTR was 4.8% ± 4.1%. The 5-year disease-free survival was 89.6%, with a cause-specific survival and overall survival of 97.6% and 95.3%, respectively. There were no IBTRs among 32 patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) vs. 6.1% for patients with invasive carcinoma (p = 0.24). Among 104 patients with Stage I or II invasive carcinoma, the IBTR rate for patients considered cautionary because of age alone was 0% vs. 12.7% in those deemed cautionary due to histopathologic factors (p = 0.018). Conclusions: Overall, we observed few local recurrences among patients with cautionary features. Women with DCIS and patients 50 to 59 years of age with Stage I/II disease who otherwise meet the criteria for suitability appear to be at a low risk of IBTR. Patients with tumor-related cautionary features will benefit from careful patient selection.

  6. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 2012 Workforce Study: The Radiation Oncologists' and Residents' Perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) conducted the 2012 Radiation Oncology Workforce Survey to obtain an up-to-date picture of the workforce, assess its needs and concerns, and identify quality and safety improvement opportunities. The results pertaining to radiation oncologists (ROs) and residents (RORs) are presented here. Methods: The ASTRO Workforce Subcommittee, in collaboration with allied radiation oncology professional societies, conducted a survey study in early 2012. An online survey questionnaire was sent to all segments of the radiation oncology workforce. Respondents who were actively working were included in the analysis. This manuscript describes the data for ROs and RORs. Results: A total of 3618 ROs and 568 RORs were surveyed. The response rate for both groups was 29%, with 1047 RO and 165 ROR responses. Among ROs, the 2 most common racial groups were white (80%) and Asian (15%), and the male-to-female ratio was 2.85 (74% male). The median age of ROs was 51. ROs averaged 253.4 new patient consults in a year and 22.9 on-treatment patients. More than 86% of ROs reported being satisfied or very satisfied overall with their career. Close to half of ROs reported having burnout feelings. There was a trend toward more frequent burnout feelings with increasing numbers of new patient consults. ROs' top concerns were related to documentation, reimbursement, and patients' health insurance coverage. Ninety-five percent of ROs felt confident when implementing new technology. Fifty-one percent of ROs thought that the supply of ROs was balanced with demand, and 33% perceived an oversupply. Conclusions: This study provides a current snapshot of the 2012 radiation oncology physician workforce. There was a predominance of whites and men. Job satisfaction level was high. However a substantial fraction of ROs reported burnout feelings. Perceptions about supply and demand balance were mixed. ROs top concerns reflect areas of attention for the

  7. Astro 001: Interactive, Online, and with a Sci-Fi Storyline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, K. A.; Palma, C.; Charlton, J. C.; Narayanan, A.

    2008-06-01

    We present a new, fully on-line astronomy course for undergraduate non-science majors at Penn State that was offered for the first time in Spring 2007 with an enrollment of 422 students. The entire course content is conveyed through an interactive story, capitalizing on the many multimedia astronomy resources publicly available on the Internet. The four units of the course (Basic Astronomy and the Nighttime Sky, Our Solar System, Stars and the Milky Way Galaxy, and Extragalactic Astronomy and Cosmology) deliver the same content as a traditional Astro 001 course. Each unit follows the educational adventure of a different fictional Astro 001 student who has been ``abducted'' by aliens. The four units are united by a character, the Riddler, who poses riddles about various aspects of astronomy, and whose identity and purpose is revealed gradually as a reward for completion of various subtopics. This initial offering of the course was entirely web-based except for traditional evening in-class exams. Our first offering was very successful: it was very popular with the students, the exam grades were about 10 percent higher than usual, and we expect an even higher enrollment in our second offering in Fall of 2007. This Spring we used the Astronomy Diagnostic Test (ADT), but plan in the Fall to use a different pre- and post-assessment that will benchmark each of the four content units. Our future plans include adapting the course into a shorter form to be delivered in middle schools. We gratefully acknowledge funding from STScI IDEAS grant HST-ED-90284-01-A and a Zaccheus Daniel travel grant.

  8. Nuclear engineering, health physics, and radioactive waste management fellowship program: Summary of program activities: Nuclear engineering and health physics fellowship, 1985-1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress is reported in the nuclear engineering and health physics elements of the fellowship program. Statistics are given on numbers of student applications and new appointments, the degree areas of applicants, GPA and GRE score averages of the fellows, and employment of completed fellows

  9. Planning and Conducting Research Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Richard L.

    1983-01-01

    Some directions and influences on dental research activities in the near future are discussed. Current challenges include international competition, fellowships, and equipment. Potential research activity includes preventive medicine, epidemiology, chronic illness, the elderly, bioengineering, materials research, nutrition, soft tissue research,…

  10. 2014 Academic-Federal Dialogue?Environmental and Energy Research & Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation is an overview of the Environmental Protection Agency, the Office of Research and Development, and the National Center forEnvironmental Research, with an emphasis on the STAR research and fellowship programs.

  11. Albert Einstein Distinguished Educators Fellowship Act of 1994. Report To Accompany S. 2104. 103D Congress, 2d Session, Senate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources.

    This document contains the text of the "Albert Einstein Distinguished Educators Fellowship Act of 1994" (S. 2104) along with related analysis. The bill establishes a Department of Energy (DOE) fellowship program for math and science teachers that provides them opportunities to work at DOE labs in order to enhance coordination and communication…

  12. THE ROLE OF ASTRO-GEODETIC IN PRECISE GUIDANCE OF LONG TUNNELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mirghasempour

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available One of prime aspects of surveying projects is guidance of paths of a long tunnel from different directions and finally ending all paths in a specific place. This kind of underground surveying, because of particular condition, has some different points in relation to the ground surveying, including Improper geometry in underground transverse, low precise measurement in direction and length due to condition such as refraction, distinct gravity between underground point and corresponding point on the ground (both value and direction of gravity and etc. To solve this problems, astro-geodetic that is part of geodesy science, can help surveying engineers. In this article, the role of astronomy is defined in two subjects: 1- Azimuth determination of directions from entrance and exit nets of tunnel and also calibration of gyro-theodolite to use them in Underground transvers: By astronomical methods, azimuth of directions can be determine with an accuracy of 0.5 arcsecond, whereas, nowadays, no gyroscope can measure the azimuth in this accuracy; For instance, accuracy of the most precise gyroscope (Gyromat 5000 is 1.2 cm over a distance of one kilometre (2.4 arcsecond. Furthermore, the calibration methods that will be mention in this article, have significance effects on underground transverse. 2- Height relation between entrance point and exit point is problematic and time consuming; For example, in a 3 km long tunnel ( in Arak- Khoram Abad freeway, to relate entrance point to exit point, it is necessary to perform levelling about 90 km. Other example of this boring and time consuming levelling is in Kerman tunnel. This tunnel is 36 km length, but to transfer the entrance point height to exit point, 150 km levelling is needed. According to this paper, The solution for this difficulty is application of astro-geodetic and determination of vertical deflection by digital zenith camera system TZK2-D. These two elements make possible to define geoid profile

  13. Progress report on the Astro-H Soft X-Ray Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Richard L.; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa

    2016-04-01

    We describe the initial in-orbit operations and performance of the Astro-H Soft X-Ray Spectrometer (SXS). Astro-H, JAXA's sixth X-ray observatory, is scheduled for launch on February 12, 2016, from the Tanegashima Space Center in Japan abord an H-IIA rocket. The instrument is based on a 36-pixel array of microcalorimeters designed for high resolution over the 0.3-12 keV energy band at the focus of a high throughput, grazing-incidence x-ray mirror. The instrument is the result of a joint collaboration between the JAXA Institute of Space and Astronautical Science and many partners in Japan, and the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and collaborators in the US. The principal components of the spectrometer are the microcalorimeter detector system, a low-temperature anticoincidence detector, a 3-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) to maintain 50 mK operation under both cryogen and cryogen-free operation, a hybrid liquid helium/cryogen-free dewar with both Stirling and Joule-Thomson coolers, electronics for reading out the array, processing the x-ray data for spectroscopy, and operating the ADR and cryocoolers. The dewar is closed out by an aperture system with five thin-film filters designed to provide high x-ray transmission with low heat loads to the dewar and detector system, and prevent contamination from condensing on the filters. The instrument was designed to have better than 7 eV energy resolution, and was demonstrated to achieve 4-5 eV resolution across the array at the full spacecraft level of integration during extensive ground testing prior to launch. The overall cooling chain has been designed to provide a lifetime of at least 3 years in orbit, and continue to operate without liquid helium to provide redundancy and the longest operational lifetime for the instrument. In this presentation, we will describe the early phases of the SXS instrument in orbit and provide a sense of the astronomical results that can be expected. This presentation is

  14. The Role of Astro-Geodetic in Precise Guidance of Long Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirghasempour, M.; Jafari, A. Y.

    2015-12-01

    One of prime aspects of surveying projects is guidance of paths of a long tunnel from different directions and finally ending all paths in a specific place. This kind of underground surveying, because of particular condition, has some different points in relation to the ground surveying, including Improper geometry in underground transverse, low precise measurement in direction and length due to condition such as refraction, distinct gravity between underground point and corresponding point on the ground (both value and direction of gravity) and etc. To solve this problems, astro-geodetic that is part of geodesy science, can help surveying engineers. In this article, the role of astronomy is defined in two subjects: 1- Azimuth determination of directions from entrance and exit nets of tunnel and also calibration of gyro-theodolite to use them in Underground transvers: By astronomical methods, azimuth of directions can be determine with an accuracy of 0.5 arcsecond, whereas, nowadays, no gyroscope can measure the azimuth in this accuracy; For instance, accuracy of the most precise gyroscope (Gyromat 5000) is 1.2 cm over a distance of one kilometre (2.4 arcsecond). Furthermore, the calibration methods that will be mention in this article, have significance effects on underground transverse. 2- Height relation between entrance point and exit point is problematic and time consuming; For example, in a 3 km long tunnel ( in Arak- Khoram Abad freeway), to relate entrance point to exit point, it is necessary to perform levelling about 90 km. Other example of this boring and time consuming levelling is in Kerman tunnel. This tunnel is 36 km length, but to transfer the entrance point height to exit point, 150 km levelling is needed. According to this paper, The solution for this difficulty is application of astro-geodetic and determination of vertical deflection by digital zenith camera system TZK2-D. These two elements make possible to define geoid profile in terms of

  15. Phenomenological and Astro-particle analysis of light dark matter particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nature of Dark Matter (DM) is still unveiled. Experimental efforts aiming to detect the Dark Matter have shown a great progress in the last decade. This work is devoted to the phenomenological and astro-particle studies of Dark Matter candidates of supersymmetric nature - the neutralino - and beyond - scalar particles. The former, in the (1-100) GeV mass range, is currently being tested by the Large Hadron Collider, direct detection and indirect detection experiments; this work shows that the interplay between experimental techniques is a decisive tool to thoroughly search for theoretical predictions. The latter is a non-standard candidate as light as 1 MeV which could be copiously produced at the Large Hadron Collider and, at the same time, it could explain other phenomena such as neutrino masses and/or the 511 keV line from the galactic center of the Milky Way. We start by describing the DM problem in Part I, where we give a review for evidence of the existence of DM, we set the cosmological framework in which we work and describe the history of DM from the Early Universe (EU), to the formation of structure and up to the current distribution of the DM in haloes. Then, in Part II, we go through the important Cosmological, Astro-particle and Particle Physics constraints to particle DM candidates and subsequently introduce models providing relatively light DM candidates, models of standard supersymmetric nature such as the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) and the Next-to-MSSM (NMSSM) with neutralino DM, and beyond N=1 SUSY in a light scalar DM scenario inspired in N=2 SUSY. Finally, in Part III we present the findings of the investigations carried out: we describe a numerical tool developed to scan the multidimensional supersymmetric parameter space, then we present an application of this tool to the search of light neutralino configurations in the MSSM and NMSSM as well as an application to the search for neutralino DM in directional detectors, and

  16. Design and Implementation of an Evaluation Methodology for the NASA Faculty Fellowship Program (NFFP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, M. G.; Miller, M.; Freeman, M.; Watson, C.; Khalkho, M.; Smith, T.

    2005-12-01

    The NFFP was created in 2002 to accommodate the needs and capabilities of both NASA and the university community. The program combines aspects of two successful former NASA programs, the NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program and the NASA/USRA JOint VEnture (JOVE) program. The NFFP contributes directly to NASA's strategic goal to "inspire and motivate students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics", and NASA's Office of Education strategic objective to "strengthen NASA's involvement in higher education to enhance the nation's science and technology capability in NASA related fields to help meet NASA's future personnel needs." The primary goals of the NFFP are to increase the quality and quantity of research collaborations between NASA and the academic community that contribute to Agency research objectives; provide research opportunities for college and university faculty that serve to enrich their knowledge base; involve faculty in cutting-edge science and engineering challenges related to NASA's strategic enterprises, while providing exposure to the methods and practices of real-world research; facilitate interdisciplinary networking; and establish an effective education and outreach activity to foster greater awareness of the program. Participants are required to submit a research report and complete a program evaluation. The NFFP is evaluated using Web-based survey instruments in the NASA Education Evaluation Information System (NEEIS) that have been designed to collect data that measure program activities and accomplishments against program goals and NASA's education programs evaluation criteria. Data are collected from Faculty Fellows, NASA Colleagues, and students who accompanied Faculty Fellows. Participant Feedback Forms gather quantitative and qualitative information on research accomplishments, the benefits and impacts of the program, and overall program evaluation data. Follow-up feedback instruments are designed to

  17. The Design, Implementation, and Performance of the Astro-H SXS Aperture Assembly and Blocking Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Adams, Joseph S.; Arsenovic, Petar; Ayers, Travis; Chiao, Meng P.; DiPirro, Michael J.; Eckart, Megan E.; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Kazeva, John D.; Kelley, Richard L.; Kripps, Kari L.; Lairson, Bruce; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; McGuinness, Daniel S.; Porter, F. Scott; Schweiss, Andrea N.

    2016-01-01

    The calorimeter array of the JAXA Astro-H (renamed Hitomi) Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) was designed to provide unprecedented spectral resolution of spatially extended cosmic x-ray sources and of all cosmic x-ray sources in the Fe-K band around 6 keV, enabling essential plasma diagnostics. The properties that make the SXS array a powerful x-ray spectrometer also make it sensitive to photons from the entire electromagnetic band, and particles as well. If characterized as a bolometer, it would have a noise equivalent power (NEP) of less than 4x10(exp -18) W/(Hz)0.5(exp 0.5). Thus it was imperative to shield the detector from thermal radiation from the instrument and optical and UV photons from the sky. Additionally, it was necessary to shield the coldest stages of the instrument from the thermal radiation emanating from the warmer stages. Both of these needs are addressed by a series of five thin-film radiation-blocking filters, anchored to the nested temperature stages, that block long-wavelength radiation while minimizing x-ray attenuation. The aperture assembly is a system of barriers, baffles, filter carriers, and filter mounts that supports the filters and inhibits their potential contamination. The three outer filters also have been equipped with thermometers and heaters for decontamination. We present the requirements, design, implementation, and performance of the SXS aperture assembly and blocking filters.

  18. Calculating the Habitable Zone of Multiple Star Systems (http://astro.twam.info/hz)

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a comprehensive methodology and an interactive website for calculating the habitable zone (HZ) of multiple star systems. Using the concept of spectral weight factor, as introduced in our previous studies of the calculations of HZ in and around binary star systems, we calculate the contribution of each star (based on its spectral energy distribution) to the total flux received at the top of the atmosphere of an Earth-like planet, and use the models of the HZ of the Sun to determine the boundaries of the HZ in multiple star systems. Our interactive website for carrying out these calculations is publicly available at http://astro.twam.info/hz . We discuss the details of our methodology and present its application to some of the multiple star systems detected by the Kepler space telescope. We also present the instructions for using our interactive website, and demonstrate its capabilities by calculating the HZ for two interesting analytical solutions of the three-body problem.

  19. Ultra-Flexible Thermal Bus for Use in the Astro-H Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Mark O.; Shirron, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    The adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) developed for the Astro-H Soft-X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) is a multi-stage solid-state cooler. It is capable of holding the SXS detector array at 0.050 K for greater than 24 hours with a recycle time of less than one hour. This quick recycle time relies upon high-conductivity thermal straps to couple the individual stages to a pair of heat switches without imposing a lateral load on the paramagnetic salt pills. To accomplish this we construct thermal straps using a technique of diffusion bonding together the ends of high-purity copper straps leaving the length between as individual foils. A thermal bus created this way has a thermal conductivity comparable to a solid strap of the equivalent thickness but with much-increased flexibility. The technique for selecting the base material, machining, cleaning, forming into final shape, and finally bonding together individual foils will be discussed along with examples of complete straps in various geometries.

  20. AstroDAbis: Annotations and Cross-Matches for Remote Catalogues

    CERN Document Server

    Gray, Norman; Morris, Dave; Holliman, Mark; Noddle, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Astronomers are good at sharing data, but poorer at sharing knowledge. Almost all astronomical data ends up in open archives, and access to these is being simplified by the development of the global Virtual Observatory (VO). This is a great advance, but the fundamental problem remains that these archives contain only basic observational data, whereas all the astrophysical interpretation of that data -- which source is a quasar, which a low-mass star, and which an image artefact -- is contained in journal papers, with very little linkage back from the literature to the original data archives. It is therefore currently impossible for an astronomer to pose a query like "give me all sources in this data archive that have been identified as quasars" and this limits the effective exploitation of these archives, as the user of an archive has no direct means of taking advantage of the knowledge derived by its previous users. The AstroDAbis service aims to address this, in a prototype service enabling astronomers to r...

  1. Development of the x-ray CCD for SXI on board ASTRO-H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Shutaro; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Anabuki, Naohisa; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Fujikawa, Mari; Mori, Hideki; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Tatsuo; Kawai, Kohei; Ikeda, Shoma; Kaneko, Kenta; Sakata, Kazuya; Todoroki, Shotaro; Mizuno, Hideki; Yagihashi, Nobuyoshi; Dotani, Tadayasu; Ozaki, Masanobu; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Muramatsu, Masaharu; Suzuki, Hisanori; Takagi, Shin'ichiro

    2011-09-01

    We report on the development of the X-ray CCD for the soft X-ray imager (SXI) onboard ASTRO-H. SXI CCDs are P-channel, back-illuminated type manufactured by Hamamatsu Photonics K. K. Experiments with prototype CCD for the SXI shows the device has a depletion layer as thick as 200μm, high efficiency for hard X-rays. By irradiating soft X-rays to the prototype CCD for the SXI. At the same time, we found a significant low energy tail in the soft X-ray response of the SXI prototype CCD. We thus made several small size CCD chips with different treatment in processing the surface layers. CCDs with one of the surface layers treatment show a low energy tail of which intensity is one order of magnitude smaller than that of the original SXI prototype CCD for 0.5keV X-ray incidence. The same treatment will be applied to the flight model CCDs of the SXI. We also performed experiments to inject charge with the SXI prototype CCD, which is needed to mitigate the radiation damage in the orbit. We investigated the operation conditions of the charge injection. Using the potential equilibration method, charges are injected in each column homogeneously, though the amount of the charge must be larger than 20ke-.

  2. ASTRO-H White Paper - Plasma Diagnostic and Dynamics of the Galactic Center Region

    CERN Document Server

    Koyama, K; Nobukawa, M; Uchiyama, H; Nakashima, S; Aharonian, F; Chernyakova, M; Ichinohe, Y; Nobukawa, K K; Maeda, Y; Matsumoto, H; Murakami, H; Ricci, C; Stawarz, L; Tanaka, T; Tsuru, T G; Watanabe, S; Yamauchi, S; Yuasa, T

    2014-01-01

    The most characteristic high-energy phenomena in the Galactic center (GC) region is the presence of strong K-shell emission lines from highly ionized Si, S, Ar, Ca, Fe and Ni, which form the Galactic Center X-ray Emission (GCXE). These multiple lines suggest that the GCXE is composed of at least two plasmas with temperatures of ~1 and ~7 keV. The GCXE also exhibits the K-shell lines from neutral Si, S, Ar, Ca, Fe and Ni atoms. A debatable issue is the origin of the GCXE plasma; whether it is a diffuse plasma or integrated emission of many unresolved point sources such as cataclysmic variables and active binaries. Detailed spectroscopy for these lines may provide a reliable picture of the GCXE plasma. The origin of the K-shell lines from neutral atoms is most likely the fluorescence by X-rays from a putative past flare of Sgr A*. Therefore ASTRO-H may provide unprecedented data for the past light curve of Sgr A*. All these lines may provide key information for the dynamics of the GCXE, using possible Doppler s...

  3. ASTRO-H White Paper - Low-mass X-ray Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Done, C; Cackett, E; Herder, J W den; Dotani, T; Enoto, T; Ferrigno, C; Kallman, T; Kohmura, T; Laurent, P; Miller, J; Mineshige, S; Mori, H; Nakazawa, K; Paerels, F; Sakurai, S; Soong, Y; Sugita, S; Takahashi, H; Tamagawa, T; Tanaka, Y; Terada, Y; Uno, S

    2014-01-01

    There is still 10-20% uncertainty on the neutron star (NS) mass-radius relation. These uncertainties could be reduced by an order of magnitude through an unambiguous measure of M/R from the surface redshift of a narrow line, greatly constraining the Equation of State for ultra-dense material. It is possible that the SXS on ASTRO-H can detect this from an accreting neutron star with low surface velocity in the line of sight i.e. either low inclination or low spin. Currently there is only one known low inclination LMXB, Ser X-1, and one known slow spin LMXB, J17480-2446 in Terzan 5. Ser X-1 is a persistent source which is always in the soft state (banana branch), where the accreting material should form a equatorial belt around the neutron star. A pole-on view should then allow the NS surface to be seen directly. A 100 ks observation should allow us to measure M/R if there are any heavy elements in the photosphere at the poles. Conversely, J17480-2446 in Terzan 5 is a transient accretion powered millisecond pul...

  4. The Design, Implementation, and Performance of the Astro-H SXS Aperture Assembly and Blocking Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, C. A.; Adams, J. S.; Arsenovic, P.; Ayers, T.; Chiao, M. P.; DiPirro, M. J.; Eckart, M. E.; Fujimoto, R.; Kazeva, J. D.; Kelley, R. L.; Kripps, K. L.; Lairson, B.; Leutenegger, M. A.; Lopez, H.; McCammon, D.; McGuinness, D. S.; Mitsuda, K.; Moseley, S. J.; Porter, F. S.; Schweiss, A. N.; Takei, Y.; Thorpe, R. S.; Watanabe, T.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Yoshida, S.

    2016-01-01

    The calorimeter array of the JAXA Astro-H (renamed Hitomi) Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) was designed to provide unprecedented spectral resolution of spatially extended cosmic x-ray sources and of all cosmic x-ray sources in the Fe-K band around 6 keV. The properties that make the SXS a powerful x-ray spectrometer also make it sensitive to the entire electromagnetic band. If characterized as a bolometer, it would have a noise equivalent power (NEP) of < 4x10(exp -18) W/(Hz)0.5. Thus it was imperative to shield the detector from thermal radiation from the instrument and optical and UV photons from the sky. Additionally, it was necessary to shield the coldest stages of the instrument from the thermal radiation emanating from the warmer stages. These needs are addressed by a series of five thin-film radiation blocking filters that block long-wavelength radiation while minimizing x-ray attenuation. The SXS aperture assembly is a system of barriers, baffles, filter carriers, and filter mounts that supports the filters and inhibits their potential contamination. The three warmer filters also were equipped with thermometers and heaters for decontamination.

  5. Early inflation induced gravity waves can restrict Astro-Particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Nussinov, Shmuel

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss limits on various astro-particle scenarios if the scale \\textit{and} the reheat temperature of the last relevant inflation were very high. While the observed "B" like pattern of polarizations of the CMB suggest a very high ($\\ge 10^{16}\\ GeV$) scale of a primordial (which motivated this work initially) and may reflect effects of dust, we believe that addressing these issues is nonetheless very useful. We recall the potential difficulties with various topological defects - monopoles, strings and domain walls generated at the SSB (spontaneous symmetry breaking) of various gauge symmetries. The main part of the paper is devoted to discussing difficulties with long-lived heavy particles, which could be dark matter but cannot efficiently annihilate to the required residual density because of basic S-Matrix unitarity/analyticity limits. We indicate in simple terms yet in some detail how the WIMP miracle occurs at $M(X)\\sim{TeV}$ and how the axiomatic upper bound presently updated to $M(X) ...

  6. The Process of Discovery: The CLIR Postdoctoral Fellowship Program and the Future of the Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclachlan, John C., Ed.; Waraksa, Elizabeth A., Ed.; Williford, Christa, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    This volume celebrates the first decade of Council on Library and Information Resources' (CLIR) Postdoctoral Fellowship Program by bringing together 20 past and present CLIR postdoctoral fellows to share their thoughts on their experiences, and more broadly, on the direction of academia. Each essay is a look into the working conditions associated…

  7. 7 CFR 3402.5 - Overview of National Needs Graduate and Postdoctoral Fellowship Grants Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Overview of National Needs Graduate and Postdoctoral... § 3402.5 Overview of National Needs Graduate and Postdoctoral Fellowship Grants Program. (a) The program... Fellows who have completed their doctoral degrees, the program will also provide postdoctoral...

  8. Perspectives on endovascular training in traditional 5+2 vascular surgery fellowship training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, Thomas N; Shahmohammadi, Kaveh; Farber, Alik; Rybin, Denis; Doros, Gheorghe; McPhee, James T; Kalish, Jeffrey E; Eslami, Mohammad H

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to compare expectations and experiences of fellows to those of faculty in vascular surgery fellowship programs with regard to endovascular training. Anonymous surveys were sent to fellows (n = 235) and program directors (n = 147), with 79 fellows and 65 faculty members responding. Fellows noted higher expectations of their endovascular skills prior to starting fellowship than the faculty group reported expecting. Faculty assessed fellows' pre-training endovascular skills at a significantly lower level than the fellows' self-assessment. Fellows were significantly less satisfied with the structured aspects of endovascular training than the faculty believed them to be. Only 3% of fellows vs. 32% of faculty felt that the presence of an endovascular simulator affected how residents ranked fellowship programs during the match. In conclusion, incoming fellows in vascular surgery fellowship programs have high expectations of themselves, but may overestimate their actual pre-training endovascular skills. Fellows desire more structured endovascular training, which is not recognized by faculty. Endovascular simulators are valued, but may not be a significant draw in the match process. PMID:25972032

  9. 34 CFR 662.3 - Who is eligible to receive a fellowship under this program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FULBRIGHT-HAYS DOCTORAL DISSERTATION... student in good standing at an institution of higher education; and (2) When the fellowship period begins, is admitted to candidacy in a doctoral degree program in modern foreign languages and area studies...

  10. Radioactive Waste Management Fellowship Program: Summary of program activities for calendar year 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes a graduate fellowship program designed to guide future scientists and engineers toward a career in high level radioactive waste management. Oak Ridge Associated Universities administers this program on behalf of 17 participating universities. The report summarizes the background and qualifications of the last year's applicants and awardees and provides examples of the distributed literature describing the program. 8 figs

  11. Program Requirements for Fellowship Education in the Subspecialty of Clinical Informatics

    OpenAIRE

    Safran, Charles; Shabot, M. Michael; Munger, Benson S.; Holmes, John H.; Steen, Elaine B.; Lumpkin, John R.; Detmer, Don E.

    2009-01-01

    The Program Requirements for Fellowship Education identify the knowledge and skills that physicians must master through the course of a training program to be certified in the subspecialty of clinical informatics. They also specify accreditation requirements for clinical informatics training programs. The AMIA Board of Directors approved this document in November 2008.

  12. Development of a Post-Master's Fellowship Program in Oncology Nursing Education. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegele, Dorothy; Henderson, Billie

    A one-year Post-Master's Fellowship in Oncology Nursing Education for nurse educators was developed through the collaboration of San Jose State University (California) and University of Alabama at Birmingham. The project was designed to: develop or update undergraduate/graduate oncology nursing programs; provide continuing education for practicing…

  13. Study of the Residual Background Events in Ground Data from the ASTRO-HSXS Microcalorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Boyce, Kevin R.; Chiao, M. P.; Eckart, M. E.; Kelley, R. L.; Leutenegger, M. A.; Porter, F. S.; Watanabe, T.; Ishisaki, Y.; Yamada, S.; Tsujimoto, M.; Mitsuda, K.; Tashiro, M.

    2015-01-01

    The measured instrumental background of the XRS calorimeter spectrometer of Suzaku had several sources, including primary cosmic rays and secondary particles interacting with the pixels and with the silicon structure of the array. Prior to the launch of Suzaku, several data sets were taken without x-ray illumination to study the characteristics and timing of background signals produced in the array and anti-coincidence detector. Even though the source of the background in the laboratory was different from that in low-earth orbit (muons and environmental gamma-rays on the ground versus Galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) protons and alpha particles in space), the study of correlations and properties of populations of rare events was useful for establishing the preliminary screening parameters needed for selection of good science data. Sea-level muons are singly charged minimum-ionizing particles, like the GCR protons, and thus were good probes of the effectiveness of screening via the signals from the anti-coincidence detector. Here we present the first analysis of the on-ground background of the SXS calorimeter of Astro-H. On XRS, the background prior to screening was completely dominated by coincident events on many pixels resulting from the temperature pulse arising from each large energy deposition (greater than 200 keV) into the silicon frame around the array. The improved heat-sinking of the SXS array compared with XRS eliminated these thermal disturbances, greatly reducing the measured count rate in the absence of illumination. The removal of these events has made it easier to study the nature of the residual background and to look for additional event populations. We compare the SXS residual background to that measured in equivalent ground data for XRS and discuss these preliminary results.

  14. 2016 Research Final Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koskelo, EliseAnne Corinne [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-16

    These are slides which show an example of research at Los Alamos National Laboratory done by E.C. Koskelo to show college professors in the hopes of earning a research position or fellowship position. In summary, this researcher developed a new in-situ technique for the inspection of additively manufactured parts, created an algorithm which can correct "skewed" scans of angular parts/taken at oblique angles, and used AWS to detect hidden defects and thickness changes in aerospace composites.

  15. The Si/CdTe semiconductor Compton camera of the ASTRO-H Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD)

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Shin; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Ichinohe, Yuto; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Enoto, Teruaki; Fukuyama, Taro; Furui, Shunya; Genba, Kei; Hagino, Kouichi; Harayama, Astushi; Kuroda, Yoshikatsu; Matsuura, Daisuke; Nakamura, Ryo; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD) is one of the instrument payloads onboard ASTRO-H, and will cover a wide energy band (60--600 keV) at a background level 10 times better than instruments currently in orbit. The SGD achieves low background by combining a Compton camera scheme with a narrow field-of-view active shield. The Compton camera in the SGD is realized as a hybrid semiconductor detector system which consists of silicon and cadmium telluride (CdTe) sensors. The design of the SGD Compton...

  16. Fellowships for Students Pursuing Interdisciplinary MS with a Focus on Wind Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naughton, Jonathan W. [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States)

    2013-03-31

    The production of electricity from wind has grown rapidly in the U.S. and abroad. A problem generated by this rapid growth is the need for a highly trained workforce as has been discussed openly in recent workshops and in discussions with wind energy manufacturers and developers. In addition, the 20% by 2030 report lists workforce development as among the critical needs if the initiative is to succeed. This report also identified that, for this initiative to succeed, many of the wind energy related technologies needed to advance. As a result, a critical component of the workforce development is the highly trained personnel that can contribute to this technology advancement. The objective of this effort was to attract several highly qualified candidates to pursue a wind-energy focused interdisciplinary degree at the Masters Degree level. Since it was desired to produce these candidates as quickly as possible, fellowships were to be provided to the best candidates so that they could complete their degree quickly and transition to the workforce in the minimum time possible. In the course of advertising for these high quality candidates, it was hoped that other students would also be made aware of the educational and research opportunities offered by the Wind Energy Research Center (WERC). To ensure a wind energy focus for the students, a curriculum focused on wind was encouraged, but the curriculum was sufficiently flexible to allow the students to tailor the experience to meet their interests. Options for the students included internships or a thesis in addition to coursework only programs. The results of this effort are considered to be an overall success. Six students started the program and all have either completed or are in the last stages of completing the program. Individuals with a broad range of backgrounds started the program demonstrating that students from many areas can successfully complete such a program. On average, the students took longer than the

  17. Model Point-of-Care Ultrasound Curriculum in an Intensive Care Unit Fellowship Program and Its Impact on Patient Management

    OpenAIRE

    Keith Killu; Victor Coba; Michael Mendez; Subhash Reddy; Tanja Adrzejewski; Yung Huang; Jessica Ede; Mathilda Horst

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study was designed to assess the clinical applicability of a Point-of-Care (POC) ultrasound curriculum into an intensive care unit (ICU) fellowship program and its impact on patient care. Methods. A POC ultrasound curriculum for the surgical ICU (SICU) fellowship was designed and implemented in an urban, academic tertiary care center. It included 30 hours of didactics and hands-on training on models. Minimum requirement for each ICU fellow was to perform 25–50 exams on respec...

  18. NNSA Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Annual Report June 2008 - May 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkman, Clarissa O.; Fankhauser, Jana G.

    2010-03-01

    In 2009, the Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP) completed its 16th successful year in support of the NNSA’s mission by developing future leaders in nonproliferation and promoting awareness of career opportunities. We provide this annual report to review program activities from June 2008 through May 2009 - the fellowship term for the Class of 2008. Contents include: Welcome Letter Introduction The NGFP Team Program Management Highlights Class of 2008 Incoming Fellows Orientation Travel Career Development Management of the Fellows Performance Highlights Closing Ceremony Encore Performance Where They Are Now Alumnus Career Highlights: Christine Buzzard Class of 2009 Applicant Database Upgrades Fall Recruitment Activities Interviews Hiring and Clearances Introducing the Class of 2009 Class of 2010 Recruitment Strategy On the Horizon Appendix A: Class of 2009 Fellows

  19. NNSA Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Annual Report June 2009 - May 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkman, Clarissa O.; Fankhauser, Jana G.

    2011-04-01

    In 2009, the Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP) completed its 17th successful year in support of the NNSA’s mission by developing future leaders in nonproliferation and promoting awareness of career opportunities. This annual report to reviews program activities from June 2009 through May 2010 - the fellowship term for the Class of 2009. Contents include: Welcome Letter (Mission Driven: It’s all about results), Introduction, Structure of the NGFP, Program Management Highlights, Annual Lifecycle, Class of 2009 Incoming Fellows, Orientation, Global Support of the Mission, Career Development, Management of the Fellows, Performance Highlights, Closing Ceremony, Where They Are Now, Alumni Highlight - Mission Success: Exceptional Leaders from the NGFP, Class of 2009 Fall Recruitment Activities, Established Partnerships, Face-to-Face, Recruiting Results, Interviews, Hiring and Clearances, Introducing the Class of 2010, Class of 2011 Recruitment Strategy, On the Horizon, Appendix A: Class of 2010 Fellow Biographies

  20. NNSA Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Annual Report June 2009 - May 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2009, the Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP) completed its 17th successful year in support of the NNSA's mission by developing future leaders in nonproliferation and promoting awareness of career opportunities. This annual report to reviews program activities from June 2009 through May 2010 - the fellowship term for the Class of 2009. Contents include: Welcome Letter (Mission Driven: It's all about results), Introduction, Structure of the NGFP, Program Management Highlights, Annual Lifecycle, Class of 2009 Incoming Fellows, Orientation, Global Support of the Mission, Career Development, Management of the Fellows, Performance Highlights, Closing Ceremony, Where They Are Now, Alumni Highlight - Mission Success: Exceptional Leaders from the NGFP, Class of 2009 Fall Recruitment Activities, Established Partnerships, Face-to-Face, Recruiting Results, Interviews, Hiring and Clearances, Introducing the Class of 2010, Class of 2011 Recruitment Strategy, On the Horizon, Appendix A: Class of 2010 Fellow Biographies.

  1. National Nuclear Security Administration Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Annual Report in Brief: October 2007 - May 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkman, Clarissa O.; Fankhauser, Jana G.; Sandusky, Jessica A.

    2009-05-01

    This abbreviated Annual Report covers program activities of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP) from October 2007 through May 2008--the timeframe between the last Annual Report (which covered activities through September 2007) and the next report (which will begin with June 2008 activities). In that timeframe, the NGFP continued building a solid foundation as the program began reaping the benefits of recently implemented changes. This report is organized by Fellowship class and the pertinent program activities for each, including: October 2007 Recruiting events and final applications (Class of 2008) Winter 2007 Selection and hiring (Class of 2008) Spring 2008 Career development roundtables (Class of 2007) Orientation planning (Class of 2008) Recruitment planning and university outreach (Class of 2009) May 2008 Closing ceremony (Class of 2007)

  2. A Multi-Institution Study on the Effectiveness of ClassAction to Promote Student Understanding in Astro 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kevin M.; French, R. S.; Hands, D. R.; Loranz, D. R.; Martino, D.; Rudolph, A. L.; Wysong, J.; Young, T. S.; Prather, E. E.; CATS

    2010-01-01

    ClassAction is a computer database of materials designed to enhance the conceptual understanding and reasoning abilities of Astro 101 students by promoting interactive engagement and providing rapid feedback. The main focus is dynamic conceptual questions largely based upon graphics that can be projected in the classroom. Instructors have the capability to select, order, and recast these questions into alternate permutations based on their own preferences and student responses. Instructors may also provide feedback through extensive resources including outlines, graphics, and simulations. The Light and Spectroscopy Concept Inventory (LSCI) is a multiple-choice assessment instrument which focuses on the electromagnetic spectrum, Doppler shift, Wien's Law, Stefan-Boltzmann Law, and Kirchhoff's Laws. Illustrative examples of how these concepts are targeted by the questions and resources of the ClassAction module are shown. ClassAction materials covering light and spectra concepts were utilized in multiple classrooms at 6 different institutions and the LSCI was delivered as a pretest and posttest to measure the gains in student understanding. A comparison of the gains achieved in these classes will be made against the national LSCI data. We will report on our investigation into correlations between gain and the extent of ClassAction usage. ClassAction materials are publicly available at http://astro.unl.edu. We would like to thank the NSF for funding under Grant Nos. 0404988 and 0715517, a CCLI Phase III Grant for the Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS) Program.

  3. An Experimental Clinical Science Fellowship in Cardiovascular-Renal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasis, Herbert; Campbell, Charles I.

    1974-01-01

    Describes the New York Heart Association's experimental program aimed at evaluating a method of developing physicians disciplined by research and competent both as teachers and in the care of patients (clinical scientists). (Author)

  4. Essentials of Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellowship: Part 4: Beyond Clinical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Margaret; Carney, Michele; Eldridge, Charles; Zaveri, Pavan; Kou, Maybelle

    2016-08-01

    This article is the third in a 7-part series that aims to comprehensively describe the current state and future directions of pediatric emergency medicine fellowship training from the essential requirements to considerations for successfully administering and managing a program to the careers that may be anticipated upon program completion. This article focuses on the skills beyond clinical training required of pediatric emergency medicine physicians including teaching, leadership, teamwork, and communication. PMID:27490731

  5. Building capacity for HIV/AIDS program leadership and management in Uganda through mentored Fellowships

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph K.B. Matovu; Wanyenze, Rhoda K.; Mawemuko, Susan; Wamuyu-Maina, Gakenia; Bazeyo, William; Okui, Olico-; Serwadda, David

    2011-01-01

    Background: Around the world, health professionals and program managers are leading and managing public and private health organizations with little or no formal management and leadership training and experience. Objective: To describe an innovative 2-year, long-term apprenticeship Fellowship training program implemented by Makerere University School of Public Health (MakSPH) to strengthen capacity for leadership and management of HIV/AIDS programs in Uganda. Implementation process: The progr...

  6. Building capacity for HIV/AIDS program leadership and management in Uganda through mentored Fellowships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph K.B. Matovu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Around the world, health professionals and program managers are leading and managing public and private health organizations with little or no formal management and leadership training and experience. Objective: To describe an innovative 2-year, long-term apprenticeship Fellowship training program implemented by Makerere University School of Public Health (MakSPH to strengthen capacity for leadership and management of HIV/AIDS programs in Uganda. Implementation process: The program, which began in 2002, is a 2-year, full-time, non-degree Fellowship. It is open to Ugandan nationals with postgraduate training in health-related disciplines. Enrolled Fellows are attached to host institutions implementing HIV/AIDS programs and placed under the supervision of host institution and academic mentors. Fellows spend 75% of their apprenticeship at the host institutions while the remaining 25% is dedicated to didactic short courses conducted at MakSPH to enhance their knowledge base. Achievements: Overall, 77 Fellows have been enrolled since 2002. Of the 57 Fellows who were admitted between 2002 and 2008, 94.7% (54 completed the Fellowship successfully and 50 (92.3% are employed in senior leadership and management positions in Uganda and internationally. Eighty-eight percent of those employed (44/54 work in institutions registered in Uganda, indicating a high level of in-country retention. Nineteen of the 20 Fellows who were admitted between 2009 and 2010 are still undergoing training. A total of 67 institutions have hosted Fellows since 2002. The host institutions have benefited through staff training and technical expertise from the Fellows as well as through grant support to Fellows to develop and implement innovative pilot projects. The success of the program hinges on support from mentors, stakeholder involvement, and the hands-on approach employed in training. Conclusion: The Fellowship Program offers a unique opportunity for hands

  7. An Evaluation of Procedural Training in Canadian Respirology Fellowship Programs: Program Directors’ and Fellows’ Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    David Ryan Stather; Julie Jarand; Silvestri, Gerard A.; Alain Tremblay

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In recent years, there has been a rapid growth in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures performed by respirologists.OBJECTIVES: To assess the number and type of procedures performed in Canadian respirology training programs, for comparison with the American College of Chest Physicians minimum competency guidelines, and to assess fellow satisfaction with procedural training during their fellowships.METHODS: Internet-based surveys of Canadian respirology fellows and respirology fell...

  8. The Unavoidable Comparison : The Fellowship of the Ring presented in fiction and film

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to studying Peter Jackson's adaptation of J.R.R. Tolkien's 'The Fellowship of the Ring'. Based on an extensive thematic analysis of the novel, it discusses how well Peter Jackson has succeeded in adapting the main thematic aspects of the narrative. Furthermore, it offers comments on any significant alterations invoked as the text was transferred to a visual medium, and discusses how this affects the general presentation of the thematic aspects in the original text.

  9. An examination of professional and ethical issues in the fellowship application process in pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domen, Ronald E; Wehler, Amanda Brehm

    2008-04-01

    Approximately 34 medical specialty and subspecialty fellowship programs in the United States have formalized the application process through the National Resident Matching Program. This approach sets standards for the application process, offers a formalized match similar to that for residency programs, functions within a specific timeline, and establishes binding rules of behavior for both applicants and programs. For fellowship programs that operate outside the National Resident Matching Program, such as those in pathology, no published guidelines exist to help programs and applicants address the many questions and problems that can arise. As a result, programs are free to set their own timelines for interviews, application requirements, contract negotiations and finalizations, and other details. Consequently, applicants often feel pressured to apply earlier and earlier in their residency for competitive fellowship programs, are often required to fill out multiple unique applications, may feel no "loyalty" toward honoring an acceptance without a contract, and often feel disenfranchised by the whole process. This article addresses professional and ethical aspects of the current application process and offers possible solutions for improving it. PMID:18342659

  10. Mickey Leland Energy Fellowship Report: Development of Advanced Window Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolton, Ladena A.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.

    2014-08-05

    Advanced fenestration technologies for light and thermal management in building applications are of great recent research interest for improvements in energy efficiency. Of these technologies, there is specific interest in advanced window coating technologies that have tailored control over the visible and infrared (IR) scattering into a room for both static and dynamic applications. Recently, PNNL has investigated novel subwavelength nanostructured coatings for both daylighting, and IR thermal management applications. Such coatings rese still in the early stages and additional research is needed in terms of scalable manufacturing. This project investigates aspects of a potential new methodology for low-cost scalable manufacture of said subwavelength coatings.

  11. 15 CFR 255.1 - Type of fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... standardization and testing. (b) Practical laboratory training in various branches of physics, chemistry, and engineering research, under the direction of the National Institute of Standards & Technology, which will..., rubber, leather, paper, textiles, plastics, and clay and silicate products. (c) Observation and study...

  12. Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  13. Directory of Residency and Fellowship Programs in Women's Health, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Mission Statement The mission of the Association of Academic Women's Health Programs (AAWHP) is to improve the health of women through leadership in research, education clinical models, and community partnerships. This mission is carried out through networking, leadership and mentoring collaborative projects, lobbying and advocacy, political and social commentary, education of policy-makers, partnership with national organizations, and creation of interdisciplinary innovative models. May 2016. PMID:27168389

  14. What does it take to create an effective and interactive learning environment with 700 students in a college Gen. Ed. Astro Course?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Edward E.; Brissenden, G.; Cormier, S.; Eckenrode, J.; Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars CATS

    2012-01-01

    College-level general education (gen ed.) curricula in the US have many goals: exposing students to the breadth of human ideas; elevating their reading comprehension, writing abilities, critical reasoning skills; and providing an understanding of, and appreciation for, subjects outside of their chosen field of study. Unfortunately the majority of the teaching and learning for gen ed. courses takes place in large enrollment courses. In the wake of the recent US financial crisis, many institutions of higher learning face extreme budget cuts, leading many faculty to teach in substantially larger classes with increasingly fewer resources. At the University of Arizona this issue manifests itself in mega-classes with enrollments from 700-1400. We discuss key programmatic and pedagogical changes involved in successfully implementing proven collaborative learning strategies into an Astro 101 mega-class. From devising new ways to hand out and collect papers, to altering course seating, to outlawing cell phones and laptops, to implementing new ways of administering tests. We take a "what ever it takes” approach to engineering this mega-course environment so it can succeed as a learner-centered classroom. Paramount to the success of this course has been the creation of the new CAE Ambassadors program which advances the leadership role of prior non-science majors along the continuum from student, to teaching assistant, to science education researcher, to STEM minor. This material is based in part upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0715517, a CCLI Phase III Grant for the Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

  15. Simulating Magnetohydrodynamical Flow with Constrained Transport and Adaptive Mesh Refinement; Algorithms & Tests of the AstroBEAR Code

    CERN Document Server

    Cunningham, Andrew J; Varniere, Peggy; Mitran, Sorin; Jones, Thomas W

    2007-01-01

    A description is given of the algorithms implemented in the AstroBEAR adaptive mesh refinement code for ideal magnetohydrodynamics. The code provides several high resolution, shock capturing schemes which are constructed to maintain conserved quantities of the flow in a finite volume sense. Divergence free magnetic field topologies are maintained to machine precision by collating the components of the magnetic field on a cell-interface staggered grid and utilizing the constrained transport approach for integrating the induction equations. The maintenance of such topologies on adaptive grids is achieved using prolongation and restriction operators which preserve the divergence and curl of the magnetic field across co-located grids of different resolution. The robustness and correctness of the code is demonstrated by comparing the numerical solution of various tests with analytical solutions or previously published numerical solutions obtained by other codes.

  16. The Radiology Fellowship Application and Selection Process in the United States: Experiences and Perceptions from Both Sides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our purpose was to investigate radiology fellowship directors' and recent fellows' experiences and perceptions with regard to the fellowship application and selection process and to compare these experiences and perceptions. Materials and Methods. Institutional review board approval was obtained. We conducted an online survey of the memberships of three radiology subspecialty societies between October 2009 and December 2009 to learn about radiologists' views regarding various aspects of radiology fellowships. Results. In the process of selecting fellows, program directors and recent fellows consider performance during the radiology residency and the quality or prestige of the residency program as the most important objective factors, and the personal interview, letters of recommendation, and personality as the most important subjective factors. 25% of the program directors were in the match, and 41% of the recent fellows were in the match. Most (48%) of program directors favored a match, but most (56%) of the recent fellows disfavored participating in a match. Both program directors and recent fellows expressed satisfaction with the fellowship application and selection process. Conclusion. There was no majority support for a fellowship match among program directors and recent fellows and less support among recent fellows. Recent fellows appear more satisfied with the current selection and application process than program directors

  17. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 2012 Workforce Study: The Radiation Oncologists' and Residents' Perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohar, Surjeet, E-mail: spohar@iuhealth.org [Indiana University Health East, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Fung, Claire Y. [Commonwealth Newburyport Cancer Center, Newburyport, Massachusetts (United States); Hopkins, Shane [William R. Bliss Cancer Center, Ames, Iowa (United States); Miller, Robert [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Azawi, Samar [VA Veteran Hospital/University of California Irvine, Newport Beach, California (United States); Arnone, Anna; Patton, Caroline [ASTRO, Fairfax, Virginia (United States); Olsen, Christine [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) conducted the 2012 Radiation Oncology Workforce Survey to obtain an up-to-date picture of the workforce, assess its needs and concerns, and identify quality and safety improvement opportunities. The results pertaining to radiation oncologists (ROs) and residents (RORs) are presented here. Methods: The ASTRO Workforce Subcommittee, in collaboration with allied radiation oncology professional societies, conducted a survey study in early 2012. An online survey questionnaire was sent to all segments of the radiation oncology workforce. Respondents who were actively working were included in the analysis. This manuscript describes the data for ROs and RORs. Results: A total of 3618 ROs and 568 RORs were surveyed. The response rate for both groups was 29%, with 1047 RO and 165 ROR responses. Among ROs, the 2 most common racial groups were white (80%) and Asian (15%), and the male-to-female ratio was 2.85 (74% male). The median age of ROs was 51. ROs averaged 253.4 new patient consults in a year and 22.9 on-treatment patients. More than 86% of ROs reported being satisfied or very satisfied overall with their career. Close to half of ROs reported having burnout feelings. There was a trend toward more frequent burnout feelings with increasing numbers of new patient consults. ROs' top concerns were related to documentation, reimbursement, and patients' health insurance coverage. Ninety-five percent of ROs felt confident when implementing new technology. Fifty-one percent of ROs thought that the supply of ROs was balanced with demand, and 33% perceived an oversupply. Conclusions: This study provides a current snapshot of the 2012 radiation oncology physician workforce. There was a predominance of whites and men. Job satisfaction level was high. However a substantial fraction of ROs reported burnout feelings. Perceptions about supply and demand balance were mixed. ROs top concerns reflect areas of attention

  18. Proposal for subspecialty physician fellowship training in nutrition and health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I; Graham, Toby; Gramlich, Leah; McMahon, M Molly; Ziegler, Thomas R

    2010-01-01

    Subspecialty fellowship training programs in nutrition and health promotion (NHP) are necessary for any comprehensive solution to address physician shortages in this discipline. After a careful needs and resource assessment, current or future program directors can decide on 1 of 3 potential NHP training models: dedicated continuous, dedicated carve-out, or concurrent continuous. Each of these models will need to provide complete elements of core curricula and a sufficient amount of specialized modular NHP training. At the conclusion of the training program, NHP fellows should have fulfilled board certification eligibility requirements so that they may later become NHP experts and mentors to perpetuate this subspecialty. PMID:21149836

  19. New Water Disinfection Technology for Earth and Space Applications as Part of the NPP Fellowship Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    SilvestryRodriquez, Nadia

    2010-01-01

    There is the need for a safe, low energy consuming and compact water disinfection technology to maintain water quality for human consumption. The design of the reactor should present no overheating and a constant temperature, with good electrical and optical performance for a UV water treatment system. The study assessed the use of UVA-LEDs to disinfectant water for MS2 Bacteriophage. The log reduction was sufficient to meet US EPA standards as a secondary disinfectant for maintaining water quality control. The study also explored possible inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and E. coli.

  20. Final Report for 2015 ER&L + EBSCO Library Fellowship Research Project

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Tao; Niu, Xi

    2015-01-01

    We report findings from a comprehensive assessment of e-book user experience (search and information seeking) from transaction logs, e-book usage data, and user tests. There are differences between e-book and general searches in terms of query length, number of queries and actions per session. There are also distinctive reading patterns from e-book usage data. The user tests showed that experience levels with e-books and features of e-book platforms influenced users’ information seeking behav...

  1. Accelerating Research Productivity in Social Work Programs: Perspectives on NIH's Postdoctoral T32 Research Training Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthieu, Monica M.; Bellamy, Jennifer L.; Pena, Juan B.; Scott, Lionel D., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the experiences of four social work researchers who pursued an alternative career path immediately following their doctorate in social work by accepting a postdoctoral training fellowship funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). As schools of social work look for creative ways to build research capacity, this…

  2. An analytical perspective on the Fellowship Narrative of Genesis 18:1–15

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahn Sang Keun

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The narrative in Genesis 18:1–15 deals with God’s visit to Abraham at Mamre. The general tendency in the interpretation of this narrative is to focus on Abraham’s hospitality. It is usually interpreted as an example of his righteousness, in line with Hebrews 13:2, or with the test motive of the Greek myth of the birth of Orion. These interpretations, however, seem to be in conflict with the narrator’s own theological views.This study, therefore, attempts to explore the view point of the author of the Fellowship Narrative (Gn 18:1–15 within the context of the larger Abraham narrative (Gn 11:27–25:11. The method used for the investigation is mainly that of narrative criticism. Attention is paid to the narrator’s various literary skills: ‘linking structure with preceding episode’ (Gn 18:1a, the ‘sandwiched structure’ of the larger context (Gn 18:1–21:7, the unique plot sequence, as well as repeated clue words and phrases (such as ‘laugh’, ‘Sarah’ and ‘this time next year’. These literary aspects are used by the narrator to depict the faithfulness of the Lord who fulfils what he promised. The conclusion of this study overturns the traditional interpretations of the Fellowship Narrative.

  3. Teaching Critical Thinking Using Reflective Journaling in a Nursing Fellowship Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zori, Susan

    2016-07-01

    Critical thinking (CT) is considered to be foundational for the development of RN clinical reasoning. Reflective journaling has been used as an educational strategy to support the development of CT. This project's purpose was to explore how using reflective journaling about CT dispositions with RNs in a fellowship program might influence RN's use of CT dispositions. This descriptive, qualitative study used content analysis as the method to analyze journal entries focused on seven CT dispositions: inquisitiveness, systematicity, open mindedness, analyticity, truth seeking, CT maturity, and CT confidence written by RNs in the first 7 weeks of their fellowship program. Based on the content analysis of journal entries, two major descriptive themes emerged: Development of Critical Thinking Is a Process That Develops During a Period of Time, and Purposefully Engaging Critical Thinking Dispositions May Help Prevent Negative Patient Outcomes. The purposeful use of CT dispositions as described in the journal entries also helped to guide the RN's individual learning. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(7):321-329. PMID:27351265

  4. A unique faith-based medical organization: the Christian Medical Fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnatz, Peter F

    2008-01-01

    The Association of American Medical Colleges has challenged medical educators to be role models for the incorporation of faith into the art and practice of medicine. The Christian Medical Fellowship (CMF) is one approach toward accomplishing this goal. CMF is a nonprofit organization that brings health, hope, and healing, to and through the health-care community, providing transformational love locally and internationally. CMFseeks to support the caregiver while serving the underserved. CMF accomplishes this through a three-fold approach: promoting individual faith, community outreach, and international missions. CMF provides a framework to assist health-care providers in meeting their own spiritual needs along with those of their patients. The Christian ethic teaches that Jesus touched and changed lives by showing love and compassion, while meeting physical as well as spiritual needs. The goal of CMF is to do the same. The CMF vision is to replicate CMF's three-fold ministry by fostering the development of independent, self-supporting CMF chapters to serve throughout the USA and the world. CMF plans to develop a fully functioning faith-based Fellowship Program in conjunction with a CMF faith-based clinic and an international hospital. The growth of CMF and the advancement of the educational experiences are a result of many committed, disciplined, and focused individuals motivated by a deep faith in the original vision. We look to the future with anticipation, as we continue to bridge the gap between faith and the science of medicine. PMID:18610708

  5. The Si/CdTe semiconductor Compton camera of the ASTRO-H Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD) is one of the instrument payloads onboard ASTRO-H, and will cover a wide energy band (60–600 keV) at a background level 10 times better than instruments currently in orbit. The SGD achieves low background by combining a Compton camera scheme with a narrow field-of-view active shield. The Compton camera in the SGD is realized as a hybrid semiconductor detector system which consists of silicon and cadmium telluride (CdTe) sensors. The design of the SGD Compton camera has been finalized and the final prototype, which has the same configuration as the flight model, has been fabricated for performance evaluation. The Compton camera has overall dimensions of 12 cm×12 cm×12 cm, consisting of 32 layers of Si pixel sensors and 8 layers of CdTe pixel sensors surrounded by 2 layers of CdTe pixel sensors. The detection efficiency of the Compton camera reaches about 15% and 3% for 100 keV and 511 keV gamma rays, respectively. The pixel pitch of the Si and CdTe sensors is 3.2 mm, and the signals from all 13,312 pixels are processed by 208 ASICs developed for the SGD. Good energy resolution is afforded by semiconductor sensors and low noise ASICs, and the obtained energy resolutions with the prototype Si and CdTe pixel sensors are 1.0–2.0 keV (FWHM) at 60 keV and 1.6–2.5 keV (FWHM) at 122 keV, respectively. This results in good background rejection capability due to better constraints on Compton kinematics. Compton camera energy resolutions achieved with the final prototype are 6.3 keV (FWHM) at 356 keV and 10.5 keV (FWHM) at 662 keV, which satisfy the instrument requirements for the SGD Compton camera (better than 2%). Moreover, a low intrinsic background has been confirmed by the background measurement with the final prototype. - Highlights: • The final prototype of the Si/CdTe Compton camera for the ASTRO-H SGD was completed. • The detailed design of the Compton camera is described. • The unprecedented high efficiency and high

  6. An Anonymous Survey of Psychosomatic Medicine Fellowship Directors regarding Breaches of Contracts and a Proposal for Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, James L.; Bialer, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors studied how often applicants accept positions at more than one program, or programs offer positions to applicants who have already signed contracts with other programs. Methods: An anonymous survey was distributed to all psychosomatic medicine fellowship program directors. Results: It is fairly common for applicants to sign…

  7. 26 CFR 143.2 - Taxes on self-dealing; scholarship and fellowship grants by private foundations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... fellowship grants by private foundations. 143.2 Section 143.2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... by private foundations. (a) In general. Section 4941(d)(1)(D) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 as...) by a private foundation to a disqualified person. Section 4941(d)(1)(E) provides that the term...

  8. 34 CFR 657.33 - What are the limitations on the use of funds for overseas fellowships?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the limitations on the use of funds for overseas fellowships? 657.33 Section 657.33 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOREIGN LANGUAGE AND...

  9. The ongoing evolution of the core curriculum of a clinical fellowship in pathology informatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M Quinn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Partners HealthCare system′s Clinical Fellowship in Pathology Informatics (Boston, MA, USA faces ongoing challenges to the delivery of its core curriculum in the forms of: (1 New classes of fellows annually with new and varying educational needs and increasingly fractured, enterprise-wide commitments; (2 taxing electronic health record (EHR and laboratory information system (LIS implementations; and (3 increasing interest in the subspecialty at the academic medical centers (AMCs in what is a large health care network. In response to these challenges, the fellowship has modified its existing didactic sessions and piloted both a network-wide pathology informatics lecture series and regular "learning laboratories". Didactic sessions, which had previously included more formal discussions of the four divisions of the core curriculum: Information fundamentals, information systems, workflow and process, and governance and management, now focus on group discussions concerning the fellows′ ongoing projects, updates on the enterprise-wide EHR and LIS implementations, and directed questions about weekly readings. Lectures are given by the informatics faculty, guest informatics faculty, current and former fellows, and information systems members in the network, and are open to all professional members of the pathology departments at the AMCs. Learning laboratories consist of small-group exercises geared toward a variety of learning styles, and are driven by both the fellows and a member of the informatics faculty. The learning laboratories have created a forum for discussing real-time and real-world pathology informatics matters, and for incorporating awareness of and timely discussions about the latest pathology informatics literature. These changes have diversified the delivery of the fellowship′s core curriculum, increased exposure of faculty, fellows and trainees to one another, and more equitably distributed teaching responsibilities among

  10. International Atomic Energy Agency fellows: Where are they now? The Department of Technical Cooperation's report on the fellowship survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to assess the impact and the quality of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) fellowship programme, the Department of Technical Cooperation conducted a survey among former fellows from the years 2001 and 2002. These fellows have all completed the fellowship training, and have had time to judge in what way their training is useful to their work in their home country. As a result of this survey, further surveys could be conducted to serve as a continuous systematic assessment of the fellowship and other programmes. Former fellows from the years 2001 and 2002 were asked to fill out a questionnaire containing questions regarding the following: Where are the former fellows now and what are they doing? How did the fellows rate the quality of the fellowship programme? How did the fellows rate the impact of the training they received through the fellowship programme, the impact on their home institution, and the impact on the TC project and their home country? The survey period was 11 February - 4 March 2005. Reaching a sufficient number of former fellows from the years 2001 and 2002 posed some difficulties. The National Liaison Officers contributed greatly in finding the former fellows' current contact information. Out of the 2067 fellows who were in the field in the years 2001 and 2002, 613 participated in the survey (meaning, 30% of all fellows from those years and 50% of those reached by email or fax). The results of the survey given below represent only the survey participants' opinions, not those of all former fellows from the years 2001 and 2002. To ensure that the results are representative of all fellows, a follow-up study of seven countries is currently being done. The IAEA fellowship programme contributes successfully to knowledge and technology transfer to fellows' home institutions, their home countries and the TC projects they are involved in, as evidenced by the following survey results: 94% of the fellows who participated in the survey

  11. Thermodynamic Analysis of the 3-Stage ADR for the Astro-H Soft X-Ray Spectrometer Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirron, Peter; Kimball, Mark; DiPirro, Michael; Bialas, Tom; Sneiderman, Gary; Porter, Scott; Kelley, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) instrument on Astro-H will use a 3-stage ADR to cool the microcalorimeter array to 50 mK. In the primary operating mode, two stages of the ADR cool the detectors using superfluid helium at 1.20 K as the heat sink. In the secondary mode, which is activated when the liquid helium is depleted, two of the stages continuously cool the (empty) helium tank using a 4.5 K Joule-Thomson cooler as the heat sink, and the third stage cools the detectors. In the design phase, a high-fidelity model of the ADR was developed in order to predict both the cooling capacity and heat rejection rates in both operating modes. The primary sources of heat flow are from the salt pills, hysteresis heat from the magnets and magnetic shields, and power dissipated by the heat switches. The flight instrument dewar, ADR, detectors and electronics were integrated in mid-2014 and have since undergone extensive performance testing, in part to validate the performance model. This paper will present the thermodynamic performance of the ADR, including cooling capacity, heat rejection to the heat sinks, and various measures of efficiency.

  12. Inspiring a future generation of Astronomer and Astrophysicists during the 48th and 49th annual Astro-Science Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynowycz, Michael; Ratliff, G.; Gyuk, G.; Hammergren, M.

    2014-01-01

    Aging of the technological workforce and declining STEM interest among teens gives impetus to a more exciting, hands-on approach to science education. As one of the longest running astronomy & astrophysics programs for high school students in the country, the Adler Planetarium’s Astro-Science Workshop (ASW) has continually evolved to best serve the out-of-school time needs of science-interested teens in the region. More than a decade ago, ASW underwent a major shift in underlying philosophy from a traditional lecture-oriented program to one focused on hands-on, student led inquiry in which students design, build, and conduct their own experiments. This strategy capitalizes on the natural inclinations of curious youth, and has found a strong synergy with the emerging “maker” movement. Over the past two years, a very successful effort has been made to retain students following ASW as volunteers in the Adler’s Far Horizons high-altitude ballooning group. The necessity to continually inspire and spark interests in science futures in our youth has been ongoing; this intense program serves this niche while giving students experiences they will keep with them for their entire lives. Here, we share our successes, failures, and future perspectives on astronomy education and the mission of widening the future pipeline of young scientists in the nation.

  13. Flight model performance test results of a helium dewar for the soft X-ray spectrometer onboard ASTRO-H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Seiji; Miyaoka, Mikio; Kanao, Ken'ichi; Tsunematsu, Shoji; Otsuka, Kiyomi; Hoshika, Shunji; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Yamasaki, Noriko; Takei, Yoh; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Sato, Yoichi; DiPirro, Mike; Shirron, Peter

    2016-03-01

    ASTRO-H is a Japanese X-ray astronomy satellite, scheduled to be launched in fiscal year 2015. The mission includes a soft X-ray spectrometer instrument (SXS), which contains an X-ray micro calorimeter operating at 50 mK by using an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR). The heat sink of the ADR is superfluid liquid helium below 1.3 K. The required lifetime of the superfluid helium is 3 years or more. In order to realize this lifetime, we have improved the thermal performance from the engineering model (EM) while maintaining the mechanical performance. Then, we have performed a thermal test of the flight model (FM). The results were that the heat load to the helium tank was reduced to below 0.8 mW in the FM from 1.2 mW in the EM. Therefore, the lifetime of the superfluid helium is more than 3 years with 30 L of liquid helium. In this paper, the thermal design and thermal test results are described.

  14. The Si/CdTe semiconductor Compton camera of the ASTRO-H Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD)

    CERN Document Server

    Watanabe, Shin; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Ichinohe, Yuto; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Enoto, Teruaki; Fukuyama, Taro; Furui, Shunya; Genba, Kei; Hagino, Kouichi; Harayama, Astushi; Kuroda, Yoshikatsu; Matsuura, Daisuke; Nakamura, Ryo; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Noda, Hirofumi; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ohta, Masayuki; Onishi, Mitsunobu; Saito, Shinya; Sato, Goro; Sato, Tamotsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tanaka, Takaaki; Togo, Atsushi; Tomizuka, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    The Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD) is one of the instrument payloads onboard ASTRO-H, and will cover a wide energy band (60--600 keV) at a background level 10 times better than instruments currently in orbit. The SGD achieves low background by combining a Compton camera scheme with a narrow field-of-view active shield. The Compton camera in the SGD is realized as a hybrid semiconductor detector system which consists of silicon and cadmium telluride (CdTe) sensors. The design of the SGD Compton camera has been finalized and the final prototype, which has the same configuration as the flight model, has been fabricated for performance evaluation. The Compton camera has overall dimensions of 12 cm x 12 cm x 12 cm, consisting of 32 layers of Si pixel sensors and 8 layers of CdTe pixel sensors surrounded by 2 layers of CdTe pixel sensors. The detection efficiency of the Compton camera reaches about 15% and 3% for 100 keV and 511 keV gamma rays, respectively. The pixel pitch of the Si and CdTe sensors is 3.2 mm, and ...

  15. An Online National Archive of Multiple-Choice Questions for Astro 101 and the Development of the Question Complexity Rubric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, S.; Prather, E.; Brissenden, G.

    2011-09-01

    We are developing a national archive of multiple-choice questions for use in the Astronomy 101 classroom. These questions are intended to supplement an instructor's implementation of Think-Pair-Share or for their assessment purposes (i.e., exams and homework). We are also developing the Question Complexity Rubric (QCR) to guide members of the Astro 101 teaching and learning community in assisting us with hierarchically ranking questions in this archive based on their conceptual complexity. Using the QCR, a score is assigned to differentiate each question based on the cognitive steps necessary to comprehensively explain the reasoning pathway to the correct answer. The lowest QCR score is given to questions with a reasoning pathway requiring only declarative knowledge. The highest QCR score is given to questions with a reasoning pathway that requires multiple connected cognitive steps. When completed, the online question archive will provide users with the utility to 1) use the QCR to score questions 2) search for and download questions based on topic and/or QCR score, and 3) add their own questions to the archive. Stop by our poster to test your skills at determining question complexity by trying out the QCR with our sample questions.

  16. Thermodynamic performance of the 3-stage ADR for the Astro-H Soft-X-ray Spectrometer instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirron, Peter J.; Kimball, Mark O.; James, Bryan L.; Muench, Theodore; DiPirro, Michael J.; Bialas, Thomas G.; Sneiderman, Gary A.; Porter, Frederick S.; Kelley, Richard L.

    2016-03-01

    The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) instrument (Mitsuda et al., 2010) [1] on Astro-H (Takahashi et al., 2010) [2] will use a 3-stage ADR (Shirron et al., 2012) to cool the microcalorimeter array to 50 mK. In the primary operating mode, two stages of the ADR cool the detectors using superfluid helium at ⩽1.20 K as the heat sink (Fujimoto et al., 2010). In the secondary mode, which is activated when the liquid helium is depleted, the ADR uses a 4.5 K Joule-Thomson cooler as its heat sink. In this mode, all three stages operate together to continuously cool the (empty) helium tank and single-shot cool the detectors. The flight instrument - dewar, ADR, detectors and electronics - were integrated in 2014 and have since undergone extensive performance testing. This paper presents a thermodynamic analysis of the ADR's operation, including cooling capacity, heat rejection to the heat sinks, and various measures of efficiency.

  17. The Design, Implementation, and Performance of the Astro-H SXS Calorimeter Array and Anti-Coincidence Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Adams, Joseph S.; Brekosky, Regis P.; Chiao, Meng P.; Chervenak, James A.; Eckart, Megan E.; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Galeazzi, Masimilliano; Grein, Christoph; Jhabvala, Christine A.; Kelley, Richard L.; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; McCammon, Dan; Porter, F. Scott; Szymkowiak, Andrew E.; Watanabe, Tomomi; Zhao, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The calorimeter array of the JAXA Astro-H (renamed Hitomi) Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) was designed to provide unprecedented spectral resolution of spatially extended cosmic x-ray sources and of all cosmic x-ray sources in the Fe-K band around 6 keV, enabling essential plasma diagnostics. The SXS has a square array of 36 microcalorimeters at the focal plane. These calorimeters consist of ion-implanted silicon thermistors and HgTe thermalizing x-ray absorbers. These devices have demonstrated a resolution of better than 4.5 eV at 6 keV when operated at a heat-sink temperature of 50 mK. We will discuss the basic physical parameters of this array, including the array layout, thermal conductance of the link to the heat sink, resistance function, absorber details, and means of attaching the absorber to the thermistor-bearing element. We will also present the thermal characterization of the whole array, including thermal conductance and crosstalk measurements and the results of pulsing the frame temperature via alpha particles, heat pulses, and the environmental background. A silicon ionization detector is located behind the calorimeter array and serves to reject events due to cosmic rays. We will briefly describe this anti-coincidence detector and its performance.

  18. AstroSat/LAXPC reveals the high energy variability of GRS 1915+105 in the chi class

    CERN Document Server

    Yadav, J S; Chauhan, Jai Verdhan; Agrawal, P C; Antia, H M; Pahari, Mayukh; Dedhia, Dhiraj; Katoch, Tilak; Madhwani, P; Manchanda, R K; Paul, B; Shah, Parag; Ishwara-Chandra, C H

    2016-01-01

    We present the first quick look analysis of data from nine {\\it AstroSat}'s LAXPC observations of GRS 1915+105 during March 2016 when the source had the characteristics of being in Radio-quiet $\\chi$ class. We find that a simple empirical model of a disk blackbody emission, with Comptonization and a broad Gaussian Iron line can fit the time averaged 3--80 keV spectrum with a systematic uncertainty of 1.5\\% and a background flux uncertainty of 4\\%. A simple deadtime-corrected Poisson noise level spectrum matches well with the observed high frequency power spectra till 50 kHz and as expected the data show no significant high frequency ($> 20$ Hz) features. Energy dependent power spectra reveal a strong low frequency (2 - 8 Hz) Quasi-periodic oscillation (LFQPO) and its harmonic along with broad band noise. The QPO frequency changes rapidly with flux (nearly 4 Hz in ~ 5 hours). With increasing QPO frequency, an excess noise component appears significantly in the high energy regime (> 8 keV). At the QPO frequenci...

  19. Influence of the Surgical Education and Training programme on the Fellowship Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, Spencer W; Hardware, Narelle

    2013-06-01

    Introduction of an increasingly competence-based Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS) Surgical Education and Training (SET) programme has influenced the nature and conduct of the Fellowship Examination (FEX). The FEX is the final summative assessment taken near the completion of SET training, and is aligned to the other SET assessment processes. It mainly tests two of the nine RACS surgical competencies, focusing on professional judgement and the clinical application of knowledge. It is used to help determine whether candidates are safe to practise unsupervised at consultant level. There have been refinements to a number of the processes including standard setting, blueprinting, developing marking descriptors and improving the reliability and validity of the examination. An Examiners' Training Course has also been introduced. PMID:23627698

  20. Current status of advanced gastrointestinal endoscopy training fellowships in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J Heller

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stephen J Heller, Jeffrey L TokarDepartment of Medicine, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Rapid growth in the field of advanced gastrointestinal endoscopy has led to an increase in specialized therapeutic endoscopy fellowships. The cornerstones of these programs are training in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP and endoscopic ultrasound. These procedures are more complex and challenging to master than routine colonoscopy and upper endoscopy, and in the case of ERCP, higher risk. The concentration of the educational experience in the hands of relatively fewer trainees with specialized interest in advanced endoscopy has resulted in providing a focused cohort of graduating fellows with higher case volumes in training, which likely enhances diagnostic and therapeutic success and safer performance of these procedures. Endoscopic simulators, although not currently in widespread use, have the potential to improve advanced procedural training without jeopardizing patient safety.Keywords: gastrointestinal endoscopy, training, procedures, safety 

  1. Research: A Pathway Towards a Good Curriculum Vitae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad T. Shakoor

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays there is a lashing trend of doing fellowships. Residency and fellowship positions have become very competitive. From my experience, I found that the majority of candidates who aspire to apply for residency or fellowship positions don’t have any significant research backgrounds. Being a medical student myself, I should not blame any other student for this deficiency, as most of the medical schools don’t provide basic atmosphere, guidance and infrastructure for undergraduate research activities. By the time students graduate and apply for a residency spot or fellowship position after residency, they have no research credentials with them other than their degree requirements and a few certificates for extracurricular activities. One should realize that these accomplishments merely provide a skeleton for your Curriculum vitae (CV in order to add depth to your CV you have to be able to include research experiences (that you have acquired during your undergraduate degree, as well as good recommendation letters and advanced clinical experience.1 Research work in your CV will help set you apart. When you go for a job interview, having a strong research background and independent work gives you something to talk about that the interviewer will be interested in. As a student, any efforts in the field of research are highly appreciated. Above all, research training will make you a better-equipped physician with a sharper mind and stronger critical thinking skills.

  2. Enhancement of nondestructive evaluation techniques for magnetic and nonmagnetic structural components (Final report for doctoral fellowship)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report, research works performed in the Structural Safety Engineering Group of OEC/JNC are summarized as the final report of the doctoral fellowship. The main objective of this study is for the enhancement of the nondestructive evaluation techniques for structural components of both magnetic and nonmagnetic material. Studies in three topics have been carried out aiming at the quantitative evaluation of crack with the eddy current testing and the validation of a natural magnetic field based NDE method for detecting mechanical damages in a paramagnetic material. In the first part of the study, an approach to the reconstruction of the natural crack was proposed and implemented with an idealized crack model for its validation. In the second part, the correlation of the natural magnetization and the mechanical damages in the SUS304 stainless steel was investigated by using an experimental approach. In part 3, an inverse method of the measured magnetic fields is proposed for the reconstruction of magnetic charges in the inspected material by using an optimization method and wavelet. As the first work, an approach to the reconstruction of an idealized natural crack of non-vanishing conductivity is proposed with use of signals of eddy current testing. Two numerical models are introduced at first for modeling the natural crack in order to represented it with a set of crack parameters. A method for the rapid prediction of the eddy current testing signals coming from these idealized cracks is given then by extending a knowledge based fast forward solver to the case of a non-vanishing conductivity. Based on this fast forward solver, the inverse algorithm of conjugate gradient method is updated to identify the crack parameters. Several examples are presented finally as a validation of the proposed strategy. The results show that both the two numerical models can give reasonable reconstruction results for signal of low noise. The model concerning the touch of crack

  3. Design of a 3-Stage ADR for the Soft X-Ray Spectrometer Instrument on the Astro-H Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirron, Peter J.; Kimball, Mark O.; Wegel, Donald C.; Canavan, Edgar R.; DiPirro, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    The Japanese Astro-H mission will include the Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) instrument, whose 36-pixel detector array of ultra-sensitive x-ray microcalorimeters requires cooling to 50 mK. This will be accomplished using a 3-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR). The design is dictated by the need to operate with full redundancy with both a superfluid helium dewar at 1.3 K or below, and with a 4.5 K Joule-Thomson (JT) cooler. The ADR is configured as a 2-stage unit that is located in a well in the helium tank, and a third stage that is mounted to the top of the helium tank. The third stage is directly connected through two heat switches to the JT cooler and the helium tank, and manages heat flow between the two. When liquid helium is present, the 2-stage ADR operates in a single-shot manner using the superfluid helium as a heat sink. The third stage may be used independently to reduce the time-average heat load on the liquid to extend its lifetime. When the liquid is depleted, the 2nd and 3rd stages operate as a continuous ADR to maintain the helium tank at as low a temperature as possible - expected to be 1.2 K - and the 1st stage cools from that temperature as a single-stage, single-shot ADR. The ADR s design and operating modes are discussed, along with test results of the prototype 3-stage ADR.

  4. The Question Complexity Rubric: Development and Application for a National Archive of Astro 101 Multiple-Choice Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Sebastien; Prather, E. E.; Brissenden, G.; Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars CATS

    2011-01-01

    For the last two years we have been developing an online national archive of multiple-choice questions for use in the Astro 101 classroom. These questions are intended to either supplement an instructor's implementation of Think-Pair-Share or be used for assessment purposes (i.e. exams and homework). In this talk we will describe the development, testing and implementation of the Question Complexity Rubric (QCR), which is designed to guide the ranking of questions in this archive based on their conceptual complexity. Using the QCR, a score is assigned to differentiate each question based on the cognitive steps necessary to comprehensively explain the reasoning pathway to the correct answer. The lowest QCR score is given to questions with a reasoning pathway requiring only declarative knowledge whereas the highest QCR score is given to questions that require multiple pathways of multi-step reasoning. When completed, the online question archive will provide users with the utility to 1) search for and download questions based on subject and average QCR score, 2) use the QCR to score questions, and 3) add their own questions to the archive. We will also discuss other potential applications of the QCR, such as how it informs our work in developing and testing of survey instruments by allowing us to calibrate the range of question complexity. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0715517, a CCLI Phase III Grant for the Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

  5. Mining the SDSS Database to Teach the Evolution of Galaxy Clusters to ASTRO101 Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufnagel, Beth; Raddick, M. J.

    2007-12-01

    Astronomy research has been undergoing an information explosion over the last few decades, with significant progress made in streamlining and simplifying Internet access to everything from telescope application processes to abstracts to multi-wavelength data. These access tools are now user-friendly enough to bring us into a new realm of teaching, giving undergraduates access to research databases using software with a gentle learning curve. We present an online module that helps introductory-level, non-science undergraduates learn to extract information about the evolution of galaxy clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey database. The students interface the database through the SkyServer web site at http://skyserver.sdss.org. This multimedia education module is intended for inclusion in an introductory undergraduate Astronomy course for non-science majors, as part of the galaxies and cosmology topics. It starts with a directed exploration of background information, e.g., galaxian mergers by simulations, and gradually segues into student exploration. It can be used as a PC-based laboratory activity, assigned as a homework, or used as a module in an on-line course. Support for this work was provided by the Southeast Clearinghouse (SERCH), the Maryland Space Grant Consortium, and the Simple Effective Education and Dissemination (SEED) grant program of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific.

  6. Development of high performance Avalanche Photodiodes and dedicated analog systems for HXI/SGD detectors onboard the Astro-H mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hard X-ray Imager and Soft Gamma-ray Detector are being developed as onboard instruments for the Astro-H mission, which is scheduled for launch in 2014. In both detectors, BGO scintillators play key roles in achieving high sensitivity in low Earth orbit (LEO), by generating active veto signals to reject cosmic-ray events and gamma-ray backgrounds from radio-activated detector materials. In order to maximize background rejection power, it is also important to minimize the energy threshold of this shield. As a readout sensor of weak scintillation light from a number of BGO crystals in a complicated detector system, high performance, reverse-type Avalanche Photodiodes (APDs), with an effective area of 10×10mm2 are being employed, instead of bulky photomultiplier tubes (PMTs).Another advantage of using APDs is their low power consumption, although the relatively low gain of APDs (compared to conventional PMTs) requires dedicated analog circuits for noise suppression. In this paper, we report on the development and performance of APD detectors specifically designed for the Astro-H mission. In addition to APD performance, various environmental tests, including radiation hardness and qualification thermal cycling, will be described in detail. Moreover, a dedicated charge sensitive amplifier and analog filters are newly developed and tested here to optimize the performance of APDs to activate fast veto signals within a few μs from the BGO trigger. We will also report on overall performance testing of a prototype BGO detector system that mimics the data acquisition system onboard Astro-H.

  7. Christian’s perception in coping with stress related depression : a case study of Vantaa International Christian Fellowship (VICF), Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Eyongakpa, Marie

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Marie, Eyongakpa. Christian’s perception in coping with stress related depression. Diak South, Helsinki. Spring 2014. 70 p., 2 appendices. Diaconia University of Applied Sciences. Degree Programme in Social Services. Bachelor of Social Services (UAS). The aim of the study was to explore Christian’s perception in coping with stress related depression. A case study of Vantaa International Christian Fellowship, Finland (VICF). The methodology of the study entails a qualit...

  8. The Effect of 12-Step Based Fellowship Participation on Abstinence Among Dually Diagnosed Persons: A Two-Year Longitudinal Study†

    OpenAIRE

    Laudet, Alexandra B.; Magura, Stephen; Cleland, Charles M.; Vogel, Howard S.; Knight, Edward L.; Rosenblum, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    A large percentage of individuals are dually-diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder and a substance use disorder. Such persons typically face more difficulties and have poorer outcomes than do single disorder substance users. Among noncomorbid substance users, treatment and participation in 12-Step groups have been shown to enhance the likelihood of abstinence from substance misuse. Specialized 12-Step based fellowships have recently emerged to address the recovery needs of dually-diagnosed pe...

  9. Evangelical Doctors Belief and Practice: A Case Study of the Wellington Christian Medical Fellowship, New Zealand 1971-1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Zoe

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a critical analysis of the proceedings of the Wellington Christian Medical Fellowship (CMF) during the 1970s. Formation of the CMF, contemporaneous and historical influences, new traditions, and key events are discussed as they arise in the narrative of the case study. Interaction between cultural and religious influences on medical practice is a recurring theme relevant to other bicultural or multicultural nations with significant health inequalities. PMID:25064312

  10. EUV transmission of Optical Blocking Filter and Optical Blocking Layer for Soft X-ray Imager (SXI) onboard Astro-H

    OpenAIRE

    渡辺, 辰雄; Watanabe, Tatsuo; 幸村, 孝由; Kohmura, Takayoshi; 北本, 俊二; Kitamoto, Shunji; 村上, 弘志; Murakami, Hiroshi; 竹中, 恵理; Takenaka, Eri; 長崎, 健太; Nagasaki, Kenta; 東, 慶一; Higashi, Keiichi; 吉田, 正樹

    2010-01-01

    We have developed the X-ray CCD camera system for the Soft X-ray Imager (SXI) which will be launched as focal plane detectors of X-ray telescope onboard the Japanese 6th X-ray astronomical satellite, Astro-H. The X-ray CCD is back-illuminated (BI) CCD which has an Optical Blocking Layer (OBL) directly coating its X-ray illumination surface with Aluminum-Polyimide-Aluminum instead of Optical Blocking Filter (OBF). The X-ray CCD is affected by large doses of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation ...

  11. Chinese Digital Zenith Telescope (DZT) used for Astro-geodetic Deflection of the Vertical Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, L.; Wang, B.; Wang, Z.; Yin, Z.; Hu, H.; Wang, H.; Han, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Classical optical astrometry can be used to measure and study variations of plumb line. For the earth gravity filed related researches, it is irreplaceable by technologies like GNSS、VLBI、SLR, etc. However, classical astrometric instruments have some major drawback, such as low efficiency, low automation, more operating observers, and individual error in some visual instruments. In 2011, The National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC) successfully developed the new digital zenith telescope prototype (DZT-1), which has the ability of highly automatic observation and data processing, even allowing unattended observation by remote control. By utilizing CCD camera as imaging terminal and high-accuracy tiltmeter to replace mercurial plate, observation efficiency of DZT is improved greatly. According to the results of data obtained from test observations, single-observation accuracy of DZT-1 is 0.15-0.3″ and one night observation accuracy up to 0.07-0.08″, which is better than the observation accuracy of classical astrometric instruments. The observations of DZT can be used to obtain the plumb line variations and the vertical deflections, which can be used for carrying out seismic, geodetic and other related geo-scientific researches. Especially the collocated observations with gravimeters and the conjoint analysis of the observation data will be helpful to recognize the anomalous motion and variation of underground mass over time, and maybe provide significant information for estimating the scale of underground anomalous mass. The information is valuable for determining the three key factors of earthquake possibly. Moreover, the project team is carrying out the development of new DZT with better performance and studying the key techniques for new instrument to make DZT play a more significant role in the astronomy and geoscience fields.

  12. Meeting the milestones. Strategies for including high-value care education in pulmonary and critical care fellowship training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtright, Katherine R; Weinberger, Steven E; Wagner, Jason

    2015-04-01

    Physician decision making is partially responsible for the roughly 30% of U.S. healthcare expenditures that are wasted annually on low-value care. In response to both the widespread public demand for higher-quality care and the cost crisis, payers are transitioning toward value-based payment models whereby physicians are rewarded for high-value, cost-conscious care. Furthermore, to target physicians in training to practice with cost awareness, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has created both individual objective milestones and institutional requirements to incorporate quality improvement and cost awareness into fellowship training. Subsequently, some professional medical societies have initiated high-value care educational campaigns, but the overwhelming majority target either medical students or residents in training. Currently, there are few resources available to help guide subspecialty fellowship programs to successfully design durable high-value care curricula. The resource-intensive nature of pulmonary and critical care medicine offers unique opportunities for the specialty to lead in modeling and teaching high-value care. To ensure that fellows graduate with the capability to practice high-value care, we recommend that fellowship programs focus on four major educational domains. These include fostering a value-based culture, providing a robust didactic experience, engaging trainees in process improvement projects, and encouraging scholarship. In doing so, pulmonary and critical care educators can strive to train future physicians who are prepared to provide care that is both high quality and informed by cost awareness. PMID:25714122

  13. Defining biochemical failure following radiotherapy with or without hormonal therapy in men with clinically localized prostate cancer: recommendations of the R.T.O.G.-Astro phoenix consensus conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, M. [California Univ., Dept. of Radiation Oncology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Hanks, G. [Texas Univ., Dept. of Biostatistics and Applied Mathematics, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Thames, H. [Fox Chase Comprehensive Cancer Center, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Schellhammer, P. [Eastern Virginia Medical School, Dept. of Urology, Norfolk, VA (United States); Shipley, W.U. [Harvard Medical School, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Sokol, G.H. [U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Rockville, MD (United States); Sandler, H. [Michigan Univ., Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2008-01-15

    In 1996 the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) sponsored a Consensus Conference to establish a definition of biochemical failure after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). The ASTRO definition defined prostate specific antigen (PSA) failure as occurring after three consecutive PSA rises after a nadir with the date of failure as the point halfway between the nadir date and the first rise or any rise great enough to provoke initiation of therapy. This definition was not linked to clinical progression or survival; it performed poorly in patients undergoing hormonal therapy (HT), and back-dating biased the Kaplan-Meier estimates of event-free survival. A second Consensus Conference was sponsored by ASTRO and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group in Phoenix, Arizona, on January 21, 2005, to revise the ASTRO definition. The panel recommended: (1) a rise by 2 ng/mL or more above the nadir PSA be considered the standard definition for biochemical failure after EBRT with or without HT; (2) the date of failure be determined 'at call' (not back-dated). They recommended that investigators be allowed to use the ASTRO Consensus Definition after EBRT alone (no hormonal therapy) with strict adherence to guidelines as to 'adequate follow-up.' To avoid the artifacts resulting from short follow-up, the reported date of control should be listed as 2 years short of the median follow-up. For example, if the median follow-up is 5 years, control rates at 3 years should be cited. Retaining a strict version of the ASTRO definition would allow comparisons with a large existing body of literature. (authors)

  14. The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) MIDEX Mission Concept: Identifying Organic Molecules in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennico, Kimberly; Sandford, Scott; Allamandola, Louis; Bregman, Jesse; Cohen, Martin; Cruikshank, Dale; Greene, Thomas; Hudgins, Douglas; Kwok, Sun; Lord, Steven; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Astrobiology Explorer (ABE) is a MIDEX mission concept, currently under Concept Phase A study at NASA's Ames Research Center in collaboration with Ball Aerospace & Technologies, Corp., and managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. ABE will conduct infrared spectroscopic observations to address important problems in astrobiology, astrochemistry, and astrophysics. The core observational program would make fundamental scientific progress in understanding the distribution, identity, and evolution of ices and organic matter in dense molecular clouds, young forming stellar systems, stellar outflows, the general diffuse ISM, HII regions, Solar System bodies, and external galaxies. The ABE instrument concept includes a 0.6 m aperture Ritchey-Chretien telescope and three moderate resolution (R = 2000-3000) spectrometers together covering the 2.5-20 micron spectral region. Large format (1024 x 1024 pixel) IR detector arrays will allow each spectrometer to cover an entire octave of spectral range per exposure without any moving parts. The telescope will be cooled below 50 K by a cryogenic dewar shielded by a sunshade. The detectors will be cooled to approx. 7.5 K by a solid hydrogen cryostat. The optimum orbital configuration for achieving the scientific objectives of the ABE mission is a low background, 1 AU Earth driftaway orbit requiring a Delta II launch vehicle. This configuration provides a low thermal background and allows adequate communications bandwidth and good access to the entire sky over the approx. 1.5 year mission lifetime.

  15. Postgraduate musculoskeletal fellowship training in the United States: current trends and future direction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To document current postgraduate musculoskeletal training program (accredited and unaccredited) curricula and approaches to education.Design and patients Questionnaires were sent to all musculoskeletal training programs. Responses regarding radiology residency and fellowship program sizes, types of imaging and invasive procedures included, and other program parameters were solicited. Features of accredited and unaccredited programs were compared. Teaching approaches, including the use of web-based or distance learning were evaluated. Twenty-nine (73%) of 40 musculoskeletal programs responded to the questionnaire. Twenty-eight percent of programs were accredited and 72% unaccredited. Radiology residencies were also present at all responding institutions (the majority had a class size of 4-8/year). Residency programs in related specialties included pathology 96%, orthopedics and rheumatology 90%, oncology 83% and pain management 69%. The majority (93-100%) provided training in radiography, MRI and CT. Spine MRI was included in 69% of programs, ultrasonography in 62% and positron emission tomography in 24%. Arthrography and diagnostic and therapeutic injections (100%) were included in all programs. Other invasive procedures, including spine and radiofrequency ablation, were offered less frequently. Teaching approaches included conferences (100%), journal clubs (62%), multidisciplinary conferences (45-90%), web-based learning (30%) and distance learning (7%). Forty-one percent of programs offered off-site rotations. The majority of musculoskeletal training programs prepared trainees for private or academic practice. There are inconsistencies that could be improved to better prepare trainees for careers in musculoskeletal imaging. (orig.)

  16. Palliative Radiotherapy for Bone Metastases: An ASTRO Evidence-Based Guideline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To present guidance for patients and physicians regarding the use of radiotherapy in the treatment of bone metastases according to current published evidence and complemented by expert opinion. Methods and Materials: A systematic search of the National Library of Medicine's PubMed database between 1998 and 2009 yielded 4,287 candidate original research articles potentially applicable to radiotherapy for bone metastases. A Task Force composed of all authors synthesized the published evidence and reached a consensus regarding the recommendations contained herein. Results: The Task Force concluded that external beam radiotherapy continues to be the mainstay for the treatment of pain and/or prevention of the morbidity caused by bone metastases. Various fractionation schedules can provide significant palliation of symptoms and/or prevent the morbidity of bone metastases. The evidence for the safety and efficacy of repeat treatment to previously irradiated areas of peripheral bone metastases for pain was derived from both prospective studies and retrospective data, and it can be safe and effective. The use of stereotactic body radiotherapy holds theoretical promise in the treatment of new or recurrent spine lesions, although the Task Force recommended that its use be limited to highly selected patients and preferably within a prospective trial. Surgical decompression and postoperative radiotherapy is recommended for spinal cord compression or spinal instability in highly selected patients with sufficient performance status and life expectancy. The use of bisphosphonates, radionuclides, vertebroplasty, and kyphoplasty for the treatment or prevention of cancer-related symptoms does not obviate the need for external beam radiotherapy in appropriate patients. Conclusions: Radiotherapy is a successful and time efficient method by which to palliate pain and/or prevent the morbidity of bone metastases. This Guideline reviews the available data to define its proper use

  17. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Consensus Statement From the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To present guidance for patients and physicians regarding the use of accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI), based on current published evidence complemented by expert opinion. Methods and Materials: A systematic search of the National Library of Medicine's PubMed database yielded 645 candidate original research articles potentially applicable to APBI. Of these, 4 randomized trials and 38 prospective single-arm studies were identified. A Task Force composed of all authors synthesized the published evidence and, through a series of meetings, reached consensus regarding the recommendations contained herein. Results: The Task Force proposed three patient groups: (1) a 'suitable' group, for whom APBI outside of a clinical trial is acceptable, (2) a 'cautionary' group, for whom caution and concern should be applied when considering APBI outside of a clinical trial, and (3) an 'unsuitable' group, for whom APBI outside of a clinical trial is not generally considered warranted. Patients who choose treatment with APBI should be informed that whole-breast irradiation (WBI) is an established treatment with a much longer track record that has documented long-term effectiveness and safety. Conclusion: Accelerated partial-breast irradiation is a new technology that may ultimately demonstrate long-term effectiveness and safety comparable to that of WBI for selected patients with early breast cancer. This consensus statement is intended to provide guidance regarding the use of APBI outside of a clinical trial and to serve as a framework to promote additional clinical investigations into the optimal role of APBI in the treatment of breast cancer.

  18. On-Orbit Operation of the Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator on the Astro-H/Hitomi Soft X-ray Spectrometer Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirron, Peter; Kimball, Mark; James, Bryan; Muench, Theodore; Canavan, Edgar; DiPirro, Michael; Bialas, Thomas; Sneiderman, Gary; Boyce, Kevin; Kilbourne, Caroline; Porter, Scott; Kelley, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The Soft X-ray Spectrometer instrument on the Astro-H observatory contains a 6x6 array of x-ray microcalorimeters, which is cooled to 50 mK by an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR). The ADR consists of three stages in order to provide stable detector cooling using either a 1.2 K superfluid helium bath or a 4.5 K Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocooler as its heat sink. When liquid helium is present, two of the ADRs stages are used to single-shot cool the detectors while rejecting heat to the helium. After the helium is depleted, all three stages are used to cool both the helium tank (to about 1.5 K) and the detectors (to 50 mK) using the JT cryocooler as its heat sink. The Astro-H observatory, renamed Hitomi after its successful launch in February 2016, carried approximately 36 liters of helium into orbit. On day 5, the helium had cooled sufficiently (1.4 K) to allow operation of the ADR. This paper describes the design, operation and on-orbit performance of the ADR.

  19. The challenge of closing the diversity gap: development of Hispanic nursing faculty through a Health Resources and Services Administration Minority Faculty Fellowship Program grant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Susan R; Sánchez, Zoila V

    2011-01-01

    Underrepresentation of minority faculty in schools of nursing is well reported. Recently, there have been multiple initiatives from both public and private sectors to alleviate the shortage of minority faculty. This article describes how the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) College of Nursing took advantage of one such initiative: the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Minority Faculty Fellowship Program (MFFP) grant. This program grant provides stipends to enable health professions educational programs to increase the number of faculty who are racial and ethnic minorities underrepresented in the health professions. It enabled the college to recruit a Hispanic nurse and to assist her in preparing for a successful academic career. HRSA provided a stipend in an amount not exceeding 50% of regular faculty salary of the institution for 3 years, to be matched by the institution. Expert faculty mentored the nurse's development in the areas of pedagogy, administration and leadership, design and conduct of research, grant writing and scientific writing for publication in peer-reviewed journals, and cultural competence. Dr. Susan Jacob was the project director of the MFFP grant received by the College of Nursing at UTHSC, and Zoila Sanchez, a Cuban American, was the minority faculty fellow supported by an HRSA MFFP grant. Dr. Sanchez was the first minority faculty fellow selected from the nursing profession. Past fellows represented the other health professions such as medicine and dentistry. PMID:21420043

  20. Preparedness of Ob/Gyn residents for fellowship training in gynecologic oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Doo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Residency training in obstetrics and gynecology is being challenged by increasingly stringent regulations and decreased operative experience. We sought to determine the perception of preparedness of incoming gynecologic oncology fellows for advanced surgical training in gynecologic oncology. An online survey was sent to gynecologic oncologists involved in fellowship training in the United States. They were asked to evaluate their most recent incoming clinical fellows in the domains of professionalism, level of independence/graduated responsibility, psychomotor ability, clinical evaluation and management, and academia and scholarship using a standard Likert-style scale. The response rate among attending physicians was 40% (n = 105/260 and 61% (n = 28/46 for program directors. Of those who participated, 49% reported that their incoming fellows could not independently perform a hysterectomy, 59% reported that they could not independently perform 30 min of a major procedure, 40% reported that they could not control bleeding, 40% reported that they could not recognize anatomy and tissue planes, and 58% reported that they could not dissect tissue planes. Fellows lacked an understanding of pathophysiology, treatment recommendations, and the ability to identify and treat critically ill patients. In the academic domain, respondents agreed that fellows were deficient in the areas of protocol design (54%, statistical analysis (54%, and manuscript writing (65%. These results suggest that general Ob/Gyn residency is ineffective in preparing fellows for advanced training in gynecologic oncology and should prompt a revision of the goals and objectives of resident education to correct these deficiencies.

  1. Astro-Medicine. Astrology and Medicine, East and West, éd. Anna Akasoy, Charles Burnett et Ronit Yoeli-Tlalin

    OpenAIRE

    Ventura, Iolanda

    2010-01-01

    Le volume Astro-Medicine. Astrology and Medicine, East and West, édité par A. Akasoy, C. Burnett et R. Yoeli-Tlalin, nous présente les Actes d’un Colloque organisé par le Projet de recherche AHRC « Islam and Tibet : Cultural Interactions (8th-17th Centuries) » en 2005. Le but de ce Colloque et, plus généralement, du Projet de Recherche « Islam and Tibet » était celui d’examiner en profondeur les modalités d’interaction entre les cultures occidentale et orientale dans une perspective qui allai...

  2. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) Practice Guideline for the Transperineal Permanent Brachytherapy of Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transperineal permanent prostate brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with organ-confined prostate cancer. Careful adherence to established brachytherapy standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for permanent prostate brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrist. Factors with respect to patient selection and appropriate use of supplemental treatment modalities such as external beam radiation and androgen suppression therapy are discussed. Logistics with respect to the brachtherapy implant procedure, the importance of dosimetric parameters, and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful prostate brachytherapy program.

  3. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) Practice Guideline for the Performance of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-Dose-Rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with a variety of different malignancies. Careful adherence to established standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for HDR brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrists. Review of the leading indications for HDR brachytherapy in the management of gynecologic, thoracic, gastrointestinal, breast, urologic, head and neck, and soft tissue tumors is presented. Logistics with respect to the brachytherapy implant procedures and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful HDR brachytherapy program.

  4. Interprofessional Fellowship Training for Emerging Global Health Leaders in Africa to Improve HIV Prevention and Care: The Afya Bora Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ousman, Kevin; Polomano, Rosemary C; Seloilwe, Esther; Odero, Theresa; Tarimo, Edith; Mashalla, Yohana J; Voss, Joachim G; O'Malley, Gabrielle; Chapman, Susan A; Gachuno, Onesmus; Manabe, Yukari; Nakanjako, Damalie; Sewankambo, Nelson; Urassa, David; Wasserheit, Judith N; Wiebe, Douglas J; Green, Wendy; Farquhar, Carey

    2016-01-01

    HIV continues to challenge health systems, especially in low- and middle-income countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. A qualified workforce of transformational leaders is required to strengthen health systems and introduce policy reforms to address the barriers to HIV testing, treatment, and other HIV services. The 1-year Afya Bora Consortium Fellowship in Global Health capitalizes on academic partnerships between African and U.S. universities to provide interprofessional leadership training through classroom, online, and service-oriented learning in 5 countries in Africa. This fellowship program prepares health professionals to design, implement, scale-up, evaluate, and lead health programs that are population-based and focused on prevention and control of HIV and other public health issues of greatest importance to African communities and health service settings. Afya Bora nurse fellows acquire leadership attributes and competencies that are continuously and systematically tested during the entire program. This multinational training platform promotes interprofessional networks and career opportunities for nurses. PMID:27086192

  5. Geriatrics Education Team Model Results in Sustained Geriatrics Training in 15 Residency and Fellowship Programs and Scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denson, Steven; Simpson, Deborah; Denson, Kathryn; Brown, Diane; Manzi, Gabriel; Rehm, Judith; Wessel, Bambi; Duthie, Edmund H

    2016-04-01

    Caring for the growing elderly population will require specialty and subspecialty physicians who have not completed geriatric medicine fellowship training to participate actively in patient care. To meet this workforce demand, a sustainable approach to integrating geriatrics into specialty and subspecialty graduate medical education training is needed. This article describes the use of a geriatrics education team (GET) model to develop, implement, and sustain specialty-specific geriatrics curricula using a systematic process of team formation and needs assessment through evaluation, with a unique focus on developing curricular interventions that are meaningful to each specialty and satisfy training, scholarship, and regulatory requirements. The GET model and associated results from 15 specialty residency and fellowship training programs over a 4-year period include 93% curriculum sustainability after initial implementation, more than half of the programs introducing additional geriatrics education, and more than 80% of specialty GETs fulfilling their scholarship requirements through their curriculum dissemination. Win-wins and barriers encountered in using the GET model, along with the model's efficacy in curriculum development, sustainability, and dissemination, are summarized. PMID:27021702

  6. Intercâmbios acadêmicos internacionais: bolsas Capes, CNPq e Fapesp International academic exchange programs: Capes, CNPq and Fapesp fellowships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Mazza

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo é parte de pesquisa que atenta para o peso crescente que a circulação internacional de pessoas, saberes e práticas tem alcançado nos processos de escolarização e formação profissional de determinados setores sociais. Considerando os recursos públicos que a Capes, o CNPq e a Fapesp destinam à formação de pesquisadores com vistas ao fomento à pesquisa e aos investimentos em ciência e tecnologia no horizonte da circulação internacional, recortamos para este artigo a descrição e a análise preliminares da base de dados de bolsistas no exterior dessas agências de fomento, no período de 1970 a 2000. O movimento de fluxos, a partir da metodologia quantitativa de correlação de variáveis, desenha as tendências dos intercâmbios acadêmicos internacionais promovidos pelas três agências e nas diversas áreas do conhecimento, sendo que se procura contextualizá-las nas políticas de desenvolvimento científico-tecnológico desenvolvidas pelo Estado brasileiro no período.This article is part of a study considering the growing importance of the international transit of people, knowledge, and practices in the schooling and professional education processes of some social segments. Considering the public funds made available by the Coordination for the Improvement of Higher Education Personnel - Capes -, the National Council for Scientific and Technological Development - CNPq - and the State of São Paulo Research Foundation - Fapesp - to support researchers' fellowships abroad, aming to improve research and investments on Science and Technology on the context of international exchanges, we have dedicated this article to the preliminary description and analysis of the database of fellows funded abroad by these research agencies from 1970 to 2000. The movement of flows based on the quantitative methodology of the correlation of variables draws the trends of international academic exchange programs in the three research

  7. Developing Research Capabilities in Energy Biosciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Donald D

    2008-01-01

    Scientists founded the Life Sciences Research Foundation (LSRF) in 1983 as a non-profit pass through foundation that awards post doctoral fellowships in all areas of the life sciences. LSRF scientists review hundreds of applications each year from PhDs seeking support. For example this year, our 26th, we received 800 applications and our peer review committee will choose about 50 finalists who are eligible for these awards. We have no endowment so we solicit sponsors each year. The fellowships are sponsored by research oriented companies, foundations, philanthropists, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and other organizations who believe in the value of awarding fellowships to the best and the brightest young scientists. Our web site has a complete listing of all details about LSRF (http://www.lsrf.org/). In the late 1980s the Division of Bioscience in the Office of Basic Energy Science, a granting agency of the Department of Energy, joined this partnership. Bioscience's mandate was to support non-medical microbiology and plant sciences. LSRF received a series of 5 year grants from DOE to award fellowships to our top applicants in these fields of research. We began to support DOE-Energy Bioscience post doctoral fellows in 1989. From 1989 through 2004 when DOE funding ended our partnership awarded 41 DOE-Energy Bioscience Fellows of the Life Sciences Research Foundation. Each of these was a three year fellowship. DOE-Energy Biosciences was well matched with LSRF. Our extensive peer review screened applicants in all areas of the life sciences. Most LSRF sponsors are interested in supporting fellows who work on diseases. At the time that we began our partnership with DOE we had no sponsors willing to support plant biology and non medical microbiology. For 15 years DOE played a major role in the training of the very best young scientists in these important fields of research simply through its support of LSRF post doctoral fellows. Young scientists interested in

  8. Fralin Life Science Institute summer fellows research topics like infectious disease

    OpenAIRE

    Trulove, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Thirteen Virginia Tech students concluded their 10-week Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) on Aug. 6 by presenting results on projects that addressed such topics as improving nutrition for persons living with HIV/AIDS in Kenya, gender differences in arterial destiffening with weight loss, and the home range of red wolves in North Carolina.

  9. Research Faculty Development: An Historical Perspective and Ideas for a Successful Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutkiewicz, Randy R.

    2012-01-01

    What does it take to be successful as a tenure-track research faculty member in a School of Medicine? What are the elements necessary to run a successful laboratory? How does one find the resources and help to know what is important for promotion and tenure? Most training in graduate school or in clinical fellowships does not answer these…

  10. Twelve tips for developing, implementing, and sustaining medical education fellowship programs: Building on new trends and solid foundations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, Charlene M; Turner, Teri L; Perkowski, Linda; Bailey, Jean; Gruppen, Larry D; Riddle, Janet; Singhal, Geeta; Mullan, Patricia; Poznanski, Ann; Pillow, Tyson; Robins, Lynne S; Rougas, Steven C; Horn, Leora; Ghulyan, Marine V; Simpson, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Medical education fellowship programs (MEFPs) are a form of faculty development contributing to an organization's educational mission and participants' career development. Building an MEFP requires a systematic design, implementation, and evaluation approach which aligns institutional and individual faculty goals. Implementing an MEFP requires a team of committed individuals who provide expertise, guidance, and mentoring. Qualified MEFP directors should utilize instructional methods that promote individual and institutional short and long term growth. Directors must balance the use of traditional design, implementation, and evaluation methodologies with advancing trends that may support or threaten the acceptability and sustainability of the program. Drawing on the expertise of 28 MEFP directors, we provide twelve tips as a guide to those implementing, sustaining, and/or growing a successful MEFP whose value is demonstrated by its impacts on participants, learners, patients, teaching faculty, institutions, the greater medical education community, and the population's health. PMID:26398270

  11. Analisis Yuridis Penolakan Eksekusi Putusan Arbitrase Internasional (Studi Kasus: Putusan Mahkamah Agung Nomor 808 K/Pdt.Sus/2011 Dalam Perkara Antara PT. Direct Vision Melawan Astro Group Malaysia)

    OpenAIRE

    Panggabean, Junandar Indra Tongam

    2016-01-01

    The international dispute between PT. Direct Vision and Astro Group Malaysia was settled by Singapore International Arbitration Center (SIAC), an international arbitration located in Singapore. PT. Direct Vision requested for rejecting the execution of the verdict of the international SIAC by arguing that it violated public order. However, Jakarta District Court and the Supreme Court dismissed the lawsuit, arguing that PT. Ayunda Prima Mitra, the holder of PT. Direct Vision’s stocks, filed a ...

  12. The correlation between the ASTRO consensus panel definition of biochemical failure and clinical outcome for patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We reviewed our institution's experience treating patients with external beam irradiation (RT) to determine if the ASTRO Consensus Panel definition of biochemical failure (BF) following radiation therapy correlates with clinical distant metastases free survival (DMFS), disease-free survival (DFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and local control (LC). Methods and Materials: Between 1/1/87 and 12/31/92, 568 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer received external beam irradiation (RT) using localized prostate fields at William Beaumont Hospital (median total dose 66.6 Gy; range: 60-70.4 Gy). Biochemical failure was defined as three consecutive increases in post-treatment prostate specific antigen (PSA) after achieving a nadir. Biochemical failure was recorded as the time midway between the nadir and the first rising PSA. Five-year actuarial rates of clinical DMFS, DFS, CSS, and LC were calculated for patients who were biochemically controlled (BC) versus those who failed biochemically. Median follow-up was 56 months (range: 24-118 months). Results: Five-year actuarial rates of DMFS, DFS, CSS, and LC were significantly greater in patients who were biochemically controlled versus those who were not (p < 0.001). In patients who were BC, the 5-year actuarial rates of DMFS, DFS, CSS, and LC were 99%, 99%, 98%, and 99% respectively. For patients who failed biochemically, the 5-year actuarial rates of DMFS, DFS, CSS, and LC were 74%, 64%, 89%, and 86% respectively. When stratifying by pretreatment PSA, Gleason score, and T stage these differences remained significant for DMFS, DFS, and CSS. The Cox proportional hazards model demonstrated that BC was the single most important predictor of clinical outcome for DMFS, DFS, CSS, and LC. Pretreatment PSA and Gleason score were also independent predictors of outcome for DMFS and DFS. Conclusions: The ASTRO Consensus Panel definition of BF following radiation therapy correlates well with clinical DMFS, DFS

  13. The correlation between the astro consensus panel definition of biochemical failure and clinical outcome for patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The ASTRO Consensus Panel on PSA After Radiation Therapy recently recommended a definition of biochemical failure (BF) following treatment of prostate cancer with radiation therapy. We reviewed our institution's experience treating patients with external beam irradiation (RT) to determine if the Consensus Panel definition correlates with clinical distant metastases free survival (DMFS), disease free survival (DFS), cause specific survival (CSS), and local control (LC) rates for a large group of patients from the PSA era. Methods And Materials: Between 1/1/87 and 12/31/92, 653 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer received external beam irradiation (RT) using localized prostate fields at William Beaumont Hospital. Of these patients, 568 had a minimum follow-up of 2 years and constitute the study population. The median pre-treatment PSA and Gleason score was 11 ng/ml and 6, respectively. The median dose to the prostate using megavoltage RT was 66.6 Gy (range: 60-70.4 Gy) using a four field or arc technique. No patient received hormonal therapy either prior to, during, or after radiotherapy unless local or distant failure was documented. Pre-treatment and post-treatment serum PSA levels were recorded. Biochemical failure was defined as three consecutive increases in post-treatment PSA after achieving a nadir. Biochemical failure was recorded as the time midway between the nadir and first increase in PSA. Five year actuarial rates of DMFS, DFS, CSS, and LC were calculated for patients who were biochemically controlled (BC) versus those who failed biochemically. Results: Median follow-up was 56 months (range: 24-118 months). The overall 5 year actuarial rates of DMFS, DFS, CSS, and LC were significantly better in patients who were biochemically controlled versus those who were not (p< 0.001). The median time to DM within the BF group was 21 months (range: 2-112 months). When stratifying by pre-treatment PSA, Gleason score, and T stage, these

  14. Flight model measurements of the porous plug and film flow suppression system for the ASTRO-H Soft X-ray Spectrometer dewar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezoe, Yuichiro; Ishikawa, Kumi; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Ohashi, Takaya; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Murakami, Masahide; Kanao, Kenichi; Yoshida, Seiji; Tsunematsu, Shoji; DiPirro, Michael; Shirron, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Flight model measurements of a porous plug phase separator and a film flow suppression system for the ASTRO-H Soft X-ray Spectrometer dewar are described. ASTRO-H is the sixth Japanese astronomy satellite and will be launched in 2016. It carries the Soft X-ray Spectrometer consisting of an X-ray optic and an X-ray microcalorimeter system operated at 50 mK. Superfluid liquid He is employed as a part of the cooling system. A wide range of He flows from 28 μ g/s to 3.2 mg/s in various operation cases must be safely vented under zero gravity. At the same time, superfluid He film flow through the vent line must be suppressed to separator together with a film flow suppression system is installed. To verify its performance, the mass flow rates and the film flow rate of the flight model system were measured at component level. The mass flow rates at various He tank temperatures (1.15, 1.30, 1.50, and 2.00 K) were obtained and also the film flow rate was measured at 1.15 K. Then, the mass flow rates were measured after installing the whole system into a flight model dewar at the He tank temperature of 1.16, 1.30, 1.50, and 2.00 K. The dewar was tilted so that the porous plug located at the top of the dewar is immersed in the liquid He and the porous plug separates the liquid and vapor He by the thermomechanical effect as in orbit. The obtained mass flow rates and the film flow rate in these tests were confirmed to meet the requirements and to be consistent with each other. No abnormal event such as large mass flow rates was observed. All these experimental results strongly suggest that this flight model of the porous plug and the film flow suppression system will work properly in space.

  15. 34 CFR 657.3 - Who is eligible to receive a fellowship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... graduate student, is engaged in— (1) Predissertation level study; (2) Preparation for dissertation research; (3) Dissertation research abroad; or (4) Dissertation writing. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1122)...

  16. Proton radiation damage experiment on P-Channel CCD for an X-ray CCD camera onboard the ASTRO-H satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a proton radiation damage experiment on P-channel CCD newly developed for an X-ray CCD camera onboard the ASTRO-H satellite. The device was exposed up to 109 protons cm−2 at 6.7 MeV. The charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) was measured as a function of radiation dose. In comparison with the CTI currently measured in the CCD camera onboard the Suzaku satellite for 6 years, we confirmed that the new type of P-channel CCD is radiation tolerant enough for space use. We also confirmed that a charge-injection technique and lowering the operating temperature efficiently work to reduce the CTI for our device. A comparison with other P-channel CCD experiments is also discussed. -- Author-Highlights: •We performed a proton radiation damage experiment on a new P-channel CCD. •The device was exposed up to 109 protons cm−2 at 6.7 MeV. •We confirmed that it is radiation tolerant enough for space use. •We confirmed that a charge-injection technique reduces the CTI. •We confirmed that lowering the operating temperature also reduces the CTI

  17. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Survey of Radiation Biology Educators in U.S. and Canadian Radiation Oncology Residency Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To obtain, in a survey-based study, detailed information on the faculty currently responsible for teaching radiation biology courses to radiation oncology residents in the United States and Canada. Methods and Materials: In March-December 2007 a survey questionnaire was sent to faculty having primary responsibility for teaching radiation biology to residents in 93 radiation oncology residency programs in the United States and Canada. Results: The responses to this survey document the aging of the faculty who have primary responsibility for teaching radiation biology to radiation oncology residents. The survey found a dramatic decline with time in the percentage of educators whose graduate training was in radiation biology. A significant number of the educators responsible for teaching radiation biology were not fully acquainted with the radiation sciences, either through training or practical application. In addition, many were unfamiliar with some of the organizations setting policies and requirements for resident education. Freely available tools, such as the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Radiation and Cancer Biology Practice Examination and Study Guides, were widely used by residents and educators. Consolidation of resident courses or use of a national radiation biology review course was viewed as unlikely by most programs. Conclusions: A high priority should be given to the development of comprehensive teaching tools to assist those individuals who have responsibility for teaching radiation biology courses but who do not have an extensive background in critical areas of radiobiology related to radiation oncology. These findings also suggest a need for new graduate programs in radiobiology.

  18. National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Academic Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomer, S. A.

    2004-12-01

    "Know the Earth.Show the Way." In fulfillment of its vision, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) provides geospatial intelligence in all its forms and from whatever source-imagery, imagery intelligence, and geospatial data and information-to ensure the knowledge foundation for planning, decision, and action. To achieve this, NGA conducts a multi-disciplinary program of basic research in geospatial intelligence topics through grants and fellowships to the leading investigators, research universities, and colleges of the nation. This research provides the fundamental science support to NGA's applied and advanced research programs. The major components of the NGA Academic Research Program (NARP) are: - NGA University Research Initiatives (NURI): Three-year basic research grants awarded competitively to the best investigators across the US academic community. Topics are selected to provide the scientific basis for advanced and applied research in NGA core disciplines. - Historically Black College and University - Minority Institution Research Initiatives (HBCU-MI): Two-year basic research grants awarded competitively to the best investigators at Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and Minority Institutions across the US academic community. - Director of Central Intelligence Post-Doctoral Research Fellowships: Fellowships providing access to advanced research in science and technology applicable to the intelligence community's mission. The program provides a pool of researchers to support future intelligence community needs and develops long-term relationships with researchers as they move into career positions. This paper provides information about the NGA Academic Research Program, the projects it supports and how other researchers and institutions can apply for grants under the program.

  19. His Majesty Carl XVI Gustav, King of Sweden, Honorary President of the World Scout Foundation, and about 80 fellows, on the occasion of the 48th World Baden-Powell Fellowship Event on Saturday, 18th September 2004

    CERN Document Server

    Patrice Loiez

    2004-01-01

    His Majesty Carl XVI Gustav, King of Sweden, Honorary President of the World Scout Foundation, and about 80 fellows, on the occasion of the 48th World Baden-Powell Fellowship Event on Saturday, 18th September 2004

  20. 18th Onassis Foreigners’ Fellowships Programme – Academic Year 2012-2013

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    The Alexander S. Onassis Public Benefit Foundation operates an annual Programme of Research Grants and Educational Scholarships addressed to foreign (non-Greek) Scholars, Researchers, Artists and Postgraduate Students.   Interested parties are invited to apply before February 29, 2012. More information is available at www.onassis.gr.

  1. ASTRO Research Fellow Presentation - A comparison of the comet assay and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis as a predictive assay for radiosensitivity in human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: To determine whether neutral lysis single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) or pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) can be used as a predictive assay for tissue response to radiotherapy as an alternative to clonogenic survival measurements. Materials and Methods: The comet assay has been widely used to measure DNA double strand breaks (dsb) in individual cells, and it has been suggested that it could be used as an alternative to clonogenic assays to measure radiosensitivity. Previous studies in this lab have demonstrated the ability of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, which also measures DNA dsb, to accurately predict the radiosensitivity of a panel of fibroblasts based on determination of residual DNA dsb. As part of an ongoing study examining the relationship between fibroblast radiosensitivity and normal-tissue radiation reactions, we have compared the sensitivity and accuracy of the comet assay and PFGE on a different panel of non-transformed fibroblasts derived from breast cancer patients who developed severe radiation late effects and from case-matched controls. For the measurement of initial damage, cells were suspended in PBS and irradiated on ice for the comet assay and irradiated in agarose plugs on ice for pFGE. Residual damage was measured following irradiation of confluent cultures at 37 degree sign C and subsequent incubation for four hours prior to preparation of agarose slides and plugs. All irradiations were performed with a 59 TBq 60Co source at a dose rate of 1.7 Gy/min. Electrophoresis was performed following neutral pH cell lysis. Comet images were captured and analyzed using Optimas software with DNA damage quantitated by the comet moment. PFGE gels were analyzed using a phosphor-image analysis system and damage was quantitated based on the percent of activity released from the well. Results: The comet assay was able to detect initial DNA damage at a threshold of 5 Gy and exhibited a linear dose-response relationship from 0 to 100 Gy. In contrast, PFGE was able to detect initial damage after 2 Gy and exhibited a linear dose-response relationship only up to 30-40 Gy. Residual damage was reliably detected after 40 Gy with the comet assay and after 20 Gy with PFGE. Both techniques exhibited a linear dose-response relationship for residual damage. Not only was the comet assay less sensitive in detecting initial and residual damage than PFGE, but the comet assay was also less accurate in detecting small differences in radiosensitivity in the panel of fibroblasts tested. A complete analysis of six cell lines with the comet assay and PFGE is underway and the results will be presented. Conclusions: The comet assay appears to be less sensitive than PFGE for use as a predictive assay for radiosensitivity in non-transformed human fibroblasts

  2. Accreditation council for graduate medical education (ACGME annual anesthesiology residency and fellowship program review: a "report card" model for continuous improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Timothy R

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME requires an annual evaluation of all ACGME-accredited residency and fellowship programs to assess program quality. The results of this evaluation must be used to improve the program. This manuscript describes a metric to be used in conducting ACGME-mandated annual program review of ACGME-accredited anesthesiology residencies and fellowships. Methods A variety of metrics to assess anesthesiology residency and fellowship programs are identified by the authors through literature review and considered for use in constructing a program "report card." Results Metrics used to assess program quality include success in achieving American Board of Anesthesiology (ABA certification, performance on the annual ABA/American Society of Anesthesiology In-Training Examination, performance on mock oral ABA certification examinations, trainee scholarly activities (publications and presentations, accreditation site visit and internal review results, ACGME and alumni survey results, National Resident Matching Program (NRMP results, exit interview feedback, diversity data and extensive program/rotation/faculty/curriculum evaluations by trainees and faculty. The results are used to construct a "report card" that provides a high-level review of program performance and can be used in a continuous quality improvement process. Conclusions An annual program review is required to assess all ACGME-accredited residency and fellowship programs to monitor and improve program quality. We describe an annual review process based on metrics that can be used to focus attention on areas for improvement and track program performance year-to-year. A "report card" format is described as a high-level tool to track educational outcomes.

  3. Fellowship, service and the "spirit of adventure": the Religious Society of Friends and the outdoors movement in Britain c.1900-1950

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman, M.

    2009-01-01

    This article considers the involvement of members of the Religious Society of Friends in various manifestations of the outdoors movement in early twentieth-century Britain. It examines the Edwardian ‘Quaker tramps’ and their role in the ‘Quaker renaissance’, and goes on to consider the influence of Friends in organisations such as the Holiday Fellowship and the Youth Hostels Association, as well as interwar Quaker mountaineers. It argues that, while the outdoor activities of the Quaker renais...

  4. Calibration and alignment of strapped-down astro-inertial system for attitude determination of large-scale information spacecraft

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Somov, Y.; Butyrin, S.; Fedosov, Viktor

    Melville: AIP, 2012 - (Sivasundaram, S.), s. 949-956. (AIP Conference Proceedings. 1493). ISBN 978-0-7354-1105-0. [International Conference on Mathematical Problems in Engineering, Aerospace and Sciences/19./ - ICNPAA 2012. Vienna (AT), 10.07.2012-14.07.2012] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : aerospace instrumentation * astronomical telescopes * calibration * digital control Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics

  5. Researching research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pais, Alexandre; Valero, Paola

    2012-01-01

    We discuss contemporary theories in mathematics education in order to do research on research. Our strategy consists of analysing discursively and ideologically recent key publications addressing the role of theory in mathematics education research. We examine how the field fabricates its object of...... research by deploying Foucault’s notion of bio-politics - mainly to address the object “learning” - and Žižek’s ideology critique - to address the object “mathematics”. These theories, which have already been used in the field to research teaching and learning, have a great potential to contribute to a...... reflexivity of research on its discourses and effects. Furthermore, they enable us to present a clear distinction between what has been called the sociopolitical turn in mathematics education research and what we call a positioning of mathematics education (research) practices in the Political....

  6. Updated results of high-dose rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy for locally and locally advanced prostate cancer using the RTOG-ASTRO phoenix definition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio C. Pellizzon

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the prognostic factors for patients with local or locally advanced prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy (RT and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR according to the RTOG-ASTRO Phoenix Consensus Conference. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The charts of 209 patients treated between 1997 and 2005 with localized RT and HDR as a boost at the Department of Radiation Oncology, AC Camargo Hospital, Sao Paulo, Brazil were reviewed. Clinical and treatment parameters i.e.: patient's age, Gleason score, clinical stage, initial PSA (iPSA, risk group (RG for biochemical failure, doses of RT and HDR were evaluated. Median age and median follow-up time were 68 and 5.3 years, respectively. Median RT and HDR doses were 45 Gy and 20 Gy. RESULTS: Disease specific survival (DSS at 3.3 year was 94.2%. Regarding RG, for the LR (low risk, IR (intermediate risk and HR (high risk, the DSS rates at 3.3 years were 91.5%, 90.2% and 88.5%, respectively. On univariate analysis prognostic factors related to DSS were RG (p = 0.040, Gleason score ≤ 6 ng/mL (p = 0.002, total dose of HDR ≥ 20 Gy (p < 0.001 On multivariate analysis the only statistical significant predictive factor for biochemical control (bNED was the RG, p < 0.001 (CI - 1.147-3.561. CONCLUSIONS: Although the radiation dose administered to the prostate is an important factor related to bNED, this could not be established with statistical significance in this group of patients. To date , in our own experience, HDR associated to RT could be considered a successful approach in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  7. Updated results of high-dose rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy for locally and locally advanced prostate cancer using the RTOG-ASTRO phoenix definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic factors for patients with local or locally advanced prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy (RT) and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) according to the RTOG-ASTRO Phoenix Consensus Conference. Materials and methods: The charts of 209 patients treated between 1997 and 2005 with localized RT and HDR as a boost at the Department of Radiation Oncology, AC Camargo Hospital, Sao Paulo, Brazil were reviewed. Clinical and treatment parameters i.e.: patient's age, Gleason score, clinical stage, initial PSA (iPSA), risk group (RG) for biochemical failure, doses of RT and HDR were evaluated. Median age and median follow-up time were 68 and 5.3 years, respectively. Median RT and HDR doses were 45 Gy and 20 Gy. Results: Disease specific survival (DSS) at 3.3 year was 94.2%. Regarding RG, for the LR (low risk), IR (intermediate risk) and HR (high risk), the DSS rates at 3.3 years were 91.5%, 90.2% and 88.5%, respectively. On univariate analysis prognostic factors related to DSS were RG (p = 0.040), Gleason score ≤ 6 ng/mL (p = 0.002), total dose of HDR ≥ 20 Gy (p < 0.001) On multivariate analysis the only statistical significant predictive factor for biochemical control (bNED) was the RG, p < 0.001 (CI -1.147-3.561). Conclusions: Although the radiation dose administered to the prostate is an important factor related to bNED, this could not be established with statistical significance in this group of patients. To date , in our own experience, HDR associated to RT could be considered a successful approach in the treatment of prostate cancer. (author)

  8. Use of Social Media to Promote Continuous Learning: A Phased Strategy for Graduate Medical Education Fellowship Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaswant Singh Basraon

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Clinical developments continue to grow at an accelerated rate, challenging the existing paradigm of information access, dissemination and learning by trainees. The aim of this study was to deliver relevant, concise and newly emerging information on cardiovascular disease using Twitter, and assess its impact. Methods: A Twitter account for our institution’s cardiovascular disease fellowship program was established. All fellows and faculty were encouraged to follow tweets for clinical developments. To assess Twitter use, participation rates and the number of tweets by topics and followers were tracked longitudinally. Impact on fellows was assessed through a brief evaluation survey and an emailed clinical vignette quiz that required the application of evidence to clinical questions. Results: Since project onset in September 2013, there have been 458 tweets, including 21 Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA-compliant photos and videos, available to 48 followers, including 7 faculty and 20 current or former fellows. More than 60% of fellows achieved perfect quiz performance scores. Evaluations were completed by 94% of fellows (15/16, 25% of whom report checking for information at least every other day, 50% once a week and 25% once a month. Trainees report more frequent literature-based deliberations with faculty since Twitter inception. Conclusions: Twitter can deliver relevant, concise and newly emerging clinical information to trainees, impacting their ability to apply evidence to clinical problems. Trainee and faculty engagement with Twitter increases over time.

  9. How Do the ASTRO Consensus Statement Guidelines for the Application of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Fit Intraoperative Radiotherapy? A Retrospective Analysis of Patients Treated at the European Institute of Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To verify how the classification according to the American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) consensus statement (CS) for the application of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) fits patients treated with intraoperative radiotherapy with electrons (ELIOT) at a single institution. Methods and Materials: The study included 1,822 patients treated with ELIOT as the sole radiation modality outside of a clinical trial at the European Institute of Oncology after breast-conserving surgery for invasive breast cancer, who were classified into CS groups of suitable, cautionary, and unsuitable. The outcome in terms of ipsilateral breast recurrence, regional node relapse, distant metastases, progression free-survival, cause-specific survival, and overall survival were assessed. Results: All the 1,822 cases except for 25 could be classified according to ASTRO CS: 294 patients met the criteria for inclusion into the suitable group, 691 patients into the cautionary group, and 812 patients into the unsuitable group. The 5-year rate of ipsilateral breast recurrence for suitable, cautionary, and unsuitable groups were 1.5%, 4.4%, and 8.8%, respectively (p = 0.0003). Whereas the regional node relapse showed no difference, the rate of distant metastases was significantly different in the unsuitable group compared with the suitable and cautionary groups, having a significant impact on survival. Conclusion: In the context of patients treated with ELIOT, the ASTRO guidelines identify well the groups for whom APBI might be considered as an effective alternative to whole breast radiotherapy and also identify groups for whom APBI is not indicated.

  10. Providing a setup and opportunities for better training of postdoctoral research fellows in an academic environment

    OpenAIRE

    Ghayur Muhammad

    2008-01-01

    Thousands of young researchers come from different parts of the world every year to take up postdoctoral (postdoc) research fellowship positions in the developed countries. In the US alone, there were 48,601 postdocs in the year 2005 working in different labs in the fields of science, health and engineering. Many pursue this option for lack of other alternatives. Expectedly, these individuals face a lot of difficulties in making this transition from being a student to becoming an employee of ...

  11. The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) MIDEX Mission Concept: Using Infrared Spectroscopy to Identify Organic Molecules in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Ennico, Kimberly; Allamandola, Louis; Bregman, Jesse; Greene, Thomas; Hudgins, Douglas

    2002-01-01

    One of the principal means by which organic compounds are detected and identified in space is by infrared spectroscopy. Past IR telescopic and laboratory studies have shown that much of the carbon in the interstellar medium (ISM) is in complex organic species but the distribution, abundance and evolutionary relationships of these materials are not well understood. The Astrobiology Explorer (ABE) is a MIDEX mission concept designed to conduct IR spectroscopic observations to detect and identify these materials and address outstanding problems in astrobiology, astrochemistry, and astrophysics. ABE's core science program includes observations of planetary nebulae and stellar outflows, protostellar objects, Solar System objects, and galaxies, and lines of sight through dense molecular clouds and the diffuse ISM. ABE is a cryogenically-cooled 60 cm diameter space telescope equipped with 3 cross-dispersed R-2000 spectrometers that share a single common slit. Each spectrometer measures one spectral octave and together cover the entire 2.5-20 micron region simultaneously. The spectrometers use state-of-the-art InSb and Si:As 1024x1024 pixel detectors. ABE would operate in a heliocentric, Earth drift-away orbit and have a core science mission lasting approximately 1.5 years. ABE is currently under study at NASA's Ames Research Center in collaboration with Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp.

  12. United States Department of Energy Integrated Manufacturing & Processing Predoctoral Fellowships. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrochenkov, M.

    2003-03-31

    The objective of the program was threefold: to create a pool of PhDs trained in the integrated approach to manufacturing and processing, to promote academic interest in the field, and to attract talented professionals to this challenging area of engineering. It was anticipated that the program would result in the creation of new manufacturing methods that would contribute to improved energy efficiency, to better utilization of scarce resources, and to less degradation of the environment. Emphasis in the competition was on integrated systems of manufacturing and the integration of product design with manufacturing processes. Research addressed such related areas as aspects of unit operations, tooling and equipment, intelligent sensors, and manufacturing systems as they related to product design.

  13. U.S. Department of Energy integrated manufacturing & processing predoctoral fellowships. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrochenkov, Margaret

    2003-03-31

    The objective of this program was threefold: to create a pool of PhDs trained in the integrated approach to manufacturing and processing, to promote academic interest in the field, and to attract talented professionals to this challenging area of engineering. It was anticipated that the program would result in the creation of new manufacturing methods that would contribute to improved energy efficiency, to better utilization of scarce resources, and to less degradation of the environment. Emphasis in the competition was on integrated systems of manufacturing and the integration of product design with manufacturing processes. Research addressed such related areas as aspects of unit operations, tooling and equipment, intelligent sensors, and manufacturing systems as they related to product design. This is the final report to close out the contract.

  14. Sandia Combustion Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, S.C.; Palmer, R.E.; Montana, C.A. (eds.)

    1988-01-01

    During the late 1970s, in response to a national energy crisis, Sandia proposed to the US Department of Energy (DOE) a new, ambitious program in combustion research. Shortly thereafter, the Combustion Research Facility (CRF) was established at Sandia's Livermore location. Designated a ''user facility,'' the charter of the CRF was to develop and maintain special-purpose resources to support a nationwide initiative-involving US inventories, industry, and national laboratories--to improve our understanding and control of combustion. This report includes descriptions several research projects which have been simulated by working groups and involve the on-site participation of industry scientists. DOE's Industry Technology Fellowship program, supported through the Office of Energy Research, has been instrumental in the success of some of these joint efforts. The remainder of this report presents results of calendar year 1988, separated thematically into eleven categories. Referred journal articles appearing in print during 1988 and selected other publications are included at the end of Section 11. Our traditional'' research activities--combustion chemistry, reacting flows, diagnostics, engine and coal combustion--have been supplemented by a new effort aimed at understanding combustion-related issues in the management of toxic and hazardous materials.

  15. Georgia Teachers in Academic Laboratories: Research Experiences in the Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, D.

    2005-12-01

    The Georgia Intern-Fellowships for Teachers (GIFT) is a collaborative effort designed to enhance mathematics and science experiences of Georgia teachers and their students through summer research internships for teachers. By offering business, industry, public science institute and research summer fellowships to teachers, GIFT provides educators with first-hand exposure to the skills and knowledge necessary for the preparation of our future workforce. Since 1991, GIFT has placed middle and high school mathematics, science and technology teachers in over 1000 positions throughout the state. In these fellowships, teachers are involved in cutting edge scientific and engineering research, data analysis, curriculum development and real-world inquiry and problem solving, and create Action Plans to assist them in translating the experience into changed classroom practice. Since 2004, an increasing number of high school students have worked with their teachers in research laboratories. The GIFT program places an average of 75 teachers per summer into internship positions. In the summer of 2005, 83 teachers worked in corporate and research environments throughout the state of Georgia and six of these positions involved authentic research in geoscience related departments at the Georgia Institute of Technology, including aerospace engineering and the earth and atmospheric sciences laboratories. This presentation will review the history and the structure of the program including the support system for teachers and mentors as well as the emphasis on inquiry based learning strategies. The focus of the presentation will be a comparison of two placement models of the teachers placed in geoscience research laboratories: middle school earth science teachers placed in a 6 week research experience and high school teachers placed in 7 week internships with teams of 3 high school students. The presentation will include interviews with faculty to determine the value of these experiences

  16. Academic research opportunities at the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency(NGA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomer, Scott A.

    2006-05-01

    The vision of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) is to "Know the Earth...Show the Way." To achieve this vision, the NGA provides geospatial intelligence in all its forms and from whatever source-imagery, imagery intelligence, and geospatial data and information-to ensure the knowledge foundation for planning, decision, and action. Academia plays a key role in the NGA research and development program through the NGA Academic Research Program. This multi-disciplinary program of basic research in geospatial intelligence topics provides grants and fellowships to the leading investigators, research universities, and colleges of the nation. This research provides the fundamental science support to NGA's applied and advanced research programs. The major components of the NGA Academic Research Program are: *NGA University Research Initiatives (NURI): Three-year basic research grants awarded competitively to the best investigators across the US academic community. Topics are selected to provide the scientific basis for advanced and applied research in NGA core disciplines. *Historically Black College and University - Minority Institution Research Initiatives (HBCU-MI): Two-year basic research grants awarded competitively to the best investigators at Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and Minority Institutions across the US academic community. *Intelligence Community Post-Doctoral Research Fellowships: Fellowships providing access to advanced research in science and technology applicable to the intelligence community's mission. The program provides a pool of researchers to support future intelligence community needs and develops long-term relationships with researchers as they move into career positions. This paper provides information about the NGA Academic Research Program, the projects it supports and how researchers and institutions can apply for grants under the program. In addition, other opportunities for academia to engage with NGA through

  17. U.S. Department of Energy Integrated Manufacturing & Processing Predoctoral Fellowships. 2000-2001 Annual Progress Report. Reporting period - July 1, 2000 - June 30, 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willis, J.

    2001-08-28

    Administration and management of predoctoral fellowship program for the reporting period. The objective of the program was threefold: to create a pool of PhD's trained in the integrated approach to manufacturing and processing, to promote academic interest in the field, and to attract talented professionals to this challenging area of engineering. It was anticipated that the program would result in the creation of new manufacturing methods that would contribute to improved energy efficiency, to better utilization of scarce resources, and to less degradation of the environment. Emphasis in the competition was on integrated systems of manufacturing and the integration of product design with manufacturing processes.

  18. News Conference: Bloodhound races into history Competition: School launches weather balloon Course: Update weekends inspire teachers Conference: Finland hosts GIREP conference Astronomy: AstroSchools sets up schools network to share astronomy knowledge Teaching: Delegates praise science events in Wales Resources: ELI goes from strength to strength International: South Sudan teachers receive training Workshop: Delegates experience universality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    Conference: Bloodhound races into history Competition: School launches weather balloon Course: Update weekends inspire teachers Conference: Finland hosts GIREP conference Astronomy: AstroSchools sets up schools network to share astronomy knowledge Teaching: Delegates praise science events in Wales Resources: ELI goes from strength to strength International: South Sudan teachers receive training Workshop: Delegates experience universality

  19. Astronomy Legacy Project - Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Thurburn; Castelaz, Michael W.; Rottler, Lee; Cline, J. Donald

    2016-01-01

    Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI) is a not-for-profit public foundation in North Carolina dedicated to providing hands-on educational and research opportunities for a broad cross-section of users in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) disciplines. In November 2007 a Workshop on a National Plan for Preserving Astronomical Photographic Data (2009ASPC,410,33O, Osborn, W. & Robbins, L) was held at PARI. The result was the establishment of the Astronomical Photographic Data Archive (APDA) at PARI. In late 2013 PARI began ALP (Astronomy Legacy Project). ALP's purpose is to digitize an extensive set of twentieth century photographic astronomical data housed in APDA. Because of the wide range of types of plates, plate dimensions and emulsions found among the 40+ collections, plate digitization will require a versatile set of scanners and digitizing instruments. Internet crowdfunding was used to assist in the purchase of additional digitization equipment that were described at AstroPlate2014 Plate Preservation Workshop (www.astroplate.cz) held in Prague, CZ, March, 2014. Equipment purchased included an Epson Expression 11000XL scanner and two Nikon D800E cameras. These digital instruments will compliment a STScI GAMMA scanner now located in APDA. GAMMA will be adapted to use an electroluminescence light source and a digital camera with a telecentric lens to achieve high-speed high-resolution scanning. The 1μm precision XY stage of GAMMA will allow very precise positioning of the plate stage. Multiple overlapping CCD images of small sections of each plate, tiles, will be combined using a photo-mosaic process similar to one used in Harvard's DASCH project. Implementation of a software pipeline for the creation of a SQL database containing plate images and metadata will be based upon APPLAUSE as described by Tuvikene at AstroPlate2014 (www.astroplate.cz/programs/).

  20. Entrustable professional activities and curricular milestones for fellowship training in pulmonary and critical care medicine: report of a multisociety working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessler, Henry E; Addrizzo-Harris, Doreen; Beck, James M; Buckley, John D; Pastores, Stephen M; Piquette, Craig A; Rowley, James A; Spevetz, Antoinette

    2014-09-01

    This article describes the curricular milestones and entrustable professional activities for trainees in pulmonary, critical care, or combined fellowship programs. Under the Next Accreditation System of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), curricular milestones compose the curriculum or learning objectives for training in these fields. Entrustable professional activities represent the outcomes of training, the activities that society and professional peers can expect fellowship graduates to be able to perform unsupervised. These curricular milestones and entrustable professional activities are the products of a consensus process from a multidisciplinary committee of medical educators representing the American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST), the American Thoracic Society, the Society of Critical Care Medicine, and the Association of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Program Directors. After consensus was achieved using the Delphi process, the document was revised with input from the sponsoring societies and program directors. The resulting lists can serve as a roadmap and destination for trainees, program directors, and educators. Together with the reporting milestones, they will help mark trainees' progress in the mastery of the six ACGME core competencies of graduate medical education. PMID:24945874

  1. Developing “the Wings to Really Fly”: The Experiences of Four Postdoctoral Research Fellows within an Australian University Faculty of Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuija A. Turunen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Postdoctoral research fellowships are a recent phenomenon in teacher education and little has been documented about them. This paper presents findings from a study in which the experiences of research fellows in a rural university were investigated. The data were gathered as audio recordings from peer mentoring meetings, notes from these meetings, individual reflective journals, and interviews conducted with six key informants. The analysis highlights that the experience of research fellowships was marked by a need to negotiate four competing, though not necessarily exclusive, demands related to the institute’s research productivity, its research culture and teaching, and personal professional goals. A range of institutional practices and individual characteristics mediated these negotiations.

  2. Research issues in forensic pathology: a survey of academic institutions employing forensic pathologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, Kurt B

    2004-05-01

    In an effort to characterize research efforts in forensic pathology, a questionnaire was sent to a representative of each of the 14 academic medical centers that employ full-time faculty forensic pathologists. Responses were received from all 14 (100%) of the institutions queried, representing a total of 39 forensic pathology faculty positions; 21 positions were tenure track and 18 positions were clinical or other tracks. Of the 39 positions, 25 positions (64%) at 10 institutions required some degree of research or scholarly output. Of the 25 forensic pathologists with a research imperative, only 3 (12%) were principal investigators or co-investigators on funded forensic pathology-based projects. The major limitation cited by respondents on the performance of forensic pathology research was the lack of protected time from service responsibilities. Fellowship training in forensic pathology was available at 6 of the 14 respondent institutions. Of these institutions, 4 (67%) had a research requirement for trainees, and 4 (67%) provided research training. In conclusion, very few US medical schools currently employ full-time faculty forensic pathologists. Of these, only a small number of institutions prioritize research by these faculty members. Scant federal funds are available to support research in forensic pathology. Few forensic pathology fellowship programs provide research training. To achieve a robust research agenda in forensic pathology that is sufficient to support the needs of the criminal justice and public health systems will require a paradigm shift in the medicolegal death investigative system and investment by federal agencies. PMID:15138925

  3. Report on the research conducted under the funding of the Sloan foundation postdoctoral fellowship in Computational Molecular Biology [Systematic study of protein-protein complexes] Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheinerman, Felix

    2001-06-01

    A central question in molecular biology is what structural features are common at protein-protein interfaces and what energetic factors define the affinity and specificity of protein-protein association. Analysis of structural and mutational data on protein-protein interfaces revealed that protein-protein interfaces of different functional classes contain many more energetically important charged and polar residues than was previously thought. Since, in the context of protein folding studies, polar interactions are believed to destabilize the folded proteins, this observation raised the question as to the forces that determine the stability of protein complexes. To investigate this issue in detail, the authors developed a number of partitioning schemes that allowed them to investigate the role of selected residues, ion pairs, and networks of polar interactions in protein-protein association. The methods developed were applied to the analysis of four different protein-protein interfaces: the ribonuclease barnase and its inhibitor barstar, the human growth hormone and its receptor, subtype N9 influenze virus neuraminidase and NC41 antibody, and the Ras Binding Domain of kinase cRaf and a Ras homologue Rap1A. The calculations revealed a surprising variability in how polar interactions affect the stability of different complexes. The finding that positions of charged and polar residues on protein-protein interfaces are optimized with respect to electrostatic interactions suggests that this property can be employed for the discrimination between native conformations and trial complexes generated by a docking algorithm. Analysis indicated the presence of SH2 domains in Janus family of non-receptor protein tyrosine kinases.

  4. Brief report on the research by JAEA postdoctoral fellows for 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) (Old Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute) commenced a JAEA Postdoctoral Fellowship Program in 1997 in order to raise capable researchers by providing an appropriate research environment to young postdoctoral researchers, which means that fiscal year 2006 was the 10th year of the program. The purpose of this program is to provide young researchers full of originality with opportunities to perform research independently on themes related to leading research, and basic and fundamental research of JAEA, selected by the researchers themselves and approved by JAEA, for a period of two or three years and also to promote the efficiency of JAEA's research. This report includes a summary of the results of the research on fourteen themes performed by JAEA Postdoctoral Fellows in the fiscal year 2006. Of these, research into nine themes ended in 2006. (author)

  5. Brief report on the research by JAEA postdoctoral fellows for 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) commenced a JAEA Postdoctoral Fellowship Program in 1997 in order to raise capable researchers by providing an appropriate research environment to young postdoctoral researchers, which means that fiscal year 2007 was the 11th year of the program. The purpose of this program is to provide young researchers full of originality with opportunities to perform research independently on themes related to leading research, and basic and fundamental research of JAEA, selected by the researchers themeselves and approved by JAEA, for a period of two or three years and also to promote the efficiency of JAEA's research. This report includes a summary of the results of the research on five themes performed by JAEA Postdoctoral Fellows in the fiscal year 2007. Of these, research into four themes ended in 2007. (author)

  6. Brief report on the research by JNC postdoctoral fellows for 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) commenced a JNC Postdoctoral Fellowship Program in 1997 in order to raise capable researchers by providing an appropriate research environment to young postdoctoral researchers, which means that fiscal year 2002 was the sixth year of the program. The purpose of this program is to provide young researchers full of originality with opportunities to perform research independently on themes related to leading research, and basic and fundamental research of JNC, selected by the researchers themselves and approved by JNC, for a period of two or three years and also to promote the efficiency of JNC's research. This report includes a summary of the results of the research on sixteen themes performed by JNC Postdoctoral Fellows in the fiscal year 2002. Of these, research into four themes ended in 2002. (author)

  7. Brief report on the research by JNC Postdoctoral Fellows for 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) commenced a JNC Postdoctoral Fellowship Program in 1997 in order to raise capable researchers by providing an appropriate research environment to young postdoctoral researchers, which means that fiscal year 2003 was the seventh year of the program. The purpose of this program is to provide young researchers full of originality with opportunities to perform research independently on themes related to leading research, and basic and fundamental research of JNC, selected by the researchers themselves and approved by JNC, for a period of two or three years and also to promote the efficiency of JNC's research. This report includes a summary of the results of the research on sixteen themes performed by JNC Postdoctoral Fellows in the fiscal year 2003. Of these, research into seven themes ended in 2003. (author)

  8. 34 CFR 663.21 - What criteria does the Secretary use to evaluate an application for a fellowship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... discipline; (3) The preliminary research already completed or plans for research prior to going overseas, and... geographic area or country, such as East Asia or Latvia; (ii) An academic discipline, such as history or political science; (iii) A language, such as Hausa or Telegu; or (iv) A topic, such as...

  9. Methods of Scientific Research: Teaching Scientific Creativity at Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Dennis; Ford, K. E. Saavik

    2016-01-01

    We present a scaling-up plan for AstroComNYC's Methods of Scientific Research (MSR), a course designed to improve undergraduate students' understanding of science practices. The course format and goals, notably the open-ended, hands-on, investigative nature of the curriculum are reviewed. We discuss how the course's interactive pedagogical techniques empower students to learn creativity within the context of experimental design and control of variables thinking. To date the course has been offered to a limited numbers of students in specific programs. The goals of broadly implementing MSR is to reach more students and early in their education—with the specific purpose of supporting and improving retention of students pursuing STEM careers. However, we also discuss challenges in preserving the effectiveness of the teaching and learning experience at scale.

  10. Improving Cancer Care Through Nursing Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Deborah K

    2015-09-01

    Nursing research and nurse researchers have been an integral and significant part of the Oncology Nursing Society's (ONS's) history, as evidenced by the development of the Nursing Research Committee within a few years of ONS's establishment. Ruth McCorkle, PhD, RN, FAAN, was the committee's first chairperson in 1979. This was followed by the creation of the Advanced Nursing Research Special Interest Group in 1989 under the leadership of Jean Brown, PhD, RN, FAAN. ONS also began to recognize nurse researchers in 1994 by creating the annual ONS Distinguished Researcher Award to recognize the contributions of a member who has conducted or promoted research that has enhanced the science and practice of oncology nursing. The list of recipients and of their work is impressive and reflects the wide range of our practice areas (see http://bit.ly/1MTC5cp for the recipient list). In addition, the ONS Foundation began funding research in 1981 and has distributed more than $24 million in research grants, research fellowships, and other scholarships, lectures, public education projects, and career development awards (ONS Foundation, 2015). And, in 2006, the Putting Evidence Into Practice resource was unveiled, which provides evidence-based intervention reviews for the 20 most common problems experienced by patients with cancer and their caregivers (www.ons
.org/practice-resources/pep)
. PMID:26302272

  11. 34 CFR 662.21 - What criteria does the Secretary use to evaluate an application for a fellowship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Poland; (ii) An academic discipline, such as economics or political science; (iii) A language, such as... terms of the concerns of the discipline; (3) The preliminary research already completed in the...

  12. AST/RO 13CO(J=2-1) and 12CO(J=4-3) Mapping of Southern Spitzer c2d Small Clouds and Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Löhr, A; Lane, A P; Myers, P C; Parshley, S C; Stark, A A; Tothill, N F H

    2007-01-01

    Forty molecular cloud cores in the southern hemisphere from the initial Spitzer Space Telescope Cores-to-Disks (c2d) Legacy program source list have been surveyed in 13CO(2-1), 12CO(4-3), and 12CO(7-6) with the Antarctic Submillimeter Telescope and Remote Observatory (AST/RO). The cores, ten of which contain embedded sources, are located mostly in the Vela, Ophiuchus, Lupus, Chamaeleon, Musca, and Scorpius complexes. 12CO(7-6) emission was undetected in all 40 clouds. We present data of 40 sources in 13CO(2-1) and 12CO(4-3), significant upper limits of 12CO(7-6), as well as a statistical analysis of the observed properties of the clouds. We find the typical 13CO(2-1) linewidth to be 2.0 km/s for cores with embedded stars, and 1.8 km/s for all others. The typical 12CO(4-3) linewidth is 2.6 to 3.7 km/s for cores with known embedded sources, and 1.6 to 2.3 km/s for all others. The average 13CO column density derived from the line intensities was found to be 1.9 x 10^15 cm^(-2) for cores with embedded stars, and ...

  13. Aspects of radiological protection for low power research reactor in the experimental teaching and learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It describes how learning by students and professional staff of nuclear facilities in the Czech Republic and Slovak Republic in the field of radiation protection within the reactor experiments at the school VR-1 Sparrow (CTU Faculty of Nuclear Sciences), where radiation protection is a natural essential part of every teaching and activities at the reactor. Reactor is presented and learning module 'Radiation Protection and Dosimetry' created for IAEA training courses - EERRI Group Fellowship Training Programme on Research Reactors (2010, 2011), which are intended for future training of personnel research reactors in IAEA Member States interested in the development of nuclear energy, but with little experience in this area. (authors)

  14. Global faculty development: lessons learned from the Foundation for Advancement of International Medical Education and Research (FAIMER) initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdick, William P

    2014-08-01

    Foundation for Advancement of International Medical Education and Research (FAIMER) faculty development programs have operated since 2001 and are designed to overcome many of the challenges inherent in global health collaborations, including alignment with local needs, avoiding persistent dependency, and development of trust. FAIMER fellowship programs, developed for midcareer faculty members in all health professions from around the world, share goals of strengthening knowledge and skills in education leadership, education methods, and project management and evaluation. Building community is another explicit goal that allows participants to support and learn from each other.The author recommends several practices for successful international collaborations based on 13 years of experience with FAIMER fellowships. These include using authentic education projects to maintain alignment with local needs and apply newly acquired knowledge and skills, teaching leadership across cultures with careful communication and adaptation of concepts to local environments, cultivating a strong field of health professions education to promote diffusion of ideas and advocate for policy change, intentionally promoting field development and leadership to reduce dependency, giving generously of time and resources, learning from others as much as teaching others, and recognizing that effective partnerships revolve around personal relationships to build trust. These strategies have enabled the FAIMER fellowship programs to stay aligned with local needs, reduce dependency, and maintain trust. PMID:24918762

  15. JPL/Student Independent Research Internship (SIRI): Research and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma; Alvidrez, R. F.; Kahn, R. A.; Whitney, W.

    2006-09-01

    One of NASA's Strategic goals is the education and retention of students in math and science, and providing outreach experiences to all levels of the public (formal and informal). At JPL, an innovative program, SIRI, was initiated in 2003 with the following goals: 1. Provide local college students, with strong support from their faculty advisors, hands-on experience in scientific research and engineering while they are still forming their higher-education and career plans. 2. JPL and NASA education office interests in providing more help to college students in preparing for careers in science and engineering. Following its initial pilot program with eight students from two local community colleges, the SIRI program branched out in two directions: (1) providing research opportunities to students from a wider range of colleges and (2) research apprenticeship or RA program, so eligible students could continue their research after completing their semester. With support of their JPL mentors, students derived educational and technical benefits. Currently, the SIRI Program includes eight local 2-year and 4-year colleges; serves approximately 25-30 students per year. To date, nearly 50% of interns become apprentices to their JPL mentors. The SIRI program is currently complementary to many undergraduate internship programs as the SIRI interns participate during school year for credit. The RA students are empowered to attend scientific meetings; co-author peer-reviewed papers; continue their research through fellowships, and mentor other students. The success of the SIRI program stems both from the contributions of the students to their mentors’ efforts and JPL's outreach efforts to afford exposure and research experience to students in all fields of science to develop the next generation of scientists. Specific examples of SIRI projects will be showcased.

  16. New researchers join HIE-ISOLDE

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    The HIE-ISOLDE team is expecting a few new faces around the lab, as the new EU-funded project CATHI (Cryogenics, Accelerators and Targets for HIE-ISOLDE) gets into full swing as part of the Seventh Framework Programme. The project will recruit researchers from around the world to be trained at CERN and will hold its kick-off meeting here on 23 May.   CATHI is a 4-year Marie Curie-funded Initial Training Network aimed at preparing researchers in the application of advanced accelerator technology. The €4.97 million initiative provides support for 20 researchers: 16 Early Stage Researchers and 4 Experienced Researchers (positions are similar to CERN’s junior and senior fellowships). The main objective of the CATHI project is to give researchers the highest level of specialist training. Researchers will develop expert, technical R&D skills by working on HIE-ISOLDE, the ongoing upgrade of the ISOLDE facility, one of Europe’s leading radioactive ion beam facilities. In...

  17. FACTORS HAMPERING DOCTORAL RESEARCH: SAVING THE INTELLECTUAL ENDEAVOUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu Phaugat

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Young persons, who qualify for University Grants Commission-Junior Research Fellowship (UGC-JRF, find it increasingly daunting to get admission in institutions that offer seats for doing doctoral research. The number of such students as was desirous of doing Doctorate in Philosophy (PhDs hasgrownin the last decade. Universities funded by the respective states of India and the central government have takennote of this fact but seems to have visibly done a little in ameliorating the situationdue to which intellectual contributions andgeneration of new knowledge suffered. Its impact on the student community was adverse that resulted in declining interest in pursuing doctoral research. The publically funded Universities should have diligently played their role in making India a knowledge hub and acted on several reports with novel recommendations for reform. Owing to a large human resource base in India, an effective strategy needs to be put in place.

  18. From the NSF: The National Science Foundation's Investments in Broadening Participation in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Education through Research and Capacity Building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Sylvia M; Singer, Susan R

    2016-01-01

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) has a long history of investment in broadening participation (BP) in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. A review of past NSF BP efforts provides insights into how the portfolio of programs and activities has evolved and the broad array of innovative strategies that has been used to increase the participation of groups underrepresented in STEM, including women, minorities, and persons with disabilities. While many are familiar with these long-standing programmatic efforts, BP is also a key component of NSF's strategic plans, has been highlighted in National Science Board reports, and is the focus of ongoing outreach efforts. The majority of familiar BP programs, such as the Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation (now 25 years old), are housed in the Directorate for Education and Human Resources. However, fellowship programs such as the Graduate Research Fellowships and Postdoctoral Research Fellowships under the Directorate for Biological Sciences (and parallel directorates in other STEM disciplines) are frequently used to address underrepresentation in STEM disciplines. The FY2016 and FY2017 budget requests incorporate funding for NSF INCLUDES, a new cross-agency BP initiative that will build on prior successes while addressing national BP challenges. NSF INCLUDES invites the use of innovative approaches for taking evidence-based best practices to scale, ushering in a new era in NSF BP advancement. PMID:27587853

  19. A Summary of NASA Summer Faculty Fellowship Work in the E.O. Office and in the Educator Resources Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, H. Wendell, Sr.

    2005-01-01

    The Office of Equal Opportunity supports a number of summer programs which are designed to: 1.) Increase the number of elementary and secondary students and teachers who are involved in NASA-related education opportunities; and 2.) Support higher education research capability and opportunities that attract and prepare increasing numbers of students and faculty for NASA-related careers. A part of my work in the E.O. office involved the evaluation of several of the programs in order to determine their level of success and to make recommendations for the improvement of those programs where necessary. As a part of the involvement with one of the programs, the PSTI, I had the great opportunity to interact with the students in a number of their sessions which involved problem-based learning in science, mathematics and technology. A summary of the evaluation of those programs is included in this report. The second part of my work involved assisting the coordinator of the Educator Resource Center at the Space and Rocket Center. I participated in space science workshops for in-service and pre-service teachers. There educational resources were made available to the participants including many hands-on activities that hey could take back to their classes. I participated in the three hour workshops that were offered on Tuesdays and Thursdays of each week, although there were workshops on other days. On Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, I worked in the E.O. office. As a result of my work in the ERC, I developed a Directed Reading PowerPoint Lesson Plan Guide involving remote sensing entitled, Echo the Bat. This was based on a NASA published children's book entitled Echo The Bat, written by Ginger Butcher. I have included a description of the lesson in this report. A summary of the evaluations of several of the summer programs supported by the Equal Opportunity office are included in this report.

  20. Sandia combustion research program: Annual report, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, R.E.; Sanders, B.R.; Ivanetich, C.A. (eds.)

    1988-01-01

    More than a decade ago, in response to a national energy crisis, Sandia proposed to the US Department of Energy a new, ambitious program in combustion research. Our strategy was to apply the rapidly increasing capabilities in lasers and computers to combustion science and technology. Shortly thereafter, the Combustion Research Facility (CRF) was established at Sandia's Livermore location. Designated a ''User Facility,'' the charter of the CRF was to develop and maintain special-purpose resources to support a nationwide initiative--involving US universities, industry, and national laboratories--to improve our understanding and control of combustion. This report includes descriptions of several research projects which have been stimulated by Working Groups and involve the on-site participation of industry scientists. DOE's Industry Technology Fellowship Program has been instrumental in the success of some of the joint efforts. The remainder of this report presents research results of calendar year 1987, separated thematically into nine categories. Refereed journal articles appearing in print during 1987, along with selected other publications, are included at the end of Section 10. In addition to our ''traditional'' research--chemistry, reacting flow, diagnostics, engine combustion, and coal combustion--you will note continued progress in somewhat recent themes: pulse combustion, high temperature materials, and energetic materials, for example. Moreover, we have just started a small, new effort to understand combustion-related issues in the management of toxic and hazardous materials.

  1. "Lunar Phases Project" as a Foundation for the Development of Innovative Inquiry Based ASTRO 101 Activities Utilizing Existing Concept Inventories as Assessment Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mon, M. J.; Meyer, A. O.

    2012-08-01

    The cause and process of the lunar phases are difficult concepts for undergraduates and non-science majors to grasp. At Florida Gulf Coast University (FGCU) we have combined an inquiry-based instructional method (Mental Model Building) which can be more effective increasing students' conceptual understanding of the lunar phase cycle, together with the students' own observations. Undergraduate and non-science major students completed a hands-on project designed to integrate real observations, application of the scientific method, and Mental Model Building to connect the students' own observations to the Earth-Sun-Moon orientations responsible for their findings. Students' learning was assessed by administering the Lunar Phases Concept Inventory (developed by Rebecca S. Lindell and James P. Olsen, Southern Illinois University) before and after students completed the project, with positive results. We describe the methodology and activities utilized in our Lunar Phases Project, and propose their expansion to a variety of astronomical topics for undergraduate non-science majors and pre-service teachers. We emphasize developing and implementing new instructional strategies through the expansion of the Mental Model Building and similar pedagogical methodologies to develop innovative inquiry-based projects and activities in a variety of astronomical topics for undergraduate non-science majors and pre-service teachers. In order to meaningfully assess the new curriculum tools, we recommend utilizing already existing research-validated concept inventories specific to the astronomy content in the curriculum tools. These inventories can be analyzed to determine the conceptual learning gains achieved by the participating students and with further analysis can be used to refine portions of the activity under study.

  2. A Research Agenda for Radiation Oncology: Results of the Radiation Oncology Institute’s Comprehensive Research Needs Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To promote the rational use of scarce research funding, scholars have developed methods for the systematic identification and prioritization of health research needs. The Radiation Oncology Institute commissioned an independent, comprehensive assessment of research needs for the advancement of radiation oncology care. Methods and Materials: The research needs assessment used a mixed-method, qualitative and quantitative social scientific approach, including structured interviews with diverse stakeholders, focus groups, surveys of American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) members, and a prioritization exercise using a modified Delphi technique. Results: Six co-equal priorities were identified: (1) Identify and develop communication strategies to help patients and others better understand radiation therapy; (2) Establish a set of quality indicators for major radiation oncology procedures and evaluate their use in radiation oncology delivery; (3) Identify best practices for the management of radiation toxicity and issues in cancer survivorship; (4) Conduct comparative effectiveness studies related to radiation therapy that consider clinical benefit, toxicity (including quality of life), and other outcomes; (5) Assess the value of radiation therapy; and (6) Develop a radiation oncology registry. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this prioritization exercise is the only comprehensive and methodologically rigorous assessment of research needs in the field of radiation oncology. Broad dissemination of these findings is critical to maximally leverage the impact of this work, particularly because grant funding decisions are often made by committees on which highly specialized disciplines such as radiation oncology are not well represented.

  3. Fusion Energy Postdoctoral Research Program, Professional Development Program: FY 1987 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In FY 1986, Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) initiated two programs for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fusion Energy (OFE): the Fusion Energy Postdoctoral Research Program and the Fusion Energy Professional Development Program. These programs provide opportunities to conduct collaborative research in magnetic fusion energy research and development programs at DOE laboratories and contractor sites. Participants become trained in advanced fusion energy research, interact with outstanding professionals, and become familiar with energy-related national issues while making personal contributions to the search for solutions to scientific problems. Both programs enhance the national fusion energy research and development effort by providing channels for the exchange of scientists and engineers, the diffusion of ideas and knowledge, and the transfer of relevant technologies. These programs, along with the Magnetic Fusion Energy Science and Technology Fellowship Programs, compose the fusion energy manpower development programs administered by ORAU for DOE/OFE

  4. Wilderness Fellowship Program 2011 Fellows

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Natural Resources and Conservation Planning Division of the National Wildlife Refuge System, in cooperation with 19 refuges across 6 regions, has established a...

  5. The Bonn Astro/Geo Correlator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhart, Simone; Alef, Walter; Bertarini, Alessandra; La Porta, Laura; Muskens, Arno; Rottmann, Helge; Roy, Alan

    2013-01-01

    The Bonn Distributed FX (DiFX) correlator is a software correlator operated jointly by the Max- Planck-Institut fur Radioastronomie (MPIfR), the Institut fur Geodasie und Geoinformation der Universitat Bonn (IGG), and the Bundesamt fur Kartographie und Geodasie (BKG) in Frankfurt.

  6. Exploring Best Practices for Research Data Management in Earth Science through Collaborating with University Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T.; Branch, B. D.

    2013-12-01

    Earth Science research data, its data management, informatics processing and its data curation are valuable in allowing earth scientists to make new discoveries. But how to actively manage these research assets to ensure them safe and secure, accessible and reusable for long term is a big challenge. Nowadays, the data deluge makes this challenge become even more difficult. To address the growing demand for managing earth science data, the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) partners with the Library and Technology Services (LTS) of Lehigh University and Purdue University Libraries (PUL) on hosting postdoctoral fellows in data curation activity. This inter-disciplinary fellowship program funded by the SLOAN Foundation innovatively connects university libraries and earth science departments and provides earth science Ph.D.'s opportunities to use their research experiences in earth science and data curation trainings received during their fellowship to explore best practices for research data management in earth science. In the process of exploring best practices for data curation in earth science, the CLIR Data Curation Fellows have accumulated rich experiences and insights on the data management behaviors and needs of earth scientists. Specifically, Ting Wang, the postdoctoral fellow at Lehigh University has worked together with the LTS support team for the College of Arts and Sciences, Web Specialists and the High Performance Computing Team, to assess and meet the data management needs of researchers at the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences (EES). By interviewing the faculty members and graduate students at EES, the fellow has identified a variety of data-related challenges at different research fields of earth science, such as climate, ecology, geochemistry, geomorphology, etc. The investigation findings of the fellow also support the LTS for developing campus infrastructure for long-term data management in the sciences. Likewise

  7. Research on agricultural research

    OpenAIRE

    Renborg, Ulf

    2010-01-01

    A Cobb-Douglas type production function is estimated for the Swedish agricultural sector over the period 1944/45 - 1986/87. Total production of the sector is the dependent variable. Public research and advisory services are introduced as independent variables together with labour, land, variable capital and inputs bought from other sectors and a yield variable. Research is introduced with lags from 6 to 24 years from research inputs to effects on the total sector production. Research lags of ...

  8. Research Extension and Education Programs on Bio-based Energy Technologies and Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Sam [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Tennessee Agricultural Experiment Station; Harper, David [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Tennessee Agricultural Experiment Station; Womac, Al [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Tennessee Agricultural Experiment Station

    2010-03-02

    The overall objectives of this project were to provide enhanced educational resources for the general public, educational and development opportunities for University faculty in the Southeast region, and enhance research knowledge concerning biomass preprocessing and deconstruction. All of these efforts combine to create a research and education program that enhances the biomass-based industries of the United States. This work was broken into five primary objective areas: • Task A - Technical research in the area of biomass preprocessing, analysis, and evaluation. • Tasks B&C - Technical research in the areas of Fluidized Beds for the Chemical Modification of Lignocellulosic Biomass and Biomass Deconstruction and Evaluation. • Task D - Analyses for the non-scientific community to provides a comprehensive analysis of the current state of biomass supply, demand, technologies, markets and policies; identify a set of feasible alternative paths for biomass industry development and quantify the impacts associated with alternative path. • Task E - Efforts to build research capacity and develop partnerships through faculty fellowships with DOE national labs The research and education programs conducted through this grant have led to three primary results. They include: • A better knowledge base related to and understanding of biomass deconstruction, through both mechanical size reduction and chemical processing • A better source of information related to biomass, bioenergy, and bioproducts for researchers and general public users through the BioWeb system. • Stronger research ties between land-grant universities and DOE National Labs through the faculty fellowship program. In addition to the scientific knowledge and resources developed, funding through this program produced a minimum of eleven (11) scientific publications and contributed to the research behind at least one patent.

  9. The Role of Research in an Astronomy or Astrophysics Major

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, J. M.

    2001-12-01

    Undergraduates have proven capable of substantial research success in the hundreds of projects undertaken at both Williams College and over the past decade at its associated institutions in the Keck Northeast Astronomy Consortium: Wellesley, Wesleyan, Middlebury, Colgate, Vassar, Haverford, and Swarthmore. We consider the undergraduate research to be central to our astronomy and astrophysics major programs. Research opportunities of underclass years, usually during summers, often help students decide to major in astronomy or astrophysics. The senior thesis research is often a highpoint of the undergraduate educational experience while nonthesis projects often also prove valuable for students assessing their interests and careers. Many of the projects have been on campus while others are at national observatories or in other non-local research programs. Our Keck consortium has included a student summer exchange in which 12-16 students, usually after their sophomore or junior years, undertake research projects at member institutions other than their own. The results are reported at a student research symposium each fall, with approximately 35 research papers delivered; the proceedings are available. See http://www.astro.wellesley.edu/keck/. Institutions such as those in the consortium, with typical enrollments of 1100-2800, have been shown to generate a higher rate of attainment of science professional degrees than universities. Of course, many students at universities also benefit from undergraduate research opportunities during their undergraduate careers. Whether at colleges at universities, the personal contact and opportunity to transfer one's abilities from book learning to independent investigation can be invaluable in preparing students for their post-undergraduate lives.

  10. International research centre launched

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ), and (secretary) Prof. A. Sanielevici (IAEA). Prof. Salam is Director of the research centre, and Prof. Budini Deputy Director. Establishment of the Centre was first proposed in 1960, and after plans had been worked out, the IAEA Board of Governors approved the programme in June 1963. The Italian Government has lent its support and co-operation ; it is providing a building for the needs of the Centre, and staff housing, and is supplying staff services and $28,000 a year for fellowships as well as an annual contribution of $250,000 for five years. The IAEA Budget for 1965 includes a similar amount of $278,000 for the Centre. The Centre plans to work in close collaboration with the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN); the United Nations Educational, Cultural and Scientific Organisation is also a party to the Centre and is making contributions

  11. Lewis' Educational and Research Collaborative Intership Program Grant Closeout Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The Lewis' Educational and Research Collaborative Internship Program (LERCIP) is a collaborative undertaking by the Office of Educational Programs at NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field (formerly NASA Lewis Research Center) and the Ohio Aerospace Institute. This program provides 10-week internships and 10 or 12-week fellowships for undergraduate/graduate students and secondary school teachers. Approximately 130 interns are selected to participate in this program each year and begin arriving the second week in May. The internships provide students with introductory professional experiences to complement their academic programs. The interns are given assignments on research and development projects under the personal guidance of NASA professional staff members. Each intern is assigned a NASA mentor who facilitates a research assignment. In addition to the research assignment, the summer program includes a strong educational component that enhances the professional stature of the participants. The educational activities include a research symposium and a variety of workshops, lectures and short courses. An important aspect of the program is that it includes students with diverse social, cultural and economic backgrounds.

  12. Integration of biological and nursing sciences: a 10-year plan to enhance research and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, M J; Heinrich, J; Lucas, M; Sigmon, H; Hinshaw, A S

    1993-02-01

    A proposed multiyear plan of funding mechanisms by the National Center for Nursing Research (NCNR) to increase the use of biological theory and measurements in nursing research has been developed for both research training and research programs. The objectives of the research training programs are (a) to develop a cadre of nurse scientists with solid research training in the biological sciences, (b) to upgrade to state-of-the-art biological research for mid-career nurse scientists, and (c) to ensure adequate highly trained biological-nurse manpower will be available to accomplish the nation's nursing research agenda. The objectives of the research programs are (a) to stimulate nurse scientists to undertake novel, innovative research using state-of-the-art biological technology, (b) to link the behavioral and biological underpinnings of nursing science in specified areas of biomedical clinical research, and (c) to ensure that, in the coming decade, nursing science and behavioral research will be inextricably interwoven with biological research. The research training programs include: targeted predoctoral-postdoctoral transitional training, targeted predoctoral or postdoctoral fellowships, training awards for existing institutional training grants in other disciplines, mid-career awards, the Nurse Scientist award, and institutional training grants for biological nursing. The research programs include: small grants programs, augmentation of existing projects in other Institutes, Requests For Applications (RFA) in biobehavioral nursing, cluster studies, and clinical trials. PMID:8488310

  13. Entangled research(ers)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøgger, Katja; Staunæs, Dorthe

    This paper takes up the challenges of analyzing how empirical knowledge is created when the research(ers) are always already “thrown into the world” (Heidegger) and thereby affectively “intra-act” (Barad) with and ‘perform’ the empirical knowledge. ‘ ‘Thrownness’ is Heidegger’s way of expressing...... thrown into the world and being situated and attuned to it in specific ways through interest, fear, boredom or something else. Combing concepts from philosophy as well as psychology, the material and the affective turn allow us to rethink and elaborate on well-known discussions on qualitative research...

  14. Connecting researchers and research

    OpenAIRE

    Walton, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Libraries have long held an established role in the scholarly research process; however the process of scholarly communication is evolving. Citation management software, institutional repositories, open access and open data mandates have opened up new opportunities and new challenges. Researchers have more responsibility for managing their work, but less time to do it. Libraries are struggling to remain an active part of the scholarly communication process. It has become increasingly difficu...

  15. Evaluation of a College Freshman Diversity Research Program in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremmel, Michael J.; Garner, S. M.; Schmidt, S. J.; Wisniewski, J. P.; Agol, E.

    2014-01-01

    Graduate students in the astronomy department at the University of Washington began the Pre-Major in Astronomy Program (Pre-MAP) after recognizing that underrepresented students in STEM fields are not well retained after their transition from high school. Pre-MAP is a research and mentoring program that begins with a keystone seminar where they learn astronomical research techniques that they apply to research projects conducted in small groups. Students also receive one-on-one mentoring and peer support for the duration of the academic year and beyond. Successful Pre-MAP students have declared astronomy and physics majors, expanded their research projects beyond the fall quarter, presented posters at the UW Undergraduate Research Symposium, and received research fellowships and summer internships. Here we examine the success of the program in attracting underrepresented minorities and in facilitating better STEM retention and academic performance among incoming UW students. We use the University of Washington Student Database to study both the performance of Pre-MAP students and the overall UW student body over the past 8 years. We show that Pre-MAP students are generally more diverse than the overall UW population and also come in with a variety of different math backgrounds, which we show to be an important factor on STEM performance for the overall UW population. We find that that Pre-MAP students are both more academically successful and more likely to graduate in STEM fields than their UW peers, regardless of initial math placement.

  16. Research News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research News - National Multiple Sclerosis Society Skip to navigation Skip to content Menu Navigation National Multiple Sclerosis ... Email Home Research Research News & Progress Research News Research News Share Smaller Text Larger Text Print Read ...

  17. Malaria Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Malaria Research NIAID Role in Malaria Research Basic Biology Prevention ... Labs​ Malaria Research Program Services for Researchers Featured Research Ancient Immune Mechanism Identified That Controls Malaria in ...

  18. Idaho national laboratory - a nuclear research center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is committed to providing international nuclear leadership for the 21st Century, developing and demonstrating compelling national security technologies, and delivering excellence in science and technology as one of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) multi program national laboratories. INL runs three major programs - Nuclear, Security and Science. Nuclear programs covers the Advanced test reactor, Six Generation IV technology concepts selected for Rand D, targeting tumors - Boron Neutron Capture therapy. Homeland Security establishes the Control System Security and Test Center, Critical Infrastructure Test Range evaluates technologies on a scalable basis, INL conducts high performance computing and visualization research and science. To provide leadership in the education and training, INL has established an Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (INSE) under the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) and the Idaho State University (ISU). INSE will offer a four year degree based on a newly developed curriculum - two year of basic science course work and two years of participation in project planning and development. The students enrolled in this program can continue to get a masters or a doctoral degree. This summer INSE is the host for the training of the first international group selected by the World Nuclear University (WNU) - 75 fellowship holders and their 30 instructors from 40 countries. INL has been assigned to provide future global leadership in the field of nuclear science and technology. Here, at INL, we keep safety first above all things and our logo is 'Nuclear leadership synonymous with safety leadership'. (author)

  19. MITR-III: Upgrade and relicensing studies for the MIT Research Reactor. Second annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trosman, H.G. [ed.; Lanning, D.D.; Harling, O.K.

    1994-08-01

    The current operating license of the MIT research reactor will expire on May 7, 1996 or possibly a few years later if the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission agrees that the license period can start with the date of initial reactor operation. Driven by the imminent expiration of the operating license, a team of nuclear engineering staff and students have begun a study of the future options for the MIT Research Reactor. These options have included the range from a major rebuilding of the reactor to its decommissioning. This document reports the results of a two year intensive activity which has been supported by a $148,000 grant from the USDOE contract Number DEFG0293ER75859, approximately $100,000 of internal MIT funds and Nuclear Engineering Department graduate student fellowships as well as assistance from international visiting scientists and engineers.

  20. MITR-III: Upgrade and relicensing studies for the MIT Research Reactor. Second annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current operating license of the MIT research reactor will expire on May 7, 1996 or possibly a few years later if the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission agrees that the license period can start with the date of initial reactor operation. Driven by the imminent expiration of the operating license, a team of nuclear engineering staff and students have begun a study of the future options for the MIT Research Reactor. These options have included the range from a major rebuilding of the reactor to its decommissioning. This document reports the results of a two year intensive activity which has been supported by a $148,000 grant from the USDOE contract Number DEFG0293ER75859, approximately $100,000 of internal MIT funds and Nuclear Engineering Department graduate student fellowships as well as assistance from international visiting scientists and engineers

  1. Research Results Research Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    A Highly Efficient Route for Selective Phenol Hydrogenation to Cyclohexanone A Novel Mechanism Employed by KSHV to Maintain the Latent Infection was Revealed Breakthrough in the Synthesis of Interconnected NW/NT and NT/NW/NT Heterojunctions with Branched Topology GABA Transporter-1 Activity Modulates Hippocampal Theta Oscillation and Theta Burst Stimulation-Induced Long-Term Potentiation Meta-analysis of Vitamin D, Calcium and the Prevention of Breast Cancer New Findings on the Origin of TrpRS PKCd Regulates Cortical Radial Migration by Stabilizing the Cdk5 Activator P35 PKU Research Team Publishes Papers on Inhalation Exposure to Pollutant and Cancer Risk Progress of the Research on Arbitrarily Elliptical Invisibility Cloaks An Advance in Complete Oxidation of Formaldehyde at Low Temperatures

  2. Is operations research really research?

    OpenAIRE

    NJ Manson

    2006-01-01

    This paper takes a philosophical look at the Research in Operations Research. First, the questions "What is Research?" and "What is Operations Research?" are discussed. Next, the paper discusses why it is important to have a clear definition of research, especially in academia. The paper then discusses a research paradigm called 'Design Research'. Design Research is defined and compared with other research paradigms. Seven guidelines for understanding, executing, and evaluating Design Researc...

  3. Sharing perspectives and experiences of doctoral fellows in the first cohort of Consortium for Advanced Research Training in Africa: 2011–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babatunde Adedokun

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resolution of public health problems in Africa remains a challenge because of insufficient skilled human resource capacity. The Consortium for Advanced Research Training in Africa (CARTA was established to enhance capacity in multi-disciplinary health research that will make a positive impact on population health in Africa. Objective: The first cohort of the CARTA program describes their perspectives and experiences during the 4 years of fellowship and puts forward suggestions for future progress and direction of research in Africa. Conclusions: The model of training as shown by the CARTA program is an effective model of research capacity building in African academic institutions. An expansion of the program is therefore warranted to reach out to more African academics in search of advanced research training.

  4. Valuing Professional Development Components for Emerging Undergraduate Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, I.

    2015-12-01

    In 2004 the Hatfield Marine Science Center (HMSC) at Oregon State University (OSU) established a Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program to engage undergraduate students in hands-on research training in the marine sciences. The program offers students the opportunity to conduct research focused on biological and ecological topics, chemical and physical oceanography, marine geology, and atmospheric science. In partnership with state and federal government agencies, this ten-week summer program has grown to include 20+ students annually. Participants obtain a background in the academic discipline, professional development training, and research experience to make informed decisions about careers and advanced degrees in marine and earth system sciences. Professional development components of the program are designed to support students in their research experience, explore career goals and develop skills necessary to becoming a successful young marine scientist. These components generally include seminars, discussions, workshops, lab tours, and standards of conduct. These componentscontribute to achieving the following professional development objectives for the overall success of new emerging undergraduate researchers: Forming a fellowship of undergraduate students pursuing marine research Stimulating student interest and understanding of marine research science Learning about research opportunities at Oregon State University "Cross-Training" - broadening the hands-on research experience Exploring and learning about marine science careers and pathways Developing science communication and presentation skills Cultivating a sense of belonging in the sciences Exposure to federal and state agencies in marine and estuarine science Academic and career planning Retention of talented students in the marine science Standards of conduct in science Details of this program's components, objectives and best practices will be discussed.

  5. Idaho National Laboratory - Nuclear Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Idaho National Laboratory is committed to the providing international nuclear leadership for the 21st Century, developing and demonstrating compiling national security technologies, and delivering excellence in science and technology as one of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) multiprogram national laboratories. INL runs three major programs - Nuclear, Security and Science. nuclear programs covers the Advanced test reactor, Six Generation technology concepts selected for R and D, Targeting tumors - Boron Neutron capture therapy. Homeland security - Homeland Security establishes the Control System Security and Test Center, Critical Infrastructure Test Range evaluates technologies on a scalable basis, INL conducts high performance computing and visualization research and science - INL facility established for Geocentrifuge Research, Idaho Laboratory, a Utah company achieved major milestone in hydrogen research and INL uses extremophile bacteria to ease bleaching's environmental cost. To provide leadership in the education and training, INL has established an Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (Inset). The institute will offer a four year degree based on a newly developed curriculum - two year of basic science course work and two years of participation in project planning and development. The students enrolled in this program can continue to get a masters or a doctoral degree. This summer Inset is the host for the training of the first international group selected by the World Nuclear University (WNU) - 75 fellowship holders and their 30 instructors from 40 countries. INL has been assigned to provide future global leadership in the field of nuclear science and technology. Here, at INL, we keep safety first above all things and our logo is 'Nuclear leadership synonymous with safety leadership'

  6. Educational Experiences of Embry-Riddle Students through NASA Research Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlee, Keith; Gangadharan, Sathya; Chatman, Yadira; Sudermann, James; Walker, Charles; Ristow, James

    2006-01-01

    NASA's educational. programs benefit students and faculty while increasing the overall productivity of the organization. The NASA Graduate Student Research Program (GSRP) awards fellowships for graduate study leading to both masters and doctoral degrees in several technical fields. GSRP participants have the option to utilize NASA Centers andlor university research facilities. In addition, GSRP students can serve as mentors for undergrad students to provide a truly unique learning experience. NASA's Cooperative Education Program allows undergraduate students the chance to gain "real-world" work experience in the field. It also gives NASA a no risk capability to evaluate the true performance of a prospective new hire without relying solely on a "paper resume" while providing the students with a greater hiring potential upon graduation, at NASA or elsewhere. University faculty can also benefit by participating in the NASA Faculty Fellowship Program (NFFP). This program gives the faculty an opportunity to work with NASA peers. The Mission Analysis Branch of the Expendable Launch Vehicles Division at NASA Kennedy Space Center has utilized these two programs with students from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU) to conduct research in modeling and developing a parameter estimation method for spacecraft fuel slosh using simple pendulum analogs. Simple pendulum models are used to understand complicated spacecraft fuel slosh behavior. A robust parameter estimation process will help to identif' the parameters that will predict the response fairly accurately during the initial stages of design. These programs provide students with a unique opportunity to work on "real-world" aerospace problems, like spacecraft fuel slosh,. This in turn reinforces their problem solving abilities and their communication skills such as interviewing, resume writing, technical writing, and presentation. Faculty benefits by applying what they have learned to the classroom. Through

  7. Model for Developing Educational Research Productivity: The Medical Education Research Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Perry

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Education research and scholarship are essential for promotion of faculty as well as dissemination of new educational practices. Educational faculty frequently spend the majority of their time on administrative and educational commitments and as a result educators often fall behind on scholarship and research. The objective of this educational advance is to promote scholarly productivity as a template for others to follow. Methods: We formed the Medical Education Research Group (MERG of education leaders from our emergency medicine residency, fellowship, and clerkship programs, as well as residents with a focus on education. First, we incorporated scholarship into the required activities of our education missions by evaluating the impact of programmatic changes and then submitting the curricula or process as peer-reviewed work. Second, we worked as a team, sharing projects that led to improved motivation, accountability, and work completion. Third, our monthly meetings served as brainstorming sessions for new projects, research skill building, and tracking work completion. Lastly, we incorporated a workstudy graduate student to assist with basic but time-consuming tasks of completing manuscripts. Results: The MERG group has been highly productive, achieving the following scholarship over a three-year period: 102 abstract presentations, 46 journal article publications, 13 MedEd Portal publications, 35 national didactic presentations and five faculty promotions to the next academic level. Conclusion: An intentional focus on scholarship has led to a collaborative group of educators successfully improving their scholarship through team productivity, which ultimately leads to faculty promotions and dissemination of innovations in education.

  8. Opportunities in Research in Nuclear Science at MSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bibber, Karl

    2013-04-01

    Nuclear science and engineering, once thought to be a field in decline, is experiencing a remarkable renaissance, with all the major nuclear science and engineering programs in the US having doubled in the past ten years, a growth which continues unabated. Students view the vast potential of nuclear power and radiation as transformative for energy, industry and medicine, but also see the associated challenges of nonproliferation and environmental stewardship as important societal goals worthy of their future careers. In order to replenish the pipeline of critical nuclear skills into the DOE national labs for the national security mission, the NNSA Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation in 2011 launched a major education and pipeline initiative called the Nuclear Science and Security Consortium (NSSC), comprised of seven research universities and four national labs. Against the backdrop of the projected dearth of scientists and engineers in the 21st century who could hold security clearances, the NNSA augmented this program with a MSI component to engage traditionally underrepresented minority institutions and students, and thus reach out to previously untapped pools of talent. This talk will review the NSSC MSI program after one year, including the Summer Fellowship Program and the Research Grant Program, along with the experience of two NSSC universities with long-standing research relationships with MSI partners in nuclear science and engineering. The perspective from the DOE labs will be discussed as well, who are the intended beneficiaries of the transition from students to career scientists.

  9. Charismatic Fellowship or tradition- bound hierarchy: Studying the roots of Church Government with focus upon the Pauline and the Johannine source material

    OpenAIRE

    Ekroll, Hilde

    2013-01-01

    This paper is looking at authority and leadership in the earliest stages of Christianity, and is built up under the following research question: With basis in the Pauline and the Johannine text corpus, how might we define authority and leadership in the primitive church? The source material which is presented and analyzed is mainly biblical texts, 1 Corinthians, Galatians, The Pastoral Letters, The Gospel of John and the first letter of John. The method is Biblical exegesis and the theory ...

  10. Research organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bøje; Aagaard, Peter

    in Copenhagen - we argue that a post-rational form of research activity is emerging which revert these features. We term this new type of research "enchanted research", "sciencetainment" and "Mode2-b research". The factors that facilitate this development include the boring style of conventional research......, growing competition for research funds, more project funding compared to institutional funding and a demand for accountability. Countervailing forces also exist, however....

  11. A collection of research reporting, theoretical analysis, and practical applications in science education: Examining qualitative research methods, action research, educator-researcher partnerships, and constructivist learning theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartle, R. Todd

    2007-12-01

    Educator-researcher partnerships are increasingly being used to improve the teaching of science. Chapter 1 provides a summary of the literature concerning partnerships, and examines the justification of qualitative methods in studying these relationships. It also justifies the use of Participatory Action Research (PAR). Empirically-based studies of educator-researcher partnership relationships are rare despite investments in their implementation by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and others. Chapter 2 describes a qualitative research project in which participants in an NSF GK-12 fellowship program were studied using informal observations, focus groups, personal interviews, and journals to identify and characterize the cultural factors that influenced the relationships between the educators and researchers. These factors were organized into ten critical axes encompassing a range of attitudes, behaviors, or values defined by two stereotypical extremes. These axes were: (1) Task Dictates Context vs. Context Dictates Task; (2) Introspection vs. Extroversion; (3) Internal vs. External Source of Success; (4) Prior Planning vs. Implementation Flexibility; (5) Flexible vs. Rigid Time Sense; (6) Focused Time vs. Multi-tasking; (7) Specific Details vs. General Ideas; (8) Critical Feedback vs. Encouragement; (9) Short Procedural vs. Long Content Repetition; and (10) Methods vs. Outcomes are Well Defined. Another ten important stereotypical characteristics, which did not fit the structure of an axis, were identified and characterized. The educator stereotypes were: (1) Rapport/Empathy; (2) Like Kids; (3) People Management; (4) Communication Skills; and (5) Entertaining. The researcher stereotypes were: (1) Community Collaboration; (2) Focus Intensity; (3) Persistent; (4) Pattern Seekers; and (5) Curiosity/Skeptical. Chapter 3 summarizes the research presented in chapter 2 into a practical guide for participants and administrators of educator-researcher partnerships

  12. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management: Support for university research and education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) currently sponsors two programs that provide funding to universities and graduate students. The OCRWM graduate fellowship program and the OCRWM research program for historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) are designed to enhance the involvement of universities in the nation's high-level radioactive waste program. The specific goals of these programs are to (a) attract talented young scientists and engineers into OCRWM and OCRWM support contractor high-level radioactive waste management programs, (b) improve the quality of graduate education in disciplines directly related to high-level radioactive waste management, and (c) encourage university faculty to become involved in OCRWM mission-related activities

  13. UNIVERSITY TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH PROGRAM SUMMARY AND DIRECTORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence P. Golan; Richard A. Wenglarz

    2004-07-01

    The South Carolina Institute for Energy Studies (SCIES), administratively housed at Clemson University, has participated in the advancement of combustion turbine technology for over a decade. The University Turbine Systems Research Program, previously referred to as the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program, has been administered by SCIES for the U.S. DOE during the 1992-2003 timeframe. The structure of the program is based on a concept presented to the DOE by Clemson University. Under the supervision of the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the UTSR consortium brings together the engineering departments at leading U.S. universities and U.S. combustion turbine developers to provide a solid base of knowledge for the future generations of land-based gas turbines. In the UTSR program, an Industrial Review Board (IRB) (Appendix C) of gas turbine companies and related organizations defines needed gas turbine research. SCIES prepares yearly requests for university proposals to address the research needs identified by the IRB organizations. IRB technical representatives evaluate the university proposals and review progress reports from the awarded university projects. To accelerate technology transfer technical workshops are held to provide opportunities for university, industry and government officials to share comments and improve quality and relevancy of the research. To provide educational growth at the Universities, in addition to sponsored research, the UTSR provides faculty and student fellowships. The basis for all activities--research, technology transfer, and education--is the DOE Turbine Program Plan and identification, through UTSR consortium group processes, technology needed to meet Program Goals that can be appropriately researched at Performing Member Universities.

  14. International Arctic Research Collaborations: Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintisch, E. S.

    2015-12-01

    International cooperation on Arctic research has a long and storied history, predating even the first International Polar Year in 1881. But scientists want to improve and expand current efforts to conduct international Arctic research, despite politcal and legal barriers that can hamper it. A review of the past and present aspects of such research can inform that effort. As part of a six month fellowship at the Center for Science Diplomacy at the American Association for the Advancement of Science I studied the history and current status of international cooperation in the Arctic. I will report on my findings, which include the fact that some of the first substantial international environmental research and regulatory cooperation began in the far North. My session will identify the elements that make international research collaborations successful, for example more than a century of cooperative work by Russian and Norwegian fishery scientists to monitor and regulate the cod trade in the Barents Sea. And it will explore the challenges that can threaten such collaborations. These can include rules that stymie data collection, block the import of certain analytical equipment across national boundaries, and bar the export of soil or water samples. I will mention specific complications to recent international arctic research projects. These include the SWERUS cruise, a joint effort between Sweden, Russia and the US, an effort to study carbon fluxes over the East Siberian Arctic Shelf in 2014. The session will also review progress towards a new international agreeement, first proposed by the US, on improving arctic research cooperation. That deal is focused on removing the bureacratic and legal barriers to scientists seeking to conduct arctic research on foreign waters and land.

  15. Action Research and Interactive Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, lennart; Nielsen, Kurt Aagaard

    2006-01-01

    The authors present trends in Nordic action research. They ask critical questions in the development towards mode 2 and points out alternative roads for a scientific consolidation of action research and interactive research.......The authors present trends in Nordic action research. They ask critical questions in the development towards mode 2 and points out alternative roads for a scientific consolidation of action research and interactive research....

  16. Desert Research and Technology Studies 2005 Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Amy J.; Kosmo, Joseph J.; Janoiko, Barbara A.; Bernard, Craig; Splawn, Keith; Eppler, Dean B.

    2006-01-01

    During the first two weeks of September 2005, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) Advanced Extravehicular Activity (AEVA) team led the field test portion of the 2005 Research and Technology Studies (RATS). The Desert RATS field test activity is the culmination of the various individual science and advanced engineering discipline areas year-long technology and operations development efforts into a coordinated field test demonstration under representative (analog) planetary surface terrain conditions. The purpose of the RATS is to drive out preliminary exploration concept of operations EVA system requirements by providing hands-on experience with simulated planetary surface exploration extravehicular activity (EVA) hardware and procedures. The RATS activities also are of significant importance in helping to develop the necessary levels of technical skills and experience for the next generation of engineers, scientists, technicians, and astronauts who will be responsible for realizing the goals of the Constellation Program. The 2005 Desert RATS was the eighth RATS field test and was the most systems-oriented, integrated field test to date with participants from NASA field centers, the United States Geologic Survey (USGS), industry partners, and research institutes. Each week of the test, the 2005 RATS addressed specific sets of objectives. The first week focused on the performance of surface science astro-biological sampling operations, including planetary protection considerations and procedures. The second week supported evaluation of the Science, Crew, Operations, and Utility Testbed (SCOUT) proto-type rover and its sub-systems. Throughout the duration of the field test, the Communications, Avionics, and Infomatics pack (CAI-pack) was tested. This year the CAI-pack served to provide information on surface navigation, science sample collection procedures, and EVA timeline awareness. Additionally, 2005 was the first

  17. AcademyHealth and the future of comparative effectiveness research: making sure evidence matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Dr Lisa Simpson is the president and CEO of AcademyHealth, and its advocacy arm, the Coalition for Health Services Research. A nationally recognized health policy researcher and pediatrician, Dr Simpson is a passionate advocate for the translation of research into policy and practice. Before joining AcademyHealth, Dr Simpson was director of the Child Policy Research Center at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Health Policy and Clinical Effectiveness, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati (OH, USA). She served as the Deputy Director of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) from 1996 to 2002. She previously served on the Institute of Medicine's Committee on Comparative Effectiveness Research Priorities and the Committee on Highly Effective Clinical Services. Dr Simpson is a member of the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program National Advisory Council and the AHRQ Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) Steering Committee. Dr Simpson's research focuses on improving the performance of the healthcare system and includes studies of the quality and safety of care, the role of health information technology in improving the quality of care, health and healthcare disparities, and the health policy and system response to childhood obesity. Dr Simpson earned her undergraduate and medical degrees at Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland), a master's in public health at the University of Hawaii (HI, USA), and completed a post-doctoral fellowship in health services research and health policy at the University of California, San Francisco (CA, USA). PMID:24237294

  18. Research Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    Gunnar Scott Reinbacher (editor) Antology.  Research Design : Validation in Social Sciences. Gunnar Scott Reinbacher: Introduction. Research design and validity. 15p Ole Riis: Creative Research design. 16 p Lennart Nørreklit: Validity in Research Design. 24p Gitte Sommer Harrits: Praxeological...... knowledge: An integrated strategy for combining "explaining" and "understanding". 22p Heidi Houlberg Salomonsen & Viola Burau: Comparative research designs. 40p Rasmus Antoft & Heidi Houlberg Salomonsen: Studying organizations by a Pragmatic Research Design: the case of qualitative case study  designs. 31p...... Kenneth Mølbjerg Jørgensen: Research as storrytelling: constructing reflexive research practice. 21p Lars Ole Bonde: Reflections on the relationship between research questions, design and methods in the research project "Receptive music therapy with female cancer patients in rehabilitation. 35p Gunnar...

  19. Astrobites: The Online Astronomy Research Digest for Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faesi, Christopher; Astrobites Collaboration

    2013-06-01

    Astrobites (http://astrobites.org) is an innovative science education initiative developed by graduate students in astrophysics for an undergraduate audience. Our goal is to help undergraduates make the transition from the classroom to careers in research by introducing them to the astronomical literature in a pedagogical, approachable, and comprehensible way. Every day we select one new journal article posted to the astrophysics preprint server (http://arXiv.org/astro-ph) and prepare a brief summary describing methods and results, explaining jargon, and providing context. We also write regular blog posts containing career advice, such as tips for applying for graduate school, how to install astronomical software, or demystifying the publishing process. The articles are written by a team of about 30 graduate students in astrophysics from throughout the US and Europe. Since its founding in 2010, Astrobites has grown dramatically, now reaching more than 1000 daily readers in over 100 countries worldwide. Our audience includes not only undergraduates, but also interested non-scientists, educators, and professional researchers. More broadly, Astrobites is interested in fostering the development of vital communication skills that are crucial to a successful science career, yet not formally taught in most astronomy PhD programs. In addition to providing our graduate student authors with valuable opportunities to practice these skills through writing and editing articles, we organize events such as the upcoming workshop Communicating Science 2013, at which graduate students in all science fields from around the country will learn from and interact with panelists who are experts in science communication.

  20. Particle accelerator physics and technology for high energy density physics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interaction phenomena of intense ion- and laser radiation with matter have a large range of application in different fields of science, extending from basic research of plasma properties to applications in energy science, especially in inertial fusion. The heavy ion synchrotron at GSI now routinely delivers intense uranium beams that deposit about 1 kJ/g of specific energy in solid matter, e.g. solid lead. Our simulations show that the new accelerator complex FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) at GSI as well as beams from the CERN large hadron collider (LHC) will vastly extend the accessible parameter range for high energy density states. A natural example of hot dense plasma is provided by our neighbouring star the sun, and allows a deep insight into the physics of fusion, the properties of matter at high energy density, and is moreover an excellent laboratory for astro-particle physics. As such the sun's interior plasma can even be used to probe the existence of novel particles and dark matter candidates. We present an overview on recent results and developments of dense plasma physics addressed with heavy ion and laser beams combined with accelerator- and nuclear physics technology. (authors)

  1. Summary reports of doctoral research fellows in 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JNC (Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute) has been promoting the fellowship program for young scientists to encourage their expertise from 1997. The objective of this program is to raise the talented persons for future JNC activities. This report summarized the status on the 17 themes of researches implemented by young research fellows in 1999. The report includes the list of individual titles and the site and supporting staffs of JNC. The individual reports given by 17 authors describe its time schedule, status, achievements and own publications in the prearranged format. Topics include the followings; Those are giant resonance structures of short lifetime nuclei, growth of cavities in structural materials, calculation methods of photonuclear interaction cross-section, stability and radioactivity diffusion of bentonite, plant ecology of radioactivity in uranium mines, numerical simulations on the TRUEX process, advanced nondestructive testing of materials, physical properties of actinides obtained by band theory, de-oxidisation capability in pyrite to decrease oxygen in bentonite, investigation on equilibrium fast reactor recycling, behaviors of underground water in the Tono Mine, effects of radiation induced educts on swelling, simulation on fuel-coolant interaction after severe accidents, and resonance ionization mass spectrometry for the JOYO reactor to detect failed fuel locations. (Tanaka, Y.)

  2. Contribution of a small university reactor to nuclear research in education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Triga Mark II reactor in Vienna, operated by the Vienna University of Technology, is the research reactor facility closest to the IAEA. Its main tasks are nuclear education and training in the fields of neutron and solid state physics, nuclear technology, reactor safety, radiochemistry, radiation protection and dosimetry, and low temperature physics and fusion research. Academic research is carried out by students in the fields mentioned. The students are coordinated and supervised by about 70 staff members with the aim of a Master's Degree or PhD in one of the areas mentioned. In addition, the Atomic Institute of the Austrian Universities cooperates closely with the IAEA, located nearby, in research projects, coordinated research projects (CRPs) and in supplying expert services. Regular training courses are performed for the IAEA for safeguard trainees. Moreover, fellowship places are offered for scientists from developing countries and staff members carry out expert missions to research centres in Africa, Asia and South America. Special nuclear material (SNM) belonging to the IAEA is stored for calibration purposes at the Atomic Institute. A summary follows of how and to what extent low power research reactors can efficiently be used to serve university education and training, cooperation with international and national networks, as well as for the IAEA in various fields, such as nuclear safeguards and participation in international coordinated projects

  3. Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martens, Frederick H. [Argonne National Laboratory; Jacobson, Norman H.

    1968-09-01

    This booklet discusses research reactors - reactors designed to provide a source of neutrons and/or gamma radiation for research, or to aid in the investigation of the effects of radiation on any type of material.

  4. Preeclampsia Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Media Resources Interviews & Selected Staff Profiles Multimedia Preeclampsia Research at the NICHD Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content NICHD Research aims to detect, treat, and prevent this potentially ...

  5. Research circles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Helle Merete; Thomsen, Rie; Möller, Jonas;

    lifelong guidance policies. This paper presents `research circles´ as a way to develop guidance practices through long-term research relationships between practice and research. Research circles support a bottom up approach to policy development just like ELGPN considers to be necessary and required in...... career guidance development. In the paper we draw on the preliminary findings from an ongoing Nordic project: “The future of career guidance and educational counselling”. Specifically, we explore the career guidance practitioners´ response to research circles as means to professional development. We...... argue that this practicebased way of organizing research facilitates learning, and potentially, qualifies practice. The collaboration between researchers and practitioners in the research circle fosters a joint venture and an academic perspective on practice, which stimulates practitioners to step out...

  6. Marketing research

    OpenAIRE

    Wienerová, Alžběta

    2013-01-01

    This bachelor’s thesis deals with marketing research of fair trade coffee market. Theoretical part is applied types of marketing research and characterization of theirs. It’s explained single steps of marketing research and activities which are practised in these. Final is chapter explained fiction of social responsible marketing. In practical part are information about fair trade certificate, about Starbucks and about purchase of coffee this corporate. After was maked research in on...

  7. Researcher Positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khawaja, Iram; Mørck, Line Lerche

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on the complex and multilayered process of researcher positioning,specifically in relation to the politically sensitive study of marginalised and "othered"groups such as Muslims living in Denmark. We discuss the impact of different ethnic,religious, and racial backgrounds, of...... involvement by the researcher, which challenges traditional perspectives onresearch and researcher positioning. A key point in this regard is the importance ofconstant awareness of and reflection on the multiple ways in which one's positioningas a researcher influences the research process. Studying the other...... calls for closereflections on one's own position, theoretically, personally, and politically, taking intoaccount one's complicity in either overcoming or reproducing processes of otheringand marginalisation....

  8. Research misconduct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Good research practice is important to the scientific community. An awareness of what constitutes poor practice is important. Various types of research misconduct are defined in this article. The extent of research misconduct in the field of radiology has been assessed by contacting five English language radiology journals. Redundant or duplicate publication has been reported infrequently, Radiology (1), American Journal of Roentgenology (3), Clinical Radiology (3), British Journal of Radiology (2) and European Radiology (1). The issue of how the radiology community might tackle research misconduct is discussed with reference to guidance from the Medical Research Council, the Wellcome Trust and the Committee of Publication Ethics

  9. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are currently 284 research reactors in operation, and 12 under construction around the world. Of the operating reactors, nearly two-thirds are used exclusively for research, and the rest for a variety of purposes, including training, testing, and critical assembly. For more than 50 years, research reactor programs have contributed greatly to the scientific and educational communities. Today, six of the world's research reactors are being shut down, three of which are in the USA. With government budget constraints and the growing proliferation concerns surrounding the use of highly enriched uranium in some of these reactors, the future of nuclear research could be impacted

  10. Utilization of nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Report on an IAEA interregional training course, Budapest, Hungary, 5-30 November 1979. The course was attended by 19 participants from 16 Member States. Among the 28 training courses which the International Atomic Energy Agency organized within its 1979 programme of technical assistance was the Interregional Training Course on the Utilization of Nuclear Research Reactors. This course was held at the Nuclear Training Reactor (a low-power pool-type reactor) of the Technical University, Budapest, Hungary, from 5 to 30 November 1979 and it was complemented by a one-week Study Tour to the Nuclear Research Centre in Rossendorf near Dresden, German Democratic Republic. The training course was very successful, with 19 participants attending from 16 Member States - Bangladesh, Bolivia, Czechoslovakia, Ecuador, Egypt, India, Iraq, Korean Democratic People's Republic, Morocco, Peru, Philippines, Spain, Thailand, Turkey, Vietnam and Yugoslavia. Selected invited lecturers were recruited from the USA and Finland, as well as local scientists from Hungarian institutions. During the past two decades or so, many research reactors have been put into operation around the world, and the demand for well qualified personnel to run and fully utilize these facilities has increased accordingly. Several developing countries have already acquired small- and medium-size research reactors mainly for isotope production, research in various fields, and training, while others are presently at different stages of planning and installation. Through different sources of information, such as requests to the IAEA for fellowship awards and experts, it became apparent that many research reactors and their associated facilities are not being utilized to their full potential in many of the developing countries. One reason for this is the lack of a sufficient number of trained professionals who are well acquainted with all the capabilities that a research reactor can offer, both in research and

  11. Research Impact and Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oancea, Alis

    2013-01-01

    Based on a 2010-11 study involving senior researchers from seven disciplines, this article explores critically some of the diverse interpretations of impact in different disciplines, sub-fields and modes of research, and researchers' views about how these interpretations articulate with top-down impact agendas and with university structures…

  12. Research 101: Understanding Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Angela; Bagby, Janet; Sulak, Tracey

    2010-01-01

    Currently, the Montessori community is increasing its focus on the importance of research. The purpose of this article is to provide some background for critical readers of research related to Montessori education and to provide the tools to implement these findings in one's own Montessori work. Research articles are generally organized in a way…

  13. HEASARC - The High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smale, Alan P.

    2011-01-01

    The High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) is NASA's archive for high-energy astrophysics and cosmic microwave background (CMB) data, supporting the broad science goals of NASA's Physics of the Cosmos theme. It provides vital scientific infrastructure to the community by standardizing science data formats and analysis programs, providing open access to NASA resources, and implementing powerful archive interfaces. Over the next five years the HEASARC will ingest observations from up to 12 operating missions, while serving data from these and over 30 archival missions to the community. The HEASARC archive presently contains over 37 TB of data, and will contain over 60 TB by the end of 2014. The HEASARC continues to secure major cost savings for NASA missions, providing a reusable mission-independent framework for reducing, analyzing, and archiving data. This approach was recognized in the NRC Portals to the Universe report (2007) as one of the HEASARC's great strengths. This poster describes the past and current activities of the HEASARC and our anticipated developments in coming years. These include preparations to support upcoming high energy missions (NuSTAR, Astro-H, GEMS) and ground-based and sub-orbital CMB experiments, as well as continued support of missions currently operating (Chandra, Fermi, RXTE, Suzaku, Swift, XMM-Newton and INTEGRAL). In 2012 the HEASARC (which now includes LAMBDA) will support the final nine-year WMAP data release. The HEASARC is also upgrading its archive querying and retrieval software with the new Xamin system in early release - and building on opportunities afforded by the growth of the Virtual Observatory and recent developments in virtual environments and cloud computing.

  14. Management of nuclear knowledge on an international scale using a small university research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Atominstitut Vienna operates a 250 kW TRIGA Mark-II reactor since March 1962 used for nuclear education and training in the fields of neutron- and solid state physics, nuclear technology, reactor safety, radiochemistry, radiation protection, dosimetry, low temperature physics and fusion research. During the past 20 years about 640 students graduated with a diploma - or PhD degree from the Atominstitut attached to the University of Technology Vienna. To perform nuclear relevant academic studies the Atominstitut offers about 100 highly specialised theoretical lectures and about 10 practical courses where students have to perform experiments in small groups of four on subjects mentioned above. Although the TRIGA reactor is a rather low power research reactor it is very easy and cheap to operate and an excellent tool to transfer knowledge and experience to the younger generation. This reactor is therefore not only used by other European universities such as University of Manchester or Bratislava Technical University but also by nuclear institutions such as the GRS/Germany, NPP Bohunice and NPP Mochovce for nuclear training. On an international scale the Atominstitut co-operates closely with the nearby located IAEA in international research projects, coordinated research programs (CRP) and supplying expert services. Regular training courses are carried out for the IAEA for Safeguard Trainees, fellowship places are offered for scientists from developing countries and staff members carry out expert missions to research centres in Africa, Asia and South America. In the past 20 years more than 120 IAEA fellows from all over the world have been trained at the Atominstitut. The fellows spend between one to twelve month at the Atominstitut and are integrated in the respective work program. Experience showed that out of this fellowship a long-term relation between the institutes continues. The paper focuses especially on the transfer of knowledge between

  15. Researcher positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørck, Line Lerche; Khawaja, Iram

    2009-01-01

    abstract  This article focuses on the complex and multi-layered process of researcher positioning, specifically in relation to the politically sensitive study of marginalised and ‘othered' groups such as Muslims living in Denmark. We discuss the impact of different ethnic, religious and racial...... political and personal involvement by the researcher, which challenges traditional perspectives on research and researcher positioning. A key point in this regard is the importance of constant awareness of and reflection on the multiple ways in which one's positioning as a researcher influences the research...... process. Studying the other calls for close reflections on one's own position, theoretically, personally, and politically, taking into account one's complicity in either overcoming or reproducing processes of othering and marginalisation. [i] We use the term (ethnic) minoritised, not as a distinction with...

  16. Centering research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katan, Lina Hauge; Baarts, Charlotte

    share as the common aim of both research and education. Despite some similarities, we find that how the two groups engage in and benefit from reading and writing diverges significantly. Thus we have even more reason to believe that centering practice-based teaching on these aspects of research is a good......’ exercises tend to dominate the common understandings of research-based learning. Here we address a specific area of inquiry overlooked by previous studies: whether and how reading, thinking and writing indeed share the same learning potentials as the practical foundation for research-based teaching....... In the humanities and social sciences, integrated acts of reading, writing and thinking account for an obvious and substantial overlap in student and researcher practices, creating a clear opportunity for research-based teaching. Moreover, our empirical data point to reading, thinking and writing as quintessential...

  17. Animal research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, I.A.S.; Sandøe, Peter

    2012-01-01

    in science (as in any other human use that is not also in the animals’ best interest). These views are not compatible, and since all three views in more or less pure form are found in modern Western societies, use of animals for research is bound to cause controversy. However, there may be room for some kind......This article presents the ethical issues in animal research using a combined approach of ethical theory and analysis of scientific findings with bearing on the ethical analysis. The article opens with a general discussion of the moral acceptability of animal use in research. The use of animals...... in research is analyzed from the viewpoint of three distinct ethical approaches: contractarianism, utilitarianism, and animal rights view. On a contractarian view, research on animals is only an ethical issue to the extent that other humans as parties to the social contract care about how research animals...

  18. Research methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuada, John

    This book deals with how students should use of research methods in their university projects. It aims at helping students in developing comprehensive research strategies for their projects. It also provides introduction to issues of philosophy of science as applied in the social sciences. That is...... it provides them with a fair understanding of the root assumptions that guide researchers in their investigations and how these assumptions inform their theoretical thinking and choice of methods....

  19. Avian Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    <正>Aims and Scope Avian Research is an open access,peer-reviewed journal publishing high quality research and review articles on all aspects of ornithology from all over the world.It aims to report the latest and most significant progress in ornithology and to encourage exchange of ideas among international ornithologists.As an Open Access journal,Avian Research provides a unique opportunity to publish high quality contents that will be internationally accessible to any reader at no cost.

  20. Plant Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    The Land's agricultural research team is testing new ways to sustain life in space as a research participant with Kennedy Space Center's Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS). The Land, sponsored by Kraft General Foods, is an entertainment, research, and education facility at EPCOT Center, part of Walt Disney World. The cooperative effort is simultaneously a research and development program, a technology demonstration that provides the public to see high technology at work and an area of potential spinoff: the CELSS work may generate Earth use technology beneficial to the hydroponic (soilless growing) vegetable production industries of the world.