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Sample records for asthma doctors completing

  1. Asthma control - Practical suggestions for practicing doctors in family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    practicing doctors in family practice. Green RJ, MBBCh, DCH(SA), FCPaed(SA), .... Asthma control assessment cannot be done in a few minutes during a quick consultation. Unfortunately this is a part of .... not limited to language differences, but also includes ethnicity, the generation gap and the difference in the levels of ...

  2. [Asthma guidelines: knowledge of family doctors and trainees in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingner, H; Piepenschneider, D; Schleef, T; Criée, C-P; Kardos, P; Worth, H; Hummers-Pradier, E

    2013-06-01

    In Germany as well as internationally, evidence-based asthma guidelines were developed as a decision aid for diagnosis and therapy. However, adherence to recommendations is usually less than optimal. The authors explore potential implementation barriers: knowledge gaps, practical presentation of guidelines, and attitudes of doctors and patients. In this paper, we compare results of our knowledge survey of family doctors and trainees with results of similar national and international studies. In all studies, all surveyed groups of physicians revealed considerable knowledge gaps. Many physicians in our own study erroneously preferred mucolytics and antibiotics to treat acute or subacute asthma symptoms though these drugs are not or only exceptionally indicated. The inflammatory character of asthma often goes unrecognized, as well as the importance of inhaled (and systemic) corticosteroids in long term treatment (or treatment of exacerbations). © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. What Works for Doctoral Students in Completing Their Thesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Siân

    2015-01-01

    Writing a thesis is one of the most challenging activities that a doctoral student must undertake and can represent a barrier to timely completion. This is relevant in light of current and widespread concerns regarding doctoral completion rates. This study explored thesis writing approaches of students post or near Ph.D. completion through…

  4. Meeting the Challenges of Completing a Counseling Doctoral Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Susan R.; Ullery, Elizabeth K.; Millner, Vaughn S.; Cobia, Debra C.

    1999-01-01

    Tasks of a doctoral program are discussed, including selecting a program, maneuvering through initial experiences, making adjustments, completing coursework, preparing for comprehensive examinations, choosing an internship, and completing the dissertation. (Author)

  5. Drug prescription pattern for asthma among nigerian doctors in general practice: A cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ademola E Fawibe

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: The poor anti-asthma prescribing behavior among these doctors is associated with a low level of participation at update training on asthma management and poor awareness of asthma guidelines. The Nigerian Medical Association and the Nigerian Thoracic Society should urgently address these problems.

  6. Factors affecting the Timely Completion of Doctoral Degree in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Forty-five doctoral graduates in library and information science (LIS) of Nigerian universities from 2009 to 2013 were surveyed in order to determine factors affecting the timely completion of doctoral degree programme in LIS in Nigerian universities. Using social survey design, a questionnaire purposely designed for the ...

  7. Asthma control - Practical suggestions for practicing doctors in family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the 'Goals of asthma management' as set out in the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guidelines. Despite the availability of useful asthma therapies and treatment strategies, the morbidity from asthma has remained significant. This review includes practical suggestions on optimal asthma control for the family practitioner.

  8. Inhaled medication for asthma management: evaluation of how asthma patients, medical students, and doctors use the different devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muniz Janaína Barbosa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma results from a combination of three essential features: airflow obstruction, hyperresponsiveness of airways to endogenous or exogenous stimuli and inflammation. Inadequacy of the techniques to use different inhalation devices is one of the causes of therapeutic failure. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate how 20 medical students, 36 resident physicians of Internal Medicine/Pediatrics, and 40 asthma patients used three devices for inhalation therapy containing placebo. All patients were followed at the Pulmonary Outpatient Service of Botucatu Medical School and had been using inhaled medication for at least six months. The following devices were evaluated: metered dose inhalers (MDI, dry powder inhalers (DPI, and MDI attached to a spacer device. A single observer applied a protocol containing the main steps necessary to obtain a good inhaler technique to follow and grade the use of different devices. Health care professionals tested all three devices and patients tested only the device being used on their management. MDI was the device best known by doctors and patients. MDI use was associated with errors related to the coordination between inspiration and device activation. Failure to exhale completely before inhalation of the powder was the most frequent error observed with DPI use. In summary, patients did not receive precise instruction on how to use inhaled medication and health care professionals were not well prepared to adequately teach their patients.

  9. Doctoral Students in a Distance Program: Advising and Degree Completion Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Marilyn L.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to suggest strategies for advising doctoral students in an online doctoral program in educational leadership and higher education. The strategies are based on experiences with 33 doctoral students who completed their doctoral degrees 1992-2016. The strategies for doctoral advising offered in this manuscript are…

  10. Women of African Descent: Persistence in Completing Doctorates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iddrisu, Vannetta Bailey

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the educational persistence of women of African descent (WOAD) in pursuit of a doctorate degree at universities in the southeastern United States. WOAD are women of African ancestry born outside the African continent. These women are heirs to an inner dogged determination and spirit to survive despite all odds (Pulliam, 2003,…

  11. Journey to the Doctorate: Motivating Factors for Persistence and Completion of Doctoral Programs among McNair Scholars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baness King, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Using a qualitative approach, this study investigated the perceptions of motivating factors for persistence and completion of the doctorate among low income, first generation and students of color that participated in the federally funded Ronald E. McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Program. Purposive sampling was used to obtain a pool of nine…

  12. Doctoral Students' Experiences Leading to Completion or Attrition: A Matter of Sense, Progress and Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devos, Christelle; Boudrenghien, Gentiane; Van der Linden, Nicolas; Azzi, Assaad; Frenay, Mariane; Galand, Benoit; Klein, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    A central trend in qualitative studies investigating doctoral students' dropout is to stress the importance of students' integration and socialisation in their working environment. Yet, few of these studies actually compared the experiences of doctoral students who completed or quit their PhD. In order to overcome this limitation and identify the…

  13. Lessons Learned for Successful Dissertation Completion from Social Work Doctoral Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ashley; Wladkowski, Stephanie P.; Mirick, Rebecca G.

    2017-01-01

    A dissertation demonstrates a doctoral candidate's knowledge of a content area, mastery of research methodology, and readiness for future scholarship. Doctoral candidates, social work programs, and the profession as a whole are invested in ensuring that candidates successfully complete dissertations and enter academic, research, and leadership…

  14. Doctoral Theses in Library and Information Science Completed in Indian Universities, 2001-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestri, D. D.

    2008-01-01

    Provides a complete listing and analysis of 219 doctoral theses submitted to the departments of library and information science (DLIS) in 45 Indian universities between January 2001 and December 2007. (Contains 10 tables.)

  15. Knowledge and use of asthma control measurement tools in the management of asthma: a survey of doctors working in family and internal medicine practice in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desalu, Olufemi Olumuyiwa; Onyedum, Cajetan C; Adeoti, Adekunle O; Ozoh, Obianuju B; Fadare, Joseph O

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the knowledge and use of asthma control measurement (ACM) tools in the management of asthma among doctors working in family and internal medicine practice in Nigeria. A questionnaire based on the global initiative on asthma (GINA) guideline was self-administered by 194 doctors. It contains 12 test items on knowledge of ACM tools and its application. The knowledge score was obtained by adding the correct answers and classified as good if the score ≥ 9, satisfactory if score was 6-8 and poor if tools was 4.49±2.14 (maximum of 12). Pulmonologists recorded the highest knowledge score of 10.75±1.85. The majority (69.6%) had poor knowledge score of ACM tools. Fifty (25.8%) assessed their patients' level of asthma control and 34(17.5%) at every visit. Thirty-nine (20.1%) used ACM tools in their consultation, 29 (15.0%) of them used GINA defined control while 10 (5.2 %) used asthma control test (ACT). The use of the tools was associated with pulmonologists, having attended CME within six months and graduated within five years prior to the survey. The results highlight the poor knowledge and use of ACM tools and the need to address the knowledge gap.

  16. A study of the lived experiences of African American women STEM doctoral degree completers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, Stephanie Michelle

    This study examined the lived experiences of African American women (AAW) who completed doctoral degrees in a STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) discipline in the United States. This study sought to fill the gap in the literature by examining how AAW described and made meaning of lived STEM educational experiences during doctoral degree completion in the context of the intersection of being African American and a woman. This study utilized a theoretical perspective based upon three theories: (a) critical race theory as a framework to gather AAW's narratives about STEM doctorate education, (b) Black feminist thought as a framework to view the intersection of being African American and a woman in the United States, and (c) the science identity model as a framework to view how women of color successfully complete scientific graduate degrees. Participants revealed that being an African American and a woman in a STEM doctoral program often complicated an already difficult process of completing the doctoral degree. The participants described the educational experience as challenging, particularly the writing of the dissertation. The challenges that the participants faced were due to various factors such as difficult advisor/advisee relationships, tedious writing and revision processes, politics, and lack of information regarding the doctoral degree process. The findings suggested that AAW participants confronted intrinsic bias while completing STEM doctoral degrees, which led to isolation and feelings of being an impostor---or feelings of not belonging in scientific studies. The findings also indicated that the women in this study ascribed success in dissertation writing and degree completion to one or more of the following attributes: (a) having a clear plan, (b) taking ownership of the writing process, (c) having an engaged advisor, (d) learning the writing style of the advisor, (e) understanding the temperament of the advisor, (f) personal will

  17. The Relationship between Doctoral Completion Time, Gender, and Future Salary Prospects for Physical Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin, Geoff; Tai, Robert H.

    2012-03-01

    Drawing from a national survey of Ph.D.-holding physical scientists, we present evidence that doctoral completion time is a strong predictor of future salary prospects: each additional year in graduate school corresponds to a substantially lower average salary. This is true even while controlling for typical measures of scientific merit (grant funding and publication rates) and several other structural and career factors expected to influence salaries. Extending this picture to include gender effects, we show that women earn significantly less than men overall and experience no effect of doctoral completion time on their salaries, while men see a significant gain in salary stemming from earlier completion times. Doctoral completion time is shown to be largely unconnected to measures of prior academic success, research independence, and scientific merit suggesting that doctoral completion time is, to a great extent, out of the control of individual graduate students. Nonetheless, it can be influential on an individual's future career prospects, as can gender-related effects.

  18. Can Low-Cost Support Programmes with Coaching Accelerate Doctoral Completion in Health Science Faculty Academics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geber, Hilary; Bentley, Alison

    2012-01-01

    Career development for full-time Health Sciences academics through to doctoral studies is a monumental task. Many academics have difficulty completing their studies in the minimum time as well as publishing after obtaining their degree. As this problem is particularly acute in the Health Sciences, the PhD Acceleration Programme in Health Sciences…

  19. Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... babies. Poor asthma control increases the risk of preeclampsia, a condition in which a pregnant woman develops ... other conditions that can interfere with your asthma management. Watch for Signs That Your Asthma Is Getting ...

  20. [Doctoral thesis projects for medical students? Retrospective estimation of the fraction of successfully completed medical doctoral thesis projects at Witten/Herdecke University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfenberg, Janna; Schaper, Katharina; Krummenauer, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The German "Dr med" plays a specific role in doctoral thesis settings since students may start the underlying doctoral project during their studies at medical school. If a Medical Faculty principally encourages this approach, then it should support the students in performing the respective projects as efficiently as possible. Consequently, it must be ensured that students are able to implement and complete a doctoral project in parallel to their studies. As a characteristic efficiency feature of these "Dr med" initiatives, the proportion of doctoral projects successfully completed shortly after graduating from medical school is proposed and illustrated. The proposed characteristic can be estimated by the time period between the state examination (date of completion of the qualifying medical examination) and the doctoral examination. Completion of the doctoral project "during their medical studies" was then characterised by a doctoral examination no later than 12 months after the qualifying medical state examination. To illustrate the estimation and interpretation of this characteristic, it was retrospectively estimated on the basis of the full sample of all doctorates successfully completed between July 2009 and June 2012 at the Department of Human Medicine at the Faculty of Health of the University of Witten/Herdecke. During the period of investigation defined, a total number of 56 doctoral examinations were documented, 30 % of which were completed within 12 months after the qualifying medical state examination (95% confidence interval 19 to 44 %). The median duration between state and doctoral examination was 27 months. The proportion of doctoral projects completed parallel to the medical studies increased during the investigation period from 14 % in the first year (July 2009 till June 2010) to 40 % in the third year (July 2011 till June 2012). Only about a third of all "Dr med" projects at the Witten/Herdecke Faculty of Health were completed during or close to

  1. Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Cough How the Lungs Work Oxygen Therapy Pulmonary Function Tests Other Resources NHLBI Resources "Asthma Action Plan" "Asthma and Physical Activity in the School" "At-A-Glance: Asthma" "How Asthma-Friendly Is ...

  2. Reasons for the Slow Completion of Masters and Doctoral Degrees by Adult Learners in a South African Township

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motseke, Masilonyana

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the reasons why adult learners took longer than required to complete their Master's and Doctoral degrees. A questionnaire and focus group interviews were used to collect data. Twenty adult learners who registered for the Master's and Doctoral degrees at one township campus of a university were targeted, and…

  3. Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Harold

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Asthma is the most common respiratory disorder in Canada. Despite significant improvement in the diagnosis and management of this disorder, the majority of Canadians with asthma remain poorly controlled. In most patients, however, control can be achieved through the use of avoidance measures and appropriate pharmacological interventions. Inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs represent the standard of care for the majority of patients. Combination ICS/long-acting beta2-agonists (LABA inhalers are preferred for most adults who fail to achieve control with ICS therapy. Allergen-specific immunotherapy represents a potentially disease-modifying therapy for many patients with asthma, but should only be prescribed by physicians with appropriate training in allergy. Regular monitoring of asthma control, adherence to therapy and inhaler technique are also essential components of asthma management. This article provides a review of current literature and guidelines for the appropriate diagnosis and management of asthma.

  4. An audit cycle of consent form completion: A useful tool to improve junior doctor training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Leng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Consent for surgical procedures is an essential part of the patient's pathway. Junior doctors are often expected to do this, especially in the emergency setting. As a result, the aim of our audit was to assess our practice in consenting and institute changes within our department to maintain best medical practice. Methods: An audit of consent form completion was conducted in March 2013. Standards were taken from Good Surgical Practice (2008 and General Medical Council guidelines. Inclusion of consent teaching at a formal consultant delivered orientation programme was then instituted. A re-audit was completed to reassess compliance. Results: Thirty-seven consent forms were analysed. The re-audit demonstrated an improvement in documentation of benefits (91–100% and additional procedures (0–7.5%. Additional areas for improvement such as offering a copy of the consent form to the patient and confirmation of consent if a delay occurred between consenting and the procedure were identified. Conclusion: The re-audit demonstrated an improvement in the consent process. It also identified new areas of emphasis that were addressed in formal teaching sessions. The audit cycle can be a useful tool in monitoring, assessing and improving clinical practice to ensure the provision of best patient care.

  5. An Analysis of Persistence and Motivation in Public Research Institutions for Doctoral Completers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbert, Marvette D.

    2013-01-01

    Doctoral student attrition is an issue of great concern among leaders in higher education (Gardner, 2009a). In response to concern for high attrition rates in doctoral programs, several studies (Lovitts, 2001; National Science Foundation, 2004; Nettles & Millett, 2006) investigated this issue aimed at gaining data to address this concern.…

  6. Examining the Relationships among Doctoral Completion Time, Gender, and Future Salary Prospects for Physical Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin, Geoff; Tai, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    Using data from a national survey of Ph.D.-holding chemists and physicists, time-to-doctoral degree is found to be a strong predictor of salary: each additional year in graduate school corresponds to a significantly lower average salary. This is true even while controlling for standard measures of scientific merit (grant funding and publication…

  7. [Role of the family doctor in the completion and registration of advance directives documents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal Hernández, M; Rivas Baez, J A; Martínez Monje, F; Lozano Espinosa, M

    2015-04-01

    The attitude of professionals about living wills (advance directives) is not homogenous and varies depending on the specialty, experience and beliefs. Many doctors are still afraid of inconveniencing patients. The situation confronting the professional in an acute care hospital with a relatively unknown patient in a palliative care unit is not the same as consulting a family doctor who is caring for the patient holistically. Primary care has a unique position to approach the life and values of our patients and their families and not just the disease, which makes it the right place to guide and advise the patient on the preparation and registration of living wills. Copyright © 2014. Publicado por Elsevier España.

  8. Living with asthma in 19th-century France: The doctor, Armand Trousseau, and the patient, Emile Pereire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Helen M

    2018-01-01

    Major advances in the French medical system following the French Revolution have stimulated a rich historiography of which Michel Foucault's Naissance de la clinique: une archéologie du regard médical (1963) and Erwin H. Ackerknecht's Medicine at the Paris Hospital, 1794-1848 (1967) are of lasting significance. Changes in the organisation and structure of hospitals accompanied the development and availability of new medical technologies and procedures and encouraged a more intense study of the aetiology and pathology of disease. Theories about asthma and its treatment profited from this dynamic environment as Classical Greek doctrines about the effect of the humours on bodily imbalance gave way to an increasingly more precise understanding of the nature and cause of asthma. The clinician and teacher, Armand Trousseau (1801-1867), who held the chair of Clinical Medicine at the Hôtel-Dieu in Paris and was himself an asthmatic, promoted new theories about the illness and developed innovative ways of dealing with its effects. Among his patients was the banker and financier, Emile Pereire (1800-1875), a lifelong asthmatic. Based on the Pereire Family Archives (hereafter AFP), the case of Emile Pereire provides a preface to the later case of that other, more famous, asthmatic, Marcel Proust.

  9. Obesity and Asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Caroline Trunk-Black; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is more prevalent in obese compared with normal weight subjects. Our aim has been to review current knowledge of the impact of obesity on asthma severity, asthma control, and response to therapy.Several studies have shown that overweight and obesity is associated with more severe asthma...... and impaired quality of life compared with normal weight individuals. Furthermore, obesity is associated with poorer asthma control, as assessed by asthma control questionnaires, limitations in daily activities, breathlessness and wheezing, use of rescue medication, unscheduled doctor visits, emergency...... department visits, and hospitalizations for acute asthma. Studies of the impact of a high body mass index (BMI) on response to asthma therapy have, however, revealed conflicting results. Most studies show that overweight and obesity is associated with less favorable response to asthma therapy with regard...

  10. Asthma control in London secondary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Katherine; Mosler, Gioia; Williams, Samson A; Whitehouse, Abigail; Raine, Rosalind; Grigg, Jonathan

    2017-12-01

    The asthma control test (ACT) is a validated tool for assessing control in asthmatic children aged 12 years and older. Using the ACT, we sought to assess asthma control and knowledge in London secondary school children. Secondary schools in London, UK, participated in this study. Children with doctor-diagnosed asthma were invited to complete an online questionnaire that included the ACT and questions about asthma. Suboptimal asthma control was defined as an ACT score of ≤ 19 out of a maximum score of 25. Data are summarised as median and interquartile range (IQR), and were analysed by either Mann-Whitney test, or chi-square test. A p value of asthma control was reported by 49.6% of students. Over a third (42.4%) of students prescribed a short-acting β2-agonist inhaler felt uncomfortable using it at school, and 29.2% (n = 173) reported not using this inhaler when wheezy. 56.4% (n = 220) of those with regular inhaled corticosteroids did not take them as prescribed, and 41.7% did not know what this inhaler was for. Suboptimal control was associated with a greater proportion of students reporting that they were 'somewhat', 'hardly' or 'not at all' comfortable using inhalers at school (52.7% vs 29.1%, p asthma control and poor asthma knowledge are common in London schoolchildren.

  11. The national review of asthma deaths: what did we learn and what needs to change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Key points The 2014 UK National Review of Asthma Deaths identified potentially preventable factors in two-thirds of the medical records of cases scrutinised 45% of people who died from asthma did not call for or receive medical assistance in their final fatal attack Overall asthma management, acute and chronic, in primary and secondary care was judged to be good in less than one-fifth of those who died There was a failure by doctors and nurses to identify and act on risk factors for asthma attacks and asthma death The rationale for diagnosing asthma was not evident in a considerable number of cases, and there were inaccuracies related to the completion of medical certificates of the cause of death in over half of the cases considered for the UK National Review of Asthma Deaths Educational aims To increase awareness of some of the findings of the recent UK National Review of Asthma Deaths and previous similar studies To emphasise the need for accurate diagnosis of asthma, and of the requirements for completion of medical certificates of the cause of death To consider areas for improving asthma care and prevention of attacks and avoidable deaths Summary Despite the development and publication of evidence-based asthma guidelines nearly three decades ago, potentially preventable factors are repeatedly identified in studies of the care provided for patients who die from asthma. The UK National Review of Asthma Deaths (NRAD), a confidential enquiry, was no exception: major preventable factors were identified in two-thirds of asthma deaths. Most of these factors, such as inappropriate prescription and failure to provide patients with personal asthma action plans (PAAPs), could possibly have been prevented had asthma guidelines been implemented. NRAD involved in-depth scrutiny by clinicians of the asthma care for 276 people who were classified with asthma as the underlying cause of death in real-life. A striking finding was that a third of these patients did not actually

  12. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PDF – 1.1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir You can control your asthma and avoid an attack by taking your medicine exactly as your doctor or other medical professional ...

  13. Pets keeping in home, parental atopy, asthma, and asthma-related symptoms in 12,910 elementary school children from northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, G-H; Ma, Y-N; Ding, H-L; Jin, J; Cao, Y; Zhao, Y-D; He, Q-C

    2009-04-01

    The effects of pet exposure and parental atopy on respiratory symptoms were investigated in 12,910 children residing in twelve districts of northeast China. Responses to a self-administered questionnaire completed by parents of children were used to ascertain children with persistent cough, persistent phlegm, doctor-diagnosed asthma, current asthma and current wheeze. Exposure to animals during pregnancy was positively associated with doctor-diagnosed asthma [adjusted odds ratio (ORs), 1.86; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.35-2.57], current asthma (adjusted OR, 3.06; 95% CI, 1.95-4.81) and asthma-related symptoms. Pet exposure in the first year of life and currently having animals in household were also related to a significantly higher prevalence of doctor-diagnosed asthma and asthma-related symptoms in these children. Associations with respiratory symptoms strengthened with higher levels of animal exposure. Parental atopy increased the risk of asthma diagnosis (OR, 3.49; 95%CI, 2.84-4.30), current asthma (OR, 3.94; 95%CI, 2.81-5.54) and asthma-related symptoms. There was an interaction between parental atopy and pet exposure in persistent phlegm, but not in doctor-diagnosed asthma. We conclude that pet keeping and parental atopy increased the risk of respiratory symptoms in children. Parental atopy did modify the effect of pet exposure on persistent phlegm but not on doctor-diagnosed asthma. The relationship between exposure to animals and allergic respiratory diseases in childhood is controversial. Inconsistent with other cross-sectional studies mostly conducted in industrialized countries, our study indicates that exposure to animals may increase the occurrence of respiratory symptoms and diseases in children, and the associations with respiratory symptoms strengthened with higher levels of animal exposure parental atopy did modify the effect of pet exposure on persistent phlegm but not on doctor-diagnosed asthma. These findings support the view that measures

  14. Knowledge and use of asthma control measurement tools in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To investigate the knowledge and use of asthma control measurement (ACM) tools in the management of asthma among doctors working in family and internal medicine practice in Nigeria. Method: A questionnaire based on the global initiative on asthma (GINA) guideline was self-administered by 194 doctors.

  15. A case for revising the strength of the relationship between childhood asthma and atopy in the developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, S; Els, C; Boonzaaier, L; Becker, P; Green, R J

    2013-05-22

    Asthma is the commonest chronic condition of children. Diagnosis remains difficult and many surrogate markers are used, such as documenting evidence of atopy. Two studies investigated the role of atopy in childhood asthma. The first documented the prevalence and nature of allergy sensitivities in a group of asthmatic children compared with non-asthmatic children in Pretoria, South Africa. The second enrolled a random sample of asthmatic children and their mothers attending the Children's Chest and Allergy Clinic at Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Pretoria. Children were classified as having atopic or non-atopic asthma. Mothers completed a questionnaire to reveal atopic features. In the first study, only 45.0% of asthmatic children had a positive skin-prick test (SPT), as opposed to 16.2% of control children. This is a lower proportion than in many reported international studies. In the second study, 64 children with atopic asthma and 36 with non-atopic asthma were studied, along with their mothers. The proportion of children with atopic asthma did not differ for mothers with and without a positive SPT (p=0.836), a history of asthma (p=0.045) or symptoms suggestive of an allergic disease (p=1.000), or who were considered to be allergic (p=0.806). The odds ratio (OR) of a child having atopic asthma when he or she had a mother with a doctor-diagnosed history of asthma was 4.76, but the sensitivity was low (21.9%). The data demonstrate that fewer asthmatic children in South Africa are atopic than was previously thought. Also, all maternal allergic or asthmatic associations are poor predictors of childhood atopic asthma. Despite the increased risk of atopic asthma in a child of a mother who has a doctor diagnosis of asthma (OR 4.76; p=0.045), this is a poor predictor of atopic asthma (sensitivity 21.9%).

  16. Are asthma-like symptoms in elite athletes associated with classical features of asthma?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, T.K.; Pedersen, L.; Anderson, S.D.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Asthma is frequent in elite athletes and clinical studies in athletes have found increased airway inflammation. Objective: To investigate asthma-like symptoms, airway inflammation, airway reactivity (AR) to mannitol and use of asthma medication in Danish elite athletes. Methods......: The study group consisted of 54 elite athletes (19 with doctor-diagnosed asthma), 22 non-athletes with doctor-diagnosed asthma (steroid naive for 4 weeks before the examination) and 35 non-athletes without asthma; all aged 18-35 years. Examinations (1 day): questionnaires, exhaled nitric oxide (e......-diagnosed asthma had less AR (response dose ratio 0.02 (0.004) vs 0.08 (0.018) pathletes with doctor-diagnosed asthma. Use of inhaled corticosteroids was similar in the two groups (not significant). In all, 42 elite athletes had...

  17. Fertility outcomes in asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Elisabeth Juul; Thomsen, Simon Francis; Lindenberg, Svend

    2016-01-01

    of fertility treatments, and the number of successful pregnancies differ significantly between women with unexplained infertility with and without asthma.245 women with unexplained infertility (aged 23-45 years) underwent questionnaires and asthma and allergy testing while undergoing fertility treatment. 96...... women entering the study had either a former doctor's diagnosis of asthma or were diagnosed with asthma when included. After inclusion they were followed for a minimum of 12 months in fertility treatment, until they had a successful pregnancy, stopped treatment, or the observation ended.The likelihood...... pregnancies during fertility treatment, 39.6 versus 60.4% (p=0.002). Increasing age was of negative importance for expected time to pregnancy, especially among asthmatic women (interaction between age and asthma on time to pregnancy, p=0.001). Female asthmatics had a longer time to pregnancy and less often...

  18. Asthma Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Giving Teens a Voice in Health Care Decisions Asthma KidsHealth > For Parents > Asthma Print A A A ... Should I Know? en español Asma What Is Asthma? Asthma is a condition that causes breathing problems. ...

  19. Maternal vitamin D and E intakes during pregnancy are associated with asthma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Keith M; Prabhu, Nanda; Craig, Leone C A; McNeill, Geraldine; Kirby, Bradley; McLay, James; Helms, Peter J; Ayres, Jon G; Seaton, Anthony; Turner, Stephen W; Devereux, Graham

    2015-04-01

    Are maternal vitamin D and E intakes during pregnancy associated with asthma in 10-year-old children? In a longitudinal study of 1924 children born to women recruited during pregnancy, maternal vitamin D intake during pregnancy was assessed by the Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and vitamin E by FFQ and plasma α-tocopherol; respiratory questionnaires were completed for the 10-year-old children. Their treatment for asthma was also ascertained using administrative data. Longitudinal analyses included data collected at 1, 2, 5 and 10 years. Symptom data were available for 934 (49%) children and use of asthma medication for 1748 (91%). In the children maternal vitamin D intake during pregnancy was negatively associated with doctor-diagnosed asthma at 10 years of age (OR per intake quintile 0.86, 95% CI 0.74-0.99) and over the first 10 years (hazard ratio 0.90, 95% CI 0.81-1.00). Maternal plasma α-tocopherol at 11 weeks gestation was negatively associated with children receiving asthma treatment (OR per standard deviation increase 0.52, 95% CI 0.31-0.87). Maternal vitamin E intake was negatively associated with doctor-diagnosed asthma (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.81-0.99) in the first 10 years. Low maternal vitamin D and E intakes during pregnancy are associated with increased risk of children developing asthma in the first 10 years of life. These associations may have significant public health implications. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  20. Basal or stress-induced cortisol and asthma development : the TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, Nienke M; Boezen, Hendrika; Postma, Dirkje S; Rosmalen, Judith G M

    We examined the association between: 1) cortisol levels and asthma or asthma development; 2) cortisol levels upon stress and asthma. In addition, we performed a post hoc meta-analysis on results from the literature. Cortisol, cortisol upon stress, asthma (doctor diagnosis of asthma and/or symptoms

  1. Asthma education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-01-01

    ). Allergy and Asthma Clinic, Red Cross War Memorial Hospital. Mike Levin runs a secondary level asthma/ allergy clinic and does a tertiary allergy session once a week, focusing on difficult asthma and food allergies. He has ...

  2. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... asthma and avoid an attack by taking your medicine exactly as your doctor or other medical professional ... Page last reviewed: May 6, 2013 Page last updated: November 19, 2014 Content source: National Center for ...

  3. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... avoid an attack by taking your medicine exactly as your doctor or other medical professional tells you ... keep them with your Asthma Action Plan. Using a metered dose inhaler with a spacer Your browser ...

  4. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... your doctor or other medical professional tells you to do and by avoiding things that can cause ...

  5. Young People's Preferences for an Asthma Self-Management App Highlight Psychological Needs: A Participatory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Dorian; Davis, Sharon; Calvo, Rafael Alejandro; Sawyer, Susan M; Smith, Lorraine; Foster, Juliet M

    2017-04-11

    Although the prevalence of mental illness among young people with asthma is known to be twice the rate of the wider population, none of the asthma apps reported have acknowledged or attempted to include psychological support features. This is perhaps because user involvement in the development of asthma apps has been scarce. User involvement, facilitated by participatory design methods, can begin to address these issues while contributing insights to our understanding of the psychological experience associated with asthma and how technology might improve quality of life. The goal of this participatory user research study was to explore the experience, needs, and ideas of young people with asthma while allowing them to define requirements for an asthma app that would be engaging and effective at improving their well-being. Young people aged 15-24 years with doctor-diagnosed asthma were invited to participate in a participatory workshop and to complete a workbook designed to elicit their thoughts and ideas about living with asthma, technology use, and the design of an app. Participants generated a number of artifacts (including collages, concept maps, and paper prototypes) designed to reify their ideas, tacit knowledge, and experience. A total of 20 participants (mean age 17.8 years; 60%, 12/20 female) representing a range from inadequately to well-controlled asthma completed a workbook and 13 of these also took part in a workshop (four workshops were held in total), resulting in 102 participant-generated artifacts. Theoretical thematic analysis resulted in a set of personal needs, feature ideas, and app characteristics considered relevant by young people for an asthma support app. The data revealed that psychological factors such as anxiety, and impediments to autonomy, competence, and relatedness (as consistent with self-determination theory [SDT]), were considered major influences on quality of life by young people with asthma. Furthermore, the incorporation of

  6. Prevalence of asthma-like symptoms, asthma and its treatment in elite athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, T; Pedersen, L; Larsson, B

    2008-01-01

    The objective was to determine the prevalence of asthma-like symptoms and asthma and the use of asthma medication in Danish elite athletes. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey of Danish elite athletes was conducted in 2006. All elite athletes (N=418) financially supported by the national...... organization of elite athletes comprised the study group; 329 (79%) completed the questionnaire concerning their sport, asthma-like symptoms, asthma and use of asthma medication. Asthma-like symptoms at rest were reported by 41% of respondents; 55% reported asthma-like symptoms at rest or at exercise....... Physician-diagnosed asthma was present in 16% and 14% had current asthma. Asthma medication was taken by 7% of the athletes, of whom 79% used inhaled corticosteroids and 21% used inhaled beta(2)-agonists only. Athletes participating in endurance sports had higher prevalences of current asthma (24%) and use...

  7. A snapshot of pharmacist attitudes and behaviors surrounding the management of pediatric asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elaro, Amanda; Shah, Smita; Armour, Carol L; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the current status of pediatric asthma management in the Australian community pharmacy setting from the pharmacists' perspective. This research will allow us to identify training needs of community pharmacists. Pharmacists were recruited from the Sydney metropolitan region and asked to complete a self-reported questionnaire that elucidated information on four general domains relating to pediatric asthma management within community pharmacy. All data collected were analysed descriptively. Bivariate Pearson correlations were performed to determine whether interrelationships existed between specific domains. All 77 pharmacists completed the questionnaire. Thirty-two percent had not completed any asthma related CPD in the past year and only 25% of pharmacists reported using the national asthma guidelines in practice. Just over half of the pharmacists (54%) reported that they provide device technique demonstrations for new inhaled medicines, and 35% of pharmacists reported that they check for written asthma self-management plan possession. Although 65% of pharmacists reported confidence in communication skills, most pharmacists were not confident in setting short-/long-term goals with the patient and carer for managing asthma at home. Pharmacists believed that they are just as effective as doctors in providing asthma counseling and education. Lack of time was identified as a significant barrier. We have identified a gap between guideline recommended practices and the self-reported practices of community pharmacists. Pharmacists need more appropriate continuing education programs that can translate into improved pediatric asthma self-management practices and thus improved asthma outcomes in children. This may require an alternative approach.

  8. Doctoral surplus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Universities in the United States are producing about 25% more doctorates in science and engineering than the U.S. economy can absorb, according to a new study by the Rand Corporation and Stanford University's Institute for Higher Education Research. The study looked at 13 science and engineering fields, covering 210 doctorate-granting institutions and more than 1,000 educational institutions that employ people with doctorates. The study was done by Stanford Professor William Massy and Charles Goldman of Rand, with graduate students Marc Chun and Beryle Hsiao.The researchers found that supply and demand do not work in the usual way to regulate the employment market for doctoral candidates. In labor markets, when job opportunities decrease, fewer people usually seek to enter the field. In the case of Ph.D.s, however, the researchers found that neither departments nor prospective doctoral students take close accounting of the doctorate employment gap.

  9. A survey of asthma management practices and implementation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Bronchial asthma is a global health problem that causes significant morbidity and mortality in all age groups. Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) seeks to standardize the care asthma patients receive. We assessed the knowledge, attitude, and practices of doctors in Umuahia, Southeast Nigeria, regarding ...

  10. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health ... as your doctor or other medical professional tells you to do and by avoiding things that can cause an attack. Watch a video to follow along ...

  11. Evaluation of quality of life according to asthma control and asthma severity in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Natasha Yumi; Ribeiro, Maria Angela Gonçalves de Oliveira; Saad, Ivete Alonso Bredda; Morcillo, André Moreno; Ribeiro, José Dirceu; Toro, Adyléia Aparecida Dalbo Contrera

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate quality of life according to the level of asthma control and degree of asthma severity in children and adolescents. We selected children and adolescents with asthma (7-17 years of age) from the Pediatric Pulmonology Outpatient Clinic of the State University of Campinas Hospital de Clínicas, located in the city of Campinas, Brazil. Asthma control and asthma severity were assessed by the Asthma Control Test and by the questionnaire based on the Global Initiative for Asthma, respectively. The patients also completed the Paediatric Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (PAQLQ), validated for use in Brazil, in order to evaluate their quality of life. The mean age of the patients was 11.22 ± 2.91 years, with a median of 11.20 (7.00-17.60) years. We selected 100 patients, of whom 27, 33, and 40 were classified as having controlled asthma (CA), partially controlled asthma (PCA), and uncontrolled asthma (UA), respectively. As for asthma severity, 34, 19, and 47 were classified as having mild asthma (MiA), moderate asthma (MoA), and severe asthma (SA), respectively. The CA and the PCA groups, when compared with the NCA group, showed higher values for the overall PAQLQ score and all PAQLQ domains (activity limitation, symptoms, and emotional function; p Quality of life appears to be directly related to asthma control and asthma severity in children and adolescents, being better when asthma is well controlled and asthma severity is lower.

  12. Indoor mold levels and current asthma among school-aged children in Saskatchewan, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluwole, O; Kirychuk, S P; Lawson, J A; Karunanayake, C; Cockcroft, D W; Willson, P J; Senthilselvan, A; Rennie, D C

    2017-03-01

    Current knowledge regarding the association between indoor mold exposures and asthma is still limited. The objective of this case-control study was to investigate the relationship between objectively measured indoor mold levels and current asthma among school-aged children. Parents completed a questionnaire survey of health history and home environmental conditions. Asthma cases had a history of doctor-diagnosed asthma or current wheeze without a cold in the past 12 months. Controls were age- and sex-matched to cases. Vacuumed dust samples were collected from the child's indoor play area and mattress. Samples were assessed for mold levels and quantified in colony-forming units (CFU). Sensitization to mold allergens was also determined by skin testing. Being a case was associated with family history of asthma, pet ownership, and mold allergy. Mold levels (CFU/m2 ) in the dust samples of children's mattress and play area floors were moderately correlated (r = 0.56; P mold levels (≥30 000 CFU/m2 ) in dust samples from play [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 2.6; 95% CI: 1.03-6.43] and mattress (aOR) = 3.0; 95% CI: 1.11-8.00) areas were significantly associated with current asthma. In this study high levels of mold are a risk factor for asthma in children. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. School-based asthma disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinkelman, David; Schwartz, Abby

    2004-06-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic childhood illness and the leading cause of missed school days. School is a potential location for establishing an asthma education program for children and their parents/caregivers designed to improve disease management. To determine whether a comprehensive, school-based asthma management program, in addition to a conventional disease management program, can reduce measures of asthma control, student absenteeism, and caregiver lost workdays. School nurses recruited parents/caregivers of students with asthma from three urban elementary and middle schools. Children were identified as having asthma by a previous diagnosis from their personal physician. Parents were invited to attend educational sessions about the program. Students received peak flow meters and training in their use and had access to an interactive asthma diary to record symptoms, peak flow, and medicine usage. They received monthly asthma education at school and had access to an online asthma education program and additional handouts. Parents received several educational calls regarding asthma and had a 24-hour, 7-days-a-week emergency number to call if problems arose. At 6 months, missed school days and unscheduled doctor visits were reduced by two thirds (n = 41; pschool-based asthma management program can successfully improve asthma control and reduce absenteeism in elementary and middle school students and caregiver lost workdays.

  14. The Saudi Initiative for asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Moamary Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Saudi Initiative for Asthma (SINA provides up-to-date guidelines for healthcare workers managing patients with asthma. SINA was developed by a panel of Saudi experts with respectable academic backgrounds and long-standing experience in the field. SINA is founded on the latest available evidence, local literature, and knowledge of the current setting in Saudi Arabia. Emphasis is placed on understanding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, medications, and clinical presentation. SINA elaborates on the development of patient-doctor partnership, self-management, and control of precipitating factors. Approaches to asthma treatment in SINA are based on disease control by the utilization of Asthma Control Test for the initiation and adjustment of asthma treatment. This guideline is established for the treatment of asthma in both children and adults, with special attention to children 5 years and younger. It is expected that the implementation of these guidelines for treating asthma will lead to better asthma control and decrease patient utilization of the health care system.

  15. Asthma Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is working to explore the role of common air pollutants in the development and exacerbation of asthma at different life stages as well as other environmental and genetic factors that might make a person more sensitive to developing asthma.

  16. Doctors Today

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, JFA

    2012-03-01

    Doctors’ relationship with patients and their role in society is changing. Until the 1960s doctors concentrated on the welfare of patients with less emphasis placed on patients’ rights1. Over recent decades there has been increasing empowerment of the individual across all facets of society including health care. Doctors continue to be perceived as having expertise and authority over medical science. Patients, however, now hold sway over questions of values or preferences. We all must be aware of this change in the doctor- patient interaction. We need to be more aware of the outcomes that patients view as important. The concept of shared decision-making with the patient is now widely appreciated. The process involves a change in mind set particularly for doctors who trained in an earlier era.

  17. Doctor Shopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Lori A.

    2012-01-01

    Doctor shopping is defined as seeing multiple treatment providers, either during a single illness episode or to procure prescription medications illicitly. According to the available literature, prevalence rates of doctor shopping vary widely, from 6.3 to 56 percent. However, this variability is partially attributable to research methodology, including the study definition of doctor shopping as well as the patient sample. The reasons for doctor shopping are varied. Some patient explanations for this phenomenon relate to clinician factors, such as inconvenient office hours or locations, long waiting times, personal characteristics or qualities of the provider, and/or insufficient communication time between the patient and clinician. Some patient explanations relate to personal factors and include both illness factors (e.g., symptom persistence, lack of understanding or nonacceptance of the diagnosis or treatment) as well as psychological factors (e.g., somatization, prescription drug-seeking). Importantly, not all doctor shopping is driven by suspect motivations. Being aware of these various patient justifications for doctor shopping is important in understanding and managing these challenging patients in the clinical setting, whether they emerge in psychiatric or primary care environments. PMID:23346518

  18. Young People’s Preferences for an Asthma Self-Management App Highlight Psychological Needs: A Participatory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Sharon; Calvo, Rafael Alejandro; Sawyer, Susan M

    2017-01-01

    Background Although the prevalence of mental illness among young people with asthma is known to be twice the rate of the wider population, none of the asthma apps reported have acknowledged or attempted to include psychological support features. This is perhaps because user involvement in the development of asthma apps has been scarce. User involvement, facilitated by participatory design methods, can begin to address these issues while contributing insights to our understanding of the psychological experience associated with asthma and how technology might improve quality of life. Objective The goal of this participatory user research study was to explore the experience, needs, and ideas of young people with asthma while allowing them to define requirements for an asthma app that would be engaging and effective at improving their well-being. Methods Young people aged 15-24 years with doctor-diagnosed asthma were invited to participate in a participatory workshop and to complete a workbook designed to elicit their thoughts and ideas about living with asthma, technology use, and the design of an app. Participants generated a number of artifacts (including collages, concept maps, and paper prototypes) designed to reify their ideas, tacit knowledge, and experience. Results A total of 20 participants (mean age 17.8 years; 60%, 12/20 female) representing a range from inadequately to well-controlled asthma completed a workbook and 13 of these also took part in a workshop (four workshops were held in total), resulting in 102 participant-generated artifacts. Theoretical thematic analysis resulted in a set of personal needs, feature ideas, and app characteristics considered relevant by young people for an asthma support app. The data revealed that psychological factors such as anxiety, and impediments to autonomy, competence, and relatedness (as consistent with self-determination theory [SDT]), were considered major influences on quality of life by young people with asthma

  19. Coexistence of asthma and polycystic ovary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zierau, Louise; Gade, Elisabeth Juul; Lindenberg, Svend

    2016-01-01

    Asthma may be associated with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and possibly patients with PCOS have a more severe type of asthma. The purpose of this systematic literature review is to summarize evidence of a coexistense of PCOS and asthma using the available literature. The search was completed...... on 01.01.2016. English language articles were retrieved using the search terms 'Asthma' AND 'PCOS', 'Asthma' AND 'systemic inflammation', 'Asthma' AND 'metabolic syndrome', 'asthma' AND 'gynaecology', 'PCOS' AND 'systemic inflammation', 'PCOS' AND 'metabolic syndrome', 'PCOS' AND 'allergy'. Five papers...... meeting prespecified search criteria were found of which two were registry studies of relevance. The current literature supports a coexistense of PCOS and asthma and gives us an indication of the causes for the possible link between PCOS and asthma. Further research in the area must be conducted...

  20. Asthma and obesity: does weight loss improve asthma control? a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juel CTB

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Caroline Trunk-Black Juel,1 Zarqa Ali,1 Lisbeth Nilas,2 Charlotte Suppli Ulrik11Respiratory Section, Internal Medicine Unit, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Hvidovre Hospital and University of Copenhagen, Hvidovre, DenmarkAim and methods: Obesity is a major health problem, and obesity is associated with a high incidence of asthma and poor asthma control. The aim of the present paper is to systematically review the current knowledge of the effect on overall asthma control of weight reduction in overweight and obese adults with asthma.Results: Weight loss in obese individuals with doctor-diagnosed asthma is associated with a 48%–100% remission of asthma symptoms and use of asthma medication. Published studies, furthermore, reveal that weight loss in obese asthmatics improves asthma control, and that especially surgically induced weight loss results in significant improvements in asthma severity, use of asthma medication, dyspnoea, exercise tolerance, and acute exacerbations, including hospitalizations due to asthma. Furthermore, weight loss in obese asthmatics is associated with improvements in level of lung function and airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine, whereas no significant improvements have been observed in exhaled nitric oxide or other markers of eosinophilic airway inflammation.Conclusion: Overweight and obese adults with asthma experience a high symptomatic remission rate and significant improvements in asthma control, including objective measures of disease activity, after weight loss. Although these positive effects of weight loss on asthma-related health outcomes seem not to be accompanied by remission or improvements in markers of eosinophilic airway inflammation, it has potentially important implications for the future burden of asthma.Keywords: asthma, weight loss, diet, bariatric surgery, asthma control

  1. Japanese Guideline for Childhood Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Nishimuta

    2011-01-01

    JAGL differs from the Global Initiative for Asthma Guideline (GINA in that the former emphasizes long-term management of childhood asthma based on asthma severity and early diagnosis and intervention at <2 years and 2–5 years of age. However, a management method, including step-up or step-down of long-term management agents based on the status of asthma symptoms, is easy to understand and thus JAGL is suitable for routine medical treatment. JAGL also introduced treatment and management using a control test for children, recommending treatment and management aimed at complete control through avoiding exacerbation factors and appropriate use of antiinflammatory agents.

  2. Monitoring strategies in children with asthma: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorend-van Bergen, Sandra; Vaessen-Verberne, Anja A; Brackel, Hein J; Landstra, Anneke M; van den Berg, Norbert J; Hop, Wim C; de Jongste, Johan C; Merkus, Peter J; Pijnenburg, Mariëlle W

    2015-06-01

    Asthma guidelines recommend monitoring of asthma control. However, in a substantial proportion of children, asthma is poorly controlled and the best monitoring strategy is not known. We studied two monitoring strategies for their ability to improve asthma outcomes in comparison with standard care (SC): web-based monthly monitoring with the (Childhood) Asthma Control Test (ACT or C-ACT) and 4-monthly monitoring of FENO. In this randomised controlled, partly blinded, parallel group multicentre trial with a 1-year follow-up, children aged 4-18 with a doctor's diagnosis of asthma treated in seven hospitals were randomised to one of the three groups. In the web group, treatment was adapted according to ACT obtained via a website at 1-month intervals; in the FENO group according to ACT and FENO, and in the SC group according to the ACT at 4-monthly visits. The primary endpoint was the change from baseline in the proportion of symptom-free days (SFD). Two-hundred and eighty children (mean age 10.4 years, 66% boys) were included; 268 completed the study. Mean changes from baseline in SFD were similar between the groups: -2.1% (web group, n=90), +8.9% (FENO group, n=91) versus 0.15% (SC, n=87), p=0.15 and p=0.78. Daily dose of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) decreased more in the web-based group compared with both other groups (-200 μg/day, p<0.01), while ACT and SFD remained similar. The change from baseline in SFD did not differ between monitoring strategies. With web-based ACT monitoring, ICS could be reduced substantially while control was maintained. NTR 1995. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. [Asthma drugs and doping].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillard, F; Rolland, Y; Rivière, D

    1999-11-01

    Some drugs regularly used in the treatment of asthma (beta-agonists and corticosteroids) are registered on the list of drugs forbidden in sport, because they have a doping action. To avoid penalizing asthmatic sportsmen, some beta-agonists (Salbutamol, Salmeterol, Terbutaline) and corticosteroids are allowed only in inhaled form, with written notification from the prescribing physician, a pneumologist or the team doctor. Considering the increase of doping with increasing involvement of physicians, good and up to date notions about the current rules of prescription in asthmatic sportsmen are needed.

  4. Perception of asthma as a factor in career choice among young adults with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhinder, Sacha; Cicutto, Lisa; Abdel-Qadir, Husam M; Tarlo, Susan M

    2009-01-01

    Asthma is a common chronic condition that can be aggravated by workplace exposures. Young adults with asthma should know how their future occupation might affect their asthma, and potentially, their quality of life. The aim of the present study was to assess the awareness of young adults to occupational risks for asthma and high-risk occupations, as well as their perception of the role of asthma in career choice. Young adults 16 to 22 years of age with reported physician-diagnosed asthma were recruited to complete a questionnaire eliciting information regarding asthma control, career choice and awareness of occupational exposure risks. A small majority of the study cohort (56.4%) could identify occupations that cause or exacerbate asthma, and 34.7% indicated that asthma was an important factor in their career plans. Family physicians were most responsible for asthma management (80.2%), but young adults were more likely to discuss asthma and career plans with their parents (43.6%) or friends (29.7%) than with their family physician (13.9%; PFamily physicians most commonly provide asthma care to these young adults. However, few young adults are talking to their family physicians about career choices and asthma. This observation represents an area of asthma care that needs to be explored in young adults with asthma.

  5. Individual-level socioeconomic status is associated with worse asthma morbidity in patients with asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouchard Anne

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low socioeconomic status (SES has been linked to higher morbidity in patients with chronic diseases, but may be particularly relevant to asthma, as asthmatics of lower SES may have higher exposures to indoor (e.g., cockroaches, tobacco smoke and outdoor (e.g., urban pollution allergens, thus increasing risk for exacerbations. Methods This study assessed associations between adult SES (measured according to educational level and asthma morbidity, including asthma control; asthma-related emergency health service use; asthma self-efficacy, and asthma-related quality of life, in a Canadian cohort of 781 adult asthmatics. All patients underwent a sociodemographic and medical history interview and pulmonary function testing on the day of their asthma clinic visit, and completed a battery of questionnaires (Asthma Control Questionnaire, Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire, and Asthma Self-Efficacy Scale. General Linear Models assessed associations between SES and each morbidity measure. Results Lower SES was associated with worse asthma control (F = 11.63, p Conclusions Results suggest that lower SES (measured according to education level, is associated with several indices of worse asthma morbidity, particularly worse asthma control, in adult asthmatics independent of disease severity. Results are consistent with previous studies linking lower SES to worse asthma in children, and add asthma to the list of chronic diseases affected by individual-level SES.

  6. Doctoral Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral education covers the “third cycle” of degrees following the bachelor’s and the master’s degree. The education of researchers is necessary for developing music therapy as a scientific discipline and calls for a certain research culture that not only brings knowledge on research...... with an integration of science and practice. This leads to a description of the principles of problem-based learning as a social constructive approach, problematization, self-directed learning and learning community. The chapter is concluded with an example of a model of doctoral education, the Aalborg model, where...... the coursework, supervision, and curriculum is based on problem-based learning. About the book: 'International Perspectives in Music Therapy Education and Training: Adapting to a Changing World,' the first anthology of its kind, edited by Professor Karen Goodman, brings noted educators from Brazil, Canada...

  7. Asthma during pregnancy: the experiences, concerns and views of pregnant women with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Angelina S; Stewart, Kay; Abramson, Michael J; Ryan, Kath; George, Johnson

    2012-06-01

    To investigate how pregnant women manage their asthma during pregnancy and factors influencing their behavior. In-depth interviews (telephone or face-to-face) with a purposive sample of 23 asthmatic women at various stages of pregnancy and with varying severity of asthma. Five major themes were discerned relating to health behavior of pregnant women with asthma. Many of the participants decreased or discontinued their asthma medications themselves and refrained from taking doses when necessary during pregnancy without consulting their doctors. Reasons behind their decisions revolved around lack of support and information about what to do, concerns about the safety of the medications, past experiences, and desire for an "all natural" pregnancy. Asthma monitoring during pregnancy was seen as a low priority for some women and their doctors. Communication between pregnant women and health professionals regarding asthma management was poor. The health behavior of pregnant women with asthma could be explained using the Health Beliefs Model. Pregnant women are not well supported in managing asthma during pregnancy, despite being concerned about outcomes. Interventions, education, and more support are warranted and wanted by pregnant women with asthma to optimize pregnancy and neonatal outcomes.

  8. Severe Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erzurum, Serpil C.; Bleecker, Eugene R.; Calhoun, William J.; Castro, Mario; Comhair, Suzy A. A.; Chung, Kian Fan; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Dweik, Raed A.; Fain, Sean B.; Fitzpatrick, Anne M.; Gaston, Benjamin M.; Israel, Elliot; Hastie, Annette; Hoffman, Eric A.; Holguin, Fernando; Levy, Bruce D.; Meyers, Deborah A.; Moore, Wendy C.; Peters, Stephen P.; Sorkness, Ronald L.; Teague, W. Gerald; Wenzel, Sally E.; Busse, William W.

    2012-01-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Severe Asthma Research Program (SARP) has characterized over the past 10 years 1,644 patients with asthma, including 583 individuals with severe asthma. SARP collaboration has led to a rapid recruitment of subjects and efficient sharing of samples among participating sites to conduct independent mechanistic investigations of severe asthma. Enrolled SARP subjects underwent detailed clinical, physiologic, genomic, and radiological evaluations. In addition, SARP investigators developed safe procedures for bronchoscopy in participants with asthma, including those with severe disease. SARP studies revealed that severe asthma is a heterogeneous disease with varying molecular, biochemical, and cellular inflammatory features and unique structure–function abnormalities. Priorities for future studies include recruitment of a larger number of subjects with severe asthma, including children, to allow further characterization of anatomic, physiologic, biochemical, and genetic factors related to severe disease in a longitudinal assessment to identify factors that modulate the natural history of severe asthma and provide mechanistic rationale for management strategies. PMID:22095547

  9. High prevalence of asthma in Danish elite canoe- and kayak athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Svenningsen, Claus

    2012-04-01

    Asthma is common in elite athletes, but our knowledge of asthma in elite canoe and kayak athletes is limited. The aim of the present prospective cross-sectional study was therefore to investigate the prevalence of asthma, including asthma-like symptoms, exhaled nitric oxide, and airway reactivity to mannitol in Danish elite canoe and kayak athletes The study group consisted of 29 (of 33 eligible) elite athletes aged 17-43 years, and the examination programme consisted of questionnaires, including the Asthma Control Questionnaire, fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO), spirometry and airway reactivity to mannitol. Asthma was defined as a history of doctor-diagnosed asthma and/or elevated FENO and airway reactivity. Seven of the elite athletes (24.1%) were found to have asthma, including four subjects with previously doctor-diagnosed asthma. Of the four athletes (all treated with inhaled corticosteroids) with doctor-diagnosed asthma, all reported asthma-symptoms and two had elevated FENO, but none had airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to mannitol. All three athletes with previously undiagnosed asthma had elevated FENO and AHR to mannitol, but reported no asthma-like symptoms. Asthma is common in elite canoe and kayak athletes, and classical signs of asthmatic airway inflammation are also found in asymptomatic athletes. not relevant. not relevant.

  10. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Access Talking to Your Doctor Plain Language Talking to Your Doctor Part I: Preparing for Your Medical ... pharmacists are also good sources of information. How to Talk to your Doctor Talking With Your Doctor , ...

  11. Swimming attendance during childhood and development of asthma: Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeriani, Federica; Protano, Carmela; Vitali, Matteo; Romano Spica, Vincenzo

    2017-05-01

    The association between asthma and swimming pool attendance has not been demonstrated and currently there are conflicting results. In order to clarify the association between asthma diagnosis in children and swimming pool attendance, and to assess the consistency of the available epidemiological studies, we completed a literature analysis on the relationship between the exposure to disinfection by-products in indoor swimming pools during childhood and asthma diagnosis. Following the Meta-analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) and Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) criteria, a systematic review and meta-analysis was performed by searching MEDLINE via PubMed, TOXNET, and Scopus databases (from inception to 20 April 2015) using the key word "Asthma" together with "swimming pool", "disinfection by-products", "indoor air pollution" and "children". Inclusion criteria were: English language, a complete analytic study design involving a cohort of children (0-16 years), a well-defined definition of exposure, and the presence of data on effect and variance. Studies on in vivo, in vitro or professional and accidental exposure were excluded. After a screening process, seven reports (n = 5851 subjects) were included out of a total of 2928 references. The reported OR of the association between swimming pool attendance and asthma prevalence ranged from 0.58 to 2.30. The present meta-analysis failed to identify a significant difference in asthma development between children attending swimming pools and controls (OR, 1.084; 95% CI: 0.89-1.31). Swimming in childhood does not increase the likelihood of doctor-diagnosed asthma. Based on this meta-analysis review, the association of the disease with indoor pool attendance is still unclear. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  12. Evaluation of quality of life according to asthma control and asthma severity in children and adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Natasha Yumi; Ribeiro, Maria Angela Gonçalves de Oliveira; Saad, Ivete Alonso Bredda; Morcillo, André Moreno; Ribeiro, José Dirceu; Toro, Adyléia Aparecida Dalbo Contrera

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate quality of life according to the level of asthma control and degree of asthma severity in children and adolescents. METHODS: We selected children and adolescents with asthma (7-17 years of age) from the Pediatric Pulmonology Outpatient Clinic of the State University of Campinas Hospital de Clínicas, located in the city of Campinas, Brazil. Asthma control and asthma severity were assessed by the Asthma Control Test and by the questionnaire based on the Global Initiative for Asthma, respectively. The patients also completed the Paediatric Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (PAQLQ), validated for use in Brazil, in order to evaluate their quality of life. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 11.22 ± 2.91 years, with a median of 11.20 (7.00-17.60) years. We selected 100 patients, of whom 27, 33, and 40 were classified as having controlled asthma (CA), partially controlled asthma (PCA), and uncontrolled asthma (UA), respectively. As for asthma severity, 34, 19, and 47 were classified as having mild asthma (MiA), moderate asthma (MoA), and severe asthma (SA), respectively. The CA and the PCA groups, when compared with the NCA group, showed higher values for the overall PAQLQ score and all PAQLQ domains (activity limitation, symptoms, and emotional function; p < 0.001 for all). The MiA group showed higher scores for all of the PAQLQ components than did the MoA and SA groups. CONCLUSIONS: Quality of life appears to be directly related to asthma control and asthma severity in children and adolescents, being better when asthma is well controlled and asthma severity is lower. PMID:26785958

  13. Management of asthma in adults: do the patients get what they need--and want?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backer, V; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Harving, H

    2007-01-01

    Suboptimal asthma control may be caused by a combination of factors, such as nonadherence to guidelines, lack of compliance, and poor asthma education. The aim was to assess patients' knowledge of asthma and different management strategies, including patients' attitudes toward involvement...... by their doctor, indicating that change in educational strategy is needed....

  14. Knowledge and use of asthma control measurement tools in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge and use of asthma control measurement tools in the management of asthma: a survey of doctors working in family and internal medicine practice in Nigeria. Olufemi Olumuyiwa Desalu1, Cajetan C. Onyedum2, Adekunle O. Adeoti3,. Obianuju B. Ozoh4 , Joseph O Fadare5. 1. Department of Medicine , University ...

  15. Asthma, Allergic Rhinitis And Atopic Eczema In Schoolchildren Kashan (1998 -1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gharagosloo M

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Wide variations in the prevalence of asthma, allergic rhinitis and eczema have been reported in the world, between regions and countries. The international study of asthma and allergies in childhood (ISAAC was developed to provide standardized method to ascertain the prevalence of asthma and allergies in different regions. Comparisons of prevalence rates across geographic regions may help to identify factors that influence the development of these conditions in individuals."nMethods and Materials: For doing this descriptive study the ISAAC written questionnaire was completed by the parents of 3000 school children aged 6-7 years in Kashan, the central area of Iran, with different geographic and cultural characteristics, during the fall of 1998."nResults: The overall cumulative and 12 month prevalence of wheezing were 10.2 percent, 6.9 percent in the girls and 18.2 percent, 13.1 percent in the boys respectively. The prevalence of doctor diagnosed asthma were 1.3 percent and 2.2 percent in the girls and boys. Rhinitis symptoms were reported by 14,7 percent, 16.9 percent and chronic pruritic rashes by 5.1 percent and 8.3 percent of the girls and boys respectively."nConclusion: Allergic disorders are common in this area and prevalence is comparable to other parts of Iran and many other countries. Prevalence of asthma by medical diagnosis is relatively low with respect to other studies performed with the same methodology.

  16. Acute bronchial asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Ramuscello

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is one of the main causes of morbidity worldwide. It affects some 300 million individuals and has risen over the past 20 years, especially in the paediatric population. Asthma is a chronic inflammation of the airways, subject to periodic exacerbations, characterised by coughing and progressive dyspnoea. Clinical conditions may vary greatly, ranging from moderate exacerbation with an increase in nocturnal awakening and a less than 20% reduction in the flow peak, through to severe respiratory insufficiency that requires immediate intubation of the airways. Pharmacological treatment envisages a step approach that aims to obtain and maintain control over the symptoms, taking into consideration the effectiveness of the treatment available, potential side effects and cost. β2-agonists and corticosteroids are the drugs of election for both maintenance therapy and for treating exacerbations. Other therapeutic devices may prove useful in particular cases. One fundamental key point in treatment over time is the cooperation between patient and attending doctor. The latest review of the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA guidelines was published in 2006.

  17. Diagnosing Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ribbon Commands Skip to main content Turn off Animations Turn on Animations Our Sponsors Log in | Register Menu Log in | ... were tried and if they helped Any family history of allergies or asthma It is very important ...

  18. Occupational Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the enzymes of the bacteria Bacillus subtilis, while bakers may develop an allergy and occupational asthma symptoms ... counts Continuing education center Find an allergist / immunologist Journals Login / My membership Search your symptoms Shop the ...

  19. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Voice in Health Care Decisions Do Allergies Cause Asthma? KidsHealth > For Parents > Do Allergies Cause Asthma? Print ... son la causa del asma? Do Allergies Cause Asthma? Allergies don't cause asthma. But kids who ...

  20. Asthma Medications and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Associated Conditions Asthma & Pregnancy Asthma & Pregnancy: Medications Asthma & Pregnancy: Medications Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask ... mother and child. Making Decisions about Medication During Pregnancy It is important that your asthma be controlled ...

  1. A Qualitative Examination of Challenges Influencing Doctoral Students in an Online Doctoral Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Anant

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of the study was to investigate the challenges faced by students in completion of an online doctoral program at the University of Liverpool, Online Doctoral Business Administration program. We analyse the responses of 91 doctoral students in an online DBA program. Based on the exploratory qualitative study themes were developed…

  2. Different Types of Doctoral Study Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahenius, Katja; Martinsuo, Miia

    2011-01-01

    Becoming a doctor can be viewed as a highly personal and unique experience, which is why many factors influence the completion or non-completion of the doctoral degree. The attention in previous research has been on the students' characteristics, and the university faculty role in promoting degree progress. Therefore, more research is needed on…

  3. Prescription of respiratory medication without an asthma diagnosis in children: a population based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunekreef Bert

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In pre-school children a diagnosis of asthma is not easily made and only a minority of wheezing children will develop persistent atopic asthma. According to the general consensus a diagnosis of asthma becomes more certain with increasing age. Therefore the congruence between asthma medication use and doctor-diagnosed asthma is expected to increase with age. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between prescribing of asthma medication and doctor-diagnosed asthma in children age 0–17. Methods We studied all 74,580 children below 18 years of age, belonging to 95 GP practices within the second Dutch national survey of general practice (DNSGP-2, in which GPs registered all physician-patient contacts during the year 2001. Status on prescribing of asthma medication (at least one prescription for beta2-agonists, inhaled corticosteroids, cromones or montelukast and doctor-diagnosed asthma (coded according to the International Classification of Primary Care was determined. Results In total 7.5% of children received asthma medication and 4.1% had a diagnosis of asthma. Only 49% of all children receiving asthma medication was diagnosed as an asthmatic. Subgroup analyses on age, gender and therapy groups showed that the Positive Predictive Value (PPV differs significantly between therapy groups only. The likelihood of having doctor-diagnosed asthma increased when a child received combination therapy of short acting beta2-agonists and inhaled corticosteroids (PPV = 0.64 and with the number of prescriptions (3 prescriptions or more, PPV = 0.66. Both prescribing of asthma medication and doctor-diagnosed asthma declined with age but the congruence between the two measures did not increase with age. Conclusion In this study, less than half of all children receiving asthma medication had a registered diagnosis of asthma. Detailed subgroup analyses show that a diagnosis of asthma was present in at most 66%, even in groups of

  4. Masculinity in the doctor's office: Masculinity, gendered doctor preference and doctor-patient communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelstein, Mary S; Sanchez, Diana T

    2016-03-01

    Mortality and morbidity data suggest that men have shorter life expectancies than women and outrank women on several leading causes of death. These gendered disparities may be influenced by psychosocial factors like masculinity. Three studies (Total N=546) examined the role of masculinity in men's doctor choices and doctor-patient interactions. In Studies 1 and 2, men completed measures of masculinity, gender bias, and doctor preference. Using structural equation modeling, we tested the direct relationship between masculinity and male doctor preference and the indirect relationship of masculinity on male doctor preference through an association with gendered competence stereotypes. Participants in Study 3 disclosed symptoms in private followed by disclosure to a male or female interviewer in a clinical setting. Using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), we examined the interaction among symptom reporting, masculinity and doctor gender, controlling for participant comfort. In Study 1, results suggested that masculinity encouraged choice of a male doctor directly and indirectly via beliefs that men make more competent doctors than women; Study 2 directly replicated the results of Study 1. In Study 3, independent of participant comfort, an interaction between interviewer gender and masculinity emerged such that men scoring higher on masculinity reported symptoms less consistently to male interviewers (relative to higher scoring men reporting to female interviewers); the reverse was found for men scoring low on masculinity. Taken together these studies suggest that masculinity may affect men's health by encouraging choice of a male doctor with whom doctor-patient communication may be impaired. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Outcomes of the Montana Asthma Home Visiting Program: A home-based asthma education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Jessie C; Biskupiak, William W; Brokaw, Sarah M; Carpenedo, Dorota; Loveland, Katie M; Tysk, Sonja; Vogl, Shea

    2018-02-09

    Asthma is a common disease in children. Home-based, multi-trigger, multi-component interventions with an environmental focus have been shown to be effective to address asthma in children. The objective of this study was to assess the outcomes and feasibility of implementing a specific asthma home visiting (HV) program in a rural area. Children aged 0-17 years with uncontrolled asthma were enrolled in an asthma HV program that included six contacts over a 12-month period delivered by a registered nurse specifically trained in asthma education and trigger removal in eleven counties in the rural state of Montana. Between June 2010 and December 2016, data on asthma symptoms and asthma self-management skills were collected at baseline and throughout the program. In June 2017, they were analyzed to assess changes in asthma control and quality of life over time among participants completing all six contacts. Since June 2010, 152 of 338 enrolled children completed all six contacts outlined in the program (45%). Participants who completed the program reported significant improvements in asthma control test scores, self-management skills, and self-efficacy related to asthma management. These results improved the longer participants remained in the program. These findings suggest that it is feasible to implement a 12-month HV program using local public health resources in a rural area as outcomes improved over this time period.

  6. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... communication. Remember that nurses and pharmacists are also good sources of information. How to Talk to your Doctor Talking With Your Doctor , NIH News in Health Español Talking to Your Doctor , National Eye Institute ( ...

  7. Influence of asthma definition on the asthma-obesity relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies suggest an association between obesity and asthma in adults and children. Asthma diagnosis criteria are different among studies. The aim of this study was to test the influence of asthma definition on the asthma-obesity relationship. Methods In a cross-sectional analysis of 1922 men and women, subjects completed a translated questionnaire from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey and underwent spirometry and a bronchial challenge test. Weight, height and waist circumference were measured. Multiple logistic regression analysis was carried out to assess the association of variables related to obesity and asthma. Asthma was defined either by the presence of symptoms with bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) or by a self-report of a physician-made diagnosis. The following variables were separately tested for associations with asthma: socioeconomic characteristics, schooling, physical activity, smoking status, anthropometry and spirometry. Results No association was detected between asthma confirmed by BHR and obesity indicators, odds ratio (OR) = 1.08 (95% confidence interval: 0.69 - 1.68) for obesity assessed by body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m2; OR = 1.02 (0.74 - 1.40) for obesity assessed by abnormal waist-to-height ratio; and, OR = 0.96 (0.69 - 1.33) for abnormal waist circumference. On the contrary, a previous diagnosis of asthma was associated with obesity, OR = 1.48 (1.01 - 2.16) for body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m2; OR = 1.48 (1.13 - 1.93) for abnormal waist-to-height ratio; and, OR = 1.32 (1.00 – 1.75) for abnormal waist circumference. Female gender, schooling ≥ 12 years and smoking were associated with BHR-confirmed asthma. Physically inactive subjects were associated with a previous diagnosis of asthma. Conclusions Our findings indicate that the relationship between asthma and obesity in epidemiological studies depends on the definition adopted. Certain components of asthma, for instance, symptoms may be more prone to

  8. Comparison of clinically diagnosed asthma with parental assessment of children's asthma in a questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hederos, C.A.; Hasselgren, M.; Hedlin, G.

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiological evaluations of the prevalence of asthma are usually based on written questionnaires (WQs) in combination with validation by clinical investigation. In the present investigation, we compared parental assessment of asthma among their preschool children in response to a WQ...... clinics in the same region, were analysed in parallel. Finally, a complementary WQ was sent to the parents of children identified as asthmatic by either or both of this approaches. In response to the WQ 5.9% were claimed to suffer from asthma diagnosed by a doctor. According to the medical records...... with the corresponding medical records in the same region. An International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC)-based WQ was answered by 75% of the parents of 6295 children aged 1-6 yr. Clinically diagnosed asthma, recorded in connection with admissions to the hospital or a visit to any of the outpatient...

  9. Death due to asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert L. Sheffer

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence and fatality rate of asthma have increased worldwide. Underdiagnosis and undertreatment of asthma are central to the occurrence of fatal asthma. Atopy is the principal risk factor associated with asthma. However, consideration of the epidemiologic, physiologic, pharmacologic, pathologic and clinical parameters of asthma assessment may provide valuable insight into death due to asthma. Psychologic and socioeconomic factors may further aggravate the asthma status. Ethnic minorities are at increased risk of asthma. The perception of dyspnea may be blunted in asthma sufferers. Slow-onset fatal asthma may be associated with submucosal eosinophilic, whereas sudden-onset may be associated with submucosal neutrophilia. Fatal asthma occurs in patients abusing regular |32-agonist therapy. Peak flow assessment often provides insight into asthma deterioration prior to signs of respiratory distress. Markers of risk of death due to asthma further identify the fatality-prone asthma patient.

  10. Endotoxin as a determinant of asthma and wheeze among rural dwelling children and adolescents: A case–control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawson Joshua A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The association between endotoxin exposure and asthma is complex and has been associated with rural living. We examined the relationship between domestic endotoxin and asthma or wheeze among rural school-aged children (6–18 years and assessed the interaction between endotoxin and other characteristics with these outcomes. Methods Between 2005 and 2007 we conducted a case–control study of children 6–18 years in the rural region of Humboldt, Canada. Cases (n = 102 reported doctor-diagnosed asthma or wheeze in the past year. Controls (n = 208 were randomly selected from children without asthma or wheeze. Data were collected to ascertain symptoms, asthma history and indoor environmental exposures (questionnaire, endotoxin (dust collection from the play area floor and child’s mattress, and tobacco smoke exposure (saliva collection. Statistical testing was completed using multiple logistic regression to account for potential confounders and to assess interaction between risk factors. A stratified analysis was also completed to examine the effect of personal history of allergy. Results Among children aged 6–12 years, mattress endotoxin concentration (EU/mg and load (EU/m2 were inversely associated with being a case [odds ratio (OR = 0.44, 95% confidence interval (CI = 0.20-0.98; and OR = 0.38, 95% CI = 0.20-0.75, respectively]. These associations were not observed in older children or with play area endotoxin. Conclusions Our results suggest that endotoxin exposure might be protective for asthma or wheeze. The protective effect is found in younger school-aged, non-allergic children. These results may help explain the inconsistencies in previous studies and suggest that the protective effects of endotoxin in the prevention of atopy and asthma or wheeze are most effective earlier in life.

  11. Death due to asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Sheffer, Albert L.

    1996-01-01

    The prevalence and fatality rate of asthma have increased worldwide. Underdiagnosis and undertreatment of asthma are central to the occurrence of fatal asthma. Atopy is the principal risk factor associated with asthma. However, consideration of the epidemiologic, physiologic, pharmacologic, pathologic and clinical parameters of asthma assessment may provide valuable insight into death due to asthma. Psychologic and socioeconomic factors may further aggravate the asthma status. Ethnic minoriti...

  12. [The motivation to become a medical doctor - doctoral students in a formal academic study program compared with those pursuing their doctorate independently].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, M; Dimitriadis, K; Holzer, M; Reincke, M; Fischer, M R

    2011-04-01

    Weight and quality of medical doctoral theses have been discussed in Germany for years. Doctoral study programs in various graduate schools offer opportunities to improve quality of medical doctoral theses. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate distinctions and differences concerning motivation, choice of subject and the dissertation process between doctoral candidates completing the doctoral seminar for doctoral students in the Ludwig-Maximilians-University (LMU) Munich and doctoral candidates doing their doctorate individually. All 4000 medical students of the LMU obtained an online-questionnaire which was completed by 767 students (19 % response rate). The theoretical framework of this study was based upon the Self-Determination-Theory by Deci and Ryan. Doctoral candidates completing the doctoral study program were more intrinsically motivated than doctoral candidates doing their doctorate individually; no difference was found in their extrinsic motivation. In regard to choice of subject and dissertation process the doctoral students in the seminar were distinguished from the individual group by having chosen a more challenging project. They anticipated a demanding dissertation process including conference participation, publishing of papers, etc. Intrinsic motivation correlates positively with choosing a challenging project and a demanding dissertation process. High intrinsic motivation seems to be very important for autonomous scholarly practice. Our results suggest that doctoral study programs have a positive impact on intrinsic motivation and interest in research. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Enhancing Asthma Self-Management in Rural School-Aged Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Sharon D; Brown, Adama; Brown, Sharon A; Rew, D Lynn

    2016-06-01

    To test the effects of 2 modes of delivering an asthma educational intervention on health outcomes and asthma self-management in school-aged children who live in rural areas. Longitudinal design with data collected 4 times over 12 months. The target sample was composed of children in grades 2-5 who had a provider diagnosis of asthma. Elementary schools were stratified into high or low socioeconomic status based on student enrollment in the free or reduced-cost lunch program. Schools were then randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment arms: in-school asthma class, asthma day camp, or the attention-control group. Sample retention was good (87.7%) and equally distributed by study arm. Improvements in emergency department visits and office visits were related to attending either the asthma class or asthma day camp. Asthma severity significantly decreased in both asthma treatment groups. Other factors such as hospitalizations, parent asthma management, and child asthma management improved for all groups. Both asthma class and asthma day camp yielded significant reductions in asthma severity. There were reductions in the emergency department and office visits for the 2 asthma arms, and hospitalizations declined significantly for all groups. Asthma self-management also improved in all groups, while it was somewhat higher in the asthma arms. This may be due to the attention being drawn to asthma management by study participation and the action of completing questionnaires about asthma management, asthma symptoms, and health outcomes. © 2015 National Rural Health Association.

  14. Asthma - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... BS, Burks AW, et al, eds. Middleton's Allergy Principles and Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 53. Lugogo N, Que LG, Gilstrap DL, Kraft M. Asthma: clinical diagnosis and management. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et ...

  15. Childhood asthma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    atopy, night cough, exercise-induced cough and/or wheeze and seasonal variation in symptoms. Epidemiology. Asthma is on the increase in both the developed and developing countries of the world. In South Africa, its prevalence in children in Cape Town (measured by exercise challenge) was only three per cent in 1979.

  16. Childhood asthma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    prevalence in children in Cape Town (measured by exercise challenge) was only three per ... mortality among the five to 34-year-old age group, and fifth for asthma ... clouded by differences in terminology used by respondents, depending on ...

  17. Asthma outcomes: Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szefler, Stanley J.; Wenzel, Sally; Brown, Robert; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Fahy, John V.; Hamilton, Robert G.; Hunt, John F.; Kita, Hirohito; Liu, Andrew H.; Panettieri, Reynold A.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Minnicozzi, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background Measurement of biomarkers has been incorporated within clinical research studies of asthma to characterize the population and associate the disease with environmental and therapeutic effects. Objective National Institutes of Health institutes and federal agencies convened an expert group to propose which biomarkers should be assessed as standardized asthma outcomes in future clinical research studies. Methods We conducted a comprehensive search of the literature to identify studies that developed and/or tested asthma biomarkers. We identified biomarkers relevant to the underlying disease process progression and response to treatment. We classified the biomarkers as either core (required in future studies), supplemental (used according to study aims and standardized), or emerging (requiring validation and standardization). This work was discussed at an National Institutes of Health–organized workshop convened in March 2010 and finalized in September 2011. Results Ten measures were identified; only 1, multiallergen screening to define atopy, is recommended as a core asthma outcome. Complete blood counts to measure total eosinophils, fractional exhaled nitric oxide (Feno), sputum eosinophils, urinary leukotrienes, and total and allergen-specific IgE are recommended as supplemental measures. Measurement of sputum polymorphonuclear leukocytes and other analytes, cortisol measures, airway imaging, breath markers, and system-wide studies (eg, genomics, proteomics) are considered as emerging outcome measures. Conclusion The working group participants propose the use of multiallergen screening in all asthma clinical trials to characterize study populations with respect to atopic status. Blood, sputum, and urine specimens should be stored in biobanks, and standard procedures should be developed to harmonize sample collection for clinical trial biorepositories. PMID:22386512

  18. Doctors' involvement in torture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesper, Sonntag

    2008-01-01

    Doctors from both non-democratic and democratic countries are involved in torture. The majority of doctors involved in torture are doctors at risk. Doctors at risk might compromise their ethical duty towards patients for the following possible reasons: individual factors (such as career, economic or ideological reasons), threats, orders from a higher ranking officer, political initiatives, working in atrocity-producing situations or dual loyalty. In dual loyalty conflicts, factors that might compromise doctors' ethical obligations towards detainees/patients are: ideological totalitarianism, moral disengagement, victim blame, patriotism, individual factors or threats. Another important reason why doctors are involved in torture is that not all doctors are trained in addressing human rights issues of detainees. Torture survivors report that they have experienced doctors' involvement in torture and doctors themselves report that they have been involved in torture. Testimonies from both torture survivors and doctors demonstrate that the most common way doctors are involved is in the diagnosis/medical examination of torture survivors/prisoners. And it is common before, during and after torture. Both torture survivors and doctors state that doctors are involved during torture by treatment and direct participation. Doctors also falsify journals, certificates and reports. When doctors are involved in torture it has devastating consequences for both torture survivors and doctors. The consequences for the survivors can be mistrust of doctors, avoidance of seeking doctors' help and nightmares involving doctors. Mistrust and avoidance of doctors could be especially fatal to the survivor, as it could mean a survivor who is ill may not seek medical attention. When the unambiguous role of the doctor as the protector and helper of people is questioned, it affects the medical profession all over the world.

  19. Exercise-Induced Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... January 2014 More on this topic for: Parents Kids Teens Can Kids and Teens With Asthma Play Sports? Asthma Center When to Go to the ER if Your Child Has Asthma Kids and Exercise Asthma Triggers Word! Exercise-Induced Asthma ...

  20. Patients' attitudes to doctors

    OpenAIRE

    Lawson, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A survey was conducted on 1,012 people in the Oxford Region to determine their general attitude to doctors' age, sex and colour and to various aspects of doctor/patient communication. Results indicate that whereas there were no prejudices about appearance there was a significant degree of dissatisfaction with information given by doctors in general and hospital doctors in particular.

  1. Home renovation, family history of atopy, and respiratory symptoms and asthma among children living in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Guang-Hui; Qian, Zhengmin Min; Wang, Jing; Trevathan, Edwin; Liu, Miao-Miao; Wang, Da; Ren, Wan-Hui; Chen, Weiqing; Simckes, Maayan; Zelicoff, Alan

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the association of indoor air pollution with the respiratory health of children, we evaluated the associations of children's respiratory symptoms with asthma and recent home renovation. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in a school recruitment sample of 31,049 children aged 2 to 14 years in 25 districts of 7 cities of northeast China in 2008-2009. The children's parents completed standardized questionnaires characterizing the children's histories of respiratory symptoms and illness, recent home renovation information, and other associated risk factors. The effects of home renovation in the past 2 years were significantly associated with cough, phlegm, current wheeze, doctor-diagnosed asthma, and current asthma. The associations we computed when combining the status of home renovation and family history of atopy were higher than were those predicted from the combination of the separate effects. However, the interactions between home renovation and family history of atopy on a multiplicative scale were not statistically significant (P>.05). Home renovation is associated with increases in the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and asthma in children. The effects of different renovation materials on child respiratory health should be studied further.

  2. Adequacy of inhaler technique used by people with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bang C

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are ongoing concerns to the health system. Poor inhaler technique results in less than optimal delivery of medicine to the lungs and consequent inadequate symptom control. AIM: This study aimed to assess inhaler technique amongst people with asthma and/or COPD. The secondary aims were to investigate who provided education on inhaler technique and whether age, gender or ethnicity was associated with poor inhaler technique. METHODS: People with asthma or COPD who presented to a community pharmacy with a prescription for a respiratory inhaler were invited to participate in the study. Participants completed a brief questionnaire and had their inhaler technique assessed against a standard checklist. RESULTS: There were 103 participants from 26 pharmacies, 86 with asthma and 17 with COPD. Just over half (52.5% of the assessments indicated good inhaler technique, with 68% of people using the Turbuhaler having good technique compared to 53% for the pressurised metered dose inhaler (pMDI with spacer and 47% for the pMDI alone. The majority of people (76% received their initial inhaler technique instruction from their doctor. Over half of participants did not recall having their inhaler technique rechecked. DISCUSSION: After prescribing appropriate therapy, correct inhaler technique is a cornerstone of achieving adequate therapy. Rechecking inhaler technique is a gap in care that needs to be addressed from an interdisciplinary perspective.

  3. Comparing the Asthma APGAR system and the Asthma Control Test™ in a multicenter primary care sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rank, Matthew A; Bertram, Susan; Wollan, Peter; Yawn, Roy A; Yawn, Barbara P

    2014-07-01

    To compare asthma control assessment using the Asthma APGAR system, a tool developed by primary care clinicians, in a multicenter primary care sample with the Asthma Control Test (ACT™)/Childhood Asthma Control Test (CACT™), a tool developed by asthma specialists. This is a substudy of a multicenter, randomized, controlled pragmatic trial that tests the effectiveness of the Asthma APGAR system in primary care practices. As part of the study, enrolled patients completed both the ACT™/CACT™ and the Asthma APGAR system between March 1, 2011, and December 31, 2011. Kappa and McNemar statistics were used to compare the results of questionnaires. Of the 468 patients in our sample, 306 (65%) were classified as not controlled by the ACT™/CACT™ or the Asthma APGAR system. The overall agreement was 84.4%, with a kappa value of .68 (substantial agreement) and a McNemar test P value of .35 (suggesting no significant difference in the direction of disagreement). Of those with poor control as defined by the Asthma APGAR system, 23.8% (73) had no controller medications and 76.5% (234) were seldom or sometimes able to avoid identified triggers for their asthma. Of those who stated that they had been prescribed controller medications, 116 of 332 (35%) stated that they did not use the controller medication on a daily basis. The Asthma APGAR system and the ACT™/CACT™ similarly assess asthma control in a multicenter primary care-based sample. The Asthma APGAR system identified an "actionable item" in more than 75% (234) of the individuals with poor asthma control, thus linking an assessment of poor asthma control with a management strategy. Copyright © 2014 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Allergies, asthma, and molds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive airway - mold; Bronchial asthma - mold; Triggers - mold; Allergic rhinitis - pollen ... Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Mold is a common trigger. When your asthma or allergies become worse due to mold, you are ...

  5. Asthma Triggers: Gain Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... asthma. Dogs, cats, rodents (including hamsters and guinea pigs) and other warm-blooded mammals can trigger asthma ... Page Contact Us to ask a question, provide feedback, or report a problem. Asthma Indoor Air Quality ...

  6. Interpersonal perception in the context of doctor-patient relationships: a dyadic analysis of doctor-patient communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, David A; Veldhuijzen, Wemke; Weijden, Trudy van der; Leblanc, Annie; Lockyer, Jocelyn; Légaré, France; Campbell, Craig

    2010-03-01

    Doctor-patient communication is an interpersonal process and essential to relationship-centered care. However, in many studies, doctors and patients are studied as if living in separate worlds. This study assessed whether: 1) doctors' perception of their communication skills is congruent with their patients' perception; and 2) patients of a specific doctor agree with each other about their doctor's communication skills. A cross-sectional study was conducted in three provinces in Canada with 91 doctors and their 1749 patients. Doctors and patients independently completed questions on the doctor's communication skills (content and process) after a consultation. Multilevel modeling provided an estimate of the patient and doctor variance components at both the dyad-level and the doctor-level. We computed correlations between patients' and doctors' perceptions at both levels to assess how congruent they were. Consensus among patients of a specific doctor was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The mean score of the rating of doctor's skills according to patients was 4.58, and according to doctors was 4.37. The dyad-level variance for the patient was .38 and for the doctor was .06. The doctor-level variance for the patient ratings was .01 and for the doctor ratings, .18. The correlation between both the patients' and the doctors' skills' ratings scores at the dyad-level was weak. At the doctor-level, the correlation was not statistically significant. The ICC for patients' ratings was .03 and for the doctors' ratings .76. Overall, this study suggests that doctors and their patients have a very different perspective of the doctors' communication skills occurring during routine clinical encounters. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Coaching doctoral students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godskesen, Mirjam Irene; Kobayashi, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we focus on individual coaching carried out by an external coach as a new pedagogical element that can impact doctoral students’ sense of progress in doctoral education. The study used a mixed methods approach in that we draw on quantitative and qualitative data from the evaluation...... of a project on coaching doctoral students. We explore how coaching can contribute to the doctoral students’ development of a broad set of personal competences and suggest that coaching could work as a means to engender self-management and improve relational competences. The analysis of the participants’ self......-reported gains from coaching show that doctoral students experience coaching as an effective method to support the doctoral study process. This study also provides preliminary empirical evidence that coaching of doctoral students can facilitate the doctoral study process so that the doctoral students experience...

  8. Managing Asthma in Elementary and Middle Schools: Adherence to Federal Laws and National Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Ethan J.; Neuharth-Pritchett, Stacey; Getch, Yvette Q.; Lease, A. Michele

    2017-01-01

    The current study examined teacher-reported asthma management practices in school and adherence to federal guidelines for students with asthma. 593 kindergarten-eighth grade teachers completed surveys regarding compliance with federal laws and policies, information-seeking behavior, asthma-related professional development, and asthma management…

  9. What Is Asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Asthma Awareness National Asthma Awards Federal and Partner Organizations Public Service Announcements & Multimedia Main menu Environmental Topics Air Bed Bugs Chemicals and Toxics Environmental ...

  10. The integrated care of asthma in Switzerland (INCAS)-study: Patients' perspective of received asthma care and their interest in asthma education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürr, Selina; Hersberger, Kurt E; Zeller, Andreas; Scheuzger, Jonas; Miedinger, David; Gregoriano, Claudia; Leuppi, Jörg D; Steurer-Stey, Claudia

    2016-11-01

    For successful long-term asthma care, self-management education is a cornerstone. Little is known about associations between patients' interest in education, asthma control and care delivery. We compared patients' characteristics, asthma control and patients' perspective about asthma care in subjects with and without interest in asthma education. Moreover, we assessed reasons, why patients denied participating in asthma education. Baseline data of 223 patients with asthma (age 43 ± 12 years, 38% male, 58% non-smokers, 13% current smokers), who participated in a multicentre longitudinal controlled study, are reported. At baseline, patients completed the Asthma Control Test (ACT), the Patient Assessment Chronic Illness Care questionnaire (PACIC 5A) and stated their interest in an asthma education programme. Overall, 34% of all participants showed uncontrolled asthma. One hundred and twenty-five (56%) patients were interested in education. Compared to patients without interest, they were characterised by male gender (p = 0.013), worse asthma control (p < 0.001), and perception of lower quality of chronic asthma care delivery, in particular lower self-management support (p < 0.001). Main reasons for rejecting asthma education were having sufficient asthma knowledge, having only mild asthma, receiving adequate medical support and lack of time. More than half of the patients were interested in asthma education. Interest was associated with worse asthma control and lower receipt of care according to the Chronic Care Model. Considering these aspects, this approach may help to improve care quality and allow targeting interventions to those patients who are interested in becoming active participants in their care and who might benefit most.

  11. Asthma management experiences of Australians who are native Arabic speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzayer, Reem; Chaar, Betty; Basheti, Iman; Saini, Bandana

    2017-08-11

    The aim of this study was to explore the asthma management experiences of people with asthma within the Arabic-speaking community in Australia. Semi-structured interviews guided by a schedule of questions were conducted with 25 Arabic-speaking women with asthma\\carer of a child with asthma, recruited from medical practices and community centers in Melbourne, Australia. Twenty-five Arabic-speaking participants with asthma or caring for those with asthma were interviewed. Interviews lasted on average 25 minutes. Most participants or those they were caring for did not have well-controlled asthma. Thematic analyses of the interview transcripts highlighted five key emergent themes: stigma, health literacy, non-adherence, expectations, and coping styles. Findings indicated that many participants were not conversant about local information avenues or healthcare or facilities such as the Asthma Foundation or availability of Arabic translators during general practitioner (GP) consults. Many recent migrants were generally non-adherent with treatment; preferring to follow traditional folk medicine rather than consulting a GP or pharmacist. Some unrealistic expectations from doctors/treatment goals were expressed by a few participants. Some parents of children with asthma reported disappointment with the fact that their children did not grow out of asthma. Low health literacy and in particular knowledge about asthma, cultural beliefs, language, and migration-related issues may all be affecting the level of asthma control in the Arabic-speaking population in Australia. Measures to enhance asthma and health system literacy designed to be culturally concordant with the beliefs, expectations, and experiences of such populations may be key to improving asthma management.

  12. Soda consumption and hospital admissions among Californian adults with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros, Ricardo; Gonzalez, Mariaelena; Brown, Paul; Schweizer, Don

    2017-05-01

    Asthma prevalence has been increasing consistently since 1995 in California. Recent studies have found that consuming soda and sugar-containing drinks may pose a risk for asthma. Research that examines the relationship between soda intake and asthma among adult asthmatics is limited. This study investigated the relationship between sugar-sweetened soda consumption and asthma hospitalization among adult asthmatics in California. This cross-sectional study was based on the 2011-2012 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) data and included 3,784 adults who were diagnosed with asthma by a doctor and who currently reported either that they still had asthma, or that they had suffered from an asthma attack in the last 12 months. The analysis was survey weighted. The exposure variable was soda intake measured as the number of times soda was consumed in the last week. The health outcome measure was overnight hospital admission due to asthma. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between soda consumption and overnight hospital admission after adjusting for age, education, sex, race/ethnicity, weight status, smoking status, and self-rated health. Adults with asthma who drank soda three or more times per week reported higher odds of overnight hospitalization (adjusted odds ratio = 2.77, 95% CI: 1.51-5.10, p = 0.001). Our findings suggest that efforts designed to limit soda consumption would benefit asthma suffers by reducing hospital admissions. This, however, needs further research to confirm a direct causal association.

  13. Sleep duration, sleep hygiene, and insomnia in adolescents with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Lisa J; Ullrich, Maureen; Szefler, Stanley J

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to understand more about modifiable health behaviors that may be related to asthma control. Sleep is one such health behavior that has received little attention in pediatric asthma research. To examine sleep duration, sleep hygiene, and insomnia in adolescents with and without asthma. Adolescents (n = 298; 51% boys; age range, 12-17 years; 48% with asthma) from the general community completed an online survey that included the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood questionnaire, the Children's Report of Sleep Patterns, and the Insomnia Severity Index. Sleep duration did not differ between the asthma severity groups, yet more adolescents with severe asthma reported insufficient weekday sleep (44%) versus adolescents without asthma (31%). Significant asthma group differences were found for sleep hygiene, with adolescents with severe asthma reporting poorer sleep hygiene. Almost twice as many adolescents with severe asthma reported clinically significant insomnia than adolescents with mild or no asthma. Sleep hygiene variables were correlated with insomnia, although these associations did not differ between adolescents with and without severe asthma. Finally, both insomnia severity and asthma severity were significant predictors of daytime sleepiness; however, asthma severity accounted for only 2% of the variance compared with 28% of the variance accounted for by insomnia severity. Many adolescents with severe asthma regularly obtain insufficient sleep, have poor sleep hygiene, and experience clinically significant insomnia. It is important to ask adolescents with asthma about sleep duration, sleep hygiene, and insomnia because there are effective interventions that can improve sleep for these youths. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cost incentives for doctors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schottmüller, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    If doctors take the costs of treatment into account when prescribing medication, their objectives differ from their patients' objectives because the patients are insured. This misalignment of interests hampers communication between patient and doctor. Giving cost incentives to doctors increases...... welfare if (i) the doctor's examination technology is sufficiently good or (ii) (marginal) costs of treatment are high enough. If the planner can costlessly choose the extent to which doctors take costs into account, he will opt for less than 100%. Optimal health care systems should implement different...... degrees of cost incentives depending on type of disease and/or doctor....

  15. [Asthma clinical practice guidelines: advantages and pitfalls].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Vicente; Bellido-Casado, Jesús; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Rodrigo, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    The Clinical Practice Guidelines on asthma have contributed towards unifying concepts and reaching a consensus on performances between different professional groups. However, they have failed in the overall improvement in the management of asthma, the final objective that they are meant to achieve. Today, almost 20 years after they appeared, the majority of asthmatic patients are still inadequately controlled, partly due to lack of follow up by doctors and the rest of health care staff who have to look after them. This lack of follow up of these recommendations is probably associated with a lack of well structured planning in their circulation and implementation. Also, although the recommendations of these guidelines agree in what is essential, they differ in other aspects, which in turn could be determining factors in clinical practice. The purpose of this article has been to establish the main differences in the recommendations that the principal clinical practice guidelines on the disease propose on the diagnosis, classification and treatment of asthma. To do this we have compared, The British Guideline on the Management of Asthma 2007, The Global Strategy for Asthma Management and Prevention/Global Initiative for Asthma 2006 (GINA), the National Prevention program for Education on Asthma (Programa Nacional de Prevención para la Educación del Asma) (NAEPP), the Spanish Guide for the Management of Asthma (Guía Española para el Manejo del Asma 2003) (GEMA) and the ALAT y SEPAR guides, Latin-America and Spain. Recommendations for the Prevention and Treatment of Asthma Exacerbation (América Latina y España. Recomendaciones para la Prevención y el Tratamiento de la Exacerbación Asmática 2008) (ALERTA).

  16. Doctoral Women: Managing Emotions, Managing Doctoral Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitchison, Claire; Mowbray, Susan

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the experiences of women doctoral students and the role of emotion during doctoral candidature. The paper draws on the concept of emotional labour to examine the two sites of emotional investment students experienced and managed during their studies: writing and family relationships. Emotion is perceived by many dominant…

  17. Temporal relationship of allergic rhinitis with asthma and other co-morbidities in a Mediterranean country: a retrospective study in a tertiary reference allergy clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, M; Koulouris, S; Koti, I; Aggelides, X; Sideri, K; Chliva, C; Vassilatou, E; Kalogeromitros, D

    2010-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a global health problem which causes major illness and represents a risk factor for asthma. The primary aim of the study was to record the clinical pattern of allergic rhinitis and its temporal relation with asthma in a Greek population. Three-hundred and sixteen subjects with documented diagnosis of allergic rhinitis in a two-year period were included in this study. All participants completed a standardised questionnaire with full retrospective epidemiological data for rhinitis; in addition, serum IgE measurement and skin prick tests with 22 common inhalant allergens were carried out, while spirometry was performed in subjects with self-reported or doctor-diagnosed asthma. All subjects with at least one positive skin test were included in study analysis. One-hundred and sixty five out of 316 patients (49.1%) stated self reported-asthma while in 63/316 (19.9%) asthma was documented with spirometry. One hundred out of 165 (60.6%) had rhinitis as first clinical manifestation while in 24/165 (14.5%) asthma symptoms appeared first; the remaining 31/165 (24.9%) reported simultaneous onset of upper and lower airways' symptoms. About 68.5% were sensitised to seasonal allergens exclusively, while 50% were sensitised to ≥ 1 of Parietaria, grasses sp., Olea eur. The duration of rhinitis in the subpopulation of patients with self-reported asthma (n=165) was significantly higher compared with non-asthmatics (mean=3.22 years, p<0.001). Survival analysis for the estimation of asthma onset showed that the mean time interval with rhinitis only is 16.6 years (median 12 years, incidence 0.0596). The unique environmental conditions and the aerobiology of each area clearly affect the clinical features of respiratory allergy. Copyright © 2009 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Female physicist doctoral experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine P. Dabney

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The underrepresentation of women in physics doctorate programs and in tenured academic positions indicates a need to evaluate what may influence their career choice and persistence. This qualitative paper examines eleven females in physics doctoral programs and professional science positions in order to provide a more thorough understanding of why and how women make career choices based on aspects both inside and outside of school and their subsequent interaction. Results indicate that female physicists experience conflict in achieving balance within their graduate school experiences and personal lives and that this then influences their view of their future careers and possible career choices. Female physicists report both early and long-term support outside of school by family, and later departmental support, as being essential to their persistence within the field. A greater focus on informal and out-of-school science activities for females, especially those that involve family members, early in life may help influence their entrance into a physics career later in life. Departmental support, through advisers, mentors, peers, and women’s support groups, with a focus on work-life balance can help females to complete graduate school and persist into an academic career.

  19. How does a doctor study other doctors being doctors?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risør, Torsten

    The intension of this presentation is to encourage debate on auto-ethnography in medical systems. The empirical starting point will be my present study of how young doctors learn to make decisions about diagnosis and treatment of the individual patient. The study is an ethnographic field study......, among other doctors, at departments where I have worked. My parents, my sister and my grandfather are doctors. So reflections and experiences concerning medicine and being a doctor are integrated parts of my personal history and identity. Will I be capable of critical reflection on something...... that is a part of me? How can I represent the experience and learning of my informants without simply reproducing my own experience? This makes the project both anthropology-at-home and auto-ethnography. I will present an example from the field work to illustrate the many ways in which the auto- part...

  20. Japanese guidelines for childhood asthma 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Arakawa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The Japanese Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Allergic Diseases 2017 (JAGL 2017 includes a minor revision of the Japanese Pediatric Guideline for the Treatment and Management of Asthma 2012 (JPGL 2012 by the Japanese Society of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology. The section on child asthma in JAGL 2017 provides information on how to diagnose asthma between infancy and adolescence (0–15 years of age. It makes recommendations for best practices in the management of childhood asthma, including management of acute exacerbations and non-pharmacological and pharmacological management. This guideline will be of interest to non-specialist physicians involved in the care of children with asthma. JAGL differs from the Global Initiative for Asthma Guideline in that JAGL emphasizes diagnosis and early intervention of children with asthma at <2 years or 2–5 years of age. The first choice of treatment depends on the severity and frequency of symptoms. Pharmacological management, including step-up or step-down of drugs used for long-term management based on the status of asthma control levels, is easy to understand; thus, this guideline is suitable for the routine medical care of children with asthma. JAGL also recommends using a control test in children, so that the physician aims for complete control by avoiding exacerbating factors and appropriately using anti-inflammatory drugs (for example, inhaled corticosteroids and leukotriene receptor antagonists.

  1. Importance of education in bronchial asthma treatment - gender differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowska-Polańska, Beata; Pleśniak, Justyna; Seń, Mariola; Uchmanowicz, Izabella; Rosińczuk, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant progress in understanding mechanisms and effective treatment there are still therapeutic failures in patients treated for bronchial asthma. Education is vital in the therapeutic process. It improves the control of the disease at the individual level by influencing the adherence and compliance. The study included 100 patients suffering from bronchial asthma and treated according to GINA 2002 guidelines in Allergy Clinic. Asthma control test (ACT), analysis of patients' medical documentation and a self-constructed questionnaire concerning health promotion and education were used in the study. Aim of this work was to assess differences in the influence of education on results of bronchial asthma control between sexes. Average duration of asthma was similar in women and men (13.0 ± 11.16 vs.12.7 ± 9.74 years). Weaker asthma control was found in women (ACT 17.7 vs. 20.4), as well as lower FEV1 values (80-50% of predicted value in 60.3% of women vs. 43.25 of men). In women an analysis of correlation concerning patients' knowledge and conducted health education with asthma control revealed a statistically significant positive correlation of knowledge acquired from the allergologist with asthma control, information about proceeding in acute attack, whereas negative correlation with asthma control with knowledge passed on by family doctor was found. Among the male respondents positive correlations of knowledge with asthma control within the scope of knowledge from allergologist and information concerning proceeding in asthmatic attack were found, while negative correlation with information coming from family doctor was revealed. Health education in patients with asthma should be conducted by a specialist in allergic diseases and well-prepared healthcare professionals.

  2. Finding the Right Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aortic Aneurysm More Finding the Right Doctor Updated:Mar 6,2017 Choosing the right doctor for you ... health Answers by Heart Fact Sheets Learn and live with our downloadable patient information sheets . Dozens of ...

  3. Building doctoral ecologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    2018-01-01

    During the recent years doctoral education has ultimately left its seclusion within the disciplines and become part of national and global policy agendas, claimed to ensure societal welfare and financial growth. As a consequence more resources have been allocated to the formalization and professi......, and discusses how institutions and doctoral programmes could use such sprawling spaces for learning to build doctoral ecologies and to strengthening existentially based pedagogies within doctoral education....

  4. The Integrated Care of Asthma in Switzerland (INCAS) Study: Changes in Asthma Control and Perception of Health Care through Asthma Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürr, Selina; Hersberger, Kurt E; Zeller, Andreas; Scheuzger, Jonas; Miedinger, David; Gregoriano, Claudia; Joos Zellweger, Ladina; Steurer-Stey, Claudia; Leuppi, Jörg Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Despite great efforts in establishing optimal asthma management, asthma may remain uncontrolled. To effectively manage chronic diseases, such as asthma, it is important to train patients in self-management skills. The aim of this study was to assess the potential benefit of standardised asthma education in Switzerland for asthma control and patients' perception of received asthma care and of self-management support. For this multicentre longitudinal controlled study, asthma patients were recruited in Switzerland. The Asthma Control Test (ACT) was used to assess asthma control. The Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care questionnaire (PACIC 5A) was applied to evaluate received health-care services and self-management support. Patients were offered the possibility to attend asthma education sessions conducted by the Swiss Lung League and Swiss Allergy Centre. After 1 year, attenders and non-attenders completed the questionnaires again. Changes in ACT and PACIC 5A scores were analysed using dependent t tests. Overall, 223 patients with asthma were investigated (mean age 43 ± 12 years, 38% male, 13% current smokers, 29% ex-smokers). Sixty-one (27%) patients attended education sessions. Both groups had improved asthma control at follow-up (attenders: t(56) = -3.2, r = 0.4 [medium effect size], p = 0.002; non-attenders: t(141) = -2.6, r = 0.2 [small effect size], p = 0.010). Attenders improved in PACIC and 5A sum scores (t(50) = -3.6, r = 0.5 [medium effect size], p = 0.001). A comprehensive self-management asthma education programme in Switzerland improved asthma control and patients' perception of received asthma care and of self-management support. Professionals should motivate patients to attend asthma education in order to become active partners in managing their disease. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Your Doctor , National Eye Institute (NEI) Español Aging Planning Your Doctor Visit , NIHSeniorHealth.gov Videos: Talking ... A Guide for Older People , National Institute on Aging (NIA) Talking With Your Doctor Presentation Toolkit , National ...

  6. Doctoral Scientists in Oceanography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Mathematical and Physical Sciences.

    The purpose of this report was to classify and count doctoral scientists in the United States trained in oceanography and/or working in oceanography. Existing data from three sources (National Research Council's "Survey of Earned Doctorates," and "Survey of Doctorate Recipients," and the Ocean Sciences Board's "U.S. Directory of Marine…

  7. Doctoral Assistants = Critical Friends: A Simple yet Complex Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, John; Laguerre, Fabrice; Moore, Eric; Reedy, Katherine; Rose, Scott; Vickers, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    The Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate (CPED) encourages doctoral candidates volunteering in order to give back and continue their relationship with the university after completing their dissertation. Volunteering can take on many forms, from acting as doctoral assistants to performing the role of critical friends on future doctoral…

  8. Doctoral Success as Ongoing Quality Business: A Possible Conceptual Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitzer, E. M.

    2011-01-01

    The challenges involving doctoral non-completion and a lack of academic or scholarly quality are not restricted to putting the blame on doctoral candidates themselves, their supervisors or the institutions where they enrol. As candidates carry huge responsibilities when entering doctoral studies, success can be associated with an array of factors…

  9. Asthma and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Caroline Trunk-Black; Ali, Zarqa; Nilas, Lisbeth

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a major health problem, and obesity is associated with a high incidence of asthma and poor asthma control. The aim of the present paper is to systematically review the current knowledge of the effect on overall asthma control of weight reduction in overweight and obese adults with asthma....

  10. Are operating room nurses at higher risk of severe persistent asthma? The Nurses' Health Study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moual, N. le; Varraso, R.; Zock, J.P.; Henneberger, P.; Speizer, F.E.; Kauffmann, F.; Camargo, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the associations between operating room (OR) nursing, a category of health care workers at high risk of exposure to various inhaled agents, and asthma severity/control among women with asthma. Methods: The level of severity/control in nurses with prevalent doctor-diagnosed

  11. Monitoring childhood asthma: web-based diaries and the asthma control test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorend-van Bergen, Sandra; Vaessen-Verberne, Anja A; Landstra, Anneke M; Brackel, Hein J; van den Berg, Norbert J; Caudri, Daan; de Jongste, Johan C; Merkus, Peter J; Pijnenburg, Mariëlle W

    2014-06-01

    Data from asthma diaries are frequently used as an end point in asthma studies; however, data on the validity of Web-based diaries are scarce. First, we examined the validity of a Web-based diary in assessing asthma control. Second, we determined the cutoff points for well-controlled asthma of the Childhood Asthma Control Test (C-ACT) and the Asthma Control Test (ACT), and calculated the minimal important difference for both tests. Children with asthma, ages 4-18 years (n = 228) completed a 4-week Web-based diary, C-ACT, ACT, and an asthma-related quality-of-life questionnaire at baseline and after 1-year follow-up. The completion rate of the Web-based diaries was 89%. The diary scores correlated strongly with C-ACT and ACT scores (r = -0.73, P < .01; r = -0.64, P < .01, respectively) and the changes in diary scores correlated well with changes in C-ACT and ACT scores. The best cutoff points for well-controlled asthma were C-ACT ≥ 22 and ACT ≥ 23. The minimal important differences were 1.9 (95% CI, 1.3-2.5) for ACT and 1.6 (95% CI, 1.1-2.1) for C-ACT, and -0.7 points/d (95% CI, -1.1 to -0.4) for the Web-based diary. Our Web-based diary was valid for recording asthma symptoms. Cutoff points of ≥22 (C-ACT) and ≥23 (ACT) define well-controlled asthma. We recommend a 2 C-ACT and ACT points difference as minimally important. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Adherence to management guidelines for childhood asthma in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereznicki, Bonnie J; Beggs, Sean; Duff, Caitlin; Bereznicki, Luke

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about doctors' treatment preferences for childhood asthma. The aim of this study was to investigate adherence to management guidelines for childhood asthma. One thousand general practitioners (GPs) and paediatric specialists in Australia were invited to take part in a survey, which collected demographic details and explored their familiarity with and adherence to childhood asthma management guidelines. Two hundred doctors (20% response rate) responded and were eligible for inclusion in the survey. Approximately half (54.5%) of the respondents were very familiar with at least one of the childhood asthma management guidelines. The majority of respondents (86.8%) followed guideline recommendations when prescribing initial maintenance therapy for childhood asthma, while 89.2% and 68.0% followed guideline recommendations regarding step-up and step-down therapy respectively. Overall familiarity with childhood asthma management guidelines could be improved. There is scope for improvement in the adherence to these guidelines when prescribing medication in childhood asthma, particularly for step-down therapy.

  13. Pesticides and atopic and nonatopic asthma among farm women in the Agricultural Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppin, Jane A; Umbach, David M; London, Stephanie J; Henneberger, Paul K; Kullman, Greg J; Alavanja, Michael C R; Sandler, Dale P

    2008-01-01

    Risk factors for asthma among farm women are understudied. We evaluated pesticide and other occupational exposures as risk factors for adult-onset asthma. Studying 25,814 farm women in the Agricultural Health Study, we used self-reported history of doctor-diagnosed asthma with or without eczema and/or hay fever to create two case groups: patients with atopic asthma and those with nonatopic asthma. We assessed disease-exposure associations with polytomous logistic regression. At enrollment (1993-1997), 702 women (2.7%) reported a doctor's diagnosis of asthma after age 19 years (282 atopic, 420 nonatopic). Growing up on a farm (61% of all farm women) was protective for atopic asthma (odds ratio [OR], 0.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.43-0.70) and, to a lesser extent, for nonatopic asthma (OR, 0.83; 95%CI, 0.68-1.02; P value for difference = 0.008). Pesticide use was almost exclusively associated with atopic asthma. Any use of pesticides on the farm was associated only with atopic asthma (OR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.14-1.87). This association with pesticides was strongest among women who had grown up on a farm. Women who grew up on farms and did not apply pesticides had the lowest overall risk of atopic asthma (OR, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.27-0.62) compared with women who neither grew up on farms nor applied pesticides. A total of 7 of 16 insecticides, 2 of 11 herbicides, and 1 of 4 fungicides were significantly associated with atopic asthma; only permethrin use on crops was associated with nonatopic asthma. These findings suggest that pesticides may contribute to atopic asthma, but not nonatopic asthma, among farm women.

  14. Loss of asthma control and activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneeboer, M M S; Fens, N; van de Pol, M A; Majoor, C J; Meijers, J C M; Kamphuisen, P W; Lutter, R; Sterk, P J; Bel, E H D

    2016-03-01

    Epidemiologic studies have shown that patients with severe asthma have increased risk of pulmonary embolism, in particular patients with frequent asthma exacerbations. Therefore, we hypothesized that asthma exacerbations are associated with increased haemostatic activity. To investigate whether induced loss of asthma control is associated with changes in coagulation and fibrinolytic parameters in peripheral blood. We performed a prospective, inhaled steroid withdrawal study in 23 patients with moderate to moderately severe asthma, consisting of a baseline visit and a visit after loss of asthma control. During the visits, we measured asthma control questionnaire (ACQ), atopy, lung function, inflammatory markers (eosinophils and neutrophils), and haemostatic parameters in plasma. Complete cessation of inhaled corticosteroids led to a loss of asthma control in 22 of 23 patients. We found increased asthma symptoms (ACQ 0.9 vs. 2.9, P fibrinolysis parameters. Loss of asthma control after cessation of inhaled corticosteroids does not lead to increased haemostatic activation in patients with moderate to moderately severe asthma. This suggests that more severe inflammation or additional risk factors are required for activation of coagulation or reduction of fibrinolysis in asthma. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Assessing and Treating Work-Related Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoughton Tracy

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Work-related asthma is asthma that is caused or exacerbated by exposures at work. It is the most common form of occupational lung disease in developed countries. It has important impacts on the health and well-being of the affected individual, as well as consequences for society because of unemployment issues and workers' compensation claims. With ongoing exposure, occupational asthma can result in persistent airway hyperresponsiveness and, possibly, permanent disability for the individual. Thus, it is important for the clinician to be able to diagnose this disorder as quickly and accurately as possible. The evaluation of a patient with work-related asthma can be extensive. It includes obtaining a consistent history, identifying the cause in the workplace, and confirming the diagnosis with objective tests. After a diagnosis has been made, treatment must sometimes go beyond the medications used for nonoccupational asthma and include interventions to minimize or completely remove the individual from exposure to the causal agent if he or she has sensitizer-induced occupational asthma. In addition, once an individual has been identified with occupational asthma, steps should be taken to prevent the development of this disorder in other workers. The purpose of this article is to review the current literature and provide the clinician with a stepwise approach to the diagnosis and management of a patient with work-related asthma.

  16. Comparing Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) criteria with the Childhood Asthma Control Test (C-ACT) and Asthma Control Test (ACT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koolen, B B; Pijnenburg, M W H; Brackel, H J L; Landstra, A M; van den Berg, N J; Merkus, P J F M; Hop, W C J; Vaessen-Verberne, A A P H

    2011-09-01

    Several tools are useful in detecting uncontrolled asthma in children. The aim of this study was to compare Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guidelines with the Childhood Asthma Control Test (C-ACT) and the Asthma Control Test (ACT) in detecting uncontrolled asthma in children. 145 children with asthma filled in a web-based daily diary card for 4 weeks on symptoms, use of rescue medication and limitations of activities, followed by either the C-ACT or ACT. For predicting uncontrolled asthma, score cut-off points of 19 were used for C-ACT and ACT. According to GINA guidelines, asthma was uncontrolled in 71 (51%) children and completely controlled in 19 (14%) children. The area under the curve in the receiver operating characteristic curves for C-ACT and ACT versus GINA guidelines were 0.89 and 0.92, respectively. Cut-off points of 19 for C-ACT and ACT resulted in a sensitivity of 33% and 66% in predicting uncontrolled asthma, respectively. C-ACT and ACT correlate well with GINA criteria in predicting uncontrolled asthma, but commonly used cut-off points for C-ACT and ACT seem to underestimate the proportion of children with uncontrolled asthma as defined by GINA.

  17. Smoking and Asthma (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Personal Plan Hot Topics Flu Facts Arrhythmias Abuse Smoking and Asthma KidsHealth > For Teens > Smoking and Asthma ... A en español Fumar y el asma Does Smoking Make Asthma Worse? Yes. If you have asthma, ...

  18. Marcel Proust's fictional diseases and doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2013-01-01

    Marcel Proust (1875-1922), the son and brother of famous physicians, had close and continuous contact with medicine and doctors in connection with chronic asthma, neurasthenia, medical 'tourism', and self-medication. This proximity to medical issues is obvious in his work, particularly his novel In Search of Lost Time, which today is still considered one of the most important literary works ever. In this novel, medicine, patients, and doctors are everywhere, and it can be claimed that while it is often considered to be the great novel of memory, medicine in itself also can be seen as a true character of the story, in which Proust displays surprisingly extensive knowledge. Neurasthenia and asthma (i.e. Proust's diseases), as well as specific neurological disorders, such as stroke, migraine, epilepsy, and dementia, appear in the novel. The disease of the narrator's grandmother remains a piece of anthology, and probably remains the best literary report of a progressive stroke leading to death. Proust also quoted neurological conditions which were virtually unreported in his time, such as phantom limb syndrome and poststroke depression associated with aphasia in Baron Charlus. Doctors are nearly systematically depicted as incompetent and superficial, characteristics which appear to increase with academic titles and glory. The main physician of the novel, Professor Cottard, even ends up writing fake certificates for his rich friend Mrs. Verdurin during World War I so that she can obtain fresh croissants for breakfast, while poor people around her are starving. When called to examine a dying patient, one of the real doctors of the novel, Professor Dieulafoy, says and does nothing except ask for his fees. This defiance and criticism of physicians were indeed those of Proust in real life. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. The significance of early recurrent wheeze for asthma outcomes in late childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovland, Vegard; Riiser, Amund; Mowinckel, Petter; Carlsen, Kai-Håkon; Lødrup Carlsen, Karin C

    2013-04-01

    Recurrent early life wheeze is not always asthma, and up to 50% of children are reported to remit. With reports of adult asthma symptom relapse, we assessed the prognosis of recurrent bronchial obstruction (rBO) through adolescence in the Environment and Childhood Asthma (ECA) prospective birth cohort study. The present study is based on data from investigations at ages 2, 10 and 16 years of 550 young people (52% males) attending at 16 years of age. Based on the presence of rBO from 0-2 years, defined as recurrent (at least two episodes) doctor-diagnosed wheeze, and asthma from 2-10 years and 10-16 years, defined as at least two episodes of doctor-diagnosed asthma, symptoms and medication use, prognosis of rBO was assessed. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) was diagnosed by a metacholine provocation dose ≤ 8 μmol that caused 20% reduction in the forced expiratory volume in 1 s. At 10-16 years, 34% of the 143 rBO children had asthma. All children with rBO had reduced lung function compared with the never asthmatics. Of the rBO children in remission, 48.4% had asthma symptoms, medication use and/or BHR compared with 26.7% with never asthma (p<0.001). Only 34.3% of rBO children were without asthma symptoms, medication use or BHR by 16 years, possibly indicating future asthma risk.

  20. Asthma and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulet, L-P

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence and incidence of asthma have increased among obese children and adults, particularly among women. Obesity seems to be a predisposing factor for the development of asthma, but the underlying mechanisms of its influence are still uncertain. Various hypotheses have been proposed to explain the link between obesity and asthma such as a common genetic predisposition, developmental changes, altered lung mechanics, the presence of a systemic inflammatory process, and an increased prevalence of associated comorbid conditions. Over-diagnosis of asthma does not seem to be more frequent in obese compared to non-obese subjects, but the added effects of obesity on respiratory symptoms can affect asthma control assessment. Obesity can make asthma more difficult to control and is associated with a reduced beneficial effect of asthma medications. This could be due to a change in asthma phenotype, particularly evidenced as a less eosinophilic type of airway inflammation combined to the added effects of changes in lung mechanics. Weight loss is associated with a universal improvement of asthma and should be part of asthma management in the obese patient. Additional research should be conducted to better determine how obesity influences the development and clinical expression of asthma, establish the optimal management of asthma in this population and determine how obesity affects long-term asthma outcomes in these patients. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Allergy in severe asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giacco, S R; Bakirtas, A; Bel, E; Custovic, A; Diamant, Z; Hamelmann, E; Heffler, E; Kalayci, Ö; Saglani, S; Sergejeva, S; Seys, S; Simpson, A; Bjermer, L

    2017-02-01

    It is well recognized that atopic sensitization is an important risk factor for asthma, both in adults and in children. However, the role of allergy in severe asthma is still under debate. The term 'Severe Asthma' encompasses a highly heterogeneous group of patients who require treatment on steps 4-5 of GINA guidelines to prevent their asthma from becoming 'uncontrolled', or whose disease remains 'uncontrolled' despite this therapy. Epidemiological studies on emergency room visits and hospital admissions for asthma suggest the important role of allergy in asthma exacerbations. In addition, allergic asthma in childhood is often associated with severe asthma in adulthood. A strong association exists between asthma exacerbations and respiratory viral infections, and interaction between viruses and allergy further increases the risk of asthma exacerbations. Furthermore, fungal allergy has been shown to play an important role in severe asthma. Other contributing factors include smoking, pollution and work-related exposures. The 'Allergy and Asthma Severity' EAACI Task Force examined the current evidence and produced this position document on the role of allergy in severe asthma. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. For Parents of Children with Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Asthma > Managing Asthma For Parents of Children with Asthma Your Child's Asthma: A Parent's Guide to Better Breathing This step- ... health considerations you should keep in mind. Diagnosing Asthma in Young Children Most children who have asthma ...

  3. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Asthma among Persons with Current Asthma Asthma and Obesity Percentage of People with Asthma who Smoke Insurance ... Asthma Resources for Professionals National Asthma Control Program America Breathing Easier Guide for State Programs Interventions Community ...

  4. Hyperventilation syndrome in adolescents with and without asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alba, Irene; Carloni, Ines; Ferrante, Anna Lisa; Gesuita, Rosaria; Palazzi, Maria Laura; de Benedictis, Fernando Maria

    2015-12-01

    Data on the prevalence of hyperventilation syndrome (HVS) in adolescents are scanty. To determine the prevalence of HVS in a population of adolescents with and without asthma, and to verify whether HVS was related to asthma activity. A population of adolescents was asked to self-complete a questionnaire, including the Nijmegen questionnaire to assess HVS, and a standardized asthma questionnaire. Seven hundred and sixty questionnaires were suitable for analysis. One hundred and twenty subjects (15.8%) were classified as asthmatic. Forty-seven subjects (6.2%) had a Nijmegen score ≥ 23, which was suggestive of HVS. Symptoms indicative of HVS were ten times more common in subjects with asthma (25%) than in those without asthma (2.5%). Nijmegen score was significantly higher in subjects with lifetime asthma (P < 0.001), current episodic asthma (P < 0.05) and current active asthma (P < 0.001) than in those with no asthma. In the whole population, girls presented HVS more frequently than boys (P < 0.001). There was a significant effect of gender (females, OR 3.2) and status of asthma (lifetime asthma, OR 11.2; current episodic asthma, OR 8.9; current active asthma, OR 41.5) on the probability of suffering from HVS. The prevalence of symptoms indicative of HVS in an unselected population of adolescents was relatively high. Symptoms were more common in girls and in subjects with asthma, and there was a significant effect of asthma activity on the probability of suffering from HVS. Further studies need to be performed in order to validate a screening tool for HVS in both adolescents and asthmatic subjects. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A Survey of Asthma Management Practices and Implementation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-14

    Sep 14, 2017 ... and implementation of Global Initiative for Asthma guidelines among doctors in a resource-limited setting in Nigeria. Niger J Clin Pract. 2017;20:984-91. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons. Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License, which allows ...

  6. Variations in the prevalence of childhood asthma and wheeze in MeDALL cohorts in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora P. Uphoff

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available While there is evidence for variations in prevalence rates of childhood wheeze and asthma between countries, longitudinal, individual-level data are needed to understand these differences. The aim of this study was to examine variations in prevalence rates of childhood asthma, wheeze and wheeze with asthma in Europe. We analysed datasets from 10 MeDALL (Mechanisms of the Development of ALLergy cohorts in eight countries, representing 26 663 children, to calculate prevalence rates of wheeze and asthma by child age and wheeze with asthma at age 4 years. Harmonised variables included outcomes parent-reported wheeze and parent-reported doctor-diagnosed asthma, and covariates maternal education, parental smoking, pets, parental asthma, doctor-diagnosed allergic rhinitis, doctor-diagnosed eczema and wheeze severity. At age 4 years, asthma prevalence varied from 1.72% in Germany to 13.48% in England and the prevalence of wheeze varied from 9.82% in Greece to 55.37% in Spain. Adjusted estimates of the proportion of 4-year-old children with wheeze diagnosed with asthma remained highest in England (38.14%, 95% CI 31.38–44.90% and lowest in Spain (15.94%, 95% CI 6.16–25.71%. The large differences in prevalence rates of asthma, wheeze and wheeze with asthma at age 4 years between European cohorts may indicate that childhood asthma is more readily diagnosed in some countries while going unrecognised elsewhere.

  7. "My child has asthma": some answers to parents' questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, J

    1996-01-01

    The incidence of asthma appears to have doubled since the 1970s. 15% of children in the UK are now estimated to have the condition. Children's asthma needs to be taken seriously by parents, health professionals and teachers. Its severity varies and it is a potentially life-threatening condition. The reason why children develop asthma is not known. Theories include a family tendency to asthma and allergy, house-dust mite and parental smoking. There is no clear evidence of a link between asthma and traffic fumes and air pollution. The vast majority of people with asthma take inhaled steroids, and these produce little or no side-effects. Tablet forms of the drug also have few side-effects if used for short courses of a few days. Only a minority need to take steroid tablets regularly, and need to discuss the issue of side-effects versus improvements in symptoms with their doctor. Most children use a preventer and a reliever medication. It is important that parents and child understand how and when to use each. Research suggests that two-thirds of children may grow out of their asthma symptoms, though asthma that is triggered by an allergic response may recur in later life. The prognosis for pre-school children is good.

  8. What is Asthma?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Lung Association 104 COPD Awareness Month: Connecting with Social Support American Lung Association ... Asthma - Duration: 3:36. Nucleus Medical Media 658,979 views 3:36 What is asthma. ...

  9. Obesity, adipokines and asthma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jartti, T; Saarikoski, L; Jartti, L; Lisinen, I; Jula, A; Huupponen, R; Viikari, J; Raitakari, O. T

    2009-01-01

    .... Our objective was to examine whether obesity is associated with asthma in three time points of life, and whether immunomodulatory adipokines, leptin and adiponectin are linked to overweight-associated asthma. Methods...

  10. What is Asthma?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Lung Association 139 Barbara Tie talks about Alpha 1-caused COPD American Lung Association 140 Judy Pruitt ... American Lung Association 182 Asthma - Theresa Moore PSA 1 American Lung Association 183 Asthma Walk PSA American ...

  11. Exercise-induced asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000036.htm Exercise-induced asthma To use the sharing features on this page, ... such as running, basketball, or soccer. Use Your Asthma Medicine Before you Exercise Take your short-acting, ...

  12. Allergies, asthma, and pollen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive airway - pollen; Bronchial asthma - pollen; Triggers - pollen; Allergic rhinitis - pollen ... Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. It is important to know your triggers because avoiding them is your first step toward feeling better. ...

  13. What is Asthma?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Clubs American Lung Association 146 Angela Abel on exercise and COPD American Lung Association 147 American Lung ... 40 Types of Asthma - Duration: 11:38. Affinity Health Plan 6,222 views 11:38 Asthma Tech - ...

  14. Smoking and asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000504.htm Smoking and asthma To use the sharing features on ... your allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Smoking is a trigger for many people who have ...

  15. Asthma - child - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000001.htm Asthma - child - discharge To use the sharing features on this ... care for your child. Take Charge of Your Child's Asthma at Home Make sure you know the ...

  16. Psychopathology in difficult asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, L.C.; van Son, M.J.M.; Keimpema, A.R.; van Ranst, D; Pommer, A; Meijer, J.W.; Pop, V.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Within the asthma population, difficult asthma (DA) is a severe condition in which patients present with frequent exacerbations, hospitalizations and emergency room visits. The identification and treatment of psychopathology is included in the management of DA. Psychopathology is supposed

  17. resuscitation among Nigerian doctors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. Background: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), first described in 1960, is observed to be poorly applied in quality and quantum, hence, the need to ascertain its correct knowledge and practice among Nigerian doctors. Methods: Questionnaires were distributed randomly to doctors in a Nigerian University.

  18. Choosing a Family Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... history, and lifestyle. These help determine possible health risk factors.Research shows that people who have a family doctor have better overall health outcomes, lower death rates, and lower total costs of care.Things to considerFamily doctors know ...

  19. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NIH Website NIH Employee Intranet Staff Directory En Español Site Menu Home Health Information Health Info Lines ... Talking With Your Doctor , NIH News in Health Español Talking to Your Doctor , National Eye Institute (NEI) ...

  20. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Doctor , National Eye Institute (NEI) Español Aging Planning Your Doctor Visit , NIHSeniorHealth.gov Videos: Talking with ... Us Contact Us Bookmark & Share Email Updates Social Media & Outreach Twitter Facebook YouTube Footer NIH Home En ...

  1. The prevalence of asthma in schoolboys of travellers' families.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kearney, P M

    2012-02-03

    This study compared the prevalence of asthma in travelling schoolboys and settled controls to determine whether the travelling lifestyle may be a protective factor in the development of asthma. Information was collected by parental responses to the ISAAC (International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood) questionnaire. The design was a cross-sectional study with descriptive and analytical components. The subjects were six to twelve year old schoolboys from all male travelling children in Cork and from a selection of settled schoolboys. In addition the study collected information on the predictor variables--age, passive smoking and number of siblings. The questionnaire was administered to 54 travelling boys and 129 controls. The parent reported prevalence of wheeze and related symptoms were all more common in controls compared with the travelling boys. The values were significant for wheeze in the last year (31.3% v 14.8%; OR-5.6, p = 0.025), and for doctor diagnosed asthma (25.6% v 11.1%; OR = 5.1, p = 0.04). Schoolboys from travelling families have less wheeze and doctor diagnosed asthma than controls. The experience of the travelling lifestyle maybe a protective factor in the development of asthma.

  2. Obesity and asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Zarqa; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological data has established increasing adiposity as a risk factor for incident asthma. However, the mechanisms underlying the association between obesity and asthma are incompletely understood. In the present paper, we review current knowledge of possible mechanisms mediating the observed...... association between obesity and asthma....

  3. Allergy in severe asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Del Giacco, Stefano R.; Bakirtas, A.; Bel, E.; Custovic, A.; Diamant, Z.; Hamelmann, E.; Heffler, E.; Kalayci, O.; Saglani, S.; Sergejeva, S.; Seys, S.; Simpson, A.; Bjermer, Leif

    It is well recognized that atopic sensitization is an important risk factor for asthma, both in adults and in children. However, the role of allergy in severe asthma is still under debate. The term 'Severe Asthma' encompasses a highly heterogeneous group of patients who require treatment on steps

  4. Clinical phenotypes of asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bel, Elisabeth H.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Asthma is a phenotypically heterogeneous disorder and, over the years, many different clinical subtypes of asthma have been described. A precise definition of asthma phenotypes is now becoming more and more important, not only for a better understanding of pathophysiologic

  5. The effect of mold sensitization and humidity upon allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Don; Jhaveri, Manan A; Mannino, David M; Strawbridge, Heather; Temprano, James

    2013-04-01

    Humidity is commonly associated with increased airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma. To examine mold sensitization in patients with allergic asthma or allergic rhinitis and self-reports of humidity as exacerbating factors of clinical symptoms. A retrospective, cross-sectional study at a University hospital outpatient allergy and asthma clinic was performed. A total of 106 patients with either allergic asthma or allergic rhinitis completed standard prick-puncture skin testing with 17 allergens and controls and completed standardized forms addressing trigger factors for clinical symptoms. Allergic asthmatics sensitized to Cladosporium were more likely to have a more severe asthma severity class (odds ratio = 4.26, confidence interval = 1.30-16.93). Sensitization to Alternaria, Cladosporium, Helminthosporium, Aspergillus and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus in asthma was associated with higher likelihood for previous hospitalization, while sensitization to Cladosporium, Helminthosporium, Aspergillus, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and cockroach in asthma was associated with higher likelihood of having reduced pulmonary function based on forced expiratory volume in 1s. Furthermore, allergic asthmatics more commonly reported humidity as an exacerbating factor of symptoms than did patients only with allergic rhinitis (68.42% vs 42.86%, respectively; P Mold sensitization is highly associated with more severe asthma, while humidity is more of an exacerbating factor in patients with allergic asthma as compared with allergic rhinitis alone. Further delineation between mold sensitization and humidity is needed to determine whether these are independent factors in asthma. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Neurocognitive functioning in children with mild and moderate asthma in the childhood asthma management program. The Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP) Research Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annett, R D; Aylward, E H; Lapidus, J; Bender, B G; DuHamel, T

    2000-04-01

    The Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP) is a multicenter double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, clinical trial of two anti-inflammatory agents and placebo in children with mild and moderate asthma. The interrelationship between asthma severity and neurocognitive functioning among 1041 children (age range, 5-12 years) enrolled in the CAMP trial was examined. Asthma severity was established at baseline with a clinical history of asthma symptomatology and measures of lung function (spirometry and methacholine challenge). Diary cards were used in a screening to record nighttime awakenings and doctor contacts caused by asthma symptoms, symptom severity, and number of puffs from a rescue inhaler. All children received a comprehensive neurocognitive assessment at the end of the 28-day screening period (before randomization), including measures of intelligence, attention, memory, and academic achievement. Significant differences were found between children with mild and moderate asthma on lung function and symptom outcome variables (log(e)FEV(1)PC(20), DeltaFEV(1) percent predicted, change in peak flow percent predicted, nighttime awakenings caused by asthma, average symptom severity score, and average daily number of puffs from a rescue inhaler) but not on neurocognitive variables. Multiple regression analyses revealed that asthma outcomes could not be predicted by neurocognitive variables despite controlling for socioeconomic status. The prevalence of neurocognitive dysfunction, as indicated by the use of psychostimulant medication, was found to be consistent with that found in the existing literature. Mild and moderate asthma symptoms are not related to neurocognitive functioning in the children enrolled in CAMP. Mean performance on neurocognitive variables was found to be similar to that of national normative data.

  7. Asthma education for school staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kew, Kayleigh M; Carr, Robin; Donovan, Tim; Gordon, Morris

    2017-04-12

    preparedness, but studies vary and all available evidence is of low quality. Studies have not yet captured whether this improvement in knowledge has led to appreciable benefits over the short term or the longer term for the safety and health of children with asthma in school. Randomised evidence does not contribute to our knowledge of content or attributes of interventions that lead to the best outcomes, or of resources required for successful implementation.Complete reporting of the content and resources of educational interventions is essential for assessment of their effectiveness and feasibility for implementation. This applies to both randomised and non-randomised studies, although the latter may be better placed to observe important clinical outcomes such as exacerbations and mortality in the longer term.

  8. University and public health system partnership: A real-life intervention to improve asthma management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Janaina; Moreno, Adriana; Ferriani, Virginia; Araujo, Ana Carla; Vianna, Elcio; Borges, Marcos; Roxo, Pérsio; Gonçalves, Marcos; Mello, Luane; Parreira, Rosa; Silva, Jorgete; Stefanelli, Patricia; Panazolo, Larissa; Cetlin, Andrea; Queiroz, Luana; Araujo, Rosângela; Dias, Marina; Aragon, Davi; Domingos, Nélio; Arruda, L Karla

    2017-05-01

    Asthma is under-diagnosed in many parts of the world. We aimed to assess the outcome of a capacitating program on asthma for non-specialist physicians and other healthcare professionals working in the public system in Ribeirão Preto, Brazil. A group of 16 asthma specialists developed a one-year capacitating program in 11 healthcare clinics in the Northern District of the city, which included lectures on asthma, training on inhalation device use and spirometry, and development of an asthma management protocol. Researchers visited one health unit 2-4 times monthly, working with doctors on patients' care, discussing cases, and delivering lectures. Asthma education was also directed to the general population, focusing on recognition of signs and symptoms and long-term treatment, including production of educational videos available on YouTube. Outcome measures were the records of doctors' prescriptions of individual asthma medications pre- and post-intervention. Prior to the program, 3205 units of inhaled albuterol and 2876 units of inhaled beclomethasone were delivered by the Northern District pharmacy. After the one-year program, there was increase to 4850 units (51.3%) for inhaled albuterol and 3526 units (22.6%) for inhaled beclomethasone. The albuterol increase followed the recommendation given to the non-specialist doctors by the asthma experts, that every patient with asthma should have inhaled albuterol as a rescue medication, by protocol. No increase was observed in other districts where no capacitating program was conducted. A systematic capacitating program was successful in changing asthma prescription profiles among non-specialist doctors, with increased delivery of inhaled albuterol and beclomethasone.

  9. Doctors and society: a Northern Thailand study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, H E

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a survey together with other observations to characterize the medical profession in Northern Thailand. Data were obtained in early 1976 using a self-administered questionnaire which was completed by 132 physicians in three Northern Thai provinces. Officially approved Thai medicine is 'Western' in nature and is predominantly an urban phenomenon. Practitioners of indigenous medicine are widespread and although illegal, they are tolerated. Training of doctors conforms very largely to Western standards. This plus the limited demand for private medical care results in a high proportion of the graduates of Thai medical schools migrating abroad. Results of the survey indicate that doctors in Northern Thailand were predominantly government employees or staff of a private hospital. Less than 5% were solely in self-employment. However, most 'employee' doctors had a private 'after hours' practice. Two types of medical professionals were identified: the 'cosmopolitan' and the 'local' doctor. Difficulties in communicating with patients were indicated by about 30% of the respondent doctors. The level of dissatisfaction expressed by the doctors surveyed was relatively high--43%. Items most often mentioned were: over-work, low compensation and lack of cooperation of patients. Satisfaction most often mentioned were: service to others, independent occupation and prestige with which doctors are regarded. In the analysis, the influence of several independent variables on type of professionalism and on satisfaction-dissatisfaction was determined.

  10. Epigenetic Mechanisms in Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVries, Avery; Vercelli, Donata

    2016-03-01

    Asthma and allergic diseases are among the most prevalent chronic noncommunicable diseases of childhood, but the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms are poorly understood. Because epigenetic mechanisms link gene regulation to environmental cues and developmental trajectories, their contribution to asthma and allergy pathogenesis is under active investigation. DNA methylation signatures associated with concurrent disease and with the development of asthma during childhood asthma have been identified, but their significance is not easily interpretable. On the other hand, the characterization of early epigenetic predictors of asthma points to a potential role of epigenetic mechanisms in regulating the inception of, and the susceptibility to, this disease.

  11. Impact of Maternal Lifetime Interpersonal Trauma on Children's Asthma: Mediation Through Maternal Active Asthma During Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunst, Kelly J; Rosa, Maria José; Jara, Calvin; Lipton, Lianna R; Lee, Alison; Coull, Brent A; Wright, Rosalind J

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic stressors, including child abuse and/or interpersonal violence over a woman's lifecourse, can affect the health of her children. This study examines the associations between maternal lifetime interpersonal trauma (IPT) and children's asthma by age 6 years (n = 857). Pregnant women completed the Revised Conflict Tactics Scale; IPT exposure was categorized as unexposed (55%), early (childhood and/or teen years only, 25%), late (adulthood and/or index pregnancy, 7%), and chronic (early and late, 13%). Clinician-diagnosed asthma in children was reported by mothers at each follow-up visit until the child reached age 6 years. We examined the effects of maternal IPT categories and child's asthma using logistic regression. Using structural equation models, we also examined indirect relationships between maternal chronic IPT and child asthma operating through active asthma in pregnancy, prepregnancy BMI, prenatal smoking, and/or increased exposure to other adverse life events or environmental toxins prenatally. Effect modification by the child's sex was examined. Mothers were primarily Hispanic (55%) or black (30%) with less than high school education (62%). In logistic regression models, chronic maternal IPT (compared with unexposed) was associated with asthma in boys (odds ratio = 2.87, 95% confidence interval = 1.48-5.57) but not girls (odds ratio = 0.69, 95% confidence interval = 0.23-2.12; pinteraction = .042). In structural equation models, chronic IPT was associated with maternal active asthma in pregnancy (β = 0.59, p mediated through active maternal asthma in pregnancy.

  12. Choose your doctorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, Jeremy

    2007-02-01

    The development of education options for nurses has been inexorable and it is increasingly the case that senior nurses are considering a doctorate as the logical next step in their educational career. Such individuals need to make important decisions as to whether they should embark on a taught doctorate, professional doctorate or a traditional PhD. Each of these options will necessitate a considerable investment in time and money as well as the sacrifice of quality time and spare time over a significant number of years. A doctorate is not for everyone. Those still reading this text may be asking 'could this possibly be for me'? This paper will try to help the reader decide which if any option to take. It is suggested that nurses will now turn to the doctoral degree as their next adventure in academic study. It is argued that this development is not being controlled by management forces and indeed cannot be controlled by them. This last is chiefly because the move towards doctoral education is led by individuals who choose to study for a doctorate simply because they can. The paper considers what choices are available to nurses who wish to pursue a doctoral programme of study. In particular, this paper considers what new developments in doctoral courses are becoming available and what advantage there may be in studying for one of the newer professional doctorates rather than a traditional PhD. The material here is the result of a review of the literature on recent developments in doctoral education for nurses. The existing provision by UK and other universities was also reviewed, the data being collected by an informal review of universities' advertising material. It is inevitable that some nurses who are already qualified to degree and masters degree will take advantage of the doctoral degree opportunities which now newly present themselves. For nurses in practice, the advantages of the professional doctorate is that it is more structured, enables more peer and

  13. Doctors' attitudes regarding not for resuscitation orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sritharan, Gaya; Mills, Amber C; Levinson, Michele R; Gellie, Anthea L

    2017-12-01

    Objectives The aims of the present study were to investigate doctors' attitudes regarding the discussion and writing of not for resuscitation (NFR) orders and to identify potential barriers to the completion of these orders. Methods A questionnaire-based convenience study was undertaken at a tertiary hospital. Likert scales and open-ended questions were directed to issues surrounding the discussion, timing, understanding and writing of NFR orders, including legal and personal considerations. Results Doctors thought the presence of an NFR order both should and does alter care delivered by nursing staff, particularly delivery of pain relief, nursing observations and contacting the medical emergency team. Eighty-five per cent of doctors believed they needed somebody else's consent to write an NFR order (seeking of consent is not a requirement in most Australian jurisdictions). Conclusion There are complex barriers to the writing and implementation of NFR orders, including doctors' knowledge around the need for consent when cardiopulmonary resuscitation is likely to be futile or excessively burdensome. Doctors also believed that NFR orders result in changes to goals-of-care, suggesting a confounding of NFR orders with palliative care. Furthermore, doctors are willing to write NFR orders where there is clear medical indication and the patient is imminently dying, but are otherwise reliant on patients and family to initiate discussion. What is known about the topic? Hospitalised elderly patients, in the absence of an NFR order, are known to have poor survival and outcomes following resuscitation. Further, Australian data on the prevalence of NFR forms show that only a minority of older in-patients have a written NFR order in their history. In Australian hospitals, NFR orders are completed by doctors. What does this paper add? To our knowledge, the present study is the first in Australia to qualitatively analyse doctors' reasons to writing NFR orders. The open-text nature

  14. Obesity and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Peter G

    2013-12-01

    There is a global epidemic of asthma and obesity that is concentrated in Westernized and developed countries. A causal association in some people with asthma is suggested by observations that obesity precedes the onset of asthma and that bariatric surgery for morbid obesity can resolve asthma. The obese asthma phenotype features poor asthma control, limited response to corticosteroids, and an exaggeration of the physiological effects of obesity on lung function, which includes a reduction in expiratory reserve volume and airway closure occurring during tidal breathing. Obesity has important implications for asthma treatment. Increasing corticosteroid doses based on poor asthma control, as currently recommended in guidelines, may lead to overtreatment with corticosteroids in obese asthma. Enhanced bronchodilation, particularly of the small airways, may reduce the component of airway closure due to increased bronchomotor tone and suggests that greater emphasis should be placed on long-acting bronchodilators in obese asthma. The societal implications of this are important: with increasing obesity there will be increasing asthma from obesity, and the need to identify successful individual and societal weight-control strategies becomes a key goal.

  15. Nocturnal Dry Cough in the First 7 Years of Life is Associated With Asthma at School Age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boudewijn, Ilse M.; Savenije, Olga E. M.; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Wijga, Alet H.; Smit, Henriette A.; de Jongste, Johan C.; Gehring, Ulrike; Postma, Dirkje S.; Kerkhof, Marjan

    Background: Childhood wheeze is an important, well-known risk factor for asthma, yet little is known about the contribution of nocturnal dry cough. We investigated the association of nocturnal dry cough at ages 1-7 years with doctor-diagnosed asthma at 8 years of age, both in the presence and

  16. Nocturnal dry cough in the first 7 years of life is associated with asthma at school age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boudewijn, Ilse M; Savenije, Olga E M; Koppelman, Gerard H; Wijga, Alet H; Smit, Henriëtte A; de Jongste, Johan C; Gehring, Ulrike; Postma, Dirkje S; Kerkhof, Marjan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Childhood wheeze is an important, well-known risk factor for asthma, yet little is known about the contribution of nocturnal dry cough. We investigated the association of nocturnal dry cough at ages 1-7 years with doctor-diagnosed asthma at 8 years of age, both in the presence and

  17. Nocturnal dry cough in the first 7 years of life is associated with asthma at school age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boudewijn, Ilse M; Savenije, Olga E M; Koppelman, Gerard H; Wijga, Alet H; Smit, Henriëtte A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/067730043; de Jongste, Johan C; Gehring, Ulrike; Postma, Dirkje S; Kerkhof, Marjan

    BACKGROUND: Childhood wheeze is an important, well-known risk factor for asthma, yet little is known about the contribution of nocturnal dry cough. We investigated the association of nocturnal dry cough at ages 1-7 years with doctor-diagnosed asthma at 8 years of age, both in the presence and

  18. Obesity and asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivapalan, Pradeesh; Diamant, Zuzana; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Obesity has significant impact on asthma incidence and manifestations. The purpose of the review is to discuss recent observations regarding the association between obesity and asthma focusing on underlying mechanisms, clinical presentation, response to therapy and effect...... of weight reduction. RECENT FINDINGS: Clinical and epidemiological studies indicate that obese patients with asthma may represent a unique phenotype, which is more difficult to control, less responsive to asthma medications and by that may have higher healthcare utilization. A number of common comorbidities...... have been linked to both obesity and asthma, and may, therefore, contribute to the obese-asthma phenotype. Furthermore, recently published studies indicate that even a modest weight reduction can improve clinical manifestations and outcome of asthma. SUMMARY: Compared with normal-weight patients, obese...

  19. Patient's adherence in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillisen, Adrian

    2007-11-01

    Nonadherence in asthma treatment results in increasing mortality, morbidity, and it is associated with increasing treatment costs. In asthma, adherence rates are often below 50%. Understanding of the needs and behaviors of asthma patients as well as treatment barriers to comply with asthma guidelines is important in developing programs to promote adherence. This article presents information on common types of nonadherence in asthma patients, the causes, and it reviews the literature on interventions to overcome these factors to maximize adherence rates. Although several interventions are effective in improving medication adherence in asthma, only few significantly enhance adherence rates and clinical outcomes of these patients. An improvement in treatment adherence is a complex task, requiring asthma self-management, education programs coupled with educational reinforcements, simplifying treatment planes and applications forms. Good communications skills among clinicians and patient education are also central for improving adherence. Methods to overcoming physician barriers ensure consistency in implementing guideline recommendations in practice.

  20. Doctor-patient communication about cancer-related internet information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bylund, Carma L; Gueguen, Jennifer A; D'Agostino, Thomas A; Li, Yuelin; Sonet, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the effect of doctor-patient communication about cancer-related Internet information on self-reported outcomes. Two hundred and thirty cancer patients and caregivers completed an online survey regarding their experiences searching for and discussing with their doctors cancer-related Internet information. Participants who assertively introduced the Internet information in a consultation were more likely to have their doctor agree with the information. When doctors showed interest and involvement and took the information seriously, participants were less likely to report a desire to change the doctor's response. Taking the information seriously was also associated with greater satisfaction. This preliminary evidence that the doctor's response is associated with patient outcomes indicates the potential for improving patient-centered communication. In an effort to maximize patient-centered communication, doctors should be encouraged to take their patients and the information they present seriously, as well as show their patients that they are interested and involved.

  1. Premenstrual asthma and atopy markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira-Vega, Antonio; Sánchez, José L; Maldonado, José A; Borrero, Fátima; Rico, Ignacio Vázquez; Vázquez, Rosa; Alvarez, Francisco; Ignacio, José M; Romero, Pedro; Gil, Francisco L

    2010-09-01

    The frequency of atopy in women with premenstrual asthma (PMA) and its possible effect on the premenstrual exacerbation of asthma are unknown. To analyze the relation between atopy markers (total IgE, Phadiatop, and specific IgE) and PMA. Asthmatic women of reproductive age completed a questionnaire about respiratory symptoms and recorded peak flow during an entire menstrual cycle to be classified as asthmatic patients with or without PMA. Their asthma severity was graded according to the 2005 Global Initiative for Asthma scale. PMA was defined as a clinical or functional exacerbation (>or=20%) in the premenstrual phase compared with the preovulatory phase. Blood tests for several atopy markers were conducted for: total IgE and screening for aeroallergens (Phadiatop) and specific IgE. Blood determinations were performed in 59 asthmatic women, of whom 31 (53%) had PMA. Twenty-six patients with PMA (84%) and 12 without PMA (43%) had total IgE values greater than 100 kU/L (P=.001). Twenty-one patients with PMA (68%) and 14 without PMA (50%) tested positive for Phadiatop (P=.17). Those who were positive for Phadiatop were also tested for specific IgE. No relation was found between specific IgE and PMA; values for ryegrass (63%), olive (60%), and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (54%) exceeded 0.35 kU/L. PMA seems to be closely linked to total IgE levels but not to specific allergens. The atopy affects the clinical manifestations of PMA in women of reproductive age. Copyright © 2010 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... your appointment. Consider bringing a close friend or family member with you. Take notes about what the doctor says, or ask a friend or family member to take notes for you. Learn how ...

  3. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... Health Literacy Clear & Simple Clear Health from NIH Cultural Respect Language Access Talking to Your Doctor Plain ... Español More Information For more information about this publication, contact OD OCPL Inquiries . This page last reviewed ...

  4. Talking to Your Doctor

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  5. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... Info Lines Health Services Locator HealthCare.gov NIH Clinical Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor ... Labs & Clinics Training Opportunities Library Resources Research Resources Clinical Research Resources Safety, Regulation and Guidance More » Quick ...

  6. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... appointment. Consider bringing a close friend or family member with you. Take notes about what the doctor says, or ask a friend or family member to take notes for you. Learn how to ...

  7. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... Simple Clear Health from NIH Cultural Respect Language Access Talking to Your ... Resources from NIH You can play an active role in your health care by talking to your doctor. Clear and honest ...

  8. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications ... Research & Training Medical Research Initiatives Science Highlights Science Education Research in NIH Labs & Clinics Training Opportunities Library ...

  9. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... can play an active role in your health care by talking to your doctor. Clear and honest ... Institute on Aging (NIA) Cancer Communication in Cancer Care , National Cancer Institute (NCI) Español Complementary and Integrative ...

  10. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... Information More » Quick Links NCI NEI NHLBI NHGRI NIA NIAAA NIAID NIAMS NIBIB NICHD NIDCD NIDCR NIDDK ... Guide for Older People , National Institute on Aging (NIA) Talking With Your Doctor Presentation Toolkit , National Institute ...

  11. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... concerns before your appointment. Consider bringing a close friend or family member with you. Take notes about what the doctor says, or ask a friend or family member to take notes for you. ...

  12. Going to the Doctor

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    ... sound quite right, the doctor will want to investigate further. Look in your ears, nose, and throat: ... Us Print Resources Send to a Friend Permissions Guidelines About KidsHealth Nemours.org Reading BrightStart! Contact Us ...

  13. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... appointment: Write down a list of questions and concerns before your appointment. Consider bringing a close friend ... Talking with Your Doctor: A Guide for Older People , National Institute on Aging (NIA) Talking With Your ...

  14. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z ... Matters NIH Record Research & Training Medical Research Initiatives Science Highlights Science Education Research in NIH Labs & Clinics ...

  15. Assessing the knowledge of asthma among community pharmacists ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To assess the knowledge of community pharmacists about asthma and its management. Methods: Seventy-six registered community pharmacists in. Edo State completed a structured questionnaire consisting of open and close ended questions which addressed issues relating to their knowledge of asthma

  16. What is meant by control of childhood asthma?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    patient perception of asthma control did not match symptom severity. – approximately 50% of patients reporting severe persistent symptoms also considered their asthma to be completely or well controlled.5 The paediatric data from this study were even more compelling, where the level of control was overestimated and ...

  17. The doctoral learning penumbra. Darkness, creativity, and meaningful others in doctoral education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard; Robinson, Gill; Wisker, Gina

    This paper presents our cross-national research into what we term the ‘doctoral learning penumbra’, which covers the diverse, unnoticed, and often unrecognised forms of help and support that doctoral students draw from during their PhD, and which are vital for completion. Our aim is to better...... understand the range of different actors, support systems, and meaningful others, which to a high degree shape and influence doctoral education, but without receiving acknowledgement, and sometimes without awareness even, of the Graduate Schools and research programmes that educate present and future...

  18. The doctor(s) in house: an analysis of the evolution of the television doctor-hero.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauman, Elena C; Goodier, Bethany C

    2011-03-01

    The medical drama and its central character, the doctor-hero have been a mainstay of popular television. House M.D. offers a new (and problematic) iteration of the doctor-hero. House eschews the generic conventions of the "television doctor" by being neither the idealized television doctor of the past, nor the more recent competent but often fallible physicians in entertainment texts. Instead, his character is a fragmented text which privileges the biomedical over the personal or emotional with the ultimate goal of scientifically uncovering and resolving instances of disease. This article examines the implicit and explicit messages in House M.D. and critically analyzes both the show and its lead character in relation to the traditional medical drama genre that highlights the "doctor-hero" as the central character. While at first House seems to completely violate narrative and generic norms, ultimately the program provides a new form that reinforces the presence of the doctor-hero, but highlights House's character as the central figure who is personally and interpersonally problematic but biomedically effective.

  19. Exploring the impact of workplace cyberbullying on trainee doctors

    OpenAIRE

    Farley, S; Coyne, I.; Sprigg, C.; Axtell, C.; Subramanian, G

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Workplace bullying is an occupational hazard for trainee doctors. However, little is known about their experiences of cyberbullying at work. This study examines the impact of cyberbullying among trainee doctors, and how attributions of blame for cyberbullying influence individual and work-related outcomes.\\ud \\ud Methods: Doctors at over 6 months into training were asked to complete an online survey that included measures of cyberbullying, blame attribution, negative emotion, job ...

  20. Work stress, asthma control and asthma-specific quality of life: Initial evidence from a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Bettina; Leucht, Verena; Loerbroks, Adrian

    2017-03-01

    Research has suggested that psychological stress is positively associated with asthma morbidity. One major source of stress in adulthood is one's occupation. However, to date, potential links of work stress with asthma control or asthma-specific quality of life have not been examined. We aimed to address this knowledge gap. In 2014/2015, we conducted a cross-sectional study among adults with asthma in Germany (n = 362). For the current analyses that sample was restricted to participants in employment and reporting to have never been diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n = 94). Work stress was operationalized by the 16-item effort-reward-imbalance (ERI) questionnaire, which measures the subcomponents "effort", "reward" and "overcommitment." Participants further completed the Asthma Control Test and the Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire-Sydney. Multivariable associations were quantified by linear regression and logistic regression. Effort, reward and their ratio (i.e. ERI ratio) did not show meaningful associations with asthma morbidity. By contrast, increasing levels of overcommitment were associated with poorer asthma control and worse quality of life in both linear regression (ß = -0.26, p = 0.01 and ß = 0.44, p asthma control and asthma-specific quality of life. Longitudinal studies with larger samples are needed to confirm our findings and to disentangle the potential causality of associations.

  1. Relationships among obesity, physical activity and sedentary behavior in young adolescents with and without lifetime asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth, Susan W; Rhee, Hyekyun; Kitzman, Harriet

    2016-01-01

    To examine the inter-relationships among body mass index (BMI), physical activity, sedentary behavior and gender in urban, low-income, primarily African American young adolescents with or without lifetime asthma. Data were collected in 2002-2004 from 626 12-year old adolescents who were children of women who participated in the New Mother's Study in Memphis, TN (1990-1991). Adolescents with and without asthma were compared on BMI, physical activity and sedentary behavior. Multiple linear regression models were used to examine the association of asthma, gender and BMI with physical activity and sedentary behavior. Complete data were available for 545 adolescents. Eleven percent of adolescents had lifetime asthma. Asthma and gender were associated with high-intensity physical activity (p asthma participated in less physical activity and girls participated less than boys. Gender was associated with sedentary behavior (p asthma had a higher BMI than girls without asthma (p = 0.027). Boys with asthma were less physically active than boys without asthma (p asthma are less physically active than those without asthma and girls are less active than boys. Clinicians who provide care for adolescents with asthma are encouraged to assess physical activity/sedentary behavior and provide guidance that promotes active lifestyles. A longitudinal study is needed to shed light on the unique contribution of asthma separated from the effects of overweight/obesity on physical activity and sedentary behaviors.

  2. Monitoring asthma in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin C. Lødrup Carlsen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of asthma treatment is to obtain clinical control and reduce future risks to the patient. However, to date there is limited evidence on how to monitor patients with asthma. Childhood asthma introduces specific challenges in terms of deciding what, when, how often, by whom and in whom different assessments of asthma should be performed. The age of the child, the fluctuating course of asthma severity, variability in clinical presentation, exacerbations, comorbidities, socioeconomic and psychosocial factors, and environmental exposures may all influence disease activity and, hence, monitoring strategies. These factors will be addressed in herein. We identified large knowledge gaps in the effects of different monitoring strategies in children with asthma. Studies into monitoring strategies are urgently needed, preferably in collaborative paediatric studies across countries and healthcare systems.

  3. Tobaksrygning og asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Lange, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a well-known health hazard, probably not least for patients suffering from asthma. This review gives a short overview of the effects of passive and active smoking on the inception and outcome with of longitudinal changes in the lung function and mortality of patients...... with asthma. Substantial evidence suggests that smoking affects asthma adversely. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, especially maternal smoking in children, may be a significant risk factor for asthma. Such exposure in patients with established asthma is not only associated with more severe symptoms......, but also with a poorer quality of life, reduced lung function, and increased utilisation of health care including hospital admissions. Active smoking does not appear to be a significant risk factor for asthma, but is associated with a worse outcome with regard to both longitudinal changes in lung function...

  4. Asthma in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Lorenzo Urso

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bronchial asthma is a common problem with enormous medical and economics impacts. It is an inflammatory disease of the airways associated with intermittent episodes of bronchospasm. Asthma is not uncommon in the elderly patients. Prevalence of asthma is similar in older and younger adults. Asthma in the elderly patient is underdiagnosed because of false perceptions by both patient and physician. The high incidence of comorbid conditions in the elderly patient makes the diagnosis and management more difficult. Correct diagnosis is demonstrated with spirometry. The goals of asthma treatment are to achieve and maintain control of symptoms and to prevent development of irreversible airflow limitation. Asthma drugs are preferably inhaled because this route minimizes systemic absorption and, thus, improves the ratio of the therapeutic benefit to the potential side-effects in elderly patients.

  5. Asthma and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte S

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Obesity has significant negative impact on asthma control and risk of exacerbations. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent studies evaluating the effects of weight reduction on asthma control in obese adults. RECENT FINDINGS: Clinical studies have shown that weight...... reduction in obese patients is associated with improvements in symptoms, use of controller medication, and asthma-related quality of life together with a reduction in the risk for severe exacerbations. Furthermore, several studies have also revealed improvements in lung function and airway responsiveness...... reduction in obese adults with asthma leads to an overall improvement in asthma control, including airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation. Weight reduction should be a cornerstone in the management of obese patients with asthma....

  6. Late-Onset Asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2017-01-01

    , to objectively confirm asthma. If necessary, a trial of oral or inhaled corticosteroid might be necessary. Asthma can be diagnosed when increased airflow variability is identified in a symptomatic patient, and if the patient does not have a history of exposure, primarily smoking, known to cause chronic...... obstructive pulmonary disease, the diagnosis is asthma even if the patient does not have fully reversible airflow obstruction. Pharmacological therapy in patients with late-onset asthma follows international guidelines, including treatment with the lowest effective dose of inhaled corticosteroid to minimize...... the risk of systemic effects. However, most recommendations are based on extrapolation from findings in younger patients. Comorbidities are very common in patients with late-onset asthma and need to be taken into account in the management of the disease. In conclusion, late-onset asthma is poorly...

  7. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Asthma Learn How to Control Asthma Asthma and Severe Weather ... Working on Asthma Follow @CDCasthma on Twitter to learn more about helping people with asthma live healthier ...

  8. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler ... MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health File Formats Help: How do I view ...

  9. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

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    Full Text Available ... ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler ... ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health File Formats Help: How do I view ...

  10. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

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    Full Text Available ... 1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Know How to Use Your Asthma ... 1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health File Formats Help: How do I ...

  11. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... among Children Asthma-related Missed School Days among Children aged 5–17 Years Asthma Severity among Adults with Current Asthma Asthma Severity among Children with Current Asthma Overuse of quick-relief medication ...

  12. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Know How to Use Your Asthma ... MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health File Formats Help: How do I ...

  13. Medical thrillers: doctored fiction for future doctors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpy, Jean-Pierre

    2014-12-01

    Medical thrillers have been a mainstay of popular fiction since the late 1970s and still attract a wide readership today. This article examines this specialized genre and its core conventions within the context of professionally-based fiction, i.e. the class of thrillers written by professionals or former professionals. The author maps this largely unchartered territory and analyzes the fictional representations of doctors and medicine provided in such novels. He argues that medical thrillers, which are not originally aimed at specialized readers and sometimes project a flawed image of medicine, may be used as a pedagogical tool with non-native learners of medical English.

  14. Severe Asthma in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipps, Bradley E; Parikh, Neil G; Maharaj, Sheena K

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study is to characterize, diagnose, evaluate, and treat severe childhood asthma. Understanding the occurrence of the physiologic and clinical presentations of childhood severe asthma, the treatment and response may be predicted by biomarkers, but the patient's response is highly variable. The onset of severe asthma occurs early and is primarily predicted by severity of viral infection and coexistence of the atopic state.

  15. Doctors with dyslexia: strategies and support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Rachel; Alexander, Gail; Mann, Richard; Kibble, Sharon; Scallan, Samantha

    2017-10-01

    Looking beyond dyslexia as an individual doctor's issue requires adjusting a working environment to better serve the needs of doctors with dyslexia. With an increasing number of doctors disclosing dyslexia at medical school, how can educators best provide this support? Our research looks at the impact of dyslexia on clinical practice and the coping strategies used by doctors to minimise the effect. Qualitative data were collected from 14 doctors with dyslexia using semi-structured interviews and by survey. 'In situ' demonstration interviews were conducted in order to understand how dyslexia is managed in the workplace from first-hand experience. Employers and educators who have responsibility for meeting the needs of this group were also consulted. Even in cases of doctors who had a diagnosis, they often did not disclose their dyslexia to their employer. Study participants reported having developed individual ways of coping and devised useful 'workarounds'. Support from employers comes in the form of 'reasonable adjustments', although from our data we cannot be sure that such adjustments contribute to an 'enabling' work environment. Supportive characteristics included the opportunity to shadow others and the time and space to complete paperwork on a busy ward. How can educators best provide support [for doctors with dyslexia]? Doctors with dyslexia need to be helped to feel comfortable enough to disclose. Educators need to challenge any negative assumptions that exist as well as promote understanding about the elements that contribute to a positive working environment. As a result of the research there is now practice available for educators to identify evidence-based strategies and resources. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  16. Effectiveness of Evidence-Based Asthma Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Suzanne; Bailey, Ryan; Jaffee, Katy; Markus, Anne; Gerstein, Maya; Stevens, David M; Lesch, Julie Kennedy; Malveaux, Floyd J; Mitchell, Herman

    2017-06-01

    Researchers often struggle with the gap between efficacy and effectiveness in clinical research. To bridge this gap, the Community Healthcare for Asthma Management and Prevention of Symptoms (CHAMPS) study adapted an efficacious, randomized controlled trial that resulted in evidence-based asthma interventions in community health centers. Children (aged 5-12 years; N = 590) with moderate to severe asthma were enrolled from 3 intervention and 3 geographically/capacity-matched control sites in high-risk, low-income communities located in Arizona, Michigan, and Puerto Rico. The asthma intervention was tailored to the participant's allergen sensitivity and exposure, and it comprised 4 visits over the course of 1 year. Study visits were documented and monitored prospectively via electronic data capture. Asthma symptoms and health care utilization were evaluated at baseline, and at 6 and 12 months. A total of 314 intervention children and 276 control children were enrolled in the study. Allergen sensitivity testing (96%) and home environmental assessments (89%) were performed on the majority of intervention children. Overall study activity completion (eg, intervention visits, clinical assessments) was 70%. Overall and individual site participant symptom days in the previous 4 weeks were significantly reduced compared with control findings (control, change of -2.28; intervention, change of -3.27; difference, -0.99; P asthma in these high-need populations. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  17. Prevalence of asthma and atopy in sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilsher, Margaret; Hopkins, Raewyn; Zeng, Irene; Cornere, Megan; Douglas, Richard

    2012-02-01

    We hypothesized that the prevalence of allergic disorders, characterized by the release of type 2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, IL-10), would be lower in sarcoidosis in which there is a dominant type 1 immune response (IL-2, interferon-gamma). The objective was to measure the prevalence of atopy and self-reported asthma in patients with sarcoidosis. Sarcoidosis patients (n = 136, 72 M, age range 22-75), recruited in the outpatient setting, completed a modified European Community Respiratory Health Survey. 123 of these patients provided blood for allergy testing. For the cohort as a whole the self-reported prevalence of asthma ever (21.5%) and asthma attack in the last 12 months (7.5%), was high as was wheezing (42.1%), breathlessness with wheeze (22.3%) and use of an asthma medication (13.1%). The prevalence of atopy was 34%. These data are not different from the previously reported prevalence of asthma and atopy in New Zealand. The same prevalence of asthma symptoms and atopy as in the normal population suggests that the immune system is not skewed away from mounting T helper type 2 immune responses in sarcoidosis. © 2011 The Authors. Respirology © 2011 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  18. Linking obesity and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, E Rand

    2014-04-01

    A growing body of literature suggests that obesity has a significant impact on asthma risk, phenotype, and prognosis. Epidemiological studies have clearly demonstrated that asthma is more likely to occur in obese patients, and health status is impaired in obese individuals with asthma, with obese asthmatics experiencing more symptoms, worse quality of life, increased healthcare use, and increased asthma severity. However, obesity has well-described effects on lung function and mechanics that can lead to symptoms of dyspnea without causing the pathophysiologic changes of asthma. Adding to the challenges of evaluating this association, some studies have failed to demonstrate a robust relationship between obesity and traditional biomarkers of airway inflammation in adult asthmatics, leading to the conclusion that obesity does not necessarily worsen airway inflammation in asthma. In this regard, emerging data suggest that nonatopic mechanisms may be relevant in obese asthmatics, and that these mechanisms may have a direct impact on the response of obese asthmatics to asthma therapies, most notably inhaled glucocorticoids. This article will review selected aspects of the contributions of obesity-related airway and systemic inflammation to asthma, with a focus on the impact of obesity as a modifier of risk, prognosis, and therapeutic response in asthma. © 2014 New York Academy of Sciences.

  19. Asthma in the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braman, Sidney S

    2017-11-01

    The older population has seen the greatest increase in the prevalence of current asthma in recent years. Asthma may begin at any age and when it occurs at an advanced as opposed to a young age, it is often nonatopic, severe, and unremitting. Unfortunately, geriatric-specific guidelines are not available for the diagnosis and treatment of asthma. However, with objective monitoring, avoidance of asthma triggers, appropriate pharmacotherapy, and patient education, the disease can be managed successfully. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Asthma among mink workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Berit; Carstensen, Ole; Petersen, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    We report two cases of asthma among mink workers. The first case is about a mink farmer who had asthma that was difficult to treat. In the medical history there was no clear relation to work, and no conclusive work relation with peak flow monitoring. He had a positive histamine release test to mink...... urine. The second case is about a mink farm worker, who had an asthma attack when handling mink furs. Peak flow monitoring showed a clear relation to this work, but there were no signs of allergy. We conclude that these two cases suggest an increased risk of asthma among mink workers....

  1. Urban vs. rural factors that affect adult asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Yu; Isa, Zaleha Md; Jie, Xu; Ju, Zhang Long; Ismail, Noor Hassim

    2013-01-01

    , particularly in winter. Moreover, exposure to ETS is common at home or at work in urban areas.There is evidence that asthma prevalence and morbidity is less common in rural than in urban areas. The possible reasons are that rural residents are exposed early in life to stables and to farm milk production, and such exposures are protective against developing asthma morbidity. Even so, asthma morbidity is disproportionately high among poor inner-city residents and in rural populations. A higher proportion of adult residents of nonmetropolitan areas were characterized as follows:aged 55 years or older, no previous college admission, low household income, no health insurance coverage, and could not see a doctor due to healthcare service availability, etc. In rural areas, biomass fuels meet more than 70% of the rural energy needs. Progress in adopting modern energy sources in rural areas has been slow. The most direct health impact comes from household energy use among the poor, who depend almost entirely on burning biomass fuels in simple cooking devices that are placed in inadequately ventilated spaces. Prospective studies are needed to assess the long-term effects of biomass smoke on lung health among adults in rural areas.Geographic differences in asthma susceptibility exist around the world. The reason for the differences in asthma prevalence in rural and urban areas may be due to the fact that populations have different lifestyles and cultures, as well as different environmental exposures and different genetic backgrounds. Identifying geographic disparities in asthma hospitalizations is critical to implementing prevention strategies,reducing morbidity, and improving healthcare financing for clinical asthma treatment. Although evidence shows that differences in the prevalence of asthma do exist between urban and rural dwellers in many parts of the world, including in developed countries, data are inadequate to evaluate the extent to which different pollutant exposures

  2. Patient compliance with assessing and monitoring of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Han, Jiangna; Zhu, Zhu; Xu, Wenbin; Zheng, Jinping; Zhu, Yuanjue

    2009-12-01

    The current asthma guidelines encourage use of a diary for assessing and monitoring symptoms and airway function. However, patient compliance and acceptability are usually poor owing to the burden of frequent and prolonged assessment. We investigated whether better patient compliance could be ensured if a study was more relevant to patient convenience and had less impact on their daily life. A total of 106 patients with symptomatic asthma underwent a fixed-time thrice-daily assessment schedule for a period lasting 2 weeks, and they were assigned to a doctor visit after the assessment. Symptoms and medication use were recorded in a booklet (paper diary) and airway function measured by a portable spirometer (electronic diary). Of 4,452 expected entries, the paper diary yielded 3,186 compliant entries and the electronic diary yielded 3,557 compliant entries; 71% of patients completed at least 30 compliant entries in the paper diary and 79% in the electronic diary. Use of an electronic device was associated with better compliance compared with paper technique (80.0% vs. 71.7%, p compliance decreased in the second week compared with the first week of diary keeping for both types of diaries (paper diary: 68.6% vs. 74.8%, p compliance was the least good, the afternoon better, and the evening best (paper diary: 68.2% vs. 71.0% vs. 75.9%, p compliance. Good patient compliance and acceptability can be achieved when a study takes into account patient convenience, uses user friendly electronic devices, and is less disruptive to patients' daily life.

  3. Association of Youth and Caregiver Anxiety and Asthma Care Among Urban Young Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzese, Jean-Marie; Reigada, Laura C; Lamm, Alexandra; Wang, Jing; Li, Meng; Zandieh, Stephanie O; Klein, Rachel G

    To examine the association of adolescent asthma-related anxiety, social anxiety, separation anxiety, and caregiver asthma-related anxiety with asthma care by urban adolescents. Participants were 386 ethnic minority adolescents (mean age 12.8 years) with persistent asthma and their caregivers. Adolescents reported what they do to prevent asthma symptoms and to manage acute symptoms, and if they or their caregiver is responsible for their asthma care. Adolescents completed the Youth Asthma-Related Anxiety Scale, and the social and separation anxiety subscales of the Screen for Child Anxiety and Emotional Disorders (SCARED); caregivers completed the Parent Asthma-Related Anxiety Scale. Linearity of the associations was assessed by generalized additive models. When there was no evidence for nonlinearity, linear mixed effects models were used to evaluate the effects of the predictors. Adolescent asthma-related anxiety had a strong curvilinear relationship with symptom prevention (P Adolescents took more prevention steps as their anxiety increased, with a plateau at moderate anxiety. There was a linear relationship of adolescent asthma-related anxiety to symptom management (β = 0.03, P = .021) and to asthma responsibility (β = 0.11, P = .015), and of caregiver asthma-related anxiety to adolescent symptom prevention (β = 0.04, P = .001). Adolescent social and separation anxiety had weak to no relationship with asthma care. Results remained consistent when controlling for each of the other anxieties. Asthma-related anxiety plays an important, independent role in asthma care. When low, adolescents may benefit from increased support from caregivers and awareness of the consequences of uncontrolled asthma. When elevated, health providers should ensure the adolescents are not assuming responsibility for asthma care prematurely. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Comparison of British and French expatriate doctors' characteristics and motivations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, R; Carnet, D; D'Athis, P; Fiet, C; Le Breton, G; Romestaing, M; Quantin, C

    2015-02-01

    Migration of medical practitioners is rarely studied despite its importance in medical demography: the objective of this study was to analyze the characteristics and motivations of the French doctors settled in the United Kingdom and of the British doctors settled in France. This cross-sectional study was conducted using a self-completed questionnaire sent to all French doctors practicing in the United Kingdom (in 2005) and all British medicine doctors practicing in France (in 2009). The doctors were identified with official data from the National Medical Councils: 244 French doctors practicing in the United Kingdom and 86 British doctors practicing in France. The questionnaire was specifically developed to determine the reasons of moving to the other country, and the level of satisfaction after expatriation. A total of 98 French doctors (out of 244) and 40 British doctors (out of 86) returned the questionnaire. Respondents were mainly general practitioners with a professional experience of 8 to 9 years. The sex ratio was near 1 for both groups with a majority of women among physicians under 50 years. The motivations were different between groups: French doctors were attracted by the conditions offered at the National Health Service, whereas British doctors were more interested in opportunities for career advancement, joining husband or wife, or favourable environmental conditions. Overall, the respondents considered expatriation as satisfactory: 84% of French doctors, compared with only 58% of British doctors, were satisfied with their new professional situation. This study, the first in its kind, leads to a clearer understanding of the migration of doctors between France and the United Kingdom. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. [Socioeconomic Costs of Asthma in the European Union, United States and Canada: A Systematic Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig-Junoy, Jaume; Pascual-Argenté, Natàlia

    2017-03-09

    Asthma is responsible for a large number of doctor and emergency visits due to exacerbations and inadequate control of the disease, which give rise to very high associated economic costs. The social cost of asthma comprises both the healthcare and non-healthcare costs. The purpose of this study was to analyse up-to-date estimates of the social cost of asthma, with special reference to the influence of level of severity and degree of control. A systematic review of original cost-of-illness studies of asthma published in English or Spanish between January 2004 and December 2014 and indexed in PubMed, IBECS or IME was conducted. 29 cost-of-illness studies of asthma were identified, 21 of which used the societal perspective. Only 10 studies estimated the incremental cost of asthma with a control group, and none of them refers to EU countries. Of these 10, only 4 were regarded as high-quality evidence, insofar as they combined a matched control with regression models. The annual incremental cost of asthma in adults ranged from €416 to €5,317. The incremental healthcare cost of asthma increased with level of severity, from €964 for intermittent asthma to €11,703 for severe persistent asthma in adults. In adults, the incremental non-healthcare cost of asthma ranged from €136 to €3,461. Selected studies in this review show great heterogeneity due to different population characteristics, study designs and valuation methods, which limits their comparability. However, it can be concluded that incremental healthcare costs of asthma, compared to people without asthma, exceeds seven hundred Euros (valued in 2013) in most of the reviwed estimation for several countries. This figure is greater for studies from the United States. The incremental cost per patient increases very rapidly with level of severity and decreases with asthma patient control.

  6. Nutrition communication styles of family doctors: results of quantitative research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dillen, van S.M.E.; Hiddink, G.J.; Koelen, M.A.; Woerkum, van C.M.J.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess the nutrition communication styles of Dutch family doctors and in particular to assess its psychosocial and sociodemographic correlates. Design: A cross-sectional study in which a representative sample of 600 Dutch family doctors completed a questionnaire. Setting: The survey

  7. Managing Power Relations in Doctoral Education through Research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research is central to doctoral education in universities around the globe. The ability of a student to successfully complete the doctoral research is largely dependent on the power relations between the student and the supervisor. The purpose of this paper is to discuss how power relations could be managed through ...

  8. L ocating the doctoral study in the 'paradigm skirmishes': Challenges ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is important to understand the thought patterns of students and supervisors that underlie the choice of paradigm and determine the progression of doctoral studies as an integral part of articulating scholarship at the doctoral level and subsequently, to completing the research. This paper traces a student's and a supervisor's ...

  9. Importance and benefits of the doctoral thesis for medical graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesler, Marianne; Boeker, Martin; Fabry, Götz; Biller, Silke

    2016-01-01

    The majority of medical graduates in Germany complete a doctorate, even though a doctoral degree is not necessary for the practice of medicine. So far, little is known about doctoral candidates' view on the individual benefit a doctoral thesis has for them. Consequently, this is the subject of the present investigation. Data from surveys with graduates of the five medical faculties of Baden-Württemberg from the graduation years 2007/2008 (N=514) and 2010/2011 (N=598) were analysed. One and a half years after graduating 53% of those interviewed had completed their doctorate. When asked about their motivation for writing a doctoral thesis, participants answered most frequently "a doctorate is usual" (85%) and "improvement of job opportunities" (75%), 36% said that an academic career has been their primary motive. Less than 10% responded that they used their doctoral thesis as a means to apply for a job. The proportion of graduates working in health care is equally large among those who have completed a thesis and those who have not. Graduates who pursued a thesis due to scientific interest are also currently more interested in an academic career and recognise more opportunities for research. An implicit benefit of a medical thesis emerged with regard to the self-assessment of scientific competences as those who completed a doctorate rated their scientific competencies higher than those who have not. Although for the majority of physicians research interest is not the primary motivation for completing a doctorate, they might nevertheless achieve some academic competencies. For graduates pursuing an academic career the benefit of completing a medical thesis is more obvious.

  10. Importance and benefits of the doctoral thesis for medical graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giesler, Marianne

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The majority of medical graduates in Germany complete a doctorate, even though a doctoral degree is not necessary for the practice of medicine. So far, little is known about doctoral candidates’ view on the individual benefit a doctoral thesis has for them. Consequently, this is the subject of the present investigation.Method: Data from surveys with graduates of the five medical faculties of Baden-Württemberg from the graduation years 2007/2008 (N=514 and 2010/2011 (N=598 were analysed.Results: One and a half years after graduating 53% of those interviewed had completed their doctorate. When asked about their motivation for writing a doctoral thesis, participants answered most frequently “a doctorate is usual” (85% and “improvement of job opportunities” (75%, 36% said that an academic career has been their primary motive. Less than 10% responded that they used their doctoral thesis as a means to apply for a job. The proportion of graduates working in health care is equally large among those who have completed a thesis and those who have not. Graduates who pursued a thesis due to scientific interest are also currently more interested in an academic career and recognise more opportunities for research. An implicit benefit of a medical thesis emerged with regard to the self-assessment of scientific competences as those who completed a doctorate rated their scientific competencies higher than those who have not.Discussion: Although for the majority of physicians research interest is not the primary motivation for completing a doctorate, they might nevertheless achieve some academic competencies. For graduates pursuing an academic career the benefit of completing a medical thesis is more obvious.

  11. Analysis of nurse-doctorates; data collected for the International Directory of Nurses with Doctoral Degrees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitel, M; Vian, J

    1975-01-01

    In an American Nurses' Foundation survey of the 1973 population of nurses with doctoral degrees (N = 1,020) general trends in doctoral education of nurses were elicited. Specific unique characteristics were highlighted, including: a continuing trend for nurses to earn the Ph.D. rather than the Ed.D., a divergence between field of doctoral study and the current field of research interest, and a slight number of these qualified nurses actually participating in research of any kind. The majority of subjects were single; most were employed in a university or college where they held either full or associate professorships; most considered themselves still to be in the field of nursing, although their doctoral studies frequently took them out of the discipline; their work responsibilities were heavily loaded with administrative duties. As compared with the holders of doctoral degrees in other fields, nurses earned their degrees later, but took no longer to complete them. While universities in the Mid-Atlantic states were the largest producers of nurse-doctorates, universities in the Midwest were found to be the most frequent employers. Questions regarding the future direction of nurse-doctorates were raised.

  12. Nutrition and Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta K

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Increase in the asthma prevalence in many countries over the recent decades, highlights the need for a greater understanding of the risk factors for asthma. Be-cause asthma is the result of interaction between genetic and environmental fac-tors, increasing prevalence is certainly the result of changes in environmental fac-tors because of process of wesernization. That is the reason for higher prevalence in countries where a traditional to a westernized lifestyle occurred earlier. This increasing prevalence has affected both rural and urban communities, suggesting that local environmental factors such as exposure to allergens or industrial air pol-lutions are not the sole cause. In the last few years, nutrition has represented an important conditioning factor of many cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and chronic pulmonary diseases. So it has been hypothesized that dietary constituents influence the immune system and thus, may also be actively involved in the onset of asthma and other allergic diseases. Dietary constituents can play beneficial as well as det-rimental role in asthma. The possible role of diet in the development of asthma can be described as follows: first, a food allergen can cause asthma. Second, there is role of breast-feeding for prevention of asthma later in life. Third, a low intake of antioxidative dietary constituents might be a risk factor for asthma. Moreover, role of cations such as sodium, potassium and magnesium has been described in development of asthma. Finally, intake of fatty acids specially the role of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids play important role in cause of asthma.

  13. Surviving the Doctoral Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott P. Kerlin

    1995-11-01

    Full Text Available This article probes the implications of neo-conservative public education policies for the future of the academic profession through a detailed examination of critical issues shaping contemporary doctoral education in U.S. and Canadian universities. Institutional and social factors such as financial retrenchment, declining support for affirmative action, downward economic mobility, a weak academic labor market for tenure-track faculty, professional ethics in graduate education, and backlash against women's progress form the backdrop for analysis of the author's survey of current doctoral students' opinions about funding, support, the job market, and quality of learning experiences.

  14. Risks associated with managing asthma without a preventer: urgent healthcare, poor asthma control and over-the-counter reliever use in a cross-sectional population survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddel, Helen K; Ampon, Rosario D; Sawyer, Susan M; Peters, Matthew J

    2017-09-25

    Overuse of asthma relievers, particularly without anti-inflammatory preventers, increases asthma risks. This study aimed to identify how many reliever-only users have urgent healthcare, explore their attitudes and beliefs about asthma and its treatment, and investigate whether purchasing over-the-counter relievers was associated with worse asthma outcomes than by prescription. Cross-sectional population-based Internet survey in Australia. Of 2686 participants ≥16 years with current asthma randomly drawn from a web-based panel, 1038 (50.7% male) used only reliever medication. Urgent asthma-related healthcare; Asthma Control Test (ACT); patient attitudes about asthma and medications; reliever purchase (with/without prescription). Of 1038 reliever-only participants, 23.3% had required urgent healthcare for asthma in the previous year, and only 36.0% had a non-urgent asthma review. Those needing urgent healthcare were more likely than those without such events to be male (56.5% vs 49.0%, p=0.003) and current smokers (29.4% vs 23.3%, p=0.009). Only 30.6% had well-controlled asthma (ACT ≥20) compared with 71.0% of those with no urgent healthcare (pprevent asthma symptoms (vs 5.5% of those without urgent healthcare). Those with urgent healthcare were more frustrated by their asthma and less happy with how they managed it, and they were less confident about their ability to manage worsening asthma, but just as likely as those without urgent healthcare to manage worsening asthma themselves rather than visit a doctor. Reliever-only users purchasing over-the-counter relievers were no more likely than those purchasing relievers by prescription to have uncontrolled asthma (35.9% vs 40.6%, p=0.23) but were less likely to have had a non-urgent asthma review. One-quarter of the reliever-only population had needed urgent asthma healthcare in the previous year, demonstrating the importance of identifying such patients. Their attitudes and beliefs suggest opportunities for

  15. Quality of Life in Children With Asthma: A Developmental Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miadich, Samantha A; Everhart, Robin S; Borschuk, Adrienne P; Winter, Marcia A; Fiese, Barbara H

    2015-08-01

    The current study investigated whether factors associated with quality of life (QOL) in children with asthma (e.g., family functioning, asthma routines, asthma severity) differed by child age. Participants included 192 children with asthma (5-12 years) and their caregivers. Both children and caregivers completed questionnaires at an initial research session. Family functioning was determined from a mealtime observation that occurred in family homes. Child age moderated the association between asthma severity and child QOL and between routine burden and QOL in children with asthma. Post hoc probing analyses revealed that among older children, QOL levels were lower in the presence of worse asthma severity and more routine burden. Findings suggest that associations between asthma severity, routine burden, and QOL may differ by child age. Treatment programs and health-care recommendations addressing QOL in children with asthma may need to be tailored to address differences in factors associated with QOL by child age. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Quality of Life in Children With Asthma: A Developmental Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everhart, Robin S.; Borschuk, Adrienne P.; Winter, Marcia A.; Fiese, Barbara H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The current study investigated whether factors associated with quality of life (QOL) in children with asthma (e.g., family functioning, asthma routines, asthma severity) differed by child age. Methods Participants included 192 children with asthma (5–12 years) and their caregivers. Both children and caregivers completed questionnaires at an initial research session. Family functioning was determined from a mealtime observation that occurred in family homes. Results Child age moderated the association between asthma severity and child QOL and between routine burden and QOL in children with asthma. Post hoc probing analyses revealed that among older children, QOL levels were lower in the presence of worse asthma severity and more routine burden. Conclusions Findings suggest that associations between asthma severity, routine burden, and QOL may differ by child age. Treatment programs and health-care recommendations addressing QOL in children with asthma may need to be tailored to address differences in factors associated with QOL by child age. PMID:25680363

  17. Perceived neighborhood safety and asthma morbidity in the school inner-city asthma study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopel, Lianne S; Gaffin, Jonathan M; Ozonoff, Al; Rao, Devika R; Sheehan, William J; Friedlander, James L; Permaul, Perdita; Baxi, Sachin N; Fu, Chunxia; Subramanian, S V; Gold, Diane R; Phipatanakul, Wanda

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether neighborhood safety as perceived by primary caregivers is associated with asthma morbidity outcomes among inner-city school children with asthma. School children with asthma were recruited from 25 inner-city schools between 2009 and 2012 for the School Inner-City Asthma Study (N = 219). Primary caregivers completed a baseline questionnaire detailing their perception of neighborhood safety and their children's asthma symptoms, and the children performed baseline pulmonary function tests. In this cross-sectional analysis, asthma control was compared between children whose caregivers perceived their neighborhood to be unsafe versus safe. After adjusting for potential confounders, those children whose primary caregivers perceived the neighborhood to be unsafe had twice the odds of having poorly controlled asthma (odds ratio [OR] adjusted = 2.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.2-3.9, P = 0.009), four times the odds of dyspnea and rescue medication use (OR adjusted = 4.7; 95% CI = 1.7-13.0, P = 0.003, OR adjusted = 4.0; 95% CI = 1.8-8.8, P neighborhoods. There was no difference in pulmonary function test results between the two groups. Primary caregivers' perception of neighborhood safety is associated with childhood asthma morbidity among inner-city school children with asthma. Further study is needed to elucidate mechanisms behind this association, and future intervention studies to address social disadvantage may be important. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Examining Profiles of Family Functioning in Pediatric Asthma: Longitudinal Associations With Child Adjustment and Asthma Severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al G Hriwati, Nour; Winter, Marcia A; Everhart, Robin S

    2017-05-01

    Identify profiles of functioning in families of children with asthma and examine whether profile membership predicts subsequent child mental and physical well-being. Primary caregivers and children ( N  = 1,030) from the Childhood Asthma Management Program completed questionnaires assessing family functioning and child adaptation at five time points. Asthma severity was also assessed via spirometry. Latent profile analyses identified a four-profile solution as best fitting the data: cohesive, permissive, controlling/disengaged, and controlling/enmeshed families. Distal outcome analyses using Bolck-Croon-Hagenaars techniques suggested that children from families that were more cohesive had fewer internalizing and externalizing symptoms. These associations remained stable across time. Family profiles did not differ with regards to child asthma severity. Results highlight the importance of looking beyond the effects of distinct components of family functioning and instead using pattern-based approaches. Recommendations for incorporating screenings and services for families in pediatric care settings are provided.

  19. Dating relationships in college students with childhood-onset asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddington, Angelica R; Mullins, Larry L; Fedele, David A; Ryan, Jamie L; Junghans, Ashley N

    2010-02-01

    The current study investigated whether differences existed in dating anxiety and fear of intimacy between individuals with childhood-onset asthma and individuals without a chronic illness. Analyses were also conducted to determine if dating anxiety or fear of intimacy were predictors of health-related quality of life in individuals with asthma and healthy controls. Additionally, potential gender differences in dating anxiety and fear of intimacy in individuals with childhood-onset asthma were explored. College undergraduates at least 17 years of age who self-identified as having childhood asthma were randomly matched by age and gender to healthy control participants. Participants completed a demographic form, the Dating Anxiety Scale for Adolescents, the Fear of Intimacy Scale, and the SF-36 Health Survey, a measure of health-related quality of life. There were no significant differences between self-identified participants with asthma and matched healthy controls on the Dating Anxiety Scale or Fear of Intimacy Scale. However, dating anxiety was a significant predictor of mental health-related quality of life in participants with asthma but not in matched health controls. Fear of intimacy was not a significant predictor of mental or physical health-related quality of life in individuals with asthma. In addition, women with asthma endorsed significantly more dating anxiety and lower physical health-related quality of life than males with asthma. College students with asthma appear to experience similar levels of dating anxiety and fear of intimacy than healthy college students; however, their anxiety about dating may have a larger effect on health-related quality of life than healthy individuals. Additional examination of dating and interpersonal relationships among individuals with asthma appears warranted, particularly as it concerns possible gender differences in individuals with childhood-onset asthma.

  20. What is Asthma?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Lung Association 104 COPD Awareness Month: Connecting with Social Support American Lung Association 105 Ohio Cares about ... 7:59 Asthma - Duration: 3:36. Nucleus Medical Media 658,979 views 3:36 What is asthma. ...

  1. Traveling and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stress How Cliques Make Kids Feel Left Out Traveling and Asthma KidsHealth > For Kids > Traveling and Asthma Print A A A en español ... handy at all times. So if you're traveling by car, keep them where you can get ...

  2. Assessment of asthma control using asthma control test in chest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... CI 1.06-3.47) and obesity (OR 1.81; 1.01-3.27). Conclusion: Asthma remains poorly controlled in a large proportion of asthma patients under specialist care in Cameroon. Educational programs for asthma patients targeting women and based on weight loss for obese patients may help in improving the control of asthma.

  3. Advances in pediatric asthma in 2013: coordinating asthma care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szefler, Stanley J

    2014-03-01

    Last year's "Advances in pediatric asthma: moving toward asthma prevention" concluded that "We are well on our way to creating a pathway around wellness in asthma care and also to utilize new tools to predict the risk for asthma and take steps to not only prevent asthma exacerbations but also to prevent the early manifestations of the disease and thus prevent its evolution to severe asthma." This year's summary will focus on recent advances in pediatric asthma on prenatal and postnatal factors altering the natural history of asthma, assessment of asthma control, and new insights regarding potential therapeutic targets for altering the course of asthma in children, as indicated in Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology publications in 2013 and early 2014. Recent reports continue to shed light on methods to understand factors that influence the course of asthma, methods to assess and communicate levels of control, and new targets for intervention, as well as new immunomodulators. It will now be important to carefully assess risk factors for the development of asthma, as well as the risk for asthma exacerbations, and to improve the way we communicate this information in the health care system. This will allow parents, primary care physicians, specialists, and provider systems to more effectively intervene in altering the course of asthma and to further reduce asthma morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetics of asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon F

    2015-01-01

    Asthma runs in families, and children of asthmatic parents are at increased risk of asthma. Prediction of disease risk is pivotal for the clinician when counselling atopic families. However, this is not always an easy task bearing in mind the vast and ever-increasing knowledge about asthma genetics....... The advent of new genotyping technologies has made it possible to sequence in great detail the human genome for asthma-associated variants, and accordingly, recent decades have witnessed an explosion in the number of rare and common variants associated with disease risk. This review presents an overview...... of methods and advances in asthma genetics in an attempt to help the clinician keep track of the most important knowledge in the field....

  5. The Doctoral Debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Margaret Terry

    2007-01-01

    The value of the doctorate in educational administration has been debated in recent years over its appropriateness as a qualification for superintendency. Underlying these debates are two overlapping trends. One is increasing program availability and shifts in institutional type, and the second is changes in program content and dissertation…

  6. Fourth Doctoral Student Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Ingrid Haug

    2016-01-01

    On 10 May, over 130 PhD students and their supervisors, from both CERN and partner universities, gathered for the 4th Doctoral Student Assembly in the Council Chamber.   The assembly was followed by a poster session, at which eighteen doctoral students presented the outcome of their scientific work. The CERN Doctoral Student Programme currently hosts just over 200 students in applied physics, engineering, computing and science communication/education. The programme has been in place since 1985. It enables students to do their research at CERN for a maximum of three years and to work on a PhD thesis, which they defend at their University. The programme is steered by the TSC committee, which holds two selection committees per year, in June and December. The Doctoral Student Assembly was opened by the Director-General, Fabiola Gianotti, who stressed the importance of the programme in the scientific environment at CERN, emphasising that there is no more rewarding activity than lear...

  7. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications List More » Search Health Topics Quick Links MedlinePlus Health Info NIH News in Health Wellness Toolkits Grants & Funding Grants Home ...

  8. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications List More » Search Health Topics ... Social Media More » Quick Links NIH News in Health NIH Research ... Highlights Science Education Research in NIH Labs & Clinics Training Opportunities Library ...

  9. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Staff Directory En Español Site Menu Home Health Information Health Info Lines Health Services Locator HealthCare.gov NIH Clinical Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z ...

  10. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Lines Health Services Locator HealthCare.gov NIH Clinical Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications List More » Search Health Topics Quick Links MedlinePlus Health Info NIH News in ...

  11. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Menu Home Health Information Health Info Lines Health Services Locator HealthCare.gov NIH Clinical Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications List More » ...

  12. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 4:37) Part II: Talking Openly with Your Medical Provider (3:51) Part III: Understanding Diagnosis and Treatment (3:57) More Resources from NIH You can play an active role in your health care by talking to your doctor. Clear and honest ...

  13. Practice patterns of doctors of chiropractic with a pediatric diplomate: a cross-sectional survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is growing in popularity, especially within the pediatric population. Research on CAM practitioners and their specialties, such as pediatrics, is lacking. Within the chiropractic profession, pediatrics is one of the most recently established post-graduate specialty programs. This paper describes the demographic and practice characteristics of doctors of chiropractic with a pediatric diplomate. Methods 218 chiropractors with a pediatric diplomate were invited to complete our survey using either web-based or mailed paper survey methods. Practitioner demographics, practice characteristics, treatment procedures, referral patterns, and patient characteristics were queried with a survey created with the online survey tool, SurveyMonkey©®. Results A total of 135 chiropractors responded (62.2% response rate); they were predominantly female (74%) and white (93%). Techniques most commonly used were Diversified, Activator ®, and Thompson with the addition of cranial and extremity manipulation to their chiropractic treatments. Adjunctive therapies commonly provided to patients included recommendations for activities of daily living, corrective or therapeutic exercise, ice pack\\cryotherapy, and nutritional counseling. Thirty eight percent of respondents' patients were private pay and 23% had private insurance that was not managed care. Pediatrics represented 31% of the survey respondents' patients. Chiropractors also reported 63% of their work time devoted to direct patient care. Health conditions reportedly treated within the pediatric population included back or neck pain, asthma, birth trauma, colic, constipation, ear infection, head or chest cold, and upper respiratory infections. Referrals made to or from these chiropractors were uncommon. Conclusions This mixed mode survey identified similarities and differences between doctors of chiropractic with a pediatric diplomate to other surveys of doctors of chiropractic

  14. Negative affect, medication adherence, and asthma control in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Bruce; Zhang, Lening

    2008-09-01

    Negative affect including depression is known to be associated with asthma control, but whether and how it influences control in children with asthma is not understood. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate whether negative affect and medication nonadherence each predict decreased symptom control, and whether the relationship between negative affect and disease control is explained by children's adherence to asthma medications. Participants included 104 children 8 to 18 years old being treated with an inhaled corticosteroid delivered by metered-dose inhaler for asthma diagnosed by their health care providers. Children and parents independently rated asthma symptoms and completed questionnaires assessing sad and anxious affect. Electronic devices were attached to each participant's metered-dose inhaler to measure adherence. At study completion, records were collected to confirm reports of health events. Both child and parent negative affect scores predicted symptom scores, whether reported by child or parent, and child negative affect scores predicted school absence because of asthma. In a lagged analysis taking into account time sequence, medication adherence predicted prednisone bursts but not subjective symptom scores. Nonadherence did not explain the relationship between negative affect and symptom scores, but parent negative affect predicted prednisone bursts even when controlling for level of adherence. Although both negative affect and adherence were predictive of asthma control, the relationship of each to asthma control was distinctly different. Accuracy of symptom perception may be influenced by patient and parent affect characteristics.

  15. Adolescent asthma after rhinovirus and respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruotsalainen, Marja; Hyvärinen, Mari K; Piippo-Savolainen, Eija; Korppi, Matti

    2013-07-01

    Asthma risk is increased after bronchiolitis in infancy. Recent studies have suggested that the risk may be dependent on the causative virus. The aim of the study was to evaluate the asthma risk in adolescence in subjects hospitalized for rhinovirus or respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis in infancy. At the median age of 16.5 years, a questionnaire was sent to 96 study subjects hospitalized for bronchiolitis at rhinovirus etiology of bronchiolitis had been studied in serum and respiratory samples obtained on admission in infancy. The occurrence of asthma was compared between former bronchiolitis patients and population controls recruited for this study in adolescence. Doctor-diagnosed asthma was present in 30% of former bronchiolitis patients and in 5% of controls (OR 7.9, 95% CI 3.3-19.3). The respective figures for self-reported asthma were 64% and 11% (OR 14.7, 95% CI 7.2-30.0). Self-reported asthma was more common in the former rhinovirus than RSV patients (83.3% vs. 47.6%, P = 0.023, mixed infections included; 81.3% vs. 50%, P = 0.067, mixed infections excluded). Patients hospitalized for RSV and rhinovirus bronchiolitis at rhinovirus versus non-rhinovirus bronchiolitis. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Determinants of allergic rhinitis in young children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussu, Lise; Saint-Pierre, Philippe; Panayotopoulos, Virginie; Couderc, Rémy; Amat, Flore; Just, Jocelyne

    2014-01-01

    In the preschool period, allergic rhinitis (AR) is infrequent and thus under-diagnosed. However, recent works have highlighted the occurrence of AR in toddlers although the causes of AR in this young population remain unknown. The objective of this study was to identify determinants of AR in young children with asthma. We carried out a case-control study of 227 children with active asthma and enrolled in the Trousseau Asthma Program. AR and other allergic diseases (asthma, food allergy and eczema) were diagnosed by medical doctors using standardized questionnaires. Parental history of AR and asthma, biological markers of atopy (total IgE, blood eosinophilia, allergic sensitization towards food and aeroallergens) and environmental parameters were also collected. Forty one of the children (18.1%) had AR. By univariate logistic regression analysis, AR was mainly associated with peanut sensitization (OR = 6.75; p = 0.002); food allergy (OR = 4.31; p = 0.026); mold exposure (OR = 3.81 pfood allergy and peanut sensitization three models of multivariate logistic regression were performed and confirmed that AR is associated with peanut sensitization but also food allergy and mold exposure. A random forest analysis was also performed to explain AR. The results reinforced the logistic analysis that peanut sensitization and mold exposure were the principal determinants of AR. These results stress the importance of investigating AR in young children with asthma to potentially diagnose a particularly severe allergic asthmatic phenotype. Moreover, these data evoke the hypothesis that peanut could be an aeroallergen.

  17. Teaching Corner: Adult Asthma in Malawi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and have normal respiratory function. Pathogenesis. Asthma is a disease that affects the small ... to smooth muscle constriction; immune system activation mediated by immunogloubulin E (IgE) increases mast .... completely (cigarette smoke) or to increase their medication accordingly (weather). However we also know that ...

  18. Effect of a home intervention program on pediatric asthma in an environmental justice community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shani, Zalika; Scott, Richard G; Schofield, Lynne Steuerle; Johnson, John H; Williams, Ellen R; Hampton, Janiene; Ramprasad, Vatsala

    2015-03-01

    Asthma prevalence rates are at an all-time high in the United States with over 25 million persons diagnosed with asthma. African Americans and other minorities have higher asthma prevalence and higher exposure to environmental factors that worsen asthma as compared to Caucasians. This article describes the evaluation of an inner-city home-based asthma education and environmental remediation program that addressed both indoor and outdoor triggers through collaboration between a health system and local environmental justice organization. The program enrolled 132 children older than 2.5 years and centers on a 4- to 6-week intervention with peer counselors using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Asthma Home Environment Checklist and the You Can Control Asthma curriculum. Families receive asthma-friendly environmental home kits. Peer counselors reinforce key asthma management messages and facilitate the completion of Asthma Action Plans. The environmental justice community partner organized block cleanups to reduce outdoor triggers. The evaluation used a pretest-posttest design to assess changes in client behavior and asthma symptoms. Data were collected at baseline and during a 6-month postintervention period. Participants saw enhanced conditions on asthma severity and control. The improvement was greatest for children whose asthma was considered "severe" based on the validated Asthma Control Test. Other positive results include the following: greater completion of Asthma Action Plans, significant reduction in the number of emergency room visits (p = .006), and substantial decreases in school absenteeism (p = .008) and use of rescue medications (p = .049). The evaluation suggests that the program was effective in improving asthma self-management in a high-risk population living within an environmental justice community. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  19. Advances in Pediatric Asthma in 2013: Coordinating Asthma Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szefler, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    Last year’s Advances in Pediatric Asthma: Moving Toward Asthma Prevention concluded that: “We are well on our way to creating a pathway around wellness in asthma care and also to utilize new tools to predict the risk for asthma and take steps to not only prevent asthma exacerbations but also to prevent the early manifestations of the disease and thus prevent its evolution to severe asthma.” This year’s summary will focus on recent advances in pediatric asthma on pre- and postnatal factors altering the natural history of asthma, assessment of asthma control, and new insights regarding potential therapeutic targets for altering the course of asthma in children as indicated in Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology publications in 2013 and early 2014. Recent reports continue to shed light on methods to understand factors that influence the course of asthma, methods to assess and communicate levels of control, and new targets for intervention as well as new immunomodulators. It will now be important to carefully assess risk factors for the development of asthma as well as the risk for asthma exacerbations and to improve the way we communicate this information in the health care system. This will allow parents, primary care physicians, specialists and provider systems to more effectively intervene in altering the course of asthma and to further reduce asthma morbidity and mortality. PMID:24581430

  20. Penumbra: Doctoral support as drama

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisker, Gina; Robinson, Gill; Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    2017-01-01

    Much international doctoral learning research focuses on personal, institutional and learning support provided by supervisors, managed relationships,‘nudging’ robust, conceptual, critical, creative work. Other work focuses on stresses experienced in supervisor-student relationships and doctoral j...

  1. Patient-doctor relationship: the practice orientation of doctors in Kano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiola, T; Udofia, O; Abdullahi, A T

    2014-01-01

    Attitude and orientation of doctors to the doctor-patient relationship has a direct influence on delivery of high quality health- care. No study to the knowledge of these researchers has so far examined the practice orientation of doctors in Nigeria to this phenomenon. The aims of this study were to determine the orientation of Kano doctors to the practice of doctor-patient relationship and physicians' related-factors. Participants were doctors working in four major hospitals (i.e., two federal-owned and two state-owned) servicing Kano State and its environs. The Patient-Practitioner Orientation Scale (PPOS) and a socio-demographic questionnaire were completed by the 214 participants. The PPOS has 18 items and measures three parameters of a total score and two dimension of "sharing" and "caring". The mean age of participants was 31.72 years (standard deviation = 0.87), with 22% being females, 40.7% have been practicing for ≥ 6 years and about two-third working in federal-owned health institution. The Cronbach's alpha of total PPOS scores was 0.733 and that of two sub-scale scores of "sharing" and "caring" were 0.659 and 0.546 respectively. Most of the doctors' orientation (92.5%) was towards doctor-centered (i.e., paternalistic) care, majority (75.2%) upheld the view of not sharing much information and control with patients, and showing little interest in psychosocial concerns of patients (i.e., 'caring'=93.0%). Respondents' characteristics that were significantly associated with high doctor 'caring' relationship orientation were being ≥ 30-year-old and practicing for ≥ 6 years. Working in State-owned hospitals was also significantly associated with high doctor "sharing" orientation. This paper demonstrated why patient-centered medical interviewing should be given top priority in medical training in Nigeria, and particularly for federal health institutions saddled with production of new doctors and further training for practicing doctors.

  2. Reinventing The Doctor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moyez Jiwa

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available There has been a seismic shift in the lives of people because of technology. People are far better informed than they were in the 1980s and 1990s. Much of this information is available through the media but even more is available and archived on the internet. The forces pushing the internet into health and health care are strong and unstoppable, ensuring that the internet and the choices it offers must be part of the design of our future health care system. We are no longer content to wait in queues as we live at a faster pace than earlier generations — we don’t not have time to wait for appointments months, weeks or even days in advance. The internet offers the prospect of online consultations in the comfort of your own home. The physical examination will change as new devices are developed to allow the necessary sounds and signals emitted by our malfunctioning bodies to be recorded, interpreted and captured at a remote location. Meanwhile, for those who prefer to see a health care practitioner in person the options to consult practitioners other than doctors who can advise on our health is expanding. The reality is we can’t afford to train or pay for all the doctors we need under the current “doctor-knows-best” system of health care. Patients no longer believe the rhetoric and are already voting with their feet. Pharmacists, nurses and other allied health professionals are beginning to play a much greater role in offering relief from symptoms and monitoring of chronic diseases. Of course, the doctor of the future will still need to offer face-to-face consultations to some people most of the time or most people some of the time. The social role doctors play will continue to be important as humans will always need other humans to personally respond to their distress. As doctors reinvent themselves, the internet and the value of time with patients will be the driving forces that move us into a more sustainable future in health care.

  3. The Significance of Asthma Follow-Up Consultations for Adherence to Asthma Medication, Asthma Medication Beliefs, and Asthma Control

    OpenAIRE

    Malin Axelsson; Linda Ekerljung; Bo Lundbäck

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim was to investigate adherence to asthma medication treatment, medication beliefs, and asthma control in relation to asthma follow-up consultations in asthmatics in the general population. A further aim was to describe associations between adherence, medication beliefs, and asthma control. Method. In the population-based West Sweden Asthma Study, data allowing calculation of adherence for 4.5 years based on pharmacy records were obtained from 165 adult asthmatics. Additional ...

  4. Children with Asthma and Sports

    OpenAIRE

    Selda Yuzer; Sevinc Polat

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is one of the chronic diseases which have are widely seen among the children. The disease has recently been in the increase all over the world and affects many children. In a study conducted with International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) method, it was found out that prevalence of childhood asthma was 17.1%. Participation in sportive activities by the children with asthma, which is today considered as a part of asthma treatment program, makes contributions to the...

  5. Management of asthma in adults: do the patients get what they need--and want?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backer, V; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Harving, H

    2007-01-01

    Suboptimal asthma control may be caused by a combination of factors, such as nonadherence to guidelines, lack of compliance, and poor asthma education. The aim was to assess patients' knowledge of asthma and different management strategies, including patients' attitudes toward involvement...... function measured and peak flow monitoring was reported by 5%. Written action plans were provided for 12% of patients and 50% had had their inhaler technique checked. Although 59% of patients were instructed to adjust their controller therapy if needed, only 23% reported that they had done so...... by their doctor, indicating that change in educational strategy is needed....

  6. Tobaksrygning og asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Lange, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a well-known health hazard, probably not least for patients suffering from asthma. This review gives a short overview of the effects of passive and active smoking on the inception and outcome with of longitudinal changes in the lung function and mortality of patients with ast......Cigarette smoking is a well-known health hazard, probably not least for patients suffering from asthma. This review gives a short overview of the effects of passive and active smoking on the inception and outcome with of longitudinal changes in the lung function and mortality of patients...... with asthma. Substantial evidence suggests that smoking affects asthma adversely. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, especially maternal smoking in children, may be a significant risk factor for asthma. Such exposure in patients with established asthma is not only associated with more severe symptoms......, but also with a poorer quality of life, reduced lung function, and increased utilisation of health care including hospital admissions. Active smoking does not appear to be a significant risk factor for asthma, but is associated with a worse outcome with regard to both longitudinal changes in lung function...

  7. OMALIZUMAB FOR CHILDREN WITH BRONCHIAL ASTHMA: INDICATIONS TO APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V. Kulichenko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies to IgE are a totally new class of medications currently used to enhance the supervision over severe persistent atopic bronchial asthma. Omalizumab is the most well studied, first and only medication of this group, which is recommended for the application and is allowed for treatment of uncontrolled bronchial asthma among adults and children aged 12 and over in different countries of the world, including Russia. High omalizumab assisted treatment costs, as well as the need in the monthly visits to the doctor for the omalizumab injections are justified for the patients, requiring repeat hospitalizations, emergency medical aid, using high doses of the inhalation and/or systemic glucocorticosteroids. The article reviews the criteria for the selection of patients fit for omalizumab assisted treatment.Key words: omalizumab, anti-ige-antibodies, bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, treatment, children.

  8. The association of health literacy with illness and medication beliefs among older adults with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federman, Alex D; Wolf, Michael; Sofianou, Anastasia; Wilson, Elizabeth A H; Martynenko, Melissa; Halm, Ethan A; Leventhal, Howard; Wisnivesky, Juan P

    2013-08-01

    Suboptimal health literacy (HL) and asthma beliefs are associated with poor asthma self-management and outcomes. We tested the hypothesis that low HL is associated with inaccurate beliefs. Asthmatics ≥60 were recruited from hospital and community practices in New York, NY and Chicago, IL (n=420). HL was measured with the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults; validated instruments derived from the self regulation model were used to assess beliefs. The association of beliefs with HL was evaluated with multivariate models. Thirty-six percent of patients had low HL; 54% believed they only have asthma when symptoms are present, 29% believed they will not always have asthma and 20% believed that their doctor can cure asthma. HL was associated with beliefs of not having asthma all the time and that asthma can be cured (OR: 1.84, 95% CI: 1.2-2.82; OR: 2.22, 95% CI: 1.29-3.82, respectively). Patients with low HL were also more likely to be concerned about medication use (β=0.92, p=.05), despite recognizing their necessity (β=-1.36, p=.01). Older asthmatics with low HL endorse erroneous asthma beliefs. Health communications for improving self-management behaviors in asthma should employ both health literacy-appropriate strategies and messages to counter illness-related misconceptions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Asthma is inversely associated with Helicobacter pylori status in an urban population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Reibman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microbial exposures have been suggested to confer protection from allergic disorders and reduced exposures to gastrointestinal microbiota have been proposed as an explanation for the increase in asthma prevalence. Since the general prevalence of Helicobacter pylori has been decreasing, we hypothesized that H. pylori serostatus would be inversely related to the presence of asthma. METHODS: Adults were recruited to participate in the New York University (NYU/Bellevue Asthma Registry in New York City. Adult asthma cases (N = 318 and controls (N = 208 were identified and serum IgG antibodies to H. pylori whole cell antigens or the immunodominant CagA antigen were measured. RESULTS: As expected, the asthma cases and controls differed with respect to atopy and lung function. Seropositivity to H. pylori or CagA antigen was present in 47.1% of the total case and control study population. Asthma was inversely associated with CagA seropositivity (OR = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.36-0.89. Median age of onset of asthma (doctor's diagnosis was older (21 years among individuals with CagA+ strains than among H. pylori- individuals (11 years (p = 0.006. CONCLUSION: These data are consistent with the hypothesis that colonization with CagA+ H. pylori strains is inversely associated with asthma and is associated with an older age of asthma onset in an urban population. The data suggest H. pylori as a marker for protection.

  10. Talking to Your Child's Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... role in your child's health? The Doctor-Patient Relationship Today, doctors are pressured to see more patients in less time and to spend less time with each patient. Insurance issues, such as the need for referrals, complicate patient care for parents as well as doctors and their ...

  11. Doctorateness as a Threshold Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trafford, Vernon; Leshem, Shosh

    2009-01-01

    Achieving a doctorate presents candidates with certain challenges--undertaking the research, writing the thesis and defending both at their viva. Throughout that doctoral journey, candidates are expected to display doctorateness in their thesis via the characteristics of high-quality scholarly research. The blockages that occur and prevent…

  12. The Moderating Effect of Personality Traits on Advisor Relationships in Predicting Doctoral Student Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosh, Emily P.

    2014-01-01

    Personality affects relationships. During the doctoral education, the second most important factor in degree completion, after financial support, is the student-advisor relationship. Approximately half of doctoral students do not finish their degrees. While it is known mentors have a profound impact on the success of doctoral students, the effect…

  13. Emotional Labour, Training Stress, Burnout, and Depressive Symptoms in Junior Doctors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Mary E.; Creed, Peter A.; Searle, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Junior doctors are at risk of work-related burnout and mental health problems due to training workload demands and responsibilities. This study investigated the predictors of work-related burnout and depressive symptoms in junior doctors. Participants were 349 Australian doctors in postgraduate years 1-4, who completed a web-based survey assessing…

  14. Purist or Pragmatist? UK Doctoral Scientists' Moral Positions on the Knowledge Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Sally; Hughes, Gwyneth; Walsh, Elaine

    2017-01-01

    Doctoral scientists increasingly forge non-academic careers after completing the doctorate. Governments and industry in advanced economies welcome this trend, since it complements the "knowledge economy" vision that has come to dominate higher education globally. Knowledge economy stakeholders consider doctoral scientists to constitute…

  15. Asthma control in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    studies have added new information about the effects of poorly controlled asthma on a range of important, but less studied outcomes, including risk of obesity, daily physical activity, cardiovascular fitness, stress, concentration and focused attention, learning disabilities and risk of depression. From...... in whom the tests suggest good asthma control may still have poorly controlled asthma when various objective outcomes are included in the assessment. A main reason for that seems to be that none of the tests accurately detects the child's adaptation in lifestyle. If you do not exercise you have fewer...

  16. Genetics, atopy asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William O.C.M. Cookson

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a complex disease which is due to the interaction of an unknown number of genes with strong environmental factors. Segregation analysis suggests the presence of major genes underlying asthma and atopy. Different genetic effects have been recognized which predispose to generalized atopy, or modify the atopic response to particular allergens, or enhance bronchial inflammation, or modify bronchial tone. These known genes or genetic loci do not account for all of the familial clustering of asthma and atopy. Many studies are now under way to identify the remaining genes.

  17. The Common Sense Model in early adolescents with asthma: longitudinal relations between illness perceptions, asthma control and emotional problems mediated by coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiggelman, Dana; van de Ven, Monique O M; van Schayck, Onno C P; Kleinjan, Marloes; Engels, Rutger C M E

    2014-10-01

    The present study examined the longitudinal relations between illness perceptions and asthma control and emotional problems (i.e., anxiety, depression, stress), respectively, in adolescents with asthma. Furthermore, the mediating effects of asthma-specific coping strategies on these relations were examined, as specified in the Common Sense Model (CSM). In 2011, 2012, and 2013, adolescents (aged 10-15) with asthma were visited at home (N=253) and completed questionnaires about their illness perceptions, asthma-specific coping strategies, asthma control, symptoms of anxiety and depression, and perceived stress. Path analyses were used to examine the direct relations of illness perceptions with asthma control and emotional problems and the mediating effects of coping strategies cross-sectionally and longitudinally. Perceptions of less perceived control and attributing more complaints to asthma were associated with better asthma control. Perceptions of more concern, less coherence, and increased influence of asthma on emotional well-being were associated with more emotional problems. Longitudinally, perceptions of more treatment control and fewer concerns predicted less emotional problems over time. More worrying mediated the cross-sectional relation between perceiving more concern about asthma and less asthma control and the longitudinal relation between perceiving more concern about asthma and more emotional problems. Illness perceptions were associated with asthma control and emotional problems; however, over time, illness perceptions only predicted changes in emotional problems. Most coping strategies did not mediate the relation between illness perceptions and outcomes. Interventions aimed to change illness perceptions in adolescents with asthma could decrease emotional problems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. How doctors search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Price, Susan; Delcambre, Lois

    2012-01-01

    Professional, workplace searching is different from general searching, because it is typically limited to specific facets and targeted to a single answer. We have developed the semantic component (SC) model, which is a search feature that allows searchers to structure and specify the search...... to context-specific aspects of the main topic of the documents. We have tested the model in an interactive searching study with family doctors with the purpose to explore doctors’ querying behaviour, how they applied the means for specifying a search, and how these features contributed to the search outcome....... In general, the doctors were capable of exploiting system features and search tactics during the searching. Most searchers produced well-structured queries that contained appropriate search facets. When searches failed it was not due to query structure or query length. Failures were mostly caused by the well...

  19. Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap: asthmatic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or chronic obstructive asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slats, Annelies; Taube, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are different disease entities. They are both clinical diagnoses, with diagnostic tools to discriminate between one another. However, especially in older patients (>55 years) it seems more difficult to differentiate between asthma and COPD. This has led to the definition of a new phenotype called asthma COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). However, our understanding of ACOS is at a very preliminary stage, as most research has involved subjects with existing diagnoses of asthma or COPD from studies with different definitions for ACOS. This has led to different and sometimes opposing results between studies on several features of ACOS, also depending on the comparison with COPD alone, asthma alone or both, which are summarized in this review.We suggest not using the term ACOS for a patient with features of both asthma and COPD, but to describe a patient with chronic obstructive airway disease as completely as possible, with regard to characteristics that determine treatment response (e.g. eosinophilic inflammation) and prognosis (such as smoking status, exacerbation rate, fixed airflow limitation, hyperresponsiveness, comorbidities). This will provide a far more clinically relevant diagnosis, and would aid in research on treatment in more homogenous groups of patients with chronic airways obstruction. More research is certainly needed to develop more evidence-based definitions for this patient group and to evaluate biomarkers, which will help to further classify these patients, treat them more adequately and unravel the underlying pathophysiological mechanism. © The Author(s), 2015.

  20. Electronic monitoring of symptoms and lung function to assess asthma control in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Dillys; van Horck, Marieke; van de Kant, Kim; Vaassen, Sanne; Gulikers, Sjoerd; Winkens, Bjorn; Rosias, Philippe; Heynens, Jan; Muris, Jean; Essers, Brigitte; Jöbsis, Quirijn; Dompeling, Edward

    2014-09-01

    Asthma remains poorly controlled in children. Home monitoring of asthma control may help to improve the level of asthma control. To compare 2 methods to assess asthma control: (1) prospective home monitoring, based on daily assessment of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and electronic symptom score, and (2) Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) with retrospective assessment of symptoms and FEV1. Ninety-six children with asthma were prospectively followed up during 1 year. Asthma control was assessed by home monitoring, including an electronic symptom score based on Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) criteria and FEV1 measurements. In the hospital, the ACQ was completed and FEV₁ was measured. Kappa analysis was performed to assess levels of agreement between the 2 methods. Agreement between the 2 methods was low (κ coefficient of 0.393). In 29 children (37%), prospective home monitoring was less optimistic than the retrospective assessment of asthma control by the ACQ. This study found low agreement between asthma control based on GINA criteria by means of prospective home monitoring and the hospital ACQ. The prospective home monitor detected more cases of less well-controlled asthma than the ACQ. However, optimization of adherence to home monitor use is necessary. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01239238. Copyright © 2014 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Trial of a "credit card" asthma self-management plan in a high-risk group of patients with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, W; Burgess, C; Ayson, M; Crane, J; Pearce, N; Beasley, R

    1996-05-01

    The "credit card" asthma self-management plan provides the adult asthmatic patient with simple guidelines for the self-management of asthma, which are based on the self-assessment of peak expiratory flow rate recordings and symptoms. The study was a trial of the clinical efficacy of the credit card plan in a high-risk group of asthmatic patients. In this "before-and-after" trial, patients discharged from the emergency department of Wellington Hospital, after treatment for severe asthma were invited to attend a series of hospital outpatient clinics at which the credit card plan was introduced. Questionnaires were used to compare markers of asthma morbidity, requirement for emergency medical care, and medication use during the 6-month period before and after intervention with the credit card plan. Of the 30 patients with asthma who attended the first outpatient clinic, 26 (17 women and 9 men) completed the program. In these 26 participants, there was a reduction in both morbidity and requirement for acute medical services: specifically, the proportion waking with asthma more than once a week decreased from 65% to 23% (p = 0.005) and the proportion visiting the emergency department for treatment of severe asthma decreased from 58% to 15% (p = 0.004). The patients attending the clinics commented favorably on the plan, in particular on its usefulness as an educational tool for monitoring and treating their asthma. Although the interpretation of this study is limited by the lack of a randomized control group, the findings are consistent with other evidence that the credit card asthma self-management plan can be an effective and acceptable system for improving asthma care in a high-risk group of adult patients with asthma.

  2. Attendance for general practitioner asthma care by children with moderate to severe asthma in Auckland, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buetow, Stephen; Richards, Deborah; Mitchell, Ed; Gribben, Barry; Adair, Vivienne; Coster, Gregor; Hight, Makere

    2004-11-01

    Attendance for general practitioner (GP) care of childhood asthma varies widely in New Zealand (NZ). There is little current research to account for the variations, although groups such as Māori and Pacific peoples have traditionally faced barriers to accessing GP care. This paper aims to describe and account for attendance levels for GP asthma care among 6-9 year-olds with moderate to severe asthma in Auckland, NZ. During 2002, randomly selected schools identified all 6-9 year-olds with possible breathing problems. Completion of a questionnaire by each parent/guardian indicated which children had moderate to severe asthma, and what characteristics influenced their access to GP asthma care. A multilevel, negative binomial regression model (NBRM) was fitted to account for the number of reported GP visits for asthma, with adjustment for clustering within schools. Twenty-six schools (89.7 percent) identified 931 children with possible breathing problems. Useable questionnaires were returned to schools by 455 children (48.9 percent). Results indicated 209 children with moderate to severe asthma, almost one in every three reportedly making 5 or more GP visits for asthma in the previous year. Māori, Pacific and Asian children were disproportionately represented among these 'high attendees'. Low attendees (0-2 visits) were mainly NZ Europeans. The NBRM (n=155) showed that expected visits were increased by perceived need, ill-health, asthma severity and, in particular, Māori and Pacific child ethnicity. It may be that Māori and Pacific children no longer face significant barriers to accessing GP asthma care. However, more likely is that barriers apply only to accessing routine, preventative care, leading to poor asthma control, exacerbations requiring acute care, and paradoxically an increase in GP visits. That barriers may increase total numbers of visits challenges the assumption, for all health systems, that access can be defined in terms of barriers that must be

  3. Asthma in the Elderly: Current Understanding and Future Research Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanania, Nicola A.; King, Monroe J.; Braman, Sidney S.; Saltoun, Carol; Wise, Robert A.; Enright, Paul; Falsey, Ann A; Mathur, Sameer K.; Ramsdell, Joe W.; Rogers, Linda; Stempel, David A.; Lima, John J.; Fish, James E.; Wilson, Sandra R.; Boyd, Cynthia; Patel, Kushang V.; Irvin, Charles G.; Yawn, Barbara P.; Halm, Ethan A; Wasserman, Stephen I.; Sands, Mark F.; Ershler, William B.; Ledford, Dennis K.

    2011-01-01

    Asthma in the elderly (AIE) is under diagnosed and under treated and there is a paucity of knowledge. The National Institute on Aging convened this workshop to identify what is known, what gaps in knowledge remain and suggest research directions needed to improve the understanding and care of AIE. Asthma presenting at an advanced age often has similar clinical and physiologic consequences as seen with younger individuals but co-morbid illnesses and the psychosocial effects of aging may affect the diagnosis, clinical presentation and care of asthma in this population. At least two phenotypes exist among elderly asthma; those with long-standing asthma have more severe airflow limitation and less complete reversibility than those with late-onset asthma. Many challenges exist in the recognition and treatment of asthma in the elderly. Furthermore, the pathophysiological mechanisms of AIE are likely to be different from those seen in young asthmatics and these differences may influence the clinical course and outcomes of asthma in this population. PMID:21872730

  4. Exercise-Induced Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-pro/resources/lung/naci/discover/action-plans.htm. Accessed Sept. 12, 2014. Mickleborough TD, et al. Exercise-induced asthma: Nutritional management. Current ...

  5. Reflexology and bronchial asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brygge, T; Heinig, J H; Collins, P

    2001-01-01

    Many asthma patients seek alternative or adjunctive therapies. One such modality is reflexology, whereby finger pressure is applied to certain parts of the body. The aim of the study was to examine the popular claim that reflexology treatment benefits bronchial asthma. Ten weeks of active...... or simulated (placebo) reflexology given by an experienced reflexologist, were compared in an otherwise blind, controlled trial of 20+20 outpatients with asthma. Objective lung function tests (peak flow morning and evening, and weekly spirometry at the clinic) did not change. Subjective scores (describing...... diaries was carried out. It was accompanied by a significant pattern compatible with subconscious unblinding, in that patients tended to guess which treatment they had been receiving. No evidence was found that reflexology has a specific effect on asthma beyond placebo influence....

  6. Asthma in elite athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elers, Jimmi; Pedersen, Lars; Backer, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is frequently found among elite athletes performing endurance sports such as swimming, rowing and cross-country skiing. Although these athletes often report symptoms while exercising, they seldom have symptoms at rest. Moreover, compared with nonathletic asthmatic individuals, elite athletes...... their physical capacity. Elite athletes should undergo comprehensive assessment to confirm an asthma diagnosis and determine its degree of severity. Treatment should be as for any other asthmatic individual, including the use of ß2-agonist, inhaled steroid as well as leukotriene-antagonist. It should, however......, be noted that daily use of ß-agonists could expose elite athletes to the risk of developing tolerance towards these drugs. Use of ß2-agonist should be replaced with daily inhaled corticosteroid treatment, the most important treatment of exercise-induced asthma. All physicians treating asthma should...

  7. Zoneterapi og asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brygge, Thor; Heinig, John Hilligsøe; Collins, Philippa

    2002-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Many patients with asthma seek alternative or adjunctive therapies. One such modality is reflexology. Our aim was to examine the popular claim that reflexology treatment benefits bronchial asthma. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ten weeks of either active or simulated (placebo) reflexology were...... compared in an otherwise blind, controlled trial of 40 patients with asthma. RESULTS: Objective lung function tests did not change. Subjective scores and bronchial sensitivity to histamine improved on both regimens, but no differences were found in the groups receiving active or placebo reflexology....... However, a trend in favour of reflexology became significant when a supplementary analysis of symptom diaries was carried out. At the same time a significant pattern compatible with subconscious un-blinding was found. DISCUSSION: We found no evidence that reflexology has a specific effect on asthma beyond...

  8. Asthma in elite athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elers, Jimmi; Pedersen, Lars; Backer, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is frequently found among elite athletes performing endurance sports such as swimming, rowing and cross-country skiing. Although these athletes often report symptoms while exercising, they seldom have symptoms at rest. Moreover, compared with nonathletic asthmatic individuals, elite athletes...... their physical capacity. Elite athletes should undergo comprehensive assessment to confirm an asthma diagnosis and determine its degree of severity. Treatment should be as for any other asthmatic individual, including the use of β2-agonist, inhaled steroid as well as leukotriene-antagonist. It should, however......, be noted that daily use of β-agonists could expose elite athletes to the risk of developing tolerance towards these drugs. Use of β2-agonist should be replaced with daily inhaled corticosteroid treatment, the most important treatment of exercise-induced asthma. All physicians treating asthma should...

  9. Vitamin D and asthma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, Sheena D; Calvert, H. Hardie; Fitzpatrick, Anne M

    2012-01-01

    .... Vitamin D is of particular interest in asthma since vitamin D concentrations decrease with increased time spent indoors, decreased exposure to sunlight, less exercise, obesity, and inadequate calcium intake...

  10. So You Have Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... get all the medicine into your lungs . The best way to learn to use these devices correctly is ... bed. • Take your asthma medicine right after you brush your teeth and keep it with your toothbrush as a ...

  11. Inflammation in Asthma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ashraf

    Systemic hypersensitivity diseases include, among others, asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, otitis, rhinosinusitis ... hypersensitivity.13 As a medical specialty based on immunology, the allergy specialty (in some countries, called .... In certain countries (the United States, for instance), training in allergy encompasses both pediatrics.

  12. Pediatric asthma in a nutshell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Holger Werner

    2014-07-01

    On the basis of strong research evidence, asthma is a leading cause of emergency department visits and hospital admissions for children. On the basis of research evidence, implementation of asthma guidelines by medical professionals in not optimal. On the basis of research evidence, the Asthma Predictive Index supports a diagnosis of chronic asthma in children younger than 3 years. On the basis of strong research evidence, premedication with a short-acting β2-agonist is the preferred initial therapy for exercise-induced asthma. On the basis of strong research evidence, anti-inflammatory therapy with inhaled corticosteroids is an effective treatment for asthma. On the basis of research and consensus, assessment of impairment and risk followed by scheduled assessment for asthma control is recommended. On the basis of research and consensus, the establishment of a close cooperative relationship among medical professionals, patients with asthma, and their families is an important component of asthma management.

  13. A child's asthma quality of life rating does not significantly influence management of their asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandhane, Piush J; McGhan, Shawna L; Sharpe, Heather M; Wong, Eric; Hessel, Pat A; Befus, A Dean; Majaesic, Carina

    2010-02-01

    Children of parents who perceive their children have increased asthma severity use more medical services and reliever medication. A randomized control trial of the Roaring Adventures of Puff (RAP) education program was completed among 287 grade 2-5 children with asthma. Parents and children completed a quality of life (QOL) questionnaire pre-intervention, 6 and 12 months post-intervention. We hypothesized that RAP altered how parent's assessed their child's QOL with a resultant change in asthma management. Pre-intervention, parents rated their child's overall QOL higher than their child (parent 5.41 [95% CI 5.24, 5.58] vs. child 4.54 [95% CI 4.32, 4.75]; P parent's overall QOL score, the child was 36% less likely to receive inhaled corticosteroids in the prior 2 weeks (OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.46, 0.88; P = 0.024) and 46% less likely to have missed school due to asthma in the prior 6 months (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.36, 0.82; P = 0.016: logistic regression). The child's QOL assessment, beyond that provided by their parent, was not associated with the asthma management outcomes examined. The RAP program decreased parent's symptoms QOL assessment by an improvement of 0.45 on a 7-point scale greater than control at 6 months (95% CI -0.81, -0.09; P = 0.06). Moreover, the RAP interaction on parent symptoms rating was important in determining whether the child received a short-acting beta-agonist in the prior 2 weeks (P = 0.05). Parent's QOL perception, and not the child's, is associated with asthma management. RAP decreased the parent's QOL symptoms assessment and was important in determining the child's asthma management. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Stress and asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Shoji Nagata; Masahiro Irie; Norio Mishima

    1999-01-01

    Three factors in recent medical research and treatment (advances in the field of psychoneuroimmunology, epidemiological evidence regarding important interaction between psychosocial factors and development of disease, and the recognition of the importance of patient education for self-management of asthma) have led clinicians and researchers to reconsider the role of psychosocial stress in asthma. There are many reports suggesting that stressful life events, family problems and a behavior pat...

  15. Update in asthma 2008

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Wendy C

    2009-01-01

    ... between obesity and asthma (8-10). Articles published in 2008 have advanced our understanding of the influence of genetics (11-18), factors in early life (19-21), and the environment (19, 22-24) on the development of asthma or the modification of disease severity. Basic pathobiologic studies in humans (25-35) and mice (36-46) have added to our underst...

  16. Genetics, atopy asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Cookson, William O. C. M.

    1996-01-01

    Asthma is a complex disease which is due to the interaction of an unknown number of genes with strong environmental factors. Segregation analysis suggests the presence of major genes underlying asthma and atopy. Different genetic effects have been recognized which predispose to generalized atopy, or modify the atopic response to particular allergens, or enhance bronchial inflammation, or modify bronchial tone. These known genes or genetic loci do not account for all of the familial clustering...

  17. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to learn more about helping people with asthma live healthier lives by gaining control over their asthma. Quick Links ... to learn more about helping people with asthma live healthier lives by gaining control over their asthma. ...

  18. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Recent Asthma Data Most Recent Asthma State or Territory Data Previous Most Recent Asthma Data 2014 National Data Archive 2014 State or Territory Data Archive AsthmaStats Flu Vaccination among Adults with ...

  19. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... page: About CDC.gov . Asthma Learn How to Control Asthma Asthma and Severe Weather Brochures Facts Triggers Indoors In the Workplace Outdoors Management Asthma Action Plan Flu Shots Inhalers Data, Statistics, ...

  20. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir You can control your asthma and avoid an attack by taking ... people with asthma live healthier lives by gaining control over their asthma. Quick Links Asthma Action Plan ...

  1. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Archive 2014 State or Territory Data Archive AsthmaStats Flu Vaccination among Adults with Current Asthma Flu Vaccination among Children with Current Asthma Asthma and Fair ...

  2. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Learn How to Control Asthma Asthma and Severe Weather Brochures Facts Triggers Indoors In the Workplace Outdoors ... CDC Publications on Asthma National Asthma Control Program America Breathing Easier Guide for State Programs Interventions Community ...

  3. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Know How to Use Your ... 1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health File Formats Help: How do ...

  4. Asthma Control Essential in Pregnancy, Study Suggests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... were born to mothers with active asthma during pregnancy. Those born to mothers who had mild controlled asthma were less likely to be diagnosed with asthma at an early age than those whose moms had mild uncontrolled asthma, ...

  5. Predicting the long-term prognosis of children with symptoms suggestive of asthma at preschool age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudri, Daan; Wijga, Alet; A Schipper, C Maarten; Hoekstra, Maarten; Postma, Dirkje S; Koppelman, Gerard H; Brunekreef, Bert; Smit, Henriette A; de Jongste, Johan C

    2009-11-01

    Clinicians have difficulty in diagnosing asthma in preschool children with suggestive symptoms. We sought to develop a clinical asthma prediction score for preschool children who have asthma-like symptoms for the first time. The Prevalence and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy birth cohort followed 3,963 children for 8 years. Between 0 and 4 years of age, 2,171 (55%) children reported "wheezing," "coughing at night without a cold," or both. In these children possible predictor variables for asthma were assessed at the age respiratory symptoms were first reported. Asthma was defined as wheezing, inhaled steroid prescription, or a doctor's diagnosis of asthma at both age 7 and 8 years of age. Eleven percent of children with symptoms at 0 to 4 years of age had asthma at 7 to 8 years of age. Eight clinical parameters independently predicted asthma at 7 to 8 years of age: male sex, postterm delivery, parental education and inhaled medication, wheezing frequency, wheeze/dyspnea apart from colds, respiratory infections, and eczema. In 72% of the cases, the model accurately discriminated between asthmatic and nonasthmatic children. A clinical risk score was developed (range, 0-55 points). Symptomatic children with a score of less than 10 points had a 3% risk, whereas children with a score of 30 points or greater had a 42% risk of asthma. A risk score based on 8 readily available clinical parameters at the time preschool children first reported asthma-like symptoms predicted the risk of asthma at 7 to 8 years of age.

  6. Correlations between pulmonary function and childhood asthma control test results in 5-11-year-old children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming-Sheng; Kao, Jun-Kai; Lee, Cheng-Han; Tsao, Lon-Yen; Chiu, Han-Yao; Tseng, Yu-Ching; Lin, Liang-Mei

    2014-06-01

    We examined correlations between the two asthma assessment tools, pulmonary function tests, and Childhood Asthma Control Test (C-ACT) scores, in 5-11-year-old children with asthma to determine if the C-ACT scores could predict pulmonary function test results. A total of 172 children with asthma aged 5-11 years completed C-ACT questionnaires and underwent pulmonary function testing. Correlations between these test results were examined. Patients were also placed into two groups, C-ACT scores ≤19 and >19, to determine if patients with scores >19 had better pulmonary function test results. Weak correlations were found between pulmonary function test results and childhood asthma control test scores in 5-11-year-old children with asthma, with or without the use of an asthma controller. These correlations included: 0.061 for FEV1 [confidence interval (CI): -0.022-0.049] and 0.074 for MMEF (CI: -0.013-0.037). The proportions of children with C-ACT test scores ≤19 group and those with scores >19 group were not significantly different. Correlations between C-ACT scores and pulmonary function test results were poor for children aged 5-11 years with asthma. FEV1, FVC, FEF25, FEF50, FEF75, MMEF, and PEFR were not significantly correlated with C-ACT scores. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Evolving Concepts of Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Anuradha; Wenzel, Sally E.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of asthma has evolved over time from a singular disease to a complex of various phenotypes, with varied natural histories, physiologies, and responses to treatment. Early therapies treated most patients with asthma similarly, with bronchodilators and corticosteroids, but these therapies had varying degrees of success. Similarly, despite initial studies that identified an underlying type 2 inflammation in the airways of patients with asthma, biologic therapies targeted toward these type 2 pathways were unsuccessful in all patients. These observations led to increased interest in phenotyping asthma. Clinical approaches, both biased and later unbiased/statistical approaches to large asthma patient cohorts, identified a variety of patient characteristics, but they also consistently identified the importance of age of onset of disease and the presence of eosinophils in determining clinically relevant phenotypes. These paralleled molecular approaches to phenotyping that developed an understanding that not all patients share a type 2 inflammatory pattern. Using biomarkers to select patients with type 2 inflammation, repeated trials of biologics directed toward type 2 cytokine pathways saw newfound success, confirming the importance of phenotyping in asthma. Further research is needed to clarify additional clinical and molecular phenotypes, validate predictive biomarkers, and identify new areas for possible interventions. PMID:26161792

  8. Asthma is Different in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erzurum, Serpil C.

    2015-01-01

    Gender differences in asthma incidence, prevalence and severity have been reported worldwide. After puberty, asthma becomes more prevalent and severe in women, and is highest in women with early menarche or with multiple gestations, suggesting a role for sex hormones in asthma genesis. However, the impact of sex hormones on the pathophysiology of asthma is confounded by and difficult to differentiate from age, obesity, atopy, and other gender associated environmental exposures. There are also gender discrepancies in the perception of asthma symptoms. Understanding gender differences in asthma is important to provide effective education and personalized management plans for asthmatics across the lifecourse. PMID:26141573

  9. Childhood asthma and physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lochte, Lene; Nielsen, Kim G; Petersen, Poul Erik

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Childhood asthma is a global problem affecting the respiratory health of children. Physical activity (PA) plays a role in the relationship between asthma and respiratory health. We hypothesized that a low level of PA would be associated with asthma in children and adolescents. The obj......BACKGROUND: Childhood asthma is a global problem affecting the respiratory health of children. Physical activity (PA) plays a role in the relationship between asthma and respiratory health. We hypothesized that a low level of PA would be associated with asthma in children and adolescents...

  10. Doctor-Shopping Behavior among Patients with Eye Floaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Gow-Lieng; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2015-07-13

    Patients suffering from eye floaters often resort to consulting more than one ophthalmologist. The purpose of this study, using the Health Belief Model (HBM), was to identify the factors that influence doctor-shopping behavior among patients with eye floaters. In this cross-sectional survey, 175 outpatients who presented floaters symptoms were enrolled. Data from 143 patients (77 first time visitors and 66 doctor-shoppers) who completed the questionnaire were analyzed. Descriptive and logistic regression analyses were performed. We found that women and non-myopia patients were significantly related with frequent attendance and doctor switching. Though the HBM has performed well in a number of health behaviors studies, but most of the conceptual constructors of HBM did not show significant differences between the first time visitors and true doctor-shoppers in this study. Motivation was the only significant category affecting doctor-shopping behavior of patients with eye floaters.

  11. Doctor-Shopping Behavior among Patients with Eye Floaters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gow-Lieng Tseng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Patients suffering from eye floaters often resort to consulting more than one ophthalmologist. The purpose of this study, using the Health Belief Model (HBM, was to identify the factors that influence doctor-shopping behavior among patients with eye floaters. In this cross-sectional survey, 175 outpatients who presented floaters symptoms were enrolled. Data from 143 patients (77 first time visitors and 66 doctor-shoppers who completed the questionnaire were analyzed. Descriptive and logistic regression analyses were performed. We found that women and non-myopia patients were significantly related with frequent attendance and doctor switching. Though the HBM has performed well in a number of health behaviors studies, but most of the conceptual constructors of HBM did not show significant differences between the first time visitors and true doctor-shoppers in this study. Motivation was the only significant category affecting doctor-shopping behavior of patients with eye floaters.

  12. Physical training for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Mônica Corso

    2014-01-01

    People with asthma may show less tolerance to exercise due to worsening asthma symptoms during exercise or other reasons such as deconditioning as a consequence of inactivity. Some may restrict activities as per medical advice or family influence and this might result in reduced physical fitness. Physical training programs aim to improve physical fitness, neuromuscular coordination and self confidence. Subjectively, many people with asthma report that they are symptomatically better when fit, but results from trials have varied and have been difficult to compare because of different designs and training protocols. Also, as exercise can induce asthma, the safety of exercise programmes needs to be considered. To gain a better understanding of the effect of physical training on the respiratory and general health of people with asthma, from randomised trials. We searched the Cochrane Airways Group Specialised Register of trials up to January 2013. We included randomised trials of people over eight years of age with asthma who were randomised to undertake physical training or not. Physical training had to be undertaken for at least 20 minutes, two times a week, over a minimum period of four weeks. Two review authors independently assessed eligibility for inclusion and undertook risk of bias assessment for the included studies. Twenty-one studies (772 participants) were included in this review with two additional 2012 studies identified as 'awaiting classification'. Physical training was well tolerated with no adverse effects reported. None of the studies mentioned worsening of asthma symptoms following physical training. Physical training showed marked improvement in cardiopulmonary fitness as measured by a statistically and clinically significant increase in maximum oxygen uptake (mean difference (MD) 4.92 mL/kg/min; 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.98 to 5.87; P physical training may have positive effects on health-related quality of life, with four of five studies

  13. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Breathing Easier [PDF – 1.1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Asthma & Community Health Know How ... Breathing Easier [PDF – 1.1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Asthma & Community Health File Formats ...

  14. Onset and persistence of childhood asthma: predictors from infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinnert, M D; Nelson, H S; Price, M R; Adinoff, A D; Leung, D Y; Mrazek, D A

    2001-10-01

    completed for 77 children at age 6. Total serum IgE levels were significantly higher for the children with asthma between ages 6 and 8. Skin-prick testing showed that the children with asthma had significantly more positive skin test reactions than did the children without asthma. Psychosocial interview data at 6 years of age were available for 103 families, and behavioral questionnaires were available for 133 families. On the basis of 6-year interviews, children with asthma were rated as being at greater psychological risk than were the children without asthma. Mothers' Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) ratings of their children's behavior indicated higher internalizing scores for the children with asthma as compared with the children without asthma. Like the 6-month IgE, 6-year IgE was higher for boys. IgE levels measured at 6 months of age were significantly correlated with 6-year IgE levels. Parenting difficulties measured at 3 weeks were significantly correlated with 6-year measures of maternal depression, CBCL Internalizing score, and Child Psychological Risk (CPR) score. There also were significant correlations among the psychosocial variables assessed when the children were 6 years of age; maternal depression was significantly associated with child CBCL Internalizing score and CPR score, and the last 2 also were significantly correlated. Multiple logistic regression showed that 2 concurrently measured variables entered the model showing the strongest associations with asthma at ages 6 to 8. The adjusted odds ratio for CPR score was 3.21 (1.29-7.96) and for 6-year IgE was 1.71 (1.04-2.80). This study of the natural history of childhood asthma focused on the development of asthma into the school-age years in a genetically at-risk group of children. The relationships between biological and psychosocial variables in the first year and school-age asthma support the formulation of asthma as beginning early in life, with the developing immune system interacting with

  15. Environmental pollution and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giampaolo, L; Quecchia, C; Schiavone, C; Cavallucci, E; Renzetti, A; Braga, M; Di Gioacchino, M

    2011-01-01

    Clinical evidences and epidemiological studies show that allergic pathologies of the respiratory tract are increasing in the world areas with high pollution impact, demonstrating how many polluting substances favor both allergic sensitization and the bronchial inflammatory changes characteristic of asthma. It has been shown that asthma, as many other diseases, is a complex interaction between genetic predisposition and environmental stimuli that results in clinical expression of various phenotypes of asthma: allergic, intrinsic etc. Many pollutants have such a potential. Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) can favor allergic sensitization, induce acute asthma attacks and increase bronchial reactivity, acting both on allergen, on bronchial mucosa and on immune cells. In fact, DEP can favor B lymphocytes to shift to a production of IgE and T cells to produce Th2 cytokines. Asthma can be also induced by high exposure to many other substances as NO2 and first of all ozone (O3): strong oxidizing substance that is synthesized, in absence of ventilation, by photochemical reaction due to the combination of ultraviolet sun radiation on exhaust gases as NO2 and hydrocarbons. Ozone is abundant in cities with minimal concentration in the morning gradually increasing during the day until maximal levels in the afternoon and then decreasing during the night. Epidemiological studies show that the number of access to hospital for acute asthma and even the use of bronchodilator by asthmatics increase during the high level periods when Ozone constitute almost 90 percent of the total oxidants in the environment. Particulate matter of very small diameter have a crucial role in favoring asthma attacks, and smaller the substance deeper the penetration in the bronchial tree, with an inflammatory reaction in the peripheral bronchial mucosa characterized by increased vessel permeability, mucosal edema, inflammatory mediator production by damaged epithelium and inflammatory cells that determines

  16. Training tomorrow's doctors in the preoperative clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousland, Zoe; Shelton, Clifford; O'Mahony, Fidelma

    2013-06-01

      The reduction in the length of hospital stay for surgical patients at a time of expanding medical student numbers has created challenges in the provision of adequate exposure to surgical patients. This has required the use of surgical learning opportunities in the ambulatory setting, including the preoperative assessment clinic. At Keele University, fourth-year medical students follow patient journeys through the preoperative assessment process, gaining experience of history taking, examination, prescribing and practical skills. This is followed by group discussion with a clinical teaching fellow, focusing on management and clinical reasoning. We audited the experience our students gained in the preoperative assessment clinic against the relevant Tomorrow's Doctors outcomes.   An audit tool was created by reviewing the patient journey to identify potential learning opportunities. These were then mapped to the relevant Tomorrow's Doctors outcomes. Audit pro formas were completed for each student at the end of the clinic by the clinical educator, with a total of 42 sessions audited.   Our findings show that it is possible for students to gain experience in all nine of the identified Tomorrow's Doctors outcomes in the preoperative assessment clinic. Practical procedure experience was gained by 92 per cent of students, and 70 per cent demonstrated clinical judgment and decision skills.   This study shows that students can gain experience in multiple Tomorrow's Doctors outcomes in the preoperative assessment clinic. In particular, it is a useful environment to learn and teach practical procedures, clinical reasoning and decision-making skills. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Changing doctor prescribing behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P.S.; Mäkelä, M.; Vermeulen, K.M.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this overview was to identify interventions that change doctor prescribing behaviour and to derive conclusions for practice and further research. Relevant studies (indicating prescribing as a behaviour change) were located from a database of studies maintained by the Cochrane Collabora......The aim of this overview was to identify interventions that change doctor prescribing behaviour and to derive conclusions for practice and further research. Relevant studies (indicating prescribing as a behaviour change) were located from a database of studies maintained by the Cochrane...... Collaboration on Effective Professional Practice. This register is kept up to date by searching the following databases for reports of relevant research: DHSS-DATA; EMBASE; MEDLINE; SIGLE; Resource Database in Continuing Medical Education (1975-1994), along with bibliographies of related topics, hand searching...... of key journals and personal contact with content area experts. Randomised controlled trials and non-equivalent group designs with pre- and post-intervention measures were included. Outcome measures were those used by the study authors. For each study we determined whether these were positive, negative...

  18. Asthma and suicide mortality in young people: a 12-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chian-Jue; Chen, Vincent Chin-Hung; Lee, Wen-Chung; Chen, Wei J; Ferri, Cleusa P; Stewart, Robert; Lai, Te-Jen; Chen, Chiao-Chicy; Wang, Tsu-Nai; Ko, Ying-Chin

    2010-09-01

    Mortality risk is relatively high in young people with asthma, and the risk may include causes of death other than those directly linked to respiratory disease. The authors investigated the association between asthma and suicide mortality in a large population-based cohort of young people. A total of 162,766 high school students 11 to 16 years of age living in a catchment area in Taiwan from October 1995 to June 1996 were enrolled in a study of asthma and allergy. Each student and his or her parents completed structured questionnaires. Participants were classified into three groups at baseline: current asthma (symptoms present in the past year), previous asthma (history of asthma but no symptoms in the past year), and no asthma. Participants were followed to December 2007 by record linkage to the national Death Certification System. Cox proportional hazards models were used to study the association between asthma and cause of death. The incidence rate of suicide mortality in participants with current asthma at baseline was more than twice that of those without asthma (11.0 compared with 4.3 per 100,000 person-years), but there was no significant difference in the incidence of natural deaths. The adjusted hazard ratio for suicide was 2.26 (95% CI=1.43-3.58) in the current asthma group and 1.76 (95% CI=0.90-3.43) in the previous asthma group. Having a greater number of asthma symptoms at baseline was associated with a higher risk of subsequent suicide. The population attributable fraction was 7.0%. These results highlight evidence of excess suicide mortality in young people with asthma. There is a need to improve mental health care for young people, particularly those with more severe and persistent asthma symptoms.

  19. Impact of quality circles for improvement of asthma care: results of a randomized controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, A.; Wensing, M.J.P.; Biessecker, K.; Quinzler, R.; Kaufmann-Kolle, P.; Szecsenyi, J.

    2008-01-01

    RATIONALE AND AIMS: Quality circles (QCs) are well established as a means of aiding doctors. New quality improvement strategies include benchmarking activities. The aim of this paper was to evaluate the efficacy of QCs for asthma care working either with general feedback or with an open benchmark.

  20. Comparison of indicators assessing the quality of drug prescribing for asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veninga, C.C.M.; Denig, P.; Pont, L.G.; Haaijer-Ruskamp, F.M.

    Objective. To compare different indicators for assessing the quality of drug prescribing and establish their agreement in identifying doctors who may not adhere to treatment guidelines. Data Sources/Study Setting. Data from 181 general practitioners (GPs) from The Netherlands. The case of asthma is

  1. shared care for asthma proceedings of the 8th world congress on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There are many role-players across the health scene involved with the care of asthmatics - GPs, general physicians and paediatricians, respiratory specialists, practice and clinic nurses, and emergency unit doctors. The aim of this book is to improve asthma care by helping all these different players to understand.

  2. Innate lymphoid cells and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sanhong; Kim, Hye Young; Chang, Ya-Jen; DeKruyff, Rosemarie H; Umetsu, Dale T

    2014-04-01

    Asthma is a complex and heterogeneous disease with several phenotypes, including an allergic asthma phenotype characterized by TH2 cytokine production and associated with allergen sensitization and adaptive immunity. Asthma also includes nonallergic asthma phenotypes, such as asthma associated with exposure to air pollution, infection, or obesity, that require innate rather than adaptive immunity. These innate pathways that lead to asthma involve macrophages, neutrophils, natural killer T cells, and innate lymphoid cells, newly described cell types that produce a variety of cytokines, including IL-5 and IL-13. We review the recent data regarding innate lymphoid cells and their role in asthma. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Asthma-COPD overlap syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Şen, Elif; Oğuzülgen, Kıvılcım; Bavbek, Sevim; Günen, Hakan; Kıyan, Esen; Türktaş, Haluk; Yorgancıoğlu, Arzu; Polatlı, Mehmet; Yıldız, Füsun; Çelik, Gülfem; Demir, Tunçalp; Gemicioğlu, Bilun; Mungan, Dilşad; Saryal, Sevgi; Sayıner, Abdullah; Yıldırım, Nurhayat

    2015-01-01

    .... Among patient with COPD and asthma; there is a group of patients with an overlap between clinical, functional characteristics and airway inflammation patterns, named "Asthma-COPD Overlap Syndrome" (ACOS...

  4. Psychopathology in difficult asthma : Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, L.C.J.; van Son, M.A.C.; van Keimpema, A.R.J.; van Ranst, D.; Antonissen-Pommer, A.M.; Meijer, J.W.G.; Pop, V.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Within the asthma population, difficult asthma (DA) is a severe condition in which patients present with frequent exacerbations, hospitalizations and emergency room visits. The identification and treatment of psychopathology is included in the management of DA. Psychopathology is supposed

  5. Allergy and Asthma Health Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Of Age Older Adults Allergy and Asthma Health Magazine Women Infant, Children and Teenagers Living With Lung ... written by Respiratory Experts Like no other health magazine, Allergy & Asthma Health Magazine is published by people ...

  6. Asthma control cost-utility randomized trial evaluation (ACCURATE: the goals of asthma treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honkoop Persijn J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the availability of effective therapies, asthma remains a source of significant morbidity and use of health care resources. The central research question of the ACCURATE trial is whether maximal doses of (combination therapy should be used for long periods in an attempt to achieve complete control of all features of asthma. An additional question is whether patients and society value the potential incremental benefit, if any, sufficiently to concur with such a treatment approach. We assessed patient preferences and cost-effectiveness of three treatment strategies aimed at achieving different levels of clinical control: 1. sufficiently controlled asthma 2. strictly controlled asthma 3. strictly controlled asthma based on exhaled nitric oxide as an additional disease marker Design 720 Patients with mild to moderate persistent asthma from general practices with a practice nurse, age 18-50 yr, daily treatment with inhaled corticosteroids (more then 3 months usage of inhaled corticosteroids in the previous year, will be identified via patient registries of general practices in the Leiden, Nijmegen, and Amsterdam areas in The Netherlands. The design is a 12-month cluster-randomised parallel trial with 40 general practices in each of the three arms. The patients will visit the general practice at baseline, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. At each planned and unplanned visit to the general practice treatment will be adjusted with support of an internet-based asthma monitoring system supervised by a central coordinating specialist nurse. Patient preferences and utilities will be assessed by questionnaire and interview. Data on asthma control, treatment step, adherence to treatment, utilities and costs will be obtained every 3 months and at each unplanned visit. Differences in societal costs (medication, other (health care and productivity will be compared to differences in the number of limited activity days and in quality adjusted

  7. Reasons for consulting a doctor on the Internet: Web survey of users of an Ask the Doctor service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umefjord, Göran; Petersson, Göran; Hamberg, Katarina

    2003-10-22

    In 1998 the Swedish noncommercial public health service Infomedica opened an Ask the Doctor service on its Internet portal. At no charge, anyone with Internet access can use this service to ask questions about personal health-related and disease-related matters. To study why individuals choose to consult previously-unknown doctors on the Internet. Between November 1, 2001, and January 31, 2002 a Web survey of the 3622 Ask the Doctor service users, 1036 men (29%) and 2586 (71%) women, was conducted. We excluded 186 queries from users. The results are based on quantitative and qualitative analysis of the answers to the question "Why did you choose to ask a question at Infomedica's 'Ask the Doctor' service?" 1223 surveys were completed (response rate 36 %). Of the participants in the survey 322 (26%) were male and 901 (74%) female. As major reasons for choosing to consult previously-unknown doctors on the Internet participants indicated: convenience (52%), anonymity (36%), "doctors too busy" (21%), difficult to find time to visit a doctor (16%), difficulty to get an appointment (13%), feeling uncomfortable when seeing a doctor (9%), and not being able to afford a doctors' visit (3%). Further motives elicited through a qualitative analysis of free-text answers were: seeking a second opinion, discontent with previous doctors and a wish for a primary evaluation of a medical problem, asking embarrassing or sensitive questions, seeking information on behalf of relatives, preferring written communication, and (from responses by expatriates, travelers, and others) living far away from regular health care. We found that that an Internet based Ask the Doctor service is primarily consulted because it is convenient, but it may also be of value for individuals with needs that regular health care services have not been able to meet.

  8. IDRC Doctoral Research Awards

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    test

    Methodology. • Tentative schedule of field activities. • Ethical considerations. • Gender implications ... List of courses completed and to be completed in the program. • Confirmation that all your course work will be completed and comprehensive/oral exams passed before the award commences. • Confirmation that you have ...

  9. Aspirin-Exacerbated Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varghese Mathew

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on aspirin-exacerbated asthma (AEA. The review includes historical perspective of aspirin, prevalence, pathogenesis, clinical features and treatment of AEA. The pathogenesis of AEA involves the cyclooxygenase and lipooxygenase pathway. Aspirin affects both of these pathways by inhibiting the enzyme cycooxygenase-1 (COX-1. Inhibition of COX-1 leads to a decrease in prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. The decrease in PGE2 results in an increase in cysteinyl leukotrienes by the lipooxygenase pathway involving the enzyme 5-lipooxygenase (5-LO. Leukotriene C4 (LTC4 synthase is the enzyme responsible for the production of leukotriene C4, the chief cysteinyl leukotriene responsible for AEA. There have been familial occurences of AEA. An allele of the LTC4 synthase gene in AEA is known as allele C. Allele C has a higher frequency in AEA. Clinical presentation includes a history of asthma after ingestion of aspirin, nasal congestion, watery rhinorrhea and nasal polyposis. Treatment includes leukotriene receptor antagonists, leukotriene inhibitors, aspirin desinsitaztion and surgery. AEA is the most well-defined phenotype of asthma. Although AEA affects adults and children with physician-diagnosed asthma, in some cases there is no history of asthma and AEA often goes unrecognized and underdiagnosed.

  10. Allergens, germs and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scadding, Glenis Kathleen

    2015-04-01

    To explore asthma pathogenesis using data from upper and lower airways. English-language papers on human asthma and nasal polyp subjects from 1990 onwards. High-quality studies in established journals. The recognition of its inflammatory nature led to a quantum leap in the understanding and treatment of asthma, with lives saved by inhaled corticosteroids. Further work at genetic, molecular, histological and clinical levels has shown that asthma is polymorphic and rarely involves isolated Th2 bronchial inflammation. Viral infections may act as an initiating event in children and adults, showing synergy with atopy. Chronic staphylococcal colonization of the mucosa may act as a promoter, as in atopic dermatitis. These two observations may be linked, with viruses providing an entry for bacteria into the mucosal epithelium. Most asthma begins in the nose and involves allergy and infection: both viral and bacterial. The combination of atopy and infection suggests new possibilities for therapy. © 2014 The Author. The Clinical Respiratory Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Asthma and dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Joseph

    2012-06-01

    Medline, government reports and conference proceedings were searched. Case-control, cohort or cross sectional studies were included if they provided relevant and applicable quantitative information on the relation between asthma and caries, had an independent study population and adequate definitions of asthma and caries and appropriate measurement of caries. Data were extracted independently by two reviewers and quality was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale. Fixed- and random-effects models were used for the analyses. Heterogeneity and publication bias were evaluated. Eighteen articles were included; 11 provided information on primary dentition and 15 on permanent dentition. Random-effects models showed a significant association between asthma and caries for both primary and permanent dentition, the odds ratios being 2.73 (95% CI: 1.61, 4.64) and 2.04 (95% CI: 1.44, 2.89), respectively. Evidence from this analysis suggests that asthma doubles the risk of caries in both primary and permanent dentition. Publication bias diagnostics and simulation suggested possible overestimation of the summary odds ratio for permanent dentition but not for primary dentition. Physicians and dentists should recommend preventive measures against caries for people with asthma.

  12. [Epigenetics, environment and asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico-Rosillo, Guadalupe; Vega-Robledo, Gloria Bertha; Silva-García, Raúl; Oliva-Rico, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the respiratory tract with a complex genetic background influenced by the exposition to a series of environmental factors. Genetic studies can only elucidate part of the heritability and susceptibility of asthma and even though several diseases have an evident genetic etiology, only a fraction of the genes involved in their pathogenicity have been identified. The epigenetic regulation of the latter is a fact one should bear in mind in order to explain the major triggers of diseases whose understanding is complicated, such as allergies and asthma. External stimulus such as nourishment, stress, physical activity, atmospheric pollution, tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking can induce either gene silencing or gene expression. In this regard, epigenetics can explain how these environmental factors influence our genetic inheritance. There is growing evidence that backs-up the fact that DNA methylation, histone post-translational modification and microRNA expression are influenced by the environment. This helps explaining how several of the risk factors mentioned contribute to the development and inheritance of asthma. In this review, different environmental factors and their relation with the main epigenetic regulatory mechanisms will be analyzed, as well as their possible role in the development of asthma.

  13. The pharmacotherapy of the asthma

    OpenAIRE

    BROŽOVÁ, Lenka

    2008-01-01

    Asthma bronchiale is a very common chronic disorder of airways with not fully elucidated pathology, which is not fully curable at the moment. It is estimated that 300 millions of persons suffer from asthma. About 8% of adult population and 10% of children are affected in the Czech republic. The aim of this thesis is to give an overview of contemporary modern pharmacotherapy of asthma. Firstly, this work describes asthma from pathophysiological and epidemiological point of view, among others: ...

  14. Obesity, Asthma, and the Microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Youngji; Shore, Stephanie A

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for asthma, but standard asthma drugs have reduced efficacy in the obese. Obesity alters the gastrointestinal microbial community structure. This change in structure contributes to some obesity-related conditions and also could be contributing to obesity-related asthma. Although currently unexplored, obesity may also be altering lung microbiota. Understanding the role of microbiota in obesity-related asthma could lead to novel treatments for these patients. ©2016 Int. Union Physiol. Sci./Am. Physiol. Soc.

  15. Obesity, Asthma, and the Microbiome

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Youngji; Shore, Stephanie A.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for asthma, but standard asthma drugs have reduced efficacy in the obese. Obesity alters the gastrointestinal microbial community structure. This change in structure contributes to some obesity-related conditions and also could be contributing to obesity-related asthma. Although currently unexplored, obesity may also be altering lung microbiota. Understanding the role of microbiota in obesity-related asthma could lead to novel treatments for these patients.

  16. Obesity, Asthma, and the Microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Youngji

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for asthma, but standard asthma drugs have reduced efficacy in the obese. Obesity alters the gastrointestinal microbial community structure. This change in structure contributes to some obesity-related conditions and also could be contributing to obesity-related asthma. Although currently unexplored, obesity may also be altering lung microbiota. Understanding the role of microbiota in obesity-related asthma could lead to novel treatments for these patients. PMID:26889016

  17. Doctoral Supervisor Education in Denmark: Aiming to foster reflective practitioners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godskesen, Mirjam Irene; Wichmann-Hansen, Gitte; Kobayashi, Sofie

    Quality in doctoral supervision is an increasing organisational focus area for universities and the need for supervisor development and training is widely recognised. However, there is no systematic overview of competence development activities for doctoral supervisors in Europe in general...... and there are great variations in the different practices. Many universities do not offer any courses while others have semester-long courses. A complete mapping of all competence development activities for doctoral supervisors in Denmark was carried out in 2015.4 The mapping focused on the teaching formats......, the content and the quality criteria for good supervisor education. We hope that these insights can inspire the development in other European countries....

  18. The virtual asthma guideline e-learning program: learning effectiveness and user satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sung-Yoon; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Kwon, Yong-Eun; Kim, Tae-Bum; Park, Hye-Kyung; Park, Heung-Woo; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Jee, Young-Koo; Moon, Hee-Bom; Min, Kyung-Up; Cho, Sang-Heon

    2017-07-21

    Effective educational tools are important for increasing adherence to asthma guidelines and clinical improvement of asthma patients. We developed a computer-based interactive education program for asthma guideline named the Virtual Learning Center for Asthma Management (VLCAM). We evaluated the usefulness of program in terms of its effects on user awareness of asthma guideline and level of satisfaction. Physicians-in-training at tertiary hospitals in Korea were enrolled in a cross-sectional questionnaire survey. The e-learning program on asthma guideline was conducted over a 2-week period. We investigated changes in the awareness of asthma guideline using 35-item self-administered questionnaire aiming at assessing physicians' knowledge, attitude, and practice. Satisfaction with the program was scored on 4-point Likert scales. A total of 158 physicians-in-training at six tertiary hospitals completed the survey. Compared with baseline, the overall awareness obtained from the scores of knowledge, attitude, and practice was improved significantly. Participants were satisfied with the VLCAM program in the following aspects: helpfulness, convenience, motivation, effectiveness, physicians' confidence, improvement of asthma management, and willingness to recommend. All items in user satisfaction questionnaires received high scores over 3 points. Moreover, the problem-based learning with a virtual patient received the highest user satisfaction among all parts of the program. Our computer-based e-learning program is useful for improving awareness of asthma management. It could improve adherence to asthma guidelines and enhance the quality of asthma care.

  19. Perceptions about interpersonal relationships and school environment among middle school students with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Hyekyun; McQuillan, Brenda; Chen, Ding-Geng; Atis, Shannska

    2017-11-01

    To examine interpersonal relationships involving peers and teachers and perceptions about school environment among middle school students with asthma in comparison to their healthy counterparts. The study also assesses asthma prevalence in a large sample of middle school students representing different geographic locations. Cross-sectional data were collected from 1059 middle school students in grades 6-8 enrolled in schools in a northeastern region of the United States. Students reported their chronic health conditions including asthma and completed questionnaires measuring perceptions about their relationships with peers and teachers as well as school environment. Analyses of covariance (ANCOVAs) were used to compare students with asthma and their healthy counterparts in the study variables. Asthma was reported by 16.5% of the sample (n = 169). The rate was higher among minority students (23%) than their white counterparts (15%). Greater proportion of urban students (28%) reported asthma than rural (18%) and suburban (14%) students. Students with asthma reported significantly poorer relationships with peers (B = -1.74, p environment (B = -1.30, p =.009) were also lower than their healthy counterparts. Race showed no significant effects on school factors. Overall asthma prevalence was substantially higher than the national average of adolescent asthma, particularly those residing in the urban area. Poor perceptions of interpersonal relationships with peers and teachers among students with asthma may indicate compromised quality of life. Suboptimal interpersonal relationships and school environment need to be identified and adequately addressed, given their implications for asthma management at the school setting among middle school students.

  20. [Job satisfaction among Norwegian doctors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nylenna, Magne; Aasland, Olaf Gjerløw

    2010-05-20

    Doctors' job satisfaction has been discussed internationally in recent years based on reports of increasing professional dissatisfaction. We have studied Norwegian doctors' job satisfaction and their general satisfaction with life. A survey was conducted among a representative sample of practicing Norwegian doctors in 2008. The validated 10-item Job Satisfaction Scale was used to assess job satisfaction. 1,072 (65 %) doctors responded. They reported a mean job satisfaction of 5.3 on a scale from 1 (very dissatisfied) to 7 (very satisfied). Job satisfaction increased with increasing age. Private practice specialists reported the highest level of job satisfaction (5.8), and general practitioners reported higher job satisfaction (5.5) than hospital doctors (5.1). Among specialty groups, community doctors scored highest (5.6) and doctors in surgical disciplines lowest (5.0). While long working hours was negatively correlated with job satisfaction, the perception of being professionally updated and having part-time affiliation(s) in addition to a regular job were positively correlated with job satisfaction. 52.9 % of doctors reported a very high general satisfaction. Norwegian doctors have a high level of job satisfaction. Satisfaction with life in general is also high and at least in line with that in the Norwegian population.

  1. [Medical mistakes in doctors novels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeveld, Cornelis H Kees

    2011-01-01

    To investigate whether doctors novels give a realistic picture of medical practice. Descriptive, qualitative analysis. 6 items in total from two series of doctors novels (4 Dutch 'Doctors novels' and 2 'Dr. Anne Maas' publications) were examined. The series 'Doctors novels' was translated from English, the 'Dr. Anne' novels were written by Dutch authors. The medical situations were located mostly in hospital emergency departments and operation rooms. Medical specialisms were represented mainly by surgeons, emergency care doctors, orthopaedic specialists, cardiologists and gynaecologists. In the series 'Doctors novels' most of the patients described suffered a trauma. In the 'Dr. Anne' series the patients admitted to the emergency department had a greater range of medical conditions. In the series 'Doctors novels' 3 of the 4 main characters were pregnant. In one case, giving birth was described in detail. The doctors novels which were studied give an unbalanced and distorted view of medical practice. The medical information was sometimes incorrect, partly due to lack of knowledge by the author, partly due to incorrect translation from English. The reality of medical practice was not represented accurately in either of the series investigated, although the medical information in the 'Doctors novels' series appeared to be accurate more often than that in the 'Dr. Anne' series.

  2. A comparison of Dutch family doctors' and patients' perspectives on nutrition communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dillen, S M E; Hiddink, G J

    2008-12-01

    In recent years, we have investigated both patients' and family doctors' communicative characteristics towards nutrition communication in general practice with several qualitative and quantitative studies. A sound comparison of the survey results between both conversation partners has not been made before. The aim of the present study was to put together data obtained by earlier studies for the first time in order to make comparisons of patients' and family doctors' communicative characteristics regarding nutrition communication. In The Netherlands, 603 patients completed a face-to-face interview-assisted questionnaire (65% response rate) and 267 family doctors completed a questionnaire (45% response rate). When comparing communicative characteristics, patients stronger believed that nutrition was an influence on health than family doctors. They also attributed a greater role to personal hygiene, stress and heredity, while family doctors were more convinced of the role of alcohol use and smoking on health. Patients more often rated their own nutrition knowledge as good than family doctors. In contrast, family doctors showed higher interest in nutrition and nutrition information than patients. As a result, a collinear model for family doctors and nutrition communication towards patients was provided. Significant differences between patients and family doctors were found for several communicative characteristics towards nutrition communication. It is important that family doctors become convinced that patients perceive them as a reliable and expert source of nutrition information. It is recommended that family doctors raise nutrition awareness among patients. Finally, we advise family doctors to pay attention to nutrition communication styles.

  3. Fertility outcomes in asthma: a clinical study of 245 women with unexplained infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gade, Elisabeth Juul; Thomsen, Simon Francis; Lindenberg, Svend; Backer, Vibeke

    2016-04-01

    Evidence is increasing of an association between asthma and aspects of female reproduction. However, current knowledge is limited and furthermore relies on questionnaire studies or small populations. In a prospective observational cohort study to investigate whether time to pregnancy, the number of fertility treatments, and the number of successful pregnancies differ significantly between women with unexplained infertility with and without asthma.245 women with unexplained infertility (aged 23-45 years) underwent questionnaires and asthma and allergy testing while undergoing fertility treatment. 96 women entering the study had either a former doctor's diagnosis of asthma or were diagnosed with asthma when included. After inclusion they were followed for a minimum of 12 months in fertility treatment, until they had a successful pregnancy, stopped treatment, or the observation ended.The likelihood of achieving pregnancy was lower in women with asthma compared with those without asthma: median total time to pregnancy was 32.3 months in non-asthmatic women versus 55.6 months in those with asthma, hazard ratio 0.50 (95% confidence interval 0.34-0.74) pWomen with asthma had fewer successful pregnancies during fertility treatment, 39.6 versus 60.4% (p=0.002). Increasing age was of negative importance for expected time to pregnancy, especially among asthmatic women (interaction between age and asthma on time to pregnancy, p=0.001). Female asthmatics had a longer time to pregnancy and less often became pregnant than non-asthmatic women. Increasing age reduced the chances of conceiving especially among asthmatic women. The causal relationship between asthma and subfertility remains unclear. Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  4. Outdoor air pollution and asthma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzivian, Lilian

    2011-06-01

    Asthma, a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways, is associated with reversible airway obstruction and hyperresponsiveness to triggers; clinical symptoms include wheezing, episodic cough, shortness of breath, and increased mucous production. Ambient or outdoor environmental exposure to ozone, particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen oxides has been well documented to exacerbate asthma. Children appear to be most vulnerable to the harmful effects of ambient air pollutants. As their lungs are not completely developed, children may experience greater exposure to environmental pollutants than adults and the higher doses of varied composition may remain in their lungs for a greater duration. Altogether, the negative effects of air pollutants on pulmonary function place children at a greater risk of air pollutant-induced exacerbation of asthma for the duration of their lives. The aim of this review was to assess recently published literature regarding the influence of air pollution on asthma in children. For this work, we reviewed articles found in PubMed using the key words "outdoor air pollution, asthma, and children" which were published between 2006 and 2009. Only those articles that had a full version available in PubMed were analyzed. We reviewed studies published between 2006 and 2009 examining the effect of outdoor air pollution on asthma in children. In total, we evaluated 25 articles; of these, 9 were published in 2006, 3 in 2007, 8 in 2008, and 5 in 2009. Of these 25 studies, 1 was a clinical trial, 6 were cross-sectional, 4 were case-control (2 with a case-crossover design), 12 were cohort prospective, and 2 were cohort retrospective studies with varied follow-up times ranging from 10 days to 7 years. The ages of children also differed, ranging from birth to 18 years of age. All studies reviewed in this work indicate that outdoor air pollution affects the appearance and exacerbation of asthma in children. Although these findings are of great

  5. Japanese Guideline for Adult Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Ohta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult bronchial asthma (hereinafter, asthma is characterized by chronic airway inflammation, reversible airway narrowing, and airway hyperresponsiveness. Long-standing asthma induces airway remodeling to cause an intractable asthma. The number of patients with asthma has increased, while the number of patients who die from asthma has decreased (1.7 per 100,000 patients in 2009. The aim of asthma treatment is to enable patients with asthma to lead a healthy life without any symptoms. A partnership between physicians and patients is indispensable for appropriate treatment. Long-term management with agents and elimination of causes and risk factors are fundamental to asthma treatment. Four steps in pharmacotherapy differentiate mild to intensive treatments; each step includes an appropriate daily dose of an inhaled corticosteroid (ICS, varying from low to high doses. Long-acting β2 agonists (LABA, leukotriene receptor antagonists, and theophylline sustained-release preparation are recommended as concomitant drugs, while anti-IgE antibody therapy is a new choice for the most severe and persistent asthma. Inhaled β2 agonists, aminophylline, corticosteroids, adrenaline, oxygen therapy, etc., are used as needed against acute exacerbations. Allergic rhinitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, aspirin induced asthma, pregnancy, and cough variant asthma are also important factors that need to be considered.

  6. Defining asthma in genetic studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, GH; Postma, DS; Meijer, G.

    1999-01-01

    Genetic studies have been hampered by the lack of a gold standard to diagnose asthma. The complex nature of asthma makes it more difficult to identify asthma genes. Therefore, approaches to define phenotypes, which have been successful in other genetically complex diseases, may be applied to define

  7. Rhinitis: a complication to asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J W; Thomsen, S F; Nolte, H

    2010-01-01

    Asthma and rhinitis often co-occur, and this potentially increases the disease severity and impacts negatively on the quality of life. We studied disease severity, airway responsiveness, atopy, quality of life and treatment in subjects with both asthma and rhinitis compared to patients with asthma...

  8. The potential role of vitamin D in the link between obesity and asthma severity/control in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Phuong; Bair-Merritt, Megan; Camargo, Carlos A

    2015-06-01

    Childhood obesity and asthma are major public health problems. Obesity is not only associated with increased risk of incident asthma, but it may worsen asthma severity/control. Although the mechanisms linking obesity with asthma expression have not been completely elucidated, evidence suggests that increased frequency of acute respiratory infection (ARI) and decreased corticosteroid responsiveness may help to explain how obesity worsens asthma expression. In addition, obese individuals have low vitamin D status, and emerging evidence suggests vitamin D affects risk of ARI and corticosteroid responsiveness in individuals with asthma. In this review, we summarize the association between obesity and asthma severity/control in children and discuss ARI and corticosteroid responsiveness as potential mediators in the obesity-asthma pathway. We also discuss the potential role of vitamin D, including a brief summary of recent randomized controlled trials of vitamin D supplementation.

  9. Doctor-Shopping Behavior among Patients with Eye Floaters

    OpenAIRE

    Gow-Lieng Tseng; Cheng-Yu Chen

    2015-01-01

    Patients suffering from eye floaters often resort to consulting more than one ophthalmologist. The purpose of this study, using the Health Belief Model (HBM), was to identify the factors that influence doctor-shopping behavior among patients with eye floaters. In this cross-sectional survey, 175 outpatients who presented floaters symptoms were enrolled. Data from 143 patients (77 first time visitors and 66 doctor-shoppers) who completed the questionnaire were analyzed. Descriptive and logisti...

  10. Hospital consultants and workplace based assessments: how foundation doctors view these educational interactions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKavanagh, P; Smyth, A; Carragher, A

    2012-03-01

    To determine how foundation year 2 (F2) doctors view the input of hospital consultants into their workplace based assessments (WPBAs). F2 doctors in Northern Ireland participated in an electronic survey to evaluate their experiences of foundation programme WPBAs. The opportunity to participate was available to all F2 doctors. The survey was performed using questions displayed electronically and the responses were collated using Turning Point technology. Two weeks later a focus group was convened to assess the issues raised by the electronic survey. Consultant input into foundation doctor's WPBAs was an infrequent occurrence. The F2 doctors expressed a clear view that they valued consultant input, when this occurred. The WPBAs gave the foundation doctors an opportunity to have a one to one learning opportunity with their supervising consultants. However, many of the WPBAs were completed by other doctors in training, in the grades immediately above the foundation doctors. It was suggested that friendship could influence these assessments. Completion of foundation doctors' assessments by hospital consultants is viewed as a low priority. These assessments are being completed to a large extent by fellow doctors in training. The learning opportunities are consequently less educationally productive. F2 doctors want more opportunities for valued consultant interaction with timely feedback. Suggestions are proposed to improve WPBA implementation. The present WPBA process lacks integrity and a change in approach is urgently required.

  11. Patient-doctor communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teutsch, Carol

    2003-09-01

    Communication is an important component of patient care. Traditionally, communication in medical school curricula was incorporated informally as part of rounds and faculty feedback, but without a specific or intense focus on skills of communicating per se. The reliability and consistency of this teaching method left gaps, which are currently getting increased attention from medical schools and accreditation organizations. There is also increased interest in researching patient-doctor communication and recognizing the need to teach and measure this specific clinical skill. In 1999, the Accreditation of Council for Graduate Medical Education implemented a requirement for accreditation for residency programs that focuses on "interpersonal and communications skills that result in effective information exchange and teaming with patients, their families, and other health professionals." The National Board of Medical Examiners, Federation of State Medical Boards. and the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates have proposed an examination between the. third and fourth year of medical school that "requires students to demonstrate they can gather information from patients, perform a physical examination, and communicate their findings to patients and colleagues" using standardized patients. One's efficiency and effectiveness in communication can be improved through training, but it is unlikely that any future advances will negate the need and value of compassionate and empathetic two-way communication between clinician and patient. The published literature also expresses belief in the essential role of communication. "It has long been recognized that difficulties in the effective delivery of health care can arise from problems in communication between patient and provider rather than from any failing in the technical aspects of medical care. Improvements in provider-patient communication can have beneficial effects on health outcomes". A systematic review of

  12. Doctors and Dr. Seuss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, Dartmouth College renamed its medical school, founded in 1797, the Audrey and Theodor Geisel School of Medicine. Using the renaming of the medical school of Dartmouth College as a foil, I offer in this article a vision of what it might mean to align Theodor Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss, with doctors by examining Geisel's You're Only Old Once! A Book for Obsolete Children. In this article, I derive four critiques of modern medicine from the book and offer four strategies as to how these critiques could be explored in medical education. If You're Only Old Once! is read as a pathography, I argue that it can be used as a resource for medical education.

  13. Risk factors of bronchial asthma in bahrah, saudi arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mazam, A; Mohamed, A G

    2001-01-01

    Asthma is a common health problem whose prevalence in Saudi Arabia has risen over the last few decades. Brick factories in the city of Bahrah have exacerbated the problem, and increasing numbers of asthma cases are attending local primary health care centers. Determine the risk factors of asthma in Bahrah. The study was comprised of 110 cases of bronchial asthma resident in Bahrah who were diagnosed by the treating physicians and 110 healthy controls matched in age and sex. A questionnaire was completed from cases and controls, consisting of data regarding personal, familial, indoor and outdoor environmental factors that may be potential risk factors to asthma. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were done to assess risk factors. The mean ages of cases and controls were 22.4 (± 16.7) and 22.8 (± 16.1) years, respectively. Each group consisted of 64 males (58%) and 46 (42%) females. There was a significant association between distance from houses to brick factories and bronchial asthma (Chi square for linear trend = 26.6, pfactories, family history and history of rhinitis, skin atopy, or recurrent respiratory tract infections are risk factors of bronchial asthma. An in-depth study to asses air pollution in Bahrah is recom-mended. People are advised not to live near brick factories.

  14. Flavonoids and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Toshio; Takahashi, Ryo

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic disease, characterized by airway inflammation, airflow limitation, hyper-reactivity and airway remodeling. It is believed that asthma is caused by the interaction between genetic and environmental factors. The prevalence of allergic diseases, including asthma, has increased worldwide during the past two decades. Although the precise reasons that have caused this increase remain unknown, dietary change is thought to be one of the environmental factors. Flavonoids, which are polyphenolic plant secondary metabolites ubiquitously present in vegetables, fruits and beverages, possess antioxidant and anti-allergic traits, as well as immune-modulating activities. Flavonoids are powerful antioxidants and anti-allergic nutrients that inhibit the release of chemical mediators, synthesis of Th2 type cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13, and CD40 ligand expression by high-affinity immunoglobulin E (IgE) receptor-expressing cells, such as mast cells and basophils. They also inhibit IL-4-induced signal transduction and affect the differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells into effector T-cells through their inhibitory effect on the activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Various studies of flavonoids in asthmatic animal models have demonstrated their beneficial effects. The results of several epidemiological studies suggest that an increase in flavonoid intake is beneficial for asthma. Moreover, clinical trials of flavonoids have shown their ameliorative effects on symptoms related to asthma. However, these human studies are currently limited; further validation is required to clarify whether an appropriate intake of flavonoids may constitute dietary treatment and for part of a preventive strategy for asthma. PMID:23752494

  15. The Relationships between Doctoral Students’ Perceptions of Supervision and Burnout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solveig Cornér

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: Both the quality and the quantity of doctoral supervision have been identified as central determinants of the doctoral journey. However, there is a gap in our understanding of how supervision activities are associated with lack of wellbeing, such as burnout, and also to completion of the studies among doctoral students. Background:\tThe study explored doctoral students’ perceptions of different aspects of supervision including the primary sources, frequency, expressed satisfaction and their interrelation with experienced stress, exhaustion and cynicism. Methodology: Altogether 248 doctoral students from three Finnish universities representing social sciences, arts and humanities, and natural and life sciences responded to an adapted version of a Doctoral Experience Survey. A combination of several measures was used to investigate the students’ experiences of supervision and burnout. Contribution:\tThe results showed that students benefit from having several and different kinds of supervision activities. Various sources contribute not only to experiences of the doctoral journey and burnout, but also to the completion of the studies. Findings: Experienced lack of satisfaction with supervision and equality within the researcher community and a low frequency of supervision were related to experiences of burnout. Experiences of burnout were connected to students’ attrition intentions. Attrition intentions were related to source of supervision, the form of thesis, and inadequate supervision frequency. Frequency was related to both experience of burnout and likelihood of attrition. Recommendations for Practitioners: A recommendation developed from this research is to assist doctoral students with sufficient support, especially equality within the scholarly community and frequency of supervision. Further, greater emphasis could be put on group supervision and other collective forms of supervision. It is important that doctoral

  16. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Presenting as Uncontrolled Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic A. Rawlins

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH is an uncommon disorder affecting primarily young adult smokers. It is characterized by abnormal proliferation of Langerhans cells, specialized monocyte-macrophage lineage antigen-presenting cells. LCH can affect the lungs in isolation or as part of a systemic disease. Most commonly, the disease presents in the third or fourth decade without gender predominance. Symptoms typically include dyspnea and cough. Commonly, physical examination is unremarkable but cor pulmonale may be observed in advanced disease. The chest radiograph is typically abnormal with nodular or interstitial infiltrates and cystic changes. High-resolution computed tomography of the chest with these findings in the middle and upper lobes of an adult smoker is virtually diagnostic of LCH. Pulmonary function assessment is variable. Asthma has rarely been reported in association with this disorder. There are only three reported cases of the diagnosis of concomitant asthma which have been made in association with the diagnosis of LCH. We present a case in which our patient presented with signs and symptoms of asthma to include confirmatory findings of airway hyperresponsiveness. The diagnosis of LCH was established after the patient failed to respond to conventional treatment for asthma, and further evaluation was completed.

  17. Pulmonary physiotherapy in patients with bronchial asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osiadlo, Grazyna; Plewa, Michal; Zebrowska, Aleksandra; Nowak, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    In the present study we investigated the effectiveness of a 3-month breathing exercise program in patients with mild-to-moderate asthma, as assessed from spirometric indices. The study group consisted of 28 asthma patients (mean age of 43 years). The physiotherapy program consisted of 45-min exercise sessions, performed twice a week for 3 months. We measured the flow-volume indices (FEV(1), FVC, PEF, MEF(50)) before and after the exercise sessions at the beginning and end of the physiotherapy program. In addition, the patients measured their personal best peak expiratory flow (PEF). We found no significant changes in spirometric indices before and after an exercise session either at the beginning or end of the physiotherapy program, although there was a tendency for lower values after the exercise sessions at both beginning and end of the physiotherapy program. There was a significant decrease in PEF after an exercise session at the beginning of the physiotherapy program; this decrease lost significance after completion of the physiotherapy program. However, PEF values were greater both before and after the exercise sessions at the end of the physiotherapy program compared with the corresponding sessions before the program. We conclude that the breathing exercise program employed in the study failed to appreciably improve lung function in asthmatic patients. However, there was no asthma exacerbations observed during the conduction of breathing exercise program, which underscores the need for pulmonary rehabilitation in asthma treatment.

  18. Obesity and asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Pranab Baruwa; Kripesh Ranjan Sarmah

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic disorder affecting millions of people worldwide. The prevalence of asthma is around 300 million and is expected to increase another 100 million by 2025. Obesity, on the other hand, also affects a large number of individuals. Overweight in adults is defined when body mass index (BMI) is between 25 to 30 kg/m 2 and obesity when the BMI >30 kg/m 2 . It has been a matter of interest for researchers to find a relation between these two conditions. This knowledge will provide a ...

  19. Management of infantile asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasher, G W

    1977-09-01

    Infantile asthama is an important pediatric problem and may cause substantial morbidity and mortality in this age group. The pathophysiology of allergic asthma involves a type I hypersensitivity reaction that is mediated by reaginic antibodies of the IgE class. Various factors predisposing to infantile asthma have been suggested but not confirmed. The differential diagnosis of infantile wheezing is of particular importance in this very young age group. An appreciation of the natural history and clinical characteristics of the disease, and of the important causative factors (foods, environmental inhalants, and respiratory infections), will aid the physician in the management of this problem.

  20. Relvar Ellipta for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    ▼Relvar Ellipta (GSK) is a dry powder inhaler that contains a corticosteroid (fluticasone furoate) and a long-acting beta2 agonist (vilanterol trifenatate). It is licensed for once-daily use as maintenance therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. In a previous article we considered its use in the management of COPD.1 Here we review the evidence for Relvar Ellipta in the treatment of patients with asthma. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. Comparing a disease-specific and a generic health-related quality of life instrument in subjects with asthma from the general population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rochat Thierry

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few epidemiologic studies have assessed health-related quality of life (HRQL of asthma patients from a general population and it is unclear which instrument is best suitable for this purpose. We investigated the validity of the Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ and the SF-36 completed by individuals with asthma from the population-based SAPALDIA (Swiss study on air pollution and lung diseases in adults cohort. Methods The study included 258 participants with a physician-diagnosed asthma who had completed the AQLQ and SF-36. We assessed floor and ceiling effects, internal consistency reliability and cross-sectional validity with a priori hypotheses that correlations between the specific HRQL domains (e.g. "symptoms" or "physical functioning" and the corresponding external validation measures (respiratory symptoms, need for doctor visits, limitation in activities due to asthma and lung function would capture similar aspects and be correlated moderately (≥ 0.3 to strongly (≥ 0.5, whereas non-corresponding domains be correlated weakly with each other ( Results The AQLQ showed pronounced ceiling effects with all median domain scores above 6 (scores varied from 1–7. For the SF-36, ceiling effects were present in 5 out of 8 domains. Cronbach's alpha was >0.7 for all AQLQ and SF-36 domains. Correlations between the AQLQ domains "respiratory symptoms", "activity limitation" and "environmental exposure", and the validation measures ranged from 0.29–0.57. Correlations between the "emotional function" domain and the validation measures were also in this range (0.31–0.55 and not as low as we hypothesized. For the SF-36, correlations between "physical functioning" and "role physical", and the validation measures ranged from 0.25–0.56, whereas "role emotional" and "mental health" correlated with these measures from 0.01–0.23. Conclusion The AQLQ and the SF-36 showed fairly good internal consistency. Both instruments

  2. The Effect of Labor Market Conditions and Financial Aid on Doctoral Student Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampaw, Frimpomaa D.

    2010-01-01

    Forty-three percent of doctoral students never complete their degree. This dropout is the highest among graduate and professional degree programs. Previous cross sectional studies of doctoral students' retention show the importance of financial aid in predicting degree completion. The studies however, do not estimate the labor market's effect on…

  3. Will Medical Technology Deskill Doctors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jingyan

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the impact of medical technology on health care in light of the fact that doctors are becoming more reliant on technology for obtaining patient information, making diagnoses and in carrying out treatments. Evidence has shown that technology can negatively affect doctor-patient communications, physical examination skills, and…

  4. The Social Work Practice Doctorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartocollis, Lina; Cnaan, Ram A.; Ledwith, Kate

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a systematic review of the emerging practice doctorate in social work. Based on the experience of the first such Doctor of Social Work (DSW) program, we provide information regarding the program origins and rationale, development, current structure, and future direction. Such information will enrich the discussion on the role…

  5. Development and evaluation of a school-based asthma educational program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Aloola, Noha Abdullah; Saba, Maya; Nissen, Lisa; Alewairdhi, Huda Abdullaziz; Alaloola, Alhnouf; Saini, Bandana

    2017-05-01

    To develop, implement, and evaluate the effects of a school-based asthma educational program on Saudi primary school teachers' asthma awareness and competence in delivering asthma-related first aid interventions. An asthma educational intervention program entitled "School Asthma Action Program" (SAAP) was designed based on pedagogical principles and implemented among teachers randomly selected from girls' primary schools in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. This pilot study employed a pre-test/post-test experimental design. A previously tested asthma awareness questionnaire and a custom-designed asthma competence score sheet were used to evaluate the effects of the educational intervention program on teacher's asthma awareness and competence in providing asthma-related first aid interventions at schools. Forty-seven teachers from five different primary schools participated in the program. Of the 47 teachers, 39 completed both the pre- and post-program questionnaires. The SAAP improved teachers' awareness of asthma (teachers' median pre-program score was 11 (range 5-18) and their post-program score was 15 (range 7-18), p management at schools (teachers' median pre-program score was 74 (range 15-75) and their post-program score was 75 (range 15-75), p = 0.043). Further, it improved teachers' competence in providing asthma-related first aid interventions (teachers' mean pre-program score was 1.4 ± 2.3 and their mean post-program score was 9.8 ± 0.5, p School-based asthma educational programs can significantly improve teachers' knowledge of asthma and their competence in providing asthma-related first aid interventions during emergencies.

  6. [Doctor's attendance in police custody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chariot, Patrick

    2012-06-01

    Medical examination is a right for every person detained in police custody in France. Examination of detainees usually takes place in the police station so that the doctor can assess the conditions in which the detainee is being held. In some cases, such as type I diabetes care, detainees need to be examined and treated in a hospital. Doctors are subject to a duty of care and prevention. Description of recent traumatic injuries is part of the doctor's mission. They should prescribe any ongoing treatment which needs to be continued, as well as any emergency treatment required. Custody officers may monitor the detainee and administer medication. Doctor's opinion should be given in a national standard document. If the doctor considers that the custody conditions are disgraceful, they may refuse to express an opinion as to whether the detainee is fit for custody.

  7. Work-related asthma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    grain dust, welding fumes and wood dust. (Table III).1 Exposure to animal epithelia, hairs and secretions is commonly reported among laboratory animal workers and agricultural workers. Latex allergy-related asthma appears to be less common due to the introduction of latex-free gloves in most health care settings.

  8. Treating childhood asthma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    played by additional factors, such as patient adherence and administration of medication technique. It is always necessary to treat the child as an individual, but some measures apply in all cases. It is important to allay anxiety about the diagnosis. This is best done by carefully explaining the nature and causes of asthma, ...

  9. Asthma Home Environment Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    This checklist guides home care visitors in identifying environmental asthma triggers most commonly found in homes. It includes sections on the building, home interior and room interior and provides low-cost action steps for remediation. EPA 402-F-03-030.

  10. School and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or dad to speak to the teacher, school nurse, or principal. Most teachers are glad to help. After all, if you can't breathe, you can't learn! What About Sports? You might think that because you have asthma ...

  11. Asthma and Hispanic Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to non-Hispanic whites. While all of the causes of asthma remain unclear, children exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke exposure are at increased risk for acute lower respiratory tract infections, such as bronchitis. Children living below or near the poverty level are more likely to have high levels ...

  12. Stress and asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoji Nagata

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Three factors in recent medical research and treatment (advances in the field of psychoneuroimmunology, epidemiological evidence regarding important interaction between psychosocial factors and development of disease, and the recognition of the importance of patient education for self-management of asthma have led clinicians and researchers to reconsider the role of psychosocial stress in asthma. There are many reports suggesting that stressful life events, family problems and a behavior pattern that increases psychological conflict may influence the development or relapse of asthma and influence its clinical course. Depression is known as one of the risk factors of fatal asthmatic attack. In laboratory studies, about 20% of asthmatics were considered reactors who showed an airway change after exposure to emotional stress. Studies regarding the pathway of stress effect on allergy and asthma are reviewed and discussed from the standpoint of psychoneuroimmunology; for example, the enhancement of IgE production and increased susceptibility to respiratory infection by stress, conditioned anaphylaxis and nerve/mast cell interaction, the effect of stress on various bronchial responses and the inhibition of the immediate and late asthmatic response by anterior hypothalamic lesioning.

  13. Vascular remodelling in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Eugene Haydn; Soltani, Amir; Reid, David William; Ward, Chris

    2008-02-01

    We review the recent literature, focusing on 2006 and 2007, to produce an update on the patho-biology of angiogenesis and vascular endothelial growth factor in the asthmatic airway. In terms of conceptual development in asthma research, airway inflammation and remodelling have been regarded as separate processes or perhaps as sequential, with early inflammation leading later to remodelling. Recent insights identify a central role for vascular endothelial growth factor in stimulating both inflammation and vascular remodelling coincidentally, with the full panoply of vascular endothelial growth factor mediated events being complex and wide. Both nitric oxide and matrix metalloproteinase-9 induction may be important downstream pathogenic mechanisms. Virus-mediated exacerbations are a prime manifestation of the oscillating trajectory of clinical asthma. The early stimulation of vascular endothelial growth factor production is probably a central aetiological mechanism, with secondary inflammation and angiogenesis. The time scale of the latter, especially, fits with the time scale of clinico-physiological changes after exacerbation. These vascular endothelial growth factor induced changes are potentially modifiable with therapy. Insights into the importance of vascular endothelial growth factor and angiogenesis in asthma pathogenesis now lead to potential new therapeutic possibilities and elucidate why recent advances in asthma therapeutics have been so successful.

  14. Decreasing asthma morbidity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1994-12-12

    Dec 12, 1994 ... Apart from the optimal use of drugs, various supplementary methods have been tested to decrease asthma morbidity, usually in patients from reiatively affluent socio-economic backgrounds. A study of additional measures taken in a group of moderate to severe adult asthmatics from very poor socio- ...

  15. Allergy, asthma and the environment; Allergie, Asthma und Umwelt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ring, J. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Dermatologie und Allergologie am Biederstein, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Gfesser, M. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Dermatologie und Allergologie am Biederstein, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    1996-10-11

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways. Asthma and other allergic diseases have increased in prevalence during the last decades in many industrialized countries. Among other hypotheses, the possible role of environmental pollutants has received much public and scientific attention. Some pollutants may modulate the different phases of allergic reactions. Inflammation is a critical feature in the pathogenesis of asthma and therefore, beside allergen avoidance, anti-inflammatory treatment is the first line therapy of asthma. Cysteinyl-leukotrienes are lipid mediators which appear to play a major role in the pathophysiology of asthma. Based on current data, it appears that leukotrience receptor antagonists have bronchodilative and anti-inflammatory effects and may therefore enrich the pharmacotherapeutic spectrum within the therapeutic concept of patient management in asthma. (orig.) [Deutsch] Asthma bronchiale ist eine entzuendliche Erkrankung der Atemwege. Epidemiologische Studien konnten eine deutliche Zunahme der Erkrankung in den letzten zwei Jahrzehnten aufzeigen. In der Entstehung von Allergien und Asthma bronchiale spielen Umwelteinfluesse eine grosse Rolle. Luftschadstoffe scheinen mit verschiedenen Allergie-Parametern bei der Sensibilisierung, Symptombildung und Chronifizierung zu interferieren. Da beim Asthma bronchiale neben der Bronchokonstriktion die Entzuendung der Bronchialschleimhaut eine besondere Rolle spielt, wird heute neben Allergenkarenz und prophylaktischen Massnahmen eine fruehzeitige antientzuendliche Asthmatherapie angestrebt. Cysteinyl-Leukotriene gehoeren zu den wirksamsten Entzuendungsmediatoren beim Asthma bronchiale. Leukotrien-Rezeptorantagonisten scheinen sowohl bronchodilatatorische als auch antientzuendliche Wirkungen zu haben und koennten so innerhalb eines Gesamtkonzeptes von antiallergischer und antiasthmatischer Therapie das pharmakotherapeutische Spektrum bereichern. (orig.)

  16. Physical training for asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin V. Carson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: People with asthma may show less tolerance to exercise due to worsening asthma symptoms during exercise or other reasons such as deconditioning as a consequence of inactivity. Some may restrict activities as per medical advice or family influence and this might result in reduced physical fitness. Physical training programs aim to improve physical fitness, neuromuscular coordination and self confidence. Subjectively, many people with asthma report that they are symptomatically better when fit, but results from trials have varied and have been difficult to compare because of different designs and training protocols. Also, as exercise can induce asthma, the safety of exercise programmes needs to be considered.OBJECTIVE: To gain a better understanding of the effect of physical training on the respiratory and general health of people with asthma, from randomised trials.METHODS:Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Airways Group Specialised Register of trials up to January 2013. Selection criteria: We included randomised trials of people over eight years of age with asthma who were randomised to undertake physical training or not. Physical training had to be undertaken for at least 20 minutes, two times a week, over a minimum period of four weeks. Data collection and analysis:Two review authors independently assessed eligibility for inclusion and undertook risk of bias assessment for the included studies.MAIN RESULTS: Twenty-one studies (772 participants were included in this review with two additional 2012 studies identified as 'awaiting classification'. Physical training was well tolerated with no adverse effects reported. None of the studies mentioned worsening of asthma symptoms following physical training. Physical training showed marked improvement in cardiopulmonary fitness as measured by a statistically and clinically significant increase in maximum oxygen uptake (mean difference (MD 4.92 mL/kg/min; 95% confidence interval (CI 3

  17. Understanding mild persistent asthma in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans; Szefler, Stanley J

    2005-01-01

    Limitations in asthma prevalence studies and difficulties in diagnosing pediatric asthma lead to uncertainty over the full extent of mild persistent asthma in children and adolescents. Although recent surveys have reported that the majority of pediatric patients with asthma in the United States...... and Europe have symptoms consistent with mild disease, these surveys have limitations in design. Thus, the true prevalence of mild asthma remains unknown. It is unclear whether children with mild persistent asthma progress to more severe asthma, but the risk of severe asthma exacerbations seems...... into the true prevalence of mild persistent asthma in children and adolescents, and optimal treatment....

  18. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Risk, Asthma Burden and Lower Airway Inflammation in Adults in the Severe Asthma Research Program (SARP) II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodorescu, Mihaela; Broytman, Oleg; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Sorkness, Ronald L.; Crisafi, Gina; Bleecker, Eugene R.; Erzurum, Serpil; Gaston, Benjamin M.; Wenzel, Sally E.; Jarjour, Nizar N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may worsen asthma, but large studies are lacking and the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Objective Determine the prevalence of OSA risk among patients with asthma of different severity compared to normal controls (NC), and among asthmatics, test the relationship of OSA risk with asthma burden and airway inflammation. Methods Subjects with severe (SA, n=94) and non-severe asthma (NSA, n=161), and NC (n=146) were recruited in an add-on sub-study, to the observational Severe Asthma Research Program (SARP) II; subjects completed sleep quality, sleepiness and OSA risk (Sleep Apnea scale of the Sleep Disorders Questionnaire [SA-SDQ]) questionnaires and clinical assessments. Sputum was induced in a subset of asthmatics. Results Relative to NC, despite similar sleep duration, the SA and NSA subjects had worse sleep quality, were sleepier and had higher SA-SDQ scores. Among asthmatics, higher SA-SDQ was associated with increased asthma symptoms, β-agonist use, health care utilization, and worse asthma quality of life. Significant association of SA-SDQ with sputum polymorphonuclear cells% was noted: each increase in SA-SDQ by its standard deviation (6.85 units) was associated with a rise in % sputum neutrophils of 7.78 (95 % CI 2.33-13.22, p = 0.0006), independent of obesity and other confounders. Conclusions OSA symptoms are more prevalent among asthmatics, in whom they are associated with higher disease burden. OSA risk is associated with a neutrophilic airway inflammation in asthma, suggesting that OSA may be an important contributor to the neutrophilic asthma. Further studies are necessary to confirm these findings and better understand the mechanistic underpinnings of this relationship. PMID:26004304

  19. Asthma care: Structural foundations at primary health care at Al-Qassim region, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AL-Haddad Nasser

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Proper structural foundations for asthma care at primary health care centers [PHCCs], are of essential importance, regarding its management. OBJECTIVE: To assess the adherence of PHCCs to the recommended structural foundation for asthma care. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 35 PHCCs were selected in a cluster random fashion. A questionnaire for structural standards was designed, based on the Saudi national protocol for the management of asthma (SNPMA. A physician and a nurse, each from PHCC, were trained for data collection. Structural facilities deficiency was arbitrarily classified into: least deficient (>75%, moderate to severe deficient (25-75% and most deficient (< 25%. RESULTS: The total population registered, was 131190 [urban: 85701 (65.4%, rural: 45489 (34.6%]. Total registered asthmatics was 4093 [urban: 2585 (63.1%, rural: 1508 (36.9%]. The asthma prevalence rate did not differ significantly between urban (3% and rural (3.3% areas . Structural facilities distribution for asthma care, did not significantly vary among urban and rural PHCCs and none of them fulfilled 100% of the desired standards. The least deficient, were the availability of asthma register and salbutamol, in its various forms. The moderately to severely deficient were the SNPMA, peak flow meter (PFM, nebulizer system, Theophylline and systemic corticosteroid. However, they were most deficient in trained doctors and nurses, record charts for Peak flow meter, spacer, educational material and inhalers of corticosteroid or cromoglycate. CONCLUSION: Proper structural foundations for asthma care at PHCCs, at AL-Qassim region, were below the desired national standards. They were most deficient in trained doctors and nurses, record charts for PFM, spacers, educational material and anti-inflammatory inhalers. Future health directorate strategies have to provide such beneficial interventions for proper asthma care.

  20. Determinants of allergic rhinitis in young children with asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lise Moussu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the preschool period, allergic rhinitis (AR is infrequent and thus under-diagnosed. However, recent works have highlighted the occurrence of AR in toddlers although the causes of AR in this young population remain unknown. The objective of this study was to identify determinants of AR in young children with asthma. METHODS: We carried out a case-control study of 227 children with active asthma and enrolled in the Trousseau Asthma Program. AR and other allergic diseases (asthma, food allergy and eczema were diagnosed by medical doctors using standardized questionnaires. Parental history of AR and asthma, biological markers of atopy (total IgE, blood eosinophilia, allergic sensitization towards food and aeroallergens and environmental parameters were also collected. RESULTS: Forty one of the children (18.1% had AR. By univariate logistic regression analysis, AR was mainly associated with peanut sensitization (OR = 6.75; p = 0.002; food allergy (OR = 4.31; p = 0.026; mold exposure (OR = 3.81 p<0.01 and parental history of AR (OR = 1.42; p = 0.046. Due to the strong link between food allergy and peanut sensitization three models of multivariate logistic regression were performed and confirmed that AR is associated with peanut sensitization but also food allergy and mold exposure. A random forest analysis was also performed to explain AR. The results reinforced the logistic analysis that peanut sensitization and mold exposure were the principal determinants of AR. CONCLUSIONS & CLINICAL RELEVANCE: These results stress the importance of investigating AR in young children with asthma to potentially diagnose a particularly severe allergic asthmatic phenotype. Moreover, these data evoke the hypothesis that peanut could be an aeroallergen.

  1. Turning Doctors Into Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Anderson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Much of the contentious debate surrounding the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (“Obamacare” concerned its financing and its attempt to guarantee (near universal access to healthcare through the private insurance market.  Aside from sensationalist stories of “death panels,” much less attention went to implications of the bill for the actual provision of healthcare. Methodology: This paper examines the "patient-centered medical home" (PCMH model which has been widely promoted as a means of reviving and improving primary care (i.e. general internal medicine, family medicine, and pediatrics. Argument: The PCMH and many of its components (e.g pay-for-performance, electronic medical records were interventions that were implemented on a massive basis without any evidence of benefit. Recent research has not generally supported clinical benefits with the PCMH model. Instead it seems to designed to de-professionalize (make proletarians of health care workers and enforce corporate models of health. The core values of professional work are undermined while the PCMH does nothing to address the structural marginalization of primary care within US health care. Conclusions: The development of alternative models will require political changes. Both doctors and teachers are in a position of advocate for more progressive systems of care and education.

  2. Towards “Operating Within” the Field: Doctoral Students’ Views of Supervisors’ Discipline Expertise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Gube

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: This paper considers the role of supervisors’ discipline expertise in doctoral learning from a student perspective. Background:\tDoctoral students need to develop expertise in a particular field of study. In this context, developing expertise requires doctoral students to master disciplinary knowledge, conventions and scholarship under the guidance of supervisors. Methodology\t: The study draws on a mixed-method approach, using an online survey and semi-structured interviews conducted with doctoral students. Contribution: The paper brings to the fore the role of supervisors’ discipline expertise on doctoral students’ research progress. Findings: The survey data suggest that doctoral students nominate their supervisors on the basis of their discipline expertise. They also view supervisors’ expertise as key to the development of ‘insider’ knowledge of their doctoral research. Recommendations for Practitioners: Supervisors play a pivotal role in helping doctoral students overcome intellectual barriers by imparting their discipline knowledge as well as balancing satisfactory doctoral completion rate and high quality student experience. Impact on Society\t: Doctoral supervision equips doctoral students with the right arsenal to be able to competently operate within their field and prepares them for their future research or professional career that demands a high level of discipline expertise. Future Research:\tThe scope of the findings leaves open a discussion about the experiences of doctoral students matched with non-discipline expert supervisory teams; for example, the extent of the mismatch and its ramifications.

  3. Mast cell-nerve interactions in asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleij, Hanneke Paulina Maria van der

    2002-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by a chronic inflammatory reaction in the airways. Roughly, asthma can be subdivided into atopic asthma involving elevated levels of serum IgE and a less familiar form, non-atopic asthma. Non-atopic asthma is an increasing problem in the developed world. The mechanisms

  4. Do Written Asthma Action Plans Improve Outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, John M

    2016-03-01

    With appropriate management, children with asthma should expect few symptoms, no limits on activity, rare exacerbations, and normal lung function. Appropriate education of parents and other caregivers of children with asthma has clearly been shown to help achieve these goals. Although recommended in asthma guidelines, providing written asthma action plans does not improve outcomes beyond asthma education alone.

  5. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler Recommend ... 1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health File Formats Help: How do I view different ...

  6. How To Discuss Sleep With Your Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How To Discuss Sleep With Your Doctor Doctors might not ... habits. Before you see the doctor, think about how to describe your problems, including: How often you have ...

  7. Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about epilepsy - adult; Seizures - what to ask your doctor - adult; Seizure - what to ask your doctor ... call to find more information about driving and epilepsy? What should I discuss with my boss at ...

  8. The prevalence of sleep-disordered breathing in children with asthma and its behavioral effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Nira A; Aronin, Charlotte; Kantrowitz, Beth; Hershcopf, Ronald; Fishkin, Sherry; Lee, Haesoon; Weaver, Diana E; Yip, Candice; Liaw, Christine; Saadia, Tehila A; Abramowitz, Jason; Weedon, Jeremy

    2015-11-01

    To determine the prevalence of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in children with asthma compared to non-asthmatic children and to determine if behavior problems are associated with asthma and SDB. Cross-Sectional. Parents of 263 children with asthma and 266 controls ages 2 to 15 years attending routine pediatric office visits completed the Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire (PSQ) and the Child Behavior Checklist. Asthma severity was classified based on NIH guidelines. The prevalence of snoring was significantly higher in asthmatic children (35.5%) than controls (15.7%) and the prevalence of a positive PSQ was significantly higher in asthmatic children (25.9%) than controls (10.6%) (P < 0.001 for both). The effect of asthma was "dose-dependent" as children with more severe asthma had increased odds ratios for snoring and a positive PSQ. On multivariate analysis, there were significant interactions of gender with asthma and age with gender. A positive modified PSQ along with measures of socioeconomic status and age were the only independent predictors of abnormal Child Behavior Checklist scores and score classifications. There was a higher prevalence of SDB in asthmatic children compared to non-asthmatic children and the prevalence of SDB increased with increasing asthma severity. In multivariate analysis the role of asthma was much less clear as it predicted a positive PSQ in girls but not boys. SDB, but not asthma, was an independent predictor of behavioral problems. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Factors associated with levels of adherence to inhaled corticosteroids in minority adolescents with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosnaim, Giselle; Li, Hong; Martin, Molly; Richardson, Dejuran; Belice, Paula Jo; Avery, Elizabeth; Ryan, Norman; Bender, Bruce; Powell, Lynda

    2014-02-01

    Nonadherence to inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) is a significant risk factor for poor asthma outcomes in minority adolescents with persistent asthma. To identify factors associated with nonadherence to daily ICS in this target population. Adolescents 11 to 16 years old, self-identified as African American or Hispanic, diagnosed with persistent asthma and with an active prescription for daily ICS were invited to participate. Participant adherence to ICS was electronically measured during 14 days. Concurrently, participants completed the following assessments: demographic information, asthma history, asthma control, asthma exacerbations, media use, depression, asthma knowledge, ICS knowledge, and ICS self-efficacy. Of the 93 subjects, 68 had low (48%) adherence. Older age and low ICS knowledge each were associated with low (≤48%) adherence (P < .01 for the 2 variables). Older age and low ICS knowledge each may be associated with poor adherence to ICS in minority adolescents with persistent asthma. Although older age often is associated with the assignment of increased responsibility for medication-taking behavior, it may not be associated with increased adherence. Continued and expanded efforts at promoting asthma education and specifically knowledge of ICS may increase adherence to ICS. Copyright © 2014 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Low eosinophils during bronchiolitis in infancy are associated with lower risk of adulthood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backman, Katri; Nuolivirta, Kirsi; Ollikainen, Hertta; Korppi, Matti; Piippo-Savolainen, Eija

    2015-11-01

    Infant bronchiolitis may be the first manifestation of asthma. To evaluate the association of early-childhood risk or protective factors for asthma and lung function reduction in adults 30 years after bronchiolitis in infancy. Forty-seven former bronchiolitis patients attended the clinical study at the median age of 29.5 years, including doctoral examination and measurement of post-bronchodilator lung function with flow-volume spirometry. Data on early-life risk factors including blood eosinophil counts on admission for bronchiolitis and on convalescence 4-6 weeks after bronchiolitis were available. Low blood eosinophil count bronchiolitis was a significant protective factor and high blood eosinophil count >0.45 × 10E9/l on convalescence was a significant risk factor for asthma in adulthood independently from atopic status in infancy. Parental asthma and high blood eosinophil count >0.45 × 10E9/l during bronchiolitis were significant risk factors for irreversible airway obstruction (FEV1/FVC ratio below the 5th percentile lower limit of normality after bronchodilation). Our adjusted analyses confirmed that eosinopenia during infant bronchiolitis predicted low asthma risk and eosinophilia outside infection predicted high asthma risk up to the age of 28-31 years. Parental asthma and eosinophilia during bronchiolitis were recognized as risk factors for irreversible airway obstruction. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Febrile respiratory illnesses in infancy and atopy are risk factors for persistent asthma and wheeze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusel, M M H; Kebadze, T; Johnston, S L; Holt, P G; Sly, P D

    2012-04-01

    Severe viral respiratory illnesses and atopy are risk factors for childhood wheezing and asthma. The aim of this study was to explore associations between severe respiratory infections and atopy in early childhood with wheeze and asthma persisting into later childhood. 147 children at high atopic risk were followed from birth to age 10 yrs. Data on all respiratory infections occurring in infancy were collected prospectively and viral aetiology ascertained. Atopy was measured by skin prick tests at 6 months, and 2 and 5 yrs. History of wheeze and doctor-diagnosed eczema and asthma was collected regularly until 10 yrs of age. At 10 yrs, 60% of the cohort was atopic, 25.9% had current eczema, 18.4% current asthma and 20.4% persistent wheeze. 35.8% experienced at least one lower respiratory infection (LRI) associated with fever and/or wheeze in first year of life. Children who had wheezy or, in particular, febrile LRI in infancy and were atopic by 2 yrs, were significantly more likely to have persistent wheeze (RR 3.51, 95% CI 1.83-6.70; pasthma (RR 4.92, 95% CI 2.59-9.36; patopy are risk factors for persistent wheeze and asthma. The strongest marker of the asthmatogenic potential of early life infections was concurrent fever. The occurrence of fever during respiratory illnesses is an important marker of risk for wheeze and asthma later in childhood, suggesting it should be measured in prospective studies of asthma aetiology.

  12. Predicting Asthma Outcome Using Partial Least Square Regression and Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Chatzimichail

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The long-term solution to the asthma epidemic is believed to be prevention and not treatment of the established disease. Most cases of asthma begin during the first years of life; thus the early determination of which young children will have asthma later in their life counts as an important priority. Artificial neural networks (ANN have been already utilized in medicine in order to improve the performance of the clinical decision-making tools. In this study, a new computational intelligence technique for the prediction of persistent asthma in children is presented. By employing partial least square regression, 9 out of 48 prognostic factors correlated to the persistent asthma have been chosen. Multilayer perceptron and probabilistic neural networks topologies have been investigated in order to obtain the best prediction accuracy. Based on the results, it is shown that the proposed system is able to predict the asthma outcome with a success of 96.77%. The ANN, with which these high rates of reliability were obtained, will help the doctors to identify which of the young patients are at a high risk of asthma disease progression. Moreover, this may lead to better treatment opportunities and hopefully better disease outcomes in adulthood.

  13. The Self-Efficacy Scale for Preschool Teachers Regarding Asthma Care: Instrument Development and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gau, Bih-Shya; Hung, Chao-Chia

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to develop and test the psychometric properties of a questionnaire that assesses preschool teachers' self-efficacy in providing asthma care. Methods: A total of 407 teachers from 54 preschools in Taiwan participated in the study by completing the asthma management self-efficacy scale. We assessed validity…

  14. Early identification of atopy in the prediction of persistent asthma in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sly, Peter D; Boner, Attilio L; Björksten, Bengt

    2008-01-01

    The long-term solution to the asthma epidemic is thought to be prevention, and not treatment of established disease. Atopic asthma arises from gene-environment interactions, which mainly take place during a short period in prenatal and postnatal development. These interactions are not completely ...

  15. Early identification of atopy in the prediction of persistent asthma in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sly, Peter D.; Boner, Attilio L.; Bjorksten, Bengt; Bush, Andy; Custovic, Adnan; Eigenmann, Philippe A.; Gern, James E.; Gerritsen, Jorrit; Hamelmann, Eckard; Helms, Peter J.; Lemanske, Robert F.; Martinez, Fernando; Pedersen, Soren; Renz, Harald; Sampson, Hugh; von Mutius, Erika; Wahn, Ulrich; Holt, Patrick G.

    2008-01-01

    The long-term solution to the asthma epidemic is thought to be prevention, and not treatment of established disease. Atopic asthma arises from gene-environment interactions, which mainly take place during a short period in prenatal and postnatal development. These interactions are not completely

  16. Teaching and Assessing Doctor-Patient Communication Using Remote Standardized Patients and SKYPE: Feedback from Medical Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horber, Dot; Langenau, Erik E.; Kachur, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Teaching and assessing doctor-patient communication has become a priority in medical education. This pilot study evaluated resident physicians' perceptions of teaching and assessing doctor-patient communication skills related to pain management using a web-based format. Fifty-nine resident physicians completed four doctor-patient clinical…

  17. Mechanisms of obesity in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Finn; Hancox, Robert J

    2014-02-01

    Obesity and asthma are chronic conditions affecting millions of people worldwide. The two conditions also appear to be linked with an increased risk of asthma in people who are obese. The purpose of this review is to describe mechanism(s) that may explain the association between asthma and obesity. Current evidence suggests that the association between asthma and obesity is linked by two major phenotypes and three important pathways of obesity-related asthma: one phenotype with primary (often atopic) asthma that is aggravated by obesity and a second phenotype with late-onset nonatopic asthma, which predominantly affects women and primarily seems to be associated with neutrophilic inflammation. Proposed pathways include the mechanical effects of obesity (fewer deep inspirations leading to increased airway hyperresponsiveness), an inflammatory pathway driven by obesity-related cytokines (adipokines), and finally environment and lifestyle changes that have led to an increasing prevalence of obesity over the past 50 years (including exposures in utero, physical activity, and diet) may also result in asthma in predisposed individuals. How these environmental changes influence the occurrence and expression of asthma may depend on the age of exposure and on interactions with genetic susceptibilities. Future research should be directed to shed light on the associations between obesity and asthma phenotypes, modern lifestyles and environmental exposures and genetic susceptibilities. http://links.lww.com/COAI/A6.

  18. Children with Asthma and Sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selda Yuzer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is one of the chronic diseases which have are widely seen among the children. The disease has recently been in the increase all over the world and affects many children. In a study conducted with International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC method, it was found out that prevalence of childhood asthma was 17.1%. Participation in sportive activities by the children with asthma, which is today considered as a part of asthma treatment program, makes contributions to their physical, mental and psychological development and increases their quality of life. The most recommended sports for the children with asthma are swimming and water sports. Sports like tennis and volleyball are too advised. Choice of sports depends on severity of asthma, child and #8217;s choice and whether or not asthma is kept under control. Nursing approaches for the children with asthma include correction of symptoms, training of children and their families, assistance with disease adaptation, continuing asthma care at home and interventions to make children lead healthy activities of daily life of children. With protective measures to be taken by families and children; children should be encourage for sportive activities. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2014; 13(3.000: 241-244

  19. Rhinoviruses, Allergic Inflammation, and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavala, Monica; Bertics, Paul J.; Gern, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Viral infections affect wheezing and asthma in children and adults of all ages. In infancy, wheezing illnesses are usually viral in origin, and children with more severe wheezing episodes are more likely to develop recurrent episodes of asthma and to develop asthma later in childhood. Children who develop allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (allergic sensitization), and those who wheeze with rhinoviruses (HRV) are at especially high risk for asthma. In older children and adults, HRV infections generally cause relatively mild respiratory illnesses and yet contribute to acute and potentially severe exacerbations in patients with asthma. These findings underline the importance of understanding the synergistic nature of allergic sensitization and infections with HRV in infants relative to the onset of asthma and in children and adults with respect to exacerbations of asthma. This review discusses clinical and experimental evidence of virus/allergen interactions and evaluates theories which relate immunologic responses to respiratory viruses and allergens to the pathogenesis and disease activity of asthma. Greater understanding of the relationship between viral respiratory infections, allergic inflammation, and asthma is likely to suggest new strategies for the prevention and treatment of asthma. PMID:21682739

  20. AsthmaVent – Effect of Ventilation on Asthma Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hogaard, Nina Viskum; Rubak, Sune Leisgaard Mørck; Halken, Susanne

    sensitive towards. Reducing this exposure may improve the asthma control in these children. Previous studies give conflicting information on the effect of mechanical ventilation on asthma control in children. Objectives We aim at investigating whether mechanical ventilation is capable of improving indoor...... and design of housing. Indoor environment factors that trigger the disease must be controlled as well as possible. The results of this project will be a significant contribution to the potential recommendations regarding the effect of ventilation on indoor air quality and asthma control of HDM allergic...... air quality and thereby asthma symptoms and quality of life, in children with house dust mite allergy and asthma. Materials and Methods Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled intervention study, including 80 children from 3 Danish Pediatric outpatient clinics, with: Verified asthma, requiring...

  1. What Predicts Whether Foreign Doctorate Recipients from U.S. Institutions Stay in the United States: Foreign Doctorate Recipients in Science and Engineering Fields from 2000 to 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Jin-Young

    2015-01-01

    Using data from the Survey of Earned Doctorates by the National Science Foundation, this study examines factors influencing foreign doctorate recipients' decisions to stay in the United States after they complete their degrees. This study expands the existing literature on human capital theory on migration decision by exploring the variables that…

  2. [Special considerations in children under five years with asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas Schacht, Francisco J; Cano Salas, Maria del Carmen

    2009-01-01

    Currently, clinical practice guidelines and international guidelines on diagnosis and management of asthma, including special considerations in patients under five years old, given the frequent respiratory morbidity associated with this age group and poor or no cooperation from the child for testing respiratory function, favoring the underdiagnosis, delaying treatment and affecting the proper assessment of severity, level of control, and adequate clinical response to treatment. That is why the proper understanding of the natural history and the different phenotypes in infants and toddlers, allow for functional and clinical considerations on the progression of asthma from early childhood to adulthood, being necessary to make a special deal considering personal and family history, symptoms and progression of comorbidities exist which in turn will classify, monitor and plan treatment to achieve and maintain control of the disease, so far as asthma is not cured but their control is achieved in most patients. The doctor-patient interaction, family, education, control of risk factors and comorbidities, assessment, treatment and monitoring of the development of asthma are the foundation for success in the management of asthmatic patients.

  3. Yoga for asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zu-Yao Yang

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Asthma is a common chronic inflammatory disorder affecting about 300 million people worldwide. As a holistic therapy, yoga has the potential to relieve both the physical and psychological suffering of people with asthma, and its popularity has expanded globally. A number of clinical trials have been carried out to evaluate the effects of yoga practice, with inconsistent results. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of yoga in people with asthma. METHODS: Search methods: We systematically searched the Cochrane Airways Group Register of Trials, which is derived from systematic searches of bibliographic databases including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, and PsycINFO, and handsearching of respiratory journals and meeting abstracts. We also searched PEDro. We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the WHO ICTRP search portal. We searched all databases from their inception to 22 July 2015, and used no restriction on language of publication. We checked the reference lists of eligible studies and relevant review articles for additional studies. We attempted to contact investigators of eligible studies and experts in the field to learn of other published and unpublished studies. Selection criteria: We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs that compared yoga with usual care (or no intervention or sham intervention in people with asthma and reported at least one of the following outcomes: quality of life, asthma symptom score, asthma control, lung function measures, asthma medication usage, and adverse events. Data collection and analysis: We extracted bibliographic information, characteristics of participants, characteristics of interventions and controls, characteristics of methodology, and results for the outcomes of our interest from eligible studies. For continuous outcomes, we used mean difference (MD with 95% confidence interval (CI to denote the treatment effects, if the

  4. Changes in prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma in the US population and associated risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halldin, Cara N; Doney, Brent C; Hnizdo, Eva

    2015-02-01

    Chronic lower airway diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma, are currently the third leading cause of death in the United States. We aimed to evaluate changes in prevalence of and risk factors for COPD and asthma among the US adult population. We evaluated changes in prevalence of self-reported doctor-diagnosed COPD (i.e. chronic bronchitis and emphysema) and asthma and self-reported respiratory symptoms comparing data from the 1988-1994 and 2007-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys. To investigate changes in the severity of each outcome over the two periods, we calculated changes in the proportions of spirometry-based airflow obstruction for each outcome. Prevalence of doctor-diagnosed chronic bronchitis and emphysema decreased significantly mainly among males, while asthma increased only among females. The self-reported disease and the respiratory symptoms were associated with increased prevalence of airflow obstruction for both periods. However, the prevalence of airflow obstruction decreased significantly in the second period among those with shortness of breath and doctor-diagnosed respiratory conditions (chronic bronchitis, emphysema, and asthma). COPD outcomes and asthma were associated with lower education, smoking, underweight and obesity, and occupational dusts and fumes exposure. Chronic lower airway diseases continue to be major public health problems. However, decreased prevalence of doctor-diagnosed chronic bronchitis and emphysema (in males) and decreased prevalence of airflow obstruction in those with respiratory symptoms and doctor-diagnosed respiratory diseases may indicate a declining trend and decrease in disease severity between the two periods. Continued focus on prevention of these diseases through public health interventions is prudent. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Doctor-patient communication: a historical overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, A A; Gensini, G F

    2008-08-01

    Doctor-patient communication is an issue that is attracting more and more attention within the international scientific community, stimulating an interest involving many different health contexts, from academic to medico-legal ones. In the academic setting, the insertion of health communication courses into the curriculum has been a recent renovation, given that in the past such training was not considered a necessary formative step. In the medico-legal scenario, among the main causes of legal action is an incorrect, incomplete or non-existent transmission of information. Doctor-patient communication is therefore an extremely up-to-date topic, the problematic of which may already be discerned in Western medicine in the so-called Hippocratic Oath. In this paper the historical roots and the evolution through time of doctor-patient communication are discussed, together with the description of the predominant models of communication of the past (the physician-centred and the disease-centred approaches) and of the present (the patient-centred and the person-centred paradigms). Nowadays complete, correct and comprehensible communication is a primary exigency for the physician, for the patient/person and for all the organizational levels of the sanitary system. Every physician and, more in general, every health operator, must therefore learn to communicate effectively in the course of his/her medical training, and must continually refine this capacity during his/her professional career.

  6. Nutrition communication styles of family doctors: results of quantitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dillen, S M E; Hiddink, G J; Koelen, M A; van Woerkum, C M J

    2005-08-01

    To assess the nutrition communication styles of Dutch family doctors and in particular to assess its psychosocial and sociodemographic correlates. A cross-sectional study in which a representative sample of 600 Dutch family doctors completed a questionnaire. The survey was conducted in October and November 2004 in the Netherlands. A total of 267 family doctors completed the questionnaire (response rate 45%). Principal component factor analyses with varimax rotation were performed to construct factors. Cronbach's alpha was used as an index of reliability. Our hypothetical model for nutrition communication style was tested using multiple regression analysis, combining the forward and backward procedures under the condition of the same results. Many family doctors felt at ease with a motivational nutrition communication style. The main predictor for motivational nutrition communication style was task perception of prevention (26%). Some individual and environmental correlates had an additional influence (explained variance 49%). Other styles showed explained variances up to 57%. The motivational style was the best predictor for actual nutrition communication behaviour (35%), while the confrontational style was the best predictor for actual nutrition communication behaviour towards overweight (34%). In contemporary busy practice, family doctors seem to rely on their predominant nutrition communication style to deal with standard situations efficiently: for the majority, this proved to be the motivational nutrition communication style. Moreover, family doctors used a combination of styles. This study suggests that family doctors behave like chameleons, by adapting their style to the specific circumstances, like context, time and patient. If family doctors communicate about nutrition in general, they select any of the five nutrition communication styles. If they communicate about overweight, they pick either the confrontational or motivational style.

  7. TESIS DOCTORALES Doctoral dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban Hernández Esteve

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available TESIS DOCTORALES Doctoral dissertations María Soledad Campos Lucena: El control de las arcas municipales a través de la rendición de cuentas. La transformación del proceso del Antiguo al Nuevo régimen y la consolidación del modelo liberal: 1745-1914 The control of municipal coffers by means of account rendering. The change from Ancien Régime to the New Regime and the consolidation of liberalism: 1745-1914 Candelaria Castro Pérez: La institución parroquial a través de los registros contables del Señorío episcopal de la Villa de Agüimes. (1500-1860 The parochial institution seen through the account books of the Episcopal domain of the city of Aguimes (1500-1860 José Julián Hernández Borreguero: El Cabildo Catedral de Sevilla: organización y sistema contable. (1625-1650 Administrative and accounting organization of the Seville Cathedral. (1625-1650 Juan Lanero Fernández: El esplendor de la teneduría de libros: la partida doble en los tratados contables ingleses de la dinastia Tudor (1543-1588 Bookkeeping splendor: double-entry in the English accounting treatises at the time of the Tudor dynasty (1543-1588 María Llompart Bibiloni: Un análisis histórico-contable de la Procuración del Real Patrimonio en el Reino de Mallorca, período 1310-1330 An accounting historical análisis of the Royal Exchequer of the Kingdom of Mallorca (1310-1330

  8. Pediatric asthma hospitalizations among urban minority children and the continuity of primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utidjian, Levon H; Fiks, Alexander G; Localio, A Russell; Song, Lihai; Ramos, Mark J; Keren, Ron; Bell, Louis M; Grundmeier, Robert W

    2017-12-01

    To examine the effect of ambulatory health care processes on asthma hospitalizations. A retrospective cohort study using electronic health records was completed. Patients aged 2-18 years receiving health care from 1 of 5 urban practices between Jan 1, 2004 and Dec 31, 2008 with asthma documented on their problem list were included. Independent variables were modifiable health care processes in the primary care setting: (1) use of asthma controller medications; (2) regular assessment of asthma symptoms; (3) use of spirometry; (4) provision of individualized asthma care plans; (5) timely influenza vaccination; (6) access to primary healthcare; and (7) use of pay for performance physician incentives. Occurrence of one or more asthma hospitalizations was the primary outcome of interest. We used a log linear model (Poisson regression) to model the association between the factors of interest and number of asthma hospitalizations. 5,712 children with asthma were available for analysis. 96% of the children were African American. The overall hospitalization rate was 64 per 1,000 children per year. None of the commonly used asthma-specific indicators of high quality care were associated with fewer asthma hospitalizations. Children with documented asthma who experienced a lack of primary health care (no more than one outpatient visit at their primary care location in the 2 years preceding hospitalization) were at higher risk of hospitalization compared to those children with a greater number of visits (incidence rate ratio 1.39; 95% CI 1.09-1.78). In children with asthma, more frequent primary care visits are associated with reduced asthma hospitalizations.

  9. Asthma management by medical practitioners: the situation in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaretin, Osarogiagbon Wilson; Uchechukwu, Nwaneri Damian; Osawaru, Oviawe

    2013-02-01

    Asthma is a common chronic disease worldwide and is responsible for considerable morbidity, socioeconomic burden, and depletion of health resources. Clinically, diagnosis of asthma is based on information obtained from symptom questionnaires, physical examination and demonstration of variable airflow obstruction. Proper diagnosis of asthma is mandatory in clinical practice in order to avoid undue use of potentially toxic asthma medications and prevent unwarranted social stigmatization. This study aimed to determine how medical practitioners in Nigeria diagnose asthma and use asthma medications during asthma exacerbation and the follow-up period. A semi-structured self-administered questionnaire on asthma management was distributed to medical practitioners attending the annual scientific meeting/update course in August, 2009. Forty-nine practice centers in the 6 geopolitical zones in Nigeria were included in this survey. Totally 131 medical practitioners (80 males, 51 females) completed the questionnaire. Post National Youth Service Corp practice (mean ± SD) was 9.95±7.78 years, ranging from 2 to 39 years. The practice centers of respondents included university teaching hospitals (65.6%), state specialist hospitals (17.6%), private hospitals (10.7%), and missionary hospitals (6.l%). Respondents' assessment of burden of asthma was high (30.5%), moderate (63.4%) and low (6.1%). Asthma diagnosis was made by various methods including: symptoms only (35.9%), health personnels (32.3%), mother/self evaluation (20.3%), and use of spirometry/peak expiratory flow rate (11.5%). Thus inappropriate asthma diagnosis could have been practiced by 116 (88.5%) medical practitioners. The study revealed inadequate knowledge of asthma diagnosis and drug management of asthma by medical practitioners in Nigeria.

  10. Effects of Immunoglobulin Replacement on Asthma Exacerbation in Adult Asthmatics with IgG Subclass Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo Hee; Ye, Young Min; Ban, Ga Young; Shin, Yoo Seob; Lee, Hyun Young; Nam, Young Hee; Lee, Soo Keol; Cho, You Sook; Jang, Seung Hun; Jung, Ki Suck; Park, Hae Sim

    2017-11-01

    Recurrent respiratory tract infection is a common manifestation of primary immunodeficiency disease, and respiratory viruses or bacteria are important triggers of asthma exacerbations. Asthma often coexists with humoral immunodeficiency in adults, and some asthmatics with immunoglobulin (Ig) G subclass deficiency (IgGSCD) suffer from recurrent exacerbations. Although some studies suggest a benefit from Ig replacement, others have failed to support its use. This study aimed to assess the effect of Ig replacement on asthma exacerbation caused by respiratory infection as well as the asthma control status of adult asthmatics with IgGSCD. This is a multi-center, open-label study of adult asthmatics with IgGSCD. All patients received monthly intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) for 6 months and were evaluated regarding asthma exacerbation related to infection, asthma control status, quality of life, and lung function before and after IVIG infusion. A total of 30 patients were enrolled, and 24 completed the study. Most of the patients had a moderate degree of asthma severity with partly (52%) or uncontrolled (41%) status at baseline. IVIG significantly reduced the proportion of patients with asthma exacerbations, lowered the number of respiratory infections, and improved asthma control status, compared to the baseline values (P<0.001). The mean asthma-specific quality of life and asthma control test scores were improved significantly (P=0.009 and P=0.053, respectively); however, there were no significant changes in lung function. IVIG reduced the frequency of asthma exacerbations and improved asthma control status in adult asthmatics with IgGSCD, suggesting that IVIG could be an effective treatment option in this population.

  11. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Quick Links Asthma Action Plan America Breathing Easier [PDF – 1.1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical ... Using a metered dose inhaler with a spacer [ PDF - 377 KB] Your browser does not support iframes ...

  12. Can the Weather Affect My Child's Asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Giving Teens a Voice in Health Care Decisions Can the Weather Affect My Child's Asthma? KidsHealth > For ... Affect My Child's Asthma? Print A A A Can the Weather Affect My Child's Asthma? Yes. Weather ...

  13. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... In the Workplace Outdoors Management Asthma Action Plan Flu Shots Inhalers Data, Statistics, and Surveillance Most Recent ... Archive 2014 State or Territory Data Archive AsthmaStats Flu Vaccination among Adults with Current Asthma Flu Vaccination ...

  14. Treating Asthma in Children under 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... laughing Gastrointestinal reflux Changes or extremes in weather Asthma emergencies Severe asthma attacks can be life-threatening ... Changes in activity levels or sleep patterns Control asthma triggers Depending on the triggers for your child's ...

  15. Managing Asthma: Learning to Breathe Easier

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Subscribe June 2014 Print this issue Managing Asthma Learn To Breathe Easier En español Send us ... Allergy Therapy Seeking Allergy Relief Wise Choices Controlling Asthma Get regular checkups for your asthma. Make a ...

  16. Allergies and Asthma: They Often Occur Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A family history of allergies is a major risk factor for allergic asthma. Having hay fever or other allergies yourself also increases your risk of getting asthma. Though allergic asthma is very common, there are other types ...

  17. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... among Adults with Current Asthma Flu Vaccination among Children with Current Asthma Asthma and Fair or Poor Health Usual Place for Medical Care among Children Number of Visits to a Health Care Provider(s) ...

  18. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

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    Full Text Available ... and Publications Related Articles, Publications, and Links Asthma’s Impact on the Nation Fact Sheet State Data Profiles ( ... MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Know How to Use Your Asthma ...

  19. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

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    Full Text Available ... Obesity Percentage of People with Asthma who Smoke Insurance coverage and barriers to care for people with ... Asthma NCHS Asthma FastStats Survey Questions Resources for Health Professionals and Schools Healthcare Professionals Public Health Professionals ...

  20. Asthma & Physical Activity in the School

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Education) How Asthma-Friendly Is Your School? (checklist in English and in Spanish) Is the Asthma ... gov/ asthma/ publications. html U.S. Department of Education Office for Civil Rights Lyndon Baines Johnson Department of ...

  1. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Messages Agencies Working on Asthma Follow @CDCasthma on Twitter to learn more about helping people with asthma ... de boca) [PDF - 276 KB] Follow @CDCasthma on Twitter to learn more about helping people with asthma ...

  2. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brochures Facts Triggers Indoors In the Workplace Outdoors Management Asthma Action Plan Flu Shots Inhalers Data, Statistics, ... Work-related Asthma NCHS Asthma FastStats Survey Questions Resources for Health Professionals and Schools Healthcare Professionals Public ...

  3. Violence and Asthma: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo Fujiwara

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research shows that exposure to community violence is, directly and indirectly, associated with asthma. This article reviews the findings on the impact of violence on asthma, and the pathways for the association of violence and asthma are suggested: 1 exposure to violence is directly associated with asthma, mainly through dysregulation of sympathetic-adrenal-medullary (SAM and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, 2 exposure to violence is associated with the change of susceptibility of outdoor air pollution on asthma, probably through the change of an immune response, and 3 behavioral change due to exposure to violence (e.g. keeping children indoors leads to more exposure to indoor pollutants. The suggested framework may be useful to develop health policy on asthma in high-violence communities.

  4. Asthma in Children: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PDF School and Asthma (Nemours Foundation) Also in Spanish Teaching Your Child about Asthma (American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology) What's an Asthma Action Plan? (Nemours Foundation) ... Also in Spanish Related Issues Asthma & Physical Activity in the School ( ...

  5. Nonprescription racemic epinephrine for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Pritish; Kandala, Bhargava; Ahrens, Richard; Chesrown, Sarah E; Hendeles, Leslie

    2014-01-01

    Inhaled racepinephrine (RE) (Asthmanefrin) became available in September 2012 as a nonprescription treatment for bronchospasm based on a 1986 US Food and Drug Administration rule. It contains 11.25 mg RE in 0.5 mL and is delivered by a handheld electronic nebulizer. In 2001, we conducted a pilot study that was never published. Now that the product is promoted as a replacement for epinephrine chlorofluorocarbon metered-dose inhaler (Primatene), we provide the results of that study. Methacholine challenge was used as a bioassay. To determine the dose of RE that is equivalent to nebulized albuterol. Four subjects, 18 to 45 years old, with mild stable asthma completed the pilot study. Methacholine challenge was performed on the first screening day, without pretreatment, and then on different days, 15 minutes after 1.25 mg albuterol and 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 mg RE delivered by a Pari LC Plus nebulizer. The end point was the provocative concentration of methacholine that caused a 20% decrease in FEV1. Data were log transformed and analyzed by an ANOVA for repeated measures. There was a significant dose response for RE. The geometric mean provocative concentration of methacholine that caused a 20% decrease in FEV1 was 44 mg/mL (95% CI, 23-85 mg/mL) after albuterol, and 10.2 mg/mL (95% CI, 3.5-30 mg/mL) after the 10-mg dose of RE (approximate nonprescription dose) (P = .001). There were no adverse effects. RE provides less bronchoprotection from methacholine than does albuterol and may be less effective in treating acute bronchospasm. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. IDRC Doctoral Research Awards

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    test

    Example of the letter required by IDRC: Reference: IDRC Awards competition: John Smith (Please indicate the title of the award.) a) As research supervisor of Mr. John Smith, I confirm that I approve and support the research proposal submitted by the candidate. b) Mr. Smith has successfully completed the following course(s):.

  7. Nasal disease and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marseglia, G L; Merli, P; Caimmi, D; Licari, A; Labó, E; Marseglia, A; Ciprandi, G; La Rosa, M

    2011-10-01

    The nose plays a primary role within the airways, working as a filter and air-conditioner, together with other important functions. Thus, it is not surprising that nasal diseases are associated with several other comorbidities, including both upper and lower airways, such as bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) and asthma. Several studies have investigated the relationship existing between the upper and the lower airways and new insights are rising. Nevertheless, some uncertainties still remain, mainly because nasal disorders are quite heterogeneous, overlapping (i.e. rhinitis-rhinosinusitis-sinusitis, acute or chronic, allergic or non-allergic) and difficult to diagnose, so that, frequently, many studies don’t differentiate between the various conditions. For this reason, the purpose of this review is to systematically analyze present epidemiological, pathophysiological and clinical data on the relationship between nasal diseases and asthma, splitting up three main conditions: allergic rhinitis, chronic rhinosinusitis and nasal polyposis.

  8. Asthma management: important issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Barnes

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Although most attention has been focused on the drugs used to control asthma, it is increasingly recognised that effective delivery of these drugs to the lungs is just as important. The most effective drugs, beta2-agonists and corticosteroids, are given by inhalation so there has been a search for more efficient inhaler devices that are easier for patients to use. A symposium at the European Respiratory Society Annual Meeting in 2005 discussed some of the important issues in inhaler therapy in adults and children. This article summarises the major points of discussion that arose out of this symposium. New more effective inhaler devices are now becoming available and are likely to have an important impact on asthma management.

  9. MANIFEST ANXIETY IN BRONCHIAL ASTHMA

    OpenAIRE

    Sreedhar, Krishna Prasad

    1989-01-01

    SUMMARY Using a vernacular adaptation of MAS 50 bronchial asthma patients were compared with 102 normals, 60 hospital general out-patients and 50 neurotics to determine the level of anxiety in asthma. The manifest anxiety scores of the bronchial asthma patients were found to be significantly high showing that their level of anxiety was abnormally higher in comparison with that of the normals and the hospital general out-patients. The bronchial asthmatics and the neurotics did not differ in an...

  10. Aspirin-Exacerbated Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Varghese, Mathew; Lockey, Richard F

    2008-01-01

    This review focuses on aspirin-exacerbated asthma (AEA). The review includes historical perspective of aspirin, prevalence, pathogenesis, clinical features and treatment of AEA. The pathogenesis of AEA involves the cyclooxygenase and lipooxygenase pathway. Aspirin affects both of these pathways by inhibiting the enzyme cycooxygenase-1 (COX-1). Inhibition of COX-1 leads to a decrease in prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). The decrease in PGE2 results in an increase in cysteinyl leukotrienes by the lipoo...

  11. [Asthma and cyclic neutropenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar Cabrera, A N; Berrón Pérez, R; Ortega Martell, J A; Onuma Takane, E

    1996-01-01

    We report a male with history of recurrent infections (recurrent oral aphtous disease [ROAD], middle ear infections and pharyngo amigdalitis) every 3 weeks since he was 7 months old. At the age of 3 years cyclic neutropenia was diagnosed with cyclic fall in the total neutrophil count in blood smear every 21 days and prophylactic antimicrobial therapy was indicated. Episodic events every 3 weeks of acute asthma and allergic rhinitis were detected at the age of 6 years old and specific immunotherapy to Bermuda grass was given during 3 years with markedly improvement in his allergic condition but not in the ROAD. He came back until the age of 16 with episodic acute asthma and ROAD. The total neutrophil count failed to 0 every 21 days and surprisingly the total eosinophil count increased up to 2,000 at the same time, with elevation of serum IgE (412 Ul/mL). Specific immunotherapy to D.pt. and Aller.a. and therapy with timomodulin was indicated. After 3 months we observed clinical improvement in the asthmatic condition and the ROAD disappeared, but the total neutrophil count did not improve. We present this case as a rare association between 2 diseases with probably no etiological relationship but may be physiopatological that could help to understand more the pathogenesis of asthma.

  12. Mycoplasma pneumoniae and health outcomes in children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Pamela R; Kampschmidt, Jordan C; Dube, Peter H; Cagle, Marianna P; Chaparro, Paola; Ketchum, Norma S; Kannan, Thirumalai R; Singh, Harjinder; Peters, Jay I; Baseman, Joel B; Brooks, Edward G

    2017-08-01

    Acute infections with Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp) have been associated with worsening asthma in children. Mp can be present in the respiratory tract for extended periods; it is unknown whether the long-term persistence of Mp in the respiratory tract affects long-term asthma control. To determine the effect of Mp on asthma control. We enrolled 31 pediatric subjects 3 to 10 years of age with persistent asthma who completed up to 8 visits over a 24-month period. We detected Mp by antigen capture and polymerase chain reaction. Primary outcome measurements included symptom scores, quality of life, medication scores, oral corticosteroid use, health care usage, school absences, and exhaled breath condensate pH. Low levels of Mp community-acquired respiratory distress syndrome toxin were detected in 20 subjects (64.5%) at enrollment. Subjects with Mp positivity at a given visit had a .579 probability of remaining Mp positive at the subsequent visit, whereas those with Mp negativity had a .348 probability of becoming Mp positive at the following visit. The incidence of Mp overall was higher in the spring and summer months. Overall, we found no significant relation between the detection of Mp and worse outcome measurements at the same visit or at subsequent visits. The long-term persistence of Mp in the respiratory tract is common in children with asthma. However, the detection of Mp was not associated significantly with worse asthma symptoms, quality of life, health care usage, school absences, or exhaled breath condensate pH in this pediatric asthma cohort. Copyright © 2017 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Association between severe asthma and changes in the stomatognathic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra Carvalho-Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To describe orofacial muscle function in patients with severe asthma. Methods: This was a descriptive study comparing patients with severe controlled asthma (SCA and severe uncontrolled asthma (SUA. We selected 160 patients, who completed a sociodemographic questionnaire and the 6-item Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ-6, as well as undergoing evaluation of orofacial muscle function. Results: Of the 160 patients evaluated, 126 (78.8% and 34 (21.2% presented with SCA and SUA, respectively, as defined by the Global Initiative for Asthma criteria. Regardless of the level of asthma control, the most frequent changes found after evaluation of muscle function were difficulty in chewing, oronasal breathing pattern, below-average or poor dental arch condition, and difficulty in swallowing. When the sample was stratified by FEV1 (% of predicted, was significantly higher proportions of SUA group patients, compared with SCA group patients, showed habitual open-mouth chewing (24.8% vs. 7.7%; p < 0.02, difficulty in swallowing water (33.7% vs. 17.3%; p < 0.04, and voice problems (81.2% vs. 51.9%; p < 0.01. When the sample was stratified by ACQ-6 score, the proportion of patients showing difficulty in swallowing bread was significantly higher in the SUA group than in the SCA group (66.6% vs. 26.6%; p < 0.01. Conclusions: The prevalence of changes in the stomatognathic system appears to be high among adults with severe asthma, regardless of the level of asthma control. We found that some such changes were significantly more common in patients with SUA than in those with SCA.

  14. Influenza immunisation of doctors at an Australian tertiary hospital: immunisation rate and factors contributing to uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Jonathan; Davis, Joshua; Krause, Vicki

    2008-12-01

    Immunisation of health care workers against influenza reduces influenza-related morbidity and mortality of hospital inpatients and staff absenteeism. Uptake of influenza vaccination amongst hospital doctors is generally inadequate, and factors contributing to influenza vaccine uptake among doctors have not been well defined. We performed an audit of doctors at an Australian hospital to establish the rate of and the factors contributing to influenza immunisation uptake. The audit was conducted by delivering a survey to doctors for self-completion at major departmental meetings. Of 243 doctors employed at the hospital, 150 completed the survey (response rate 62%), of whom only 28% received influenza immunisation in 2007 and 44% in any prior year. Doctors immunised in 2007 were of an older age (39.1 vs. 34.7 years, P = 0.01) and level of seniority (odds ratio for consultant vs. more junior staff = 2.9, P = 0.02) than those not immunised. Doctors who had ever been immunised had a better knowledge about influenza than those never immunised (odds ratio for high knowledge score 4.2, P vaccine. Immunisation rates among doctors in this study are inadequate. A perceived lack of convenience of the immunisation service and poor knowledge about influenza vaccination are the major contributing factors. Efforts to improve influenza immunisation uptake amongst hospital doctors should focus on education, and on innovative strategies to make immunisation more convenient and accessible specifically for doctors.

  15. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Providers CDC Publications on Asthma National Asthma Control Program America Breathing Easier Guide for State Programs Interventions Community Guide—Evidence-based Potentially Effective Interventions ...

  16. Shame! Self-stigmatisation as an obstacle to sick doctors returning to work: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Max; Brooks, Samantha K; Del Busso, Lilliana; Chalder, Trudie; Harvey, Samuel B; Hotopf, Matthew; Madan, Ira; Hatch, Stephani

    2012-01-01

    To explore the views of sick doctors on the obstacles preventing them returning to work. Qualitative study. Single participating centre recruiting doctors from all over the UK. Doctors who had been away from work for at least 6 months with physical or mental health problems, drug or alcohol problems, General Medical Council involvement or any combination of these, were eligible. Eligible doctors were recruited in conjunction with the Royal Medical Benevolent Fund, the General Medical Council and the Practitioner Health Programme. These organisations approached 77 doctors; 19 participated. Each doctor completed an in-depth semistructured interview. We used a constant comparison method to identify and agree on the coding of the data and the identification of a number of central themes. The doctors described that being away from work left them isolated and sad. Many experienced negative reactions from their family and some deliberately concealed their problems. Doctors described a lack of support from colleagues and feared a negative response when returning to work. Self-stigmatisation was central to the participants' accounts; several described themselves as failures and appeared to have internalised the negative views of others. Self-stigmatising views, which possibly emerge from the belief that 'doctors are invincible', represent a major obstacle to doctors returning to work. From medical school onwards cultural change is necessary to allow doctors to recognise their vulnerabilities so they can more easily generate strategies to manage if they become unwell.

  17. Phthalate-induced oxidative stress and association with asthma-related airway inflammation in adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franken, Carmen; Lambrechts, Nathalie; Govarts, Eva

    2017-01-01

    BP) and mono-ethyl phthalate (MEP). Analysis of 8-OHdG in urine was used as a sensitive biomarker of oxidative stress at the level of DNA. The presence of doctor-diagnosed asthma was elicited by a self-administered questionnaire. Associations were assessed using multiple linear and logistic regression models....... Mediation was tested using Baron and Kenny's regression approach. Results A significant increased risk of a youngster being diagnosed with asthma was found for both urinary MnBP (metabolite of dibutyl phthalate (DBP)) and the sum of the three di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate metabolites (ΣDEHP...

  18. The effects of asthma and asthma medication on dental caries and salivary characteristics in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaki, Sumer Madani; Ashiry, Eman Anwar; Bakry, Niveen Samir; Baghlaf, Khlood Khaled; Bagher, Sarah Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence and severity of dental caries in children with a history of asthma in addition to their salivary characteristics, flow rate and buffering capacity, as well as the salivary level of Mutans streptococci (MS) and lactobacilli present. The study sample was composed of 30 cases and 30 controls with an age range from 5 to 13 years. The cases involved children with a past history of asthma, while the controls were medically fit children. The study was conducted from 2010 to 2011 and patients were randomly selected through the electronic filing system at King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital (R4 system), Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Interviews and questionnaires were completed by the parents of the children involved and dental examinations were performed. Stimulated salivary samples were collected to determine the salivary flow rate, buffering capacity and salivary levels of MS and lactobacilli. No significant differences were found in the DMFT, dmft scores or community periodontal index (CPI) scores between the cases and controls. However, there was a positive correlation between DMFT and dmft scores (r = 0.83, P corticosteroids had higher levels of lactobacilli compared with patients using other medications (P = 0.02). The frequency of taking asthma medication, the severity of asthma and the use of combination therapy can significantly alter the salivary characteristics in asthmatic children.

  19. Exercise and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children this means the regular use of inhaled steroid medicines and use of medicines before exercise. Ask your child’s doctor ... 11/21/2015 Source Care of the Young Athlete Patient Education Handouts (Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Pediatrics) The information ... Editorial Policy This site complies with the HONcode ...

  20. Smart strategies for doctors and doctors-in-training: heuristics in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegwarth, Odette; Gaissmaier, Wolfgang; Gigerenzer, Gerd

    2009-08-01

    How do doctors make sound decisions when confronted with probabilistic data, time pressures and a heavy workload? One theory that has been embraced by many researchers is based on optimisation, which emphasises the need to integrate all information in order to arrive at sound decisions. This notion makes heuristics, which use less than complete information, appear as second-best strategies. In this article, we challenge this pessimistic view of heuristics. We introduce two medical problems that involve decision making to the reader: one concerns coronary care issues and the other macrolide prescriptions. In both settings, decision-making tools grounded in the principles of optimisation and heuristics, respectively, have been developed to assist doctors in making decisions. We explain the structure of each of these tools and compare their performance in terms of their facilitation of correct predictions. For decisions concerning both the coronary care unit and the prescribing of macrolides, we demonstrate that sacrificing information does not necessarily imply a forfeiting of predictive accuracy, but can sometimes even lead to better decisions. Subsequently, we discuss common misconceptions about heuristics and explain when and why ignoring parts of the available information can lead to the making of more robust predictions. Heuristics are neither good nor bad per se, but, if applied in situations to which they have been adapted, can be helpful companions for doctors and doctors-in-training. This, however, requires that heuristics in medicine be openly discussed, criticised, refined and then taught to doctors-in-training rather than being simply dismissed as harmful or irrelevant. A more uniform use of explicit and accepted heuristics has the potential to reduce variations in diagnoses and to improve medical care for patients.

  1. The search for common pathways underlying asthma and COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaneko Y

    2013-01-01

    for the comparison between asthma and COPD was 0.81 for the network-level comparison, and the odds ratio was 3.62 (P < 0.0001 for the asthma/COPD pair in comparison with the tuberculosis/ essential hypertension pair. In conclusion, although the identification of asthma and COPD networks is still far from complete, these networks may be used as frameworks for integrating other genome-scale information including expression profiling and phenotypic analysis. Network overlap between asthma and COPD may indicate significant overlap between the pathobiology of these two diseases, which are thought to be genetically related.Keywords: COPD, asthma, network, common pathways, aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling

  2. Asthma symptoms improvement in moderate persistent asthma patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD: the role of proton-pump inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus D. Susanto

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate effect of proton pump inhibitor (esomeprazole on asthma symptoms, use of inhaled bronchodilator and peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR in moderate persistent asthma with gastroesofageal refluks disease (GERD. This randomized single blind, controlled clinical trial study was conducted at Persahabatan Hospital, Jakarta from July 2004 until October 2005. Samples were moderate persistent asthma patients with GERD. GERD is diagnosed GERD symptoms and proof of oesophagitis from endoscopy and or histapatologic examination from oesophagus biopsy. Phase 1:2 week run-in period patient received inhaled budesonide 2x200 ug/day. Phase 2: patient randomised to receive inhaled budesonide 2 x 400 ug/day with esomeprazole 40 mg/day or without esomeprazole (control group for 8 weeks. Phase 3: 4 week wash out period, patient receive inhaled budesonide 2 x 200 ug/day. Diary cards were assessed at run-in periode, after treatment 4 weeks, 8 weeks and wash out. There were 32 patients (23 female and 9 male completed the study. Mean total asthma symptoms score daily were significantly decreased on esomeprazole vs without esomeprazole after 8 weeks (-2.29 vs -0.90; p < 0.05. Mean use of inhaled bronchodilator was significantly decreased on esomeprazole vs without esomeprazole after 8 weeks (-1.09 vs -0.42; p < 0.05. Morning and evening PEFR improved higher on esomeprazole than without esomeprazol but were not significantly difference. In conclusion, administration esomeprazole 40 mg daily improved asthma symptoms and lower the use of inhaled bronchodilator in moderate persistent asthma patients with GERD. (Med J Indones 2008; 17: 169-74Keywords: Asthma symptoms, inhaled bronchodilator, moderate persistent asthma, GERD, esomeprazole

  3. Looking beyond patients: Can parents' quality of life predict asthma control in children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-Garcinuño, Alfredo; Mora-Gandarillas, Isabel; Bercedo-Sanz, Alberto; Callén-Blecua, María Teresa; Castillo-Laita, José Antonio; Casares-Alonso, Irene; Forns-Serrallonga, Dolors; Tauler-Toro, Eulàlia; Alonso-Bernardo, Luz María; García-Merino, Águeda; Moneo-Hernández, Isabel; Cortés-Rico, Olga; Carvajal-Urueña, Ignacio; Morell-Bernabé, Juan José; Martín-Ibáñez, Itziar; Rodríguez-Fernández-Oliva, Carmen Rosa; Asensi-Monzó, María Teresa; Fernández-Carazo, Carmen; Murcia-García, José; Durán-Iglesias, Catalina; Montón-Álvarez, José Luis; Domínguez-Aurrecoechea, Begoña; Praena-Crespo, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    Social and family factors may influence the probability of achieving asthma control in children. Parents' quality of life has been insufficiently explored as a predictive factor linked to the probability of achieving disease control in asthmatic children. Determine whether the parents' quality of life predicts medium-term asthma control in children. Longitudinal study of children between 4 and 14 years of age, with active asthma. The parents' quality of life was evaluated using the specific IFABI-R instrument, in which scores were higher for poorer quality of life. Its association with asthma control measures in the child 16 weeks later was analyzed using multivariate methods, adjusting the effect for disease, child and family factors. The data from 452 children were analyzed (median age 9.6 years, 63.3% males). The parents' quality of life was predictive for asthma control; each point increase on the initial IFABI-R score was associated with an adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 0.56 (0.37-0.86) for good control of asthma on the second visit, 2.58 (1.62-4.12) for asthma exacerbation, 2.12 (1.33-3.38) for an unscheduled visit to the doctor, and 2.46 (1.18-5.13) for going to the emergency room. The highest quartile for the IFABI-R score had a sensitivity of 34.5% and a specificity of 82.2% to predict poorly controlled asthma. Parents' poorer quality of life is related to poor, medium-term asthma control in children. Assessing the parents' quality of life could aid disease management decisions. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2016;51:670-677. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The Medical Home Model and Pediatric Asthma Symptom Severity: Evidence from a National Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojanasarot, Sirikan; Carlson, Angeline M

    2017-08-14

    The objective was to investigate the association between receiving care under the medical home model and parental assessment of the severity of asthma symptoms. It was hypothesized that parents of children who received care under the medical home model reported less severe asthma symptoms compared with their counterparts, whose care did not meet the medical home criteria. Secondary analyses were conducted using cross-sectional data from the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children's Health. Children with asthma aged 0-17 years were included and classified as receiving care from the medical home if their care contained 5 components: a personal doctor, a usual source of sick care, family-centered care, no problems getting referrals, and effective care coordination. Ordinal logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between parent-rated severity of asthma symptoms (mild, moderate, and severe symptoms) and the medical home. Approximately 52% of 8229 children who reported having asthma received care from the medical home. Only 30.8% of children with severe asthma symptoms received care that met the medical home criteria, compared to 55.7% of children with mild symptoms. After accounting for confounding factors, obtaining care under the medical home model decreased the odds of parent-reported severe asthma symptoms by 31% (adjusted odds ratio 0.69; 95% CI, 0.56-0.85). Study results suggest that the medical home model can reduce parent-rated severity of asthma symptoms. The findings highlight the importance of providing medical home care to children with asthma to improve the outcomes that matter most to children and their families.

  5. DETERMINANTS OF SPECIALTY CHOICE OF RESIDENT DOCTORS; CASE STUDY--AMONG RESIDENT DOCTORS IN NIGERIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuoji, Roland I; Adebanji, Atinuke; Abdulsalam, Moruf A; Oludara, Mobolaji A; Abolarinwa, Abimbola A

    2015-01-01

    This study examined medical specialty selection by Nigerian resident doctors using a marketing research approach to determine the selection criteria and the role of perceptions, expected remuneration, and job placement prospects of various specialties in the selection process. Data were from the Community of residents from April 2014 to July 2014. The cohort included 200 residents, but only 171 had complete information. Data were obtained from a cross section of resident doctors in the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital and at the 2014 Ordinary General Meeting of the National Association of Resident Doctors(NARD) where representatives from over 50 Teaching hospitals in Nigeria attended. Using a client behaviour model as a framework, a tripartite questionnaire was designed and administered to residents to deduce information on their knowledge about and interests in various specialties, their opinions of sixteen specialties, and the criteria they used in specialty selection. A total of 171 (85.5%) questionnaires were returned. ln many instances, consistency between selection criteria and perceptions of a specialty were accompanied by interest in pursuing the specialty. Job security, job availability on completion of programme, duration of training and qualifying examinations were highly correlated with p value marketing research concepts for medical specialty selection (Weissmanet al 2012) stipulates that choice of speciality is influenced by criteria and perception. This study shows that job security expected financial remuneration, and examination requirements for qualification are major determinants of the choice of speciality for residents.

  6. Perennial aeroallergens sensitisation and risk of asthma in African children and adolescents: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pefura-Yone, Eric Walter; Mbele-Onana, Charles Lebon; Balkissou, Adamou Dodo; Kenmegne-Noumsi, Elvira Christelle; Boulleys-Nana, Julie Raïcha; Kolontchang-Yomi, Barbara Linda; Theubo-Kamgang, Boris Judicaël; Ndjeutcheu-Moualeu, Patricia Ingrid; Ebouki, Emilienne Régine; Kengne, André Pascal

    2015-01-01

    The distribution and impact of various aeroallergens on asthma occurrence vary across regions. We investigated the association between sensitisation to perennial aeroallergens and asthma risk in children and adolescents in Yaounde, Cameroon. This was a case-control study involving children and adolescents with asthma (cases) vs. non-allergic counterparts (controls). Children/adolescents with doctor-diagnosed asthma were included over a period of 30 months, and controls were selected from the community through random sampling. Logistic regression models were used to relate perennial aeroallergens sensitisation with asthma. The asthma and control groups included, respectively, 151 and 372 participants, with no sex ratio difference. The mean age (standard deviation) was 11.9 (4.4) years in cases and 11.3 (3.7) years in controls. The prevalence of sensitisation to any aeroallergen (cases vs. controls) was 76.8% (116/151) and 32.3% (120/372), p controls, p allergenic factor associated with asthma in children and adolescents in this setting. This has application for the selection of patients with asthma who could benefit from the control of exposure to mites and specific immunotherapy.

  7. Association between asthma control test, pulmonary function tests and non-specific bronchial hyperresponsiveness in assessing the level of asthma control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzelewska-Rzymowska, Iwona Florentyna; Mikołajczyk, Joanna; Kroczyńska-Bednarek, Jadwiga; Górski, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) reports emphasize the use of validated and simple tools in order to assess the level of asthma control, as the Asthma Control Test (ACT). However, an ACT does not include assessment of airway inflammation, which is better reflected when measuring nonspecific bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR). The authors aimed to find out if the level of asthma control quantified by an ACT correlates with BHR and pulmonary function tests. 118 asthmatics participated in the study. All patients completed an ACT. The scores of the ACTs were compared with pulmonary function tests and BHR assessed with the methacholine challenge test and expressed as a provocative concentration of methacholine, inducing a 20% decline in the FEV1 (PC20 M in mg/ml). Patients with controlled asthma amounted to 52 (44%) while those with uncontrolled asthma amounted to 66 (56%). In patients with controlled asthma (ACT score ≥ 20) the mean geometric value of PC20M was 2.72 mg/ml (range from 0.25 to > 8.0), whereas 0.94 mg/ml (range from 0.28 to 8.0) (p = 0.02) was observed in patients with uncontrolled asthma (ACT score 80% pred. value) while 19% (5/26) patients with controlled asthma presented an FEV1 Asthma duration in years in controlled asthmatics was significantly shorter than in uncontrolled patients (6.2 ± 8.9 vs. 12.0 ± 11.4, p = 0.005) CONCLUSION: In determining the most accurate level of asthma control it is reasonable to use an ACT in conjunction with BHR, which provides more accurate assessment of bronchial inflammation than ventilatory parameters alone.

  8. Doctors and nurses benefit from interprofessional online education in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flytkjær Vibeke

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Benefits of online learning in the health sector have been demonstrated in previous studies. We examined the potential benefits of a joint web-based curriculum on atopic eczema for health personnel. Methods Enrolled doctors and nurses had access to the curriculum for 8 weeks. After the course learners completed a questionnaire. Two dermatologists rated the quality of the submitted homework assignments. Based on data from the project's budget and the Norwegian Medical Association, we estimated the saved travel expenses. Results Eighty-eight learners (46 doctors registered for the course. We received 55 questionnaires (response rate 63%. Twenty-seven learners (31%; 16 doctors, 11 nurses; χ2 = 0.03; P = 0.87 used the discussion forum. We found no significant differences in the total questionnaire scores between doctors and nurses. The homework assignments were given an average score of 3.6 for doctors and 3.5 for nurses (P = 0.8 by rater 1. Rater 2 scored 3.9 and 3.6 for doctors and nurses respectively (P = 0.2. The break-even between travel/hotel expenses and course development costs occurred at 135 saved travel refund applications. Conclusions Doctors and nurses were equally satisfied with a joint web-based course on atopic eczema. The use of an online discussion forum was limited but similar between doctors and nurses. There were no significant differences in the quality of submitted homework assignments. The cost of developing the course was 716 841 NOK and the first 86 learners saved 455 198 NOK in travel expenses.

  9. Doctors and nurses benefit from interprofessional online education in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopf, Thomas; Flytkjær, Vibeke

    2011-10-14

    Benefits of online learning in the health sector have been demonstrated in previous studies. We examined the potential benefits of a joint web-based curriculum on atopic eczema for health personnel. Enrolled doctors and nurses had access to the curriculum for 8 weeks. After the course learners completed a questionnaire. Two dermatologists rated the quality of the submitted homework assignments. Based on data from the project's budget and the Norwegian Medical Association, we estimated the saved travel expenses. Eighty-eight learners (46 doctors) registered for the course. We received 55 questionnaires (response rate 63%). Twenty-seven learners (31%; 16 doctors, 11 nurses; χ2 = 0.03; P = 0.87) used the discussion forum. We found no significant differences in the total questionnaire scores between doctors and nurses. The homework assignments were given an average score of 3.6 for doctors and 3.5 for nurses (P = 0.8) by rater 1. Rater 2 scored 3.9 and 3.6 for doctors and nurses respectively (P = 0.2). The break-even between travel/hotel expenses and course development costs occurred at 135 saved travel refund applications. Doctors and nurses were equally satisfied with a joint web-based course on atopic eczema. The use of an online discussion forum was limited but similar between doctors and nurses. There were no significant differences in the quality of submitted homework assignments. The cost of developing the course was 716 841 NOK and the first 86 learners saved 455 198 NOK in travel expenses.

  10. The asthma knowledge and perceptions of older Australian adults: implications for social marketing campaigns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Uwana; Jones, Sandra C; Caputi, Peter; Iverson, Don

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this research is to gain an understanding of the asthma perceptions of older adults and identify gaps in their asthma knowledge. In regional New South Wales, Australia, a stratified, random sample of 4066 adults, aged 55 years and over, both with and without an asthma diagnosis, completed a survey based on the Health Belief Model about asthma knowledge and perceptions. Almost half of the sample had experienced symptoms of breathlessness in the past four weeks. Breathlessness was a predictor of lower health ratings and poorer mood. Older adults reported low susceptibility to developing asthma. The sample demonstrated poor knowledge of key asthma symptoms including shortness of breath, tightness in the chest and a cough at night. There is a general lack of asthma awareness in this age group. This could result in not seeking medical help, and thus a reduced quality of life. Older adults should be made aware of key symptoms and the prevalence of asthma in the older adult population, and be empowered to take control of their respiratory health. Audience segmentation for an intervention should be based on recent experience of breathlessness and asthma diagnosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Immigration and Acculturation-Related Factors and Asthma Morbidity in Latino Children*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Amy F.; Kopel, Sheryl J.; McQuaid, Elizabeth L.; Seifer, Ronald; Klein, Robert; Esteban, Cynthia; Lobato, Debra; Ortega, Alexander N.; Canino, Glorisa; Fritz, Gregory K.

    2011-01-01

    Objective This article presents a summary of findings from asthma studies focusing on immigration and acculturation-related factors. A study examining associations between these processes, family cohesion and social support networks, and asthma morbidity in a sample of Dominican and Puerto Rican caregivers residing in the mainland U.S., is also described. Methods Latino children with asthma (n = 232), ages 7–16 (49% female) and their caregivers completed interview-based questionnaires on immigration and acculturation-related processes, family characteristics, and asthma morbidity. Results The frequency of ED use due to asthma may be higher for children of caregivers born in Puerto Rico. Acculturative stress levels were higher for Puerto Rican born caregivers residing in the mainland U.S. Conclusion Asthma-related educational and intervention programs for Latino children and families should be tailored to consider the effects that the immigration and acculturation experience can have on asthma management. Specific family-based supports focused on decreasing stress related to the acculturation process, and increasing social and family support around the asthma treatment process may help to reduce asthma morbidity in Latino children. PMID:21745811

  12. A controlled trial of a school-based intervention to improve asthma management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, D C; McWhirter, J; Coleman, H; Calvert, M; Warner, J O

    2006-05-01

    The present study investigated schools as an appropriate context for an intervention designed to produce clinical and psychological benefits for children with asthma. A total of 193 out of 219 (88.1%) children with asthma (aged 7-9 yrs) from 23 out of 24 (95.8%) schools completed the study. Intervention schools received a staff asthma-training session, advice on asthma policy, an emergency beta2-agonist inhaler with spacer and whole-class asthma workshops. Nonintervention schools received no asthma-related input. Intervention children required less general practitioner-prescribed preventer medication despite no differences in symptom control compared with the nonintervention asthmatic group. Increased peer knowledge of asthma may have mediated improved active quality of life in the intervention group, together with increased self-esteem in young females. Those females not receiving the intervention, but identified as being asthmatic within the classroom, and thus possibly stigmatised, reported decreased self-esteem. Lower self-esteem in young males was associated with pet ownership. No change was found in staff knowledge, the establishment of asthma policies or school absences which were low even before intervention. In conclusion, a whole-school intervention can improve the health of children with asthma when followed with support for all children but effects are likely to be modified by sex and the home environment.

  13. Development and evaluation of an integrated asthma awareness curriculum for the elementary school classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Emily V; Richmond, Colleen M; Hobson, Angela; Kleiss, Jamie; Wottowa, Jamie; Sterling, David A

    2011-02-01

    Asthma is one of the most common causes of school absenteeism, and many children are affected by, or encounter, it in the school setting. An integrated curriculum that presents asthma as a real world example can raise all children's awareness and understanding of asthma, not just those with the condition. A 15-lesson, asthma-based curriculum was developed to integrate with and enhance the core subjects of math, science, and communication arts. A pilot test was performed in fourth- and fifth-grade classes to assess student asthma knowledge gain, teacher acceptance, and grade appropriateness of the curriculum. During the 2006-2007 school year, 15 teachers were recruited from the St. Louis, MO, USA area to assess the curriculum through teaching and administering pre- and post-unit tests and completing a teacher evaluation for each lesson taught. Four additional classrooms served as comparisons. Paired t tests were used for each lesson taught, to evaluate pre-/post-test and classroom differences, and focus groups were used for qualitative evaluation. There was an increase in asthma knowledge between pre- and post-tests in both grades, individually and combined (p Teacher feedback indicated that the lessons enhanced previously learned skills and increased students' overall understanding of asthma. Offering asthma education in the classroom can provide an opportunity for all students to gain asthma knowledge and build health literacy about a leading chronic disease in school-aged children.

  14. Immigration and acculturation-related factors and asthma morbidity in Latino children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koinis-Mitchell, Daphne; Sato, Amy F; Kopel, Sheryl J; McQuaid, Elizabeth L; Seifer, Ronald; Klein, Robert; Esteban, Cynthia; Lobato, Debra; Ortega, Alexander N; Canino, Glorisa; Fritz, Gregory K

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a summary of findings from asthma studies focusing on immigration and acculturation-related factors. A study examining associations between these processes, family cohesion and social support networks, and asthma morbidity in a sample of Dominican and Puerto Rican caregivers residing in the mainland U.S., is also described. Latino children with asthma (n = 232), ages 7-16 (49% female) and their caregivers completed interview-based questionnaires on immigration and acculturation-related processes, family characteristics, and asthma morbidity. The frequency of ED use due to asthma may be higher for children of caregivers born in Puerto Rico. Acculturative stress levels were higher for Puerto Rican born caregivers residing in the mainland U.S. Asthma-related educational and intervention programs for Latino children and families should be tailored to consider the effects that the immigration and acculturation experience can have on asthma management. Specific family-based supports focused on decreasing stress related to the acculturation process, and increasing social and family support around the asthma treatment process may help to reduce asthma morbidity in Latino children.

  15. URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR

    CERN Document Server

    Medical Service

    2001-01-01

    IN URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR GENEVA EMERGENCY SERVICES GENEVA AND VAUD 144 FIRE BRIGAD 118 POLICE 117 CERN FIREMEN 767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 01-251-51-51 Patient not fit to be moved, call family doctor, or: GP AT HOME, open 24h/24h 748-49-50 Association Of Geneva Doctors Emergency Doctors at home 07h-23h 322 20 20 Patient fit to be moved: HOPITAL CANTONAL CENTRAL 24 Micheli-du-Crest 372-33-11 ou 382-33-11 EMERGENCIES 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 6 rue Willy-Donzé 372-33-11 MATERNITY 32 bvd.de la Cluse 382-68-16 ou 382-33-11 OPHTHALMOLOGY 22 Alcide Jentzer 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 MEDICAL CENTRE CORNAVIN 1-3 rue du Jura 345 45 50 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin EMERGENCIES 719-61-11 URGENCES PEDIATRIQUES 719-61-00 LA TOUR MEDICAL CENTRE 719-74-00 European EmergencyCall 112 FRANCE EMERGENCY SERVICES 15 FIRE BRIGADE 18 POLICE 17 CERN FIREMEN AT HOME 00-41-22-767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 04-72-11-69-11 All doctors will...

  16. Exploring the impact of workplace cyberbullying on trainee doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Samuel; Coyne, Iain; Sprigg, Christine; Axtell, Carolyn; Subramanian, Ganesh

    2015-04-01

    Workplace bullying is an occupational hazard for trainee doctors. However, little is known about their experiences of cyberbullying at work. This study examines the impact of cyberbullying among trainee doctors, and how attributions of blame for cyberbullying influence individual and work-related outcomes. Doctors at over 6 months into training were asked to complete an online survey that included measures of cyberbullying, blame attribution, negative emotion, job satisfaction, interactional justice and mental strain. A total of 158 trainee doctors (104 women, 54 men) completed the survey. Overall, 73 (46.2%) respondents had experienced at least one act of cyberbullying. Cyberbullying adversely impacted on job satisfaction (β = - 0.19; p cyberbullying influenced its impact and the path of mediation. Negative emotion mediated the relationship between self-blame for a cyber-bullying act and mental strain, whereas interactional injustice mediated the association between blaming the perpetrator and job dissatisfaction. Acts of cyberbullying had been experienced by nearly half of the sample during their training and were found to significantly relate to ill health and job dissatisfaction. The deleterious impact of cyberbullying can be addressed through both workplace policies, and training for trainee doctors and experienced medical professionals. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The Future of Asthma Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis-Philippe Boulet

    1995-01-01

    identification and possible correction of genetic abnormalities responsible for the tendency to develop asthma and atopy, and prevention or functional and structural airway changes. This last goal will be achieved by improved environmental control, earlier use of more powerful and safe anti-inflammatory agents, as well as an increased involvement on the part of the asthma patient in treatment.

  18. How Do Asthma Medicines Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Kid Who's Bullied? How Do Asthma Medicines Work? KidsHealth > For Kids > How Do Asthma Medicines Work? Print A A A en español ¿Cómo funcionan ... control medicines (also called controller or maintenance medicines) work over a long period of time by keeping ...

  19. Smoking and Asthma (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Giving Teens a Voice in Health Care Decisions Smoking and Asthma KidsHealth > For Parents > Smoking and Asthma Print A A A What's in ... Antismoking Message en español Fumar y el asma Smoking is an unhealthy habit for anyone, but it's ...

  20. Adolescents and Exercise Induced Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Pamela; Bickanse, Shanna; Bogenreif, Mike; VanSickle, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    This article defines asthma and exercise induced asthma, and provides information on the triggers, signs, and symptoms of an attack. It also gives treatments for these conditions, along with prevention guidelines on how to handle an attack in the classroom or on the practice field. (Contains 2 tables and 1 figure.)

  1. Adult-onset eosinophilic asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, J.C.

    2017-01-01

    In the last decades, it has been recognized that asthma is not a single disease, but comprises several clinical syndromes, which all share respiratory symptoms and lung function abnormalities, associated with different types of airway inflammation. These syndromes are now known as different asthma

  2. Asthma in patients with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønnberg, A S; Skov, L; Skytthe, A

    2015-01-01

    We read with interest the report by Fang and colleagues of the relationship between psoriasis and asthma in a large retrospective case-control study from Taiwan [1]. The study found a 1.38-fold increased risk of asthma among patients with psoriasis, and with an increasing risk according to higher...

  3. Knowledge and practice of universal precautions among doctors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 87 health workers at the Central Hospital, Benin City, participated in this study aimed at finding out the knowledge and practice of universal precautions in 1999. All participants had worked for at least six months in the hospital and included all doctors and laboratory workers. All the respondents completed a ...

  4. Trends in Doctoral Research on English Language Teaching in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özmen, Kemal Sinan; Cephe, Pasa Tevfik; Kinik, Betül

    2016-01-01

    This review examines the doctoral research in Turkey completed between 2010 and 2014 in the area of English language teaching and learning. All of the dissertations (N = 137) indexed in the National Theses Database have been included in order to analyze dissertations' subject areas, research paradigms/techniques, and research contexts as well as…

  5. The Doctoral Cohort Model: Increasing Opportunities for Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimer, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Participation in a doctoral program cohort significantly increases the chances for the successful completion of the course of studies for all members of the cohort. After examining the concept of the cohort and the current research literature, the author shares her experiences in the Ed. D., Instructional Leadership program at Western Connecticut…

  6. Asthma in pregnancy: association between the Asthma Control Test and the Global Initiative for Asthma classification and comparisons with spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, Georgia Véras; Leite, Débora F B; Rizzo, José A; Sarinho, Emanuel S C

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify a possible association between the assessment of clinical asthma control using the Asthma Control Test (ACT) and the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) classification and to perform comparisons with values of spirometry. Through this cross-sectional study, 103 pregnant women with asthma were assessed in the period from October 2010 to October 2013 in the asthma pregnancy clinic at the Clinical Hospital of the Federal University of Pernambuco. Questionnaires concerning the level of asthma control were administered using the Global Initiative for Asthma classification, the Asthma Control Test validated for asthmatic expectant mothers and spirometry; all three methods of assessing asthma control were performed during the same visit between the twenty-first and twenty-seventh weeks of pregnancy. There was a significant association between clinical asthma control assessment using the Asthma Control Test and the Global Initiative for Asthma classification (pTest can be used for asthmatic expectant mothers to assess the clinical control of asthma, especially at the end of the second trimester, which is assumed to be the period of worsening asthma exacerbations during pregnancy. We highlight the importance of the Asthma Control Test as a subjective instrument with easy application, easy interpretation and good reproducibility that does not require spirometry to assess the level of asthma control and can be used in the primary care of asthmatic expectant mothers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Doctor's perception of doctor-patient relationships in emergency departments: What roles do gender and ethnicity play?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babitsch, Birgit; Braun, Tanja; Borde, Theda; David, Matthias

    2008-04-11

    Emergency departments continuously provide medical treatment on a walk-in basis. Several studies investigated the patient's perception of the doctor-patient relationship, but few have asked doctors about their views. Furthermore, the influence of the patient's ethnicity and gender on the doctor's perception remains largely unanswered. Based on data collated in three gynaecology (GYN)/internal medicine (INT) emergency departments in Berlin, Germany, we evaluated the impact of the patient's gender and ethnicity on the doctors' satisfaction with the course of the treatment they provided. Information was gathered from 2.429 short questionnaires completed by doctors and the medical records of the corresponding patients. The patient's ethnicity had a significant impact on the doctors' satisfaction with the doctor-patient relationship. Logistic regression analysis showed that the odds ratio (OR) for physician satisfaction was significantly lower for patients of Turkish origin (OR = 2.6 INT and 5.5 GYN) than for those of German origin. The main reasons stated were problems with communication and a perceived lack of urgency for emergency treatment. The odds ratios for dissatisfaction due to a lack of language skills were 4.48 (INT) and 6.22 (GYN), and those due to perceived lack of urgency for emergency treatment were 0.75 (INT) and 0.63 (GYN). Sex differences caused minor variation. The results show that good communication despite language barriers is crucial in providing medical care that is satisfactory to both patient and doctors, especially in emergency situations. Therefore the use of professional interpreters for improved communication and the training of medical staff for improved intercultural competence are essential for the provision of adequate health care in a multicultural setting.

  8. Doctor's perception of doctor-patient relationships in emergency departments: What roles do gender and ethnicity play?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borde Theda

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emergency departments continuously provide medical treatment on a walk-in basis. Several studies investigated the patient's perception of the doctor-patient relationship, but few have asked doctors about their views. Furthermore, the influence of the patient's ethnicity and gender on the doctor's perception remains largely unanswered. Methods Based on data collated in three gynaecology (GYN/internal medicine (INT emergency departments in Berlin, Germany, we evaluated the impact of the patient's gender and ethnicity on the doctors' satisfaction with the course of the treatment they provided. Information was gathered from 2.429 short questionnaires completed by doctors and the medical records of the corresponding patients. Results The patient's ethnicity had a significant impact on the doctors' satisfaction with the doctor-patient relationship. Logistic regression analysis showed that the odds ratio (OR for physician satisfaction was significantly lower for patients of Turkish origin (OR = 2.6 INT and 5.5 GYN than for those of German origin. The main reasons stated were problems with communication and a perceived lack of urgency for emergency treatment. The odds ratios for dissatisfaction due to a lack of language skills were 4.48 (INT and 6.22 (GYN, and those due to perceived lack of urgency for emergency treatment were 0.75 (INT and 0.63 (GYN. Sex differences caused minor variation. Conclusion The results show that good communication despite language barriers is crucial in providing medical care that is satisfactory to both patient and doctors, especially in emergency situations. Therefore the use of professional interpreters for improved communication and the training of medical staff for improved intercultural competence are essential for the provision of adequate health care in a multicultural setting.

  9. The scholarly impact of doctoral research conducted in the field of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study is to investigate the scholarly impact of knowledge generated as part of doctoral studies in the field of education in South Africa. The transition rate of the 97 doctoral theses completed in the various fields of education in South Africa in 2008 into peer-reviewed articles and chapters in scholarly books, ...

  10. Voices of Family Therapy Doctoral Students of Color: Aspirations and Factors Influencing Careers in Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John K.; Stone, Dana J.

    2011-01-01

    The authors examined factors influencing career aspirations of doctoral students of color in family therapy doctoral programs across the country, with a special focus on careers in the professoriate. Qualitative interviews were conducted with students at varying levels of degree completion. Respondents discussed barriers to careers in academia as…

  11. Design-based research and doctoral students: Guidelines for preparing a dissertation proposal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herrington, Jan; Montgomerie, C.; McKenney, Susan; Seale, J.; Reeves, Thomas C.; Oliver, Ron

    2007-01-01

    At first glance, design-based research may appear to be such a long-term and intensive approach to educational inquiry that doctoral students, most of whom expect to complete their Ph.D. degree in 4-5 years, should not attempt to adopt this approach for their doctoral dissertations. In this paper,

  12. Digital Native and Digital Immigrant Use of Scholarly Network for Doctoral Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Ronald; Hassell, Deliesha

    2014-01-01

    The Doctoral Community Network (DC) is a learner driven, scholarly community designed to help online doctoral learners successfully complete their dissertation and program of study. While digital natives grew up in an environment immersed in technology, digital immigrants adapted to this environment through their ability to learn and adjust to…

  13. Review of Doctoral Research on Second Language Teaching and Learning in Spain (2008-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Raquel; Miralpeix, Imma

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews a selection of doctoral theses on language learning and teaching completed in Spain between 2008 and 2010. A total of 16 theses have been identified as representative--in terms of the topics under investigation and the methodology employed--of the doctoral research undertaken in Spain. Current topics include the development of…

  14. "Con todo mi corazón": Mentoring Latinas in Educational Leadership Doctoral Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Mariela A.

    2016-01-01

    Personal narrative essays were used to analyze the experiences of four Latina doctoral students who completed their first year in an educational leadership doctoral program in a Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI) in the southwestern U.S. Four themes emerged from their "testimonios" 1) "Con todo el corazón"; 2) "Somos como…

  15. A pilot survey of junior doctors' confidence in tasks related to broad aspects of competence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaarup, Anne Marie; Davis, Deborah; Ringsted, Charlotte Vibeke

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to survey junior doctors' growth in confidence in different physician roles. A total of 165 junior doctors in internal medicine completed a self-administered survey of confidence levels in physician roles. Confidence levels between training levels were compared....

  16. The McNair Program as a Socializing Influence on Doctoral Degree Attainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittens, Cheryl Bailey

    2014-01-01

    The quality of doctoral students' academic and social experiences is a key element of their success in graduate school programs. These experiences support the completion of doctoral programs, especially for first-generation college students from low-income backgrounds. Framed by Weidman's (1989) undergraduate socialization model, the author…

  17. Peer-Learning Networks in Social Work Doctoral Education: An Interdisciplinary Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. Jay; Duron, Jacquelynn F.; Bosk, Emily Adlin; Finno-Velasquez, Megan; Abner, Kristin S.

    2016-01-01

    Peer-learning networks (PLN) can be valuable tools for doctoral students. Participation in these networks can aid in the completion of the dissertation, lead to increased scholarship productivity, and assist in student retention. Yet, despite the promise of PLNs, few studies have documented their effect on social work doctoral education. This…

  18. Asthma symptoms in obese adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2016-01-01

    The association between asthma and obesity is well-described, but not straightforward, and according to current guidelines asthma control is more difficult to achieve in obese patients. The currently available studies evaluating response to pharmacological asthma therapy in obese patients show...... that these patients have an altered, in general less favorable, response to both reliever and controller medication compared to normal weight patients. However, at present, the limited available evidence precludes evidence-based recommendations. The 'obesity-related asthma' phenotype has different characteristics......, including association with atopy and type of airway inflammation, compared to 'classic' asthma. Furthermore, weight loss in patients with this phenotype leads to an improvement in symptoms, lung function, and airway responsiveness, as well as a reduction in medication utilization and hospital admissions...

  19. Learning Dynamics in Doctoral Supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobayashi, Sofie

    This doctoral research explores doctoral supervision within life science research in a Danish university. From one angle it investigates doctoral students’ experiences with strengthening the relationship with their supervisors through a structured meeting with the supervisor, prepared as part of ...... of different theoretical frameworks from the perspectives of learning as individual acquisition and a sociocultural perspective on learning contributed to a nuanced illustration of the otherwise implicit practices of supervision....... investigates learning opportunities in supervision with multiple supervisors. This was investigated through observations and recording of supervision, and subsequent analysis of transcripts. The analyses used different perspectives on learning; learning as participation, positioning theory and variation theory....... The research illuminates how learning opportunities are created in the interaction through the scientific discussions. It also shows how multiple supervisors can contribute to supervision by providing new perspectives and opinions that have a potential for creating new understandings. The combination...

  20. Solo doctors and ethical isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, R J

    2009-11-01

    This paper uses the case of solo doctors to explore whether working in relative isolation from one's peers may be detrimental to ethical decision-making. Drawing upon the relevance of communication and interaction for ethical decision-making in the ethical theories of Habermas, Mead and Gadamer, it is argued that doctors benefit from ethical discussion with their peers and that solo practice may make this more difficult. The paper identifies a paucity of empirical research related to solo practice and ethics but draws upon more general medical ethics research and a study that identified ethical isolation among community pharmacists to support the theoretical claims made. The paper concludes by using the literary analogy of Soderberg's Doctor Glas to illustrate the issues raised and how ethical decision-making in relative isolation may be problematical.

  1. Obesity, Diet, and Activity in relation to Asthma and Wheeze among Rural Dwelling Children and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua A. Lawson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives. We investigated associations between weight status, activity level, and diet with asthma or wheeze as well as the interrelationship between these factors. Methods. We conducted a case-control study of 6–18-year olds from 2005 to 2007. Cases ( were subjects reporting episodes or breathing medication use along with doctor-diagnosed asthma or wheeze in the past 12 months. Controls were randomly selected ( and without asthma or wheeze. Data regarding health outcomes, diet, and activity were obtained from questionnaire. Objectively measured height and weight were collected. Results. In the adjusted analysis, there was a trend ( towards an increased risk of asthma or wheeze associated with high fast food and/or pop consumption. Among cases, a significantly lower proportion (66% classified as overweight participated in hard exercise in ≥9 of the past 14 days compared to those who were not overweight (86%. This pattern was not seen among controls (76% participating in hard exercise versus 78%, resp.. However, based on perceived weight status by the parent, the patterns were similar regardless of case-control status. Conclusions. Overweight status may negatively impact activity level among those with asthma or wheeze. Efforts should be made to encourage healthy food choices, and activity programming must consider the needs of overweight children with asthma.

  2. Prevalence of asthma by industry and occupation in the U.S. working population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Michelle K; Symanski, Elaine; Pompeii, Lisa A; Delclos, George L

    2010-05-01

    Workers are potentially exposed to asthmagens daily. Our study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of asthma among working adults in the U.S. by industry and occupation. Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2001-2004), multiple logistic regression was used to investigate associations between industry and occupation and current asthma as defined by positive responses to "Has a doctor or other health professional ever told you that you have asthma?" and "Do you still have asthma?" Workers in mining (17.0%), health-related industries (12.5%), teaching (13.1%), or in health-related occupations (12.6%) had the highest prevalence of asthma. As compared to construction industry workers, workers in mining (aOR = 5.2, 95% CI: 1.1-24.2) or health-related (aOR = 2.3, 95% CI: 1.1-4.8) industries had significantly higher odds of asthma. Our study adds to the increasing evidence that miners, healthcare workers and teachers remain high-risk working populations and appropriate evaluation and control measures are needed to protect these workers. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Cow's milk exposure and asthma in a newborn cohort: repeated ascertainment indicates reverse causation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fussman, Chris; Todem, David; Forster, Johannes; Arshad, Hassan; Urbanek, Radvan; Karmaus, Wilfried

    2007-03-01

    The effect of cow's milk consumption on childhood asthma has been debated for several years. This study attempts to provide further insight into this association through the use of a longitudinal study design. Newborns from parents with atopic history were recruited from Germany, Austria, and England (n = 696). For five repeated ascertainments, information was collected on cow's milk exposure, incidence of doctor-diagnosed asthma, and confounders. Generalized estimation equations, incorporating different models (concurrent, delayed, combined, and reverse causation), were used to determine this association. No association between cow's milk consumption and childhood asthma was found for the concurrent effects model (OR = 0.81, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.55, 1.20). In the delayed effects model, the direction of the association varied with time of follow-up. Thus, we stratified by period, which resulted in a significant protective delayed effect at 36 months (OR = 0.18, 95% CI = 0.06, 0.49). However, reverse causation negated this finding since the presence of asthma in prior months led to a reduction in further exposure to cow's milk (OR = 0.40, 95% CI = 0.16, 0.99). Hence, cow's milk consumption does not protect against childhood asthma. The apparent protection of cow's milk against asthma may result from parents of asthmatic children avoiding cow's milk, rather than actual prophylaxis.

  4. Manual therapy for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hondras, M A; Linde, K; Jones, A P

    2002-01-01

    A variety of manual therapies with similar postulated biologic mechanisms of action are commonly used to treat patients with asthma. Manual therapy practitioners are also varied, including physiotherapists, respiratory therapists, chiropractic and osteopathic physicians. A systematic review across disciplines is warranted. To evaluate the evidence for the effects of manual therapies for treatment of patients with bronchial asthma. Trials were searched in computerized general (EMBASE, CINAHL and MEDLINE) and specialized databases (Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field, Cochrane Rehabilitation Field, ICL, and MANTIS). In addition, bibliographies from included studies were assessed, and authors of known studies were contacted for additional information about published and unpublished trials. Date of most recent search: February 2002. Trials were included if they: (1) were randomised; (2) included asthmatic children or adults; (3) examined one or more types of manual therapy; and (4) included clinical outcomes. All three reviewers independently extracted data and assessed trial quality using a standard form. From 393 unique citations, 59 full text articles were retrieved and evaluated, which resulted in nine citations to five RCTs (290 patients) suitable for inclusion. Trials could not be pooled statistically because studies that addressed similar interventions used disparate patient groups or outcomes. The methodological quality of one of two trials examining chiropractic manipulation was good and neither trial found significant differences between chiropractic spinal manipulation and a sham manoeuvre on any of the outcomes measured. Quality of the remaining three trials was poor. One small trial compared massage therapy with a relaxation control group and found significant differences in many of the lung function measures obtained. However, this trial had poor reporting characteristics and the data have yet to be confirmed. One small trial compared chest

  5. Manual therapy for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hondras, M A; Linde, K; Jones, A P

    2005-04-18

    A variety of manual therapies with similar postulated biologic mechanisms of action are commonly used to treat patients with asthma. Manual therapy practitioners are also varied, including physiotherapists, respiratory therapists, chiropractic and osteopathic physicians. A systematic review across disciplines is warranted. To evaluate the evidence for the effects of manual therapies for treatment of patients with bronchial asthma. We searched for trials in computerized general (EMBASE, CINAHL and MEDLINE) and specialized databases (Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field, Cochrane Rehabilitation Field, Index to Chiropractic Literature (ICL), and Manual, Alternative and Natural Therapy (MANTIS)). In addition, we assessed bibliographies from included studies, and contacted authors of known studies for additional information about published and unpublished trials. Date of most recent search: August 2004. Trials were included if they: (1) were randomised; (2) included asthmatic children or adults; (3) examined one or more types of manual therapy; and (4) included clinical outcomes with observation periods of at least two weeks. All three reviewers independently extracted data and assessed trial quality using a standard form. From 473 unique citations, 68 full text articles were retrieved and evaluated, which resulted in nine citations to three RCTs (156 patients) suitable for inclusion. Trials could not be pooled statistically because studies that addressed similar interventions used disparate patient groups or outcomes. The methodological quality of one of two trials examining chiropractic manipulation was good and neither trial found significant differences between chiropractic spinal manipulation and a sham manoeuvre on any of the outcomes measured. One small trial compared massage therapy with a relaxation control group and found significant differences in many of the lung function measures obtained. However, this trial had poor reporting characteristics and the data

  6. Mrs Hitler and her doctor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macleod, Sandy

    2005-12-01

    The doctor who attended the mother of Adolf Hitler in her terminal illness has been blamed as a cause of the Holocaust. The medical details recorded of this professional relationship are presented and discussed. Dr Bloch's medical care of Mrs Hitler was consistent with the prevailing medical practice of the management of fungating breast carcinoma. Indeed, the general practitioner's care and attention of the family appear to have been astute and supportive. There is nothing to suggest that Dr Bloch's medical care was other than competent. Doctors who have the (mis)fortune to professionally attend major figures of history may be unfairly viewed, despite their appropriate and adequate care.

  7. Management of Mass Casualties Using Doctor Helicopters and Doctor Cars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsaka, Hiromichi; Ishikawa, Kouhei; Omori, Kazuhiko; Jitsuiki, Kei; Yoshizawa, Toshihiko; Yanagawa, Youichi

    At approximately 10 o'clock in September 2015, a minibus carrying 18 people accidentally slid backwards because of a malfunctioning brake system while climbing a steep incline on Togasayama Mountain, colliding with a van (Toyota HiAce wagon) carrying 11 people that was situated behind the minibus. Togasayama Mountain is located 1 hour by car and 10 minutes by helicopter from our hospital. The minibus slid off a roadside cliff at a height of 0.5 m and rolled over after colliding with the van. There were 7 victims with yellow tags and 22 with green tags. Two Doctor Helicopters and 1 Doctor Car cooperated with the fire departments by providing medical treatments, selection of medical facilities, and dispersion transportation. In this mass casualty event, there were no mortalities, and all of the victims recovered without sequelae. The coordinated and combined use of Doctor Helicopters and Doctor Cars in addition to the activities of the fire department in response to a mass casualty event resulted in appropriate triage, medical treatments, selection of medical facilities, and dispersion transportation. Copyright © 2017 Air Medical Journal Associates. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Early risk factors for pubertal asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovland, V; Riiser, A; Mowinckel, P; Carlsen, K-H; Lødrup Carlsen, K C

    2015-01-01

    Early life risk factors are previously described for childhood asthma, but less is known related to asthma in adolescence. We aimed to investigate early risk factors (before 2 years) for pubertal asthma and secondarily for pubertal asthma phenotypes based upon allergic comorbidities. Based on data from 550 adolescents in the prospective birth cohort 'Environment and Childhood Asthma' study, subjects were categorized by recurrent bronchial obstruction (rBO) 0-2 years, asthma 2-10 years, and pubertal asthma from 10 to 16 years including incident asthma in puberty and asthma in remission from 10 to 16 years or as never rBO/asthma 0-16 years. Asthma in puberty was further classified based on the comorbidities atopic dermatitis and allergic rhinitis (AR) from 10 to 16 years. Twenty-three common asthma risk factors identified by 2 years of age, including frequency and persistence of bronchial obstruction (severity score), were analysed by weighted logistic regression for each phenotype. In adjusted models, the risk of pubertal asthma increased significantly with higher severity score, parental rhinitis, being the firstborn child, and familial stress around birth. Pubertal asthma in remission was significantly associated with severity score and number of lower respiratory tract infections and inversely associated with breastfeeding beyond 4 months. Pubertal incident asthma was more common among firstborn children. All asthma phenotypes with allergic diseases were significantly associated with severity score, whereas familial perinatal stress increased the risk of asthma only. Asthma combined with AR was associated with parental asthma and being firstborn, whereas the risk of asthma with both atopic dermatitis and AR increased with higher paternal education, atopic dermatitis, being firstborn, and familial perinatal stress. Important early risk factors for pubertal asthma were early airways obstruction, parental rhinitis, being the firstborn child, and perinatal familial

  9. Global Asthma Network survey suggests more national asthma strategies could reduce burden of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, I; Haahtela, T; Selroos, O; Ellwood, P; Ellwood, E

    Several countries or regions within countries have an effective national asthma strategy resulting in a reduction of the large burden of asthma to individuals and society. There has been no systematic appraisal of the extent of national asthma strategies in the world. The Global Asthma Network (GAN) undertook an email survey of 276 Principal Investigators of GAN centres in 120 countries, in 2013-2014. One of the questions was: "Has a national asthma strategy been developed in your country for the next five years? For children? For adults?". Investigators in 112 (93.3%) countries answered this question. Of these, 26 (23.2%) reported having a national asthma strategy for children and 24 (21.4%) for adults; 22 (19.6%) countries had a strategy for both children and adults; 28 (25%) had a strategy for at least one age group. In countries with a high prevalence of current wheeze, strategies were significantly more common than in low prevalence countries (11/13 (85%) and 7/31 (22.6%) respectively, pasthma strategy was reported. A large reduction in the global burden of asthma could be potentially achieved if more countries had an effective asthma strategy. Copyright © 2017 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PDF – 1.1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Know How to ... PDF – 1.1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health File Formats Help: ...

  11. Exploring the obesity-asthma link

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, R V; Gonzalez-Quintela, A; Vidal, C

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and risk of asthma are linked. Different distributions of adiposity, such as visceral, subcutaneous or ectopic adiposity, may affect asthma risk differently.......Obesity and risk of asthma are linked. Different distributions of adiposity, such as visceral, subcutaneous or ectopic adiposity, may affect asthma risk differently....

  12. What's an Asthma Flare-Up?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnancy Healthy Food Shopping Healthy Drinks for Kids Asthma Flare-Ups KidsHealth > For Parents > Asthma Flare-Ups ... español ¿Qué es una crisis asmática? What Are Asthma Flare-Ups? Keeping asthma under control helps kids ...

  13. American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Life Spectrum of Asthma Meeting School-based Asthma Management Program – (SAMPRO TM ) This central resource focuses on ... AAAAI is proud to endorse HR 2285, the School-Based Respiratory Health Management Act Read Practice Matters! Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Quality ...

  14. Developing and emerging clinical asthma phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekking, Pieter-Paul W.; Bel, Elisabeth H.

    2014-01-01

    For more than a century, clinicians have attempted to subdivide asthma into different phenotypes based on triggers that cause asthma attacks, the course of the disease, or the prognosis. The first phenotypes that were described included allergic asthma, intrinsic or nonallergic asthma, infectious

  15. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with asthma Tables and Graphs Asthma Call-back Survey Technical Information Prevalence Tables BRFSS Prevalence Data NHIS ... Profiles (2011) Work-related Asthma NCHS Asthma FastStats Survey Questions Resources for Health Professionals and Schools Healthcare ...

  16. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Breathing Easier [PDF – 1.1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Know ... Breathing Easier [PDF – 1.1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health File ...

  17. Communication problems between doctors and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, R C; Matsuno, K; Mulligan, J

    1991-01-01

    Communication difficulties between hospital doctors and nurses are well documented. A survey undertaken jointly by medical and nursing administration at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital in Perth, Western Australia, verified difficulties in doctor-nurse communication as perceived by doctors and nurses, as well as by ward clerks as impartial observers. Questionnaire responses revealed some impediments in the flow of communication. Both nurses and doctors perceived less frequency of difficulties in communicating with members of their own professional group than with members of the other group. Nurses with university preparation and other special clinical qualifications perceived significantly fewer communication problems with doctors than nurses with less education. Interns perceived greater frequency in difficulty communicating with nurses than did more highly qualified doctors, and female doctors who were not interns claimed fewer problems than their male counterparts. Moreover, more highly qualified male doctors who had a previous occupation acknowledged fewer doctor-nurse communication problems.

  18. Prevalence of Exercise Induced Asthma in Female School Students

    OpenAIRE

    Hamid Marefati; Helimeh Nikbine; Mohammad Hossein Boskabady

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of exercise induced asthma (EIA) in Iran is not known. In the present study the  prevalence of  EIA  among female students  of  guidance school  in the  city of Mashhad was evaluated.A total of 1690 female students aged 12-14 years in ten randomly selected schools in north east of Iran (Mashhad) completed an asthma symptoms- specific questionnaire. One hundred forty four randomly selected students including 49 symptomatic and 95 asymptomatic cases participated in a 6 minutes fr...

  19. [Gender patterns in Spanish otolaryngologic doctoral theses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prim-Espada, María Pilar; De Diego-Sastre, Juan Ignacio; Pérez-Fernández, Elia

    2010-01-01

    In last decades women in Spain have a greater access to postgraduate education. The objective of this study was to perform a gender analysis on the Otolaryngology doctoral theses presented in a 25 year-period. The TESEO data base on doctoral theses was searched for theses on Otorhinolaryngology written between 1981 and 2005. As strategy for the research we employed the terms: 1) Otorrinolaringología (Otorhinolaryngology); 2) Cirugía de garganta, nariz y oídos (Ear, nose and throat surgery); 3) Fisiología de la audición (Physiology of hearing); 4) Fisiología del equilibrio (Physiology of balance); 5) Física de la audición (Physics of hearing); and 6) Bioacústica (Bioacoustics). A total of 450 theses (18.0±8.3 theses/year) were found, of which 129 were written by females (28.6%). There was a gender imbalance among authors, with 5.2±3.4 theses/year for women vs. 12.9±6.6 theses/year for men (p=0.0002). Nevertheless, there was a tendency toward equality in the last 10 years (p=0.001). On the other hand, the PhD student's gender was clearly related to the supervisor's gender (p=0.0001). With respect to the main topics in our area (otology, audiology/vestibular diseases, rhinology and pathology of paranasal sinuses and neck diseases), there were no significant differences between males and females (p=0.231). These results indicate a tendency towards equality in the number of men and women successfully completing doctoral studies in Otolaryngology. However, the PhD student's gender is clearly related to the supervisor's gender. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Eicosanoids in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Kong-Sang; Wu, Wei-Fong

    2007-01-01

    Eicosanoids belong to a diverse family of bioactive fatty acids that play important roles in regulating airway inflammation and reactivity. They are the key mediators of the pathobiology of asthma. Among the eicosanoids, lipoxins (LXs) were the first agents to be identified and recognized as potential anti-inflammatory endogenous lipid mediators. Lipoxins are biosynthesized in vivo at inflammation sites. They result mainly from the interaction between 5 and 15-lipoxygenases (LOs), which are distinct from leukotrienes (LTs) and prostaglandins (PGs) in structure and function. Leukotrienes are potent proinflammatory mediators and directly and indirectly stimulate fibroblast chemotaxis, proliferation, and collagen synthesis. Prostaglandins have both bronchoconstrictive and bronchoprotective effects and the bronchoconstriction mediated by PGD2 and PGF2alpha is only occurred in asthmatic patients but not in healthy subjects. Lipoxins counter-regulate the proinflammatory actions of LTs and activate resolution of the inflammatory response. At least two classes of receptors, CysLT1 receptors and Asprin-triggered lipoxin A4 (ALX) receptors, can interact with lipoxin A4 (LXA4) and LXA4 analogs to mediate their biologic actions. Allergen challenge initiates airway biosynthesis of LXA4 and increases expression of its receptor. In addition, LXA4 affects the release of interleukin-8 by blood mononuclear cells, and ALX affects calcium influx into epithelial cells. Therefore, the pivotal role of LXs is mediating airway homeostasis, and LXs may be part of a novel, multipronged approach for treating human asthma.