WorldWideScience

Sample records for astatine-211-labeled chimeric 81c6

  1. Human/murine chimeric 81C6 F(ab')2 fragment: preclinical evaluation of a potential construct for the targeted radiotherapy of malignant glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boskovitz, Abraham; Akabani, Gamal H.; Pegram, Charles N.; Bigner, Darrell D.; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    We have obtained encouraging responses in recent Phase I studies evaluating 131 I-labeled human/murine chimeric 81C6 anti-tenascin monoclonal antibody (ch81C6) administered into surgically-created tumor resection cavities in brain tumor patients. However, because the blood clearance is slow, hematologic toxicity has been higher than seen with murine 81C6 (mu81C6). In the current study, a series of paired-label experiments were performed in athymic mice bearing subcutaneous D-245 MG human glioma xenografts to compare the biodistribution of the fragment ch81C6 F(ab') 2 labeled using Iodogen to a) intact ch81C6, b) mu81C6, and c) ch81C6 F(ab') 2 labeled using N-succinimidyl 3-[ 131 I]iodobenzoate. Tumor retention of radioiodine activity for the F(ab') 2 fragment was comparable to that for intact ch81C6 for the first 24 h and to that for mu81C6 for the first 48 h; as expected, blood and other normal tissue levels declined faster for ch81C6 F(ab') 2. Radiation dosimetry calculations suggest that 131 I-labeled ch81C6 F(ab') 2 may warrant further evaluation as a targeted radiotherapeutic for the treatment of brain tumors

  2. Human/murine chimeric 81C6 F(ab'){sub 2} fragment: preclinical evaluation of a potential construct for the targeted radiotherapy of malignant glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boskovitz, Abraham; Akabani, Gamal H.; Pegram, Charles N.; Bigner, Darrell D.; Zalutsky, Michael R. E-mail: zalut001@mc.duke.edu

    2004-04-01

    We have obtained encouraging responses in recent Phase I studies evaluating {sup 131}I-labeled human/murine chimeric 81C6 anti-tenascin monoclonal antibody (ch81C6) administered into surgically-created tumor resection cavities in brain tumor patients. However, because the blood clearance is slow, hematologic toxicity has been higher than seen with murine 81C6 (mu81C6). In the current study, a series of paired-label experiments were performed in athymic mice bearing subcutaneous D-245 MG human glioma xenografts to compare the biodistribution of the fragment ch81C6 F(ab'){sub 2} labeled using Iodogen to a) intact ch81C6, b) mu81C6, and c) ch81C6 F(ab'){sub 2} labeled using N-succinimidyl 3-[{sup 131}I]iodobenzoate. Tumor retention of radioiodine activity for the F(ab'){sub 2} fragment was comparable to that for intact ch81C6 for the first 24 h and to that for mu81C6 for the first 48 h; as expected, blood and other normal tissue levels declined faster for ch81C6 F(ab'){sub 2.} Radiation dosimetry calculations suggest that {sup 131}I-labeled ch81C6 F(ab'){sub 2} may warrant further evaluation as a targeted radiotherapeutic for the treatment of brain tumors.

  3. Preparation and evaluation of an astatine-211-labeled sigma receptor ligand for alpha radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Kazuma; Mizuno, Yoshiaki; Washiyama, Kohshin; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Naruto; Kozaka, Takashi; Watanabe, Shigeki; Shinohara, Atsushi; Odani, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sigma receptors are overexpressed in a variety of human tumors, making them potential targets for radionuclide receptor therapy. We have previously synthesized and evaluated 131 I-labeled (+)-2-[4-(4-iodophenyl)piperidino]cyclohexanol [(+)-[ 131 I]pIV], which has a high affinity for sigma receptors. Therefore, (+)-[ 131 I]pIV significantly inhibited tumor cell proliferation in tumor-bearing mice. In the present study, we report the synthesis and the in vitro and in vivo characterization of (+)-[ 211 At]pAtV, an 211 At-labeled sigma receptor ligand, that has potential use in alpha-radionuclide receptor therapy. Methods: The radiolabeled sigma receptor ligand (+)-[ 211 At]pAtV was prepared using a standard halogenation reaction generating a 91% radiochemical yield with 98% purity after HPLC purification. The partition coefficient of (+)-[ 211 At]pAtV was measured. Cellular uptake experiments and in vivo biodistribution experiments were performed using a mixed solution of (+)-[ 211 At]pAtV and (+)-[ 125 I]pIV; the human prostate cancer cell line DU-145, which expresses high levels of the sigma receptors, and DU-145 tumor-bearing mice. Results: The lipophilicity of (+)-[ 211 At]pAtV was similar to that of (+)-[ 125 I]pIV. DU-145 cellular uptake and the biodistribution patterns in DU-145 tumor-bearing mice at 1 h post-injection were also similar between (+)-[ 211 At]pAtV and (+)-[ 125 I]pIV. Namely, (+)-[ 211 At]pAtV demonstrated high uptake and retention in tumor via binding to sigma receptors. Conclusion: These results indicate that (+)-[ 211 At]pAtV could function as an new agent for alpha-radionuclide receptor therapy.

  4. Preparation and evaluation of an astatine-211-labeled sigma receptor ligand for alpha radionuclide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Kazuma; Mizuno, Yoshiaki; Washiyama, Kohshin; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Naruto; Kozaka, Takashi; Watanabe, Shigeki; Shinohara, Atsushi; Odani, Akira

    2015-11-01

    Sigma receptors are overexpressed in a variety of human tumors, making them potential targets for radionuclide receptor therapy. We have previously synthesized and evaluated (131)I-labeled (+)-2-[4-(4-iodophenyl)piperidino]cyclohexanol [(+)-[(131)I]pIV], which has a high affinity for sigma receptors. Therefore, (+)-[(131)I]pIV significantly inhibited tumor cell proliferation in tumor-bearing mice. In the present study, we report the synthesis and the in vitro and in vivo characterization of (+)-[(211)At]pAtV, an (211)At-labeled sigma receptor ligand, that has potential use in alpha-radionuclide receptor therapy. The radiolabeled sigma receptor ligand (+)-[(211)At]pAtV was prepared using a standard halogenation reaction generating a 91% radiochemical yield with 98% purity after HPLC purification. The partition coefficient of (+)-[(211)At]pAtV was measured. Cellular uptake experiments and in vivo biodistribution experiments were performed using a mixed solution of (+)-[(211)At]pAtV and (+)-[(125)I]pIV; the human prostate cancer cell line DU-145, which expresses high levels of the sigma receptors, and DU-145 tumor-bearing mice. The lipophilicity of (+)-[(211)At]pAtV was similar to that of (+)-[(125)I]pIV. DU-145 cellular uptake and the biodistribution patterns in DU-145 tumor-bearing mice at 1h post-injection were also similar between (+)-[(211)At]pAtV and (+)-[(125)I]pIV. Namely, (+)-[(211)At]pAtV demonstrated high uptake and retention in tumor via binding to sigma receptors. These results indicate that (+)-[(211)At]pAtV could function as an new agent for alpha-radionuclide receptor therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Chimeric Pestivirus Experimental Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, Ilona; Blome, Sandra; Beer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric pestiviruses have shown great potential as marker vaccine candidates against pestiviral infections. Exemplarily, we describe here the construction and testing of the most promising classical swine fever vaccine candidate "CP7_E2alf" in detail. The description is focused on classical cloning technologies in combination with reverse genetics.

  6. Chimeric enzymes with improved cellulase activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qi; Baker, John O; Himmel, Michael E

    2015-03-31

    Nucleic acid molecules encoding chimeric cellulase polypeptides that exhibit improved cellulase activities are disclosed herein. The chimeric cellulase polypeptides encoded by these nucleic acids and methods to produce the cellulases are also described, along with methods of using chimeric cellulases for the conversion of cellulose to sugars such as glucose.

  7. Posttransplant chimeric antigen receptor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Melody; Zakrzewski, Johannes; James, Scott; Sadelain, Michel

    2018-03-08

    Therapeutic T-cell engineering is emerging as a powerful approach to treat refractory hematological malignancies. Its most successful embodiment to date is based on the use of second-generation chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting CD19, a cell surface molecule found in most B-cell leukemias and lymphomas. Remarkable complete remissions have been obtained with autologous T cells expressing CD19 CARs in patients with relapsed, chemo-refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Allogeneic CAR T cells may also be harnessed to treat relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, the use of donor T cells poses unique challenges owing to potential alloreactivity. We review different approaches to mitigate the risk of causing or aggravating graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), including CAR therapies based on donor leukocyte infusion, virus-specific T cells, T-cell receptor-deficient T cells, lymphoid progenitor cells, and regulatory T cells. Advances in CAR design, T-cell selection and gene editing are poised to enable the safe use of allogeneic CAR T cells without incurring GVHD. © 2018 by The American Society of Hematology.

  8. Virulence, immunogenicity and vaccine properties of a novel chimeric pestivirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Uttenthal, Åse; Reimann, Ilona

    2007-01-01

    A chimeric pestivirus of border disease virus Gifhorn and bovine viral diarrhea virus CP7 (Meyers et al., 1996) was constructed. Virulence, immunogenicity and vaccine properties of the chimeric virus were studied in a vaccination–challenge experiment in pigs. The chimeric virus proved to be aviru......A chimeric pestivirus of border disease virus Gifhorn and bovine viral diarrhea virus CP7 (Meyers et al., 1996) was constructed. Virulence, immunogenicity and vaccine properties of the chimeric virus were studied in a vaccination–challenge experiment in pigs. The chimeric virus proved...

  9. Tumor resection cavity administered iodine-131-labeled antitenascin 81C6 radioimmunotherapy in patients with malignant glioma: neuropathology aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLendon, Roger E. [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)]. E-mail: mclen001@mc.duke.edu; Akabani, Gamal [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Friedman, Henry S. [Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Reardon, David A. [Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Cleveland, Linda [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Cokgor, Ilkcan [Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Herndon, James E. [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Wikstrand, Carol [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Boulton, Susan T. [Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Friedman, Allan H. [Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Bigner, Darell D. [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Zalutsky, Michael R. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)

    2007-05-15

    Introduction: The neurohistological findings in patients treated with targeted {beta} emitters such as {sup 131}I are poorly described. We report a histopathologic analysis from patients treated with combined external beam therapy and a brachytherapy consisting of a {sup 131}I-labeled monoclonal antibody (mAb) injected into surgically created resection cavities during brain tumor resections. Methods: Directed tissue samples of the cavity walls were obtained because of suspected tumor recurrence from 28 patients. Samples and clinical follow-up were evaluated on all patients (Group A) based on total radiation dose received and a subset of these (n=18; Group B, proximal therapy subset) who had received external beam therapy within {<=}3 months of mAb therapy and undergoing 26 biopsies over 37 months. Histologic outcomes were 'proliferative glioma,' 'quiescent glioma' and negative for neoplasm. Statistical analysis was used to assess the casual relation between total absorbed dose ({sup 131}I-mAb+external beam) and histologic diagnosis. Results: The lesions observed after {sup 131}I-mAb therapy were qualitatively similar to those reported for other types of radiation therapy; however, the high localized dose rate and absorbed doses produced by the short range of {sup 131}I {beta} particles seem to have resulted in an earlier necrotic reaction in the tumor bed. Among all 28 (Group A) patients, median survival from tissue analysis after mAb therapy depended on histopathology and total radiation absorbed dose. Median survival for patients with tissue classified as proliferative glioma, quiescent glioma and negative for neoplasm were 3.5, 15 and 27.5 months, respectively. Without categorization, total dose was a significant predictor of survival (P<.002) where patients with higher doses had better prognoses. For example, median survival in patients receiving a total radiation dose greater than 86 Gy was 19 months compared with 7 months for those receiving less than 86 Gy. Conclusions: Histopathologic analysis correlated with prognosis. Among all patients (Group A) there was a significant correlation between biopsy outcome, survival, and total radiation absorbed dose. Among the Group B proximal therapy patients, the neuropathologic changes were qualitatively similar to those described for external beam therapy and interstitial brachytherapy.

  10. Chimeric polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wogulis, Mark; Sweeney, Matthew; Heu, Tia

    2017-06-14

    The present invention relates to chimeric GH61 polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the chimeric GH61 polypeptides; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the chimeric GH61 polypeptides.

  11. Chimerism in health, transplantation and autoimmunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, Marije; Kremer Hovinga, Idske Cornelia Lydia

    2009-01-01

    The term “chimerism” originates from Greek mythology and refers to the creature Chimaera, whose body was in front a lion, the back a serpent and the midsection a goat. In medicine, the term chimerism refers to an individual, organ or part consisting of tissues of diverse genetic constitution.

  12. Development of chimeric laccases by directed evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Isabel; Vicente, Ana Isabel; Mate, Diana M; Alcalde, Miguel; Camarero, Susana

    2012-12-01

    DNA recombination methods are useful tools to generate diversity in directed evolution protein engineering studies. We have designed an array of chimeric laccases with high-redox potential by in vitro and in vivo DNA recombination of two fungal laccases (from Pycnoporus cinnabarinus and PM1 basidiomycete), which were previously tailored by laboratory evolution for functional expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The laccase fusion genes (including the evolved α-factor prepro-leaders for secretion in yeast) were subjected to a round of family shuffling to construct chimeric libraries and the best laccase hybrids were identified in dual high-throughput screening (HTS) assays. Using this approach, we identified chimeras with up to six crossover events in the whole sequence, and we obtained active hybrid laccases with combined characteristics in terms of pH activity and thermostability. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Detection and quantification of chimerism by droplet digital PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, David; Czech, Juliann; John, Bobby; Yu, Min; Jennings, Lawrence J

    2013-01-01

    Accurate quantification of chimerism and microchimerism is proving to be increasingly valuable for hematopoietic cell transplantation as well as non-transplant conditions. However, methods that are available to quantify low-level chimerism lack accuracy. Therefore, we developed and validated a method for quantifying chimerism based on digital PCR technology. We demonstrate accurate quantification that far exceeds what is possible with analog qPCR down to 0.01% with the potential to go even lower. Also, this method is inherently more informative than qPCR. We expect the advantages of digital PCR will make it the preferred method for chimerism analysis.

  14. Pregnancy, chimerism and lupus nephritis: a multi-centre study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremer Hovinga, I.C.; Koopmans, M.; Grootscholten, C.; Wal, A.M. van der; Bijl, M. van der; Derksen, R.H.W.M.; Voskuyl, A.E.; Heer, E. de; Bruijn, J.A.; Berden, J.H.M.; Bajema, I.M.

    2008-01-01

    Chimerism occurs twice as often in the kidneys of women with lupus nephritis as in normal kidneys and may be involved in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus. Pregnancy is considered the most important source of chimerism, but the exact relationship between pregnancy, the persistence of

  15. Pregnancy, chimerism and lupus nephritis : a multi-centre study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovinga, I. C. L. Kremer; Koopmans, M.; Grootscholten, C.; van der Wal, A. M.; Bijl, M.; Derksen, R. H. W. M.; Voslcuyl, A. E.; de Heer, E.; Bruijn, J. A.; Berden, J. H. M.; Rajema, I. M.

    2008-01-01

    Chimerism occurs twice as often in the kidneys of women with lupus nephritis as in normal kidneys and may he involved in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus. Pregnancy is considered the most important source of chimerism, but the exact relationship between pregnancy, the persistence of

  16. Vectors expressing chimeric Japanese encephalitis dengue 2 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Y; Wang, S; Wang, X

    2014-01-01

    Vectors based on self-replicating RNAs (replicons) of flaviviruses are becoming powerful tool for expression of heterologous genes in mammalian cells and development of novel antiviral and anticancer vaccines. We constructed two vectors expressing chimeric viruses consisting of attenuated SA14-14-2 strain of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) in which the PrM/M-E genes were replaced fully or partially with those of dengue 2 virus (DENV-2). These vectors, named pJED2 and pJED2-1770 were transfected to BHK-21 cells and produced chimeric viruses JED2V and JED2-1770V, respectively. The chimeric viruses could be passaged in C6/36 but not BHK-21 cells. The chimeric viruses produced in C6/36 cells CPE 4-5 days after infection and RT-PCR, sequencing, immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and Western blot analysis confirmed the chimeric nature of produced viruses. The immunogenicity of chimeric viruses in mice was proved by detecting DENV-2 E protein-specific serum IgG antibodies with neutralization titer of 10. Successful preparation of infectious clones of chimeric JEV-DENV-2 viruses showed that JEV-based expression vectors are fully functional.

  17. Chimeric Plastics : a new class of thermoplastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenschein, Mark

    A new class of thermoplastics (dubbed ``Chimerics'') is described that exhibits a high temperature glass transition followed by high performance elastomer properties, prior to melting. These transparent materials are comprised of co-continuous phase-separated block copolymers. One block is an amorphous glass with a high glass transition temperature, and the second is a higher temperature phase transition block creating virtual thermoreversible crosslinks. The material properties are highly influenced by phase separation on the order of 10-30 nanometers. At lower temperatures the polymer reflects the sum of the block copolymer properties. As the amorphous phase glass transition is exceeded, the virtual crosslinks of the higher temperature second phase dominate the plastic properties, resulting in rubber-like elasticity.

  18. chimeraviz: a tool for visualizing chimeric RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lågstad, Stian; Zhao, Sen; Hoff, Andreas M; Johannessen, Bjarne; Lingjærde, Ole Christian; Skotheim, Rolf I

    2017-09-15

    Advances in high-throughput RNA sequencing have enabled more efficient detection of fusion transcripts, but the technology and associated software used for fusion detection from sequencing data often yield a high false discovery rate. Good prioritization of the results is important, and this can be helped by a visualization framework that automatically integrates RNA data with known genomic features. Here we present chimeraviz , a Bioconductor package that automates the creation of chimeric RNA visualizations. The package supports input from nine different fusion-finder tools: deFuse, EricScript, InFusion, JAFFA, FusionCatcher, FusionMap, PRADA, SOAPfuse and STAR-FUSION. chimeraviz is an R package available via Bioconductor ( https://bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/chimeraviz.html ) under Artistic-2.0. Source code and support is available at GitHub ( https://github.com/stianlagstad/chimeraviz ). rolf.i.skotheim@rr-research.no. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  19. Developmental competence of porcine chimeric embryos produced by aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Juan; Jakobsen, Jannik E.; Xiong, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    either by parthenogenetic activation (PA) or handmade cloning (HMC). Results showed that the developmental competence of chimeric embryos, evaluated based on their blastocyst rate and total cell number per blastocyst, was increased when two whole 2-cell stage embryos (PA or HMC) were aggregated....... In comparison, when two blastomeres were aggregated, the developmental competence of the chimeric embryos decreased if the blastomeres were either from PA or from HMC embryos, but not if they were from different sources, i.e. one PA and one HMC blastomere. To evaluate the cell contribution in embryo formation......, aggregation was made with HMC embryos cloned using EGFP transgenic cells; the cell contribution in the formation of the inner cell mass or trophectoderm was random in chimeric blastocysts. Finally, two blastomeres from 2-cell stage embryos were fused to construct tetraploid embryos, and when diploid...

  20. A PCR amplification strategy for unrestricted generation of chimeric genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Michel J.; Kampinga, Harm H.

    2008-01-01

    For analyzing protein function, protein dynamics, or protein-protein interactions, the use of chimeric proteins has become an indispensable tool. The generation of DNA constructs coding for such fused proteins can, however, be a tedious process. Currently used strategies often make use of available

  1. Systematic evaluation of atmospheric chemistry-transport model CHIMERE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khvorostyanov, Dmitry; Menut, Laurent; Mailler, Sylvain; Siour, Guillaume; Couvidat, Florian; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Turquety, Solene

    2017-04-01

    Regional-scale atmospheric chemistry-transport models (CTM) are used to develop air quality regulatory measures, to support environmentally sensitive decisions in the industry, and to address variety of scientific questions involving the atmospheric composition. Model performance evaluation with measurement data is critical to understand their limits and the degree of confidence in model results. CHIMERE CTM (http://www.lmd.polytechnique.fr/chimere/) is a French national tool for operational forecast and decision support and is widely used in the international research community in various areas of atmospheric chemistry and physics, climate, and environment (http://www.lmd.polytechnique.fr/chimere/CW-articles.php). This work presents the model evaluation framework applied systematically to the new CHIMERE CTM versions in the course of the continuous model development. The framework uses three of the four CTM evaluation types identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the American Meteorological Society (AMS): operational, diagnostic, and dynamic. It allows to compare the overall model performance in subsequent model versions (operational evaluation), identify specific processes and/or model inputs that could be improved (diagnostic evaluation), and test the model sensitivity to the changes in air quality, such as emission reductions and meteorological events (dynamic evaluation). The observation datasets currently used for the evaluation are: EMEP (surface concentrations), AERONET (optical depths), and WOUDC (ozone sounding profiles). The framework is implemented as an automated processing chain and allows interactive exploration of the results via a web interface.

  2. Therapeutic use of chimeric bacteriophage (phage) lysins in staphylococcal endophthalmitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose: Phage endolysins are peptidoglycan hydrolases that are produced at the end of the phage lytic cycle to digest the host bacterial cell wall, facilitating the release of mature phage progeny. The aim of this study is to determine the antimicrobial activity of chimeric phage lysins against cli...

  3. Chimera: construction of chimeric sequences for phylogenetic analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leunissen, J.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Chimera allows the construction of chimeric protein or nucleic acid sequence files by concatenating sequences from two or more sequence files in PHYLIP formats. It allows the user to interactively select genes and species from the input files. The concatenated result is stored to one single output

  4. Expression of chimeric HCV peptide in transgenic tobacco plants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Expression of chimeric HCV peptide in transgenic tobacco plants infected with recombinant alfalfa mosaic virus for development of a plant-derived vaccine against HCV. AK El Attar, AM Shamloul, AA Shalaby, BY Riad, A Saad, HM Mazyad, JM Keith ...

  5. Study of allosteric communications in chimeric two-domain proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boušová, Kristýna

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 26, S1 (2017), s. 74 ISSN 0961-8368. [Annual Symposium of the Protein Society /31./. 24.07.2017-27.07.2017, Montreal] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : protein domains * chimeric structures Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  6. Modeling cognition and disease using human glial chimeric mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldman, Steven A.; Nedergaard, Maiken; Windrem, Martha S.

    2015-01-01

    As new methods for producing and isolating human glial progenitor cells (hGPCs) have been developed, the disorders of myelin have become especially compelling targets for cell-based therapy. Yet as animal modeling of glial progenitor cell-based therapies has progressed, it has become clear......, oligodendrocytes as well. As a result, the recipient brains may become inexorably humanized with regards to their resident glial populations, yielding human glial chimeric mouse brains. These brains provide us a fundamentally new tool by which to assess the species-specific attributes of glia in modulating human...... for studying the human-specific contributions of glia to psychopathology, as well as to higher cognition. As such, the assessment of human glial chimeric mice may provide us new insight into the species-specific contributions of glia to human cognitive evolution, as well as to the pathogenesis of human...

  7. An E2-Substituted Chimeric Pestivirus With DIVA Vaccine Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Uttenthal, Åse; Nielsen, Jens

    engineered specifically for this purpose. The E2-substituted Riems26_E2gif was derived by homologues recombination of the complete E2 protein encoding genome region from Border disease strain Gifhorn into a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) harbouring the genome of the CSFV vaccine strain C......An advantage of the use of chimeric pestiviruses as modified live vaccines against classical swine fever (CSF) resides in their capacity to be manipulated to achieve the characteristics desired for safe and efficacious DIVA vaccines. We have recently generated a new chimeric virus, Riems26_E2gif......-Riems. The virulence, immunogenicity and vaccine properties of Riems26_E2gif were tested in a vaccine-challenge experiment in pigs. Riems26_E2gif vaccinated pigs could be differentiated from infected pigs using a CSFV-E2 specific ELISA. Following challenge infection with highly virulent CSFV strain Koslov, all...

  8. Blood Chimerism in Dizygotic Monochorionic Twins During 5 Years Observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziegiel, M H; Hansen, M H; Haedersdal, S; Barrett, A N; Rieneck, K; Main, K M; Hansen, A T; Clausen, F B

    2017-10-01

    Dizygotic monochorionic twin pregnancies can result in blood chimerism due to in utero twin-to-twin exchange of stem cells. In this case, we examined the proportion of allogeneic red blood cells by flow cytometry and the proportion of allogeneic nucleated cells by digital polymerase chain reaction at 7 months and again at 5 years. We found an increase in the proportion of allogeneic cells from 63% to 89% in one twin, and a similar increase in autologous cells in the other twin from 57% to 84%. A paradigm for stem cell therapy could be modeled on this case: induction of tolerance and chimerism by antenatal transfusion of donor stem cells. The procedure would hold the promise of transplantation and tolerance induction without myeloablative conditioning for inheritable benign hematological diseases such as sickle cell disease and thalassemia. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  9. Chimeric recombinant antibody fragments in cardiac troponin I immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyytiä, Heidi; Heikkilä, Taina; Brockmann, Eeva-Christine; Kekki, Henna; Hedberg, Pirjo; Puolakanaho, Tarja; Lövgren, Timo; Pettersson, Kim

    2015-03-01

    To introduce a novel nanoparticle-based immunoassay for cardiac troponin I (cTnI) utilizing chimeric antibody fragments and to demonstrate that removal of antibody Fc-part and antibody chimerization decrease matrix related interferences. A sandwich-type immunoassay for cTnI based on recombinant chimeric (mouse variable/human constant) antigen binding (cFab) antibodies and intrinsically fluorescent nanoparticles was developed. To test whether using chimeric antibody fragments helps to avoid matrix related interferences, samples (n=39) with known amounts of triglycerides, bilirubin, rheumatoid factor (RF) or human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMAs) were measured with the novel assay, along with a previously published nanoparticle-based research assay with the same antibody epitopes. The limit of detection (LoD) was 3.30ng/L. Within-laboratory precision for 29ng/L and 2819ng/L cTnI were 13.7% and 15.9%, respectively. Regression analysis with Siemens ADVIA Centaur® yielded a slope (95% confidence intervals) of 0.18 (0.17-1.19) and a y-intercept of 1.94 (-1.28-3.91) ng/L. When compared to a previously published nanoparticle-based assay, the novel assay showed substantially reduced interference in the tested interference prone samples, 15.4 vs. 51.3%. A rheumatoid factor containing sample was decreased from 241ng/L to

  10. Tolerance in Nonhuman Primates by Delayed Mixed Chimerism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    human primate model SA2: To investigate the effect of T memory cell inhibition and in-vivo T regulatory cell up regulation on the delayed induction of VCA...life of the recipient to prevent rejection, remain significant areas in which improvement would enhance quality of life, improve the risk-benefit ratio...induction of mixed chimerism in a non- human primate (NHP) model. This approach, in contrast to protocols which have already reached clinical trials

  11. Elutriated lymphocytes for manufacturing chimeric antigen receptor T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Stroncek, David F.; Lee, Daniel W.; Ren, Jiaqiang; Sabatino, Marianna; Highfill, Steven; Khuu, Hanh; Shah, Nirali N.; Kaplan, Rosandra N.; Fry, Terry J.; Mackall, Crystal L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Clinical trials of Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cells manufactured from autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) concentrates for the treatment of hematologic malignancies have been promising, but CAR T cell yields have been variable. This variability is due in part to the contamination of the PBMC concentrates with monocytes and granulocytes. Methods Counter-flow elutriation allows for the closed system separation of lymphocytes from monocytes and granulocytes. We ...

  12. Cord Blood Chimerism And Relapse After Haplo-Cord Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Besien, Koen; Koshy, Nebu; Gergis, Usama; Mayer, Sebastian; Cushing, Melissa; Rennert, Hannah; Slotky, Ronit; Mark, Tomer; Pearse, Roger; Rossi, Adriana; Phillips, Adrienne; Vasovic, Liljana; Ferrante, Rosanna; Hsu, Michael; Shore, Tsiporah

    2018-01-01

    Haplo-cord stem cell transplantation combines the infusion of CD34 selected hematopoietic progenitors from a haplo-identical donor with an umbilical cord blood graft from an unrelated donor and allows faster count recovery, with low rates of disease recurrence and chronic GVHD. But the contribution of the umbilical cord blood graft to long-term transplant outcome remains unclear. We analyzed 39 recipients of haplo-cord transplants with AML and MDS, engrafted and in remission at 2 months. Median age was 66 (18-72) and all had intermediate, high, or very high risk disease. Less than 20% UCB chimerism in the CD33 lineage was associated with an increased rate of disease recurrence (54% vs 11% Pdisease recurrence (46% vs 12%, P=0.007) Persistent haplo-chimerism in the CD3 lineage was associated with an increased rate of disease recurrence (40% vs 15%, P=0.009) Chimerism did not predict for treatment related mortality. The cumulative incidence of acute GVHD by day 100 was 43%. The cumulative incidence of moderate/severe chronic GVHD was only 5%. Engraftment of the umbilical cord blood grafts provides powerful GVL effects which protect against disease recurrence and is associated with low risk of chronic GVHD. Engraftment of CD34 selected haplo-identical cells can lead to rapid development of circulating T-cells, but when these cells dominate, GVL-effects are limited and rates of disease recurrence are high. PMID:27333804

  13. Thionin-D4E1 chimeric protein protects plants against bacterial infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, Eddie W; Gupta, Goutam; Hao, Guixia

    2017-08-08

    The generation of a chimeric protein containing a first domain encoding either a pro-thionon or thionin, a second domain encoding D4E1 or pro-D4E1, and a third domain encoding a peptide linker located between the first domain and second domain is described. Either the first domain or the second domain is located at the amino terminal of the chimeric protein and the other domain (second domain or first domain, respectively) is located at the carboxyl terminal. The chimeric protein has antibacterial activity. Genetically altered plants and their progeny expressing a polynucleotide encoding the chimeric protein resist diseases caused by bacteria.

  14. Chimeric OspA genes, proteins and methods of use thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowe, Brian A.; Livey, Ian; O' Rourke, Maria; Schwendinger, Michael; Dunn, John J.; Luft, Benjamin J.

    2018-02-20

    The invention relates to the development of chimeric OspA molecules for use in a new Lyme vaccine. More specifically, the chimeric OspA molecules comprise the proximal portion from one OspA serotype, together with the distal portion from another OspA serotype, while retaining antigenic properties of both of the parent polypeptides. The chimeric OspA molecules are delivered alone or in combination to provide protection against a variety of Borrelia genospecies. The invention also provides methods for administering the chimeric OspA molecules to a subject in the prevention and treatment of Lyme disease or borreliosis.

  15. Construction, purification, and characterization of a chimeric TH1 antagonist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier-González Luís

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TH1 immune response antagonism is a desirable approach to mitigate some autoimmune and inflammatory reactions during the course of several diseases where IL-2 and IFN-γ are two central players. Therefore, the neutralization of both cytokines could provide beneficial effects in patients suffering from autoimmune or inflammatory illnesses. Results A chimeric antagonist that can antagonize the action of TH1 immunity mediators, IFN-γ and IL-2, was designed, engineered, expressed in E. coli, purified and evaluated for its in vitro biological activities. The TH1 antagonist molecule consists of the extracellular region for the human IFNγ receptor chain 1 fused by a four-aminoacid linker peptide to human 60 N-terminal aminoacid residues of IL-2. The corresponding gene fragments were isolated by RT-PCR and cloned in the pTPV-1 vector. E. coli (W3110 strain was transformed with this vector. The chimeric protein was expressed at high level as inclusion bodies. The protein was partially purified by pelleting and washing. It was then solubilized with strong denaturant and finally refolded by gel filtration. In vitro biological activity of chimera was demonstrated by inhibition of IFN-γ-dependent HLA-DR expression in Colo 205 cells, inhibition of IFN-γ antiproliferative effect on HEp-2 cells, and by a bidirectional effect in assays for IL-2 T-cell dependent proliferation: agonism in the absence versus inhibition in the presence of IL-2. Conclusion TH1 antagonist is a chimeric protein that inhibits the in vitro biological activities of human IFN-γ, and is a partial agonist/antagonist of human IL-2. With these attributes, the chimera has the potential to offer a new opportunity for the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases.

  16. Chimeric creatures in Greek mythology and reflections in science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazopoulou-Kyrkanidou, E

    2001-04-15

    "The Chimaera" in Homer's Iliad, "was of divine stock, not of men, in the forepart a lion, in the hinder a serpent, and in the midst a goat, ellipsis Bellerophon slew her, trusting in the signs of the gods." In Hesiod's Theogony it is emphasized that "Chimaera ellipsis had three heads, one of a grim-eyed lion, another of a goat, and another of a snakeellipsis". In addition to this interspecies animal chimera, human/animal chimeras are referred to in Greek mythology, preeminent among them the Centaurs and the Minotaur. The Centaurs, as horse/men, first appear in Geometric and early Archaic art, but in the literature not until early in the fifth century B.C. The bullheaded-man Minotaur, who is not certainly attested in the literary evidence until circa 500 B.C., first appears in art about 650 B.C. Attempts, in the fourth century B.C. and thereafter, to rationalize their mythical appearance were in vain; their chimeric nature retained its fascinating and archetypal form over the centuries. Early in the 1980s, experimental sheep/goat chimeras were produced removing the reproductive barrier between these two animal species. Late in the 1990s, legal, political, ethical, and moral fights loomed over a patent bid on human/animal chimeras. Chimeric technology is recently developed; however, the concept of chimerism has existed in literary and artistic form in ancient mythology. This is yet another example where art and literature precede scientific research and development. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss. Inc.

  17. Immunogenicity of candidate chimeric DNA vaccine against tuberculosis and leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Ayan; Kumar, Umesh; Sharma, Pawan; Singh, Sarman

    2009-08-13

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Leishmania donovani are important intracellular pathogens, especially in Indian context. In India and other South East Asian countries, both these infections are highly endemic and in about 20% cases co-infection of these pathogens is reported. For both these pathogens cell mediated immunity plays most important role. The available treatment of these infections is either prolonged or cumbersome or it is ineffective in controlling the outbreaks and spread. Therefore, potentiation of a common host defense mechanism can be used to prevent both the infections simultaneously. In this study we have developed a novel chimeric DNA vaccine candidate comprising the esat-6 gene of M. tuberculosis and kinesin motor domain gene of L. donovani. After developing this novel chimera, its immunogenicity was studied in mouse model. The immune response was compared with individual constructs of esat-6 and kinesin motor domain. The results showed that immunization with chimeric DNA vaccine construct resulted in stronger IFN-gamma and IL-2 response against kinesin (3012+/-102 and 367.5+/-8.92pg/ml) and ESAT-6 (1334+/-46.5 and 245.1+/-7.72pg/ml) in comparison to the individual vaccine constructs. The reciprocal immune response (IFN-gamma and IL-2) against individual construct was lower (kinesin motor domain: 1788+/-36.48 and 341.8+/-9.801pg/ml and ESAT-6: 867.0+/-47.23 and 170.8+/-4.578pg/ml, respectively). The results also suggest that using the chimeric construct both proteins yielded a reciprocal adjuvant affect over each other as the IFN-gamma production against chimera vaccination is statistically significant (pleishmaniasis and tuberculosis and have important implication in future vaccine design.

  18. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kheng Newick

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cells are engineered constructs composed of synthetic receptors that direct T cells to surface antigens for subsequent elimination. Many CAR constructs are also manufactured with elements that augment T-cell persistence and activity. To date, CAR T cells have demonstrated tremendous success in eradicating hematological malignancies (e.g., CD19 CARs in leukemias. This success is not yet extrapolated to solid tumors, and the reasons for this are being actively investigated. Here in this mini-review, we discuss some of the key hurdles encountered by CAR T cells in the solid tumor microenvironment.

  19. High-resolution air quality simulation over Europe with the chemistry transport model CHIMERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Terrenoire

    2015-01-01

    The results suggest that future work should focus on the development of national bottom-up emission inventories including a better account for semi-volatile organic compounds and their conversion to SOA, the improvement of the CHIMERE urban parameterization, the introduction into CHIMERE of the coarse nitrate chemistry and an advanced parameterization accounting for windblown dust emissions.

  20. DIVA vaccine properties of the live chimeric pestivirus strain CP7_E2gif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Rosen, Tanya; Rangelova, Desislava Yordanova; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Live modified vaccines to protect against classical swine fever virus (CSFV), based on chimeric pestiviruses, have been developed to enable serological Differentiation of Infected from Vaccinated Animals (DIVA). In this context, the chimeric virus CP7_E2gif vaccine candidate is unique as it does...

  1. Relationship between Mixed Donor–Recipient Chimerism and Disease Recurrence after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Sickle Cell Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abraham, Allistair; Hsieh, Matthew; Eapen, Mary; Fitzhugh, Courtney; Carreras, Jeanette; Keesler, Daniel; Guilcher, Gregory; Kamani, Naynesh; Walters, Mark C.; Boelens, Jaap J.; Tisdale, John; Shenoy, Shalini

    2017-01-01

    Mixed donor chimerism after hematopoietic cell transplantation for sickle cell disease (SCD) can result in resolution of disease symptoms, but symptoms recur when donor chimerism is critically low. The relationship between chimerism, hemoglobin S (HbS) level, and symptomatic disease was correlated

  2. Chimeric antigen receptor engineered stem cells: a novel HIV therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Anjie; Carrillo, Mayra A; Kitchen, Scott G

    2017-03-01

    Despite the success of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) for suppressing HIV and improving patients' quality of life, HIV persists in cART-treated patients and remains an incurable disease. Financial burdens and health consequences of lifelong cART treatment call for novel HIV therapies that result in a permanent cure. Cellular immunity is central in controlling HIV replication. However, HIV adopts numerous strategies to evade immune surveillance. Engineered immunity via genetic manipulation could offer a functional cure by generating cells that have enhanced antiviral activity and are resistant to HIV infection. Recently, encouraging reports from several human clinical trials using an anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) modified T-cell therapy for treating B-cell malignancies have provided valuable insights and generated remarkable enthusiasm in engineered T-cell therapy. In this review, we discuss the development of HIV-specific chimeric antigen receptors and the use of stem cell based therapies to generate lifelong anti-HIV immunity.

  3. Mixed chimerism to induce tolerance for solid organ transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wren, S.M.; Nalesnik, M.; Hronakes, M.L.; Oh, E.; Ildstad, S.T.

    1991-01-01

    Chimerism, or the coexistence of tissue elements from more than one genetically different strain or species in an organism, is the only experimental state that results in the induction of donor-specific transplantation tolerance. Transplantation of a mixture of T-cell-depleted syngeneic (host-type) plus T-cell-depleted allogeneic (donor) bone marrow into a normal adult recipient mouse (A + B----A) results in mixed allogeneic chimerism. Recipient mice exhibit donor-specific transplantation tolerance, yet have full immunocompetence to recognize and respond to third-party transplantation antigens. After complete hematolymphopoietic repopulation at 28 days, animals accept a donor-specific skin graft but reject major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus-disparate third-party grafts. We now report that permanent graft acceptance can also be achieved when the graft is placed at the time of bone marrow transplantation. Histologically, grafts were viable and had only minimal inflammatory changes. This model may have potential future clinical application for the induction of donor-specific transplantation tolerance

  4. Characterization and biodistribution of a mouse/human chimeric antibody directed against pancreatic cancer mucin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, K; Chung, Y S; Sawada, T; Kim, Y S; Sowa, M

    1995-03-15

    Nd2 is a murine monoclonal antibody (MoAb) directed against purified mucins of the human pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990. The authors previously reported promising results with Nd2 for immunotargeting pancreatic cancer. However, murine MoAbs induce human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMAs), a serious problem for clinical use. Mouse/human chimeric antibodies may be less immunogenic and therefore reduce the incidence of HAMAs. In this study, the binding affinity, tumor specificity, biodistribution, and immunoimaging of chimeric Nd2 were evaluated. The affinity of chimeric Nd2 was evaluated by competition radioimmunoassay and Scatchard analysis using 125I-chimeric Nd2, 125I-murine Nd2, and SW1990 mucin. Immunoreactivity against pancreatic cancer tissues was examined histochemically by the avidin-biotin peroxidase complex method. The biodistribution of the MoAbs was examined in athymic nude mice bearing SW1990 xenografts that were administered intravenous 125I-labeled chimeric or murine Nd2. 111In-chimeric Nd2 was injected into the same xenograft models, and scintigrams were obtained on day 3. Affinity analysis and immunohistochemical studies showed that chimeric Nd2 had the same affinity to SW1990 mucin and the same specificity for pancreas cancer tissues as murine Nd2. Intravenous administration of 125I-chimeric Nd2 resulted in a maximum tumor accumulation of 43% of the initial dose/gram of tumor, which was almost identical to the accumulation of 125I-murine Nd2. Distinct immunoscintigrams of tumors in nude mice were obtained with 111In-chimeric Nd2. Chimeric Nd2 may have clinical potential in the radioimmunodetection and immunotherapy of pancreatic cancer.

  5. Identification and analysis of pig chimeric mRNAs using RNA sequencing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Lei

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene fusion is ubiquitous over the course of evolution. It is expected to increase the diversity and complexity of transcriptomes and proteomes through chimeric sequence segments or altered regulation. However, chimeric mRNAs in pigs remain unclear. Here we identified some chimeric mRNAs in pigs and analyzed the expression of them across individuals and breeds using RNA-sequencing data. Results The present study identified 669 putative chimeric mRNAs in pigs, of which 251 chimeric candidates were detected in a set of RNA-sequencing data. The 618 candidates had clear trans-splicing sites, 537 of which obeyed the canonical GU-AG splice rule. Only two putative pig chimera variants whose fusion junction was overlapped with that of a known human chimeric mRNA were found. A set of unique chimeric events were considered middle variances in the expression across individuals and breeds, and revealed non-significant variance between sexes. Furthermore, the genomic region of the 5′ partner gene shares a similar DNA sequence with that of the 3′ partner gene for 458 putative chimeric mRNAs. The 81 of those shared DNA sequences significantly matched the known DNA-binding motifs in the JASPAR CORE database. Four DNA motifs shared in parental genomic regions had significant similarity with known human CTCF binding sites. Conclusions The present study provided detailed information on some pig chimeric mRNAs. We proposed a model that trans-acting factors, such as CTCF, induced the spatial organisation of parental genes to the same transcriptional factory so that parental genes were coordinatively transcribed to give birth to chimeric mRNAs.

  6. Relationship between Mixed Donor-Recipient Chimerism and Disease Recurrence after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Allistair; Hsieh, Matthew; Eapen, Mary; Fitzhugh, Courtney; Carreras, Jeanette; Keesler, Daniel; Guilcher, Gregory; Kamani, Naynesh; Walters, Mark C; Boelens, Jaap J; Tisdale, John; Shenoy, Shalini

    2017-12-01

    Mixed donor chimerism after hematopoietic cell transplantation for sickle cell disease (SCD) can result in resolution of disease symptoms, but symptoms recur when donor chimerism is critically low. The relationship between chimerism, hemoglobin S (HbS) level, and symptomatic disease was correlated retrospectively in 95 patients who had chimerism reports available at day 100 and at 1 and 2 years after transplantation. Recurrent disease was defined as recurrence of vaso-occlusive crises, acute chest syndrome, stroke, and/or HbS levels > 50%. Thirty-five patients maintained full donor chimerism (myeloid or whole blood) through 2 years. Donor chimerism was less than 10% (defined as graft failure) in 13 patients during this period. Mixed chimerism was reported in the remaining 47 patients (range, 10% to 94%). The lowest documented donor chimerism without symptomatic disease was 26%. Of 12 surviving patients with recurrent disease, 2 had recurrence of symptoms before documented graft failure (donor chimerism of 11% and 17%, respectively). Three patients underwent second transplantation for graft failure. None received donor leukocyte infusion to maintain mixed chimerism or prevent graft failure. We conclude stable donor chimerism greater than 25% is associated with resolution of SCD-related symptoms, and HbS levels in transplant recipients should be interpreted in context of the sickle trait status of the donors. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. All rights reserved.

  7. The biological characteristics of anti-CD71 mouse/human chimeric antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shuo; Jiang Lin; Lei Ping; Zhu Huifen; Shen Guanxin; Cui Wuren; Wang Yanggong

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the biological characteristics of an anti-CD71 mouse/human chimeric antibody (D2C). Methods: Analysis of the chimeric Ab production in culture supernatant was made by the standard concentration curve method with ELISA. The antibody was purified by DEAE-Sephredax-A50 ion-exchange chromatography and was confirmed by SDS-PAGE. The competition inhibition studies for binding to the same epitope on CD71 were performed between the chimeric Ab(D2C) in the culture supernatant was about 0.5-5 μg/ml in 5-day cultures when seeded at 1 x 10 5 cells/5ml compared with 12.5-25 μg/ml in the supernatant from their parental monoclonal Ab(7579). The purified chimeric Ab(D2C) from mouse ascetics was 1-2 mg/ml. The SDS-PAGE analysis of purified chimeric Ab(D2C) with discontinuous system confirmed two protein bands of 55 kDa and 25 kDa. It was clear that both chimeric Ab(D2C) and murine monoclonal Ab (7579) compete effectively to join the same epitope of CD71 each other. The chimeric antibody's affinity constant (Ka), quantitated by Scatchard analysis, is about 9.34-9.62 x 10 9 L/mol. Conclusion: The chimeric Ab(D2C) produced from the transfectomas is stable. The binding capacity of the chimeric Ab(D2C) to the antigen (CD71) was retained

  8. Perceptual asymmetry for chimeric faces across the life span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, S C; Levy, J

    1986-07-01

    Perceptual asymmetries for processing chimeric faces were investigated in dextral subjects, ranging in age from 5 years to elderly adults. The task involved deciding which member of a pair of face chimeras presented in free vision looks happier, the one with the smile to the left or its mirror image with the smile to the right (Levy, Heller, Banich, & Burton, 1983a, Brain and Cognition, 2, 404-419). A leftward bias was found for all age groups. However, kindergarteners' mean asymmetry score was lower than that of all other groups combined, most likely due to noise in their data. The direction in which subjects drew circles with their left and right hands was also observed as an index of interhemispheric communication. All groups showed a bias toward drawing the circles in concordant directions except the kindergarteners. The relation between subjects' performance on the circle drawing and facebook tasks is discussed.

  9. New Chimeric Antigen Receptor Design for Solid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuedi Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T-cell therapy has become popular in immunotherapy, particularly after its tremendous success in the treatment of lineage-restricted hematologic cancers. However, the application of CAR T-cell therapy for solid tumors has not reached its full potential because of the lack of specific tumor antigens and inhibitory factors in suppressive tumor microenvironment (TME (e.g., programmed death ligand-1, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and transforming growth factor-β. In this review, we include some limitations in CAR design, such as tumor heterogeneity, indefinite spatial distance between CAR T-cell and its target cell, and suppressive TME. We also summarize some new approaches to overcome these hurdles, including targeting neoantigens and/or multiple antigens at once and depleting some inhibitory factors.

  10. Novel fusion genes and chimeric transcripts in ependymal tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thale Kristin; Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Gorunova, Ludmila

    2016-01-01

    using the FusionCatcher algorithm on 12 RNA-sequenced ependymal tumors. Candidate transcripts were prioritized based on the software's filtering and manual visualization using the BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool) and BLAT (BLAST-like alignment tool) tools. Genomic and reverse transcriptase PCR......We have previously identified two ALK rearrangements in a subset of ependymal tumors using a combination of cytogenetic data and RNA sequencing. The aim of this study was to perform an unbiased search for fusion transcripts in our entire series of ependymal tumors. Fusion analysis was performed...... with subsequent Sanger sequencing was used to validate the potential fusions. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using locus-specific probes was also performed. A total of 841 candidate chimeric transcripts were identified in the 12 tumors, with an average of 49 unique candidate fusions per tumor. After...

  11. Novel fusion genes and chimeric transcripts in ependymal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Thale Kristin; Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Gorunova, Ludmila; Micci, Francesca; Andersen, Kristin; Kilen Andersen, Hege; Meling, Torstein R; Due-Tønnessen, Bernt; Scheie, David; Heim, Sverre; Brandal, Petter

    2016-12-01

    We have previously identified two ALK rearrangements in a subset of ependymal tumors using a combination of cytogenetic data and RNA sequencing. The aim of this study was to perform an unbiased search for fusion transcripts in our entire series of ependymal tumors. Fusion analysis was performed using the FusionCatcher algorithm on 12 RNA-sequenced ependymal tumors. Candidate transcripts were prioritized based on the software's filtering and manual visualization using the BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool) and BLAT (BLAST-like alignment tool) tools. Genomic and reverse transcriptase PCR with subsequent Sanger sequencing was used to validate the potential fusions. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using locus-specific probes was also performed. A total of 841 candidate chimeric transcripts were identified in the 12 tumors, with an average of 49 unique candidate fusions per tumor. After algorithmic and manual filtering, the final list consisted of 24 potential fusion events. Raw RNA-seq read sequences and PCR validation supports two novel fusion genes: a reciprocal fusion gene involving UQCR10 and C1orf194 in an adult spinal ependymoma and a TSPAN4-CD151 fusion gene in a pediatric infratentorial anaplastic ependymoma. Our previously reported ALK rearrangements and the RELA and YAP1 fusions found in supratentorial ependymomas were until now the only known fusion genes present in ependymal tumors. The chimeric transcripts presented here are the first to be reported in infratentorial or spinal ependymomas. Further studies are required to characterize the genomic rearrangements causing these fusion genes, as well as the frequency and functional importance of the fusions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Modeling cognition and disease using human glial chimeric mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Steven A; Nedergaard, Maiken; Windrem, Martha S

    2015-08-01

    As new methods for producing and isolating human glial progenitor cells (hGPCs) have been developed, the disorders of myelin have become especially compelling targets for cell-based therapy. Yet as animal modeling of glial progenitor cell-based therapies has progressed, it has become clear that transplanted hGPCs not only engraft and expand within murine hosts, but dynamically outcompete the resident progenitors so as to ultimately dominate the host brain. The engrafted human progenitor cells proceed to generate parenchymal astrocytes, and when faced with a hypomyelinated environment, oligodendrocytes as well. As a result, the recipient brains may become inexorably humanized with regards to their resident glial populations, yielding human glial chimeric mouse brains. These brains provide us a fundamentally new tool by which to assess the species-specific attributes of glia in modulating human cognition and information processing. In addition, the cellular humanization of these brains permits their use in studying glial infectious and inflammatory disorders unique to humans, and the effects of those disorders on the glial contributions to cognition. Perhaps most intriguingly, by pairing our ability to construct human glial chimeras with the production of patient-specific hGPCs derived from pluripotential stem cells, we may now establish mice in which a substantial proportion of resident glia are both human and disease-derived. These mice in particular may provide us new opportunities for studying the human-specific contributions of glia to psychopathology, as well as to higher cognition. As such, the assessment of human glial chimeric mice may provide us new insight into the species-specific contributions of glia to human cognitive evolution, as well as to the pathogenesis of human neurological and neuropsychiatric disease. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Chimeric Enzyme/Prodrug Therapy as Novel Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cooper, David

    1997-01-01

    .... The selective expression of active CD44/CD chimeric protein potentially enables tumor-specific killing via the RNA metabolism of alternative splicing following administration of the prodrug 5-FC...

  14. A chimeric measles virus with a lentiviral envelope replicates exclusively in CD4+/CCR5+ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourez, Thomas; Mesel-Lemoine, Mariana; Combredet, Chantal; Najburg, Valerie; Cayet, Nadege; Tangy, Frederic

    2011-01-01

    We generated a replicating chimeric measles virus in which the hemagglutinin and fusion surface glycoproteins were replaced with the gp160 envelope glycoprotein of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac239). Based on a previously cloned live-attenuated Schwarz vaccine strain of measles virus (MV), this chimera was rescued at high titers using reverse genetics in CD4+ target cells. Cytopathic effect consisted in the presence of large cell aggregates evolving to form syncytia, as observed during SIV infection. The morphology of the chimeric virus was identical to that of the parent MV particles. The presence of SIV gp160 as the only envelope protein on chimeric particles surface altered the cell tropism of the new virus from CD46+ to CD4+ cells. Used as an HIV candidate vaccine, this MV/SIVenv chimeric virus would mimic transient HIV-like infection, benefiting both from HIV-like tropism and the capacity of MV to replicate in dendritic cells, macrophages and lymphocytes.

  15. Frequency of chimerism in populations of the kelp Lessonia spicata in central Chile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra V González

    Full Text Available Chimerism occurs when two genetically distinct conspecific individuals fuse together generating a single entity. Coalescence and chimerism in red seaweeds has been positively related to an increase in body size, and the consequent reduction in susceptibility to mortality factors, thus increasing survival, reproductive potential and tolerance to stress in contrast to genetically homogeneous organisms. In addition, they showed that a particular pattern of post-fusion growth maintains higher genetic diversity and chimerism in the holdfast but homogenous axes. In Chilean kelps (brown seaweeds, intraorganismal genetic heterogeneity (IGH and holdfast coalescence has been described in previous research, but the extent of chimerism in wild populations and the patterns of distribution of the genetically heterogeneous thallus zone have scarcely been studied. Since kelps are under continuous harvesting, with enormous social, ecological and economic importance, natural chimerism can be considered a priceless in-situ reservoir of natural genetic resources and variability. In this study, we therefore examined the frequency of IGH and chimerism in three harvested populations of Lessonia spicata. We then evaluated whether chimeric wild-type holdfasts show higher genetic diversity than erect axes (stipe and lamina and explored the impact of this on the traditional estimation of genetic diversity at the population level. We found a high frequency of IGH (60-100% and chimerism (33.3-86.7%, varying according to the studied population. We evidenced that chimerism occurs mostly in holdfasts, exhibiting heterogeneous tissues, whereas stipes and lamina were more homogeneous, generating a vertical gradient of allele and genotype abundance as well as divergence, constituting the first time "within- plant" genetic patterns have been reported in kelps. This is very different from the chimeric patterns described in land plants and animals. Finally, we evidenced that IGH

  16. Establishment of donor Chimerism Using Allogeneic Bone Marrow with AMP Cell Co-infusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0234 TITLE: Establishment of donor Chimerism Using Allogeneic Bone Marrow with AMP Cell Co-infusion PRINCIPAL...14/2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Establishment of donor Chimerism Using Allogeneic Bone Marrow with AMP Cell Co-infusion 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...tolerance induction of all types of allografts. In this study, we investigate whether co-infusion of amnion- derived multipotent progenitor ( AMP ) cells

  17. Endothelial cell chimerism associated with graft rejection after human lung transplantation.

    OpenAIRE

    Ratajczak , Philippe; Murata , Hideyuki; Meignin , Véronique; Groussard , Odile; Fournier , Michel; Socié , Gérard; Mal , Hervé; Janin , Anne

    2008-01-01

    International audience; Endotheliitis is a major sign of graft rejection. Recipient-derived endothelial cells found in two series of liver and kidney transplants were related to graft rejection. Here, we assessed the presence and the number of chimeric endothelial cells in lung transplants, and their relation with graft rejection. In six males grafted with female lungs out of 193 lung transplantations, endothelial chimerism was studied by combined XY-fluorescent in situ hybridization with CD3...

  18. Context Dependent Effects of Chimeric Peptide Morpholino Conjugates Contribute to Dystrophin Exon-skipping Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HaiFang Yin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have recently reported that cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs and novel chimeric peptides containing CPP (referred as B peptide and muscle-targeting peptide (referred as MSP motifs significantly improve the systemic exon-skipping activity of morpholino phosphorodiamidate oligomers (PMOs in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. In the present study, the general mechanistic significance of the chimeric peptide configuration on the activity and tissue uptake of peptide conjugated PMOs in vivo was investigated. Four additional chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates including newly identified peptide 9 (B-9-PMO and 9-B-PMO and control peptide 3 (B-3-PMO and 3-B-PMO were tested in mdx mice. Immunohistochemical staining, RT-PCR and western blot results indicated that B-9-PMO induced significantly higher level of exon skipping and dystrophin restoration than its counterpart (9-B-PMO, further corroborating the notion that the activity of chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates is dependent on relative position of the tissue-targeting peptide motif within the chimeric peptide with respect to PMOs. Subsequent mechanistic studies showed that enhanced cellular uptake of B-MSP-PMO into muscle cells leads to increased exon-skipping activity in comparison with MSP-B-PMO. Surprisingly, further evidence showed that the uptake of chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates of both orientations (B-MSP-PMO and MSP-B-PMO was ATP- and temperature-dependent and also partially mediated by heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG, indicating that endocytosis is likely the main uptake pathway for both chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates. Collectively, our data demonstrate that peptide orientation in chimeric peptides is an important parameter that determines cellular uptake and activity when conjugated directly to oligonucleotides. These observations provide insight into the design of improved cell targeting compounds for future therapeutics studies.

  19. Prolonged Survival of Subcutaneous Allogeneic Islet Graft by Donor Chimerism without Immunosuppressive Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brend Ray-Sea Hsu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate whether tolerance-induced protection of islets in the renal subcapsular space can also prevent subcutaneous allogeneic islets from being rejected. We used bone marrow stem cells from C57BL/6 (H2b mice to construct donor chimerism in conditioned diabetic BALB/c (H2d mice and investigated the effect of donor chimerism on engraftment and survival of subcutaneously transplanted allogeneic islets in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. We also studied the anti-inflammatory effect of mesenchymal stem cell on islet engraftment. Full but not low-grade or no donor chimerism was associated with successful engraftment of allogeneic islets and restoration of normoglycemia in the treated diabetic mice. The temporary hyperglycemia was 11 ± 1 versus 19 ± 5 days (p<0.05 for the mice with full donor chimerism with transplanted islets in the renal subcapsular space versus the subcutaneous space, respectively. Cotransplantation of mesenchymal stem cell did not enhance alloislet engraftment. Full multilineage donor chimerism was associated with a higher transient expansion of CD11b+ and Gr-1+ myeloid progenitor cells and effector memory CD4 and CD8 T cells. In conclusion, full donor chimerism protected both renal subcapsular and subcutaneous allogeneic islets in this rodent transplantation model.

  20. Study the effect of F17S mutation on the chimeric Bacillus thermocatenulatus lipase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hossein Khaleghinejad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Lipases (triacylglycerol acylhydrolase, EC 3.1.1.3 are one of the highest value commercial enzymes as they have potential applications in biotechnology for detergents, food, pharmaceuticals, leather, textiles, cosmetics, and paper industries; and are currently receiving considerable attention because of their potential applications in biotechnology. Bacillus thermocatenulatus Lipase 2 (BTL2 is one of the most important research targets, because of its potential industrial applications. In this study, the effect of substitution Phe17 with Ser in mutated BTL2 lipase, which conserved pentapeptide (112Ala-His-Ser-Gln-Gly116 was replaced with similar sequences (207Gly-Glu-Ser-Ala-Gly211 of Candida rugosa lipase (CLR at the nucleophilic elbow region. Docking results confirmed the mutated lipase to be better than the chimeric lipase. So, cloning was conducted, and the mutated and chimeric btl2 genes were expressed in Escherichia coli, and then the enzymes were purified by anion exchange chromatography. The mutation increased lipase lipolytic activity against most of the applied substrates, with the exception of tributyrin when compared with chimeric lipase. Further, the mutated lipase exhibited higher activity than the chimeric lipase at all temperatures. Optimum pH of the mutated lipase was obtained at pH 9.5, which was more than the chimeric one. Enzyme activity of the mutated lipase in the presence of organic solvents, detergents, and metal ions was also improved than the chimeric lipase.

  1. Antistaphylococcal activity of bacteriophage derived chimeric protein P128

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipra Aradhana A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial drug resistance is one of the most significant challenges to human health today. In particular, effective antibacterial agents against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA are urgently needed. A causal relationship between nasal commensal S. aureus and infection has been reported. Accordingly, elimination of nasal S. aureus reduces the risk of infection. Enzymes that degrade bacterial cell walls show promise as antibacterial agents. Bacteriophage-encoded bacterial cell wall-degrading enzymes exhibit intrinsic bactericidal activity. P128 is a chimeric protein that combines the lethal activity of the phage tail-associated muralytic enzyme of Phage K and the staphylococcal cell wall targeting-domain (SH3b of lysostaphin. Here we report results of in vitro studies evaluating the susceptibility of staphylococcal strains to this novel protein. Results Using the broth microdilution method adapted for lysostaphin, we found that P128 is effective against S. aureus clinical strains including MRSA, methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA, and a mupirocin-resistant S. aureus. Minimum bactericidal concentrations and minimum inhibitory concentrations of P128 (1-64 μg/mL were similar across the 32 S. aureus strains tested, demonstrating its bactericidal nature. In time-kill assays, P128 reduced colony-forming units by 99.99% within 1 h and inhibited growth up to 24 h. In an assay simulating topical application of P128 to skin or other biological surfaces, P128 hydrogel was efficacious when layered on cells seeded on solid media. P128 hydrogel was lethal to Staphylococci recovered from nares of healthy people and treated without any processing or culturing steps, indicating its in situ efficacy. This methodology used for in vitro assessment of P128 as an agent for eradicating nasal carriage is unique. Conclusions The novel chimeric protein P128 is a staphylococcal cell wall-degrading enzyme under development for

  2. Preparation and characterization of chimeric CD19 monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zola, H.; Macardle, P.J.; Bradford, T.; Weedon, H.; Yasui, H.; Kurosawa, Y.

    1991-01-01

    CD19 antibodies have been suggested as candidates for immunological attack on leukemic and lymphoma cells of the B lineage because the antigen is restricted to the B lineage. With the potential use of FMC63 in immunotherapy in mind a mouse-human chimera was produced in which the genes coding for the VDJ region of the heavy chain and the VJ region of the light chain derive from the FMC63 mouse hybridoma, while the C region genes code for human IgG1. The genes have been transfected back into a mouse myeloma line, which secretes low levels of immunoglobulin. (Ig). This Ig was purified and biotinylated in order to determine the specificity of the antibody. The chimeric antibody has a reaction profile concordant with the original FMC63 antibody, but has the properties of a human IgG1, including the ability to fix human complement. However, the antibody is not cytotoxic in vitro in the presence of complement or cells capable of mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Possible reasons for this and ways of using the antibody are discussed. 47 refs., 7 figs

  3. Protective and immunological behavior of chimeric yellow fever dengue vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Scott B; Russell, Philip K

    2016-03-29

    Clinical observations from the third year of the Sanofi Pasteur chimeric yellow fever dengue tetravalent vaccine (CYD) trials document both protection and vaccination-enhanced dengue disease among vaccine recipients. Children who were 5 years-old or younger when vaccinated experienced a DENV disease resulting in hospitalization at 5 times the rate of controls. On closer inspection, hospitalized cases among vaccinated seropositives, those at highest risk to hospitalized disease accompanying a dengue virus (DENV) infection, were greatly reduced by vaccination. But, seronegative individuals of all ages after being vaccinated were only modestly protected from mild to moderate disease throughout the entire observation period despite developing neutralizing antibodies at high rates. Applying a simple epidemiological model to the data, vaccinated seronegative individuals of all ages were at increased risk of developing hospitalized disease during a subsequent wild type DENV infection. The etiology of disease in placebo and vaccinated children resulting in hospitalization during a DENV infection, while clinically similar are of different origin. The implications of the observed mixture of DENV protection and enhanced disease in CYD vaccinees are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Chimeric Antigen Receptor Therapy in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luskin, Marlise R; DeAngelo, Daniel J

    2017-08-01

    Over half of patients diagnosed with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) develop relapsed or refractory disease. Traditional chemotherapy salvage is inadequate, and new therapies are needed. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy is a novel, immunologic approach where T cells are genetically engineered to express a CAR conferring specificity against a target cell surface antigen, most commonly the pan-B-cell marker CD19. After infusion, CAR T cells expand and persist, allowing ongoing tumor surveillance. Several anti-CD19 CAR T cell constructs have induced high response rates in heavily pre-treated populations, although durability of response varied. Severe toxicity (cytokine release syndrome and neurotoxicity) is the primary constraint to broad implementation of CAR T cell therapy. Here, we review the experience of CAR T cell therapy for ALL and ongoing efforts to modify existing technology to improve efficacy and decrease toxicity. As an anti-CD19 CAR T cell construct may be FDA approved soon, we focus on issues relevant to practicing clinicians.

  5. Competitive annealing of multiple DNA origami: formation of chimeric origami

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majikes, Jacob M; Nash, Jessica A; LaBean, Thomas H

    2016-01-01

    Scaffolded DNA origami are a robust tool for building discrete nanoscale objects at high yield. This strategy ensures, in the design process, that the desired nanostructure is the minimum free energy state for the designed set of DNA sequences. Despite aiming for the minimum free energy structure, the folding process which leads to that conformation is difficult to characterize, although it has been the subject of much research. In order to shed light on the molecular folding pathways, this study intentionally frustrates the folding process of these systems by simultaneously annealing the staple pools for multiple target or parent origami structures, forcing competition. A surprising result of these competitive, simultaneous anneals is the formation of chimeric DNA origami which inherit structural regions from both parent origami. By comparing the regions inherited from the parent origami, relative stability of substructures were compared. This allowed examination of the folding process with typical characterization techniques and materials. Anneal curves were then used as a means to rapidly generate a phase diagram of anticipated behavior as a function of staple excess and parent staple ratio. This initial study shows that competitive anneals provide an exciting way to create diverse new nanostructures and may be used to examine the relative stability of various structural motifs. (paper)

  6. ChimericSeq: An open-source, user-friendly interface for analyzing NGS data to identify and characterize viral-host chimeric sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fwu-Shan Shieh

    Full Text Available Identification of viral integration sites has been important in understanding the pathogenesis and progression of diseases associated with particular viral infections. The advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS has enabled researchers to understand the impact that viral integration has on the host, such as tumorigenesis. Current computational methods to analyze NGS data of virus-host junction sites have been limited in terms of their accessibility to a broad user base. In this study, we developed a software application (named ChimericSeq, that is the first program of its kind to offer a graphical user interface, compatibility with both Windows and Mac operating systems, and optimized for effectively identifying and annotating virus-host chimeric reads within NGS data. In addition, ChimericSeq's pipeline implements custom filtering to remove artifacts and detect reads with quantitative analytical reporting to provide functional significance to discovered integration sites. The improved accessibility of ChimericSeq through a GUI interface in both Windows and Mac has potential to expand NGS analytical support to a broader spectrum of the scientific community.

  7. ChimerDB 3.0: an enhanced database for fusion genes from cancer transcriptome and literature data mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myunggyo; Lee, Kyubum; Yu, Namhee; Jang, Insu; Choi, Ikjung; Kim, Pora; Jang, Ye Eun; Kim, Byounggun; Kim, Sunkyu; Lee, Byungwook; Kang, Jaewoo; Lee, Sanghyuk

    2017-01-04

    Fusion gene is an important class of therapeutic targets and prognostic markers in cancer. ChimerDB is a comprehensive database of fusion genes encompassing analysis of deep sequencing data and manual curations. In this update, the database coverage was enhanced considerably by adding two new modules of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) RNA-Seq analysis and PubMed abstract mining. ChimerDB 3.0 is composed of three modules of ChimerKB, ChimerPub and ChimerSeq. ChimerKB represents a knowledgebase including 1066 fusion genes with manual curation that were compiled from public resources of fusion genes with experimental evidences. ChimerPub includes 2767 fusion genes obtained from text mining of PubMed abstracts. ChimerSeq module is designed to archive the fusion candidates from deep sequencing data. Importantly, we have analyzed RNA-Seq data of the TCGA project covering 4569 patients in 23 cancer types using two reliable programs of FusionScan and TopHat-Fusion. The new user interface supports diverse search options and graphic representation of fusion gene structure. ChimerDB 3.0 is available at http://ercsb.ewha.ac.kr/fusiongene/. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Cryo-electron Microscopy Structures of Chimeric Hemagglutinin Displayed on a Universal Influenza Vaccine Candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Erin E H; Podolsky, Kira A; Bartesaghi, Alberto; Kuybeda, Oleg; Grandinetti, Giovanna; Wohlbold, Teddy John; Tan, Gene S; Nachbagauer, Raffael; Palese, Peter; Krammer, Florian; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2016-03-22

    Influenza viruses expressing chimeric hemagglutinins (HAs) are important tools in the quest for a universal vaccine. Using cryo-electron tomography, we have determined the structures of a chimeric HA variant that comprises an H1 stalk and an H5 globular head domain (cH5/1 HA) in native and antibody-bound states. We show that cH5/1 HA is structurally different from native HA, displaying a 60° rotation between the stalk and head groups, leading to a novel and unexpected "open" arrangement of HA trimers. cH5/1N1 viruses also display higher glycoprotein density than pH1N1 or H5N1 viruses, but despite these differences, antibodies that target either the stalk or head domains of hemagglutinins still bind to cH5/1 HA with the same consequences as those observed with native H1 or H5 HA. Our results show that a large range of structural plasticity can be tolerated in the chimeric spike scaffold without disrupting structural and geometric aspects of antibody binding. Chimeric hemagglutinin proteins are set to undergo human clinical trials as a universal influenza vaccine candidate, yet no structural information for these proteins is available. Using cryo-electron tomography, we report the first three-dimensional (3D) visualization of chimeric hemagglutinin proteins displayed on the surface of the influenza virus. We show that, unexpectedly, the chimeric hemagglutinin structure differs from those of naturally occurring hemagglutinins by displaying a more open head domain and a dramatically twisted head/stalk arrangement. Despite this unusual spatial relationship between head and stalk regions, virus preparations expressing the chimeric hemagglutinin are fully infectious and display a high glycoprotein density, which likely helps induction of a broadly protective immune response. Copyright © 2016 Tran et al.

  9. Antigenic properties of a transport-competent influenza HA/HIV Env chimeric protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Ling; Sun Yuliang; Lin Jianguo; Bu Zhigao; Wu Qingyang; Jiang, Shibo; Steinhauer, David A.; Compans, Richard W.; Yang Chinglai

    2006-01-01

    The transmembrane subunit (gp41) of the HIV Env glycoprotein contains conserved neutralizing epitopes which are not well-exposed in wild-type HIV Env proteins. To enhance the exposure of these epitopes, a chimeric protein, HA/gp41, in which the gp41 of HIV-1 89.6 envelope protein was fused to the C-terminus of the HA1 subunit of the influenza HA protein, was constructed. Characterization of protein expression showed that the HA/gp41 chimeric proteins were expressed on cell surfaces and formed trimeric oligomers, as found in the HIV Env as well as influenza HA proteins. In addition, the HA/gp41 chimeric protein expressed on the cell surface can also be cleaved into 2 subunits by trypsin treatment, similar to the influenza HA. Moreover, the HA/gp41 chimeric protein was found to maintain a pre-fusion conformation. Interestingly, the HA/gp41 chimeric proteins on cell surfaces exhibited increased reactivity to monoclonal antibodies against the HIV Env gp41 subunit compared with the HIV-1 envelope protein, including the two broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 4E10. Immunization of mice with a DNA vaccine expressing the HA/gp41 chimeric protein induced antibodies against the HIV gp41 protein and these antibodies exhibit neutralizing activity against infection by an HIV SF162 pseudovirus. These results demonstrate that the construction of such chimeric proteins can provide enhanced exposure of conserved epitopes in the HIV Env gp41 and may represent a novel vaccine design strategy for inducing broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV

  10. Application of chimeric glucanase comprising mutanase and dextranase for prevention of dental biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Ryoko; Imai, Susumu; Murata, Takatoshi; Nomura, Yoshiaki; Okamoto, Masaaki; Tsumori, Hideaki; Kakuta, Erika; Hanada, Nobuhiro; Momoi, Yasuko

    2015-01-01

    Water-insoluble glucan (WIG) produced by mutans streptococci, an important cariogenic pathogen, plays an important role in the formation of dental biofilm and adhesion of biofilm to tooth surfaces. Glucanohydrolases, such as mutanase (α-1,3-glucanase) and dextranase (α-1,6-glucanase), are able to hydrolyze WIG. The purposes of this study were to construct bi-functional chimeric glucanase, composed of mutanase and dextranase, and to examine the effects of this chimeric glucanase on the formation and decomposition of biofilm. The mutanase gene from Paenibacillus humicus NA1123 and the dextranase gene from Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175 were cloned and ligated into a pE-SUMOstar Amp plasmid vector. The resultant his-tagged fusion chimeric glucanase was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and partially purified. The effects of chimeric glucanase on the formation and decomposition of biofilm formed on a glass surface by Streptococcus sobrinus 6715 glucosyltransferases were then examined. This biofilm was fractionated into firmly adherent, loosely adherent, and non-adherent WIG fractions. Amounts of WIG in each fraction were determined by a phenol-sulfuric acid method, and reducing sugars were quantified by the Somogyi-Nelson method. Chimeric glucanase reduced the formation of the total amount of WIG in a dose-dependent manner, and significant reductions of WIG in the adherent fraction were observed. Moreover, the chimeric glucanase was able to decompose biofilm, being 4.1 times more effective at glucan inhibition of biofilm formation than a mixture of dextranase and mutanase. These results suggest that the chimeric glucanase is useful for prevention of dental biofilm formation. © 2014 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Immunological tolerance and tumor rejection in embryo-aggregated chimeric mice – Lessons for tumor immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, Alexander Y; Holle, Eric; Holle, Lori; Yu, Xianzhong; Schwamberger, Günter

    2008-01-01

    Rejection of transplanted tumors by the immune system is a rare event in syngeneic hosts, and is considered to be dependent on the local interaction of defensive immune reactions and tumor tolerance mechanisms. Here, we have enlisted the aid of a unique set of embryo-aggregated lineage chimeric mice derived from C57/BL6 and FVB donors to study the interplay between local and systemic tumor immunity and tolerance in rejection of mouse B16 melanoma cells, syngeneic to the C57/BL6 donor strain. Two variants of embryo-aggregated chimeric mice with either variable or no contribution of C57-derived cells to their skin were generated by the fusion of different ratios of morula stage blastomers. Chimeric mice were analyzed for s.c. growth of B16 tumors in comparison to their respective donor strains as well as normal F1 hybrids, and the relative frequencies of cellular components of the immune system by FACS analysis of peripheral blood or lymph node cells. B16 tumors grew significantly faster in mice with full chimerism in their skin as compared to syngeneic C57 or semi-syngeneic C57 × FVB F1 hosts. In contrast, s.c. tumor growth was either absent or significantly reduced in chimeric mice lacking C57-derived cells in their skin, but tolerant to C57 tissue in other organs. Comparison of the relative frequencies of various immune cells in the periphery via FACS-analysis did not reveal any significant differences between the two types of chimeric mice with respect to their donor strains. Our data suggest a complex interplay between mechanisms of local peripheral tolerance and innate antitumor mechanisms possibly involving NK cell allorecognition as a basis for the differential growth or rejection of B16 tumors in these unique chimeric mice, which we suggest to constitute a valuable new model system for the study of immune-mediated tumor rejection

  12. Immune Reconstitution Kinetics following Intentionally Induced Mixed Chimerism by Nonmyeloablative Transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayoun Kim

    Full Text Available Establishing mixed chimerism is a promising approach for inducing donor-specific transplant tolerance. The establishment and maintenance of mixed chimerism may enable long-term engraftment of organ transplants while minimizing the use of immunosuppressants. Several protocols for inducing mixed chimerism have been reported; however, the exact mechanism underlying the development of immune tolerance remains to be elucidated. Therefore, understanding the kinetics of engraftment during early post-transplant period may provide insight into establishing long-term mixed chimerism and permanent transplant tolerance. In this study, we intentionally induced allogeneic mixed chimerism using a nonmyeloablative regimen by host natural killer (NK cell depletion and T cell-depleted bone marrow (BM grafts in a major histocompatibility complex (MHC-mismatched murine model and analyzed the kinetics of donor (C57BL/6 and recipient (BALB/c engraftment in the weeks following transplantation. Donor BM cells were well engrafted and stabilized without graft-versus-host disease (GVHD as early as one week post-bone marrow transplantation (BMT. Donor-derived thymic T cells were reconstituted four weeks after BMT; however, the emergence of newly developed T cells was more obvious at the periphery as early as two weeks after BMT. Also, the emergence and changes in ratio of recipient- and donor-derived NKT cells and antigen presenting cells (APCs including dendritic cells (DCs and B cells were noted after BMT. Here, we report a longitudinal analysis of the development of donor- and recipient-originated hematopoietic cells in various lymphatic tissues of intentionally induced mixed chimerism mouse model during early post-transplant period. Through the understanding of immune reconstitution at early time points after nonmyeloablative BMT, we suggest guidelines on intentionally inducing durable mixed chimerism.

  13. Endosymbiotic gene transfer from prokaryotic pangenomes: Inherited chimerism in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Chuan; Nelson-Sathi, Shijulal; Roettger, Mayo; Garg, Sriram; Hazkani-Covo, Einat; Martin, William F

    2015-08-18

    Endosymbiotic theory in eukaryotic-cell evolution rests upon a foundation of three cornerstone partners--the plastid (a cyanobacterium), the mitochondrion (a proteobacterium), and its host (an archaeon)--and carries a corollary that, over time, the majority of genes once present in the organelle genomes were relinquished to the chromosomes of the host (endosymbiotic gene transfer). However, notwithstanding eukaryote-specific gene inventions, single-gene phylogenies have never traced eukaryotic genes to three single prokaryotic sources, an issue that hinges crucially upon factors influencing phylogenetic inference. In the age of genomes, single-gene trees, once used to test the predictions of endosymbiotic theory, now spawn new theories that stand to eventually replace endosymbiotic theory with descriptive, gene tree-based variants featuring supernumerary symbionts: prokaryotic partners distinct from the cornerstone trio and whose existence is inferred solely from single-gene trees. We reason that the endosymbiotic ancestors of mitochondria and chloroplasts brought into the eukaryotic--and plant and algal--lineage a genome-sized sample of genes from the proteobacterial and cyanobacterial pangenomes of their respective day and that, even if molecular phylogeny were artifact-free, sampling prokaryotic pangenomes through endosymbiotic gene transfer would lead to inherited chimerism. Recombination in prokaryotes (transduction, conjugation, transformation) differs from recombination in eukaryotes (sex). Prokaryotic recombination leads to pangenomes, and eukaryotic recombination leads to vertical inheritance. Viewed from the perspective of endosymbiotic theory, the critical transition at the eukaryote origin that allowed escape from Muller's ratchet--the origin of eukaryotic recombination, or sex--might have required surprisingly little evolutionary innovation.

  14. Development of a recombinant, chimeric tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Jorge E; Partidos, Charalambos D; Wallace, Derek; Stinchcomb, Dan T

    2015-12-10

    Dengue is a significant threat to public health worldwide. Currently, there are no licensed vaccines available for dengue. Takeda Vaccines Inc. is developing a live, attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate (TDV) that consists of an attenuated DENV-2 strain (TDV-2) and three chimeric viruses containing the prM and E protein genes of DENV-1, -3 and -4 expressed in the context of the attenuated TDV-2 genome backbone (TDV-1, TDV-3, and TDV-4, respectively). TDV has been shown to be immunogenic and efficacious in nonclinical animal models. In interferon-receptor deficient mice, the vaccine induces humoral neutralizing antibody responses and cellular immune responses that are sufficient to protect from lethal challenge with DENV-1, DENV-2 or DENV-4. In non-human primates, administration of TDV induces innate immune responses as well as long lasting antibody and cellular immunity. In Phase 1 clinical trials, the safety and immunogenicity of two different formulations were assessed after intradermal or subcutaneous administration to healthy, flavivirus-naïve adults. TDV administration was generally well-tolerated independent of dose and route. The vaccine induced neutralizing antibody responses to all four DENV serotypes: after a single administration of the higher formulation, 24-67%% of the subjects seroconverted to all four DENV and >80% seroconverted to three or more viruses. In addition, TDV induced CD8(+) T cell responses to the non-structural NS1, NS3 and NS5 proteins of DENV. TDV has been also shown to be generally well tolerated and immunogenic in a Phase 2 clinical trial in dengue endemic countries in adults and children as young as 18 months. Additional clinical studies are ongoing in preparation for a Phase 3 safety and efficacy study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Reversible Heat-Induced Inactivation of Chimeric β-Glucuronidase in Transgenic Plants1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almoguera, Concepción; Rojas, Anabel; Jordano, Juan

    2002-01-01

    We compared the expression patterns in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) of two chimeric genes: a translational fusion to β-glucuronidase (GUS) and a transcriptional fusion, both with the same promoter and 5′-flanking sequences of Ha hsp17.7 G4, a small heat shock protein (sHSP) gene from sunflower (Helianthus annuus). We found that immediately after heat shock, the induced expression from the two fusions in seedlings was similar, considering chimeric mRNA or GUS protein accumulation. Surprisingly, we discovered that the chimeric GUS protein encoded by the translational fusion was mostly inactive in such conditions. We also found that this inactivation was fully reversible. Thus, after returning to control temperature, the GUS activity was fully recovered without substantial changes in GUS protein accumulation. In contrast, we did not find differences in the in vitro heat inactivation of the respective GUS proteins. Insolubilization of the chimeric GUS protein correlated with its inactivation, as indicated by immunoprecipitation analyses. The inclusion in another chimeric gene of the 21 amino-terminal amino acids from a different sHSP lead to a comparable reversible inactivation. That effect not only illustrates unexpected post-translational problems, but may also point to sequences involved in interactions specific to sHSPs and in vivo heat stress conditions. PMID:12011363

  16. Chimeric hERG channels containing a tetramerization domain are functional and stable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausammann, Georg J; Grütter, Markus G

    2013-12-23

    Biochemical and detailed structural information of human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) potassium channels are scarce but are a prerequisite to understand the unwanted interactions of hERG with drugs and the effect of mutations that lead to long QT syndrome. Despite the huge interest in hERG, to our knowledge, procedures that provide a purified, functional, and tetrameric hERG channel are not available. Here, we describe hybrid hERG molecules, termed chimeric hERG channels, in which the N-terminal Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain is deleted and the C-terminal C-linker as well as the cyclic nucleotide binding domain (CNBD) portion is replaced by an artificial tetramerization domain. These chimeric hERG channels can be overexpressed in HEK cells, solubilized in detergent, and purified as tetramers. When expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, the chimeric channels exhibit efficient trafficking to the cell surface, whereas a hERG construct lacking the PAS and C-linker/CNBD domains is retained in the cytoplasm. The chimeric hERG channels retain essential hERG functions such as voltage-dependent gating and inhibition by astemizole and the scorpion toxin BeKm-1. The chimeric channels are thus powerful tools for helping to understand the contribution of the cytoplasmic hERG domains to the gating process and are suitable for in vitro biochemical and structural studies.

  17. Mixed allogeneic chimerism to induce tolerance to solid organ and cellular grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exner, B G; Acholonu, I N; Bergheim, M; Mueller, Y M; Ildstad, S T

    1999-01-01

    Transplantation of solid organs and cellular grafts has become clinical routine in the last 30 years. However, the requirement for life-long immunosuppression is associated with infections, malignancies and end-organ toxicity. Moreover, the treatment fails to prevent chronic rejection. The induction of donor-specific transplantation tolerance would solve these problems, but has remained an elusive goal. One approach to achieve transplantation tolerance is through hematopoietic chimerism. This review outlines different concepts of hematopoietic chimerism focusing on macrochimerism. Mixed allogeneic chimerism, also known as macrochimerism, is defined as engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells achieved by bone marrow transplantation (BMT). It discusses the advantages and limitations of the BMT as well as approaches to overcome these limitations in the future.

  18. Targeted transcriptional repression using a chimeric TALE-SRDX repressor protein

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2011-12-14

    Transcriptional activator-like effectors (TALEs) are proteins secreted by Xanthomonas bacteria when they infect plants. TALEs contain a modular DNA binding domain that can be easily engineered to bind any sequence of interest, and have been used to provide user-selected DNA-binding modules to generate chimeric nucleases and transcriptional activators in mammalian cells and plants. Here we report the use of TALEs to generate chimeric sequence-specific transcriptional repressors. The dHax3 TALE was used as a scaffold to provide a DNA-binding module fused to the EAR-repression domain (SRDX) to generate a chimeric repressor that targets the RD29A promoter. The dHax3. SRDX protein efficiently repressed the transcription of the RD29A

  19. Rats and mice immunised with chimeric human/mouse proteinase 3 produce autoantibodies to mouse Pr3 and rat granulocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geld, Ymke M.; Hellmark, Thomas; Selga, Daina; Heeringa, Peter; Huitema, Minke G.; Limburg, Pieter C.; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: In this study, we employed chimeric human/ mouse Proteinase 3 ( PR3) proteins as tools to induce an autoantibody response to PR3 in rats and mice. Method: Rats and mice were immunised with recombinant human PR3 ( HPR3), recombinant murine PR3 ( mPR3), single chimeric human/ mouse PR3 ( HHm,

  20. Design and production in Aspergillus niger of a chimeric protein associating a fungal feruloyl esterase and a clostridial dockerin domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levasseur, A.; Pagès, S.; Fierobe, H.-P.; Navarro, D.; Punt, P.; Belaïch, J.-P.; Asther, M.; Record, E.

    2004-01-01

    A chimeric enzyme associating feruloyl esterase A (FAEA) from Aspergilhis niger and dockerin from Clostridium thermocellum was produced in A. niger. A completely truncated form was produced when the dockerin domain was located downstream of the FAEA (FAEA-Doc), whereas no chimeric protein was

  1. Structure-Function Analysis of Peroxisomal ATP-binding Cassette Transporters Using Chimeric Dimers*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geillon, Flore; Gondcaille, Catherine; Charbonnier, Soëli; Van Roermund, Carlo W.; Lopez, Tatiana E.; Dias, Alexandre M. M.; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Arnould, Christine; Wanders, Ronald J.; Trompier, Doriane; Savary, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    ABCD1 and ABCD2 are two closely related ATP-binding cassette half-transporters predicted to homodimerize and form peroxisomal importers for fatty acyl-CoAs. Available evidence has shown that ABCD1 and ABCD2 display a distinct but overlapping substrate specificity, although much remains to be learned in this respect as well as in their capability to form functional heterodimers. Using a cell model expressing an ABCD2-EGFP fusion protein, we first demonstrated by proximity ligation assay and co-immunoprecipitation assay that ABCD1 interacts with ABCD2. Next, we tested in the pxa1/pxa2Δ yeast mutant the functionality of ABCD1/ABCD2 dimers by expressing chimeric proteins mimicking homo- or heterodimers. For further structure-function analysis of ABCD1/ABCD2 dimers, we expressed chimeric dimers fused to enhanced GFP in human skin fibroblasts of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy patients. These cells are devoid of ABCD1 and accumulate very long-chain fatty acids (C26:0 and C26:1). We checked that the chimeric proteins were correctly expressed and targeted to the peroxisomes. Very long-chain fatty acid levels were partially restored in transfected X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy fibroblasts regardless of the chimeric construct used, thus demonstrating functionality of both homo- and heterodimers. Interestingly, the level of C24:6 n-3, the immediate precursor of docosahexaenoic acid, was decreased in cells expressing chimeric proteins containing at least one ABCD2 moiety. Our data demonstrate for the first time that both homo- and heterodimers of ABCD1 and ABCD2 are functionally active. Interestingly, the role of ABCD2 (in homo- and heterodimeric forms) in the metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids is clearly evidenced, and the chimeric dimers provide a novel tool to study substrate specificity of peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette transporters. PMID:25043761

  2. Structure-function analysis of peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette transporters using chimeric dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geillon, Flore; Gondcaille, Catherine; Charbonnier, Soëli; Van Roermund, Carlo W; Lopez, Tatiana E; Dias, Alexandre M M; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Arnould, Christine; Wanders, Ronald J; Trompier, Doriane; Savary, Stéphane

    2014-08-29

    ABCD1 and ABCD2 are two closely related ATP-binding cassette half-transporters predicted to homodimerize and form peroxisomal importers for fatty acyl-CoAs. Available evidence has shown that ABCD1 and ABCD2 display a distinct but overlapping substrate specificity, although much remains to be learned in this respect as well as in their capability to form functional heterodimers. Using a cell model expressing an ABCD2-EGFP fusion protein, we first demonstrated by proximity ligation assay and co-immunoprecipitation assay that ABCD1 interacts with ABCD2. Next, we tested in the pxa1/pxa2Δ yeast mutant the functionality of ABCD1/ABCD2 dimers by expressing chimeric proteins mimicking homo- or heterodimers. For further structure-function analysis of ABCD1/ABCD2 dimers, we expressed chimeric dimers fused to enhanced GFP in human skin fibroblasts of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy patients. These cells are devoid of ABCD1 and accumulate very long-chain fatty acids (C26:0 and C26:1). We checked that the chimeric proteins were correctly expressed and targeted to the peroxisomes. Very long-chain fatty acid levels were partially restored in transfected X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy fibroblasts regardless of the chimeric construct used, thus demonstrating functionality of both homo- and heterodimers. Interestingly, the level of C24:6 n-3, the immediate precursor of docosahexaenoic acid, was decreased in cells expressing chimeric proteins containing at least one ABCD2 moiety. Our data demonstrate for the first time that both homo- and heterodimers of ABCD1 and ABCD2 are functionally active. Interestingly, the role of ABCD2 (in homo- and heterodimeric forms) in the metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids is clearly evidenced, and the chimeric dimers provide a novel tool to study substrate specificity of peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette transporters. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Bone marrow cell migration to the heart in a chimeric mouse model of acute chagasic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Iansen Irion

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Chagas disease is a public health problem caused by infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. There is currently no effective therapy for Chagas disease. Although there is some evidence for the beneficial effect of bone marrow-derived cells in chagasic disease, the mechanisms underlying their effects in the heart are unknown. Reports have suggested that bone marrow cells are recruited to the chagasic heart; however, studies using chimeric mouse models of chagasic cardiomyopathy are rare. OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to investigate the migration of bone marrow cells to the heart after T. cruzi infection in a model of chagasic disease in chimeric mice. METHODS To obtain chimerical mice, wild-type (WT C57BL6 mice were exposed to full body irradiation (7 Gy, causing bone marrow ablation. Then, bone marrow cells from green fluorescent protein (GFP-transgenic mice were infused into the mice. Graft effectiveness was confirmed by flow cytometry. Experimental mice were divided into four groups: (i infected chimeric (iChim mice; (ii infected WT (iWT mice, both of which received 3 × 104 trypomastigotes of the Brazil strain; (iii non-infected chimeric (Chim mice; and (iv non-infected WT mice. FINDINGS At one-month post-infection, iChim and iWT mice showed first degree atrioventricular block with decreased heart rate and treadmill exercise parameters compared to those in the non-infected groups. MAIN CONCLUSIONS iChim mice showed an increase in parasitaemia, myocarditis, and the presence of amastigote nests in the heart tissue compared to iWT mice. Flow cytometry analysis did not detect haematopoietic progenitor cells in the hearts of infected mice. Furthermore, GFP+ cardiomyocytes were not detected in the tissues of chimeric mice.

  4. Bone marrow cell migration to the heart in a chimeric mouse model of acute chagasic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irion, Camila Iansen; Paredes, Bruno Diaz; Brasil, Guilherme Visconde; da Cunha, Sandro Torrentes; Paula, Luis Felipe; Carvalho, Alysson Roncally; de Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Campos; Carvalho, Adriana Bastos; Goldenberg, Regina Coeli dos Santos

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Chagas disease is a public health problem caused by infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. There is currently no effective therapy for Chagas disease. Although there is some evidence for the beneficial effect of bone marrow-derived cells in chagasic disease, the mechanisms underlying their effects in the heart are unknown. Reports have suggested that bone marrow cells are recruited to the chagasic heart; however, studies using chimeric mouse models of chagasic cardiomyopathy are rare. OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to investigate the migration of bone marrow cells to the heart after T. cruzi infection in a model of chagasic disease in chimeric mice. METHODS To obtain chimerical mice, wild-type (WT) C57BL6 mice were exposed to full body irradiation (7 Gy), causing bone marrow ablation. Then, bone marrow cells from green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transgenic mice were infused into the mice. Graft effectiveness was confirmed by flow cytometry. Experimental mice were divided into four groups: (i) infected chimeric (iChim) mice; (ii) infected WT (iWT) mice, both of which received 3 × 104 trypomastigotes of the Brazil strain; (iii) non-infected chimeric (Chim) mice; and (iv) non-infected WT mice. FINDINGS At one-month post-infection, iChim and iWT mice showed first degree atrioventricular block with decreased heart rate and treadmill exercise parameters compared to those in the non-infected groups. MAIN CONCLUSIONS iChim mice showed an increase in parasitaemia, myocarditis, and the presence of amastigote nests in the heart tissue compared to iWT mice. Flow cytometry analysis did not detect haematopoietic progenitor cells in the hearts of infected mice. Furthermore, GFP+ cardiomyocytes were not detected in the tissues of chimeric mice. PMID:28767980

  5. Radiation induced chimeric rearrangement flower structure of Rhododendron simsii Planch. (Azaleaindica L.) Use of recurrent irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loose, R. de

    1979-01-01

    A radiation-induced chimeric flower colour sport of vegetatively propagated Rhododendron simsii Planch was recurrently irradiated (up to three times in three consecutive years) with soft X-rays (50kV-30mA), as compared to a single treatment. Because of the low true flower colour mutation frequency the efficiency of the different radiation treatments was compared on the basis of the number of chimeric rearrangements in flower structure i.e. the flower colour change from red with broad white edge towards either homogeneous carminered or white. It is quite clear that recurrent irradiation with appropiate doses is most efficient. (Auth.)

  6. Translation activity of chimeric ribosomes composed of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis or Geobacillus stearothermophilus subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayaka Tsuji

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome composition, consisting of rRNA and ribosomal proteins, is highly conserved among a broad range of organisms. However, biochemical studies focusing on ribosomal subunit exchangeability between organisms remain limited. In this study, we show that chimeric ribosomes, composed of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis or E. coli and Geobacillus stearothermophilus subunits, are active for β-galactosidase translation in a highly purified E. coli translation system. Activities of the chimeric ribosomes showed only a modest decrease when using E. coli 30 S subunits, indicating functional conservation of the 50 S subunit between these bacterial species.

  7. Tumor-Triggered Geometrical Shape Switch of Chimeric Peptide for Enhanced in Vivo Tumor Internalization and Photodynamic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kai; Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Weiyun; Wang, Shibo; Xu, Luming; Zhang, Chi; Zhang, Xianzheng; Han, Heyou

    2017-03-28

    Geometrical shape of nanoparticles plays an important role in cellular internalization. However, the applicability in tumor selective therapeutics is still scarcely reported. In this article, we designed a tumor extracellular acidity-responsive chimeric peptide with geometrical shape switch for enhanced tumor internalization and photodynamic therapy. This chimeric peptide could self-assemble into spherical nanoparticles at physiological condition. While at tumor extracellular acidic microenvironment, chimeric peptide underwent detachment of acidity-sensitive 2,3-dimethylmaleic anhydride groups. The subsequent recovery of ionic complementarity between chimeric peptides resulted in formation of rod-like nanoparticles. Both in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that this acidity-triggered geometrical shape switch endowed chimeric peptide with accelerated internalization in tumor cells, prolonged accumulation in tumor tissue, enhanced photodynamic therapy, and minimal side effects. Our results suggested that fusing tumor microenvironment with geometrical shape switch should be a promising strategy for targeted drug delivery.

  8. Tubular and endothelial chimerism in renal allografts using fluorescence and chromogenic in situ hybridization (FISH, CISH) technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Zsuzsanna; Gaspert, Ariana; Behnke, Silvia; von Teichman, Adriana; Fritzsche, Florian; Fehr, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    The role of endothelial and tubular chimerism in renal allograft adaptation and rejection varies in different studies. We addressed the correlation between different clinico-pathological settings and sex-chromosomal endothelial and/or tubular chimerism in renal allografts. We examined the presence or absence of the X and Y chromosomes by fluorescence and chromogenic in situ hybridization (FISH, CISH) methodology on paraffin embedded kidney biopsies in 16 gender mismatched renal transplants (1 to 12 years post-transplantation). Twelve patients were male, four female. Four groups were selected: (i) Vascular calcineurin inhibitor toxicity without rejection; (ii) T-cell mediated vascular rejection; (iii) antibody mediated rejection; and (iv) C4d-positivity in AB0-incompatible transplants with or without rejection. Twelve non-transplant kidney biopsies (8 female, 4 male) were used as controls. Tubular chimerism was detected more frequently (69%) than endothelial chimerism (12%) in renal transplants. One of 12 control patients had tubular and endothelial chimeric cells (8%). The Y chromosome occurred in 8/12 male recipients (67%) in tubular epithelial cells and in 5/12 male recipients (42%) in endothelial cells. Double X chromosomes were detected in 3/4 female recipients in tubular epithelium. Tubular chimerism occurred more often with endothelial chimerism and capillaritis without correlation with other parameters, such as rejection. Combined Y chromosomal tubular and lymphatic endothelial chimerism correlated with T-cell mediated vascular rejection in two out of three patients (66%). Combined Y chromosomal tubular and peritubular capillary chimerism correlated with antibody mediated C4d+ rejection in one out of two patients (50%). Tubular and/or endothelial chimerism occur frequently in gender mismatched renal allografts and, when combined, this is associated with T-cell mediated rejection. © 2012 The Authors. Pathology International © 2012 Japanese Society of

  9. Alloreactive regulatory T cells allow the generation of mixed chimerism and transplant tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina eRuiz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The induction of donor-specific transplant tolerance is one of the main goals of modern immunology. Establishment of a mixed chimerism state in the transplant recipient has proven to be a suitable strategy for the induction of long-term allograft tolerance; however, current experimental recipient preconditioning protocols have many side effects, and are not feasible for use in future therapies. In order to improve the current mixed chimerism induction protocols, we developed a non-myeloablative bone-marrow transplant protocol using retinoic acid induced alloantigen-specific Tregs, clinically available immunosuppressive drugs and lower doses of irradiation. We demonstrate that retinoic acid induced alloantigen-specific Tregs in addition to a non-myeloablative bone-marrow transplant protocol generates stable mixed chimerism and induce tolerance to allogeneic secondary skin allografts in mice. Therefore, the establishment of mixed chimerism through the use of donor-specific Tregs rather than non-specific immunosuppression could have a potential use in organ transplantation.

  10. Versatile bio-ink for covalent immobilization of chimeric avidin on sol-gel substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Jarkko J; Kivimäki, Liisa; Määttä, Juha A E; Mäkelä, Inka; Hakalahti, Leena; Takkinen, Kristiina; Kulomaa, Markku S; Hytönen, Vesa P; Hormi, Osmo E O

    2011-10-15

    A bio-ink for covalent deposition of thermostable, high affinity biotin-binding chimeric avidin onto sol-gel substrates was developed. The bio-ink was prepared from heterobifunctional crosslinker 6-maleimidohexanoic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide which was first reacted either with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane or 3-aminopropyldimethylethoxysilane to form silane linkers 6-maleimide-N-(3-(triethoxysilyl)propyl)hexanamide or -(ethoxydimethylsilyl)propyl)-hexanamide. C-terminal cysteine genetically engineered to chimeric avidin was reacted with the maleimide group of silane linker in methanol/PBS solution to form a suspension, which was printed on sol-gel modified PMMA film. Different concentrations of chimeric avidin and ratios between silane linkers were tested to find the best properties for the bio-ink to enable gravure or inkjet printing. Bio-ink prepared from 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane was found to provide the highest amount of active immobilized chimeric avidin. The developed bio-ink was shown to be valuable for automated fabrication of avidin-functionalized polymer films. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flap for reconstruction of complex defects in head and neck.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canhua Jiang

    Full Text Available The anterolateral thigh flap has been the workhouse flap for coverage of soft-tissue defects in head and neck for decades. However, the reconstruction of multiple and complex soft-tissue defects in head and neck with multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flaps is still a challenge for reconstructive surgeries. Here, a clinical series of 12 cases is reported in which multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flaps were used for complex soft-tissue defects with several separately anatomic locations in head and neck. Of the 12 cases, 7 patients presented with trismus were diagnosed as advanced buccal cancer with oral submucous fibrosis, 2 tongue cancer cases were found accompanied with multiple oral mucosa lesions or buccal cancer, and 3 were hypopharyngeal cancer with anterior neck skin invaded. All soft-tissue defects were reconstructed by multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flaps, including 9 tripaddled anterolateral thigh flaps and 3 bipaddled flaps. The mean length of skin paddle was 19.2 (range: 14-23 cm and the mean width was 4.9 (range: 2.5-7 cm. All flaps survived and all donor sites were closed primarily. After a mean follow-up time of 9.1 months, there were no problems with the donor or recipient sites. This study supports that the multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flap is a reliable and good alternative for complex and multiple soft-tissue defects of the head and neck.

  12. Trypanosoma cruzi Differentiates and Multiplies within Chimeric Parasitophorous Vacuoles in Macrophages Coinfected with Leishmania amazonensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessoa, Carina Carraro; Ferreira, Éden Ramalho; Bayer-Santos, Ethel; Rabinovitch, Michel; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Real, Fernando

    2016-05-01

    The trypanosomatids Leishmania amazonensis and Trypanosoma cruzi are excellent models for the study of the cell biology of intracellular protozoan infections. After their uptake by mammalian cells, the parasitic protozoan flagellates L. amazonensis and T. cruzi lodge within acidified parasitophorous vacuoles (PVs). However, whereas L. amazonensis develops in spacious, phagolysosome-like PVs that may enclose numerous parasites, T. cruzi is transiently hosted within smaller vacuoles from which it soon escapes to the host cell cytosol. To investigate if parasite-specific vacuoles are required for the survival and differentiation of T. cruzi, we constructed chimeric vacuoles by infection of L. amazonensis amastigote-infected macrophages with T. cruzi epimastigotes (EPIs) or metacyclic trypomastigotes (MTs). These chimeric vacuoles, easily observed by microscopy, allowed the entry and fate of T. cruzi in L. amazonensis PVs to be dynamically recorded by multidimensional imaging of coinfected cells. We found that although T. cruzi EPIs remained motile and conserved their morphology in chimeric vacuoles, T. cruzi MTs differentiated into amastigote-like forms capable of multiplying. These results demonstrate that the large adaptive vacuoles of L. amazonensis are permissive to T. cruzi survival and differentiation and that noninfective EPIs are spared from destruction within the chimeric PVs. We conclude that T. cruzi differentiation can take place in Leishmania-containing vacuoles, suggesting this occurs prior to their escape into the host cell cytosol. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Lenalidomide enhances antitumor functions of chimeric antigen receptor modified T cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Otáhal, Pavel; Průková, D.; Král, Vlastimil; Fábry, Milan; Vockova, P.; Lateckova, L.; Trněný, M.; Klener, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 4 (2016), č. článku e1115940. ISSN 2162-402X R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT13201 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Chimeric anti genic receptor * lenalidomide * lymphoma * tumor immunotherapy * T cells Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.719, year: 2016

  14. Human glial chimeric mice reveal astrocytic dependence of JC virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondo, Yoichi; Windrem, Martha S; Zou, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    with humanized white matter by engrafting human glial progenitor cells (GPCs) into neonatal immunodeficient and myelin-deficient mice. Intracerebral delivery of JCV resulted in infection and subsequent demyelination of these chimeric mice. Human GPCs and astrocytes were infected more readily than...

  15. CCR 20th anniversary commentary: a chimeric antibody, C225, inhibits EGFR activation and tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, John; Prewett, Marie; Rockwell, Patricia; Goldstein, Neil I

    2015-01-15

    Murine mAb 225 was effective against the EGFR tyrosine kinase and inhibited tumor growth in preclinical studies. A phase I trial showed safety, tumor localization, and satisfactory pharmacokinetics. Human:murine chimeric C225 retained biologic activity, which was essential for the conduct of subsequent combination therapy trials and eventual regulatory approval. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Minimal Residual Disease Diagnostics and Chimerism in the Post-Transplant Period in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Bacher

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In acute myeloid leukemia (AML, the selection of poor-risk patients for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is associated with rather high post-transplant relapse rates. As immunotherapeutic intervention is considered to be more effective before the cytomorphologic manifestation of relapse, post-transplant monitoring gains increasing attention in stem cell recipients with a previous diagnosis of AML. Different methods for detection of chimerism (e.g., microsatellite analysis or quantitative real-time PCR are available to quantify the ratio of donor and recipient cells in the post-transplant period. Various studies demonstrated the potential use of mixed chimerism kinetics to predict relapse of the AML. CD34+-specific chimerism is associated with a higher specificity of chimerism analysis. Nevertheless, a decrease of donor cells can have other causes as well. Therefore, efforts continue to introduce minimal residual disease (MRD monitoring based on molecular mutations in the post-transplant period. The NPM1 (nucleophosmin mutations can be monitored by sensitive quantitative real-time PCR in subsets of stem cell recipients with AML, but for approximately 20% of patients, suitable molecular mutations for post-transplant MRD monitoring are not available so far. This emphasizes the need for an expansion of the panel of MRD markers in the transplant setting.

  17. Investigation of chimeric reads using the MinION [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruby White

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Following a nanopore sequencing run of PCR products of three amplicons less than 1kb, an abundance of reads failed quality control due to template/complement mismatch. A BLAST search demonstrated that some of the failed reads mapped to two different genes -- an unexpected observation, given that PCR was carried out separately for each amplicon. A further investigation was carried out specifically to search for chimeric reads, using separate barcodes for each amplicon and trying two different ligation methods prior to sample loading. Despite the separation of ligation products, chimeric reads formed from different amplicons were still observed in the base-called sequence. The long-read nature of nanopore sequencing presents an effective tool for the discovery and filtering of chimeric reads. We have found that at least 1.7% of reads prepared using the Nanopore LSK002 2D Ligation Kit include post-amplification chimeric elements. This finding has potential implications for other amplicon sequencing technologies, as the process is unlikely to be specific to the sample preparation used for nanopore sequencing.

  18. Intravitreal injection of a chimeric phage endolysin Ply187 protects mice from Staphylococcus aureus endophthalmitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objectives: The treatment of endophthalmitis is becoming very challenging due to the emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria. Hence, the development of novel therapeutic alternatives for ocular use is essential. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of Ply187AN-KSH3b, a chimeric phage endol...

  19. Chimeric Ply187 endolysin kills Staphylococcus aureus more effectively than the parental enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peptidoglycan hydrolases are an effective new source of antimicrobials. A chimeric fusion protein of the Ply187 endopeptidase domain and LysK SH3b cell wall binding domain is a potent agent against Staphylococcus aureus in three functional assays....

  20. Enhanced antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis by chimeric monoclonal antibodies with tandemly repeated Fc domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Hiroaki; Ootsubo, Michiko; Fukazawa, Mizuki; Motoi, Sotaro; Konakahara, Shu; Masuho, Yasuhiko

    2011-04-01

    We previously reported that chimeric monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with tandemly repeated Fc domains, which were developed by introducing tandem repeats of Fc domains downstream of 2 Fab domains, augmented binding avidities for all Fcγ receptors, resulting in enhanced antibody (Ab)-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Here we investigated regarding Ab-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) mediated by these chimeric mAbs, which is considered one of the most important mechanisms that kills tumor cells, using two-color flow cytometric methods. ADCP mediated by T3-Ab, a chimeric mAb with 3 tandemly repeated Fc domains, was 5 times more potent than that by native anti-CD20 M-Ab (M-Ab hereafter). Furthermore, T3-Ab-mediated ADCP was resistant to competitive inhibition by intravenous Ig (IVIG), although M-Ab-mediated ADCP decreased in the presence of IVIG. An Fcγ receptor-blocking study demonstrated that T3-Ab mediated ADCP via both FcγRIA and FcγRIIA, whereas M-Ab mediated ADCP exclusively via FcγRIA. These results suggest that chimeric mAbs with tandemly repeated Fc domains enhance ADCP as well as ADCC, and that Fc multimerization may significantly enhance the efficacy of therapeutic Abs. Copyright © 2010 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Preparation and Characterization of a Novel Chimeric Protein VEGI-CTT in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiping Cai

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial cell growth inhibitor (VEGI is a recently identified antiangiogenic cytokine that belongs to the TNF superfamily, and could effectively inhibit endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Synthetic peptide CTT (CTTHWGFTLC has been found to suppress invasion and migration of both tumor and endothelial cells by potent and selective inhibition of MMP-2 and MMP-9. To prepare chimeric protein VEGI-CTT for more potent antitumor therapy, the recombinant expression vector pET-VEGI-CTT was constructed. This fusion protein was expressed in inclusion bodies in E. coli BL21 (DE3, and was refolded and purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography using His-tag. Purified VEGI-CTT protein was characterized by proliferation assays of the endothelial cells and casein degradation assay in vitro. The results demonstrated that chimeric protein VEGI-CTT had a potent activity of antiangiogenesis through inhibiting the proliferation of endothelial cells, and could effectively reduce the activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9. The preliminarily in vivo study demonstrated that chimeric protein VEGI-CTT had more potent antitumor activity than VEGI and/or CTT peptide against CA46 human lymphoma xenografts in nude mice. Thus, these facts that are derived from the present study suggest that the chimeric protein VEGI-CTT may be used for tumor therapy in the future.

  2. Optimized total body irradiation for induction of renal allograft tolerance through mixed chimerism in cynomolgus monkeys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimikawa, Masaaki; Kawai, Tatsuo; Ota, Kazuo [Tokyo Women`s Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    We previously demonstrated that a nonmyeloablative preparative regimen can induce mixed chimerism and renal allograft tolerance between MHC-disparate non-human primates. The basic regimen includes anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG), total body irradiation (TBI, 300 cGy), thymic irradiation (TI, 700 cGy), splenectomy, donor bone marrow (DBM) infusion, and posttransplant cyclosporine therapy (CYA, discontinued after 4 weeks). To evaluate the importance and to minimize the toxicity of irradiation, kidney allografts were transplanted with various manipulations of the irradiation protocol. Monkeys treated with the basic protocol without TBI and TI did not develop chimerism or long-term allograft survival. In monkeys treated with the full protocol, all six monkeys treated with two fractionated dose of 150 cGy developed chimerism and five monkeys appeared tolerant. In contrast, only two of the four monkeys treated with fractionated doses of 125 cGy developed chimerism and only one monkey survived long term. The degree of lymphocyte depletion in all recipients was proportional to the TBI dose. The fractionated TBI regimen of 150 cGy appears to be the most consistently effective regimen for establishing donor bone marrow cell engraftment and allograft tolerance. (author)

  3. Exploration of genetically encoded voltage indicators based on a chimeric voltage sensing domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukiko eMishina

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Deciphering how the brain generates cognitive function from patterns of electrical signals is one of the ultimate challenges in neuroscience. To this end, it would be highly desirable to monitor the activities of very large numbers of neurons while an animal engages in complex behaviours. Optical imaging of electrical activity using genetically encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs has the potential to meet this challenge. Currently prevalent GEVIs are based on the voltage-sensitive fluorescent protein (VSFP prototypical design or on the voltage dependent state transitions of microbial opsins.We recently introduced a new VSFP design in which the voltage-sensing domain (VSD is sandwiched between a FRET pair of fluorescent proteins (termed VSFP-Butterflies and also demonstrated a series of chimeric VSD in which portions of the VSD of Ciona intestinalis voltage-sensitive phosphatase (Ci-VSP are substituted by homologous portions of a voltage-gated potassium channel subunit. These chimeric VSD had faster sensing kinetics than that of the native Ci-VSD. Here, we describe a new set of VSFPs that combine chimeric VSD with the Butterfly structure. We show that these chimeric VSFP-Butterflies can report membrane voltage oscillations of up to 200 Hz in cultured cells and report sensory evoked cortical population responses in living mice. This class of GEVIs may be suitable for imaging of brain rhythms in behaving mammalians.

  4. Impact of Mixed Xenogeneic Porcine Hematopoietic Chimerism on Human NK Cell Recognition in a Humanized Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H W; Vishwasrao, P; Hölzl, M A; Chen, S; Choi, G; Zhao, G; Sykes, M

    2017-02-01

    Mixed chimerism is a promising approach to inducing allograft and xenograft tolerance. Mixed allogeneic and xenogeneic chimerism in mouse models induced specific tolerance and global hyporesponsiveness, respectively, of host mouse natural killer (NK) cells. In this study, we investigated whether pig/human mixed chimerism could tolerize human NK cells in a humanized mouse model. Our results showed no impact of induced human NK cell reconstitution on porcine chimerism. NK cells from most pig/human mixed chimeric mice showed either specifically decreased cytotoxicity to pig cells or global hyporesponsiveness in an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. Mixed xenogeneic chimerism did not hamper the maturation of human NK cells but was associated with an alteration in NK cell subset distribution and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) production in the bone marrow. In summary, we demonstrate that mixed xenogeneic chimerism induces human NK cell hyporesponsiveness to pig cells. Our results support the use of this approach to inducing xenogeneic tolerance in the clinical setting. However, additional approaches are required to improve the efficacy of tolerance induction while ensuring adequate NK cell functions. © Copyright 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  5. Understanding Zika Virus Stability and Developing a Chimeric Vaccine through Functional Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuping Xie

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Compared with other flaviviruses, Zika virus (ZIKV is uniquely associated with congenital diseases in pregnant women. One recent study reported that (i ZIKV has higher thermostability than dengue virus (DENV [a flavivirus closely related to ZIKV], which might contribute to the disease outcome; (ii the higher thermostability of ZIKV could arise from an extended loop structure in domain III of the viral envelope (E protein and an extra hydrogen-bond interaction between E molecules (V. A. Kostyuchenko, E. X. Y. Lim, S. Zhang, G. Fibriansah, T.-S. Ng, J. S. G. Ooi, J. Shi, and S.-M. Lok, Nature 533:425–428, 2016, https://doi.org/10.1038/nature17994. Here we report the functional analysis of the structural information in the context of complete ZIKV and DENV-2 virions. Swapping the prM-E genes between ZIKV and DENV-2 switched the thermostability of the chimeric viruses, identifying the prM-E proteins as the major determinants for virion thermostability. Shortening the extended loop of the E protein by 1 amino acid was lethal for ZIKV assembly/release. Mutations (Q350I and T351V that abolished the extra hydrogen-bond interaction between the E proteins did not reduce ZIKV thermostability, indicating that the extra interaction does not increase the thermostability. Interestingly, mutant T351V was attenuated in A129 mice defective in type I interferon receptors, even though the virus retained the wild-type thermostability. Furthermore, we found that a chimeric ZIKV with the DENV-2 prM-E and a chimeric DENV-2 with the ZIKV prM-E were highly attenuated in A129 mice; these chimeric viruses were highly immunogenic and protective against DENV-2 and ZIKV challenge, respectively. These results indicate the potential of these chimeric viruses for vaccine development.

  6. A Novel Chimeric Endolysin with Antibacterial Activity against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Haddad Kashani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine/histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase (CHAP and amidase are known as catalytic domains of the bacteriophage-derived endolysin LysK and were previously reported to show lytic activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. In the current study, the in silico design and analysis of chimeric CHAP-amidase model was applied to enhance the stability and solubility of protein, which was achieved through improving the properties of primary, secondary and tertiary structures. The coding gene sequence of the chimeric CHAP-amidase was synthesized and subcloned into the pET-22(+ expression vector, and the recombinant protein was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3 strain. Subsequent affinity-based purification yielded ~12 mg soluble protein per liter of E. coli culture. Statistical analysis indicated that concentrations of ≥1 μg/mL of the purified protein have significant antibacterial activity against S. aureus MRSA252 cells. The engineered chimeric CHAP-amidase exhibited 3.2 log reduction of MRSA252 cell counts at the concentration of 10 μg/mL. A synergistic interaction between CHAP-amidase and vancomycin was detected by using checkerboard assay and calculating the fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC index. This synergistic effect was shown by 8-fold reduction in the minimum inhibitory concentration of vancomycin. The chimeric CHAP-amidase displayed strong antibacterial activity against S. aureus, S. epidermidis, and enterococcus. However, it did not indicate any significant antibacterial activity against E. coli and Lactococcus lactis. Taken together, these findings suggest that our chimeric CHAP-amidase might represent potential to be used for the development of efficient antibacterial therapies targeting MRSA and certain Gram-positive bacteria.

  7. Enhancement of mucosal immune responses by chimeric influenza HA/SHIV virus-like particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Lizheng; Lu Xiaoyan; Kang, S.-M.; Chen Changyi; Compans, Richard W.; Yao Qizhi

    2003-01-01

    To enhance mucosal immune responses using simian/human immunodeficiency virus-like particles (SHIV VLPs), we have produced novel phenotypically mixed chimeric influenza HA/SHIV VLPs and used them to immunize C57BL/6J mice intranasally. Antibody and cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) responses as well as cytokine production in both systemic and mucosal sites were compared after immunization with SHIV VLPs or chimeric HA/SHIV VLPs. By using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the levels of serum IgG and mucosal IgA to the HIV envelope protein (Env) were found to be highest in the group immunized with chimeric HA/SHIV VLPs. Furthermore, the highest titer of serum neutralizing antibody against HIV Env was found with the group immunized with chimeric HA/SHIV VLPs. Analysis of the IgG1/IgG2a ratio indicated that a T H 1-oriented immune response resulted from these VLP immunizations. HA/SHIV VLP-immunized mice also showed significantly higher CTL responses than those observed in SHIV VLP-immunized mice. Moreover, a MHC class I restricted T-cell activation ELISPOT assay showed a mixed type of T H 1/T H 2 cytokines in the HA/SHIV VLP-immunized mice, indicating that the chimeric VLPs can enhance both humoral and cellular immune responses to the HIV Env protein at multiple mucosal and systemic sites. The results indicate that incorporation of influenza HA into heterotypic VLPs may be highly effective for targeting vaccines to mucosal surfaces

  8. A Novel Chimeric Endolysin with Antibacterial Activity against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad Kashani, Hamed; Fahimi, Hossein; Dasteh Goli, Yasaman; Moniri, Rezvan

    2017-01-01

    Cysteine/histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase (CHAP) and amidase are known as catalytic domains of the bacteriophage-derived endolysin LysK and were previously reported to show lytic activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). In the current study, the in silico design and analysis of chimeric CHAP-amidase model was applied to enhance the stability and solubility of protein, which was achieved through improving the properties of primary, secondary and tertiary structures. The coding gene sequence of the chimeric CHAP-amidase was synthesized and subcloned into the pET-22(+) expression vector, and the recombinant protein was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) strain. Subsequent affinity-based purification yielded ~12 mg soluble protein per liter of E. coli culture. Statistical analysis indicated that concentrations of ≥1 μg/mL of the purified protein have significant antibacterial activity against S. aureus MRSA 252 cells. The engineered chimeric CHAP-amidase exhibited 3.2 log reduction of MRSA 252 cell counts at the concentration of 10 μg/mL. A synergistic interaction between CHAP-amidase and vancomycin was detected by using checkerboard assay and calculating the fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) index. This synergistic effect was shown by 8-fold reduction in the minimum inhibitory concentration of vancomycin. The chimeric CHAP-amidase displayed strong antibacterial activity against S. aureus, S. epidermidis , and enterococcus . However, it did not indicate any significant antibacterial activity against E. coli and Lactococcus lactis . Taken together, these findings suggest that our chimeric CHAP-amidase might represent potential to be used for the development of efficient antibacterial therapies targeting MRSA and certain Gram-positive bacteria.

  9. The expression and genetic immunization of chimeric fragment of Hantaan virus M and S segments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Fanglin; Wu Xingan; Luo Wen; Bai Wentao; Liu Yong; Yan Yan; Wang Haitao; Xu Zhikai

    2007-01-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS), which is characterized by severe symptoms and high mortality, is caused by hantavirus. There are still no effective prophylactic vaccines directed to HFRS until now. In this research, we fused expressed G2 fragment of M segment and 0.7 kb fragment of S segment. We expect it could be a candidate vaccine. Chimeric gene G2S0.7 was first expressed in prokaryotic expression system pGEX-4T. After inducing expressed fusion proteins, GST-G2S0.7 was induced and its molecular weight was about 100 kDa. Meanwhile, the fusion protein kept the activity of its parental proteins. Further, BALB/c mice were vaccinated by the chimeric gene. ELISA, cell microculture neutralization test in vitro were used to detect the humoral immune response in immunized BALB/c mice. Lymphocyte proliferation assay was used to detect the cellular immune response. The results showed that the chimeric gene could simultaneously evoke specific antibody against nucleocapsid protein (NP) and glycoprotein (GP). And the immunized mice of every group elicited neutralizing antibodies with different titers. But the titers were low. Lymphocyte proliferation assay results showed that the stimulation indexes of splenocytes of chimeric gene to NP and GP were significantly higher than that of control. It suggested that the chimeric gene of Hantaan virus containing G2 fragment of M segment and 0.7 kb fragment of S segment could directly elicit specific anti-Hantaan virus humoral and cellular immune response in BALB/c mice

  10. Vaccinia virus recombinants expressing chimeric proteins of human immunodeficiency virus and gamma interferon are attenuated for nude mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Giavedoni, L D; Jones, L; Gardner, M B; Gibson, H L; Ng, C T; Barr, P J; Yilma, T

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a method for attenuating vaccinia virus recombinants by expressing a fusion protein of a lymphokine and an immunogen. Chimeric genes were constructed that coded for gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and structural proteins of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). In this study, we describe the biological and immunological properties of vaccinia virus recombinants expressing chimeric genes of murine or human IFN-gamma with glycoprotein gp120, gag, and a fragment of gp41...

  11. Generation of chimeric T-cell receptor transgenes and their efficient transfer in primary mouse T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, Linda J; Haynes, Nicole M; Darcy, Phillip K

    2010-01-01

    Gene modification of T cells with chimeric T-cell receptor (TCR) transgenes offers a novel way to generate tumor-specific T cells for cancer immunotherapy. Retroviruses have been utilized as the most common means of efficiently transducing primary T lymphocytes with these transgenes. In this section we describe methods for generation of chimeric TCR's and utilization of retroviral vectors for efficient transduction of these transgenes in primary mouse T lymphocytes.

  12. Suppression of the biosynthesis of proanthocyanidin in Arabidopsis by a chimeric PAP1 repressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Kyoko; Tanaka, Hideo; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru

    2004-11-01

    Flavonoids are secondary metabolites that are specific to higher plants. PAP1, a member of the family of MYB domain transcription factors in Arabidopsis, is a positive regulator of the biosynthesis of anthocyanin. We show here that a chimeric PAP1 repressor, in which the EAR-motif repression domain from SUPERMAN was fused to PAP1, suppressed the expression of four flavonoid biosynthetic genes, namely CHS, DFR, LDOX, and BAN, in siliques, and inhibited the accumulation of proanthocyanidin, even in the presence of an endogenous positive regulator, such as TT2. This suppression resulted in the formation of light yellow seeds in 35S::PAP1SRDX transgenic plants. Our results indicate that PAP1 has the potential ability to regulate the biosynthesis not only of anthocyanin but also of proanthocyanidin. Our gene silencing system, using chimeric repressors, appears to be a useful tool for the manipulation of the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites in plants.

  13. Task difficulty reduces the left visual hemispace bias for judgments of emotion in chimeric faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbary, Timothy J; Almerigi, Jason B; Harris, Lauren Julius

    2002-01-01

    A prior study (Carbary, Almerigi, & Harris, 2001) of adults' judgments of emotional chimeric faces showed that the left visual hemispace (LVH) bias normally found on a free-viewing chimeric faces test is reduced when the task is judged to be difficult. Taking into account theory and research on hemispheric differences in styles, or strategies, of information processing, we proposed that the reduction was related to a change in these strategies. Two new experiments are presented that independently manipulate task difficulty and show the same task difficulty-related effect as in our prior study. Data are also presented suggesting that the strategy most commonly adopted for difficult judgments is part-based or feature-oriented, whereas the strategy most commonly adopted for easy judgments is reliance on "first impression."

  14. Authentic display of a cholera toxin epitope by chimeric type 1 fimbriae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stentebjerg-Olesen, Bodil; Pallesen, Lars; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    1997-01-01

    The potential of the major structural protein of type 1 fimbriae as a display system for heterologous sequences was tested. As a reporter-epitope, a heterologous sequence mimicking a neutralizing epitope of the cholera toxin B chain was inserted, in one or two copies, into four different positions...... in the fimA gene. This was carried out by introduction of new restriction sites by PCR-mediated site-directed mutagenesis of fimA in positions predicted to correspond to optimally surface-located regions of the subunit protein. Subsequently, the synthetic cholera-toxin-encoding DNA segment was inserted....... Several of the chosen positions seemed amenable even for large foreign inserts; the chimeric proteins were exposed on the bacterial surface and the cholera toxin epitope was authentically displayed, i.e. it was recognized on bacteria by specific antiserum. Display of chimeric fimbriae was tested...

  15. Suicide Gene Therapy to Increase the Safety of Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Redirected T Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Casucci, Attilio Bondanza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding motif of a monoclonal antibody (mAb with the signal transduction machinery of the T-cell receptor (TCR. The genetic modification of T lymphocytes with chimeric receptors specific for tumor-associated antigens (TAAs allows for the redirection towards tumor cells. Clinical experience with CAR-redirected T cells suggests that antitumor efficacy associates with some degree of toxicity, especially when TAA expression is shared with healthy tissues. This situation closely resembles the case of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT, wherein allorecognition causes both the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL effect and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. Suicide gene therapy, i.e. the genetic induction of a conditional suicide phenotype into donor T cells, enables dissociating the GVL effect from GVHD. Applying suicide gene modification to CAR-redirected T cells may therefore greatly increase their safety profile and facilitate their clinical development.

  16. High Rate of Chimeric Gene Origination by Retroposition in Plant Genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Wen; Zheng, Hongkung; Fan, Chuanzhu

    2006-01-01

    Retroposition is widely found to play essential roles in origination of new mammalian and other animal genes. However, the scarcity of retrogenes in plants has led to the assumption that plant genomes rarely evolve new gene duplicates by retroposition, despite abundant retrotransposons in plants...... and a reported long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposon-mediated mechanism of retroposing cellular genes in maize (Zea mays). We show extensive retropositions in the rice (Oryza sativa) genome, with 1235 identified primary retrogenes. We identified 27 of these primary retrogenes within LTR retrotransposons......% of these retrosequences have recruited new exons from flanking regions, generating a large number of chimerical genes. We also identified young chimerical genes, suggesting that gene origination through retroposition is ongoing, with a rate an order of magnitude higher than the rate in primates. Finally, we observed...

  17. Establishment of Donor Chimerism Using Allogeneic Bone Marrow with AMP Cell Co-infusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    cynomolgus monkeys so that tolerance will be applicable to CTA and all donor organ types. We aim to extend and improve upon the 60-day chimerism...transplant PBMCs and those harvested at the time of euthanasia as responders confirmed that tolerance to donor alloantigens had not been induced (Figure...report 6G. Inventions, patent applications , and/or licenses Nothing to report 6H. Other Products Nothing to report 7. PARTICIPANTS & OTHER

  18. Therapeutic effects of induced pluripotent stem cells in chimeric mice with β-thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guanheng; Shi, Wansheng; Hu, Xingyin; Zhang, Jingzhi; Gong, Zhijuan; Guo, Xinbing; Ren, Zhaorui; Zeng, Fanyi

    2014-08-01

    Although β-thalassemia is one of the most common human genetic diseases, there is still no effective treatment other than bone marrow transplantation. Induced pluripotent stem cells have been considered good candidates for the future repair or replacement of malfunctioning organs. As a basis for developing transgenic induced pluripotent stem cell therapies for thalassemia, β(654) induced pluripotent stem cells from a β(654) -thalassemia mouse transduced with the normal human β-globin gene, and the induced pluripotent stem cells with an erythroid-expressing reporter GFP were used to produce chimeric mice. Using these chimera models, we investigated changes in various pathological indices including hematologic parameters and tissue pathology. Our data showed that when the chimerism of β(654) induced pluripotent stem cells with the normal human β-globin gene in β(654) mice is over 30%, the pathology of anemia appeared to be reversed, while chimerism ranging from 8% to 16% provided little improvement in the typical β-thalassemia phenotype. Effective alleviation of thalassemia-related phenotypes was observed when chimerism with the induced pluripotent stem cells owning the erythroid-expressing reporter GFP in β(654) mouse was greater than 10%. Thus, 10% or more expression of the exogenous normal β-globin gene reduces the degree of anemia in our β-thalassemia mouse model, whereas treatment with β(654) induced pluripotent stem cells which had the normal human β-globin gene had stable therapeutic effects but in a more dose-dependent manner. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  19. Chimerism in M1 plants of Vicia faba, Capsicum annuum and Linum usitatissimum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermelin, T.; Brunner, H.; Daskalov, S.; Nakai, H.

    1983-01-01

    One important task of our group at IAEA is to develop procedures aiming to improve sampling of M 2 seeds to facilitate the recovery of a maximum number of induced mutations in crop plants. Results from studies on three species are reported in this paper. Seeds have been mutagen treated and the chimeric M 1 plants were progeny tested in M 2 . The position of the M 2 seeds on the M 1 plants has been recorded

  20. CCR 20th Anniversary Commentary: Chimeric Antigen Receptors-From Model T to the Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwu, Patrick

    2015-07-15

    The research article by Kershaw and colleagues, published in the October 15, 2006, issue of Clinical Cancer Research, presents one of the first clinical trials to utilize chimeric antigen receptors. Subsequent studies have shown promise for the treatment of patients with lymphoid malignancies, but further progress will require optimization, including the identification of more specific antigens for solid tumors. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Conformational influence of the ribose 2'-hydroxyl group: crystal structures of DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egli, M.; Usman, N.; Rich, A.

    1993-01-01

    We have crystallized three double-helical DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes and determined their structures by X-ray crystallography at resolutions between 2 and 2.25 A. The two self-complementary duplexes [r(G)d(CGTATACGC)]2 and [d(GCGT)r(A)d(TACGC)]2, as well as the Okazaki fragment d(GGGTATACGC).r(GCG)d(TATACCC), were found to adopt A-type conformations. The crystal structures are non-isomorphous, and the crystallographic environments for the three chimeras are different. A number of intramolecular interactions of the ribose 2'-hydroxyl groups contribute to the stabilization of the A-conformation. Hydrogen bonds between 2'-hydroxyls and 5'-oxygens or phosphate oxygens, in addition to the previously observed hydrogen bonds to 1'-oxygens of adjacent riboses and deoxyriboses, are observed in the DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes. The crystalline chimeric duplexes do not show a transition between the DNA A- and B-conformations. CD spectra suggest that the Okazaki fragment assumes an A-conformation in solution as well. In this molecule the three RNA residues may therefore lock the complete decamer in the A-conformation. Crystals of an all-DNA strand with the same sequence as the self-complementary chimeras show a morphology which is different from those of the chimera crystals. Moreover, the oligonucleotide does not match any of the sequence characteristics of DNAs usually adopting the A-conformation in the crystalline state (e.g., octamers with short alternating stretches of purines and pyrimidines). In DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes, it is therefore possible that a single RNA residue can drive the conformational equilibrium toward the A-conformation.

  2. T cells expressing VHH-directed oligoclonal chimeric HER2 antigen receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamnani, Fatemeh Rahimi; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy with engineered T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) originated from antibodies is a promising strategy in cancer immunotherapy. Several unsuccessful trials, however, highlight the need for alternative conventional binding domains and the better combination...... of costimulatory endodomains for CAR construction to improve the effector functions of the engineered T cells. Camelid single-domain antibodies (VHHs), which are the smallest single domain antibodies, can endow great targeting ability to CAR-engineered T cells....

  3. Targeted induction of interferon-λ in humanized chimeric mouse liver abrogates hepatotropic virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ichiro Nakagawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: The interferon (IFN system plays a critical role in innate antiviral response. We presume that targeted induction of IFN in human liver shows robust antiviral effects on hepatitis C virus (HCV and hepatitis B virus (HBV. METHODS: This study used chimeric mice harboring humanized livers and infected with HCV or HBV. This mouse model permitted simultaneous analysis of immune responses by human and mouse hepatocytes in the same liver and exploration of the mechanism of antiviral effect against these viruses. Targeted expression of IFN was induced by treating the animals with a complex comprising a hepatotropic cationic liposome and a synthetic double-stranded RNA analog, pIC (LIC-pIC. Viral replication, IFN gene expression, IFN protein production, and IFN antiviral activity were analyzed (for type I, II and III IFNs in the livers and sera of these humanized chimeric mice. RESULTS: Following treatment with LIC-pIC, the humanized livers of chimeric mice exhibited increased expression (at the mRNA and protein level of human IFN-λs, resulting in strong antiviral effect on HBV and HCV. Similar increases were not seen for human IFN-α or IFN-β in these animals. Strong induction of IFN-λs by LIC-pIC occurred only in human hepatocytes, and not in mouse hepatocytes nor in human cell lines derived from other (non-hepatic tissues. LIC-pIC-induced IFN-λ production was mediated by the immune sensor adaptor molecules mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS and Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adaptor molecule-1 (TICAM-1, suggesting dual recognition of LIC-pIC by both sensor adaptor pathways. CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate that the expression and function of various IFNs differ depending on the animal species and tissues under investigation. Chimeric mice harboring humanized livers demonstrate that IFN-λs play an important role in the defense against human hepatic virus infection.

  4. Cryo-electron Microscopy Structures of Chimeric Hemagglutinin Displayed on a Universal Influenza Vaccine Candidate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin E. H. Tran

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses expressing chimeric hemagglutinins (HAs are important tools in the quest for a universal vaccine. Using cryo-electron tomography, we have determined the structures of a chimeric HA variant that comprises an H1 stalk and an H5 globular head domain (cH5/1 HA in native and antibody-bound states. We show that cH5/1 HA is structurally different from native HA, displaying a 60° rotation between the stalk and head groups, leading to a novel and unexpected “open” arrangement of HA trimers. cH5/1N1 viruses also display higher glycoprotein density than pH1N1 or H5N1 viruses, but despite these differences, antibodies that target either the stalk or head domains of hemagglutinins still bind to cH5/1 HA with the same consequences as those observed with native H1 or H5 HA. Our results show that a large range of structural plasticity can be tolerated in the chimeric spike scaffold without disrupting structural and geometric aspects of antibody binding.

  5. Development of a high-throughput microfluidic integrated microarray for the detection of chimeric bioweapons.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppod, Timothy; Satterfield, Brent; Hukari, Kyle W.; West, Jason A. A.; Hux, Gary A.

    2006-10-01

    The advancement of DNA cloning has significantly augmented the potential threat of a focused bioweapon assault, such as a terrorist attack. With current DNA cloning techniques, toxin genes from the most dangerous (but environmentally labile) bacterial or viral organism can now be selected and inserted into robust organism to produce an infinite number of deadly chimeric bioweapons. In order to neutralize such a threat, accurate detection of the expressed toxin genes, rather than classification on strain or genealogical decent of these organisms, is critical. The development of a high-throughput microarray approach will enable the detection of unknowns chimeric bioweapons. The development of a high-throughput microarray approach will enable the detection of unknown bioweapons. We have developed a unique microfluidic approach to capture and concentrate these threat genes (mRNA's) upto a 30 fold concentration. These captured oligonucleotides can then be used to synthesize in situ oligonucleotide copies (cDNA probes) of the captured genes. An integrated microfluidic architecture will enable us to control flows of reagents, perform clean-up steps and finally elute nanoliter volumes of synthesized oligonucleotides probes. The integrated approach has enabled a process where chimeric or conventional bioweapons can rapidly be identified based on their toxic function, rather than being restricted to information that may not identify the critical nature of the threat.

  6. Human-animal chimeras: ethical issues about farming chimeric animals bearing human organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourret, Rodolphe; Martinez, Eric; Vialla, François; Giquel, Chloé; Thonnat-Marin, Aurélie; De Vos, John

    2016-06-29

    Recent advances in stem cells and gene engineering have paved the way for the generation of interspecies chimeras, such as animals bearing an organ from another species. The production of a rat pancreas by a mouse has demonstrated the feasibility of this approach. The next step will be the generation of larger chimeric animals, such as pigs bearing human organs. Because of the dramatic organ shortage for transplantation, the medical needs for such a transgressive practice are indisputable. However, there are serious technical barriers and complex ethical issues that must be discussed and solved before producing human organs in animals. The main ethical issues are the risks of consciousness and of human features in the chimeric animal due to a too high contribution of human cells to the brain, in the first case, or for instance to limbs, in the second. Another critical point concerns the production of human gametes by such chimeric animals. These worst-case scenarios are obviously unacceptable and must be strictly monitored by careful risk assessment, and, if necessary, technically prevented. The public must be associated with this ethical debate. Scientists and physicians have a critical role in explaining the medical needs, the advantages and limits of this potential medical procedure, and the ethical boundaries that must not be trespassed. If these prerequisites are met, acceptance of such a new, borderline medical procedure may prevail, as happened before for in-vitro fertilization or preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

  7. Venturing in coral larval chimerism: a compact functional domain with fostered genotypic diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinkevich, Baruch; Shaish, Lee; Douek, Jacob; Ben-Shlomo, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    The globally distributed coral species Pocillopora damicornis is known to release either sexual or asexual derived planula-larvae in various reef locations. Using microsatellite loci as markers, we documented the release of asexually derived chimeric larvae (CL), originating from mosaicked maternal colonies that were also chimeras, at Thai and Philippines reefs. The CL, each presenting different combinations of maternal genotypic constituents, create genetically-complex sets of asexual propagules. This novel mode of inheritance in corals challenges classical postulations of sexual/asexual reproduction traits, as asexual derived CL represent an alliance between genotypes that significantly sways the recruits’ absolute fitness. This type of inherited chimerism, while enhancing intra-entity genetic heterogeneity, is an evolutionary tactic used to increase genetic-heterogeneity, primarily in new areas colonized by a limited number of larvae. Chimerism may also facilitate combat global change impacts by exhibiting adjustable genomic combinations of within-chimera traits that could withstand alterable environmental pressures, helping Pocillopora become a successful cosmopolitan species.

  8. Intravitreal injection of the chimeric phage endolysin Ply187 protects mice from Staphylococcus aureus endophthalmitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pawan Kumar; Donovan, David M; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-08-01

    The treatment of endophthalmitis is becoming very challenging due to the emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria. Hence, the development of novel therapeutic alternatives for ocular use is essential. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of Ply187AN-KSH3b, a chimeric phage endolysin derived from the Ply187 prophage, in a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus endophthalmitis. Our data showed that the chimeric Ply187 endolysin exhibited strong antimicrobial activity against both methicillin-sensitive S. aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains, as evidenced by MIC determinations, reductions in turbidity, and disruption of biofilms. Moreover, exposure of S. aureus to Ply187 for up to 10 generations did not lead to resistance development. The intravitreal injection of chimeric Ply187 (at 6 or 12 h postinfection) significantly improved the outcome of endophthalmitis, preserved retinal structural integrity, and maintained visual function as assessed by electroretinogram analysis. Furthermore, phage lysin treatment significantly reduced the bacterial burden and the levels of inflammatory cytokines and neutrophil infiltration in the eyes. These results indicate that the intravitreal administration of a phage lytic enzyme attenuates the development of bacterial endophthalmitis in mice. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating the therapeutic use of phage-based antimicrobials in ocular infections. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Generation of Chimeric RNAs by cis-splicing of adjacent genes (cis-SAGe) in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Jian-Shu; Jing, Xiao-Yan; Du, Xin; Yang, Xiu-Qin

    2018-02-20

    Chimeric RNA molecules, possessing exons from two or more independent genes, are traditionally believed to be produced by chromosome rearrangement. However, recent studies revealed that cis-splicing of adjacent genes (cis- SAGe) is one of the major mechanisms underlying the formation of chimeric RNAs. cis-SAGe refers to intergenic splicing of directly adjacent genes with the same transcriptional orientation, resulting in read-through transcripts, termed chimeric RNAs, which contain sequences from two or more parental genes. cis-SAGe was first identified in tumor cells, since then its potential in carcinogenesis has attracted extensive attention. More and more scientists are focusing on it. With the development of research, cis-SAGe was found to be ubiquitous in various normal tissues, and might make a crucial contribution to the formation of novel genes in the evolution of genomes. In this review, we summarize the splicing pattern, expression characteristics, possible mechanisms, and significance of cis-SAGe in mammals. This review will be helpful for general understanding of the current status and development tendency of cis-SAGe.

  10. Connections between Transcription Downstream of Genes and cis-SAGe Chimeric RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwalenia, Katarzyna; Qin, Fujun; Singh, Sandeep; Tangtrongstittikul, Panjapon; Li, Hui

    2017-11-22

    cis-Splicing between adjacent genes (cis-SAGe) is being recognized as one way to produce chimeric fusion RNAs. However, its detail mechanism is not clear. Recent study revealed induction of transcriptions downstream of genes (DoGs) under osmotic stress. Here, we investigated the influence of osmotic stress on cis-SAGe chimeric RNAs and their connection to DoGs. We found,the absence of induction of at least some cis-SAGe fusions and/or their corresponding DoGs at early time point(s). In fact, these DoGs and their cis-SAGe fusions are inversely correlated. This negative correlation was changed to positive at a later time point. These results suggest a direct competition between the two categories of transcripts when total pool of readthrough transcripts is limited at an early time point. At a later time point, DoGs and corresponding cis-SAGe fusions are both induced, indicating that total readthrough transcripts become more abundant. Finally, we observed overall enhancement of cis-SAGe chimeric RNAs in KCl-treated samples by RNA-Seq analysis.

  11. Skin Recurrence of Transformed Mycosis Fungoides Postumbilical Cord Blood Transplant despite Complete Donor Chimerism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Pawar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Allogeneic stem cell transplant is the treatment of choice for systemic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL which provides graft-versus-lymphoma effect. Herein we discuss a case of recurrence of CTCL skin lesions after cord blood transplant in a patient who continued to have 100% donor chimerism in bone marrow. Case Presentation. A 48-year-old female with history of mycosis fungoides (MF presented with biopsy proven large cell transformation of MF. PET scan revealed multiple adenopathy in abdomen and chest suspicious for lymphoma and skin biopsy showed large cell transformation. She was treated with multiple cycles of chemotherapy. Posttherapy PET scan showed resolution of lymphadenopathy. Later she underwent ablative preparative regimen followed by single cord blood transplant. Bone marrow chimerism studies at day +60 after transplant showed 100% donor cells without presence of lymphoma. However 5 months after transplant she had recurrence of MF with the same genotype as prior skin lesion. Bone marrow chimerism study continued to show 100% donor cells. Conclusion. A differential graft-versus-lymphoma effect in our case prevented lymphoma recurrence systemically but failed to do so in skin. We hypothesize that this response may be due to presence of other factors in the bone marrow and lymph node microenvironments preventing recurrence in these sites.

  12. Early CD3+/CD15+ peripheral blood leukocyte chimerism patterns correlate with long-term engraftment in non-malignant hematopoietic SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketterl, T G; Flesher, M; Shanley, R; Miller, W

    2014-04-01

    Following hematopoietic SCT (HSCT) for non-malignant disorders (NMDs) variable donor chimerism among lympho-hematopoietic lines may be observed. We retrospectively evaluated early post-HSCT, lineage-sorted (CD3+ and CD15+) peripheral blood leukocyte chimerism data to characterize patterns and assess for association with long-term CD15+ engraftment. 'Early' was defined as the first value obtained between days +14 and +42, 'late' as the last recorded value after day +90. 'High' donor chimerism was defined as 80% on either fraction at all time-points. Patients were classified into four subgroups with respect to early CD3+/CD15+ chimerism patterns (high/low) then analyzed for long-term CD15+ chimerism status. A total of 135 transplants were evaluable, with all three time-points available in 97. Underlying disease, graft source, patient age and conditioning intensity varied. 'Split' early chimerism (discordant high/low CD3+/CD15+ status) was common. Multivariable analysis revealed strong association between conditioning regimen and primary disease on early CD3+/CD15+ chimerism patterns and a dominant predictive effect of early CD15+ chimerism on long-term CD15+ donor engraftment (observed at median day +365). These data may guide real-time clinician decisions (restraint vs intervention, when available) when faced with unfavorable or unusual early lympho-hematopoietic chimerism patterns following HSCT for NMD.

  13. Chimeric SV40 virus-like particles induce specific cytotoxicity and protective immunity against influenza A virus without the need of adjuvants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, Masaaki [Department of Allergy and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan); Morikawa, Katsuma [Department of Biological Information, Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Suda, Tatsuya [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan); Laboratory for Immunopharmacology of Microbial Products, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Ohno, Naohito [Laboratory for Immunopharmacology of Microbial Products, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Matsushita, Sho [Department of Allergy and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan); Allergy Center, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan); Akatsuka, Toshitaka [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan); Handa, Hiroshi, E-mail: handa.h.aa@m.titech.ac.jp [Solutions Research Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Matsui, Masanori, E-mail: mmatsui@saitama-med.ac.jp [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan)

    2014-01-05

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) are a promising vaccine platform due to the safety and efficiency. However, it is still unclear whether polyomavirus-based VLPs are useful for this purpose. Here, we attempted to evaluate the potential of polyomavirus VLPs for the antiviral vaccine using simian virus 40 (SV40). We constructed chimeric SV40-VLPs carrying an HLA-A{sup ⁎}02:01-restricted, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope derived from influenza A virus. HLA-A{sup ⁎}02:01-transgenic mice were then immunized with the chimeric SV40-VLPs. The chimeric SV40-VLPs effectively induced influenza-specific CTLs and heterosubtypic protection against influenza A viruses without the need of adjuvants. Because DNase I treatment of the chimeric SV40-VLPs did not disrupt CTL induction, the intrinsic adjuvant property may not result from DNA contaminants in the VLP preparation. In addition, immunization with the chimeric SV40-VLPs generated long-lasting memory CTLs. We here propose that the chimeric SV40-VLPs harboring an epitope may be a promising CTL-based vaccine platform with self-adjuvant properties. - Highlights: • We constructed chimeric SV40-VLPs carrying an influenza virus-derived CTL epitope. • Chimeric SV40-VLPs induce influenza-specific CTLs in mice without adjuvants. • Chimeric SV40-VLPs induce heterosubtypic protection against influenza A viruses. • Chimeric SV40-VLPs induce long-lasting memory CTLs. • Chimeric SV40-VLPs is a promising vaccine platform with self-adjuvant properties.

  14. Analysis of Hepatitis C Virus Particle Heterogeneity in Immunodeficient Human Liver Chimeric fah-/- MiceSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursula Andreo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Hepatitis C virus (HCV is a leading cause of chronic liver diseases and the most common indication for liver transplantation in the United States. HCV particles in the blood of infected patients are characterized by heterogeneous buoyant densities, likely owing to HCV association with lipoproteins. However, clinical isolates are not infectious in vitro and the relative infectivity of the particles with respect to their buoyant density therefore cannot be determined, pointing to the need for better in vivo model systems. Methods: To analyze the evolution of the buoyant density of in vivo–derived infectious HCV particles over time, we infected immunodeficient human liver chimeric fumaryl acetoacetate hydrolase-/- mice with J6/JFH1 and performed ultracentrifugation of infectious mouse sera on isopicnic iodixanol gradients. We also evaluated the impact of a high sucrose diet, which has been shown to increase very-low-density lipoprotein secretion by the liver in rodents, on lipoprotein and HCV particle characteristics. Results: Similar to the severe combined immunodeficiency disease/Albumin-urokinase plasminogen activator human liver chimeric mouse model, density fractionation of infectious mouse serum showed higher infectivity in the low-density fractions early after infection. However, over the course of the infection, viral particle heterogeneity increased and the overall in vitro infectivity diminished without loss of the human liver graft over time. In mice provided with a sucrose-rich diet we observed a minor shift in HCV infectivity toward lower density that correlated with a redistribution of triglycerides and cholesterol among lipoproteins. Conclusions: Our work indicates that the heterogeneity in buoyant density of infectious HCV particles evolves over the course of infection and can be influenced by diet. Keywords: HCV, Lipoprotein, Mouse Model, Human Liver Chimeric Mice

  15. Ataxia with cerebellar lesions in mice expressing chimeric PrP-Dpl protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire-Vieille, Catherine; Bailly, Yannick; Erlich, Paul; Loeuillet, Corinne; Brocard, Jacques; Haeberlé, Anne-Marie; Bombarde, Guy; Rak, Camille; Demais, Valérie; Dumestre-Pérard, Chantal; Gagnon, Jean; Cesbron, Jean-Yves

    2013-01-23

    Mutations within the central region of prion protein (PrP) have been shown to be associated with severe neurotoxic activity similar to that observed with Dpl, a PrP-like protein. To further investigate this neurotoxic effect, we generated lines of transgenic (Tg) mice expressing three different chimeric PrP-Dpl proteins. Chi1 (amino acids 1-57 of Dpl replaced by amino acids 1-125 of PrP) and Chi2 (amino acids 1-66 of Dpl replaced by amino acids 1-134 of PrP) abrogated the pathogenicity of Dpl indicating that the presence of a N-terminal domain of PrP (23-134) reduced the toxicity of Dpl, as reported. However, when the amino acids 1-24 of Dpl were replaced by amino acids 1-124 of PrP, Chi3 Tg mice, which express the chimeric protein at a very low level, start developing ataxia at the age of 5-7 weeks. This phenotype was not counteracted by a single copy of full-length-PrP(c) but rather by its overexpression, indicating the strong toxicity of the chimeric protein Chi3. Chi3 Tg mice exhibit severe cerebellar atrophy with a significant loss of granule cells. We concluded that aa25 to aa57 of Dpl, which are not present in Chi1 and Chi2 constructs, confer toxicity to the protein. We tested this possibility by using the 25-57 Dpl peptide in primary culture of mouse embryo cortical neurons and found a significant neurotoxic effect. This finding identifies a protein domain that plays a role in mediating Dpl-related toxicity.

  16. Mice with chimeric livers are an improved model for human lipoprotein metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa C S Ellis

    Full Text Available Rodents are poor model for human hyperlipidemias because total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein levels are very low on a normal diet. Lipoprotein metabolism is primarily regulated by hepatocytes and we therefore assessed whether chimeric mice extensively repopulated with human cells can model human lipid and bile acid metabolism.FRG [ F ah(-/- R ag2(-/-Il2r g (-/-] mice were repopulated with primary human hepatocytes. Serum lipoprotein lipid composition and distribution (VLDL, LDL, and HDL was analyzed by size exclusion chromatography. Bile was analyzed by LC-MS or by GC-MS. RNA expression levels were measured by quantitative RT-PCR.Chimeric mice displayed increased LDL and VLDL fractions and a lower HDL fraction compared to wild type, thus significantly shifting the ratio of LDL/HDL towards a human profile. Bile acid analysis revealed a human-like pattern with high amounts of cholic acid and deoxycholic acid (DCA. Control mice had only taurine-conjugated bile acids as expcted, but highly repopulated mice had glycine-conjugated cholic acid as found in human bile. RNA levels of human genes involved in bile acid synthesis including CYP7A1, and CYP27A1 were significantly upregulated as compared to human control liver. However, administration of recombinant hFGF19 restored human CYP7A1 levels to normal.Humanized-liver mice showed a typical human lipoprotein profile with LDL as the predominant lipoprotein fraction even on a normal diet. The bile acid profile confirmed presence of an intact enterohepatic circulation. Although bile acid synthesis was deregulated in this model, this could be fully normalized by FGF19 administration. Taken together these data indicate that chimeric FRG-mice are a useful new model for human lipoprotein and bile-acid metabolism.

  17. Design of Fab-based chimeric antibodies against Bothrops asper toxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    M. Haack, Aleksander; B. Hallgren, Malte; U. W. Friis, Rasmus

    Snakebite is one of the world’s most neglected tropical diseases, with an estimated 5 million bites per year, resulting in about 125.000 deaths. The only current treatment for snakebite envenoming is antiserum derived from the blood of immunized mammals(typically horses). These antisera are expen...... are expensive to produce and carry a high risk of causing hyper-allergic reactions in human recipients due to their heterologous origin. Here we report the discovery of chimeric scFvs against Bothrops asper toxins....

  18. Transplantation Tolerance through Hematopoietic Chimerism: Progress and Challenges for Clinical Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt Mahr

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The perception that transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells can confer tolerance to any tissue or organ from the same donor is widely accepted but it has not yet become a treatment option in clinical routine. The reasons for this are multifaceted but can generally be classified into safety and efficacy concerns that also became evident from the results of the first clinical pilot trials. In comparison to standard immunosuppressive therapies, the infection risk associated with the cytotoxic pre-conditioning necessary to allow allogeneic bone marrow engraftment and the risk of developing graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD constitute the most prohibitive hurdles. However, several approaches have recently been developed at the experimental level to reduce or even overcome the necessity for cytoreductive conditioning, such as costimulation blockade, pro-apoptotic drugs, or Treg therapy. But even in the absence of any hazardous pretreatment, the recipients are exposed to the risk of developing GVHD as long as non-tolerant donor T cells are present. Total lymphoid irradiation and enriching the stem cell graft with facilitating cells emerged as potential strategies to reduce this peril. On the other hand, the long-lasting survival of kidney allografts, seen with transient chimerism in some clinical series, questions the need for durable chimerism for robust tolerance. From a safety point of view, loss of chimerism would indeed be favorable as it eliminates the risk of GVHD, but also complicates the assessment of tolerance. Therefore, other biomarkers are warranted to monitor tolerance and to identify those patients who can safely be weaned off immunosuppression. In addition to these safety concerns, the limited efficacy of the current pilot trials with approximately 40–60% patients becoming tolerant remains an important issue that needs to be resolved. Overall, the road ahead to clinical routine may still be rocky but the first successful long

  19. Expression of kenaf mitochondrial chimeric genes HM184 causes male sterility in transgenic tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanhong; Liao, Xiaofang; Huang, Zhipeng; Chen, Peng; Zhou, Bujin; Liu, Dongmei; Kong, Xiangjun; Zhou, Ruiyang

    2015-08-01

    Chimeric genes resulting from the rearrangement of a mitochondrial genome were generally thought to be a causal factor in the occurrence of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS). In the study, earlier we reported that identifying a 47 bp deletion at 3'- flanking of atp9 that was linked to male sterile cytoplasm in kenaf. The truncated fragment was fused with atp9, a mitochondrial transit signal (MTS) and/or GFP, comprised two chimeric genes MTS-HM184-GFP and MTS-HM184. The plant expression vector pBI121 containing chimeric genes were then introduced to tobacco plants by Agrobacterium-mediated T-DNA transformation. The result showed that certain transgenic plants were male sterility or semi-sterility, while some were not. The expression analysis further demonstrated that higher level of expression were showed in the sterility plants, while no expression or less expression in fertility plants, the levels of expression of semi-sterility were in between. And the sterile plant (containing MTS-HM184-GFP) had abnormal anther produced malformed/shriveled pollen grains stained negative that failed to germinate (0%), the corresponding fruits was shrunken, the semi-sterile plants having normal anther shape produced about 10-50% normal pollen grains, the corresponding fruits were not full, and the germination rate was 58%. Meanwhile these transgenic plants which altered on fertility were further analyzed in phenotype. As a result, the metamorphosis leaves were observed in the seedling stage, the plant height of transgenic plants was shorter than wild type. The growth duration of transgenic tobacco was delayed 30-45 days compared to the wild type. The copy numbers of target genes of transgenic tobacco were analyzed using the real-time quantitative method. The results showed that these transgenic plants targeting-expression in mitochondrial containing MTS-HM184-GFP had 1 copy and 2 copies, the other two plants containing MTS-HM184 both had 3 copies, but 0 copy in wild type. In

  20. Predominant or complete recipient T-cell chimerism following alemtuzumab-based allogeneic transplantation is reversed by donor lymphocytes and not associated with graft failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamedbhai, Sajir G; Edwards, Noha; Morris, Emma C; Mackinnon, Stephen; Thomson, Kirsty J; Peggs, Karl S

    2012-02-01

    The clinical significance of mixed chimerism following allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) remains controversial. Its relevance and incidence are probably influenced by the conditioning regimen and incorporation of T-cell depletion. The presence of recipient chimerism levels >40-50% following T-cell replete reduced intensity transplantation correlates with a high risk of graft rejection, regardless of donor-lymphocyte infusions, but it is unclear whether this finding translates to T-cell depleted transplants. We conducted a retrospective single-institution analysis of patients receiving alemtuzumab-based HSCT. 27/152 (18%) evaluable cases had predominantly recipient T-cell chimerism at 3 months or beyond. By contrast, coincident chimerism in the granulocyte lineage was predominantly of donor origin (median 100%) in all but one patient. Donor lymphocyte infusion effectively converted predominantly recipient T-cell chimerism to ful donor chimerism in all evaluable cases including three cases with no detectable donor T cells. The only graft failure occurred in the patient with predominantly recipient myeloid chimerism in whom rejection occurred rapidly before donor lymphocytes could be administered. We conclude that predominant or complete recipient T-cell chimerism following alemtuzumab-based regimens does not have the same clinical implications as that following T-cell replete transplants and can be effectively converted with donor lymphocytes without the need for lympho-depleting agents or re-conditioning. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Local Tacrolimus (FK506) Delivery for Prevention of Acute Rejection in the Nonhuman Primate Delayed Mixed Chimerism Vascularized Composite Allograft Tolerance Induction Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Chimerism Vascularized Composite Allograft Tolerance Induction Protocol PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATORS: Dr. Curtis L. Cetrulo CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...Tacrolimus (FK506) Delivery for Prevention of Acute Rejection in the Nonhuman Primate Delayed Mixed Chimerism Vascularized Composite Allograft Tolerance...tacrolimus, FK506, vascularized composite allografts, immune rejection, preclinical, transplant, nonhuman primate model, degradable polymer, tyrosine

  2. MHC-mismatched mixed chimerism restores peripheral tolerance of noncross-reactive autoreactive T cells in NOD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingfeng; Racine, Jeremy J; Lin, Qing; Liu, Yuqing; Tang, Shanshan; Qin, Qi; Qi, Tong; Riggs, Arthur D; Zeng, Defu

    2018-03-06

    Autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D) and other autoimmune diseases are associated with particular MHC haplotypes and expansion of autoreactive T cells. Induction of MHC-mismatched but not -matched mixed chimerism by hematopoietic cell transplantation effectively reverses autoimmunity in diabetic nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, even those with established diabetes. As expected, MHC-mismatched mixed chimerism mediates deletion in the thymus of host-type autoreactive T cells that have T-cell receptor (TCR) recognizing (cross-reacting with) donor-type antigen presenting cells (APCs), which have come to reside in the thymus. However, how MHC-mismatched mixed chimerism tolerizes host autoreactive T cells that recognize only self-MHC-peptide complexes remains unknown. Here, using NOD.Rag1 -/- BDC2.5 or NOD.Rag1 -/- BDC12-4.1 mice that have only noncross-reactive transgenic autoreactive T cells, we show that induction of MHC-mismatched but not -matched mixed chimerism restores immune tolerance of peripheral noncross-reactive autoreactive T cells. MHC-mismatched mixed chimerism results in increased percentages of both donor- and host-type Foxp3 + Treg cells and up-regulated expression of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) by host-type plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). Furthermore, adoptive transfer experiments showed that engraftment of donor-type dendritic cells (DCs) and expansion of donor-type Treg cells are required for tolerizing the noncross-reactive autoreactive T cells in the periphery, which are in association with up-regulation of host-type DC expression of PD-L1 and increased percentage of host-type Treg cells. Thus, induction of MHC-mismatched mixed chimerism may establish a peripheral tolerogenic DC and Treg network that actively tolerizes autoreactive T cells, even those with no TCR recognition of the donor APCs. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  3. Chimerism in wild adult populations of the broadcast spawning coral Acropora millepora on the Great Barrier Reef.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eneour Puill-Stephan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Chimeras are organisms containing tissues or cells of two or more genetically distinct individuals, and are known to exist in at least nine phyla of protists, plants, and animals. Although widespread and common in marine invertebrates, the extent of chimerism in wild populations of reef corals is unknown.The extent of chimerism was explored within two populations of a common coral, Acropora millepora, on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, by using up to 12 polymorphic DNA microsatellite loci. At least 2% and 5% of Magnetic Island and Pelorus Island populations of A. millepora, respectively, were found to be chimeras (3% overall, based on conservative estimates. A slightly less conservative estimate indicated that 5% of colonies in each population were chimeras. These values are likely to be vast underestimates of the true extent of chimerism, as our sampling protocol was restricted to a maximum of eight branches per colony, while most colonies consist of hundreds of branches. Genotypes within chimeric corals showed high relatedness, indicating that genetic similarity is a prerequisite for long-term acceptance of non-self genotypes within coral colonies.While some brooding corals have been shown to form genetic chimeras in their early life history stages under experimental conditions, this study provides the first genetic evidence of the occurrence of coral chimeras in the wild and of chimerism in a broadcast spawning species. We hypothesize that chimerism is more widespread in corals than previously thought, and suggest that this has important implications for their resilience, potentially enhancing their capacity to compete for space and respond to stressors such as pathogen infection.

  4. Chimeric antigen receptor T cells for the treatment of cancer and the future of preclinical models for predicting their toxicities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Anja

    2017-06-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy has achieved highly promising results in clinical trials, particularly in B-cell malignancies. However, reports of serious adverse events including a number of patient deaths have raised concerns about safety of this treatment. Presently available preclinical models are not designed for predicting toxicities seen in human patients. Besides choosing the right animal model, careful considerations must be taken in chimeric antigen receptor T-cell design and the amount of T cells infused. The development of more sophisticated in vitro models and humanized mouse models for preclinical modeling and toxicity tests will help us to improve the design of clinical trials in cancer immunotherapy.

  5. Chimeric proteins for detection and quantitation of DNA mutations, DNA sequence variations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric proteins having both DNA mutation binding activity and nuclease activity are synthesized by recombinant technology. The proteins are of the general formula A-L-B and B-L-A where A is a peptide having DNA mutation binding activity, L is a linker and B is a peptide having nuclease activity. The chimeric proteins are useful for detection and identification of DNA sequence variations including DNA mutations (including DNA damage and mismatches) by binding to the DNA mutation and cutting the DNA once the DNA mutation is detected.

  6. Recruitment of SHP-1 protein tyrosine phosphatase and signalling by a chimeric T-cell receptor-killer inhibitory receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, M D; Geisler, C

    2000-01-01

    recognize MHC class I molecules. Following coligation of KIR with an activating receptor, the tyrosine in the ITIM is phosphorylated and the cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 is recruited to the ITIM via its SH2 domains. It is still not clear how SHP-1 affects T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling....... In this study, we constructed a chimeric TCR-KIR receptor. We demonstrated that SHP-1 is recruited to the chimeric TCR-KIR receptor following T-cell stimulation with either anti-TCR monoclonal antibody (MoAb) or superantigen. However, in spite of this we could not detect any effect of SHP-1 on TCR signalling...

  7. Incorporation of chimeric HIV-SIV-Env and modified HIV-Env proteins into HIV pseudovirions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devitt, Gerard; Emerson, Vanessa; Holtkotte, Denise; Pfeiffer, Tanya; Pisch, Thorsten; Bosch, Valerie

    2007-01-01

    Low level incorporation of the viral glycoprotein (Env) into human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) particles is a major drawback for vaccine strategies against HIV/AIDS in which HIV particles are used as immunogen. Within this study, we have examined two strategies aimed at achieving higher levels of Env incorporation into non-infectious pseudovirions (PVs). First, we have generated chimeric HIV/SIV Env proteins containing the truncated C-terminal tail region of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)mac239-Env767 stop , which mediates strongly increased incorporation of SIV-Env into SIV particles. In a second strategy, we have employed a truncated HIV-Env protein (Env-Tr752 N750K ) which we have previously demonstrated to be incorporated into HIV virions, generated in infected T-cells, to a higher level than that of Wt-HIV-Env. Although the chimeric HIV/SIV Env proteins were expressed at the cell surface and induced increased levels of cell-cell fusion in comparison to Wt-HIV-Env, they did not exhibit increased incorporation into either HIV-PVs or SIV-PVs. Only Env-Tr752 N750K exhibited significantly higher (threefold) levels of incorporation into HIV-PVs, an improvement, which, although not dramatic, is worthwhile for the large-scale preparation of non-infectious PVs for vaccine studies aimed at inducing Env humoral responses

  8. Generation of Gene-Engineered Chimeric DNA Molecules for Specific Therapy of Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesheva, Vera; Szekeres, Zsuzsanna; Mihaylova, Nikolina; Dimitrova, Iliyana; Nikolova, Maria; Erdei, Anna; Prechl, Jozsef

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the development of self-reactive B and T cells and autoantibody production. In particular, double-stranded DNA-specific B cells play an important role in lupus progression, and their selective elimination is a reasonable approach for effective therapy of SLE. DNA-based vaccines aim at the induction of immune response against the vector-encoded antigen. Here, we are exploring, as a new DNA-based therapy of SLE, a chimeric DNA molecule encoding a DNA-mimotope peptide, and the Fv but not the immunogenic Fc fragment of an FcγRIIb-specific monoclonal antibody. This DNA construct was inserted in the expression vector pNut and used as a naked DNA vaccine in a mouse model of lupus. The chimeric DNA molecule can be expressed in eukaryotic cells and cross-links cell surface receptors on DNA-specific B cells, delivering an inhibitory intracellular signal. Intramuscular administration of the recombinant DNA molecule to lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice prevented increase in IgG anti-DNA antibodies and was associated with a low degree of proteinuria, modulation of cytokine profile, and suppression of lupus nephritis. PMID:23075110

  9. Development and characterization of novel chimeric monoclonal antibodies for broad spectrum neutralization of rabies virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Kyeom Kim

    Full Text Available Current post-exposure prophylaxis for rabies virus infection has several limitations in terms of supply, cost, safety, and efficacy. Attempts to replace human or equine rabies immune globulins (HRIG or ERIG have been made by several companies and institutes. We developed potent monoclonal antibodies to neutralize a broad spectrum of rabies viruses by screening hybridomas received from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC. Two kinds of chimeric human antibodies (chimeric #7 and #17 were constructed by cloning the variable regions from selected hybridomas and the constant region of a human antibody. Two antibodies were bound to antigenic site III and I/IV, respectively, and were able to neutralize 51 field isolates of rabies virus that were isolated at different times and places such as Asia, Africa, North America, South America, and Australia. These two antibodies neutralize rabies viruses with high efficacy in an in vivo test using Syrian hamster and mouse models and show low risk for adverse immunogenicity.

  10. Chimeric mice with humanized liver: Application in drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics studies for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naritomi, Yoichi; Sanoh, Seigo; Ohta, Shigeru

    2018-02-01

    Predicting human drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics (PK) is key to drug discovery. In particular, it is important to predict human PK, metabolite profiles and drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Various methods have been used for such predictions, including in vitro metabolic studies using human biological samples, such as hepatic microsomes and hepatocytes, and in vivo studies using experimental animals. However, prediction studies using these methods are often inconclusive due to discrepancies between in vitro and in vivo results, and interspecies differences in drug metabolism. Further, the prediction methods have changed from qualitative to quantitative to solve these issues. Chimeric mice with humanized liver have been developed, in which mouse liver cells are mostly replaced with human hepatocytes. Since human drug metabolizing enzymes are expressed in the liver of these mice, they are regarded as suitable models for mimicking the drug metabolism and PK observed in humans; therefore, these mice are useful for predicting human drug metabolism and PK. In this review, we discuss the current state, issues, and future directions of predicting human drug metabolism and PK using chimeric mice with humanized liver in drug discovery. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Chimeric Hemagglutinin Constructs Induce Broad Protection against Influenza B Virus Challenge in the Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermler, Megan E; Kirkpatrick, Ericka; Sun, Weina; Hai, Rong; Amanat, Fatima; Chromikova, Veronika; Palese, Peter; Krammer, Florian

    2017-06-15

    Seasonal influenza virus epidemics represent a significant public health burden. Approximately 25% of all influenza virus infections are caused by type B viruses, and these infections can be severe, especially in children. Current influenza virus vaccines are an effective prophylaxis against infection but are impacted by rapid antigenic drift, which can lead to mismatches between vaccine strains and circulating strains. Here, we describe a broadly protective vaccine candidate based on chimeric hemagglutinins, consisting of globular head domains from exotic influenza A viruses and stalk domains from influenza B viruses. Sequential vaccination with these constructs in mice leads to the induction of broadly reactive antibodies that bind to the conserved stalk domain of influenza B virus hemagglutinin. Vaccinated mice are protected from lethal challenge with diverse influenza B viruses. Results from serum transfer experiments and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) assays indicate that this protection is antibody mediated and based on Fc effector functions. The present data suggest that chimeric hemagglutinin-based vaccination is a viable strategy to broadly protect against influenza B virus infection. IMPORTANCE While current influenza virus vaccines are effective, they are affected by mismatches between vaccine strains and circulating strains. Furthermore, the antiviral drug oseltamivir is less effective for treating influenza B virus infections than for treating influenza A virus infections. A vaccine that induces broad and long-lasting protection against influenza B viruses is therefore urgently needed. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Inter-specific coral chimerism: genetically distinct multicellular structures associated with tissue loss in Montipora capitata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry M Work

    Full Text Available Montipora white syndrome (MWS results in tissue-loss that is often lethal to Montipora capitata, a major reef building coral that is abundant and dominant in the Hawai'ian Archipelago. Within some MWS-affected colonies in Kane'ohe Bay, Oahu, Hawai'i, we saw unusual motile multicellular structures within gastrovascular canals (hereafter referred to as invasive gastrovascular multicellular structure-IGMS that were associated with thinning and fragmentation of the basal body wall. IGMS were in significantly greater densities in coral fragments manifesting tissue-loss compared to paired normal fragments. Mesenterial filaments from these colonies yielded typical M. capitata mitochondrial haplotypes (CO1, CR, while IGMS from the same colony consistently yielded distinct haplotypes previously only found in a different Montipora species (Montipora flabellata. Protein profiles showed consistent differences between paired mesenterial filaments and IGMS from the same colonies as did seven microsatellite loci that also exhibited an excess of alleles per locus inconsistent with a single diploid organism. We hypothesize that IGMS are a parasitic cellular lineage resulting from the chimeric fusion between M. capitata and M. flabellata larvae followed by morphological reabsorption of M. flabellata and subsequent formation of cell-lineage parasites. We term this disease Montiporaiasis. Although intra-specific chimerism is common in colonial animals, this is the first suspected inter-specific example and the first associated with tissue loss.

  13. Structural and functional properties of chimeric EspA-FliCi filaments of EPEC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepin, Valerie F; Martinez, Eric; Shaw, Robert K; Frankel, Gad; Daniell, Sarah J

    2008-04-18

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli utilise a filamentous type III secretion system to translocate effector proteins into host gut epithelial cells. The primary constituent of the extracellular component of the filamentous type III secretion system is EspA. This forms a long flexible helical conduit between the bacterium and host and has a structure almost identical to that of the flagella filament. We have inserted the D3 domain of FliCi (from Salmonella typhimurium) into the outer domain of EspA and have studied the structure and function of modified filaments when expressed in an enteropathogenic E. coli espA mutant. We found that the chimeric protein EspA-FliCi filaments were biologically active as they supported protein secretion and translocation [assessed by their ability to trigger actin polymerisation beneath adherent bacteria (fluorescent actin staining test)]. The expressed filaments were recognised by both EspA and FliCi antisera. Visualisation and analysis of the chimeric filaments by electron microscopy after negative staining showed that, remarkably, EspA filaments are able to tolerate a large protein insertion without a significant effect on their helical architecture.

  14. Development and characterization of novel chimeric monoclonal antibodies for broad spectrum neutralization of rabies virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pan Kyeom; Keum, Sun Ju; Osinubi, Modupe O V; Franka, Richard; Shin, Ji Young; Park, Sang Tae; Kim, Man Su; Park, Mi Jung; Lee, Soo Young; Carson, William; Greenberg, Lauren; Yu, Pengcheng; Tao, Xiaoyan; Lihua, Wang; Tang, Qing; Liang, Guodong; Shampur, Madhusdana; Rupprecht, Charles E; Chang, Shin Jae

    2017-01-01

    Current post-exposure prophylaxis for rabies virus infection has several limitations in terms of supply, cost, safety, and efficacy. Attempts to replace human or equine rabies immune globulins (HRIG or ERIG) have been made by several companies and institutes. We developed potent monoclonal antibodies to neutralize a broad spectrum of rabies viruses by screening hybridomas received from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Two kinds of chimeric human antibodies (chimeric #7 and #17) were constructed by cloning the variable regions from selected hybridomas and the constant region of a human antibody. Two antibodies were bound to antigenic site III and I/IV, respectively, and were able to neutralize 51 field isolates of rabies virus that were isolated at different times and places such as Asia, Africa, North America, South America, and Australia. These two antibodies neutralize rabies viruses with high efficacy in an in vivo test using Syrian hamster and mouse models and show low risk for adverse immunogenicity.

  15. Human natural chimerism: an acquired character or a vestige of evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinkevich, B

    2001-06-01

    Analysis on five common classes of human natural chimeras (cytomictical, whole body, fetal-maternal, germ cell, and tumor chimeras) reveals that (1) they initiate only during pregnancy, (2) the most common class are chimeras which contain maternal cells, and (3) the primary mechanisms that are involved in their formation and establishment are still elusive. These classes of natural chimerism, are involved only with maladaptive phenomena such as malignancy and autoimmune diseases and without any documented benefit. A recent review has challenged the accepted dogma that the evolution of immunity is pathogen-directed and asserted that preserving individuality from littering the soma and the germline by conspecific alien cells might have been the original function of the innate immunity. Following this tenet, I propose here that human natural chimerism is a by-product of the new role evolved from primitive components of immunity to "educate" the developing embryo with the armamentarium of effector mechanisms, dedicated to purge the individual from pervasive somatic and germline variants, and is not a vestige of evolution.

  16. A general insert label for peptide display on chimeric filamentous bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Gilad; Gershoni, Jonathan M

    2012-01-01

    The foreign insert intended to be displayed via recombinant phage proteins can have a negative effect on protein expression and phage assembly. A typical example is the case of display of peptides longer than 6 amino acid residues on the major coat protein, protein VIII of the filamentous bacteriophages M13 and fd. A solution to this problem has been the use of "two-gene systems" generating chimeric phages that concomitantly express wild-type protein VIII along with recombinant protein VIII. Although the two-gene systems are much more permissive in regard to insert length and composition, some cases can still adversely affect phage assembly. Although these phages genotypically contain the desired DNA of the insert, they appear to be phenotypically wild type. To avoid false-negative results when using chimeric phages in binding studies, it is necessary to confirm that the observed lack of phage recognition is not due to faulty assembly and display of the intended insert. Here we describe a strategy for generating antibodies that specifically recognize recombinant protein VIII regardless of the nature of its foreign insert. These antibodies can be used as a general monitor of the display of recombinant protein VIII into phage particles. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. In silico prediction of monovalent and chimeric tetravalent vaccines for prevention and treatment of dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Subramaniyan; Ramesh, Venkatachalam; Prabhu, Srinivasan; Manogar, Palani

    2017-11-01

    Reverse vaccinology method was used to predict the monovalent peptide vaccine candidate to produce antibodies for therapeutic purpose and to predict tetravalent vaccine candidate to act as a common vaccine to cover all the fever dengue virus serotypes. Envelope (E)-proteins of DENV-1-4 serotypes were used for vaccine prediction using NCBI, Uniprot/Swissprot, Swiss-prot viewer, VaxiJen V2.0, TMHMM, BCPREDS, Propred-1, Propred and MHC Pred,. E-proteins of DENV-1-4 serotypes were identified as antigen from which T cell epitopes, through B cell epitopes, were predicted to act as peptide vaccine candidates. Each selected T cell epitope of E-protein was confirmed to act as vaccine and to induce complementary antibody against particular serotype of dengue virus. Chimeric tetravalent vaccine was formed by the conjugation of four vaccines, each from four dengue serotypes to act as a common vaccine candidate for all the four dengue serotypes. It can be justifiably concluded that the monovalent 9-mer T cell epitope for each DENV serotypes can be used to produce specific antibody agaomst dengue virus and a chimeric common tetravalent vaccine candidate to yield a comparative vaccine to cover any of the four dengue virus serotype. This vaccine is expected to act as highly immunogenic against preventing dengue fever.

  18. Generation of chimeric minipigs by aggregating 4- to 8-cell-stage blastomeres from somatic cell nuclear transfer with the tracing of enhanced green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Huili; Long, Chuan; Feng, Chong; Shi, Ningning; Jiang, Yingdi; Zeng, Guomin; Li, Xirui; Wu, Jingjing; Lu, Lin; Lu, Shengsheng; Pan, Dengke

    2017-05-01

    Blastocyst complementation is an important technique for generating chimeric organs in organ-deficient pigs, which holds great promise for solving the problem of a shortage of organs for human transplantation procedures. Porcine chimeras have been generated using embryonic germ cells, embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells; however, there are no authentic pluripotent stem cells for pigs. In previous studies, blastomeres from 4- to 8-cell-stage parthenogenetic embryos were able to generate chimeric fetuses efficiently, but the resulting fetuses did not produce live-born young. Here, we used early-stage embryos from somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) to generate chimeric piglets by the aggregation method. Then, the distribution of chimerism in various tissues and organs was observed through the expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Initially, we determined whether 4- to 8- or 8- to 16-cell-stage embryos were more suitable to generate chimeric piglets. Chimeras were produced by aggregating two EGFP-tagged Wuzhishan minipig (WZSP) SCNT embryos and two Bama minipig (BMP) SCNT embryos. The chimeric piglets were identified by coat color and microsatellite and swine leukocyte antigen analyses. Moreover, the distribution of chimerism in various tissues and organs of the piglets was evaluated by EGFP expression. We found that more aggregated embryos were produced using 4- to 8-cell-stage embryos (157/657, 23.9%) than 8- to 16-cell-stage embryos (100/499, 20.0%). Thus, 4- to 8-cell-stage embryos were used for the generation of chimeras. The rate of blastocysts development after aggregating WZSP with BMP embryos was 50.6%. Transfer of 391 blastocysts developed from 4- to 8-cell-stage embryos to five recipients gave rise to 18 piglets, of which two (11.1%) were confirmed to be chimeric by their coat color and microsatellite examination of the skin. One of the chimeric piglets died at 35 days and was subsequently autopsied, whereas the

  19. Production of unnaturally linked chimeric proteins using a combination of sortase-catalyzed transpeptidation and click chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witte, Martin D.; Theile, Christopher S.; Wu, Tongfei; Guimaraes, Carla P.; Blom, Annet E. M.; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    Chimeric proteins, including bispecific antibodies, are biological tools with therapeutic applications. Genetic fusion and ligation methods allow the creation of N-to-C and C-to-N fused recombinant proteins, but not unnaturally linked N-to-N and C-to-C fusion proteins. This protocol describes a

  20. A beam of "chimeric" darkness: presence, interconnectedness, and transformation in the psychoanalytic treatment of a patient convicted of sex offenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshel, Ofra

    2012-04-01

    The paper puts forward the dimension created by analytic presence and the ensuing patient-analyst interconnectedness in the process of psychoanalytic treatment and change, particularly with more disturbed patients. Working within this dimension, at a fundamental level of contact and impact, opens up new possibilities of extending the reach of psychoanalytic treatment. The analyst's "presencing" and interconnectedness with the patient forge a living therapeutic entity that is not a one-person or two-person psychology, but an emergent two-in-one new entity that goes beyond the confines of the separate subjectivities of patient and analyst and the simple summation of the two. The paper describes the kind of knowledge, experience, and powerful therapeutic potential that comes into being through analytic "presencing" and patient-analyst interconnectedness, and particularly focuses on the chimeric element, or quality, of this interconnectedness. The term "chimera/chimerism"-chosen here for its wealth of mythological, genetic, biological, biomedicinal (chimeric proteins), and psychoanalytical associations-is used in this paper to highlight the complex quality of patient-analyst interconnectedness, especially in difficult, psychotic, psychically foreclosed, dissociative and perverse states. The author offers an extensive clinical account of psychoanalytic treatment of a patient convicted of sex offenses in order to illustrate "presencing," interconnectedness, and the extent and intricate emotional meaning of the extreme chimerism that this kind of (difficult) treatment entailed.

  1. Induction of partial protection against infection with Toxoplasma gondii genotype II by DNA vaccination with recombinant chimeric tachyzoite antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Carina Agerbo; De Craeye, S.; Jongert, E.

    2009-01-01

    complications. Although several strategies have been suggested for making a vaccine, none is currently available. Here, we investigate the protection conferred by DNA vaccination with two constructs, pcEC2 (MIC2-MIC3-SAG1) and pcEC3 (GRA3-GRA7-M2AP), encoding chimeric proteins containing multiple antigenic...

  2. Fiber-chimeric adenoviruses expressing fibers from serotype 16 and 50 improve gene transfer to human pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhlmann, K.F.D.; Geer, M.A. van; Bakker, C.T.; Dekker, J.E.M.; Havenga, M.J.E.; Oude Elferink, R.P.J.; Gouma, D.J.; Bosma, P.J.; Wesseling, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    Survival of patients with pancreatic cancer is poor. Adenoviral (Ad) gene therapy employing the commonly used serotype 5 reveals limited transduction efficiency due to the low amount of coxsackie-adenovirus receptor on pancreatic cancer cells. To identify fiber-chimeric adenoviruses with improved

  3. The Construction of Chimeric T-Cell Receptor with Spacer Base of Modeling Study of VHH and MUC1 Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazanin Pirooznia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive cell immunotherapy with the use of chimeric receptors leads to the best and most specific response against tumors. Chimeric receptors consist of a signaling fragment, extracellular spacer, costimulating domain, and an antibody. Antibodies cause immunogenicity; therefore, VHH is a good replacement for ScFv in chimeric receptors. Since peptide sequences have an influence on chimeric receptors, the effect of peptide domains on each other's conformation were investigated. CD3Zeta, CD28, VHH and CD8α, and FcgIIα are used as signaling moieties, costimulating domain, antibody, and spacers, respectively. To investigate the influence of the ligation of spacers on the conformational structure of VHH, models of VHH were constructed. Molecular dynamics simulation was run to study the influence of the presence of spacers on the conformational changes in the binding sites of VHH. Root mean square deviation and root mean square fluctuation of critical segments in the binding site showed no noticeable differences with those in the native VHH. Results from molecular docking revealed that the presence of spacer FcgIIα causes an increasing effect on VHH with MUC1 interaction. Each of the constructs was transformed into the Jurkat E6.1. Expression analysis and evaluation of their functions were examined. The results showed good expression and function.

  4. A yeast recombination-based cloning system to produce chimeric HIV-1 viruses and express HIV-1 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Dawn M; Arts, Eric J; Gao, Yong; Marozsan, Andre J

    2005-01-01

    Differential phenotypes or properties of HIV-1 gene products in primary virus isolates are difficult to assess due to interference by the high degree of sequence variation across the entire genome. Thus, chimeric viruses provide a powerful tool to study the function of single gene products or genetic elements in the context of a neutral viral genomic backbone. In this chapter, we describe how to produce HIV-1 chimeric viruses utilizing a yeast-based homologous recombination cloning technique to insert env sequences first into a yeast cloning vector and then into the common pNL4-3 virus backbone. This technique is not limited to the env gene, but can be used to build chimeric viruses with any HIV-1 gene or genetic element. This cloning technique involves the use of a shuttle vector that can replicate in yeast and bacterial cells. Along with acting as a shuttle vector for subsequent subcloning into pNL4-3, this construct pRec/env can also be used to express to the env gene product, gp120/gp41, on the surface of mammalian cells. The chimeric viruses produced by this cloning method are capable of undergoing multiple rounds of replication and are therefore very useful to study drug sensitivity, coreceptor usage, and viral fitness as influenced by a single gene or gene fragment of a primary HIV-1 isolate from any group M subtype.

  5. Chimeric porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus containing shuffled multiple envelope genes confers cross-protection in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Debin; Ni, Yan-Yan; Zhou, Lei; Opriessnig, Tanja; Cao, Dianjun; Piñeyro, Pablo; Yugo, Danielle M; Overend, Christopher; Cao, Qian; Lynn Heffron, C; Halbur, Patrick G; Pearce, Douglas S; Calvert, Jay G; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2015-11-01

    The extensive genetic diversity of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) strains is a major obstacle for vaccine development. We previously demonstrated that chimeric PRRSVs in which a single envelope gene (ORF3, ORF4, ORF5 or ORF6) was shuffled via DNA shuffling had an improved heterologous cross-neutralizing ability. In this study, we incorporate all of the individually-shuffled envelope genes together in different combinations into an infectious clone backbone of PRRSV MLV Fostera(®) PRRS. Five viable progeny chimeric viruses were rescued, and their growth characteristics were characterized in vitro. In a pilot pig study, two chimeric viruses (FV-SPDS-VR2,FV-SPDS-VR5) were found to induce cross-neutralizing antibodies against heterologous strains. A subsequent vaccination/challenge study in 72 pigs revealed that chimeric virus FV-SPDS-VR2 and parental virus conferred partial cross-protection when challenged with heterologous strains NADC20 or MN184B. The results have important implications for future development of an effective PRRSV vaccine that confers heterologous protection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Engraftment of donor mesenchymal stem cells in chimeric BXSB includes vascular endothelial cells and hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones OY

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Olcay Y Jones1, Faysal Gok2, Elisabeth J Rushing3, Iren Horkayne-Szakaly4, Atif A Ahmed51Department of Pediatrics, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Department of Pediatrics, Gulhane Military Medical Academy, Ankara, Turkey; 3Institut für Neuropathologie, Universitäts Spital Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland; 4Department of Neuropathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, DC, USA; 5Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Kansas City, MO, USAAbstract: Somatic tissue engraftment was studied in BXSB mice treated with mesenchymal stem cell transplantation. Hosts were conditioned with nonlethal radiation prior to introducing donor cells from major histocompatibility complex-matched green fluorescent protein transgenic mice. Transplant protocols differed for route of injection, ie, intravenous (i.v. versus intraperitoneal (i.p., and source of mesenchymal stem cells, ie, unfractionated bone marrow cells, ex vivo expanded mesenchymal stem cells, or bone chips. Tissue chimerism was determined after short (10–12 weeks or long (62 weeks posttransplant follow-up by immunohistochemistry for green fluorescent protein. Engraftment of endothelial cells was seen in several organs including liver sinusoidal cells in i.v. treated mice with ex vivo expanded mesenchymal stem cells or with unfractionated bone marrow cells. Periportal engraftment of liver hepatocytes, but not engraftment of endothelial cells, was found in mice injected i.p. with bone chips. Engraftment of adipocytes was a common denominator in both i.v. and i.p. routes and occurred during early phases post-transplant. Disease control was more robust in mice that received both i.v. bone marrow and i.p. bone chips compared to mice that received i.v. bone marrow alone. Thus, the data support potential use of mesenchymal stem cell transplant for treatment of severe lupus. Future studies are needed to optimize

  7. Generation of infectious feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) encoding FIV/human immunodeficiency virus chimeric protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying-Chuan; Torbett, Bruce E; Elder, John H

    2010-07-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) proteases (PRs) share only 23% amino acid identity and exhibit distinct specificities yet have very similar 3-dimensional structures. Chimeric PRs in which HIV residues were substituted in structurally equivalent positions in FIV PR were prepared in order to study the molecular basis of PR specificity. Previous in vitro analyses showed that such substitutions dramatically altered the inhibitor specificity of mutant PRs but changed the rate and specificity of Gag cleavage so that chimeric FIVs were not infectious. Chimeric PRs encoding combinations of the I37V, N55M, M56I, V59I, L97T, I98P, Q99V, and P100N mutations were cloned into FIV Gag-Pol, and those constructs that best approximated the temporal cleavage pattern generated by wild-type FIV PR, while maintaining HIV-like inhibitor specificity, were selected. Two mutations, M56I and L97T, were intolerant to change and caused inefficient cleavage at NC-p2. However, a mutant PR with six substitutions (I37V, N55M, V59I, I98P, Q99V, and P100N) was selected and placed in the context of full-length FIV-34TF10. This virus, termed YCL6, had low-level infectivity ex vivo, and after passage, progeny that exhibited a higher growth rate emerged. The residue at the position of one of the six mutations, I98P, further mutated on passage to either P98H or P98S. Both PRs were sensitive to the HIV-1 PR inhibitors lopinavir (LPV) and darunavir (DRV), as well as to the broad-based inhibitor TL-3, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) of 30 to 40 nM, consistent with ex vivo results obtained using mutant FIVs. The chimeras offer an infectivity system with which to screen compounds for potential as broad-based PR inhibitors, define structural parameters that dictate specificity, and investigate pathways for drug resistance development.

  8. [Expression, purification and serological reactivity of a chimeric antigen of GRA6 with P30 from Toxoplasma gondii].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue-Xi; Zhang, Jin-Hai; Tao, Kai-Hua; Huang, Pei-Tang

    2003-11-01

    Major surface protein (p30) and Dense Granule Antigen GRA6 of Toxoplasma gondii have good antigenicity, and could be used for detection of IgM against Toxoplasma gondii. GRA6 may complement P30 to reach more high sensitivity for detection of antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii, so, we try to express the chimeric protein of GRA6 and P30 by genetic engineering, identify its antignenicity and use for developing diagnosis reagent. Antigenic domains of p30 and GRA6 of Toxoplasma gondii were screened by analyzing their sequences using the software ANTHEWIN. Two DNA fragments encoding respectively antigenic domains of p30 and GRA6 were cloned, they were inserted into the same expression vector pET28a( + ) and expressed as a chimeric protein in Escherichia coli. BL21(DE3), the expressed chimeric protein of p30 with GRA6 in a form of inclusion body was about 25% of total proteins of E. coli. BL21(DE3). The inclusion body was washed once with 0.5% Triton X-100 and dissolved with 0.5% SKL, after renaturation by gradient dialysis, the recombinant protein was purified by DEAE-Sepharose FF cation column and then detected with 12% SDS-PAGE, it exists mainly in the eluted peak with 300 mmol/L NaCl and has high purity. By using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the recombinant protein was examined for reactivity with immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies in 6 sera from patients infected with Toxoplasma gondii ., it was reactive with all the 6 sera but not with sera from normal people, these results showed that the recombinant chimeric antigen has good antigenicity and specificity and could be used for detection of IgM against Toxoplasma gondii. The expressed chimeric protein could be used for epidemic investigation of Toxoplasma gondii, blood donor screening, especially for detection of pregnant women, and is of great significance in prevention of Toxoplasma gondii infection.

  9. An avirulent chimeric Pestivirus with altered cell tropism protects pigs against lethal infection with classical swine fever virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimann, Ilona; Depner, Klaus; Trapp, Sascha; Beer, Martin

    2004-01-01

    A chimeric Pestivirus was constructed using an infectious cDNA clone of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) [J. Virol. 70 (1996) 8606]. After deletion of the envelope protein E2-encoding region, the respective sequence of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) strain Alfort 187 was inserted in-frame resulting in plasmid pA/CP7 E 2alf. After transfection of in vitro-transcribed CP7 E 2alf RNA, autonomous replication of chimeric RNA in bovine and porcine cell cultures was observed. Efficient growth of chimeric CP7 E 2alf virus, however, could only be demonstrated on porcine cells, and in contrast to the parental BVDV strain CP7, CP7 E 2alf only inefficiently infected and propagated in bovine cells. The virulence, immunogenicity, and 'marker vaccine' properties of the generated chimeric CP7 E 2alf virus were determined in an animal experiment using 27 pigs. After intramuscular inoculation of 1 x 10 7 TCID 50 , CP7 E 2alf proved to be completely avirulent, and neither viremia nor virus transmission to contact animals was observed; however, CSFV-specific neutralizing antibodies were detected from day 11 after inoculation. In addition, sera from all animals reacted positive in an E2-specific CSFV-antibody ELISA, but were negative for CSFV-E RNS -specific antibodies as determined with a CSFV marker ELISA. After challenge infection with highly virulent CSFV strain Eystrup, pigs immunized with CP7 E 2alf were fully protected against clinical signs of CSFV infection, viremia, and shedding of challenge virus, and almost all animals scored positive in a CSFV marker ELISA. From our results, we conclude that chimeric CP7 E 2alf may not only serve as a tool for a better understanding of Pestivirus attachment, entry, and assembly, but also represents an innocuous and efficacious modified live CSFV 'marker vaccine'

  10. Case of 46,XX/47,XY, +21 chimerism in a newborn infant with ambiguous genitalia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawai, Tomoko; Yoshimoto, Masaaki; Kinoshita, Ei-ichi; Baba, Tsuneyoshi; Matsumoto, Tadashi; Tsuji, Yoshiro, Niikawa, Norio [Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine, Nagasaki (Japan); Fukuda, Shinpei [Ohmura Municipal Hospital, Ohmura (Japan); Harada, Naoki [Kyushu Medical Science, Nagasaki (Japan)

    1994-02-15

    The authors describe the whole-body chimerism in a newborn infant with small phallus, pseudo-vaginal perineal hypospadias, and a bifid scrotum containing gonads. The human testis determining factor gene (SRY) was detected by PCR amplification. GTG-banding chromosome analysis in peripheral blood lymphocytes and cultured fibroblasts derived from right cubital skin showed a 46,XX/47,XY, +21 karyotype. Their ratios in each cell line were 294:5 and 178:7, respectively. QFQ-banding chromosome analysis documented 3 heteromorphic satellites on trisomic chromsomes 21 in the 47,XY,+21 cell line and a homozygous satellite pattern in the 46,XX cell line. Heteromorphic patterns of chromsomes 4, 13, 14, and 22 were also different between the two cell lines. To our knowledge, such disomy/trisomy chimeras have not been described previously. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Cloning of the sth gene from Azotobacter vinelandii and construction of chimeric soluble pyridine nucleotide transhydrogenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonstra, B; Björklund, L; French, C E; Wainwright, I; Bruce, N C

    2000-10-01

    The gene encoding the soluble pyridine nucleotide transhydrogenase (STH) of Azotobacter vinelandii was cloned and sequenced. This is the third sth gene identified and further defines a new subfamily within the flavoprotein disulfide oxidoreductases. The three STHs identified all lack one of the redox active cysteines that are characteristic for this large family of enzymes, and instead they contain a conserved threonine residue at this position. The recombinant A. vinelandii enzyme was purified to homogeneity and shown to form filamentous structures different from those of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Escherichia coli STH. Chimeric STHs were constructed which showed that the C-terminal region is important for polymer formation. The A. vinelandii STH containing the C-terminal region of P. fluorescens or E. coli STH showed structures resembling those of the STH contributing the C-terminal portion of the protein.

  12. Adoptive T Cell Therapies: A Comparison of T Cell Receptors and Chimeric Antigen Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Daniel T.; Kranz, David M.

    2016-01-01

    The tumor-killing properties of T cells provide tremendous opportunities to treat cancer. Adoptive T cell therapies have begun to harness this potential by endowing a functionally diverse repertoire of T cells with genetically modified, tumor-specific recognition receptors. Normally, this antigen recognition function is mediated by an αβ T cell receptor (TCR), but the dominant therapeutic forms currently in development are synthetic constructs called chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). While CAR-based adoptive cell therapies are already showing great promise, their basic mechanistic properties have been studied in less detail compared with those of αβ TCRs. In this review, we compare and contrast various features of TCRs versus CARs, with a goal of highlighting issues that need to be addressed to fully exploit the therapeutic potential of both. PMID:26705086

  13. HIV-specific Immunity Derived From Chimeric Antigen Receptor-engineered Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Anjie; Kamata, Masakazu; Rezek, Valerie; Rick, Jonathan; Levin, Bernard; Kasparian, Saro; Chen, Irvin Sy; Yang, Otto O; Zack, Jerome A; Kitchen, Scott G

    2015-08-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response is critical in controlling HIV infection. Since the immune response does not eliminate HIV, it would be beneficial to develop ways to enhance the HIV-specific CTL response to allow long-term viral suppression or clearance. Here, we report the use of a protective chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) in a hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC)-based approach to engineer HIV immunity. We determined that CAR-modified HSPCs differentiate into functional T cells as well as natural killer (NK) cells in vivo in humanized mice and these cells are resistant to HIV infection and suppress HIV replication. These results strongly suggest that stem cell-based gene therapy with a CAR may be feasible and effective in treating chronic HIV infection and other morbidities.

  14. Chimeric plant virus particles administered nasally or orally induce systemic and mucosal immune responses in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brennan, F.R.; Bellaby, T.; Helliwell, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    The humoral immune responses to the D2 peptide of fibronectin-binding protein B (FnBP) of Staphylococcus aureus, expressed on the plant virus cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV), were evaluated after mucosal delivery to mice. Intranasal immunization of these chimeric virus particles (CVPs), either alone o...... demonstrate for the first time that recombinant plant viruses have potential as mucosal vaccines without the requirement for adjuvant and that the nasal route is most effective for the delivery of these nonreplicating particles....... or in the presence of ISCOM matrix, primed CPMV-specific T cells and generated high titers of CPMV- and FnBP-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) in sera. Furthermore, CPMV- and FnBP-specific IgA and IgG could also be detected in the bronchial, intestinal, and vaginal lavage fluids, highlighting the ability of CVPs...

  15. Remote control of therapeutic T cells through a small molecule-gated chimeric receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Yung; Roybal, Kole T.; Puchner, Elias M.; Onuffer, James; Lim, Wendell A.

    2016-01-01

    There is growing promise in using engineered cells as therapeutic agents. For example, synthetic Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs) can redirect T cells to recognize and eliminate tumor cells expressing specific antigens. Despite promising clinical results, excessive activity and poor control over such engineered T cells can cause severe toxicities. We present the design of “ON-switch” CARs that enable small molecule-control over T cell therapeutic functions, while still retaining antigen specificity. In these split receptors, antigen binding and intracellular signaling components only assemble in the presence of a heterodimerizing small molecule. This titratable pharmacologic regulation could allow physicians to precisely control the timing, location, and dosage of T cell activity, thereby mitigating toxicity. This work illustrates the potential of combining cellular engineering with orthogonal chemical tools to yield safer therapeutic cells that tightly integrate both cell autonomous recognition and user control. PMID:26405231

  16. Remote control of therapeutic T cells through a small molecule-gated chimeric receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Yung; Roybal, Kole T; Puchner, Elias M; Onuffer, James; Lim, Wendell A

    2015-10-16

    There is growing interest in using engineered cells as therapeutic agents. For example, synthetic chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) can redirect T cells to recognize and eliminate tumor cells expressing specific antigens. Despite promising clinical results, these engineered T cells can exhibit excessive activity that is difficult to control and can cause severe toxicity. We designed "ON-switch" CARs that enable small-molecule control over T cell therapeutic functions while still retaining antigen specificity. In these split receptors, antigen-binding and intracellular signaling components assemble only in the presence of a heterodimerizing small molecule. This titratable pharmacologic regulation could allow physicians to precisely control the timing, location, and dosage of T cell activity, thereby mitigating toxicity. This work illustrates the potential of combining cellular engineering with orthogonal chemical tools to yield safer therapeutic cells that tightly integrate cell-autonomous recognition and user control. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. A recombinant, chimeric tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate based on a dengue virus serotype 2 backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Jorge E; Wallace, Derek; Stinchcomb, Dan T

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever is caused by infection with one of four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes (DENV-1-4), necessitating tetravalent dengue vaccines that can induce protection against all four DENV. Takeda's live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate (TDV) comprises an attenuated DENV-2 strain plus chimeric viruses containing the prM and E genes of DENV-1, -3 and -4 cloned into the attenuated DENV-2 'backbone'. In Phase 1 and 2 studies, TDV was well tolerated by children and adults aged 1.5-45 years, irrespective of prior dengue exposure; mild injection-site symptoms were the most common adverse events. TDV induced neutralizing antibody responses and seroconversion to all four DENV as well as cross-reactive T cell-mediated responses that may be necessary for broad protection against dengue fever.

  18. Efficient, trans-complementing packaging systems for chimeric, pseudoinfectious dengue 2/yellow fever viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shustov, Alexandr V.; Frolov, Ilya

    2010-01-01

    In our previous studies, we have stated to build a new strategy for developing defective, pseudoinfectious flaviviruses (PIVs) and applying them as a new type of vaccine candidates. PIVs combined the efficiency of live vaccines with the safety of inactivated or subunit vaccines. The results of the present work demonstrate further development of chimeric PIVs encoding dengue virus 2 (DEN2V) glycoproteins and yellow fever virus (YFV)-derived replicative machinery as potential vaccine candidates. The newly designed PIVs have synergistically functioning mutations in the prM and NS2A proteins, which abolish processing of the latter proteins and make the defective viruses capable of producing either only noninfectious, immature and/or subviral DEN2V particles. The PIV genomes can be packaged to high titers into infectious virions in vitro using the NS1-deficient YFV helper RNAs, and both PIVs and helpers can then be passaged as two-component genome viruses at an escalating scale.

  19. Adoptitive immunotherapy with genetically engineered T lymphocytes modified to express chimeric antigen receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. А. Pavlova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant mortality due to oncological diseases as a whole, and oncohematological diseases in particular, motivates scientific and medical community to develop new treatment methods. One of the newest methods is adoptive cell therapy using patient’s own T-cells modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CAR to tumor-specific antigens. Despite high cost and side effects of treatment, promising clinical trials even in patients with advanced disease allow to anticipate successful use of this method in clinical practice.The article includes a review of the main principles of this technique, published results of clinical studies of CAR T-cells with a focus on CD19 gene targeting, complications of this therapy, mechanisms of tumor resistance to CAR T-cells, and potential ways to overcome it.

  20. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cell therapy for malignant cancers: Summary and perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron J. Smith

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper will summarize the data obtained primarily from the last decade of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cell immunotherapy. It will do so in a manner that provides an overview needed to set the foundation for perspective on the state of research associated with CAR T cell therapy. The topics covered will include the construction of engineered CAR T cells from the standpoint of the different generations, the mode in which autologous T cells are transfected, the various biomarkers that have been used in CAR T cell immunotherapy, and setbacks associated with engineered T cells. Perspective on priorities of CAR T cell immunotherapy will also be addressed as they are related to safety and efficacy.

  1. Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Engineered T Cells for Immunotherapy of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Cartellieri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes are powerful components of adaptive immunity, which essentially contribute to the elimination of tumors. Due to their cytotoxic capacity, T cells emerged as attractive candidates for specific immunotherapy of cancer. A promising approach is the genetic modification of T cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs. First generation CARs consist of a binding moiety specifically recognizing a tumor cell surface antigen and a lymphocyte activating signaling chain. The CAR-mediated recognition induces cytokine production and tumor-directed cytotoxicity of T cells. Second and third generation CARs include signal sequences from various costimulatory molecules resulting in enhanced T-cell persistence and sustained antitumor reaction. Clinical trials revealed that the adoptive transfer of T cells engineered with first generation CARs represents a feasible concept for the induction of clinical responses in some tumor patients. However, further improvement is required, which may be achieved by second or third generation CAR-engrafted T cells.

  2. Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Engineered T Cells in Tumor Immunotherapy: From Bench to Beside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng WANG

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptor-engineered T cells (CAR-T cells, a classification of cultured T cells after modification of gene engineering technology, can recognize specific tumor antigens in a major histocompatibility complex (MHC-independent manner, consequently leading to the activation of antitumor function. The recent studies have confirmed that a variety of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs can act as target antigens for CAR-T cells. Nowadays, CAR T-cell therapy, one of the most potential tumor immunotherapies, has made great breakthroughs in hematological malignancies and promising outcomes in solid tumors. In this article, the biological characteristics and antitumor mechanism of CAR-T cells, and their application in tumor treatment were mainly reviewed.

  3. Increasing the safety and efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Li

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cell therapy is a promising cancer treatment that has recently been undergoing rapid development. However, there are still some major challenges, including precise tumor targeting to avoid off-target or “on-target/off-tumor” toxicity, adequate T cell infiltration and migration to solid tumors and T cell proliferation and persistence across the physical and biochemical barriers of solid tumors. In this review, we focus on the primary challenges and strategies to design safe and effective CAR T cells, including using novel cutting-edge technologies for CAR and vector designs to increase both the safety and efficacy, further T cell modification to overcome the tumor-associated immune suppression, and using gene editing technologies to generate universal CAR T cells. All these efforts promote the development and evolution of CAR T cell therapy and move toward our ultimate goal—curing cancer with high safety, high efficacy, and low cost.

  4. Chimeric antigen receptors for adoptive T cell therapy in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxue Fan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Currently, conventional therapies for acute myeloid leukemia (AML have high failure and relapse rates. Thus, developing new strategies is crucial for improving the treatment of AML. With the clinical success of anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cell therapies against B-lineage malignancies, many studies have attempted to translate the success of CAR T cell therapy to other malignancies, including AML. This review summarizes the current advances in CAR T cell therapy against AML, including preclinical studies and clinical trials, and discusses the potential AML-associated surface markers that could be used for further CAR technology. Finally, we describe strategies that might address the current issues of employing CAR T cell therapy in AML.

  5. Chimeric Antigen Receptors T Cell Therapy in Solid Tumor: Challenges and Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid R. Mirzaei

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive cellular immunotherapy (ACT employing engineered T lymphocytes expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs has demonstrated promising antitumor effects in advanced hematologic cancers, such as relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, supporting the translation of ACT to non-hematological malignancies. Although CAR T cell therapy has made remarkable strides in the treatment of patients with certain hematological cancers, in solid tumors success has been limited likely due to heterogeneous antigen expression, immunosuppressive networks in the tumor microenvironment limiting CAR T cell function and persistence, and suboptimal trafficking to solid tumors. Here, we outline specific approaches to overcome barriers to CAR T cell effectiveness in the context of the tumor microenvironment and offer our perspective on how expanding the use of CAR T cells in solid tumors may require modifications in CAR T cell design. We anticipate these modifications will further expand CAR T cell therapy in clinical practice.

  6. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cell (Car T Cell Therapy In Hematology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Ataca

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It is well demonstrated that immune system can control and eliminate cancer cells. Immune-mediated elimination of tumor cells has been discovered and is the basis of both cancer vaccines and cellular therapies including hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. Adoptive T cell transfer has been improved to be more specific and potent and cause less off-target toxicities. Currently, there are two forms of engineered T cells being tested in clinical trials: T cell receptor (TCR and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR modified T cells. On July 1, 2014, the United States Food and Drug Administration granted ‘breakthrough therapy’ designation to anti-CD19 CAR T cell therapy. Many studies were conducted to evaluate the beneficiaries of this exciting and potent new treatment modality. This review summarizes the history of adoptive immunotherapy, adoptive immunotherapy using CARs, the CAR manufacturing process, preclinical-clinical studies, effectiveness and drawbacks of this strategy.

  7. Chimeric-antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cell therapy for solid tumors: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, An-Liang; Wang, Xiao-Chen; Lu, Yi-Jun; Lu, Xiao-Jie; Sun, Beicheng

    2017-10-27

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells (CAR-T cells) have been shown to have unprecedented efficacy in B cell malignancies, most notably in B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) with up to a 90% complete remission rate using anti-CD19 CAR-T cells. However, CAR T-cell therapy for solid tumors currently is faced with numerous challenges such as physical barriers, the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment and the specificity and safety. The clinical results in solid tumors have been much less encouraging, with multiple cases of toxicity and a lack of therapeutic response. In this review, we will discuss the current stats and challenges of CAR-T cell therapy for solid tumors, and propose possibl e solutions and future perspectives.

  8. Sandwich ELISA Using a Mouse/Human Chimeric CSLEX-1 Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, J; Kobayashi, I; Tatematsu, K; Sezutsu, H; Noda, K; Ishihara, H

    2016-11-01

    An assay using a mouse antisialyl Lewis X (sLeX) antibody (CSLEX-1) is used clinically for screening and monitoring patients with breast cancer in Japan. However, the IgM isoform of CSLEX-1 is not preferred for the assay because the bulkiness of IgM generally causes poor accessibility to the antigen. To solve this problem, we developed an antisLeX mouse/human chimeric IgG antibody, CH-CSLEX-1, using transgenic silkworms. The performance of a homologous sandwich ELISA of CH-CSLEX1 was then evaluated. To generate CH-CSLEX-1, we used a GAL4/UAS binary gene expression system in transgenic silkworms. The reactivities of CSLEX-1 and CH-CSLEX-1 were determined in a Biacore analysis. To confirm antigen specificity, 3 antigens [sLeX, sLeA, and Lewis Y (LeY)] were used. CH-CSLEX-1 formed correctly as an IgG class of immunoglobulin molecule with an isoelectric point close to the predicted value. The best combination for capturing and probing in a sandwich ELISA was determined as a homologous combination of CH-CSLEX-1. The CH-CSLEX-1 assay specifically detected sLeX, but not sLeA and LeY. A correlation analysis with 107 human samples showed good concordance between the conventional CSLEX-1 assay (homologous sandwich ELISA using CSLEX-1) and the CH-CSLEX-1 assay (r = 0.98). Moreover, the CH-CSLEX-1 assay was not affected by either human antimouse IgG antibodies (HAMA IgG) or HAMA IgM. The mouse/human chimeric antibody CH-CSLEX-1 allowed the establishment of a highly specific sandwich ELISA for sLeX that was not affected by HAMA. © 2016 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  9. Repeated evolution of chimeric fusion genes in the β-globin gene family of laurasiatherian mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudry, Michael J; Storz, Jay F; Butts, Gary Tyler; Campbell, Kevin L; Hoffmann, Federico G

    2014-05-09

    The evolutionary fate of chimeric fusion genes may be strongly influenced by their recombinational mode of origin and the nature of functional divergence between the parental genes. In the β-globin gene family of placental mammals, the two postnatally expressed δ- and β-globin genes (HBD and HBB, respectively) have a propensity for recombinational exchange via gene conversion and unequal crossing-over. In the latter case, there are good reasons to expect differences in retention rates for the reciprocal HBB/HBD and HBD/HBB fusion genes due to thalassemia pathologies associated with the HBD/HBB "Lepore" deletion mutant in humans. Here, we report a comparative genomic analysis of the mammalian β-globin gene cluster, which revealed that chimeric HBB/HBD fusion genes originated independently in four separate lineages of laurasiatherian mammals: Eulipotyphlans (shrews, moles, and hedgehogs), carnivores, microchiropteran bats, and cetaceans. In cases where an independently derived "anti-Lepore" duplication mutant has become fixed, the parental HBD and/or HBB genes have typically been inactivated or deleted, so that the newly created HBB/HBD fusion gene is primarily responsible for synthesizing the β-type subunits of adult and fetal hemoglobin (Hb). Contrary to conventional wisdom that the HBD gene is a vestigial relict that is typically inactivated or expressed at negligible levels, we show that HBD-like genes often encode a substantial fraction (20-100%) of β-chain Hbs in laurasiatherian taxa. Our results indicate that the ascendancy or resuscitation of genes with HBD-like coding sequence requires the secondary acquisition of HBB-like promoter sequence via unequal crossing-over or interparalog gene conversion. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  10. Enhancement by dimethyl myleran of donor type chimerism in murine recipients of bone marrow allografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidot, T.; Terenzi, A.; Singer, T.S.; Salomon, O.; Reisner, Y. (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel))

    1989-05-15

    A major problem in using murine models for studies of bone marrow allograft rejection in leukemia patients is the narrow margin in which graft rejection can be analyzed. In mice irradiated with greater than 9 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) rejection is minimal, whereas after administration of 8 Gy TBI, which spares a significant number of clonable T cells, a substantial frequency of host stem cells can also be detected. In current murine models, unlike in humans, bone marrow allograft rejection is generally associated with full autologous hematopoietic reconstitution. In the present study, we investigated the effect of the myeloablative drug dimethyl myleran (DMM) on chimerism status following transplantation of T cell-depleted allogenic bone marrow (using C57BL/6 donors and C3H/HeJ recipients, conditioned with 8 Gy TBI). Donor type chimerism 1 to 2 months post-transplant of 1 to 3 x 10(6) bone marrow cells was markedly enhanced by using DMM one day after TBI and prior to transplantation. Conditioning with cyclophosphamide instead of DMM, in combination with 8 Gy TBI, did not enhance engraftment of donor type cells. Artificial reconstitution of T cells, after conditioning with TBI plus DMM, by adding mature thymocytes, or presensitization with irradiated donor type spleen cells 1 week before TBI and DMM, led to strong graft rejection and consequently to severe anemia. The anti-donor responses in these models were proportional to the number of added T cells and to the number of cells used for presensitization, and they could be neutralized by increasing the bone marrow inoculum.

  11. Performance Assessment of a Trypanosoma cruzi Chimeric Antigen in Multiplex Liquid Microarray Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Fred Luciano Neves; Celedon, Paola Alejandra Fiorani; Zanchin, Nilson Ivo Tonin; Leitolis, Amanda; Crestani, Sandra; Foti, Leonardo; de Souza, Wayner Vieira; Gomes, Yara de Miranda; Krieger, Marco Aurélio

    2017-10-01

    Diagnosing chronic Chagas disease (CD) requires antibody-antigen detection methods, which are traditionally based on enzymatic assay techniques whose performance depend on the type and quality of antigen used. Previously, 4 recombinant chimeric proteins from the Instituto de Biologia Molecular do Paraná (IBMP-8.1 to 8.4) comprising immuno-dominant regions of diverse Trypanosoma cruzi antigens showed excellent diagnostic performance in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Considering that next-generation platforms offer improved CD diagnostic accuracy with different T. cruzi -specific recombinant antigens, we assessed the performance of these chimeras in liquid microarrays (LMAs). The chimeric proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by chromatography. Sera from 653 chagasic and 680 healthy individuals were used to assess the performance of these chimeras in detecting specific anti- T. cruzi antibodies. Accuracies ranged from 98.1 to 99.3%, and diagnostic odds ratio values were 3,548 for IBMP-8.3, 4,826 for IBMP-8.1, 7,882 for IBMP-8.2, and 25,000 for IBMP-8.4. A separate sera bank (851 samples) was employed to assess cross-reactivity with other tropical diseases. Leishmania , a pathogen with high similarity to T. cruzi , showed cross-reactivity rates ranging from 0 to 2.17%. Inconclusive results were negligible (0 to 0.71%). Bland-Altman and Deming regression analysis based on 200 randomly selected CD-positive and negative samples demonstrated interchangeability with respect to CD diagnostic performance in both singleplex and multiplex assays. Our results suggested that these chimeras can potentially replace antigens currently used in commercially available assay kits. Moreover, the use of multiplex platforms, such as LMA assays employing 2 or more IBMP antigens, would abrogate the need for 2 different testing techniques when diagnosing CD. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Enhanced protective efficacy of a chimeric form of the schistosomiasis vaccine antigen Sm-TSP-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S Pearson

    Full Text Available The large extracellular loop of the Schistosoma mansoni tetraspanin, Sm-TSP-2, when fused to a thioredoxin partner and formulated with Freund's adjuvants, has been shown to be an efficacious vaccine against murine schistosomiasis. Moreover, Sm-TSP-2 is uniquely recognised by IgG(1 and IgG(3 from putatively resistant individuals resident in S. mansoni endemic areas in Brazil. In the present study, we expressed Sm-TSP-2 at high yield and in soluble form in E. coli without the need for a solubility enhancing fusion partner. We also expressed in E. coli a chimera called Sm-TSP-2/5B, which consisted of Sm-TSP-2 fused to the immunogenic 5B region of the hookworm aspartic protease and vaccine antigen, Na-APR-1. Sm-TSP-2 formulated with alum/CpG showed significant reductions in adult worm and liver egg burdens in two separate murine schistosomiasis challenge studies. Sm-TSP-2/5B afforded significantly greater protection than Sm-TSP-2 alone when both antigens were formulated with alum/CpG. The enhanced protection obtained with the chimeric fusion protein was associated with increased production of anti-Sm-TSP-2 antibodies and IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ from spleen cells of vaccinated animals. Sera from 666 individuals from Brazil who were infected with S. mansoni were screened for potentially deleterious IgE responses to Sm-TSP-2. Anti-Sm-TSP-2 IgE to this protein was not detected (also shown previously for Na-APR-1, suggesting that the chimeric antigen Sm-TSP-2/5B could be used to safely and effectively vaccinate people in areas where schistosomes and hookworms are endemic.

  13. Enhancement by dimethyl myleran of donor type chimerism in murine recipients of bone marrow allografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapidot, T.; Terenzi, A.; Singer, T.S.; Salomon, O.; Reisner, Y.

    1989-01-01

    A major problem in using murine models for studies of bone marrow allograft rejection in leukemia patients is the narrow margin in which graft rejection can be analyzed. In mice irradiated with greater than 9 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) rejection is minimal, whereas after administration of 8 Gy TBI, which spares a significant number of clonable T cells, a substantial frequency of host stem cells can also be detected. In current murine models, unlike in humans, bone marrow allograft rejection is generally associated with full autologous hematopoietic reconstitution. In the present study, we investigated the effect of the myeloablative drug dimethyl myleran (DMM) on chimerism status following transplantation of T cell-depleted allogenic bone marrow (using C57BL/6 donors and C3H/HeJ recipients, conditioned with 8 Gy TBI). Donor type chimerism 1 to 2 months post-transplant of 1 to 3 x 10(6) bone marrow cells was markedly enhanced by using DMM one day after TBI and prior to transplantation. Conditioning with cyclophosphamide instead of DMM, in combination with 8 Gy TBI, did not enhance engraftment of donor type cells. Artificial reconstitution of T cells, after conditioning with TBI plus DMM, by adding mature thymocytes, or presensitization with irradiated donor type spleen cells 1 week before TBI and DMM, led to strong graft rejection and consequently to severe anemia. The anti-donor responses in these models were proportional to the number of added T cells and to the number of cells used for presensitization, and they could be neutralized by increasing the bone marrow inoculum

  14. Synthetic metabolic engineering-a novel, simple technology for designing a chimeric metabolic pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Xiaoting

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The integration of biotechnology into chemical manufacturing has been recognized as a key technology to build a sustainable society. However, the practical applications of biocatalytic chemical conversions are often restricted due to their complexities involving the unpredictability of product yield and the troublesome controls in fermentation processes. One of the possible strategies to overcome these limitations is to eliminate the use of living microorganisms and to use only enzymes involved in the metabolic pathway. Use of recombinant mesophiles producing thermophilic enzymes at high temperature results in denaturation of indigenous proteins and elimination of undesired side reactions; consequently, highly selective and stable biocatalytic modules can be readily prepared. By rationally combining those modules together, artificial synthetic pathways specialized for chemical manufacturing could be designed and constructed. Results A chimeric Embden-Meyerhof (EM pathway with balanced consumption and regeneration of ATP and ADP was constructed by using nine recombinant E. coli strains overproducing either one of the seven glycolytic enzymes of Thermus thermophilus, the cofactor-independent phosphoglycerate mutase of Pyrococcus horikoshii, or the non-phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of Thermococcus kodakarensis. By coupling this pathway with the Thermus malate/lactate dehydrogenase, a stoichiometric amount of lactate was produced from glucose with an overall ATP turnover number of 31. Conclusions In this study, a novel and simple technology for flexible design of a bespoke metabolic pathway was developed. The concept has been testified via a non-ATP-forming chimeric EM pathway. We designated this technology as “synthetic metabolic engineering”. Our technology is, in principle, applicable to all thermophilic enzymes as long as they can be functionally expressed in the host, and thus would be

  15. Synthesis and characterization of chimeric proteins based on cellulase and xylanase from an insect gut bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlakha, Nidhi; Rajagopal, Raman; Kumar, Saravanan; Reddy, Vanga Siva; Yazdani, Syed Shams

    2011-07-01

    Insects living on wood and plants harbor a large variety of bacterial flora in their guts for degrading biomass. We isolated a Paenibacillus strain, designated ICGEB2008, from the gut of a cotton bollworm on the basis of its ability to secrete a variety of plant-hydrolyzing enzymes. In this study, we cloned, expressed, and characterized two enzymes, β-1,4-endoglucanase (Endo5A) and β-1,4-endoxylanase (Xyl11D), from the ICGEB2008 strain and synthesized recombinant bifunctional enzymes based on Endo5A and Xyl11D. The gene encoding Endo5A was obtained from the genome of the ICGEB2008 strain by shotgun cloning. The gene encoding Xyl11D was obtained using primers for conserved xylanase sequences, which were identified by aligning xylanase sequences in other species of Paenibacillus. Endo5A and Xyl11D were overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and their optimal activities were characterized. Both Endo5A and Xyl11D exhibited maximum specific activity at 50°C and pH 6 to 7. To take advantage of this feature, we constructed four bifunctional chimeric models of Endo5A and Xyl11D by fusing the encoding genes either end to end or through a glycine-serine (GS) linker. We predicted three-dimensional structures of the four models using the I-TASSER server and analyzed their secondary structures using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The chimeric model Endo5A-GS-Xyl11D, in which a linker separated the two enzymes, yielded the highest C-score on the I-TASSER server, exhibited secondary structure properties closest to the native enzymes, and demonstrated 1.6-fold and 2.3-fold higher enzyme activity than Endo5A and Xyl11D, respectively. This bifunctional enzyme could be effective for hydrolyzing plant biomass owing to its broad substrate range.

  16. The solution structure of a chimeric LEKTI domain reveals a chameleon sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidow, Henning; Lauber, Thomas; Vitzithum, Klaus; Sommerhoff, Christian P; Rösch, Paul; Marx, Ute C

    2004-09-07

    The conversion of an alpha-helical to a beta-strand conformation and the presence of chameleon sequences are fascinating from the perspective that such structural features are implicated in the induction of amyloid-related fatal diseases. In this study, we have determined the solution structure of a chimeric domain (Dom1PI) from the multidomain Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor LEKTI using multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. This chimeric protein was constructed to investigate the reasons for differences in the folds of the homologous LEKTI domains 1 and 6 [Lauber, T., et al. (2003) J. Mol. Biol. 328, 205-219]. In Dom1PI, two adjacent phenylalanine residues (F28 and F29) of domain 1 were substituted with proline and isoleucine, respectively, as found in the corresponding P4' and P5' positions of domain 6. The three-dimensional structure of Dom1PI is significantly different from the structure of domain 1 and closely resembles the structure of domain 6, despite the sequence being identical to that of domain 1 except for the two substituted phenylalanine residues and being only 31% identical to the sequence of domain 6. The mutation converted a short 3(10)-helix into an extended loop conformation and parts of the long COOH-terminal alpha-helix of domain 1 into a beta-hairpin structure. The latter conformational change occurs in a sequence stretch distinct from the region containing the substituted residues. Therefore, this switch from an alpha-helical structure to a beta-hairpin structure indicates a chameleon sequence of seven residues. We conclude that the secondary structure of Dom1PI is determined not only by the local protein sequence but also by nonlocal interactions.

  17. Chimerism representing both paternal alleles detected by HLA typing before kidney transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mette; Petersen, Mikkel Steen; Møller, Bjarne Kuno

    2014-01-01

    We select donors and recipients for solid organ transplantations by employing HLA serology and PCR with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP). Routinely, patients and donors are typed for HLA-A and B using serological techniques, while HLA-C, HLA-DRB1, and HLA-DQB1 are typed with PCR-SSP. In a 38-y......-year-old female kidney transplantation recipient, the PCR-SSP technique yielded very unusual results, whereas her parents were assigned routinely. The mother had the following HLA types: A3,33(19); B7,39(16); C*07; DQB1*06; DRB1*13; the father A2,11; B27,35; C*01,*04; DQB1*03,*05; DRB1......*01,*04 and the patient was serologically typed as A11,33(19); B35,39(16). But when DNA was analyzed, the patient showed three different alleles in the HLA-genes tested: A*02,*11,*33; C*01,*04, *07; DQB1*03,*05*,06; DRB1*01,*04, *13. The PCR-bands for A*02, C*01, DQB1*03, and DRB1*01 were all specific but relatively weak...... trisomy 6p or by chimerism. Flow cytometric analysis, employing antibodies specific for the two paternal HLA-A alleles, clearly showed two distinct populations of cells: 83% expressing HLA-A11 and 12% expressing HLA-A2, suggesting a paternal chimerism. We are studying these cell populations to possibly...

  18. DIVA vaccine properties of the live chimeric pestivirus strain CP7_E2gif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Rosen, Tanya; Rangelova, Desislava; Nielsen, Jens; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Uttenthal, Åse

    2014-06-04

    Live modified vaccines to protect against classical swine fever virus (CSFV), based on chimeric pestiviruses, have been developed to enable serological Differentiation of Infected from Vaccinated Animals (DIVA). In this context, the chimeric virus CP7_E2gif vaccine candidate is unique as it does not include any CSFV components. In the present study, the DIVA vaccine properties of CP7_E2gif were evaluated in comparison to the conventional live attenuated Riemser C-strain vaccine. Sera and tonsil samples obtained from pigs immunised with these two vaccines were analysed. No viral RNA was found in serum after vaccination with CP7_E2gif, whereas some serum samples from C-strain vaccinated animals were positive. In both vaccinated groups, individual viral RNA-positive tonsil samples were detected in animals euthanised between 7 and 21 days post vaccination. Furthermore, serum samples from these animals, together with archival samples from pigs vaccinated with CP7_E2gif and subsequently CSFV challenged, were analysed for specific antibodies using ELISAs and for homologous neutralising antibodies. In animals vaccinated with CP7_E2gif, neutralising antibodies were detected from day 10. However, the sera remained negative for anti-CSFV E2-specific antibodies whereas pigs vaccinated with C-strain seroconverted against CSFV by 14 days after vaccination, as determined by a CSFV-E2 specific blocking ELISA. One week after subsequent CSFV challenge, a strong anti-CSFV E2 reaction was detected in CP7_E2gif vaccinated pigs and anti-E(rns) antibodies were detected from 10 days after infection. In conclusion, CP7_E2gif has the potential to be used as a DIVA vaccine in combination with detection of anti-CSFV E2-specific antibodies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Construction of Methanol-SensingEscherichia coliby the Introduction of aParacoccus denitrificansMxaY-Based Chimeric Two-Component System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Irisappan; Vidhya, Selvamani; Eom, Gyeong Tae; Hong, Soon Ho

    2017-06-28

    Escherichia coli was engineered to sense methanol by employing a chimeric two-component system (TCS) strategy. A chimeric MxaY/EnvZ (MxaYZ) TCS was constructed by fusing the Paracoccus denitrificans MxaY with the E. coli EnvZ. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis and GFP-based fluorescence analysis showed maximum transcription of ompC and the fluorescence at 0.01% of methanol, respectively. These results suggested that E. coli was successfully engineered to sense methanol by the introduction of chimeric MxaYZ. By using this strategy, various chimeric TCS-based bacterial biosensors can be constructed and used for the development of biochemical-producing recombinant microorganisms.

  20. Chimeric SV40 virus-like particles induce specific cytotoxicity and protective immunity against influenza A virus without the need of adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Masaaki; Morikawa, Katsuma; Suda, Tatsuya; Ohno, Naohito; Matsushita, Sho; Akatsuka, Toshitaka; Handa, Hiroshi; Matsui, Masanori

    2014-01-05

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) are a promising vaccine platform due to the safety and efficiency. However, it is still unclear whether polyomavirus-based VLPs are useful for this purpose. Here, we attempted to evaluate the potential of polyomavirus VLPs for the antiviral vaccine using simian virus 40 (SV40). We constructed chimeric SV40-VLPs carrying an HLA-A*02:01-restricted, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope derived from influenza A virus. HLA-A*02:01-transgenic mice were then immunized with the chimeric SV40-VLPs. The chimeric SV40-VLPs effectively induced influenza-specific CTLs and heterosubtypic protection against influenza A viruses without the need of adjuvants. Because DNase I treatment of the chimeric SV40-VLPs did not disrupt CTL induction, the intrinsic adjuvant property may not result from DNA contaminants in the VLP preparation. In addition, immunization with the chimeric SV40-VLPs generated long-lasting memory CTLs. We here propose that the chimeric SV40-VLPs harboring an epitope may be a promising CTL-based vaccine platform with self-adjuvant properties. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Prevention of Asthma Exacerbation in a Mouse Model by Simultaneous Inhibition of NF-κB and STAT6 Activation Using a Chimeric Decoy Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuo Miyake

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Transactivation of inflammatory and immune mediators in asthma is tightly regulated by nuclear factor κB (NF-κB and signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6. Therefore, we investigated the efficacy of simultaneous inhibition of NF-κB and STAT6 using a chimeric decoy strategy to prevent asthma exacerbation. The effects of decoy oligodeoxynucleotides were evaluated using an ovalbumin-induced mouse asthma model. Ovalbumin-sensitized mice received intratracheal administration of decoy oligodeoxynucleotides 3 days before ovalbumin challenge. Fluorescent-dye-labeled decoy oligodeoxynucleotides could be detected in lymphocytes and macrophages in the lung, and activation of NF-κB and STAT6 was inhibited by chimeric decoy oligodeoxynucleotide transfer. Consequently, treatment with chimeric or NF-κB decoy oligodeoxynucleotides protected against methacholine-induced airway hyperresponsiveness, whereas the effect of chimeric decoy oligodeoxynucleotides was significantly greater than that of NF-κB decoy oligodeoxynucleotides. Treatment with chimeric decoy oligodeoxynucleotides suppressed airway inflammation through inhibition of overexpression of interleukin-4 (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 and inflammatory infiltrates. Histamine levels in the lung were reduced via suppression of mast cell accumulation. A significant reduction in mucin secretion was observed due to suppression of MUC5AC gene expression. Interestingly, the inhibitory effects on IL-5, IL-13, and histamine secretion were achieved by transfer of chimeric decoy oligodeoxynucleotides only. This novel therapeutic approach could be useful to treat patients with various types of asthma.

  2. Construction and preliminary investigation of a novel dengue serotype 4 chimeric virus using Japanese encephalitis vaccine strain SA14-14-2 as the backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhushi; Yang, Huiqiang; Yang, Jian; Lin, Hua; Wang, Wei; Liu, Lina; Zhao, Yu; Liu, Li; Zeng, Xianwu; Yu, Yongxin; Li, Yuhua

    2014-10-13

    For the purpose of developing a novel dengue vaccine candidate, recombinant plasmids were constructed which contained the full length cDNA clone of Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccine strain SA14-14-2 with its premembrane (PreM) and envelope (E) genes replaced by the counterparts of dengue virus type 4 (DENV4). By transfecting the in vitro transcription products of the recombinant plasmids into BHK-21 cells, a chimeric virus JEV/DENV4 was successfully recovered. The chimeric virus was identified by complete genome sequencing, Western blot and immunofluorescent staining. Growth characteristics revealed it was well adapted to primary hamster kidney (PHK) cells. Its genetic stability was investigated and only one unintentional mutation in 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) was found after 20 passages in PHK cells. Neurotropism, neurovirulence and immunogenicity of the chimeric virus were tested in mice. Besides, the influence of JE vaccine pre-immunization on the neutralizing antibody level induced by the chimeric virus was illuminated. To our knowledge, this is the first chimeric virus incorporating the JE vaccine stain SA14-14-2 and DENV4. It is probably a potential candidate to compose a tetravalent dengue chimeric vaccine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Recruitment of SHP-1 protein tyrosine phosphatase and signalling by a chimeric T-cell receptor-killer inhibitory receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, M D; Geisler, C

    2000-01-01

    Receptors expressing the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) in their cytoplasmic tail play an important role in the negative regulation of natural killer and B-cell activation. A subpopulation of T cells expresses the ITIM containing killer cell inhibitory receptor (KIR), which...... recognize MHC class I molecules. Following coligation of KIR with an activating receptor, the tyrosine in the ITIM is phosphorylated and the cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 is recruited to the ITIM via its SH2 domains. It is still not clear how SHP-1 affects T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling....... In this study, we constructed a chimeric TCR-KIR receptor. We demonstrated that SHP-1 is recruited to the chimeric TCR-KIR receptor following T-cell stimulation with either anti-TCR monoclonal antibody (MoAb) or superantigen. However, in spite of this we could not detect any effect of SHP-1 on TCR signalling...

  4. Authentic display of a cholera toxin epitope by chimeric type 1 fimbriae: effects of insert position and host background

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stentebjerg-Olesen, B; Pallesen, L; Jensen, LB

    1997-01-01

    The potential of the major structural protein of type 1 fimbriae as a display system for heterologous sequences was tested. As a reporter-epitope, a heterologous sequence mimicking a neutralizing epitope of the cholera toxin B chain was inserted, in one or two copies, into four different positions...... in the fimA gene. This was carried out by introduction of new restriction sites by PCR-mediated site-directed mutagenesis of fimA in positions predicted to correspond to optimally surface-located regions of the subunit protein. Subsequently, the synthetic cholera-toxin-encoding DNA segment was inserted....... Several of the chosen positions seemed amenable even for large foreign inserts; the chimeric proteins were exposed on the bacterial surface and the cholera toxin epitope was authentically displayed, i.e. it was recognized on bacteria by specific antiserum. Display of chimeric fimbriae was tested...

  5. Chimeric FimH adhesin of type 1 fimbriae: a bacterial surface display system for heterologous sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, L; Poulsen, LK; Christiansen, Gunna

    1995-01-01

    of heterologous DNA segments encoding two reporter sequences. In the selected positions such insertions did not significantly alter the function of the FimH protein with regard to surface location and adhesive ability. The system seemed to be quite flexible, since chimeric versions of the FimH adhesin containing......The FimH adhesin of type 1 fimbriae has been tested as a display system for heterologous protein segments on the surface of Escherichia coli. This was carried out by introduction of restriction site handles (BglII sites) in two different positions in the fimH gene, followed by in-frame insertion...... as many as 56 foreign amino acids were transported to the bacterial surface as components of the fimbrial organelles. Furthermore, the foreign protein segments were recognized by insert-specific antibodies when expressed within chimeric proteins on the surface of the bacteria. The results from...

  6. Comparison of human papillomavirus type 16 L1 chimeric virus-like particles versus L1/L2 chimeric virus-like particles in tumor prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Mark T; Da Silva, Diane M; Potkul, Ronald K; Kast, W Martin

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric human papillomavirus (HPV) virus-like particles (cVLPs) with the HPV16 E7 antigen fused to either the major capsid protein, L1, or the minor capsid protein, L2, have been used independently to protect against the formation of HPV-induced tumors in animal models. However, the advantages and disadvantages of both types of particles with respect to production and vaccine efficacy have never been analyzed. Therefore, in this study, we compared cVLPs with the HPV16 E7 antigen fused to L1 versus cVLPs with E7 fused to L2 with respect to their ability to protect mice from tumor challenge. The first 57 amino acids of E7 were used to overcome the size limitation and limited VLP production imposed by inserting polypeptides into L1 cVLPs. C57BL/6 mice were immunized with the above cVLPs at various doses. Tumor challenge was then performed with HPV16 E7-positive TC-1 cells. HPV16 L1-E7((1-57)) was superior to HPV16 L1/L2-E7((1-57)) in eliciting tumor protection at equivalent doses, although both types of particles were able to protect mice. Both cVLPs induced a specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response to the H2-D(b)-restricted E7 peptide (E7(49-57)) as determined by an ELISPOT assay and tetramer staining; however, immunization with the L1-E7((1-57)) cVLPs resulted in twofold higher CTL precursor frequencies. Our results demonstrate that cVLPs with the antigen fused to L1 are a more efficient vaccine with respect to tumor prevention than cVLPs with the antigen fused to L2. At the same time, however, L1 cVLPs are limited by the size of the antigen that can be incorporated and in the amount of cVLP that can be obtained from cultures when compared to L1/L2 cVLPs. This balances out their superior ability to induce protective immunity. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  7. Advanced error diagnostics of the CMAQ and Chimere modelling systems within the AQMEII3 model evaluation framework

    OpenAIRE

    E. Solazzo; C. Hogrefe; A. Colette; M. Garcia-Vivanco; M. Garcia-Vivanco; S. Galmarini

    2017-01-01

    The work here complements the overview analysis of the modelling systems participating in the third phase of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII3) by focusing on the performance for hourly surface ozone by two modelling systems, Chimere for Europe and CMAQ for North America. The evaluation strategy outlined in the course of the three phases of the AQMEII activity, aimed to build up a diagnostic methodology for model evaluation, is pursued her...

  8. Engineered chimeric peptides with antimicrobial and titanium-binding functions to inhibit biofilm formation on Ti implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Hongjuan; Yuan, Yang; Adayi, Aidina; Zhang, Xu; Song, Xin; Gong, Lei; Zhang, Xi; Gao, Ping

    2018-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) implants have been commonly used in oral medicine. However, despite their widespread clinical application, these implants are susceptible to failure induced by microbial infection due to bacterial biofilm formation. Immobilization of chimeric peptides with antibacterial properties on the Ti surface may be a promising antimicrobial approach to inhibit biofilm formation. Here, chimeric peptides were designed by connecting three sequences (hBD-3-1/2/3) derived from human β-defensin-3 (hBD-3) with Ti-binding peptide-l (TBP-l: RKLPDAGPMHTW) via a triple glycine (G) linker to modify Ti surfaces. Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), the properties of individual domains of the chimeric peptides were evaluated for their binding activity toward the Ti surface. The antimicrobial and anti-biofilm efficacy of the peptides against initial settlers, Streptococcus oralis (S. oralis), Streptococcus gordonii (S. gordonii) and Streptococcus sanguinis (S. sanguinis), was evaluated with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) were used to study cell membrane changes and the underlying antimicrobial mechanism. Compared with the other two peptides, TBP-1-GGG-hBD3-3 presented stronger antibacterial activity and remained stable in saliva and serum. Therefore, it was chosen as the best candidate to modify Ti surfaces in this study. This peptide inhibited the growth of initial streptococci and biofilm formation on Ti surfaces with no cytotoxicity to MC3T3-E1 cells. Disruption of the integrity of bacterial membranes and decreased expression of adhesion protein genes from S. gordonii revealed aspects of the antibacterial mechanism of TBP-1-GGG-hBD3-3. We conclude that engineered chimeric peptides with antimicrobial activity provide a potential solution for inhibiting biofilm formation on Ti surfaces to reduce or prevent the occurrence of peri

  9. Cellular and humoral immune responses to chimeric EGFP-pseudocapsids derived from the mouse polyomavirus after their intranasal administration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frič, Jan; Marek, M.; Hrušková, V.; Holáň, Vladimír; Forstová, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 26 (2008), s. 3242-3251 ISSN 0264-410X R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0506; GA MŠk LC545 Grant - others:GA Mšk(CZ) 1M0508 Program:1M Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : mouse polyomavirus pseudocapsids * chimeric VLPs * antigen carrier and adjuvant Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.298, year: 2008

  10. Immunotherapy of acute leukemia by chimeric antigen receptor-modified lymphocytes using an improved Sleeping Beauty transposon platform

    OpenAIRE

    Magnani, Chiara F.; Turazzi, Nice; Benedicenti, Fabrizio; Calabria, Andrea; Tenderini, Erika; Tettamanti, Sarah; Attianese, Greta M.P. Giordano; Cooper, Laurence J.N.; Aiuti, Alessandro; Montini, Eugenio; Biondi, Andrea; Biagi, Ettore

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T-cell adoptive immunotherapy is a remarkable therapeutic option proven effective in the treatment of hematological malignancies. In order to optimize cell manufacturing, we sought to develop a novel clinical-grade protocol to obtain CAR-modified cytokine-induced killer cells (CIKs) using the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system. Administration of irradiated PBMCs overcame cell death of stimulating cells induced by non-viral transfection, enabling ro...

  11. Lym-1 Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells Exhibit Potent Anti-Tumor Effects against B-Cell Lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Long Zheng; Peisheng Hu; Brandon Wolfe; Caryn Gonsalves; Luqing Ren; Leslie A. Khawli; Harvey R. Kaslow; Alan L. Epstein

    2017-01-01

    T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) recognizing CD19 epitopes have produced remarkable anti-tumor effects in patients with B-cell malignancies. However, cancer cells lacking recognized epitopes can emerge, leading to relapse and death. Thus, CAR T cells targeting different epitopes on different antigens could improve immunotherapy. The Lym-1 antibody targets a conformational epitope of Human Leukocyte Antigen-antigen D Related (HLA-DR) on the surface of human B-cell lymphomas...

  12. Origin of the nucleus and Ran-dependent transport to safeguard ribosome biogenesis in a chimeric cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jékely Gáspár

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The origin of the nucleus is a central problem about the origin of eukaryotes. The common ancestry of nuclear pore complexes (NPC and vesicle coating complexes indicates that the nucleus evolved via the modification of a pre-existing endomembrane system. Such an autogenous scenario is cell biologically feasible, but it is not clear what were the selective or neutral mechanisms that had led to the origin of the nuclear compartment. Results A key selective force during the autogenous origin of the nucleus could have been the need to segregate ribosome factories from the cytoplasm where ribosomal proteins (RPs of the protomitochondrium were synthesized. After its uptake by an anuclear cell the protomitochondrium transferred several of its RP genes to the host genome. Alphaproteobacterial RPs and archaebacterial-type host ribosomes were consequently synthesized in the same cytoplasm. This could have led to the formation of chimeric ribosomes. I propose that the nucleus evolved when the host cell compartmentalised its ribosome factories and the tightly linked genome to reduce ribosome chimerism. This was achieved in successive stages by first evolving karyopherin and RanGTP dependent chaperoning of RPs, followed by the evolution of a membrane network to serve as a diffusion barrier, and finally a hydrogel sieve to ensure selective permeability at nuclear pores. Computer simulations show that a gradual segregation of cytoplasm and nucleoplasm via these steps can progressively reduce ribosome chimerism. Conclusion Ribosome chimerism can provide a direct link between the selective forces for and the mechanisms of evolving nuclear transport and compartmentalisation. The detailed molecular scenario presented here provides a solution to the gradual evolution of nuclear compartmentalization from an anuclear stage. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Eugene V Koonin, Martijn Huynen, Anthony M. Poole and Patrick Forterre.

  13. Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells for the treatment of solid tumors: Defining the challenges and next steps☆

    OpenAIRE

    Beatty, Gregory L.; O’Hara, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy has shown promise in CD19 expressing hematologic malignancies, but how to translate this success to solid malignancies remains elusive. Effective translation of CAR T cells to solid tumors will require an understanding of potential therapeutic barriers, including factors that regulate CAR T cells expansion, persistence, trafficking, and fate within tumors. Herein, we describe the current state of CAR T cells in solid tumors; define key barriers t...

  14. Thermostability of Multidomain Proteins: Elongation Factors EF-Tu from Escherichia coli and Bacillus stearothermophilus and Their Chimeric Forms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šanderová, Hana; Hůlková, Marta; Maloň, Petr; Kepková, M.; Jonák, Jiří

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 1 (2004), s. 89-99 ISSN 0961-8368 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IPP1050128; GA ČR GA204/98/0863; GA ČR GA303/02/0689 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905; CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : elongation factor EF-Tu, thermostability, chimeric protein Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.116, year: 2004

  15. Acute HBV infection in humanized chimeric mice has multiphasic viral kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Yuji; Chung, Tje Lin; Imamura, Michio; Hiraga, Nobuhiko; Sen, Suranjana; Yokomichi, Hiroshi; Tateno, Chise; Canini, Laetitia; Perelson, Alan S; Uprichard, Susan L; Dahari, Harel; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2018-03-23

    Chimeric uPA/SCID mice reconstituted with humanized livers are useful for studying HBV infection in the absence of an adaptive immune response. However, the detailed characterization of HBV infection kinetics necessary to enable in-depth mechanistic studies in this novel in vivo HBV infection model is lacking. To characterize HBV kinetics post-inoculation (p.i.) to steady state, 42 mice were inoculated with HBV. Serum HBV DNA was frequently measured from 1 minute to 63 days p.i. Total intrahepatic HBV DNA, HBV cccDNA, and HBV RNA was measured in a subset of mice at 2, 4, 6, 10, and 13 weeks p.i. HBV half-life (t 1/2 ) was estimated using a linear mixed-effects model. During the first 6 h p.i. serum HBV declined in repopulated uPA/SCID mice with a t 1/2 =62 min [95%CI=59-67min]. Thereafter, viral decline slowed followed by a 2 day lower plateau. Subsequent viral amplification was multiphasic with an initial mean doubling time of t 2 =8±3 h followed by an interim plateau before prolonged amplification (t 2 =2±0.5 days) to a final HBV steady state of 9.3±0.3 log copies/ml. Serum HBV and intrahepatic HBV DNA were positively correlated (R 2 =0.98). HBV infection in uPA/SCID chimeric mice is highly dynamic despite the absence of an adaptive immune response. The serum HBV t 1/2 in humanized uPA/SCID mice was estimated to be ∼1 h regardless of inoculum size. The HBV acute infection kinetics presented here is an important step in characterizing this experimental model system so that it can be effectively used to elucidate the dynamics of the HBV lifecycle and thus possibly reveal effective antiviral drug targets. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  16. Chimeric L2-Based Virus-Like Particle (VLP Vaccines Targeting Cutaneous Human Papillomaviruses (HPV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Huber

    Full Text Available Common cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV types induce skin warts, whereas species beta HPV are implicated, together with UV-radiation, in the development of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC in immunosuppressed patients. Licensed HPV vaccines contain virus-like particles (VLP self-assembled from L1 major capsid proteins that provide type-restricted protection against mucosal HPV infections causing cervical and other ano-genital and oro-pharyngeal carcinomas and warts (condylomas, but do not target heterologous HPV. Experimental papillomavirus vaccines have been designed based on L2 minor capsid proteins that contain type-common neutralization epitopes, to broaden protection to heterologous mucosal and cutaneous HPV types. Repetitive display of the HPV16 L2 cross-neutralization epitope RG1 (amino acids (aa 17-36 on the surface of HPV16 L1 VLP has greatly enhanced immunogenicity of the L2 peptide. To more directly target cutaneous HPV, L1 fusion proteins were designed that incorporate the RG1 homolog of beta HPV17, the beta HPV5 L2 peptide aa53-72, or the common cutaneous HPV4 RG1 homolog, inserted into DE surface loops of HPV1, 5, 16 or 18 L1 VLP scaffolds. Baculovirus expressed chimeric proteins self-assembled into VLP and VLP-raised NZW rabbit immune sera were evaluated by ELISA and L1- and L2-based pseudovirion (PsV neutralizing assays, including 12 novel beta PsV types. Chimeric VLP displaying the HPV17 RG1 epitope, but not the HPV5L2 aa53-72 epitope, induced cross-neutralizing humoral immune responses to beta HPV. In vivo cross-protection was evaluated by passive serum transfer in a murine PsV challenge model. Immune sera to HPV16L1-17RG1 VLP (cross- protected against beta HPV5/20/24/38/96/16 (but not type 76, while antisera to HPV5L1-17RG1 VLP cross-protected against HPV20/24/96 only, and sera to HPV1L1-4RG1 VLP cross-protected against HPV4 challenge. In conclusion, RG1-based VLP are promising next generation vaccine candidates to target

  17. Chimeric L2-Based Virus-Like Particle (VLP) Vaccines Targeting Cutaneous Human Papillomaviruses (HPV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Bettina; Schellenbacher, Christina; Shafti-Keramat, Saeed; Jindra, Christoph; Christensen, Neil; Kirnbauer, Reinhard

    2017-01-01

    Common cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV) types induce skin warts, whereas species beta HPV are implicated, together with UV-radiation, in the development of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) in immunosuppressed patients. Licensed HPV vaccines contain virus-like particles (VLP) self-assembled from L1 major capsid proteins that provide type-restricted protection against mucosal HPV infections causing cervical and other ano-genital and oro-pharyngeal carcinomas and warts (condylomas), but do not target heterologous HPV. Experimental papillomavirus vaccines have been designed based on L2 minor capsid proteins that contain type-common neutralization epitopes, to broaden protection to heterologous mucosal and cutaneous HPV types. Repetitive display of the HPV16 L2 cross-neutralization epitope RG1 (amino acids (aa) 17-36) on the surface of HPV16 L1 VLP has greatly enhanced immunogenicity of the L2 peptide. To more directly target cutaneous HPV, L1 fusion proteins were designed that incorporate the RG1 homolog of beta HPV17, the beta HPV5 L2 peptide aa53-72, or the common cutaneous HPV4 RG1 homolog, inserted into DE surface loops of HPV1, 5, 16 or 18 L1 VLP scaffolds. Baculovirus expressed chimeric proteins self-assembled into VLP and VLP-raised NZW rabbit immune sera were evaluated by ELISA and L1- and L2-based pseudovirion (PsV) neutralizing assays, including 12 novel beta PsV types. Chimeric VLP displaying the HPV17 RG1 epitope, but not the HPV5L2 aa53-72 epitope, induced cross-neutralizing humoral immune responses to beta HPV. In vivo cross-protection was evaluated by passive serum transfer in a murine PsV challenge model. Immune sera to HPV16L1-17RG1 VLP (cross-) protected against beta HPV5/20/24/38/96/16 (but not type 76), while antisera to HPV5L1-17RG1 VLP cross-protected against HPV20/24/96 only, and sera to HPV1L1-4RG1 VLP cross-protected against HPV4 challenge. In conclusion, RG1-based VLP are promising next generation vaccine candidates to target cutaneous HPV

  18. FCγ Chimeric Receptor-Engineered T Cells: Methodology, Advantages, Limitations, and Clinical Relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Sconocchia

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available For many years, disappointing results have been generated by many investigations, which have utilized a variety of immunologic strategies to enhance the ability of a patient’s immune system to recognize and eliminate malignant cells. However, in recent years, immunotherapy has been used successfully for the treatment of hematologic and solid malignancies. The impressive clinical responses observed in many types of cancer have convinced even the most skeptical clinical oncologists that a patient’s immune system can recognize and reject his tumor if appropriate strategies are implemented. The success immunotherapy is due to the development of at least three therapeutic strategies. They include tumor-associated antigen (TAA-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs, T cell checkpoint blockade, and TAA-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs T cell-based immunotherapy. However, the full realization of the therapeutic potential of these approaches requires the development of strategies to counteract and overcome some limitations. They include off-target toxicity and mechanisms of cancer immune evasion, which obstacle the successful clinical application of mAbs and CAR T cell-based immunotherapies. Thus, we and others have developed the Fc gamma chimeric receptors (Fcγ-CRs-based strategy. Like CARs, Fcγ-CRs are composed of an intracellular tail resulting from the fusion of a co-stimulatory molecule with the T cell receptor ζ chain. In contrast, the extracellular CAR single-chain variable fragment (scFv, which recognizes the targeted TAA, has been replaced with the extracellular portion of the FcγRIIIA (CD16. Fcγ-CR T cells have a few intriguing features. First, given in combination with mAbs, Fcγ-CR T cells mediate anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo by an antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity mechanism. Second, CD16-CR T cells can target multiple cancer types provided that TAA-specific mAbs with the appropriate specificity are available

  19. DPPC/poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline)-grad-poly(2-phenyl-2-oxazoline) chimeric nanostructures as potential drug nanocarriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pippa, Natassa [Faculty of Pharmacy, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology (Greece); Kaditi, Eleni; Pispas, Stergios [Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute, National Hellenic Research Foundation (Greece); Demetzos, Costas, E-mail: demetzos@pharm.uoa.gr [Faculty of Pharmacy, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology (Greece)

    2013-06-15

    In this study, we report on the self assembly behavior and on stability studies of mixed (chimeric) nanosystems consisting of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline)-grad-poly(2-phenyl-2-oxazoline) (MPOx) gradient copolymer in aqueous media and in fetal bovine serum (FBS). A gamut of light scattering techniques and fluorescence spectroscopy were used in order to extract information on the size and morphological characteristics of the nanoassemblies formed, as a function of gradient block copolymer content, as well as temperature. The hydrodynamic radii (R{sub h}) of nanoassemblies decreased in the process of heating up to 50 Degree-Sign C, while the fractal dimension (d{sub f}) values, also increased. Indomethacin was successfully incorporated into these chimeric nanocarriers. Drug release was depended on the components ratio. The present studies show that there are a number of parameters that can be used in order to alter the properties of chimeric nanosystems, and this is advantageous to the development of 'smart' nanocarriers for drug delivery.

  20. A modified free chimeric osteocutaneous fibular flap design for head and neck reconstruction: experience on a series of 10 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roan, Tyng-Luen; Chen, Chien-Chang; Yu, Yen-Chen; Hsieh, Jung-Hsien; Horng, Shyue-Yih; Tai, Hao-Chih; Cheng, Nai-Chen; Chien, Hsiung-Fei; Tang, Yueh-Bih

    2013-09-01

    We have previously described a modified chimeric fibular osteocutaneous flap design based on a combination of a traditional fibular flap and a peroneal artery perforator fasciocutaneous flap for mandible and adjacent soft tissue reconstruction. The purpose of this article is to share our experience with a larger case series utilizing this new technique for mandible and adjacent soft tissue reconstruction after cancer wide excision surgery and a more detailed description on these flaps harvesting procedures. Ten patients (age range from 32 to 63 years), who had segmental defect of mandible and adjacent soft tissue defect after cancer wide excision surgery, received mandible and adjacent soft tissue reconstruction based on the modified chimeric fibular flap design. The skin paddle based on peroneal perforators ranged from 9 cm × 3.5 cm to 10 cm × 10 cm and the mean pedicle length was 8.9 cm. Four patients underwent primary closure of the donor site. Three flap salvage procedures were performed due to vascular thrombosis and all flaps survived well. Nine patients had acceptable outer appearance, and one patient complained of cheek sunken. All patients had at least 3-cm interincisor distance during a mean of 12-month follow-up period. The modified chimeric osteocutaneous fibula flaps were feasible design with few intermuscular septum problems during bone fixation. Furthermore, it provided larger skin paddles with few restrictions to reconstruct the cheek skin defect. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Functional participation of a nifH-arsA2 chimeric fusion gene in arsenic reduction by Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahiri, Surobhi; Pulakat, Lakshmi; Gavini, Nara

    2008-01-01

    The NifH (dimer) and ArsA proteins are structural homologs and share common motifs like nucleotide-binding domains, signal transduction domains and also possible similar metal center ligands. Given the similarity between two proteins, we investigated if the NifH protein from Azotobacter vinelandii could functionally substitute for the ArsA1 half of the ArsA protein of Escherichia coli. The chimeric NifH-ArsA2 protein was expressed and detected in the E. coli strain by Western blotting. Growth comparisons of E. coli strains containing plasmids encoding for complete ArsA, partial ArsA (ArsA2) or chimeric ArsA (NifH-ArsA2) in media with increasing sodium arsenite concentrations (0-5 mM) showed that the chimeric NifH-ArsA2 could substitute for the ArsA. This functional complementation demonstrated the strong conservation of essential domains that have been maintained in NifH and ArsA even after their divergence to perform varied functions

  2. DPPC/poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline)-grad-poly(2-phenyl-2-oxazoline) chimeric nanostructures as potential drug nanocarriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pippa, Natassa; Kaditi, Eleni; Pispas, Stergios; Demetzos, Costas

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we report on the self assembly behavior and on stability studies of mixed (chimeric) nanosystems consisting of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline)-grad-poly(2-phenyl-2-oxazoline) (MPOx) gradient copolymer in aqueous media and in fetal bovine serum (FBS). A gamut of light scattering techniques and fluorescence spectroscopy were used in order to extract information on the size and morphological characteristics of the nanoassemblies formed, as a function of gradient block copolymer content, as well as temperature. The hydrodynamic radii (R h ) of nanoassemblies decreased in the process of heating up to 50 °C, while the fractal dimension (d f ) values, also increased. Indomethacin was successfully incorporated into these chimeric nanocarriers. Drug release was depended on the components ratio. The present studies show that there are a number of parameters that can be used in order to alter the properties of chimeric nanosystems, and this is advantageous to the development of “smart” nanocarriers for drug delivery.

  3. Nanobody-based chimeric receptor gene integration in Jurkat cells mediated by PhiC31 integrase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iri-Sofla, Farnoush Jafari [Department of Medical Biotechnology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh, E-mail: rahbarif@modares.ac.ir [Department of Medical Biotechnology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ahmadvand, Davoud [Center of Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology, Department of Pharmaceutics and Analytical Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 2, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark); Rasaee, Mohammad J. [Department of Medical Biotechnology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-11-01

    The crucial role of T lymphocytes in anti-tumor immunity has led to the development of novel strategies that can target and activate T cells against tumor cells. Recombinant DNA technology has been used to generate non-MHC-restricted chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). Here, we constructed a panel of recombinant CAR that harbors the anti-MUC1 nanobody and the signaling and co-signaling moieties (CD3{zeta}/CD28) with different spacer regions derived from human IgG3 with one or two repeats of the hinge sequence or the hinge region of Fc{gamma}RII. The PhiC31 integrase system was employed to investigate if the recombination efficiency could be recruited for high and stable expression of T cell chimeric receptor genes. The effect of nuclear localization signal (NLS) and two different promoters (CMV and CAG) on efficacy of PhiC31 integrase in human T cell lines was evaluated. The presence of integrase in combination with NLS, mediated up to 7.6 and 8.5 fold increases in CAR expression in ZCHN-attB and ZCHHN-attB cassette integrated T cells, respectively. Our results showed that highly efficient and stable transduction of the Jurkat cell line by PhiC31 integrase is a feasible modality for generating anti-cancer chimeric T cells for use in cancer immunotherapy.

  4. Nanobody-based chimeric receptor gene integration in Jurkat cells mediated by PhiC31 integrase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iri-Sofla, Farnoush Jafari; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Ahmadvand, Davoud; Rasaee, Mohammad J.

    2011-01-01

    The crucial role of T lymphocytes in anti-tumor immunity has led to the development of novel strategies that can target and activate T cells against tumor cells. Recombinant DNA technology has been used to generate non-MHC-restricted chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). Here, we constructed a panel of recombinant CAR that harbors the anti-MUC1 nanobody and the signaling and co-signaling moieties (CD3ζ/CD28) with different spacer regions derived from human IgG3 with one or two repeats of the hinge sequence or the hinge region of FcγRII. The PhiC31 integrase system was employed to investigate if the recombination efficiency could be recruited for high and stable expression of T cell chimeric receptor genes. The effect of nuclear localization signal (NLS) and two different promoters (CMV and CAG) on efficacy of PhiC31 integrase in human T cell lines was evaluated. The presence of integrase in combination with NLS, mediated up to 7.6 and 8.5 fold increases in CAR expression in ZCHN-attB and ZCHHN-attB cassette integrated T cells, respectively. Our results showed that highly efficient and stable transduction of the Jurkat cell line by PhiC31 integrase is a feasible modality for generating anti-cancer chimeric T cells for use in cancer immunotherapy.

  5. Use of homologous recombination in yeast to create chimeric bovine viral diarrhea virus cDNA clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Arenhart

    Full Text Available Abstract The open reading frame of a Brazilian bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV strain, IBSP4ncp, was recombined with the untranslated regions of the reference NADL strain by homologous recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, resulting in chimeric full-length cDNA clones of BVDV (chi-NADL/IBSP4ncp#2 and chi-NADL/IBSP4ncp#3. The recombinant clones were successfully recovered, resulting in viable viruses, having the kinetics of replication, focus size, and morphology similar to those of the parental virus, IBSP4ncp. In addition, the chimeric viruses remained stable for at least 10 passages in cell culture, maintaining their replication efficiency unaltered. Nucleotide sequencing revealed a few point mutations; nevertheless, the phenotype of the rescued viruses was nearly identical to that of the parental virus in all experiments. Thus, genetic stability of the chimeric clones and their phenotypic similarity to the parental virus confirm the ability of the yeast-based homologous recombination to maintain characteristics of the parental virus from which the recombinant viruses were derived. The data also support possible use of the yeast system for the manipulation of the BVDV genome.

  6. Development of mPMab-1, a Mouse-Rat Chimeric Antibody Against Mouse Podoplanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shinji; Kaneko, Mika K; Nakamura, Takuro; Ichii, Osamu; Konnai, Satoru; Kato, Yukinari

    2017-04-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN), the ligand of C-type lectin-like receptor-2, is used as a lymphatic endothelial marker. We previously established clone PMab-1 of rat IgG 2a as a specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) against mouse PDPN. PMab-1 is also very sensitive in immunohistochemical analysis; however, rat mAbs seem to be unfavorable for pathologists because anti-mouse IgG and anti-rabbit IgG are usually used as secondary antibodies in commercially available kits for immunohistochemical analysis. In this study, we develop a mouse-rat chimeric antibody, mPMab-1 of mouse IgG 2a , which was derived from rat PMab-1 mAb. Immunohistochemical analysis shows that mPMab-1 detects podocytes of the kidney, lymphatic endothelial cells of the colon, and type I alveolar cells of the lung. Importantly, mPMab-1 is more sensitive than PMab-1. This conversion strategy from rat mAb to mouse mAb could be applicable to other mAbs.

  7. Interleukin 18 secretion and its effect in improving Chimeric Antigen Receptors efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Kun

    Clinical trials have shown that chimeric antigen receptor T cells modified to target cancer cells expressing a surface antigen found on immature B-cells. The purpose of this experiment is to take a pro-inflammatory cytokine, and analyze its effect in improving the efficiency of the T cells. IL-18 has been previously shown to recruit T cells to the tumor site and improve their secretion of cytotoxic cytokines. A human model of the proposed armored T cell has been created and has shown success in combating cancer cells in vitro. The next step is to design and produce a murine model to test in vivo in immunocompetent mice. This research project aimed to create two models: one utilizing 2A peptides and another utilizing IRES elements as a multicistronic vector. Both models would require the insertion of the desired genes into SFG backbones. IRES, a DNA element which acts as a binding site for the transcriptional machinery to recognize which part of the DNA to transcribe, commonly found in bicistronic vectors, is large with 500-600 base pairs, and has a lower transgene expression rate. P2A is smaller, only consisting of about 20 amino acids, and typically has a higher transgene expression rate, which may or may not result in higher effectiveness of the model. I would like to thank Dr. Renier Brentjens for being a mentor who cared about giving his interns as much educational value as possible.

  8. Clinically compliant spatial and temporal imaging of chimeric antigen receptor T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami-Shahri, Nia; Foster, Julie; Kashani, Roxana; Gazinska, Patrycja; Cook, Celia; Sosabowski, Jane; Maher, John; Papa, Sophie

    2018-03-14

    The unprecedented efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell immunotherapy of CD19 + B-cell malignancy has established a new therapeutic pillar of hematology-oncology. Nonetheless, formidable challenges remain for the attainment of comparable success in patients with solid tumors. To accelerate progress and rapidly characterize emerging toxicities, systems that permit the repeated and non-invasive assessment of CAR T-cell bio-distribution would be invaluable. An ideal solution would entail the use of a non-immunogenic reporter that mediates specific uptake of an inexpensive, non-toxic and clinically established imaging tracer by CAR T cells. Here we show the utility of the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) for the temporal and spatial monitoring of CAR T-cell behavior in a cancer-bearing host. This system provides a clinically compliant toolkit for high-resolution serial imaging of CAR T cells in vivo, addressing a fundamental unmet need for future clinical development in the field.

  9. Creation of chimeric human/rabbit APOBEC1 with HIV-1 restriction and DNA mutation activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Terumasa; Ong, Eugene Boon Beng; Watanabe, Nobumoto; Sakaguchi, Nobuo; Maeda, Kazuhiko; Koito, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    APOBEC1 (A1) proteins from lagomorphs and rodents have deaminase-dependent restriction activity against HIV-1, whereas human A1 exerts a negligible effect. To investigate these differences in the restriction of HIV-1 by A1 proteins, a series of chimeric proteins combining rabbit and human A1s was constructed. Homology models of the A1s indicated that their activities derive from functional domains that likely act in tandem through a dimeric interface. The C-terminal region containing the leucine-rich motif and the dimerization domains of rabbit A1 is important for its anti-HIV-1 activity. The A1 chimeras with strong anti-HIV-1 activity were incorporated into virions more efficiently than those without anti-HIV-1 activity, and exhibited potent DNA-mutator activity. Therefore, the C-terminal region of rabbit A1 is involved in both its packaging into the HIV-1 virion and its deamination activity against both viral cDNA and genomic RNA. This study identifies the novel molecular mechanism underlying the target specificity of A1.

  10. Therapeutically Targeting the Inflammasome Product in a Chimeric Model of Endometriosis-Related Surgical Adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocks, Meredith M; Crispens, Marta A; Ding, Tianbing; Mokshagundam, Shilpa; Bruner-Tran, Kaylon L; Osteen, Kevin G

    2017-08-01

    Development of adhesions commonly occurs in association with surgery for endometriosis. Even in the absence of surgery, women with endometriosis appear to be at an enhanced risk of developing adhesions. In the current study, we utilized a chimeric mouse model of experimental endometriosis in order to examine the role of inflammasome activation in the development of postsurgical adhesions. Mice were randomized to receive peritoneal injections of human endometrial tissue fragments or endometrial tissue conditioned media (CM) from women with or without endometriosis 16 hours after ovariectomy and placement of an estradiol-releasing silastic capsule. A subset of mice receiving CM was also treated with interleukin (IL) 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra). Our studies demonstrate that peritoneal injection of endometrial tissue fragments near the time of surgery resulted in extensive adhesive disease regardless of tissue origin. However, adhesion scores were significantly higher in mice receiving CM from tissues acquired from patients with endometriosis compared to control tissue CM ( P = .0001). Cytokine bead array analysis of endometrial CM revealed enhanced expression of IL-1β from patients with endometriosis compared to controls ( P endometriosis as a potential causal factor in their increased susceptibility of developing postsurgical adhesions. Thus, targeting inflammasome activation may be an effective strategy for the prevention of surgical adhesions in patients with endometriosis.

  11. Plant-derived chimeric virus particles for the diagnosis of primary Sjögren syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa eTinazzi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Plants are ideal for the production of protein-based nanomaterials because they synthesize and assemble complex multimeric proteins that cannot be expressed efficiently using other platforms. Plant viruses can be thought of as self-replicating proteinaceous nanomaterials generally stable and easily produced in high titers. We used Potato virus X (PVX chimeric virus particles (CVPs and Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV empty virus-like particles (eVLPs to display a linear peptide (lipo derived from human lipocalin , which is immunodominant in Sjögren’s syndrome (SjS and is thus recognized by autoantibodies in SjS patient serum. These virus-derived nanoparticles (VNPs were thus used to develop a diagnostic assay for SjS based on a direct enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA format. We found that PVX-lipo formulations were more sensitive than the chemically synthesized immunodominant peptide and equally specific when used to distinguish between healthy individuals and SjS patients. Our novel assay therefore allows the diagnosis of SjS using a simple, low-invasive serum test, contrasting with the invasive labial biopsy required for current tests. Our results demonstrate that nanomaterials based on plant viruses can be used as diagnostic reagents for SjS, and could also be developed for the diagnosis of other diseases.

  12. Chimeric Mice with Competent Hematopoietic Immunity Reproduce Key Features of Severe Lassa Fever.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Oestereich

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Lassa fever (LASF is a highly severe viral syndrome endemic to West African countries. Despite the annual high morbidity and mortality caused by LASF, very little is known about the pathophysiology of the disease. Basic research on LASF has been precluded due to the lack of relevant small animal models that reproduce the human disease. Immunocompetent laboratory mice are resistant to infection with Lassa virus (LASV and, to date, only immunodeficient mice, or mice expressing human HLA, have shown some degree of susceptibility to experimental infection. Here, transplantation of wild-type bone marrow cells into irradiated type I interferon receptor knockout mice (IFNAR-/- was used to generate chimeric mice that reproduced important features of severe LASF in humans. This included high lethality, liver damage, vascular leakage and systemic virus dissemination. In addition, this model indicated that T cell-mediated immunopathology was an important component of LASF pathogenesis that was directly correlated with vascular leakage. Our strategy allows easy generation of a suitable small animal model to test new vaccines and antivirals and to dissect the basic components of LASF pathophysiology.

  13. Subalpine Pyrenees received higher nitrogen deposition than predicted by EMEP and CHIMERE chemistry-transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Marion; Lamaze, Thierry; Couvidat, Florian; Pornon, André

    2015-08-01

    Deposition of reactive nitrogen (N) from the atmosphere is expected to be the third greatest driver of biodiversity loss by the year 2100. Chemistry-transport models are essential tools to estimate spatially explicit N deposition but the reliability of their predictions remained to be validated in mountains. We measured N deposition and air concentration over the subalpine Pyrenees. N deposition was found to range from 797 to 1,463 mg N m-2 year-1. These values were higher than expected from model predictions, especially for nitrate, which exceeded the estimations of EMEP by a factor of 2.6 and CHIMERE by 3.6. Our observations also displayed a reversed reduced-to-oxidized ratio in N deposition compared with model predictions. The results highlight that the subalpine Pyrenees are exposed to higher levels of N deposition than expected according to standard predictions and that these levels exceed currently recognized critical loads for most high-elevation habitats. Our study reveals a need to improve the evaluation of N deposition in mountains which are home to a substantial and original part of the world’s biodiversity.

  14. Engineering Synthetic Signaling Pathways with Programmable dCas9-Based Chimeric Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni A. Baeumler

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic receptors provide a powerful experimental tool for generation of designer cells capable of monitoring the environment, sensing specific input signals, and executing diverse custom response programs. To advance the promise of cellular engineering, we have developed a class of chimeric receptors that integrate a highly programmable and portable nuclease-deficient CRISPR/Cas9 (dCas9 signal transduction module. We demonstrate that the core dCas9 synthetic receptor (dCas9-synR architecture can be readily adapted to various classes of native ectodomain scaffolds, linking their natural inputs with orthogonal output functions. Importantly, these receptors achieved stringent OFF/ON state transition characteristics, showed agonist-mediated dose-dependent activation, and could be programmed to couple specific disease markers with diverse, therapeutically relevant multi-gene expression circuits. The modular dCas9-synR platform developed here provides a generalizable blueprint for designing next generations of synthetic receptors, which will enable the implementation of highly complex combinatorial functions in cellular engineering.

  15. Structure-based design of chimeric antigens for multivalent protein vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingshead, S; Jongerius, I; Exley, R M; Johnson, S; Lea, S M; Tang, C M

    2018-03-13

    There is an urgent need to develop vaccines against pathogenic bacteria. However, this is often hindered by antigenic diversity and difficulties encountered manufacturing membrane proteins. Here we show how to use structure-based design to develop chimeric antigens (ChAs) for subunit vaccines. ChAs are generated against serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis (MenB), the predominant cause of meningococcal disease in wealthy countries. MenB ChAs exploit factor H binding protein (fHbp) as a molecular scaffold to display the immunogenic VR2 epitope from the integral membrane protein PorA. Structural analyses demonstrate fHbp is correctly folded and the PorA VR2 epitope adopts an immunogenic conformation. In mice, immunisation with ChAs generates fHbp and PorA antibodies that recognise the antigens expressed by clinical MenB isolates; these antibody responses correlate with protection against meningococcal disease. Application of ChAs is therefore a potentially powerful approach to develop multivalent subunit vaccines, which can be tailored to circumvent pathogen diversity.

  16. Plant-Derived Chimeric Virus Particles for the Diagnosis of Primary Sjögren Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinazzi, Elisa; Merlin, Matilde; Bason, Caterina; Beri, Ruggero; Zampieri, Roberta; Lico, Chiara; Bartoloni, Elena; Puccetti, Antonio; Lunardi, Claudio; Pezzotti, Mario; Avesani, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Plants are ideal for the production of protein-based nanomaterials because they synthesize and assemble complex multimeric proteins that cannot be expressed efficiently using other platforms. Plant viruses can be thought of as self-replicating proteinaceous nanomaterials generally stable and easily produced in high titers. We used Potato virus X (PVX), chimeric virus particles, and Cowpea mosaic virus, empty virus-like particles to display a linear peptide (lipo) derived from human lipocalin, which is immunodominant in Sjögren's syndrome (SjS) and is thus recognized by autoantibodies in SjS patient serum. These virus-derived nanoparticles were thus used to develop a diagnostic assay for SjS based on a direct enzyme linked immunosorbent assay format. We found that PVX-lipo formulations were more sensitive than the chemically synthesized immunodominant peptide and equally specific when used to distinguish between healthy individuals and SjS patients. Our novel assay therefore allows the diagnosis of SjS using a simple, low-invasive serum test, contrasting with the invasive labial biopsy required for current tests. Our results demonstrate that nanomaterials based on plant viruses can be used as diagnostic reagents for SjS, and could also be developed for the diagnosis of other diseases.

  17. Chimeric Avidin--NMR structure and dynamics of a 56 kDa homotetrameric thermostable protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Tossavainen

    Full Text Available Chimeric avidin (ChiAVD is a product of rational protein engineering remarkably resistant to heat and harsh conditions. In quest of the fundamentals behind factors affecting stability we have elucidated the solution NMR spectroscopic structure of the biotin-bound form of ChiAVD and characterized the protein dynamics through 15N relaxation and hydrogen/deuterium (H/D exchange of this and the biotin-free form. To surmount the challenges arising from the very large size of the protein for NMR spectroscopy, we took advantage of its high thermostability. Conventional triple resonance experiments for fully protonated proteins combined with methyl-detection optimized experiments acquired at 58°C were adequate for the structure determination of this 56 kDa protein. The model-free parameters derived from the 15N relaxation data reveal a remarkably rigid protein at 58°C in both the biotin-bound and the free forms. The H/D exchange experiments indicate a notable increase in hydrogen protection upon biotin binding.

  18. Reproductive mode and ovarian morphology regulation in chimeric planarians composed of asexual and sexual neoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodono, Hanae; Matsumoto, Midori

    2012-07-01

    Planarians are comprised of populations with different reproductive strategies: exclusively innately asexual (AS), exclusively innately sexual (InS), and seasonally switching. AS worms can be sexualized experimentally by feeding them with minced InS worms, and the resultant worms are characterized as acquired sexual (AqS). Differences between InS and AqS worms are expected to provide important clues to the poorly understood mechanism underlying the regulation of their reproductive mode. Morphological differences were found between InS and AqS worm ovaries, and we showed that the pluripotent stem cells (neoblasts) from InS worms, but not those of AqS worms, have the capacity to initiate the sexual state autonomously via neoblast fraction transplantation. To compare their reproductive mode and ovarian morphology regulation, InS donor neoblast fractions were transplanted into non-lethally X-ray-irradiated AS recipients. All transplants showed stable chimerism and reproduced sexually, suggesting that InS worm neoblasts can initiate sexual state autonomously, even when coexisting with AS worm neoblasts. The chimeras formed extraordinarily large and supernumerary ovaries equivalent to AqS worms, which were not seen in InS worms, suggesting that regulation of ovarian morphology in AS worm-derived cells in response to endogenous sexualizing stimulation distinctly differs from that of InS worms. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Comparison of predictability for human pharmacokinetics parameters among monkeys, rats, and chimeric mice with humanised liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Maki; Iwasaki, Shinji; Chisaki, Ikumi; Nakagawa, Sayaka; Amano, Nobuyuki; Hirabayashi, Hideki

    2017-12-01

    1. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of chimeric mice with humanised liver (PXB mice) for the prediction of clearance (CL t ) and volume of distribution at steady state (Vd ss ), in comparison with monkeys, which have been reported as a reliable model for human pharmacokinetics (PK) prediction, and with rats, as a conventional PK model. 2. CL t and Vd ss values in PXB mice, monkeys and rats were determined following intravenous administration of 30 compounds known to be mainly eliminated in humans via the hepatic metabolism by various drug-metabolising enzymes. Using single-species allometric scaling, human CL t and Vd ss values were predicted from the three animal models. 3. Predicted CL t values from PXB mice exhibited the highest predictability: 25 for PXB mice, 21 for monkeys and 14 for rats were predicted within a three-fold range of actual values among 30 compounds. For predicted human Vd ss values, the number of compounds falling within a three-fold range was 23 for PXB mice, 24 for monkeys, and 16 for rats among 29 compounds. PXB mice indicated a higher predictability for CL t and Vd ss values than the other animal models. 4. These results demonstrate the utility of PXB mice in predicting human PK parameters.

  20. Chimeric DNA Vaccines against ErbB2{sup +} Carcinomas: From Mice to Humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quaglino, Elena; Riccardo, Federica; Macagno, Marco; Bandini, Silvio; Cojoca, Rodica; Ercole, Elisabetta [Molecular Biotechnology Center, Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin, 10126 Turin (Italy); Amici, Augusto [Department of Molecular Cellular and Animal Biology, University of Camerino, 62032 Camerino (Italy); Cavallo, Federica, E-mail: federica.cavallo@unito.it [2 Department of Molecular Cellular and Animal Biology, University of Camerino, 62032 Camerino (Italy)

    2011-08-10

    DNA vaccination exploits a relatively simple and flexible technique to generate an immune response against microbial and tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). Its effectiveness is enhanced by the application of an electrical shock in the area of plasmid injection (electroporation). In our studies we exploited a sophisticated electroporation device approved for clinical use (Cliniporator, IGEA, Carpi, Italy). As the target antigen is an additional factor that dramatically modulates the efficacy of a vaccine, we selected ErbB2 receptor as a target since it is an ideal oncoantigen. It is overexpressed on the cell membrane by several carcinomas for which it plays an essential role in driving their progression. Most oncoantigens are self-tolerated molecules. To circumvent immune tolerance we generated two plasmids (RHuT and HuRT) coding for chimeric rat/human ErbB2 proteins. Their immunogenicity was compared in wild type mice naturally tolerant for mouse ErbB2, and in transgenic mice that are also tolerant for rat or human ErbB2. In several of these mice, RHuT and HuRT elicited a stronger anti-tumor response than plasmids coding for fully human or fully rat ErbB2. The ability of heterologous moiety to blunt immune tolerance could be exploited to elicit a significant immune response in patients. A clinical trial to delay the recurrence of ErbB2{sup +} carcinomas of the oral cavity, oropharynx and hypopharynx is awaiting the approval of the Italian authorities.

  1. Air quality high resolution simulations of Italian urban areas with WRF-CHIMERE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falasca, Serena; Curci, Gabriele

    2017-04-01

    The new European Directive on ambient air quality and cleaner air for Europe (2008/50/EC) encourages the use of modeling techniques to support the observations in the assessment and forecasting of air quality. The modelling system based on the combination of the WRF meteorological model and the CHIMERE chemistry-transport model is used to perform simulations at high resolution over the main Italian cities (e.g. Milan, Rome). Three domains covering Europe, Italy and the urban areas are nested with a decreasing grid size up to 1 km. Numerical results are produced for a winter month and a summer month of the year 2010 and are validated using ground-based observations (e.g. from the European air quality database AirBase). A sensitivity study is performed using different physics options, domain resolution and grid ratio; different urban parameterization schemes are tested using also characteristic morphology parameters for the cities considered. A spatial reallocation of anthropogenic emissions derived from international (e.g. EMEP, TNO, HTAP) and national (e.g. CTN-ACE) emissions inventories and based on the land cover datasets (Global Land Cover Facility and GlobCover) and the OpenStreetMap tool is also included. Preliminary results indicate that the introduction of the spatial redistribution at high-resolution allows a more realistic reproduction of the distribution of the emission flows and thus the concentrations of the pollutants, with significant advantages especially for the urban environments.

  2. Covalent-display of an active chimeric-recombinant tissue plasminogen activator on polyhydroxybutyrate granules surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafizi, Akram; Malboobi, Mohamad Ali; Jalali-Javaran, Mokhtar; Maliga, Pal; Alizadeh, Houshang

    2017-11-01

    To develop a deliberately engineered expression and purification system for an active chimeric-recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (crtPA) using co-expression with polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) operon genes. Fusion of crtPA with PhaC-synthase simplified the purification steps through crtPA sedimentation with PHB particles. Moreover, the covalently immobilized crtPA was biologically active as shown in a chromogenic assay. Upon WELQut-protease activity, the released single-chain crtPA converted to the two-chain form which produced a pattern of bands with approx. MW of 32 and 11 kDa in addition to the full length crtPA. Fusion of crtPA with PhaC-synthase not only simplifies purification from the bacterial host lysate, but also co-expression of PHB operon genes creates an oxidative environment, thereby reducing the inclusion body formation possibility. The isolated crtPA-PHB granules exhibited crtPA serine protease activity. Thus, fusion with the PhaC protein could be used as a scaffold for covalent displaying of functional disulfide-rich proteins.

  3. Bidirectional transcription of a novel chimeric gene mapping to mouse chromosome Yq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemente Emily J

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The male-specific region of the mouse Y chromosome long arm (MSYq contains three known highly multi-copy X-Y homologous gene families, Ssty1/2, Sly and Asty. Deletions on MSYq lead to teratozoospermia and subfertility or infertility, with a sex ratio skew in the offspring of subfertile MSYqdel males Results We report the highly unusual genomic structure of a novel MSYq locus, Orly, and a diverse set of spermatid-specific transcripts arising from copies of this locus. Orly is composed of partial copies of Ssty1, Asty and Sly arranged in sequence. The Ssty1- and Sly-derived segments are in antisense orientation relative to each other, leading to bi-directional transcription of Orly. Genome search and phylogenetic tree analysis is used to determine the order of events in mouse Yq evolution. We find that Orly is the most recent gene to arise on Yq, and that subsequently there was massive expansion in copy number of all Yq-linked genes. Conclusion Orly has an unprecedented chimeric structure, and generates both "forward" (Orly and "reverse" (Orlyos transcripts arising from the promoters at each end of the locus. The region of overlap of known Orly and Orlyos transcripts is homologous to Sly intron 2. We propose that Orly may be involved in an intragenomic conflict between mouse X and Y chromosomes, and that this process underlies the massive expansion in copy number of the genes on MSYq and their X homologues.

  4. Advancing chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy with CRISPR/Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jiangtao; Zhao, Yangbing

    2017-09-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) system, an RNA-guided DNA targeting technology, is triggering a revolution in the field of biology. CRISPR/Cas9 has demonstrated great potential for genetic manipulation. In this review, we discuss the current development of CRISPR/Cas9 technologies for therapeutic applications, especially chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell-based adoptive immunotherapy. Different methods used to facilitate efficient CRISPR delivery and gene editing in T cells are compared. The potential of genetic manipulation using CRISPR/Cas9 system to generate universal CAR T cells and potent T cells that are resistant to exhaustion and inhibition is explored. We also address the safety concerns associated with the use of CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing and provide potential solutions and future directions of CRISPR application in the field of CAR T cell immunotherapy. As an integration-free gene insertion method, CRISPR/Cas9 holds great promise as an efficient gene knock-in platform. Given the tremendous progress that has been made in the past few years, we believe that the CRISPR/Cas9 technology holds immense promise for advancing immunotherapy.

  5. Chimeric repressor of PtSND2 severely affects wood formation in transgenic Populus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H H; Tang, R J; Liu, H; Chen, H Y; Liu, J Y; Jiang, X N; Zhang, H X

    2013-08-01

    NAC domain transcription factors are important regulators that activate the secondary wall biosynthesis in wood formation. In this work, we investigated the possible functions of an NAC family member SECONDARY WALL-ASSOCIATED NAC DOMAIN PROTEIN2 (PtSND2) using chimeric repressor silencing technology. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, subcellular localization and transcriptional activation analyses indicated that PtSND2 is a wood-associated transcriptional factor with the predicted transcriptional activation activity, which could be inhibited by the repression domain SUPERMAN REPRESSION DOMAIN X (SRDX) in yeast. Wood formation was severely repressed in transgenic poplar plants overexpressing PtSND2-SRDX. Meanwhile, the secondary cell wall thickness of xylem fibers was restrained, and the contents of cellulose and lignin were obviously decreased in the stems of transgenic plants. Further studies indicated that expressions of a number of wood-associated genes were down-regulated in the stems of transgenic plants. Our results suggest that PtSND2 may play important roles during the secondary growth of stems in poplar.

  6. Pharmacologic suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells expressing chimeric T-cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Vallina, L; Yañez, R; Blanco, B; Gil, M; Russell, S J

    2000-04-01

    Adoptive therapy with autologous T cells expressing chimeric T-cell receptors (chTCRs) is of potential interest for the treatment of malignancy. To limit possible T-cell-mediated damage to normal tissues that weakly express the targeted tumor antigen (Ag), we have tested a strategy for the suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells. Jurkat T cells were transduced with an anti-hapten chTCR tinder the control of a tetracycline-suppressible promoter and were shown to respond to Ag-positive (hapten-coated) but not to Ag-negative target cells. The engineered T cells were then reacted with hapten-coated target cells at different effector to target cell ratios before and after exposure to tetracycline. When the engineered T cells were treated with tetracycline, expression of the chTCR was greatly decreased and recognition of the hapten-coated target cells was completely suppressed. Tetracycline-mediated suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells may be a useful strategy to limit the toxicity of the approach to cancer gene therapy.

  7. Chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in tobacco: differential regulation by calmodulin isoforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Xia, M.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1998-01-01

    cDNA clones of chimeric Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) from tobacco (TCCaMK-1 and TCCaMK-2) were isolated and characterized. The polypeptides encoded by TCCaMK-1 and TCCaMK-2 have 15 different amino acid substitutions, yet they both contain a total of 517 amino acids. Northern analysis revealed that CCaMK is expressed in a stage-specific manner during anther development. Messenger RNA was detected when tobacco bud sizes were between 0.5 cm and 1.0 cm. The appearance of mRNA coincided with meiosis and became undetectable at later stages of anther development. The reverse polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification assay using isoform-specific primers showed that both of the CCaMK mRNAs were expressed in anther with similar expression patterns. The CCaMK protein expressed in Escherichia coli showed Ca2+-dependent autophosphorylation and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent substrate phosphorylation. Calmodulin isoforms (PCM1 and PCM6) had differential effects on the regulation of autophosphorylation and substrate phosphorylation of tobacco CCaMK, but not lily CCaMK. The evolutionary tree of plant serine/threonine protein kinases revealed that calmodulin-dependent kinases form one subgroup that is distinctly different from Ca2+-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) and other serine/threonine kinases in plants.

  8. Horizontal transfer of an adaptive chimeric photoreceptor from bryophytes to ferns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fay-Wei; Villarreal, Juan Carlos; Kelly, Steven; Rothfels, Carl J; Melkonian, Michael; Frangedakis, Eftychios; Ruhsam, Markus; Sigel, Erin M; Der, Joshua P; Pittermann, Jarmila; Burge, Dylan O; Pokorny, Lisa; Larsson, Anders; Chen, Tao; Weststrand, Stina; Thomas, Philip; Carpenter, Eric; Zhang, Yong; Tian, Zhijian; Chen, Li; Yan, Zhixiang; Zhu, Ying; Sun, Xiao; Wang, Jun; Stevenson, Dennis W; Crandall-Stotler, Barbara J; Shaw, A Jonathan; Deyholos, Michael K; Soltis, Douglas E; Graham, Sean W; Windham, Michael D; Langdale, Jane A; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Mathews, Sarah; Pryer, Kathleen M

    2014-05-06

    Ferns are well known for their shade-dwelling habits. Their ability to thrive under low-light conditions has been linked to the evolution of a novel chimeric photoreceptor--neochrome--that fuses red-sensing phytochrome and blue-sensing phototropin modules into a single gene, thereby optimizing phototropic responses. Despite being implicated in facilitating the diversification of modern ferns, the origin of neochrome has remained a mystery. We present evidence for neochrome in hornworts (a bryophyte lineage) and demonstrate that ferns acquired neochrome from hornworts via horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Fern neochromes are nested within hornwort neochromes in our large-scale phylogenetic reconstructions of phototropin and phytochrome gene families. Divergence date estimates further support the HGT hypothesis, with fern and hornwort neochromes diverging 179 Mya, long after the split between the two plant lineages (at least 400 Mya). By analyzing the draft genome of the hornwort Anthoceros punctatus, we also discovered a previously unidentified phototropin gene that likely represents the ancestral lineage of the neochrome phototropin module. Thus, a neochrome originating in hornworts was transferred horizontally to ferns, where it may have played a significant role in the diversification of modern ferns.

  9. Design and development of therapies using chimeric antigen receptor-expressing T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotti, Gianpietro; Gottschalk, Stephen; Savoldo, Barbara; Brenner, Malcolm K

    2014-01-01

    Investigators developed chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) for expression on T cells more than 25 years ago. When the CAR is derived from an antibody, the resultant cell should combine the desirable targeting features of an antibody (e.g. lack of requirement for major histocompatibility complex recognition, ability to recognize non-protein antigens) with the persistence, trafficking, and effector functions of a T cell. This article describes how the past two decades have seen a crescendo of research which has now begun to translate these potential benefits into effective treatments for patients with cancer. We describe the basic design of CARs, describe how antigenic targets are selected, and the initial clinical experience with CAR-T cells. Our review then describes our own and other investigators' work aimed at improving the function of CARs and reviews the clinical studies in hematological and solid malignancies that are beginning to exploit these approaches. Finally, we show the value of adding additional engineering features to CAR-T cells, irrespective of their target, to render them better suited to function in the tumor environment, and discuss how the safety of these heavily modified cells may be maintained. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Regional Delivery of Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR T-Cells for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Sridhar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR T-cells are T-cells with recombinant receptors targeted to tumor antigens. CAR-T cell therapy has emerged as a mode of immunotherapy and is now being extensively explored in hematologic cancer. In contrast, CAR-T cell use in solid tumors has been hampered by multiple obstacles. Several approaches have been taken to circumvent these obstacles, including the regional delivery of CAR-T cells. Regional CAR-T cell delivery can theoretically compensate for poor T-cell trafficking and tumor antigen specificity while avoiding systemic toxicity associated with intravenous delivery. We reviewed completed clinical trials for the treatment of glioblastoma and metastatic colorectal cancer and examined the data in these studies for safety, efficacy, and potential advantages that regional delivery may confer over systemic delivery. Our appraisal of the available literature revealed that regional delivery of CAR-T cells in both glioblastoma and hepatic colorectal metastases was generally well tolerated and efficacious in select instances. We propose that the regional delivery of CAR-T cells is an area of potential growth in the solid tumor immunotherapy, and look towards future clinical trials in head and neck cancer, mesothelioma, and peritoneal carcinomatosis as the use of this technique expands.

  11. Incorporation of a hinge domain improves the expansion of chimeric antigen receptor T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Qin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple iterations of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs have been developed, mainly focusing on intracellular signaling modules. However, the effect of non-signaling extracellular modules on the expansion and therapeutic efficacy of CARs remains largely undefined. Methods We generated two versions of CAR vectors, with or without a hinge domain, targeting CD19, mesothelin, PSCA, MUC1, and HER2, respectively. Then, we systematically compared the effect of the hinge domains on the growth kinetics, cytokine production, and cytotoxicity of CAR T cells in vitro and in vivo. Results During in vitro culture period, the percentages and absolute numbers of T cells expressing the CARs containing a hinge domain continuously increased, mainly through the promotion of CD4+ CAR T cell expansion, regardless of the single-chain variable fragment (scFv. In vitro migration assay showed that the hinges enhanced CAR T cells migratory capacity. The T cells expressing anti-CD19 CARs with or without a hinge had similar antitumor capacities in vivo, whereas the T cells expressing anti-mesothelin CARs containing a hinge domain showed enhanced antitumor activities. Conclusions Hence, our results demonstrate that a hinge contributes to CAR T cell expansion and is capable of increasing the antitumor efficacy of some specific CAR T cells. Our results suggest potential novel strategies in CAR vector design.

  12. Genetic engineering of chimeric antigen receptors using lamprey derived variable lymphocyte receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Moot

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are used to redirect effector cell specificity to selected cell surface antigens. Using CARs, antitumor activity can be initiated in patients with no prior tumor specific immunity. Although CARs have shown promising clinical results, the technology remains limited by the availability of specific cognate cell target antigens. To increase the repertoire of targetable tumor cell antigens we utilized the immune system of the sea lamprey to generate directed variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs. VLRs serve as membrane bound and soluble immune effectors analogous but not homologous to immunoglobulins. They have a fundamentally different structure than immunoglobulin (Ig-based antibodies while still demonstrating high degrees of specificity and affinity. To test the functionality of VLRs as the antigen recognition domain of CARs, two VLR-CARs were created. One contained a VLR specific for a murine B cell leukemia and the other contained a VLR specific for the human T cell surface antigen, CD5. The CAR design consisted of the VLR sequence, myc-epitope tag, CD28 transmembrane domain, and intracellular CD3ζ signaling domain. We demonstrate proof of concept, including gene transfer, biosynthesis, cell surface localization, and effector cell activation for multiple VLR-CAR designs. Therefore, VLRs provide an alternative means of CAR-based cancer recognition.

  13. Advancing chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy with CRISPR/Cas9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangtao Ren

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/CRISPR-associated 9 (CRISPR/Cas9 system, an RNA-guided DNA targeting technology, is triggering a revolution in the field of biology. CRISPR/Cas9 has demonstrated great potential for genetic manipulation. In this review, we discuss the current development of CRISPR/Cas9 technologies for therapeutic applications, especially chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cell-based adoptive immunotherapy. Different methods used to facilitate efficient CRISPR delivery and gene editing in T cells are compared. The potential of genetic manipulation using CRISPR/Cas9 system to generate universal CAR T cells and potent T cells that are resistant to exhaustion and inhibition is explored. We also address the safety concerns associated with the use of CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing and provide potential solutions and future directions of CRISPR application in the field of CAR T cell immunotherapy. As an integration-free gene insertion method, CRISPR/Cas9 holds great promise as an efficient gene knock-in platform. Given the tremendous progress that has been made in the past few years, we believe that the CRISPR/Cas9 technology holds immense promise for advancing immunotherapy.

  14. A new insight in chimeric antigen receptor-engineered T cells for cancer immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhao Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Adoptive cell therapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-engineered T cells has emerged as a very promising approach to combating cancer. Despite its ability to eliminate tumors shown in some clinical trials, CAR-T cell therapy involves some significant safety challenges, such as cytokine release syndrome (CRS and “on-target, off-tumor” toxicity, which is related to poor control of the dose, location, and timing of T cell activity. In the past few years, some strategies to avoid the side effects of CAR-T cell therapy have been reported, including suicide gene, inhibitory CAR, dual-antigen receptor, and the use of exogenous molecules as switches to control the CAR-T cell functions. Because of the advances of the CAR paradigm and other forms of cancer immunotherapy, the most effective means of defeating the cancer has become the integration therapy with the combinatorial control system of switchable dual-receptor CAR-T cell and immune checkpoint blockade.

  15. Chimeric antigen receptor T cells: a novel therapy for solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengnan Yu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T cell therapy is a newly developed adoptive antitumor treatment. Theoretically, CAR-T cells can specifically localize and eliminate tumor cells by interacting with the tumor-associated antigens (TAAs expressing on tumor cell surface. Current studies demonstrated that various TAAs could act as target antigens for CAR-T cells, for instance, the type III variant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII was considered as an ideal target for its aberrant expression on the cell surface of several tumor types. CAR-T cell therapy has achieved gratifying breakthrough in hematological malignancies and promising outcome in solid tumor as showed in various clinical trials. The third generation of CAR-T demonstrates increased antitumor cytotoxicity and persistence through modification of CAR structure. In this review, we summarized the preclinical and clinical progress of CAR-T cells targeting EGFR, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, and mesothelin (MSLN, as well as the challenges for CAR-T cell therapy.

  16. Chimeric Antigen Receptor Expressing Natural Killer Cells for the Immunotherapy of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohtesh S. Mehta

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive cell therapy has emerged as a powerful treatment for advanced cancers resistant to conventional agents. Most notable are the remarkable responses seen in patients receiving autologous CD19-redirected chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cells for the treatment of B lymphoid malignancies; however, the generation of autologous products for each patient is logistically cumbersome and has restricted widespread clinical use. A banked allogeneic product has the potential to overcome these limitations, yet allogeneic T-cells (even if human leukocyte antigen-matched carry a major risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. Natural killer (NK cells are bone marrow-derived innate lymphocytes that can eliminate tumors directly, with their activity governed by the integration of signals from activating and inhibitory receptors and from cytokines including IL-15, IL-12, and IL-18. NK cells do not cause GVHD or other alloimmune or autoimmune toxicities and thus, can provide a potential source of allogeneic “off-the-shelf” cellular therapy, mediating major anti-tumor effects without inducing potentially lethal alloreactivity such as GVHD. Given the multiple unique advantages of NK cells, researchers are now exploring the use of CAR-engineered NK cells for the treatment of various hematological and non-hematological malignancies. Herein, we review preclinical data on the development of CAR-NK cells, advantages, disadvantages, and current obstacles to their clinical use.

  17. Enhanced cytotoxicity of natural killer cells following the acquisition of chimeric antigen receptors through trogocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Nan Cho

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells have the capacity to target tumors and are ideal candidates for immunotherapy. Viral vectors have been used to genetically modify in vitro expanded NK cells to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs, which confer cytotoxicity against tumors. However, use of viral transduction methods raises the safety concern of viral integration into the NK cell genome. In this study, we used trogocytosis as a non-viral method to modify NK cells for immunotherapy. A K562 cell line expressing high levels of anti-CD19 CARs was generated as a donor cell to transfer the anti-CD19 CARs onto NK cells via trogocytosis. Anti-CD19 CAR expression was observed in expanded NK cells after these cells were co-cultured for one hour with freeze/thaw-treated donor cells expressing anti-CD19 CARs. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the localization of the anti-CD19 CARs on the NK cell surface. Acquisition of anti-CD19 CARs via trogocytosis enhanced NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against the B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL cell lines and primary B-ALL cells derived from patients. To our knowledge, this is the first report that describes the increased cytotoxicity of NK cells following the acquisition of CARs via trogocytosis. This novel strategy could be a potential valuable therapeutic approach for the treatment of B-cell tumors.

  18. Enhanced cytotoxicity of natural killer cells following the acquisition of chimeric antigen receptors through trogocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Fu-Nan; Chang, Tsung-Hsien; Shu, Chih-Wen; Ko, Ming-Chin; Liao, Shuen-Kuei; Wu, Kang-Hsi; Yu, Ming-Sun; Lin, Shyh-Jer; Hong, Ying-Chung; Chen, Chien-Hsun; Hung, Chien-Hui; Chang, Yu-Hsiang

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have the capacity to target tumors and are ideal candidates for immunotherapy. Viral vectors have been used to genetically modify in vitro expanded NK cells to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), which confer cytotoxicity against tumors. However, use of viral transduction methods raises the safety concern of viral integration into the NK cell genome. In this study, we used trogocytosis as a non-viral method to modify NK cells for immunotherapy. A K562 cell line expressing high levels of anti-CD19 CARs was generated as a donor cell to transfer the anti-CD19 CARs onto NK cells via trogocytosis. Anti-CD19 CAR expression was observed in expanded NK cells after these cells were co-cultured for one hour with freeze/thaw-treated donor cells expressing anti-CD19 CARs. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the localization of the anti-CD19 CARs on the NK cell surface. Acquisition of anti-CD19 CARs via trogocytosis enhanced NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against the B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) cell lines and primary B-ALL cells derived from patients. To our knowledge, this is the first report that describes the increased cytotoxicity of NK cells following the acquisition of CARs via trogocytosis. This novel strategy could be a potential valuable therapeutic approach for the treatment of B-cell tumors.

  19. Designing, Expression and Immunological Characterization of a Chimeric Protein of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Yong, Qi; Jun, Guo; Ying, Pan; Suqin, Li; Jiameng, Li; Hongxia, Chen; Sumei, Li; Yuexi, Li; Min, Wang

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is thought to be the simplest and smallest cell wall-deficient bacterium which can cause chronic respiratory infections. Recently vaccination has been a possible and reliable way to reduce the spreading and infection effectively. In this study, the transmembrane proteins P116N (the N-terminal of P116), P1C (the C-terminal of P1), P30, and P116N-P1C-P30 (MP559 for short), a chimeric protein were expressed using prokaryotic expression system. The four purified recombinant proteins were synergized with freund's adjuvant and immunized New Zealand White rabbits respectively for three times. The IgG antibodies collected from immunized rabbits and mouse were analyzed by ELISA to analyze the immunogenicity and antigenicity. The results showed the four different recombinant proteins could induce strong humoral immune response. Protein MP559 could react with antisera from rabbit immunized with P1C, P30, and P116N, indicating MP559 was well designed and presented antigen epitopes of all the three antigens. Antibodies against P116N, P1C, and P30 could be stimulated by MP559 immunization, indicating MP559 has a potential to replace the three antigens as a vaccine candidate. This study laid a substantial foundation for the vaccine development of M. pneumoniae, and at the same time provided a essential strategy for the vaccine research of other pathogen.

  20. Regional Delivery of Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T-Cells for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Praveen; Petrocca, Fabio

    2017-07-18

    Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T-cells are T-cells with recombinant receptors targeted to tumor antigens. CAR-T cell therapy has emerged as a mode of immunotherapy and is now being extensively explored in hematologic cancer. In contrast, CAR-T cell use in solid tumors has been hampered by multiple obstacles. Several approaches have been taken to circumvent these obstacles, including the regional delivery of CAR-T cells. Regional CAR-T cell delivery can theoretically compensate for poor T-cell trafficking and tumor antigen specificity while avoiding systemic toxicity associated with intravenous delivery. We reviewed completed clinical trials for the treatment of glioblastoma and metastatic colorectal cancer and examined the data in these studies for safety, efficacy, and potential advantages that regional delivery may confer over systemic delivery. Our appraisal of the available literature revealed that regional delivery of CAR-T cells in both glioblastoma and hepatic colorectal metastases was generally well tolerated and efficacious in select instances. We propose that the regional delivery of CAR-T cells is an area of potential growth in the solid tumor immunotherapy, and look towards future clinical trials in head and neck cancer, mesothelioma, and peritoneal carcinomatosis as the use of this technique expands.

  1. Efficient CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Genome Editing Using a Chimeric Single-Guide RNA Molecule

    KAUST Repository

    Butt, Haroon

    2017-08-24

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been applied in diverse eukaryotic organisms for targeted mutagenesis. However, targeted gene editing is inefficient and requires the simultaneous delivery of a DNA template for homology-directed repair (HDR). Here, we used CRISPR/Cas9 to generate targeted double-strand breaks and to deliver an RNA repair template for HDR in rice (Oryza sativa). We used chimeric single-guide RNA (cgRNA) molecules carrying both sequences for target site specificity (to generate the double-strand breaks) and repair template sequences (to direct HDR), flanked by regions of homology to the target. Gene editing was more efficient in rice protoplasts using repair templates complementary to the non-target DNA strand, rather than the target strand. We applied this cgRNA repair method to generate herbicide resistance in rice, which showed that this cgRNA repair method can be used for targeted gene editing in plants. Our findings will facilitate applications in functional genomics and targeted improvement of crop traits.

  2. Efficient isolation of non-chimeric tetraploids artificially induced in a stable culture of Haplopappus gracilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujishige, I; Tanaka, R; Taniguchi, K

    1996-02-01

    A method for reducing cytochimerism and inducing homogeneous tetraploids in Haplopappus gracilis (2n = 4) was developed in which masses of shoot primordia treated with 0.5 mg/ml of colcemid for 3 days were cut into small meristematic domes. All of the shoot primordia sampled just after the colcemid treatment were cytochimeras that were mixoploids of 2x, 4x and 8x cells. However, when they were allowed to recover in a colcemid-free medium, the frequency of 4x cells spontaneously increased in most of the shoot primordia. Thirty days after the recovery, chimeric masses containing shoot primordia, each of which consisted uniformly of 4x or 2x cells, were observed. In order to obtain a completely homogeneous tetraploid mass, we then cut these primordia into small pieces, each of which had approximately one meristematic dome. Subsequent to this homogeneous tetraploid masses were easily obtained. Tetraploid shoot primordia could propagate with chromosomal stability over a year, and plants regenerated from these tetraploid shoot primordia were also completely tetraploid. These results show that non-chrimeric masses can be easily isolated from artificially induced cytochimeras using masses of shoot primordia as material.

  3. Functionality of Chimeric E2 Glycoproteins of BVDV and CSFV in Virus Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.G.P. van Gennip

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An intriguing difference between the E2 glycoprotein of CSFV and the other groups of pestiviruses (nonCSFV is a lack of two cysteine residues on positions cysteine 751 and 798. Other groups of pestivirus are not restricted to one species as swine, whereas CSFV is restricted to swine and wild boar. We constructed chimeric CSFV/BVDV E2 genes based on a 2D model of E2 proposed by van Rijn et al. (van Rijn et al. 1994, J Virol 68, 3934–42 and confirmed their expression by immunostaining of plasmid-transfected SK6 cells. No equivalents for the antigenic units B/C and A were found on E2 of BVDVII. This indicates major structural differences in E2. However, the immunodominant BVDVII domain A, containing epitopes with essential amino acids between position 760–764, showed to be dependent on the presence of the region defined by amino acids 684 to 796. As for the A domain of CSFV, the BVDVII A-like domain seemed to function as a separate unit. These combined domains in E2 proved to be the only combination which was functional in viral background of CSFV C-strain. The fitness of this virus (vfl c36BVDVII 684–796 seemed to be reduced compared to vfl c9 (with the complete antigenic region of BVDVII.

  4. Functionality of Chimeric E2 Glycoproteins of BVDV and CSFV in Virus Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.G.P. Van Gennip

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An intriguing difference between the E2 glycoprotein of CSFV and the other groups of pestiviruses (nonCSFV is a lack of two cysteine residues on positions cysteine 751 and 798. Other groups of pestivirus are not restricted to one species as swine, whereas CSFV is restricted to swine and wild boar. We constructed chimeric CSFV/BVDV E2 genes based on a 2D model of E2 proposed by van Rijn et al. (van Rijn et al. 1994, J Virol 68, 3934–42 and confirmed their expression by immunostaining of plasmid-transfected SK6 cells. No equivalents for the antigenic units B/C and A were found on E2 of BVDVII. This indicates major structural differences in E2. However, the immunodominant BVDVII domain A, containing epitopes with essential amino acids between position 760–764, showed to be dependent on the presence of the region defined by amino acids 684 to 796. As for the A domain of CSFV, the BVDVII A-like domain seemed to function as a separate unit. These combined domains in E2 proved to be the only combination which was functional in viral background of CSFV C-strain. The fitness of this virus (vflc36 BVDVII 684–796 seemed to be reduced compared to vflc9 (with the complete antigenic region of BVDVII.

  5. Glutamine domain of the chimeric protein, CAD, that initiates pyrimidine biosynthesis in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, R.E.; Kim, H.; Evans, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Glutamine dependent carbamyl phosphate synthesis, the first step in mammalian de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis, is catalyzed by a 240 kDa chimeric protein, CAD, that also has the aspartate transcarbamylase and dihydroorotase activities. The complex was found to have a separate glutaminase activity of 0.04 μmol/min/mg, that increased five fold in the presence of bicarbonate and ATP. To determine whether the glutaminase activity, which provides ammonia for carbamyl phosphate synthesis, is associated with a separate structural domain (GLN), CAD was subjected to controlled proteolysis with elastase. The glutaminase, glutamine and ammonia dependent carbamyl phosphate synthetase activities, as well as the partial reactions; carbamyl phosphate dependent ATP synthesis and bicarbonate dependent ATPase, were correlated with the concentration of the various proteolytic fragments that accumulated in the digest. While the glutamine dependent carbamyl phosphate synthetase was rapidly inactivated, the glutaminase activity was found to be very resistant to proteolysis. The glutamine binding site of CAD was also specifically modified with 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON). The modification was accompanied by a loss of both glutaminase and glutamine dependent carbamyl phosphate synthetase activities. Bicarbonate and ATP increased the rate of reaction of CAD with DON, while glutamine protected against inactivation. The stoichiometry of the reaction and the identity of the modified proteolytic fragments was determined using 14 C labelled DON

  6. Characterization of a switchable chimeric antigen receptor platform in a pre-clinical solid tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishali Bejestani, Elham; Cartellieri, Marc; Bergmann, Ralf; Ehninger, Armin; Loff, Simon; Kramer, Michael; Spehr, Johannes; Dietrich, Antje; Feldmann, Anja; Albert, Susann; Wermke, Martin; Baumann, Michael; Krause, Mechthild; Bornhäuser, Martin; Ehninger, Gerhard; Bachmann, Michael; von Bonin, Malte

    2017-01-01

    The universal modular chimeric antigen receptor (UniCAR) platform redirects CAR-T cells using a separated, soluble targeting module with a short half-life. This segregation allows precise controllability and flexibility. Herein we show that the UniCAR platform can be used to efficiently target solid cancers in vitro and in vivo using a pre-clinical prostate cancer model which overexpresses prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA). Short-term administration of the targeting module to tumor bearing immunocompromised mice engrafted with human UniCAR-T cells significantly delayed tumor growth and prolonged survival of recipient mice both in a low and high tumor burden model. In addition, we analyzed phenotypic and functional changes of cancer cells and UniCAR-T cells in association with the administration of the targeting module to reveal potential immunoevasive mechanisms. Most notably, UniCAR-T cell activation induced upregulation of immune-inhibitory molecules such as programmed death ligands. In conclusion, this work illustrates that the UniCAR platform mediates potent anti-tumor activity in a relevant in vitro and in vivo solid tumor model.

  7. Performance-enhancing drugs: design and production of redirected chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, B L

    2015-03-01

    Performance enhancement of the immune system can now be generated through ex vivo gene modification of T cells in order to redirect native specificity to target tumor antigens. This approach combines the specificity of antibody therapy, the expanded response of cellular therapy and the memory activity of vaccine therapy. Recent clinical trials of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells directed toward CD19 as a stand-alone therapy have shown sustained complete responses in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. As these drug products are individually derived from a patient's own cells, a different manufacturing approach is required for this kind of personalized therapy compared with conventional drugs. Key steps in the CAR T-cell manufacturing process include the selection and activation of isolated T cells, transduction of T cells to express CARs, ex vivo expansion of modified T cells and cryopreservation in infusible media. In this review, the steps involved in isolating, genetically modifying and scaling-out the CAR T cells for use in a clinical setting are described in the context of in-process and release testing and regulatory standards.

  8. Innovative immunization protocols using chimeric recombinant protein for the production of polyspecific loxoscelic antivenom in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Luís F M; Dias-Lopes, Camila; Alvarenga, Larissa M; Mendes, Thais M; Machado-de-Ávila, Ricardo A; McCormack, Jessica; Minozzo, João C; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes; Chávez-Olórtegui, Carlos

    2014-08-01

    A chimeric protein (rCpLi) was constructed expressing three epitopes of rLiD1, a dermonecrotic toxin from the venom of Loxosceles intermedia spider. We have analyzed the neutralization potential of sera obtained by immunization of horses with rCpLi and rCpLi combined with initial doses of venoms and compared these with antivenom traditionally produced in horses using crude Loxosceles gaucho, Loxosceles laeta and L. intermedia venoms as antigens. We have demonstrated by ELISA that horses immunized with three initial doses of crude venom containing mixtures of L. intermedia, L. gaucho and L. laeta followed by nine doses of rCpLi generate antibodies with the same reactivity as those produced following immunization with traditional antivenom, towards the venoms of the three Loxosceles sp. species. Results from in vivo and in vitro neutralization assays showed that the new horse sera are able to neutralize the dermonecrotic activity of Loxosceles venoms, which are of medical importance in Brazil and some of these sera are capable of meeting the necessary potency requirements that could allow for their therapeutic use in humans. This immunization strategy combining both antigens used approximately 67% less crude Loxosceles venoms compared to traditional immunization protocol and can mean the development of Loxosceles antivenoms with the consequent reduction of devastation of arachnid fauna. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Adoptive transfer of murine T cells expressing a chimeric-PD1-Dap10 receptor as an immunotherapy for lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Adam; Hawk, William; Nylen, Emily; Ober, Sean; Autin, Pierre; Barber, Amorette

    2017-11-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells is a promising cancer therapy and expression of chimeric antigen receptors can enhance tumour recognition and T-cell effector functions. The programmed death protein 1 (PD1) receptor is a prospective target for a chimeric antigen receptor because PD1 ligands are expressed on many cancer types, including lymphoma. Therefore, we developed a murine chimeric PD1 receptor (chPD1) consisting of the PD1 extracellular domain fused to the cytoplasmic domain of CD3ζ. Additionally, chimeric antigen receptor therapies use various co-stimulatory domains to enhance efficacy. Hence, the inclusion of a Dap10 or CD28 co-stimulatory domain in the chPD1 receptor was compared to determine which domain induced optimal anti-tumour immunity in a mouse model of lymphoma. The chPD1 T cells secreted pro-inflammatory cytokines and lysed RMA lymphoma cells. Adoptive transfer of chPD1 T cells significantly reduced established tumours and led to tumour-free survival in lymphoma-bearing mice. When comparing chPD1 receptors containing a Dap10 or CD28 domain, both receptors induced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines; however, chPD1-CD28 T cells also secreted anti-inflammatory cytokines whereas chPD1-Dap10 T cells did not. Additionally, chPD1-Dap10 induced a central memory T-cell phenotype compared with chPD1-CD28, which induced an effector memory phenotype. The chPD1-Dap10 T cells also had enhanced in vivo persistence and anti-tumour efficacy compared with chPD1-CD28 T cells. Therefore, adoptive transfer of chPD1 T cells could be a novel therapy for lymphoma and inclusion of the Dap10 co-stimulatory domain in chimeric antigen receptors may induce a preferential cytokine profile and T-cell differentiation phenotype for anti-tumour therapies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Expression and secretion of fungal endoglucanase II and chimeric cellobiohydrolase I in the oleaginous yeast Lipomyces starkeyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qi; Knoshaug, Eric P; Wang, Wei; Alahuhta, Markus; Baker, John O; Yang, Shihui; Vander Wall, Todd; Decker, Stephen R; Himmel, Michael E; Zhang, Min; Wei, Hui

    2017-07-24

    Lipomyces starkeyi is one of the leading lipid-producing microorganisms reported to date; its genetic transformation was only recently reported. Our aim is to engineer L. starkeyi to serve in consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) to produce lipid or fatty acid-related biofuels directly from abundant and low-cost lignocellulosic substrates. To evaluate L. starkeyi in this role, we first conducted a genome analysis, which revealed the absence of key endo- and exocellulases in this yeast, prompting us to select and screen four signal peptides for their suitability for the overexpression and secretion of cellulase genes. To compensate for the cellulase deficiency, we chose two prominent cellulases, Trichoderma reesei endoglucanase II (EG II) and a chimeric cellobiohydrolase I (TeTrCBH I) formed by fusion of the catalytic domain from Talaromyces emersonii CBH I with the linker peptide and cellulose-binding domain from T. reesei CBH I. The systematically tested signal peptides included three peptides from native L. starkeyi and one from Yarrowia lipolytica. We found that all four signal peptides permitted secretion of active EG II. We also determined that three of these signal peptides worked for expression of the chimeric CBH I; suggesting that our design criteria for selecting these signal peptides was effective. Encouragingly, the Y. lipolytica signal peptide was able to efficiently guide secretion of the chimeric TeTrCBH I protein from L. starkeyi. The purified chimeric TeTrCBH I showed high activity against the cellulose in pretreated corn stover and the purified EG II showed high endocellulase activity measured by the CELLG3 (Megazyme) method. Our results suggest that L. starkeyi is capable of expressing and secreting core fungal cellulases. Moreover, the purified EG II and chimeric TeTrCBH I displayed significant and potentially useful enzymatic activities, demonstrating that engineered L. starkeyi has the potential to function as an oleaginous CBP strain for biofuel

  11. Generation of Novel Chimeric Mice with Humanized Livers by Using Hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chise Tateno

    Full Text Available We have used homozygous albumin enhancer/promoter-driven urokinase-type plasminogen activator/severe combined immunodeficient (uPA/SCID mice as hosts for chimeric mice with humanized livers. However, uPA/SCID mice show four disadvantages: the human hepatocytes (h-heps replacement index in mouse liver is decreased due to deletion of uPA transgene by homologous recombination, kidney disorders are likely to develop, body size is small, and hemizygotes cannot be used as hosts as more frequent homologous recombination than homozygotes. To solve these disadvantages, we have established a novel host strain that has a transgene containing albumin promoter/enhancer and urokinase-type plasminogen activator cDNA and has a SCID background (cDNA-uPA/SCID. We applied the embryonic stem cell technique to simultaneously generate a number of transgenic lines, and found the line with the most appropriate levels of uPA expression-not detrimental but with a sufficiently damaged liver. We transplanted h-heps into homozygous and hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice via the spleen, and monitored their human albumin (h-alb levels and body weight. Blood h-alb levels and body weight gradually increased in the hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice and were maintained until they were approximately 30 weeks old. By contrast, blood h-alb levels and body weight in uPA/SCID chimeric mice decreased from 16 weeks of age onwards. A similar decrease in body weight was observed in the homozygous cDNA-uPA/SCID genotype, but h-alb levels were maintained until they were approximately 30 weeks old. Microarray analyses revealed identical h-heps gene expression profiles in homozygous and hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice were identical to that observed in the uPA/SCID mice. Furthermore, like uPA/SCID chimeric mice, homozygous and hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID chimeric mice were successfully infected with hepatitis B virus and C virus. These results indicate that hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice may be novel and

  12. Prevention of birch pollen-related food allergy by mucosal treatment with multi-allergen-chimers in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Hoflehner

    Full Text Available Among birch pollen allergic patients up to 70% develop allergic reactions to Bet v 1-homologue food allergens such as Api g 1 (celery or Dau c 1 (carrot, termed as birch pollen-related food allergy. In most cases, specific immunotherapy with birch pollen extracts does not reduce allergic symptoms to the homologue food allergens. We therefore genetically engineered a multi-allergen chimer and tested if mucosal treatment with this construct could represent a novel approach for prevention of birch pollen-related food allergy.BALB/c mice were poly-sensitized with a mixture of Bet v 1, Api g 1 and Dau c 1 followed by a sublingual challenge with carrot, celery and birch pollen extracts. For prevention of allergy sensitization an allergen chimer composed of immunodominant T cell epitopes of Api g 1 and Dau c 1 linked to the whole Bet v 1 allergen, was intranasally applied prior to sensitization.Intranasal pretreatment with the allergen chimer led to significantly decreased antigen-specific IgE-dependent β-hexosaminidase release, but enhanced allergen-specific IgG2a and IgA antibodies. Accordingly, IL-4 levels in spleen cell cultures and IL-5 levels in restimulated spleen and cervical lymph node cell cultures were markedly reduced, while IFN-γ levels were increased. Immunomodulation was associated with increased IL-10, TGF-β and Foxp3 mRNA levels in NALT and Foxp3 in oral mucosal tissues. Treatment with anti-TGF-β, anti-IL10R or anti-CD25 antibodies abrogated the suppression of allergic responses induced by the chimer.Our results indicate that mucosal application of the allergen chimer led to decreased Th2 immune responses against Bet v 1 and its homologue food allergens Api g 1 and Dau c 1 by regulatory and Th1-biased immune responses. These data suggest that mucosal treatment with a multi-allergen vaccine could be a promising treatment strategy to prevent birch pollen-related food allergy.

  13. Prevention of birch pollen-related food allergy by mucosal treatment with multi-allergen-chimers in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoflehner, Elisabeth; Hufnagl, Karin; Schabussova, Irma; Jasinska, Joanna; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, Karin; Bohle, Barbara; Maizels, Rick M; Wiedermann, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    Among birch pollen allergic patients up to 70% develop allergic reactions to Bet v 1-homologue food allergens such as Api g 1 (celery) or Dau c 1 (carrot), termed as birch pollen-related food allergy. In most cases, specific immunotherapy with birch pollen extracts does not reduce allergic symptoms to the homologue food allergens. We therefore genetically engineered a multi-allergen chimer and tested if mucosal treatment with this construct could represent a novel approach for prevention of birch pollen-related food allergy. BALB/c mice were poly-sensitized with a mixture of Bet v 1, Api g 1 and Dau c 1 followed by a sublingual challenge with carrot, celery and birch pollen extracts. For prevention of allergy sensitization an allergen chimer composed of immunodominant T cell epitopes of Api g 1 and Dau c 1 linked to the whole Bet v 1 allergen, was intranasally applied prior to sensitization. Intranasal pretreatment with the allergen chimer led to significantly decreased antigen-specific IgE-dependent β-hexosaminidase release, but enhanced allergen-specific IgG2a and IgA antibodies. Accordingly, IL-4 levels in spleen cell cultures and IL-5 levels in restimulated spleen and cervical lymph node cell cultures were markedly reduced, while IFN-γ levels were increased. Immunomodulation was associated with increased IL-10, TGF-β and Foxp3 mRNA levels in NALT and Foxp3 in oral mucosal tissues. Treatment with anti-TGF-β, anti-IL10R or anti-CD25 antibodies abrogated the suppression of allergic responses induced by the chimer. Our results indicate that mucosal application of the allergen chimer led to decreased Th2 immune responses against Bet v 1 and its homologue food allergens Api g 1 and Dau c 1 by regulatory and Th1-biased immune responses. These data suggest that mucosal treatment with a multi-allergen vaccine could be a promising treatment strategy to prevent birch pollen-related food allergy.

  14. Beta-endorphin chimeric peptides: Transport through the blood-brain barrier in vivo and cleavage of disulfide linkage by brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardridge, W.M.; Triguero, D.; Buciak, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    Water soluble peptides are normally not transported through the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Chimeric peptides may be transportable through the BBB and are formed by the covalent coupling of a nontransportable peptide to a transportable peptide vector, e.g. cationized albumin, using disulfide-based coupling reagents such as N-succinimidyl 3-[2-pyridyldithio(propionate)] (SPDP). The transcytosis of peptide into brain parenchyma, as opposed to vascular sequestration of blood-borne peptide, was quantified using an internal carotid artery perfusion/capillary depletion method. It is shown that [125I]beta-endorphin is not transported through the BBB, but is rapidly cleaved to free [125I] tyrosine via capillary peptidase. Therefore, chimeric peptide was prepared using [125I] [D-Ala2]beta-endorphin (DABE), owing to the resistance of this analogue to peptidase degradation. The [125I] DABE-cationized albumin chimeric peptide is shown to enter brain parenchyma at a rate comparable to that reported previously for unconjugated cationized albumin. When the [125I] DABE-cationized albumin chimeric peptide was incubated with rat brain homogenate at 37 C, the free [125I] DABE was liberated from the cationized albumin conjugate prior to its subsequent degradation into free [125I] tyrosine. Approximately 50% of the chimeric peptide was cleaved within 60 sec of incubation at 37 C. These studies demonstrate that (1) [125I]beta-endorphin is not transported through the BBB in its unconjugated form, (2) a [125I] DABE-cationized albumin chimeric peptide is transported through the BBB into brain parenchyma at a rate comparable to the unconjugated cationized albumin, and (3) brain contains the necessary disulfide reductases for rapid cleavage of the chimeric peptide into free beta-endorphin and this cleavage occurs before degradation of the [125I] DABE into [125I] tyrosine

  15. Beta-endorphin chimeric peptides: Transport through the blood-brain barrier in vivo and cleavage of disulfide linkage by brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardridge, W.M.; Triguero, D.; Buciak, J.L. (UCLA School of Medicine (USA))

    1990-02-01

    Water soluble peptides are normally not transported through the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Chimeric peptides may be transportable through the BBB and are formed by the covalent coupling of a nontransportable peptide to a transportable peptide vector, e.g. cationized albumin, using disulfide-based coupling reagents such as N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio(propionate)) (SPDP). The transcytosis of peptide into brain parenchyma, as opposed to vascular sequestration of blood-borne peptide, was quantified using an internal carotid artery perfusion/capillary depletion method. It is shown that (125I)beta-endorphin is not transported through the BBB, but is rapidly cleaved to free (125I) tyrosine via capillary peptidase. Therefore, chimeric peptide was prepared using (125I) (D-Ala2)beta-endorphin (DABE), owing to the resistance of this analogue to peptidase degradation. The (125I) DABE-cationized albumin chimeric peptide is shown to enter brain parenchyma at a rate comparable to that reported previously for unconjugated cationized albumin. When the (125I) DABE-cationized albumin chimeric peptide was incubated with rat brain homogenate at 37 C, the free (125I) DABE was liberated from the cationized albumin conjugate prior to its subsequent degradation into free (125I) tyrosine. Approximately 50% of the chimeric peptide was cleaved within 60 sec of incubation at 37 C. These studies demonstrate that (1) (125I)beta-endorphin is not transported through the BBB in its unconjugated form, (2) a (125I) DABE-cationized albumin chimeric peptide is transported through the BBB into brain parenchyma at a rate comparable to the unconjugated cationized albumin, and (3) brain contains the necessary disulfide reductases for rapid cleavage of the chimeric peptide into free beta-endorphin and this cleavage occurs before degradation of the (125I) DABE into (125I) tyrosine.

  16. A Chimeric LysK-Lysostaphin Fusion Enzyme Lysing Staphylococcus aureus Cells: a Study of Both Kinetics of Inactivation and Specifics of Interaction with Anionic Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatova, Lyubov Y; Donovan, David M; Ishnazarova, Nadiya T; Foster-Frey, Juli A; Becker, Stephen C; Pugachev, Vladimir G; Balabushevich, Nadezda G; Dmitrieva, Natalia F; Klyachko, Natalia L

    2016-10-01

    A staphylolytic fusion protein (chimeric enzyme K-L) was created, harboring three unique lytic activities composed of the LysK CHAP endopeptidase, and amidase domains, and the lysostaphin glycyl-glycine endopeptidase domain. To assess the potential of possible therapeutic applications, the kinetic behavior of chimeric enzyme K-L was investigated. As a protein antimicrobial, with potential antigenic properties, the biophysical effect of including chimeric enzyme K-L in anionic polymer matrices that might help reduce the immunogenicity of the enzyme was tested. Chimeric enzyme K-L reveals a high lytic activity under the following optimal ( opt ) conditions: pH opt 6.0-10.0, t opt 20-30 °C, NaCl opt 400-800 mM. At the working temperature of 37 °C, chimeric enzyme K-L is inactivated by a monomolecular mechanism and possesses a high half-inactivation time of 12.7 ± 3.0 h. At storage temperatures of 22 and 4 °C, a complex mechanism (combination of monomolecular and bimolecular mechanisms) is involved in the chimeric enzyme K-L inactivation. The optimal storage conditions under which the enzyme retains 100 % activity after 140 days of incubation (4 °C, the enzyme concentration of 0.8 mg/mL, pH 6.0 or 7.5) were established. Chimeric enzyme K-L is included in complexes with block-copolymers of poly-L-glutamic acid and polyethylene glycol, while the enzyme activity and stability are retained, thus suggesting methods to improve the application of this fusion as an effective antimicrobial agent.

  17. Xenogeneic gene expression in chimeric mice derived from rat--mouse hybrid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illmensee, K; Croce, C M

    1979-02-01

    Thymidine kinase-deficient OTT6050 mouse teratocarcinoma cells were fused with hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase-deficient Fu5AH rat hepatoma cells by means of inactivated Sendai virus. The resulting hybrid cells, which were selected in hypoxanthine/aminopterin/thymidine medium, retained almost all of the mouse chromosomes and various numbers of rat chromosomes, and showed many chromosomal rearrangements. The hybrid cells, as well as both parental lines, formed tumors after subcutaneous injection into athymic nude mice. Single rat--mouse hybrid cells from a clonally established subline were transplanted into C57BL6/J mouse blastocysts carrying many genetic markers suitable for the detection of hybrid cell-derived tissue contributions. From 144 blastocysts, each of which was injected with a hybrid cell and then surgically transferred to the uterus of a pseudopregnant foster mother, 62 adult mice developed without any visible coat mosaicism. However, three of these mice showed internal hybrid-cell participation in their livers and a limited number of organs of endomesodermal origin. A tumor classifiable as hemangio endothelioma was found in the liver, the only mosaic tissue, of one of the chimeric mice. Nine different rat-specific enzyme variants were detected in the mosaic organs. A considerable number of variations concerning the presence and quantitative activity of the foreign gene products probably resulted from chromosomal segregation, tissue-specific gene activity, or dosage compensation during differentiation in vivo. Our results demonstrate that cultured malignant rat--mouse hybrid cells differentiate normally and become functionally integrated during development. The appearacne in vivo of certain rat-specific gene products that are not found in the hybrid cells under conditions in vitro indicates differential gene expression of the introduced xenogeneic chromosomes.

  18. Evidence of a chimeric genome in the cyanobacterial ancestor of plastids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya Debashish

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Horizontal gene transfer (HGT is a vexing fact of life for microbial phylogeneticists. Given the substantial rates of HGT observed in modern-day bacterial chromosomes, it is envisaged that ancient prokaryotic genomes must have been similarly chimeric. But where can one find an ancient prokaryotic genome that has maintained its ancestral condition to address this issue? An excellent candidate is the cyanobacterial endosymbiont that was harnessed over a billion years ago by a heterotrophic protist, giving rise to the plastid. Genetic remnants of the endosymbiont are still preserved in plastids as a highly reduced chromosome encoding 54 – 264 genes. These data provide an ideal target to assess genome chimericism in an ancient cyanobacterial lineage. Results Here we demonstrate that the origin of the plastid-encoded gene cluster for menaquinone/phylloquinone biosynthesis in the extremophilic red algae Cyanidiales contradicts a cyanobacterial genealogy. These genes are relics of an ancestral cluster related to homologs in Chlorobi/Gammaproteobacteria that we hypothesize was established by HGT in the progenitor of plastids, thus providing a 'footprint' of genome chimericism in ancient cyanobacteria. In addition to menB, four components of the original gene cluster (menF, menD, menC, and menH are now encoded in the nuclear genome of the majority of non-Cyanidiales algae and plants as the unique tetra-gene fusion named PHYLLO. These genes are monophyletic in Plantae and chromalveolates, indicating that loci introduced by HGT into the ancestral cyanobacterium were moved over time into the host nucleus. Conclusion Our study provides unambiguous evidence for the existence of genome chimericism in ancient cyanobacteria. In addition we show genes that originated via HGT in the cyanobacterial ancestor of the plastid made their way to the host nucleus via endosymbiotic gene transfer (EGT.

  19. A novel method to generate T-cell receptor-deficient chimeric antigen receptor T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Takahiro; Wong, Desmond; Png, Yi Tian; Campana, Dario

    2018-03-13

    Practical methods are needed to increase the applicability and efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies. Using donor-derived CAR-T cells is attractive, but expression of endogenous T-cell receptors (TCRs) carries the risk for graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD). To remove surface TCRαβ, we combined an antibody-derived single-chain variable fragment specific for CD3ε with 21 different amino acid sequences predicted to retain it intracellularly. After transduction in T cells, several of these protein expression blockers (PEBLs) colocalized intracellularly with CD3ε, blocking surface CD3 and TCRαβ expression. In 25 experiments, median TCRαβ expression in T lymphocytes was reduced from 95.7% to 25.0%; CD3/TCRαβ cell depletion yielded virtually pure TCRαβ-negative T cells. Anti-CD3ε PEBLs abrogated TCRαβ-mediated signaling, without affecting immunophenotype or proliferation. In anti-CD3ε PEBL-T cells, expression of an anti-CD19-41BB-CD3ζ CAR induced cytokine secretion, long-term proliferation, and CD19 + leukemia cell killing, at rates meeting or exceeding those of CAR-T cells with normal CD3/TCRαβ expression. In immunodeficient mice, anti-CD3ε PEBL-T cells had markedly reduced GVHD potential; when transduced with anti-CD19 CAR, these T cells killed engrafted leukemic cells. PEBL blockade of surface CD3/TCRαβ expression is an effective tool to prepare allogeneic CAR-T cells. Combined PEBL and CAR expression can be achieved in a single-step procedure, is easily adaptable to current cell manufacturing protocols, and can be used to target other T-cell molecules to further enhance CAR-T-cell therapies. © 2018 by The American Society of Hematology.

  20. Clinical usefulness of human-mouse chimeric Fab monoclonal antibody A7 for radioimmunoguided surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuhito

    1999-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the clinical usefulness of radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS) using the human-mouse chimeric Fab monoclonal antibody A7 (chA7Fab) for colorectal cancer patients. Whole murine monoclonal antibody A7 (whole A7) and chA7Fab were labelled with 125 I and 131 I, and their biodistributions were investigated experimentally and clinically. Radioactivities of the antibodies in the tissues were measured by a portable gamma detecting probe (GDP) purchased from Neoprobe Corp.. Of the four labelled antibodies used in a mouse model, 125 I-chA7Fab revealed the highest tumor/surrounding tissue ratio and all values were greater than 2.0. All tumor/surrounding tissue ratios of 131 I-chA7Fab were greater than 1.5, but the values were lower than those of 125 I-chA7Fab. Due to the limited clinical use of 125 I in Japan, 131 I was used as a radio-tracer for chA7Fab in the clinical trial. RIGS using 131 I-chA7Fab was performed on ten colorectal cancer patients. Tumor localization was intraoperatively determined in four of ten patients using the GDP. Liver metastasis and lymph node metastasis were identified in two patients and one patient, respectively. The GDP revealed tumor/surrounding tissue ratios of 1.5 or greater in eight of the ten resected tumors. Although radioimmunoguided surgery using chA7Fab is a promising tool to intraoperatively determine the tumor localization of colorectal cancer, 125 I and not 131 I should be used as a tracer for radioimmunoguided surgery to increase the accuracy of chA7Fab. (author)

  1. Automated Manufacturing of Potent CD20-Directed Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells for Clinical Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, Dominik; Mockel-Tenbrinck, Nadine; Drechsel, Katharina; Barth, Carola; Mauer, Daniela; Schaser, Thomas; Kolbe, Carolin; Al Rawashdeh, Wael; Brauner, Janina; Hardt, Olaf; Pflug, Natali; Holtick, Udo; Borchmann, Peter; Assenmacher, Mario; Kaiser, Andrew

    2017-10-01

    The clinical success of gene-engineered T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), as manifested in several clinical trials for the treatment of B cell malignancies, warrants the development of a simple and robust manufacturing procedure capable of reducing to a minimum the challenges associated with its complexity. Conventional protocols comprise many open handling steps, are labor intensive, and are difficult to upscale for large numbers of patients. Furthermore, extensive training of personnel is required to avoid operator variations. An automated current Good Manufacturing Practice-compliant process has therefore been developed for the generation of gene-engineered T cells. Upon installation of the closed, single-use tubing set on the CliniMACS Prodigy™, sterile welding of the starting cell product, and sterile connection of the required reagents, T cells are magnetically enriched, stimulated, transduced using lentiviral vectors, expanded, and formulated. Starting from healthy donor (HD) or lymphoma or melanoma patient material (PM), the robustness and reproducibility of the manufacturing of anti-CD20 specific CAR T cells were verified. Independent of the starting material, operator, or device, the process consistently yielded a therapeutic dose of highly viable CAR T cells. Interestingly, the formulated product obtained with PM was comparable to that of HD with respect to cell composition, phenotype, and function, even though the starting material differed significantly. Potent antitumor reactivity of the produced anti-CD20 CAR T cells was shown in vitro as well as in vivo. In summary, the automated T cell transduction process meets the requirements for clinical manufacturing that the authors intend to use in two separate clinical trials for the treatment of melanoma and B cell lymphoma.

  2. Regional inverse modeling for high reactive species with PYVAR-CHIMERE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortems-Cheiney, A.; Pison, I.; Dufour, G.; Broquet, G.; Costantino, L.

    2017-12-01

    The degradation of air quality is a worldwide environmental problem: according to the World Health Organization WHO, 92% of the world's population breathe polluted air in 2016. A number of air pollutants associated with respiratory disease and shortened life expectancy play a particularly important role in global outdoor air pollution. In addition to threatening both human health and ecosystems, these gaseous air pollutants including nitrogen oxides (NOx=NO+NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), ammonia (NH3), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) could be precursors of ozone (O3) and Particulate Matter (PM). Without a strong scientific back-up to determine their different sources, the necessary regulations to improve air quality will not be efficient. To date, only chemistry-transport models (CTM) are able to describe pollutant concentrations at any location in the world and their evolution in the atmosphere. Consequently, they have become essential tools for studying air quality. However, CTM are hampered by incomplete information on gaseous precursors and one of the large shortcoming for simulating the gaseous pollutants budgets is the lack of high spatio-temporal variability for the emission estimations provided as inputs for chemistry-transport models. For all these reasons, an inverse system called PYVAR-CHIMERE has been developed, operating in synergy between a CTM and atmospheric observations, and being adjust for the highly reactive species of interest here, as NO2. We present here the first results of this Bayesian variational inverse method for the quantification of NO2 emissions both over Europe (in March 2011) and over China (in January 2015), with a spatial resolution of 0.5°x0.5° and at a weekly temporal resolution, constrained by surface measurements and OMI NO2 satellite observations.

  3. Identification of chimeric antigen receptors that mediate constitutive or inducible proliferation of T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigault, Matthew J; Lee, Jihyun; Basil, Maria Ciocca; Carpenito, Carmine; Motohashi, Shinichiro; Scholler, John; Kawalekar, Omkar U.; Guedan, Sonia; McGettigan, Shannon E.; Posey, Avery D.; Ang, Sonny; Cooper, Laurence J. N.; Platt, Jesse M.; Johnson, F. Brad; Paulos, Chrystal M; Zhao, Yangbing; Kalos, Michael; Milone, Michael C.; June, Carl H.

    2015-01-01

    This study compared second generation chimeric antigen receptors encoding signaling domains composed of CD28, ICOS and 4-1BB. Here we report that certain CARs endow T cells with the ability to undergo long-term autonomous proliferation. Transduction of primary human T-cell with lentiviral vectors encoding some of the CARs resulted in sustained proliferation for up to three months following a single stimulation through the TCR. Sustained numeric expansion was independent of cognate antigen and did not require the addition of exogenous cytokines or feeder cells after a single stimulation of the TCR and CD28. Results from gene array and functional assays linked sustained cytokine secretion and expression of T-bet, EOMES and GATA-3 to the effect. Sustained expression of the endogenous IL2 locus has not been reported in primary T cells. Sustained proliferation was dependent on CAR structure and high expression, the latter of which was necessary but not sufficient. The mechanism involves constitutive signaling through NF-kB, Akt, Erk and NFAT. The propagated CAR T cells retained a diverse TCR repertoire and cellular transformation was not observed. The CARs with a constitutive growth phenotype displayed inferior antitumor effects and engraftment in vivo. Therefore the design of CARs that have a non-constitutive growth phenotype may be a strategy to improve efficacy and engraftment of CAR T cells. The identification of CARs that confer constitutive or non-constitutive growth patterns may explain observations that CAR T cells have differential survival patterns in clinical trials. PMID:25600436

  4. The Formation of Chimeric Nanomorphologies, as a Reflection of Naturally Occurring Thermodynamic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naziris, N.; Demetzos, C.

    2017-11-01

    The self-assembly process of different in nature biomaterials leads to the morphogenesis of various nano-structures, where the individual molecule properties (e.g. hydrophilic-to-hydrophobic balance and elasticity), profoundly affect the intermediate surfaces’ interfacial thermodynamics. Herein, the mixing of a phospholipid and an amphiphilic block copolymer, through the thin-film hydration method, gave different morphologies, among which there were vesicles (i.e. liposomes and polymersomes), micelles and worm-like structures. The formation of such variety of structures is attributed to divergent entropic pathways, which are determined by a number of parameters, such as the lipid:polymer molar ratio and the polymer composition. The developed nanosystems are considered as chimeric/mixed, because of the two different in type biomaterials that compose them. The vesicles also exhibited membrane “irregularities”, which are connected with their biophysical behavior. Nature has “chosen” vesicular forms to be the thermodynamically stable “biological apartments”, in which life was enclosed and additionally, vesicles provided compartmentalized systems, where the intracellular environment was built. Phospholipid properties result in membranes/bilayers that harmonically assimilate other molecules, like proteins and retain their integrity and functionality, while gaining additional features. A cause that alters this relationship might induce changes in the membrane composition and morphology, with respect to lipid rafts/domains, what has been linked with the activation and development of certain human disorders/diseases. The self-assembly of two different biomaterials into various structures that present distinct membrane phenomena is believed to simulate these natural processes.

  5. Identification of chimeric antigen receptors that mediate constitutive or inducible proliferation of T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigault, Matthew J; Lee, Jihyun; Basil, Maria Ciocca; Carpenito, Carmine; Motohashi, Shinichiro; Scholler, John; Kawalekar, Omkar U; Guedan, Sonia; McGettigan, Shannon E; Posey, Avery D; Ang, Sonny; Cooper, Laurence J N; Platt, Jesse M; Johnson, F Brad; Paulos, Chrystal M; Zhao, Yangbing; Kalos, Michael; Milone, Michael C; June, Carl H

    2015-04-01

    This study compared second-generation chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) encoding signaling domains composed of CD28, ICOS, and 4-1BB (TNFRSF9). Here, we report that certain CARs endow T cells with the ability to undergo long-term autonomous proliferation. Transduction of primary human T cells with lentiviral vectors encoding some of the CARs resulted in sustained proliferation for up to 3 months following a single stimulation through the T-cell receptor (TCR). Sustained numeric expansion was independent of cognate antigen and did not require the addition of exogenous cytokines or feeder cells after a single stimulation of the TCR and CD28. Results from gene array and functional assays linked sustained cytokine secretion and expression of T-bet (TBX21), EOMES, and GATA-3 to the effect. Sustained expression of the endogenous IL2 locus has not been reported in primary T cells. Sustained proliferation was dependent on CAR structure and high expression, the latter of which was necessary but not sufficient. The mechanism involves constitutive signaling through NF-κB, AKT, ERK, and NFAT. The propagated CAR T cells retained a diverse TCR repertoire, and cellular transformation was not observed. The CARs with a constitutive growth phenotype displayed inferior antitumor effects and engraftment in vivo. Therefore, the design of CARs that have a nonconstitutive growth phenotype may be a strategy to improve efficacy and engraftment of CAR T cells. The identification of CARs that confer constitutive or nonconstitutive growth patterns may explain observations that CAR T cells have differential survival patterns in clinical trials. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Efficient neutralization and disruption of rhinovirus by chimeric ICAM-1/immunoglobulin molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, S; Casasnovas, J M; Staunton, D E; Springer, T A

    1993-01-01

    The intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) is used as a cellular receptor by 90% of human rhinoviruses (HRVs). Chimeric immunoadhesin molecules containing extracellular domains of ICAM-1 and constant regions of immunoglobulins (Igs) were designed in order to determine the effect of increased valency, Ig isotype, and number of ICAM-1 domains on neutralization and disruption of rhinovirus structure. These immunoadhesins include ICAM-1 amino-terminal domains 1 and 2 fused to the hinge and constant domains of the heavy chains of IgA1, IgM, and IgG1 (IC1-2D/IgA, -/IgM, and -/IgG). In addition, all five extracellular domains were fused to IgA1 (IC1-5D/IgA). Immunoadhesins were compared with soluble forms of ICAM-1 containing five and two domains (sICAM-1 and ICI-2D, respectively) in assays of HRV binding, infectivity, and conformation. In prevention of HRV plaque formation, IC1-5D/IgA was 200 times and IC1-2D/IgM and IC1-2D/IgA were 25 and 10 times more effective, respectively, than ICAM-1. The same chimeras were highly effective in inhibiting binding of rhinovirus to cells and disrupting the conformation of the virus capsid, as demonstrated by generation of approximately 65S particles. The results show that the number of ICAM-1 domains and a flexible Ig hinge are important factors contributing to the efficacy of neutralization. The higher efficiency of chimeras that bound bivalently in disrupting HRV was attributed to higher binding avidity. The IC1-5D/IgA immunoadhesin was effective at nanomolar concentrations, making it feasible therapy for rhinovirus infection. Images PMID:8098781

  7. Preubiquitinated chimeric ErbB2 is constitutively endocytosed and subsequently degraded in lysosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuong, Tram Thu; Berger, Christian; Bertelsen, Vibeke; Rødland, Marianne Skeie; Stang, Espen; Madshus, Inger Helene

    2013-01-01

    The oncoprotein ErbB2 is endocytosis-deficient, probably due to its interaction with Heat shock protein 90. We previously demonstrated that clathrin-dependent endocytosis of ErbB2 is induced upon incubation of cells with Ansamycin derivatives, such as geldanamycin and its derivative 17-AAG. Furthermore, we have previously demonstrated that a preubiquitinated chimeric EGFR (EGFR-Ub 4 ) is constitutively endocytosed in a clathrin-dependent manner. We now demonstrate that also an ErbB2-Ub 4 chimera is endocytosed constitutively and clathrin-dependently. Upon expression, the ErbB2-Ub 4 was further ubiquitinated, and by Western blotting, we demonstrated the formation of both Lys48-linked and Lys63-linked polyubiquitin chains. ErbB2-Ub 4 was constitutively internalized and eventually sorted to late endosomes and lysosomes where the fusion protein was degraded. ErbB2-Ub 4 was not cleaved prior to internalization. Interestingly, over-expression of Ubiquitin Interaction Motif-containing dominant negative fragments of the clathrin adaptor proteins epsin1 and Eps15 negatively affected endocytosis of ErbB2. Altogether, this argues that ubiquitination is sufficient to induce clathrin-mediated endocytosis and lysosomal degradation of the otherwise plasma membrane localized ErbB2. Also, it appears that C-terminal cleavage is not required for endocytosis. -- Highlights: ► A chimera containing ErbB2 and a tetra-Ubiquitin chain internalizes constitutively. ► Receptor fragmentation is not required for endocytosis of ErbB2. ► Ubiquitination is sufficient to induce endocytosis and degradation of ErbB2. ► ErbB2-Ub4 is internalized clathrin-dependently.

  8. Evaluation of chimeric yellow fever 17D/dengue viral replication in ticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazimírová, Mária; Mantel, Nathalie; Raynaud, Sandrine; Slovák, Mirko; Ustaniková, Katarína; Lang, Jean; Guy, Bruno; Barban, Veronique; Labuda, Milan

    2012-11-01

    Chimeric yellow fever 17D/DENV-1-4 viruses (CYD-1-4) have been developed as a tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate which is currently being evaluated in efficacy trials in Asia and America. While YF 17D and DENV are mosquito-borne flaviviruses, it has been shown that CYD-1-4 do not replicate after oral infection in mosquitoes and are not transmitted to new hosts. To further document the risk of environmental dissemination of these viruses, we evaluated the replication of CYD-1-4 in ticks, the vector of tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), another member of the flavivirus family. Females of two hard tick species, Ixodes ricinus and Rhipicephalus appendiculatus, were inoculated intracoelomically with CYD-1-4 viruses and parent viruses (DENV-1-4 and YF 17D). Virus persistence and replication was assessed 2, 16, and 44 days post-inoculation by plaque titration and qRT-PCR. CYD-1-4 viruses were detected in I. ricinus ticks at early time points post-inoculation, but with infectious titers at least 100-fold lower than those observed in TBEV-infected ticks. Unlike TBEV, complete viral clearance occurred by day 44 in most ticks except for CYD-2, which had a tendency to decline. In addition, while about 70% of TBEV-infected I. ricinus nymphs acquired infection by co-feeding with infected tick females on non-viremic hosts, no co-feeding transmission of CYD-2 virus was detected. Based on these results, we conclude that the risk of dissemination of the candidate vaccine viruses by tick bite is highly unlikely.

  9. RNA-guided Transcriptional Regulation in Plants via dCas9 Chimeric Proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Baazim, Hatoon

    2014-05-01

    Developing targeted genome regulation approaches holds much promise for accelerating trait discovery and development in agricultural biotechnology. Clustered Regularly Interspaced Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs)/CRISPR associated (Cas) system provides bacteria and archaea with an adaptive molecular immunity mechanism against invading nucleic acids through phages and conjugative plasmids. The type II CRISPR/Cas system has been adapted for genome editing purposes across a variety of cell types and organisms. Recently, the catalytically inactive Cas9 (dCas9) protein combined with guide RNAs (gRNAs) were used as a DNA-targeting platform to modulate the expression patterns in bacterial, yeast and human cells. Here, we employed this DNA-targeting system for targeted transcriptional regulation in planta by developing chimeric dCas9-based activators and repressors. For example, we fused to the C-terminus of dCas9 with the activation domains of EDLL and TAL effectors, respectively, to generate transcriptional activators, and the SRDX repression domain to generate transcriptional repressor. Our data demonstrate that the dCas9:EDLL and dCas9:TAD activators, guided by gRNAs complementary to promoter elements, induce strong transcriptional activation on episomal targets in plant cells. Moreover, our data suggest that the dCas9:SRDX repressor and the dCas9:EDLL and dCas9:TAD activators are capable of markedly repressing or activating, respectively, the transcription of an endogenous genomic target. Our data indicate that the CRISPR/dCas9:TFs DNA targeting system can be used in plants as a functional genomic tool and for biotechnological applications.

  10. Automated manufacturing of chimeric antigen receptor T cells for adoptive immunotherapy using CliniMACS prodigy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mock, Ulrike; Nickolay, Lauren; Philip, Brian; Cheung, Gordon Weng-Kit; Zhan, Hong; Johnston, Ian C D; Kaiser, Andrew D; Peggs, Karl; Pule, Martin; Thrasher, Adrian J; Qasim, Waseem

    2016-08-01

    Novel cell therapies derived from human T lymphocytes are exhibiting enormous potential in early-phase clinical trials in patients with hematologic malignancies. Ex vivo modification of T cells is currently limited to a small number of centers with the required infrastructure and expertise. The process requires isolation, activation, transduction, expansion and cryopreservation steps. To simplify procedures and widen applicability for clinical therapies, automation of these procedures is being developed. The CliniMACS Prodigy (Miltenyi Biotec) has recently been adapted for lentiviral transduction of T cells and here we analyse the feasibility of a clinically compliant T-cell engineering process for the manufacture of T cells encoding chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) for CD19 (CAR19), a widely targeted antigen in B-cell malignancies. Using a closed, single-use tubing set we processed mononuclear cells from fresh or frozen leukapheresis harvests collected from healthy volunteer donors. Cells were phenotyped and subjected to automated processing and activation using TransAct, a polymeric nanomatrix activation reagent incorporating CD3/CD28-specific antibodies. Cells were then transduced and expanded in the CentriCult-Unit of the tubing set, under stabilized culture conditions with automated feeding and media exchange. The process was continuously monitored to determine kinetics of expansion, transduction efficiency and phenotype of the engineered cells in comparison with small-scale transductions run in parallel. We found that transduction efficiencies, phenotype and function of CAR19 T cells were comparable with existing procedures and overall T-cell yields sufficient for anticipated therapeutic dosing. The automation of closed-system T-cell engineering should improve dissemination of emerging immunotherapies and greatly widen applicability. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-Cells for the Treatment of B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciprian Tomuleasa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T-cell technology has seen a rapid development over the last decade mostly due to the potential that these cells may have in treating malignant diseases. It is a generally accepted principle that very few therapeutic compounds deliver a clinical response without treatment-related toxicity, and studies have shown that CAR T-cells are not an exception to this rule. While large multinational drug companies are currently investigating the potential role of CAR T-cells in hematological oncology, the potential of such cellular therapies are being recognized worldwide as they are expected to expand in the patient to support the establishment of the immune memory, provide a continuous surveillance to prevent and/or treat a relapse, and keep the targeted malignant cell subpopulation in check. In this article, we present the possible advantages of using CAR T-cells in treating acute lymphoblastic leukemia, presenting the technology and the current knowledge in their preclinical and early clinical trial use. Thus, this article first presents the main present-day knowledge on the standard of care for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Afterward, current knowledge is presented about the use of CAR T-cells in cancer immunotherapy, describing their design, the molecular constructs, and the preclinical data on murine models to properly explain the background for their clinical use. Last, but certainly not least, this article presents the use of CAR T-cells for the immunotherapy of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, describing both their potential clinical advantages and the possible side effects.

  12. Homology-Directed Recombination for Enhanced Engineering of Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malika Hale

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Gene editing by homology-directed recombination (HDR can be used to couple delivery of a therapeutic gene cassette with targeted genomic modifications to generate engineered human T cells with clinically useful profiles. Here, we explore the functionality of therapeutic cassettes delivered by these means and test the flexibility of this approach to clinically relevant alleles. Because CCR5-negative T cells are resistant to HIV-1 infection, CCR5-negative anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cells could be used to treat patients with HIV-associated B cell malignancies. We show that targeted delivery of an anti-CD19 CAR cassette to the CCR5 locus using a recombinant AAV homology template and an engineered megaTAL nuclease results in T cells that are functionally equivalent, in both in vitro and in vivo tumor models, to CAR T cells generated by random integration using lentiviral delivery. With the goal of developing off-the-shelf CAR T cell therapies, we next targeted CARs to the T cell receptor alpha constant (TRAC locus by HDR, producing TCR-negative anti-CD19 CAR and anti-B cell maturation antigen (BCMA CAR T cells. These novel cell products exhibited in vitro cytolytic activity against both tumor cell lines and primary cell targets. Our combined results indicate that high-efficiency HDR delivery of therapeutic genes may provide a flexible and robust method that can extend the clinical utility of cell therapeutics.

  13. Chimeric thermostable DNA polymerases with reverse transcriptase and attenuated 3'-5' exonuclease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönbrunner, Nancy J; Fiss, Ellen H; Budker, Olga; Stoffel, Susanne; Sigua, Christopher L; Gelfand, David H; Myers, Thomas W

    2006-10-24

    The synthesis of accurate, full-length cDNA from low-abundance RNA and the subsequent PCR amplification under conditions which provide amplicon that contains minimal mutations remain a difficult molecular biological process. Many of the challenges associated with performing sensitive, long RT/PCR have been alleviated by using a mixture of DNA polymerases. These mixtures have typically contained a DNA polymerase devoid of 3'-5' exonuclease, or "proofreading", activity blended with a small amount of an Archaea DNA polymerase possessing 3'-5' exonuclease activity, since reverse transcriptases lack 3'-5' exonuclease activity and generally have low fidelity. To create a DNA polymerase with efficient reverse transcriptase and 3'-5' exonuclease activity, a family of mutant DNA polymerases with a range of attenuated 3'-5' exonuclease activities was constructed from a chimeric DNA polymerase derived from Thermus species Z05 and Thermotoga maritima DNA polymerases. These "designer" DNA polymerases were fashioned using structure-based tools to identify amino acid residues involved in the substrate-binding site of the exonuclease domain of a thermostable DNA polymerase. Mutation of some of these residues resulted in proteins in which DNA polymerase activity was unaffected, while proofreading activity ranged from 60% of the wild-type level to undetectable levels. Kinetic characterization of the exonuclease activity indicated that the mutations affected catalysis much more than binding. On the basis of their specificity constants (kcat/KM), the mutant enzymes have a 5-15-fold stronger preference for a double-stranded mismatched substrate over a single-stranded substrate than the wild-type DNA polymerase, a desirable attribute for RT/PCR. The utility of these enzymes was evaluated in a RT/PCR assay to generate a 1.7 kb amplicon from HIV-1 RNA.

  14. Efficacy of chimeric Pestivirus vaccine candidates against classical swine fever: protection and DIVA characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eblé, P L; Geurts, Y; Quak, S; Moonen-Leusen, H W; Blome, S; Hofmann, M A; Koenen, F; Beer, M; Loeffen, W L A

    2013-03-23

    Currently no live DIVA (Differentiating Infected from Vaccinated Animals) vaccines against classical swine fever (CSF) are available. The aim of this study was to investigate whether chimeric pestivirus vaccine candidates (CP7_E2alf, Flc11 and Flc9) are able to protect pigs against clinical signs, and to reduce virus shedding and virus transmission, after a challenge with CSF virus (CSFV), 7 or 14 days after a single intramuscular vaccination. In these vaccine candidates, either the E2 or the E(rns) encoding genome region of a bovine viral diarrhoea virus strain were combined with a cDNA copy of CSFV or vice versa. Furthermore, currently available serological DIVA tests were evaluated. The vaccine candidates were compared to the C-strain. All vaccine candidates protected against clinical signs. No transmission to contact pigs was detected in the groups vaccinated with C-strain, CP7_E2alf and Flc11. Limited transmission occurred in the groups vaccinated with Flc9. All vaccine candidates would be suitable to stop on-going transmission of CSFV. For Flc11, no reliable differentiation was possible with the current E(rns)-based DIVA test. For CP7_E2alf, the distribution of the inhibition percentages was such that up to 5% false positive results may be obtained in a large vaccinated population. For Flc9 vaccinated pigs, the E2 ELISA performed very well, with an expected 0.04% false positive results in a large vaccinated population. Both CP7_E2alf and Flc9 are promising candidates to be used as live attenuated marker vaccines against CSF, with protection the best feature of CP7_E2alf, and the DIVA principle the best feature of Flc9. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Is there a role for B lymphocyte chimerism in the monitoring of B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients receiving allogeneic stem cell transplantation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ning Yang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the sensitivity and significance of B-cell chimerism for the detection of early engraftment, transplant rejection, and disease relapse. Methods: The dynamic monitoring of lineage-specific cell subtypes (B, T, and NK cells was made in 20 B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL patients following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT. In the early period after allo-HSCT, the latest establishment of B-cell complete chimerism (CC was observed in a majority of patients. Results: The percentage of donor cells of B-cell lineage was lower than the percent of T-cell lineage in most of the mixed chimerism (MC patients. During graft rejection, the frequency of patients with decreasing MC of B-, T- and NK-cell lineage were 5/5, 2/5, and 2/5. When disease relapsed, five patients showed a faster decrease of the donor percent of B-cells than of T- or NK-cells. Only one patient displayed a more rapid decrease in NK-cells than in T- or B-cells. Conclusion: Monitoring of B-cell chimerism after HSCT seems to be valuable for insuring complete engraftment, anticipating graft rejection, and relapse in B-ALL patients. Keywords: B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL, B-cell, T-cell, Chimerism, Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT

  16. Chimerism Analysis of Cell-Free DNA in Patients Treated with Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation May Predict Early Relapse in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Aljurf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We studied DNA chimerism in cell-free DNA (cfDNA in patients treated with HSCT. Methods. Chimerism analysis was performed on CD3+ cells, polymorphonuclear (PMN cells, and cfDNA using 16 small tandem repeat loci. The resulting labeled PCR-products were size-fractionated and quantified. Results. Analyzing samples from 191 patients treated with HSCT for nonneoplastic hematologic disorders demonstrated that the cfDNA chimerism is comparable to that seen in PMN cells. Analyzing leukemia patients (N = 126 showed that, of 84 patients with 100% donor DNA in PMN, 16 (19% had evidence of clinical relapse and >10% recipient DNA in the plasma. Additional 16 patients of the 84 (19% showed >10% recipient DNA in plasma, but without evidence of relapse. Eight patients had mixed chimerism in granulocytes, lymphocytes, and plasma, but three of these patients had >10% recipient DNA in plasma compared to PMN cells and these three patients had clinical evidence of relapse. The remaining 34 patients showed 100% donor DNA in both PMN and lymphocytes, but cfDNA showed various levels of chimerism. Of these patients 14 (41% showed laboratory or clinical evidence of relapse and all had >10% recipient DNA in cfDNA. Conclusion. Monitoring patients after HSCT using cfDNA might be more reliable than cellular DNA in predicting early relapse.

  17. A novel antigen-toxin chimeric protein: myelin basic protein-pseudomonas exotoxin (MBP-PE 40) for treatment of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, T; Steinberger, I; Soffer, D; Beraud, E; Ben-Nun, A; Lorberboum-Galski, H

    1999-06-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP), is a major component of the central nervous system (CNS) myelin. MBP can stimulate T cells that migrate into the CNS, initiating a cascade of events that result in perivascular infiltration and demyelination. EAE is an inflammatory and demyelinating autoimmune disease of the CNS that serves as a model for the human disease Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Taking advantage of the fact that EAE can be mediated by T cells, able to recognize MBP or its peptides, we developed a new approach to target anti-MBP T cells by fusing an MBP-sequence to a toxin. In the new chimeric protein, an oligonucleotide coding for the guinea pig MBP encephalitogenic moiety (residues 68-88) was fused to a cDNA encoding a truncated form of the PE gene (PE40). The chimeric gene termed MBP-PE was expressed in E. coli and highly purified. MBP-PE chimeric protein was cytotoxic to various anti-MBP T cells. Moreover, treatment with the novel MBP-toxin blocked the clinical signs of EAE as well as CNS inflammation and demyelination. A chimeric protein such as MBP-PE40 presents a novel prototype of chimeric proteins, composed of antigen/peptide-toxin, that could prove to be an efficient and specific immunotherapeutic agent for autoimmune diseases in which a known antigen is involved.

  18. Evidence for Anger Saliency during the Recognition of Chimeric Facial Expressions of Emotions in Underage Ebola Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Ardizzi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the crucial features defining basic emotions and their prototypical facial expressions is their value for survival. Childhood traumatic experiences affect the effective recognition of facial expressions of negative emotions, normally allowing the recruitment of adequate behavioral responses to environmental threats. Specifically, anger becomes an extraordinarily salient stimulus unbalancing victims’ recognition of negative emotions. Despite the plethora of studies on this topic, to date, it is not clear whether this phenomenon reflects an overall response tendency toward anger recognition or a selective proneness to the salience of specific facial expressive cues of anger after trauma exposure. To address this issue, a group of underage Sierra Leonean Ebola virus disease survivors (mean age 15.40 years, SE 0.35; years of schooling 8.8 years, SE 0.46; 14 males and a control group (mean age 14.55, SE 0.30; years of schooling 8.07 years, SE 0.30, 15 males performed a forced-choice chimeric facial expressions recognition task. The chimeric facial expressions were obtained pairing upper and lower half faces of two different negative emotions (selected from anger, fear and sadness for a total of six different combinations. Overall, results showed that upper facial expressive cues were more salient than lower facial expressive cues. This priority was lost among Ebola virus disease survivors for the chimeric facial expressions of anger. In this case, differently from controls, Ebola virus disease survivors recognized anger regardless of the upper or lower position of the facial expressive cues of this emotion. The present results demonstrate that victims’ performance in the recognition of the facial expression of anger does not reflect an overall response tendency toward anger recognition, but rather the specific greater salience of facial expressive cues of anger. Furthermore, the present results show that traumatic experiences deeply modify

  19. X-irradiation removes endogenous primordial germ cells (PGCs) and increases germline transmission of donor PGCs in chimeric chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yoshiaki; Usui, Fumitake; Miyahara, Daichi; Mori, Takafumi; Ono, Tamao; Kagami, Hiroshi; Takeda, Kumiko; Nirasawa, Keijiro; Tagami, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are embryonic precursors of germline cells with potential applications in genetic conservation, transgenic animal production and germline stem cell research. These lines of research would benefit from improved germline transmission of transplanted PGCs in chimeric chickens. We therefore evaluated the effects of pretransplant X-irradiation of recipient embryos on the efficacy of germline transmission of donor PGCs in chimeric chickens. Intact chicken eggs were exposed to X-ray doses of 3, 6 and 9 Gy (dose rate = 0.12 Gy/min) after 52 h of incubation. There was no significant difference in hatching rate between the 3-Gy-irradiated group and the nonirradiated control group (40.0 vs. 69.6%), but the hatching rate in the 6-Gy-irradiated group (28.6%) was significantly lower than in the control group (PPGCs in the embryonic gonads at stage 27 in a dose-dependent manner compared with nonirradiated controls. The numbers of endogenous PGCs in the 3-, 6- and 9-Gy-irradiated groups were 21.0, 9.6 and 4.6% of the nonirradiated control numbers, respectively. Sets of 100 donor PGCs were subsequently transferred intravascularly into embryos irradiated with 3 Gy X-rays and nonirradiated control embryos. Genetic cross-test analysis revealed that the germline transmission rate in the 3-Gy-irradiated group was significantly higher than in the control group (27.5 vs. 5.6%; PPGCs and increased the germline transmission of transferred PGCs in chimeric chickens.

  20. A novel chimeric protein composed of recombinant Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae antigens as a vaccine candidate evaluated in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Natasha Rodrigues; Jorge, Sérgio; Gomes, Charles Klazer; Rizzi, Caroline; Pacce, Violetta Dias; Collares, Thais Farias; Monte, Leonardo Garcia; Dellagostin, Odir Antônio

    2017-03-01

    Enzootic Pneumonia (EP) is caused by the Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae pathogenic bacteria, and it represents a significant respiratory disease that is responsible for major economic losses within the pig industry throughout the world. The bacterins that are currently commercially available have been proven to offer only partial protection against M. hyopneumoniae, and the development of more efficient vaccines is required. Several recombinant antigens have been evaluated via different immunization strategies and have been found to be highly immunogenic. This work describes the construction and immunological characterization of a multi-antigen chimera composed of four M. hyopneumoniae antigens: P97R1, P46, P95, and P42. Immunogenic regions of each antigen were selected and combined to encode a single polypeptide. The gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the chimeric protein was recognized by specific antibodies against each subunit, as well as by convalescent pig sera. The immunogenic properties of the chimera were then evaluated in a mice model through two recombinant vaccines that were formulated as follows: (1) purified chimeric protein plus adjuvant or (2) recombinant Escherichia coli bacterin. The immune response induced in BALB/c mice immunized with each formulation was characterized in terms of total IgG levels, IgG1, and IgG2a isotypes against each antigen present in the chimera. The results of the study indicated that novel chimeric protein is a potential candidate for the future development of a more effective vaccine against EP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Chimeric vip3Aa16TC Gene Encoding the Toxic Core of the Vegetative Insecticidal Protein Enhanced Bacillus thuringiensis Entomopathogenicity

    OpenAIRE

    Sameh Sellami; Maroua Cherif; Samir Jaoua; Kaïs Jamoussi

    2015-01-01

    Vip3 insecticidal protein is produced by Bacillus thuringiensis during the vegetative stage. Its proteolysis by the midgut juice of susceptible larvae formed four major products of approximately 66, 45, 33 and 22 kDa. In this study, we cloned the vip3Aa16TC DNA encoding the “Vip3Aa16 toxic core (TC)” of 33 kDa corresponding to the Vip3Aa16 region from amino acid 200 to 456. The vip3Aa16TC chimeric gene carried by the pHT-vip3Aa16TC plasmid was under the control of the sporulation ...

  2. The Hox cooperativity motif of the chimeric oncoprotein E2a-Pbx1 is necessary and sufficient for oncogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, C P; de Vivo, I; Cleary, M L

    1997-01-01

    E2a-Pbx1 chimeric oncoproteins result from fusion of the E2A and PBX1 genes at the sites of t(1;19) chromosomal translocations in a subset acute lymphoblastic leukemias. Experimentally, E2a-Pbx1 transforms a variety of cell types, including fibroblasts, myeloid progenitors, and lymphoblasts. Structure-function studies have shown that contributions from both E2a and Pbx1 are necessary for oncogenesis, but the Pbx1 homeodomain is dispensable and the required portion of Pbx1 has not been delinea...

  3. Characterization of a Novel Chimeric Swine Enteric Coronavirus from Diseased Pigs in Central Eastern Europe in 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belsham, Graham; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Normann, Preben

    2016-01-01

    of these coronaviruses. However, further analyses, using other TGEV- and PEDV-specific RT-qPCR assays, provided results inconsistent with infection by either of these viruses. Sequencing of an amplicon (ca. 1.6 kb), generated by an RT-PCR specific for the PEDV S-gene, indicated a very close similarity (ca. 99% identity......) to recently described chimeric viruses termed swine enteric coronaviruses (SeCoVs). These viruses (with an RNA genome of ca. 28 kb) were first identified in Italy in samples from 2009 but have not been detected there since 2012. A closely related virus was detected in archived samples in Germany from 2012...

  4. Pre-clinical evaluation of CD38 chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cells for the treatment of multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drent, Esther; Groen, Richard W. J.; Noort, Willy A. Noort

    2016-01-01

    appeared to lyse the CD38+ fractions of CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells, monocytes, natural killer cells, and to a lesser extent T and B cells but did not inhibit the outgrowth of progenitor cells into various myeloid lineages and, furthermore, were effectively controllable with a caspase-9-based...... suicide gene. These results signify the potential importance of CD38-chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells as therapeutic tools for CD38+ malignancies and warrant further efforts to diminish the undesired effects of this immunotherapy using appropriate strategies. © 2016 Ferrata Storti Foundation....

  5. Chimerization at the AQP2–AQP3 locus is the genetic basis of melarsoprol–pentamidine cross-resistance in clinical Trypanosoma brucei gambiense isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice E. Graf

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aquaglyceroporin-2 is a known determinant of melarsoprol–pentamidine cross-resistance in Trypanosoma brucei brucei laboratory strains. Recently, chimerization at the AQP2–AQP3 tandem locus was described from melarsoprol–pentamidine cross-resistant Trypanosoma brucei gambiense isolates from sleeping sickness patients in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Here, we demonstrate that reintroduction of wild-type AQP2 into one of these isolates fully restores drug susceptibility while expression of the chimeric AQP2/3 gene in aqp2–aqp3 null T. b. brucei does not. This proves that AQP2–AQP3 chimerization is the cause of melarsoprol–pentamidine cross-resistance in the T. b. gambiense isolates.

  6. Lentiviral Gag assembly analyzed through the functional characterization of chimeric simian immunodeficiency viruses expressing different domains of the feline immunodeficiency virus capsid protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María J Esteva

    Full Text Available To gain insight into the functional relationship between the capsid (CA domains of the Gag polyproteins of simian and feline immunodeficiency viruses (SIV and FIV, respectively, we constructed chimeric SIVs in which the CA-coding region was partially or totally replaced by the equivalent region of the FIV CA. The phenotypic characterization of the chimeras allowed us to group them into three categories: the chimeric viruses that, while being assembly-competent, exhibit a virion-associated unstable FIV CA; a second group represented only by the chimeric SIV carrying the N-terminal domain (NTD of the FIV CA which proved to be assembly-defective; and a third group constituted by the chimeric viruses that produce virions exhibiting a mature and stable FIV CA protein, and which incorporate the envelope glycoprotein and contain wild-type levels of viral genome RNA and reverse transcriptase. Further analysis of the latter group of chimeric SIVs demonstrated that they are non-infectious due to a post-entry impairment, such as uncoating of the viral core, reverse transcription or nuclear import of the preintegration complex. Furthermore, we show here that the carboxyl-terminus domain (CTD of the FIV CA has an intrinsic ability to dimerize in vitro and form high-molecular-weight oligomers, which, together with our finding that the FIV CA-CTD is sufficient to confer assembly competence to the resulting chimeric SIV Gag polyprotein, provides evidence that the CA-CTD exhibits more functional plasticity than the CA-NTD. Taken together, our results provide relevant information on the biological relationship between the CA proteins of primate and nonprimate lentiviruses.

  7. A novel chimeric DNA vaccine: enhancement of preventive and therapeutic efficacy of DNA vaccine by fusion of Mucin 1 to a heat shock protein 70 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Dae-Han; Woo, Jong Kyu; Choi, Yun; Seo, Hye-Sook; Kim, Chul-Woo

    2011-01-01

    Intensive efforts to improve vaccines against cancer are currently outgoing. Mucin 1 (Muc1) is a tumor-specific antigen that is overexpressed and heavily glycosylated in a variety of adenocarcinomas. In the present study, the efficacy of an anticancer DNA vaccination strategy was demonstrated using Muc1 fusion vaccines. To enhance antigen presentation and tumor-suppressive efficacy, a chimeric Muc1 vaccine was designed, encoding the transmembrane- and C-terminal domain-deleted Muc1 gene (∆TM) fused to the human HSP70 gene. To confirm the expression and secretion of fusion protein, cell culture supernatants were subjected to Western blotting. We found secreted Muc1 ΔTM-HSP0 fusion protein in the supernatants. These results demonstrate that the Muc1 ΔTM-HSP0 construct can be efficiently expressed and secreted from transfected cells. When the chimeric Muc1 vaccine was administered to mice, antigen-specific cellular immune responses were observed. Notably, we observed that antigen-specific lymphocyte proliferation and cytotoxic responses were effectively induced only in the group of mice that had been vaccinated with the chimeric Muc1 vaccine. Concurrent with the Muc1-specific tumor-suppressive effect, the growth of established Muc1-expressing B16 mouse melanoma cells was also significantly inhibited by vaccination with the chimeric Muc1 vaccine. The growth of B16 mouse melanoma cells expressing human Muc1 in C57BL/6 mice was effectively suppressed by the Muc1-HSP70 chimeric DNA vaccine. Our results reveal that the antitumor efficacy of the chimeric DNA vaccine was improved by the presence of HSP/70.

  8. Dizygotic monochorionic twin pregnancy conceived following intracytoplasmic sperm injection treatment and complicated by twin-twin transfusion syndrome and blood chimerism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekelund, Charlotte Kvist; Skibsted, L.; Søgaard, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    and zygocity determination were performed on amniotic fluid and showed the twins to be dizygotic with normal female and male karyotypes. There were clinical and sonographic signs of twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS), and Cesarean delivery was performed at 32 weeks' gestation. At birth the twins were...... phenotypically a normal male and a normal female. Histology of the placenta showed it to be monochorionic diamniotic. Blood chimerism was found postnatally as both infants had the karyotypes 46,XX[13]/46,XY[17]. Chimerism was not found in cells from a buccal swab at 6 months of age. This is one of only a few...

  9. Generation and characterization of infectious chimeric clones between human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and simian immunodeficiency virus from an African green monkey.

    OpenAIRE

    Shibata, R; Sakai, H; Kiyomasu, T; Ishimoto, A; Hayami, M; Adachi, A

    1990-01-01

    A series of chimeric clones of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and simian immunodeficiency virus isolated from an African green monkey was constructed in vitro. In transient transfection experiments, all clones produced virion-associated reverse transcriptase, gag proteins, and env proteins. Eight out of 10 chimeric viruses clearly grew in the human CD4+ cell line C8166. Susceptibility of other CD4+ cell lines, MT-4, A3.01, and Molt4 clone 8, to infection with these viruses was also demon...

  10. Long-term follow-up of Japanese encephalitis chimeric virus vaccine: Immune responses in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Sirivichayakul, Chukiat; Thisyakorn, Usa; Pancharoen, Chitsanu; Boaz, Mark; Bouckenooghe, Alain; Feroldi, Emmanuel

    2016-11-04

    A single dose of live attenuated Japanese encephalitis chimeric virus vaccine (JE-CV) was shown to be immunogenic and well tolerated when given either as a booster to formalin-inactivated Japanese encephalitis (JE)-vaccine (mouse brain-derived vaccine [MBDV])-primed 2-5-year-olds, or as a primary vaccination to JE-vaccine-naïve 12-24-month-old toddlers in Thailand. A 5-year follow-up assessment of immune response persistence over time was conducted. Four additional visits (at 2, 3, 4, and 5years) for immunologic assessments were added to the original 12-month open-label crossover study, in which 100 healthy children aged 2-5years with a history of two-dose primary vaccination with MBDV (according to the Thai Expanded Program for Immunization schedule), and 200 healthy JE-vaccine-naïve 12-24-month-old toddlers, were randomized 1:1 to receive JE-CV, containing ⩾4 log 10 plaque forming units, 1month before or after hepatitis A control vaccine. In MBDV-primed 2-5-year-olds (n=78), the immune response to the JE-CV vaccine persisted up to at least 5years after vaccination with a single dose of JE-CV, with all (n=78) children seroprotected at the year 5 visit (geometric mean titers [GMT]: 2521/dil). There was no decrease of seroprotection rate over time (100% at 6months post-vaccination and 96.8% (90.3-98.9) at 5yearspost-vaccination). In JE-vaccine-naïve toddlers, a protective immune response persisted up to at least 5years in 58.8% (50.9-66.4) after a single-dose administration of JE-CV (GMT 26.71/dil; sensitivity analysis). A single-dose of JE-CV as a booster following MBDV administration provided long-lasting immunity. In JE-vaccine-naïve toddlers, despite relatively high seroprotection rates persisting over time, a subsequent booster dose is recommended following a JE-CV primary vaccination for long-term protection. This study was registered on www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00621764). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Kinetic evaluation of photosensitivity in bi-stable variants of chimeric channelrhodopsins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoko Hososhima

    Full Text Available Channelrhodopsin-1 and 2 (ChR1 and ChR2 form cation channels that are gated by light through an unknown mechanism. We tested the DC-gate hypothesis that C167 and D195 are involved in the stabilization of the cation-permeable state of ChRWR/C1C2 which consists of TM1-5 of ChR1 and TM6-7 of ChR2 and ChRFR which consists of TM1-2 of ChR1 and TM3-7 of ChR2. The cation permeable state of each ChRWR and ChRFR was markedly prolonged in the order of several tens of seconds when either C167 or D195 position was mutated to alanine (A. Therefore, the DC-gate function was conserved among these chimeric ChRs. We next investigated the kinetic properties of the ON/OFF response of these bi-stable ChR mutants as they are important in designing the photostimulation protocols for the optogenetic manipulation of neuronal activities. The turning-on rate constant of each photocurrent followed a linear relationship to 0-0.12 mW mm(-2 of blue LED light or to 0-0.33 mW mm(-2 of cyan LED light. Each photocurrent of bi-stable ChR was shut off to the non-conducting state by yellow or orange LED light in a manner dependent on the irradiance. As the magnitude of the photocurrent was mostly determined by the turning-on rate constant and the irradiation time, the minimal irradiance that effectively evoked an action potential (threshold irradiance was decreased with time only if the neuron, which expresses bi-stable ChRs, has a certain large membrane time constant (eg. τm > 20 ms. On the other hand, in another group of neurons, the threshold irradiance was not dependent on the irradiation time. Based on these quantitative data, we would propose that these bi-stable ChRs would be most suitable for enhancing the intrinsic activity of excitatory pyramidal neurons at a minimal magnitude of irradiance.

  12. Chimeric green fluorescent protein as a tool for visualizing subcellular organelles in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzuto, R; Brini, M; Pizzo, P; Murgia, M; Pozzan, T

    1995-06-01

    identifying genetically modified cells to be used in physiological studies. More importantly, chimeric GFP, which in principle can be targeted to any subcellular location, can be used to monitor complex phenomena in intact living cells, such as changes in shape and distribution of organelles, and it has the potential to be used as a probe of physiological parameters.

  13. Dominant repression of target genes by chimeric repressors that include the EAR motif, a repression domain, in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratsu, Keiichiro; Matsui, Kyoko; Koyama, Tomotsugu; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru

    2003-06-01

    The redundancy of genes for plant transcription factors often interferes with efforts to identify the biologic functions of such factors. We show here that four different transcription factors fused to the EAR motif, a repression domain of only 12 amino acids, act as dominant repressors in transgenic Arabidopsis and suppress the expression of specific target genes, even in the presence of the redundant transcription factors, with resultant dominant loss-of-function phenotypes. Chimeric EIN3, CUC1, PAP1, and AtMYB23 repressors that included the EAR motif dominantly suppressed the expression of their target genes and caused insensitivity to ethylene, cup-shaped cotyledons, reduction in the accumulation of anthocyanin, and absence of trichomes, respectively. This chimeric repressor silencing technology (CRES-T), exploiting the EAR-motif repression domain, is simple and effective and can overcome genetic redundancy. Thus, it should be useful not only for the rapid analysis of the functions of redundant plant transcription factors but also for the manipulation of plant traits via the suppression of gene expression that is regulated by specific transcription factors.

  14. Mutation of the fiber shaft heparan sulphate binding site of a 5/3 chimeric adenovirus reduces liver tropism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anniina Koski

    Full Text Available Natural tropism to the liver is a major obstacle in systemic delivery of adenoviruses in cancer gene therapy. Adenovirus binding to soluble coagulation factors and to cellular heparan sulphate proteoglycans via the fiber shaft KKTK domain are suggested to cause liver tropism. Serotype 5 adenovirus constructs with mutated KKTK regions exhibit liver detargeting, but they also transduce tumors less efficiently, possibly due to altered fiber conformation. We constructed Ad5/3lucS*, a 5/3 chimeric adenovirus with a mutated KKTK region. The fiber knob swap was hypothesized to facilitate tumor transduction. This construct was studied with or without additional coagulation factor ablation. Ad5/3lucS* exhibited significantly reduced transduction of human hepatic cells in vitro and mouse livers in vivo. Combination of coagulation factor ablation by warfarinization to Ad5/3lucS* seemed to further enhance liver detargeting. Cancer cell transduction by Ad5/3lucS* was retained in vitro. In vivo, viral particle accumulation in M4A4-LM3 xenograft tumors was comparable to controls, but Ad5/3lucS* transgene expression was nearly abolished. Coagulation factor ablation did not affect tumor transduction. These studies set the stage for further investigations into the effects of the KKTK mutation and coagulation factor ablation in the context of 5/3 serotype chimerism. Of note, the putative disconnect between tumor transduction and transgene expression could prove useful in further understanding of adenovirus biology.

  15. Oromandibular reconstruction with chimeric double-skin paddle flap based on peroneal vessel axis for synchronous opposite double oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Tsai; Liu, Wen-Chung; Chen, Lee-Wei; Yang, Kuo-Chung

    2015-05-01

    Synchronous double oral cancer represents the minority of cases of head and neck cancer. After tumor ablation, 2 separate oromandibular defects, even combined with a through-and-through oral defect, pose a serious reconstructive challenge. The ideal method for reconstruction remains controversial. Based on the peroneal vessel axis, a chimeric double-skin paddle peroneal fasciocutaneous or fibular osteomyocutaneous flap could be designed to accomplish the difficult reconstruction. Six male patients, each with 2 separate oromandibular defects after tumor ablation of synchronous double oral cancer, received double-skin paddle flap reconstruction with 3 peroneal fasciocutaneous and 3 fibular osteomyocutaneous flaps. All 6 flaps survived; however, complications included 1 skin paddle lost due to insufficient perfusion of a visible perforator, and 1 superficial necrosis occurring over the tip of a longer skin paddle. One postoperative intraoral infection and 1 donor site infection were also reported. During follow-up, 3 months later, 1 patient succumbed to local recurrence and bony metastasis. One patient developed a new cancer in the maxillary gingiva, and another had osteoradionecrosis 8 months later. Four patients gained acceptable cosmesis with good oral competence. A chimeric flap based on the peroneal artery could provide a segment of fibular bone, 1 or 2 skin paddles, and a cuff of the flexor hallucis longus muscle simultaneously. For 1-stage reconstruction of separate oromandibular defects after tumor ablation of synchronous double oral cancer, this design could provide all components at 1 transfer.

  16. Dualism of mixed chimerism between hematopoiesis and stroma in chronic idiopathic myelofibrosis after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, J; Varus, E; Siebolts, U; Kvasnicka, H M; Wickenhauser, C; Metz, K A; Beelen, D W; Ditschkowski, M; Zander, A; Kröger, N

    2007-04-01

    Scant knowledge exists concerning lineage-restricted mixed chimerism (mCh) after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PSCT) in patients with chronic idiopathic myelofibrosis (CIMF). Following a sex-mismatched PSCT, a combined immunopheno- and genotyping by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) was performed on sequential bone marrow (BM) biopsies at standardized intervals. Results were compared with PCR analysis of corresponding peripheral blood samples in five patients. According to FISH, pretransplant specimens revealed a gender congruence of more than 99%, while in the first three months the total BM exhibited a persistent fraction of host cells (30% to 40%) with a tendency to decline after about one year. It is noteworthy that the majority of endothelial cells maintained a recipient origin, whereas CD34+ progenitors and especially CD61+ megakaryocytes exhibited only very few host-derived cells. In keeping with the prevalence of donor cells in the hematopoietic compartment, PCR analysis of peripheral blood cells displayed a non-significant degree of mCh. In conclusion, according to FISH and PCR analysis, successful PSCT in CIMF results in an almost complete chimeric (donor-derived) state of the hematopoietic cell population. The non-transplantable stromal compartment includes the vascular endothelium with a predominance of recipient cells. The minimal mCh of this population implies probably a donor-derived origin (endothelial progenitor cells).

  17. Structure-based approach to rationally design a chimeric protein for an effective vaccine against Group B Streptococcus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuccitelli, Annalisa; Cozzi, Roberta; Gourlay, Louise J; Donnarumma, Danilo; Necchi, Francesca; Norais, Nathalie; Telford, John L; Rappuoli, Rino; Bolognesi, Martino; Maione, Domenico; Grandi, Guido; Rinaudo, C Daniela

    2011-06-21

    Structural vaccinology is an emerging strategy for the rational design of vaccine candidates. We successfully applied structural vaccinology to design a fully synthetic protein with multivalent protection activity. In Group B Streptococcus, cell-surface pili have aroused great interest because of their direct roles in virulence and importance as protective antigens. The backbone subunit of type 2a pilus (BP-2a) is present in six immunogenically different but structurally similar variants. We determined the 3D structure of one of the variants, and experimentally demonstrated that protective antibodies specifically recognize one of the four domains that comprise the protein. We therefore constructed a synthetic protein constituted by the protective domain of each one of the six variants and showed that the chimeric protein protects mice against the challenge with all of the type 2a pilus-carrying strains. This work demonstrates the power of structural vaccinology and will facilitate the development of an optimized, broadly protective pilus-based vaccine against Group B Streptococcus by combining the uniquely generated chimeric protein with protective pilin subunits from two other previously identified pilus types. In addition, this work describes a template procedure that can be followed to develop vaccines against other bacterial pathogens.

  18. Virus-Like Particles of Chimeric Recombinant Porcine Circovirus Type 2 as Antigen Vehicle Carrying Foreign Epitopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huawei Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Virus-like particles (VLPs of chimeric porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2 were generated by replacing the nuclear localization signal (NLS; at 1–39 aa of PCV2 capsid protein (Cap with classical swine fever virus (CSFV T-cell epitope (1446–1460 aa, CSFV B-cell epitope (693–716 aa and CSFV T-cell epitope conjugated with B-cell epitope. The recombinant proteins were expressed using the baculovirus expression system and detected by immunoblotting and indirect immunofluorescence assay. The abilities to form PCV2 VLPs were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Immunogenicities of the three recombinant proteins were evaluated in mice. Our Results indicated that Cap protein NLS deletion or substitution with CSFV epitopes did not affect the VLPs assembly. Three chimeric Cap proteins could form VLPs and induce efficient humoral and cellular immunity against PCV2 and CSFV in mice. Results show that PCV2 VLPs can be used as an efficient antigen carrier for delivery of foreign epitopes, and a potential novel vaccine.

  19. The role of bone marrow-derived cells in bone fracture repair in a green fluorescent protein chimeric mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Kazuhiro; Ogawa, Rei; Migita, Makoto; Hanawa, Hideki; Ito, Hiromoto; Orimo, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the role of bone marrow cells in bone fracture repair using green fluorescent protein (GFP) chimeric model mice. First, the chimeric model mice were created: bone marrow cells from GFP-transgenic C57BL/6 mice were injected into the tail veins of recipient wild-type C57BL/6 mice that had been irradiated with a lethal dose of 10 Gy from a cesium source. Next, bone fracture models were created from these mice: closed transverse fractures of the left femur were produced using a specially designed device. One, three, and five weeks later, fracture lesions were extirpated for histological and immunohistochemical analyses. In the specimens collected 3 and 5 weeks after operation, we confirmed calluses showing intramembranous ossification peripheral to the fracture site. The calluses consisted of GFP- and osteocalcin-positive cells at the same site, although the femur consisted of only osteocalcin-positive cells. We suggest that bone marrow cells migrated outside of the bone marrow and differentiated into osteoblasts to make up the calluses

  20. Crystal structure of an FIV/HIV chimeric protease complexed with the broad-based inhibitor, TL-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elder John H

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have obtained the 1.7 Å crystal structure of FIV protease (PR in which 12 critical residues around the active site have been substituted with the structurally equivalent residues of HIV PR (12X FIV PR. The chimeric PR was crystallized in complex with the broad-based inhibitor TL-3, which inhibits wild type FIV and HIV PRs, as well as 12X FIV PR and several drug-resistant HIV mutants 1234. Biochemical analyses have demonstrated that TL-3 inhibits these PRs in the order HIV PR > 12X FIV PR > FIV PR, with Ki values of 1.5 nM, 10 nM, and 41 nM, respectively 234. Comparison of the crystal structures of the TL-3 complexes of 12X FIV and wild-typeFIV PR revealed theformation of additinal van der Waals interactions between the enzyme inhibitor in the mutant PR. The 12X FIV PR retained the hydrogen bonding interactions between residues in the flap regions and active site involving the enzyme and the TL-3 inhibitor in comparison to both FIV PR and HIV PR. However, the flap regions of the 12X FIV PR more closely resemble those of HIV PR, having gained several stabilizing intra-flap interactions not present in wild type FIV PR. These findings offer a structural explanation for the observed inhibitor/substrate binding properties of the chimeric PR.

  1. Chimeric anti-staphylococcal enterotoxin B antibodies and lovastatin act synergistically to provide in vivo protection against lethal doses of SEB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulualem E Tilahun

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB is one of a family of toxins secreted by Staphylococcus aureus that act as superantigens, activating a large fraction of the T-cell population and inducing production of high levels of inflammatory cytokines that can cause toxic shock syndrome (TSS and death. Extracellular engagement of the TCR of T-cells and class II MHC of antigen presenting cells by SEB triggers the activation of many intracellular signaling processes. We engineered chimeric antibodies to block the extracellular engagement of cellular receptors by SEB and used a statin to inhibit intracellular signaling. Chimeric human-mouse antibodies directed against different neutralizing epitopes of SEB synergistically inhibited its activation of human T-cells in vitro. In the in vivo model of lethal toxic shock syndrome (TSS in HLA-DR3 transgenic mice, two of these antibodies conferred significant partial protection when administered individually, but offered complete protection in a synergistic manner when given together. Similarly, in vivo, lovastatin alone conferred only partial protection from TSS similar to single anti-SEB antibodies. However, used in combination with one chimeric neutralizing anti-SEB antibody, lovastatin provided complete protection against lethal TSS in HLA-DR3 transgenic mice. These experiments demonstrate that in vivo protection against lethal doses of SEB can be achieved by a statin of proven clinical safety and chimeric human-mouse antibodies, agents now widely used and known to be of low immunogenicity in human hosts.

  2. Co-expression of xerophyte Zygophyllum xanthoxylum ZxNHX and ZxVP1-1 confers enhanced salinity tolerance in chimeric sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guo-Qiang; Feng, Rui-Jun; Wang, Suo-Min; Wang, Chun-Mei; Bao, Ai-Ke; Wei, Li; Yuan, Hui-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Salinity is one of the major abiotic stresses that limit the growth and productivity of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.). To improve sugar beet's salinity tolerance, the ZxNHX and ZxVP1-1 genes encoding tonoplast Na(+)/H(+) antiporter and H(+)-PPase from xerophyte Zygophyllum xanthoxylum were co-expressed by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. It is showed here that co-expression of ZxNHX and ZxVP1-1 confers enhanced salinity tolerance to the transformed sugar beet plants compared with the wild-type (WT) plants. The chimeric plants grew well in the presence of high salinity (400 mM NaCl), whereas WT plants displayed chlorosis and died within 8 days. Compared to WT plants, the chimeric plants co-expressing ZxNHX and ZxVP1-1 accumulated more proline, Na(+) and K(+) in their leaves and petioles when exposed to high salinity, which caused lower solute potential, retained more water and thus subjected to lesser cell membrane damage. Interestingly, the chimeric plants accumulated higher sucrose, glucose and fructose contents in their storage roots than WT plants in the absence or presence of high salinity. Our results suggested that co-expression of ZxNHX and ZxVP1-1 improved the osmoregulatory capacity in chimeric sugar beet through increased compartmentalization of ions into the vacuoles by enhancing the activity of proton pumps and thus mitigated Na(+)-toxicity for plants.

  3. Development of a Novel Anti-HIV-1 Agent from within: Effect of Chimeric Vpr-Containing Protease Cleavage Site Residues on Virus Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serio, D.; Rizvi, T. A.; Cartas, M.; Kalyanaraman, V. S.; Weber, I. T.; Koprowski, H.; Srinivasan, A.

    1997-04-01

    Effective antiviral agents will be of great value in controlling virus replication and delaying the onset of HIV-1-related disease symptoms. Current therapy involves the use of antiviral agents that target the enzymatic functions of the virus, resulting in the emergence of resistant viruses to these agents, thus lowering their effectiveness. To overcome this problem, we have considered the idea of developing novel agents from within HIV-1 as inhibitors of virus replication. The specificity of the Vpr protein for the HIV-1 virus particle makes it an attractive molecule for the development of antiviral agents targeting the events associated with virus maturation. We have generated chimeric Vpr proteins containing HIV-1-specific sequences added to the C terminus of Vpr. These sequences correspond to nine cleavage sites of the Gag and Gag-Pol precursors of HIV-1. The chimeric Vpr constructs were introduced into HIV-1 proviral DNA to assess their effect on virus infectivity using single- and multiple-round replication assays. The virus particles generated exhibited a variable replication pattern depending on the protease cleavage site used as a fusion partner. Interestingly, the chimeric Vpr containing the cleavage sequences from the junction of p24 and p2, 24/2, completely abolished virus infectivity. These results show that chimeric proteins generated from within HIV-1 have the ability to suppress HIV-1 replication and make ideal agents for gene therapy or intracellular immunization to treat HIV-1 infection.

  4. Biological activity and field efficacy of a genetically modified Helicoverpa armigera single-nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus expressing an insect-selective toxin from a chimeric promoter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, X.; Wang, H.; Sun, X.C.; Chen Xinwen,; Peng, C.; Pan, D.; Jehle, J.A.; Werf, van der W.; Vlak, J.M.; Hu, Z.

    2004-01-01

    A recombinant baculovirus (HaSNPV-AaIT) with improved insecticidal properties was constructed for the control of the cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera). A chimeric promoter of the p6.9 and polyhedrin gene of H. armigera single-nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (HaSNPV) was used to drive the

  5. Kinetics and tissue distribution of the radiolabeled chimeric monoclonal antibody MOv18 IgG and F(ab')2 fragments in ovarian carcinoma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buist, M. R.; Kenemans, P.; den Hollander, W.; Vermorken, J. B.; Molthoff, C. J.; Burger, C. W.; Helmerhorst, T. J.; Baak, J. P.; Roos, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-four patients suspected of having ovarian carcinoma received i.v. injection with a combination of radiolabeled intact IgG (1 mg) and F(ab')2 fragments (1 mg) of the chimeric monoclonal antibody MOv18, each form labeled with 1.85 MBq 131I or 125I. Laparotomy was performed either 2 or 6 days

  6. Experimental and clinical analysis of the characteristics of a chimeric monoclonal antibody, MOv18, reactive with an ovarian cancer-associated antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molthoff, C. F.; Buist, M. R.; Kenemans, P.; Pinedo, H. M.; Boven, E.

    1992-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (Mab) MOv18 preferentially reacts with gynecological carcinomas. We have analyzed the characteristics of murine MOv18 (m-MOv18) and chimeric MOv18 (c-MOv18). We found no differences in affinity and binding to IGROV1 cells between c-MOv18 as IgG and F(ab')2 fragments and m-MOv18.

  7. Pharmacokinetics and tumor targeting of 131I-labeled F(ab')2 fragments of the chimeric monoclonal antibody G250: preclinical and clinical pilot studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, A.H.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Oosterwijk, E.; Buijs, W.C.A.M.; Corstens, F.H.M.; Boerman, O.C.; Oyen, W.J.G.

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Clinical and animal studies of chimeric monoclonal antibody G250 (moAb cG250) for the targeting of clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC), to date, have been with the intact IgG form. To determine whether F(ab')2 fragments are more suited for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) than intact IgG,

  8. Target Antigen Density Governs the Efficacy of Anti-CD20-CD28-CD3 zeta Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Modified Effector CD8(+) T Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watanabe, Keisuke; Terakura, Seitaro; Martens, Anton C.; van Meerten, Tom; Uchiyama, Susumu; Imai, Misa; Sakemura, Reona; Goto, Tatsunori; Hanajiri, Ryo; Imahashi, Nobuhiko; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Tomita, Akihiro; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Nishida, Tetsuya; Naoe, Tomoki; Murata, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of chimeric Ag receptor (CAR)-transduced T (CAR-T) cells has been attributed to supraphysiological signaling through CARs. Second-and later-generation CARs simultaneously transmit costimulatory signals with CD3 zeta signals upon ligation, but may lead to severe adverse effects

  9. The B7-1 cytoplasmic tail enhances intracellular transport and mammalian cell surface display of chimeric proteins in the absence of a linear ER export motif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chieh Lin

    Full Text Available Membrane-tethered proteins (mammalian surface display are increasingly being used for novel therapeutic and biotechnology applications. Maximizing surface expression of chimeric proteins on mammalian cells is important for these applications. We show that the cytoplasmic domain from the B7-1 antigen, a commonly used element for mammalian surface display, can enhance the intracellular transport and surface display of chimeric proteins in a Sar1 and Rab1 dependent fashion. However, mutational, alanine scanning and deletion analysis demonstrate the absence of linear ER export motifs in the B7 cytoplasmic domain. Rather, efficient intracellular transport correlated with the presence of predicted secondary structure in the cytoplasmic tail. Examination of the cytoplasmic domains of 984 human and 782 mouse type I transmembrane proteins revealed that many previously identified ER export motifs are rarely found in the cytoplasmic tail of type I transmembrane proteins. Our results suggest that efficient intracellular transport of B7 chimeric proteins is associated with the structure rather than to the presence of a linear ER export motif in the cytoplasmic tail, and indicate that short (less than ~ 10-20 amino acids and unstructured cytoplasmic tails should be avoided to express high levels of chimeric proteins on mammalian cells.

  10. [COMPARISON OF REPAIR EFFECT BETWEEN CHIMERIC ANTEROLATERAL THIGH FLAP AND SERIES-WOUND FLAPS FOR DEFECT AFTER RESECTION OF ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL CANCER].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Heping; Zhang, Hongwu; Chen, Haidi; Yang, Shuxiong; Wang, Jun; Hu, Dawang

    2016-04-01

    To compare the effectiveness of complex defects repair between using chimeric anterolateral thigh flap and series-wound flaps after resection of oral and maxillofacial cancer. After resection of oral and maxillofacial cancer, defect was repaired with chimeric anterolateral thigh flap in 39 patients between January 2011 and July 2014 (chimeric anterolateral thigh flap group); and defect was repaired with series-wound flaps in 35 patients between January 2009 and December 2010 (series-wound flaps group). There was no significant difference in gender, age, duration of disease, tumor type, tumor staging, defect location, and defect area between 2 groups (P > 0.05). The operation time, flap harvesting and microvascular anastomosis time, stomach tube extraction time, and oral feeding time were recorded and compared between 2 groups, and postoperative complications were observed; the effectiveness was evaluated according to clinical efficacy evaluation table of bone and soft tissue defects reconstruction surgery in oral and maxillofacial region. Vascular crisis occurred in 2 cases of chimeric anterolateral thigh flap group, and 4 cases of series-wound flaps group. Partial necrosis appeared at distal end of a series-wound flaps, and oral fistula and infection developed in 3 series-wound flaps. The other flaps and the grafted skin at donor site survived; wounds at recipient site healed by first intention. The operation time, stomach tube extraction time, and oral feeding time of chimeric anterolateral thigh flap group were significantly shorter than those of series-wound flaps group (P oral closure function, chew, language performance, and swallowing scores of the chimeric anterolateral thigh-flap group were significantly better than those of the series-wound flaps group (P oral cavity holding water test, and occlusion scores between the 2 groups (P > 0.05). Using chimeric anterolateral thigh flap for defect repair after resection of oral and maxillofacial cancer can

  11. Comparison of Variable Number Tandem Repeat and Short Tandem Repeat Genetic Markers for Qualitative and Quantitative Chimerism Analysis Post Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mossallam, G.I.; Smith, A.G.; Mcfarland, C.

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of donor chimerism has become a routine procedure for the documentation of engraftment after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Quantitative analysis of chimerism kinetics has been shown to predict graft failure or relapse. In this study, we compared the use of variable number tandem repeats (VNTR) and short tandem repeats (STR) as polymorphic genetic markers in chimerism analysis. This study included qualitative and quantitative assessment of both techniques to assess informative yield and sensitivity. Patients and Methods: We analyzed 206 samples representing 40 transplant recipients and their HLA identical sibling donors. A panel of six VNTR loci, 15 STR loci and 1 sex chromosome locus was used. Amplified VNTR products were visualized in an ethidium bromide stained gel. STR loci were amplified using fluorescent primers, and the products were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis. VNTR and STR analysis gave comparable qualitative results in the majority of cases. The incidence of mixed chimerism (Me) by STR analysis was 45% compared to 32% in cases evaluated by VNTR analysis. STR markers were more informative; several informative loci could be identified in all patients. Unique alleles for both patient and donor could be identified in all patients by STR versus 32/40 by VNTR analysis. The STR markers were also more sensitive in the detection of chimerism. The size of VNTR alleles and differences between the size of donor and recipient VNTR alleles affected the sensitivity of detection. With both techniques, quantitative assessment of chimerism showed some discrepancies between the estimated and the calculated percentage of donor DNA. Discordance between the two estimates was observed in 8/19 patients with Me. However, sequential monitoring of the relative band intensity of VNTR alleles offered some insight into the direction of change in engraftment over time. The higher yield of informative loci with STR and the automated measurement of

  12. Vaccination with Vesicular Stomatitis Virus-Vectored Chimeric Hemagglutinins Protects Mice against Divergent Influenza Virus Challenge Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Alex B; Nachbagauer, Raffael; Buonocore, Linda; Palese, Peter; Krammer, Florian; Rose, John K

    2015-12-16

    Seasonal influenza virus infections continue to cause significant disease each year, and there is a constant threat of the emergence of reassortant influenza strains causing a new pandemic. Available influenza vaccines are variably effective each season, are of limited scope at protecting against viruses that have undergone significant antigenic drift, and offer low protection against newly emergent pandemic strains. "Universal" influenza vaccine strategies that focus on the development of humoral immunity directed against the stalk domains of the viral hemagglutinin (HA) show promise for protecting against diverse influenza viruses. Here, we describe such a strategy that utilizes vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) as a vector for chimeric hemagglutinin (cHA) antigens. This vaccination strategy is effective at generating HA stalk-specific, broadly cross-reactive serum antibodies by both intramuscular and intranasal routes of vaccination. We show that prime-boost vaccination strategies provide protection against both lethal homologous and heterosubtypic influenza challenge and that protection is significantly improved with intranasal vaccine administration. Additionally, we show that vaccination with VSV-cHAs generates greater stalk-specific and cross-reactive serum antibodies than does vaccination with VSV-vectored full-length HAs, confirming that cHA-based vaccination strategies are superior at generating stalk-specific humoral immunity. VSV-vectored influenza vaccines that express chimeric hemagglutinin antigens offer a novel means for protecting against widely diverging influenza viruses. Universal influenza vaccination strategies should be capable of protecting against a wide array of influenza viruses, and we have developed such an approach utilizing a single viral vector system. The potent antibody responses that these vaccines generate are shown to protect mice against lethal influenza challenges with highly divergent viruses. Notably, intranasal vaccination

  13. HIV-1 with multiple CCR5/CXCR4 chimeric receptor use is predictive of immunological failure in infected children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariangela Cavarelli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV-1 R5 viruses are characterized by a large phenotypic variation, that is reflected by the mode of coreceptor use. The ability of R5 HIV-1 to infect target cells expressing chimeric receptors between CCR5 and CXCR4 (R5(broad viruses, was shown to correlate with disease stage in HIV-1 infected adults. Here, we ask the question whether phenotypic variation of R5 viruses could play a role also in mother-to-child transmission (MTCT of HIV-1 and pediatric disease progression. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Viral isolates obtained from a total of 59 HIV-1 seropositive women (24 transmitting and 35 non transmitting and 28 infected newborn children, were used to infect U87.CD4 cells expressing wild type or six different CCR5/CXCR4 chimeric receptors. HIV-1 isolates obtained from newborn infants had predominantly R5(narrow phenotype (n = 20, but R5(broad and R5X4 viruses were also found in seven and one case, respectively. The presence of R5(broad and R5X4 phenotypes correlated significantly with a severe decline of the CD4+ T cells (CDC stage 3 or death within 2 years of age. Forty-three percent of the maternal R5 isolates displayed an R5(broad phenotype, however, the presence of the R5(broad virus was not predictive for MTCT of HIV-1. Of interest, while only 1 of 5 mothers with an R5X4 virus transmitted the dualtropic virus, 5 of 6 mothers carrying R5(broad viruses transmitted viruses with a similar broad chimeric coreceptor usage. Thus, the maternal R5(broad phenotype was largely preserved during transmission and could be predictive of the phenotype of the newborn's viral variant. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results show that R5(broad viruses are not hampered in transmission. When transmitted, immunological failure occurs earlier than in children infected with HIV-1 of R5(narrow phenotype. We believe that this finding is of utmost relevance for therapeutic interventions in pediatric HIV-1 infection.

  14. A chimeric prokaryotic-eukaryotic pentameric ligand gated ion channel reveals interactions between the extracellular and transmembrane domains shape neurosteroid modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Borna; Tsao, Tzu-Wei; Czajkowski, Cynthia

    2017-10-01

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) are the targets of several clinical and endogenous allosteric modulators including anesthetics and neurosteroids. Molecular mechanisms underlying allosteric drug modulation are poorly understood. Here, we constructed a chimeric pLGIC by fusing the extracellular domain (ECD) of the proton-activated, cation-selective bacterial channel GLIC to the transmembrane domain (TMD) of the human ρ1 chloride-selective GABA A R, and tested the hypothesis that drug actions are regulated locally in the domain that houses its binding site. The chimeric channels were proton-gated and chloride-selective demonstrating the GLIC ECD was functionally coupled to the GABAρ TMD. Channels were blocked by picrotoxin and inhibited by pentobarbital, etomidate and propofol. The point mutation, ρ TMD W328M, conferred positive modulation and direct gating by pentobarbital. The data suggest that the structural machinery mediating general anesthetic modulation resides in the TMD. Proton-activation and neurosteroid modulation of the GLIC-ρ chimeric channels, however, did not simply mimic their respective actions on GLIC and GABAρ revealing that across domain interactions between the ECD and TMD play important roles in determining their actions. Proton-induced current responses were biphasic suggesting that the chimeric channels contain an additional proton sensor. Neurosteroid modulation of the GLIC-ρ chimeric channels by the stereoisomers, 5α-THDOC and 5β-THDOC, were swapped compared to their actions on GABAρ indicating that positive versus negative neurosteroid modulation is not encoded solely in the TMD nor by neurosteroid isomer structure but is dependent on specific interdomain connections between the ECD and TMD. Our data reveal a new mechanism for shaping neurosteroid modulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Therapeutic cytodifferentiation in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma without genetic change of the PAX3-FKHR chimeric fusion gene: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakozaki, Michiyuki; Hojo, Hiroshi; Tajino, Takahiro; Yamada, Hitoshi; Kikuchi, Shinichi; Kikuta, Atsushi; Konno, Shinichi; Abe, Masafumi

    2013-12-01

    Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) is a subtype of rhabdomyosarcoma and usually occurs in childhood and adolescence. ARMS is characterized by its aggressive behavior and poor prognosis. To improve the unfavorable prognosis, new therapeutic developments and the establishment of methods for precise prognostic prediction are required. We describe a case of ARMS, solid variant, which occurred in a 10-year-old boy. After chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the tumor morphologically and immunohistochemically showed marked cytodifferentiation, whereas the exact same PAX3-FKHR chimeric fusion gene transcript was detected in samples before and after treatment. The result of this study seems to indicate that therapeutic cytodifferentiation does not always correlate with genetic change and favorable prognosis in ARMS.

  16. Development of DENVax: a chimeric dengue-2 PDK-53-based tetravalent vaccine for protection against dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Jorge E; Huang, Claire Y-H; Kinney, Richard M; Stinchcomb, Dan T

    2011-09-23

    Dengue. virus infection is the leading arboviral cause of disease worldwide. A vaccine is being developed based on the attenuated DEN-2 virus, DEN-2 PDK-53. In this review, we summarize the characteristics of the parent DEN-2 PDK-53 strain as well as the chimeric viruses containing the prM and E genes of DEN-1, DEN-3 or DEN-4 virus in the genetic backbone of the DEN-2 PDK-53 virus (termed DENVax). Tetravalent DENVax formulations containing cloned, fully sequenced isolates of the DEN-2 PDK-53 virus and the three chimeras have been evaluated for safety and efficacy in preclinical animal models. Based on the safety, immunogenicity and efficacy in preclinical studies, Phase 1 clinical testing of DENVax has been initiated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Chimeric homeobox gene E2A-PBX1 induces proliferation, apoptosis, and malignant lymphomas in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedera, D A; Waller, E K; LeBrun, D P; Sen-Majumdar, A; Stevens, M E; Barsh, G S; Cleary, M L

    1993-09-10

    Expression of the homeobox fusion gene E2A-PBX1 under control of the immunoglobulin heavy chain enhancer efficiently induced malignancies in transgenic mice. All animals died before 5 months of age with lymphomas that demonstrated phenotypes consistent with transitional intermediate thymocytes (CD4+/CD8+/CD3med). E2A-PBX1 also markedly altered lymphoid development in pretumorous animals, reducing the number of thymocytes and bone marrow B lineage progenitors to 20% of normal levels. In spite of the observed reductions in lymphoid cells, premalignant animals contained significantly increased numbers of cycling thymocytes, but a higher proportion was also undergoing apoptosis, suggesting that increased cell death resulted in the marked lymphopenias. These data indicate that the chimeric homeodomain protein E2A-PBX1 paradoxically induces both proliferation and apoptosis in lymphoid cells, suggesting an in vivo association between nuclear oncogene-induced cell cycle progression and programed cell death.

  18. A novel chimeric prophage vB_LdeS-phiJB from commercial Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tingting; Zhang, Chenchen; Xin, Yongping; Xin, Min; Kong, Jian

    2016-05-01

    Prophage vB_LdeS-phiJB (phiJB) was induced by mitomycin C and UV radiation from the Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus SDMCC050201 isolated from a Chinese yoghurt sample. It has an isometric head and a non-contractile tail with 36,969 bp linear double-stranded DNA genome, which is classified into the group a of Lb. delbrueckii phages. The genome of phiJB is highly modular with functionally related genes clustered together. Unexpectedly, there is no similarity of its DNA replication module to any phages that have been reported, while it consists of open-reading frames homologous to the proteins of Lactobacillus strains. Comparative genomic analysis indicated that its late gene clusters, integration/lysogeny modules and DNA replication module derived from different evolutionary ancestors and integrated into a chimera. Our results revealed a novel chimeric phage of commercial Lb. delbrueckii and will broaden the knowledge of phage diversity in the dairy industry.

  19. Transmission Potential of Two Chimeric Chikungunya Vaccine Candidates in the Urban Mosquito Vectors, Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwin, Justin R.; Kenney, Joan L.; Weaver, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an emerging, mosquito-borne alphavirus that has caused major epidemics in Africa and Asia. We developed chimeric vaccine candidates using the non-structural protein genes of either Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) attenuated vaccine strain TC-83 or a naturally attenuated strain of eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) and the structural genes of CHIKV. Because the transmission of genetically modified live vaccine strains is undesirable because of the potentially unpredictable evolution of these viruses as well as the potential for reversion, we evaluated the ability of these vaccines to infect the urban CHIKV vectors, Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus. Both vaccine candidates exhibited significantly lower infection and dissemination rates compared with the parent alphaviruses. Intrathoracic inoculations indicated that reduced infectivity was mediated by midgut infection barriers in both species. These results indicate a low potential for transmission of these vaccine strains in the event that a vaccinee became viremic. PMID:21633043

  20. CD19-Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells for Treatment of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, C L; thor Straten, Per

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) for cancer represents a promising new treatment modality. ACT based on the administration of cytotoxic T cells genetically engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) recognizing CD19 expressed by B cell malignancies has been shown to induce complete lasting...... responses in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). So far, eleven clinical trials including 99 CLL and ALL patients treated with CAR T cells targeting CD19 have been published, and the results from these trials are promising with impressive clinical...... responses in heavily pretreated patients. Thus, CAR T cell therapy has induced complete responses in both CLL and ALL, and surprisingly, current results indicate that patients with ALL are more prone to respond than are CLL patients. Importantly, the majority of CAR cell studies have observed severe therapy...

  1. Genetically engineered T cells bearing chimeric nanoconstructed receptors harboring TAG-72-specific camelid single domain antibodies as targeting agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharifzadeh, Zahra; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad A

    2013-01-01

    Despite the preclinical success of adoptive therapy with T cells bearing chimeric nanoconstructed antigen receptors (CARs), certain limitations of this therapeutic approach such as the immunogenicity of the antigen binding domain, the emergence of tumor cell escape variants and the blocking...... expressing tumor cells, the combination of CD3ζ, OX40, CD28 as well as the CH3-CH2-hinge-hinge domains most efficiently triggered T cell activation. Importantly, CAR mediated functions were not blocked by the soluble TAG-72 antigen at a supraphysiological concentration. Our approach may have the potential...... capacity of soluble antigen still remain. Here, we address these issues using a novel CAR binding moiety based on the oligoclonal camelid single domain antibodies. A unique set of 13 single domain antibodies were selected from an immunized camel phage library based on their target specificity and binding...

  2. Mitochondrial DNA suggests at least 11 origins of parasitism in angiosperms and reveals genomic chimerism in parasitic plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Croom Henrietta B

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some of the most difficult phylogenetic questions in evolutionary biology involve identification of the free-living relatives of parasitic organisms, particularly those of parasitic flowering plants. Consequently, the number of origins of parasitism and the phylogenetic distribution of the heterotrophic lifestyle among angiosperm lineages is unclear. Results Here we report the results of a phylogenetic analysis of 102 species of seed plants designed to infer the position of all haustorial parasitic angiosperm lineages using three mitochondrial genes: atp1, coxI, and matR. Overall, the mtDNA phylogeny agrees with independent studies in terms of non-parasitic plant relationships and reveals at least 11 independent origins of parasitism in angiosperms, eight of which consist entirely of holoparasitic species that lack photosynthetic ability. From these results, it can be inferred that modern-day parasites have disproportionately evolved in certain lineages and that the endoparasitic habit has arisen by convergence in four clades. In addition, reduced taxon, single gene analyses revealed multiple horizontal transfers of atp1 from host to parasite lineage, suggesting that parasites may be important vectors of horizontal gene transfer in angiosperms. Furthermore, in Pilostyles we show evidence for a recent host-to-parasite atp1 transfer based on a chimeric gene sequence that indicates multiple historical xenologous gene acquisitions have occurred in this endoparasite. Finally, the phylogenetic relationships inferred for parasites indicate that the origins of parasitism in angiosperms are strongly correlated with horizontal acquisitions of the invasive coxI group I intron. Conclusion Collectively, these results indicate that the parasitic lifestyle has arisen repeatedly in angiosperm evolutionary history and results in increasing parasite genomic chimerism over time.

  3. Ectopic bone formation cannot occur by hydroxyapatite/{beta}-tricalcium phosphate bioceramics in green fluorescent protein chimeric mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng Lijia [Key Laboratory of Transplant Engineering and Immunology, Ministry of Health, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Duan Xin [Department of Orthopaedics, Chengdu Second People' s Hospital, Chengdu (China); Department of Orthopaedics, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Xiang Zhou [Department of Orthopaedics, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Shi Yujun; Lu Xiaofeng; Ye Feng [Key Laboratory of Transplant Engineering and Immunology, Ministry of Health, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Bu Hong, E-mail: hongbu@scu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Transplant Engineering and Immunology, Ministry of Health, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Department of Pathology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Firstly, chimeric mouse model could be established successfully by bone marrow transplantation after irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Secondly, bone induction can occur in wild-type mice 90 days after implantation, but not occur in chimeric mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thirdly, destruction of immune function will block osteoinduction by calcium phosphate ceramics. - Abstract: Many studies have shown that calcium phosphate ceramics (CP) have osteoconductive and osteoinductive properties; however, the exact mechanism of bone induction has not yet been reported. This study was performed to investigate if destroying immunological function will influence osteogenesis, to explain the mechanism which is unclear. In this study, twenty C57BL/6 mice were divided into two groups (n = 10), in group 1, a hydroxyapatite/{beta}-tricalcium phosphate (HA/{beta}-TCP) ceramic was implanted into both the left and right leg muscles of each mouse; in group 2, ten mice experienced lethal irradiation, then were injected bone marrow (BM) cells from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice by tail veil, after bone marrow transplantation (BMT), heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, and muscle were harvested for biological analysis, after the GFP chimera model was established successfully, the same HA/{beta}-TCP ceramic was implanted into both leg muscles of each mouse immediately after irradiation. 45 and 90 days after implantation, the ceramics of the two groups were harvested to perform with hematoxylin and eosin (HE) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining; the results showed that there was no bone formation in group 2, while new bone tissues were detected in group 1. Our findings suggest that the BM cell from GFP transgenic mice is a good biomarker and it could set a good platform for chimera model; it also shows that BM cell is one of cell resources of bone induction, and destruction of immune function will impede

  4. InFusion: Advancing Discovery of Fusion Genes and Chimeric Transcripts from Deep RNA-Sequencing Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Okonechnikov

    Full Text Available Analysis of fusion transcripts has become increasingly important due to their link with cancer development. Since high-throughput sequencing approaches survey fusion events exhaustively, several computational methods for the detection of gene fusions from RNA-seq data have been developed. This kind of analysis, however, is complicated by native trans-splicing events, the splicing-induced complexity of the transcriptome and biases and artefacts introduced in experiments and data analysis. There are a number of tools available for the detection of fusions from RNA-seq data; however, certain differences in specificity and sensitivity between commonly used approaches have been found. The ability to detect gene fusions of different types, including isoform fusions and fusions involving non-coding regions, has not been thoroughly studied yet. Here, we propose a novel computational toolkit called InFusion for fusion gene detection from RNA-seq data. InFusion introduces several unique features, such as discovery of fusions involving intergenic regions, and detection of anti-sense transcription in chimeric RNAs based on strand-specificity. Our approach demonstrates superior detection accuracy on simulated data and several public RNA-seq datasets. This improved performance was also evident when evaluating data from RNA deep-sequencing of two well-established prostate cancer cell lines. InFusion identified 26 novel fusion events that were validated in vitro, including alternatively spliced gene fusion isoforms and chimeric transcripts that include intergenic regions. The toolkit is freely available to download from http:/bitbucket.org/kokonech/infusion.

  5. A simple and universal ligation mediated fusion of genes based on hetero-staggered PCR for generating immunodominant chimeric proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Prakash K; Ramlal, Shylaja; Sripathy, Murali H; Batra, Harshvardhan

    2012-11-01

    We developed a simple T4 DNA ligase mediated strategy for inframe splicing of two or more cohesive genes generated by hetero-staggered PCR and directionally cloning the spliced product bearing sticky overhangs in to a correspondingly cut vector. For this, two pairs of primers are used in two different parallel PCRs, for generation of each cohesive gene product. We exemplified this strategy by splicing two major super-antigen genes of Staphylococcus aureus, namely, staphylococcal enterotoxin A (sea), and toxic shock syndrome toxin (tsst-1) followed by its directional cloning into pre-digested pRSET A vector. The fusion gene encoding chimeric recombinant SEA-TSST protein (32kDa) was expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3) host strain. The recombinant chimeric protein retained the antigenicity of both toxins as observed by the strong immunoreactivity with commercial antibodies against both SEA and TSST-1 toxin components by Western blot analysis. We observed that the present method for gene splicing with cohesive ends is simple since it does not require elaborate standardization and a single fusion product is obtained consistently during nested PCR with forward primer of first gene and reverse primer of second gene. For comparison, we fused the same genes using splicing by overlap extension PCR (SOE-PCR) and consistently obtained DNA smearing and multiple non-specific bands even after several rounds of PCRs from gel excised product. Moreover, the newly described method requires only two to six complimentary sticky ends between the genes to be spliced, in contrast to long stretch of overlapping nucleotides in case of SOE-PCR. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. HBsAg-redirected T cells exhibit antiviral activity in HBV-infected human liver chimeric mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Robert L; Shum, Thomas; Tashiro, Haruko; Barzi, Mercedes; Yi, Zhongzhen; Whitten-Bauer, Christina; Legras, Xavier; Bissig-Choisat, Beatrice; Garaigorta, Urtzi; Gottschalk, Stephen; Bissig, Karl-Dimiter

    2018-04-06

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains incurable. Although HBsAg-specific chimeric antigen receptor (HBsAg-CAR) T cells have been generated, they have not been tested in animal models with authentic HBV infection. We generated a novel CAR targeting HBsAg and evaluated its ability to recognize HBV+ cell lines and HBsAg particles in vitro. In vivo, we tested whether human HBsAg-CAR T cells would have efficacy against HBV-infected hepatocytes in human liver chimeric mice. HBsAg-CAR T cells recognized HBV-positive cell lines and HBsAg particles in vitro as judged by cytokine production. However, HBsAg-CAR T cells did not kill HBV-positive cell lines in cytotoxicity assays. Adoptive transfer of HBsAg-CAR T cells into HBV-infected humanized mice resulted in accumulation within the liver and a significant decrease in plasma HBsAg and HBV-DNA levels compared with control mice. Notably, the fraction of HBV core-positive hepatocytes among total human hepatocytes was greatly reduced after HBsAg-CAR T cell treatment, pointing to noncytopathic viral clearance. In agreement, changes in surrogate human plasma albumin levels were not significantly different between treatment and control groups. HBsAg-CAR T cells have anti-HBV activity in an authentic preclinical HBV infection model. Our results warrant further preclinical exploration of HBsAg-CAR T cells as immunotherapy for HBV. Copyright © 2018 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ectopic bone formation cannot occur by hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate bioceramics in green fluorescent protein chimeric mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Lijia; Duan Xin; Xiang Zhou; Shi Yujun; Lu Xiaofeng; Ye Feng; Bu Hong

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Firstly, chimeric mouse model could be established successfully by bone marrow transplantation after irradiation. ► Secondly, bone induction can occur in wild-type mice 90 days after implantation, but not occur in chimeric mice. ► Thirdly, destruction of immune function will block osteoinduction by calcium phosphate ceramics. - Abstract: Many studies have shown that calcium phosphate ceramics (CP) have osteoconductive and osteoinductive properties; however, the exact mechanism of bone induction has not yet been reported. This study was performed to investigate if destroying immunological function will influence osteogenesis, to explain the mechanism which is unclear. In this study, twenty C57BL/6 mice were divided into two groups (n = 10), in group 1, a hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate (HA/β-TCP) ceramic was implanted into both the left and right leg muscles of each mouse; in group 2, ten mice experienced lethal irradiation, then were injected bone marrow (BM) cells from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice by tail veil, after bone marrow transplantation (BMT), heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, and muscle were harvested for biological analysis, after the GFP chimera model was established successfully, the same HA/β-TCP ceramic was implanted into both leg muscles of each mouse immediately after irradiation. 45 and 90 days after implantation, the ceramics of the two groups were harvested to perform with hematoxylin and eosin (HE) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining; the results showed that there was no bone formation in group 2, while new bone tissues were detected in group 1. Our findings suggest that the BM cell from GFP transgenic mice is a good biomarker and it could set a good platform for chimera model; it also shows that BM cell is one of cell resources of bone induction, and destruction of immune function will impede osteoinduction by CP. Overall, our results may shed light on clear mechanism study of bone

  8. [Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia with t(1;19) lacking E2A-pBX1 chimeric transcripts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Kousaku; Hirata, Takuya

    2005-01-01

    We present a pediatric case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with chromosomal translocation 1;19 lacking E2A-PBX1 chimeric transcripts. On admission, the patient showed remarkable splenomegaly. Laboratory findings demonstrated that WBC was 12900/microl with blasts 61.5%. Bone marrow examination revealed 1282 X 10(3)/microl of the nucleated cell count with 95.5% lymphoblasts. Surface marker analysis showed an early pre-B lineage immunophenotype (CD10+, CD19+, CD34+, surface Ig-). Although G-banding chromosomal analysis showed 46,XY,der(19)t(1;19)(q23;p13), E2A-PBX1 chimeric transcripts and E2A gene rearrangement were not detected with the polymerase chain reaction method and Southern blot analysis, respectively. The patient was assigned to high-risk ALL according to the criteria of the Japan Association of Childhood Leukemia Study. His clinical response to prednisolone monotherapy for the initial 7 days and subsequent multidrug chemotherapy was excellent, and he achieved complete remission on day 15, which has lasted for more than 30 months. We reviewed the bibliography of the clinical and biological features of 17 children with t(1;19)+E2A-PBX1- ALL including this case. The two prominent characteristics included an early pre-B immunophenotype (11/13) and hyperdiploid (>50 chromosomes) chromosome abnormality (8/14). However, there was substantial heterogeneity in the demographic features and prognosis. Further accumulation of such patients will facilitate the determination of the appropriate treatment for childhood t(1;19)+E2A-PBX1- ALL.

  9. Generation, characterization and immunogenicity of a novel chimeric recombinant protein based on Plasmodium vivax AMA-1 and MSP119.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Mariana Vilela; Françoso, Kátia Sanches; Lima, Luciana Chagas; Camargo, Tarsila Mendes; Machado, Ricardo L D; Costa, Fabio T M; Rénia, Laurent; Nosten, Francois; Russell, Bruce; Rodrigues, Mauricio M; Soares, Irene S

    2017-04-25

    Plasmodium vivax is the most widely distributed malaria species and the most prevalent species of malaria in America and Asia. Vaccine development against P. vivax is considered a priority in the global program for the eradication of malaria. Earlier studies have characterized the Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA-1) ectodomain and the C-terminal region (19kDa) of the Merozoite Surface Protein 1 (MSP-1) of P. vivax as immunodominant antigens. Based on this characterization, we designed a chimeric recombinant protein containing both merozoite immunodominant domains (PvAMA1 66 -MSP1 19 ). The recombinant PvAMA1 66 -MSP1 19 was successfully expressed in Pichia pastoris and used to immunize two different mouse strains (BALB/c and C57BL/6) in the presence of the Poly (I:C) as an adjuvant. Immunization with the chimeric protein induced high antibody titers against both proteins in both strains of mice as detected by ELISA. Antisera also recognized the native proteins expressed on the merozoites of mature P. vivax schizonts. Moreover, this antigen was able to induce IFN-gamma-secreting cells in C57BL/6 mice. These findings indicate that this novel yeast recombinant protein containing PvAMA1 66 and PvMSP1 19 is advantageous, because of improved antibody titers and cellular immune response. Therefore, this formulation should be further developed for pre-clinical trials in non-human primates as a potential candidate for a P. vivax vaccine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. InFusion: Advancing Discovery of Fusion Genes and Chimeric Transcripts from Deep RNA-Sequencing Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonechnikov, Konstantin; Imai-Matsushima, Aki; Paul, Lukas; Seitz, Alexander; Meyer, Thomas F; Garcia-Alcalde, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of fusion transcripts has become increasingly important due to their link with cancer development. Since high-throughput sequencing approaches survey fusion events exhaustively, several computational methods for the detection of gene fusions from RNA-seq data have been developed. This kind of analysis, however, is complicated by native trans-splicing events, the splicing-induced complexity of the transcriptome and biases and artefacts introduced in experiments and data analysis. There are a number of tools available for the detection of fusions from RNA-seq data; however, certain differences in specificity and sensitivity between commonly used approaches have been found. The ability to detect gene fusions of different types, including isoform fusions and fusions involving non-coding regions, has not been thoroughly studied yet. Here, we propose a novel computational toolkit called InFusion for fusion gene detection from RNA-seq data. InFusion introduces several unique features, such as discovery of fusions involving intergenic regions, and detection of anti-sense transcription in chimeric RNAs based on strand-specificity. Our approach demonstrates superior detection accuracy on simulated data and several public RNA-seq datasets. This improved performance was also evident when evaluating data from RNA deep-sequencing of two well-established prostate cancer cell lines. InFusion identified 26 novel fusion events that were validated in vitro, including alternatively spliced gene fusion isoforms and chimeric transcripts that include intergenic regions. The toolkit is freely available to download from http:/bitbucket.org/kokonech/infusion.

  11. PROKARYOTIC EXPRESSION AND BIOACTIVITY EVALUATION OF THE CHIMERIC GENE DERIVED FROM THE GROUP 1 ALLERGENS OF DUST MITES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xiaodong; Li, Chaopin; Guo, Wei; Jiang, Yuxin

    2015-12-01

    we successfully reconstituted the gene from group 1 allergens of dust mites, and obtained a body of shuffled genes. In order to verify the prediction on the chimeric gene, we tentatively cloned R8 into the vector that was prokaryoticly expressed, purified and assessed for its bio-activities. the expressed product was detected by SDSPAGE and the target protein was purified. The purified protein R8 was detected by ELISA. 75 BALB/c mice were divided into 5 groups, namely PBS, rDer f1, rDer p1, R8 and asthma group. The mice were treated with dust mite allergens at 0, 7, 14 day by intraperitoneal injection and inhaled challenge as aerosol on day 21 for 7 days. Specific allergen immunotherapy was performed using rDer f1, rDer p1 and R8 allergens respectively. The level of IFN and IL- 4 in BALF was detected by ELISA. the chimeric gene R8 was expressed with a band of approximately Mr 35000. Compared with groups of rDer f 1 and rDer p 1 [(80.44±15.50) and (90.79±10.38) μg/ml respectively], IgE binding capacity of the protein R8 (37.03±12.46) μg/ml was statistically lower (P0.05). IL-4 level in R8 group was lower markedly than the others (Pdust mites has been expressed with low allergenicity and high immunogenicity. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  12. A METHOD FOR RESTORING ORAL CAVITY AND TONGUE USING A COMPOSITE, FREE, CHIMERIC, REVASCULARIZED, REINNERVED, MUSCULOCUTANEOUS FLAP AFTER TOTAL GLOSSECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Polyakov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Combination therapy is the main method used for treatment of patients with locally advanced cancer of the oral floor and tongue. Radical surgery is a key stage of this therapy. These surgeries are inevitably associated with extensive defects in the oral cavity and tongue and, therefore, the loss of necessary organism functions. Currently, there is no optimal autotransplant for tongue reconstruction after total or subtotal removal of the tongue and oral floor muscles; it appears to be one of the most significant challenges in modern reconstructive surgery.Materials and methods. The authors describe a case of successful repair of the oral floor and tongue after total glossectomy using a novel method developed in the Department of Microsurgery at the P. A. Herzen Moscow Oncology Research Institute – branch of the National Medical Research Radiology Center, Ministry of Health of Russia. This method implies tongue reconstruction using a revascularized, reinnerved, chimeric, thoracodorsal flap with inclusion of a muscular portion from the serratus anterior muscle and a musculocutaneous portion from the latissimus dorsi muscle. We performed tongue reconstruction in a 62-year-old patient diagnosed with stage IVA (Т3N2bМ0 tongue cancer. Results. The novel method of surgical treatment of locally advanced tongue cancer with simultaneous repair of defects using a revascularized, reinnerved, chimeric flap with inclusion of the serratus anterior muscle and latissimus dorsi muscle allowed to remove the tumor, stabilize the laryngeal complex, restore the diaphragm of the oral floor, create an adequate volume of neotongue, obtain good functional and cosmetic results, and reduce the length of hospital stay. Conclusion. Novel method of surgical treatment of locally advanced tongue cancer facilitates health, employment, and social rehabilitation of patients with oropharyngeal cancer. This method can be considered as an alternative method of choice

  13. reSpect: software for identification of high and low abundance ion species in chimeric tandem mass spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shteynberg, David; Mendoza, Luis; Hoopmann, Michael R; Sun, Zhi; Schmidt, Frank; Deutsch, Eric W; Moritz, Robert L

    2015-11-01

    Most shotgun proteomics data analysis workflows are based on the assumption that each fragment ion spectrum is explained by a single species of peptide ion isolated by the mass spectrometer; however, in reality mass spectrometers often isolate more than one peptide ion within the window of isolation that contribute to additional peptide fragment peaks in many spectra. We present a new tool called reSpect, implemented in the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline (TPP), which enables an iterative workflow whereby fragment ion peaks explained by a peptide ion identified in one round of sequence searching or spectral library search are attenuated based on the confidence of the identification, and then the altered spectrum is subjected to further rounds of searching. The reSpect tool is not implemented as a search engine, but rather as a post-search engine processing step where only fragment ion intensities are altered. This enables the application of any search engine combination in the iterations that follow. Thus, reSpect is compatible with all other protein sequence database search engines as well as peptide spectral library search engines that are supported by the TPP. We show that while some datasets are highly amenable to chimeric spectrum identification and lead to additional peptide identification boosts of over 30% with as many as four different peptide ions identified per spectrum, datasets with narrow precursor ion selection only benefit from such processing at the level of a few percent. We demonstrate a technique that facilitates the determination of the degree to which a dataset would benefit from chimeric spectrum analysis. The reSpect tool is free and open source, provided within the TPP and available at the TPP website. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  14. High occurrence of functional new chimeric genes in survey of rice chromosome 3 short arm genome sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengjun; Wang, Jun; Marowsky, Nicholas C; Long, Manyuan; Wing, Rod A; Fan, Chuanzhu

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to identify newly evolved genes in rice, we searched the genomes of Asian-cultivated rice Oryza sativa ssp. japonica and its wild progenitors, looking for lineage-specific genes. Using genome pairwise comparison of approximately 20-Mb DNA sequences from the chromosome 3 short arm (Chr3s) in six rice species, O. sativa, O. nivara, O. rufipogon, O. glaberrima, O. barthii, and O. punctata, combined with synonymous substitution rate tests and other evidence, we were able to identify potential recently duplicated genes, which evolved within the last 1 Myr. We identified 28 functional O. sativa genes, which likely originated after O. sativa diverged from O. glaberrima. These genes account for around 1% (28/3,176) of all annotated genes on O. sativa's Chr3s. Among the 28 new genes, two recently duplicated segments contained eight genes. Fourteen of the 28 new genes consist of chimeric gene structure derived from one or multiple parental genes and flanking targeting sequences. Although the majority of these 28 new genes were formed by single or segmental DNA-based gene duplication and recombination, we found two genes that were likely originated partially through exon shuffling. Sequence divergence tests between new genes and their putative progenitors indicated that new genes were most likely evolving under natural selection. We showed all 28 new genes appeared to be functional, as suggested by Ka/Ks analysis and the presence of RNA-seq, cDNA, expressed sequence tag, massively parallel signature sequencing, and/or small RNA data. The high rate of new gene origination and of chimeric gene formation in rice may demonstrate rice's broad diversification, domestication, its environmental adaptation, and the role of new genes in rice speciation.

  15. Targeting Multiple Tumors Using T-Cells Engineered to Express a Natural Cytotoxicity Receptor 2-Based Chimeric Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasyl Eisenberg

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in cancer treatment are demonstrating the increasing and powerful potential of immunotherapeutic strategies. In this regard, the adoptive transfer of tumor-specific T-lymphocytes approaches can lead to tumor regression in cancer patients. More recently, the use of T-cells genetically engineered to express cancer-specific receptors such as the anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR continues to show promise for the treatment of hematological malignancies. Still, there is a crucial need to develop efficient CAR-T cell approaches for the treatment of solid tumors. It has been shown that other lymphocytes such as natural killer (NK cells can demonstrate potent antitumor function—nonetheless, their use in immunotherapy is rather limited due to difficulties in expanding these cells to therapeutically relevant numbers and to suppression by endogenous inhibitory mechanisms. Cancer recognition by NK cells is partly mediated by molecules termed natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs. In the present study, we hypothesize that it is possible to endow T-cells with an NK recognition pattern, providing them with a mean to recognize tumor cells, in a non-MHC restricted way. To test this, we genetically modified human T-cells with different chimeric receptors based on the human NCR2 molecule and then assessed their antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Our results show that expression in primary lymphocytes of an NCR2-derived CAR, termed s4428z, confers T-cells with the ability to specifically recognize heterogeneous tumors and to mediate tumor cytotoxicity in a mouse model. This study demonstrates the benefit of combining tumor recognition capability of NK cells with T cell effectiveness to improve cancer immunotherapy.

  16. Data contributed by EPA/ORD/NERL/CED researchers to the manuscript "Advanced Error Diagnostics of the CMAQ and CHIMERE modeling systems within the AQMEII3 Model Evaluation Framework"

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset contains the data contributed by EPA/ORD/NERL/CED researchers to the manuscript "Advanced Error Diagnostics of the CMAQ and CHIMERE modeling systems...

  17. A new microcolumn-type microchip for examining the expression of chimeric fusion genes using a nucleic acid sandwich hybridization technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Michihiro; Sasaki, Naoyuki; Kishimoto, Takuya; Watanabe, Hidetoshi; Takagi, Masatoshi; Mizutani, Shuki; Kishii, Noriyuki; Yasuda, Akio

    2014-11-01

    We report a new type of microcolumn installed in a microchip. The architecture allows use of a nucleic acid sandwich hybridization technique to detect a messenger RNA (mRNA) chain as a target. Data are presented that demonstrate that the expression of a chimeric fusion gene can be detected. The microcolumn was filled with semi-transparent microbeads made of agarose gel that acted as carriers, allowing increased efficiency of the optical detection of fluorescence from the microcolumn. The hybrid between the target trapped on the microbeads and a probe DNA labeled with a fluorescent dye was detected by measuring the intensity of the fluorescence from the microcolumn directly. These results demonstrate an easy and simple method for determining the expression of chimeric fusion genes with no preamplification. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Peripheral Red Blood Cell Split Chimerism as a Consequence of Intramedullary Selective Apoptosis of Recipient Red Blood Cells in a Case of Sickle Cell Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Marziali

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic cellular gene therapy through hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only radical cure for congenital hemoglobinopathies like thalassemia and sickle cell anemia. Persistent mixed hematopoietic chimerism (PMC has been described in thalassemia and sickle cell anemia. Here, we describe the clinical course of a 6-year-old girl who had received bone marrow transplant for sickle cell anemia. After the transplant, the patient showed 36% donor hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow, whereas in the peripheral blood there was evidence of 80%  circulating donor red blood cells (RBC. The analysis of apoptosis at the Bone Marrow  level suggests that Fas might contribute to the cell death of host erythroid precursors. The increase in NK cells and the regulatory T cell population observed in this patient suggests that these cells might contribute to the condition of mixed chimerism.

  19. A chimeric haemagglutinin-based influenza split virion vaccine adjuvanted with AS03 induces protective stalk-reactive antibodies in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachbagauer, Raffael; Kinzler, David; Choi, Angela; Hirsh, Ariana; Beaulieu, Edith; Lecrenier, Nicolas; Innis, Bruce L; Palese, Peter; Mallett, Corey P; Krammer, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal influenza virus vaccines are generally effective at preventing disease, but need to be well matched to circulating virus strains for maximum benefit. Influenza viruses constantly undergo antigenic changes because of their high mutation rate in the immunodominant haemagglutinin (HA) head domain, which necessitates annual re-formulation and re-vaccination for continuing protection. In case of pandemic influenza virus outbreaks, new vaccines need to be produced and quickly distributed. Novel influenza virus vaccines that redirect the immune response towards more conserved epitopes located in the HA stalk domain may remove the need for annual vaccine re-formulation and could also protect against emergent pandemic strains to which the human population is immunologically naive. One approach to create such universal influenza virus vaccines is the use of constructs expressing chimeric HAs. By sequential immunization with vaccine strains expressing the same conserved HA stalk domain and exotic HA heads to which the host is naive, antibodies against the stalk can be boosted to high titres. Here we tested a monovalent chimeric HA-based prototype universal influenza virus split virion vaccine candidate with and without AS03 adjuvant in primed mice. We found that the chimeric HA-based vaccination regimen induced higher stalk antibody titres than the seasonal vaccine. The stalk antibody responses were long lasting, cross-reactive to distantly related HAs and provided protection in vivo in a serum transfer challenge model. The results of this study are promising and support further development of a universal influenza vaccine candidate built on the chimeric HA technology platform.

  20. Solution structure of a Plasmodium falciparum AMA-1/MSP 1 chimeric protein vaccine candidate (PfCP-2.9 for malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Changwen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Plasmodium falciparum chimeric protein PfCP-2.9 is a promising asexual-stage malaria vaccine evaluated in clinical trials. This chimeric protein consists of two cysteine-rich domains: domain III of the apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA-1 [III] and the C-terminal region of the merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1-19. It has been reported that the fusion of these two antigens enhanced their immunogenicity and antibody-mediated inhibition of parasite growth in vitro. Methods The 15N-labeled and 13C/15N-labeled PfCP-2.9 was produced in Pichia pastoris for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR structure analysis. The chemical shift assignments of PfCP-2.9 were compared with those previously reported for the individual domains (i.e., PfAMA-1(III or PfMSP 1-19. The two-dimensional spectra and transverse relaxation rates (R2 of the PfMSP1-19 alone were compared with that of the PfCP-2.9. Results Confident backbone assignments were obtained for 122 out of 241 residues of PfCP-2.9. The assigned residues in PfCP-2.9 were very similar to those previously reported for the individual domains. The conformation of the PfMSP1-19 in different constructs is essentially the same. Comparison of transverse relaxation rates (R2 strongly suggests no weak interaction between the domains. Conclusions These data indicate that the fusion of AMA-1(III and MSP1-19 as chimeric protein did not change their structures, supporting the use of the chimeric protein as a potential malaria vaccine.

  1. Chimeric Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus with Attachment and Fusion Glycoproteins Replaced by Bovine Parainfluenza Virus Type 3 Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase and Fusion Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stope, Matthias B.; Karger, Axel; Schmidt, Ulrike; Buchholz, Ursula J.

    2001-01-01

    Chimeric bovine respiratory syncytial viruses (BRSV) expressing glycoproteins of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV-3) instead of BRSV glycoproteins were generated from cDNA. In the BRSV antigenome cDNA, the open reading frames of the major BRSV glycoproteins, attachment protein G and fusion protein F, were replaced individually or together by those of the BPIV-3 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and/or fusion (F) glycoproteins. Recombinant virus could not be recovered from cDNA when the BRSV F open reading frame was replaced by the BPIV-3 F open reading frame. However, cDNA recovery of the chimeric virus rBRSV-HNF, with both glycoproteins replaced simultaneously, and of the chimeric virus rBRSV-HN, with the BRSV G protein replaced by BPIV-3 HN, was successful. The replication rates of both chimeras were similar to that of standard rBRSV. Moreover, rBRSV-HNF was neutralized by antibodies specific for BPIV-3, but not by antibodies specific to BRSV, demonstrating that the BRSV glycoproteins can be functionally replaced by BPIV-3 glycoproteins. In contrast, rBRSV-HN was neutralized by BRSV-specific antisera, but not by BPIV-3 specific sera, showing that infection of rBRSV-HN is mediated by BRSV F. Hemadsorption of cells infected with rBRSV-HNF and rBRSV-HN proved that BPIV-3 HN protein expressed by rBRSV is functional. Colocalization of the BPIV-3 glycoproteins with BRSV M protein was demonstrated by confocal laser scan microscopy. Moreover, protein analysis revealed that the BPIV-3 glycoproteins were present in chimeric virions. Taken together, these data indicate that the heterologous glycoproteins were not only expressed but were incorporated into the envelope of recombinant BRSV. Thus, the envelope glycoproteins derived from a member of the Respirovirus genus can together functionally replace their homologs in a Pneumovirus background. PMID:11533200

  2. ITS all right mama: investigating the formation of chimeric sequences in the ITS2 region by DNA metabarcoding analyses of fungal mock communities of different complexities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørnsgaard Aas, Anders; Davey, Marie Louise; Kauserud, Håvard

    2017-07-01

    The formation of chimeric sequences can create significant methodological bias in PCR-based DNA metabarcoding analyses. During mixed-template amplification of barcoding regions, chimera formation is frequent and well documented. However, profiling of fungal communities typically uses the more variable rDNA region ITS. Due to a larger research community, tools for chimera detection have been developed mainly for the 16S/18S markers. However, these tools are widely applied to the ITS region without verification of their performance. We examined the rate of chimera formation during amplification and 454 sequencing of the ITS2 region from fungal mock communities of different complexities. We evaluated the chimera detecting ability of two common chimera-checking algorithms: perseus and uchime. Large proportions of the chimeras reported were false positives. No false negatives were found in the data set. Verified chimeras accounted for only 0.2% of the total ITS2 reads, which is considerably less than what is typically reported in 16S and 18S metabarcoding analyses. Verified chimeric 'parent sequences' had significantly higher per cent identity to one another than to random members of the mock communities. Community complexity increased the rate of chimera formation. GC content was higher around the verified chimeric break points, potentially facilitating chimera formation through base pair mismatching in the neighbouring regions of high similarity in the chimeric region. We conclude that the hypervariable nature of the ITS region seems to buffer the rate of chimera formation in comparison with other, less variable barcoding regions, due to shorter regions of high sequence similarity. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Construction of a non toxic chimeric protein (L1-L2-B) of Haemolysin BL from Bacillus cereus and its application in HBL toxin detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, T D Kalyan; Murali, H S; Batra, H V

    2008-12-01

    Among the many potential virulence factors of B. cereus, Haemolysin BL is a unique and potent three component pore forming toxin composed of a binding component, B, and two lytic components, L(1) and L(2). Heterogeneity in nucleic acid and protein sequences of HBL components and problems during expression of L(1) and L(2) proteins in recombinant host due to their toxicity causes problems for development of specific detection systems based on PCR and Immunoassay, respectively. Commercially available kit (BCET RPLA, Oxoid) is useful for detection of L(2) component of HBL, but detection of only one component is insufficient to give comprehensive view on HBL toxin producing strains as some strains produced only one or two of the three HBL components. To address above mentioned problems, in this study, we cloned conserved domains of B, L(1) and L(2) components together as single fusion gene and expressed as recombinant multidomain chimeric protein in E. coli. The resultant protein having L(1), B and L(2) components in the form of single protein had no toxicity towards E. coli as we followed truncated protein approach. The hyperimmune antisera raised in mice against r-chimeric protein reacted with all the three components of HBL toxin of B. cereus (ATCC 14579) and provided three reaction bands at ~40 kDa to ~50 kDa regions during Western blot analysis. The hyperimmune sera of r-chimeric protein also notably neutralized the hemolytic activity of native HBL toxin. These results demonstrated that the obtained chimeric protein is correct and retained the antigenicity of native HBL toxin components. Therefore, it has better application in the development of a comprehensive HBL detection immunoassay and may also be a potential candidate molecule for vaccine studies.

  4. Engineering chimeric human and mouse major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I tetramers for the production of T-cell receptor (TCR) mimic antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Demin; Bentley, Carol; Yates, Jenna; Salimi, Maryam; Greig, Jenny; Wiblin, Sarah; Hassanali, Tasneem; Banham, Alison H

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies targeting cell surface or secreted antigens are among the most effective classes of novel immunotherapies. However, the majority of human proteins and established cancer biomarkers are intracellular. Peptides derived from these intracellular proteins are presented on the cell surface by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) and can be targeted by a novel class of T-cell receptor mimic (TCRm) antibodies that recognise similar epitopes to T-cell receptors. Humoural immune responses to MHC-I tetramers rarely generate TCRm antibodies and many antibodies recognise the α3 domain of MHC-I and β2 microglobulin (β2m) that are not directly involved in presenting the target peptide. Here we describe the production of functional chimeric human-murine HLA-A2-H2Dd tetramers and modifications that increase their bacterial expression and refolding efficiency. These chimeric tetramers were successfully used to generate TCRm antibodies against two epitopes derived from wild type tumour suppressor p53 (RMPEAAPPV and GLAPPQHLIRV) that have been used in vaccination studies. Immunisation with chimeric tetramers yielded no antibodies recognising the human α3 domain and β2m and generated TCRm antibodies capable of specifically recognising the target peptide/MHC-I complex in fully human tetramers and on the cell surface of peptide pulsed T2 cells. Chimeric tetramers represent novel immunogens for TCRm antibody production and may also improve the yield of tetramers for groups using these reagents to monitor CD8 T-cell immune responses in HLA-A2 transgenic mouse models of immunotherapy.

  5. Characterization of a Novel Chimeric Swine Enteric Coronavirus from Diseased Pigs in Central Eastern Europe in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belsham, G J; Rasmussen, T B; Normann, P; Vaclavek, P; Strandbygaard, B; Bøtner, A

    2016-12-01

    During a severe outbreak of diarrhoea and vomiting in a pig herd in Central Eastern Europe, faecal samples were tested positive for porcine epidemic diarrhoea virus (PEDV) and negative for transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) using a commercial RT-qPCR assay that can detect both of these coronaviruses. However, further analyses, using other TGEV- and PEDV-specific RT-qPCR assays, provided results inconsistent with infection by either of these viruses. Sequencing of an amplicon (ca. 1.6 kb), generated by an RT-PCR specific for the PEDV S-gene, indicated a very close similarity (ca. 99% identity) to recently described chimeric viruses termed swine enteric coronaviruses (SeCoVs). These viruses (with an RNA genome of ca. 28 kb) were first identified in Italy in samples from 2009 but have not been detected there since 2012. A closely related virus was detected in archived samples in Germany from 2012, but has not been detected subsequently. Building on the initial sequence data, further amplicons were generated and over 9 kb of sequence corresponding to the 3'-terminus of the new SeCoV genome was determined. Sequence comparisons showed that the three known SeCoVs are ≥98% identical across this region and contain the S-gene and 3a sequences from PEDV within a backbone of TGEV, but the viruses are clearly distinct from each other. It is demonstrated, for the first time, that pigs from within the SeCoV-infected herd seroconverted against PEDV but tested negative in a TGEV-specific ELISA that detects antibodies against the S protein. These results indicate that SeCoV is continuing to circulate in Europe and suggest it can cause a disease that is very similar to PED. Specific detection of the chimeric SeCoVs either requires development of a new diagnostic RT-qPCR assay or the combined use of assays targeting the PEDV S-gene and another part of the TGEV genome. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Advanced error diagnostics of the CMAQ and Chimere modelling systems within the AQMEII3 model evaluation framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Solazzo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The work here complements the overview analysis of the modelling systems participating in the third phase of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII3 by focusing on the performance for hourly surface ozone by two modelling systems, Chimere for Europe and CMAQ for North America. The evaluation strategy outlined in the course of the three phases of the AQMEII activity, aimed to build up a diagnostic methodology for model evaluation, is pursued here and novel diagnostic methods are proposed. In addition to evaluating the base case simulation in which all model components are configured in their standard mode, the analysis also makes use of sensitivity simulations in which the models have been applied by altering and/or zeroing lateral boundary conditions, emissions of anthropogenic precursors, and ozone dry deposition. To help understand of the causes of model deficiencies, the error components (bias, variance, and covariance of the base case and of the sensitivity runs are analysed in conjunction with timescale considerations and error modelling using the available error fields of temperature, wind speed, and NOx concentration. The results reveal the effectiveness and diagnostic power of the methods devised (which remains the main scope of this study, allowing the detection of the timescale and the fields that the two models are most sensitive to. The representation of planetary boundary layer (PBL dynamics is pivotal to both models. In particular, (i the fluctuations slower than ∼ 1.5 days account for 70–85 % of the mean square error of the full (undecomposed ozone time series; (ii a recursive, systematic error with daily periodicity is detected, responsible for 10–20 % of the quadratic total error; (iii errors in representing the timing of the daily transition between stability regimes in the PBL are responsible for a covariance error as large as 9 ppb (as much as the standard deviation of the network

  7. Accuracy of chimeric proteins in the serological diagnosis of chronic chagas disease – a Phase II study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celedon, Paola Alejandra Fiorani; Zanchin, Nilson Ivo Tonin; de Souza, Wayner Vieira; da Silva, Edimilson Domingos; Foti, Leonardo; Krieger, Marco Aurélio; Gomes, Yara de Miranda

    2017-01-01

    Background The performance of current serologic tests for diagnosing chronic Chagas disease (CD) is highly variable. The search for new diagnostic markers has been a constant challenge for improving accuracy and reducing the number of inconclusive results. Methodology/Principal findings Here, four chimeric proteins (IBMP-8.1 to -8.4) comprising immunodominant regions of different Trypanosoma cruzi antigens were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The proteins were used to detect specific anti-T. cruzi antibodies in the sera of 857 chagasic and 689 non-chagasic individuals to evaluate their accuracy for chronic CD diagnosis. The antigens were recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by chromatographic methods. The sensitivity and specificity values ranged from 94.3% to 99.3% and 99.4% to 100%, respectively. The diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) values were 6,462 for IBMP-8.1, 3,807 for IBMP-8.2, 32,095 for IBMP-8.3, and 283,714 for IBMP-8.4. These chimeric antigens presented DORs that were higher than the commercial test Pathozyme Chagas. The antigens IBMP-8.3 and -8.4 also showed DORs higher than the Gold ELISA Chagas test. Mixtures with equimolar concentrations were tested in order to improve the diagnosis accuracy of negative samples with high signal and positive samples with low signal. However, no gain in accuracy was observed relative to the individual antigens. A total of 1,079 additional sera were used to test cross-reactivity to unrelated diseases. The cross-reactivity rates ranged from 0.37% to 0.74% even for Leishmania spp., a pathogen showing relatively high genome sequence identity to T. cruzi. Imprecision analyses showed that IBMP chimeras are very stable and the results are highly reproducible. Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicate that the IBMP-8.4 antigen can be safely used in serological tests for T. cruzi screening in blood banks and for chronic CD laboratory diagnosis. PMID:28273127

  8. Co-expression of interleukin 12 enhances antitumor effects of a novel chimeric promoter-mediated suicide gene therapy in an immunocompetent mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yu, E-mail: xuyu1001@gmail.com [Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors and Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Liu, Zhengchun, E-mail: l135027@126.com [Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors and Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Kong, Haiyan, E-mail: suppleant@163.com [Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors and Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Sun, Wenjie, E-mail: wendy11240325@163.com [Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors and Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Liao, Zhengkai, E-mail: fastbeta@gmail.com [Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors and Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Zhou, Fuxiang, E-mail: happyzhoufx@sina.com [Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors and Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Xie, Conghua, E-mail: chxie_65@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors and Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, 169 Donghu Road, Wuhan 430071 (China); and others

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} A novel chimeric promoter consisting of CArG element and hTERT promoter was developed. {yields} The promoter was characterized with radiation-inducibility and tumor-specificity. {yields} Suicide gene system driven by the promoter showed remarkable cytotoxicity in vitro. {yields} Co-expression of IL12 enhanced the promoter mediated suicide gene therapy in vivo. -- Abstract: The human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter has been widely used in target gene therapy of cancer. However, low transcriptional activity limited its clinical application. Here, we designed a novel dual radiation-inducible and tumor-specific promoter system consisting of CArG elements and the hTERT promoter, resulting in increased expression of reporter genes after gamma-irradiation. Therapeutic and side effects of adenovirus-mediated horseradish peroxidase (HRP)/indole-3-acetic (IAA) system downstream of the chimeric promoter were evaluated in mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma, combining with or without adenovirus-mediated interleukin 12 (IL12) gene driven by the cytomegalovirus promoter. The combination treatment showed more effective suppression of tumor growth than those with single agent alone, being associated with pronounced intratumoral T-lymphocyte infiltration and minor side effects. Our results suggest that the combination treatment with HRP/IAA system driven by the novel chimeric promoter and the co-expression of IL12 might be an effective and safe target gene therapy strategy of cancer.

  9. Interaction analysis of chimeric metal-binding green fluorescent protein and artificial solid-supported lipid membrane by quartz crystal microbalance and atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Na Ayudhya, Chartchalerm Isarankura; Hilterhaus, Lutz; Hinz, Andreas; Tantimongcolwat, Tanawut; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2005-01-01

    Non-specific adsorption and specific interaction between a chimeric green fluorescent protein (GFP) carrying metal-binding region and the immobilized zinc ions on artificial solid-supported lipid membranes was investigated using the quartz crystal microbalance technique and the atomic force microscopy (AFM). Supported lipid bilayer, composed of octanethiol and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine/1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-[N- (5-amino-1-carboxypentyl iminodiacetic acid)succinyl] (NTA-DOGS)-Zn 2+ , was formed on the gold electrode of quartz resonator (5 MHz). Binding of the chimeric GFP to zinc ions resulted in a rapid decrease of resonance frequency. Reversibility of the process was demonstrated via the removal of metal ions by EDTA. Nanoscale structural orientation of the chimeric GFP on the membrane was imaged by AFM. Association constant of the specific binding to metal ions was 2- to 3-fold higher than that of the non-specific adsorption, which was caused by the fluidization effect of the metal-chelating lipid molecules as well as the steric hindrance effect. This infers a possibility for a further development of biofunctionalized membrane. However, maximization is needed in order to attain closer advancement to a membrane-based sensor device

  10. Characterization of the neutralization determinants of equine arteritis virus using recombinant chimeric viruses and site-specific mutagenesis of an infectious cDNA clone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasuriya, Udeni B.R.; Dobbe, Jessika C.; Heidner, Hans W.; Smalley, Victoria L.; Navarrette, Andrea; Snijder, Eric J.; MacLachlan, N. James

    2004-01-01

    We have used an infectious cDNA clone of equine arteritis virus (EAV) and reverse genetics technology to further characterize the neutralization determinants in the GP5 envelope glycoprotein of the virus. We generated a panel of 20 recombinant viruses, including 10 chimeric viruses that each contained the ORF5 (which encodes GP5) of different laboratory, field, and vaccine strains of EAV, a chimeric virus containing the N-terminal ectodomain of GP5 of a European strain of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, and 9 mutant viruses with site-specific substitutions in their GP5 proteins. The neutralization phenotype of each recombinant chimeric/mutant strain of EAV was determined with EAV-specific monoclonal antibodies and EAV strain-specific polyclonal equine antisera and compared to that of their parental viruses from which the substituted ORF5 was derived. The data unequivocally confirm that the GP5 ectodomain contains critical determinants of EAV neutralization. Furthermore, individual neutralization sites are conformationally interactive, and the interaction of GP5 with the unglycosylated membrane protein M is likely critical to expression of individual epitopes in neutralizing conformation. Substitution of individual amino acids within the GP5 ectodomain usually resulted in differences in neutralization phenotype of the recombinant viruses, analogous to differences in the neutralization phenotype of field strains of EAV and variants generated during persistent infection of EAV carrier stallions

  11. Cytogenetic survey of Holstein bulls at a commercial artificial insemination company to determine prevalence of bulls with centric fusion and chimeric anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguin, B E; Zhang, T Q; Buoen, L C; Weber, A F; Ruth, G R

    2000-01-01

    To determine prevalence of Holstein bulls with chromosomal anomalies, particularly the 1/21 centric fusion (CF), at a commercial artificial insemination (AI) company in the United States. Cross-sectional cytogenetic prevalence study. All 606 Holstein bulls at a commercial AI company were cytogenetically screened to detect CF, chimerism, and other chromosomal abnormalities. Lymphocytes from heparinized blood samples were cultured by standard cytogenetic techniques, and chromosome spreads were prepared for microscopic examination. Chromosomal abnormalities were detected by examining 10 chromosome spreads per bull. Pedigree analysis was performed. None of the bulls had any type of CF. However, 6 bulls were identified as chimeras (i.e., contained lymphocytes with male [XY] and female [XX] chromosomes). One bull was sire or maternal grandsire to 85 of the bulls tested, and 739 of 1,212 (61%) sire and maternal-grandsire possibilities were accounted for by just 18 bulls. Analysis of these results supports previous indications that CF is extremely rare in Holstein bloodlines available commercially via AI in the United States. However, chimeric bulls are more common, and they reportedly have decreased reproductive performance. Therefore, identification of chimeric sires in the AI facility reported here and the possibility of de novo onset of CF at any time indicates that early cytogenetic screening should be encouraged for prospective bulls intended for use in AI programs.

  12. Co-expression of interleukin 12 enhances antitumor effects of a novel chimeric promoter-mediated suicide gene therapy in an immunocompetent mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yu; Liu, Zhengchun; Kong, Haiyan; Sun, Wenjie; Liao, Zhengkai; Zhou, Fuxiang; Xie, Conghua

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A novel chimeric promoter consisting of CArG element and hTERT promoter was developed. → The promoter was characterized with radiation-inducibility and tumor-specificity. → Suicide gene system driven by the promoter showed remarkable cytotoxicity in vitro. → Co-expression of IL12 enhanced the promoter mediated suicide gene therapy in vivo. -- Abstract: The human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter has been widely used in target gene therapy of cancer. However, low transcriptional activity limited its clinical application. Here, we designed a novel dual radiation-inducible and tumor-specific promoter system consisting of CArG elements and the hTERT promoter, resulting in increased expression of reporter genes after gamma-irradiation. Therapeutic and side effects of adenovirus-mediated horseradish peroxidase (HRP)/indole-3-acetic (IAA) system downstream of the chimeric promoter were evaluated in mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma, combining with or without adenovirus-mediated interleukin 12 (IL12) gene driven by the cytomegalovirus promoter. The combination treatment showed more effective suppression of tumor growth than those with single agent alone, being associated with pronounced intratumoral T-lymphocyte infiltration and minor side effects. Our results suggest that the combination treatment with HRP/IAA system driven by the novel chimeric promoter and the co-expression of IL12 might be an effective and safe target gene therapy strategy of cancer.

  13. Upregulation of adhesion molecules on leukemia targets improves the efficacy of cytotoxic T cells transduced with chimeric anti-CD19 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurin, David; Marin, Virna; Biagi, Ettore; Pizzitola, Irene; Agostoni, Valentina; Gallot, Géraldine; Vié, Henri; Jacob, Marie Christine; Chaperot, Laurence; Aspord, Caroline; Plumas, Joël

    2013-04-01

    T lymphocytes engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) interact directly with cell surface molecules, bypassing MHC antigen presentation dependence. We generated human anti-CD19ζ CAR cytotoxic T lymphocytes and cytokine-induced killer cells and studied their sensitivity to the expression of adhesion molecules for the killing of primary B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) targets. Despite a very low basal expression of surface adhesion molecules, B-ALL blasts were lysed by the anti-CD19ζ-CAR transduced effectors as expected. We next investigated the regulatory role of adhesion molecules during CAR-mediated cytolysis. The blocking of these accessory molecules strongly limited the chimeric effector's cytotoxicity. Thereafter, B-ALL cells surface adhesion molecule level expression was induced by IFN-γ or by the combined use of CD40L and IL-4 and the cells were submitted to anti-CD19ζ-CAR transduced effectors lysis. Upregulation of adhesion molecules expression by blasts potentiated their killing. The improved cytotoxicity observed was dependent on target surface expression of adhesion molecules, particularly CD54. Taken together, these results indicate that adhesion molecules, and principally CD54, are involved in the efficiency of recognition by effector chimeric ζ. These observations have potential implications for the design of immunotherapy treatment approaches for hematological malignancies and tumors based on the adoption of CAR effector cells.

  14. Combinatorial RNA Interference Therapy Prevents Selection of Pre-existing HBV Variants in Human Liver Chimeric Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yao-Ming; Sun, Cheng-Pu; Chou, Hui-Hsien; Wu, Tzu-Hui; Chen, Chun-Chi; Wu, Ping-Yi; Enya Chen, Yu-Chen; Bissig, Karl-Dimiter; Tao, Mi-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Selection of escape mutants with mutations within the target sequence could abolish the antiviral RNA interference activity. Here, we investigated the impact of a pre-existing shRNA-resistant HBV variant on the efficacy of shRNA therapy. We previously identified a highly potent shRNA, S1, which, when delivered by an adeno-associated viral vector, effectively inhibits HBV replication in HBV transgenic mice. We applied the “PICKY” software to systemically screen the HBV genome, then used hydrodynamic transfection and HBV transgenic mice to identify additional six highly potent shRNAs. Human liver chimeric mice were infected with a mixture of wild-type and T472C HBV, a S1-resistant HBV variant, and then treated with a single or combined shRNAs. The presence of T472C mutant compromised the therapeutic efficacy of S1 and resulted in replacement of serum wild-type HBV by T472C HBV. In contrast, combinatorial therapy using S1 and P28, one of six potent shRNAs, markedly reduced titers for both wild-type and T472C HBV. Interestingly, treatment with P28 alone led to the emergence of escape mutants with mutations in the P28 target region. Our results demonstrate that combinatorial RNAi therapy can minimize the escape of resistant viral mutants in chronic HBV patients. PMID:26482836

  15. An Evaluation of the CHIMERE Chemistry Transport Model to Simulate Dust Outbreaks across the Northern Hemisphere in March 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Bessagnet

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mineral dust is one of the most important aerosols over the world, affecting health and climate. These mineral particles are mainly emitted over arid areas but may be long-range transported, impacting the local budget of air quality in urban areas. While models were extensively used to study a single specific event, or make a global analysis at coarse resolution, the goal of our study is to simultaneously focus on several affected areas—Europe, North America, Central Asia, east China and the Caribbean area—for a one-month period, March 2014, avoiding any parameter fitting to better simulate a single dust outbreak. The simulation is performed for the first time with the hemispheric version of the CHIMERE model, with a high horizontal resolution (about 10 km. In this study, an overview of several simultaneous dust outbreaks over the Northern Hemisphere is proposed to assess the capability of such modeling tools to predict dust pollution events. A quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the most striking episodes is presented with comparisons to satellite data, ground based particulate matter and calcium measurements. Despite some overestimation of dust concentrations far from emission source areas, the model can simulate the timing of the arrival of dust outbreaks on observational sites. For instance, several spectacular dust storms in the US and China are rather well captured by the models. The high resolution provides a better description and understanding of the orographic effects and the long-range transport of dust plumes.

  16. High-throughput screening of effective siRNAs using luciferase-linked chimeric mRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Pang

    Full Text Available The use of siRNAs to knock down gene expression can potentially be an approach to treat various diseases. To avoid siRNA toxicity the less transcriptionally active H1 pol III promoter, rather than the U6 promoter, was proposed for siRNA expression. To identify highly efficacious siRNA sequences, extensive screening is required, since current computer programs may not render ideal results. Here, we used CCR5 gene silencing as a model to investigate a rapid and efficient screening approach. We constructed a chimeric luciferase-CCR5 gene for high-throughput screening of siRNA libraries. After screening approximately 900 shRNA clones, 12 siRNA sequences were identified. Sequence analysis demonstrated that most (11 of the 12 sequences of these siRNAs did not match those identified by available siRNA prediction algorithms. Significant inhibition of CCR5 in a T-lymphocyte cell line and primary T cells by these identified siRNAs was confirmed using the siRNA lentiviral vectors to infect these cells. The inhibition of CCR5 expression significantly protected cells from R5 HIV-1JRCSF infection. These results indicated that the high-throughput screening method allows efficient identification of siRNA sequences to inhibit the target genes at low levels of expression.

  17. 4-1BB Costimulation Ameliorates T Cell Exhaustion Induced by Tonic Signaling of Chimeric Antigen Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Adrienne H.; Haso, Waleed M.; Shern, Jack F.; Wanhainen, Kelsey M.; Murgai, Meera; Ingaramo, Maria; Smith, Jillian P.; Walker, Alec J.; Kohler, M. Eric; Venkateshwara, Vikas R.; Kaplan, Rosandra N.; Patterson, George H.; Fry, Terry J.; Orentas, Rimas J.; Mackall, Crystal L.

    2015-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting CD19 have mediated dramatic anti-tumor responses in hematologic malignancies, but tumor regression has rarely occurred using CARs targeting other antigens. It remains unknown whether the impressive effects of CD19 CARs relate to greater susceptibility of hematologic malignancies to CAR therapies, or superior functionality of the CD19 CAR itself. We discovered that tonic CAR CD3ζ phosphorylation, triggered by antigen-independent clustering of CAR scFvs, can induce early exhaustion of CAR T cells that limits anti-tumor efficacy. Such activation is present to varying degrees in all CARs studied, with the exception of the highly effective CD19 CAR. We further identify that CD28 costimulation augments, while 4-1BB costimulation ameliorates, exhaustion induced by persistent CAR signaling. Our results provide biological explanations for the dramatic anti-tumor effects of CD19 CARs and for the observations that CD19.BBz CAR T cells are more persistent than CD19.28z CAR T cells in clinical trials. PMID:25939063

  18. Standardized quantitative RT-PCR assays for quantitation of yellow fever and chimeric yellow fever-dengue vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantel, N; Aguirre, M; Gulia, S; Girerd-Chambaz, Y; Colombani, S; Moste, C; Barban, V

    2008-07-01

    Yellow fever-dengue chimeras (CYDs) are being developed currently as live tetravalent dengue vaccine candidates. Specific quantitative assays are needed to evaluate the viral load of each serotype in vaccine batches and biological samples. A quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) system was developed comprising five one-step qRT-PCRs targeting the E/NS1 junction of each chimera, or the NS5 gene in the yellow fever backbone. Each assay was standardized using in vitro transcribed RNA qualified according to its size and purity, and precisely quantified. A non RNA-extracted virus sample was introduced as external quality control (EQC), as well as 2 extraction controls consisting of 2 doses, 40 and 4,000 GEQ (genomic equivalents), of this EQC extracted in parallel to the samples. Between 6 and 10 GEQ/reaction were reproducibly measured with all assays and similar titers were obtained with the two methods when chimeric virus samples were quantified with the E/NS1- or the NS5-specific assays. Reproducibility of RNA extraction was ensured by automation of the process (yield>or=50%), and infectious virus was isolated in >or=80% of PCR-positive sera from immune monkeys.

  19. Immunotherapy of acute leukemia by chimeric antigen receptor-modified lymphocytes using an improved Sleeping Beauty transposon platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnani, Chiara F; Turazzi, Nice; Benedicenti, Fabrizio; Calabria, Andrea; Tenderini, Erika; Tettamanti, Sarah; Giordano Attianese, Greta M P; Cooper, Laurence J N; Aiuti, Alessandro; Montini, Eugenio; Biondi, Andrea; Biagi, Ettore

    2016-08-09

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T-cell adoptive immunotherapy is a remarkable therapeutic option proven effective in the treatment of hematological malignancies. In order to optimize cell manufacturing, we sought to develop a novel clinical-grade protocol to obtain CAR-modified cytokine-induced killer cells (CIKs) using the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system. Administration of irradiated PBMCs overcame cell death of stimulating cells induced by non-viral transfection, enabling robust gene transfer together with efficient T-cell expansion. Upon single stimulation, we reached an average of 60% expression of CD123- and CD19- specific 3rd generation CARs (CD28/OX40/TCRzeta). Furthermore, modified cells displayed persistence of cell subsets with memory phenotype, specific and effective lytic activity against leukemic cell lines and primary blasts, cytokine secretion, and proliferation. Adoptive transfer of CD123.CAR or CD19.CAR lymphocytes led to a significant anti-tumor response against acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) disseminated diseases in NSG mice. Notably, we found no evidence of integration enrichment near cancer genes and transposase expression at the end of the differentiation. Taken all together, our findings describe a novel donor-derived non-viral CAR approach that may widen the repertoire of available methods for T cell-based immunotherapy.

  20. Lym-1 Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells Exhibit Potent Anti-Tumor Effects against B-Cell Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Long; Hu, Peisheng; Wolfe, Brandon; Gonsalves, Caryn; Ren, Luqing; Khawli, Leslie A; Kaslow, Harvey R; Epstein, Alan L

    2017-12-20

    T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) recognizing CD19 epitopes have produced remarkable anti-tumor effects in patients with B-cell malignancies. However, cancer cells lacking recognized epitopes can emerge, leading to relapse and death. Thus, CAR T cells targeting different epitopes on different antigens could improve immunotherapy. The Lym-1 antibody targets a conformational epitope of Human Leukocyte Antigen-antigen D Related (HLA-DR) on the surface of human B-cell lymphomas. Lym-1 CAR T cells were thus generated for evaluation of cytotoxic activity towards lymphoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Human T cells from healthy donors were transduced to express a Lym-1 CAR, and assessed for epitope-driven function in culture and towards Raji xenografts in NOD-scidIL2Rgamma null (NSG) mice. Lym-1 CAR T cells exhibited epitope-driven activation and lytic function against human B-cell lymphoma cell lines in culture and mediated complete regression of Raji/Luciferase-Green fluorescent protein (Raji/Luc-GFP) in NSG mice with similar or better reactivity than CD19 CAR T cells. Lym-1 CAR transduction of T cells is a promising immunotherapy for patients with Lym-1 epitope positive B-cell malignancies.

  1. A competitive advantage by neonatally engrafted human glial progenitors yields mice whose brains are chimeric for human glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windrem, Martha S; Schanz, Steven J; Morrow, Carolyn; Munir, Jared; Chandler-Militello, Devin; Wang, Su; Goldman, Steven A

    2014-11-26

    Neonatally transplanted human glial progenitor cells (hGPCs) densely engraft and myelinate the hypomyelinated shiverer mouse. We found that, in hGPC-xenografted mice, the human donor cells continue to expand throughout the forebrain, systematically replacing the host murine glia. The differentiation of the donor cells is influenced by the host environment, such that more donor cells differentiated as oligodendrocytes in the hypomyelinated shiverer brain than in myelin wild-types, in which hGPCs were more likely to remain as progenitors. Yet in each recipient, both the number and relative proportion of mouse GPCs fell as a function of time, concomitant with the mitotic expansion and spread of donor hGPCs. By a year after neonatal xenograft, the forebrain GPC populations of implanted mice were largely, and often entirely, of human origin. Thus, neonatally implanted hGPCs outcompeted and ultimately replaced the host population of mouse GPCs, ultimately generating mice with a humanized glial progenitor population. These human glial chimeric mice should permit us to define the specific contributions of glia to a broad variety of neurological disorders, using human cells in vivo. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3416153-09$15.00/0.

  2. Tonic 4-1BB Costimulation in Chimeric Antigen Receptors Impedes T Cell Survival and Is Vector-Dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Gomes-Silva

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Antigen-independent tonic signaling by chimeric antigen receptors (CARs can increase differentiation and exhaustion of T cells, limiting their potency. Incorporating 4-1BB costimulation in CARs may enable T cells to resist this functional exhaustion; however, the potential ramifications of tonic 4-1BB signaling in CAR T cells remain unclear. Here, we found that tonic CAR-derived 4-1BB signaling can produce toxicity in T cells via continuous TRAF2-dependent activation of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB pathway and augmented FAS-dependent cell death. This mechanism was amplified in a non-self-inactivating gammaretroviral vector through positive feedback on the long terminal repeat (LTR promoter, further enhancing CAR expression and tonic signaling. Attenuating CAR expression by substitution with a self-inactivating lentiviral vector minimized tonic signaling and improved T cell expansion and anti-tumor function. These studies illuminate the interaction between tonic CAR signaling and the chosen expression platform and identify inhibitory properties of the 4-1BB costimulatory domain that have direct implications for rational CAR design.

  3. Antigen-specific T cell activation independently of the MHC: chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-redirected T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinrich eAbken

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive T cell therapy has recently shown powerful in initiating a lasting anti-tumor response with spectacular therapeutic success in some cases. Specific T cell therapy, however, is limited since a number of cancer cells are not recognized by T cells due to various mechanisms including the limited availability of tumor-specific T cells and deficiencies in antigen processing or major histocompatibility complex (MHC expression of cancer cells. To make adoptive cell therapy applicable for the broad variety of cancer entities, patient's T cells are engineered ex vivo with pre-defined specificity by a recombinant chimeric antigen receptor (CAR which consists in the extracellular part of an antibody-derived domain for binding with a tumor-associated antigen and in the intracellular part of a TCR-derived signaling moiety for T cell activation. The specificity of CAR mediated T cell recognition is defined by the antibody domain, is independent of MHC presentation and can be extended to any target for which an antibody is available. We discuss the advantages and limitations of MHC-independent T cell targeting by an engineered CAR and review most significant progress recently made in early stage clinical trials to treat cancer.

  4. Lym-1 Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells Exhibit Potent Anti-Tumor Effects against B-Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Zheng

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs recognizing CD19 epitopes have produced remarkable anti-tumor effects in patients with B-cell malignancies. However, cancer cells lacking recognized epitopes can emerge, leading to relapse and death. Thus, CAR T cells targeting different epitopes on different antigens could improve immunotherapy. The Lym-1 antibody targets a conformational epitope of Human Leukocyte Antigen-antigen D Related (HLA-DR on the surface of human B-cell lymphomas. Lym-1 CAR T cells were thus generated for evaluation of cytotoxic activity towards lymphoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Human T cells from healthy donors were transduced to express a Lym-1 CAR, and assessed for epitope-driven function in culture and towards Raji xenografts in NOD-scidIL2Rgammanull (NSG mice. Lym-1 CAR T cells exhibited epitope-driven activation and lytic function against human B-cell lymphoma cell lines in culture and mediated complete regression of Raji/Luciferase-Green fluorescent protein (Raji/Luc-GFP in NSG mice with similar or better reactivity than CD19 CAR T cells. Lym-1 CAR transduction of T cells is a promising immunotherapy for patients with Lym-1 epitope positive B-cell malignancies.

  5. CARbodies: Human Antibodies Against Cell Surface Tumor Antigens Selected From Repertoires Displayed on T Cell Chimeric Antigen Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanesa Alonso-Camino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A human single-chain variable fragment (scFv antibody library was expressed on the surface of human T cells after transduction with lentiviral vectors (LVs. The repertoire was fused to a first-generation T cell receptor ζ (TCRζ-based chimeric antigen receptor (CAR. We used this library to isolate antibodies termed CARbodies that recognize antigens expressed on the tumor cell surface in a proof-of-principle system. After three rounds of activation-selection there was a clear repertoire restriction, with the emergence dominant clones. The CARbodies were purified from bacterial cultures as soluble and active proteins. Furthermore, to validate its potential application for adoptive cell therapy, human T cells were transduced with a LV encoding a second-generation costimulatory CAR (CARv2 bearing the selected CARbodies. Transduced human primary T cells expressed significant levels of the CARbodies-based CARv2 fusion protein on the cell surface, and importantly could be specifically activated, after stimulation with tumor cells. This approach is a promising tool for the generation of antibodies fully adapted to the display format (CAR and the selection context (cell synapse, which could extend the scope of current adoptive cell therapy strategies with CAR-redirected T cells.

  6. Enhanced Expression of Anti-CD19 Chimeric Antigen Receptor in piggyBac Transposon-Engineered T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Morita

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive T cell therapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-modified T cells is a promising cancer immunotherapy. We previously developed a non-viral method of gene transfer into T cells using a piggyBac transposon system to improve the cost-effectiveness of CAR-T cell therapy. Here, we have further improved our technology by a novel culture strategy to increase the transfection efficiency and to reduce the time of T cell manufacturing. Using a CH2CH3-free CD19-specific CAR transposon vector and combining irradiated activated T cells (ATCs as feeder cells and virus-specific T cell receptor (TCR stimulation, we achieved 51.4% ± 14% CAR+ T cells and 2.8-fold expansion after 14 culture days. Expanded CD19.CAR-T cells maintained a significant fraction of CD45RA+CCR7+ T cells and demonstrated potent antitumor activity against CD19+ leukemic cells both in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, piggyBac-based gene transfer may provide an alternative to viral gene transfer for CAR-T cell therapy.

  7. The CD3-zeta chimeric antigen receptor overcomes TCR Hypo-responsiveness of human terminal late-stage T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunter Rappl

    Full Text Available Adoptive therapy of malignant diseases with tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells showed remarkable efficacy in recent trials. Repetitive T cell receptor (TCR engagement of target antigen, however, inevitably ends up in hypo-responsive cells with terminally differentiated KLRG-1(+ CD57(+ CD7(- phenotype limiting their therapeutic efficacy. We here revealed that hypo-responsiveness of CMV-specific late-stage CD8(+ T cells is due to reduced TCR synapse formation compared to younger cells. Membrane anchoring of TCR components contributes to T cell hypo-responsiveness since dislocation of galectin-3 from the synapse by swainsonine restored both TCR synapse formation and T cell response. Transgenic expression of a CD3-zeta signaling chimeric antigen receptor (CAR recovered hypo-responsive T cells to full effector functions indicating that the defect is restricted to TCR membrane components while synapse formation of the transgenic CAR was not blocked. CAR engineered late-stage T cells released cytokines and mediated redirected cytotoxicity as efficiently as younger effector T cells. Our data provide a rationale for TCR independent, CAR mediated activation in the adoptive cell therapy to avoid hypo-responsiveness of late-stage T cells upon repetitive antigen encounter.

  8. Development of A Chimeric Antigen Receptor Targeting C-Type Lectin-Like Molecule-1 for Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Laborda

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML with targeted immunotherapy is challenged by the heterogeneity of the disease and a lack of tumor-exclusive antigens. Conventional immunotherapy targets for AML such as CD33 and CD123 have been proposed as targets for chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-engineered T-cells (CAR-T-cells, a therapy that has been highly successful in the treatment of B-cell leukemia and lymphoma. However, CD33 and CD123 are present on hematopoietic stem cells, and targeting with CAR-T-cells has the potential to elicit long-term myelosuppression. C-type lectin-like molecule-1 (CLL1 or CLEC12A is a myeloid lineage antigen that is expressed by malignant cells in more than 90% of AML patients. CLL1 is not expressed by healthy Hematopoietic Stem Cells (HSCs, and is therefore a promising target for CAR-T-cell therapy. Here, we describe the development and optimization of an anti-CLL1 CAR-T-cell with potent activity on both AML cell lines and primary patient-derived AML blasts in vitro while sparing healthy HSCs. Furthermore, in a disseminated mouse xenograft model using the CLL1-positive HL60 cell line, these CAR-T-cells completely eradicated tumor, thus supporting CLL1 as a promising target for CAR-T-cells to treat AML while limiting myelosuppressive toxicity.

  9. Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Redirected Regulatory T Cells Suppress Experimental Allergic Airway Inflammation, a Model of Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Skuljec

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cellular therapy with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-redirected cytotoxic T cells has shown impressive efficacy in the treatment of hematologic malignancies. We explored a regulatory T cell (Treg-based therapy in the treatment of allergic airway inflammation, a model for asthma, which is characterized by an airway hyper-reactivity (AHR and a chronic, T helper-2 (Th2 cell-dominated immune response to allergen. To restore the immune balance in the lung, we redirected Tregs by a CAR toward lung epithelia in mice upon experimentally induced allergic asthma, closely mimicking the clinical situation. Adoptively transferred CAR Tregs accumulated in the lung and in tracheobronchial lymph nodes, reduced AHR and diminished eosinophilic airway inflammation, indicated by lower cell numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and decreased cell infiltrates in the lung. CAR Treg cells furthermore prevented excessive pulmonary mucus production as well as increase in allergen-specific IgE and Th2 cytokine levels in exposed animals. CAR Tregs were more efficient in controlling asthma than non-modified Tregs, indicating the pivotal role of specific Treg cell activation in the affected organ. Data demonstrate that lung targeting CAR Treg cells ameliorate key features of experimental airway inflammation, paving the way for cell therapy of severe allergic asthma.

  10. Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T Cells: Lessons Learned from Targeting of CD19 in B-Cell Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Kevin A; Turtle, Cameron J

    2017-03-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with chimeric antigen receptor-modified (CAR)-T cells is a rapidly growing therapeutic approach to treating patients with refractory cancer, with over 100 clinical trials in various malignancies in progress. The enthusiasm for CAR-T cells has been driven by the clinical success of CD19-targeted CAR-T cell therapy in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and the promising data in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Despite the success of targeting CD19 with CAR-T cells in early clinical studies, many challenges remain to improve outcomes, reduce toxicity, and determine the appropriate settings for CAR-T cell immunotherapy. Reviewing the lessons learned thus far in CD19 CAR-T cell trials and how some of these challenges may be overcome will help guide the development of CAR-T cell therapy for malignancies of B-cell origin, as well as for other hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cancers.

  11. Chimeric antigen receptor T cell (CAR-T) immunotherapy for solid tumors: lessons learned and strategies for moving forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Li, Wenwen; Huang, Kejia; Zhang, Yang; Kupfer, Gary; Zhao, Qi

    2018-02-13

    Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first chimeric antigen receptor T cell (CAR-T) therapy for the treatment CD19-positive B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. While CAR-T has achieved remarkable success in the treatment of hematopoietic malignancies, whether it can benefit solid tumor patients to the same extent is still uncertain. Even though hundreds of clinical trials are undergoing exploring a variety of tumor-associated antigens (TAA), no such antigen with comparable properties like CD19 has yet been identified regarding solid tumors CAR-T immunotherapy. Inefficient T cell trafficking, immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, suboptimal antigen recognition specificity, and lack of safety control are currently considered as the main obstacles in solid tumor CAR-T therapy. Here, we reviewed the solid tumor CAR-T clinical trials, emphasizing the studies with published results. We further discussed the challenges that CAR-T is facing for solid tumor treatment and proposed potential strategies to improve the efficacy of CAR-T as promising immunotherapy.

  12. Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cells: Lessons Learned from Targeting of CD19 in B cell malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Kevin A; Turtle, Cameron J

    2017-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with chimeric antigen receptor-modified T (CAR-T) cells is a rapidly growing therapeutic approach to treating patients with refractory cancer, with over 100 clinical trials in various malignancies in progress. The enthusiasm for CAR-T cells has been driven by the clinical success of CD19-targeted CAR-T therapy in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and the promising data in B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Despite the success of targeting CD19 with CAR-T cells in early clinical studies, many challenges remain to improve outcomes, reduce toxicity, and determine the appropriate settings for CAR-T cell immunotherapy. Reviewing the lessons learned thus far in CD19 CAR-T cell trials and how some of these challenges may be overcome will help guide the development of CAR-T cell therapy for malignancies of B-cell origin, as well as for other hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cancers. PMID:28110394

  13. Identification of Predictive Biomarkers for Cytokine Release Syndrome after Chimeric Antigen Receptor T cell Therapy for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teachey, David T.; Lacey, Simon F.; Shaw, Pamela A.; Melenhorst, J. Joseph; Maude, Shannon L.; Frey, Noelle; Pequignot, Edward; Gonzalez, Vanessa E.; Chen, Fang; Finklestein, Jeffrey; Barrett, David M.; Weiss, Scott L.; Fitzgerald, Julie C.; Berg, Robert A.; Aplenc, Richard; Callahan, Colleen; Rheingold, Susan R.; Zheng, Zhaohui; Rose-John, Stefan; White, Jason C.; Nazimuddin, Farzana; Wertheim, Gerald; Levine, Bruce L.; June, Carl H.; Porter, David L.; Grupp, Stephan A.

    2017-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells with anti-CD19 specificity are a highly effective novel immune therapy for relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Cytokine release syndrome (CRS) is the most significant and life-threatening toxicity. To improve understanding of CRS, we measured cytokines and clinical biomarkers in 51 CTL019-treated patients. Peak levels of 24 cytokines, including IFNγ, IL6, sgp130, and sIL6R in the first month after infusion were highly associated with severe CRS. Using regression modeling, we could accurately predict which patients would develop severe CRS with a signature composed of three cytokines. Results validated in an independent cohort. Changes in serum biochemical markers, including C-reactive protein and ferritin, were associated with CRS but failed to predict development of severe CRS. These comprehensive profiling data provide novel insights into CRS biology, and importantly represent the first data that can accurately predict which patients have a high probability of becoming critically ill. PMID:27076371

  14. Constant domains influence binding of mouse–human chimeric antibodies to the capsular polypeptide of Bacillus anthracis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Mark A; Thorkildson, Peter; Kozel, Thomas R; AuCoin, David P

    2013-01-01

    Our laboratory previously described the binding characteristics of the murine IgG3 monoclonal antibody (MuAb) F26G3. This antibody binds the poly-glutamic acid capsule (PGA) of Bacillus anthracis, an essential virulence factor in the progression of anthrax. F26G3 IgG3 MuAb binds PGA with a relatively high functional affinity (10 nM), produces a distinct “rim” quellung reaction, and is protective in a murine model of pulmonary anthrax. This study engineered an IgG subclass family of F26G3 mouse–human chimeric antibodies (ChAb). The F26G3 ChAbs displayed 9- to 20-fold decreases in functional affinity, as compared with the parent IgG3 MuAb. Additionally, the quellung reactions that were produced by the ChAbs all differed from the parent IgG3 MuAb in that they appeared “puffy” in nature. This study demonstrates that human constant domains may influence multiple facets of antibody binding to microbial capsular antigens despite their spatial separation from the traditional antigen-binding site. PMID:23863605

  15. Constant domains influence binding of mouse-human chimeric antibodies to the capsular polypeptide of Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Mark A; Thorkildson, Peter; Kozel, Thomas R; AuCoin, David P

    2013-08-15

    Our laboratory previously described the binding characteristics of the murine IgG3 monoclonal antibody (MuAb) F26G3. This antibody binds the poly-glutamic acid capsule (PGA) of Bacillus anthracis, an essential virulence factor in the progression of anthrax. F26G3 IgG3 MuAb binds PGA with a relatively high functional affinity (10 nM), produces a distinct "rim" quellung reaction, and is protective in a murine model of pulmonary anthrax. This study engineered an IgG subclass family of F26G3 mouse-human chimeric antibodies (ChAb). The F26G3 ChAbs displayed 9- to 20-fold decreases in functional affinity, as compared with the parent IgG3 MuAb. Additionally, the quellung reactions that were produced by the ChAbs all differed from the parent IgG3 MuAb in that they appeared "puffy" in nature. This study demonstrates that human constant domains may influence multiple facets of antibody binding to microbial capsular antigens despite their spatial separation from the traditional antigen-binding site.

  16. Suppression of Retinal Neovascularization in vivo by Inhibition of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Using Soluble VEGF-Receptor Chimeric Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Lloyd Paul; Pierce, Eric A.; Foley, Eliot D.; Takagi, Hitoshi; Chen, Helen; Riddle, Lavon; Ferrara, Napoleone; King, George L.; Smith, Lois E. H.

    1995-11-01

    The majority of severe visual loss in the United States results from complications associated with retinal neovascularization in patients with ischemic ocular diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, retinal vein occlusion, and retinopathy of prematurity. Intraocular expression of the angiogenic protein vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is closely correlated with neovascularization in these human disorders and with ischemia-induced retinal neovascularization in mice. In this study, we evaluated whether in vivo inhibition of VEGF action could suppress retinal neovascularization in a murine model of ischemic retinopathy. VEGF-neutralizing chimeric proteins were constructed by joining the extracellular domain of either human (Flt) or mouse (Flk) high-affinity VEGF receptors with IgG. Control chimeric proteins that did not bind VEGF were also used. VEGF-receptor chimeric proteins eliminated in vitro retinal endothelial cell growth stimulation by either VEGF (P hypoxic conditioned medium (P < 0.005) without affecting growth under nonstimulated conditions. Control proteins had no effect. To assess in vivo response, animals with bilateral retinal ischemia received intravitreal injections of VEGF antagonist in one eye and control protein in the contralateral eye. Retinal neovascularization was quantitated histologically by a masked protocol. Retinal neovascularization in the eye injected with human Flt or murine Flk chimeric protein was reduced in 100% (25/25; P < 0.0001) and 95% (21/22; P < 0.0001) of animals, respectively, compared to the control treated eye. This response was evident after only a single intravitreal injection and was dose dependent with suppression of neovascularization noted after total delivery of 200 ng of protein (P < 0.002). Reduction of histologically evident neovascular nuclei per 6-um section averaged 47% ± 4% (P < 0.001) and 37% ± 2% (P < 0.001) for Flt and Flk chimeric proteins with maximal inhibitory effects of 77% and 66

  17. A cooperative interaction between nontranslated RNA sequences and NS5A protein promotes in vivo fitness of a chimeric hepatitis C/GB virus B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucile Warter

    Full Text Available GB virus B (GBV-B is closely related to hepatitis C virus (HCV, infects small non-human primates, and is thus a valuable surrogate for studying HCV. Despite significant differences, the 5' nontranslated RNAs (NTRs of these viruses fold into four similar structured domains (I-IV, with domains II-III-IV comprising the viral internal ribosomal entry site (IRES. We previously reported the in vivo rescue of a chimeric GBV-B (vGB/III(HC containing HCV sequence in domain III, an essential segment of the IRES. We show here that three mutations identified within the vGB/III(HC genome (within the 3'NTR, upstream of the poly(U tract, and NS5A coding sequence are necessary and sufficient for production of this chimeric virus following intrahepatic inoculation of synthetic RNA in tamarins, and thus apparently compensate for the presence of HCV sequence in domain III. To assess the mechanism(s underlying these compensatory mutations, and to determine whether 5'NTR subdomains participating in genome replication do so in a virus-specific fashion, we constructed and evaluated a series of chimeric subgenomic GBV-B replicons in which various 5'NTR subdomains were substituted with their HCV homologs. Domains I and II of the GBV-B 5'NTR could not be replaced with HCV sequence, indicating that they contain essential, virus-specific RNA replication elements. In contrast, domain III could be swapped with minimal loss of genome replication capacity in cell culture. The 3'NTR and NS5A mutations required for rescue of the related chimeric virus in vivo had no effect on replication of the subgenomic GBneoD/III(HC RNA in vitro. The data suggest that in vivo fitness of the domain III chimeric virus is dependent on a cooperative interaction between the 5'NTR, 3'NTR and NS5A at a step in the viral life cycle subsequent to genome replication, most likely during particle assembly. Such a mechanism may be common to all hepaciviruses.

  18. Safety and Efficacy of Intratumoral Injections of Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T Cells in Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchou, Julia; Zhao, Yangbing; Levine, Bruce L; Zhang, Paul J; Davis, Megan M; Melenhorst, Jan Joseph; Kulikovskaya, Irina; Brennan, Andrea L; Liu, Xiaojun; Lacey, Simon F; Posey, Avery D; Williams, Austin D; So, Alycia; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R; Plesa, Gabriela; Young, Regina M; McGettigan, Shannon; Campbell, Jean; Pierce, Robert H; Matro, Jennifer M; DeMichele, Angela M; Clark, Amy S; Cooper, Laurence J; Schuchter, Lynn M; Vonderheide, Robert H; June, Carl H

    2017-12-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) are synthetic molecules that provide new specificities to T cells. Although successful in treatment of hematologic malignancies, CAR T cells are ineffective for solid tumors to date. We found that the cell-surface molecule c-Met was expressed in ∼50% of breast tumors, prompting the construction of a CAR T cell specific for c-Met, which halted tumor growth in immune-incompetent mice with tumor xenografts. We then evaluated the safety and feasibility of treating metastatic breast cancer with intratumoral administration of mRNA-transfected c-Met-CAR T cells in a phase 0 clinical trial (NCT01837602). Introducing the CAR construct via mRNA ensured safety by limiting the nontumor cell effects (on-target/off-tumor) of targeting c-Met. Patients with metastatic breast cancer with accessible cutaneous or lymph node metastases received a single intratumoral injection of 3 × 10 7 or 3 × 10 8 cells. CAR T mRNA was detectable in peripheral blood and in the injected tumor tissues after intratumoral injection in 2 and 4 patients, respectively. mRNA c-Met-CAR T cell injections were well tolerated, as none of the patients had study drug-related adverse effects greater than grade 1. Tumors treated with intratumoral injected mRNA c-Met-CAR T cells were excised and analyzed by immunohistochemistry, revealing extensive tumor necrosis at the injection site, cellular debris, loss of c-Met immunoreactivity, all surrounded by macrophages at the leading edges and within necrotic zones. We conclude that intratumoral injections of mRNA c-Met-CAR T cells are well tolerated and evoke an inflammatory response within tumors. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(12); 1152-61. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Synthetic ciguatoxins selectively activate Nav1.8-derived chimeric sodium channels expressed in HEK293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Kaoru; Inoue, Masayuki; Miyazaki, Keisuke; Hirama, Masahiro; Kondo, Chie; Kinoshita, Eiji; Miyoshi, Hiroshi; Seyama, Issei

    2009-03-20

    The synthetic ciguatoxin CTX3C has been shown to activate tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive sodium channels (Na(v)1.2, Na(v)1.4, and Na(v)1.5) by accelerating activation kinetics and shifting the activation curve toward hyperpolarization (Yamaoka, K., Inoue, M., Miyahara, H., Miyazaki, K., and Hirama, M. (2004) Br. J. Pharmacol. 142, 879-889). In this study, we further explored the effects of CTX3C on the TTX-resistant sodium channel Na(v)1.8. TTX-resistant channels have been shown to be involved in transducing pain and related sensations (Akopian, A. N., Sivilotti, L., and Wood, J. N. (1996) Nature 379, 257-262). Thus, we hypothesized that ciguatoxin-induced activation of the Na(v)1.8 current would account for the neurological symptoms of ciguatera poisoning. We found that 0.1 mum CTX3C preferentially affected the activation process of the Na(v)1.8 channel compared with those of the Na(v)1.2 and Na(v)1.4 channels. Importantly, without stimulation, 0.1 mum CTX3C induced a large leakage current (I (L)). The conductance of the I (L) calculated relative to the maximum conductance (G (max)) was 10 times larger than that of Na(v)1.2 or Na(v)1.4. To determine the molecular domain of Na(v)1.8 responsible for conferring higher sensitivity to CTX3C, we made two chimeric constructs from Na(v)1.4 and Na(v)1.8. Chimeras containing the N-terminal half of Na(v)1.8 exhibited a large response similar to wild-type Na(v)1.8, indicating that the region conferring high sensitivity to ciguatoxin action is located in the D1 or D2 domains.

  20. Synthetic Ciguatoxins Selectively Activate Nav1.8-derived Chimeric Sodium Channels Expressed in HEK293 Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Kaoru; Inoue, Masayuki; Miyazaki, Keisuke; Hirama, Masahiro; Kondo, Chie; Kinoshita, Eiji; Miyoshi, Hiroshi; Seyama, Issei

    2009-01-01

    The synthetic ciguatoxin CTX3C has been shown to activate tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive sodium channels (Nav1.2, Nav1.4, and Nav1.5) by accelerating activation kinetics and shifting the activation curve toward hyperpolarization (Yamaoka, K., Inoue, M., Miyahara, H., Miyazaki, K., and Hirama, M. (2004) Br. J. Pharmacol. 142, 879–889). In this study, we further explored the effects of CTX3C on the TTX-resistant sodium channel Nav1.8. TTX-resistant channels have been shown to be involved in transducing pain and related sensations (Akopian, A. N., Sivilotti, L., and Wood, J. N. (1996) Nature 379, 257–262). Thus, we hypothesized that ciguatoxin-induced activation of the Nav1.8 current would account for the neurological symptoms of ciguatera poisoning. We found that 0.1 μm CTX3C preferentially affected the activation process of the Nav1.8 channel compared with those of the Nav1.2 and Nav1.4 channels. Importantly, without stimulation, 0.1 μm CTX3C induced a large leakage current (IL). The conductance of the IL calculated relative to the maximum conductance (Gmax) was 10 times larger than that of Nav1.2 or Nav1.4. To determine the molecular domain of Nav1.8 responsible for conferring higher sensitivity to CTX3C, we made two chimeric constructs from Nav1.4 and Nav1.8. Chimeras containing the N-terminal half of Nav1.8 exhibited a large response similar to wild-type Nav1.8, indicating that the region conferring high sensitivity to ciguatoxin action is located in the D1 or D2 domains. PMID:19164297

  1. Chimeric Rabies Virus-Like Particles Containing Membrane-Anchored GM-CSF Enhances the Immune Response against Rabies Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Kang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Rabies remains an important public health threat in most developing countries. To develop a more effective and safe vaccine against rabies, we have constructed a chimeric rabies virus-like particle (VLP, which containing glycoprotein (G and matrix protein (M of rabies virus (RABV Evelyn-Rokitnicki-Abelseth (ERA strain, and membrane-anchored granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, and it was named of EVLP-G. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of EVLP-G against RABV were evaluated by intramuscular administration in a mouse model. The EVLP-G was successfully produced in insect cells by coinfection with three recombinant baculoviruses expressing G, M, and GM-CSF, respectively. The membrane-anchored GM-CSF possesses a strong adjuvant activity. More B cells and dendritic cells (DCs were recruited and/or activated in inguinal lymph nodes in mice immunized with EVLP-G. EVLP-G was found to induce a significantly increased RABV-specific virus-neutralizing antibody and elicit a larger and broader antibody subclass responses compared with the standard rabies VLP (sRVLP, consisting of G and M. The EVLP-G also elicited significantly more IFN-γ- or IL-4-secreting CD4+ and CD8+ T cells than the sRVLP. Moreover, the immune responses induced by EVLP-G protect all vaccinated mice from lethal challenge with RABV. These results suggest that EVLP-G has the potential to be developed as a novel vaccine candidate for the prevention and control of animal rabies.

  2. The Hox cooperativity motif of the chimeric oncoprotein E2a-Pbx1 is necessary and sufficient for oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C P; de Vivo, I; Cleary, M L

    1997-01-01

    E2a-Pbx1 chimeric oncoproteins result from fusion of the E2A and PBX1 genes at the sites of t(1;19) chromosomal translocations in a subset acute lymphoblastic leukemias. Experimentally, E2a-Pbx1 transforms a variety of cell types, including fibroblasts, myeloid progenitors, and lymphoblasts. Structure-function studies have shown that contributions from both E2a and Pbx1 are necessary for oncogenesis, but the Pbx1 homeodomain is dispensable and the required portion of Pbx1 has not been delineated. In this study, we used deletional and site-directed mutagenesis to identify portions of Pbx1 necessary for oncogenic and transcriptional activities of E2a-Pbx1. These studies defined a motif (named the Hox cooperativity motif [HCM]) carboxy terminal to the Pbx homeodomain that is required for cooperative DNA binding, cellular transcriptional activity, and the oncogenic potential of E2a-Pbx1. The HCM is highly conserved throughout the Pbx/exd subfamily of divergent homeodomain proteins and functions in DNA-binding assays as a potential contact site for Hox dimerization. E2a-Pbx1 proteins with interstitial deletion or single-point mutations in the HCM could neither activate transcription in cellular assays nor transform NIH 3T3 cells. An E2a-Pbx1 mutant containing 50 amino acids of Pbx1b spanning the HCM but lacking the homeodomain was capable of inducing fibroblast transformation. Thus, the HCM is a necessary and sufficient contribution of Pbx1 for oncogenesis induced by E2a-Pbx1 and accounts for its homeodomain-independent transforming properties. Since subtle alterations of the Pbx HCM result in complete abrogation of transforming activity whereas the homeodomain is entirely dispensable, we conclude that interactions mediated by the HCM are more important for transformation by E2a-Pbx1 than interactions with cognate Pbx DNA sites.

  3. Use of the Teres Major Muscle in Chimeric Subscapular System Free Flaps for Head and Neck Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Andrew R; Jameson, Mark J; Pagedar, Nitin A; Schoeff, Stephen S; Shearer, A Eliot; Boyd, Nathan H

    2015-09-01

    We present what we believe to be the first case series in which the teres major muscle is used as a free flap in head and neck reconstruction. To describe our experience with the teres major muscle in free flap reconstruction of head and neck defects and to identify advantages of this approach. A retrospective review was performed at 2 tertiary care centers between February 1, 2007, and June 30, 2012. Data analysis was conducted from July 31, 2014, through December 1, 2014. Teres major muscle free flap for use in head and neck reconstruction. Indications for use, complications, and outcomes including donor site morbidity. The teres major free flap was used in 11 patients as a component of chimeric subscapular system free flaps for a variety of complex head and neck defects. The teres major muscle was used to fill soft-tissue defects of the neck, face, and nasal cavity; it provided substantial soft-tissue volume but was less bulky than the latissimus dorsi muscle. The teres major muscle was also used to provide protection for vascular anastomoses and/or great vessels and to enhance soft-tissue coverage of the mandibular reconstruction plate. In addition, the muscle was selected as a substrate for skin grafting where inadequate neck skin remained. Flap survival occurred in 10 of 11 flaps (91%). Two flaps (18%) demonstrated venous congestion that was managed successfully. Two patients (18%) developed minor recipient-site complications (submental fistula and infection with recurrent wound dehiscence and plate exposure). All donor sites healed well, with chronic, mild shoulder pain noted in 2 patients (18%) and no postoperative seromas observed in any patient. Addition of the teres major muscle to a subscapular system free flap is an option for reconstruction of a variety of complex head and neck defects, particularly when a moderate amount of soft tissue is required. In select cases, the teres major muscle may have advantages over the latissimus dorsi muscle.

  4. Blockade of CD7 expression in T cells for effective chimeric antigen receptor targeting of T-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Png, Yi Tian; Vinanica, Natasha; Kamiya, Takahiro; Shimasaki, Noriko; Coustan-Smith, Elaine; Campana, Dario

    2017-11-28

    Effective immunotherapies for T-cell malignancies are lacking. We devised a novel approach based on chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-redirected T lymphocytes. We selected CD7 as a target because of its consistent expression in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), including the most aggressive subtype, early T-cell precursor (ETP)-ALL. In 49 diagnostic T-ALL samples (including 14 ETP-ALL samples), median CD7 expression was >99%; CD7 expression remained high at relapse (n = 14), and during chemotherapy (n = 54). We targeted CD7 with a second-generation CAR (anti-CD7-41BB-CD3ζ), but CAR expression in T lymphocytes caused fratricide due to the presence of CD7 in the T cells themselves. To downregulate CD7 and control fratricide, we applied a new method (protein expression blocker [PEBL]), based on an anti-CD7 single-chain variable fragment coupled with an intracellular retention domain. Transduction of anti-CD7 PEBL resulted in virtually instantaneous abrogation of surface CD7 expression in all transduced T cells; 2.0% ± 1.7% were CD7 + vs 98.1% ± 1.5% of mock-transduced T cells (n = 5; P < .0001). PEBL expression did not impair T-cell proliferation, interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α secretion, or cytotoxicity, and eliminated CAR-mediated fratricide. PEBL-CAR T cells were highly cytotoxic against CD7 + leukemic cells in vitro and were consistently more potent than CD7 + T cells spared by fratricide. They also showed strong anti-leukemic activity in cell line- and patient-derived T-ALL xenografts. The strategy described in this study fits well with existing clinical-grade cell manufacturing processes and can be rapidly implemented for the treatment of patients with high-risk T-cell malignancies.

  5. An MHC-restricted antibody-based chimeric antigen receptor requires TCR-like affinity to maintain antigen specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela V Maus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are synthetic receptors that usually redirect T cells to surface antigens independent of human leukocyte antigen (HLA. Here, we investigated a T cell receptor-like CAR based on an antibody that recognizes HLA-A*0201 presenting a peptide epitope derived from the cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1. We hypothesized that this CAR would efficiently redirect transduced T cells in an HLA-restricted, antigen-specific manner. However, we found that despite the specificity of the soluble Fab, the same antibody in the form of a CAR caused moderate lysis of HLA-A2 expressing targets independent of antigen owing to T cell avidity. We hypothesized that lowering the affinity of the CAR for HLA-A2 would improve its specificity. We undertook a rational approach of mutating residues that, in the crystal structure, were predicted to stabilize binding to HLA-A2. We found that one mutation (DN lowered the affinity of the Fab to T cell receptor-range and restored the epitope specificity of the CAR. DN CAR T cells lysed native tumor targets in vitro, and, in a xenogeneic mouse model implanted with two human melanoma lines (A2+/NYESO+ and A2+/NYESO−, DN CAR T cells specifically migrated to, and delayed progression of, only the HLA-A2+/NY-ESO-1+ melanoma. Thus, although maintaining MHC-restricted antigen specificity required T cell receptor-like affinity that decreased potency, there is exciting potential for CARs to expand their repertoire to include a broad range of intracellular antigens.

  6. Isolation and characterization of chimeric human Fc-expressing proteins using protein a membrane adsorbers and a streamlined workflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdick, Monica M; Reynolds, Nathan M; Martin, Eric W; Hawes, Jacquelyn V; Carlson, Grady E; Cuckler, Chaz M; Bates, Michael C; Barthel, Steven R; Dimitroff, Charles J

    2014-01-08

    Laboratory scale to industrial scale purification of biomolecules from cell culture supernatants and lysed cell solutions can be accomplished using affinity chromatography. While affinity chromatography using porous protein A agarose beads packed in columns is arguably the most common method of laboratory scale isolation of antibodies and recombinant proteins expressing Fc fragments of IgG, it can be a time consuming and expensive process. Time and financial constraints are especially daunting in small basic science labs that must recover hundreds of micrograms to milligram quantities of protein from dilute solutions, yet lack access to high pressure liquid delivery systems and/or personnel with expertise in bioseparations. Moreover, product quantification and characterization may also excessively lengthen processing time over several workdays and inflate expenses (consumables, wages, etc.). Therefore, a fast, inexpensive, yet effective protocol is needed for laboratory scale isolation and characterization of antibodies and other proteins possessing an Fc fragment. To this end, we have devised a protocol that can be completed by limited-experience technical staff in less than 9 hr (roughly one workday) and as quickly as 4 hr, as opposed to traditional methods that demand 20+ work hours. Most required equipment is readily available in standard biomedical science, biochemistry, and (bio)chemical engineering labs, and all reagents are commercially available. To demonstrate this protocol, representative results are presented in which chimeric murine galectin-1 fused to human Fc (Gal-1hFc) from cell culture supernatant was isolated using a protein A membrane adsorber. Purified Gal-1hFc was quantified using an expedited Western blotting analysis procedure and characterized using flow cytometry. The streamlined workflow can be modified for other Fc-expressing proteins, such as antibodies, and/or altered to incorporate alternative quantification and characterization

  7. Factor H-IgG Chimeric Proteins as a Therapeutic Approach against the Gram-Positive Bacterial Pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Anna M; Magda, Michal; Kohl, Lisa; Shaughnessy, Jutamas; Lambris, John D; Ram, Sanjay; Ermert, David

    2017-12-01

    Bacteria can cause life-threatening infections, such as pneumonia, meningitis, or sepsis. Antibiotic therapy is a mainstay of treatment, although antimicrobial resistance has drastically increased over the years. Unfortunately, safe and effective vaccines against most pathogens have not yet been approved, and thus developing alternative treatments is important. We analyzed the efficiency of factor H (FH)6-7/Fc, a novel antibacterial immunotherapeutic protein against the Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes This protein is composed of two domains of complement inhibitor human FH (FH complement control protein modules 6 and 7) that bind to S. pyogenes , linked to the Fc region of IgG (FH6-7/Fc). FH6-7/Fc has previously been shown to enhance complement-dependent killing of, and facilitate bacterial clearance in, animal models of the Gram-negative pathogens Haemophilus influenzae and Neisseria meningitidis We hypothesized that activation of complement by FH6-7/Fc on the surface of Gram-positive bacteria such as S. pyogenes will enable professional phagocytes to eliminate the pathogen. We found that FH6-7/Fc alleviated S. pyogenes- induced sepsis in a transgenic mouse model expressing human FH ( S. pyogenes binds FH in a human-specific manner). Furthermore, FH6-7/Fc, which binds to protein H and selected M proteins, displaced FH from the bacterial surface, enhanced alternative pathway activation, and reduced bacterial blood burden by opsonophagocytosis in a C3-dependent manner in an ex vivo human whole-blood model. In conclusion, FH-Fc chimeric proteins could serve as adjunctive treatments against multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  8. ΔF508-CFTR Modulator Screen Based on Cell Surface Targeting of a Chimeric Nucleotide Binding Domain 1 Reporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuan, Puay-Wah; Veit, Guido; Tan, Joseph-Anthony; Roldan, Ariel; Finkbeiner, Walter E; Haggie, Peter M; Lukacs, Gergely L; Verkman, Alan S

    2018-03-01

    The most common cystic fibrosis-causing mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is deletion of phenylalanine at residue 508 (∆F508). The ∆F508 mutation impairs folding of nucleotide binding domain 1 (NBD1) and interfacial interactions of NBD1 and the membrane spanning domains. Here, we report a domain-targeted screen to identify ∆F508-CFTR modulators that act on NBD1. A biochemical screen for ΔF508-NBD1 cell surface expression was done in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells expressing a chimeric reporter consisting of ΔF508-NBD1, the CD4 transmembrane domain, and an extracellular horseradish peroxidase (HRP) reporter. Using a luminescence readout of HRP activity, the screen was robust with a Z' factor of 0.7. The screening of ~20,000 synthetic small molecules allowed the identification of compounds from four chemical classes that increased ∆F508-NBD1 cell surface expression by up to 4-fold; for comparison, a 12-fold increased cell surface expression was found for a wild-type NBD1 chimera. While the compounds were inactive as correctors of full-length ΔF508-CFTR, several carboxamide-benzothiophenes had potentiator activity with low micromolar EC 50 . Interestingly, the potentiators did not activate G551D or wild-type CFTR. Our results provide a proof of concept for a cell-based NBD1 domain screen to identify ∆F508-CFTR modulators that target the NBD1 domain.

  9. Optimization of IL13Rα2-Targeted Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells for Improved Anti-tumor Efficacy against Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christine E; Aguilar, Brenda; Starr, Renate; Yang, Xin; Chang, Wen-Chung; Weng, Lihong; Chang, Brenda; Sarkissian, Aniee; Brito, Alfonso; Sanchez, James F; Ostberg, Julie R; D'Apuzzo, Massimo; Badie, Behnam; Barish, Michael E; Forman, Stephen J

    2018-01-03

    T cell immunotherapy is emerging as a powerful strategy to treat cancer and may improve outcomes for patients with glioblastoma (GBM). We have developed a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell immunotherapy targeting IL-13 receptor α2 (IL13Rα2) for the treatment of GBM. Here, we describe the optimization of IL13Rα2-targeted CAR T cells, including the design of a 4-1BB (CD137) co-stimulatory CAR (IL13BBζ) and a manufacturing platform using enriched central memory T cells. Utilizing orthotopic human GBM models with patient-derived tumor sphere lines in NSG mice, we found that IL13BBζ-CAR T cells improved anti-tumor activity and T cell persistence as compared to first-generation IL13ζ-CAR CD8 + T cells that had shown evidence for bioactivity in patients. Investigating the impact of corticosteroids, given their frequent use in the clinical management of GBM, we demonstrate that low-dose dexamethasone does not diminish CAR T cell anti-tumor activity in vivo. Furthermore, we found that local intracranial delivery of CAR T cells elicits superior anti-tumor efficacy as compared to intravenous administration, with intraventricular infusions exhibiting possible benefit over intracranial tumor infusions in a multifocal disease model. Overall, these findings help define parameters for the clinical translation of CAR T cell therapy for the treatment of brain tumors. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of transgenic watermelon resistant to Cucumber mosaic virus and Watermelon mosaic virus by using a single chimeric transgene construct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Yi; Ku, Hsin-Mei; Chiang, Yi-Hua; Ho, Hsiu-Yin; Yu, Tsong-Ann; Jan, Fuh-Jyh

    2012-10-01

    Watermelon, an important fruit crop worldwide, is prone to attack by several viruses that often results in destructive yield loss. To develop a transgenic watermelon resistant to multiple virus infection, a single chimeric transgene comprising a silencer DNA from the partial N gene of Watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV) fused to the partial coat protein (CP) gene sequences of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) and Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV) was constructed and transformed into watermelon (cv. Feeling) via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Single or multiple transgene copies randomly inserted into various locations in the genome were confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Transgenic watermelon R(0) plants were individually challenged with CMV, CGMMV or WMV, or with a mixture of these three viruses for resistance evaluation. Two lines were identified to exhibit resistance to CMV, CGMMV, WMV individually, and a mixed inoculation of the three viruses. The R(1) progeny of the two resistant R(0) lines showed resistance to CMV and WMV, but not to CGMMV. Low level accumulation of transgene transcripts in resistant plants and small interfering (si) RNAs specific to CMV and WMV were readily detected in the resistant R(1) plants by northern blot analysis, indicating that the resistance was established via RNA-mediated post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). Loss of the CGMMV CP-transgene fragment in R1 progeny might be the reason for the failure to resistant CGMMV infection, as shown by the absence of a hybridization signal and no detectable siRNA specific to CGMMV in Southern and northern blot analyses. In summary, this study demonstrated that fusion of different viral CP gene fragments in transgenic watermelon contributed to multiple virus resistance via PTGS. The construct and resistant watermelon lines developed in this study could be used in a watermelon breeding program for resistance to multiple viruses.

  11. Isolation and Characterization Of Chimeric Human Fc-expressing Proteins Using Protein A Membrane Adsorbers And A Streamlined Workflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdick, Monica M.; Reynolds, Nathan M.; Martin, Eric W.; Hawes, Jacquelyn V.; Carlson, Grady E.; Cuckler, Chaz M.; Bates, Michael C.; Barthel, Steven R.; Dimitroff, Charles J.

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory scale to industrial scale purification of biomolecules from cell culture supernatants and lysed cell solutions can be accomplished using affinity chromatography. While affinity chromatography using porous protein A agarose beads packed in columns is arguably the most common method of laboratory scale isolation of antibodies and recombinant proteins expressing Fc fragments of IgG, it can be a time consuming and expensive process. Time and financial constraints are especially daunting in small basic science labs that must recover hundreds of micrograms to milligram quantities of protein from dilute solutions, yet lack access to high pressure liquid delivery systems and/or personnel with expertise in bioseparations. Moreover, product quantification and characterization may also excessively lengthen processing time over several workdays and inflate expenses (consumables, wages, etc.). Therefore, a fast, inexpensive, yet effective protocol is needed for laboratory scale isolation and characterization of antibodies and other proteins possessing an Fc fragment. To this end, we have devised a protocol that can be completed by limited-experience technical staff in less than 9 hr (roughly one workday) and as quickly as 4 hr, as opposed to traditional methods that demand 20+ work hours. Most required equipment is readily available in standard biomedical science, biochemistry, and (bio)chemical engineering labs, and all reagents are commercially available. To demonstrate this protocol, representative results are presented in which chimeric murine galectin-1 fused to human Fc (Gal-1hFc) from cell culture supernatant was isolated using a protein A membrane adsorber. Purified Gal-1hFc was quantified using an expedited Western blotting analysis procedure and characterized using flow cytometry. The streamlined workflow can be modified for other Fc-expressing proteins, such as antibodies, and/or altered to incorporate alternative quantification and characterization

  12. Construction and in vitro characterization of a chimeric simian and human immunodeficiency virus with the RANTES gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yuya; Okoba, Masashi; Yamazaki, Nanase; Goto, Yoshitaka; Miura, Tomoyuki; Hayami, Masanori; Hoshino, Hiroo; Haga, Takeshi

    2006-01-01

    Chimeric simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) containing the env gene of HIV-1 infects macaque monkeys and provides basic information that is useful for the development of HIV-1 vaccines. Regulated-on-activation-normal-T-cell-expressed-and-secreted (RANTES), a CC-chemokine, enhances antigen-specific T helper type-1 responses against HIV-1. With the final goal of testing the adjuvant effects of RANTES in SHIV-macaque models, we constructed a SHIV having the RANTES gene (SHIV-RANTES) and characterized its properties in vitro. SHIV-RANTES replicated both in human and monkey T cell lines. Along with SHIV-RANTES replication, RANTES was detected in the supernatant of human and monkey cell cultures, at maximal levels of 98.5 and 4.1 ng/ml, respectively. A flow cytometric analysis showed that the expressed RANTES down-modulated CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) on PM1 cells, which was restored by adding anti-RANTES antibody. UV-irradiated culture supernatants from the SHIV-RANTES-infected cells suppressed replication of CCR5-tropic HIV-1 BaL in PM-1 cells. Differentiating real-time RT-PCR showed that pre-infection of SHIV-RANTES in C8166 cells expressing CCR5 suppressed the replication of HIV-1 BaL. Biological activity of the expressed RANTES and the inserted RANTES gene in SHIV-RANTES remained stable after 10 passages. These results suggest that SHIV-RANTES is worth testing in macaque models.

  13. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-specific monoclonal antibody to detect CD19-specific T cells in clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bipulendu Jena

    Full Text Available Clinical trials targeting CD19 on B-cell malignancies are underway with encouraging anti-tumor responses. Most infuse T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR with specificity derived from the scFv region of a CD19-specific mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb, clone FMC63. We describe a novel anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody (mAb to detect CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells before and after their adoptive transfer. This mouse mAb was generated by immunizing with a cellular vaccine expressing the antigen-recognition domain of FMC63. The specificity of the mAb (clone no. 136.20.1 was confined to the scFv region of the CAR as validated by inhibiting CAR-dependent lysis of CD19(+ tumor targets. This clone can be used to detect CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a sensitivity of 1∶1,000. In clinical settings the mAb is used to inform on the immunophenotype and persistence of administered CD19-specific T cells. Thus, our CD19-specific CAR mAb (clone no. 136.20.1 will be useful to investigators implementing CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells to treat B-lineage malignancies. The methodology described to develop a CAR-specific anti-idiotypic mAb could be extended to other gene therapy trials targeting different tumor associated antigens in the context of CAR-based adoptive T-cell therapy.

  14. Predominant cerebral cytokine release syndrome in CD19-directed chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxian Hu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chimeric antigen receptor-modified (CAR T cells targeting CD19 (CART19 have shown therapeutical activities in CD19+ malignancies. However, the etiological nature of neurologic complications remains a conundrum. In our study, the evidence of blood-brain barrier (BBB-penetrating CAR T cells as a culprit was revealed. A patient with acute lymphocytic leukemia developed sustained pyrexia with tremors about 6 h after CART19 infusion, followed by a grade 2 cytokine release syndrome (CRS and neurological symptoms in the next 3 days. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance showed signs of intracranial edema. Lumbar puncture on day 5 showed an over 400-mmH2O cerebrospinal pressure. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF contained 20 WBCs/μL with predominant CD3+ T cells. qPCR analysis for CAR constructs showed 3,032,265 copies/μg DNA in CSF and 988,747 copies/μg DNA in blood. Cytokine levels including IFN-γ and IL-6 in CSF were extremely higher than those in the serum. Methyprednisone was administrated and the symptoms relieved gradually. The predominance of CART19 in CSF and the huge discrepancies in cytokine distributions indicated the development of a cerebral CRS, presumably featured as CSF cytokines largely in situ produced by BBB-penetrating CAR T cells. For the first time, we reported the development of cerebral CRS triggered by BBB-penetrating CAR T cells. Trial registration: ChiCTR-OCC-15007008 .

  15. Tumor-Targeted Human T Cells Expressing CD28-Based Chimeric Antigen Receptors Circumvent CTLA-4 Inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maud Condomines

    Full Text Available Adoptive T cell therapy represents a promising treatment for cancer. Human T cells engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR recognize and kill tumor cells in a MHC-unrestricted manner and persist in vivo when the CAR includes a CD28 costimulatory domain. However, the intensity of the CAR-mediated CD28 activation signal and its regulation by the CTLA-4 checkpoint are unknown. We investigated whether T cells expressing an anti-CD19, CD3 zeta and CD28-based CAR (19-28z displayed the same proliferation and anti-tumor abilities than T cells expressing a CD3 zeta-based CAR (19z1 costimulated through the CD80/CD28, ligand/receptor pathway. Repeated in vitro antigen-specific stimulations indicated that 19-28z+ T cells secreted higher levels of Th1 cytokines and showed enhanced proliferation compared to those of 19z1+ or 19z1-CD80+ T cells. In an aggressive pre-B cell leukemia model, mice treated with 19-28z+ T cells had 10-fold reduced tumor progression compared to those treated with 19z1+ or 19z1-CD80+ T cells. shRNA-mediated CTLA-4 down-regulation in 19z1-CD80+ T cells significantly increased their in vivo expansion and anti-tumor properties, but had no effect in 19-28z+ T cells. Our results establish that CTLA-4 down-regulation may benefit human adoptive T cell therapy and demonstrate that CAR design can elude negative checkpoints to better sustain T cell function.

  16. A high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen-specific chimeric antigen receptor redirects lymphocytes to target human melanomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, William R; Zhao, Yangbing; Frankel, Timothy L; Hinrichs, Christian S; Zheng, Zhili; Xu, Hui; Feldman, Steven A; Ferrone, Soldano; Rosenberg, Steven A; Morgan, Richard A

    2010-04-15

    Immunotherapy, particularly the adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), is a very promising therapy for metastatic melanoma. Some patients unable to receive TIL have been successfully treated with autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), genetically modified to express human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I antigen-restricted, melanoma antigen-reactive T-cell receptors; however, substantial numbers of patients remain ineligible due to the lack of expression of the restricting HLA class I allele. We sought to overcome this limitation by designing a non-MHC-restricted, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) targeting the high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen (HMW-MAA), which is highly expressed on more than 90% of human melanomas but has a restricted distribution in normal tissues. HMW-MAA-specific CARs containing an antigen recognition domain based on variations of the HMW-MAA-specific monoclonal antibody 225.28S and a T-cell activation domain based on combinations of CD28, 4-1BB, and CD3zeta activation motifs were constructed within a retroviral vector to allow stable gene transfer into cells and their progeny. Following optimization of the HMW-MAA-specific CAR for expression and function in human PBL, these gene-modified T cells secreted cytokines, were cytolytic, and proliferated in response to HMW-MAA-expressing cell lines. Furthermore, the receptor functioned in both CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells, was non-MHC restricted, and reacted against explanted human melanomas. To evaluate this HMW-MAA-specific CAR in patients with metastatic melanoma, we developed a clinical-grade retroviral packaging line. This may represent a novel means to treat the majority of patients with advanced melanoma, most notably those unable to receive current ACT therapies. (c)2010 AACR.

  17. Invariant NKT cells with chimeric antigen receptor provide a novel platform for safe and effective cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heczey, Andras; Liu, Daofeng; Tian, Gengwen; Courtney, Amy N; Wei, Jie; Marinova, Ekaterina; Gao, Xiuhua; Guo, Linjie; Yvon, Eric; Hicks, John; Liu, Hao; Dotti, Gianpietro; Metelitsa, Leonid S

    2014-10-30

    Advances in the design of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) have improved the antitumor efficacy of redirected T cells. However, functional heterogeneity of CAR T cells limits their therapeutic potential and is associated with toxicity. We proposed that CAR expression in Vα24-invariant natural killer T (NKT) cells can build on the natural antitumor properties of these cells while their restriction by monomorphic CD1d limits toxicity. Primary human NKT cells were engineered to express a CAR against the GD2 ganglioside (CAR.GD2), which is highly expressed by neuroblastoma (NB). We compared CAR.GD2 constructs that encoded the CD3ζ chain alone, with CD28, 4-1BB, or CD28 and 4-1BB costimulatory endodomains. CAR.GD2 expression rendered NKT cells highly cytotoxic against NB cells without affecting their CD1d-dependent reactivity. We observed a striking T helper 1-like polarization of NKT cells by 4-1BB-containing CARs. Importantly, expression of both CD28 and 4-1BB endodomains in the CAR.GD2 enhanced in vivo persistence of NKT cells. These CAR.GD2 NKT cells effectively localized to the tumor site had potent antitumor activity, and repeat injections significantly improved the long-term survival of mice with metastatic NB. Unlike T cells, CAR.GD2 NKT cells did not induce graft-versus-host disease. These results establish the potential of NKT cells to serve as a safe and effective platform for CAR-directed cancer immunotherapy. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  18. Assessing the ammonium nitrate formation regime in the Paris megacity and its representation in the CHIMERE model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Petetin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Secondary inorganic compounds represent a major fraction of fine aerosol in the Paris megacity. The thermodynamics behind their formation is now relatively well constrained but, due to sparse direct measurements of their precursors (in particular NH3 and HNO3, uncertainties remain on their concentrations and variability as well as the formation regime of ammonium nitrate (in terms of limited species among NH3 and HNO3 in urban environments such as Paris. This study presents the first urban background measurements of both inorganic aerosol compounds and their gaseous precursors during several months within the city of Paris. Intense agriculture-related NH3 episodes are observed in spring/summer while HNO3 concentrations remain relatively low, even during summer, which leads to a NH3-rich regime in Paris. The local formation of ammonium nitrate within the city appears low, despite high NOx emissions. The data set also allows evaluating the CHIMERE chemistry-transport model (CTM. Interestingly, the rather good results obtained on ammonium nitrates hide significant errors on gaseous precursors (e.g., mean bias of −75 and +195 % for NH3 and HNO3, respectively. This leads to a misrepresentation of the nitrate formation regime through a highly underestimated gas ratio metric (introduced by Ansari and Pandis, 1998 and a much higher sensitivity of nitrate concentrations to ammonia changes. Several uncertainty sources are investigated, pointing out the importance of better assessing both NH3 agricultural emissions and OH concentrations in the future. These results remind us of the caution required when using of CTMs for emission scenario analysis, highlighting the importance of prior diagnostic and dynamic evaluations.

  19. High-Level Systemic Expression of Conserved Influenza Epitope in Plants on the Surface of Rod-Shaped Chimeric Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia V. Petukhova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant viruses based on the cDNA copy of the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV genome carrying different versions of the conserved M2e epitope from influenza virus A cloned into the coat protein (CP gene were obtained and partially characterized by our group previously; cysteines in the human consensus M2e sequence were changed to serine residues. This work intends to show some biological properties of these viruses following plant infections. Agroinfiltration experiments on Nicotiana benthamiana confirmed the efficient systemic expression of M2e peptides, and two point amino acid substitutions in recombinant CPs significantly influenced the symptoms and development of viral infections. Joint expression of RNA interference suppressor protein p19 from tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV did not affect the accumulation of CP-M2e-ser recombinant protein in non-inoculated leaves. RT-PCR analysis of RNA isolated from either infected leaves or purified TMV-M2e particles proved the genetic stability of TMV‑based viral vectors. Immunoelectron microscopy of crude plant extracts demonstrated that foreign epitopes are located on the surface of chimeric virions. The rod‑shaped geometry of plant-produced M2e epitopes is different from the icosahedral or helical filamentous arrangement of M2e antigens on the carrier virus-like particles (VLP described earlier. Thereby, we created a simple and efficient system that employs agrobacteria and plant viral vectors in order to produce a candidate broad-spectrum flu vaccine.

  20. Development of a chimeric recombinant disintegrin as a cost-effective anticancer agent with promising translational potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minea, Radu; Helchowski, Corey; Rubino, Barbara; Brodmann, Kyle; Swenson, Stephen; Markland, Francis

    2011-01-01

    Vicrostatin (VCN) is a chimeric recombinant disintegrin generated in Origami B (DE3) E. coli as a genetic fusion between the C-terminal tail of a viperid disintegrin echistatin and crotalid disintegrin contortrostatin (CN). The therapeutic modulation of multiple integrin pathways via soluble disintegrins was previously shown by us and others to elicit potent anti-angiogenic and anti-metastatic effects in several animal cancer models. Despite these favorable attributes, these polypeptides are notoriously difficult to produce recombinantly in significant quantity due to their structure which requires the correct pairing of multiple disulfide bonds for biological activity. In this report, we show that VCN can be reliably produced in large amounts (yields in excess of 200mg of active purified disintegrin per liter of bacterial culture) in Origami B (DE3), an E. coli expression strain engineered to support the folding of disulfide-rich heterologous proteins directly in its oxidative cytoplasmic compartment. VCN retains the integrin binding specificity of both parental molecules it was derived from, but with a different binding affinity profile. While competing for the same integrin receptors that are preferentially upregulated in the tumor microenvironment, VCN exerts a potent inhibitory effect on endothelial cell (EC) migration and tube formation in a dose-dependent manner, by forcing these cells to undergo significant actin cytoskeleton reorganization when exposed to this agent in vitro. Moreover, VCN has a direct effect on breast cancer cells inhibiting their in vitro motility. In an effort to address our main goal of developing a clinically relevant delivery method for recombinant disintegrins, VCN was efficiently packaged in liposomes (LVCN) and evaluated in vivo in an animal breast cancer model. Our data demonstrate that LVCN is well tolerated, its intravenous administration inducing a significant delay in tumor growth and an increase in animal survival, results

  1. Induction of virus-specific neutralizing immune response against West Nile and Japanese encephalitis viruses by chimeric peptides representing T-helper and B-cell epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangwar, Roopesh Singh; Shil, Pratip; Sapkal, Gajanan N; Khan, Siraj A; Gore, Milind M

    2012-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), the members of JEV serocomplex group are pathogens of global health concern. The co-circulation of these viruses poses challenges in effective diagnostics due to antigenic similarity between the E-protein of these viruses. The present study aimed to design chimeric peptides and study the immune response against the same. B-cell epitopes were predicted on structural proteins of WNV and JEV based on bioinformatics tools. The peptides representing to these B-cell epitopes were synthesized and subjected to ELISA. Two peptides, one each from WNV (named WE147) and JEV (named JE40) E-protein, showed virus-specific and strong reactivity to the immune mice sera and human clinical samples. The chimeric peptides for WNV and JEV were constructed by synthesizing the B-cell epitope of WNV (WE147) or JEV (JE40) with T-helper epitope (JM17) separated by diglycine spacer in between. The immune response generated against these chimeric peptides was found to be specific to the respective B-cell epitopes. The anti-peptide sera showed virus-specific reactivity in ELISA and in immunofluorescence assay with no cross-reactivity. Also, the anti-peptide sera could neutralize JE and WN viruses in an in vitro virus neutralization assay. The B-cell epitopes identified in the present study may be used as diagnostic markers for differentiating between WN and JE virus infections. The present study can form a basis for future design of vaccines. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Recombinant Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki HD73 strain that synthesizes Cry1Ac and chimeric ChiA74∆sp chitinase inclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ponce, Karen S; Casados-Vázquez, Luz E; Salcedo-Hernández, Rubén; Bideshi, Dennis K; Del Rincón-Castro, María C; Barboza-Corona, José E

    2017-05-01

    In this study, the endochitinase chiA74 gene lacking its secretion signal peptide sequence (chiA74∆sp) was fused in frame with the sequence coding for the C-terminal crystallization domain and transcription terminator of cry1Ac. The chimeric gene was expressed under the strong pcytA-p/STAB-SD promoter system in an acrystalliferous Cry - B strain of Bacillus thuringiensis and B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki HD73. We showed that the chimeric ChiA74∆sp produced amorphous inclusions in both Cry - B and HD73. In addition to the amorphous inclusions putatively composed of the chimera, bipyramidal Cry1Ac crystals, smaller than the wild-type crystal, were observed in recombinant HD73, and chitinase activity was remarkably higher (75-fold) in this strain when compared with parental HD73. Moreover, we observed that lyophilized samples of a mixture containing Cry1Ac, amorphous inclusions, and spores maintained chitinase activity. Amorphous inclusions could not be separated from Cry1Ac crystals by sucrose gradient centrifugation. Interestingly, the chitinase activity of purified Cry1Ac/amorphous inclusions was 51-fold higher compared to purified Cry1Ac inclusions of parental HD73, indicating that the increased enzymatic activity was due primarily to the presence of the atypical amorphous component. The possibility that the chimera is occluded with the Cry1Ac crystal, thereby contributing to the increased endochitinolytic activity, cannot be excluded. Finally, bioassays against larvae of Spodoptera frugiperda with spore/crystals of HD73 or spore-crystal ChiA74∆sp chimeric inclusions of recombinant HD73 strain showed LC 50 s of 396.86 and 290.25 ng/cm 2 , respectively. Our study suggests a possible practical application of the chimera in formulations of B. thuringiensis-based lepidopteran larvicides.

  3. Chimeric negative regulation of p14ARF and TBX1 by a t(9;22) translocation associated with melanoma, deafness and DNA repair deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiaohui; Anzick, Sarah L.; Khan, Sikandar G.; Ueda, Takahiro; Stone, Gary; DiGiovanna, John J.; Tamura, Deborah; Wattendorf, Daniel; Busch, David; Brewer, Carmen C.; Zalewski, Christopher; Butman, John A; Griffith, Andrew J.; Meltzer, Paul; Kraemer, Kenneth H.

    2013-01-01

    Melanoma is the most deadly form of skin cancer and DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is the most frequent interstitial deletion syndrome. We characterized a novel balanced t(9;22)(p21;q11.2) translocation in a patient with melanoma, DNA repair deficiency, and features of DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) including deafness and malformed inner ears. Using chromosome sorting we located the 9p21 breakpoint in CDKN2A intron 1. This resulted in under-expression of the tumor suppressor p14ARF; the reduced DNA repair was corrected by transfection with p14ARF. UV-type p14ARF mutations in his melanoma implicated p14ARF in its pathogenesis. The 22q11.2 breakpoint was located in a palindromic AT-rich repeat (PATRR22). We identified a new gene, FAM230A that contains PATRR22 within an intron. The 22q11.2 breakpoint was located 800 kb centromeric to TBX1, which is required for inner ear development. TBX1 expression was greatly reduced. The translocation resulted in a chimeric transcript encoding portions of p14ARF and FAM230A. Inhibition of chimeric p14ARF-FAM230A expression increased p14ARF and TBX1 expression and improved DNA repair. Expression of the chimera in normal cells produced dominant negative inhibition of p14ARF. Similar chimeric mRNAs may mediate haploinsufficiency in DGS or dominant negative inhibition of other genes such as those involved in melanoma. PMID:23661601

  4. RT-qPCR with chimeric dU stem-loop primer is efficient for the detection of bacterial small RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yangfan; Xing, Xuejiao; You, Ting; Liang, Rubing; Liu, Jianhua

    2017-06-01

    Small non-coding RNAs are considered be involved in the regulation of multiple cellular processes. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) is widely used in the detection of eukaryotic microRNA, and the stem-loop primers can improve the specificity and efficiency of reverse transcription. However, the loop structure of primers probably influence the next quantitative amplification due to the base stacking and steric hindrance. Here, we designed a chimeric stem-loop primer with a deoxyuracil (dU) base located near the RNA matching part. After the reverse transcription, uracil-DNA glycosylase (UDG) treatment was used to remove the dU base and destroy the stem-loop structure of RT product. Enzymatic assay confirmed that the recombinant UDG could efficiently eliminate the dU base in the oligonucleotide. Transcriptions of two small RNAs (TFF and ryeA) in Escherichia coli were detected by RT-qPCR with different primers. Results showed that the use of the chimeric dU stem-loop primer and UDG treatment could enhance the detection specificity and sensitivity about 1.1- to 3.4-fold, compared to those with traditional stem-loop primer and linear primer. Total RNA of 1-10 pg was enough for efficient detection with the chimeric stem-loop primers. In a word, this strategy could promote the RT-qPCR detection efficiency on the transcription of bacterial small RNAs even in trace samples and can facilitate the detection of exiguous change in cellular metabolism.

  5. Using QCM and SPR for the Kinetic Evaluation of the Binding Between A New Recombinant Chimeric Protein and Specific Antibodies of the Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souto, Denio E P; Faria, Angelica R; de Andrade, Helida M; Kubota, Lauro T

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) techniques were employed to kinetically evaluate the binding affinity of a new recombinant chimeric protein (CP10) toward anti-Leishmania infantum antibodies for the immunodiagnostics of the visceral leishmaniasis (VL). This chimeric protein was formed by the union in a same artificial coding DNA of ten different peptides, which showed themselves reactive toward positive canine serum for VL. Using the CP10 in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), it was possible to detect 80% of the asymptomatic infected dogs. After this, SPR and QCM immunosensors were constructed by the covalent immobilization of the CP10 on a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) formed by adsorption of alkanethiol on gold substrates. The thickness (6.80 nm) and the refractive index (1.475) of the protein on the SAM were simultaneously determined through SPR curves measured in different wavelengths (670 and 785 nm). Interactions between the CP10 and its specific IgGs (anti-CP10 antibodies) were characterized by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, SPR and QCM techniques. The equilibrium dissociation constant obtained by SPR (K(D) = 8.27 x 10(-10) mol.L(-1)) and QCM (K(D) = 2.42 x 10(- 10) mol.L(-1)) demonstrated high binding affinity of the CP10 toward anti-CP10 antibodies. In this sense, this work quantitatively proves the strong antigenic character of a new recombinant chimeric protein, giving evidence to potential contribution for the use of this protein in programs of control of the VL.

  6. Novel recombinant chimeric virus-like particle is immunogenic and protective against both enterovirus 71 and coxsackievirus A16 in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui; Li, Hao-Yang; Han, Jian-Feng; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Zhu, Shun-Ya; Li, Xiao-Feng; Yang, Hui-Qin; Li, Yue-Xiang; Zhang, Yu; Qin, E-De; Chen, Rong; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2015-01-19

    Hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) has been recognized as an important global public health issue, which is predominantly caused by enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16). There is no available vaccine against HFMD. An ideal HFMD vaccine should be bivalent against both EV-A71 and CVA16. Here, a novel strategy to produce bivalent HFMD vaccine based on chimeric EV-A71 virus-like particles (ChiEV-A71 VLPs) was proposed and illustrated. The neutralizing epitope SP70 within the capsid protein VP1 of EV-A71 was replaced with that of CVA16 in ChiEV-A71 VLPs. Structural modeling revealed that the replaced CVA16-SP70 epitope is well exposed on the surface of ChiEV-A71 VLPs. These VLPs produced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae exhibited similarity in both protein composition and morphology as naive EV-A71 VLPs. Immunization with ChiEV-A71 VLPs in mice elicited robust Th1/Th2 dependent immune responses against EV-A71 and CVA16. Furthermore, passive immunization with anti-ChiEV-A71 VLPs sera conferred full protection against lethal challenge of both EV-A71 and CVA16 infection in neonatal mice. These results suggested that this chimeric vaccine, ChiEV-A71 might have the potential to be further developed as a bivalent HFMD vaccine in the near future. Such chimeric enterovirus VLPs provide an alternative platform for bivalent HFMD vaccine development.

  7. Novel deletion alleles carrying CYP21A1P/A2 chimeric genes in Brazilian patients with 21-hydroxylase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guerra-Júnior Gil

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency is caused by deletions, large gene conversions or mutations in CYP21A2 gene. The human gene is located at 6p21.3 within a locus containing the genes for putative serine/threonine Kinase RP, complement C4, steroid 21-hydroxylase CYP21 tenascin TNX, normally, in a duplicated cluster known as RCCX module. The CYP21 extra copy is a pseudogene (CYP21A1P. In Brazil, 30-kb deletion forming monomodular alleles that carry chimeric CYP21A1P/A2 genes corresponds to ~9% of disease-causing alleles. Such alleles are considered to result from unequal crossovers within the bimodular C4/CYP21 locus. Depending on the localization of recombination breakpoint, different alleles can be generated conferring the locus high degree of allelic variability. The purpose of the study was to investigate the variability of deleted alleles in patients with 21-hydroxylase deficiency. Methods We used different techniques to investigate the variability of 30-kb deletion alleles in patients with 21-hydroxylase deficiency. Alleles were first selected after Southern blotting. The composition of CYP21A1P/A2 chimeric genes was investigated by ASO-PCR and MLPA analyses followed by sequencing to refine the location of recombination breakpoints. Twenty patients carrying at least one allele with C4/CYP21 30-kb deletion were included in the study. Results An allele carrying a CYP21A1P/A2 chimeric gene was found unusually associated to a C4B/C4A Taq I 6.4-kb fragment, generally associated to C4B and CYP21A1P deletions. A novel haplotype bearing both p.P34L and p.H62L, novel and rare mutations, respectively, was identified in exon 1, however p.P30L, the most frequent pseudogene-derived mutation in this exon, was absent. Four unrelated patients showed this haplotype. Absence of p.P34L in CYP21A1P of normal controls indicated that it is not derived from pseudogene. In addition, the combination of different

  8. Redirecting Therapeutic T Cells against Myelin-Specific T Lymphocytes Using a Humanized Myelin Basic Protein-HLA-DR2-{zeta} Chimeric Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moisini, Ioana; Nguyen, Phuong; Fugger, Lars

    2008-01-01

    to selectively redirect therapeutic T cells against myelin basic protein (MBP)-specific T lymphocytes implicated in MS. We generated two heterodimeric receptors that genetically link the human MBP(84-102) epitope to HLA-DR2 and either incorporate or lack a TCRzeta signaling domain. The Ag-MHC domain serves...... mouse model system. Finally, the chimeric receptor-modified CTL ameliorated or blocked experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) disease mediated by MBP(84-102)/DR2-specific T lymphocytes. These results provide support for the further development of redirected therapeutic T cells able to counteract...

  9. Radiolabeling and biotinylation of internalizing monoclonal antibody chimeric BR96: Potential use of extracorporeal immunoadsorption with enhanced tumor radioactivity retention of Iodine, Indium and Rhenium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, JianQing

    1997-01-01

    In this thesis, methodology of radiolabeling and simultaneous biotinylation for internalizing monoclonal antibody chimeric BR96 have been investigated by using three element groups of potential therapeutic radionuclides iodine, indium and rhenium, and their different labeling methods. The biodistribution and kinetics of biotinylated and radiolabeled chiBR96 have been studied in colon carcinoma isografted rats. The potential use of ECIA, based on the biotin-avidin concept, has been evaluated and compared with the approach of avidin `chase` in the same animal tumor model with respect to an enhancement of tumor-to-normal tissue (T/N) activity ratio. 131 refs.

  10. Radiolabeling and biotinylation of internalizing monoclonal antibody chimeric BR96: Potential use of extracorporeal immunoadsorption with enhanced tumor radioactivity retention of Iodine, Indium and Rhenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, JianQing.

    1997-01-01

    In this thesis, methodology of radiolabeling and simultaneous biotinylation for internalizing monoclonal antibody chimeric BR96 have been investigated by using three element groups of potential therapeutic radionuclides iodine, indium and rhenium, and their different labeling methods. The biodistribution and kinetics of biotinylated and radiolabeled chiBR96 have been studied in colon carcinoma isografted rats. The potential use of ECIA, based on the biotin-avidin concept, has been evaluated and compared with the approach of avidin 'chase' in the same animal tumor model with respect to an enhancement of tumor-to-normal tissue (T/N) activity ratio. 131 refs

  11. Rapid obtention of stable, bioluminescent tumor cell lines using a tCD2-luciferase chimeric construct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gourzones Claire

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bioluminescent tumor cell lines are experimental tools of major importance for cancer investigation, especially imaging of tumors in xenografted animals. Stable expression of exogenous luciferase in tumor cells combined to systemic injection of luciferin provides an excellent signal/background ratio for external optical imaging. Therefore, there is a need to rationalize and speed up the production of luciferase-positive tumor cell lines representative of multiple tumor phenotypes. For this aim we have designed a fusion gene linking the luciferase 2 protein to the c-terminus of a truncated form of the rat CD2 protein (tCD2-luc2. To allow simultaneous assessment of the wild-type luciferase 2 in a context of tCD2 co-expression, we have made a bicistronic construct for concomitant but separate expression of these two proteins (luc2-IRES-tCD2. Both the mono- and bi-cistronic constructs were transduced in lymphoid and epithelial cells using lentiviral vectors. Results The tCD2-luc2 chimera behaves as a type I membrane protein with surface presentation of CD2 epitopes. One of these epitopes reacts with the OX34, a widely spread, high affinity monoclonal antibody. Stably transfected cells are sorted by flow cytometry on the basis of OX34 staining. In vitro and, moreover, in xenografted tumors, the tCD2-luc2 chimera retains a substantial and stable luciferase activity, although not as high as the wild-type luciferase expressed from the luc2-IRES-tCD2 construct. Expression of the tCD2-luc2 chimera does not harm cell and tumor growth. Conclusion Lentiviral transduction of the chimeric tCD2-luc2 fusion gene allows selection of cell clones with stable luciferase expression in less than seven days without antibiotic selection. We believe that it will be helpful to increase the number of tumor cell lines available for in vivo imaging and assessment of novel therapeutic modalities. On a longer term, the tCD2-luc2 chimera has the potential to

  12. Expression of 12 rabbit IgA C alpha genes as chimeric rabbit-mouse IgA antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderman, R D; Hanly, W C; Knight, K L

    1989-10-01

    Serologic analysis of rabbit secretory IgA initially identified two subclasses of IgA, IgA-f and IgA-g. Recent molecular genetic studies have resulted in the identification and cloning of 13 genes encoding the constant region (C) of rabbit IgA heavy chains. Each of these 13 C alpha genes, C alpha 1-C alpha 13, was subcloned into an expression vector containing the VDJ (V, variable; D, diversity; J, joining) gene of a dansyl (DNS)-binding hybridoma antibody. The alpha heavy-chain constructs were transfected into SP2/0 cells producing murine light chains with specificity for DNS. Of the 13 resulting transfectomas, 12 were shown by ELISA to secrete DNS-binding chimeric rabbit-mouse IgA molecules. By immunoblot analysis, the 12 IgA-producing transfectomas were shown to secrete alpha chains ranging in size from 60 to 72 kDa. These data suggest that rabbit IgA may be composed of as many as 12 IgA isotypes. This is in marked contrast to mouse and human, in which only 1 and 2 IgA isotypes, respectively, are found. Serologic analyses, using anti-IgA-f and anti-IgA-g alloantisera, revealed that 11 of the 12 transfectoma IgAs reacted with anti-IgA-f and not with anti-IgA-g antibodies and that one reacted with anti-IgA-g and not with anti-IgA-f antibodies. Each of the IgA-producing transfectomas was cocultured with a Madin-Darby canine kidney cell line expressing the rabbit polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, and the transcytosed IgA antibodies were analyzed by immunoblots to determine whether they associated with secretory component (SC) through covalent or noncovalent interactions. Each of the 11 IgA-f isotypes was shown to bind SC by a disulfide linkage, whereas the single IgA-g isotype appeared to bind SC through noncovalent interactions only.

  13. First-in-human evaluation of a hexon chimeric adenovirus vector expressing HIV-1 Env (IPCAVD 002).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baden, Lindsey R; Walsh, Stephen R; Seaman, Michael S; Johnson, Jennifer A; Tucker, Robert P; Kleinjan, Jane A; Gothing, Jon A; Engelson, Brian A; Carey, Brittany R; Oza, Avinash; Bajimaya, Shringkhala; Peter, Lauren; Bleckwehl, Chelsea; Abbink, Peter; Pau, Maria G; Weijtens, Mo; Kunchai, Meghan; Swann, Edith M; Wolff, Mark; Dolin, Raphael; Barouch, Dan H

    2014-10-01

    We report the first-in-human safety and immunogenicity assessment of a prototype hexon chimeric adenovirus (Ad) serotype 5 (Ad5) vector containing the hexon hypervariable regions of Ad serotype 48 (Ad48) and expressing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 EnvA. Forty-eight Ad5 and Ad48 seronegative, HIV-uninfected subjects were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose escalation phase 1 study. Four groups of 12 subjects received 10(9) to 10(11) viral particles (vp) of the Ad5HVR48.EnvA.01 vaccine (n = 10 per group) or placebo (n = 2 per group) at week 0 or weeks 0, 4, and 24. Safety and immunogenicity were assessed. Self-limited reactogenicity was observed after the initial immunization in the highest (10(11) vp) dose group. Responses in vaccinees included Ad48 neutralizing antibody (nAb) titers higher than Ad5 nAb titers, EnvA-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay titers, and EnvA-specific enzyme-linked immunospot assay responses, and these responses generally persisted at week 52. At week 28 in the 10(9), 10(10), and 10(11) vp 3-dose groups, geometric mean EnvA enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay titers were 5721, 10 929, and 3420, respectively, and Ad48 nAb titers were a median of 1.7-fold higher than for Ad5. Ad5HVR48.ENVA.01 was safe, well tolerated, and immunogenic at all doses tested. Vector-elicited nAb responses were greater for Ad48 than Ad5, confirming that Ad-specific nAbs in humans are primarily, but not exclusively, directed against the hexon hypervariable regions. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00695877. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Differences in Expansion Potential of Naive Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells from Healthy Donors and Untreated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marc Hoffmann

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionTherapy with chimeric antigen receptor T (CART cells for hematological malignancies has shown promising results. Effectiveness of CART cells may depend on the ratio of naive (TN vs. effector (TE T cells, TN cells being responsible for an enduring antitumor activity through maturation. Therefore, we investigated factors influencing the TN/TE ratio of CART cells.Materials and methodsCART cells were generated upon transduction of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with a CD19.CAR-CD28-CD137zeta third generation retroviral vector under two different stimulating culture conditions: anti-CD3/anti-CD28 antibodies adding either interleukin (IL-7/IL-15 or IL-2. CART cells were maintained in culture for 20 days. We evaluated 24 healthy donors (HDs and 11 patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL for the composition of cell subsets and produced CART cells. Phenotype and functionality were tested using flow cytometry and chromium release assays.ResultsIL-7/IL-15 preferentially induced differentiation into TN, stem cell memory (TSCM: naive CD27+ CD95+, CD4+ and CXCR3+ CART cells, while IL-2 increased effector memory (TEM, CD56+ and CD4+ T regulatory (TReg CART cells. The net amplification of different CART subpopulations derived from HDs and untreated CLL patients was compared. Particularly the expansion of CD4+ CARTN cells differed significantly between the two groups. For HDs, this subtype expanded >60-fold, whereas CD4+ CARTN cells of untreated CLL patients expanded less than 10-fold. Expression of exhaustion marker programmed cell death 1 on CARTN cells on day 10 of culture was significantly higher in patient samples compared to HD samples. As the percentage of malignant B cells was expectedly higher within patient samples, an excessive amount of B cells during culture could account for the reduced expansion potential of CARTN cells in untreated CLL patients. Final TN/TE ratio stayed <0.3 despite stimulation condition for patients

  15. Safety, tumor trafficking and immunogenicity of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cells specific for TAG-72 in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hege, Kristen M; Bergsland, Emily K; Fisher, George A; Nemunaitis, John J; Warren, Robert S; McArthur, James G; Lin, Andy A; Schlom, Jeffrey; June, Carl H; Sherwin, Stephen A

    2017-01-01

    T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) have established efficacy in the treatment of B-cell malignancies, but their relevance in solid tumors remains undefined. Here we report results of the first human trials of CAR-T cells in the treatment of solid tumors performed in the 1990s. Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) were treated in two phase 1 trials with first-generation retroviral transduced CAR-T cells targeting tumor-associated glycoprotein (TAG)-72 and including a CD3-zeta intracellular signaling domain (CART72 cells). In trial C-9701 and C-9702, CART72 cells were administered in escalating doses up to 10 10 total cells; in trial C-9701 CART72 cells were administered by intravenous infusion. In trial C-9702, CART72 cells were administered via direct hepatic artery infusion in patients with colorectal liver metastases. In both trials, a brief course of interferon-alpha (IFN-α) was given with each CART72 infusion to upregulate expression of TAG-72. Fourteen patients were enrolled in C-9701 and nine in C-9702. CART72 manufacturing success rate was 100% with an average transduction efficiency of 38%. Ten patients were treated in CC-9701 and 6 in CC-9702. Symptoms consistent with low-grade, cytokine release syndrome were observed in both trials without clear evidence of on target/off tumor toxicity. Detectable, but mostly short-term (≤14 weeks), persistence of CART72 cells was observed in blood; one patient had CART72 cells detectable at 48 weeks. Trafficking to tumor tissues was confirmed in a tumor biopsy from one of three patients. A subset of patients had 111 Indium-labeled CART72 cells injected, and trafficking could be detected to liver, but T cells appeared largely excluded from large metastatic deposits. Tumor biomarkers carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and TAG-72 were measured in serum; there was a precipitous decline of TAG-72, but not CEA, in some patients due to induction of an interfering antibody to the TAG-72

  16. ChiPPI: a novel method for mapping chimeric protein-protein interactions uncovers selection principles of protein fusion events in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel-Morgenstern, Milana; Gorohovski, Alessandro; Tagore, Somnath; Sekar, Vaishnovi; Vazquez, Miguel; Valencia, Alfonso

    2017-07-07

    Fusion proteins, comprising peptides deriving from the translation of two parental genes, are produced in cancer by chromosomal aberrations. The expressed fusion protein incorporates domains of both parental proteins. Using a methodology that treats discrete protein domains as binding sites for specific domains of interacting proteins, we have cataloged the protein interaction networks for 11 528 cancer fusions (ChiTaRS-3.1). Here, we present our novel method, chimeric protein-protein interactions (ChiPPI) that uses the domain-domain co-occurrence scores in order to identify preserved interactors of chimeric proteins. Mapping the influence of fusion proteins on cell metabolism and pathways reveals that ChiPPI networks often lose tumor suppressor proteins and gain oncoproteins. Furthermore, fusions often induce novel connections between non-interactors skewing interaction networks and signaling pathways. We compared fusion protein PPI networks in leukemia/lymphoma, sarcoma and solid tumors finding distinct enrichment patterns for each disease type. While certain pathways are enriched in all three diseases (Wnt, Notch and TGF β), there are distinct patterns for leukemia (EGFR signaling, DNA replication and CCKR signaling), for sarcoma (p53 pathway and CCKR signaling) and solid tumors (FGFR and EGFR signaling). Thus, the ChiPPI method represents a comprehensive tool for studying the anomaly of skewed cellular networks produced by fusion proteins in cancer. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. The Synergistic Effect of Combined Immunization with a DNA Vaccine and Chimeric Yellow Fever/Dengue Virus Leads to Strong Protection against Dengue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Adriana S.; Gonçalves, Antônio J. S.; Archer, Marcia; Freire, Marcos S.; Galler, Ricardo; Alves, Ada M. B.

    2013-01-01

    The dengue envelope glycoprotein (E) is the major component of virion surface and its ectodomain is composed of domains I, II and III. This protein is the main target for the development of a dengue vaccine with induction of neutralizing antibodies. In the present work, we tested two different vaccination strategies, with combined immunizations in a prime/booster regimen or simultaneous inoculation with a DNA vaccine (pE1D2) and a chimeric yellow fever/dengue 2 virus (YF17D-D2). The pE1D2 DNA vaccine encodes the ectodomain of the envelope DENV2 protein fused to t-PA signal peptide, while the YF17D-D2 was constructed by replacing the prM and E genes from the 17D yellow fever vaccine virus by those from DENV2. Balb/c mice were inoculated with these two vaccines by different prime/booster or simultaneous immunization protocols and most of them induced a synergistic effect on the elicited immune response, mainly in neutralizing antibody production. Furthermore, combined immunization remarkably increased protection against a lethal dose of DENV2, when compared to each vaccine administered alone. Results also revealed that immunization with the DNA vaccine, regardless of the combination with the chimeric virus, induced a robust cell immune response, with production of IFN-γ by CD8+ T lymphocytes. PMID:23472186

  18. The synergistic effect of combined immunization with a DNA vaccine and chimeric yellow fever/dengue virus leads to strong protection against dengue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Adriana S; Gonçalves, Antônio J S; Archer, Marcia; Freire, Marcos S; Galler, Ricardo; Alves, Ada M B

    2013-01-01

    The dengue envelope glycoprotein (E) is the major component of virion surface and its ectodomain is composed of domains I, II and III. This protein is the main target for the development of a dengue vaccine with induction of neutralizing antibodies. In the present work, we tested two different vaccination strategies, with combined immunizations in a prime/booster regimen or simultaneous inoculation with a DNA vaccine (pE1D2) and a chimeric yellow fever/dengue 2 virus (YF17D-D2). The pE1D2 DNA vaccine encodes the ectodomain of the envelope DENV2 protein fused to t-PA signal peptide, while the YF17D-D2 was constructed by replacing the prM and E genes from the 17D yellow fever vaccine virus by those from DENV2. Balb/c mice were inoculated with these two vaccines by different prime/booster or simultaneous immunization protocols and most of them induced a synergistic effect on the elicited immune response, mainly in neutralizing antibody production. Furthermore, combined immunization remarkably increased protection against a lethal dose of DENV2, when compared to each vaccine administered alone. Results also revealed that immunization with the DNA vaccine, regardless of the combination with the chimeric virus, induced a robust cell immune response, with production of IFN-γ by CD8+ T lymphocytes.

  19. Immune responses against chimeric DNA and protein vaccines composed of plpEN-OmpH and PlpEC-OmpH from Pasteurella multocida A:3 in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okay, Sezer; Ozcengiz, Erkan; Ozcengiz, Gülay

    2012-12-01

    Pasteurella multocida is a pathogenic bacterium causing many diseases that are of significant economic importance to livestock industries. Outer membrane protein H (ompH) gene and two fragments of Pasteurella lipoprotein E (plpE) gene, namely plpEN and plpEC, were cloned from P. multocida A:3. Three DNA vaccine formulations, namely pCMV-ompH, pCMV-plpEN-ompH and pCMV-plpEC-ompH and two protein-based prototype vaccines, alum adjuvanted PlpEN-OmpH and PlpEC-OmpH, were generated. Antibody levels were induced in mice vaccinated with chimeric DNA or protein vaccines. A significant (p multocida A:3. However, 40% protection was conferred by 100 μg of PlpEC-OmpH which was not statistically significant. These results showed that plpEN-ompH and plpEC-ompH chimeric DNA vaccines and alum adjuvanted PlpEN-OmpH or PlpEC-OmpH protein vaccines were immunogenic but not protective against P. multocida A:3 in mice. Prime-boost strategies, i.e. priming with DNA vaccines and boost with protein formulations or different adjuvants can be utilized to obtain significant protection.

  20. Chimeric avian paramyxovirus-based vector immunization against highly pathogenic avian influenza followed by conventional Newcastle disease vaccination eliminates lack of protection from virulent ND virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Steglich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, we described a chimeric, hemagglutinin of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV H5 expressing Newcastle disease virus (NDV-based vector vaccine (chNDVFHNPMV8H5 in which NDV envelope glycoproteins were replaced by those of avian paramyxovirus-8 (APMV-8. This chimeric vaccine induced solid protection against lethal HPAIV H5N1 even in chickens with maternal antibodies against NDV (MDA+. However, due to the absence of the major NDV immunogens it failed to induce protection against Newcastle disease (ND. Here, we report on protection of MDA+ chickens against HPAI H5N1 and ND, by vaccination with chNDVFHNPMV8H5 either on day 1 or day seven after hatch, and subsequent immunization with live attenuated NDV seven days later. Vaccination was well tolerated and three weeks after immunization, challenge infections with highly pathogenic NDV as well as HPAIV H5N1 were carried out. All animals remained healthy without exhibiting any clinical signs, whereas non-vaccinated animals showed morbidity and mortality. Therefore, vaccination with chNDVFHNPMV8H5 can be followed by NDV vaccination to protect chickens from HPAIV as well as NDV, indicating that the antibody response against chNDVFHNPMV8H5 does not interfere with live ND vaccination.

  1. Chimeric oncoprotein E2a-Pbx1 induces apoptosis of hematopoietic cells by a p53-independent mechanism that is suppressed by Bcl-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K S; Jacobs, Y; Chang, C P; Cleary, M L

    1997-06-19

    The chimeric oncoprotein E2a-Pbx1 results from fusion of the E2A and PBX1 genes following t(1;19) chromosomal translocations in B cell precursor acute leukemias. Experimentally B cell progenitors do not tolerate constitutive expression of E2a-Pbx1 which contrasts with transformation of several other cell types following its stable expression both in vitro and in vivo. To further investigate the effects of E2a-Pbx1 on the B cell progenitors, we conditionally expressed E2a-Pbx1 under control of a metal response element in hematopoietic precursor cell lines in vitro. Inducible expression of E2a-Pbx1 resulted in cell death with the morphologic and molecular features of apoptosis. A structure-function analysis demonstrated that induction of apoptosis was not a dominant-negative effect of the E2a moiety but, rather, required the DNA-binding homeodomain of Pbx1. E2a-Pbx1-induced apoptosis proceeded through a BCL2-responsive checkpoint eventuating in PARP inactivation but did require p53. Constitutive expression of E2a-Pbx1 did not induce apoptosis or continued cycling of Rat-1 fibroblasts in low serum conditions. These studies demonstrate that E2a-Pbx1 initiates programmed cell death of hematopoietic precursers by a mechanism that requires its chimeric transcriptional properties, but, unlike other nuclear oncoproteins, is independent of p53.

  2. Long-term persistence and function of hematopoietic stem cell-derived chimeric antigen receptor T cells in a nonhuman primate model of HIV/AIDS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjie Zhen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR T-cells have emerged as a powerful immunotherapy for various forms of cancer and show promise in treating HIV-1 infection. However, significant limitations are persistence and whether peripheral T cell-based products can respond to malignant or infected cells that may reappear months or years after treatment remains unclear. Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells (HSPCs are capable of long-term engraftment and have the potential to overcome these limitations. Here, we report the use of a protective CD4 chimeric antigen receptor (C46CD4CAR to redirect HSPC-derived T-cells against simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV infection in pigtail macaques. CAR-containing cells persisted for more than 2 years without any measurable toxicity and were capable of multilineage engraftment. Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART treatment followed by cART withdrawal resulted in lower viral rebound in CAR animals relative to controls, and demonstrated an immune memory-like response. We found CAR-expressing cells in multiple lymphoid tissues, decreased tissue-associated SHIV RNA levels, and substantially higher CD4/CD8 ratios in the gut as compared to controls. These results show that HSPC-derived CAR T-cells are capable of long-term engraftment and immune surveillance. This study demonstrates for the first time the safety and feasibility of HSPC-based CAR therapy in a large animal preclinical model.

  3. IgE recognition of chimeric isoforms of the honeybee (Apis mellifera) venom allergen Api m 10 evaluated by protein array technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vaerenbergh, Matthias; De Smet, Lina; Rafei-Shamsabadi, David; Blank, Simon; Spillner, Edzard; Ebo, Didier G; Devreese, Bart; Jakob, Thilo; de Graaf, Dirk C

    2015-02-01

    Api m 10 has recently been established as novel major allergen that is recognized by more than 60% of honeybee venom (HBV) allergic patients. Previous studies suggest Api m 10 protein heterogeneity which may have implications for diagnosis and immunotherapy of HBV allergy. In the present study, RT-PCR revealed the expression of at least nine additional Api m 10 transcript isoforms by the venom glands. Two distinct mechanisms are responsible for the generation of these isoforms: while the previously known variant 2 is produced by an alternative splicing event, novel identified isoforms are intragenic chimeric transcripts. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the identification of chimeric transcripts generated by the honeybee. By a retrospective proteomic analysis we found evidence for the presence of several of these isoforms in the venom proteome. Additionally, we analyzed IgE reactivity to different isoforms by protein array technology using sera from HBV allergic patients, which revealed that IgE recognition of Api m 10 is both isoform- and patient-specific. While it was previously demonstrated that the majority of HBV allergic patients display IgE reactivity to variant 2, our study also shows that some patients lacking IgE antibodies for variant 2 display IgE reactivity to two of the novel identified Api m 10 variants, i.e. variants 3 and 4. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody conjugated with visible or near-infrared fluorescent dyes for imaging pancreatic cancer in orthotopic nude mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maawy, Ali A.; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Luiken, George A.; Hoffman, Robert M.; Bouvet, Michael

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a set of visible and near-infrared dyes conjugated to a tumor-specific chimeric antibody for high-resolution tumor imaging in orthotopic models of pancreatic cancer. BxPC-3 human pancreatic cancer was orthotopically implanted into pancreata of nude mice. Mice received a single intravenous injection of a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody conjugated to one of the following fluorophores: 488-nm group (Alexa Fluor 488 or DyLight 488); 550-nm group (Alexa Fluor 555 or DyLight 550); 650-nm group (Alexa Fluor 660 or DyLight 650), or the 750-nm group (Alexa Fluor 750 or DyLight 755). After 24 h, the Olympus OV100 small-animal imaging system was used for noninvasive and intravital fluorescence imaging of mice. Dyes were compared with respect to depth of imaging, resolution, tumor-to-background ratio (TBR), photobleaching, and hemoglobin quenching. The longer wavelength dyes had increased depth of penetration and ability to detect the smallest tumor deposits and provided the highest TBRs, resistance to hemoglobin quenching, and specificity. The shorter wavelength dyes were more photostable. This study showed unique advantages of each dye for specific cancer imaging in a clinically relevant orthotopic model.

  5. Eliciting neutralizing antibodies against the membrane proximal external region of HIV-1 Env by chimeric live attenuated influenza A virus vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Yang; Du, Dongchuan; Li, Na; Su, Weiheng; Liu, Xintao; Zhang, Yan; Nie, Jianhui; Wang, Youchun; Kong, Wei; Jiang, Chunlai

    2015-07-31

    Despite significant efforts directed toward research on HIV-1 vaccines, a truly effective immunogen has not been achieved. However, the broadly neutralizing antibodies (BnAbs) 2F5 and 4E10, targeting the highly conserved membrane proximal external region (MPER) of HIV-1, are two promising tools for vaccine development. Here we engrafted the MPER into the linker domain between the trimeric core structure and the transmembrane domain of influenza A virus HA2 to investigate the potential of such chimeric viruses to elicit HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies. In the context of proliferating attenuated influenza A viruses, these HIV-1 neutralizing antibody epitopes could be continuously expressed and mimicked their native conformation to induce humoral immune responses. While MPER-specific antibodies could be detected in serum of guinea pigs vaccinated with the chimeric viruses, they exhibited only weakly neutralizing activities. These antisera from vaccinated animals neutralized viruses of clades B and BC (tier 1), but not of clades AE (tier 1) and C (tier 2). These results suggest that influenza A virus can be used as a vehicle for displaying MPER and inducing BnAbs, but it provides limited protection against HIV-1 infection. In the future development of HIV-1 vaccines by rational design, a more effective live virus vector or multiple antigens should be chosen to facilitate the process of neutralizing antibody maturation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Sequencing and characterisation of rearrangements in three S. pastorianus strains reveals the presence of chimeric genes and gives evidence of breakpoint reuse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K Hewitt

    Full Text Available Gross chromosomal rearrangements have the potential to be evolutionarily advantageous to an adapting organism. The generation of a hybrid species increases opportunity for recombination by bringing together two homologous genomes. We sought to define the location of genomic rearrangements in three strains of Saccharomyces pastorianus, a natural lager-brewing yeast hybrid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces eubayanus, using whole genome shotgun sequencing. Each strain of S. pastorianus has lost species-specific portions of its genome and has undergone extensive recombination, producing chimeric chromosomes. We predicted 30 breakpoints that we confirmed at the single nucleotide level by designing species-specific primers that flank each breakpoint, and then sequencing the PCR product. These rearrangements are the result of recombination between areas of homology between the two subgenomes, rather than repetitive elements such as transposons or tRNAs. Interestingly, 28/30 S. cerevisiae-S. eubayanus recombination breakpoints are located within genic regions, generating chimeric genes. Furthermore we show evidence for the reuse of two breakpoints, located in HSP82 and KEM1, in strains of proposed independent origin.

  7. The synergistic effect of combined immunization with a DNA vaccine and chimeric yellow fever/dengue virus leads to strong protection against dengue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana S Azevedo

    Full Text Available The dengue envelope glycoprotein (E is the major component of virion surface and its ectodomain is composed of domains I, II and III. This protein is the main target for the development of a dengue vaccine with induction of neutralizing antibodies. In the present work, we tested two different vaccination strategies, with combined immunizations in a prime/booster regimen or simultaneous inoculation with a DNA vaccine (pE1D2 and a chimeric yellow fever/dengue 2 virus (YF17D-D2. The pE1D2 DNA vaccine encodes the ectodomain of the envelope DENV2 protein fused to t-PA signal peptide, while the YF17D-D2 was constructed by replacing the prM and E genes from the 17D yellow fever vaccine virus by those from DENV2. Balb/c mice were inoculated with these two vaccines by different prime/booster or simultaneous immunization protocols and most of them induced a synergistic effect on the elicited immune response, mainly in neutralizing antibody production. Furthermore, combined immunization remarkably increased protection against a lethal dose of DENV2, when compared to each vaccine administered alone. Results also revealed that immunization with the DNA vaccine, regardless of the combination with the chimeric virus, induced a robust cell immune response, with production of IFN-γ by CD8+ T lymphocytes.

  8. Exploiting the yeast L-A viral capsid for the in vivo assembly of chimeric VLPs as platform in vaccine development and foreign protein expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Powilleit

    Full Text Available A novel expression system based on engineered variants of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae dsRNA virus L-A was developed allowing the in vivo assembly of chimeric virus-like particles (VLPs as a unique platform for a wide range of applications. We show that polypeptides fused to the viral capsid protein Gag self-assemble into isometric VLP chimeras carrying their cargo inside the capsid, thereby not only effectively preventing proteolytic degradation in the host cell cytosol, but also allowing the expression of a per se cytotoxic protein. Carboxyterminal extension of Gag by T cell epitopes from human cytomegalovirus pp65 resulted in the formation of hybrid VLPs that strongly activated antigen-specific CD8(+ memory T cells ex vivo. Besides being a carrier for polypeptides inducing antigen-specific immune responses in vivo, VLP chimeras were also shown to be effective in the expression and purification of (i a heterologous model protein (GFP, (ii a per se toxic protein (K28 alpha-subunit, and (iii a particle-associated and fully recyclable biotechnologically relevant enzyme (esterase A. Thus, yeast viral Gag represents a unique platform for the in vivo assembly of chimeric VLPs, equally attractive and useful in vaccine development and recombinant protein production.

  9. The concept of the eudicot shoot apical meristem as it applies to four Spiraea (Rosaceae), one Mentha (Lamiaceae) and one Euonymus (Celastraceae) cultivars based on chimeric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korn, Robert W

    2013-05-01

    Eversporting eudicots were sought to see if they behave like gymnosperms. Behaviour of eversporting gymnosperm chimeras indicates a single apical cell is present in SAM and it would be of interest to see if eudicot chimeras have the same behaviour. Four eversporting spireas, the pineapple mint and the Silver King euonymus were inspected for the fate of the yellow (mutant)-green (wild type) chimeras. As with gymnosperms, unstable eudicot chimeras in the four spireas, the pineapple mint and the Silver King euonymus became stable yellow about 80 % or more of the time and 20 % or less became stable green. The statistically significant preponderance of chimeric fates becoming all yellow suggests that a single apical cell resides in the yellow tunica. As with gymnosperms, descendent cells of the yellow replacement corpus cell eventually take over the corpus. Here is the first chimeric set of data to support the hypothesis of a one-celled meristem in eudicots rather than the traditional view of a muticellular meristem.

  10. Chimeric viruses containing the N-terminal ectodomains of GP5 and M proteins of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome do not change the cellular tropism of equine arteritis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Equine arteritis virus (EAV) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) are members of family Arteriviridae; they share many biological properties but differ significantly in cellular tropism. Using an infectious cDNA clone of EAV, we engineered a panel of six chimeric viruses b...

  11. Expression of c-kit receptor in human cholangiocarcinoma and in vivo treatment with imatinib mesilate in chimeric mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenz, Thomas; Caca, Karel; Blüthner, Thilo; Tannapfel, Andrea; Mössner, Joachim; Wiedmann, Marcus

    2006-01-01

    treatment with imatinib mesilate, using the chimeric mouse model, c-kit positive Mz-ChA-2 tumors had a significantly reduced volume and mass as compared to NS treatment (P < 0.05). In contrast to that, treatment of mice bearing c-kit negative EGI-1 tumors did not result in any change of tumor volume and mass as compared to NS treatment. CONCLUSION: c-kit expression is detectable at a moderate to low protein level in biliary tract cancer. Imatinib mesilate exerts marked effects on tumor growth in vitro and in vitro dependent on the level of c-kit expression. PMID:16570351

  12. In-silico design, expression, and purification of novel chimeric Escherichia coli O157:H7 OmpA fused to LTB protein in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aytak Novinrooz

    Full Text Available E. coli O157:H7, one of the major EHEC serotypes, is capable of developing bloody diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis (HC, and fatal hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS and is accompanied by high annual economic loss worldwide. Due to the increased risk of HC and HUS development following antibiotic therapy, the prevention of infections caused by this pathogen is considered to be one of the most effective ways of avoiding the consequences of this infection. The main aim of the present study was to design, express, and purify a novel chimeric protein to develope human vaccine candidate against E. coli O157:H7 containing loop 2-4 of E. coli O157:H7, outer membrane protein A (OmpA, and B subunit of E. coli heat labile enterotoxin (LTB which are connected by a flexible peptide linker. Several online databases and bioinformatics software were utilized to choose the peptide linker among 537 analyzed linkers, design the chimeric protein, and optimize the codon of the relative gene encoding this protein. Subsequently, the recombinant gene encoding OmpA-LTB was synthesized and cloned into pET-24a (+ expression vector and transferred to E. coli BL21(DE3 cells. The expression of OmpA-LTB chimeric protein was then carried out by induction of cultured E. coli Bl21 (DE3 cells with 1mM isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG. The purification of OmpA-LTB was then performed by nickel affinity chromatography. Expression and purification were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulphate poly acrylamide gel electrophoresis. Moreover, the identity of the expressed protein was analyzed by western blotting. SDS-PAGE and western immunoblotting confirmed the successful expression of a 27 KDa recombinant protein after 24 hours at 37°C post-IPTG induction. OmpA-LTB was then successfully purified, using nickel affinity chromatography under denaturing conditions. The yield of purification was 12 mg per liter of culture media. Ultimately, we constructed the successful design and efficient

  13. RecNcMIC3-1-R is a microneme- and rhoptry-based chimeric antigen that protects against acute neosporosis and limits cerebral parasite load in the mouse model for Neospora caninum infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monney, Thierry; Rütti, David; Schorer, Michelle; Debache, Karim; Grandgirard, Denis; Leib, Stephen L; Hemphill, Andrew

    2011-09-16

    In order to achieve host cell entry, the apicomplexan parasite Neospora caninum relies on the contents of distinct organelles, named micronemes, rhoptries and dense granules, which are secreted at defined timepoints during and after host cell entry. It was shown previously that a vaccine composed of a mixture of three recombinant antigens, corresponding to the two microneme antigens NcMIC1 and NcMIC3 and the rhoptry protein NcROP2, prevented disease and limited cerebral infection and transplacental transmission in mice. In this study, we selected predicted immunogenic domains of each of these proteins and created four different chimeric antigens, with the respective domains incorporated into these chimers in different orders. Following vaccination, mice were challenged intraperitoneally with 2 × 10(6)N. caninum tachzyoites and were then carefully monitored for clinical symptoms during 4 weeks post-infection. Of the four chimeric antigens, only recNcMIC3-1-R provided complete protection against disease with 100% survivors, compared to 40-80% of survivors in the other groups. Serology did not show any clear differences in total IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a levels between the different treatment groups. Vaccination with all four chimeric variants generated an IL-4 biased cytokine expression, which then shifted to an IFN-γ-dominated response following experimental infection. Sera of recNcMIC3-1-R vaccinated mice reacted with each individual recombinant antigen, as well as with three distinct bands in Neospora extracts with similar Mr as NcMIC1, NcMIC3 and NcROP2, and exhibited distinct apical labeling in tachyzoites. These results suggest that recNcMIC3-1-R is an interesting chimeric vaccine candidate and should be followed up in subsequent studies in a fetal infection model. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Impaired virus control and severe CD8+ T-cell-mediated immunopathology in chimeric mice deficient in gamma interferon receptor expression on both parenchymal and hematopoietic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henrichsen, Pernille; Bartholdy, Christina; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard

    2005-01-01

    virus completely lack the ability to control the infection and develop severe wasting disease. Further, the study shows that IFN-gamma receptor expression on parenchymal cells in the viscera is more important for virus control than IFN-gamma receptor expression on bone marrow-derived cells.......Bone marrow chimeras were used to determine the cellular target(s) for the antiviral activity of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma). By transfusing such mice with high numbers of naive virus-specific CD8(+) T cells, a system was created in which the majority of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells would...... be capable of responding to IFN-gamma, but expression of the relevant receptor on non-T cells could be experimentally controlled. Only when the IFN-gamma receptor is absent on both radioresistant parenchymal and bone marrow-derived cells will chimeric mice challenged with a highly invasive, noncytolytic...

  15. Broad neutralization of wild-type dengue virus isolates following immunization in monkeys with a tetravalent dengue vaccine based on chimeric yellow fever 17D/dengue viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barban, Veronique; Munoz-Jordan, Jorge L; Santiago, Gilberto A; Mantel, Nathalie; Girerd, Yves; Gulia, Sandrine; Claude, Jean-Baptiste; Lang, Jean

    2012-08-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate if the antibodies elicited after immunization with a tetravalent dengue vaccine, based on chimeric yellow fever 17D/dengue viruses, can neutralize a large range of dengue viruses (DENV). A panel of 82 DENVs was developed from viruses collected primarily during the last decade in 30 countries and included the four serotypes and the majority of existing genotypes. Viruses were isolated and minimally amplified before evaluation against a tetravalent polyclonal serum generated during vaccine preclinical evaluation in monkey, a model in which protection efficacy of this vaccine has been previously demonstrated (Guirakhoo et al., 2004). Neutralization was observed across all the DENV serotypes, genotypes, geographical origins and isolation years. These data indicate that antibodies elicited after immunization with this dengue vaccine candidate should widely protect against infection with contemporary DENV lineages circulating in endemic countries. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Young T cells age during a redirected anti-tumour attack: chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-provided dual costimulation is half the battle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas A Hombach

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive therapy with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-redirected T cells showed spectacular efficacy in the treatment of leukaemia in recent early phase trials. Patient's T cells were ex vivo genetically engineered with a CAR, amplified and re-administered to the patient. While T cells mediating the primary response were predominantly of young effector and central memory phenotype, repetitive antigen engagement irreversible triggers T cell maturation leaving late memory cells with the KLRG-1+ CD57+ CD7- CCR7- phenotype in the long-term. These cells preferentially accumulate in the periphery, are hypo-responsive upon TCR engagement and prone to activation-induced cell death. A recent report indicates that those T cells can be rescued by CAR provided CD28 and OX40 (CD134 stimulation. We discuss the strategy with respect to prolong the anti-tumour response and to improve the over-all efficacy of adoptive cell therapy.

  17. Incorporation of Immune Checkpoint Blockade into Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells (CAR-Ts: Combination or Built-In CAR-T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dok Hyun Yoon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cell therapy represents the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved gene therapy and these engineered cells function with unprecedented efficacy in the treatment of refractory CD19 positive hematologic malignancies. CAR translation to solid tumors is also being actively investigated; however, efficacy to date has been variable due to tumor-evolved mechanisms that inhibit local immune cell activity. To bolster the potency of CAR-T cells, modulation of the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment with immune-checkpoint blockade is a promising strategy. The impact of this approach on hematological malignancies is in its infancy, and in this review we discuss CAR-T cells and their synergy with immune-checkpoint blockade.

  18. Incorporation of Immune Checkpoint Blockade into Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells (CAR-Ts): Combination or Built-In CAR-T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Dok Hyun; Osborn, Mark J; Tolar, Jakub; Kim, Chong Jai

    2018-01-24

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy represents the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved gene therapy and these engineered cells function with unprecedented efficacy in the treatment of refractory CD19 positive hematologic malignancies. CAR translation to solid tumors is also being actively investigated; however, efficacy to date has been variable due to tumor-evolved mechanisms that inhibit local immune cell activity. To bolster the potency of CAR-T cells, modulation of the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment with immune-checkpoint blockade is a promising strategy. The impact of this approach on hematological malignancies is in its infancy, and in this review we discuss CAR-T cells and their synergy with immune-checkpoint blockade.

  19. Transformation properties of the E2a-Pbx1 chimeric oncoprotein: fusion with E2a is essential, but the Pbx1 homeodomain is dispensable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monica, K; LeBrun, D P; Dedera, D A; Brown, R; Cleary, M L

    1994-12-01

    The t(1;19) chromosomal translocation in acute lymphoblastic leukemias creates chimeric E2a-Pbx1 oncoproteins that can act as DNA-binding activators of transcription. A structural analysis of the functional domains of E2a-Pbx1 showed that portions of both E2a and Pbx1 were essential for transformation of NIH 3T3 cells and transcriptional activation of synthetic reporter genes containing PBX1 consensus binding sites. Hyperexpression of wild-type or experimentally truncated Pbx1 proteins was insufficient for transformation, consistent with their inability to activate transcription. When fused with E2a, the Pbx-related proteins Pbx2 and Pbx3 were also transformation competent, demonstrating that all known members of this highly similar subfamily of homeodomain proteins have latent oncogenic potential. The oncogenic contributions of E2a to the chimeras were localized to transactivation motifs AD1 and AD2, as their mutation significantly impaired transformation. Either the homeodomain or Pbx1 amino acids flanking this region could mediate transformation when fused to E2a. However, the homeodomain was not essential for transformation, since a mutant E2a-Pbx1 protein (E2a-Pbx delta HD) lacking the homeodomain efficiently transformed fibroblasts and induced malignant lymphomas in transgenic mice. Thus, transformation mediated by the chimeric oncoprotein E2a-Pbx1 is absolutely dependent on motifs acquired from E2a but the Pbx1 homeodomain is optional. The latter finding suggests that E2a-Pbx1 may interact with cellular proteins that assist or mediate alterations in gene expression responsible for oncogenesis even in the absence of homeodomain-DNA interactions.

  20. Establishment of a chimeric reporting system for the universal detection and high-throughput screening of G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Jen; Hsu, Shih-Han; Hung, Wei-Ting; Luo, Ching-Wei

    2009-03-15

    G proteins, further divided into four subfamilies (G(s), G(q), G(12) and G(i)) based on their Galpha subunits, are the primary components activated by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Current GPCR assays are limited to the evaluation of selective Galpha signaling and do not allow comprehensive screening for orphan GPCRs without a known coupled Galpha. Therefore, our aim was to design a chimeric reporting system that covers responses from all Galpha subfamilies simultaneously. Because G(s) activates cAMP response element (CRE)-driven genes whereas G(q) and G(12) activate serum response element (SRE)-driven genes, we therefore incorporated 2x CRE and 5x SRE (2CRE5SRE) into a promoter for driving luciferase expression. To further report G(i) signals, a 2CRE5SRE-driven chimeric G(qi), in which the C-terminus of G(q) is replaced by that of G(i), was integrated to switch the responses of G(i)-coupled GPCRs to the G(q) signaling. The novel reporter system showed a strong signal amplification when activated by neuromedin U receptor 1 (mainly activates G(q)), neuromedin U receptor 2 (mainly activates G(i)) or luteinizing hormone receptor (mainly through the G(s) and G(q) pathways). In addition, 293T cells stably carrying our reporter construct showed a similar sensitivity to the radioactive cAMP assay when revealing the constitutive signal from gain-of-function mutants of luteinizing hormone receptor. To our knowledge, this is the first reporting system capable of covering the G(s), G(q), G(12) and G(i) signals and revealing the phenomena of constitutively active GPCRs. Such a universal platform will benefit future high-throughput screening and drug designs for any GPCR.

  1. Elimination of HCV via a non-ISG-mediated mechanism by vaniprevir and BMS-788329 combination therapy in human hepatocyte chimeric mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Takuro; Hiraga, Nobuhiko; Imamura, Michio; Yoshimi, Satoshi; Kan, Hiromi; Miyaki, Eisuke; Tsuge, Masataka; Abe, Hiromi; Hayes, C Nelson; Aikata, Hiroshi; Ishida, Yuji; Tateno, Chise; Ellis, Joan D; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2016-02-02

    We previously reported that interferon (IFN)-free direct-acting antiviral combination treatment succeeded in eradicating genotype 1b hepatitis C virus (HCV) in human hepatocyte chimeric mice. In this study, we examined the effect of vaniprevir (MK7009, NS3/4A protease inhibitor) and BMS-788329 (NS5A inhibitor) combination treatment on HCV genotype 1b and the expression of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) using a subgenomic replicon system and the same animal model. Combination treatment with vaniprevir and BMS-788329 significantly reduced HCV replication compared to vaniprevir monotherapy in HCV replicon cells (Huh7/Rep-Feo cells). HCV genotype 1b-infected human hepatocyte chimeric mice were treated with vaniprevir alone or in combination with BMS-788329 for four weeks. Vaniprevir monotherapy reduced serum HCV RNA titers in mice, but viral breakthrough was observed in mice with high HCV titers. Ultra-deep sequence analysis revealed a predominant replacement by drug-resistant substitutions at 168 in HCV NS3 region in these mice. Conversely, in mice with low HCV titers, HCV was eradicated by vaniprevir monotherapy without viral breakthrough. In contrast to monotherapy, combination treatment with vaniprevir and BMS-788329 succeeded in completely eradicating HCV regardless of serum viral titer. IFN-alpha treatment significantly increased ISG expression; however, vaniprevir and BMS-788329 combination treatment caused no increase in ISG expression both in cultured cells and in mouse livers. Therefore, combination treatment with vaniprevir and BMS-788329 eliminated HCV via a non-ISG-mediated mechanism. This oral treatment might offer an alternative DAA combination therapy for patients with chronic hepatitis C. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A restriction enzyme based cloning method to assess the in vitro replication capacity of HIV-1 subtype C Gag-MJ4 chimeric viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claiborne, Daniel T; Prince, Jessica L; Hunter, Eric

    2014-08-31

    The protective effect of many HLA class I alleles on HIV-1 pathogenesis and disease progression is, in part, attributed to their ability to target conserved portions of the HIV-1 genome that escape with difficulty. Sequence changes attributed to cellular immune pressure arise across the genome during infection, and if found within conserved regions of the genome such as Gag, can affect the ability of the virus to replicate in vitro. Transmission of HLA-linked polymorphisms in Gag to HLA-mismatched recipients has been associated with reduced set point viral loads. We hypothesized this may be due to a reduced replication capacity of the virus. Here we present a novel method for assessing the in vitro replication of HIV-1 as influenced by the gag gene isolated from acute time points from subtype C infected Zambians. This method uses restriction enzyme based cloning to insert the gag gene into a common subtype C HIV-1 proviral backbone, MJ4. This makes it more appropriate to the study of subtype C sequences than previous recombination based methods that have assessed the in vitro replication of chronically derived gag-pro sequences. Nevertheless, the protocol could be readily modified for studies of viruses from other subtypes. Moreover, this protocol details a robust and reproducible method for assessing the replication capacity of the Gag-MJ4 chimeric viruses on a CEM-based T cell line. This method was utilized for the study of Gag-MJ4 chimeric viruses derived from 149 subtype C acutely infected Zambians, and has allowed for the identification of residues in Gag that affect replication. More importantly, the implementation of this technique has facilitated a deeper understanding of how viral replication defines parameters of early HIV-1 pathogenesis such as set point viral load and longitudinal CD4+ T cell decline.

  3. Chimeric Recombinant Human Metapneumoviruses with the Nucleoprotein or Phosphoprotein Open Reading Frame Replaced by That of Avian Metapneumovirus Exhibit Improved Growth In Vitro and Attenuation In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Quynh N.; Biacchesi, Stéphane; Skiadopoulos, Mario H.; Murphy, Brian R.; Collins, Peter L.; Buchholz, Ursula J.

    2005-01-01

    Chimeric versions of recombinant human metapneumovirus (HMPV) were generated by replacing the nucleoprotein (N) or phosphoprotein (P) open reading frame with its counterpart from the closely related avian metapneumovirus (AMPV) subgroup C. In Vero cells, AMPV replicated to an approximately 100-fold-higher titer than HMPV. Surprisingly, the N and P chimeric viruses replicated to a peak titer that was 11- and 25-fold higher, respectively, than that of parental HMPV. The basis for this effect is not known but was not due to obvious changes in the efficiency of gene expression. AMPV and the N and P chimeras were evaluated for replication, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy in hamsters. AMPV was attenuated compared to HMPV in this mammalian host on day 5 postinfection, but not on day 3, and only in the nasal turbinates. In contrast, the N and P chimeras were reduced approximately 100-fold in both the upper and lower respiratory tract on day 3 postinfection, although there was little difference by day 5. The N and P chimeras induced a high level of neutralizing serum antibodies and protective efficacy against HMPV; AMPV was only weakly immunogenic and protective against HMPV challenge, reflecting antigenic differences. In African green monkeys immunized intranasally and intratracheally, the mean peak titer of the P chimera was reduced 100- and 1,000-fold in the upper and lower respiratory tracts, whereas the N chimera was reduced only 10-fold in the lower respiratory tract. Both chimeras were comparable to wild-type HMPV in immunogenicity and protective efficacy. Thus, the P chimera is a promising live HMPV vaccine candidate that paradoxically combines improved growth in vitro with attenuation in vivo. PMID:16306583

  4. Chimeric Glutamate Receptor Subunits Reveal the Transmembrane Domain Is Sufficient for NMDA Receptor Pore Properties but Some Positive Allosteric Modulators Require Additional Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilding, Timothy J; Lopez, Melany N; Huettner, James E

    2016-08-24

    NMDA receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that underlie transmission at excitatory synapses and play an important role in regulating synaptic strength and stability. Functional NMDA receptors require two copies of the GluN1 subunit coassembled with GluN2 (and/or GluN3) subunits into a heteromeric tetramer. A diverse array of allosteric modulators can upregulate or downregulate NMDA receptor activity. These modulators include both synthetic compounds and endogenous modulators, such as cis-unsaturated fatty acids, 24(S)-hydroxycholesterol, and various neurosteroids. To evaluate the structural requirements for the formation and allosteric modulation of NMDA receptor pores, we have replaced portions of the rat GluN1, GluN2A, and GluN2B subunits with homologous segments from the rat GluK2 kainate receptor subunit. Our results with these chimeric constructs show that the NMDA receptor transmembrane domain is sufficient to account for most pore properties, but that regulation by some allosteric modulators requires additional cytoplasmic or extracellular domains. Glutamate receptors mediate excitatory synaptic transmission by forming cation channels through the membrane that open upon glutamate binding. Although many compounds have been identified that regulate glutamate receptor activity, in most cases the detailed mechanisms that underlie modulation are poorly understood. To identify what parts of the receptor are essential for pore formation and sensitivity to allosteric modulators, we generated chimeric subunits that combined segments from NMDA and kainate receptors, subtypes with distinct pharmacological profiles. Surprisingly, our results identify separate domain requirements for allosteric potentiation of NMDA receptor pores by pregnenolone sulfate, 24(S)-hydroxycholesterol, and docosahexaenoic acid, three endogenous modulators derived from membrane constituents. Understanding where and how these compounds act on NMDA receptors should aid in designing better

  5. Study of Chinese pollution with the 3D regional chemistry transport CHIMERE model and remote sensing observations, with a focus on mineral dust impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachatre, Mathieu; Foret, Gilles; Beekmann, Matthias; Cheiney, Audrey; Dufour, Gaëlle; Laurent, Benoit; Cuesta, Juan

    2017-04-01

    Since the end of the 20th century, China has observed important growth in numerous sectors. China's Gross Domestic Product (GDP) has been multiply by 4 during the 2000-2010 decade (National Bureau of Statistics of China), mostly because of the industry's growth. These evolutions have been accompanied by important increases of atmospheric pollutants emissions (Yinmin et al, Atmo Env, 2016). As a consequence and for about 10 years now, Chinese authorities have been working to reduce pollutant levels, because atmospheric pollution is a major health issue for Chinese population especially within cities, for which World Health Organisation's standards for major pollutants (Ozone, PM2.5, PM10) are often exceeded. Particles have multiple issues, as they impact on health and global warming. Their impacts will depend on their sources (primary or secondary pollutants) and natures (Particle size distribution, chemical composition…). Controlling particles loading is a complex task as their sources are various and dispersed on the Chinese territories: mineral dust can be emitted from Chinese deserts in large amount (Laurent et al., GPC, 2006), ammonia can be emitted from agriculture and livestock (Kang et al., ACP, 2016) and lots of urban primary pollutants can be emitted from urbanized areas. It is then necessary to work from a continental to local scales to understand more precisely pollution of urbanized areas. It is then mandatory to discriminate and quantify pollution sources and to estimate the impact of natural pollution and the major contributing sources. We propose here an approach based on a model and satellite observation synergy to estimate what controls Chinese pollution. We use the regional chemistry transport model CHIMERE (Menut et al., GMD, 2013) to simulate atmospheric pollutants concentrations. A large domain (72°E-145°E; 17.5°N-55°N), with a ¼°x¼° resolution is used to make multi-annual simulations. CHIMERE model include most of the pollutants

  6. In Vitro Pre-Clinical Validation of Suicide Gene Modified Anti-CD33 Redirected Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-Cells for Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Minagawa

    Full Text Available Approximately fifty percent of patients with acute myeloid leukemia can be cured with current therapeutic strategies which include, standard dose chemotherapy for patients at standard risk of relapse as assessed by cytogenetic and molecular analysis, or high-dose chemotherapy with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant for high-risk patients. Despite allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant about 25% of patients still succumb to disease relapse, therefore, novel strategies are needed to improve the outcome of patients with acute myeloid leukemia.We developed an immunotherapeutic strategy targeting the CD33 myeloid antigen, expressed in ~ 85-90% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia, using chimeric antigen receptor redirected T-cells. Considering that administration of CAR T-cells has been associated with cytokine release syndrome and other potential off-tumor effects in patients, safety measures were here investigated and reported. We genetically modified human activated T-cells from healthy donors or patients with acute myeloid leukemia with retroviral supernatant encoding the inducible Caspase9 suicide gene, a ΔCD19 selectable marker, and a humanized third generation chimeric antigen receptor recognizing human CD33. ΔCD19 selected inducible Caspase9-CAR.CD33 T-cells had a 75±3.8% (average ± standard error of the mean chimeric antigen receptor expression, were able to specifically lyse CD33+ targets in vitro, including freshly isolated leukemic blasts from patients, produce significant amount of tumor-necrosis-factor-alpha and interferon-gamma, express the CD107a degranulation marker, and proliferate upon antigen specific stimulation. Challenging ΔCD19 selected inducible Caspase9-CAR.CD33 T-cells with programmed-death-ligand-1 enriched leukemia blasts resulted in significant killing like observed for the programmed-death-ligand-1 negative leukemic blasts fraction. Since the administration of 10 nanomolar of a non

  7. In Vitro Pre-Clinical Validation of Suicide Gene Modified Anti-CD33 Redirected Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-Cells for Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minagawa, Kentaro; Jamil, Muhammad O; Al-Obaidi, Mustafa; Pereboeva, Larisa; Salzman, Donna; Erba, Harry P; Lamb, Lawrence S; Bhatia, Ravi; Mineishi, Shin; Di Stasi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Approximately fifty percent of patients with acute myeloid leukemia can be cured with current therapeutic strategies which include, standard dose chemotherapy for patients at standard risk of relapse as assessed by cytogenetic and molecular analysis, or high-dose chemotherapy with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant for high-risk patients. Despite allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant about 25% of patients still succumb to disease relapse, therefore, novel strategies are needed to improve the outcome of patients with acute myeloid leukemia. We developed an immunotherapeutic strategy targeting the CD33 myeloid antigen, expressed in ~ 85-90% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia, using chimeric antigen receptor redirected T-cells. Considering that administration of CAR T-cells has been associated with cytokine release syndrome and other potential off-tumor effects in patients, safety measures were here investigated and reported. We genetically modified human activated T-cells from healthy donors or patients with acute myeloid leukemia with retroviral supernatant encoding the inducible Caspase9 suicide gene, a ΔCD19 selectable marker, and a humanized third generation chimeric antigen receptor recognizing human CD33. ΔCD19 selected inducible Caspase9-CAR.CD33 T-cells had a 75±3.8% (average ± standard error of the mean) chimeric antigen receptor expression, were able to specifically lyse CD33+ targets in vitro, including freshly isolated leukemic blasts from patients, produce significant amount of tumor-necrosis-factor-alpha and interferon-gamma, express the CD107a degranulation marker, and proliferate upon antigen specific stimulation. Challenging ΔCD19 selected inducible Caspase9-CAR.CD33 T-cells with programmed-death-ligand-1 enriched leukemia blasts resulted in significant killing like observed for the programmed-death-ligand-1 negative leukemic blasts fraction. Since the administration of 10 nanomolar of a non-therapeutic dimerizer to

  8. A chimeric dengue virus vaccine using Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine strain SA14-14-2 as backbone is immunogenic and protective against either parental virus in mice and nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Feng; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Yang, Hui-Qiang; Zhao, Hui; Jiang, Tao; Yu, Xue-Dong; Li, Shi-Hua; Ye, Qing; Zhu, Shun-Ya; Wang, Hong-Jiang; Zhang, Yu; Ma, Jie; Yu, Yong-Xin; Liu, Zhong-Yu; Li, Yu-Hua; Qin, E-De; Shi, Pei-Yong; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2013-12-01

    The development of a safe and efficient dengue vaccine represents a global challenge in public health. Chimeric dengue viruses (DENV) based on an attenuated flavivirus have been well developed as vaccine candidates by using reverse genetics. In this study, based on the full-length infectious cDNA clone of the well-known Japanese encephalitis virus live vaccine strain SA14-14-2 as a backbone, a novel chimeric dengue virus (named ChinDENV) was rationally designed and constructed by replacement with the premembrane and envelope genes of dengue 2 virus. The recovered chimeric virus showed growth and plaque properties similar to those of the parental DENV in mammalian and mosquito cells. ChinDENV was highly attenuated in mice, and no viremia was induced in rhesus monkeys upon subcutaneous inoculation. ChinDENV retained its genetic stability and attenuation phenotype after serial 15 passages in cultured cells. A single immunization with various doses of ChinDENV elicited strong neutralizing antibodies in a dose-dependent manner. When vaccinated monkeys were challenged with wild-type DENV, all animals except one that received the lower dose were protected against the development of viremia. Furthermore, immunization with ChinDENV conferred efficient cross protection against lethal JEV challenge in mice in association with robust cellular immunity induced by the replicating nonstructural proteins. Taken together, the results of this preclinical study well demonstrate the great potential of ChinDENV for further development as a dengue vaccine candidate, and this kind of chimeric flavivirus based on JE vaccine virus represents a powerful tool to deliver foreign antigens.

  9. Combined multi-lobed flaps: A series of 39 extensive hand and multi-digit injuries one-staged reconstructions using modified designs of ALT, DPA and chimeric linking flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Liang; Pafitanis, Georgios; Yang, Peng; Li, Zan; Jia, Ming; Koshima, Isao; Song, Dajiang; Chi, Zhenglin

    2017-07-01

    The use of multiple small flaps linked in a "chain-linked" flap microanastomosed chimeric system is recommended in distal hand and digital defects reconstruction. The aim of this study is to demonstrates our experience utilizing microsurgical fabrication, multi-lobed and linking combined flaps for the reconstruction of hand degloving injuries with complex multidigit soft tissue defects. Microanastomosed chimeric flap systems using ALT and DPA modified designed flaps were combined in five selections to cover extensive soft tissue defects involving the hands and multiple digits of 39 patients (M:F - 36:3) from October 2009 to February 2013. Five different microsurgical combined chimeric flap systems utilised in extensive hand and multidigit injuries; innervated ALT flaps, multilobed DPA flaps, innervated ALT flap with multilobed DPA flap, innervated ALT flap with sensate ALT flap and bilobed ALT flap with multilobed DPA flap. All DPA donor sites were reconstructed using free ALT flap and anterior tibial artery propeller flap. Thirty-nine combined free flap extremities reconstructions on 39 patients (M:F - 36:3) with average age 28.5 (18-45) years sustained traumatic degloving injuries, 24 from road traffic accidents and 15 from industrial devices. Five different designs of combined multi-lobed flaps have be successfully used without any peri-operative complications. Average follow-up of 12 months, all flaps survived without complications. Operated extremities showed favorable functional recovery with restoration of the diminished protective sensation on the flap through reinnervation. All flaps survived uneventfully with coverage matching the texture and color of the recipients. Donor sites healed without complication. The microsurgical fabrication of chimeric ALT flaps and multilobed DPA flaps is a valuable alternative for the reconstruction of hand degloving injury with complex multidigit soft tissue defects. Level IV, therapeutic study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier

  10. Molecular determinants of desensitization and assembly of the chimeric GABA(A) receptor subunits (alpha1/gamma2) and (gamma2/alpha1) in combinations with beta2 and gamma2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elster, L; Kristiansen, U; Pickering, D S

    2001-01-01

    Two gamma-aminobutyric acid(A) (GABA(A)) receptor chimeras were designed in order to elucidate the structural requirements for GABA(A) receptor desensitization and assembly. The (alpha1/gamma2) and (gamma2/alpha1) chimeric subunits representing the extracellular N-terminal domain of alpha1 or gam...... receptor with respect to the direct activation by pentobarbital. This suggests differences in the mechanism of channel activation for pentobarbital and GABA....

  11. Development of β-lactoglobulin-specific chimeric human IgEκ monoclonal antibodies for in vitro safety assessment of whey hydrolysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipping, Karen; Simons, Peter J; Buelens-Sleumer, Laura S; Cox, Linda; den Hartog, Marcel; de Jong, Niels; Teshima, Reiko; Garssen, Johan; Boon, Louis; Knippels, Léon M J

    2014-01-01

    Cow's milk-derived whey hydrolysates are nutritional substitutes for allergic infants. Safety or residual allergenicity assessment of these whey hydrolysates is crucial. Currently, rat basophilic leukemia RBL-2H3 cells expressing the human IgE receptor α-chain (huFcεRIα-RBL-2H3), sensitized with serum IgE from cow's milk allergic children, are being employed to assess in vitro residual allergenicity of these whey hydrolysates. However, limited availability and inter-lot variation of these allergic sera impede standardization of whey hydrolysate safety testing in degranulation assays. An oligoclonal pool of chimeric human (chu)IgE antibodies against bovine β-lactoglobulin (a major allergen in whey) was generated to increase sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of existing degranulation assays. Mice were immunized with bovine β-lactoglobulin, and subsequently the variable domains of dissimilar anti-β-lactoglobulin mouse IgG antibodies were cloned and sequenced. Six chimeric antibodies were generated comprising mouse variable domains and human constant IgE/κ domains. After sensitization with this pool of anti-β-lactoglobulin chuIgEs, huFcεRIα-expressing RBL-2H3 cells demonstrated degranulation upon cross-linking with whey, native 18 kDa β-lactoglobulin, and 5-10 kDa whey hydrolysates, whereas a 3 kDa whey hydrolysate and cow's milk powder (mainly casein) showed no degranulation. In parallel, allergic serum IgEs were less sensitive. In addition, our pool anti-β-lactoglobulin chuIgEs recognized multiple allergenic immunodominant regions on β-lactoglobulin, which were also recognized by serum IgEs from cow's milk allergic children. Usage of our 'unlimited' source and well-defined pool of β-lactoglobulin-specific recombinant chuIgEs to sensitize huFcεRIα on RBL-2H3 cells showed to be a relevant and sensitive alternative for serum IgEs from cow's milk allergic patients to assess safety of whey-based non-allergic hydrolyzed formula.

  12. Use of a Chimeric Hsp70 to Enhance the Quality of Recombinant Plasmodium falciparum S-Adenosylmethionine Decarboxylase Protein Produced in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhoba, Xolani Henry; Burger, Adélle; Coertzen, Dina; Zininga, Tawanda; Birkholtz, Lyn-Marie; Shonhai, Addmore

    2016-01-01

    S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (PfAdoMetDC) from Plasmodium falciparum is a prospective antimalarial drug target. The production of recombinant PfAdoMetDC for biochemical validation as a drug target is important. The production of PfAdoMetDC in Escherichia coli has been reported to result in unsatisfactory yields and poor quality product. The co-expression of recombinant proteins with molecular chaperones has been proposed as one way to improve the production of the former in E. coli. E. coli heat shock proteins DnaK, GroEL-GroES and DnaJ have previously been used to enhance production of some recombinant proteins. However, the outcomes were inconsistent. An Hsp70 chimeric protein, KPf, which is made up of the ATPase domain of E. coli DnaK and the substrate binding domain of P. falciparum Hsp70 (PfHsp70) has been previously shown to exhibit chaperone function when it was expressed in E. coli cells whose resident Hsp70 (DnaK) function was impaired. We proposed that because of its domain constitution, KPf would most likely be recognised by E. coli Hsp70 co-chaperones. Furthermore, because it possesses a substrate binding domain of plasmodial origin, KPf would be primed to recognise recombinant PfAdoMetDC expressed in E. coli. First, using site-directed mutagenesis, followed by complementation assays, we established that KPf with a mutation in the hydrophobic residue located in its substrate binding cavity was functionally compromised. We further co-expressed PfAdoMetDC with KPf, PfHsp70 and DnaK in E. coli cells either in the absence or presence of over-expressed GroEL-GroES chaperonin. The folded and functional status of the produced PfAdoMetDC was assessed using limited proteolysis and enzyme assays. PfAdoMetDC co-expressed with KPf and PfHsp70 exhibited improved activity compared to protein co-expressed with over-expressed DnaK. Our findings suggest that chimeric KPf may be an ideal Hsp70 co-expression partner for the production of recombinant plasmodial

  13. Radiolabeling and animal experimental studies of anti-breast cancer McAb 6C6 and mouse-human chimeric antibody 6C6CHI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhi; Hu Xiaoqian; Li Erqiu

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study bio-distribution and tumor absorption of anti breast cancer monoclonal antibody 6C6 and its chimeric antibody 6C6-CHI. The modified Schwartz method was employed to label 6C6 and 6C6CHI with 99 Tc m . The labeled antibody was injected to mouse via tail vein and the blood clearance and whole body clearance were observed. Nude mice bearing breast cancer MCF7 were injected with 99 Tc m -labeled antibody and the bio-distribution was studied and imaged with γ-ray camera. The yield of the two labeled antibodies was more than 90% and their immunoactivities were more than 80%. The whole body eliminated half-time of 99 Tc m -6C6 was 4.1h, and the half-times in blood were T α =0.55h and T β =12.42h respectively. The whole body half-time of 99 Tc m -6C6CHI was 4.28h and the half-times in blood were T α =0.98h and T β =12.42h respectively. The bio-distribution of nude mice bearing breast cancer MCF7 cells was as follows: the ID%/g of tumor and blood was (7.42±0.85) and (5.67±1.44) respectively at 23h after injection of 99 Tc m -6C6. The T/NT (tumor to non tumor) ratios were all more than 1.0 except kidney and the ID%/g of tumor and blood was (4.23±0.64) and (6.97±0.23) respectively at 23 h after injection of 99 Tc m -6C6CHI. The T/NT (tumor to non tumor) ratios were all more than 1.0 except blood and kidney. The γ imaging results showed that the tumor was imaged clearly at 24h after injection of radiolabeled antibodies and the other organs did not concentrate the antibodies except kidney. Anti-breast cancer monoclonal antibody 6C6 can be well located in tumor. Although ID%/g of tumor of the chimeric antibody 6C6CHI was slightly lower than that of 6C6 antibody, and ID%/g of blood was higher than that of 6C6, the tumor imaging of 6C6-CHI was also clear

  14. Selection of drug-resistant feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) encoding FIV/HIV chimeric protease in the presence of HIV-specific protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying-Chuan; Happer, Meaghan; Elder, John H

    2013-08-01

    An infectious chimeric feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)/HIV strain carrying six HIV-like protease (PR) mutations (I37V/N55M/V59I/I98S/Q99V/P100N) was subjected to selection in culture against the PR inhibitor lopinavir (LPV), darunavir (DRV), or TL-3. LPV selection resulted in the sequential emergence of V99A (strain S-1X), I59V (strain S-2X), and I108V (strain S-3X) mutations, followed by V37I (strain S-4X). Mutant PRs were analyzed in vitro, and an isogenic virus producing each mutant PR was analyzed in culture for LPV sensitivity, yielding results consistent with the original selection. The 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) for S-1X, S-2X, S-3X, and S-4X were 95, 643, 627, and 1,543 nM, respectively. The primary resistance mutations, V99(82)A, I59(50)V, and V37(32)I, are consistent with the resistance pattern developed by HIV-1 under similar selection conditions. While resistance to LPV emerged readily, similar PR mutations causing resistance to either DRV or TL-3 failed to emerge after passage for more than a year. However, a G37D mutation in the nucleocapsid (NC) was observed in both selections and an isogenic G37D mutant replicated in the presence of 100 nM DRV or TL-3, whereas parental chimeric FIV could not. An additional mutation, L92V, near the PR active site in the folded structure recently emerged during TL-3 selection. The L92V mutant PR exhibited an IC50 of 50 nM, compared to 35 nM for 6s-98S PR, and processed the NC-p2 junction more efficiently, consistent with increased viral fitness. These findings emphasize the role of mutations outside the active site of PR in increasing viral resistance to active-site inhibitors and suggest additional targets for inhibitor development.

  15. Genetic Construction of Truncated and Chimeric Metalloproteins Derived from the Alpha Subunit of Acetyl-CoA Synthase from Clostridium thermoaceticum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huay-Keng Loke; Xiangshi Tan; Paul A. Lindahl

    2002-06-28

    In this study, a genetics-based method is used to truncate acetyl-coenzyme A synthase from Clostridium thermoaceticum (ACS), an alpha2beta2 tetrameric 310 kda bifunctional enzyme. ACS catalyzes the reversible reduction of CO2 to CO and the synthesis of acetyl-CoA from CO (or CO2 in the presence of low-potential reductants), CoA, and a methyl group bound to a corrinoid-iron sulfur protein (CoFeSP). ACS contains 7 metal-sulfur clusters of 4 different types called A, B, C, and D. The B, C, and D clusters are located in the 72 kda beta subunit while the A-cluster, a Ni-X-Fe4S4 cluster that serves as the active site for acetyl-CoA synthase activity, is located in the 82 kda alpha subunit. The extent to which the essential properties of the cluster, including catalytic, redox, spectroscopic, and substrate-binding properties, were retained as ACS was progressively truncated was determined. Acetyl-CoA synthase catalytic activity remained when the entire alpha subunit was removed, as long as CO, rather than CO2 and a low-potential reductant, was used as a substrate. Truncating an {approx} 30 kda region from the N-terminus of the alpha subunit yielded a 49 kda protein that lacked catalytic activity but exhibited A-cluster-like spectroscopic, redox, and CO binding properties. Further truncation afforded a 23 kda protein that lacked recognizable A-cluster properties except for UV-vis spectra typical of [Fe4S4]2+ clusters. Two chimeric proteins were constructed by fusing the gene encoding a ferredoxin from Chromatium vinosum to genes encoding the 49 kda and 82 kda fragments of the alpha subunit. The chimeric proteins exhibited EPR signals that were not the simple sum of the signals from the separate proteins, suggesting magnetic interactions between clusters. This study highlights the potential for using genetics to simplify the study of complex multi-centered metalloenzymes and to generate new complex metalloenzymes with interesting properties.

  16. Validation of chimerism in pediatric recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) a comparison between two methods: real-time PCR (qPCR) vs. variable number tandem repeats PCR (VNTR PCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kletzel, Morris; Huang, Wei; Olszewski, Marie; Khan, Sana

    2013-01-01

    Post-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) chimerism monitoring is important to assess relapse and therapeutic intervention. The purpose of our study is to compare two methods variable number tandem repeats (VNTR) vs. quantitative real- time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in terms of determining chimerism. 127 (peripheral blood n=112, bone marrow n=15) samples were simultaneously tested by VNTR using APO-B, D1S80, D1S111, D17S30, gene loci SRY and ZP3 and qPCR using 34 assays (CA001-CA034) that are designed to a bi-allelic insertion/deletion (indel) polymorphism in the human genome. Samples were separated in three subsets: total WBC, T-cell and Myeloid cells. Extraction of DNA was performed then quantified. We analyzed column statistics, paired t-test and regression analysis for both methods. There was complete correlation between the two methods. The simplicity and rapidity of the test results from the qPCR method is more efficient and accurate to assess chimerism.

  17. Expression of a Chimeric Gene Encoding Insecticidal Crystal Protein Cry1Aabc of Bacillus thuringiensis in Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) Confers Resistance to Gram Pod Borer (Helicoverpa armigera Hubner.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Alok; Datta, Subhojit; Thakur, Shallu; Shukla, Alok; Ansari, Jamal; Sujayanand, G K; Chaturvedi, Sushil K; Kumar, P A; Singh, N P

    2017-01-01

    Domain swapping and generation of chimeric insecticidal crystal protein is an emerging area of insect pest management. The lepidopteran insect pest, gram pod borer ( Helicoverpa armigera H.) wreaks havoc to chickpea crop affecting production. Lepidopteran insects were reported to be controlled by Bt ( cryI ) genes. We designed a plant codon optimized chimeric Bt gene ( cry1Aabc ) using three domains from three different cry1A genes (domains I, II, and III from cry1Aa , cry1Ab , and cry1Ac , respectively) and expressed it under the control of a constitutive promoter in chickpea ( cv . DCP92-3) to assess its effect on gram pod borer. A total of six transgenic chickpea shoots were established by grafting into mature fertile plants. The in vitro regenerated (organogenetic) shoots were selected based on antibiotic kanamycin monosulfate (100 mg/L) with transformation efficiency of 0.076%. Three transgenic events were extensively studied based on gene expression pattern and insect mortality across generations. Protein expression in pod walls, immature seeds and leaves (pre- and post-flowering) were estimated and expression in pre-flowering stage was found higher than that of post-flowering. Analysis for the stable integration, expression and insect mortality (detached leaf and whole plant bioassay) led to identification of efficacious transgenic chickpea lines. The chimeric cry1Aabc expressed in chickpea is effective against gram pod borer and generated events can be utilized in transgenic breeding program.

  18. Expression of a Chimeric Gene Encoding Insecticidal Crystal Protein Cry1Aabc of Bacillus thuringiensis in Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. Confers Resistance to Gram Pod Borer (Helicoverpa armigera H